Science.gov

Sample records for degenerative diseases clinical

  1. No publication bias in industry funded clinical trials of degenerative diseases of the spine.

    PubMed

    Son, Colin; Tavakoli, Samon; Bartanusz, Viktor

    2016-03-01

    Industry sponsorship of clinical research of degenerative diseases of the spine has been associated with excessive positive published results as compared to research carried out without industry funding. We sought the rates of publication of clinical trials of degenerative diseases of the spine based on funding source as a possible explanation for this phenomenon. We reviewed all clinical trials registered at clinicaltrials.gov relating to degenerative diseases of the spine as categorized under six medical subject heading terms (spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, spondylolysis, spondylosis, failed back surgery syndrome, intervertebral disc degeneration) and with statuses of completed or terminated. These collected studies were categorized as having, or not having, industry funding. Published results for these studies were then sought within the clinicaltrials.gov database itself, PubMed and Google Scholar. One hundred sixty-one clinical trials met these criteria. One hundred nineteen of these trials had industry funding and 42 did not. Of those with industry funding, 45 (37.8%) had identifiable results. Of those without industry funding, 17 (40.5%) had identifiable results. There was no difference in the rates of publication of results from clinical trials of degenerative diseases of the spine no matter the funding source.

  2. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  3. Nerve cell death in degenerative diseases of the central nervous system: clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Agid, Y; Blin, J

    1987-01-01

    The origin of degenerative diseases of the central nervous system lies in genetic and acquired disorders. Analysis of the clinical characteristics of diseases affecting specific neuronal systems may help us to understand their pathogenesis. The stereotyped symptomatology characteristic of most degenerative diseases results from neuronal death in specific pathways: pyramidal tract and motor neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, nigrostriatal dopamine system in Parkinson's disease, posterior and lateral columns of the spinal cord in Friedreich's ataxia, etc. This suggests that these neurons are sensitive to pathological processes that are still unknown. Progression of the disease, whether linear or not, is slow, but it is more rapid than similar effects due to ageing. This indicates either that the environmental cause of degeneration (if it exists) is continuously present or that a vital process has been once and for all disrupted, perhaps at the level of the genome, causing insufficient production of essential proteins, or accumulation of eventually toxic metabolites. Symptoms generally appear during adulthood, i.e. after normal differentiation has taken place, and after a considerable number of neurons have already been damaged. The initiation of neuronal death precedes the appearance of the first symptoms. PMID:3556087

  4. Degenerative disease of the spine.

    PubMed

    Gallucci, Massimo; Limbucci, Nicola; Paonessa, Amalia; Splendiani, Alessandra

    2007-02-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine is a definition that includes a wide spectrum of degenerative abnormalities. Degeneration involves bony structures and the intervertebral disk, although many aspects of spine degeneration are strictly linked because the main common pathogenic factor is identified in chronic overload. During life the spine undergoes continuous changes as a response to physiologic axial load. These age-related changes are similar to pathologic degenerative changes and are a common asymptomatic finding in adults and elderly persons. A mild degree of degenerative changes is paraphysiologic and should be considered pathologic only if abnormalities determine symptoms. Imaging allows complete evaluation of static and dynamic factors related to degenerative disease of the spine and is useful in diagnosing the different aspects of spine degeneration.

  5. [Dysexecutive syndromes and degenerative diseases].

    PubMed

    Pillon, B; Czernecki, V; Dubois, B

    2004-04-01

    A dysexecutive syndrome is observed not only in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, but also in subcortical degenerative diseases, and even in Alzheimer's disease whose lesions predominate in temporoparietal associative areas. The association between a dysexecutive syndrome and various cerebral localisations may be explained by the fact that cognitive and behavioral organisation recruits anatomofunctional frontostriatal and frontoparietal circuits. Both animal experimentation and human clinical observation argue in favour of a functional continuity and complementarity among these loops. The prefrontal cortex would be particularly needed in new situations, to inhibit old programs of action not adapted to the present context and to elaborate new ones; the basal ganglia would be rather required by the repetition of the situation to progressively transform the new program in routine. If we refer to Shallice model, we can hypothesize that optimal executive functions require the preservation not only of the Supervisory Attentional System, mainly dependent on the prefrontal cortex, but also of the Contention Scheduling, recruiting the basal ganglia, and of the Schemas of Action, represented in parietal and premotor areas. Therefore, the neuropsychological assessment of patients with degenerative diseases contributes to the understanding of the anatomofunctional architecture of executive functions.

  6. Criterion Validation Testing of Clinical Metrology Instruments for Measuring Degenerative Joint Disease Associated Mobility Impairment in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Gruen, Margaret E.; Griffith, Emily H.; Thomson, Andrea E.; Simpson, Wendy; Lascelles, B. Duncan X.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Degenerative joint disease and associated pain are common in cats, particularly in older cats. There is a need for treatment options, however evaluation of putative therapies is limited by a lack of suitable, validated outcome measures that can be used in the target population of client owned cats. The objectives of this study were to evaluate low-dose daily meloxicam for the treatment of pain associated with degenerative joint disease in cats, and further validate two clinical metrology instruments, the Feline Musculoskeletal Pain Index (FMPI) and the Client Specific Outcome Measures (CSOM). Methods Sixty-six client owned cats with degenerative joint disease and owner-reported impairments in mobility were screened and enrolled into a double-masked, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. Following a run-in baseline period, cats were given either placebo or meloxicam for 21 days, then in a masked washout, cats were all given placebo for 21 days. Subsequently, cats were given the opposite treatment, placebo or meloxicam, for 21 days. Cats wore activity monitors throughout the study, owners completed clinical metrology instruments following each period. Results Activity counts were increased in cats during treatment with daily meloxicam (p<0.0001) compared to baseline. The FMPI results and activity count data offer concurrent validation for the FMPI, though the relationship between baseline activity counts and FMPI scores at baseline was poor (R2=0.034). The CSOM did not show responsiveness for improvement in this study, and the relationship between baseline activity counts and CSOM scores at baseline was similarly poor (R2=0.042). Conclusions Refinements to the FMPI, including abbreviation of the instrument and scoring as percent of possible score are recommended. This study offered further validation of the FMPI as a clinical metrology instrument for use in detecting therapeutic efficacy in cats with degenerative joint disease. PMID:26162101

  7. Pedicle-Screw-Based Dynamic Systems and Degenerative Lumbar Diseases: Biomechanical and Clinical Experiences of Dynamic Fusion with Isobar TTL

    PubMed Central

    Barrey, Cédric; Perrin, Gilles; Champain, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic systems in the lumbar spine are believed to reduce main fusion drawbacks such as pseudarthrosis, bone rarefaction, and mechanical failure. Compared to fusion achieved with rigid constructs, biomechanical studies underlined some advantages of dynamic instrumentation including increased load sharing between the instrumentation and interbody bone graft and stresses reduction at bone-to-screw interface. These advantages may result in increased fusion rates, limitation of bone rarefaction, and reduction of mechanical complications with the ultimate objective to reduce reoperations rates. However published clinical evidence for dynamic systems remains limited. In addition to providing biomechanical evaluation of a pedicle-screw-based dynamic system, the present study offers a long-term (average 10.2 years) insight view of the clinical outcomes of 18 patients treated by fusion with dynamic systems for degenerative lumbar spine diseases. The findings outline significant and stable symptoms relief, absence of implant-related complications, no revision surgery, and few adjacent segment degenerative changes. In spite of sample limitations, this is the first long-term report of outcomes of dynamic fusion that opens an interesting perspective for clinical outcomes of dynamic systems that need to be explored at larger scale. PMID:25031874

  8. Non-familial degenerative disease and atrophy of brainstem and cerebellum. Clinical and CT data in 47 patients.

    PubMed

    Staal, A; Meerwaldt, J D; van Dongen, K J; Mulder, P G; Busch, H F

    1990-03-01

    We studied the clinical features of 47 patients with a non-hereditary degenerative disease and with atrophy of brainstem or cerebellum or both in CT scanning. There was no relation between the CT findings and duration or severity of the disease, nor with the kind of the neurological signs which comprised ataxia, a hypokinetic rigid syndrome, oculomotor abnormalities, upper and lower motor neuron signs, orthostatic hypotension and dementia. The 2 main diagnoses were olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), or a combination of OPCA and striatonigral degeneration (SND). The differential diagnosis with Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy was discussed. We concluded, that a CT scan is warranted in all cases of suspected Parkinson's disease, especially in those without tremor, and in cases of motoneuron disease with broad-based gait. In our patients with mainly hypokinesia and rigidity, levodopa treatment had no or brief beneficial effects. If ataxia predominated, OPCA appeared the most sensible diagnosis; if a hypokinetic-rigid syndrome predominated, the diagnoses SND plus OPCA appeared the most suitable. We assessed the degree of atrophy on CT subjectively, because an interobserver study of 60 normal CT scans, did not produce reliable measurements. PMID:2358820

  9. Non-familial degenerative disease and atrophy of brainstem and cerebellum. Clinical and CT data in 47 patients.

    PubMed

    Staal, A; Meerwaldt, J D; van Dongen, K J; Mulder, P G; Busch, H F

    1990-03-01

    We studied the clinical features of 47 patients with a non-hereditary degenerative disease and with atrophy of brainstem or cerebellum or both in CT scanning. There was no relation between the CT findings and duration or severity of the disease, nor with the kind of the neurological signs which comprised ataxia, a hypokinetic rigid syndrome, oculomotor abnormalities, upper and lower motor neuron signs, orthostatic hypotension and dementia. The 2 main diagnoses were olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA), or a combination of OPCA and striatonigral degeneration (SND). The differential diagnosis with Parkinson's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy was discussed. We concluded, that a CT scan is warranted in all cases of suspected Parkinson's disease, especially in those without tremor, and in cases of motoneuron disease with broad-based gait. In our patients with mainly hypokinesia and rigidity, levodopa treatment had no or brief beneficial effects. If ataxia predominated, OPCA appeared the most sensible diagnosis; if a hypokinetic-rigid syndrome predominated, the diagnoses SND plus OPCA appeared the most suitable. We assessed the degree of atrophy on CT subjectively, because an interobserver study of 60 normal CT scans, did not produce reliable measurements.

  10. Developing Cellular Therapies for Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Kapil; Rao, Mahendra; Hull, Sara Chandros; Stroncek, David; Brooks, Brian P.; Feigal, Ellen; van Meurs, Jan C.; Huang, Christene A.; Miller, Sheldon S.

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical advances in vision research have been greatly facilitated by the clinical accessibility of the visual system, its ease of experimental manipulation, and its ability to be functionally monitored in real time with noninvasive imaging techniques at the level of single cells and with quantitative end-point measures. A recent example is the development of stem cell–based therapies for degenerative eye diseases including AMD. Two phase I clinical trials using embryonic stem cell–derived RPE are already underway and several others using both pluripotent and multipotent adult stem cells are in earlier stages of development. These clinical trials will use a variety of cell types, including embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cell–derived RPE, bone marrow– or umbilical cord–derived mesenchymal stem cells, fetal neural or retinal progenitor cells, and adult RPE stem cells–derived RPE. Although quite distinct, these approaches, share common principles, concerns and issues across the clinical development pipeline. These considerations were a central part of the discussions at a recent National Eye Institute meeting on the development of cellular therapies for retinal degenerative disease. At this meeting, emphasis was placed on the general value of identifying and sharing information in the so-called “precompetitive space.” The utility of this behavior was described in terms of how it could allow us to remove road blocks in the clinical development pipeline, and more efficiently and economically move stem cell–based therapies for retinal degenerative diseases toward the clinic. Many of the ocular stem cell approaches we discuss are also being used more broadly, for nonocular conditions and therefore the model we develop here, using the precompetitive space, should benefit the entire scientific community. PMID:24573369

  11. Degenerative spinal disease in large felids.

    PubMed

    Kolmstetter, C; Munson, L; Ramsay, E C

    2000-03-01

    Degenerative spinal disorders, including intervertebral disc disease and spondylosis, seldom occur in domestic cats. In contrast, a retrospective study of 13 lions (Panthera leo), 16 tigers (Panthera tigris), 4 leopards (Panthera pardis), 1 snow leopard (Panthera uncia), and 3 jaguars (Panthera onca) from the Knoxville Zoo that died or were euthanatized from 1976 to 1996 indicated that degenerative spinal disease is an important problem in large nondomestic felids. The medical record, radiographic data, and the necropsy report of each animal were examined for evidence of intervertebral disc disease or spondylosis. Eight (three lions, four tigers, and one leopard) animals were diagnosed with degenerative spinal disease. Clinical signs included progressively decreased activity, moderate to severe rear limb muscle atrophy, chronic intermittent rear limb paresis, and ataxia. The age at onset of clinical signs was 10-19 yr (median = 18 yr). Radiographic evaluation of the spinal column was useful in assessing the severity of spinal lesions, and results were correlated with necropsy findings. Lesions were frequently multifocal, included intervertebral disc mineralization or herniation with collapsed intervertebral disc spaces, and were most common in the lumbar area but also involved cervical and thoracic vertebrae. Marked spondylosis was present in the cats with intervertebral disc disease, presumably subsequent to vertebral instability. Six of the animals' spinal cords were examined histologically, and five had acute or chronic damage to the spinal cord secondary to disc protrusion. Spinal disease should be suspected in geriatric large felids with decreased appetite or activity. Radiographic evaluation of the spinal column is the most useful method to assess the type and severity of spinal lesions.

  12. Degenerative spinal disease in large felids.

    PubMed

    Kolmstetter, C; Munson, L; Ramsay, E C

    2000-03-01

    Degenerative spinal disorders, including intervertebral disc disease and spondylosis, seldom occur in domestic cats. In contrast, a retrospective study of 13 lions (Panthera leo), 16 tigers (Panthera tigris), 4 leopards (Panthera pardis), 1 snow leopard (Panthera uncia), and 3 jaguars (Panthera onca) from the Knoxville Zoo that died or were euthanatized from 1976 to 1996 indicated that degenerative spinal disease is an important problem in large nondomestic felids. The medical record, radiographic data, and the necropsy report of each animal were examined for evidence of intervertebral disc disease or spondylosis. Eight (three lions, four tigers, and one leopard) animals were diagnosed with degenerative spinal disease. Clinical signs included progressively decreased activity, moderate to severe rear limb muscle atrophy, chronic intermittent rear limb paresis, and ataxia. The age at onset of clinical signs was 10-19 yr (median = 18 yr). Radiographic evaluation of the spinal column was useful in assessing the severity of spinal lesions, and results were correlated with necropsy findings. Lesions were frequently multifocal, included intervertebral disc mineralization or herniation with collapsed intervertebral disc spaces, and were most common in the lumbar area but also involved cervical and thoracic vertebrae. Marked spondylosis was present in the cats with intervertebral disc disease, presumably subsequent to vertebral instability. Six of the animals' spinal cords were examined histologically, and five had acute or chronic damage to the spinal cord secondary to disc protrusion. Spinal disease should be suspected in geriatric large felids with decreased appetite or activity. Radiographic evaluation of the spinal column is the most useful method to assess the type and severity of spinal lesions. PMID:10884118

  13. Biological Treatment Approaches for Degenerative Disk Disease: A Literature Review of In Vivo Animal and Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Moriguchi, Yu; Alimi, Marjan; Khair, Thamina; Manolarakis, George; Berlin, Connor; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Härtl, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Literature review. Objective  Degenerative disk disease (DDD) has a negative impact on quality of life and is a major cause of morbidity worldwide. There has been a growing interest in the biological repair of DDD by both researchers and clinicians alike. To generate an overview of the recent progress in reparative strategies for the treatment of DDD highlighting their promises and limitations, a comprehensive review of the current literature was performed elucidating data from in vivo animal and clinical studies. Methods  Articles and abstracts available in electronic databases of PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar as of December 2014 were reviewed. Additionally, data from unpublished, ongoing clinical trials was retrieved from clinicaltrials.gov and available abstracts from research forums. Data was extracted from the most recent in vivo animal or clinical studies involving any of the following: (1) treatment with biomolecules, cells, or tissue-engineered constructs and (2) annulus fibrosus repair. Results  Seventy-five articles met the inclusion criteria for review. Among these, 17 studies involved humans; 37, small quadrupeds; and 21, large quadrupeds. Findings from all treatments employed demonstrated improvement either in regenerative capacity or in pain attenuation, with the exception of one clinical study. Conclusion  Published clinical studies on cell therapy have reported encouraging results in the treatment of DDD and resultant back pain. We expect new data to emerge in the near future as treatments for DDD continue to evolve in parallel to our greater understanding of disk health and pathology. PMID:27433434

  14. Current and future perspectives on lumbar degenerative disc disease: a UK survey exploring specialist multidisciplinary clinical opinion

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite lumbar degenerative disc disease (LDDD) being significantly associated with non-specific low back pain and effective treatment remaining elusive, specialist multidisciplinary clinical stakeholder opinion remains unexplored. The present study examines the views of such experts. Design A reliable and valid electronic survey was designed to establish trends using theoretical constructs relating to current assessment and management practices. Clinicians from the Society of Back Pain Research (SBPR) UK were invited to take part. Quantitative data were collated and coded using Bristol Online Surveys (BOS) software, and content analysis was used to systematically code and categorise qualitative data. Setting Specialist multidisciplinary spinal interest group in the UK. Participants 38/141 clinically active, multidisciplinary SBPR members with specialist spinal interest participated. Among them, 84% had >9 years postgraduate clinical experience. Interventions None. Outcome measures Frequency distributions were used to establish general trends in quantitative data. Qualitative responses were coded and categorised in relation to each theme and percentage responses were calculated. Results LDDD symptom recurrence, in the absence of psychosocial influence, was associated with physical signs of joint stiffness (26%), weakness (17%) and joint hypermobility (6%), while physical factors (21%) and the ability to adapt (11%) were postulated as reasons why some experience pain and others do not. No one management strategy was supported exclusively or with consensus. Regarding effective modalities, there was no significant difference between allied health professional and medic responses (p=0.1–0.8). The future of LDDD care was expressed in terms of improvements in patient communication (35%), patient education (38%) and treatment stratification (24%). Conclusions Results suggest that multidisciplinary expert spinal clinicians appear to follow UK

  15. Clinical experiences of dynamic stabilizers: Dynesys and Dynesys top loading system for lumbar spine degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Cheng-Ta; Chang, Chih-Ju; Su, I-Chang; Lin, Li-Ying

    2016-04-01

    Dynesys (Dynamic Neutralization System) was designed to overcome the shortcomings of fusion. The Dynesys top loading (DTL) system is a new alternative Dynesys system that can be applied via a minimally invasive procedure. This study aimed to ascertain whether DTL is a suitable device for motion preservation and prevention of instability, and to compare the clinical and radiological outcomes between DTL and Dynesys. In this study, 12 patients were treated with Dynesys and 21 patients were treated with DTL. Back and leg pain were evaluated using the visual analog scale. The Oswestry Disability Index was used to evaluate the patients' function. Range of motion (ROM) at the operative level and for the whole lumbar spine was measured pre- and postoperatively. The length of wound, blood loss, length of hospital stay, and operation duration were also compared. All patients were followed up for 12-76 months. Scores on the visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index were significantly improved postoperatively. The median ROM of the whole spine and index level ROM in all patients showed 12.5% and 79.6% loss, respectively. The DTL group exhibited significantly better results in terms of blood loss, wound length, and operation duration, in addition to early ambulation. In conclusion, Dynesys and DTL are semirigid fixation systems that can significantly improve clinical symptoms and signs. Our results suggested that DTL was better than Dynesys as a result of it being a minimally invasive procedure. However, further study with large sample sizes and longer follow-up durations is required to validate the effects of these dynamic stabilizers.

  16. Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, F M; Arana, E

    2016-04-01

    In the last 25 years, scientific research has brought about drastic changes in the concept of low back pain and its management. Most imaging findings, including degenerative changes, reflect anatomic peculiarities or the normal aging process and turn out to be clinically irrelevant; imaging tests have proven useful only when systemic disease is suspected or when surgery is indicated for persistent spinal cord or nerve root compression. The radiologic report should indicate the key points of nerve compression, bypassing inconsequential findings. Many treatments have proven inefficacious, and some have proven counterproductive, but they continue to be prescribed because patients want them and there are financial incentives for doing them. Following the guidelines that have proven effective for clinical management improves clinical outcomes, reduces iatrogenic complications, and decreases unjustified and wasteful healthcare expenditures. PMID:26872873

  17. Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, F M; Arana, E

    2016-04-01

    In the last 25 years, scientific research has brought about drastic changes in the concept of low back pain and its management. Most imaging findings, including degenerative changes, reflect anatomic peculiarities or the normal aging process and turn out to be clinically irrelevant; imaging tests have proven useful only when systemic disease is suspected or when surgery is indicated for persistent spinal cord or nerve root compression. The radiologic report should indicate the key points of nerve compression, bypassing inconsequential findings. Many treatments have proven inefficacious, and some have proven counterproductive, but they continue to be prescribed because patients want them and there are financial incentives for doing them. Following the guidelines that have proven effective for clinical management improves clinical outcomes, reduces iatrogenic complications, and decreases unjustified and wasteful healthcare expenditures.

  18. Cell-Based Therapies Used to Treat Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease: A Systematic Review of Animal Studies and Human Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Oehme, David; Goldschlager, Tony; Ghosh, Peter; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Jenkin, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain and degenerative disc disease are a significant cause of pain and disability worldwide. Advances in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies, particularly the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells and intervertebral disc chondrocytes, have led to the publication of numerous studies and clinical trials utilising these biological therapies to treat degenerative spinal conditions, often reporting favourable outcomes. Stem cell mediated disc regeneration may bridge the gap between the two current alternatives for patients with low back pain, often inadequate pain management at one end and invasive surgery at the other. Through cartilage formation and disc regeneration or via modification of pain pathways stem cells are well suited to enhance spinal surgery practice. This paper will systematically review the current status of basic science studies, preclinical and clinical trials utilising cell-based therapies to repair the degenerate intervertebral disc. The mechanism of action of transplanted cells, as well as the limitations of published studies, will be discussed. PMID:26074979

  19. Cell-Based Therapies Used to Treat Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease: A Systematic Review of Animal Studies and Human Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Oehme, David; Goldschlager, Tony; Ghosh, Peter; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V.; Jenkin, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain and degenerative disc disease are a significant cause of pain and disability worldwide. Advances in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies, particularly the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells and intervertebral disc chondrocytes, have led to the publication of numerous studies and clinical trials utilising these biological therapies to treat degenerative spinal conditions, often reporting favourable outcomes. Stem cell mediated disc regeneration may bridge the gap between the two current alternatives for patients with low back pain, often inadequate pain management at one end and invasive surgery at the other. Through cartilage formation and disc regeneration or via modification of pain pathways stem cells are well suited to enhance spinal surgery practice. This paper will systematically review the current status of basic science studies, preclinical and clinical trials utilising cell-based therapies to repair the degenerate intervertebral disc. The mechanism of action of transplanted cells, as well as the limitations of published studies, will be discussed. PMID:26074979

  20. Physiochemical basis of human degenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Boguslaw

    2015-01-01

    The onset of human degenerative diseases in humans, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, neurological disorders, neurodevelopmental disease and neurodegenerative disease has been shown to be related to exposures to persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ethers and others, as well as to polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates, bisphenol-A and other aromatic lipophilic species. The onset of these diseases has also been related to exposures to transition metal ions. A physiochemical mechanism for the onset of degenerative environmental disease dependent upon exposure to a combination of lipophilic aromatic hydrocarbons and transition metal ions is proposed here. The findings reported here also, for the first time, explain why aromatic hydrocarbons exhibit greater toxicity than aliphatic hydrocarbons of equal carbon numbers. PMID:27486355

  1. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Eye Diseases Hereditary; Retinal Disease; Achromatopsia; Bardet-Biedl Syndrome; Bassen-Kornzweig Syndrome; Batten Disease; Best Disease; Choroidal Dystrophy; Choroideremia; Cone Dystrophy; Cone-Rod Dystrophy; Congenital Stationary Night Blindness; Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome; Fundus Albipunctatus; Goldmann-Favre Syndrome; Gyrate Atrophy; Juvenile Macular Degeneration; Kearns-Sayre Syndrome; Leber Congenital Amaurosis; Refsum Syndrome; Retinitis Pigmentosa; Retinitis Punctata Albescens; Retinoschisis; Rod-Cone Dystrophy; Rod Dystrophy; Rod Monochromacy; Stargardt Disease; Usher Syndrome

  2. Operative Management of Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Chao; Osti, Orso Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease is extremely common. Current evidence supports surgery in carefully selected patients who have failed non-operative treatment and do not exhibit any substantial psychosocial overlay. Fusion surgery employing the correct grafting and stabilization techniques has long-term results demonstrating successful clinical outcomes. However, the best approach for fusion remains debatable. There is some evidence supporting the more complex, technically demanding and higher risk interbody fusion techniques for the younger, active patients or patients with a higher risk of non-union. Lumbar disc arthroplasty and hybrid techniques are still relatively novel procedures despite promising short-term and mid-term outcomes. Long-term studies demonstrating superiority over fusion are required before these techniques may be recommended to replace fusion as the gold standard. Novel stem cell approaches combined with tissue engineering therapies continue to be developed in expectation of improving clinical outcomes. Results with appropriate follow-up are not yet available to indicate if such techniques are safe, cost-effective and reliable in the long-term. PMID:27559465

  3. Operative Management of Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Chao; Zotti, Mario Giuseppe Tedesco; Osti, Orso Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease is extremely common. Current evidence supports surgery in carefully selected patients who have failed non-operative treatment and do not exhibit any substantial psychosocial overlay. Fusion surgery employing the correct grafting and stabilization techniques has long-term results demonstrating successful clinical outcomes. However, the best approach for fusion remains debatable. There is some evidence supporting the more complex, technically demanding and higher risk interbody fusion techniques for the younger, active patients or patients with a higher risk of non-union. Lumbar disc arthroplasty and hybrid techniques are still relatively novel procedures despite promising short-term and mid-term outcomes. Long-term studies demonstrating superiority over fusion are required before these techniques may be recommended to replace fusion as the gold standard. Novel stem cell approaches combined with tissue engineering therapies continue to be developed in expectation of improving clinical outcomes. Results with appropriate follow-up are not yet available to indicate if such techniques are safe, cost-effective and reliable in the long-term. PMID:27559465

  4. Clinical outcomes of lumbar degenerative disc disease treated with posterior lumbar interbody fusion allograft spacer: a prospective, multicenter trial with 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Paul M; Robbins, Stephen; Paullus, Wayne; Faust, Stephen; Holt, Richard; McGuire, Robert

    2009-07-01

    The clinical benefits and complications of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) have been studied over the past 60 years. In recent years, spine surgeons have had the option of treating low back pain caused by degenerative disc disease using PLIF with machined allograft spacers and posterior pedicle fixation. The purpose of this clinical series was to assess the clinical benefits of using a machined PLIF allograft spacer and posterior pedicle fixation to treat degenerative disc disease, both in terms of fusion rates and patient outcomes, and to compare these results with those in previous studies using autograft and metal interbody fusion devices. Results were also compared with results from studies using transverse process fusion. This prospective, nonrandomized clinical series was conducted at 10 US medical centers. Eighty-nine (55 male, 34 female) patients underwent PLIF with a presized, machined allograft spacer and posterior pedicle fixation between January 2000 and April 2003. Their outcomes were compared with outcomes in previous series described in the literature. All patients had experienced at least 6 months of low back pain that had been unresponsive to nonsurgical treatment. Physical examinations were performed before surgery, after surgery, and at 4 follow-up visits (6 weeks, 6 months, 12 months, 24 months). At each interval, we obtained radiographs and patient outcome measures, including SF-36 Bodily Pain Score, visual analog scale pain rating, and Oswestry Disability Index. The primary outcome was fusion results at 12 and 24 months; the secondary outcomes were pain, disability, function/quality of life, and satisfaction. One-level PLIFs were performed in 65 patients, and 2-level PLIFs in 24 patients. Flexion-extension radiographs at 12 and 24 months revealed a 98% fusion rate. Of the 72 patients who reached the 12-month follow-up, 86% reported decreased pain and disability as measured with the Oswestry Disability Index. Decreased pain as measured

  5. Is running associated with degenerative joint disease

    SciTech Connect

    Panush, R.S.; Schmidt, C.; Caldwell, J.R.; Edwards, N.L.; Longley, S.; Yonker, R.; Webster, E.; Nauman, J.; Stork, J.; Pettersson, H.

    1986-03-07

    Little information is available regarding the long-term effects, if any, of running on the musculoskeletal system. The authors compared the prevalence of degenerative joint disease among 17 male runners with 18 male nonrunners. Running subjects (53% marathoners) ran a mean of 44.8 km (28 miles)/wk for 12 years. Pain and swelling of hips, knees, ankles and feet and other musculoskeletal complaints among runners were comparable with those among nonrunners. Radiologic examinations (for osteophytes, cartilage thickness, and grade of degeneration) also were without notable differences among groups. They did not find an increased prevalence of osteoarthritis among the runners. Our observations suggest that long-duration, high-mileage running need to be associated with premature degenerative joint disease in the lower extremities.

  6. Effects of interspinous spacers on lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong; Nong, Lu-Ming; DU, Rui; Gao, Gong-Ming; Jiang, Yu-Qing; Xu, Nan-Wei

    2013-03-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the early effects of interspinous spacers on lumbar degenerative disease. The clinical outcomes of 23 patients with lumbar degenerative disease, treated using interspinous spacer implantation alone or combined with posterior lumbar fusion, were retrospectively studied and assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Pre-operative and post-operative interspinous distance, disc space height, foraminal width and height and segmental lordosis were determined. The early effects and complications associated with the interspinous spacers were recorded. The surgical procedures performed with the in-space treatment were easy and minimally invasive. The VAS scores and ODI were improved post-operatively compared with pre-operatively. Significant changes in the interspinous distance, disc space height, foraminal width and height and segmental lordosis were noted. In-space treatment for degenerative lumbar disease is easy and safe, with good early effects. The in-space system provides an alternative treatment for lumbar degenerative disease.

  7. Degenerative disease affecting the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Eadie, M J

    1974-03-01

    The term "degenerative disease" is one which is rather widely used in relation to the nervous system and yet one which is rarely formally and carefully defined. The term appears to be applied to disorders of the nervous system which often occur in later life and which are of uncertain cause. In the Shorter Oxford Dictionary the word degeneration is defined as "a change of structure by which an organism, or an organ, assumes the form of a lower type". However this is not quite the sense in which the word is applied in human neuropathology, where it is conventional to restrict the use of the word to those organic disorders which are of uncertain or poorly understood cause and in which there is a deterioration or regression in the level of functioning of the nervous system. The concept of degenerative disorder is applied to other organs as well as to the brain, and as disease elsewhere in the body may affect the nervous system, it seems reasonable to include within the topic of degenerative disorder affecting the nervous system those conditions in which the nervous system is involved as a result of primary degenerations in other parts of the body. PMID:25026144

  8. Degenerative disease affecting the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Eadie, M J

    1974-03-01

    The term "degenerative disease" is one which is rather widely used in relation to the nervous system and yet one which is rarely formally and carefully defined. The term appears to be applied to disorders of the nervous system which often occur in later life and which are of uncertain cause. In the Shorter Oxford Dictionary the word degeneration is defined as "a change of structure by which an organism, or an organ, assumes the form of a lower type". However this is not quite the sense in which the word is applied in human neuropathology, where it is conventional to restrict the use of the word to those organic disorders which are of uncertain or poorly understood cause and in which there is a deterioration or regression in the level of functioning of the nervous system. The concept of degenerative disorder is applied to other organs as well as to the brain, and as disease elsewhere in the body may affect the nervous system, it seems reasonable to include within the topic of degenerative disorder affecting the nervous system those conditions in which the nervous system is involved as a result of primary degenerations in other parts of the body.

  9. Posterior Transpedicular Dynamic Stabilization versus Total Disc Replacement in the Treatment of Lumbar Painful Degenerative Disc Disease: A Comparison of Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Oktenoglu, Tunc; Ozer, Ali Fahir; Sasani, Mehdi; Ataker, Yaprak; Gomleksiz, Cengiz; Celebi, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Prospective clinical study. Objective. This study compares the clinical results of anterior lumbar total disc replacement and posterior transpedicular dynamic stabilization in the treatment of degenerative disc disease. Summary and Background Data. Over the last two decades, both techniques have emerged as alternative treatment options to fusion surgery. Methods. This study was conducted between 2004 and 2010 with a total of 50 patients (25 in each group). The mean age of the patients in total disc prosthesis group was 37,32 years. The mean age of the patients in posterior dynamic transpedicular stabilization was 43,08. Clinical (VAS and Oswestry) and radiological evaluations (lumbar lordosis and segmental lordosis angles) of the patients were carried out prior to the operation and 3, 12, and 24 months after the operation. We compared the average duration of surgery, blood loss during the surgery and the length of hospital stay of both groups. Results. Both techniques offered significant improvements in clinical parameters. There was no significant change in radiologic evaluations after the surgery for both techniques. Conclusion. Both dynamic systems provided spine stability. However, the posterior dynamic system had a slight advantage over anterior disc prosthesis because of its convenient application and fewer possible complications. PMID:23401784

  10. MRI Evaluation of Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rupal; Mehta, Chetan; Patel, Narrotam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Lower back pain secondary to degenerative disc disease is a condition that affects young to middle-aged persons with peak incidence at approximately 40 y. MRI is the standard imaging modality for detecting disc pathology due to its advantage of lack of radiation, multiplanar imaging capability, excellent spinal soft-tissue contrast and precise localization of intervertebral discs changes. Aims and Objective: To evaluate the characterization, extent, and changes associated with the degenerative lumbar disc disease by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Study Design: Cross-sectional and observational study. Materials and Methods: A total 109 patients of the lumbar disc degeneration with age group between 17 to 80 y were diagnosed & studied on 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging machine. MRI findings like lumbar lordosis, Schmorl’s nodes, decreased disc height, disc annular tear, disc herniation, disc bulge, disc protrusion and disc extrusion were observed. Narrowing of the spinal canal, lateral recess and neural foramen with compression of nerve roots observed. Ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was observed. Result: Males were more commonly affected in Degenerative Spinal Disease & most of the patients show loss of lumbar lordosis. Decreased disc height was common at L5-S1 level. More than one disc involvement was seen per person. L4 – L5 disc was the most commonly involved. Annular disc tear, disc herniation, disc extrusion, narrowing of spinal canal, narrowing of lateral recess, compression of neural foramen, ligamentum flavum thickening and facetal arthropathy was common at the L4 –L5 disc level. Disc buldge was common at L3 – L4 & L4 – L5 disc level. Posterior osteophytes are common at L3 - L4 & L5 –S1 disc level. L1- L2 disc involvement and spondylolisthesis are less common. Conclusion: Lumbar disc degeneration is the most common cause of low back pain. Plain radiograph can be helpful in visualizing gross anatomic changes in

  11. Nanoneuromedicines for Degenerative, Inflammatory, and Infectious Nervous System Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gendelman, Howard E.; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Bronich, Tatiana; Ghaisas, Shivani; Jin, Huajun; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Liu, Xinming; McMillan, JoEllyn; Mosley, R. Lee; Narasimhan, Balaji; Mallapragada, Surya K.

    2015-01-01

    Interest in nanoneuromedicine has grown rapidly due to the immediate need for improved biomarkers and therapies for psychiatric, developmental, traumatic, inflammatory, infectious and degenerative nervous system disorders. These, in whole or in part, are a significant societal burden due to growth in numbers of affected people and in disease severity. Lost productivity of the patient and his or her caregiver, and the emotional and financial burden cannot be overstated. The need for improved health care, treatment and diagnostics are immediate. A means to such an end is nanotechnology. Indeed, recent developments of health-care enabling nanotechnologies and nanomedicines range from biomarker discovery including neuroimaging to therapeutic applications for degenerative, inflammatory and infectious disorders of the nervous system. This review focuses on the current and future potential of the field to positively affect clinical outcomes. PMID:25645958

  12. Neuromuscular exercise as treatment of degenerative knee disease.

    PubMed

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Ewa M

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is recommended as first-line treatment of degenerative knee disease. Our hypothesis is that neuromuscular exercise is feasible and at least as effective as traditionally used strength or aerobic training but aims to target more closely the sensorimotor deficiencies and functional instability associated with the degenerative knee disease than traditionally used training methods.

  13. Contribution of Microglia-Mediated Neuroinflammation to Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Maria H.; Boia, Raquel; Santos, Paulo F.; Ambrósio, António F.; Santiago, Ana R.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases are major causes of vision loss and blindness worldwide and are characterized by chronic and progressive neuronal loss. One common feature of retinal degenerative diseases and brain neurodegenerative diseases is chronic neuroinflammation. There is growing evidence that retinal microglia, as in the brain, become activated in the course of retinal degenerative diseases, having a pivotal role in the initiation and propagation of the neurodegenerative process. A better understanding of the events elicited and mediated by retinal microglia will contribute to the clarification of disease etiology and might open new avenues for potential therapeutic interventions. This review aims at giving an overview of the roles of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in major retinal degenerative diseases like glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25873768

  14. Clinical outcome of stand-alone ALIF compared to posterior instrumentation for degenerative disc disease: A pilot study and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Udby, Peter M; Bech-Azeddine, Rachid

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the article was to: a) present results from a case cohort pilot study comparing stand-alone ALIF and TLIF and, b) review the literature on studies comparing the clinical outcome of stand-alone ALIF with posterior instrumentation including TLIF or PLIF, in patients with disabling low back pain resulting from degenerative disc disease. ALIF surgery has previously been linked with certain high risk complications and unfavorable long term fusion results. Newer studies suggest that stand-alone ALIF can possibly be advantageous compared to other types of posterior instrumented interbody fusion for a selected group of DDD patients. The methods and material consisted of a cohort pilot study of patients, with DDD treated with stand-alone ALIF or TLIF followed by a literature review conducted through a comprehensive PubMed database search of the English literature. Studies comparing stand-alone ALIF with posterior instrumented interbody fusion were selected and reviewed. Results from the pilot study, n = 21, showed a reduced perioperative blood loss, shorter operative time and a trend towards better pain reduction and decreased use of opioid analgesics in patients undergoing stand-alone ALIF compared to posterior instrumented fusion with TLIF. The literature review included three studies, n = 630. All three studies were retrospective cohort studies. The average patient follow-up was 2-years but with heterogeneous selected outcomes. Two of three articles documented significant advantages when using stand-alone ALIF on outcomes such as ODI, VAS, surgical time, blood loss and patient satisfaction. No study found stand-alone ALIF inferior in chosen outcomes including fusion. In conclusion the pilot study and the literature review, finds similar clinical outcomes and fusion rates after stand-alone ALIF and posterior interbody fusion. Stand-alone ALIF was associated with a shorter duration of surgery, less perioperative blood loss and a faster improvement post

  15. Total Disc Replacement in Lumbar Degenerative Disc Diseases.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun Kun

    2015-11-01

    More than 10 years have passed since lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) was introduced for the first time to the world market for the surgical management of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). It seems like the right time to sum up the relevant results in order to understand where LTDR stands on now, and is heading forward to. The pathogenesis of DDD has been currently settled, but diagnosis and managements are still controversial. Fusion is recognized as golden standard of surgical managements but has various kinds of shortcomings. Lately, LTDR has been expected to replace fusion surgery. A great deal of LTDR reports has come out. Among them, more than 5-year follow-up prospective randomized controlled studies including USA IDE trials were expected to elucidate whether for LTDR to have therapeutic benefit compared to fusion. The results of these studies revealed that LTDR was not inferior to fusion. Most of clinical studies dealing with LTDR revealed that there was no strong evidence for preventive effect of LTDR against symptomatic degenerative changes of adjacent segment disease. LTDR does not have shortcomings associated with fusion. However, it has a potentiality of the new complications to occur, which surgeons have never experienced in fusion surgeries. Consequently, longer follow-up should be necessary as yet to confirm the maintenance of improved surgical outcome and to observe any very late complications. LTDR still may get a chance to establish itself as a substitute of fusion both nominally and virtually if it eases the concerns listed above. PMID:26713139

  16. Total Disc Replacement in Lumbar Degenerative Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    More than 10 years have passed since lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) was introduced for the first time to the world market for the surgical management of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). It seems like the right time to sum up the relevant results in order to understand where LTDR stands on now, and is heading forward to. The pathogenesis of DDD has been currently settled, but diagnosis and managements are still controversial. Fusion is recognized as golden standard of surgical managements but has various kinds of shortcomings. Lately, LTDR has been expected to replace fusion surgery. A great deal of LTDR reports has come out. Among them, more than 5-year follow-up prospective randomized controlled studies including USA IDE trials were expected to elucidate whether for LTDR to have therapeutic benefit compared to fusion. The results of these studies revealed that LTDR was not inferior to fusion. Most of clinical studies dealing with LTDR revealed that there was no strong evidence for preventive effect of LTDR against symptomatic degenerative changes of adjacent segment disease. LTDR does not have shortcomings associated with fusion. However, it has a potentiality of the new complications to occur, which surgeons have never experienced in fusion surgeries. Consequently, longer follow-up should be necessary as yet to confirm the maintenance of improved surgical outcome and to observe any very late complications. LTDR still may get a chance to establish itself as a substitute of fusion both nominally and virtually if it eases the concerns listed above. PMID:26713139

  17. Degenerative spine disease : pathologic findings in 985 surgical specimens.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Peter; Wollmann, Robert L; Fessler, Richard G; Krausz, Thomas N; Montag, Anthony G

    2006-02-01

    A number of pathologic changes have been reported in spinal surgery specimens. The frequency of many of these is not well defined. We retrospectively reviewed the histologic features of 985 extradural spinal surgery specimens. Of the cases, 1.6% were identified clinically as synovial cysts. In addition, synovial tissue was seen in another 5.3% of cases, often embedded within disk material. Neovascularization of disk tissue was present in 8.1% of cases, chondrocyte clusters in 18.3%, and calcium pyrophosphate crystals in 2.8%, predominantly within disk material. With the exception of crystal deposits, all of these changes were significantly more common in the lumbar spine. A better understanding of cell-based degenerative changes will become essential with increasing research into cell-based therapies for spinal disk disease. We report data on the frequency of different pathologic changes and describe synovial metaplasia as a reactive change not previously reported.

  18. Destructive discovertebral degenerative disease of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Charran, A K; Tony, G; Lalam, R; Tyrrell, P N M; Tins, B; Singh, J; Eisenstein, S M; Balain, B; Trivedi, J M; Cassar-Pullicino, V N

    2012-09-01

    The uncommon variant of degenerative hip joint disease, termed rapidly progressive osteoarthritis, and highlighted by severe joint space loss and osteochondral disintegration, is well established. We present a similar unusual subset in the lumbar spine termed destructive discovertebral degenerative disease (DDDD) with radiological features of vertebral malalignment, severe disc resorption, and "bone sand" formation secondary to vertebral fragmentation. Co-existing metabolic bone disease is likely to promote the development of DDDD of the lumbar spine, which presents with back pain and sciatica due to nerve root compression by the "bone sand" in the epidural space. MRI and CT play a complimentary role in making the diagnosis.

  19. Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    SUGAWARA, Taku

    Anterior cervical spine surgery is an established surgical intervention for cervical degenerative disease and high success rate with excellent long-term outcomes have been reported. However, indications of surgical procedures for certain conditions are still controversial and severe complications to cause neurological dysfunction or deaths may occur. This review is focused mainly on five widely performed procedures by anterior approach for cervical degenerative disease; anterior cervical discectomy, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, anterior cervical foraminotomy, and arthroplasty. Indications, procedures, outcomes, and complications of these surgeries are discussed. PMID:26119899

  20. Histone Deacetylases Inhibitors in the Treatment of Retinal Degenerative Diseases: Overview and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xufeng; Du, Wei; Pang, Ji-jing

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases are one of the important refractory ophthalmic diseases, featured with apoptosis of photoreceptor cells. Histone acetylation and deacetylation can regulate chromosome assembly, gene transcription, and posttranslational modification, which are regulated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs), respectively. The histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) have the ability to cause hyperacetylation of histone and nonhistone proteins, resulting in a variety of effects on cell proliferation, differentiation, anti-inflammation, and anti-apoptosis. Several HDACis have been approved for clinical trials to treat cancer. Studies have shown that HDACis have neuroprotective effects in nervous system damage. In this paper, we will summarize the neuroprotective effects of common HDACis in retinal degenerative diseases and make a prospect to the applications of HDACis in the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases in the future. PMID:26137316

  1. Dietary Phytochemicals: Natural Swords Combating Inflammation and Oxidation-Mediated Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cumulatively, degenerative disease is one of the most fatal groups of diseases, and it contributes to the mortality and poor quality of life in the world while increasing the economic burden of the sufferers. Oxidative stress and inflammation are the major pathogenic causes of degenerative diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), diabetes mellitus (DM), and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although a number of synthetic medications are used to treat these diseases, none of the current regimens are completely safe. Phytochemicals (polyphenols, carotenoids, anthocyanins, alkaloids, glycosides, saponins, and terpenes) from natural products such as dietary fruits, vegetables, and spices are potential sources of alternative medications to attenuate the oxidative stress and inflammation associated with degenerative diseases. Based on in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials, some of these active compounds have shown good promise for development into novel agents for treating RA, DM, and CVD by targeting oxidative stress and inflammation. In this review, phytochemicals from natural products with the potential of ameliorating degenerative disease involving the bone, metabolism, and the heart are described. PMID:27721914

  2. Motor Training in Degenerative Spinocerebellar Disease: Ataxia-Specific Improvements by Intensive Physiotherapy and Exergames

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is essentially involved in movement control and plays a critical role in motor learning. It has remained controversial whether patients with degenerative cerebellar disease benefit from high-intensity coordinative training. Moreover, it remains unclear by which training methods and mechanisms these patients might improve their motor performance. Here, we review evidence from different high-intensity training studies in patients with degenerative spinocerebellar disease. These studies demonstrate that high-intensity coordinative training might lead to a significant benefit in patients with degenerative ataxia. This training might be based either on physiotherapy or on whole-body controlled videogames (“exergames”). The benefit shown in these studies is equal to regaining one or more years of natural disease progression. In addition, first case studies indicate that even subjects with advanced neurodegeneration might benefit from such training programs. For both types of training, the observed clinical improvements are paralleled by recoveries in ataxia-specific dysfunctions (e.g., multijoint coordination and dynamic stability). Importantly, for both types of training, the retention of the effects seems to depend on the frequency and continuity of training. Based on these studies, we here present preliminary recommendations for clinical practice, and articulate open questions that might guide future studies on neurorehabilitation in degenerative spinocerebellar disease. PMID:24877117

  3. Revisiting the Term Neuroprotection in Chronic and Degenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Marco; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Matta, Andre P C; Reis, Carlos Henrique Melo; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Moreira, Rayele; Ribeiro, Pedro; Fiorelli, Stenio; Novellino, Pietro; Pessoa, Bruno; Cunha, Mariana; Pupe, Camila; Morales, Pedro S; Filho, Pedro F Moreira; Trajano, Eduardo Lima; Oliveira, Acary Bulle

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to the development of several new researches, the lifetime presented a significant increase, even so, we still have many obstacles to overcome - among them, manage and get responses regarding neurodegenerative diseases. Where we are in the understanding of neuroprotection? Do we really have protective therapies for diseases considered degeneratives such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and its variants, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and many others? Neuroprotection is defined by many researches as interactions and interventions that can slow down or even inhibit the progression of neuronal degeneration process. We make some considerations on this neuroprotective effect.

  4. Revisiting the Term Neuroprotection in Chronic and Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Marco; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Matta, Andre P.C.; Reis, Carlos Henrique Melo; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Moreira, Rayele; Ribeiro, Pedro; Fiorelli, Stenio; Novellino, Pietro; Pessoa, Bruno; Cunha, Mariana; Pupe, Camila; Morales, Pedro S.; Filho, Pedro F. Moreira; Trajano, Eduardo Lima; Oliveira, Acary Bulle

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to the development of several new researches, the lifetime presented a significant increase, even so, we still have many obstacles to overcome – among them, manage and get responses regarding neurodegenerative diseases. Where we are in the understanding of neuroprotection? Do we really have protective therapies for diseases considered degeneratives such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and its variants, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease and many others? Neuroprotection is defined by many researches as interactions and interventions that can slow down or even inhibit the progression of neuronal degeneration process. We make some considerations on this neuroprotective effect. PMID:27127599

  5. Boundary lubricating ability of synovial fluid in degenerative joint disease.

    PubMed

    Davis, W H; Lee, S L; Sokoloff, L

    1978-01-01

    The boundary lubricating ability of eleven synovial fluids was measured in a miniaturized latex--glass test system. The specimens were obtained at necropsy from knees in which the degree of degenerative joint disease varied from none to very severe. The lubricating ability of the fluid was independent of the viscosity over a wide range of shear rates. It was not diminished even in advanced lesions. In two additional fluids, the mucin clot was poor; the lubricating ability of one of these was compromised. Thus, although degenerative joint disease, during its quiescent stages, is not associated with defective synovial lubrication, the possibility that transient defects might lead to cartilage wear during life has not been excluded. The measurements are believed to be valid indicators of boundary lubricating ability under physiological conditions despite the fact that the test surfaces were not cartilaginous and the loading was relatively low (up to 47 pounds per square inch).

  6. Vitiligo: A Possible Model of Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bellei, Barbara; Pitisci, Angela; Ottaviani, Monica; Ludovici, Matteo; Cota, Carlo; Luzi, Fabiola; Dell'Anna, Maria Lucia; Picardo, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Vitiligo is characterized by the progressive disappearance of pigment cells from skin and hair follicle. Several in vitro and in vivo studies show evidence of an altered redox status, suggesting that loss of cellular redox equilibrium might be the pathogenic mechanism in vitiligo. However, despite the numerous data supporting a pathogenic role of oxidative stress, there is still no consensus explanation underlying the oxidative stress-driven disappear of melanocytes from the epidermis. In this study, in vitro characterization of melanocytes cultures from non-lesional vitiligo skin revealed at the cellular level aberrant function of signal transduction pathways common with neurodegenerative diseases including modification of lipid metabolism, hyperactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), constitutive p53-dependent stress signal transduction cascades, and enhanced sensibility to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Notably, these long-term effects of subcytotoxic oxidative stress are also biomarkers of pre-senescent cellular phenotype. Consistent with this, vitiligo cells showed a significant increase in p16 that did not correlate with the chronological age of the donor. Moreover, vitiligo melanocytes produced many biologically active proteins among the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SAPS), such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), matrix metallo proteinase-3 (MMP3), cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 and 7 (IGFBP3, IGFBP7). Together, these data argue for a complicated pathophysiologic puzzle underlying melanocytes degeneration resembling, from the biological point of view, neurodegenerative diseases. Our results suggest new possible targets for intervention that in combination with current therapies could correct melanocytes intrinsic defects. PMID:23555779

  7. Health assessment of environmental pollutants; Proliferative and degenerative diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.O. )

    1987-01-01

    The health assessments of environmental air contaminants are at present frequently based upon probability of cancer, if this has been identified as a potential result of prolonged exposure to the particular inhalation hazard. However, for many airborne hazards chronic inhalation exposure may result in morbidity or mortality risks due to chronic degenerative diseases such as emphysema, fibrosis, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease that may be nearly as great or greater than those of more widely recognized neoplastic or proliferative disease. The relative hazards of environmentally released radioactive and chemical air contaminants, i.e., radon daughters and diesel engine exhaust, are discussed as examples.

  8. Clinical outcomes of two types of cages used in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases: n-HA/PA66 cages versus PEEK cages.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qian-xing; Ou, Yun-sheng; Zhu, Yong; Zhao, Zeng-hui; Liu, Bo; Huang, Qiu; Du, Xing; Jiang, Dian-ming

    2016-06-01

    This study reports the clinical effects of nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide66 cages (n-HA/PA66 cages) and compares the clinical outcomes between n-HA/PA66 and polyetheretherketone cages (PEEK cages) for application in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). A retrospective and case-control study involving 124 patients using n-HA/PA66 cages and 142 patients using PEEK cages was conducted. All patients underwent TLIF and had an average of 2-years of follow-up. The Oswestry Disability Index and Visual Analog Scale were selected to assess the pain of low back and leg, as well as neurological status. The intervertebral space height and segmental angle were also measured to estimate the radiological changes. At the 1-year and final follow-ups, the fusion and subsidence rates were evaluated. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding clinical and radiological results. At the final follow-up, the bony fusion rate was 92.45 and 91.57 % for the n-HA/PA66 and PEEK groups, respectively, and the subsidence rate was 7.55 and 8.99 %, respectively. The study indicated that both n-HA/PA66 and PEEK cages could promote effective clinical and radiographic outcomes when used to treat degenerative lumbar diseases. The high fusion and low subsidence rates revealed that n-HA/PA66 cages could be an alternative ideal choice as the same to PEEK cages for lumbar reconstruction after TLIF. PMID:27091044

  9. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods: short-term results in lumbar spine degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Colangeli, S; Barbanti Brodàno, G; Gasbarrini, A; Bandiera, S; Mesfin, A; Griffoni, C; Boriani, S

    2015-06-01

    Pedicle screw and rod instrumentation has become the preferred technique for performing stabilization and fusion in the surgical treatment of lumbar spine degenerative disease. Rigid fixation leads to high fusion rates but may also contribute to stress shielding and adjacent segment degeneration. Thus, the use of semirigid rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has been proposed. Although the PEEK rods biomechanical properties, such as anterior load sharing properties, have been shown, there are few clinical studies evaluating their application in the lumbar spine surgical treatment. This study examined a retrospective cohort of patients who underwent posterior lumbar fusion for degenerative disease using PEEK rods, in order to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes and the incidence of complications.

  10. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods: short-term results in lumbar spine degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Colangeli, S; Barbanti Brodàno, G; Gasbarrini, A; Bandiera, S; Mesfin, A; Griffoni, C; Boriani, S

    2015-06-01

    Pedicle screw and rod instrumentation has become the preferred technique for performing stabilization and fusion in the surgical treatment of lumbar spine degenerative disease. Rigid fixation leads to high fusion rates but may also contribute to stress shielding and adjacent segment degeneration. Thus, the use of semirigid rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has been proposed. Although the PEEK rods biomechanical properties, such as anterior load sharing properties, have been shown, there are few clinical studies evaluating their application in the lumbar spine surgical treatment. This study examined a retrospective cohort of patients who underwent posterior lumbar fusion for degenerative disease using PEEK rods, in order to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes and the incidence of complications. PMID:25751575

  11. Complement, a target for therapy in inflammatory and degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Morgan, B Paul; Harris, Claire L

    2015-12-01

    The complement system is a key innate immune defence against infection and an important driver of inflammation; however, these very properties can also cause harm. Inappropriate or uncontrolled activation of complement can cause local and/or systemic inflammation, tissue damage and disease. Complement provides numerous options for drug development as it is a proteolytic cascade that involves nine specific proteases, unique multimolecular activation and lytic complexes, an arsenal of natural inhibitors, and numerous receptors that bind to activation fragments. Drug design is facilitated by the increasingly detailed structural understanding of the molecules involved in the complement system. Only two anti-complement drugs are currently on the market, but many more are being developed for diseases that include infectious, inflammatory, degenerative, traumatic and neoplastic disorders. In this Review, we describe the history, current landscape and future directions for anti-complement therapies.

  12. Imaging of degenerative spine disease--the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Sasiadek, Marek J; Bladowska, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the current state of imaging of degenerative spinal disease (DSD), which is one of the most common disorders in humans. The most important definitions as well as short descriptions of the etiopathology and clinical presentation of DSD are provided first, followed by an overview of conventional and advanced imaging methods that are used in DSD. The authors then discuss in detail the imaging patterns of particular types of degenerative changes. Finally, the current imaging algorithm in DSD is presented. The imaging method of choice is magnetic resonance, including advanced techniques--especially diffusion tensor imaging. Other imaging methods (plain radiography, computed tomography, vascular studies, scintigraphy, positron emission tomography, discography) play a supplementary role ).

  13. Molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of degenerative aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Hakuno, Daihiko; Kimura, Naritaka; Yoshioka, Masatoyo; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    Morbidity from degenerative aortic valve disease is increasing worldwide, concomitant with the ageing of the general population and the habitual consumption of diets high in calories and cholesterol. Immunohistologic studies have suggested that the molecular mechanism occurring in the degenerate aortic valve resembles that of atherosclerosis, prompting the testing of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) for the prevention of progression of native and bioprosthetic aortic valve degeneration. However, the effects of these therapies remain controversial. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of aortic valve degeneration are largely unknown, research in this area is advancing rapidly. The signaling components involved in embryonic valvulogenesis, such as Wnt, TGF-beta(1), BMP, and Notch, are also involved in the onset of aortic valve degeneration. Furthermore, investigations into extracellular matrix remodeling, angiogenesis, and osteogenesis in the aortic valve have been reported. Having noted avascularity of normal cardiac valves, we recently identified chondromodulin-I (chm-I) as a crucial anti-angiogenic factor. The expression of chm-I is restricted to cardiac valves from late embryogenesis to adulthood in the mouse, rat, and human. In human degenerate atherosclerotic valves, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases and angiogenesis is observed in the area of chm-I downregulation. Gene targeting of chm-I resulted in VEGF expression, angiogenesis, and calcification in the aortic valves of aged mice, and aortic stenosis is detected by echocardiography, indicating that chm-I is a crucial factor for maintaining normal cardiac valvular function by preventing angiogenesis. The present review focuses on the animal models of aortic valve degeneration and recent studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of degenerative aortic valve disease. PMID:18766323

  14. Health assessment of environmental pollutants: proliferative and degenerative diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, B.O.

    1988-12-01

    In order to achieve a balanced approach to risk assessment between carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic health effects one must examine the risk of disease or death in the general population exposed to a particular air pollutant that can be related quantitatively to intensity and duration of exposures (National Academy of Sciences, 1983). Such risk assessment should be based upon careful evaluation of scientific findings of dose-response relationships in the chronically exposed population. Quantitative assessment of environmentally produced disease in man has proven to be complex and demanding. A variety of factors play important roles in this task. As an example, there are induction-latency periods for chronic diseases, including cancer, which may range from five to twenty-five years. The diseases themselves, whether proliferative or degenerative, may follow several stages of progression. There is only sparse epidemiological data on serious health effects that may be due to environmental as compared to occupational exposures. Exposures to chemical or radiological air contaminants do not occur singly but to a multiplicity of agents, and disease processes are frequently markedly affected by the interaction of a variety of factors, particularly that of cigarette smoking. There is growing recognition of potentially sensitive subpopulations, including the elderly and the very young, but adequate techniques for assessing the magnitude of increased risks to these groups have not yet been developed.

  15. Comparison of the Dynesys Dynamic Stabilization System and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Lumbar Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Shan, Jian-Lin; Liu, Xiu-Mei; Li, Fang; Guan, Kai; Sun, Tian-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been few studies comparing the clinical and radiographic outcomes between the Dynesys dynamic stabilization system and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The objective of this study is to compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of Dynesys and PLIF for lumbar degenerative disease. Methods Of 96 patients with lumbar degenerative disease included in this retrospectively analysis, 46 were treated with the Dynesys system and 50 underwent PLIF from July 2008 to March 2011. Clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated. We also evaluated the occurrence of radiographic and symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). Results The mean follow-up time in the Dynesys group was 53.6 ± 5.3 months, while that in the PLIF group was 55.2 ± 6.8 months. At the final follow-up, the Oswestry disability index and visual analogue scale score were significantly improved in both groups. The range of motion (ROM) of stabilized segments in Dynesys group decreased from 7.1 ± 2.2° to 4.9 ± 2.2° (P < 0.05), while that of in PLIF group decreased from 7.3 ± 2.3° to 0° (P < 0.05). The ROM of the upper segments increased significantly in both groups at the final follow-up, the ROM was higher in the PLIF group. There were significantly more radiographic ASDs in the PLIF group than in the Dynesys group. The incidence of complications was comparable between groups. Conclusions Both Dynesys and PLIF can improve the clinical outcomes for lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to PLIF, Dynesys stabilization partially preserves the ROM of the stabilized segments, limits hypermobility in the upper adjacent segment, and may prevent the occurrence of ASD. PMID:26824851

  16. Computer aided diagnosis of degenerative intervertebral disc diseases from lumbar MR images.

    PubMed

    Oktay, Ayse Betul; Albayrak, Nur Banu; Akgul, Yusuf Sinan

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the automated diagnosis of the degenerative intervertebral disc disease in midsagittal MR images. The approach is based on combining distinct disc features under a machine learning framework. The discs in the lumbar MR images are first localized and segmented. Then, intensity, shape, context, and texture features of the discs are extracted with various techniques. A Support Vector Machine classifier is applied to classify the discs as normal or degenerated. The method is tested and validated on a clinical lumbar spine dataset containing 102 subjects and the results are comparable to the state of the art.

  17. Evidence Report: Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects from Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana; Huff, Janice; Saha, Janapriya; Wang, Minli; Blattnig, Steve; Wu, Honglu; Cucinotta, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Occupational radiation exposure from the space environment may result in non-cancer or non-CNS degenerative tissue diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cataracts, and respiratory or digestive diseases. However, the magnitude of influence and mechanisms of action of radiation leading to these diseases are not well characterized. Radiation and synergistic effects of radiation cause DNA damage, persistent oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and accelerated tissue aging and degeneration, which may lead to acute or chronic disease of susceptible organ tissues. In particular, cardiovascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis are of major concern following gamma-ray exposure. This provides evidence for possible degenerative tissue effects following exposures to ionizing radiation in the form of the GCR or SPEs expected during long-duration spaceflight. However, the existence of low dose thresholds and dose-rate and radiation quality effects, as well as mechanisms and major risk pathways, are not well-characterized. Degenerative disease risks are difficult to assess because multiple factors, including radiation, are believed to play a role in the etiology of the diseases. As additional evidence is pointing to lower, space-relevant thresholds for these degenerative effects, particularly for cardiovascular disease, additional research with cell and animal studies is required to quantify the magnitude of this risk, understand mechanisms, and determine if additional protection strategies are required.The NASA PEL (Permissive Exposure Limit)s for cataract and cardiovascular risks are based on existing human epidemiology data. Although animal and clinical astronaut data show a significant increase in cataracts following exposure and a reassessment of atomic bomb (A-bomb) data suggests an increase in cardiovascular disease from radiation exposure, additional research is required to fully understand and quantify these adverse outcomes at lower doses (less than 0.5 gray

  18. Vertebral degenerative disc disease severity evaluation using random forest classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Hector E.; Yao, Jianhua; Burns, Joseph E.; Pham, Yasuyuki; Stieger, James; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) develops in the spine as vertebral discs degenerate and osseous excrescences or outgrowths naturally form to restabilize unstable segments of the spine. These osseous excrescences, or osteophytes, may progress or stabilize in size as the spine reaches a new equilibrium point. We have previously created a CAD system that detects DDD. This paper presents a new system to determine the severity of DDD of individual vertebral levels. This will be useful to monitor the progress of developing DDD, as rapid growth may indicate that there is a greater stabilization problem that should be addressed. The existing DDD CAD system extracts the spine from CT images and segments the cortical shell of individual levels with a dual-surface model. The cortical shell is unwrapped, and is analyzed to detect the hyperdense regions of DDD. Three radiologists scored the severity of DDD of each disc space of 46 CT scans. Radiologists' scores and features generated from CAD detections were used to train a random forest classifier. The classifier then assessed the severity of DDD at each vertebral disc level. The agreement between the computer severity score and the average radiologist's score had a quadratic weighted Cohen's kappa of 0.64.

  19. Dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disease: a clinical and radiological outcomes-based meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Chi Heon; Park, Sung-Bae; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Chung, Chun Kee; Kim, Hyun-Jib; Lee, Soo-Eon

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The Dynesys, a pedicle-based dynamic stabilization (PDS) system, was introduced to overcome the drawbacks of fusion procedures. Nevertheless, the theoretical advantages of PDS over fusion have not been clearly confirmed. The aim of this study was to compare clinical and radiological outcomes of patients who underwent PDS using the Dynesys system with those who underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). METHODS The authors searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Database. Studies that reported outcomes of patients who underwent PDS or PLIF for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disease were included. The primary efficacy end points were perioperative outcomes. The secondary efficacy end points were changes in the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and back and leg pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores and in range of motion (ROM) at the treated and adjacent segments. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate weighted mean differences (WMDs), 95% confidence intervals, Q statistics, and I(2) values. Forest plots were constructed for each analysis group. RESULTS Of the 274 retrieved articles, 7 (which involved 506 participants [Dynesys, 250; PLIF, 256]) met the inclusion criteria. The Dynesys group showed a competitive advantage in mean surgery duration (20.73 minutes, 95% CI 8.76-32.70 minutes), blood loss (81.87 ml, 95% CI 45.11-118.63 ml), and length of hospital stay (1.32 days, 95% CI 0.23-2.41 days). Both the Dynesys and PLIF groups experienced improved ODI and VAS scores after 2 years of follow-up. Regarding the ODI and VAS scores, no statistically significant difference was noted according to surgical procedure (ODI: WMD 0.12, 95% CI -3.48 to 3.72; back pain VAS score: WMD -0.15; 95% CI -0.56 to 0.26; leg pain VAS score: WMD -0.07; 95% CI -0.47 to 0.32). The mean ROM at the adjacent segment increased in both groups, and there was no substantial difference between them (WMD 1.13; 95% CI -0.33 to 2.59). Although the

  20. Dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disease: a clinical and radiological outcomes-based meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Chi Heon; Park, Sung-Bae; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Chung, Chun Kee; Kim, Hyun-Jib; Lee, Soo-Eon

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The Dynesys, a pedicle-based dynamic stabilization (PDS) system, was introduced to overcome the drawbacks of fusion procedures. Nevertheless, the theoretical advantages of PDS over fusion have not been clearly confirmed. The aim of this study was to compare clinical and radiological outcomes of patients who underwent PDS using the Dynesys system with those who underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). METHODS The authors searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Database. Studies that reported outcomes of patients who underwent PDS or PLIF for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disease were included. The primary efficacy end points were perioperative outcomes. The secondary efficacy end points were changes in the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and back and leg pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores and in range of motion (ROM) at the treated and adjacent segments. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate weighted mean differences (WMDs), 95% confidence intervals, Q statistics, and I(2) values. Forest plots were constructed for each analysis group. RESULTS Of the 274 retrieved articles, 7 (which involved 506 participants [Dynesys, 250; PLIF, 256]) met the inclusion criteria. The Dynesys group showed a competitive advantage in mean surgery duration (20.73 minutes, 95% CI 8.76-32.70 minutes), blood loss (81.87 ml, 95% CI 45.11-118.63 ml), and length of hospital stay (1.32 days, 95% CI 0.23-2.41 days). Both the Dynesys and PLIF groups experienced improved ODI and VAS scores after 2 years of follow-up. Regarding the ODI and VAS scores, no statistically significant difference was noted according to surgical procedure (ODI: WMD 0.12, 95% CI -3.48 to 3.72; back pain VAS score: WMD -0.15; 95% CI -0.56 to 0.26; leg pain VAS score: WMD -0.07; 95% CI -0.47 to 0.32). The mean ROM at the adjacent segment increased in both groups, and there was no substantial difference between them (WMD 1.13; 95% CI -0.33 to 2.59). Although the

  1. Outcomes observed during a 1-year clinical and radiographic follow-up of patients treated for 1- or 2-level cervical degenerative disease using a biodegradable anterior cervical plate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengcun; Yang, Shuhua; Yang, Cao; Xu, Weihua; Ye, Shunan; Wang, Jing; Feng, Yong; Yang, Wen; Liu, Xianzhe

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to present an initial surgical experience in the management of 1- or 2-level degenerative disc disease of the cervical spine using biodegradable anterior cervical plates (bACPs) in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The authors also aimed to provide insight into this critical and controversial clinical issue by clarifying outcomes for patients receiving bACPs and by comparing their outcomes with those achieved using a traditional metallic anterior cervical plate (mACP) implant. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted for 2 series of patients who had undergone ACDF using either bACP (31 patients, 38 segments) or mACP (47 patients, 57 segments) instrumentation. The patients were followed up for a mean 13.5 ± 0.9 months (range 12-18 months) in the bACP group and 14.8 ± 1.5 months (range 14-22 months) in the mACP group. Clinical outcomes were determined according to scores on the visual analog scale (VAS), the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scoring system, and Odom's criteria. Radiological images were used to assess fusion rates, intervertebral height, Cobb's angle, and the width of prevertebral soft tissue. RESULTS Both VAS and mJOA scores were significantly improved at each follow-up in both groups. Excellent or good results according to Odom's criteria were achieved in 93.5% (29/31) of patients in the bACP group and 93.6% (44/47) of patients in the mACP group. At 6 months postoperatively, the fusion rate was 94.7% (36/38) in the bACP group and 96.5% (55/57) in the mACP group, but subsidence of the intervertebral space at the surgical level was more evident in the bACP group. Angulation, as measured by Cobb's angle, demonstrated obvious healing in both groups, while better maintenance was observed in the mACP group. The local inflammatory reaction was uneventful during follow-up. Dysphonia and dysphagia were observed in both groups during the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The relatively comparable

  2. Outcomes observed during a 1-year clinical and radiographic follow-up of patients treated for 1- or 2-level cervical degenerative disease using a biodegradable anterior cervical plate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengcun; Yang, Shuhua; Yang, Cao; Xu, Weihua; Ye, Shunan; Wang, Jing; Feng, Yong; Yang, Wen; Liu, Xianzhe

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to present an initial surgical experience in the management of 1- or 2-level degenerative disc disease of the cervical spine using biodegradable anterior cervical plates (bACPs) in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The authors also aimed to provide insight into this critical and controversial clinical issue by clarifying outcomes for patients receiving bACPs and by comparing their outcomes with those achieved using a traditional metallic anterior cervical plate (mACP) implant. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted for 2 series of patients who had undergone ACDF using either bACP (31 patients, 38 segments) or mACP (47 patients, 57 segments) instrumentation. The patients were followed up for a mean 13.5 ± 0.9 months (range 12-18 months) in the bACP group and 14.8 ± 1.5 months (range 14-22 months) in the mACP group. Clinical outcomes were determined according to scores on the visual analog scale (VAS), the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scoring system, and Odom's criteria. Radiological images were used to assess fusion rates, intervertebral height, Cobb's angle, and the width of prevertebral soft tissue. RESULTS Both VAS and mJOA scores were significantly improved at each follow-up in both groups. Excellent or good results according to Odom's criteria were achieved in 93.5% (29/31) of patients in the bACP group and 93.6% (44/47) of patients in the mACP group. At 6 months postoperatively, the fusion rate was 94.7% (36/38) in the bACP group and 96.5% (55/57) in the mACP group, but subsidence of the intervertebral space at the surgical level was more evident in the bACP group. Angulation, as measured by Cobb's angle, demonstrated obvious healing in both groups, while better maintenance was observed in the mACP group. The local inflammatory reaction was uneventful during follow-up. Dysphonia and dysphagia were observed in both groups during the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The relatively comparable

  3. Novel Strategies for the Improvement of Stem Cells' Transplantation in Degenerative Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nicoară, Simona Delia; Șușman, Sergiu; Tudoran, Oana; Bărbos, Otilia; Cherecheș, Gabriela; Aștilean, Simion; Potara, Monica; Sorițău, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no cure for the permanent vision loss caused by degenerative retinal diseases. One of the novel therapeutic strategies aims at the development of stem cells (SCs) based neuroprotective and regenerative medicine. The main sources of SCs for the treatment of retinal diseases are the embryo, the bone marrow, the region of neuronal genesis, and the eye. The success of transplantation depends on the origin of cells, the route of administration, the local microenvironment, and the proper combinative formula of growth factors. The feasibility of SCs based therapies for degenerative retinal diseases was proved in the preclinical setting. However, their translation into the clinical realm is limited by various factors: the immunogenicity of the cells, the stability of the cell phenotype, the predilection of SCs to form tumors in situ, the abnormality of the microenvironment, and the association of a synaptic rewiring. To improve SCs based therapies, nanotechnology offers a smart delivery system for biomolecules, such as growth factors for SCs implantation and differentiation into retinal progenitors. This review explores the main advances in the field of retinal transplantology and applications of nanotechnology in the treatment of retinal diseases, discusses the challenges, and suggests new therapeutic approaches in retinal transplantation. PMID:27293444

  4. Analysis of Cervical Sagittal Balance Parameters in MRIs of Patients with Disc-Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao-Lin; Xiao, Jian-Lin; Mou, Jian-Hui; Qin, Ting-Zheng; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the correlations between the different parameters of the cervical sagittal balance in magnetic resonance images (MRI) and evaluate the criteria for their clinical application in disc-degenerative diseases. Material/Methods We conducted a retrospective review of the MRIs of 125 adult outpatients with disc-degenerative diseases of the cervical spine; the images were obtained between May and July 2014 at our institute. The control group comprised 50 volunteers whose MRIs were also obtained. The parameters measured in the MRIs were: neck tilt (NT), T1 slope (T1S), thoracic inlet angle (TIA), and Cobb’s angle (C2–7). The correlation between the various parameters was analyzed using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Results The outpatients group showed moderate correlation between TIA and T1S, a significant correlation between TIA and NT, a weak correlation between T1S and Cobb’s angle, and a weakly negative correlation between T1S and NT. Further, the TIA showed no significant difference between the outpatient group and the control group, as per the sample t test. Conclusions Our findings indicate that TIA, T1S, and NT could be used as indices for the evaluation of cervical sagittal balance and that the TIA could be used as a reference to assess the cervical compensation. Restoration of the NT and T1S should be considered as a goal of surgical treatment during the preoperative planning in patients with disc-degenerative diseases. PMID:26486162

  5. Generalized Degenerative Joint Disease in Osteoprotegerin (Opg) Null Mutant Mice.

    PubMed

    Bolon, B; Grisanti, M; Villasenor, K; Morony, S; Feige, U; Simonet, W S

    2015-09-01

    Bone structure is modulated by the interaction between receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) and RANK ligand (RANKL). Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for RANKL, modifies osteoclast-mediated bone resorption directly and spares articular cartilage indirectly in rodents with immune-mediated arthritis by preventing subchondral bone destruction. The OPG/RANKL balance also seems to be critical in maintaining joint integrity in osteoarthritis, a condition featuring articular bone and cartilage damage in the absence of profound inflammation. The current study explored the role of OPG in sparing articular cartilage by evaluating joint lesions in adult C57BL/6J mice lacking osteoprotegerin (Opg (-) (/-)). At 3, 5, 7, 9, and 12 months of age, both sexes of Opg (-) (/-) mice developed severe degenerative joint disease (DJD) characterized by progressive loss of cartilage matrix and eventually articular cartilage. Lesions developed earlier and more severely in Opg (-) (/-) mice relative to age-matched, wild-type (Opg (+) (/+)), or heterozygous (Opg (+) (/-)) littermates (P ≤ .05). The femorotibial joint was affected bilaterally at 3 months, while other key weight-bearing diarthrodial joints (eg, coxofemoral, scapulohumeral, humeroradioulnar) were affected later and unilaterally. Cortical bone in subchondral plates and long bone diaphyses of Opg (-) (/-) mice but not Opg (+/+) or Opg (+) (/-) animals was osteoporotic by 3 months of age (P ≤ .05); the extent of porosity was less than the degree of DJD. Closure of the physes in long bones (P ≤ .05) and cartilage retention in the femoral primary spongiosa (P ≤ .05) affected chiefly Opg (-) (/-) mice. These data suggest that OPG plays an essential direct role in maintaining cartilage integrity in the articular surfaces and physes.

  6. The Impact of Obesity on Perioperative Resource Utilization after Elective Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease.

    PubMed

    Planchard, Ryan F; Higgins, Dominique M; Mallory, Grant W; Puffer, Ross C; Jacob, Jeffrey T; Curry, Timothy B; Kor, Daryl J; Clarke, Michelle J

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective To determine the effect of obesity on the resource utilization and cost in 3270 consecutive patients undergoing elective noninstrumented decompressive surgeries for degenerative spine disease at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 2005 and 2012. Methods Groups were assessed for baseline differences (age, gender, and American Society of Anesthesiologists [ASA] classification, procedure type, and number of operative levels). Outcome variables included the transfusion requirements during surgery, the total anesthesia and surgical times, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, standardized costs, as well as the ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS). Regression analysis was used to evaluate for strength of association between obesity and outcome variables. Results Baseline differences between the groups (nonobese: n = 1,853; obese: n = 1,417) were found with respect to age, ASA class, gender, procedure type, and number of operative levels. After correcting for differences, we found significant associations between obesity and surgical (p < 0.0001) and anesthesia times (p < 0.0001) and hospital LOS (p < 0.0001). Additionally, ICU admission rates (p = 0.02) and requirement for postoperative ventilation (p = 0.048) were significantly higher in obese patients. Finally, mean difference in total cost ($1,632, p < 0.0001) was significantly higher for the obese cohort. Conclusion Obesity is associated with increased resource utilization and cost in patients undergoing a noninstrumented decompressive surgery for degenerative spine disease.

  7. Echocardiographic Follow-up of Robotic Mitral Valve Repair for Mitral Regurgitation due to Degenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao; Gao, Chang-Qing; Shen, Yan-Song; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mitral valve (MV) repair can now be carried out through small incisions with the use of robotic assistance. Previous reports have demonstrated the excellent clinical result of robotic MV repair for degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR). However, there has been limited information regarding the echocardiographic follow-up of these patients. The present study was therefore to evaluate the echocardiographic follow-up outcomes after robotic MV repair in patients with MR due to degenerative disease of the MV. Methods: A retrospective analysis was undertaken using data from the echocardiographic database of our department. Between March 2007 and February 2015, 84 patients with degenerative MR underwent robotic MV repair. The repair techniques included leaflet resection in 67 patients (79.8%), artificial chordae in 20 (23.8%), and ring annuloplasty in 79 (94.1%). Eighty-one (96.4%) of the 84 patients were eligible for echocardiographic follow-up assessment, and no patients were lost to follow-up. Results: At a median echocardiographic follow-up of 36.0 months (interquartile range 14.3–59.4 months), four patients (4.9%) developed recurrent mild MR, and no patients had more than mild MR. Mean MR grade, left atrial diameter (LAD), left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD), and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were significantly decreased when compared with preoperative values. Mean MR grade decreased from 3.96 ± 0.13 to 0.17 ± 0.49 (Z = −8.456, P < 0.001), LAD from 43.8 ± 5.9 to 35.5 ± 3.8 mm (t = 15.131, P < 0.001), LVEDD from 51.0 ± 5.0 to 43.3 ± 2.2 mm (t = 14.481, P < 0.001), and LVEF from 67.3 ± 7.0% to 63.9 ± 5.1% (t = 4.585, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Robotic MV repair for MR due to degenerative disease is associated with a low rate of recurrent MR, and a significant improvement in MR grade, LAD, and LVEDD, but a significant decrease in LVEF at echocardiographic follow-up. PMID:27625092

  8. Detection of degenerative disease of the temporomandibular joint by bone scintigraphy: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Bloom, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    Nine patients with facial pain were evaluated with limited bone scans. The scintigrams correlated with microscopy in all patients, although radiographs correlated with microscopy in only five patients. The degenerative disease process in the temporomandibular joint was more extensive in the patients with radiographic and scintigraphic abnormalities than in those with scintigraphic abnormalities alone. The limited bone scan appears useful in detecting early degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint.

  9. Restoration of synaptic function in sight for degenerative retinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Timm; Wissinger, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic disorganization is a prominent feature of many neurological diseases of the CNS, including Parkinson’s disease, intellectual development disorders, and autism. Although synaptic plasticity is critical for learning and memory, it is unclear whether this innate property helps restore synaptic function in disease once the primary cause of disease is abrogated. An answer to this question may come from a recent investigation in X-linked retinoschisis, a currently untreatable retinopathy. In this issue of the JCI, Ou, Vijayasarathy, and colleagues showed progressive disorganization of key functional elements of the synapse between photoreceptors and ON-bipolar cells in a retinoschisin-deficient mouse model. Moreover, they demonstrated that adeno-associated virus–mediated (AAV-mediated) delivery of the retinoschisin gene restores structure and function to the photoreceptor to ON–bipolar cell synapse in mouse models, even in adults at advanced stages of the disease. The results of this study hold promise that AAV-based supplemental gene therapy will benefit patients with X-linked retinoschisis in a forthcoming clinical trial. PMID:26098210

  10. Management of degenerative lumbosacral disease in cats by dorsal laminectomy and lumbosacral stabilization.

    PubMed

    Danielski, A; Bertran, J; Fitzpatrick, N

    2013-01-01

    In this case series we describe the diagnosis and surgical treatment of five cats affected by clinical cauda equina syndrome as a result of degenerative lumbosacral stenosis. Radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings confirmed the suspected diagnosis of disc-associated lumbosacral disease. Cauda equina decompression was achieved by dorsal laminectomy followed by dorsal annulectomy and nuclear extirpation. Dorsal stabilization was achieved using miniature positive-profile pins inserted into the vertebral body of L7 and the wings of S1 with the free ends of the pins being embedded in a bolus of gentamicin-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate. Reassessment two years postoperatively using a previously validated feline specific owner questionnaire indicated satisfactory outcome with complete return to normal activity and resolution of signs of pain in all cases.

  11. Novel Insights into Acid-Sensing Ion Channels: Implications for Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ren-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Shan; Wang, Zhi-Sen; Xie, Ya-Ya; Ge, Jin-Fang; Chen, Fei-Hu

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative diseases often strike older adults and are characterized by progressive deterioration of cells, eventually leading to tissue and organ degeneration for which limited effective treatment options are currently available. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), a family of extracellular H+-activated ligand-gated ion channels, play critical roles in physiological and pathological conditions. Aberrant activation of ASICs is reported to regulate cell apoptosis, differentiation and autophagy. Accumulating evidence has highlighted a dramatic increase and activation of ASICs in degenerative disorders, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, intervertebral disc degeneration and arthritis. In this review, we have comprehensively discussed the critical roles of ASICs and their potential utility as therapeutic targets in degenerative diseases. PMID:27493834

  12. Novel Insights into Acid-Sensing Ion Channels: Implications for Degenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ren-Peng; Wu, Xiao-Shan; Wang, Zhi-Sen; Xie, Ya-Ya; Ge, Jin-Fang; Chen, Fei-Hu

    2016-08-01

    Degenerative diseases often strike older adults and are characterized by progressive deterioration of cells, eventually leading to tissue and organ degeneration for which limited effective treatment options are currently available. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), a family of extracellular H(+)-activated ligand-gated ion channels, play critical roles in physiological and pathological conditions. Aberrant activation of ASICs is reported to regulate cell apoptosis, differentiation and autophagy. Accumulating evidence has highlighted a dramatic increase and activation of ASICs in degenerative disorders, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, intervertebral disc degeneration and arthritis. In this review, we have comprehensively discussed the critical roles of ASICs and their potential utility as therapeutic targets in degenerative diseases. PMID:27493834

  13. Controversies about Interspinous Process Devices in the Treatment of Degenerative Lumbar Spine Diseases: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Galarza, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    A large number of interspinous process devices (IPD) have been recently introduced to the lumbar spine market as an alternative to conventional decompressive surgery in managing symptomatic lumbar spinal pathology, especially in the older population. Despite the fact that they are composed of a wide range of different materials including titanium, polyetheretherketone, and elastomeric compounds, the aim of these devices is to unload spine, restoring foraminal height, and stabilize the spine by distracting the spinous processes. Although the initial reports represented the IPD as a safe, effective, and minimally invasive surgical alternative for relief of neurological symptoms in patients with low back degenerative diseases, recent studies have demonstrated less impressive clinical results and higher rate of failure than initially reported. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview on interspinous implants, their mechanisms of action, safety, cost, and effectiveness in the treatment of lumbar stenosis and degenerative disc diseases. PMID:24822224

  14. Controversies about interspinous process devices in the treatment of degenerative lumbar spine diseases: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Galarza, Marcelo; Alfieri, Alex

    2014-01-01

    A large number of interspinous process devices (IPD) have been recently introduced to the lumbar spine market as an alternative to conventional decompressive surgery in managing symptomatic lumbar spinal pathology, especially in the older population. Despite the fact that they are composed of a wide range of different materials including titanium, polyetheretherketone, and elastomeric compounds, the aim of these devices is to unload spine, restoring foraminal height, and stabilize the spine by distracting the spinous processes. Although the initial reports represented the IPD as a safe, effective, and minimally invasive surgical alternative for relief of neurological symptoms in patients with low back degenerative diseases, recent studies have demonstrated less impressive clinical results and higher rate of failure than initially reported. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview on interspinous implants, their mechanisms of action, safety, cost, and effectiveness in the treatment of lumbar stenosis and degenerative disc diseases.

  15. Intervertebral Fusion with Mobile Microendoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bao-Shan; Liu, Yue; Xu, Hai-Wei; Yang, Qiang; Ma, Xin-Long; Hu, Yong-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a technique for lumbar intervertebral fusion that incorporates mobile microendoscopic discectomy (MMED) for lumbar degenerative disc disease. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion is frequently performed to treat degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine; however, the scope of such surgery and vision is limited by what the naked eye can see through the expanding channel system. To expand the visual scope and reduce trauma, we perform lumbar intervertebral fusion with the aid of a MMED system that provides a wide field through freely tilting the surgical instrument and canals. We believe that this technique is a good option for treating lumbar degenerative disc disease that requires lumbar intervertebral fusion. PMID:27384734

  16. Intervertebral Fusion with Mobile Microendoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bao-Shan; Liu, Yue; Xu, Hai-Wei; Yang, Qiang; Ma, Xin-Long; Hu, Yong-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a technique for lumbar intervertebral fusion that incorporates mobile microendoscopic discectomy (MMED) for lumbar degenerative disc disease. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion is frequently performed to treat degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine; however, the scope of such surgery and vision is limited by what the naked eye can see through the expanding channel system. To expand the visual scope and reduce trauma, we perform lumbar intervertebral fusion with the aid of a MMED system that provides a wide field through freely tilting the surgical instrument and canals. We believe that this technique is a good option for treating lumbar degenerative disc disease that requires lumbar intervertebral fusion.

  17. Pluripotent Stem Cells for Gene Therapy of Degenerative Muscle Diseases.

    PubMed

    Loperfido, Mariana; Steele-Stallard, Heather B; Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; VandenDriessche, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent a unique source for cell-based therapies and regenerative medicine. The intrinsic features of these cells such as their easy accessibility and their capacity to be expanded indefinitely overcome some limitations of conventional adult stem cells. Furthermore, the possibility to derive patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells in combination with the current development of gene modification methods could be used for autologous cell therapies of some genetic diseases. In particular, muscular dystrophies are considered to be a good candidate due to the lack of efficacious therapeutic treatments for patients to date, and in view of the encouraging results arising from recent preclinical studies. Some hurdles, including possible genetic instability and their efficient differentiation into muscle progenitors through vector/transgene-free methods have still to be overcome or need further optimization. Additionally, engraftment and functional contribution to muscle regeneration in pre-clinical models need to be carefully assessed before clinical translation. This review offers a summary of the advanced methods recently developed to derive muscle progenitors from pluripotent stem cells, as well as gene therapy by gene addition and gene editing methods using ZFNs, TALENs or CRISPR/Cas9. We have also discussed the main issues that need to be addressed for successful clinical translation of genetically corrected patient-specific pluripotent stem cells in autologous transplantation trials for skeletal muscle disorders.

  18. Association between nutritional status and Modic classification in degenerative disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Seyithanoglu, Hakan; Aydin, Teoman; Taşpınar, Ozgur; Camli, Adil; Kiziltan, Huriye; Eris, Ali Hikmet; Hocaoglu, Ilknur Turk; Ozder, Aclan; Denizli, Ebru; Kepekci, Muge; Keskin, Yasar; Mutluer, Ahmet Serdar

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to examine the association between Modic classification and the eating habits in patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD) and to determine the influence of nutrition on disease severity. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients with DDD visiting a low back pain outpatient clinic were enrolled. Through face-to-face interviews, they completed questionnaires regarding their demographics, disease activity, smoking and alcohol use, concomitant diseases, disease duration, and nutritional status.Exclusion criteria were age <20 years or >65 years, other comorbidities, missing MRI data, and inability to speak Turkish. [Results] Forty patients were finally included in the study. The frequency with which they consumed water, salt, fast food, eggs, milk, yogurt, cheese, whole wheat bread, white bread, butter, and margarine was recorded. A weak negative correlation was observed between the Modic types and fish and egg consumption. [Conclusion] Modic changes, which indicate the severity of DDD, seem to be correlated to patients’ dietary habits. However, studies with comparison groups and larger samples are needed to confirm our promising results before any cause-and-effect relationship can be proposed. PMID:27190462

  19. Association between nutritional status and Modic classification in degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Seyithanoglu, Hakan; Aydin, Teoman; Taşpınar, Ozgur; Camli, Adil; Kiziltan, Huriye; Eris, Ali Hikmet; Hocaoglu, Ilknur Turk; Ozder, Aclan; Denizli, Ebru; Kepekci, Muge; Keskin, Yasar; Mutluer, Ahmet Serdar

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to examine the association between Modic classification and the eating habits in patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD) and to determine the influence of nutrition on disease severity. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients with DDD visiting a low back pain outpatient clinic were enrolled. Through face-to-face interviews, they completed questionnaires regarding their demographics, disease activity, smoking and alcohol use, concomitant diseases, disease duration, and nutritional status.Exclusion criteria were age <20 years or >65 years, other comorbidities, missing MRI data, and inability to speak Turkish. [Results] Forty patients were finally included in the study. The frequency with which they consumed water, salt, fast food, eggs, milk, yogurt, cheese, whole wheat bread, white bread, butter, and margarine was recorded. A weak negative correlation was observed between the Modic types and fish and egg consumption. [Conclusion] Modic changes, which indicate the severity of DDD, seem to be correlated to patients' dietary habits. However, studies with comparison groups and larger samples are needed to confirm our promising results before any cause-and-effect relationship can be proposed. PMID:27190462

  20. Predictive diagnostics and personalized medicine for the prevention of chronic degenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Progressive increase of mean age and life expectancy in both industrialized and emerging societies parallels an increment of chronic degenerative diseases (CDD) such as cancer, cardiovascular, autoimmune or neurodegenerative diseases among the elderly. CDD are of complex diagnosis, difficult to treat and absorbing an increasing proportion in the health care budgets worldwide. However, recent development in modern medicine especially in genetics, proteomics, and informatics is leading to the discovery of biomarkers associated with different CDD that can be used as indicator of disease’s risk in healthy subjects. Therefore, predictive medicine is merging and medical doctors may for the first time anticipate the deleterious effect of CDD and use markers to identify persons with high risk of developing a given CDD before the clinical manifestation of the diseases. This innovative approach may offer substantial advantages, since the promise of personalized medicine is to preserve individual health in people with high risk by starting early treatment or prevention protocols. The pathway is now open, however the road to an effective personalized medicine is still long, several (diagnostic) predictive instruments for different CDD are under development, some ethical issues have to be solved. Operative proposals for the heath care systems are now needed to verify potential benefits of predictive medicine in the clinical practice. In fact, predictive diagnostics, personalized medicine and personalized therapy have the potential of changing classical approaches of modern medicine to CDD. PMID:21172060

  1. Vitamin A derivatives as treatment options for retinal degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Tadao

    2013-07-12

    The visual cycle is a sequential enzymatic reaction for vitamin A, all-trans-retinol, occurring in the outer layer of the human retina and is essential for the maintenance of vision. The central source of retinol is derived from dietary intake of both retinol and pro-vitamin A carotenoids. A series of enzymatic reactions, located in both the photoreceptor outer segment and the retinal pigment epithelium, transform retinol into the visual chromophore 11-cis-retinal, regenerating visual pigments. Retina specific proteins carry out the majority of the visual cycle, and any significant interruption in this sequence of reactions is capable of causing varying degrees of blindness. Among these important proteins are Lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) and retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65-kDa protein (RPE65) known to be responsible for esterification of retinol to all-trans-retinyl esters and isomerization of these esters to 11-cis-retinal, respectively. Deleterious mutations in these genes are identified in human retinal diseases that cause blindness, such as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Herein, we discuss the pathology of 11-cis-retinal deficiency caused by these mutations in both animal disease models and human patients. We also review novel therapeutic strategies employing artificial visual chromophore 9-cis-retinoids which have been employed in clinical trials involving LCA patients.

  2. Vitamin A Derivatives as Treatment Options for Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Perusek, Lindsay; Maeda, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    The visual cycle is a sequential enzymatic reaction for vitamin A, all-trans-retinol, occurring in the outer layer of the human retina and is essential for the maintenance of vision. The central source of retinol is derived from dietary intake of both retinol and pro-vitamin A carotenoids. A series of enzymatic reactions, located in both the photoreceptor outer segment and the retinal pigment epithelium, transform retinol into the visual chromophore 11-cis-retinal, regenerating visual pigments. Retina specific proteins carry out the majority of the visual cycle, and any significant interruption in this sequence of reactions is capable of causing varying degrees of blindness. Among these important proteins are Lecithin:retinol acyltransferase (LRAT) and retinal pigment epithelium-specific 65-kDa protein (RPE65) known to be responsible for esterification of retinol to all-trans-retinyl esters and isomerization of these esters to 11-cis-retinal, respectively. Deleterious mutations in these genes are identified in human retinal diseases that cause blindness, such as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Herein, we discuss the pathology of 11-cis-retinal deficiency caused by these mutations in both animal disease models and human patients. We also review novel therapeutic strategies employing artificial visual chromophore 9-cis-retinoids which have been employed in clinical trials involving LCA patients. PMID:23857173

  3. Treatment of multilevel degenerative disc disease with intradiscal electrothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Malik, K

    2007-04-01

    Intradiscal electrothermal therapy is a frequently performed procedure for the pain of internal disc disruption. It is typically performed on one to two discs; the discal treatment is followed by a long period of rest and rehabilitation. In patients with multilevel disc disease, intradiscal electrothermal therapy is either not contemplated or only one to two discs are treated at a time. This approach therefore either denies these patients the potential benefits of intradiscal electrothermal therapy or significantly prolongs the period of pain and disability. A 25-year-old female patient presented with internal disc disruption at four lumbar disc levels, diagnosed by provocative discography and post discography CT scan. All these discs were treated simultaneously by intradiscal electrothermal therapy. The patient tolerated the procedure well and responded favourably with significant and prolonged decrease in her symptoms. She reported sustained reduction in her pain and showed no clinical evidence of early neurological or infectious complications during 18 months of follow-up. This report indicates that intradiscal electrothermal therapy can be performed at multiple levels at a single sitting, compared to intradiscal electrothermal therapy performed at one to two discs at a time, this approach may obviate the need for surgery and may reduce the duration of pain and disability incurred. However, the influence of multilevel intradiscal electrothermal therapy on long-term complications or outcome is not known. PMID:17444324

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of degenerative joint disease in a captive male chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Videan, Elaine N; Lammey, Michael L; Lee, D Rick

    2011-03-01

    Degenerative joint disease (DJD), also known as osteoarthritis, has been well documented in aging populations of captive and free-ranging macaques; however, successful treatments for DJD in nonhuman primates have not been published. Published data on chimpanzees show little to no DJD present in the wild, and there are no published reports of DJD in captive chimpanzees. We report here the first documented case of DJD of both the right and left femorotibial joints in a captive male chimpanzee. Progression from minimal to moderate to severe osteoarthritis occurred in this animal over the course of 1 y. Treatment with chondroprotective supplements (that is, glucosamine chondroitin, polysulfated glycosaminoglycan) and intraarticular corticosteroid injections (that is, methylprednisolone, ketorolac), together with pain management (that is, celecoxib, tramadol, carprofen), resulted in increased activity levels and decreased clinical signs of disease. DJD has a considerable negative effect on quality of life among the human geriatric population and therefore is likely to be one of the most significant diseases that will affect the increasingly aged captive chimpanzee population. As this case study demonstrates, appropriate treatment can improve and extend quality of life dramatically in these animals. However, in cases of severe osteoarthritis cases, medication alone may be insufficient to increase stability, and surgical options should be explored. PMID:21439223

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Degenerative Joint Disease in a Captive Male Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Videan, Elaine N; Lammey, Michael L; Lee, D Rick

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative joint disease (DJD), also known as osteoarthritis, has been well documented in aging populations of captive and free-ranging macaques; however, successful treatments for DJD in nonhuman primates have not been published. Published data on chimpanzees show little to no DJD present in the wild, and there are no published reports of DJD in captive chimpanzees. We report here the first documented case of DJD of both the right and left femorotibial joints in a captive male chimpanzee. Progression from minimal to moderate to severe osteoarthritis occurred in this animal over the course of 1 y. Treatment with chondroprotective supplements (that is, glucosamine chondroitin, polysulfated glycosaminoglycan) and intraarticular corticosteroid injections (that is, methylprednisolone, ketorolac), together with pain management (that is, celecoxib, tramadol, carprofen), resulted in increased activity levels and decreased clinical signs of disease. DJD has a considerable negative effect on quality of life among the human geriatric population and therefore is likely to be one of the most significant diseases that will affect the increasingly aged captive chimpanzee population. As this case study demonstrates, appropriate treatment can improve and extend quality of life dramatically in these animals. However, in cases of severe osteoarthritis cases, medication alone may be insufficient to increase stability, and surgical options should be explored. PMID:21439223

  6. The clinical potential of influencing Nrf2 signaling in degenerative and immunological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Bifeng; Doan, An; Hybertson, Brooks M

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2; encoded in humans by the NFE2L2 gene) is a transcription factor that regulates the gene expression of a wide variety of cytoprotective phase II detoxification and antioxidant enzymes through a promoter sequence known as the antioxidant-responsive element (ARE). The ARE is a promoter element found in many cytoprotective genes; therefore, Nrf2 plays a pivotal role in the ARE-driven cellular defense system against environmental stresses. Agents that target the ARE/Nrf2 pathway have been tested in a wide variety of disorders, with at least one new Nrf2-activating drug now approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Examination of in vitro and in vivo experimental results, and taking into account recent human clinical trial results, has led to an opinion that Nrf2-activating strategies – which can include drugs, foods, dietary supplements, and exercise – are likely best targeted at disease prevention, disease recurrence prevention, or slowing of disease progression in early stage illnesses; they may also be useful as an interventional strategy. However, this rubric may be viewed even more conservatively in the pathophysiology of cancer. The activation of the Nrf2 pathway has been widely accepted as offering chemoprevention benefit, but it may be unhelpful or even harmful in the setting of established cancers. For example, Nrf2 activation might interfere with chemotherapies or radiotherapies or otherwise give tumor cells additional growth and survival advantages, unless they already possess mutations that fully activate their Nrf2 pathway constitutively. With all this in mind, the ARE/Nrf2 pathway remains of great interest as a possible target for the pharmacological control of degenerative and immunological diseases, both by activation and by inhibition, and its regulation remains a promising biological target for the development of new therapies. PMID:24520207

  7. The role of stem cell therapies in degenerative lumbar spine disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Oehme, David; Goldschlager, Tony; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Ghosh, Peter; Jenkin, Graham

    2015-07-01

    Degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine are extremely common. Ninety percent of people over the age of 60 years have degenerative change on imaging; however, only a small minority of people will require spine surgery (Hicks et al. Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 34(12):1301-1306, 2009). This minority, however, constitutes a core element of spinal surgery practice. Whilst the patient outcomes from spinal surgeries have improved in recent years, some patients will remain with pain and disability despite technically successful surgery. Advances in regenerative medicine and stem cell therapies, particularly the use of mesenchymal stem cells and allogeneic mesenchymal precursor cells, have led to numerous clinical trials utilising these cell-based therapies to treat degenerative spinal conditions. Through cartilage formation and disc regeneration, fusion enhancement or via modification of pain pathways, stem cells are well suited to enhance spinal surgery practice. This review will focus on the outcomes of lumbar spinal procedures and the role of stem cells in the treatment of degenerative lumbar conditions to enhance clinical practice. The current status of clinical trials utilising stem cell therapies will be discussed, providing clinicians with an overview of the various cell-based treatments likely to be available to patients in the near future.

  8. Efficacy of a Human Amniotic Tissue-derived Allograft, NuCel, in Patients Undergoing Posteriolateral Lumbar Fusions for Degenerative Disc Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-13

    Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease; Spinal Stenosis; Spondylolisthesis; Spondylosis; Intervertebral Disk Displacement; Intervertebral Disk Degeneration; Spinal Diseases; Bone Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Spondylolysis

  9. National trends in outpatient surgical treatment of degenerative cervical spine disease.

    PubMed

    Baird, Evan O; Egorova, Natalia N; McAnany, Steven J; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Hecht, Andrew C; Cho, Samuel K

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Retrospective population-based observational study. Objective To assess the growth of cervical spine surgery performed in an outpatient setting. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using the United States Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's State Inpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Databases for California, New York, Florida, and Maryland from 2005 to 2009. Current Procedural Terminology, fourth revision (CPT-4) and International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify operations for degenerative cervical spine diseases in adults (age > 20 years). Disposition and complication rates were examined. Results There was an increase in cervical spine surgeries performed in an ambulatory setting during the study period. Anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion accounted for 68% of outpatient procedures; posterior decompression made up 21%. Younger patients predominantly underwent anterior fusion procedures, and patients in the eighth and ninth decades of life had more posterior decompressions. Charlson comorbidity index and complication rates were substantially lower for ambulatory cases when compared with inpatients. The majority (>99%) of patients were discharged home following ambulatory surgery. Conclusions Recently, the number of cervical spine surgeries has increased in general, and more of these procedures are being performed in an ambulatory setting. The majority (>99%) of patients are discharged home but the nature of analyzing administrative data limits accurate assessment of postoperative complications and thus patient safety. This increase in outpatient cervical spine surgery necessitates further discussion of its safety.

  10. Role of Diffusion Tensor MR Imaging in Degenerative Cervical Spine Disease: a Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Banaszek, A; Bladowska, J; Podgórski, P; Sąsiadek, M J

    2016-09-01

    In the article we review the current role of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a modern magnetic resonance (MR) technique, in the diagnosis and the management of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), the most serious complication of degenerative cervical spine disease (DCSD). The pathogenesis of DCSD is presented first with an emphasis placed on the pathological processes leading to myelopathy development. An understanding of the pathophysiological background of DCSD is necessary for appropriate interpretation of MR images, both plain and DTI. Conventional MRI is currently the imaging modality of choice in DCSD and provides useful information concerning the extent of spondylotic changes and degree of central spinal canal stenosis; however its capability in myelopathy detection is limited. DTI is a state of the art imaging method which recently has emerged in spinal cord investigations and has the potential to detect microscopic alterations which are beyond the capability of plain MRI. In the article we present the physical principles underlying DTI which determine its sensitivity, followed by an overview of technical aspects of DTI acquisition with a special consideration of spinal cord imaging. Finally, the scientific reports concerning DTI utility in DSCD are also reviewed. DTI detects spinal cord injury in the course of DCSD earlier than any other method and could be useful in predicting surgical outcomes in CMS patients, however technical and methodology improvement as well as standardization of acquisition protocols and postprocessing methods among the imaging centers are needed before its implementation in clinical practice.

  11. [Childhood feeding, chronic-degenerative disease in adults, and nutrigenomics].

    PubMed

    Caramia, G

    2007-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in understanding the relation between dietary factors and disease prevention. However, the identification of those who will or will not benefit from dietary intervention strategies remains a major obstacle. The execution of the Human Genome Project has brought forth a wealth of information about the structure of the genome and the spectacular development of broad genomics technologies have catalyzed a new era in both medicine and nutrition. Each person is genetically unique and phenotypically distinct, and the genetic makeup that individuals inherit from their ancestors is responsible for variation in responses to food. Evidence continues to implicate dietary components and genetic susceptibilities as important determinants of chronic diseases, cancer risk and tumor behavior. Variation in incidence among and within populations with similar dietary patterns suggests that an individual's response may reflect interactions with genetic factors, which may modify gene, protein, and metabolite expression patterns. Nutrigenetics studies the genetic basis of the different individual responses to the same nutritional stimulus and Nutrigenomics is defined as the interaction between nutrition and an individual's genome. With the application of "omic" technologies, proteomic, metabolomic, transcriptomic, will increase our fundamental knowledge of the interaction between life processes and diet. The identification of diet-gene interactions will offers an opportunity to develop dietary interventions that will lead to evidence-based dietary strategies for restoring health and fitness, obviate the effects of genetic factors for preventing diet-related diseases and provide important clues about gene expression and gene modulation by environmental factors. PMID:18410060

  12. Neuroimaging and Genetic Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease and Addiction-Related Degenerative Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Leonardo, Cassandra D.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging offers a powerful means to assess the trajectory of brain degeneration in a variety of disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we describe how multimodal imaging can be used to study the changing brain during the different stages of AD. We integrate findings from a range of studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Neuroimaging reveals how risk genes for degenerative disorders affect the brain, including several recently discovered genetic variants that may disrupt brain connectivity. We review some recent neuroimaging studies of genetic polymorphisms associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD). Some genetic variants that increase risk for drug addiction may overlap with those associated with degenerative brain disorders. These common associations offer new insight into mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and addictive behaviors, and may offer new leads for treating them before severe and irreversible neurological symptoms appear. PMID:24142306

  13. Regeneration of the retina: toward stem cell therapy for degenerative retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sohee; Oh, Il-Hoan

    2015-04-01

    Degenerative retinal diseases affect millions of people worldwide, which can lead to the loss of vision. However, therapeutic approaches that can reverse this process are limited. Recent efforts have allowed the possibility of the stem cell-based regeneration of retinal cells and repair of injured retinal tissues. Although the direct differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into terminally differentiated photoreceptor cells comprises one approach, a series of studies revealed the intrinsic regenerative potential of the retina using endogenous retinal stem cells. Muller glial cells, ciliary pigment epithelial cells, and retinal pigment epithelial cells are candidates for such retinal stem cells that can differentiate into multiple types of retinal cells and be integrated into injured or developing retina. In this review, we explore our current understanding of the cellular identity of these candidate retinal stem cells and their therapeutic potential for cell therapy against degenerative retinal diseases. PMID:25560700

  14. Neuroimaging and genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease and addiction-related degenerative brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Roussotte, Florence F; Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Leonardo, Cassandra D; Thompson, Paul M

    2014-06-01

    Neuroimaging offers a powerful means to assess the trajectory of brain degeneration in a variety of disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we describe how multi-modal imaging can be used to study the changing brain during the different stages of AD. We integrate findings from a range of studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). Neuroimaging reveals how risk genes for degenerative disorders affect the brain, including several recently discovered genetic variants that may disrupt brain connectivity. We review some recent neuroimaging studies of genetic polymorphisms associated with increased risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD). Some genetic variants that increase risk for drug addiction may overlap with those associated with degenerative brain disorders. These common associations offer new insight into mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and addictive behaviors, and may offer new leads for treating them before severe and irreversible neurological symptoms appear.

  15. [Role of defective intracellular proteolysis in human degenerative diseases].

    PubMed

    Nezelof, Christian

    2012-11-01

    the nature of proteolysis. In this article, therefore, the following distinction should be made:--Lysosomal failures. They represent hereditary metabolic disorders involving all categories of cells. They are characterized by the accumulation of homogeneous material related to the underlying disease. Young people are predominantly affected--UPS failures. They represent sporadic conditions principally involving long-lived cells. The accumulated material is heterogeneous, composed of abnormal proteins and various "garbage-like" waste, including pigments. The elderly are predominatly affected, suggesting an epigenetic wear and tear process. Hypothetically, most the sporadic neurodegenerative diseases, from retinal macular degeneration and its associated drüsen to Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease may represent fairly good examples of the UPS deficit. PMID:24313014

  16. A Survey of Vitamin D Status in Patients with Degenerative Diseases of the Spine

    PubMed Central

    Zolfaghari, Farid; Faridmoayer, Alireza; Soleymani, Bahram; Mahabadi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Descriptive cross-sectional study. Purpose To determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with degenerative diseases of the spine about to undergo spinal surgery and the relations between such deficiency and potential risk factors. Overview of Literature Vitamin D has a major role in musculoskeletal system health maintenance. Recently, studies on degenerative diseases of the spine have shown a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients undergoing spine surgery. Methods Serum levels of 25(OH)D were determined by an electrochemiluminescence detection assay. The other variables were determined through relevant questionnaires, and the data was analyzed through analysis of variance, t-test, chi-square and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results A total of 110 patients were enrolled in the study. The mean serum level of 25(OH)D was 27.45±18.75 ng/mL, and 44.5% of patients showed vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D<20 ng/mL), with an additional 17.3% of patients having a serum level of 25(OH)D that was insufficient (20≤25(OH)D<30 ng/mL). The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was significantly higher in the younger age group compared to the older age group (p<0.001) and the ones without a history of taking vitamin D supplements (p=0.013). Compared to men, women showed significantly higher levels of vitamin D (p=0.029). Conclusions A high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is seen in patients with degenerative diseases of the spine. On the other hand, the conventional risk factors such as old age or female sex alone did not seem to be sufficient in determining the likelihood of deficiency. Thus, it is recommended that vitamin D deficiency prevention strategies comprise a broader spectrum of the population through which such degenerative diseases and their consequences may be prevented or delayed. PMID:27790310

  17. Advances in Susceptibility Genetics of Intervertebral Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin'gang; Sun, Zhengming; Liu, Jiangtao; Guo, Xiong

    2008-01-01

    The traditional view that the etiology of lumbar disc herniation is primarily due to age, gender, occupation, smoking and exposure to vehicular vibration dominated much of the last century. Recent research indicates that heredity may be largely responsible for the degeneration as well as herniation of intervertebral discs. Since 1998, genetic influences have been confirmed by the identification of several genes forms associated with disc degeneration. These researches are paving the way for a better understanding of the biologic mechanisms. Now, many researchers unanimously agree that lumbar disc herniation appears to be similar to other complex diseases, whose etiology has both environmental and hereditary influence, each with a part of contribution and relative risk. Then addressing the etiological of lumbar disc herniation, it is important to integrate heredity with the environment factors. For the purpose of this review, we have limited our discussion to several susceptibility genes associated with disc degeneration. PMID:18781226

  18. Inter- and intraobserver reliability in radiographic assessment of degenerative disk disease.

    PubMed

    Zook, Jason; Djurasovic, Mladen; Crawford, Charles; Bratcher, Kelly; Glassman, Steven; Carreon, Leah

    2011-04-11

    Clinicians use descriptive classification systems when treating patients with low back pain as an adjunct to surgical decision making. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes, including Modic changes, the presence of a high-intensity zone, and internal disk desiccation, are commonly used descriptors. The question remains whether different clinicians interpret these terms similarly. This study evaluated the inter- and intraobserver reliability of commonly used MRI classifications in patients presenting with low back pain.Sixty-six patients who underwent lumbar spine fusion surgery at a single multiphysician spine specialty practice for degenerative disk disease were identified. For each surgical level, the following MRI variables were determined independently by 3 fellowship-trained spine surgeons: presence or absence of high-intensity zone and/or internal disk desiccation, presence and classification of disk herniation, Modic grade, and disk height. Each surgeon reviewed the same set of MRI studies a second time at least 2 weeks from the first reading. Inter- and intraobserver reliability was determined using multiobserver Kappa coefficients. Intraobserver reliability ranged from 0.563 to 0.988, with greatest agreement in determining disk height. The greatest interobserver agreement was for determining Modic changes (0.819).Controversy remains on the criteria for diagnosing degenerative disk disease. In patients presenting with low back pain diagnosed with degenerative disk disease, the inter- and intraobserver reliability with use of several common MRI diagnostic tools was substantial. These data imply that clinicians interpret these findings in a reproducible fashion and interpret these terms similarly.

  19. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management. PMID:26878769

  20. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management.

  1. Mid-range outcomes in 64 consecutive cases of multilevel fusion for degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Röllinghoff, Marc; Schlüter-Brust, Klaus; Groos, Daniel; Sobottke, Rolf; Michael, Joern William-Patrick; Eysel, Peer; Delank, Karl Stefan

    2010-01-01

    In the treatment of multilevel degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine, spondylodesis plays a controversial role. Most patients can be treated conservatively with success. Multilevel lumbar fusion with instrumentation is associated with severe complications like failed back surgery syndrome, implant failure, and adjacent segment disease (ASD). This retrospective study examines the records of 70 elderly patients with degenerative changes or instability of the lumbar spine treated between 2002 and 2007 with spondylodesis of more than two segments. Sixty-four patients were included; 5 patients had died and one patient was lost to follow-up. We evaluated complications, clinical/radiological outcomes, and success of fusion. Flexion-extension and standing X-rays in two planes, MRI, and/or CT scans were obtained pre-operatively. Patients were assessed clinically using the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Surgery performed was dorsolateral fusion (46.9%) or dorsal fusion with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF; 53.1%). Additional decompression was carried out in 37.5% of patients. Mean follow-up was 29.4±5.4 months. Average patient age was 64.7±4.3 years. Clinical outcomes were not satisfactory for all patients. VAS scores improved from 8.6±1.3 to 5.6±3.0 pre- to post-operatively, without statistical significance. ODI was also not significantly improved (56.1±22.3 pre- and 45.1±26.4 post-operatively). Successful fusion, defined as adequate bone mass with trabeculation at the facets and transverse processes or in the intervertebral segments, did not correlate with good clinical outcomes. Thirty-five of 64 patients (54%) showed signs of pedicle screw loosening, especially of the screws at S1. However, only 7 of these 35 (20%) complained of corresponding back pain. Revision surgery was required in 24 of 64 patients (38%). Of these, indications were adjacent segment disease (16 cases), pedicle screw loosening (7 cases), and

  2. A meta-analysis of artificial total disc replacement versus fusion for lumbar degenerative disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Yajun, Wu; Xiuxin, Han; Cui, Cui

    2010-01-01

    Lumbar fusion has been developed for several decades and became the standard surgical treatment for symptomatic lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). Artificial total disc replacement (TDR), as an alternative for spinal arthrodesis, is becoming more commonly employed treating lumbar DDD. It is still uncertain whether TDR is more effective and safer than lumbar fusion. To systematically compare the effectiveness and safety of TDR to that of the fusion for the treatment of lumbar DDD, we performed a meta-analysis. Cochrane review methods were used to analyze all relevant randomized controlled trials published up to July 2009. Five relevant randomized controlled trials involving 837 patients were identified. Patients in TDR group have sightly better functioning and less back or leg pain without clinical significance, and significantly higher satisfaction status in TDR group compared with lumbar fusion group at the 2-year follow-up. But these outcomes are highly influenced by the study with BAK cage interbody fusion, the function/pain and patient satisfaction status are no longer significantly different between two groups after excluding this study. At 5 years, these outcomes are not significantly different between comparing groups. The complication and reoperation rate of two groups are similar both at 2 and at 5 years. In conclusion, TDR does not show significant superiority for the treatment of lumbar DDD compared with fusion. The benefits of motion preservation and the long-term complications are still unable to be concluded. More high-quality RCTs with long-term follow-up are needed. PMID:20364392

  3. Relationship of orthopedic examination, goniometric measurements, and radiographic signs of degenerative joint disease in cats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Available information suggests a mismatch between radiographic and orthopedic examination findings in cats with DJD. However, the extent of the discrepancy between clinical and radiographic signs of OA in companion animals has not been described in detail. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between orthopedic examination findings, joint goniometry, and radiographic signs of DJD in 100 cats, in a prospective observational design. Cat temperament, pain response to palpation, joint crepitus, effusion and thickening were graded. Radiographs of appendicular joints and the axial skeleton were made under sedation. Joint motion was measured by use of a plastic goniometer before and after sedation. Associations between radiographic degenerative joint disease (DJD) and examination findings were assessed to determine sensitivity, specificity and likelihood estimations. Results Pain response to palpation was elicited in 0-67% of the joints with DJD, with a specificity ranging from 62-99%; crepitus was detected in 0-56% of the joints and its specificity varied between 87 and 99%; for effusion, values ranged between 6 and 38% (specificity, 82-100%), and thickening, 0-59% (specificity, 74-99%). Joints with DJD tended to have a decreased range of motion. The presence of pain increased the odds of having DJD in the elbow (right: 5.5; left: 4.5); the presence of pain in the lower back increased the odds of spinal DJD being present (2.97 for lumbar; 4.67 for lumbo-sacral). Conclusions Radiographic DJD cannot be diagnosed with certainty using palpation or goniometry. However, negative findings tend to predict radiographically normal joints. Palpation and goniometry may be used as a tool to help to screen cats, mostly to rule out DJD. PMID:22281125

  4. Risk of degenerative ankle joint disease in volleyball players: study of former elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Gross, P; Marti, B

    1999-01-01

    To estimate the influence of long-term, high-intensity volleyball playing on premature osteoarthritis (OA) of the ankle joint, we examined a group of 22 former elite volleyball-players age (34 +/- 6 yrs.) who had played for at least 3 years in the highest volleyball league in Switzerland, and 19 normal healthy untrained controls (35 +/- 6 yrs.). Volleyball-athletes had played during an average of 5.5 (+/- 2) h/wk for 8.5 (+/- 3) yrs. Twenty of the 22 players had suffered from at least one ankle sprain (average: 3.5), 10 had had ruptures of the lateral ligaments (8 of them operated). Four players had severe mechanical instability, 5 a talar varus tilt in the stress X-ray of more than 8 degrees. Subchondral sclerosis and osteophytes were more prevalent in volleyballers than in controls (p < 0.001), while the difference in joint space was not significant. No severe grades of OA could be observed in these former elite volleyball players. Yet, a radiologic score of degenerative ankle disease was elevated in 19/22 of them, but only in 2/19 controls (p<0.001). In multiple regression analysis among athletes, the anterior drawer sign and a feeling of instability were the only significant and independent predictors of an increased radiological index (p = 0.003 and p = 0.02, respectively) from an initial set of 9 variables covering career length and intensity as volleyball player, clinical signs of ankle instability and age. Even if in the present study, athletes had clearly more radiologic findings than controls--such as spur formation and subchondral sclerosis--long-term, high-intensity volleyball playing alone could not be confirmed as an independent risk factor for OA of the ankle joint however, a combination of chronic lateral ankle instability with intensive volleyball playing could marginally increase the risk of ankle OA. PMID:10090465

  5. Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease: Disc Degeneration Symptoms and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Shafaq; Rehmani, Muhammad Asim Khan; Raees, Aisha; Alvi, Arsalan Ahmad; Ashraf, Junaid

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional and observational. Purpose To evaluate the different aspects of lumbar disc degenerative disc disease and relate them with magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings and symptoms. Overview of Literature Lumbar disc degenerative disease has now been proven as the most common cause of low back pain throughout the world. It may present as disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis, facet joint arthropathy or any combination. Presenting symptoms of lumbar disc degeneration are lower back pain and sciatica which may be aggravated by standing, walking, bending, straining and coughing. Methods This study was conducted from January 2012 to June 2012. Study was conducted on the diagnosed patients of lumbar disc degeneration. Diagnostic criteria were based upon abnormal findings in MRI. Patients with prior back surgery, spine fractures, sacroiliac arthritis, metabolic bone disease, spinal infection, rheumatoid arthritis, active malignancy, and pregnancy were excluded. Results During the targeted months, 163 patients of lumbar disc degeneration with mean age of 43.92±11.76 years, came into Neurosurgery department. Disc degeneration was most commonly present at the level of L4/L5 105 (64.4%).Commonest types of disc degeneration were disc herniation 109 (66.9%) and lumbar spinal stenosis 37 (22.7%). Spondylolisthesis was commonly present at L5/S1 10 (6.1%) and associated mostly with lumbar spinal stenosis 7 (18.9%). Conclusions Results reported the frequent occurrence of lumbar disc degenerative disease in advance age. Research efforts should endeavor to reduce risk factors and improve the quality of life. PMID:24353850

  6. Corticosteroid and hyaluronic acid treatments in equine degenerative joint disease. A review.

    PubMed

    Nizolek, D J; White, K K

    1981-10-01

    Degenerative arthrosis is perhaps the most common debilitating disease of performance horses. Treatment should be based upon a knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of normal joints and upon an understanding of the processes of degeneration and repair. These topics are briefly reviewed. Although rest is probably, the most beneficial therapy, physical and pharmaceutical treatments are often employed in an effort to speed recovery. The effects and relative benefits of intrasynovial injections of corticosteroids, hyaluronica cid, and Arteparon are considered in detail. Although local corticosteroid therapy is inexpensive and is effective in reducing lameness caused by degenerative joint disease, it is rarely indicated. Septic arthritis and "steroid arthropathy" are two serious sequelae. Whereas the incidence of the former may be avoided through careful technique, the latter effect is inherent in the action of the drug. The accelerated rate of joint destruction observed in steroid arthropathy is due to suppression of chondrocyte metabolism and thus the processes of cartilage maintenance and repair. Hyaluronic acid is present in the synovial fluid and within the matrix of cartilage. The commercial preparation is no approved for use in the United States, but it is commonly obtained from other countries. Although hyaluronate apparently does not function in the lubrication of cartilage surfaces, it may improve lubrication of soft tissues thus decreasing resistance to joint movement and lessening pain. Reports substantiate the effectiveness of hyaluronic acid in treating early cases of degenerative arthrosis despite the fact that the drug does not significantly promote cartilage healing. Arteparon, a polysulfated glycosaminoglycan, has been used in Europe for two decades in the treatment of degeneration joint disease and is currently being tested in this country. The drug is deposited within diseased cartilage and improves the functional properties of the cartilage as

  7. Picking a bone with WISP1 (CCN4): new strategies against degenerative joint disease

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    As the world’s population continues to age, it is estimated that degenerative joint disease disorders such as osteoarthritis will impact at least 130 million individuals throughout the globe by the year 2050. Advanced age, obesity, genetics, gender, bone density, trauma, and a poor level of physical activity can lead to the onset and progression of osteoarthritis. However, factors that lead to degenerative joint disease and involve gender, genetics, epigenetic mechanisms, and advanced age are not within the control of an individual. Furthermore, current therapies including pain management, improved nutrition, and regular programs for exercise do not lead to the resolution of osteoarthritis. As a result, new avenues for targeting the treatment of osteoarthritis are desperately needed. Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1), a matricellular protein and a downstream target of the wingless pathway Wnt1, is one such target to consider that governs cellular protection, stem cell proliferation, and tissue regeneration in a number of disorders including bone degeneration. However, increased WISP1 expression also has been associated with the progression of osteoarthritis. WISP1 has an intricate relationship with a number of proliferative and protective pathways that include phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K), protein kinase B (Akt), nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), interleukin -6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-β, matrix metalloproteinase, small non-coding ribonucleic acids (RNAs), sirtuin silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) (SIRT1), and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). Taken together, this complex association WISP1 holds with these signaling pathways necessitates a fine biological regulation of WISP1 activity that can offset the progression of degenerative joint disease, but not limit the cellular protective capabilities of the WISP1 pathway. PMID:26893943

  8. [Algorithm of the diagnostics of trauma and degenerative diseases of the spine].

    PubMed

    Shchedrenok, V V; Sebelev, K I; Anikeev, N V; Tiul'kin, O N; Kaurova, T A; Moguchaia, O V

    2011-01-01

    Clinico-radial data were compared in 583 patients with trauma and degenerative diseases of the spine. The clinico-diagnostic complex included radiography of the spine (round-up and functional), magnetic resonance imaging, computerized helical tomography of the spine with spondylometric measurements. Indices of the measurements of the cross-section area of the vertebral artery canal at the level of C3-C6 vertebrae and the volume of the intervertebral canal at different levels in health among men and women are presented. An algorithm of radiation diagnostics in pathology of the spine is proposed.

  9. Preliminary results of automated removal of degenerative joint disease in bone scan lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Gregory H.; Lo, Pechin; Kim, Hyun J.; Auerbach, Martin; Goldin, Jonathan; Henkel, Keith; Banola, Ashley; Morris, Darren; Coy, Heidi; Brown, Matthew S.

    2013-03-01

    Whole-body bone scintigraphy (or bone scan) is a highly sensitive method for visualizing bone metastases and is the accepted standard imaging modality for detection of metastases and assessment of treatment outcomes. The development of a quantitative biomarker using computer-aided detection on bone scans for treatment response assessment may have a significant impact on the evaluation of novel oncologic drugs directed at bone metastases. One of the challenges to lesion segmentation on bone scans is the non-specificity of the radiotracer, manifesting as high activity related to non-malignant processes like degenerative joint disease, sinuses, kidneys, thyroid and bladder. In this paper, we developed an automated bone scan lesion segmentation method that implements intensity normalization, a two-threshold model, and automated detection and removal of areas consistent with non-malignant processes from the segmentation. The two-threshold model serves to account for outlier bone scans with elevated and diffuse intensity distributions. Parameters to remove degenerative joint disease were trained using a multi-start Nelder-Mead simplex optimization scheme. The segmentation reference standard was constructed manually by a panel of physicians. We compared the performance of the proposed method against a previously published method. The results of a two-fold cross validation show that the overlap ratio improved in 67.0% of scans, with an average improvement of 5.1% points.

  10. Early clinical results with cortically based pedicle screw trajectory for fusion of the degenerative lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Glennie, R Andrew; Dea, Nicolas; Kwon, Brian K; Street, John T

    2015-06-01

    This study reviews the outcomes and revision rates of degenerative lumbar fusion surgery using cortical trajectory pedicle screws in lieu of traditional pedicle screw instrumentation. Pedicle screw fixation can be a challenge in patients with low bone mineral density. Wide posterior approaches to the lumbar spine exposing lateral to the facet joints and onto transverse processes causes an additional degree of muscular damage and blood loss not present with a simple laminectomy. A cortical bone trajectory pedicle screw has been proposed as an alternative to prevent screw pullout and decrease the morbidity associated with the wide posterior approach to the spine. We present a series of eight consecutive patients using a cortical bone trajectory instead of traditional pedicle screw fixation for degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine. A retrospective review of our institutional registry data identified eight patients who had cortical screws placed with the assistance of O-arm Stealth navigation (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) from 2010-2013. We analyzed the need for revision, the maintenance of reduction and the incidence of screw pullout or breakage. Our review demonstrated that two of eight patients were revised at an average of 12months. The reasons for these revisions were pseudarthrosis and caudal adjacent segment failure. All patients who were revised had frank screw loosening. We present early clinical results of a new technique that has been shown to have a better fixation profile in laboratory testing. Our less than favorable early clinical results should be interpreted with caution and highlight important technical issues which should be considered.

  11. Stem cells as a novel tool for drug screening and treatment of degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Zuba-Surma, Ewa K; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Madeja, Zbigniew; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2012-01-01

    Degenerative diseases similarly as acute tissue injuries lead to massive cell loss and may cause organ failure of vital organs (e.g., heart, central nervous system). Therefore, they belong to a group of disorders that may significantly benefit from stem cells (SCs)-based therapies. Several stem and progenitor cell populations have already been described as valuable tools for developing therapeutic strategies in regenerative medicine. In particular, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), including adult-tissue-derived PSCs, neonatal-tissue-derived SCs, embryonic stem cells (ESCs), and recently described induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), are the focus of particular attention because of their capacity to differentiate into all the cell lineages. Although PSCs are predominantly envisioned to be applied for organ regeneration, they may be also successfully employed in drug screening and disease modeling. In particular, adult PSCs and iPSCs derived from patient tissues may not only be a source of cells for autologous therapies but also for individual customized in vitro drug testing and studies on the molecular mechanisms of disease. In this review, we will focus on the potential applications of SCs, especially PSCs i) in regenerative medicine therapies, ii) in studying mechanisms of disease, as well as iii) in drug screening and toxicology tests that are crucial in new drug development. In particular, we will discuss the application of SCs in developing new therapeutic approaches to treat degenerative diseases of the neural system and heart. The advantage of adult PSCs in all the above-mentioned settings is that they can be directly harvested from patient tissues and used not only as a safe non-immunogenic source of cells for therapy but also as tools for personalized drug screening and pharmacological therapies.

  12. Prognosis of intervertebral disc loss from diagnosis of degenerative disc disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Lin, A.; Tay, K.; Romano, W.; Osman, Said

    2015-03-01

    Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is one of the most common causes of low back pain, and is a major factor in limiting the quality of life of an individual usually as they enter older stages of life, the disc degeneration reduces the shock absorption available which in turn causes pain. Disc loss is one of the central processes in the pathogenesis of DDD. In this study, we investigated whether the image texture features quantified from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be appropriate markers for diagnosis of DDD and prognosis of inter-vertebral disc loss. The main objective is to use simple image based biomarkers to perform prognosis of spinal diseases using non-invasive procedures. Our results from 65 subjects proved the higher success rates of the combination marker compared to the individual markers and in the future, we will extend the study to other spine regions to allow prognosis and diagnosis of DDD for a wider region.

  13. Stemming the Degeneration: IVD Stem Cells and Stem Cell Regenerative Therapy for Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sivakamasundari, V; Lufkin, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The intervertebral disc (IVD) is immensely important for the integrity of vertebral column function. The highly specialized IVD functions to confer flexibility and tensile strength to the spine and endures various types of biomechanical force. Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is a prevalent musculoskeletal disorder and is the major cause of low back pain and includes the more severe degenerative lumbar scoliosis, disc herniation and spinal stenosis. DDD is a multifactorial disorder whereby an imbalance of anabolic and catabolic factors, or alterations to cellular composition, or biophysical stimuli and genetic background can all play a role in its genesis. However, our comprehension of IVD formation and theetiology of disc degeneration (DD) are far from being complete, hampering efforts to formulate appropriate therapies to tackle DD. Knowledge of the stem cells and various techniques to manipulate and direct them to particular fates have been promising in adopting a stem-cell based regenerative approach to DD. Moreover, new evidence on the residence of stem/progenitor cells within particular IVD niches has emerged holding promise for future therapeutic applications. Existing issues pertaining to current therapeutic approaches are also covered in this review. PMID:23951558

  14. Redox Signaling as a Therapeutic Target to Inhibit Myofibroblast Activation in Degenerative Fibrotic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Peter; Zenzmaier, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative fibrotic diseases encompass numerous systemic and organ-specific disorders. Despite their associated significant morbidity and mortality, there is currently no effective antifibrotic treatment. Fibrosis is characterized by the development and persistence of myofibroblasts, whose unregulated deposition of extracellular matrix components disrupts signaling cascades and normal tissue architecture leading to organ failure and death. The profibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) is considered the foremost inducer of fibrosis, driving myofibroblast differentiation in diverse tissues. This review summarizes recent in vitro and in vivo data demonstrating that TGFβ-induced myofibroblast differentiation is driven by a prooxidant shift in redox homeostasis. Elevated NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4)-derived hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) supported by concomitant decreases in nitric oxide (NO) signaling and reactive oxygen species scavengers are central factors in the molecular pathogenesis of fibrosis in numerous tissues and organs. Moreover, complex interplay between NOX4-derived H2O2 and NO signaling regulates myofibroblast differentiation. Restoring redox homeostasis via antioxidants or NOX4 inactivation as well as by enhancing NO signaling via activation of soluble guanylyl cyclases or inhibition of phosphodiesterases can inhibit and reverse myofibroblast differentiation. Thus, dysregulated redox signaling represents a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of wide variety of different degenerative fibrotic disorders. PMID:24701562

  15. Total disc replacement surgery for symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disease: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    van den Eerenbeemt, Karin D.; van Royen, Barend J.; Peul, Wilco C.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of total disc replacement surgery compared with spinal fusion in patients with symptomatic lumbar disc degeneration. Low back pain (LBP), a major health problem in Western countries, can be caused by a variety of pathologies, one of which is degenerative disc disease (DDD). When conservative treatment fails, surgery might be considered. For a long time, lumbar fusion has been the “gold standard” of surgical treatment for DDD. Total disc replacement (TDR) has increased in popularity as an alternative for lumbar fusion. A comprehensive systematic literature search was performed up to October 2008. Two reviewers independently checked all retrieved titles and abstracts, and relevant full text articles for inclusion. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted relevant data and outcomes. Three randomized controlled trials and 16 prospective cohort studies were identified. In all three trials, the total disc replacement was compared with lumbar fusion techniques. The Charité trial (designed as a non-inferiority trail) was considered to have a low risk of bias for the 2-year follow up, but a high risk of bias for the 5-year follow up. The Charité artificial disc was non-inferior to the BAK® Interbody Fusion System on a composite outcome of “clinical success” (57.1 vs. 46.5%, for the 2-year follow up; 57.8 vs. 51.2% for the 5-year follow up). There were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Prodisc artificial disc (also designed as a non-inferiority trail) was found to be statistically significant more effective when compared with the lumbar circumferential fusion on the composite outcome of “clinical success” (53.4 vs. 40.8%), but the risk of bias of this study was high. Moreover, there were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Flexicore trial

  16. Visuo-proprioceptive interactions in degenerative cervical spine diseases requiring surgery.

    PubMed

    Freppel, S; Bisdorff, A; Colnat-Coulbois, S; Ceyte, H; Cian, C; Gauchard, G; Auque, J; Perrin, P

    2013-01-01

    Cervical proprioception plays a key role in postural control, but its specific contribution is controversial. Postural impairment was shown in whiplash injuries without demonstrating the sole involvement of the cervical spine. The consequences of degenerative cervical spine diseases are underreported in posture-related scientific literature in spite of their high prevalence. No report has focused on the two different mechanisms underlying cervicobrachial pain: herniated discs and spondylosis. This study aimed to evaluate postural control of two groups of patients with degenerative cervical spine diseases with or without optokinetic stimulation before and after surgical treatment. Seventeen patients with radiculopathy were recruited and divided into two groups according to the spondylotic or discal origin of the nerve compression. All patients and a control population of 31 healthy individuals underwent a static posturographic test with 12 recordings; the first four recordings with the head in 0° position: eyes closed, eyes open without optokinetic stimulation, with clockwise and counter clockwise optokinetic stimulations. These four sensorial situations were repeated with the head rotated 30° to the left and to the right. Patients repeated these 12 recordings 6weeks postoperatively. None of the patients reported vertigo or balance disorders before or after surgery. Prior to surgery, in the eyes closed condition, the herniated disc group was more stable than the spondylosis group. After surgery, the contribution of visual input to postural control in a dynamic visual environment was reduced in both cervical spine diseases whereas in a stable visual environment visual contribution was reduced only in the spondylosis group. The relative importance of visual and proprioceptive inputs to postural control varies according to the type of pathology and surgery tends to reduce visual contribution mostly in the spondylosis group.

  17. Biology and therapy of inherited retinal degenerative disease: insights from mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Veleri, Shobi; Lazar, Csilla H.; Chang, Bo; Sieving, Paul A.; Banin, Eyal; Swaroop, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Retinal neurodegeneration associated with the dysfunction or death of photoreceptors is a major cause of incurable vision loss. Tremendous progress has been made over the last two decades in discovering genes and genetic defects that lead to retinal diseases. The primary focus has now shifted to uncovering disease mechanisms and designing treatment strategies, especially inspired by the successful application of gene therapy in some forms of congenital blindness in humans. Both spontaneous and laboratory-generated mouse mutants have been valuable for providing fundamental insights into normal retinal development and for deciphering disease pathology. Here, we provide a review of mouse models of human retinal degeneration, with a primary focus on diseases affecting photoreceptor function. We also describe models associated with retinal pigment epithelium dysfunction or synaptic abnormalities. Furthermore, we highlight the crucial role of mouse models in elucidating retinal and photoreceptor biology in health and disease, and in the assessment of novel therapeutic modalities, including gene- and stem-cell-based therapies, for retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:25650393

  18. Laser technologies in treatment of degenerative-dystrophic bone diseases in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abushkin, Ivan A.; Privalov, Valery A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Noskov, Nikolay V.; Neizvestnykh, Elena A.; Kotlyarov, Alexander N.; Shekunova, Yulia G.

    2014-03-01

    Two low invasive laser technologies for treatment of degenerative-dystrophic bone diseases in children are presented. The first is the transcutaneous laser osteoperforation developed by us and initially applied for treatment of different inflammatory and traumatic diseases (osteomyelitides, osteal and osteoarticular panaritiums, delayed unions, false joints, and others). Now the technology was applied to treatment of aseptic osteonecrosis of different localizations in 134 children aged from 1 to 16 years, including 56 cases with necrosis of femoral head (Legg-Calve-Perthes disease), 42 with necrosis of 2nd metatarsal bone head (Kohler II disease), and 36 with necrosis of tibial tuberosity (Osgood-Schlatter disease). The second technology is the laser intracystic thermotherapy for treatment of bone cysts. The method was applied to 108 children aged from 3 to 16 years with aneurismal and solitary cysts of different localizations. In both technologies a 970 nm diode laser was used. The suggested technologies increase the efficiency of treatment, reduce its duration, can be performed on outpatient basis, which resulted in great economical effect.

  19. Artificial Discs for Lumbar and Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease –Update

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of artificial disc replacement (ADR) technology for degenerative disc disease (DDD). Clinical Need Degenerative disc disease is the term used to describe the deterioration of 1 or more intervertebral discs of the spine. The prevalence of DDD is roughly described in proportion to age such that 40% of people aged 40 years have DDD, increasing to 80% among those aged 80 years or older. Low back pain is a common symptom of lumbar DDD; neck and arm pain are common symptoms of cervical DDD. Nonsurgical treatments can be used to relieve pain and minimize disability associated with DDD. However, it is estimated that about 10% to 20% of people with lumbar DDD and up to 30% with cervical DDD will be unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments. In these cases, surgical treatment is considered. Spinal fusion (arthrodesis) is the process of fusing or joining 2 bones and is considered the surgical gold standard for DDD. Artificial disc replacement is the replacement of the degenerated intervertebral disc with an artificial disc in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical spine that has been unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments for at least 6 months. Unlike spinal fusion, ADR preserves movement of the spine, which is thought to reduce or prevent the development of adjacent segment degeneration. Additionally, a bone graft is not required for ADR, and this alleviates complications, including bone graft donor site pain and pseudoarthrosis. It is estimated that about 5% of patients who require surgery for DDD will be candidates for ADR. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a computerized search of the literature published between 2003 and September 2005 to answer the following questions: What is the effectiveness of ADR in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical regions of the spine compared with spinal fusion surgery? Does an artificial disc reduce the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD

  20. Multi-center, Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Investigational Device Exemption Clinical Trial Comparing Mobi-C Cervical Artificial Disc to Anterior Discectomy and Fusion in the Treatment of Symptomatic Degenerative Disc Disease in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyun W.; Davis, Reginald; Gaede, Steven; Hoffman, Greg; Kim, Kee; Nunley, Pierce D.; Peterson, Daniel; Rashbaum, Ralph; Stokes, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is the gold standard for treating symptomatic cervical disc degeneration. Cervical total disc replacements (TDRs) have emerged as an alternative for some patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a new TDR device compared with ACDF for treating single-level cervical disc degeneration. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulated Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) study. A total of 245 patients were treated (164 TDR: 81 ACDF). The primary outcome measure was overall success based on improvement in Neck Disability Index (NDI), no subsequent surgical interventions, and no adverse events (AEs) classified as major complications. Secondary outcome measures included SF-12, visual analog scale (VAS) assessing neck and arm pain, patient satisfaction, radiographic range of motion, and adjacent level degeneration. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. The hypothesis was that the TDR success rate was non-inferior to ACDF at 24 months. Results Overall success rates were 73.6% for TDR and 65.3% for ACDF, confirming non-inferiority (p < 0.0025). TDR demonstrated earlier improvements with significant differences in NDI scores at 6 weeks and 3 months, and VAS neck pain and SF-12 PCS scores at 6 weeks (p<0.05). Operative level range of motion in the TDR group was maintained throughout follow-up. Radiographic evidence of inferior adjacent segment degeneration was significantly greater with ACDF at 12 and 24 months (p < 0.05). AE rates were similar. Conclusions Mobi-C TDR is a safe and effective treatment for single-level disc degeneration, producing outcomes similar to ACDF with less adjacent segment degeneration. Level of Evidence: Level I. Clinical relevance: This study adds to the literature supporting cervical TDR as a viable option to ACDF in

  1. Oleuropein Aglycone: A Possible Drug against Degenerative Conditions. In Vivo Evidence of its Effectiveness against Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Casamenti, Fiorella; Grossi, Cristina; Rigacci, Stefania; Pantano, Daniela; Luccarini, Ilaria; Stefani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles found in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain arise as a result of self-assembly into fibrillar material of amyloid-β protein (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau, respectively, through a pathological process starting with the appearance of aggregation nuclei and neurotoxic oligomers. Accordingly, the search of inhibitors of oligomer nucleation and growth is considered a promising target to prevent amyloid toxicity. In recent years, a number of dietary factors including antioxidants, vitamins, and polyphenols have been characterized for their ability to protect cells stressed by several factors including the presence of amyloid deposits as well as to inhibit amyloid self-assembly and cytotoxicity and some of them are currently in clinical trial. The present review summarizes the findings on the beneficial effects against neurodegeneration and other peripheral inflammatory and degenerative diseases of oleuropein aglycone (OLE), a natural phenol abundant in the extra virgin olive oil. The data presently available suggest that OLE could provide a protective and therapeutic effect against a number of pathologies, including AD as well as obesity, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic hepatitis, and other natural or experimentally-induced pathological conditions. Such a protection could result, at least in part, in a remarkable improvement of the pathological signs arising from stress conditions including oxidative stress, an excessive inflammatory response, and the presence of cytotoxic aggregated material. In particular, the recent data on the cellular and molecular correlates of OLE neuroprotection suggest it could also play a therapeutic role against AD.

  2. Single- or multiple-session viscosupplementation protocols for temporomandibular joint degenerative disorders: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, L; Rossi, A; Arboretti, R; Bonnini, S; Stellini, E; Manfredini, D

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of two single-session protocols, either adopting high- (protocol A) or medium-molecular weight hyaluronic acid (protocol B), with the reference five-session protocol of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lavage plus viscosupplementation (protocol C) in the management of chronic TMJ degenerative disorders. A randomized clinical trial (RCT) with ten participants per treatment group was designed, with multiple observation points, ending at 6 months after treatment. Pain levels on a 10-point VAS scale were selected as the primary outcome variable to rate treatment effectiveness, along with a number of secondary outcome parameters. Findings showed that Group C patients had the highest decrease in pain levels. Nonparametric permutation analyses revealed that the global effect of treatment was significantly different between the three protocols (P = 0·024). Pairwise comparisons showed that the differences of treatment effect between the two single-session interventions were negligible (global P-value = 0·93). On the contrary, the five-session protocol was significantly superior to both single-session protocols (global P-values ranging from 0·003 to 0·012). In conclusion, in a population of age-, sex-, and psychosocial aspects-matched study groups, the standard of reference five-session protocol proved to be superior at 6 months as far as the decrease in pain levels was concerned, whilst there were no differences between the two single-session interventions. The absence of differences in treatment effect as for some other secondary clinical outcome variables may suggest that there is further space for future investigations attempting to reduce the number of multiple interventions for TMJ viscosupplementation.

  3. MRI features of cervical articular process degenerative joint disease in Great Dane dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo; Penderis, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylomyelopathy or Wobbler syndrome commonly affects the cervical vertebral column of Great Dane dogs. Degenerative changes affecting the articular process joints are a frequent finding in these patients; however, the correlation between these changes and other features of cervical spondylomyelopathy are uncertain. We described and graded the degenerative changes evident in the cervical articular process joints from 13 Great Danes dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy using MR imaging, and evaluated the relationship between individual features of cervical articular process joint degeneration and the presence of spinal cord compression, vertebral foraminal stenosis, intramedullary spinal cord changes, and intervertebral disc degenerative changes. Degenerative changes affecting the articular process joints were common, with only 13 of 94 (14%) having no degenerative changes. The most severe changes were evident between C4-C5 and C7-T1 intervertebral spaces. Reduction or loss of the hyperintense synovial fluid signal on T2-weighted MR images was the most frequent feature associated with articular process joint degenerative changes. Degenerative changes of the articular process joints affecting the synovial fluid or articular surface, or causing lateral hypertrophic tissue, were positively correlated with lateral spinal cord compression and vertebral foraminal stenosis. Dorsal hypertrophic tissue was positively correlated with dorsal spinal cord compression. Disc-associated spinal cord compression was recognized less frequently.

  4. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 11: interbody techniques for lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Mummaneni, Praveen V; Dhall, Sanjay S; Eck, Jason C; Groff, Michael W; Ghogawala, Zoher; Watters, William C; Dailey, Andrew T; Resnick, Daniel K; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Sharan, Alok; Wang, Jeffrey C; Kaiser, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    Interbody fusion techniques have been promoted as an adjunct to lumbar fusion procedures in an effort to enhance fusion rates and potentially improve clinical outcome. The medical evidence continues to suggest that interbody techniques are associated with higher fusion rates compared with posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis who demonstrate preoperative instability. There is no conclusive evidence demonstrating improved clinical or radiographic outcomes based on the different interbody fusion techniques. The addition of a PLF when posterior or anterior interbody lumbar fusion is performed remains an option, although due to increased cost and complications, it is not recommended. No substantial clinical benefit has been demonstrated when a PLF is included with an interbody fusion. For lumbar degenerative disc disease without instability, there is moderate evidence that the standalone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) has better clinical outcomes than the ALIF plus instrumented, open PLF. With regard to type of interbody spacer used, frozen allograft is associated with lower pseudarthrosis rates compared with freeze-dried allograft; however, this was not associated with a difference in clinical outcome.

  5. Effect of posterior subsidence on cervical alignment after anterior cervical corpectomy and reconstruction using titanium mesh cages in degenerative cervical disease.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae-Won; Lee, Jung-Kil; Lee, Jung-Heon; Hur, Hyuk; Kim, Tae-Wan; Kim, Soo-Han

    2014-10-01

    Subsidence after anterior cervical reconstruction using a titanium mesh cage (TMC) has been a matter of debate. The authors investigated and analyzed subsidence and its effect on clinical and radiologic parameters after cervical reconstruction using a TMC for degenerative cervical disease. Thirty consecutive patients with degenerative cervical spine disorders underwent anterior cervical corpectomy followed by reconstruction with TMC. Twenty-four patients underwent a single-level corpectomy, and six patients underwent a two-level corpectomy. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Fusion status, anterior and posterior subsidence of the TMC, segmental angle (SA) and cervical sagittal angle (CSA) were assessed by lateral and flexion-extension radiographs of the neck. The mean follow-up period was 27.6 months (range, 24 to 49 months). The VAS, NDI and JOA scores were all significantly improved at the last follow-up. No instances of radiolucency or motion-related pseudoarthrosis were detected on radiographic analysis, yielding a fusion rate of 100%. Subsidence occurred in 28 of 30 patients (93.3%). The average anterior subsidence of the cage was 1.4 ± 0.9 mm, and the average posterior subsidence was 2.9 ± 1.2 mm. The SA and CSA at the final follow-up were significantly increased toward a lordotic angle. Anterior cervical reconstruction using TMC and plating in patients with cervical degenerative disease provides good clinical and radiologic outcomes. Cage subsidence occurred frequently, especially at the posterior part of the cage. Despite the prominent posterior subsidence of the TMC, SA and CSA were improved on final follow-up radiographs, suggesting that posterior subsidence may contribute to cervical lordosis.

  6. Mice lacking alpha 1 (IX) collagen develop noninflammatory degenerative joint disease.

    PubMed Central

    Fässler, R; Schnegelsberg, P N; Dausman, J; Shinya, T; Muragaki, Y; McCarthy, M T; Olsen, B R; Jaenisch, R

    1994-01-01

    Type IX collagen is a nonfibrillar collagen composed of three gene products, alpha 1(IX), alpha 2(IX), and alpha 3(IX). Type IX molecules are localized on the surface of type II-containing fibrils and consist of two arms, a long arm that is crosslinked to type II collagen and a short arm that projects into the perifibrillar space. In hyaline cartilage, the alpha 1(IX) collagen transcript encodes a polypeptide with a large N-terminal globular domain (NC4), whereas in many other tissues an alternative transcript encodes an alpha 1(IX) chain with a truncated NC4 domain. It has been proposed that type IX molecules are involved in the interaction of fibrils with each other or with other components of the extracellular matrix. To test this hypothesis, we have generated a mouse strain lacking both isoforms of the alpha 1(IX) chain. Homozygous mutant mice are viable and show no detectable abnormalities at birth but develop a severe degenerative joint disease resembling human osteoarthritis. Images PMID:8197187

  7. Instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with interbody fusion device (Cage) in degenerative disc disease (DDD): 3 years outcome.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M K; Hossain, M A; Sakeb, N; Khan, S I; Zaman, N

    2013-10-01

    This prospective interventional study carried out at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University and a private hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh during the period from October 2003 to September 2011. Surgical treatment of degenerative disc disease (DDD) should aim to re-expand the interbody space and stabilize until fusion is complete. The present study conducted to find out the efficacy of using interbody fusion device (Cage) to achieve interbody space re-expansion and fusion in surgical management of DDD. We have performed the interventional study on 53 patients, 42 female and 11 male, with age between 40 to 67 years. All the patients were followed up for 36 to 60 months (average 48 months). Forty seven patients were with spondylolisthesis and 06 with desiccated disc. All subjects were evaluated with regard to immediate and long term complications, radiological fusion and interbody space re-expansion and maintenance. The clinical outcome (pain and disability) was scored by standard pre and postoperative questionnaires. Intrusion, extrusion and migration of the interbody fusion cage were also assessed. Forty seven patients were considered to have satisfactory outcome in at least 36 months follow up. Pseudoarthrosis developed in 04 cases and 06 patients developed complications. In this series posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with interbody cage and instrumentation in DDD showed significant fusion rate and maintenance of interbody space. Satisfactory outcome observed in 88.68% cases.

  8. Hybrid surgery versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Peng; Fu, Xin; Li, Zhi-Jun; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis is to compare hybrid surgery (HS) and cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases (DDD). Systematic searches of all published studies through March 2015 were identified from Cochrane Library, Medline, PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect, CNKI, WANFANG DATA and CQVIP. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs involving HS and ACDF for multilevel DDD were included. All literature was searched and assessed by two independent reviewers according to the standard of Cochrane systematic review. Data of functional and radiological outcomes in two groups were pooled, which was then analyzed by RevMan 5.2 software. One RCT and four non-RCTs encompassing 160 patients met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis revealed significant differences in blood loss (p = 0.005), postoperative C2-C7 ROM (p = 0.002), ROM of superior adjacent segment (p < 0.00001) and ROM of inferior adjacent segment (p = 0.0007) between the HS group and the ACDF group. No significant differences were found regarding operation time (p = 0.75), postoperative VAS (p = 0.18) and complications (p = 0.73) between the groups. Hybrid surgery demonstrated excellent clinical efficacy and radiological results. Postoperative C2-C7 ROM was closer to the physiological status. No decrease in the ROM of the adjacent segment was noted in the hybrid surgery group. PMID:26307360

  9. The p.A382T TARDBP gene mutation in Sardinian patients affected by Parkinson’s disease and other degenerative parkinsonisms

    PubMed Central

    Cannas, Antonino; Borghero, Giuseppe; Floris, Gian Luca; Solla, Paolo; Chiò, Adriano; Traynor, Bryan J.; Calvo, Andrea; Restagno, Gabriella; Majounie, Elisa; Costantino, Emanuela; Piras, Valeria; Lavra, Loredana; Pani, Carla; Orofino, Gianni; Di Stefano, Francesca; Tacconi, Paolo; Mascia, Marcello Mario; Muroni, Antonella; Murru, Maria Rita; Tranquilli, Stefania; Corongiu, Daniela; Rolesu, Marcella; Cuccu, Stefania; Marrosu, Francesco; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Background Based on our previous finding of the p.A382T founder mutation in ALS patients with concomitant parkinsonism in the Sardinian population, we hypothesized that the same variant may underlie PD and/or other forms of degenerative parkinsonism on this Mediterranean island. Design We screened a cohort of 611 patients with PD (544 cases) and other forms of degenerative parkinsonism (67 cases), and 604 unrelated controls for the c.1144G>A (p.A382T) missense mutation of the TARDBP gene. Results The p.A382T mutation was identified in 9 patients with parkinsonism. Of these, 5 (0.9% of PD patients) presented a typical PD (2 with familiar forms), while 4 patients (6.0% of all other forms of parkinsonism) presented a peculiar clinical presentation quite different from classical atypical parkinsonism with an overlap of extrapyramidal-pyramidal-cognitive clinical signs. The mutation was found in 8 Sardinian controls (1.3%) consistent with a founder mutation in the island population. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the clinical presentation of the p.A382T TARDBP gene mutation may include forms of parkinsonism in which the extrapyramidal signs are the crucial core of the disease at onset. These forms can present PSP or CBD-like clinical signs, with bulbar and/or extrabulbar pyramidal signs and cognitive impairment. No evidence of association has been found between TARDBP gene mutation and typical PD. PMID:23546887

  10. Pathology of articular cartilage and synovial membrane from elbow joints with and without degenerative joint disease in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Freire, M; Meuten, D; Lascelles, D

    2014-09-01

    The elbow joint is one of the feline appendicular joints most commonly and severely affected by degenerative joint disease. The macroscopic and histopathological lesions of the elbow joints of 30 adult cats were evaluated immediately after euthanasia. Macroscopic evidence of degenerative joint disease was found in 22 of 30 cats (39 elbow joints) (73.33% cats; 65% elbow joints), and macroscopic cartilage erosion ranged from mild fibrillation to complete ulceration of the hyaline cartilage with exposure of the subchondral bone. Distribution of the lesions in the cartilage indicated the presence of medial compartment joint disease (most severe lesions located in the medial coronoid process of the ulna and medial humeral epicondyle). Synovitis scores were mild overall and correlated only weakly with macroscopic cartilage damage. Intra-articular osteochondral fragments either free or attached to the synovium were found in 10 joints. Macroscopic or histologic evidence of a fragmented coronoid process was not found even in those cases with intra-articular osteochondral fragments. Lesions observed in these animals are most consistent with synovial osteochondromatosis secondary to degenerative joint disease. The pathogenesis for the medial compartmentalization of these lesions has not been established, but a fragmented medial coronoid process or osteochondritis dissecans does not appear to play a role.

  11. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 5: correlation between radiographic outcome and function.

    PubMed

    Dhall, Sanjay S; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Eck, Jason C; Groff, Michael W; Ghogawala, Zoher; Watters, William C; Dailey, Andrew T; Resnick, Daniel K; Sharan, Alok; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Wang, Jeffrey C; Kaiser, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    In an effort to diminish pain or progressive instability, due to either the pathological process or as a result of surgical decompression, one of the primary goals of a fusion procedure is to achieve a solid arthrodesis. Assuming that pain and disability result from lost mechanical integrity of the spine, the objective of a fusion across an unstable segment is to eliminate pathological motion and improve clinical outcome. However, conclusive evidence of this correlation, between successful fusion and clinical outcome, remains elusive, and thus the necessity of documenting successful arthrodesis through radiographic analysis remains debatable. Although a definitive cause and effect relationship has not been demonstrated, there is moderate evidence that demonstrates a positive association between radiographic presence of fusion and improved clinical outcome. Due to this growing body of literature, it is recommended that strategies intended to enhance the potential for radiographic fusion are considered when performing a lumbar arthrodesis for degenerative spine disease.

  12. Lumbar Interbody Fusion Outcomes in Degenerative Lumbar Disease : Comparison of Results between Patients Over and Under 65 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Dae-Jean; Jun, Jae-Kyun; Kim, Ki-Tack

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes of lumbar interbody fusion and its correlation with various factors (e.g., age, comorbidities, fusion level, bone quality) in patients over and under 65 years of age who underwent lumbar fusion surgery for degenerative lumbar disease. Methods One-hundred-thirty-three patients with lumbar degenerative disease underwent lumbar fusion surgery between June 2006 and June 2007 and were followed for more than one year. Forty-eight (36.1%) were older than 65 years of age (group A) and 85 (63.9%) were under 65 years of age (group B). Diagnosis, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, and perioperative complications were recorded. The analysis of clinical outcomes was based on the visual analogue scale (VAS). Radiological results were evaluated using plain radiographs. Clinical outcomes, radiological outcomes, length of hospital stay, and complication rates were analyzed in relation to lumbar fusion level, the number of comorbidities, bone mineral density (BMD), and age. Results The mean age of the patients was 61.2 years (range, 33-86 years) and the mean BMD was -2.2 (range, -4.8 to -2.8). The mean length of hospital stay was 15.0 days (range, 5-60 days) and the mean follow-up was 23.0 months (range, 18-30 months). Eighty-five (64.0%) patients had more than one preoperative comorbidities. Perioperative complications occurred in 27 of 133 patients (20.3%). The incidence of overall complication was 22.9% in group A, and 18.8% in group B but there was no statistical difference between the two groups. The mean VAS scores for the back and leg were significantly decreased in both groups (p < 0.05), and bony fusion was achieved in 125 of 133 patients (94.0%). There was no significant difference in bony union rates between groups A and B (91.7% in group A vs. 95.3% in group B, p = 0.398). In group A, perioperative complications were more common with the increase in fusion level (p = 0.027). Perioperative complications in

  13. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 2: assessment of functional outcome following lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Ghogawala, Zoher; Resnick, Daniel K; Watters, William C; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Dailey, Andrew T; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Eck, Jason C; Sharan, Alok; Groff, Michael W; Wang, Jeffrey C; Dhall, Sanjay S; Kaiser, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    Assessment of functional patient-reported outcome following lumbar spinal fusion continues to be essential for comparing the effectiveness of different treatments for patients presenting with degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. When assessing functional outcome in patients being treated with lumbar spinal fusion, a reliable, valid, and responsive outcomes instrument such as the Oswestry Disability Index should be used. The SF-36 and the SF-12 have emerged as dominant measures of general health-related quality of life. Research has established the minimum clinically important difference for major functional outcomes measures, and this should be considered when assessing clinical outcome. The results of recent studies suggest that a patient's pretreatment psychological state is a major independent variable that affects the ability to detect change in functional outcome.

  14. Predicting the minimum clinically important difference in patients undergoing surgery for the treatment of degenerative cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Tetreault, Lindsay; Wilson, Jefferson R; Kotter, Mark R N; Nouri, Aria; Côté, Pierre; Kopjar, Branko; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The minimum clinically important difference (MCID) is defined as the minimum change in a measurement that a patient would identify as beneficial. Before undergoing surgery, patients are likely to inquire about the ultimate goals of the operation and of their chances of experiencing meaningful improvements. The objective of this study was to define significant predictors of achieving an MCID on the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale at 2 years following surgery for the treatment of degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). METHODS Seven hundred fifty-seven patients were prospectively enrolled in either the AOSpine North America or International study at 26 global sites. Fourteen patients had a perfect preoperative mJOA score of 18 and were excluded from this analysis (n = 743). Data were collected for each participating subject, including demographic information, symptomatology, medical history, causative pathology, and functional impairment. Univariate log-binominal regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the association between preoperative clinical factors and achieving an MCID on the mJOA scale. Modified Poisson regression using robust error variances was used to create the final multivariate model and compute the relative risk for each predictor. RESULTS The sample consisted of 463 men (62.31%) and 280 women (37.69%), with an average age of 56.48 ± 11.85 years. At 2 years following surgery, patients exhibited a mean change in functional status of 2.71 ± 2.89 points on the mJOA scale. Of the 687 patients with available follow-up data, 481 (70.01%) exhibited meaningful gains on the mJOA scale, whereas 206 (29.98%) failed to achieve an MCID. Based on univariate analysis, significant predictors of achieving the MCID on the mJOA scale were younger age; female sex; shorter duration of symptoms; nonsmoking status; a lower comorbidity score and absence of cardiovascular disease; and absence of upgoing plantar responses, lower

  15. [The development of organization of medical care to patients with degenerative dystrophic diseases of lumbosacral section of spine].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with issues of development of organizational technologies in the field of medical care of patients with degenerative dystrophic diseases of lumbosacral section of spine. The comprehensive evaluation of the process of medical care provision to this category of patients revealed the need in measures concerning the reconstruction and development of effectiveness of process. The model is elaborated concerning medical cary of patients with backache with the purpose to establish the succession between various stages of medical care provision. The issues of rational distribution of manpower resources and exclusion of duplication of activities on different stages of the process are considered.

  16. Genetic and degenerative disorders primarily causing other movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Pavese, Nicola; Tai, Yen F

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we will discuss the contributions of structural and functional imaging to the diagnosis and management of genetic and degenerative diseases that lead to the occurrence of movement disorders. We will mainly focus on Huntington's disease, Wilson's disease, dystonia, and neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, as they are the more commonly encountered clinical conditions within this group. PMID:27432681

  17. [Clinical and X-ray diagnosis of initial degenerative changes in the lumbar section of the spine in flight personnel].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, A Iu; Vit'ko, N K

    1996-01-01

    The paper demonstrates the diagnostic validity of X-ray computerized and magnetic/resonance tomographies in detecting early degenerative/dystrophic processes in the lumbar compartment of vertebrae in flying personnel. Examination of 215 aviators with varying degrees of impairment of the vertebrae-pelvis-lower extremity biokinematic system allowed to relate protrusions of the intervertebral disks. Correlation between the neurologic pattern of disease and different forms of protrusions was studied. Pathogenesis of the radiculopathy syndrome was made more clear. Potentials of the X-ray computerized and magnetic/resonance tomographies were given a comparative analysis. As was established, the two methods are not mutually exclusive. MRI is more advantageous in the diagnosis of degenerative/dystrophic changes in soft a tissue structures. On the other hand, the X-ray computerized tomography is preferable for visualization of changes in highly dense tissues. Semiotics of processes articularis arthrosis was studied. Discovered were X-ray detectable morphological signs of arthrosis which had never been discussed in literature. Main strategies of medical treatment of patients with various forms of protrusions are proposed.

  18. Sagittal balance of the pelvis-spine complex and lumbar degenerative diseases. A comparative study about 85 cases.

    PubMed

    Barrey, Cédric; Jund, Jérôme; Noseda, Olivier; Roussouly, Pierre

    2007-09-01

    Retrospective analysis of the spino-pelvic alignment in a population of 85 patients with a lumbar degenerative disease. Several previous publications reported the analysis of spino-pelvic alignment in the normal and low back pain population. Data suggested that patients with lumbar diseases have variations of sagittal alignment such as less distal lordosis, more proximal lumbar lordosis and a more vertical sacrum. Nevertheless most of these variations have been reported without reference to the pelvis shape which is well-known to strongly influence spino-pelvic alignment. The objective of this study was to analyse spino-pelvic parameters, including pelvis shape, in a population of 85 patients with a lumbar degenerative disease and compare these patients with a control group of normal volunteers. We analysed three different lumbar degenerative diseases: disc herniation (DH), n = 25; degenerative disc disease (DDD), n = 32; degenerative spondylolisthesis (DSPL), n = 28. Spino-pelvic alignment was analysed pre-operatively on full spine radiographs. Spino-pelvic parameters were measured as following: pelvic incidence, sacral slope, pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, spino-sacral angle and positioning of C7 plumb line. For each group of patients the sagittal profile was compared with a control population of 154 asymptomatic adults that was the subject of a previous study. In order to understand variations of spino-pelvic parameters in the patients' population a stratification (matching) according to the pelvic incidence was done between the control group and each group of patients. Concerning first the pelvis shape, patients with DH and those with DDD demonstrated to have a mean pelvic incidence equal to 49.8 degrees and 51.6 degrees, respectively, versus 52 degrees for the control group (no significant difference). Only young patients, less than 45 years old, with a disc disease (DH or DDD) demonstrated to have a pelvic incidence significantly lower (48

  19. Sagittal balance of the pelvis-spine complex and lumbar degenerative diseases. A comparative study about 85 cases

    PubMed Central

    Jund, Jérôme; Noseda, Olivier; Roussouly, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the spino-pelvic alignment in a population of 85 patients with a lumbar degenerative disease. Several previous publications reported the analysis of spino-pelvic alignment in the normal and low back pain population. Data suggested that patients with lumbar diseases have variations of sagittal alignment such as less distal lordosis, more proximal lumbar lordosis and a more vertical sacrum. Nevertheless most of these variations have been reported without reference to the pelvis shape which is well-known to strongly influence spino-pelvic alignment. The objective of this study was to analyse spino-pelvic parameters, including pelvis shape, in a population of 85 patients with a lumbar degenerative disease and compare these patients with a control group of normal volunteers. We analysed three different lumbar degenerative diseases: disc herniation (DH), n = 25; degenerative disc disease (DDD), n = 32; degenerative spondylolisthesis (DSPL), n = 28. Spino-pelvic alignment was analysed pre-operatively on full spine radiographs. Spino-pelvic parameters were measured as following: pelvic incidence, sacral slope, pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, spino-sacral angle and positioning of C7 plumb line. For each group of patients the sagittal profile was compared with a control population of 154 asymptomatic adults that was the subject of a previous study. In order to understand variations of spino-pelvic parameters in the patients’ population a stratification (matching) according to the pelvic incidence was done between the control group and each group of patients. Concerning first the pelvis shape, patients with DH and those with DDD demonstrated to have a mean pelvic incidence equal to 49.8° and 51.6°, respectively, versus 52° for the control group (no significant difference). Only young patients, less than 45 years old, with a disc disease (DH or DDD) demonstrated to have a pelvic incidence significantly lower (48.3°) than

  20. Intravitreal Autologous Bone Marrow CD34+ Cell Therapy for Ischemic and Degenerative Retinal Disorders: Preliminary Phase 1 Clinical Trial Findings

    PubMed Central

    Park, Susanna S.; Bauer, Gerhard; Abedi, Mehrdad; Pontow, Suzanne; Panorgias, Athanasios; Jonnal, Ravi; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Werner, John S.; Nolta, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Because human bone marrow (BM) CD34+ stem cells home into damaged tissue and may play an important role in tissue repair, this pilot clinical trial explored the safety and feasibility of intravitreal autologous CD34+ BM cells as potential therapy for ischemic or degenerative retinal conditions. Methods. This prospective study enrolled six subjects (six eyes) with irreversible vision loss from retinal vascular occlusion, hereditary or nonexudative age-related macular degeneration, or retinitis pigmentosa. CD34+ cells were isolated under Good Manufacturing Practice conditions from the mononuclear cellular fraction of the BM aspirate using a CliniMACs magnetic cell sorter. After intravitreal CD34+ cell injection, serial ophthalmic examinations, microperimetry/perimetry, fluorescein angiography, electroretinography (ERG), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and adaptive optics OCT were performed during the 6-month follow-up. Results. A mean of 3.4 million (range, 1–7 million) CD34+ cells were isolated and injected per eye. The therapy was well tolerated with no intraocular inflammation or hyperproliferation. Best-corrected visual acuity and full-field ERG showed no worsening after 6 months. Clinical examination also showed no worsening during follow-up except among age-related macular degeneration subjects in whom mild progression of geographic atrophy was noted in both the study eye and contralateral eye at 6-month follow-up, concurrent with some possible decline on multifocal ERG and microperimetry. Cellular in vivo imaging using adaptive optics OCT showed changes suggestive of new cellular incorporation into the macula of the hereditary macular degeneration study eye. Conclusions. Intravitreal autologous BM CD34+ cell therapy appears feasible and well tolerated in eyes with ischemic or degenerative retinal conditions and merits further exploration. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01736059.) PMID:25491299

  1. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 1: introduction and methodology.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Michael G; Eck, Jason C; Groff, Michael W; Watters, William C; Dailey, Andrew T; Resnick, Daniel K; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Sharan, Alok; Wang, Jeffrey C; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Dhall, Sanjay S; Ghogawala, Zoher

    2014-07-01

    Fusion procedures are an accepted and successful management strategy to alleviate pain and/or neurological symptoms associated with degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. In 2005, the first version of the "Guidelines for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine" was published in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine. In an effort to incorporate evidence obtained since the original publication of these guidelines, an expert panel of neurosurgical and orthopedic spine specialists was convened in 2009. Topics reviewed were essentially identical to the original publication. Selected manuscripts from the first iteration of these guidelines as well as relevant publications between 2005 through 2011 were reviewed. Several modifications to the methodology of guideline development were adopted for the current update. In contrast to the 2005 guidelines, a 5-tiered level of evidence strategy was employed, primarily allowing a distinction between lower levels of evidence. The qualitative descriptors (standards/guidelines/options) used in the 2005 recommendations were abandoned and replaced with grades to reflect the strength of medical evidence supporting the recommendation. Recommendations that conflicted with the original publication, if present, were highlighted at the beginning of each chapter. As with the original guideline publication, the intent of this update is to provide a foundation from which an appropriate treatment strategy can be formulated.

  2. Initial clinical experience with a next-generation artificial disc for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative cervical radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Sanchez, Alejandro; Miramontes, Victor; Olivarez, Luis M. Rosales; Aquirre, Armando Alpizar; Quiroz, Alfredo Ortega; Zarate-Kalfopulos, Baron

    2010-01-01

    Background A feasibility trial was conducted to evaluate the initial safety and clinical use of a next-generation artificial cervical disc (M6-C artificial cervical disc; Spinal Kinetics, Sunnyvale, CA) for the treatment of patients with symptomatic degenerative cervical radiculopathy. A standardized battery of validated outcome measures was utilized to assess condition-specific functional impairment, pain severity, and quality of life. Methods Thirty-six consecutive patients were implanted with the M6-C disc and complete clinical and radiographic outcomes for 25 patients (mean age, 44.5 ± 10.1 years) with radiographically-confirmed cervical disc disease and symptomatic radiculopathy unresponsive to conservative medical management are included in this report. All patients had disc-osteophyte complex causing neural compression and were treated with discectomy and artificial cervical disc replacement at either single level (n = 12) or 2-levels (n = 13). Functional impairment was evaluated using the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Evaluation of arm and neck pain severity utilized a standard 11-point numeric scale, and health-related quality of life was evaluated with the SF-36 Health Survey. Quantitative radiographic assessments of intervertebral motion were performed using specialized motion analysis software, QMA (Quantitative Motion Analysis; Medical Metrics, Houston, TX). All outcome measures were evaluated pre-treatment and at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Results The mean NDI score improved from 51.6 ± 11.3% pre-treatment to 27.9 ± 16.9% at 24 months, representing an approximate 46% improvement (P <.0001). The mean arm pain score improved from 6.9 ± 2.5 pre-treatment to 3.9 ± 3.1 at 24 months (43%, P =.0006). The mean neck pain score improved from 7.8 ± 2.0 pre-treatment to 3.8 ± 3.0 at 24 months (51%, P <.0001). The mean PCS score of the SF-36 improved from 34.8 ± 7.8 pre-treatment to 43.8 ± 9.3 by 24 months (26%, P =.0006). Subgroup analyses found

  3. Sex differences in subjective and objective measures of pain, functional impairment, and health-related quality of life in patients with lumbar degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Gautschi, Oliver P; Corniola, Marco V; Smoll, Nicolas R; Joswig, Holger; Schaller, Karl; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Stienen, Martin N

    2016-05-01

    Sex differences in pain perception are known to exist; however, the exact pathomechanism remains unclear. This work aims to elucidate sex differences in subjective and objective measures of pain, functional impairment, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with lumbar degenerative disc disease. In a prospective 2-center study, back and leg pain (visual analogue scale [VAS]), functional disability (Oswestry Disability Index and Roland-Morris Disability Index), and HRQoL (EuroQol-5D and Short Form [SF12]) were collected for consecutive patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Objective functional impairment (OFI) was estimated using age-adjusted and sex-adjusted cutoff values for the timed-up-and-go (TUG) test. A healthy cohort of n = 110 subjects served as the control group. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to test the association between sex and pain, subjective and OFIs, and HRQoL. The study comprised n = 305 patients (41.6% females). Female patients had more VAS back pain (P = 0.002) and leg pain (P = 0.014). They were more likely to report higher functional impairment in terms of Oswestry Disability Index (P = 0.005). Similarly, HRQoL measured with the EuroQol-5D index (P = 0.012) and SF12 physical composite score (P = 0.005) was lower in female patients. Female patients reported higher VAS back and leg pain, functional impairment, and reduced HRQoL than male patients. However, there were no sex differences with respect to the presence and degree of OFI measured by the TUG test using age-adjusted and sex-adjusted cutoff values. As such, the TUG may be a good test to overcome sex bias for the clinical assessment of patients with degenerative disc disease.

  4. Sex differences in subjective and objective measures of pain, functional impairment, and health-related quality of life in patients with lumbar degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Gautschi, Oliver P; Corniola, Marco V; Smoll, Nicolas R; Joswig, Holger; Schaller, Karl; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Stienen, Martin N

    2016-05-01

    Sex differences in pain perception are known to exist; however, the exact pathomechanism remains unclear. This work aims to elucidate sex differences in subjective and objective measures of pain, functional impairment, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with lumbar degenerative disc disease. In a prospective 2-center study, back and leg pain (visual analogue scale [VAS]), functional disability (Oswestry Disability Index and Roland-Morris Disability Index), and HRQoL (EuroQol-5D and Short Form [SF12]) were collected for consecutive patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Objective functional impairment (OFI) was estimated using age-adjusted and sex-adjusted cutoff values for the timed-up-and-go (TUG) test. A healthy cohort of n = 110 subjects served as the control group. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to test the association between sex and pain, subjective and OFIs, and HRQoL. The study comprised n = 305 patients (41.6% females). Female patients had more VAS back pain (P = 0.002) and leg pain (P = 0.014). They were more likely to report higher functional impairment in terms of Oswestry Disability Index (P = 0.005). Similarly, HRQoL measured with the EuroQol-5D index (P = 0.012) and SF12 physical composite score (P = 0.005) was lower in female patients. Female patients reported higher VAS back and leg pain, functional impairment, and reduced HRQoL than male patients. However, there were no sex differences with respect to the presence and degree of OFI measured by the TUG test using age-adjusted and sex-adjusted cutoff values. As such, the TUG may be a good test to overcome sex bias for the clinical assessment of patients with degenerative disc disease. PMID:26761383

  5. Clinical outcomes following sublaminar decompression and instrumented fusion for lumbar degenerative spinal pathology.

    PubMed

    Peddada, Kranti; Elder, Benjamin D; Ishida, Wataru; Lo, Sheng-Fu L; Goodwin, C Rory; Boah, Akwasi O; Witham, Timothy F

    2016-08-01

    Traditional treatment for lumbar stenosis with instability is laminectomy and posterolateral arthrodesis, with or without interbody fusion. However, laminectomies remove the posterior elements and decrease the available surface area for fusion. Therefore, a sublaminar decompression may be a preferred approach for adequate decompression while preserving bone surface area for fusion. A retrospective review of 71 patients who underwent sublaminar decompression in conjunction with instrumented fusion for degenerative spinal disorders at a single institution was performed. Data collected included demographics, preoperative symptoms, operative data, and radiographical measurements of the central canal, lateral recesses, and neural foramina, and fusion outcomes. Paired t-tests were used to test significance of the outcomes. Thirty-one males and 40 females with a median age 60years underwent sublaminar decompression and fusion. A median of two levels were fused. The mean Visual Analog Scale pain score improved from 6.7 preoperatively to 2.9 at last follow-up. The fusion rate was 88%, and the median time to fusion was 11months. Preoperative and postoperative mean thecal sac cross-sectional area, right lateral recess height, left lateral recess height, right foraminal diameter, and left foraminal diameter were 153 and 209mm(2) (p<0.001), 5.9 and 5.9mm (p=0.43), 5.8 and 6.3mm (p=0.027), 4.6 and 5.2mm (p=0.008), and 4.2 and 5.2mm (p<0.001), respectively. Sublaminar decompression provided adequate decompression, with significant increases in thecal sac cross-sectional area and bilateral foraminal diameter. It may be an effective alternative to laminectomy in treating central and foraminal stenosis in conjunction with instrumented fusion.

  6. BEST1-related autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy: a degenerative disease with a range of developmental ocular anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, A; McAlister, C; VandenHoven, C; Héon, E

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe the spectrum of phenotypic characteristics of BEST1-related autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC) in a family with p.V86M mutation. Methods A retrospective review of the clinical, psychophysical, and electrophysiological phenotypes of six subjects with ADVIRC. Five family members were sequenced for mutations in the BEST1gene. Results A heterozygous change, p.V86M (c.256G>A), was identified in the BEST1gene in the three affected subjects tested, and was shown to segregate with the disease phenotype. The distance visual acuity ranged from ⩾20/25 to absent perception of light. Clinical features observed included angle closure glaucoma (n=2), microcornea with shallow anterior chamber (n=1), iris dysgenesis (n=2), cataracts (n=4), classical peripheral concentric band of retinal hyperpigmentation (n=5), and optic nerve dysplasia (n=1). Full-field electroretinogram response amplitudes ranged from low normal (two cases; 27 and 32 years) to non-recordable (two cases; 42 and 63 years). Goldmann fields were normal in two (27 and 28 years) but were abnormal in two older subjects. Optical coherence tomography showed macular thinning in the proband, whereas his affected daughter had normal macular thickness. Electro-oculography showed borderline Arden's ratio (1.50) in the lone case tested (27 years). Conclusion ADVIRC is a slowly progressive vitreoretinal degeneration that demonstrates marked intra-familial phenotypic variability. Optic nerve dysplasia and iris dysgenesis are novel observations that extend the ocular phenotype of ADVIRC. PMID:21072067

  7. Gorham's disease: clinical case.

    PubMed

    Sá, Pedro; Marques, Pedro; Oliveira, Carolina; Rodrigues, André Sá; Amorim, Nelson; Pinto, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Gorham's disease, also known as idiopathic massive osteolysis, is a rare pathological condition characterized by vascular proliferation that results in destruction and reabsorption of the bone matrix, of unknown etiology. It was first described by Jackson in 1838, but it was Gorham and Stout, in 1955, who defined this disease as a specific entity. It has variable clinical presentation and generally has progressive behavior. Controversy continues regarding the treatment and there is no standard treatment. This pathological condition generally presents a favorable prognosis. Here, a case of Gorham's disease with involvement of the left hip is presented, in a male patient without relevant antecedents.

  8. Gorham's disease: clinical case☆

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Pedro; Marques, Pedro; Oliveira, Carolina; Rodrigues, André Sá; Amorim, Nelson; Pinto, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Gorham's disease, also known as idiopathic massive osteolysis, is a rare pathological condition characterized by vascular proliferation that results in destruction and reabsorption of the bone matrix, of unknown etiology. It was first described by Jackson in 1838, but it was Gorham and Stout, in 1955, who defined this disease as a specific entity. It has variable clinical presentation and generally has progressive behavior. Controversy continues regarding the treatment and there is no standard treatment. This pathological condition generally presents a favorable prognosis. Here, a case of Gorham's disease with involvement of the left hip is presented, in a male patient without relevant antecedents. PMID:26229923

  9. Cone specific promoter for use in gene therapy of retinal degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Dyka, Frank M; Boye, Sanford L; Ryals, Renee C; Chiodo, Vince A; Boye, Shannon E; Hauswirth, William W

    2014-01-01

    Achromatopsia (ACHM) is caused by a progressive loss of cone photoreceptors leading to color blindness and poor visual acuity. Animal studies and human clinical trials have shown that gene replacement therapy with adeno-associate virus (AAV) is a viable treatment option for this disease. Although there have been successful attempts to optimize capsid proteins for increased specificity, it is simpler to restrict expression via the use of cell type-specific promoters. To target cone photoreceptors, a chimeric promoter consisting of an enhancer element of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein promoter and a minimal sequence of the human transducin alpha-subunit promoter (IRBPe/GNAT2) was created. Additionally, a synthetic transducin alpha-subunit promoter (synGNAT2/GNAT2) containing conserved sequence blocks located downstream of the transcriptional start was created. The strength and specificity of these promoters were evaluated in murine retina by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the chimeric, (IRBPe/GNAT2) promoter is more efficient and specific than the synthetic, synGNAT2/GNAT2 promoter. Additionally, IRBPe/GNAT2-mediated expression was found in all cone subtypes and it was improved over existing promoters currently used for gene therapy of achromatopsia. PMID:24664760

  10. Common pathways in health benefit properties of RSV in cardiovascular diseases, cancers and degenerative pathologies.

    PubMed

    Aires, Virginie; Delmas, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Lots of epidemiological studies have put forward the beneficial effects of dietary polyphenols consumption in the prevention of diseases related to aging i.e vascular pathologies, neurodegeneration, cancers and associated inflammatory processes. Among polyphenols, resveratrol (trans-3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene, RSV), a naturally occurring stilbene widely distributed in foodstuffs such as grapes and wine, has been the most studied. Researches performed since the last decades in vitro, in animal models and in (pre)clinical studies have pointed out its pleiotropic health benefits by acting on multiple signaling pathways which go beyond its originally described direct antioxidant activity. However, its low bioavailability upon oral ingestion and lack of specificity may hamper the translation of the encouraging experimental data into human health benefits. Herein we provide an overview on the capacity of RSV to regulate oxidative stress-induced signaling and to modulate key components of signal transduction pathways which are commonly altered in cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and cancer pathologies. We also have attempted to provide a comprehensive outlook on RSV metabolism and biological activity of its main metabolites and discussed about the new strategies developed to circumvent its poor bioavailability and to improve its therapeutic efficacy, including synthesis of new derivatives and new formulations for its cell delivery. PMID:25601605

  11. Custom cerium oxide nanoparticles protect against a free radical mediated autoimmune degenerative disease in the brain.

    PubMed

    Heckman, Karin L; DeCoteau, William; Estevez, Ana; Reed, Kenneth J; Costanzo, Wendi; Sanford, David; Leiter, James C; Clauss, Jennifer; Knapp, Kylie; Gomez, Carlos; Mullen, Patrick; Rathbun, Elle; Prime, Kelly; Marini, Jessica; Patchefsky, Jamie; Patchefsky, Arthur S; Hailstone, Richard K; Erlichman, Joseph S

    2013-12-23

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles are potent antioxidants, based on their ability to either donate or receive electrons as they alternate between the +3 and +4 valence states. The dual oxidation state of ceria has made it an ideal catalyst in industrial applications, and more recently, nanoceria's efficacy in neutralizing biologically generated free radicals has been explored in biological applications. Here, we report the in vivo characteristics of custom-synthesized cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) in an animal model of immunological and free-radical mediated oxidative injury leading to neurodegenerative disease. The CeNPs are 2.9 nm in diameter, monodispersed and have a -23.5 mV zeta potential when stabilized with citrate/EDTA. This stabilizer coating resists being 'washed' off in physiological salt solutions, and the CeNPs remain monodispersed for long durations in high ionic strength saline. The plasma half-life of the CeNPs is ∼4.0 h, far longer than previously described, stabilized ceria nanoparticles. When administered intravenously to mice, the CeNPs were well tolerated and taken up by the liver and spleen much less than previous nanoceria formulations. The CeNPs were also able to penetrate the brain, reduce reactive oxygen species levels, and alleviate clinical symptoms and motor deficits in mice with a murine model of multiple sclerosis. Thus, CeNPs may be useful in mitigating tissue damage arising from free radical accumulation in biological systems.

  12. Association of rs731236 polymorphism in the vitamin D receptor gene with degenerative disc disease: evidence from a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Qiang; Ni, Dongkui; Li, Lijun; Shi, Yubo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between the rs731236 polymorphism in the vitamin D receptor gene and degenerative disc disease, especially in Chinese. We elaborately searched the relevant studies through China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), PubMed and EMBASE databases. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the strength of the association. A total of 10 studies involving 1,220 cases and 1,225 controls were included in the present study. Overall, no evidence of significant risk between rs731236 polymorphism and degenerative disc disease was found in any genetic models. In addition, stratified analyses by ethnicity revealed similar results. However, stratified analyses by sample size in Chinese population show that sample size may be the primary source of heterogeneity. This meta-analysis suggested that the rs731236 polymorphism may not be associated with degenerative disc disease. However, for Asians, there existed some diversities, especially in Chinese population. Therefore, a large number of well-designed studies are still required to assess this polymorphism and degenerative disc disease. PMID:26309717

  13. [Features of the clinical course of intravertebral disk herniation in degenerative lumbar stenosis].

    PubMed

    Kariev, M Kh; Norov, A U; Ishmukhamedov, S N; Iugaĭ, I A

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents a clinical and neurological analysis of 110 patients with discal hernias who were divided into 2 groups: 1) 50 patients with normal sizes of the vertebral column; 2) 51 patients with its stenosis. Compression syndromes were major in all cases. In patients in whom discal hernia was concurrent with lumbar stenosis, the clinical course was characterized by dull or aching pains in the low back and legs, by symptoms of dysbasia neurasthenica intermittens, severe motor and sensory disorders with autonomic impositions. PMID:11764566

  14. An unusual degenerative disorder of neurons associated with a novel intranuclear hyaline inclusion (neuronal intranuclear hyaline inclusion disease). A clinicopathological study of a case.

    PubMed

    Sung, J H; Ramirez-Lassepas, M; Mastri, A R; Larkin, S M

    1980-03-01

    A 21-year-old woman with an unusual, progressive, degenerative neurological disorder is described. The disorder is characterized clinically by behavioral abnormality, peculiar involuntary movements, and ataxia starting in early childhood and subsequent development of dementia, choreoathetosis, rectal and bladder incontinence, bulbar and spinal muscular weakness, pes cavus, kyphoscoliosis, and generalized seizures. The clinical manifestations are correlated, with widespread pathological changes affecting almost all neuronal systems. The pathological changes are discussed in relation to the wide spectrum of "multisystem atrophies." Particular attention is directed to the ubiquitous occurrence of a novel intranuclear, eosinophilic, hyaline inclusion in almost all types of central, peripheral, and autonomic neurons. The ubiquitous neuronal involvement seems to explain the diffuse multiple system degeneration. The pathogenesis of the neuronal inclusions is unknown, but it is speculated that the disorder may represent a metabolic abnormality affecting the nuclear protein of neurons, rather than a viral infection. The pathological features, consisting of the neuronal intranuclear hyaline inclusions associated with multiple system atrophy, have not hitherto been described, and "neuronal intranuclear hyaline inclusion disease" is proposed as a name for the disorder. Rectal biopsy demonstrating the intranuclear hyaline inclusions in ganglion cells of the hyenteric plexuses may serve as a diagnostic procedure for the disorder. PMID:6154779

  15. Segmental mobility, disc height and patient-reported outcomes after surgery for degenerative disc disease: a prospective randomised trial comparing disc replacement and multidisciplinary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, L G; Brinckmann, P; Hellum, C; Rossvoll, I; Leivseth, G

    2013-01-01

    This prospective multicentre study was undertaken to determine segmental movement, disc height and sagittal alignment after total disc replacement (TDR) in the lumbosacral spine and to assess the correlation of biomechanical properties to clinical outcomes.A total of 173 patients with degenerative disc disease and low back pain for more than one year were randomised to receive either TDR or multidisciplinary rehabilitation (MDR). Segmental movement in the sagittal plane and disc height were measured using distortion compensated roentgen analysis (DCRA) comparing radiographs in active flexion and extension. Correlation analysis between the range of movement or disc height and patient-reported outcomes was performed in both groups. After two years, no significant change in movement in the sagittal plane was found in segments with TDR or between the two treatment groups. It remained the same or increased slightly in untreated segments in the TDR group and in this group there was a significant increase in disc height in the operated segments. There was no correlation between segmental movement or disc height and patient-reported outcomes in either group.In this study, insertion of an intervertebral disc prosthesis TDR did not increase movement in the sagittal plane and segmental movement did not correlate with patient-reported outcomes. This suggests that in the lumbar spine the movement preserving properties of TDR are not major determinants of clinical outcomes.

  16. Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... RDCRN? Aims of the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network Contact Us RDCRN Members Login Accessibility Disclaimer The Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network is an initiative of the Office of Rare ...

  17. Multi-resolution entropy analysis of gait symmetry in neurological degenerative diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Fuyuan; Wang, Jue; He, Ping

    2008-04-01

    Gait rhythm of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been studied focusing on the fractal and correlation properties of stride time fluctuations. In this study, we investigated gait asymmetry in these diseases using the multi-resolution entropy analysis of stance time fluctuations. Since stance time is likely to exhibit fluctuations across multiple spatial and temporal scales, the data series were decomposed into appropriate levels by applying stationary wavelet transform. The similarity between two corresponding wavelet coefficient series in terms of their regularities at each level was quantified based on a modified sample entropy method and a weighted sum was then used as gait symmetry index. We found that gait symmetry in subjects with PD and HD, especially with ALS is significantly disturbed. This method may be useful in characterizing certain pathologies of motor control and, possibly, in monitoring disease progression and evaluating the effect of an individual treatment.

  18. Multi-resolution entropy analysis of gait symmetry in neurological degenerative diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Fuyuan; Wang, Jue; He, Ping

    2008-04-01

    Gait rhythm of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been studied focusing on the fractal and correlation properties of stride time fluctuations. In this study, we investigated gait asymmetry in these diseases using the multi-resolution entropy analysis of stance time fluctuations. Since stance time is likely to exhibit fluctuations across multiple spatial and temporal scales, the data series were decomposed into appropriate levels by applying stationary wavelet transform. The similarity between two corresponding wavelet coefficient series in terms of their regularities at each level was quantified based on a modified sample entropy method and a weighted sum was then used as gait symmetry index. We found that gait symmetry in subjects with PD and HD, especially with ALS is significantly disturbed. This method may be useful in characterizing certain pathologies of motor control and, possibly, in monitoring disease progression and evaluating the effect of an individual treatment. PMID:17569571

  19. Contralateral interlaminar approach for intraforaminal lumbar degenerative disease with special emphasis on L5-S1 level: A technical note

    PubMed Central

    Zekaj, Edvin; Menghetti, Claudia; Saleh, Christian; Isidori, Alessandra; Bona, Alberto R.; Aimar, Enrico; Servello, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intraforaminal disc herniations at the L5-S1 level are extremely surgically challenging lesions. Intracanal approaches frequently require partial or total facetectomy, which may lead to instability. Solely extraforaminal approaches may offer limited visualization of the more medial superiorly exiting and inferiorly exiting nerve roots; this approach is also more complicated at L5-S1 due to the often large L5 transverse process and the iliac wing. Methods: Nine patients with intraforaminal L5-S1 disc herniations, foraminal stenosis, or synovial cysts underwent contralateral interlaminar approaches for lesion resection. Preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale scores were evaluated, and complications were reviewed. Results: All 9 patients demonstrated immediate postoperative clinical improvement. None of the patients exhibited complications and none developed instability or neuropathic disorders. Conclusions: Although the number of cases in our sample was very small (9 in total), the contralateral interlaminar approach appeared to effectively address multiple degenerative L5-S1 foraminal pathologies. Large studies are needed to further evaluate the pros and cons of this approach. PMID:27713854

  20. Huntington disease: a single-gene degenerative disorder of the striatum.

    PubMed

    Nopoulos, Peggy C

    2016-03-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, neurodegenerative disorder with a primary etiology of striatal pathology. The Huntingtin gene (HTT) has a unique feature of a DNA trinucleotide (triplet) repeat, with repeat length ranging from 10 to 35 in the normal population. Repeat lengths between 36 and 39 cause HD at reduced penetrance (some will get the disease, others won't) and when expanded to 40 or more repeats (mHTT), causes HD at full penetrance (every person with this length or beyond will definitely develop the disease). The symptoms of HD may be motor, cognitive, and psychiatric, and are consistent with the pathophysiology of frontostriatal circuitry malfunction. Expressed ubiquitously and throughout the entire life cycle (development through adulthood), mHTT causes initial dysfunction and eventual death of a specific cell population within the striatum. Although all areas of the brain are eventually affected, the primary pathology of the disease is regionally specific. As a single-gene disorder, HD has the distinction of having the potential of treatment that is aimed directly at the known pathogenic mechanism by gene silencing, providing hope for neuroprotection and ultimately, prevention.

  1. An update on the role of omega-3 fatty acids on inflammatory and degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Lorente-Cebrián, Silvia; Costa, André G V; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Zabala, María; Laiglesia, Laura M; Martínez, J Alfredo; Moreno-Aliaga, María J

    2015-06-01

    Inflammation is involved in the pathophysiology of many chronic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and neurodegenerative diseases. Several studies have evidenced important anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFAs). This review illustrates current knowledge about the efficacy of n-3 LC-PUFAs (eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), particularly) in preventing and/or treating several chronic inflammatory conditions (inflammatory bowel diseases and rheumatoid arthritis) as well as their potential benefits on neurodegenerative diseases. It is well established that n-3 LC-PUFAs are substrates for synthesis of novel series of lipid mediators (e.g., resolvins, protectins, and maresins) with potent anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving properties, which have been proposed to partly mediate the protective and beneficial actions of n-3 LC-PUFAs. Here, we briefly summarize current knowledge from preclinical studies analyzing the actions of EPA- and DHA-derived resolvins and protectins on pathophysiological models of rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer, and irritable bowel syndrome.

  2. An update on the role of omega-3 fatty acids on inflammatory and degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Lorente-Cebrián, Silvia; Costa, André G V; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Zabala, María; Laiglesia, Laura M; Martínez, J Alfredo; Moreno-Aliaga, María J

    2015-06-01

    Inflammation is involved in the pathophysiology of many chronic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and neurodegenerative diseases. Several studies have evidenced important anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFAs). This review illustrates current knowledge about the efficacy of n-3 LC-PUFAs (eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), particularly) in preventing and/or treating several chronic inflammatory conditions (inflammatory bowel diseases and rheumatoid arthritis) as well as their potential benefits on neurodegenerative diseases. It is well established that n-3 LC-PUFAs are substrates for synthesis of novel series of lipid mediators (e.g., resolvins, protectins, and maresins) with potent anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving properties, which have been proposed to partly mediate the protective and beneficial actions of n-3 LC-PUFAs. Here, we briefly summarize current knowledge from preclinical studies analyzing the actions of EPA- and DHA-derived resolvins and protectins on pathophysiological models of rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer, and irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:25752887

  3. Potential new strategies for the treatment of ovarian infertility and degenerative diseases with autologous ovarian stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Copas, Pleas; Virant-Klun, Irma

    2006-04-01

    The 50-year-old and currently prevailing view that all oocytes in adult human ovaries persist from the fetal period of life is controversial as it clashes with Darwinian evolutionary theory. Studies of oogenesis and follicular renewal in adult human ovaries, and of the role of hormonal signals and third-party cells (tissue macrophages and T cells), could all be helpful in providing better understanding of the causes of ovarian infertility, its prevention and potential therapy. In addition, the authors recently reported differentiation of distinct cell types and the production of new eggs in cultures derived from premenopausal and postmenopausal human ovaries. It is possible that fertilisation of such eggs will open up new opportunities for providing genetically related children to infertile women for whom conventional in vitro fertilisation has failed. As ovarian stem cells appear to represent a new type of totipotent adult stem cell, they could also be utilised for autologous stem cell therapy of degenerative diseases, without any involvement of allogeneic embryonic stem cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  4. Application of stable isotopic techniques in the prevention of degenerative diseases like obesity and NIDDM in developing societies.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Prakash; Iyengar, Venkatesh; Sawaya, Ana; Diaz, Erik; Ma, Guansheng; Hernandez-Triana, Manuel; Yajnik, Chittaranjan; Forrester, Terrence; Valencia, Mauro; Rush, Elaine; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Jahoor, Farook; Roberts, Susan

    2002-09-01

    Economic development in developing societies characterized by industrialization, urbanization, and globalization has seen the emergence of an epidemic of diet- and life-style-related chronic degenerative diseases. A research project was initiated under the aegis of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna, Austria under its Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) to promote the use of stable isotopic techniques to document the extent of the problem and to understand the determinants of this epidemic. The principal objectives of this CRP involving countries both in the North and the South are to define the magnitude of the problem of obesity and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in developing countries, to identify the vulnerable groups at increased risk, and to attempt to describe the metabolic and physiological mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. These comparative international studies of obesity and NIDDM are looking at the effects of childhood malnutrition (Brazil) and socioeconomic differentials (Mexico) on adult risk factors; the composition of the daily diet on obesity (Chile); levels of patterns of physical activity of older adults (China) as well as their influence on weight gain and obesity (Cuba, Nigeria); the impact of body composition and energy expenditure on the evolution frank diabetes from impaired glucose tolerance (Jamaica), and of body compositional changes and the role of inflammatory cytokines on impaired glucose tolerance (India). The last study conducted in New Zealand was aimed at comparing the energy expenditures of Maori (Pacific Island) with New Zealanders of European descent.

  5. The Degenerative Spine.

    PubMed

    Clarençon, Frédéric; Law-Ye, Bruno; Bienvenot, Peggy; Cormier, Évelyne; Chiras, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine is a leading cause of back pain and radiculopathy, and is a frequent indication for spine MR imaging. Disc degeneration, disc protrusion/herniation, discarhtrosis, spinal canal stenosis, and facet joint arthrosis, as well as interspinous processes arthrosis, may require an MR imaging workup. This review presents the MR imaging patterns of these diseases and describes the benefit of the MR imaging in these indications compared with the other imaging modalities like plain radiographs or computed tomography scan. PMID:27417397

  6. Nicotinamide homeostasis: a xenobiotic pathway that is key to development and degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Williams, A C; Ramsden, D B

    2005-01-01

    Monkeys and man are very closely related genetically. Yet intellectually there are big differences and they suffer from a broad range of different diseases. For example, monkeys do not get Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. The former is surprising given that both get parkinsonism from MPTP poisoning and the latter initially less surprising as the cortex predominantly affected in Alzheimer's never developed as fully in the monkey. Man is an omnivore whilst other primates are predominantly herbivores. The one primate who was almost wholly carnivorous was Neanderthal man who became extinct. Red meat has a high content of Nicotinamide, Choline, and methyl donors. The enzyme NNMT converts nicotinamide to N-methyl-nicotinamide using SAM as the methyl donor. It is not present to any degree in herbivores. It has recently been shown to be present in human brain and up regulated in Parkinson's disease. Omnivores presumably need it for nicotinamide homeostasis but the production of N-methyl-nicotinamide will also be beneficial as it will reduce the export of Choline from neurones. Both will aid brain growth and development. However, as N-methyl-nicotinamide resembles MPTP it could cause parkinsonism later in life for man but not monkeys as they would be predicted not to have as much NNMT. Humans with a diet low in Nicotinamide,Choline or methyl donors early in life and low enzyme activity may be prone to Alzheimer's as their brain and therefore its reserves may never have developed as fully. The possession of NNMT plus a diet rich in Nicotinamide, Choline and methyl providers may explain many of the advantages but also the disadvantages of the human condition. One prediction is that a diet rich in these micronutrients whilst young will improve brain development and reduce the risk of Alzheimer's but that a lower dose later in life will reduce the risk of Parkinsonism. A second prediction is that it will become clear that dietary factors including vitamins are signalers and

  7. Ipsilateral atrophy of paraspinal and psoas muscle in unilateral back pain patients with monosegmental degenerative disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Ploumis, A; Michailidis, N; Christodoulou, P; Kalaitzoglou, I; Gouvas, G; Beris, A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the cross-sectional area (CSA) of both paraspinal and psoas muscles in patients with unilateral back pain using MRI and to correlate it with outcome measures. Methods 40 patients, all with informed consent, with a minimum of 3 months of unilateral back pain with or without sciatica and one-level disc disease on MRI of the lumbosacral spine were included. Patients were evaluated with self-report measures regarding pain (visual analogue score) and disability (Oswestry disability index). The CSA of multifidus, erector spinae, quadratus lumborum and psoas was measured at the disc level of pathology and the two adjacent disc levels, bilaterally. Comparison of CSAs of muscles between the affected vs symptomless side was carried out with Student's t-test and correlations were conducted with Spearman's test. Results The maximum relative muscle atrophy (% decrease in CSA on symptomatic side) independent of the level was 13.1% for multifidus, 21.8% for erector spinae, 24.8% for quadratus lumborum and 17.1% for psoas. There was significant difference (p<0.05) between sides (symptomatic and asymptomatic) in CSA of multifidus, erector spinae, quadratus lumborum and psoas. However, no statistically significant correlation was found between the duration of symptoms (average 15.5 months), patient's pain (average VAS 5.3) or disability (average ODI 25.2) and the relative muscle atrophy. Conclusion In patients with long-standing unilateral back pain due to monosegmental degenerative disc disease, selective multifidus, erector spinae, quadratus lumborum and psoas atrophy develops on the symptomatic side. Radiologists and clinicians should evaluate spinal muscle atrophy of patients with persistent unilateral back pain. PMID:21081573

  8. Association of rs2228570 polymorphism of vitamin D receptor gene with degenerative disc disease: a meta-analysis involving 2947 subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Qiang; Ni, Dongkui; Li, Lijun; Shi, Yubo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the association between the rs2228570 polymorphism in the vitamin D receptor gene and degenerative disc disease (IDD), especially in European. We perform a meta-analysis to analyze the association after searching the relevant studies through China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), PubMed, Medline and EMBASE databases. And odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate the strength of the association. A total of 10 studies involving 1,465 cases and 1,482 controls were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, there was not significant risk between rs2228570 polymorphism and degenerative disc disease in any genetic models. In addition, stratified analyses by ethnicity revealed similar results. However, stratified analyses by others indicates an association between IDD and the FF genotype (OR=0.62, 95% CI=0.43- 0.90, P=0.486) in age =40, and the F allele (OR=0.84, 95% CI=0.73-0.96, P=0.992), FF genotype (OR=0.78, 95% CI=0.65-0.93, P=0.853) in sample size > 300, and ff genotype (OR=0.91, 95% CI=1.11-3.29, P=0.783), FF genotype (OR=0.70, 95% CI=0.51-0.96, P=0.258) in Northern European. This meta-analysis suggested that the rs2228570 polymorphism may not be associated with degenerative disc disease. However, there existed some diversities, especially in age < 40, sample size > 300, countries in Northern Europe, suggesting that carrying the VDR FokI F allele may be a protective factor against IDD development. But a large number of well-designed studies are still required to assess this polymorphism and degenerative disc disease. PMID:26885185

  9. The yeast prions [PSI+] and [URE3] are molecular degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Wickner, Reed B; Edskes, Herman K; Bateman, David; Kelly, Amy C; Gorkovskiy, Anton

    2011-01-01

    The yeast prions [URE3] and [PSI] are not found in wild strains, suggesting they are not an advantage. Prion-forming ability is not conserved, even within Saccharomyces, suggesting it is a disease. Prion domains have non-prion functions, explaining some conservation of sequence. However, in spite of the sequence being constrained in evolution by these non-prion functions, the prion domains vary more rapidly than the remainder of the molecule, and these changes produce a transmission barrier, suggesting that these changes were selected to block prion infection. Yeast prions [PSI] and [URE3] induce a cellular stress response (Hsp104 and Hsp70 induction), suggesting the cells are not happy about being infected. Recently, we showed that the array of [PSI] and [URE3] prions includes a majority of lethal or very toxic variants, a result not expected if either prion were an adaptive cellular response to stress.

  10. Interspinous spacer decompression (X-STOP) for lumbar spinal stenosis and degenerative disk disease: a multicenter study with a minimum 3-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Puzzilli, Fabrizio; Gazzeri, Roberto; Galarza, Marcelo; Neroni, Massimiliano; Panagiotopoulos, Konstantinos; Bolognini, Andrea; Callovini, Giorgio; Agrillo, Umberto; Alfieri, Alex

    2014-09-01

    Interspinous distraction devices provide an effective treatment for patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis and/or degenerative disk disease. The aim of this multicenter study was the prospective evaluation of patients treated for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis with interspinous process decompression (IPD) implants compared with a population of patients managed with conservative treatment. 542 patients affected by symptomatic lumbar spine degenerative disease were enrolled in a controlled trial. 422 patients underwent surgical treatment consisting of X-STOP device implantation, whereas 120 control cases were managed conservatively. Both patient groups underwent follow-up evaluations at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months using the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire, the Visual Analog Scale score and spinal lumbar X-rays, CT scans and MR imaging. One-year follow-up evaluation revealed positive good results in the 83.5% of patients treated with IPD with respect to 50% of the nonoperative group cases. During the first three years, in 38 out of the 120 control cases, a posterior decompression and/or spinal fixation was performed because of unsatisfactory results of the conservative therapy. In 24 of 422 patients, the IPD device had to be removed, and a decompression and/or pedicle screw fixation was performed because of the worsening of neurological symptoms. Our results support the effectiveness of surgery in patients with stenosis. IPD may offer an effective and less invasive alternative to classical microsurgical posterior decompression in selected patients with spinal stenosis and lumbar degenerative disk diseases.

  11. Detection of neuronal damage in degenerative brain disease with cobalt-55 and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, H.M.L.; Pruim, J.; Paans, A.M.J.

    1994-05-01

    We suggest Cobalt-55 (Co) as a Calcium (Ca)-marker to visualize Ca transport across the neuronal membrane. Elevation of intracellular Ca is closely linked with the process of neuronal cell-decay. Co-uptake is correlated with Ca-accumulation through divalent cation-permeable kainate (KA)-activated receptor-operated channels in the neuronal membrane. This hypothesis was studied with position emission tomography (PET) both in patients with a ischemic cerebro-vascular accident (CVA) and in patients with relapsing progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Co-PET studies were performed in a dynamic mode (6 frames of 10 minutes) 20-25 hours after iv.-administration of 1-2 mCi Co. Regional specific accumulation irrespective of blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity in the (clinically appropriate) affected cerebral region could be demonstrated in CVA-patients, thus suggesting neuronal decay in (the early phase of) infarction. In MS, inhomogeneous cerebral distribution of Co was detected, in contrast to healthy volunteers. This suggests focal accumulation of Co in multiple spots of neuronal decay, possibly related to MS-lesions on MRI. In conclusion, Co-PET may prove to be a valuable tool for the early detection of neuronal decay not only in CVA and MS, but in other brain-pathology as well. The usefulness of Co-PET in imaging brain-tumors and myocardial ischemia has already been established.

  12. Degenerative mitral valve regurgitation: best practice revolution

    PubMed Central

    Adams, David H.; Rosenhek, Raphael; Falk, Volkmar

    2010-01-01

    Degenerative mitral valve disease often leads to leaflet prolapse due to chordal elongation or rupture, and resulting in mitral valve regurgitation. Guideline referral for surgical intervention centres primarily on symptoms and ventricular dysfunction. The recommended treatment for degenerative mitral valve disease is mitral valve reconstruction, as opposed to valve replacement with a bioprosthetic or mechanical valve, because valve repair is associated with improved event free survival. Recent studies have documented a significant number of patients are not referred in a timely fashion according to established guidelines, and when they are subjected to surgery, an alarming number of patients continue to undergo mitral valve replacement. The debate around appropriate timing of intervention for asymptomatic severe mitral valve regurgitation has put additional emphasis on targeted surgeon referral and the need to ensure a very high rate of mitral valve repair, particularly in the non-elderly population. Current clinical practice remains suboptimal for many patients, and this review explores the need for a ‘best practice revolution’ in the field of degenerative mitral valve regurgitation. PMID:20624767

  13. One decade follow up after nucleoplasty in the management of degenerative disc disease causing low back pain and radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; Lorente, Francisco de Asis; Gomez, Joaquin; Eiras, Jose; Agrawal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Nucleoplasty is a minimally invasive procedure that is developed to treat patients with symptomatic, but contained disc herniations or bulging discs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a decade follow-up of coblation nucleoplasty treatment for protruded lumbar intervertebral disc. Methods: In this retrospective study there a total 50 patients who underwent intradiscal coblation therapy for symptomatic, but contained lumbar degenerative disc disease were included. Relief of low back pain, leg pain and numbness after the operation were assessed by visual analog pain scale (VAS). Function of lower limb and daily living of patients were evaluated by the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and subjective global rating of overall satisfaction were recorded and analyzed. Results: There were 27 male and 23 female with followup mean follow up of 115 months (range 105–130 months) with a mean age was 52 years (range 26–74 years). Analgesic consumption was reduced or stopped in 90% of these cases after 1 year. At 24 months follow up VAS was four points and ODI was 7.2. In three patients, we repeated the cool ablation after 36 months, at L3–4 level in two cases. Ten patients continue to be asymptomatic after 114 months of intervention. There were no complications with the procedure including nerve root injury, discitis or allergic reactions. Conclusions: Nucleoplasty may provide intermittent relief in contained disc herniation without significant complications and minimal morbidity. In accordance with the literature the evidence for intradiscal coablation therapy is moderate in managing chronic discogenic low back pain; nucleoplasty appears to be safe and effective. PMID:25767571

  14. [Wilson's disease: clinical spectrum of liver disease].

    PubMed

    Ochoa Palominos, Alejandra; Ibáñez Samaniego, Luis; Catalina Rodríguez, María-Vega; Pajares Díaz, José; Clemente Ricote, Gerardo

    2013-02-01

    Wilson's disease is a hereditary autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism,characterized by copper accumulation in the liver and brain. This rare entity, which has a broad clinical spectrum, is often difficult to diagnose and should therefore always be suspected in patients with liver disease of unclear cause. We describe two types of manifestation of liver disease in two patients; the first developed fulminant hepatic failure requiring urgent liver transplantation and the second showed advanced chronic liver disease and received standard medical treatment. The objective of this clinical observation is to analyze the diagnosis of Wilson's disease in two patients with distinct onset, illustrating the broad clinical spectrum of the disease, and its treatment.

  15. Structural Studies on Acetylcholinesterase and Paraoxonase Directed Towards Development of Therapeutic Biomolecules for the Treatment of Degenerative Diseases and Protection Against Chemical Threat Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Joel L.; Silman, Israel

    Acetylcholinesterase and paraoxonase are important targets for treatment of degenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis, respectively, both of which impose major burdens on the health care systems in Western society. Acetylcholinesterase is the target of lethal nerve agents, and paraoxonase is under consideration as a bioscavenger for their detoxification. Both are thus the subject of research and development in the context of nerve agent toxicology. The crystal structures of the two enzymes are described, and structure/function relationships are discussed in the context of drug development and of development of means of protection against chemical threats.

  16. Comparison of Clinical and Radiological Results of Posterolateral Fusion and Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion in the Treatment of L4 Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kuraishi, Shugo; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Shimizu, Masayuki; Ikegami, Shota; Futatsugi, Toshimasa; Hirabayashi, Hiroki; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Hashidate, Hiroyuki; Tateiwa, Yutaka; Kinoshita, Hisatoshi; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Multicenter analysis of two groups of patients surgically treated for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Purpose To compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of posterolateral fusion (PLF) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Surgery for lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis is widely performed. However, few reports have compared the outcome of PLF to that of PLIF for degenerative L4 unstable spondylolisthesis. Methods Patients with L4 unstable spondylolisthesis with Meyerding grade II or more, slip of >10° or >4 mm upon maximum flexion and extension bending, and posterior opening of >5 degree upon flexion bending were studied. Patients were treated from January 2008 to January 2010. Patients who underwent PLF (n=12) and PLIF (n=19) were followed-up for >2 years. Radiographic findings and clinical outcomes evaluated by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score were compared between the two groups. Radiographic evaluation included slip angle, translation, slip angle and translation during maximum flexion and extension bending, intervertebral disc height, lumbar lordotic angle, and fusion rate. Results JOA scores of the PLF group before surgery and at final follow-up were 12.3±4.8 and 24.1±3.7, respectively; those of the PLIF group were 14.7±4.8 and 24.2±7.8, respectively, with no significant difference between the two groups. Correction of slip estimated from postoperative slip angle, translation, and maintenance of intervertebral disc height in the PLIF group was significantly (p<0.05) better than those in the PLF group. However, there was no significant difference in lumbar lordotic angle, slip angle and translation angle upon maximum flexion, or extension bending. Fusion rates of the PLIF and PLF groups had no significant difference. Conclusions The L4–L5 level posterior instrumented fusion for unstable spondylolisthesis using both PLF and PLIF

  17. Effect of complications within 90 days on patient-reported outcomes 3 months and 12 months following elective surgery for lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Chotai, Silky; Parker, Scott L; Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Sielatycki, J Alex; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT There is a paradigm shift toward rewarding providers for quality rather than volume. Complications appear to occur at a fairly consistent frequency in large aggregate data sets. Understanding how complications affect long-term patient-reported outcomes (PROs) following degenerative lumbar surgery is vital. The authors hypothesized that 90-day complications would adversely affect long-term PROs. METHODS Nine hundred six consecutive patients undergoing elective surgery for degenerative lumbar disease over a period of 4 years were enrolled into a prospective longitudinal registry. The following PROs were recorded at baseline and 12-month follow-up: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score, numeric rating scales for back and leg pain, quality of life (EQ-5D scores), general physical and mental health (SF-12 Physical Component Summary [PCS] and Mental Component Summary [MCS] scores) and responses to the North American Spine Society (NASS) satisfaction questionnaire. Previously published minimum clinically important difference (MCID) threshold were used to define meaningful improvement. Complications were divided into major (surgicalsite infection, hardware failure, new neurological deficit, pulmonary embolism, hematoma and myocardial infarction) and minor (urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and deep venous thrombosis). RESULTS Complications developed within 90 days of surgery in 13% (118) of the patients (major in 12% [108] and minor in 8% [68]). The mean improvement in ODI scores, EQ-5D scores, SF-12 PCS scores, and satisfaction at 3 months after surgery was significantly less in the patients with complications than in those who did not have major complications (ODI: 13.5 ± 21.2 vs 21.7 ± 19, < 0.0001; EQ-5D: 0.17 ± 0.25 vs 0.23 ± 0.23, p = 0.04; SF-12 PCS: 8.6 ± 13.3 vs 13.0 ± 11.9, 0.001; and satisfaction: 76% vs 90%, p = 0.002). At 12 months after surgery, the patients with major complications had higher ODI scores than those without complications (29.1

  18. Effect of complications within 90 days on patient-reported outcomes 3 months and 12 months following elective surgery for lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Chotai, Silky; Parker, Scott L; Sivaganesan, Ahilan; Sielatycki, J Alex; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT There is a paradigm shift toward rewarding providers for quality rather than volume. Complications appear to occur at a fairly consistent frequency in large aggregate data sets. Understanding how complications affect long-term patient-reported outcomes (PROs) following degenerative lumbar surgery is vital. The authors hypothesized that 90-day complications would adversely affect long-term PROs. METHODS Nine hundred six consecutive patients undergoing elective surgery for degenerative lumbar disease over a period of 4 years were enrolled into a prospective longitudinal registry. The following PROs were recorded at baseline and 12-month follow-up: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score, numeric rating scales for back and leg pain, quality of life (EQ-5D scores), general physical and mental health (SF-12 Physical Component Summary [PCS] and Mental Component Summary [MCS] scores) and responses to the North American Spine Society (NASS) satisfaction questionnaire. Previously published minimum clinically important difference (MCID) threshold were used to define meaningful improvement. Complications were divided into major (surgicalsite infection, hardware failure, new neurological deficit, pulmonary embolism, hematoma and myocardial infarction) and minor (urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and deep venous thrombosis). RESULTS Complications developed within 90 days of surgery in 13% (118) of the patients (major in 12% [108] and minor in 8% [68]). The mean improvement in ODI scores, EQ-5D scores, SF-12 PCS scores, and satisfaction at 3 months after surgery was significantly less in the patients with complications than in those who did not have major complications (ODI: 13.5 ± 21.2 vs 21.7 ± 19, < 0.0001; EQ-5D: 0.17 ± 0.25 vs 0.23 ± 0.23, p = 0.04; SF-12 PCS: 8.6 ± 13.3 vs 13.0 ± 11.9, 0.001; and satisfaction: 76% vs 90%, p = 0.002). At 12 months after surgery, the patients with major complications had higher ODI scores than those without complications (29.1

  19. Olfactory dysfunction in degenerative ataxias.

    PubMed

    Connelly, T; Farmer, J M; Lynch, D R; Doty, R L

    2003-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the cerebellum may play a role in higher-order olfactory processing. In this study, we administered the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), a standardised test of olfactory function, to patients with ataxias primarily due to cerebellar pathology (spinocerebellar ataxias and related disorders) and to patients with Friedreich ataxia, an ataxia associated mainly with loss of afferent cerebellar pathways. UPSIT scores were slightly lower in both patient groups than in the control subjects, but no differences were noted between the scores of the Friedreich and the other ataxia patients. Within the Friedreich ataxia group, the smell test scores did not correlate with the number of pathologic GAA repeats (a marker of genetic severity), disease duration, or categorical ambulatory ability. UPSIT scores did not correlate with disease duration, although they correlated marginally with ambulatory status in the patients with cerebellar pathology. This study suggests that olfactory dysfunction may be a subtle clinical component of degenerative ataxias, in concordance with the hypothesis that the cerebellum or its afferents plays some role in central olfactory processing.

  20. Red Grape Skin Polyphenols Blunt Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and -9 Activity and Expression in Cell Models of Vascular Inflammation: Protective Role in Degenerative and Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Calabriso, Nadia; Massaro, Marika; Scoditti, Egeria; Pellegrino, Mariangela; Ingrosso, Ilaria; Giovinazzo, Giovanna; Carluccio, Maria Annunziata

    2016-08-29

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are endopeptidases responsible for the hydrolysis of various components of extracellular matrix. MMPs, namely gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, contribute to the progression of chronic and degenerative diseases. Since gelatinases' activity and expression are regulated by oxidative stress, we sought to evaluate whether supplementation with polyphenol-rich red grape skin extracts modulated the matrix-degrading capacity in cell models of vascular inflammation. Human endothelial and monocytic cells were incubated with increasing concentrations (0.5-25 μg/mL) of Negroamaro and Primitivo red grape skin polyphenolic extracts (NSPE and PSPE, respectively) or their specific components (0.5-25 μmol/L), before stimulation with inflammatory challenge. NSPE and PSPE inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, endothelial invasion as well as the MMP-9 and MMP-2 release in stimulated endothelial cells, and MMP-9 production in inflamed monocytes, without affecting tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2. The matrix degrading inhibitory capacity was the same for both NSPE and PSPE, despite their different polyphenolic profiles. Among the main polyphenols of grape skin extracts, trans-resveratrol, trans-piceid, kaempferol and quercetin exhibited the most significant inhibitory effects on matrix-degrading enzyme activities. Our findings appreciate the grape skins as rich source of polyphenols able to prevent the dysregulation of vascular remodelling affecting degenerative and inflammatory diseases.

  1. Effects of age, replicative lifespan and growth rate of human nucleus pulposus cells on selecting age range for cell-based biological therapies for degenerative disc diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Lee, S M; Jeong, S W; Sung, Y G; Lee, J H; Kim, K W

    2016-07-01

    Autologous disc cell implantation, growth factors and gene therapy appear to be promising therapies for disc regeneration. Unfortunately, the replicative lifespan and growth kinetics of human nucleus pulposus (NP) cells related to host age are unclear. We investigated the potential relations among age, replicative lifespan and growth rate of NP cells, and determined the age range that is suitable for cell-based biological therapies for degenerative disc diseases. We used NP tissues classified by decade into five age groups: 30s, 40s, 50s, 60s and 70s. The mean cumulative population doubling level (PDL) and population doubling rate (PDR) of NP cells were assessed by decade. We also investigated correlations between cumulative PDL and age, and between PDR and age. The mean cumulative PDL and PDR decreased significantly in patients in their 60s. The mean cumulative PDL and PDR in the younger groups (30s, 40s and 50s) were significantly higher than those in the older groups (60s and 70s). There also were significant negative correlations between cumulative PDL and age, and between PDR and age. We found that the replicative lifespan and growth rate of human NP cells decreased with age. The replicative potential of NP cells decreased significantly in patients 60 years old and older. Young individuals less than 60 years old may be suitable candidates for NP cell-based biological therapies for treating degenerative disc diseases.

  2. Red Grape Skin Polyphenols Blunt Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 and -9 Activity and Expression in Cell Models of Vascular Inflammation: Protective Role in Degenerative and Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Calabriso, Nadia; Massaro, Marika; Scoditti, Egeria; Pellegrino, Mariangela; Ingrosso, Ilaria; Giovinazzo, Giovanna; Carluccio, Maria Annunziata

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are endopeptidases responsible for the hydrolysis of various components of extracellular matrix. MMPs, namely gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, contribute to the progression of chronic and degenerative diseases. Since gelatinases' activity and expression are regulated by oxidative stress, we sought to evaluate whether supplementation with polyphenol-rich red grape skin extracts modulated the matrix-degrading capacity in cell models of vascular inflammation. Human endothelial and monocytic cells were incubated with increasing concentrations (0.5-25 μg/mL) of Negroamaro and Primitivo red grape skin polyphenolic extracts (NSPE and PSPE, respectively) or their specific components (0.5-25 μmol/L), before stimulation with inflammatory challenge. NSPE and PSPE inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, endothelial invasion as well as the MMP-9 and MMP-2 release in stimulated endothelial cells, and MMP-9 production in inflamed monocytes, without affecting tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2. The matrix degrading inhibitory capacity was the same for both NSPE and PSPE, despite their different polyphenolic profiles. Among the main polyphenols of grape skin extracts, trans-resveratrol, trans-piceid, kaempferol and quercetin exhibited the most significant inhibitory effects on matrix-degrading enzyme activities. Our findings appreciate the grape skins as rich source of polyphenols able to prevent the dysregulation of vascular remodelling affecting degenerative and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27589705

  3. [Degenerative adult scoliosis].

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, C L; Obil-Chavarría, C A; Zárate-Kalfópulos, B; Rosales-Olivares, L M; Alpizar-Aguirre, A; Reyes-Sánchez, A A

    2015-01-01

    Adult scoliosis is a complex three-dimensional rotational deformity of the spine, resulting from the progressive degeneration of the vertebral elements in middle age, in a previously straight spine; a Cobb angle greater than 10° in the coronal plane, which also alters the sagittal and axial planes. It originates an asymmetrical degenerative disc and facet joint, creating asymmetrical loads and subsequently deformity. The main symptom is axial, radicular pain and neurological deficit. Conservative treatment includes drugs and physical therapy. The epidural injections and facet for selectively blocking nerve roots improves short-term pain. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients with intractable pain, radiculopathy and/ or neurological deficits. There is no consensus for surgical indications, however, it must have a clear understanding of the symptoms and clinical signs. The goal of surgery is to decompress neural elements with restoration, modification of the three-dimensional shape deformity and stabilize the coronal and sagittal balance. PMID:27012088

  4. [Degenerative adult scoliosis].

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, C L; Obil-Chavarría, C A; Zárate-Kalfópulos, B; Rosales-Olivares, L M; Alpizar-Aguirre, A; Reyes-Sánchez, A A

    2015-01-01

    Adult scoliosis is a complex three-dimensional rotational deformity of the spine, resulting from the progressive degeneration of the vertebral elements in middle age, in a previously straight spine; a Cobb angle greater than 10° in the coronal plane, which also alters the sagittal and axial planes. It originates an asymmetrical degenerative disc and facet joint, creating asymmetrical loads and subsequently deformity. The main symptom is axial, radicular pain and neurological deficit. Conservative treatment includes drugs and physical therapy. The epidural injections and facet for selectively blocking nerve roots improves short-term pain. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients with intractable pain, radiculopathy and/ or neurological deficits. There is no consensus for surgical indications, however, it must have a clear understanding of the symptoms and clinical signs. The goal of surgery is to decompress neural elements with restoration, modification of the three-dimensional shape deformity and stabilize the coronal and sagittal balance.

  5. REM Sleep Behavior Disorder and REM Sleep Without Atonia as an Early Manifestation of Degenerative Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCarter, Stuart J.; St Louis, Erik K.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia characterized by repeated episodes of dream enactment behavior and REM sleep without atonia (RSWA) during polysomnography recording. RSWA is characterized by increased phasic or tonic muscle activity seen on polysomnographic electromyogram channels. RSWA is a requisite diagnostic feature of RBD, but may also be seen in patients without clinical symptoms or signs of dream enactment as an incidental finding in neurologically normal individuals, especially in patients receiving antidepressant therapy. RBD may be idiopathic or symptomatic. Patients with idiopathic RBD often later develop other neurological features including parkinsonism, orthostatic hypotension, anosmia, or cognitive impairment. RSWA without clinical symptoms as well as clinically overt RBD also often occurs concomitantly with the α-synucleinopathy family of neurodegenerative disorders, which includes idiopathic Parkinson disease, Lewy body dementia, and multiple system atrophy. This review article considers the epidemiology of RBD, clinical and polysomnographic diagnostic standards for both RBD and RSWA, previously reported associations of RSWA and RBD with neurodegenerative disorders and other potential causes, the pathophysiology of which brain structures and networks mediate dysregulation of REM sleep muscle atonia, and considerations for the effective and safe management of RBD. PMID:22328094

  6. [The use of minimally invasive instrumental spinal surgical technique in lumbar diseases of degenerative or traumatic origin].

    PubMed

    Schwarcz, Attila; Kasó, Gábor; Büki, András; Dóczi, Tamás

    2013-03-30

    Paradigm change has recently taken place in spine surgery with the application of minimally invasive techniques. Minimally invasive techniques have several advantages over the open traditional techniques: less blood loss, preservation of spine muscle integrity, shorter hospitalization, early mobilization, reduced pain levels, lower risk of infection. The presented cases cover following lumbar pathologies: segmental spinal instability, LV-SI grade II. spondylolisthesis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, spine trauma. Unilateral or bilateral mini-open technique was employed in the degenerative cases, depending on symptoms and signes. If unilateral symptoms--pathology was identified, screws and rod were implanted percutaneously on the side contralateral to the pathology. The segmental fusion between vertebral bodies was always assured by a cage and autologous bone. The presented trauma case involved combined AO type A2 and B fractures. The anterior column was strengthened with vertebral body stents filled with bone cement, the posterior column was fixed with a percutaneously implanted screw rod system. Insertion of stents in the collapsed vertebra significantly increased the vertebral body height and also improved the stability of the spine. Minimally invasive spine surgery techniques appear more advantageous over the traditional open spine surgery that necessitates for large midline approaches. PMID:23750428

  7. [The Weaver syndrome in cattle. Clinical, biochemical and pathologico-anatomic studies in a Braunvieh/Brown Swiss cow with bovine progressive degenerative myeloencephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Ehrensperger, F; Bracher, V

    1987-01-01

    The clinical signs and pathological lesions, consistent with Bovine Progressive Degenerative Myeloencephalopathy (BPDME), are described in a heifer. The animal was an 18-month-old Braunvieh-/Brown Swiss crossbreed with 50% Brown Swiss. Both the sire as well as the dam were related to the bull "B.". The only neurological signs were a posterior ataxia. Mobility and coordination of the front legs were normal. The CK activity of the cerebrospinal fluid was enhanced. There was a moderate to severe degeneration of the white matter consisting of marked axonal degradation and distension and degradation of myelin sheats in all parts of the spinal cord as well as in the medulla oblongata. The lesions were more severe in the descending than in the ascending tracts.

  8. Study of the Clinical Outcome between Traumatic and Degenerative (non-traumatic) Meniscal Tears after Arthroscopic Surgery: A 4-Years Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghislain, Nietiayurk Aminake; Wei, Ji-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The meniscus is a biconcave fibrocartilage in the knee joint interpose between the femoral condyles and tibial plateau; the meniscus has functions in load bearing, load transmission, shock absorption joint stability, joint lubrication, and joint congruity. Aim The aim of this study is to provide orthopeadic surgeon a base of reference in the choice of the optimal course of management for meniscal tears. Materials and Methods One hundred and seventeen patients met the criteria of inclusion for the present study. Patients were divided in two groups T and NT according to the presence of distinct previous traumatic events to the knees. Two subgroups were formed in each groups T and NT respectively at a mean follow up of 1 and 4 years. Postoperative clinical outcome were assessed using Lysholm scores and Rand SF-36 survey. Results One hundred and seventeen patients were included in the present study with 60(51.28%) patients in the traumatic group and 57(48.71%) in the degenerative group. 95(81.19%) patients in total were satisfied with their health status at end of follow up. The mean value of Lysholm scores at 1 year were respectively 85.25±8.78 for traumatic group and 86.38±12.14 for non-traumatic group and at 4 years were respectively 92.63±7.31 for traumatic group and 72.90±20.77 for non-traumatic group. According to Rand SF-36 health, traumatic group showed better improvements compare to non-traumatic group between 1 and 4 years after arthroscopic meniscus surgery. Conclusion A total of 95(81.19%) patients in total were satisfied with their health status at follow up, however, we found that arthroscopy as a treatment for meniscal tear have a relatively better mid-term clinical outcome for traumatic meniscal tears compare to non-traumatic/degenerative meniscal tears. PMID:27190905

  9. Widespread retinal degenerative disease mutation (rdAc) discovered among a large number of popular cat breeds.

    PubMed

    Menotti-Raymond, M; David, V A; Pflueger, S; Roelke, M E; Kehler, J; O'Brien, S J; Narfström, K

    2010-10-01

    The recent discovery of a mutational variant in the CEP290 gene (CEP290: IVS50+9T>G), conferring recessive retinal degeneration in Abyssinian and Somali (long-haired Abyssinian) cats (rdAc) prompted a survey among 41 cat breeds (846 individuals) to assess the incidence, frequency and clinical consequence of rdAc. The rdAc allele displayed widespread distribution, observed in 16/43 (37%) breeds, exhibiting a high allele frequency (∼33%) in North American and European Siamese populations. Clinical evaluations demonstrated high concordance between rdAc pathology and the CEP290 (IVS50+9T>G) homozygous genotype (P=1.1E-6), with clinical disease similar to affected Abyssinians/Somalis. This retinal degeneration has not been reported in breeds other than the Abyssinian/Somali and poses a significant health risk particularly in the Siamese breed group. Alertness of the veterinary community and the present availability of commercial diagnostic testing could synergistically enable breeders to reduce the incidence of rdAc blindness in pure-bred cat populations.

  10. Clinical Genetics of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhangyu; Liu, Changyun; Che, Chunhui; Huang, Huapin

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common progressive neurodegenerative disease and the most common form of dementia in the elderly. It is a complex disorder with environmental and genetic components. There are two major types of AD, early onset and the more common late onset. The genetics of early-onset AD are largely understood with mutations in three different genes leading to the disease. In contrast, while susceptibility loci and alleles associated with late-onset AD have been identified using genetic association studies, the genetics of late-onset Alzheimer's disease are not fully understood. Here we review the known genetics of early- and late-onset AD, the clinical features of EOAD according to genotypes, and the clinical implications of the genetics of AD. PMID:24955352

  11. Cost Utility Analysis of the Cervical Artificial Disc vs Fusion for the Treatment of 2-Level Symptomatic Degenerative Disc Disease: 5-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhuo; Nunley, Pierce; Stone, Marcus B.; Lee, Darrin; Kim, Kee D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cervical total disc replacement (cTDR) was developed to treat cervical degenerative disc disease while preserving motion. OBJECTIVE: Cost-effectiveness of this intervention was established by looking at 2-year follow-up, and this update reevaluates our analysis over 5 years. METHODS: Data were derived from a randomized trial of 330 patients. Data from the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey were transformed into utilities by using the SF-6D algorithm. Costs were calculated by extracting diagnosis-related group codes and then applying 2014 Medicare reimbursement rates. A Markov model evaluated quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for both treatment groups. Univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses were conducted to test the stability of the model. The model adopted both societal and health system perspectives and applied a 3% annual discount rate. RESULTS: The cTDR costs $1687 more than anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) over 5 years. In contrast, cTDR had $34 377 less productivity loss compared with ACDF. There was a significant difference in the return-to-work rate (81.6% compared with 65.4% for cTDR and ACDF, respectively; P = .029). From a societal perspective, the incremental cost-effective ratio (ICER) for cTDR was −$165 103 per QALY. From a health system perspective, the ICER for cTDR was $8518 per QALY. In the sensitivity analysis, the ICER for cTDR remained below the US willingness-to-pay threshold of $50 000 per QALY in all scenarios (−$225 816 per QALY to $22 071 per QALY). CONCLUSION: This study is the first to report the comparative cost-effectiveness of cTDR vs ACDF for 2-level degenerative disc disease at 5 years. The authors conclude that, because of the negative ICER, cTDR is the dominant modality. ABBREVIATIONS: ACDF, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion AWP, average wholesale price CE, cost-effectiveness CEA, cost-effectiveness analysis CPT, Current Procedural Terminology cTDR, cervical total disc

  12. Clinical management of Krabbe disease.

    PubMed

    Escolar, Maria L; West, Tara; Dallavecchia, Alessandra; Poe, Michele D; LaPoint, Kathleen

    2016-11-01

    Krabbe disease (KD) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the galactocerebrosidase enzyme. The early- and late-infantile subtypes, which are the most common forms of the disease, are rapidly progressive and lead to early death, whereas the later-onset types are clinically heterogeneous. The only disease-modifying treatment currently available is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which is effective only when performed early in the course of the disease. Because most patients with KD are diagnosed too late for treatment, primary care physicians are faced with the challenge of caring for a child with severe neurologic impairment. This Review describes presenting symptoms, diagnosis, and disease manifestations of KD and provides basic guidelines for its management. Symptomatic treatment and supportive care that address the unique requirements of these patients can greatly improve the quality of life of patients and their families. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Clinical management of Krabbe disease.

    PubMed

    Escolar, Maria L; West, Tara; Dallavecchia, Alessandra; Poe, Michele D; LaPoint, Kathleen

    2016-11-01

    Krabbe disease (KD) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the galactocerebrosidase enzyme. The early- and late-infantile subtypes, which are the most common forms of the disease, are rapidly progressive and lead to early death, whereas the later-onset types are clinically heterogeneous. The only disease-modifying treatment currently available is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which is effective only when performed early in the course of the disease. Because most patients with KD are diagnosed too late for treatment, primary care physicians are faced with the challenge of caring for a child with severe neurologic impairment. This Review describes presenting symptoms, diagnosis, and disease manifestations of KD and provides basic guidelines for its management. Symptomatic treatment and supportive care that address the unique requirements of these patients can greatly improve the quality of life of patients and their families. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27638597

  14. Global Transcriptome Analysis of the Tentacle of the Jellyfish Cyanea capillata Using Deep Sequencing and Expressed Sequence Tags: Insight into the Toxin- and Degenerative Disease-Related Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dan; Wang, Qianqian; Ruan, Zengliang; He, Qian; Zhang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Background Jellyfish contain diverse toxins and other bioactive components. However, large-scale identification of novel toxins and bioactive components from jellyfish has been hampered by the low efficiency of traditional isolation and purification methods. Results We performed de novo transcriptome sequencing of the tentacle tissue of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata. A total of 51,304,108 reads were obtained and assembled into 50,536 unigenes. Of these, 21,357 unigenes had homologues in public databases, but the remaining unigenes had no significant matches due to the limited sequence information available and species-specific novel sequences. Functional annotation of the unigenes also revealed general gene expression profile characteristics in the tentacle of C. capillata. A primary goal of this study was to identify putative toxin transcripts. As expected, we screened many transcripts encoding proteins similar to several well-known toxin families including phospholipases, metalloproteases, serine proteases and serine protease inhibitors. In addition, some transcripts also resembled molecules with potential toxic activities, including cnidarian CfTX-like toxins with hemolytic activity, plancitoxin-1, venom toxin-like peptide-6, histamine-releasing factor, neprilysin, dipeptidyl peptidase 4, vascular endothelial growth factor A, angiotensin-converting enzyme-like and endothelin-converting enzyme 1-like proteins. Most of these molecules have not been previously reported in jellyfish. Interestingly, we also characterized a number of transcripts with similarities to proteins relevant to several degenerative diseases, including Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This is the first description of degenerative disease-associated genes in jellyfish. Conclusion We obtained a well-categorized and annotated transcriptome of C. capillata tentacle that will be an important and valuable resource for further understanding of jellyfish at the molecular

  15. [Clinical symptoms of Alzheimer disease].

    PubMed

    Tariska, P; Urbanics, K; Knolmayer, J; Mészáros, A

    1995-04-23

    Data of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease and checked out in the special unit named Memory Clinic functioning from 1992 in the National Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology are summarized. Age average of the 60 patients was 63 years, the first symptoms of the disease had appeared in 57 p.c. before the age of 65, so the classical presenile form of the ailment is represented too in the material. Predominance of multifocal cortical function disturbances in the symptomatology is characteristic, association of the depression is outstandingly frequent. The atypical features, or those characteristic in diseases of cerebrovascular origin are not infrequently seen (headache, dizziness, slight symptoms of pyramidal lesions). The absence of epileptic seizures It was interesting even in considering the data of the literature too. The main points of clinical diagnostics and differential diagnostics are demonstrated with the aid of case reports. The author's material is the first Hungarian publication in the topics of clinical symptoms of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease that had been investigated with up-to-date methods. Occurrence of the disease of very great frequency could be supposed to occur at general practitioners, the importance of differential diagnostics and planning of the complex longlasting therapy is extremely great.

  16. A Chaplain-led Spiritual Life Review Pilot Study for Patients with Brain Cancers and Other Degenerative Neurologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Piderman, Katherine M.; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Euerle, Terin T.; Lovejoy, Laura A.; Kwete, Gracia M.; Jatoi, Aminah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study was designed to describe changes in spiritual well-being (SWB), spiritual coping, and quality of life (QOL) in patients with brain cancer or other neurodegenerative diseases participating in a chaplain-led spiritual life review interview and development of a spiritual legacy document (SLD). Methods: Eligible participants were enrolled and completed baseline questionnaires. They were interviewed by a board-certified chaplain about spiritual influences, beliefs, practices, values, and spiritual struggles. An SLD was prepared for each participant, and one month follow-up questionnaires were completed. Two cases are summarized, and spiritual development themes are illustrated within a spiritual development framework. Results: A total of 27 patients completed baseline questionnaires and the interview; 24 completed the SLD, and 15 completed the follow-up questionnaire. Increases in SWB, religious coping, and QOL were detected. The majority maintained the highest (best) scores of negative religious coping, demonstrating minimal spiritual struggle. Conclusions: Despite the challenges of brain cancers and other neurodegenerative diseases, participants demonstrated improvements in SWB, positive religious coping, and QOL. Patient comments indicate that benefit is related to the opportunity to reflect on and integrate spiritual experiences and to preserve them for others. Research with a larger, more diverse sample is needed, as well as clinical applications for those too vulnerable to participate in longitudinal follow-up. PMID:25973267

  17. Serum levels of BMP-2, 4, 7 and AHSG in patients with degenerative joint disease requiring total arthroplasty of the hip and temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Albilia, Jonathan B; Tenenbaum, Howard C; Clokie, Cameron M L; Walt, David R; Baker, Gerald I; Psutka, David J; Backstein, David; Peel, Sean A F

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no objective or reliable means of assessing the severity of degenerative joint disease (DJD) and need for joint replacement surgery. Hence, it is difficult to know when an individual with DJD has reached a point where total arthroplasty is indicated. The purpose of the present study is to determine whether serum levels of Alpha-2 HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) as well as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2, 4, 7) can be used to predict the presence of severe DJD of the hip and/or temporomandibular joint (TMJ) (specifically: joints that require replacement). A total of 30 patients scheduled for arthroplasty (diseased) (15 HIP, 15 TMJ) and 120 age-matched controls (healthy/non-diseased) were included. Blood samples were collected from all patients ≥8 weeks after the last arthroplasty. Concentrations of serum analytes were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and these were compared between the Diseased and Healthy groups, utilizing the Mann-Whitney U-test. Patients with disease had significantly higher levels of BMP-2 and BMP-4 and lower levels of AHSG in serum compared to non-diseased humans (p < 0.01). Higher levels of BMP-2, 4 and reduced levels of AHSG appear to characterize patients who have DJD that is severe enough to require total joint replacement. Perhaps measurements of these proteins can be used to make objective decisions regarding the need for total arthroplasty as opposed to the current subjective approaches.

  18. Combined transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with posterolateral instrumented fusion for degenerative disc disease can be a safe and effective treatment for lower back pain

    PubMed Central

    Deukmedjian, Ara J; Cianciabella, Augusto J; Cutright, Jason; Deukmedjian, Arias

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lumbar fusion is a proven treatment for chronic lower back pain (LBP) in the setting of symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis; however, fusion is controversial when the primary diagnosis is degenerative disc disease (DDD). Our objective was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of lumbar fusion in the treatment of LBP due to DDD. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred and five consecutive patients with single or multi-level DDD underwent lumbar decompression and instrumented fusion for the treatment of chronic LBP between the years of 2008 and 2011. The primary outcome measures in this study were back and leg pain visual analogue scale (VAS), patient reported % resolution of preoperative back pain and leg pain, reoperation rate, perioperative complications, blood loss and hospital length of stay (LOS). Results: The average resolution of preoperative back pain per patient was 84% (n = 205) while the average resolution of preoperative leg pain was 90% (n = 190) while a mean follow-up period of 528 days (1.5 years). Average VAS for combined back and leg pain significantly improved from a preoperative value of 9.0 to a postoperative value of 1.1 (P ≤ 0.0001), a change of 7.9 points for the cohort. The average number of lumbar disc levels fused per patient was 2.3 (range 1-4). Median postoperative LOS in the hospital was 1.2 days. Average blood loss was 108 ml perfused level. Complications occurred in 5% of patients (n = 11) and the rate of reoperation for symptomatic adjacent segment disease was 2% (n = 4). Complications included reoperation at index level for symptomatic pseudoarthrosis with hardware failure (n = 3); surgical site infection (n = 7); repair of cerebrospinal fluid leak (n = 1), and one patient death at home 3 days after discharge. Conclusion: Lumbar fusion for symptomatic DDD can be a safe and effective treatment for medically refractory LBP with or without leg pain. PMID:26692696

  19. Enhancing human nucleus pulposus cells for biological treatment approaches of degenerative intervertebral disc diseases: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mern, Demissew Shenegelegn; Beierfuß, Anja; Thomé, Claudius; Hegewald, Aldemar Andres

    2014-12-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration has been described as an aberrant, cell-mediated, age- and genetics-dependent molecular degeneration process, which can be accelerated by nutritional, mechanical and toxic factors. Collective involvement of these factors can result in structural failures, which are often associated with pain. Current treatment approaches are restricted to symptomatic therapies, not addressing options of restoring structural or biological deterioration of the IVD as the underlying problem. Therapeutic potentials of IVD cell transplantation, biomaterials, inhibiting or activating bioactive factors, including gene-therapeutic approaches, have been shown in vitro or in small animal models. Since human degenerative IVD cells display distinctive features with regard to cell biology and regenerative potential, we attempted a systematic review, investigating the in vitro response of human nucleus pulposus cells to different stimuli. Therefore, we conducted an electronic database search on Medline through July 2011 to identify, compare and discuss publications concerning the effects of cell-cell stimulation, bioactive factors, biomaterials and combinations thereof in terms of cell isolation, proliferation, differentiation and matrix protein synthesis. This survey and discussion might serve as a source for designing future biological treatment strategies for the human IVD.

  20. A Novel, Minimally-Invasive Approach to Repair Degenerative Disk Disease in an Ovine Model Using Injectable Polymethyl-Methacrylate and Bovine Collagen (PMMA/BC)

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Erica; Narayan, Anisha; Taylor, William

    2016-01-01

    Background : The natural, inflammatory repair processes of an injured intervertebral degenerative disc can propagate further injury and destruction. While there are many different treatment modalities of the pain related to degenerative disc disease, none are actually reparative in nature. Treatment strategies to repair a degenerative disc without inducing a destructive inflammatory milieu have been elusive.  Purpose: The purpose of this experiment is to discover the feasibility of reconstructing an injured intervertebral disc using an injected, inert polymer as the foundation for endogenous collagen growth. Study Design: In this ovine model of six subjects in total, we introduce a modality where a large inert polymer, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), in conjunction bovine collagen (BC) is injected into the intervertebral disc. Following six months of observation, histologic specimens were evaluated macroscopically and microscopically for evidence of a benefit of the injectable PMMA/BC. Methods: We obtained six merino sheep for this study. Concentric injuries were made to four of their lumbar intervertebral discs. Two of those levels were treated with a percutaneous injection of 0.3 cc of PMMA/BC. The remaining lumbar levels were left untreated and were our controls. After six months, all subjects were sacrificed. Their four levels were extracted and were examined macroscopically and microscopically. Results: All subjects tolerated the lumbar injury and percutaneous injection of PMMA/BC well. After the six month interval, all subjects have demonstrated an intact architecture of their lumbar disc height at the macroscopic and microscopic level. Microscopically, there was no evidence of external migration of the PMMA/BC microspheres, nor was there any evidence of an inflammatory response by its presence. Notably, the PMMA/BC microspheres were well-incorporated into the concentric disc tears and had undergone endogenous collagen formation in its environment

  1. A Novel, Minimally-Invasive Approach to Repair Degenerative Disk Disease in an Ovine Model Using Injectable Polymethyl-Methacrylate and Bovine Collagen (PMMA/BC)

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Erica; Narayan, Anisha; Taylor, William

    2016-01-01

    Background : The natural, inflammatory repair processes of an injured intervertebral degenerative disc can propagate further injury and destruction. While there are many different treatment modalities of the pain related to degenerative disc disease, none are actually reparative in nature. Treatment strategies to repair a degenerative disc without inducing a destructive inflammatory milieu have been elusive.  Purpose: The purpose of this experiment is to discover the feasibility of reconstructing an injured intervertebral disc using an injected, inert polymer as the foundation for endogenous collagen growth. Study Design: In this ovine model of six subjects in total, we introduce a modality where a large inert polymer, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), in conjunction bovine collagen (BC) is injected into the intervertebral disc. Following six months of observation, histologic specimens were evaluated macroscopically and microscopically for evidence of a benefit of the injectable PMMA/BC. Methods: We obtained six merino sheep for this study. Concentric injuries were made to four of their lumbar intervertebral discs. Two of those levels were treated with a percutaneous injection of 0.3 cc of PMMA/BC. The remaining lumbar levels were left untreated and were our controls. After six months, all subjects were sacrificed. Their four levels were extracted and were examined macroscopically and microscopically. Results: All subjects tolerated the lumbar injury and percutaneous injection of PMMA/BC well. After the six month interval, all subjects have demonstrated an intact architecture of their lumbar disc height at the macroscopic and microscopic level. Microscopically, there was no evidence of external migration of the PMMA/BC microspheres, nor was there any evidence of an inflammatory response by its presence. Notably, the PMMA/BC microspheres were well-incorporated into the concentric disc tears and had undergone endogenous collagen formation in its environment

  2. Clinical Outcomes of Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion versus Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Three-Level Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guoxin; Wu, Xinbo; Yu, Shunzhi; Sun, Qi; Zhang, Hailong; Gu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to directly compare the clinical outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) in three-level lumbar spinal stenosis. This retrospective study involved a total of 60 patients with three-level degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis who underwent MIS-TLIF or PLIF from January 2010 to February 2012. Back and leg visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Short Form-36 (SF-36) scale were used to assess the pain, disability, and health status before surgery and postoperatively. In addition, the operating time, estimated blood loss, and hospital stay were also recorded. There were no significant differences in back VAS, leg VAS, ODI, SF-36, fusion condition, and complications at 12-month follow-up between the two groups (P > 0.05). However, significantly less blood loss and shorter hospital stay were observed in MIS-TLIF group (P < 0.05). Moreover, patients undergoing MIS-TLIF had significantly lower back VAS than those in PLIF group at 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05). Compared with PLIF, MIS-TLIF might be a prior option because of noninferior efficacy as well as merits of less blood loss and quicker recovery in treating three-level lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:27747244

  3. Pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilizers for degenerative spine: in vitro biomechanical testing and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chamoli, Uphar; Diwan, Ashish D; Tsafnat, Naomi

    2014-09-01

    Dynamic stabilization in a degenerate symptomatic spine may be advantageous compared with conventional fusion procedures, as it helps preserve motion and minimizes redistribution of loads at instrumented and adjacent segments. This article presents a systematic review of biomechanical and clinical evidence available on some of the pedicle screw based posterior dynamic stabilization (PDS) devices. Using Medline, Embase, and Scopus online databases, we identified four pedicle-screw-PDS devices for which both, biomechanical testing and clinical follow-up data are available: Graf artificial ligaments, Isobar TTL, Polyetheretherketone rods, and Dynesys. The current state-of-the-art of pedicle-screw-PDS devices is far from achieving its desired biomechanical efficacy, which has resulted in a weak support for the posited clinical benefits. Although pedicle-screw-PDS devices are useful in salvaging a moderately degenerate functionally suboptimal disc, for severe disc degeneration cases fusion is still the preferred choice. We conclude that a pedicle-screw-PDS device should aim at restoring load sharing amongst spinal elements while preserving the qualitative and quantitative nature of spinal motion, especially minimize posterior shift of the helical axis of motion. More precise and objective assessment techniques need to be standardized for in vivo evaluation of intervertebral motion and load sharing amongst spinal elements across different pedicle-screw-PDS devices.

  4. Veterinary Medicine and Multi-Omics Research for Future Nutrition Targets: Metabolomics and Transcriptomics of the Common Degenerative Mitral Valve Disease in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinghong; Freeman, Lisa M; Rush, John E; Huggins, Gordon S; Kennedy, Adam D; Labuda, Jeffrey A; Laflamme, Dorothy P; Hannah, Steven S

    2015-08-01

    Canine degenerative mitral valve disease (DMVD) is the most common form of heart disease in dogs. The objective of this study was to identify cellular and metabolic pathways that play a role in DMVD by performing metabolomics and transcriptomics analyses on serum and tissue (mitral valve and left ventricle) samples previously collected from dogs with DMVD or healthy hearts. Gas or liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrophotometry were used to identify metabolites in serum. Transcriptomics analysis of tissue samples was completed using RNA-seq, and selected targets were confirmed by RT-qPCR. Random Forest analysis was used to classify the metabolites that best predicted the presence of DMVD. Results identified 41 known and 13 unknown serum metabolites that were significantly different between healthy and DMVD dogs, representing alterations in fat and glucose energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and other pathways. The three metabolites with the greatest single effect in the Random Forest analysis were γ-glutamylmethionine, oxidized glutathione, and asymmetric dimethylarginine. Transcriptomics analysis identified 812 differentially expressed transcripts in left ventricle samples and 263 in mitral valve samples, representing changes in energy metabolism, antioxidant function, nitric oxide signaling, and extracellular matrix homeostasis pathways. Many of the identified alterations may benefit from nutritional or medical management. Our study provides evidence of the growing importance of integrative approaches in multi-omics research in veterinary and nutritional sciences.

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: clinical features.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Michael

    2005-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic disease affecting up to 40% of people in the Western world. Risk factors associated with GERD include age and lifestyle habits, although the clinically relevant contribution of many of these factors is unclear. In GERD, refluxed gastric acid damages the oesophageal mucosa, generally when the pH falls below 4. GERD patients present a variety of symptoms, most commonly heartburn and regurgitation. Oesophageal complications associated with GERD include erosions, ulcers, peptic strictures, and Barrett's oesophagus which is implicated in the development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Diagnosis of GERD is problematic due to the range of symptoms which may be presented to the physician and symptom severity is frequently unrelated to disease severity. While endoscopic monitoring may be used to assess the presence and severity of GERD, a lack of visible damage does not necessarily indicate an absence of GERD. Techniques used to diagnose GERD include addition of an acid solution into the oesophagus in order to replicate symptoms (Bernstein test) or 24-hour intra-oesophageal pH monitoring. Proton pump inhibitors are effective in the treatment of GERD, acting to reduce the acidity of the gastric juice and hence reduce oesophageal damage and symptoms associated with GERD. Symptoms most indicative of GERD are those associated with erosive oesophagitis, including heartburn and acid regurgitation. Less common GERD-associated symptoms include chest pain, a range of ear, nose and throat conditions, and asthma. In contrast to perceptions of the disease as 'merely' heartburn, the impact on patients' quality of life can be profound. Increasing awareness of GERD by health care professionals has led to improved diagnosis and a greater appreciation of the need for maintenance therapy.

  6. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 14: brace therapy as an adjunct to or substitute for lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Andrew T; Ghogawala, Zoher; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Watters, William C; Resnick, Daniel K; Sharan, Alok; Eck, Jason C; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Wang, Jeffrey C; Groff, Michael W; Dhall, Sanjay S; Kaiser, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    The utilization of orthotic devices for lumbar degenerative disease has been justified from both a prognostic and therapeutic perspective. As a prognostic tool, bracing is applied prior to surgery to determine if immobilization of the spine leads to symptomatic relief and thus justify the performance of a fusion. Since bracing does not eliminate motion, the validity of this assumption is questionable. Only one low-level study has investigated the predictive value of bracing prior to surgery. No correlation between response to bracing and fusion outcome was observed; therefore a trial of preoperative bracing is not recommended. Based on low-level evidence, the use of bracing is not recommended for the prevention of low-back pain in a general working population, since the incidence of low-back pain and impact on productivity were not reduced. However, in laborers with a history of back pain, a positive impact on lost workdays was observed when bracing was applied. Bracing is recommended as an option for treatment of subacute low-back pain, as several higher-level studies have demonstrated an improvement in pain scores and function. The use of bracing following instrumented posterolateral fusion, however, is not recommended, since equivalent outcomes have been demonstrated with or without the application of a brace. PMID:24980591

  7. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 14: brace therapy as an adjunct to or substitute for lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Andrew T; Ghogawala, Zoher; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Watters, William C; Resnick, Daniel K; Sharan, Alok; Eck, Jason C; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Wang, Jeffrey C; Groff, Michael W; Dhall, Sanjay S; Kaiser, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    The utilization of orthotic devices for lumbar degenerative disease has been justified from both a prognostic and therapeutic perspective. As a prognostic tool, bracing is applied prior to surgery to determine if immobilization of the spine leads to symptomatic relief and thus justify the performance of a fusion. Since bracing does not eliminate motion, the validity of this assumption is questionable. Only one low-level study has investigated the predictive value of bracing prior to surgery. No correlation between response to bracing and fusion outcome was observed; therefore a trial of preoperative bracing is not recommended. Based on low-level evidence, the use of bracing is not recommended for the prevention of low-back pain in a general working population, since the incidence of low-back pain and impact on productivity were not reduced. However, in laborers with a history of back pain, a positive impact on lost workdays was observed when bracing was applied. Bracing is recommended as an option for treatment of subacute low-back pain, as several higher-level studies have demonstrated an improvement in pain scores and function. The use of bracing following instrumented posterolateral fusion, however, is not recommended, since equivalent outcomes have been demonstrated with or without the application of a brace.

  8. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods.

    PubMed

    Benezech, Jacques; Garlenq, Bruno; Larroque, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK(®)-Optima system (Innov'Spine, France) composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA(®) polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK) without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%), quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%), and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones. PMID:26981285

  9. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods

    PubMed Central

    Benezech, Jacques; Garlenq, Bruno; Larroque, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK®-Optima system (Innov'Spine, France) composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA® polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK) without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%), quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%), and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones. PMID:26981285

  10. Degenerative alterations of the cementum-periodontal ligament complex and early tooth loss in a young patient with periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Petruţiu, S A; Buiga, Petronela; Roman, Alexandra; Danciu, Theodora; Mihu, Carmen Mihaela; Mihu, D

    2012-01-01

    Premature exfoliation of primary or permanent teeth in children or adolescents is extremely rare and it can be a manifestation of an underlying systemic disease. This study aims to present the histological aspects associated with early tooth loss in a case of periodontal disease developed without local inflammation and with minimal periodontal pockets and attachment loss. The maxillary left second premolar was extracted together with a gingival collar attached to the root surface. The histological analysis recorded the resorption of the cementum in multiple areas of the entire root surface with the connective tissue of the desmodontium invading the lacunae defects. The connective tissue rich in cells occupied the periodontal ligamentar space and the resorptive areas. No inflammation was obvious in the periodontal ligament connective tissue. This report may warn clinicians about the possibility of the association of cemental abnormalities with early tooth loss.

  11. Deletion of RBP-J in adult mice leads to the onset of aortic valve degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Feng, Lei; Wang, Chun-Mei; Zheng, Qi-Jun; Zhao, Bi-Jun; Yi, Wei; Zhang, Jin-Zhou; Wang, Yue-Min; Guo, Hai-Tao; Yi, Ding-Hua; Han, Hua

    2012-04-01

    Transcription factor RBP-J-mediated Notch signaling has been implicated in several inherited cardiovascular diseases including aortic valve diseases (AVD). But whether Notch signal plays a role in AVD in adults has been unclear. This study aims to test whether the deletion of RBP-J in adult mice would lead to AVD and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Cre-LoxP-mediated gene deletion was employed to disrupt Notch signal in adult mice. Immunofluorescence and electron microscope observations showed that deletion of RBP-J in adult mice led to early morphological changes of AVD. The size of aortic valve was enlarged. The endothelial homeostasis was perturbed, probably due to the up-regulation of VEGFR2. The endothelial cells exhibited increased proliferation and loose endothelial junctions. The valvular mesenchyme displayed significant fibrosis, consistent with the up-regulation of TGF-β1 and activation of endothelial-mesenchymal transition. We observed melanin-producing cells in aortic valves. The number of melanin-producing cells increased significantly, and their location changed from the mesenchyme to subendothelial layer of valve cusps in RBP-J deficient mice. These results suggest that RBP-J-mediated Notch signaling in aortic valves may be critically involved in valve homeostasis and valve diseases as well. These findings will be helpful for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of AVD in adults.

  12. Degenerative myelopathy in a family of Siberian Husky dogs.

    PubMed

    Bichsel, P; Vandevelde, M; Lang, J; Kull-Hächler, S

    1983-11-01

    Three closely related, Siberian Husky dogs had chronic progressive paresis and ataxia with muscle atrophy in the hindlimbs. Radiologic and myelographic examination of the spine revealed no abnormalities. On histologic examination, disseminated degeneration of the white matter, particularly in the thoracic segments, was seen. The clinical and pathological findings were similar to those described in aging large dogs with so-called degenerative myelopathy. The cause of this disease is unknown but the fact that these 3 Huskies were closely related suggest that hereditary factors may play a role.

  13. Associative learning in degenerative neostriatal disorders: contrasts in explicit and implicit remembering between Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases.

    PubMed

    Sprengelmeyer, R; Canavan, A G; Lange, H W; Hömberg, V

    1995-01-01

    The performances of 12 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), 16 with Huntington's disease (HD), and young and old healthy controls were assessed on a number of tests of verbal and nonverbal declarative memory, on a test of nonmotor conditional associative learning (words and colors), and on a number of reaction time (RT) tasks. The RT tasks consisted of cued simple and choice reactions. The relationship between the precue and the imperative stimulus in the S1-S2 paradigm was nonarbitrary in the first series and arbitrary in the second series. The series with arbitrary S1-S2 associations was repeated across two successive blocks of trials. The rationale of the study was to investigate the function of the basal ganglia "complex loop," and it was postulated that HD patients would show greater deficits because of greater involvement of the caudate nucleus. The patients with HD had the slowest RTs. Across the two blocks with arbitrary S1-S2 associations, the patients with HD but not PD nevertheless showed evidence of learning in their precued RTs. In contrast, the patients with PD were better able to remember the associations in free recall than were the HD patients. It is concluded that patients with PD have relatively greater deficits in procedural learning, whereas those with HD have relatively more impairments in declarative memory, and the greater level of cognitive impairment in HD overall is interpreted as being due to more serious damage to the caudate loop. PMID:7885356

  14. The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM): a higher oxidative stress and age-dependent degenerative diseases model.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yoichi; Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Kumagai, Naoko; Yoshikawa, Keisuke; Ishii, Sanae; Furukawa, Ayako; Takei, Shiro; Sakura, Masaaki; Kawamura, Noriko; Hosokawa, Masanori

    2009-04-01

    The SAM strain of mice is actually a group of related inbred strains consisting of a series of SAMP (accelerated senescence-prone) and SAMR (accelerated senescence-resistant) strains. Compared with the SAMR strains, the SAMP strains show a more accelerated senescence process, a shorter lifespan, and an earlier onset and more rapid progress of age-associated pathological phenotypes similar to human geriatric disorders. The higher oxidative stress status observed in SAMP mice is partly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and may be a cause of this senescence acceleration and age-dependent alterations in cell structure and function. Based on our recent observations, we discuss a possible mechanism for mitochondrial dysfunction resulting in the excessive production of reactive oxygen species, and a role for the hyperoxidative stress status in neurodegeneration in SAMP mice. These SAM strains can serve as a useful tool to understand the cellular mechanisms of age-dependent degeneration, and to develop clinical interventions. PMID:18688709

  15. Targeted transgenic expression of the mutation causing Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome leads to proliferative and degenerative epidermal disease.

    PubMed

    Sagelius, Hanna; Rosengardten, Ylva; Hanif, Mubashir; Erdos, Michael R; Rozell, Björn; Collins, Francis S; Eriksson, Maria

    2008-04-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare human genetic disorder characterized by striking progeroid features. Clinical findings in the skin include scleroderma, alopecia and loss of subcutaneous fat. HGPS is usually caused by a dominant-negative mutation in LMNA, a gene that encodes two major proteins of the inner nuclear lamina: lamin A and lamin C. We have generated tetracycline-inducible transgenic lines that carry a minigene of human LMNA under the control of a tet-operon. Two mouse lines were created: one carrying the wild-type sequence of LMNA and the other carrying the most common HGPS mutation. Targeted expression of the HGPS mutation in keratin-5-expressing tissues led to abnormalities in the skin and teeth, including fibrosis, loss of hypodermal adipocytes, structural defects in the hair follicles and sebaceous glands, and abnormal incisors. The severity of the defects was related to the level of expression of the transgene in different mouse lines. These transgenic mice appear to be good models for studies of the molecular mechanisms of skin abnormalities in HGPS and other related disorders.

  16. D-penicillamine Induced Degenerative Dermopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khandpur, Sujay; Jain, Naresh; Singla, Shweta; Chatterjee, Priti; Behari, Madhuri

    2015-01-01

    D-penicillamine interferes with elastin and collagen metabolism and produces several cutaneous and multi-systemic side-effects. We present two cases of Wilson's disease who on long-term penicillamine therapy developed drug-induced degenerative dermopathy manifesting as skin fragility over pressure sites and cutis laxa-like changes. PMID:26288416

  17. Exome sequencing of senescence-accelerated mice (SAM) reveals deleterious mutations in degenerative disease-causing genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Senescence-accelerated mice (SAM) are a series of mouse strains originally derived from unexpected crosses between AKR/J and unknown mice, from which phenotypically distinct senescence-prone (SAMP) and -resistant (SAMR) inbred strains were subsequently established. Although SAMP strains have been widely used for aging research focusing on their short life spans and various age-related phenotypes, such as immune dysfunction, osteoporosis, and brain atrophy, the responsible gene mutations have not yet been fully elucidated. Results To identify mutations specific to SAMP strains, we performed whole exome sequencing of 6 SAMP and 3 SAMR strains. This analysis revealed 32,019 to 38,925 single-nucleotide variants in the coding region of each SAM strain. We detected Ogg1 p.R304W and Mbd4 p.D129N deleterious mutations in all 6 of the SAMP strains but not in the SAMR or AKR/J strains. Moreover, we extracted 31 SAMP-specific novel deleterious mutations. In all SAMP strains except SAMP8, we detected a p.R473W missense mutation in the Ldb3 gene, which has been associated with myofibrillar myopathy. In 3 SAMP strains (SAMP3, SAMP10, and SAMP11), we identified a p.R167C missense mutation in the Prx gene, in which mutations causing hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (Dejerine-Sottas syndrome) have been identified. In SAMP6 we detected a p.S540fs frame-shift mutation in the Il4ra gene, a mutation potentially causative of ulcerative colitis and osteoporosis. Conclusions Our data indicate that different combinations of mutations in disease-causing genes may be responsible for the various phenotypes of SAMP strains. PMID:23586671

  18. Biosynthesis, characterization, and efficacy in retinal degenerative diseases of lens epithelium-derived growth factor fragment (LEDGF1-326), a novel therapeutic protein.

    PubMed

    Baid, Rinku; Upadhyay, Arun K; Shinohara, Toshimichi; Kompella, Uday B

    2013-06-14

    For vision-threatening retinitis pigmentosa and dry age-related macular degeneration, there are no United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatments. We identified, biosynthesized, purified, and characterized lens epithelium-derived growth factor fragment (LEDGF1-326) as a novel protein therapeutic. LEDGF1-326 was produced at about 20 mg/liter of culture when expressed in the Escherichia coli system, with about 95% purity and aggregate-free homogeneous population with a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 9 ± 1 nm. The free energy of unfolding of LEDGF1-326 was 3.3 ± 0.5 kcal mol(-1), and melting temperature was 44.8 ± 0.2 °C. LEDGF1-326 increased human retinal pigment epithelial cell viability from 48.3 ± 5.6 to 119.3 ± 21.1% in the presence of P23H mutant rhodopsin-mediated aggregation stress. LEDGF1-326 also increased retinal pigment epithelial cell FluoSphere uptake to 140 ± 10%. Eight weeks after single intravitreal injection in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, LEDGF1-326 increased the b-wave amplitude significantly from 9.4 ± 4.6 to 57.6 ± 8.8 μV for scotopic electroretinogram and from 10.9 ± 5.6 to 45.8 ± 15.2 μV for photopic electroretinogram. LEDGF1-326 significantly increased the retinal outer nuclear layer thickness from 6.34 ± 1.6 to 11.7 ± 0.7 μm. LEDGF1-326 is a potential new therapeutic agent for treating retinal degenerative diseases.

  19. Increasing Incidence of Degenerative Spinal Diseases in Japan during 25 Years: The Registration System of Spinal Surgery in Tohoku University Spine Society.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Toshimi; Kokubun, Shoichi; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Kusakabe, Takashi; Tanaka, Yasuhisa; Hoshikawa, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Ko; Kanno, Haruo; Morozumi, Naoki; Koizumi, Yutaka; Sato, Tetsuro; Hyodo, Hironori; Kasama, Fumio; Ogawa, Shinji; Murakami, Eiichi; Kawahara, Chikashi; Yahata, Jun-Ichiro; Ishii, Yushin; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Spinal disorders affect mainly older people and cause pain, paralysis and/or deformities of the trunk and/or extremities, which could eventually disturb locomotive functions. For ensuring safe and high-quality treatment of spinal disorders, in 1987, the Tohoku University Spine Society (TUSS) was established by orthopedic departments in Tohoku University School of Medicine and its affiliated hospitals in and around Miyagi Prefecture. All spine surgeries have been enrolled in the TUSS Spine Registry since 1988. Using the data from this registration system between 1988 and 2012, we demonstrate here the longitudinal changes in surgical trends for spinal disorders in Japan that has rushed into the most advanced "aging society" in the world. In total, data on 56,744 surgeries were retrieved. The number of spinal surgeries has annually increased approximately 4-fold. There was a particular increase among patients aged ≥ 70 years and those aged ≥ 80 years, with a 20- to 90-fold increase. Nearly 90% of the spinal operations were performed for degenerative disorders, with their number increasing approximately 5-fold from 705 to 3,448. The most common disease for surgery was lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) (35.9%), followed by lumbar disc herniation (27.7%) and cervical myelopathy (19.8%). In 2012, approximately half of the patients with LSS and cervical myelopathy were ≥ 70 years of age. In conclusion, the number of spinal operations markedly increased during the 25-year period, particularly among older patients. As Japan has a notably aged population, the present study could provide a near-future model for countries with aging population.

  20. Increasing Incidence of Degenerative Spinal Diseases in Japan during 25 Years: The Registration System of Spinal Surgery in Tohoku University Spine Society.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Toshimi; Kokubun, Shoichi; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Kusakabe, Takashi; Tanaka, Yasuhisa; Hoshikawa, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Ko; Kanno, Haruo; Morozumi, Naoki; Koizumi, Yutaka; Sato, Tetsuro; Hyodo, Hironori; Kasama, Fumio; Ogawa, Shinji; Murakami, Eiichi; Kawahara, Chikashi; Yahata, Jun-Ichiro; Ishii, Yushin; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Spinal disorders affect mainly older people and cause pain, paralysis and/or deformities of the trunk and/or extremities, which could eventually disturb locomotive functions. For ensuring safe and high-quality treatment of spinal disorders, in 1987, the Tohoku University Spine Society (TUSS) was established by orthopedic departments in Tohoku University School of Medicine and its affiliated hospitals in and around Miyagi Prefecture. All spine surgeries have been enrolled in the TUSS Spine Registry since 1988. Using the data from this registration system between 1988 and 2012, we demonstrate here the longitudinal changes in surgical trends for spinal disorders in Japan that has rushed into the most advanced "aging society" in the world. In total, data on 56,744 surgeries were retrieved. The number of spinal surgeries has annually increased approximately 4-fold. There was a particular increase among patients aged ≥ 70 years and those aged ≥ 80 years, with a 20- to 90-fold increase. Nearly 90% of the spinal operations were performed for degenerative disorders, with their number increasing approximately 5-fold from 705 to 3,448. The most common disease for surgery was lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) (35.9%), followed by lumbar disc herniation (27.7%) and cervical myelopathy (19.8%). In 2012, approximately half of the patients with LSS and cervical myelopathy were ≥ 70 years of age. In conclusion, the number of spinal operations markedly increased during the 25-year period, particularly among older patients. As Japan has a notably aged population, the present study could provide a near-future model for countries with aging population. PMID:26876801

  1. Surgical Outcome Predictor in Degenerative Lumbar Spinal Disease Based on Health Related Quality of Life Using Euro-Quality 5 Dimensions Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung Ho; Yang, Jae-Ho; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Park, Jun-Young; Park, Sang-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aim to introduce the predictive value of a quantitatively described formula model in a multicenter prospective analysis using the EuroQol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D) health scale to anticipate postoperative improvement in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease (DLSD). Materials and Methods Quality of life was evaluated in 376 patients from 17 tertiary hospitals before and after spinal decompression and fusion surgery. The five items of the EQ-5D, mobility (M), self-care (S), usual activities (A), pain/discomfort (P), and anxiety/depression (D), were checked as level 1, 2, or 3, with 3 being the worst. A minimal significant change in the calculated EQ-5D (cEQ-5D) was set as 0.05. Logistic regression analysis was performed to predict the highest successful outcome (cEQ-5D improvement after operation >0.05) with the given sets of 5 items of the EQ-5D. Results In the cEQ-5D analysis, among patients with a formula score of S+A+2×P+D≤8, 18/68 (27%) showed significant improvement in the cEQ-5D at 1 year postoperatively (p<0.05). However, in patients with a formula score of ≥9, 265/308 (86%) demonstrated significant improvements in the cEQ-5D at 1 year postoperatively (p<0.05). Conclusion We suggest that S+A+2×P+D≥9 in the EQ-5D can quantitatively describe the better surgical outcome predictors for DLSD. With a definite DLSD lesion confirmed by an imaging study, patients who meet the formula scores of 9 or over and have refractory symptoms to non-operative treatment could be better surgical candidates resulting in satisfactory surgical outcomes of over 86%, than those who scored 8 or lower. PMID:27401654

  2. Degenerative cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kato, So; Fehlings, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Cervical myelopathy is the most common cause of acquired spinal cord compromise. The concept of degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM), defined as symptomatic myelopathy associated with degenerative arthropathic changes in the spine axis, is being introduced. Given its progressive nature, treatment options have to be chosen in a timely manner. Surgical options include anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF), anterior corpectomy and fusion (ACCF), arthroplasty (in highly select cases), posterior laminectomy with/without fusion, and laminoplasty. Indications for each should be carefully considered in individual patients. Riluzole, a sodium-glutamate antagonist, is a promising option to optimize neurologic outcomes post-surgery and is being examined in the CSM-Protect Randomized Controlled Trial. Preoperative risk assessment is mandatory for prognostication. Sagittal alignment is known to play an important role to optimize surgical outcome. Guidelines for optimal management of DCM are in process. In principle, all but the mildest cases of DCM should be offered surgery for optimal outcome. PMID:27250040

  3. Disease-mongering through clinical trials.

    PubMed

    González-Moreno, María; Saborido, Cristian; Teira, David

    2015-06-01

    Our goal in this paper is to articulate a precise concept of at least a certain kind of disease-mongering, showing how pharmaceutical marketing can commercially exploit certain diseases when their best definition is given through the success of a treatment in a clinical trial. We distinguish two types of disease-mongering according to the way they exploit the definition of the trial population for marketing purposes. We argue that behind these two forms of disease-mongering there are two well-known problems in the statistical methodology of clinical trials (the reference class problem and the distinction between statistical and clinical significance). Overcoming them is far from simple.

  4. THERAPIES FOR CROHN'S DISEASE: a clinical update.

    PubMed

    Sobrado, Carlos Walter; Leal, Raquel Franco; Sobrado, Lucas Faraco

    2016-01-01

    The main objectives of clinical therapy in Crohn's disease are clinical and endoscopic remission without the use of corticosteroids for long periods of time, prevention of hospitalization and surgery, and improvement of quality of life. The main limitation of drug therapy is the loss of response over the long term, which makes incorporation of new drugs to the therapeutic arsenal necessary. This review analyses the main drugs currently used in clinical treatment of Crohn's disease. PMID:27438429

  5. Retrolisthesis as a Compensatory Mechanism in Degenerative Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ikchan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Posterior vertebral translation as a type of spondylolisthesis, retrolisthesis is observed commonly in patients with degenerative spinal problems. Nevertheless, there is insufficient literature on retrolisthesis compared to anterolisthesis. The purpose of this study is to clarify the clinical features of retrolisthesis, and its developmental mechanism associated with a compensatory role in sagittal imbalance of the lumbar spine. Methods From 2003 to 2012, 230 Korean patients who underwent spinal surgery in our department under the impression of degenerative lumbar spinal disease were enrolled. All participants were divided into four groups : 35 patients with retrolisthesis (group R), 32 patients with simultaneous retrolisthesis and anterolisthesis (group R+A), 76 patients with anterolisthesis (group A), and 87 patients with non-translation (group N). The clinical features and the sagittal parameters related to retrolisthesis were retrospectively analyzed based on the patients' medical records. Results There were different clinical features and developmental mechanisms between retrolisthesis and anterolisthesis. The location of retrolisthesis was affected by the presence of simultaneous anterolisthesis, even though it predominantly manifest in L3. The relative lower pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, and lumbar lordosis compared to anterolisthesis were related to the generation of retrolisthesis, with the opposite observations of patients with anterolisthesis. Conclusion Retrolisthesis acts as a compensatory mechanism for moving the gravity axis posteriorly for sagittal imbalance in the lumbar spine under low pelvic incidence and insufficient intra-spinal compensation. PMID:25810857

  6. [Actualities regarding the degenerative valvular heart].

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Simona Daniela; Sandru, V; Burdujan, Alina

    2002-01-01

    The degenerative valvular heart disease became prioritary from the epidemiological point of view by contrast with the rheumatismal one, as a consequence of the increase of the economic standard and of average life expectancy. The calcific aortic stenosis is the most frequently encountered among the valvular heart lesions. Since the history of this disease is not well known, many efforts have been made in order to research all its aspects from the etiology to therapeutical and prophylactic methods.

  7. Systolic arterial blood pressure in small-breed dogs with degenerative mitral valve disease: a prospective study of 103 cases (2007-2012).

    PubMed

    Petit, A M; Gouni, V; Tissier, R; Trehiou-Sechi, E; Misbach, C; Pouchelon, J-L; Lefebvre, H P; Chetboul, V

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this prospective observational study was to assess systolic arterial blood pressure (SABP) in small-breed dogs with degenerative mitral valve disease (MVD) from different International Small Animal Cardiac Health Council (ISACHC) heart failure classes. For this purpose, 103 client-owned dogs weighing <20 kg (mean ± standard deviation, 8.5 ± 3.0 kg; aged 9.8 ± 2.9 years) and presenting with MVD diagnosed by echo-Doppler examination were enrolled. Nineteen healthy dogs (9.9 ± 2.3 years; 8.7 ± 4.2 kg) were concurrently recruited as controls. SABP was measured in unsedated dogs using the Doppler method according to the recommendations in the American College of Veterinary Medicine consensus statement. SABP was significantly increased in dogs in ISACHC class 1 (n=53; median, interquartile range 140 mmHg, 130-150 mmHg) and class 2 (n=21; 140 mmHg, 130-150 mmHg), compared to the control group (n=19; 130 mmHg, 120-140 mmHg; P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively), but remained within the reference interval (≤ 160 mmHg). Conversely, dogs in ISACHC class 3 showed a significantly lower SABP (n=29, 120 mmHg, 110-130 mmHg) than those from all other ISACHC classes (P<0.001) and the controls (P<0.05). Additionally, SABP<120 mmHg was recorded in 13/103 dogs (13%). The 13 dogs were all ISACHC class 3 (3a or 3b) and were under medical treatment for heart failure. In conclusion, MVD was often associated with SABP values that were within the reference interval, but at its upper end. However, a significant decrease in SABP was observed in dogs with ISACHC heart failure class 3. Whether such low SABP values resulted from an MVD-related decrease in cardiac output, an afterload reduction owing to cardiac treatment, or both, remains to be determined.

  8. TU-C-12A-12: Differentiating Bone Lesions and Degenerative Joint Disease in NaF PET/CT Scans Using Machine Learning

    SciTech Connect

    Perk, T; Bradshaw, T; Muzahir, S; Jeraj, R; Meyer, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: [F-18]NaF PET can be used to image bone metastases; however, tracer uptake in degenerative joint disease (DJD) often appears similar to metastases. This study aims to develop and compare different machine learning algorithms to automatically identify regions of [F-18]NaF scans that correspond to DJD. Methods: 10 metastatic prostate cancer patients received whole body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans prior to treatment. Image segmentation resulted in 852 ROIs, 69 of which were identified by a nuclear medicine physician as DJD. For all ROIs, various PET and CT textural features were computed. ROIs were divided into training and testing sets used to train eight different machine learning classifiers. Classifiers were evaluated based on receiver operating characteristics area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV). We also assessed the added value of including CT features in addition to PET features for training classifiers. Results: The training set consisted of 37 DJD ROIs with 475 non-DJD ROIs, and the testing set consisted of 32 DJD ROIs with 308 non-DJD ROIs. Of all classifiers, generalized linear models (GLM), decision forests (DF), and support vector machines (SVM) had the best performance. AUCs of GLM (0.929), DF (0.921), and SVM (0.889) were significantly higher than the other models (p<0.001). GLM and DF, overall, had the best sensitivity, specificity, and PPV, and gave a significantly better performance (p<0.01) than all other models. PET/CT GLM classifiers had higher AUC than just PET or just CT. GLMs built using PET/CT information had superior or comparable sensitivities, specificities and PPVs to just PET or just CT. Conclusion: Machine learning algorithms trained with PET/CT features were able to identify some cases of DJD. GLM outperformed the other classification algorithms. Using PET and CT information together was shown to be superior to using PET or CT features alone. Research supported by the Prostate

  9. Clinical-physiologic correlates of Alzheimer's disease and frontal lobe dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J.; Reed, B.R.; Seab, J.P.; Kramer, J.H.; Budinger, T.F. )

    1989-01-01

    Thirty patients with degenerative dementia underwent clinical evaluation, neuropsychological testing, and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the blood flow tracer ({sup 123}I)-N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine. Five of these patients were clinically and psychologically different from the others, demonstrating predominant behavioral disturbances with relative preservation of memory function. These five patients, who were felt to have a frontal lobe dementia (FLD), showed SPECT perfusion patterns which differed from the remaining 25 patients, who were diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease (AD), and from 16 healthy control subjects. The FLD patients showed diminished perfusion in orbitofrontal, dorsolateral frontal, and temporal cortex relative to controls, while the AD patients showed lower perfusion in temporal and parietal cortex than controls. The FLD patients also showed hypoperfusion in both frontal cortical regions relative to AD patients. The pattern of performance on neuropsychological testing paralleled these differences in regional perfusion. These results suggest that clinical evaluation and physiological imaging may enable the differentiation of groups of degenerative dementia patients during life.

  10. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27169740

  11. Biomechanics of Degenerative Spinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Justin A.; Jakoi, Andre M.

    2016-01-01

    The spine has several important functions including load transmission, permission of limited motion, and protection of the spinal cord. The vertebrae form functional spinal units, which represent the smallest segment that has characteristics of the entire spinal column. Discs and paired facet joints within each functional unit form a three-joint complex between which loads are transmitted. Surrounding the spinal motion segment are ligaments, composed of elastin and collagen, and joint capsules which restrict motion to within normal limits. Ligaments have variable strengths and act via different lever arm lengths to contribute to spinal stability. As a consequence of the longer moment arm from the spinous process to the instantaneous axis of rotation, inherently weaker ligaments (interspinous and supraspinous) are able to provide resistance to excessive flexion. Degenerative processes of the spine are a normal result of aging and occur on a spectrum. During the second decade of life, the intervertebral disc demonstrates histologic evidence of nucleus pulposus degradation caused by reduced end plate blood supply. As disc height decreases, the functional unit is capable of an increased range of axial rotation which subjects the posterior facet capsules to greater mechanical loads. A concurrent change in load transmission across the end plates and translation of the instantaneous axis of rotation further increase the degenerative processes at adjacent structures. The behavior of the functional unit is impacted by these processes and is reflected by changes in the stress-strain relationship. Back pain and other clinical symptoms may occur as a result of the biomechanical alterations of degeneration. PMID:27114783

  12. The clinical spectrum of hexosaminidase deficiency diseases.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W G

    1981-11-01

    Hexosaminidase deficiency diseases or GM2-gangliosidoses were originally described as infantile encephalopathies. Recently, hexosaminidase deficiencies have been found with different phenotypes, including juvenile and adult encephalopathies, cerebellar ataxias, and motor neuron diseases. Individual cases have resembled Ramsey-Hunt syndrome, olivopontocerebellar ataxia, Friedreich ataxia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Kugelberg-Welander disease, Fazio-Londe disease, and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Tremor, dystonia, spastic paresis, and psychosis have been seen. Since few diagnosable causes for these system atrophies are known, these patients should be tested for hexosaminidase deficiency. These recessive disorders fit a multiple loci/multiple alleles genetic scheme, and a clinical genetic classification is presented.

  13. Stereotypic behaviors in degenerative dementias.

    PubMed

    Prioni, S; Fetoni, V; Barocco, F; Redaelli, V; Falcone, C; Soliveri, P; Tagliavini, F; Scaglioni, A; Caffarra, P; Concari, L; Gardini, S; Girotti, F

    2012-11-01

    Stereotypies are simple or complex involuntary/unvoluntary behaviors, common in fronto-temporal dementia (FTD), but not studied in other types of degenerative dementias. The aim was to investigate stereotypy frequency and type in patients with FTD, Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD) in a multicenter observational study; and to investigate the relation of stereotypies to cognitive, behavioral and motor impairment. One hundred fifty-five consecutive outpatients (45 AD, 40 FTD, 35 PSP and 35 PDD) were studied in four hospitals in northern Italy. Stereotypies were examined by the five-domain Stereotypy Rating Inventory. Cognition was examined by the Mini Mental State and Frontal Assessment Battery, neuropsychiatric symptoms by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, and motor impairment and invalidity by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III, and activities of daily living. Stereotypies were present in all groups. FTD and PDD had the greatest frequency of one-domain stereotypies; FTD also had the greatest frequency of two-or-more domain stereotypies; movement stereotypies were the most common stereotypies in all groups. AD patients had fewer stereotypies than the other groups. Stereotypies are not exclusive to FTD, but are also fairly common in PSP and PDD, though less so in AD. Stereotypies may be underpinned by dysfunctional striato-frontal circuits, known to be damaged in PSP and PDD, as well as FTD.

  14. Clinical presentation of metabolic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Odievre, M

    1991-01-01

    Some clinical clues should alert paediatricians to the possibility of metabolic liver diseases. They can be classified into three categories: (i) Manifestations due to hepatocellular necrosis, acute or subacute, which can reveal galactosaemia, hereditary fructose intolerance, tyrosinaemia type I, Wilson disease and alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. Symptoms and signs suggestive of Reye syndrome should lead to a study of fatty acid oxidation and urea cycle enzymes. All these manifestations may necessitate a rapid diagnosis and treatment when liver dysfunction is severe. (ii) Cholestatic jaundice can reveal alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency, Byler's disease, cystic fibrosis, Niemann-Pick disease and some disorders of peroxisome biogenesis. (iii) Hepatomegaly can reveal disorders with liver damage but also storage diseases such as glycogen storage diseases, cholesteryl ester storage disease and, when associated with splenomegaly, lysosomal storage diseases. Appropriate investigations for recognizing all these entities are proposed.

  15. Sickle cell disease: clinical management.

    PubMed

    Ballas, S K

    1998-03-01

    Sickle cell syndromes are a group of inherited disorders of haemoglobin structure that have no cure in adults at the present time. Bone marrow transplantation in children has been shown to be curative in selected patients. The phenotypic expression of these disorders and their clinical severity vary greatly among patients and longitudinally in the same patient. They are multisystem disorders and influence all aspects of the life of affected individuals including social interactions, family relations, peer interaction, intimate relationships, education, employment, spiritual attitudes and navigating the complexities of the health care system, providers and their ancillary functions. The clinical manifestations of these syndromes are protean. In this review emphasis is placed on four sets of major complications of these syndromes and their management. The first set pertains to the management of anaemia and its sequelae; the second set addresses painful syndromes both acute and chronic; the third set discusses infections; the fourth section deals with organ failure. New experimental therapies for these disorders are briefly mentioned at the end. Efforts were made to include several tables and figures to clarify the message of this review.

  16. Outcomes and Complications of Diabetes Mellitus on Patients Undergoing Degenerative Lumbar Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Javier Z.; Iatridis, James C.; Skovrlj, Branko; Cutler, Holt; Hecht, Andrew C.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Cho, Samuel K.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective database analysis. Objective To assess the effect glycemic control has on perioperative morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing elective degenerative lumbar spine surgery. Summary of background data Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a prevalent disease of glucose dysregulation that has been demonstrated to increase morbidity and mortality following spine surgery. However, there is limited understanding of whether glycemic control influences surgical outcomes in DM patients undergoing lumbar spine procedures for degenerative conditions. Methods The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was analyzed from 2002 to 2011. Hospitalizations were isolated based on International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedural codes for lumbar spine surgery and diagnoses codes for degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine. Patients were then classified into three cohorts: controlled diabetics, uncontrolled diabetics and non-diabetics. Patient demographic data, acute complications and hospitalization outcomes were determined for each cohort. Results A total of 403,629 (15.7%) controlled diabetics and 19,421(0.75%) uncontrolled diabetics underwent degenerative lumbar spine surgery from 2002-2011. Relative to non-diabetics, uncontrolled diabetics had significantly increased odds of cardiac complications, deep venous thrombosis and post-operative shock; additionally, uncontrolled diabetics also had an increased mean length of stay (approximately 2.5 days), greater costs (1.3-fold) and a greater risk of inpatient mortality (odds ratio=2.6, 95% confidence interval=1.5-4.8, p < .0009). Controlled diabetics also had increased risk of acute complications and inpatient mortality when compared to non-diabetics, but not nearly to the same magnitude as uncontrolled diabetics. Conclusion Suboptimal glycemic control in diabetic patients undergoing degenerative lumbar spine surgery leads to increased risk of acute complications and poor outcomes

  17. Epidemiology and clinical management of Legionnaires' disease.

    PubMed

    Phin, Nick; Parry-Ford, Frances; Harrison, Timothy; Stagg, Helen R; Zhang, Natalie; Kumar, Kartik; Lortholary, Olivier; Zumla, Alimuddin; Abubakar, Ibrahim

    2014-10-01

    Legionnaires' disease is an important cause of community-acquired and hospital-acquired pneumonia. Although uncommon, Legionnaires' disease continues to cause disease outbreaks of public health significance. The disease is caused by any species of the Gram-negative aerobic bacteria belonging to the genus Legionella; Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 is the causative agent of most cases in Europe. In this Review we outline the global epidemiology of Legionnaires' disease, summarise its diagnosis and management, and identify research gaps and priorities. Early clinical diagnosis and prompt initiation of appropriate antibiotics for Legionella spp in all patients with community-acquired or hospital-acquired pneumonias is a crucial measure for management of the disease. Progress in typing and sequencing technologies might additionally contribute to understanding the distribution and natural history of Legionnaires' disease, and inform outbreak investigations. Control of Legionnaires' disease outbreaks relies on rapid ascertainment of descriptive epidemiological data, combined with microbiological information to identify the source and implement control measures. Further research is required to define the actual burden of disease, factors that influence susceptibility, key sources of infection, and differences in virulence between strains of Legionella species. Other requirements are improved, specific, sensitive, and rapid diagnostic tests to accurately inform management of Legionnaires' disease, and controlled clinical trials to ascertain the optimum antibiotics for treatment.

  18. [Clinical condition and therapy of bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Miura, Kohji; Oznono, Keiichi

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal dysplasia is the term which represents disorders including growth and differentiation of bone, cartilage and ligament. A lot of diseases are included, and new disorders have been added. However, the therapy of most bone diseases is less well-established. Achondroplasia, hypochondroplasia, and osteogenesis imperfecta are most frequent bone diseases. There is no curative treatment for these diseases, however, supportive therapies are available ; for example, growth-hormone therapy for achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia, and bisphosphonate therapy for osteogenesis imperfecta. In addition, enzyme replacement therapy for hypophosphatasia is now on clinical trial.

  19. Surgical removal of fragmented coronoid processes and fractured anconeal process in an older dog with evidence of severe degenerative joint disease.

    PubMed

    Flo, G L

    1998-12-15

    A 10-year-old Labrador Retriever was admitted because of severe unilateral (left) forelimb lameness of 6 weeks' duration. Computerized tomography revealed bilateral fragmented coronoid processes (FCP) and unilateral fracture of the anconeal process. Surgery on the left elbow to remove the loose anconeal process and FCP resolved the severe lameness and improved the dog's overall activity, compared with that of the preceding 2 years. Unstable FCP can develop late in life, and a degenerative anconeal process may fracture. Surgical removal of loose fragments in a severely arthritic joint may be beneficial. PMID:9861974

  20. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVI. Pattern Recognition Receptors in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Selinda; Ferguson, Brian; Symmons, Martyn F.; Boyle, Joseph P.; Monie, Tom P.

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of Toll, in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, as the first described pattern recognition receptor (PRR) in 1996, many families of these receptors have been discovered and characterized. PRRs play critically important roles in pathogen recognition to initiate innate immune responses that ultimately link to the generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of PRRs leads to the induction of immune and inflammatory genes, including proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. It is increasingly clear that many PRRs are linked to a range of inflammatory, infectious, immune, and chronic degenerative diseases. Several drugs to modulate PRR activity are already in clinical trials and many more are likely to appear in the near future. Here, we review the different families of mammalian PRRs, the ligands they recognize, the mechanisms of activation, their role in disease, and the potential of targeting these proteins to develop the anti-inflammatory therapeutics of the future. PMID:25829385

  1. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. XCVI. Pattern recognition receptors in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Clare E; Orr, Selinda; Ferguson, Brian; Symmons, Martyn F; Boyle, Joseph P; Monie, Tom P

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of Toll, in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, as the first described pattern recognition receptor (PRR) in 1996, many families of these receptors have been discovered and characterized. PRRs play critically important roles in pathogen recognition to initiate innate immune responses that ultimately link to the generation of adaptive immunity. Activation of PRRs leads to the induction of immune and inflammatory genes, including proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. It is increasingly clear that many PRRs are linked to a range of inflammatory, infectious, immune, and chronic degenerative diseases. Several drugs to modulate PRR activity are already in clinical trials and many more are likely to appear in the near future. Here, we review the different families of mammalian PRRs, the ligands they recognize, the mechanisms of activation, their role in disease, and the potential of targeting these proteins to develop the anti-inflammatory therapeutics of the future.

  2. Clostridium difficile: clinical disease and diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, F C; Owens, M; Crocker, I C

    1993-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a spectrum of disease ranging from antibiotic-associated diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis. Although the disease was first described in 1893, the etiologic agent was not isolated and identified until 1978. Since clinical and pathological features of C. difficile-associated disease are not easily distinguished from those of other gastrointestinal diseases, including ulcerative colitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, and Crohn's disease, diagnostic methods have relied on either isolation and identification of the microorganism or direct detection of bacterial antigens or toxins in stool specimens. The current review focuses on the sensitivity, specificity, and practical use of several diagnostic tests, including methods for culture of the etiologic agent, cellular cytotoxicity assays, latex agglutination tests, enzyme immunoassay systems, counterimmunoelectrophoresis, fluorescent-antibody assays, and polymerase chain reactions. PMID:8358706

  3. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings.

  4. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings. PMID:27348896

  5. Clinical Experiences of Uncommon Motor Neuron Disease: Hirayama Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung Hee; Choi, Dae Seob; Lee, Young Suk

    2016-01-01

    Hirayama disease, juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper limb, is a rare disease predominantly affecting the anterior horn cells of the cervical spinal cord in young men. This cervical myelopathy is associated with neck flexion. It should be suspected in young male patients with a chronic history of weakness and atrophy involving the upper extremities followed by clinical stability in few years. Herein, we report 2 cases of Hirayama disease on emphasis of diagnostic approach and describe the pathognomonic findings at flexion magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27800001

  6. Consensus Paper: Management of Degenerative Cerebellar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ilg, W.; Bastian, A. J.; Boesch, S.; Burciu, R. G.; Celnik, P.; Claaßen, J.; Feil, K.; Kalla, R.; Miyai, I.; Nachbauer, W.; Schöls, L.; Strupp, M.; Synofzik, M.; Teufel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of motor symptoms of degenerative cerebellar ataxia remains difficult. Yet there are recent developments that are likely to lead to significant improvements in the future. Most desirable would be a causative treatment of the underlying cerebellar disease. This is currently available only for a very small subset of cerebellar ataxias with known metabolic dysfunction. However, increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of hereditary ataxia should lead to an increasing number of medically sensible drug trials. In this paper, data from recent drug trials in patients with recessive and dominant cerebellar ataxias will be summarized. There is consensus that up to date, no medication has been proven effective. Aminopyridines and acetazolamide are the only exception, which are beneficial in patients with episodic ataxia type 2. Aminopyridines are also effective in a subset of patients presenting with downbeat nystagmus. As such, all authors agreed that the mainstays of treatment of degenerative cerebellar ataxia are currently physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. For many years, well-controlled rehabilitation studies in patients with cerebellar ataxia were lacking. Data of recently published studies show that coordinative training improves motor function in both adult and juvenile patients with cerebellar degeneration. Given the well-known contribution of the cerebellum to motor learning, possible mechanisms underlying improvement will be outlined. There is consensus that evidence-based guidelines for the physiotherapy of degenerative cerebellar ataxia need to be developed. Future developments in physiotherapeutical interventions will be discussed including application of non-invasive brain stimulation. PMID:24222635

  7. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research. PMID:26135330

  8. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research.

  9. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Diseases: Concept And Clinical Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    De Jesus, Adriana Almeida; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this review are to describe the clinical manifestations of the growing spectrum of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases including recently described syndromes. The autoinflammatory diseases can be grouped based on clinical findings: 1. the three classic hereditary “periodic fever syndromes”, familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF); TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS); and mevalonate kinase deficiency/hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS); 2. the cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), comprising familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) or CINCA, and; 3. pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA); 4. disorders presenting with skin pustules, including deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA); Majeed syndrome; pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome; deficiency of interleukin 36 receptor antagonist (DITRA); CARD14 mediated psoriasis (CAMPS), and early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases (EO-IBD); 5. inflammatory disorders caused by mutations in proteasome components, the proteasome associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) 6. very rare conditions presenting with autoinflammation and immunodeficiency. PMID:23711932

  10. Viral Vectors for In Vivo Gene Transfer in Parkinson’s disease: Properties and Clinical Grade Production

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Corinna; Snyder, Richard O.

    2009-01-01

    Because Parkinson’s disease is a progressive degenerative disorder that is mainly confined to the basal ganglia, gene transfer to deliver therapeutic molecules is an attractive treatment avenue. The present review focuses on direct in vivo gene transfer vectors that have been developed to a degree that they have been successfully used in animal model of Parkinson’s disease. Accordingly, the properties of recombinant adenovirus, recombinant adeno-associated virus, herpes simplex virus, and lentivirus are described and contrasted. In order for viral vectors to be developed into clinical grade reagents, they must be manufactured and tested to precise regulatory standards. Indeed, clinical lots of viral vectors can be produced in compliance with current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs) regulations using industry accepted manufacturing methodologies, manufacturing controls, and quality systems. The viral vector properties themselves combined with physiological product formulations facilitate long-term storage and direct in vivo administration. PMID:17916354

  11. MDS clinical diagnostic criteria for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Postuma, Ronald B; Berg, Daniela; Stern, Matthew; Poewe, Werner; Olanow, C Warren; Oertel, Wolfgang; Obeso, José; Marek, Kenneth; Litvan, Irene; Lang, Anthony E; Halliday, Glenda; Goetz, Christopher G; Gasser, Thomas; Dubois, Bruno; Chan, Piu; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Adler, Charles H; Deuschl, Günther

    2015-10-01

    This document presents the Movement Disorder Society Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for Parkinson's disease (PD). The Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria are intended for use in clinical research but also may be used to guide clinical diagnosis. The benchmark for these criteria is expert clinical diagnosis; the criteria aim to systematize the diagnostic process, to make it reproducible across centers and applicable by clinicians with less expertise in PD diagnosis. Although motor abnormalities remain central, increasing recognition has been given to nonmotor manifestations; these are incorporated into both the current criteria and particularly into separate criteria for prodromal PD. Similar to previous criteria, the Movement Disorder Society PD Criteria retain motor parkinsonism as the core feature of the disease, defined as bradykinesia plus rest tremor or rigidity. Explicit instructions for defining these cardinal features are included. After documentation of parkinsonism, determination of PD as the cause of parkinsonism relies on three categories of diagnostic features: absolute exclusion criteria (which rule out PD), red flags (which must be counterbalanced by additional supportive criteria to allow diagnosis of PD), and supportive criteria (positive features that increase confidence of the PD diagnosis). Two levels of certainty are delineated: clinically established PD (maximizing specificity at the expense of reduced sensitivity) and probable PD (which balances sensitivity and specificity). The Movement Disorder Society criteria retain elements proven valuable in previous criteria and omit aspects that are no longer justified, thereby encapsulating diagnosis according to current knowledge. As understanding of PD expands, the Movement Disorder Society criteria will need continuous revision to accommodate these advances.

  12. Connecting Malfunctioning Glial Cells and Brain Degenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Natalie; Bihari, Ofer; Kanner, Sivan; Barzilai, Ari

    2016-06-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex biological system activated by different types of DNA damage. Mutations in certain components of the DDR machinery can lead to genomic instability disorders that culminate in tissue degeneration, premature aging, and various types of cancers. Intriguingly, malfunctioning DDR plays a role in the etiology of late onset brain degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. For many years, brain degenerative disorders were thought to result from aberrant neural death. Here we discuss the evidence that supports our novel hypothesis that brain degenerative diseases involve dysfunction of glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes). Impairment in the functionality of glial cells results in pathological neuro-glial interactions that, in turn, generate a "hostile" environment that impairs the functionality of neuronal cells. These events can lead to systematic neural demise on a scale that appears to be proportional to the severity of the neurological deficit. PMID:27245308

  13. The degenerative spine: pattern recognition and guidelines to image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Parizel, P M; Van Hoyweghen, A J L; Bali, A; Van Goethem, J; Van Den Hauwe, L

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine, in the form of intervertebral disc degeneration and bony growth, causing osteophytes and impinging upon the spinal canal and neural foramina, is the most frequent disorder affecting the spine. In this chapter we first discuss briefly the indications for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging in suspected degenerative spine disease. We then describe changes of disc height, signal intensity, and disc contour with aging and repeated microtrauma, as well as the imaging techniques most appropriate to image them. A grading system for lumbar disc changes is provided. Stenosis of the canal and neural foramina is reviewed next, concluding with a description of degenerative changes affecting the vertebral endplates and bone marrow.

  14. The degenerative spine: pattern recognition and guidelines to image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Parizel, P M; Van Hoyweghen, A J L; Bali, A; Van Goethem, J; Van Den Hauwe, L

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine, in the form of intervertebral disc degeneration and bony growth, causing osteophytes and impinging upon the spinal canal and neural foramina, is the most frequent disorder affecting the spine. In this chapter we first discuss briefly the indications for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging in suspected degenerative spine disease. We then describe changes of disc height, signal intensity, and disc contour with aging and repeated microtrauma, as well as the imaging techniques most appropriate to image them. A grading system for lumbar disc changes is provided. Stenosis of the canal and neural foramina is reviewed next, concluding with a description of degenerative changes affecting the vertebral endplates and bone marrow. PMID:27430442

  15. Clinical and Epidemiological Characteristics of Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shamsizadeh, Ahmad; Ziaei Kajbaf, Tahereh; Razavi, Maryam; Cheraghian, Bahman

    2014-01-01

    Background: Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute multisystem vascular syndrome of unknown etiology that is the leading cause of acquired heart disease in children of developed counties. Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the epidemiological characteristics and clinical manifestations of KD in children residing in the southwest of Iran. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed the medical records of all children with KD who had been admitted to the main children’s hospital of Ahvaz, southwest Iran, from March 2000 to March 2010. Data regarding clinical and epidemiological characteristics, management, and the outcome of disease for each patient were obtained. The patients were divided into cardiac and non-cardiac groups based on echocardiographic results. Results: In total, 104 patients with KD (66 boys and 38 girls) were enrolled in this study. The male to female ratio was 1.7:1. The mean ± SD age of the patients was 33.6 ± 24.2 months. Most (87.2%) cases were from urban areas. The disease occurred more frequently during winter and spring. Furthermore, 61.5% of the children had the criteria of classic KD, and 38.5% were labeled as incomplete KD. The mean ± SD of the duration of hospital stay was 6.9 ± 2.4 days. The mean time between illness and admission to the hospital was 6.47 ± 2.6 days. The most common sign was fever, followed by conjunctivitis and oral changes. In total, 20% of the patients had cardiac abnormalities. There was no significant statistical difference between the cardiac and non-cardiac groups according to age, sex, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and cessation of fever. The duration of hospital stay and the time between onset of illness and diagnosis were longer in the cardiac group. All patients received intravenous immunoglobulin and aspirin. Only one patient continued to have cardiac abnormalities after 6 months of follow-up. Conclusions: Kawasaki disease is not rare in southwest of Iran. The age, gender

  16. Interdisciplinary care clinics in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Johns, Tanya S; Yee, Jerry; Smith-Jules, Terrian; Campbell, Ruth C; Bauer, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is substantial, and is associated with high hospitalization rates, premature deaths, and considerable health care costs. These factors provide strong rationale for quality improvement initiatives in CKD care. The interdisciplinary care clinic (IDC) has emerged as one solution to improving CKD care. The IDC team may include other physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and social workers--all working together to provide effective care to patients with chronic kidney disease. Studies suggest that IDCs may improve patient education and preparedness prior to kidney failure, both of which have been associated with improved health outcomes. Interdisciplinary care may also delay the progression to end-stage renal disease and reduce mortality. While most studies suggest that IDC services are likely cost-effective, financing IDCs is challenging and many insurance providers do not pay for all of the services. There are also no robust long-term studies demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of IDCs. This review discusses IDC models and its potential impact on CKD care as well as some of the challenges that may be associated with implementing these clinics. PMID:26458811

  17. Gaucher disease: clinical profile and therapeutic developments

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Timothy M

    2010-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a rare inborn error of glycosphingolipid metabolism due to deficiency of lysosomal acid β-glucocerebrosidase; the condition has totemic significance for the development of orphan drugs. A designer therapy, which harnesses the mannose receptor to complement the functional defect in macrophages, ameliorates the principal clinical manifestations in hematopoietic bone marrow and viscera. While several aspects of Gaucher disease (particularly those affecting the skeleton and brain) are refractory to treatment, enzyme (replacement) therapy has become a pharmaceutical blockbuster. Human β-glucocerebrosidase was originally obtained from placenta and the Genzyme Corporation (Allston, MA) subsequently developed a recombinant product. After purification, the enzyme is modified to reveal terminal mannose residues which facilitate selective uptake of the protein, imiglucerase (Cerezyme®), in macrophage-rich tissues. The unprecedented success of Cerezyme has attracted fierce competition: two biosimilar agents, velaglucerase-alfa, VPRIV® (Shire Human Genetic Therapies, Dublin, Ireland) and taliglucerase-alfa (Protalix, Carmiel, Israel), are now approved or in late-phase clinical development as potential ‘niche busters’. Oral treatments have advantages over biological agents for disorders requiring lifelong therapy and additional stratagems which utilize small, orally active molecules have been introduced; these include two chemically distinct compounds which inhibit uridine diphosphate glucose: N-acylsphingosine glucosyltransferase, the first step in the biosynthesis of glucosylceramide – a key molecular target in Gaucher disease and other glycosphingolipidoses. Academic and commercial enterprises in biotechnology have combined strategically to expand the therapeutic repertoire in Gaucher disease. The innovative potential of orphan drug legislation has been realized – with prodigious rewards for companies embracing its humanitarian precepts. In the

  18. Plasma and liver copper values in horses with equine degenerative myeloencephalopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Dill, S G; Hintz, H F; deLahunta, A; Waldron, C H

    1989-01-01

    Equine degenerative myeloencephalopathy (EDM) is a common spinal cord disease in the horse. The etiology of EDM currently is unknown. In other species, there are similarities in the clinical signs and neuropathological changes observed in EDM and in copper deficiency. The objective of this study was to determine if horses affected with EDM had low levels of plasma or liver copper. Plasma copper values were determined in 25 EDM affected horses and 35 normal horses. Liver copper levels were determined on 13 EDM affected horses and 22 normal horses. Plasma and liver copper values were not significantly lower in EDM affected horses than in control horses. PMID:2914224

  19. Rare disease clinical trials: Power in numbers.

    PubMed

    Wicklund, Matthew P

    2016-08-01

    The limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) encompass a collection of genetic muscle diseases with proximal-predominant weakness of the limbs. Thirty-two of these disorders are named via the common nomenclature, including 8 autosomal-dominant (LGMD1A-H) and 24 autosomal-recessive (LGMD2A-X) disorders.(1) In addition, numerous other genetic muscle diseases, including Bethlem myopathy, dystrophinopathies, ryanodine receptor-associated myopathies, and many more, may clinically present with similar proximal-predominant weakness.(2) Therefore, current genetic testing panels targeting neuromuscular weakness frequently encompass >75 genes. These disorders are quite rare, each with minimum prevalence estimates of 0.01-0.60 cases per 100,000 persons.(3) LGMD2A (attributable to mutations in the gene for calpain-3) and LGMD2B (attributable to mutations in the gene for dysferlin) consistently are the 2 most prevalent LGMD subtypes in a variety of ethnic cohorts. PMID:27540592

  20. Clinical manifestations and management of Gaucher disease

    PubMed Central

    Linari, Silvia; Castaman, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gaucher disease is a rare multi-systemic metabolic disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase, which leads to the accumulation of its normal substrate, glucocerebroside, in tissue macrophages with damage to haematological, visceral and bone systems. Anaemia, thrombocytopenia, enlargement of liver and/or spleen, skeletal abnormalities (osteopenia, lytic lesions, pathological fractures, chronic bone pain, bone crisis, bone infarcts, osteonecrosis and skeletal deformities) are typical manifestations of the most prevalent form of the disease, the so-called non-neuronopathic type 1. However, severity and coexistence of different symptoms are highly variable. The determination of deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity in leukocytes or fibroblasts by enzymatic assay is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Gaucher disease. Comprehensive and reproducible evaluation and monitoring of all clinically relevant aspects are fundamental for the effective management of Gaucher disease patients. Enzyme replacement therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing glucocerebroside storage burden and diminishing the deleterious effects caused by its accumulation. Tailored treatment plan for each patient should be directed to symptom relief, general improvement of quality of life, and prevention of irreversible damage. PMID:26604942

  1. [Neuropathologic markers in degenerative dementias].

    PubMed

    Hauw, J J; Seilhean, D; Colle, M A; Hogenhuys, J; Duyckaerts, C

    1998-01-01

    The number of neuropathological markers used for the diagnosis of degenerative dementias is rapidly increasing, and this is somewhat confusing: some lesions described a long time ago, such as ballooned cells, proved to be less specific than they were supposed to be; this is also the case for Lewy bodies, that have been recognised in a larger spectrum of disorders than thought a few years ago. On the contrary, for an increasing number of neuropathologists, Pick bodies are now mandatory for the diagnosis of Pick disease, and this contrasts with the prevalent opinions of the late sixties or seventies. There are a number of reasons for the changing significance of neuropathological markers. Three of them can be easily identified: 1) the burst of immunohistochemistry into neuropathology allowed an easier recognition, a better delineation and new pathophysiological approaches to old lesions, and a dramatic increase in the description of new markers, especially in glial cells; 2) in some conditions characterized by the number and distribution of some lesions rather than by their mere presence, such as aging and Alzheimer disease, a better neuroanatomical point of view permitted new insights into the concept of disease versus age-related changes; 3) more accurate clinicopathologic correlations showed clearly the need of grouping or lumping together some entities: for example, obvious relationship aroused between progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration; in contrast, distinguishing different disorders in the frontal lobe dementias grouped together into "Pick disease" was felt necessary. This review summarizes the main criteria for identification, and the presumed meaning of the chief markers indicating the presence of abnormally phosphorylated tau proteins, A beta peptides, and PrP proteins. Abnormally phosphorylated tau proteins can be stored in the neurons, and participate in the constitution of many lesions (neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads

  2. Choosing Alzheimer's disease prevention clinical trial populations.

    PubMed

    Grill, Joshua D; Monsell, Sarah E

    2014-03-01

    To assist investigators in making design choices, we modeled Alzheimer's disease prevention clinical trials. We used longitudinal Clinical Dementia Rating Scale Sum of Boxes data, retention rates, and the proportions of trial-eligible cognitively normal participants age 65 and older in the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center Uniform Data Set to model trial sample sizes, the numbers needed to enroll to account for drop out, and the numbers needed to screen to successfully complete enrollment. We examined how enrichment strategies affected each component of the model. Relative to trials enrolling 65-year-old individuals, trials enriching for older (minimum 70 or 75) age required reduced sample sizes, numbers needed to enroll, and numbers needed to screen. Enriching for subjective memory complaints reduced sample sizes and numbers needed to enroll more than age enrichment, but increased the number needed to screen. We conclude that Alzheimer's disease prevention trials can enroll elderly participants with minimal effect on trial retention and that enriching for older individuals with memory complaints might afford efficient trial designs.

  3. Secondary Care Clinic for Chronic Disease: Protocol

    PubMed Central

    St-Pierre, Michèle; Juneau, Lucille; Legault-Mercier, Samuel; Bernardino, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background The complexity of chronic disease management activities and the associated financial burden have prompted the development of organizational models, based on the integration of care and services, which rely on primary care services. However, since the institutions providing these services are continually undergoing reorganization, the Centre hospitalier affilié universitaire de Québec wanted to innovate by adapting the Chronic Care Model to create a clinic for the integrated follow-up of chronic disease that relies on hospital-based specialty care. Objective The aim of the study is to follow the project in order to contribute to knowledge about the way in which professional and management practices are organized to ensure better care coordination and the successful integration of the various follow-ups implemented. Methods The research strategy adopted is based on the longitudinal comparative case study with embedded units of analysis. The case study uses a mixed research method. Results We are currently in the analysis phase of the project. The results will be available in 2015. Conclusions The project’s originality lies in its consideration of the macro, meso, and micro contexts structuring the creation of the clinic in order to ensure the integration process is successful and to allow a theoretical generalization of the reorganization of practices to be developed. PMID:25689840

  4. Moyamoya Disease: Epidemiology, Clinical Features, and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong S.

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a chronic, occlusive cerebrovascular disease characterized by progressive stenosis at the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery and an abnormal vascular network at the base of the brain. Although its etiology remains unknown, recent genetic studies identified RNF213 in the 17q25-ter region as an important susceptibility gene of MMD among East Asian populations. Possibly because of genetic differences, MMD is relatively common in people living in East Asian countries such as Korea and Japan, compared to those in the Western Hemisphere. The prevalence of MMD appears to be slightly lower among Chinese, compared to Koreans or Japanese. There are two peaks of incidence with different clinical presentations, at around 10 years and 30-40 years. The peak appears to occur later in women than men. In children, ischemic symptoms, especially transient ischemic attacks, are predominant. Intellectual decline, seizures, and involuntary movements are also more common in this age group. In contrast, adult patients present with intracranial hemorrhage more often than pediatric patients. In patients with MMD, intracerebral hemorrhage is more often accompanied by intraventricular hemorrhage than in patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. These different age peaks and different clinical presentations in each age group are also observed in MMD patients in the USA. Catheter angiography is the diagnostic method of choice. Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and computed tomographic angiography are noninvasive diagnostic methods. High-resolution vessel wall MR imaging also helps diagnose MMD by revealing concentric vessel wall narrowing with basal collaterals. PMID:26846755

  5. [Diverticular disease - clinical patterns and treatment].

    PubMed

    Lembcke, Bernhard; Kruis, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Diverticulosis, diverticular disease and diverticulitis have come into focus again because new aspects concerning diagnosis, risk factors and treatment arose only recently which prompted a new Guideline released by the DGVS and DGAV summarising the current evidence. Along with the guideline's essentials for medical practice a diagnosis of diverticulitis is considered unsatisfactory unless a cross-sectional imaging method (either ultrasonography [US] or computed tomography [CT] ) has proven that the clinical findings and inflammation (CRP considered superior to WBC and temperature) are due to diverticular inflammation. For reasons of practicability and considering relevant legislation for radiation exposure protection, US is the primary - and usually effectual - diagnostic method of choice as it is equipotent to CT. While US offers better resolution and enables precise imaging exactly at the location of pain as well as reiterative application, the latter implies advantages in the case of a deep abscess or diverticulitis in difficult locations (e. g. the small pelvis). Clinical evidence and laboratory and imaging findings allow for distinguishing a large number of differential diagnoses and also form the basis of a new classification (classification of diverticular disease, CDD) which comprises all forms of diverticular disease, from diverticulosis to bleeding and to the different facettes of diverticulitis. This classification -which should be applied in any patient with the diagnosis of diverticular disease- is independent of specific diagnostic preferences and applicable both to conservative and operative treatment options. While the number of recurrent episodes is no longer a significant indicator for surgery in diverticulitis, severity and / or complications determine treatment options along with the patients preferences. According to first data, conservative treatment may waive antibiotics under certain circumstances, however they are indispensible in

  6. CDKD: a clinical database of kidney diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The main function of the kidneys is to remove waste products and excess water from the blood. Loss of kidney function leads to various health issues, such as anemia, high blood pressure, bone disease, disorders of cholesterol. The main objective of this database system is to store the personal and laboratory investigatory details of patients with kidney disease. The emphasis is on experimental results relevant to quantitative renal physiology, with a particular focus on data relevant for evaluation of parameters in statistical models of renal function. Description Clinical database of kidney diseases (CDKD) has been developed with patient confidentiality and data security as a top priority. It can make comparative analysis of one or more parameters of patient’s record and includes the information of about whole range of data including demographics, medical history, laboratory test results, vital signs, personal statistics like age and weight. Conclusions The goal of this database is to make kidney-related physiological data easily available to the scientific community and to maintain & retain patient’s record. As a Web based application it permits physician to see, edit and annotate a patient record from anywhere and anytime while maintaining the confidentiality of the personal record. It also allows statistical analysis of all data. PMID:22540288

  7. Globalization of Alzheimer's disease clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapies are increasingly being tested in global clinical trials. A search of ClincalTrials.gov revealed that of 269 currently active trials, 28% are currently being conducted in the United States; the majority of trials and the majority of trial sites are ex-US. The US has the largest number of trial sites of any single country; cumulatively, nearly half of all sites are outside the US. The US conducts more trials in all phases of drug development but has a greater proportion of phase 3 trials. The increasing importance of global participants in clinical trials emphasizes the importance of considering the ethnic and international factors that may influence trial outcome. The International Conference on Harmonization guidelines divide ethnic factors that may affect drug development into intrinsic and extrinsic influences. These include language, cultural factors, educational levels, the general level of health and standard of care, as well as nutrition and diet. Ethnic influences on pharmacokinetics are known for some metabolic pathways. The biology of AD may also differ among the world's populations. The frequency of the apolipoprotein e4 allele, a major risk factor for AD, differs internationally. Genetic variations might also affect inflammatory, excitotoxic, and oxidative components of AD. Diagnostic standards and experience vary from country to country. Levels of practitioner training and experience, diagnostic approaches to AD, and attitudes regarding aging and AD may differ. Experience and sophistication with regard to clinical trial conduct also vary within and between countries. Experience with conducting the necessary examinations, as well as the linguistic and cultural validity of instrument translations, may affect trial outcomes. Operational and regulatory aspects of clinical trials vary and provide important barriers to seamless conduct of multiregional clinical trials. Collection and testing of biological samples, continuous

  8. Feline heartworm disease: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Litster, Annette L; Atwell, Richard B

    2008-04-01

    Feline heartworm disease is caused by the filarial nematode Dirofilaria immitis, and is transmitted by mosquitoes in heartworm-endemic areas worldwide. While dogs are the definitive hosts for this parasite, cats can also be infected, and the overall prevalence in cats is between 5% and 10% of that in dogs in any given area. The spectrum of feline presentations varies from asymptomatic infections to chronic respiratory signs, sometimes accompanied by chronic vomiting to acute death with no premonitory signs. Ante-mortem diagnosis can be challenging and relies on a combination of tests, including antigen and antibody serology, thoracic radiography and echocardiography. As treatment with heartworm adulticidal drugs can be life-threatening and heartworm infection in cats is often self-limiting, infected cats are frequently managed with supportive treatment (corticosteroids, bronchodilators, and anti-emetics). Surgical removal of filariae using extraction devices may be considered in some acute cases where immediate curative treatment is necessary, but filarial breakage during the procedure may result in an acute fatal shock-like reaction. Necropsy findings are mainly pulmonary and include muscular hypertrophy of the pulmonary arteries and arterioles on histopathology. A number of safe and effective macrocytic lactone drugs are available for prophylaxis in cats. These drugs can kill a range of larval and adult life-cycle stage heartworms, which may be advantageous in cases of owner compliance failure or when heartworm infection status is undetermined at the time prophylaxis is commenced. An index of suspicion for feline heartworm disease is warranted in unprotected cats with respiratory signs, and perhaps chronic vomiting, in areas where canine heartworm disease is endemic. Many cats, once diagnosed and with appropriate supportive care and monitoring, will resolve their infection and be free of clinical signs. PMID:18042416

  9. Use of (/sup 99m/Tc)-HM-PAO in the diagnosis of primary degenerative dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Testa, H.J.; Snowden, J.S.; Neary, D.; Shields, R.A.; Burjan, A.W.; Prescott, M.C.; Northen, B.; Goulding, P.

    1988-12-01

    The clinical value of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the differential diagnosis of dementia due to cerebral atrophy was evaluated by comparing the pattern of distribution (/sup 99m/Tc)-HM-PAO in three dementing conditions. Imaging was carried out in 26 patients with suspected Alzheimer's disease, 14 with dementia of the frontal-lobe type, and 13 with progressive supranuclear palsy. Images were evaluated and reported without knowledge of clinical diagnosis with respect to regions of reduced uptake of tracer. Reduced uptake in the posterior cerebral hemispheres was characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, while selective anterior hemisphere abnormalities characterized both dementia of the frontal-lobe type and progressive supranuclear palsy. The latter conditions could be distinguished on the basis of the appearance of integrity of the rim of the frontal cortex. The technique has an important role in the differentiation of degenerative dementias.

  10. Effects of Spinal Stabilization Exercise on the Cross-sectional Areas of the Lumbar Multifidus and Psoas Major Muscles, Pain Intensity, and Lumbar Muscle Strength of Patients with Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongho; Kim, Hyungguen; Chung, Jaeyeop

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using spinal stabilizing exercise to reduce atrophy of the multifidus and psoas major muscles, reduce the levels of pain and disability, and increase paraspinal muscle strength in patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD). [Subjects and Methods] In 33 patients (Age range: 25–65 years) diagnosed with DDD, spinal stabilization exercise was conducted for 8 weeks. The levels of pain and disability were measured before and after exercise using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Paraspinal muscular strength in four directions was evaluated with a CENTAUR 3D Spatial Rotation Device. Cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of both the left and right multifidus and the psoas major at the upper endplate of L4 were measured before and after exercise using computed tomography (CT). [Results] After 8 weeks of spinal stabilization exercise, the pain and lumbar disability in subjects decreased significantly from 6.12±1.24 to 2.43±1.14. The ODI score also improved from 20.18±7.14 to 8.81±5.73. In addition, paraspinal muscle strength increased significantly, while the CSAs of the left and right multifidus and psoas major widened as compared with the pre-exercise size. [Conclusion] Spinal stabilization exercise was effective for reducing pain and disability in DDD patients. It was an effective adjunct to aid rehabilitation in these cases. PMID:24764637

  11. Chronic pain coping styles in patients with herniated lumbar discs and coexisting spondylotic changes treated surgically: Considering clinical pain characteristics, degenerative changes, disability, mood disturbances, and beliefs about pain control

    PubMed Central

    Misterska, Ewa; Jankowski, Roman; Głowacki, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain catastrophizing, appraisals of pain control, styles of coping, and social support have been suggested to affect functioning in patients with low back pain. We investigated the relation of chronic pain coping strategies to psychological variables and clinical data, in patients treated surgically due to lumbar disc herniation and coexisting spondylotic changes. Material/Methods The average age of study participants (n=90) was 43.47 years (SD 10.21). Patients completed the Polish versions of the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory-42 (PL-CPCI-42), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-PL), Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ-PL), Beliefs about Pain Control Questionnaire (BPCQ-PL), and Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMQ-PL). Results In the PL-CPCI-42 results, resting, guarding and coping self-statements were frequently used as coping strategies (3.96 SD 1.97; 3.72 SD 1.72; 3.47 SD 2.02, respectively). In the CSQ-PL domains, catastrophizing and praying/hoping were frequently used as coping strategies (3.62 SD 1.19). The mean score obtained from the BDI-PL was 11.86 SD 7.23, and 12.70 SD 5.49 from the RMDQ-PL. BPCQ-PL results indicate that the highest score was in the subscale measuring beliefs that powerful others can control pain (4.36 SD 0.97). Exercise correlated significantly with beliefs about internal control of pain (rs=0.22). We identified associations between radiating pain and guarding (p=0.038) and between sports recreation and guarding (p=0.013) and task persistence (p=0.041). Conclusions Back pain characteristics, depressive mood, disability, and beliefs about personal control of pain are related to chronic LBP coping styles. Most of the variables related to advancement of degenerative changes were not associated with coping efforts. PMID:24370564

  12. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy as a novel and potential treatment for degenerative cartilage and bone disease: Osteoarthritis. A qualitative analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qiaodan; Wang, Pu; He, Chengqi

    2016-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized with pathological changes on articular cartilage and subchondral bone, with clinical symptoms of pain and motor dysfunction in affected joints. A growing number of investigations demonstrated the therapeutic effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) on joints with OA. While the partial mechanisms of action are based on cellular mechanotransduction through cytoskeleton into nuclei to regulate gene expression and cause biophysical influences, the efficacy and exact mechanisms are still under exploration. At present, a summary of the evidence regarding effectiveness of ESWT on OA is not available. The purpose of this review is thus to offer an overview of ESWT in the management of OA in the aspects of cartilage, subchondral bone, pain sensation and motor function, in hopes of eliciting further multi-disciplinary scientific investigations into this promising application as an adjunct to other modalities or surgery. The optimal frequencies, impulses, energy intensity and protocols of ESWT in the management of OA continue to be elucidated. Further studies are required to reveal its exact mechanisms and biophysical effects on cells, animals and humans prior to the clinical application.

  13. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy as a novel and potential treatment for degenerative cartilage and bone disease: Osteoarthritis. A qualitative analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qiaodan; Wang, Pu; He, Chengqi

    2016-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized with pathological changes on articular cartilage and subchondral bone, with clinical symptoms of pain and motor dysfunction in affected joints. A growing number of investigations demonstrated the therapeutic effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) on joints with OA. While the partial mechanisms of action are based on cellular mechanotransduction through cytoskeleton into nuclei to regulate gene expression and cause biophysical influences, the efficacy and exact mechanisms are still under exploration. At present, a summary of the evidence regarding effectiveness of ESWT on OA is not available. The purpose of this review is thus to offer an overview of ESWT in the management of OA in the aspects of cartilage, subchondral bone, pain sensation and motor function, in hopes of eliciting further multi-disciplinary scientific investigations into this promising application as an adjunct to other modalities or surgery. The optimal frequencies, impulses, energy intensity and protocols of ESWT in the management of OA continue to be elucidated. Further studies are required to reveal its exact mechanisms and biophysical effects on cells, animals and humans prior to the clinical application. PMID:27423987

  14. [Malabsorption is a leading clinical sign of small bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Krums, L M

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a variety of clinical manifestations of malabsorption syndrome (MAS) in celiac disease, collagenous sprue, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal lymphangiectasia, amyloidosis, common variable immune deficiency, and treatment of short bowel syndrome. It shows the specific features of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of MAS in small bowel diseases.

  15. [Malabsorption is a leading clinical sign of small bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Krums, L M

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a variety of clinical manifestations of malabsorption syndrome (MAS) in celiac disease, collagenous sprue, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal lymphangiectasia, amyloidosis, common variable immune deficiency, and treatment of short bowel syndrome. It shows the specific features of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of MAS in small bowel diseases. PMID:27636919

  16. Atrophy, hypometabolism and clinical trajectories in patients with amyloid-negative Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chételat, Gaël; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Villemagne, Victor L; Perrotin, Audrey; Landeau, Brigitte; Mézenge, Florence; Jagust, William J; Dore, Vincent; Miller, Bruce L; Egret, Stéphanie; Seeley, William W; van der Flier, Wiesje M; La Joie, Renaud; Ames, David; van Berckel, Bart N M; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Rowe, Christopher C; Masters, Colin L; de La Sayette, Vincent; Bouwman, Femke; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2016-09-01

    -negative cases whose post-positon emission tomography diagnosis remained Alzheimer's disease. While the non-amnestic and non-specific amyloid-negative cases usually showed patterns of atrophy and hypometabolism suggestive of another degenerative disorder, the amnestic amyloid-negative cases had subtle atrophy and hypometabolism, restricted to the retrosplenial/posterior cingulate cortex. Patients with a negative amyloid positon emission tomography scan following an initial clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease have heterogeneous clinical presentations and neuroimaging profiles; a majority showed a clinical progression that was consistent with a neurodegenerative condition. In contrast, in the subgroup of amnestic amyloid-negative cases, the clinical presentation and follow-up usually remained consistent with Alzheimer's disease. An alternative diagnosis was not made in about half of the amnestic amyloid-negative cases, highlighting the need for a clinical framework and terminology to define these patients, who may have underlying limbic-predominant, non-amyloid-related pathologies. PMID:27357349

  17. Atrophy, hypometabolism and clinical trajectories in patients with amyloid-negative Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chételat, Gaël; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Villemagne, Victor L; Perrotin, Audrey; Landeau, Brigitte; Mézenge, Florence; Jagust, William J; Dore, Vincent; Miller, Bruce L; Egret, Stéphanie; Seeley, William W; van der Flier, Wiesje M; La Joie, Renaud; Ames, David; van Berckel, Bart N M; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Rowe, Christopher C; Masters, Colin L; de La Sayette, Vincent; Bouwman, Femke; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2016-09-01

    -negative cases whose post-positon emission tomography diagnosis remained Alzheimer's disease. While the non-amnestic and non-specific amyloid-negative cases usually showed patterns of atrophy and hypometabolism suggestive of another degenerative disorder, the amnestic amyloid-negative cases had subtle atrophy and hypometabolism, restricted to the retrosplenial/posterior cingulate cortex. Patients with a negative amyloid positon emission tomography scan following an initial clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease have heterogeneous clinical presentations and neuroimaging profiles; a majority showed a clinical progression that was consistent with a neurodegenerative condition. In contrast, in the subgroup of amnestic amyloid-negative cases, the clinical presentation and follow-up usually remained consistent with Alzheimer's disease. An alternative diagnosis was not made in about half of the amnestic amyloid-negative cases, highlighting the need for a clinical framework and terminology to define these patients, who may have underlying limbic-predominant, non-amyloid-related pathologies.

  18. Iron behaving badly: inappropriate iron chelation as a major contributor to the aetiology of vascular and other progressive inflammatory and degenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kell, Douglas B

    2009-01-01

    Background The production of peroxide and superoxide is an inevitable consequence of aerobic metabolism, and while these particular 'reactive oxygen species' (ROSs) can exhibit a number of biological effects, they are not of themselves excessively reactive and thus they are not especially damaging at physiological concentrations. However, their reactions with poorly liganded iron species can lead to the catalytic production of the very reactive and dangerous hydroxyl radical, which is exceptionally damaging, and a major cause of chronic inflammation. Review We review the considerable and wide-ranging evidence for the involvement of this combination of (su)peroxide and poorly liganded iron in a large number of physiological and indeed pathological processes and inflammatory disorders, especially those involving the progressive degradation of cellular and organismal performance. These diseases share a great many similarities and thus might be considered to have a common cause (i.e. iron-catalysed free radical and especially hydroxyl radical generation). The studies reviewed include those focused on a series of cardiovascular, metabolic and neurological diseases, where iron can be found at the sites of plaques and lesions, as well as studies showing the significance of iron to aging and longevity. The effective chelation of iron by natural or synthetic ligands is thus of major physiological (and potentially therapeutic) importance. As systems properties, we need to recognise that physiological observables have multiple molecular causes, and studying them in isolation leads to inconsistent patterns of apparent causality when it is the simultaneous combination of multiple factors that is responsible. This explains, for instance, the decidedly mixed effects of antioxidants that have been observed, since in some circumstances (especially the presence of poorly liganded iron) molecules that are nominally antioxidants can actually act as pro-oxidants. The reduction of redox

  19. Novel BAC mouse model of Huntington’s disease with 225 CAG repeats exhibits an early widespread and stable degenerative phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Wegrzynowicz, Michal; Bichell, Terry Jo; Soares, Barbara D.; Loth, Meredith K.; McGlothan, Jennifer L.; Alikhan, Fatima S.; Hua, Kegang; Coughlin, Jennifer M.; Holt, Hunter K.; Jetter, Christopher S.; Mori, Susumu; Pomper, Martin G.; Osmand, Alexander P.; Guilarte, Tomás R.; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Unusually large CAG repeat expansions (>60) in exon one of Huntingtin (HTT) are invariably associated with a juvenile-onset form of Huntington’s disease (HD), characterized by a more extensive and rapidly progressing neuropathology than the more prevalent adult-onset form. However, existing mouse models of HD that express the full-length Htt gene with CAG repeat lengths associated with juvenile HD (ranging between ~75 to ~150 repeats in published models) exhibit selective neurodegenerative phenotypes more consistent with adult-onset HD. OBJECTIVE To determine if a very large CAG repeat (>200) in full-length Htt elicits neurodegenerative phenotypes consistent with juvenile HD. METHODS Using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system, we generated mice expressing full-length mouse Htt with ~225 CAG repeats under control of the mouse Htt promoter. Mice were characterized using behavioral, neuropathological, biochemical and brain imaging methods. RESULTS BAC-225Q mice exhibit phenotypes consistent with a subset of features seen in juvenile-onset HD: very early motor behavior abnormalities, reduced body weight, widespread and progressive increase in Htt aggregates, gliosis, and neurodegeneration. Early striatal pathology was observed, including reactive gliosis and loss of dopamine receptors, prior to detectable volume loss. HD-related blood markers of impaired energy metabolism and systemic inflammation were also increased. Aside from an age-dependent progression of diffuse nuclear aggregates at 6 months of age to abundant neuropil aggregates at 12 months of age, other pathological and motor phenotypes showed little to no progression. CONCLUSIONS The HD phenotypes present in animals 3 to 12 months of age make the BAC-225Q mice a unique and stable model of full-length mutant Htt associated phenotypes, including body weight loss, behavioral impairment and HD-like neurodegenerative phenotypes characteristic of juvenile-onset HD and/or late-stage adult

  20. Inducible Expression of a Truncated Form of Tau in Oligodendrocytes Elicits Gait Abnormalities and a Decrease in Myelin: Implications for Selective CNS Degenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    LoPresti, Patrizia

    2015-11-01

    The cytoskeleton protein Tau present in oligodendrocytes (OLGs) promotes cellular process outgrowth and myelination; whereas abnormally hyperphosphorylated Tau has been shown to be present in the most debilitating form of multiple sclerosis and in selective dementias. This research examined the functional consequences of expressing a truncated form of Tau in OLGs during the second postnatal life. In particular, this truncated form of Tau (∆Tau) retains the Fyn-binding domain but lacks the microtubule-binding domain. Similar to hyperphosphorylated Tau, ∆Tau cannot bind the cytoskeleton and is missorted. The Cre/loxP recombination system was used to generate transgenic (TG) founder lines, which contain a Floxed LacZ-STOP cassette to prevent expression of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-∆Tau. The founder lines were then crossed with a Tamoxifen (TM)-inducible proteolipid protein (PLP)-dependent Cre driver line. Myelin PLP is the major myelin protein in the central nervous system (CNS). TM was given at postnatal day (p) 12 for 3 days, and CNS tissues were collected at p22. Only TG mice with both EGFP-∆Tau and Cre manifested an overt phenotype of loss of balance and stumbles starting around p18. CNS tissues obtained from TM-treated EGFP-∆Tau/Cre double transgenic mice had recombined PCR products, GFP, and diminished brain myelin. GFP was expressed in OLGs, but not in neurons or astrocytes. On the contrary, TM-treated TG mice with only one of the two transgenes, i.e., Cre or Tau, did not have recombinant PCR products, GFP, diminished myelin, or abnormal phenotype. Thus, this inducible model shows for the first time that a non-microtubule-associated Tau protein in OLGs elicits both myelin decrease and gait abnormalities, similar to the occurrence in selective demyelinating and neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. [Clinical analysis of cat scratch disease].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kusaba, Nobuhide; Sata, Michio

    2010-05-01

    We analyzed the clinical background of 63 patients with serologically confirmed cat scratch disease (CSD), Age range of the patients was 0 to 83 years old and mean age was 35.0 years old. Seasonal patterns of cases was observed. A number of patients with CSD was increased during the summer and fall. The peak incidence of CSD occurred in October. Infection followed direct cat or dog contact. Cat contact occurred in 61 cases (96.8%) and dog contact in 2 cases (3.2%). A specific contact with kittens occurred in 39 cases (61.9%). About 49.2% of patients had a cat scratch, 3.2% had a cat bite, 3.2% had a cat flea bite, 41.2% had no history of animal bite. The papule of inoculation site were seen in 27 cases (42.9%) of CSD. The upper extremities were the most likely locations for scratches. Sixty cases (95.2%) of CSD developed lymphadenopathy, 51.7% of the involved nodes were in the axillary, 31.7% were in the inguinal, 21.7% were in the cervical, 16.7% were in the elbow. The mean incubation period of patients with CSD was 18.9 days. The mean duration of lymphadenopathy after the treatment of antibiotics was 44.2 days. The mean value of white blood cell counts was 8130/microL. The mean value of C-reactive protein level was 2.83 mg/dL.

  2. Canine degenerative myelopathy: a model of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Taylor, Alexandra C; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-02-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (CDM) represents a unique naturally occurring animal model for human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) because of similar clinical signs, neuropathologic findings, and involvement of the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutation. A definitive diagnosis can only be made postmortem through microscopic detection of axonal degeneration, demyelination and astroglial proliferation, which is more severe in the dorsal columns of the thoracic spinal cord and in the dorsal portion of the lateral funiculus. Interestingly, the muscle acetylcholine receptor complexes are intact in CDM prior to functional impairment, thus suggesting that muscle atrophy in CDM does not result from physical denervation. Moreover, since sensory involvement seems to play an important role in CDM progression, a more careful investigation of the sensory pathology in ALS is also warranted. The importance of SOD1 expression remains unclear, while oxidative stress and denatured ubiquinated proteins appear to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of CDM. In this updated narrative review we performed a systematic search of the published studies on CDM that may shed light on the pathophysiological mechanisms of human ALS. A better understanding of the factors that determine the disease progression in CDM may be beneficial for the development of effective treatments for ALS.

  3. A Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Muscle Fat Content in the Lumbar Paraspinal Muscles with Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Patients with Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease and Focal Disk Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Bhadresha, Ashwin; Lawrence, Owen John; McCarthy, Michael J H

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objectives To assess the fatty atrophy of the lumbar paraspinal muscles (LPMs) as determined using magnetic resonance imaging in patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease (DDD) and focal disk herniation and to determine if fatty atrophy is associated with patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS). Methods One hundred sixty-five patients with lumbar DDD were identified from a PROMS database of >1,500 patients. These patients were divided into two study groups: DDD alone (n = 58) and DDD with disk herniation (n = 107). A grid was randomly applied to the axial scans at the L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 levels. The muscle-to-fat ratio of the LPMs was recorded and compared with PROMS data. Subcutaneous fat thickness at each level was also measured. Results This study found no difference in the muscle-to-fat ratio between the DDD and disk herniation groups. There was no association between the muscle-to-fat ratio and PROMS data in either group. There was significantly more subcutaneous fat at all levels in the DDD group as compared with the disk prolapse group. In DDD and disk prolapses, subcutaneous fat was thicker in women (p = 0.013 and 0.001). In patients with DDD, more subcutaneous fat was associated with disability (p < 0.001). Muscle content of erector spinae and multifidus negatively correlated with increasing age in both groups at the L3-L4 level. Conclusions Muscle fat content in the LPM does not appear to relate to PROMS. Muscle content decreases with age. Those with low back pain (DDD) have greater subcutaneous fat thickness. PMID:27190744

  4. A Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Muscle Fat Content in the Lumbar Paraspinal Muscles with Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Patients with Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease and Focal Disk Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Bhadresha, Ashwin; Lawrence, Owen John; McCarthy, Michael J H

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objectives To assess the fatty atrophy of the lumbar paraspinal muscles (LPMs) as determined using magnetic resonance imaging in patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease (DDD) and focal disk herniation and to determine if fatty atrophy is associated with patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS). Methods One hundred sixty-five patients with lumbar DDD were identified from a PROMS database of >1,500 patients. These patients were divided into two study groups: DDD alone (n = 58) and DDD with disk herniation (n = 107). A grid was randomly applied to the axial scans at the L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 levels. The muscle-to-fat ratio of the LPMs was recorded and compared with PROMS data. Subcutaneous fat thickness at each level was also measured. Results This study found no difference in the muscle-to-fat ratio between the DDD and disk herniation groups. There was no association between the muscle-to-fat ratio and PROMS data in either group. There was significantly more subcutaneous fat at all levels in the DDD group as compared with the disk prolapse group. In DDD and disk prolapses, subcutaneous fat was thicker in women (p = 0.013 and 0.001). In patients with DDD, more subcutaneous fat was associated with disability (p < 0.001). Muscle content of erector spinae and multifidus negatively correlated with increasing age in both groups at the L3-L4 level. Conclusions Muscle fat content in the LPM does not appear to relate to PROMS. Muscle content decreases with age. Those with low back pain (DDD) have greater subcutaneous fat thickness.

  5. A Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Muscle Fat Content in the Lumbar Paraspinal Muscles with Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Patients with Lumbar Degenerative Disk Disease and Focal Disk Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Bhadresha, Ashwin; Lawrence, Owen John; McCarthy, Michael J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objectives To assess the fatty atrophy of the lumbar paraspinal muscles (LPMs) as determined using magnetic resonance imaging in patients with lumbar degenerative disk disease (DDD) and focal disk herniation and to determine if fatty atrophy is associated with patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS). Methods One hundred sixty-five patients with lumbar DDD were identified from a PROMS database of >1,500 patients. These patients were divided into two study groups: DDD alone (n = 58) and DDD with disk herniation (n = 107). A grid was randomly applied to the axial scans at the L3–L4, L4–L5, and L5–S1 levels. The muscle-to-fat ratio of the LPMs was recorded and compared with PROMS data. Subcutaneous fat thickness at each level was also measured. Results This study found no difference in the muscle-to-fat ratio between the DDD and disk herniation groups. There was no association between the muscle-to-fat ratio and PROMS data in either group. There was significantly more subcutaneous fat at all levels in the DDD group as compared with the disk prolapse group. In DDD and disk prolapses, subcutaneous fat was thicker in women (p = 0.013 and 0.001). In patients with DDD, more subcutaneous fat was associated with disability (p < 0.001). Muscle content of erector spinae and multifidus negatively correlated with increasing age in both groups at the L3–L4 level. Conclusions Muscle fat content in the LPM does not appear to relate to PROMS. Muscle content decreases with age. Those with low back pain (DDD) have greater subcutaneous fat thickness. PMID:27190744

  6. Inclusion body myositis: from immunopathology and degenerative mechanisms to treatment perspectives.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jens; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2013-11-01

    Inclusion body myositis is the most common inflammatory myopathy above the age of 50. It becomes clinically apparent around the fourth decade and leads to a slowly, but relentlessly progressive decline in muscular wasting and weakness. The pathology consists of a complex network of inflammatory and degenerative mechanisms, which lead to an attack of muscle fibers by auto-reactive T cells and possibly antibodies. At the same time, various aberrant proteins accumulate within the muscle fibers, including β-amyloid, tau and α-synuclein. Several key components of proinflammatory cell stress mechanisms such as nitric oxide production and macroautophagic processing contribute to the muscle fiber damage. So far, none of the anti-inflammatory or immunomodulatory treatment efforts have been able to halt the disease progression and help the patients. In this summary, the current concept of the complex disease pathology of IBM is reviewed with a focus on recent findings as well as future treatment perspectives.

  7. Mapping Gene Associations in Human Mitochondria using Clinical Disease Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Scharfe, Curt; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing; Neuenburg, Jutta K.; Allen, Edward A.; Li, Guan-Cheng; Klopstock, Thomas; Cowan, Tina M.; Enns, Gregory M.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear genes encode most mitochondrial proteins, and their mutations cause diverse and debilitating clinical disorders. To date, 1,200 of these mitochondrial genes have been recorded, while no standardized catalog exists of the associated clinical phenotypes. Such a catalog would be useful to develop methods to analyze human phenotypic data, to determine genotype-phenotype relations among many genes and diseases, and to support the clinical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders. Here we establish a clinical phenotype catalog of 174 mitochondrial disease genes and study associations of diseases and genes. Phenotypic features such as clinical signs and symptoms were manually annotated from full-text medical articles and classified based on the hierarchical MeSH ontology. This classification of phenotypic features of each gene allowed for the comparison of diseases between different genes. In turn, we were then able to measure the phenotypic associations of disease genes for which we calculated a quantitative value that is based on their shared phenotypic features. The results showed that genes sharing more similar phenotypes have a stronger tendency for functional interactions, proving the usefulness of phenotype similarity values in disease gene network analysis. We then constructed a functional network of mitochondrial genes and discovered a higher connectivity for non-disease than for disease genes, and a tendency of disease genes to interact with each other. Utilizing these differences, we propose 168 candidate genes that resemble the characteristic interaction patterns of mitochondrial disease genes. Through their network associations, the candidates are further prioritized for the study of specific disorders such as optic neuropathies and Parkinson disease. Most mitochondrial disease phenotypes involve several clinical categories including neurologic, metabolic, and gastrointestinal disorders, which might indicate the effects of gene defects within the

  8. Clinical Manifestations and Treatment of Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Joyce L

    2015-12-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne illness in the United States and is also seen in areas of Europe and Asia. The growing deer and Ixodes species tick populations in many areas underscore the importance of clinicians to properly recognize and treat the different stages of Lyme disease. Controversy regarding the cause and management of persistent symptoms following treatment of Lyme disease persists and is highlighted in this review.

  9. Using Nutrition Against Aging and Degenerative Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokosz, Francis M.

    A review of historical and research literature presents various perspectives on the growing controversy surrounding the use of vitamin and mineral supplements to maintain good health and for preventive health care. Several points are made in opposition to many health professionals' opinions that most nutritional supplements are unnecessary.…

  10. Clinical and laboratory aspects of Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Strampfer, M J; Cunha, B A

    1987-12-01

    Legionnaires' disease is an illness with protean manifestations that are due to infection with Legionella pneumophila. It occurs both in epidemic and sporadic form and usually presents as an atypical pneumonia. Relative bradycardia, abnormal liver function test results, and a patient presenting with an atypical pneumonia should alert the clinician to the possibility of Legionella. The presence of systemic involvement, specifically neurological, gastrointestinal, and renal abnormalities, should further suggest the diagnosis. Patients may demonstrate multiple extrapulmonary manifestations of legionnaires' disease, sometimes without pneumonia. Several methods are available to aid the clinician in making the diagnosis of legionnaires' disease, and the use of all tests will increase the overall sensitivity.

  11. Finnish Degenerative Meniscal Lesion Study (FIDELITY): a protocol for a randomised, placebo surgery controlled trial on the efficacy of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for patients with degenerative meniscus injury with a novel ‘RCT within-a-cohort’ study design

    PubMed Central

    Sihvonen, Raine; Paavola, Mika; Malmivaara, Antti; Järvinen, Teppo L N

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) to treat degenerative meniscus injury is the most common orthopaedic procedure. However, valid evidence of the efficacy of APM is lacking. Controlling for the placebo effect of any medical intervention is important, but seems particularly pertinent for the assessment of APM, as the symptoms commonly attributed to a degenerative meniscal injury (medial joint line symptoms and perceived disability) are subjective and display considerable fluctuation, and accordingly difficult to gauge objectively. Methods and analysis A multicentre, parallel randomised, placebo surgery controlled trial is being carried out to assess the efficacy of APM for patients from 35 to 65 years of age with a degenerative meniscus injury. Patients with degenerative medial meniscus tear and medial joint line symptoms, without clinical or radiographic osteoarthritis of the index knee, were enrolled and then randomly assigned (1 : 1) to either APM or diagnostic arthroscopy (placebo surgery). Patients are followed up for 12 months. According to the prior power calculation, 140 patients were randomised. The two randomised patient groups will be compared at 12 months with intention-to-treat analysis. To safeguard against bias, patients, healthcare providers, data collectors, data analysts, outcome adjudicators and the researchers interpreting the findings will be blind to the patients’ interventions (APM/placebo). Primary outcomes are Lysholm knee score (a generic knee instrument), knee pain (using a numerical rating scale), and WOMET score (a disease-specific, health-related quality of life index). The secondary outcome is 15D (a generic quality of life instrument). Further, in one of the five centres recruiting patients for the randomised controlled trial (RCT), all patients scheduled for knee arthroscopy due to a degenerative meniscus injury are prospectively followed up using the same protocol as in the RCT to provide an external

  12. Sagittal Balance Correction in Lateral Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Gallizzi, Michael A.; Sheets, Charles; Smith, Benjamin T.; Isaacs, Robert E.; Eure, Megan; Brown, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sagittal balance restoration has been shown to be an important determinant of outcomes in corrective surgery for degenerative scoliosis. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is a less-invasive technique which permits the placement of a high lordosis interbody cage without risks associated with traditional anterior or transforaminal interbody techniques. Studies have shown improvement in lumbar lordosis following LIF, but only one other study has assessed sagittal balance in this population. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of LIF to restore sagittal balance in degenerative lumbar scoliosis. Methods Thirty-five patients who underwent LIF for degenerative thoracolumbar scoliosis from July 2013 to March 2014 by a single surgeon were included. Outcome measures included sagittal balance, lumbar lordosis, Cobb Angle, and segmental lordosis. Measures were evaluated pre-operative, immediately post-operatively, and at their last clinical follow-up. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to assess the differences between pre-operative, first postoperative, and a follow-up visit. Results The average sagittal balance correction was not significantly different: 1.06cm from 5.79cm to 4.74cm forward. The average Cobb angle correction was 14.1 degrees from 21.6 to 5.5 degrees. The average change in global lumbar lordosis was found to be significantly different: 6.3 degrees from 28.9 to 35.2 degrees. Conclusions This study demonstrates that LIF reliably restores lordosis, but does not significantly improve sagittal balance. Despite this, patients had reliable improvement in pain and functionality suggesting that sagittal balance correction may not be as critical in scoliosis correction as previous studies have indicated. Clinical Relevance LIF does not significantly change sagittal balance; however, clinical improvement does not seem to be contingent upon sagittal balance correction in the degenerative scoliosis population. The DUHS IRB has determined this

  13. Sagittal Balance Correction in Lateral Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Gallizzi, Michael A.; Sheets, Charles; Smith, Benjamin T.; Isaacs, Robert E.; Eure, Megan; Brown, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sagittal balance restoration has been shown to be an important determinant of outcomes in corrective surgery for degenerative scoliosis. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is a less-invasive technique which permits the placement of a high lordosis interbody cage without risks associated with traditional anterior or transforaminal interbody techniques. Studies have shown improvement in lumbar lordosis following LIF, but only one other study has assessed sagittal balance in this population. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ability of LIF to restore sagittal balance in degenerative lumbar scoliosis. Methods Thirty-five patients who underwent LIF for degenerative thoracolumbar scoliosis from July 2013 to March 2014 by a single surgeon were included. Outcome measures included sagittal balance, lumbar lordosis, Cobb Angle, and segmental lordosis. Measures were evaluated pre-operative, immediately post-operatively, and at their last clinical follow-up. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to assess the differences between pre-operative, first postoperative, and a follow-up visit. Results The average sagittal balance correction was not significantly different: 1.06cm from 5.79cm to 4.74cm forward. The average Cobb angle correction was 14.1 degrees from 21.6 to 5.5 degrees. The average change in global lumbar lordosis was found to be significantly different: 6.3 degrees from 28.9 to 35.2 degrees. Conclusions This study demonstrates that LIF reliably restores lordosis, but does not significantly improve sagittal balance. Despite this, patients had reliable improvement in pain and functionality suggesting that sagittal balance correction may not be as critical in scoliosis correction as previous studies have indicated. Clinical Relevance LIF does not significantly change sagittal balance; however, clinical improvement does not seem to be contingent upon sagittal balance correction in the degenerative scoliosis population. The DUHS IRB has determined this

  14. [Some aspects regarding degenerative mitral valvular lesions encountered in medical practice].

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Simona Daniela; Sandru, V; Artenie, R; Manea, Paloma; Rezuş, C; Burdujan, Alina; Hrustovici, A; Cosovanu, A

    2003-01-01

    In the last years, the degenerative valvular heart diseases have the tendency to equalize in frequency the rheumatismal valvular diseases. The maximum attention has been paid on the degenerative aortic stenosis as being a lesion with maximum frequency and a severe evolution. This study, given on the 18391 admissions in the period 1997-2001, is a retrospective analyse and it is concerned with the degenerative mitral valvular lesions. Of the 223 patients with degenerative valvular heart lesions, 139 patients (62.3%) had degenerative aortic stenosis and 96 patients (38.5%) were diagnosed with degenerative mitral valvular lesions from which 30 patients have had no association with aortic valvular lesions while 66 patients have had such an association. The pointed out types of mitral lesions were: the mitral insufficiency in 59 patients, the mitral annular calcification without hemodynamic disease in 19 patients, the mitral stenosis in 9 patients and the mitral disease in 9 patients, too. The women was affected nearly 1.7 times more frequent than the men, with a maximum average age greater with four years for women but with a low minimal average age at 60 years for women and 52 years for men. The detailed analyse of this 96 cases had shown the presence of a cholesterol value over 200 mg/dl in 50 patients (52%), the diabetic mellitus of type II in 12 patients (12.5%), an association with HTA in 42 patients (43.7%), the cardiac insufficiency in 68 patients (70.8%), a permanent atrial fibrillation in 24 patients (25%), the chronical myocardiac infarct in 19 patients (19.7%) and disorders in the transmission of stimuli in 8 patients (8.3%). The degenerative mitral valvular lesions had occurred more and more frequently realizing more complex features under the mitral insufficiency predominance. Its frequent association with the degenerative valvular lesions determines the evolutive and therapeutic particularities that are dominated by the high gravity prognostic.

  15. [Some aspects of degenerative mitral valve lesions encountered in medical practice].

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Simona Daniela; Artenie, R; Rezuş, C; Manea, Paloma; Sandru, V; Burdujan, Alina; Cosovanu, A

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, degenerative valvular heart diseases have the tendency to be equal in frequency with rheumatic valvular diseases. The maximum attention has been paid on the degenerative aortic stenosis as being a lesion with maximum frequency and a severe evolution. This study, given on the 18,391 admissions in the period 1997-2001, is a retrospective analysis and it is concerned with the degenerative mitral valvular lesions. Of the 223 patients with degenerative valvular heart lesions, 139 patients (62.3%) had degenerative aortic stenosis and 96 patients (38.5%) were diagnosed with degenerative mitral valvular lesions from which 30 patients have had no association with aortic valvular lesions while 66 patients have had such an association. The pointed out types of mitral lesions were: the mitral insufficiency in 59 patients, the mitral annular calcification without hemodynamic disease in 19 patients, the mitral stenosis in 9 patients and the mitral disease in 9 patients, too. The women were affected nearly 1.7 times more frequent than the men, with a maximum average age greater with four years for women but with a low minimal average age at 60 years for women and 52 years for men. The detailed analysis of this 96 cases had shown the presence of a cholesterol value over 200 mg/dl in 50 patients (52%), the diabetes mellitus of type II in 12 patients (12.5%), an association with HTA in 42 patients (43.7%), the cardiac insufficiency in 68 patients (70.8%), a permanent atrial fibrillation in 24 patients (25%), chronic myocardial infarct in 19 patients (19.7%) and disorders in the transmission of stimuli in 8 patients (8.3%). The degenerative mitral valvular lesions had occurred more and more frequently realizing more complex features under the mitral insufficiency predominance. Its frequent association with the degenerative valvular lesions determines the evolutive and therapeutic particulars that are dominated by the high gravity prognostic.

  16. Lipidomics applications for discovering biomarkers of diseases in clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Yong; Cheng, Xian-long; Lin, Rui-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are the fundamental components of biological membranes as well as the metabolites of organisms. Lipids play diverse and important roles in biologicals. The lipid imbalance is closely associated with numerous human lifestyle-related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, obesity, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease. Lipidomics or lipid profiling is a system-based study of all lipids aiming at comprehensive analysis of lipids in the biological system. Lipidomics has been accepted as a lipid-related research tool in lipid biochemistry, clinical biomarker discovery, disease diagnosis, and in understanding disease pathology. Lipidomics will not only provide insights into the specific functions of lipid species in health and disease, but will also identify potential biomarkers for establishing preventive or therapeutic programs for human diseases. This review presents an overview of lipidomics followed by in-depth discussion of its application to the study of human diseases, including extraction methods of lipids, analytical technologies, data analysis, and clinical research in cancer, neuropsychiatric disease, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and respiratory disease. We describe the current status of the identification of metabolic biomarkers in different diseases. We also discuss the lipidomics for the future perspectives and their potential problems. The application of lipidomics in clinical studies may provide new insights into lipid profiling and pathophysiological mechanisms.

  17. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    PubMed

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development. PMID:27273303

  18. [Celiac disease : Pathogenesis, clinics, epidemiology, diagnostics, therapy].

    PubMed

    Schuppan, Detlef

    2016-07-01

    Celiac disease is induced by the consumption of gluten containing cereals (wheat, spelt, barley, rye). With a prevalence of ~ 1 %, it is the most common non-infectious chronic inflammatory intestinal disease worldwide. It manifests in all age groups, either classically with abdominal pain, diarrhoea and growth failure or weight loss, more commonly with indirect consequences of malabsorption, such as anaemia and osteoporosis, or with associated autoimmune diseases like type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroiditis or dermatitis herpetiformis. The pathogenesis of celiac disease is well explored. Gluten, the cereal storage protein, is not completely digested and reaches the intestinal mucosa where it activates inflammatory T cells, which cause atrophy of the resorptive villi. This T‑cell activation requires a genetic predisposition (the molecules HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 on antigen-presenting immune cells). Moreover, the enzyme tissue transglutaminase (TG2) which is released in the mucosa increases the immunogenicity of the gluten peptides by a deamidation reaction. The test for serum antibodies to the autoantigen TG2 is one of the best diagnostic markers in medicine, which in combination with endoscopically obtained biopsies, secures the diagnosis of celiac disease. Despite these tools celiac disease is severely underdiagnosed, with 80-90 % of those affected being undetected. The untreated condition can lead to grave complications. These include the consequences of malabsorption, cancers (especially intestinal T‑cell lymphoma), and likely also the promotion of autoimmune diseases. The therapy of celiac disease, a strict gluten-free diet, is difficult to maintain and not always effective. Alternative, supporting pharmacological therapies are urgently needed and are currently in development.

  19. Intestinal tuberculosis versus crohn's disease: Clinical and radiological recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raju; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Ahuja, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis is a common clinical problem in India. The clinical features of this disease are nonspecific and can be very similar to Crohn's disease. Radiological evaluation of the small bowel has undergone a paradigm shift in the last decade. This long tubular organ that has traditionally been difficult to evaluate can now be well-visualized by some innovative imaging and endoscopic techniques. This article highlights the state-of-the-art evaluation of ulceroconstrictive diseases of the bowel and provides recommendations for the differentiation of intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease. PMID:27413261

  20. Intestinal tuberculosis versus crohn's disease: Clinical and radiological recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Raju; Madhusudhan, Kumble S; Ahuja, Vineet

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal tuberculosis is a common clinical problem in India. The clinical features of this disease are nonspecific and can be very similar to Crohn's disease. Radiological evaluation of the small bowel has undergone a paradigm shift in the last decade. This long tubular organ that has traditionally been difficult to evaluate can now be well-visualized by some innovative imaging and endoscopic techniques. This article highlights the state-of-the-art evaluation of ulceroconstrictive diseases of the bowel and provides recommendations for the differentiation of intestinal tuberculosis from Crohn's disease. PMID:27413261

  1. Clinical Trials in Rare Disease: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Erika F.; Adams, Heather R.; Mink, Jonathan W.

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses constitute one of many groups of rare childhood diseases for which disease-modifying treatments are non-existent. Disease-specific barriers to therapeutic success include incomplete understanding of disease pathophysiology and limitations of treatments that cannot adequately cross the blood-brain barrier to access the central nervous system. Therapeutic development in the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses shares many challenges with other rare diseases, such as incomplete understanding of natural history to inform trial design, need for alternatives to the randomized controlled clinical trial, requirement for more sensitive outcome measures to quantify disease, limited access to resources required to mount a clinical trial (including funding), and difficulties of recruiting a small sample to participation. Solutions to these barriers will require multicenter collaboration, partnership with patient organizations, training a new generation of researchers interested in rare diseases, and leveraging existing resources. PMID:24014509

  2. Neurologic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscular dystrophy Problems with the way the nervous system develops, such as spina bifida Degenerative diseases, where nerve cells are damaged or die, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease Diseases of the blood vessels that supply ...

  3. [Congenital heart diseases in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Ratti, Carlo; Veronesi, Benedetta; Grassi, Laura; Bompani, Bruno

    2012-05-01

    Congenital heart diseases are abnormalities in the heart's structure that are present at birth. Some are known to be associated with genetic disorders. They affect 8 out of every 1,000 newborns. They range from simple defects with no symptoms to complex defects. They are divided in two types: cyanotic and not cyanotic.

  4. Bacterial clinical infectious diseases ontology (BCIDO) dataset.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Claire L; Weng, Chunhua

    2016-09-01

    This article describes the Bacterial Infectious Diseases Ontology (BCIDO) dataset related to research published in http:dx.doi.org/ 10.1016/j.jbi.2015.07.014 [1], and contains the Protégé OWL files required to run BCIDO in the Protégé environment. BCIDO contains 1719 classes and 39 object properties. PMID:27508237

  5. Clinical diagnostic clues in Crohn's disease: a 41-year experience.

    PubMed

    Quintana, C; Galleguillos, L; Benavides, E; Quintana, J C; Zúñiga, A; Duarte, I; Klaassen, J; Kolbach, M; Soto, R M; Iacobelli, S; Alvarez, M; O'Brien, A

    2012-01-01

    Determining the diagnosis of Crohn's disease has been highly difficult mainly during the first years of this study carried out at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica (PUC) Clinical Hospital. For instance, it has been frequently confused with Irritable bowel syndrome and sometimes misdiagnosed as ulcerative colitis, infectious colitis or enterocolitis, intestinal lymphoma, or coeliac disease. Consequently, it seems advisable to characterize what the most relevant clinical features are, in order to establish a clear concept of Crohn's disease. This difficulty may still be a problem at other medical centers in developing countries. Thus, sharing this information may contribute to a better understanding of this disease. Based on the clinical experience gained between 1963 and 2004 and reported herein, the main clinical characteristics of the disease are long-lasting day and night abdominal pain, which becomes more intense after eating and diarrhoea, sometimes associated to a mass in the abdomen, anal lesions, and other additional digestive and nondigestive clinical features. Nevertheless, the main aim of this work has been the following: is it possible to make, in an early stage, the diagnosis of Crohn's disease with a high degree of certainty exclusively with clinical data?

  6. Challenges assessing clinical endpoints in early Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Jane S.; Wang, Chiachi; Duff, Kevin; Barker, Roger; Nance, Martha; Beglinger, Leigh; Moser, David; Williams, Janet K.; Simpson, Sheila; Langbehn, Douglas; van Kammen, Daniel P.

    2010-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the current accepted standard clinical endpoint for the earliest-studied HD participants likely to be recruited into clinical trials. Since the advent of genetic testing for HD, it is possible to identify gene carriers prior to the diagnosis of disease, which opens up the possibility of clinical trials of disease-modifying treatments in clinically asymptomatic persons. Current accepted standard clinical endpoints were examined as part of a multi-national, 32-site, longitudinal, observational study of 786 research participants currently in the HD prodrome (gene-positive but not clinically diagnosed). Clinical signs and symptoms were used to prospectively predict functional loss as assessed by current accepted standard endpoints over 8 years of follow up. Functional capacity measures were not sensitive for HD in the prodrome; over 88% scored at ceiling. Prospective evaluation revealed that the first functional loss was in their accustomed work. In a survival analysis, motor, cognitive, and psychiatric measures were all predictors of job change. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study ever conducted on the emergence of functional loss secondary to brain disease. We conclude that future clinical trials designed for very early disease will require the development of new and more sensitive measures of real-life function. PMID:20623772

  7. Defining Clinical Excellence in Adult Infectious Disease Practice.

    PubMed

    Chida, Natasha M; Ghanem, Khalil G; Auwaerter, Paul G; Wright, Scott M; Melia, Michael T

    2016-09-01

    Clinical excellence should be recognized, particularly in the current climate that appropriately prioritizes relationship-centered care. In order to develop a recognition model, a definition of clinical excellence must be created and agreed upon. A paradigm recently suggested by C. Christmas describes clinical excellence through the following domains: diagnostic acumen, professionalism and humanism, communication and interpersonal skills, skillful negotiation of the healthcare system, knowledge, taking a scholarly approach to clinical practice, and having passion for clinical medicine. This work references examples of infectious disease (ID) clinical excellence across Christmas' domains and, in doing so, both examines how the definition of clinical excellence applies to ID practice and highlights the importance of ID physicians. Emphasizing such aspirational standards may not only inspire trainees and practicing physicians to pursue their own fulfilling clinical ID careers, it may also encourage health systems to fully value outstanding ID physicians who labor tirelessly to provide patients with exceptional care. PMID:27419186

  8. Defining Clinical Excellence in Adult Infectious Disease Practice

    PubMed Central

    Chida, Natasha M.; Ghanem, Khalil G.; Auwaerter, Paul G.; Wright, Scott M.; Melia, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical excellence should be recognized, particularly in the current climate that appropriately prioritizes relationship-centered care. In order to develop a recognition model, a definition of clinical excellence must be created and agreed upon. A paradigm recently suggested by C. Christmas describes clinical excellence through the following domains: diagnostic acumen, professionalism and humanism, communication and interpersonal skills, skillful negotiation of the healthcare system, knowledge, taking a scholarly approach to clinical practice, and having passion for clinical medicine. This work references examples of infectious disease (ID) clinical excellence across Christmas' domains and, in doing so, both examines how the definition of clinical excellence applies to ID practice and highlights the importance of ID physicians. Emphasizing such aspirational standards may not only inspire trainees and practicing physicians to pursue their own fulfilling clinical ID careers, it may also encourage health systems to fully value outstanding ID physicians who labor tirelessly to provide patients with exceptional care. PMID:27419186

  9. Defining Clinical Excellence in Adult Infectious Disease Practice.

    PubMed

    Chida, Natasha M; Ghanem, Khalil G; Auwaerter, Paul G; Wright, Scott M; Melia, Michael T

    2016-09-01

    Clinical excellence should be recognized, particularly in the current climate that appropriately prioritizes relationship-centered care. In order to develop a recognition model, a definition of clinical excellence must be created and agreed upon. A paradigm recently suggested by C. Christmas describes clinical excellence through the following domains: diagnostic acumen, professionalism and humanism, communication and interpersonal skills, skillful negotiation of the healthcare system, knowledge, taking a scholarly approach to clinical practice, and having passion for clinical medicine. This work references examples of infectious disease (ID) clinical excellence across Christmas' domains and, in doing so, both examines how the definition of clinical excellence applies to ID practice and highlights the importance of ID physicians. Emphasizing such aspirational standards may not only inspire trainees and practicing physicians to pursue their own fulfilling clinical ID careers, it may also encourage health systems to fully value outstanding ID physicians who labor tirelessly to provide patients with exceptional care.

  10. Clinical zinc deficiency as early presentation of Wilson disease.

    PubMed

    Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Küry, Sébastien; De Bruyne, Ruth; Vanakker, Olivier M; Schmitt, Sébastien; Vande Velde, Saskia; Blouin, Eric; Bézieau, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    Wilson disease is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of the copper metabolism caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the ATP-ase Cu(2+) transporting polypeptide (ATP7B) gene. The copper accumulation in different organs leads to the suspicion of Wilson disease. We describe a child with clinical zinc deficiency as presenting symptom of Wilson disease, which was confirmed by 2 mutations within the ATP7B gene and an increased copper excretion.

  11. Applications of Doppler ultrasound in clinical vascular disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, R. W.; Hokanson, D. E.; Sumner, D. S.; Strandness, D. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound has become the most useful and versatile noninvasive technique for objective evaluation of clinical vascular disease. Commercially available continuous-wave instruments provide qualitative and quantitative assessment of venous and arterial disease. Pulsed Doppler ultrasound was developed to provide longitudinal and transverse cross-sectional images of the arterial lumen with a resolution approaching that of conventional X-ray techniques. Application of Doppler ultrasound in venous, peripheral arterial, and cerebrovascular diseases is reviewed.

  12. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in clinical management.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhiguo; Chong, Jiehan; Ong, Albert C M

    2016-01-01

    The first clinical descriptions of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) go back at least 500 years to the late 16 (th) century. Advances in understanding disease presentation and pathophysiology have mirrored the progress of clinical medicine in anatomy, pathology, physiology, cell biology, and genetics. The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the major genes mutated in ADPKD, has stimulated major advances, which in turn have led to the first approved drug for this disorder and a fresh reassessment of patient management in the 21 (st) century. In this commentary, we consider how clinical management is likely to change in the coming decade. PMID:27594986

  13. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: recent advances in clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Zhiguo; Chong, Jiehan; Ong, Albert C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The first clinical descriptions of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) go back at least 500 years to the late 16 th century. Advances in understanding disease presentation and pathophysiology have mirrored the progress of clinical medicine in anatomy, pathology, physiology, cell biology, and genetics. The identification of PKD1 and PKD2, the major genes mutated in ADPKD, has stimulated major advances, which in turn have led to the first approved drug for this disorder and a fresh reassessment of patient management in the 21 st century. In this commentary, we consider how clinical management is likely to change in the coming decade. PMID:27594986

  14. What progress has been made in the understanding and treatment of degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in dogs during the past 30 years?

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Nick D; Barker, Andrew; Harcourt-Brown, Tom

    2014-07-01

    An association between degenerative changes in the lumbosacral region of the vertebral column and clinical signs of pain and pelvic limb dysfunction has long been recognized in dogs and has become known as degenerative lumbosacral stenosis syndrome. Over the past two decades, methods of imaging this condition have advanced greatly, but definitive criteria for a reliable diagnosis using physical examination, imaging and electrodiagnostics remain elusive. Available treatment options have changed little over more than 30 years but, more importantly, there is a lack of comparative studies and little progress has been made in providing evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of affected dogs. This review provides an overview of the changes in diagnosis, understanding and treatment of lumbosacral disease in dogs over the past 30 years. Approaches to address the unanswered questions regarding treatment choice are also proposed.

  15. THE PRINTO CRITERIA FOR CLINICALLY INACTIVE DISEASE IN JUVENILE DERMATOMYOSITIS

    PubMed Central

    Lazarevic, Dragana; Pistorio, Angela; Palmisani, Elena; Miettunen, Paivi; Ravelli, Angelo; Pilkington, Clarissa; Wulffraat, Nico; Malattia, Clara; Garay, Stella; Hofer, Michael; Quartier, Pierre; Dolezalova, Pavla; Calvo, Inmaculada; Ferriani, Virginia; Ganser, Gerd; Kasapcopur, Ozgur; Melo-Gomes, Jose Antonio; Reed, Ann M.; Wierzbowska, Malgorzata; Rider, Lisa G.; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To develop data-driven criteria for clinically inactive disease on and off therapy for juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM). Methods The PRINTO database contains 275 patients with active JDM evaluated prospectively up to 24 months. Thirty-eight patients off therapy at 24 months were defined as clinically inactive and included in the reference group. These were compared with a random sample of 76 patients who had active disease at study baseline. Individual measures of muscle strength/endurance, muscle enzymes, physician's and parent's global disease activity/damage evaluations, inactive disease criteria derived from literature, and other ad hoc criteria, were evaluated for sensitivity, specificity, and Cohen's kappa agreement. Results The individual measures that best characterised inactive disease (sensitivity and specificity >0.8 and Cohen's K>0.8) were manual muscle testing (MMT)≥78, physician global assessment of muscle activity=0, physician global assessment of overall disease activity (PhyGloVAS) ≤0.2, the Childhood Myositis Assessment Scale (CMAS) ≥48, the Disease Activity Score (DAS) ≤3 and the Myositis Disease Activity Assessment Visual Analogue Scale (MYOACT) ≤0.2. The best combination of variables to classify a patient as being in a status of inactive disease on or off therapy is at least 3 out of 4 of the following criteria: creatine kinase ≤150, CMAS≥48, MMT≥78, and PhyGloVAS≤0.2. After 24 months, 30/31 (96.8%) patients were inactive off therapy and 69/145 (47.6%) were inactive on-therapy. Conclusion PRINTO established data-driven criteria, with clearly evidence-based cut off values, to identify JDM patients with clinically inactive disease. These criteria can be used in clinical trials, in research and in clinical practice. PMID:22736096

  16. [Clinical management of severe ocular surface disease].

    PubMed

    Stoiber, J; Grabner, G

    2005-07-01

    Severe ocular surface diseases, such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, ocular cicatricial pemphigoid or severe ocular burns may result in a significant loss of corneal stem cells, eventually leading to vision impairment or even corneal blindness. In case of unilateral involvement, limbal autografting, by means of transplanting limbal stem cells from the healthy fellow eye, has proved to be an effective procedure for restoring the integrity of the ocular surface. Limbal allografts may be performed in patients with bilateral disease, however, systemic immunosuppression is mandatory in these cases, with a long-term outcome that is frequently reduced compared to limbal autografts due to acute or chronic graft rejection. In recent years, amniotic membrane transplantation has been successfully employed as an additional tool in ocular surface reconstruction. The AlphaCor synthetic cornea, which is made of flexible acrylic may be considered as an alternative in patients with repeated corneal graft failures. Both limbal transplantation and the AlphaCor have been shown to be effective in eyes with an adequate tear film, but are most likely to fail in severe dry eyes or in patients with cicatrising diseases. Such conditions are the domain of keratoprostheses (KPros) with rigid optics, which certainly can be considered as the 'last resort' to restore vision in patients with profound corneal blindness not amenable to conventional corneal and limbal grafting. The osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis according to Strampelli and modified by Falcinelli makes use of a "biological" support consisting of a longitudinal section of one of the patient's teeth that is also supported by the surrounding alveolar bone tissue. Compared to other devices favourable long-term results have been reported. In patients lacking any usable teeth, implantation of a keratoprosthesis with haptics made of Dacron (Pintucci-KPro) or tibial bone (Temprano-KPro) might be considered.

  17. Intestinal failure: Pathophysiological elements and clinical diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lian-An; Li, Jie-Shou

    2004-01-01

    There are two main functions of gastrointestinal tract, digestion and absorption, and barrier function. The latter has an important defensive effect, which keeps the body away from the invading and damaging of bacteria and endotoxin. It maintains the systemic homeostasis. Intestinal dysfunction would happen when body suffers from diseases or harmful stimulations. The lesser dysfunction of GI tract manifests only disorder of digestion and absorption, whereas the more serious intestinal disorders would harm the intestinal protective mechanism, or intestinal barrier function, and bacterial/endotoxin translocation, of intestinal failure (IF) would ensue. This review disscussed the theory of the intestinal failure, aiming at attracting recognition and valuable comments by clinicians. PMID:15052668

  18. Gut microbiota and related diseases: clinical features.

    PubMed

    Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Barbara, Giovanni; Cremon, Cesare; Cogliandro, Rosanna; Antonucci, Alexandra; Gabusi, Veronica; Frisoni, Chiara; De Giorgio, Roberto; Grasso, Valentina; Serra, Mauro; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2010-10-01

    Intestinal microbiota is essential for gut homeostasis. Specifically, the microorganisms inhabiting the gut lumen interact with the intestinal immune system, supply key nutrients for the major components of the gut wall, and modulate energy metabolism. Host-microbiome interactions can be either beneficial or deleterious, driving gastrointestinal lymphoid tissue activities and shaping gut wall structures. This overview briefly focuses on the potential role played by abnormalities in gut microbiota and relative responses of the gastrointestinal tract in the determination of important pathological conditions such as the irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer. PMID:20865476

  19. An intervention to improve notifiable disease reporting using ambulatory clinics.

    PubMed

    Trepka, M J; Zhang, G; Leguen, F

    2009-01-01

    Strong notifiable disease surveillance systems are essential for disease control. We sought to determine if a brief informational session between clinic and health department employees followed by reminder faxes and a newsletter would improve reporting rates and timeliness in a notifiable disease surveillance system. Ambulatory clinics were randomized to an intervention group which received the informational session, a faxed reporting reminder and newsletter, or to a control group. Among intervention and control clinics, there were improvements in the number of cases reported and the timeliness of reporting. However, there were no statistically significant changes in either group. Despite improved communication between the health department and clinics, this intervention did not significantly improve the level or the timeliness of reporting. Other types of interventions should be considered to improve reporting such as simplifying the reporting process.

  20. [Kawasaki disease: interdisciplinary and intersocieties consensus (clinical guidelines). Brief version].

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute self-limiting systemic vasculitis. It is the most common cause of acquired heart disease, with the risk of developing coronary artery aneurysms, myocardial infarction and sudden death. Diagnosis is based on the presence of fever in addition to other clinical criteria. The quarter of the Kawasaki disease patients have "incomplete" presentation. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin within ten days of fever onset improves clinical outcomes and reduces the incidence of coronary artery dilation to less than 5%. Non-responders to standard therapy have shown a successful response with the use of corticosteroids and/or biological agents. The long-term management must be delineated according to the degree of coronary involvement in a multidisciplinary manner. To facilitate the pediatrician's diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of Kawasaki disease, a group of experts from the Argentine Society of Pediatrics and the Argentine Society of Cardiology carried out a consensus to develop practical clinical guidelines. PMID:27399018

  1. Detecting Emerging Diseases in Farm Animals through Clinical Observations

    PubMed Central

    Vourc'h, Gwenaël; Bridges, Victoria E.; Gibbens, Jane; De Groot, Brad D.; McIntyre, Lachlan; Poland, Roger; Barnouin, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    Predicting emerging diseases is among the most difficult challenges facing researchers and health managers. We present available approaches and tools to detect emerging diseases in animals based on clinical observations of farm animals by veterinarians. Three information systems are described and discussed: Veterinary Practitioner Aided Disease Surveillance in New Zealand, the Rapid Syndrome Validation Project—Animal in the United States, and "émergences" in France. These systems are based on syndromic surveillance with the notification of every case or of specific clinical syndromes or on the notification of atypical clinical cases. Data are entered by field veterinarians into forms available through Internet-accessible devices. Beyond challenges of implementing new information systems, minimizing economic and health effects from emerging diseases in animals requires strong synergies across a group of field partners, in research, and in international animal and public health customs and practices. PMID:16494743

  2. [Kawasaki disease: interdisciplinary and intersocieties consensus (clinical guidelines). Brief version].

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute self-limiting systemic vasculitis. It is the most common cause of acquired heart disease, with the risk of developing coronary artery aneurysms, myocardial infarction and sudden death. Diagnosis is based on the presence of fever in addition to other clinical criteria. The quarter of the Kawasaki disease patients have "incomplete" presentation. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin within ten days of fever onset improves clinical outcomes and reduces the incidence of coronary artery dilation to less than 5%. Non-responders to standard therapy have shown a successful response with the use of corticosteroids and/or biological agents. The long-term management must be delineated according to the degree of coronary involvement in a multidisciplinary manner. To facilitate the pediatrician's diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of Kawasaki disease, a group of experts from the Argentine Society of Pediatrics and the Argentine Society of Cardiology carried out a consensus to develop practical clinical guidelines.

  3. Clinical outcome of Crohn's disease: analysis according to the vienna classification and clinical activity.

    PubMed

    Veloso, F T; Ferreira, J T; Barros, L; Almeida, S

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical course of Crohn's disease (CD) in a well-defined, homogeneous groups of patients. A total of 480 patients with CD were followed up from diagnosis up to 20 years. Definitions of patient subgroups were made according to the Vienna Classification. Markov chain analysis was used to estimate the probabilities of remissions and relapses during the disease course. Both age at diagnosis and behavior were associated with different disease locations. Patients with ileal disease had a greater need for surgical and a lesser need for immunosuppressive treatment; patients with ileocolonic disease were diagnosed at an earlier age and showed a lower probability of remaining in remission during the disease course; patients with colonic disease needed less surgical or steroid treatments; patients with intestinal penetrating disease were frequently submitted to abdominal surgery, whereas those with anal-penetrating disease often needed immunosuppressive treatment. Approximately 40% of the patients were in clinical remission at any time, but only about 10% maintained a long-term remission free of steroids after their initial presentation. A more benign clinical course could be predicted in patients who stay in remission in the year after diagnosis. The grouping of patients with CD according to the Vienna Classification and/or the clinical activity in the year after diagnosis is useful in predicting the subsequent course of disease. PMID:11720320

  4. Experiences from an interprofessional student-assisted chronic disease clinic.

    PubMed

    Frakes, Kerrie-Anne; Brownie, Sharon; Davies, Lauren; Thomas, Janelle; Miller, Mary-Ellen; Tyack, Zephanie

    2014-11-01

    Faced with significant health and workforce challenges in the region, the Central Queensland Health Service District (CQHSD) commenced a student-assisted clinical service. The Capricornia Allied Health Partnership (CAHP) is an interprofessional clinical placement program in which pre-entry students from exercise physiology, nutrition and dietetics, occupational therapy, pharmacy, podiatry and social work are embedded in a collaborative chronic disease service delivery model. The model coordinates multiple student clinical placements to: address service delivery gaps for previously underserved people with chronic disease in need of early intervention and management; provide an attractive clinical placement opportunity for students that will potentially lead to future recruitment success, and demonstrate leadership in developing future health workforce trainees to attain appropriate levels of interprofessional capacity. The CAHP clinic commenced student placements and client services in February 2010. This report provides early evaluative information regarding student experiences included self-reported changes in practice.

  5. Alexander's disease: clinical, pathologic, and genetic features.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anne B; Brenner, Michael

    2003-09-01

    Alexander's disease, a rare and fatal disorder of the central nervous system, most commonly affects infants and young children but can also occur in older children and sometimes adults. In infants and young children, it causes developmental delay, psychomotor retardation, paraparesis, feeding problems, usually megalencephaly, often seizures, and sometimes hydrocephalus. Juvenile cases often do not have megalencephaly and tend to have predominant pseudobulbar and bulbar signs. In both groups, characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings have been described. In adult cases, the signs are variable, can resemble multiple sclerosis, and might include palatal myoclonus. In all cases, the examination of brain tissue shows the presence of widely distributed Rosenthal fibers. Almost all cases have recently been found to have a heterozygous, missense, point mutation in the gene for glial fibrillary acidic protein, which provides a new diagnostic tool. In most cases, the mutation appears to occur de novo, not being present in either parent, but some adult cases are familial.

  6. A network approach to clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Jose A; Potashkin, Judith A

    2014-12-01

    Network biology has become a powerful tool to dissect the molecular mechanisms triggering neurodegeneration. Recent developments in network biology have led to the discovery of disease-causing genes, diagnostic biomarkers, and therapeutic targets for several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. Network-based approaches have provided the molecular rationale for the relationship among cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases, and have uncovered unexpected links between apparently unrelated diseases. Here, we summarize the recent advances in network biology to untangle the molecular underpinnings giving rise to the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases. We propose that network analysis provides a feasible and practical tool for identifying biologically meaningful biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for clinical intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25455073

  7. Clinical management of the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vanholder, Raymond; Fouque, Denis; Glorieux, Griet; Heine, Gunnar H; Kanbay, Mehmet; Mallamaci, Francesca; Massy, Ziad A; Ortiz, Alberto; Rossignol, Patrick; Wiecek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; London, Gérard Michel

    2016-04-01

    The clinical picture of the uraemic syndrome is a complex amalgam of accelerated ageing and organ dysfunction, which progress in parallel to chronic kidney disease. The uraemic syndrome is associated with cardiovascular disease, metabolic bone disease, inflammation, protein energy wasting, intestinal dysbiosis, anaemia, and neurological and endocrine dysfunction. In this Review, we summarise specific, modern management options for the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease. Although large randomised controlled trials are scarce, based on data from randomised controlled trials and observational studies, as well as pathophysiological reasoning, a therapeutic algorithm can be developed for this complex and multifactorial condition, with interventions targeting several modifiable factors simultaneously. PMID:26948372

  8. Clinical management of the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vanholder, Raymond; Fouque, Denis; Glorieux, Griet; Heine, Gunnar H; Kanbay, Mehmet; Mallamaci, Francesca; Massy, Ziad A; Ortiz, Alberto; Rossignol, Patrick; Wiecek, Andrzej; Zoccali, Carmine; London, Gérard Michel

    2016-04-01

    The clinical picture of the uraemic syndrome is a complex amalgam of accelerated ageing and organ dysfunction, which progress in parallel to chronic kidney disease. The uraemic syndrome is associated with cardiovascular disease, metabolic bone disease, inflammation, protein energy wasting, intestinal dysbiosis, anaemia, and neurological and endocrine dysfunction. In this Review, we summarise specific, modern management options for the uraemic syndrome in chronic kidney disease. Although large randomised controlled trials are scarce, based on data from randomised controlled trials and observational studies, as well as pathophysiological reasoning, a therapeutic algorithm can be developed for this complex and multifactorial condition, with interventions targeting several modifiable factors simultaneously.

  9. Clinical and pathological insights into Johne's disease in buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Dalto, André Cabrera; Bandarra, Paulo Mota; Pavarini, Saulo Petinatti; Boabaid, Fabiana Marques; de Bitencourt, Ana Paula Gobbi; Gomes, Marcos Pereira; Chies, José; Driemeier, David; da Cruz, Cláudio Estêvão Farias

    2012-12-01

    Alternative diagnostic tools and interesting epidemiological assumptions were associated with an outbreak of Johne's disease. In a buffalo herd infected with paratuberculosis, seven clinically affected animals and 21 animals with anti-Mycobacterium avium ELISA reactions were identified. Total herd included 203 buffaloes. Most lesions were comparable to those described in buffaloes and cattle affected by Johne's disease. Water buffalo behaviors such as communal nursing and allosuckling may be additional risk factors for this disease. Detection of positive Ziehl-Neelsen staining and anti-M. avium immunolabeling in rectal biopsies from one buffalo with paratuberculosis are highlighted as auxiliary diagnostic tools for Johne's disease in live animals.

  10. How to predict clinical relapse in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Liverani, Elisa; Scaioli, Eleonora; Digby, Richard John; Bellanova, Matteo; Belluzzi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases have a natural course characterized by alternating periods of remission and relapse. Disease flares occur in a random way and are currently unpredictable for the most part. Predictors of benign or unfavourable clinical course are required to facilitate treatment decisions and to avoid overtreatment. The present article provides a literature review of the current evidence on the main clinical, genetic, endoscopic, histologic, serologic and fecal markers to predict aggressiveness of inflammatory bowel disease and discuss their prognostic role, both in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. No single marker seems to be reliable alone as a flare predictor, even in light of promising evidence regarding the role of fecal markers, in particular fecal calprotectin, which has reported good results recently. In order to improve our daily clinical practice, validated prognostic scores should be elaborated, integrating clinical and biological markers of prognosis. Finally, we propose an algorithm considering clinical history and biological markers to intercept patients with high risk of clinical relapse. PMID:26811644

  11. Clinical arthrography

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt, R.; Horns, J.W.; Gold, R.H.; Blaschke, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This book deals with the method and interpretation of arthrography of the shoulder, knee, ankle, elbow, hip, wrist, and metacarpophalangeal, interphalangeal, and temporomandibular joints. The emphasis is on orthopaedic disorders, usually of traumatic origin, which is in keeping with the application of arthrography in clinical practice. Other conditions, such as inflammatory and degenerative diseases, congenital disorders and, in the case of the hip, arthrography of reconstructive joint surgery, are included. Each chapter is devoted to one joint and provides a comprehensive discussion on the method of arthrography, including single and double contrast techniques where applicable, normal radiographic anatomy, and finally, the interpretation of the normal and the abnormal arthrogram.

  12. [The most probable clinical diagnosis to the applicants for the intractable disease registration of Parkinson's disease, spinocerebellar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Narita, Yugo; Taniguchi, Akira; Kuzuhara, Shigeki

    2006-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD) and spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) are included in the 45 intractable diseases" acknowledged by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan. The registration of applicants is based on the attending doctors' diagnosis, and medical costs of registered patients are covered by the government. However, the accuracy of the diagnoses has not been investigated previously. The aim of the present study is to investigate the accuracy of the diagnoses of patients registered as PD, SCD and ALS in Mie prefecture of Japan. The study design was cross-sectional and the survey was carried out using an anonymous questionnaire. We asked the attending doctors the most probable clinical diagnosis in each applicant for PD, SCD or ALS at the annual renewal of application form of the specified diseases by the Ministry. The questionnaires were sent to the 57 neurologists in 20 general hospitals and 2 neurology clinics in Mie prefecture, Japan. The survey was carried out from July to September, 2003. For each disorder (PD, ALS, SCD), the accuracy rates were calculated as the ratio of the number of patients with the most probable diagnosis of the consistent disease to the number of all patients registered each disease. Questionnaires on 678 patients replied from 31 neurologists, 27 of whom were the neurology specialists approved by the Japanese Society of Neurology, were retrieved and analyzed. They covered 41.1% of the total registered PD cases, 45.4% of total SCD cases, and 54.0% of total ALS cases in Mie prefecture. The final clinical diagnosis were made by such specialists in 641 cases (94.5%). The accuracy rate of PD was 97.3% for all degenerative parkinsonisms and 90.2% for idiopathic PD, 96.0% for SCD, and 77.8% for typical ALS and 81.5% for ALS and Kennedy-Alter-Sung syndrome. Although the most probable diagnoses were performed by the attending physicians without verification by other raters, the accuracy rates

  13. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Kidneys' Structural Changes in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are the most important manifestations of end-stage kidneys' structural changes. ACKD is caused by kidney damage or scarring and it is characterized by the presence of small, multiple cortical and medullary cysts filled with a fluid similar to preurine. ACKD prevalence varies according to predialysis and dialysis age and its pathogenesis is unknown, although it is stated that progressive destruction of renal tissue induces hypertrophy/compensatory hyperplasia of residual nephrons and may trigger the degenerative process. ACKD is almost asymptomatic, but it can lead to several complications (bleeding, rupture, infections, RCC). Ultrasound (US) is the first level imaging technique in ACKD, because of its sensitivity and reliability. The most serious complication of ACKD is RCC, which is stimulated by the same growth factors and proto-oncogenes that lead to the genesis of cysts. Two different histological types of RCC have been identified: (1) RCC associated with ACKD and (2) papillary renal clear cell carcinoma. Tumors in end-stage kidneys are mainly small, multifocal and bilateral, with a papillary structure and a low degree of malignancy. At US, RCC appears as a small inhomogeneous nodule (<3 cm), clearly outlined from the renal profile and hypoechoic if compared with sclerotic parenchyma. In some cases, tumor appears as a homogeneous and hyperechoic multifocal mass. The most specific US sign of a small tumor in end-stage kidney is the important arterial vascularization, in contrast with renal parenchymal vascular sclerosis. PMID:27169876

  14. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Kidneys' Structural Changes in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are the most important manifestations of end-stage kidneys' structural changes. ACKD is caused by kidney damage or scarring and it is characterized by the presence of small, multiple cortical and medullary cysts filled with a fluid similar to preurine. ACKD prevalence varies according to predialysis and dialysis age and its pathogenesis is unknown, although it is stated that progressive destruction of renal tissue induces hypertrophy/compensatory hyperplasia of residual nephrons and may trigger the degenerative process. ACKD is almost asymptomatic, but it can lead to several complications (bleeding, rupture, infections, RCC). Ultrasound (US) is the first level imaging technique in ACKD, because of its sensitivity and reliability. The most serious complication of ACKD is RCC, which is stimulated by the same growth factors and proto-oncogenes that lead to the genesis of cysts. Two different histological types of RCC have been identified: (1) RCC associated with ACKD and (2) papillary renal clear cell carcinoma. Tumors in end-stage kidneys are mainly small, multifocal and bilateral, with a papillary structure and a low degree of malignancy. At US, RCC appears as a small inhomogeneous nodule (<3 cm), clearly outlined from the renal profile and hypoechoic if compared with sclerotic parenchyma. In some cases, tumor appears as a homogeneous and hyperechoic multifocal mass. The most specific US sign of a small tumor in end-stage kidney is the important arterial vascularization, in contrast with renal parenchymal vascular sclerosis.

  15. Fatigue in liver disease: Pathophysiology and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Mark G

    2006-01-01

    Fatigue is the most commonly encountered symptom in patients with liver disease, and it has a significant impact on their quality of life. However, although some progress has been made with regard to the understanding of the processes which may generate fatigue in general, the underlying cause(s) of liver disease-associated fatigue remain incompletely understood. The present review describes recent advances which have been made in our ability to measure fatigue in patients with liver disease in the clinical setting, as well as in our understanding of potential pathways which are likely important in the pathogenesis of fatigue associated with liver disease. Specifically, experimental findings suggest that fatigue associated with liver disease likely occurs as a result of changes in neurotransmission within the brain. In conclusion, a reasonable approach to help guide in the management of the fatigued patient with liver disease is presented. PMID:16550262

  16. Chronic liver disease in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Kudva, M V; Zawawi, M M

    1990-08-01

    This study was undertaken to analyse the clinical spectrum of chronic liver disease (cirrhosis, and others with portal hypertension) in Kuala Lumpur. Eighty patients were diagnosed over a 6-year period. Twenty-two had biopsy proven cirrhosis while 58 others had portal hypertension with clinical and biochemical evidence of chronic liver disease. The commonest aetiology was alcohol (36%), followed by the idiopathic variety and hepatitis B. The male to female ratio was 4.4:1. Indians had a high prevalence of alcohol-associated chronic liver disease. Overall, ascites was the commonest presentation. Eight patients presented with hepatocellular carcinoma. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis was diagnosed in 13% of patients undergoing abdominal paracentesis. Gallstones were detected in 37% of patients who underwent ultrasonography. Diabetes mellitus and peptic ulcer disease were noted in 22% and 31% of patients respectively.

  17. Executive functions in clinical and preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Allain, P; Etcharry-Bouyx, F; Verny, C

    2013-10-01

    Executive functions is an umbrella term describing a wide range of higher order processes that allow the flexible modification of thought and behaviour in response to changing cognitive or environmental contexts. Impairment of executive functions is common in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. These deficits negatively affect everyday activities and hamper the ability to cope with other cognitive or behavioural disorders. In this paper, we propose a synthesis of the knowledge on executive impairments in clinical and preclinical Alzheimer's disease, mostly leaning on the current studies made in this domain. We made some propositions for neuropsychological assessment of executive functions in preclinical and clinical phases of Alzheimer's disease. We hope that this overview will provide a useful insight into an area that is still insufficiently explored in the field of the neuropsychology of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. [Clinical and microbiological study of adult periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Nogueira Moreira, A; Fernández Canigia, L; Furman, C; Chiappe, V; Marcantoni, M; Bianchini, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a microbiological evaluation of sites with and without clinical evidence of moderate and severe periodontitis and their correlation with clinical parameters. A total of 52 disease sites and 10 healthy sites were selected according to clinical criteria. The following clinical indexes were measured for all the sites: plaque index, gingival index, blood on probing, depth on probing and insertion level. Samples of subgingival plaque were collected for culture and for differential counts of microbial morphotypes. In disease sites the most frequently isolated were: Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens (65%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (23%), Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (23%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (10%) and Peptostreptococcus sp. (31%). The aerobic gram-positive microflora was predominant in healthy sites. Significant differences were observed in microbial morphotypes between healthy and disease sites: cocci 18.71% and 78.90%, motile rods 46.12% and 16.70%, total spirochetes 26.48% and 2.80%, respectively. The presence of motile rods, spirochetes and P. intermedia/nigrescens were the parameters with most sensitivity to suspect periodontal disease. There were significant differences in the subgingival microflora between healthy and disease sites in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis. PMID:11594003

  19. [Clinical and microbiological study of adult periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Nogueira Moreira, A; Fernández Canigia, L; Furman, C; Chiappe, V; Marcantoni, M; Bianchini, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a microbiological evaluation of sites with and without clinical evidence of moderate and severe periodontitis and their correlation with clinical parameters. A total of 52 disease sites and 10 healthy sites were selected according to clinical criteria. The following clinical indexes were measured for all the sites: plaque index, gingival index, blood on probing, depth on probing and insertion level. Samples of subgingival plaque were collected for culture and for differential counts of microbial morphotypes. In disease sites the most frequently isolated were: Prevotella intermedia/nigrescens (65%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (23%), Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (23%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (10%) and Peptostreptococcus sp. (31%). The aerobic gram-positive microflora was predominant in healthy sites. Significant differences were observed in microbial morphotypes between healthy and disease sites: cocci 18.71% and 78.90%, motile rods 46.12% and 16.70%, total spirochetes 26.48% and 2.80%, respectively. The presence of motile rods, spirochetes and P. intermedia/nigrescens were the parameters with most sensitivity to suspect periodontal disease. There were significant differences in the subgingival microflora between healthy and disease sites in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis.

  20. [Analysis of clinical pathway in changing and disabling neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Cordesse, V; Jametal, T; Guy, C; Lefebvre, S; Roussel, M; Ruggeri, J; Schimmel, P; Holstein, J; Meininger, V

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases are characterized by the complexity of care and by a constant and changing disability. More and more frequently, their impact on the clinical pathway remains unknown. Seven postgraduate rehabilitation students (Master coordination du handicap, université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie, Paris) reconstructed the clinical pathway of 123 patients with various neurological diseases: multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal trauma, Parkinson disease and brain tumors. There was a significant correlation between disease duration and the number of specialists involved in care, the number of prescribed drugs and the number of short-term hospitalizations; there was no correlation with age. This result suggests that with time an increasing number of complications related to the initial neurological disease developed. Hospitalization in rehabilitation units was highly correlated with the degree of disability and also with the help received by the patients during the course of their disease. This result suggests that these hospitalizations were a direct consequence of burn out among relatives. General practitioners (GP) were highly involved only during the initial part of the pathway, and their involvement rapidly declined thereafter, suggesting a probable relation with the specificities and the complexity of care for neurological diseases which induces a progressive transfer of responsibilities from the GP to the hospital. Social care was always incomplete and occurred too late during the course of the disease. The feeling by the patients that their care pathway was chaotic was highly correlated with the quality of the information given to the patient at the time of the announcement of their disease. This study confirms that cares for neurological diseases is highly specific and that expert centers and coordination networks are in a key position to ensure an efficient care pathway.

  1. Currently Clinical Views on Genetics of Wilson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Shen, Bo; Xiao, Jia-Jia; Wu, Rong; Canning, Sarah Jane Duff; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to review the research on clinical genetics of Wilson's disease (WD). Data Sources: We searched documents from PubMed and Wanfang databases both in English and Chinese up to 2014 using the keywords WD in combination with genetic, ATP7B gene, gene mutation, genotype, phenotype. Study Selection: Publications about the ATP7B gene and protein function associated with clinical features were selected. Results: Wilson's disease, also named hepatolenticular degeneration, is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by abnormal copper metabolism caused by mutations to the copper-transporting gene ATP7B. Decreased biliary copper excretion and reduced incorporation of copper into apoceruloplasmin caused by defunctionalization of ATP7B protein lead to accumulation of copper in many tissues and organs, including liver, brain, and cornea, finally resulting in liver disease and extrapyramidal symptoms. It is the most common genetic neurological disorder in the onset of adolescents, second to muscular dystrophy in China. Early diagnosis and medical therapy are of great significance for improving the prognosis of WD patients. However, diagnosis of this disease is usually difficult because of its complicated phenotypes. In the last 10 years, an increasing number of clinical studies have used molecular genetics techniques. Improved diagnosis and prediction of the progression of this disease at the molecular level will aid in the development of more individualized and effective interventions, which is a key to transition from molecular genetic research to the clinical study. Conclusions: Clinical genetics studies are necessary to understand the mechanism underlying WD at the molecular level from the genotype to the phenotype. Clinical genetics research benefits newly emerging medical treatments including stem cell transplantation and gene therapy for WD patients. PMID:26112727

  2. The Advancing Clinical Impact of Molecular Imaging in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Eric A; Jaffer, Farouc A

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging seeks to unravel critical molecular and cellular events in living subjects by providing complementary biological information to current structural clinical imaging modalities. In recent years, molecular imaging efforts have marched forward into the clinical cardiovascular arena, and are now actively illuminating new biology in a broad range of conditions, including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, thrombosis, vasculitis, aneurysm, cardiomyopathy, and valvular disease. Development of novel molecular imaging reporters is occurring for many clinical cardiovascular imaging modalities (PET, SPECT, MRI), as well in translational platforms such as intravascular fluorescence imaging. The ability to image, track, and quantify molecular biomarkers in organs not routinely amenable to biopsy (e.g. the heart and vasculature) open new clinical opportunities to tailor therapeutics based on a cardiovascular disease molecular profile. In addition, molecular imaging is playing an increasing role in atherosclerosis drug development in Phase II clinical trials. Here we present state-of-the-art clinical cardiovascular molecular imaging strategies, and explore promising translational approaches positioned for clinical testing in the near term. PMID:24332285

  3. [Clinical guidelines for infantile-onset Pompe disease].

    PubMed

    Pascual-Pascual, S I; Nascimento, A; Fernandez-Llamazares, C M; Medrano-Lopez, C; Villalobos-Pinto, E; Martinez-Moreno, M; Ley, M; Manrique-Rodriguez, S; Blasco-Alonso, J

    2016-09-16

    Infantile-onset Pompe disease has a fatal prognosis in the short term unless it is diagnosed at an early stage and enzyme replacement therapy is not started as soon as possible. A group of specialists from different disciplines involved in this disease have reviewed the current scientific evidence and have drawn up an agreed series of recommendations on the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients. We recommend establishing enzyme treatment in any patient with symptomatic Pompe disease with onset within the first year of life, with a clinical and enzymatic diagnosis, and once the CRIM (cross-reactive immunological material) status is known.

  4. [Clinical guidelines for infantile-onset Pompe disease].

    PubMed

    Pascual-Pascual, S I; Nascimento, A; Fernandez-Llamazares, C M; Medrano-Lopez, C; Villalobos-Pinto, E; Martinez-Moreno, M; Ley, M; Manrique-Rodriguez, S; Blasco-Alonso, J

    2016-09-16

    Infantile-onset Pompe disease has a fatal prognosis in the short term unless it is diagnosed at an early stage and enzyme replacement therapy is not started as soon as possible. A group of specialists from different disciplines involved in this disease have reviewed the current scientific evidence and have drawn up an agreed series of recommendations on the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients. We recommend establishing enzyme treatment in any patient with symptomatic Pompe disease with onset within the first year of life, with a clinical and enzymatic diagnosis, and once the CRIM (cross-reactive immunological material) status is known. PMID:27600742

  5. Rethinking dry eye disease: a perspective on clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Bron, Anthony J; Tomlinson, Alan; Foulks, Gary N; Pepose, Jay S; Baudouin, Christophe; Geerling, Gerd; Nichols, Kelly K; Lemp, Michael A

    2014-04-01

    Publication of the DEWS report in 2007 established the state of the science of dry eye disease (DED). Since that time, new evidence suggests that a rethinking of traditional concepts of dry eye disease is in order. Specifically, new evidence on the epidemiology of the disease, as well as strategies for diagnosis, have changed the understanding of DED, which is a heterogeneous disease associated with considerable variability in presentation. These advances, along with implications for clinical care, are summarized herein. The most widely used signs of DED are poorly correlated with each other and with symptoms. While symptoms are thought to be characteristic of DED, recent studies have shown that less than 60% of subjects with other objective evidence of DED are symptomatic. Thus the use of symptoms alone in diagnosis will likely result in missing a significant percentage of DED patients, particularly with early/mild disease. This could have considerable impact in patients undergoing cataract or refractive surgery as patients with DED have less than optimal visual results. The most widely used objective signs for diagnosing DED all show greater variability between eyes and in the same eye over time compared with normal subjects. This variability is thought to be a manifestation of tear film instability which results in rapid breakup of the tearfilm between blinks and is an identifier of patients with DED. This feature emphasizes the bilateral nature of the disease in most subjects not suffering from unilateral lid or other unilateral destabilizing surface disorders. Instability of the composition of the tears also occurs in dry eye disease and shows the same variance between eyes. Finally, elevated tear osmolarity has been reported to be a global marker (present in both subtypes of the disease- aqueous-deficient dry eye and evaporative dry eye). Clinically, osmolarity has been shown to be the best single metric for diagnosis of DED and is directly related to

  6. Rethinking dry eye disease: a perspective on clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Bron, Anthony J; Tomlinson, Alan; Foulks, Gary N; Pepose, Jay S; Baudouin, Christophe; Geerling, Gerd; Nichols, Kelly K; Lemp, Michael A

    2014-04-01

    Publication of the DEWS report in 2007 established the state of the science of dry eye disease (DED). Since that time, new evidence suggests that a rethinking of traditional concepts of dry eye disease is in order. Specifically, new evidence on the epidemiology of the disease, as well as strategies for diagnosis, have changed the understanding of DED, which is a heterogeneous disease associated with considerable variability in presentation. These advances, along with implications for clinical care, are summarized herein. The most widely used signs of DED are poorly correlated with each other and with symptoms. While symptoms are thought to be characteristic of DED, recent studies have shown that less than 60% of subjects with other objective evidence of DED are symptomatic. Thus the use of symptoms alone in diagnosis will likely result in missing a significant percentage of DED patients, particularly with early/mild disease. This could have considerable impact in patients undergoing cataract or refractive surgery as patients with DED have less than optimal visual results. The most widely used objective signs for diagnosing DED all show greater variability between eyes and in the same eye over time compared with normal subjects. This variability is thought to be a manifestation of tear film instability which results in rapid breakup of the tearfilm between blinks and is an identifier of patients with DED. This feature emphasizes the bilateral nature of the disease in most subjects not suffering from unilateral lid or other unilateral destabilizing surface disorders. Instability of the composition of the tears also occurs in dry eye disease and shows the same variance between eyes. Finally, elevated tear osmolarity has been reported to be a global marker (present in both subtypes of the disease- aqueous-deficient dry eye and evaporative dry eye). Clinically, osmolarity has been shown to be the best single metric for diagnosis of DED and is directly related to

  7. Progressive diaphyseal dysplasia (Engelmann disease): scintigraphic-radiographic-clinical correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, B.; Murphy, W.A.; Whyte, M.P.

    1981-07-01

    Four patients (2 males, 2 females; ages 15-47 yrs.) with variable clinical, radiographic, and scintigraphic manifestations of progressive diaphyseal dysplasia (PDD) or Engelmann disease were studied with 99mTc methylene diphosphonate bone imaging and radiographic skeletal surveys. Comparison of the results of the two imaging procedures showed that some affected bones were scintigraphically normal but radiographically abnormal and vice versa. These findings suggest that the lesions of PDD may mature, causing a significant decrease in disease activity, and that abnormally increased radiopharmaceutical accumulation during bone scintigraphy appears to be a sensitive indicator of disease activity.

  8. A review of disease progression models of Parkinson's disease and applications in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Venuto, Charles S; Potter, Nicholas B; Ray Dorsey, E; Kieburtz, Karl

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative disease progression models for neurodegenerative disorders are gaining recognition as important tools for drug development and evaluation. In Parkinson's disease (PD), several models have described longitudinal changes in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), one of the most utilized outcome measures for PD trials assessing disease progression. We conducted a literature review to examine the methods and applications of quantitative disease progression modeling for PD using a combination of key words including "Parkinson disease," "progression," and "model." For this review, we focused on models of PD progression quantifying changes in the total UPDRS scores against time. Four different models reporting equations and parameters have been published using linear and nonlinear functions. The reasons for constructing disease progression models of PD thus far have been to quantify disease trajectories of PD patients in active and inactive treatment arms of clinical trials, to quantify and discern symptomatic and disease-modifying treatment effects, and to demonstrate how model-based methods may be used to design clinical trials. The historical lack of efficiency of PD clinical trials begs for model-based simulations in planning for studies that result in more informative conclusions, particularly around disease modification. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  9. Podometrics as a Potential Clinical Tool for Glomerular Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Masao; Wickman, Larysa; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Wiggins, Roger C

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease culminating in end-stage kidney disease is a major public health problem costing in excess of $40 billion per year with high morbidity and mortality. Current tools for glomerular disease monitoring lack precision and contribute to poor outcome. The podocyte depletion hypothesis describes the major mechanisms underlying the progression of glomerular diseases, which are responsible for more than 80% of cases of end-stage kidney disease. The question arises of whether this new knowledge can be used to improve outcomes and reduce costs. Podocytes have unique characteristics that make them an attractive monitoring tool. Methodologies for estimating podocyte number, size, density, glomerular volume and other parameters in routine kidney biopsies, and the rate of podocyte detachment from glomeruli into urine (podometrics) now have been developed and validated. They potentially fill important gaps in the glomerular disease monitoring toolbox. The application of these tools to glomerular disease groups shows good correlation with outcome, although data validating their use for individual decision making is not yet available. Given the urgency of the clinical problem, we argue that the time has come to focus on testing these tools for application to individualized clinical decision making toward more effective progression prevention.

  10. Genetics of liver disease: From pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Tom H; Lammert, Frank; Thompson, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    Paralleling the first 30 years of the Journal of Hepatology we have witnessed huge advances in our understanding of liver disease and physiology. Genetic advances have played no small part in that. Initial studies in the 1970s and 1980s identified the strong major histocompatibility complex associations in autoimmune liver diseases. During the 1990 s, developments in genomic technologies drove the identification of genes responsible for Mendelian liver diseases. Over the last decade, genome-wide association studies have allowed for the dissection of the genetic susceptibility to complex liver disorders, in which also environmental co-factors play important roles. Findings have allowed the identification and elaboration of pathophysiological processes, have indicated the need for reclassification of liver diseases and have already pointed to new disease treatments. In the immediate future genetics will allow further stratification of liver diseases and contribute to personalized medicine. Challenges exist with regard to clinical implementation of rapidly developing technologies and interpretation of the wealth of accumulating genetic data. The historical perspective of genetics in liver diseases illustrates the opportunities for future research and clinical care of our patients.

  11. Disease Surveillance and the Academic, Clinical, and Public Health Communities

    PubMed Central

    Rebmann, Catherine A.; Schuchat, Anne; Hughes, James M.

    2003-01-01

    The Emerging Infections Programs (EIPs), a population-based network involving 10 state health departments and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, complement and support local, regional, and national surveillance and research efforts. EIPs depend on collaboration between public health agencies and clinical and academic institutions to perform active, population-based surveillance for infectious diseases; conduct applied epidemiologic and laboratory research; implement and evaluate pilot prevention and intervention projects; and provide capacity for flexible public health response. Recent EIP work has included monitoring the impact of a new conjugate vaccine on the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease, providing the evidence base used to derive new recommendations to prevent neonatal group B streptococcal disease, measuring the impact of foodborne diseases in the United States, and developing a systematic, integrated laboratory and epidemiologic method for syndrome-based surveillance. PMID:12890317

  12. Neuronopathic Lysosomal Storage Diseases: Clinical and Pathologic Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prada, Carlos E.; Grabowski, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The lysosomal--autophagocytic system diseases (LASDs) affect multiple body systems including the central nervous system (CNS). The progressive CNS pathology has its onset at different ages, leading to neurodegeneration and early death. Methods: Literature review provided insight into the current clinical neurological findings,…

  13. Reductions in disease activity in the AMPLE trial: clinical response by baseline disease duration

    PubMed Central

    Schiff, Michael; Weinblatt, Michael E; Valente, Robert; Citera, Gustavo; Maldonado, Michael; Massarotti, Elena; Yazici, Yusuf; Fleischmann, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate clinical response by baseline disease duration using 2-year data from the AMPLE trial. Methods Patients were randomised to subcutaneous abatacept 125 mg weekly or adalimumab 40 mg bi-weekly, with background methotrexate. As part of a post hoc analysis, the achievement of validated definitions of remission (Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI) ≤2.8, Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) ≤3.3, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3) ≤3.0, Boolean score ≤1), low disease activity (CDAI <10, SDAI <11, RAPID3 ≤6.0), Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index response and American College of Rheumatology responses were evaluated by baseline disease duration (≤6 vs >6 months). Disease Activity Score 28 (C-reactive protein) <2.6 or ≤3.2 and radiographic non-progression in patients achieving remission were also evaluated. Results A total of 646 patients were randomised and treated (abatacept, n=318; adalimumab, n=328). In both treatment groups, comparable responses were achieved in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (≤6 months) and in those with later disease (>6 months) across multiple clinical measures. Conclusions Abatacept or adalimumab with background methotrexate were associated with similar onset and sustainability of response over 2 years. Patients treated early or later in the disease course achieved comparable clinical responses. Trial registration number NCT00929864, Post-results. PMID:27110385

  14. A Prospective Evaluation of Survivorship of Asymptomatic Degenerative Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Keener, Jay D.; Galatz, Leesa M.; Teefey, Sharlene A.; Middleton, William D.; Steger-May, Karen; Stobbs-Cucchi, Georgia; Patton, Rebecca; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this prospective study was to report the long-term risks of rotator cuff tear enlargement and symptom progression associated with degenerative asymptomatic tears. Methods: Subjects with an asymptomatic rotator cuff tear in one shoulder and pain due to rotator cuff disease in the contralateral shoulder enrolled as part of a prospective longitudinal study. Two hundred and twenty-four subjects (118 initial full-thickness tears, fifty-six initial partial-thickness tears, and fifty controls) were followed for a median of 5.1 years. Validated functional shoulder scores were calculated (visual analog pain scale, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons [ASES], and simple shoulder test [SST] scores). Subjects were followed annually with shoulder ultrasonography and clinical evaluations. Results: Tear enlargement was seen in 49% of the shoulders, and the median time to enlargement was 2.8 years. The occurrence of tear-enlargement events was influenced by the severity of the final tear type, with enlargement of 61% of the full-thickness tears, 44% of the partial-thickness tears, and 14% of the controls (p < 0.05). Subject age and sex were not related to tear enlargement. One hundred subjects (46%) developed new pain. The final tear type was associated with a greater risk of pain development, with the new pain developing in 28% of the controls, 46% of the shoulders with a partial-thickness tear, and 50% of those with a full-thickness tear (p < 0.05). The presence of tear enlargement was associated with the onset of new pain (p < 0.05). Progressive degenerative changes of the supraspinatus muscle were associated with tear enlargement, with supraspinatus muscle degeneration increasing in 4% of the shoulders with a stable tear compared with 30% of the shoulders with tear enlargement (p < 0.05). Nine percent of the shoulders with a stable tear showed increased infraspinatus muscle degeneration compared with 28% of those in which the tear had enlarged (p = 0

  15. Childhood Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Libya: Epidemiological and Clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Ahmaida, AI; Al-Shaikhi, SA

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims: Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be rare in Libya. The aim is to determine the prevalence of juvenile onset inflammatory bowel disease in Libya. Setting: Al-Fateh childrens' hospital, Benghazi, Libya. Methods: This is a retrospective study of all cases diagnosed over 10 years (1997–2006) with either ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease or indeterminate colitis. Inclusion criteria were age <15 years at time of presentation who were resident in the eastern part of the country and who diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease. Clinical features were outlined using a proforma. Results: Sixteen cases were diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease, of whom 11 were males (M:F ratio of 1.5:1). The prevalence and incidence rates in the year 2006 were 3.6 and 0.9 per 100,000 children, respectively. The incidence rate increased from 0.2 in 2002 to 0.9 in 2006 (Z score of 39.87, p= 0.00). The age at presentation ranged from 5 months to 14 years. Nine had Crohn's disease (6 males) and 6 had ulcerative colitis (4 males). One patient had indeterminate colitis. The most common clinical features were diarrhea in 10 (62.5%), abdominal pain, anorexia and weight loss in 9 (56.2%), anemia in 7 (43.75%) and vomiting in 6 (37%). Ileopancolitis was found in 3 patients whereas 6 patients had ileocecal disease. Conclusions: Childhood inflammatory bowel disease in this population is not so rare and it is increasing. The clinical pattern is similar to that reported by others. PMID:21483512

  16. Functional capacity of Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease (PD): relationship between clinical characteristics and disease severity.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Fabio A; Rinaldi, Natalia M; Santos, Paulo Cezar R; Lirani-Silva, Ellen; Vitório, Rodrigo; Teixeira-Arroyo, Cláudia; Stella, Florindo; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa B

    2012-01-01

    The present study had three objectives: (a) to characterize the functional capacity of patients with PD, (b) to assess the relationship between the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics and disease severity, and (c) to compare the physical fitness components of functional capacity with clinical characteristics according to disease severity. The study included 54 patients with idiopathic PD who were distributed into two groups according to PD severity: unilateral group (n=35); and bilateral group (n=19). All patients underwent psychiatric assessment by means of the Hoehn and Yahr (HY) staging of PD, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A and HADS-D, respectively), and The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The physical fitness components of functional capacity were evaluated over a 2-day period, using recommendations by the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Pearson correlation coefficients and multiple regressions were calculated to test the correlation between functional capacity and clinical characteristics, and to predict clinical scores from physical performance, respectively. Clinical variables and physical component data were compared between groups using analysis of variance to determine the effects of disease severity. Patients with advanced disease showed low levels of functional capacity. Interestingly, patients with good functional capacity in one of the physical fitness components also showed good capacities in the other components. Disease severity is a major factor affecting functional capacity and clinical characteristics. Medical providers should take disease severity into consideration when prescribing physical activity for PD patients, since the relationship between functional capacity and clinical characteristics is dependent on disease severity. PMID:21963176

  17. Interstitial Lung Disease in Childhood: Clinical and Genetic Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Hiroshi; Kure, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) in childhood is a heterogeneous group of rare pulmonary conditions presenting chronic respiratory disorders. Many clinical features of ILD still remain unclear, making the treatment strategies mainly investigative. Guidelines may provide physicians with an overview on the diagnosis and therapeutic directions. However, the criteria used in different clinical studies for the classification and diagnosis of ILDs are not always the same, making the development of guidelines difficult. Advances in genetic testing have thrown light on some etiologies of ILD, which were formerly classified as ILDs of unknown origins. The need of genetic testing for unexplained ILD is growing, and new classification criteria based on the etiology should be adopted to better understand the disease. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the clinical and genetic aspects of ILD in children. PMID:26512209

  18. Clinical Presentation of Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease: A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Sara G; Holmes, Jeffrey D; Ready, Emily A; Jenkins, Mary E; Johnson, Andrew M

    2016-07-01

    Up to 40% of all individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) are estimated to experience anxiety that interferes with daily functioning. This article describes research regarding the presentation of anxiety in PD and the influence anxiety has on participation in this population. A scoping review identified 1,635 articles, of which 49 met the inclusion criteria. This review identified that anxiety in PD is often associated with a range of clinical correlates related to demographic and clinical characteristics (age, gender, disease stage, duration, progression), motor symptoms (tremor, bradykinesia, dystonia, freezing of gait, symptom severity), treatment-related complications (on/off fluctuations, on with dyskinesia, unpredictable off), and non-motor symptoms (sleep abnormalities, fatigue, cognitive impairment, depression). These findings can be used to increase clinicians' awareness toward the specific clinical correlates linked to anxiety in PD so that mental health concerns can be detected and addressed more readily in practice. PMID:27618849

  19. [Geriatric particularities of Parkinson's disease: Clinical and therapeutic aspects].

    PubMed

    Belin, J; Houéto, J L; Constans, T; Hommet, C; de Toffol, B; Mondon, K

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a frequent and complex progressive neurological disorder that increases in incidence with age. Although historically PD has been characterized by the presence of progressive dopaminergic neuronal loss of the substantia nigra, the disease process also involves neurotransmitters other that dopamine and regions of the nervous system outside the basal ganglia. Its clinical presentation in elderly subjects differs from that in younger subjects, with more rapid progression, less frequent tremor, more pronounced axial signs, more frequent non-motor signs linked to concomitant degeneration of non-dopaminergic systems, and more frequent associated lesions. Despite the high prevalence of PD in elderly subjects, few therapeutic trials have been conducted in geriatric patients. Nevertheless, to improve functional disability while ensuring drug tolerance, the principles of optimized and multidisciplinary clinical management have to be known. The aim of this review is to provide an update on clinical and therapeutic features of PD specifically observed in elderly subjects. PMID:26573332

  20. Bimelic Hirayama Disease: Clinical Dilemma Solved by Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shalabh; Yadav, Siddharth; Gupta, Swarna; Gupta, Ritu

    2013-01-01

    Hirayama disease (juvenile muscular atrophy of distal upper extremity) is a cervical myelopathy predominantly affecting adolescent males. It is characterized by progressive muscular weakness and atrophy of unilateral or asymmetrically bilateral distal upper limbs. We report a case of an 18-year-male painter, who presented with gradually progressive, symmetrical bilateral weakness of hands and forearm for the last two years. On the basis of clinical examination, a provisional diagnosis of lower motor neuron type of symmetrical distal weakness due to heavy metal intoxication was kept. However, imaging studies helped in making a definitive diagnosis of Hirayama disease. The patient was advised cervical collar, and there was no progression in symptoms after six months of followup. Due to the rarity of bilateral symmetrical involvement in Hirayama disease, it remains obscured or unsuspected clinically, and MRI plays a pivotal role in diagnosis. PMID:23606856

  1. Clinical differences between alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Toshikuni, Nobuyuki; Tsutsumi, Mikihiro; Arisawa, Tomiyasu

    2014-07-14

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are serious health problems worldwide. These two diseases have similar pathological spectra, ranging from simple hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Although most subjects with excessive alcohol or food intake experience simple hepatic steatosis, a small percentage of individuals will develop progressive liver disease. Notably, both ALD and NAFLD are frequently accompanied by extrahepatic complications, including cardiovascular disease and malignancy. The survival of patients with ALD and NAFLD depends on various disease-associated conditions. This review delineates the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with ALD and NAFLD by comparing their epidemiology, the factors associated with disease susceptibility and progression, and the predictors and characteristics of outcomes. A comprehensive understanding of the characteristics and outcomes of ALD and NAFLD is imperative in the management of these chronic liver diseases. PMID:25024597

  2. Gaucher disease in Iraqi children (Clinical, diagnostic & therapeutic aspects)

    PubMed Central

    Thejeal, Rabab Farhan; Kadhum, Ausama Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Gaucher disease is the most common inherited lysosomal storage disorder. It is a multi organ disease affecting bone marrow, liver, spleen, lungs, and other organs contributes to pancytopenia and massive hepatosplenomegaly. This study aimed to spotlight on clinical and laboratory characteristics of children with Gaucher disease to raise awareness among physicians about the disease and to evaluate the outcome of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Methods: Clinical courses were reviewed in 30 patients with age (2-22 years) with Gaucher disease. After starting (ERT), assessment of response included serial measurements of hematological parameters, spleen and liver sizes, symptoms and signs of bone disease, growth and severity scores were also evaluated. Results: The most presenting age group was (1 – 5) years (60%). Abdominal distension was the most common presenting symptom, Splenomegaly presented in all of the patients. A significant response to ERT was observed, weight and height increased, both liver and spleen sizes decreased. Hemoglobin level normalizedin (67%) of the anemic patients, platelet count normalized in (53.8%)after 6 months from (ERT), the mean of severity scoring index decreased with ERT from (10.2±5.8) to (7.8±5.7) after one year of treatment. Conclusion: Using ERT was safe and effective in the reversal of hematological complications and organomegaly in most of the patients. PMID:27182231

  3. A Comprehensive Prospective Clinical Study of Hydatid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kayal, Ankit; Hussain, Akhlak

    2014-01-01

    The actual prevalence of hydatid disease in northern part of India is found more than usually interpreted. The present study has been done on 25 patients suffering from hydatid disease of various sites and treated during June 2009 to November 2011 at JLN Medical College and Hospital, Ajmer, with the aim of studying the clinical manifestations of hydatid disease of different sites and/or organ system and of analysing the morbidity and mortality of hydatid disease. The age, sex, h/o dog contact, duration of hospital stay, clinical presentation, treatment advised, findings and difficulties encountered during operation, and postoperative management of patients as well as morbidity and mortality were recorded and analysed. We observed that the mean age was 40 years. The sex incidence revealed female preponderance in the study (M : F: 1 : 2). Duration of illness in the present study varied from 1 month to 6 years in case of liver hydatid disease. Majority of patients were from rural areas (21) and the remaining (4) from urban areas. Swelling was the most common presenting feature. Incidence of hydatid disease at unusual sites in India is higher than in other parts of the world. PMID:24734188

  4. Podometrics as a potential clinical tool for glomerular disease management

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Masao; Wickman, Larysa; Hodgin, JB; Wiggins, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease culminating in End Stage Kidney Disease is a major public health problem costing in excess of $40 billion per year with high morbidity and mortality. Current tools for glomerular disease monitoring lack precision and contribute to poor outcome. The podocyte depletion hypothesis describes the major mechanisms underlying progression of glomerular diseases responsible for >80% of ESKD. The question arises whether this new knowledge can be used to improve outcomes and reduce costs. Podocytes have unique characteristics that make them an attractive monitoring tool. Methodologies for estimating podocyte number, size, density, glomerular volume and other parameters in routine kidney biopsies, and the rate of podocyte detachment from glomeruli into urine (“podometrics”), have now been developed and validated. They potentially fill important gaps in the glomerular disease monitoring toolbox. Application of these tools to glomerular disease groups demonstrates good correlation with outcome, although data validating their use for individual decision-making is not yet available. Given the urgency of the clinical problem we argue that the time has come to focus on testing these tools for application to individualized clinical decision-making towards more effective progression prevention. PMID:26215862

  5. Uncontrolled chronic disease: patient non-compliance or clinical mismanagement?

    PubMed

    Javors, Jonathan R; Bramble, Judith E

    2003-01-01

    A study group of 30 individuals was randomly chosen from 1,379 beneficiaries predicted to be at risk for health care complications at a large, Midwest, industrial company currently experiencing increased health care costs. All 30 individuals had one or more chronic illness, primarily diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or asthma. Through analysis of medical records, a self-reporting health risk assessment survey, and personal contact with both patients and clinicians, each study individual was assessed as to whether his disease(s) was under control, the individual was compliant with his treatment protocol, and whether the supervising clinician was following nationally accepted standards of care. Fewer than 50% of the individuals in the study group had their chronic illness(es) under control. Those individuals whose treatment adhered to national guidelines were significantly more likely to have their disease under control (p < 0.001). For this study, patient compliance was high and unrelated to whether their disease was under control. Behavioral (external) barriers were most often cited as the reason a clinical practitioner did not follow the appropriate national standard of care. Most clinicians were aware of and familiar with the guidelines; a few either did not agree with or misunderstood the guidelines. The results of this study suggest that changing clinical practice behaviors to better ensure compliance to national standards of care may make a substantial difference in chronic disease control.

  6. Uncontrolled chronic disease: patient non-compliance or clinical mismanagement?

    PubMed

    Javors, Jonathan R; Bramble, Judith E

    2003-01-01

    A study group of 30 individuals was randomly chosen from 1,379 beneficiaries predicted to be at risk for health care complications at a large, Midwest, industrial company currently experiencing increased health care costs. All 30 individuals had one or more chronic illness, primarily diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or asthma. Through analysis of medical records, a self-reporting health risk assessment survey, and personal contact with both patients and clinicians, each study individual was assessed as to whether his disease(s) was under control, the individual was compliant with his treatment protocol, and whether the supervising clinician was following nationally accepted standards of care. Fewer than 50% of the individuals in the study group had their chronic illness(es) under control. Those individuals whose treatment adhered to national guidelines were significantly more likely to have their disease under control (p < 0.001). For this study, patient compliance was high and unrelated to whether their disease was under control. Behavioral (external) barriers were most often cited as the reason a clinical practitioner did not follow the appropriate national standard of care. Most clinicians were aware of and familiar with the guidelines; a few either did not agree with or misunderstood the guidelines. The results of this study suggest that changing clinical practice behaviors to better ensure compliance to national standards of care may make a substantial difference in chronic disease control. PMID:14570385

  7. The spectrum of celiac disease: epidemiology, clinical aspects and treatment.

    PubMed

    Tack, Greetje J; Verbeek, Wieke H M; Schreurs, Marco W J; Mulder, Chris J J

    2010-04-01

    Celiac disease is a gluten-sensitive enteropathy that affects people of all ages worldwide. This disease has emerged as a major health-care problem, as advances in diagnostic and screening methods have revealed its global prevalence. Environmental factors such as gluten introduction at childhood, infectious agents and socioeconomic features, as well as the presence of HLA-DQ2 and/or HLA-DQ8 haplotypes or genetic variations in several non-HLA genes contribute to the development of celiac disease. Growing insight into the variable clinical and histopathological presentation features of this disease has opened new perspectives for future research. A strict life-long gluten-free diet is the only safe and efficient available treatment, yet it results in a social burden. Alternative treatment modalities focus on modification of dietary components, enzymatic degradation of gluten, inhibition of intestinal permeability and modulation of the immune response. A small group of patients with celiac disease (2-5%), however, fail to improve clinically and histologically upon elimination of dietary gluten. This complication is referred to as refractory celiac disease, and imposes a serious risk of developing a virtually lethal enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma.

  8. Bone Disease in Thalassemia: A Molecular and Clinical Overview.

    PubMed

    Wong, Phillip; Fuller, Peter J; Gillespie, Matthew T; Milat, Frances

    2016-08-01

    Thalassemia bone disease is a common and severe complication of thalassemia-an inherited blood disorder due to mutations in the α or β hemoglobin gene. In its more severe form, severe anemia is present, and treatment with frequent red blood cell transfusion is necessary. Because the body has limited capacity to excrete iron, concomitant iron chelation is required to prevent the complications of iron overload. The effects of chronic anemia and iron overload can lead to multiple end-organ complications such as cardiomyopathy, increased risks of blood-borne diseases, and liver, pituitary, and bone disease. However, our understanding of thalassemia bone disease is incomplete and is composed of a complex piecemeal of risk factors that include genetic factors, hormonal deficiency, marrow expansion, skeletal dysmorphism, iron toxicity, chelators, and increased bone turnover. The high prevalence of bone disease in transfusion-dependent thalassemia is seen in both younger and older patients as life expectancy continues to improve. Indeed, hypogonadism and GH deficiency contribute to a failure to achieve peak bone mass in this group. The contribution of kidney dysfunction to bone disease in thalassemia is a new and significant complication. This coincides with studies confirming an increase in kidney stones and associated accelerated bone loss in the thalassemia cohort. However, multiple factors are also associated with reduced bone mineral density and include marrow expansion, iron toxicity, iron chelators, increased bone turnover, GH deficiency, and hypogonadism. Thalassemia bone disease is a composite of not only multiple hormonal deficiencies but also multiorgan diseases. This review will address the molecular mechanisms and clinical risk factors associated with thalassemia bone disease and the clinical implications for monitoring and treating this disorder. PMID:27309522

  9. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Clinical Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Wendt, Mårten; Miller, Edmund J.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine implicated in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, including sepsis, autoimmune disease, atherogenesis, plaque instability, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. MIF in plasma and urine is significantly elevated in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) and elevated MIF in serum is associated with markers of oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, and markers of myocardial damage in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Furthermore, MIF seems to be involved in vascular processes and cardiovascular disease associated with CKD, glomerulonephritis, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and possibly also in progression to renal failure. Moreover, in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmatic antibody-associated vasculitis, plasma MIF levels have been shown to be significantly elevated as compared with samples from patients in remission. A significant difference in the genotype frequency of high production MIF -173 G/C genotype has been found in end-stage renal disease, compared to controls. Inhibition of MIF in a diabetic nephropathy model ameliorated blood glucose and albuminuria and in a model of adult polycystic kidney disease cyst growth was delayed. Preclinical studies support a potential therapeutic role for MIF in AKI and in a number of CKDs, whereas these data in human disease are still observational. Future interventional studies are needed to delineate the role of MIF as a treatment target in clinical kidney disease. PMID:26858715

  10. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor in Clinical Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Wendt, Mårten; Miller, Edmund J

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine implicated in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, including sepsis, autoimmune disease, atherogenesis, plaque instability, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. MIF in plasma and urine is significantly elevated in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) and elevated MIF in serum is associated with markers of oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, and markers of myocardial damage in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Furthermore, MIF seems to be involved in vascular processes and cardiovascular disease associated with CKD, glomerulonephritis, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, and possibly also in progression to renal failure. Moreover, in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmatic antibody-associated vasculitis, plasma MIF levels have been shown to be significantly elevated as compared with samples from patients in remission. A significant difference in the genotype frequency of high production MIF -173 G/C genotype has been found in end-stage renal disease, compared to controls. Inhibition of MIF in a diabetic nephropathy model ameliorated blood glucose and albuminuria and in a model of adult polycystic kidney disease cyst growth was delayed. Preclinical studies support a potential therapeutic role for MIF in AKI and in a number of CKDs, whereas these data in human disease are still observational. Future interventional studies are needed to delineate the role of MIF as a treatment target in clinical kidney disease. PMID:26858715

  11. Updated clinical diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Zerr, I; Kallenberg, K; Summers, D M; Romero, C; Taratuto, A; Heinemann, U; Breithaupt, M; Varges, D; Meissner, B; Ladogana, A; Schuur, M; Haik, S; Collins, S J; Jansen, Gerard H; Stokin, G B; Pimentel, J; Hewer, E; Collie, D; Smith, P; Roberts, H; Brandel, J P; van Duijn, C; Pocchiari, M; Begue, C; Cras, P; Will, R G; Sanchez-Juan, P

    2009-10-01

    Several molecular subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have been identified and electroencephalogram and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers have been reported to support clinical diagnosis but with variable utility according to subtype. In recent years, a series of publications have demonstrated a potentially important role for magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-mortem diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Magnetic resonance imaging signal alterations correlate with distinct sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease molecular subtypes and thus might contribute to the earlier identification of the whole spectrum of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease cases. This multi-centre international study aimed to provide a rationale for the amendment of the clinical diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and fluid attenuated inversion recovery or diffusion-weight imaging were recruited from 12 countries. Patients referred as 'suspected sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease' but with an alternative diagnosis after thorough follow up, were analysed as controls. All magnetic resonance imaging scans were assessed for signal changes according to a standard protocol encompassing seven cortical regions, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were evaluated in 436 sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients and 141 controls. The pattern of high signal intensity with the best sensitivity and specificity in the differential diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease was identified. The optimum diagnostic accuracy in the differential diagnosis of rapid progressive dementia was obtained when either at least two cortical regions (temporal, parietal or occipital) or both caudate nucleus and putamen displayed a high signal in fluid attenuated inversion recovery or diffusion-weight imaging magnetic resonance imaging. Based on our analyses, magnetic resonance imaging was

  12. Design and evaluation of a bacterial clinical infectious diseases ontology.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Claire L; Pouch, Stephanie; Cowell, Lindsay G; Boland, Mary Regina; Platt, Heather L; Goldfain, Albert; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-01-01

    With antimicrobial resistance increasing worldwide, there is a great need to use automated antimicrobial decision support systems (ADSSs) to lower antimicrobial resistance rates by promoting appropriate antimicrobial use. However, they are infrequently used mostly because of their poor interoperability with different health information technologies. Ontologies can augment portable ADSSs by providing an explicit knowledge representation for biomedical entities and their relationships, helping to standardize and integrate heterogeneous data resources. We developed a bacterial clinical infectious diseases ontology (BCIDO) using Protégé-OWL. BCIDO defines a controlled terminology for clinical infectious diseases along with domain knowledge commonly used in hospital settings for clinical infectious disease treatment decision-making. BCIDO has 599 classes and 2355 object properties. Terms were imported from or mapped to Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine, Unified Medical Language System, RxNorm and National Center for Bitechnology Information Organismal Classification where possible. Domain expert evaluation using the "laddering" technique, ontology visualization, and clinical notes and scenarios, confirmed the correctness and potential usefulness of BCIDO. PMID:24551353

  13. Vulval Crohn's disease: a clinical study of 22 patients.

    PubMed

    Laftah, Zainab; Bailey, Clare; Zaheri, Shirin; Setterfield, Jane; Fuller, Lucinda Claire; Lewis, Fiona

    2015-04-01

    Vulval Crohn's disease [VCD] is a challenging condition that can occur without gastrointestinal Crohn's disease [GCD]. We reviewed the clinical features and effects of therapy in a cohort of 22 patients with VCD to determine whether the presence of GCD affected the clinical presentation and treatment response. Of these, 64% had GCD and 65% of these presented with GCD prior to VCD. Fissuring, ulceration, and scarring were more common in those with VCD alone. Potent and ultra-potent topical steroids showed benefit in most patients. There was no clear evidence of sustained remission with metronidazole. Azathioprine was the most commonly used oral immunosuppressive agent, with an efficacy of 57%. Patients with both VCD and GCD had a better clinical response compared with those with VCD alone [70% and 25%, respectively]. Infliximab and adalimumab were effective in 56% and 71% of patients, respectively. Excision of redundant tissue was helpful in four patients. The absence of GCD may delay the diagnosis in women who present with vulval symptoms alone. The more active clinical features in those with VCD alone may represent a more aggressive condition, or the severity of the cutaneous disease may have been reduced by immunosuppression taken for GCD. Several patients obtained sustained remission in their GCD with anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha [anti-TNFα] agents while the VCD remained active.

  14. Oxidative stress treatment for clinical trials in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Ienco, Elena Caldarazzo; LoGerfo, Annalisa; Carlesi, Cecilia; Orsucci, Daniele; Ricci, Giulia; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a metabolic condition arising from imbalance between the production of potentially reactive oxygen species and the scavenging activities. Mitochondria are the main providers but also the main scavengers of cell oxidative stress. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases is well documented. Therefore, therapeutic approaches targeting mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage hold great promise in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite this evidence, human experience with antioxidant neuroprotectants has generally been negative with regards to the clinical progress of disease, with unclear results in biochemical assays. Here we review the antioxidant approaches performed so far in neurodegenerative diseases and the future challenges in modern medicine. PMID:21422516

  15. Estrogens and Coronary Artery Disease: New Clinical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M R; Barton, M

    2016-01-01

    In premenopausal women, endogenous estrogens are associated with reduced prevalence of arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Clinical trials conducted in the 1990s such as HERS, WHI, and WISDOM have shown that postmenopausal treatment with horse hormone mixtures (so-called conjugated equine estrogens) and synthetic progestins adversely affects female cardiovascular health. Our understanding of rapid (nongenomic) and chronic (genomic) estrogen signaling has since advanced considerably, including identification of a new G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), which like the "classical" receptors ERα and ERβ is highly abundant in the cardiovascular system. Here, we discuss the role of estrogen receptors in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease and review natural and synthetic ligands of estrogen receptors as well as their effects in physiology, on cardiovascular risk factors, and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Data from preclinical and clinical studies using nonselective compounds activating GPER, which include selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen or raloxifene, selective estrogen receptor downregulators such as Faslodex™ (fulvestrant/ICI 182,780), vitamin B3 (niacin), green tea catechins, and soy flavonoids such as genistein or resveratrol, strongly suggest that activation of GPER may afford therapeutic benefit for primary and secondary prevention in patients with or at risk for coronary artery disease. Evidence from preclinical studies suggest similar efficacy profiles for selective small molecule GPER agonists such as G-1 which are devoid of uterotrophic activity. Further clinical research in this area is warranted to provide opportunities for future cardiovascular drug development.

  16. Estrogens and Coronary Artery Disease: New Clinical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M R; Barton, M

    2016-01-01

    In premenopausal women, endogenous estrogens are associated with reduced prevalence of arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Clinical trials conducted in the 1990s such as HERS, WHI, and WISDOM have shown that postmenopausal treatment with horse hormone mixtures (so-called conjugated equine estrogens) and synthetic progestins adversely affects female cardiovascular health. Our understanding of rapid (nongenomic) and chronic (genomic) estrogen signaling has since advanced considerably, including identification of a new G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), which like the "classical" receptors ERα and ERβ is highly abundant in the cardiovascular system. Here, we discuss the role of estrogen receptors in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease and review natural and synthetic ligands of estrogen receptors as well as their effects in physiology, on cardiovascular risk factors, and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Data from preclinical and clinical studies using nonselective compounds activating GPER, which include selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen or raloxifene, selective estrogen receptor downregulators such as Faslodex™ (fulvestrant/ICI 182,780), vitamin B3 (niacin), green tea catechins, and soy flavonoids such as genistein or resveratrol, strongly suggest that activation of GPER may afford therapeutic benefit for primary and secondary prevention in patients with or at risk for coronary artery disease. Evidence from preclinical studies suggest similar efficacy profiles for selective small molecule GPER agonists such as G-1 which are devoid of uterotrophic activity. Further clinical research in this area is warranted to provide opportunities for future cardiovascular drug development. PMID:27451102

  17. Clinical and Sociodemographic Aspects of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Delmondes, Leda Maria; Nunes, Marcelo Oliveira; Azevedo, Arthur Rangel; Oliveira, Murilo Matos de Santana; Coelho, Lorena Eugenia Rosa; Torres-Neto, Juvenal da Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Background In Brazil, there are few epidemiological studies available about the demographic and clinical aspects of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to identify epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients with IBD treated at the University Hospital (HU) of the Sergipe Federal University (UFS). Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in HU/UFS from October 2011 to January 2014. The sample consisted of 87 patients with IBD, who registered in the coloproctology clinic. We applied a questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables. Results Of the 87 patients, 40 (46%) had Crohn’s disease (CD) and 47 (54%) had ulcerative colitis (UC). Women had a higher prevalence of IBD. Data obtained were significant (P < 0.05) in the variables: age, origin and level of education. CD patients were younger (< 25 years old), had higher prevalence of smoking habits and were associated with urban origin, conjunctivitis, palpable mass, appendectomy and intestinal complications. UC was more prevalent in older individuals (> 25 years old), with rural origin, bloody diarrhea and rectal bleeding. Location and initial behavior of CD were ileum-colic (L3), inflammatory behavior and penetrating form of the disease. There is higher prevalence of proctitis and mild and severe forms of the UC among women. Osteoarticular and systemic manifestations predominated in both diseases. Conclusions IBD affected more women than men. The age, origin and level of education can interfere with early diagnosis. Demographic and clinical aspects were similar to the literature. Data differ in the time interval between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis, smoking habit, appendectomy and severity of UC for age and gender.

  18. MicroRNA Expression Signature in Degenerative Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis, characterized by narrowing of the exit of the left ventricle of the heart, has become the most common valvular heart disease in the elderly. The aim of this study was to investigate the microRNA (miRNA) signature in degenerative AS. Through microarray analysis, we identified the miRNA expression signature in the tissue samples from healthy individuals (n = 4) and patients with degenerative AS (n = 4). Six miRNAs (hsa-miR-193a-3p, hsa-miR-29b-1-5p, hsa-miR-505-5p, hsa-miR-194-5p, hsa-miR-99b-3p, and hsa-miR-200b-3p) were overexpressed and 14 (hsa-miR-3663-3p, hsa-miR-513a-5p, hsa-miR-146b-5p, hsa-miR-1972, hsa-miR-718, hsa-miR-3138, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-630, hsa-miR-575, hsa-miR-301a-3p, hsa-miR-636, hsa-miR-34a-3p, hsa-miR-21-3p, and hsa-miR-516a-5p) were downregulated in aortic tissue from AS patients. GeneSpring 13.1 was used to identify potential human miRNA target genes by comparing a 3-way comparison of predictions from TargetScan, PITA, and microRNAorg databases. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with AS. Twenty miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between patients with AS samples and normal controls and identified potential miRNA targets and molecular pathways associated with this morbidity. This study describes the miRNA expression signature in degenerative AS and provides an improved understanding of the molecular pathobiology of this disease. PMID:27579316

  19. MicroRNA Expression Signature in Degenerative Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Liu, Hui; Wang, Hui; Kong, Xiangqing

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis, characterized by narrowing of the exit of the left ventricle of the heart, has become the most common valvular heart disease in the elderly. The aim of this study was to investigate the microRNA (miRNA) signature in degenerative AS. Through microarray analysis, we identified the miRNA expression signature in the tissue samples from healthy individuals (n = 4) and patients with degenerative AS (n = 4). Six miRNAs (hsa-miR-193a-3p, hsa-miR-29b-1-5p, hsa-miR-505-5p, hsa-miR-194-5p, hsa-miR-99b-3p, and hsa-miR-200b-3p) were overexpressed and 14 (hsa-miR-3663-3p, hsa-miR-513a-5p, hsa-miR-146b-5p, hsa-miR-1972, hsa-miR-718, hsa-miR-3138, hsa-miR-21-5p, hsa-miR-630, hsa-miR-575, hsa-miR-301a-3p, hsa-miR-636, hsa-miR-34a-3p, hsa-miR-21-3p, and hsa-miR-516a-5p) were downregulated in aortic tissue from AS patients. GeneSpring 13.1 was used to identify potential human miRNA target genes by comparing a 3-way comparison of predictions from TargetScan, PITA, and microRNAorg databases. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with AS. Twenty miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed between patients with AS samples and normal controls and identified potential miRNA targets and molecular pathways associated with this morbidity. This study describes the miRNA expression signature in degenerative AS and provides an improved understanding of the molecular pathobiology of this disease. PMID:27579316

  20. Clinical Audits in Outpatient Clinics for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Methodological Considerations and Workflow

    PubMed Central

    López-Campos, Jose Luis; Abad Arranz, María; Calero Acuña, Carmen; Romero Valero, Fernando; Ayerbe García, Ruth; Hidalgo Molina, Antonio; Aguilar Pérez-Grovas, Ricardo Ismael; García Gil, Francisco; Casas Maldonado, Francisco; Caballero Ballesteros, Laura; Sánchez Palop, María; Pérez-Tejero, Dolores; Segado, Alejandro; Calvo Bonachera, Jose; Hernández Sierra, Bárbara; Doménech, Adolfo; Arroyo Varela, Macarena; González Vargas, Francisco; Cruz Rueda, Juan Jose

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Previous clinical audits for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have provided valuable information on the clinical care delivered to patients admitted to medical wards because of COPD exacerbations. However, clinical audits of COPD in an outpatient setting are scarce and no methodological guidelines are currently available. Based on our previous experience, herein we describe a clinical audit for COPD patients in specialized outpatient clinics with the overall goal of establishing a potential methodological workflow. Methods A pilot clinical audit of COPD patients referred to respiratory outpatient clinics in the region of Andalusia, Spain (over 8 million inhabitants), was performed. The audit took place between October 2013 and September 2014, and 10 centers (20% of all public hospitals) were invited to participate. Cases with an established diagnosis of COPD based on risk factors, clinical symptoms, and a post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.70 were deemed eligible. The usefulness of formally scheduled regular follow-up visits was assessed. Two different databases (resources and clinical database) were constructed. Assessments were planned over a year divided by 4 three-month periods, with the goal of determining seasonal-related changes. Exacerbations and survival served as the main endpoints. Conclusions This paper describes a methodological framework for conducting a clinical audit of COPD patients in an outpatient setting. Results from such audits can guide health information systems development and implementation in real-world settings. PMID:26544556

  1. Updated clinical diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Kallenberg, K.; Summers, D. M.; Romero, C.; Taratuto, A.; Heinemann, U.; Breithaupt, M.; Varges, D.; Meissner, B.; Ladogana, A.; Schuur, M.; Haik, S.; Collins, S. J.; Jansen, Gerard H.; Stokin, G. B.; Pimentel, J.; Hewer, E.; Collie, D.; Smith, P.; Roberts, H.; Brandel, J. P.; van Duijn, C.; Pocchiari, M.; Begue, C.; Cras, P.; Will, R. G.; Sanchez-Juan, P.

    2009-01-01

    Several molecular subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease have been identified and electroencephalogram and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers have been reported to support clinical diagnosis but with variable utility according to subtype. In recent years, a series of publications have demonstrated a potentially important role for magnetic resonance imaging in the pre-mortem diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. Magnetic resonance imaging signal alterations correlate with distinct sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease molecular subtypes and thus might contribute to the earlier identification of the whole spectrum of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease cases. This multi-centre international study aimed to provide a rationale for the amendment of the clinical diagnostic criteria for sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. Patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease and fluid attenuated inversion recovery or diffusion-weight imaging were recruited from 12 countries. Patients referred as ‘suspected sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease’ but with an alternative diagnosis after thorough follow up, were analysed as controls. All magnetic resonance imaging scans were assessed for signal changes according to a standard protocol encompassing seven cortical regions, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were evaluated in 436 sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease patients and 141 controls. The pattern of high signal intensity with the best sensitivity and specificity in the differential diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease was identified. The optimum diagnostic accuracy in the differential diagnosis of rapid progressive dementia was obtained when either at least two cortical regions (temporal, parietal or occipital) or both caudate nucleus and putamen displayed a high signal in fluid attenuated inversion recovery or diffusion-weight imaging magnetic resonance imaging. Based on our analyses, magnetic

  2. Serial block face-scanning electron microscopy: a method to study retinal degenerative phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Mustafi, Debarshi; Kikano, Sandra; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Retinal degenerative conditions can vary in their clinical presentation and often present with subtle phenotypic features before the onset of clinically overt disease. To capture these isolated events that precipitate disease, large representative areas of the retina must be imaged at high resolution. Compared to light microscopic methods, traditional electron microscopy can provide images at sufficient resolution to detect subtle pathologic changes in the retina, but are limited to the area being surveyed. The advent of serial block face-scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) provides the resolution needed with the unprecedented advantage of imaging large volumes of retinal tissue. Furthermore, automation of SBF-SEM bypasses errors from manual sectioning and can produce reliable serial sections as thin as 25 nanometers. Moreover, the three-dimensional structures generated can highlight cellular connectivity and interactions in the retina and reveal pathological changes. Using SBF-SEM, we have identified subtle phenotypic features in mouse models of various human retinal dystrophies. This method will allow researchers to identify and monitor the time course of these pathologies. Here, we summarize the SBF-SEM methodology and its application to mouse models of retinal degeneration. PMID:25621191

  3. Clinical research of holmium laser therapy in extramammary Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Ziyao, Li; Deyong, Yang; Xiangyu, Che; Huafeng, Zong; Hafeez, Adnan; Jianbo, Wang; Xishuang, Song

    2014-11-01

    This study aims to investigate the safety and efficiency of the holmium laser therapy in extramammary Paget's disease. The clinical data of 61 patients was collected since 2002 to 2012, confirmed as non-subcutaneous invasive extramammary Paget's disease by biopsy and underwent surgery. All patients were divided into two groups. Group A included 30 patients who underwent the holmium laser therapy. Group B included 31 patients who underwent the traditional surgical therapy. The clinical data of all patients included preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative management and follow-up records. Compared with the traditional operation group, the holmium laser group had a shorter operation time and was easier to perform. There were no significant differences between the two groups in cases of intraoperative and postoperative complications, the recurrence-free survival, and the disease-specific survival. But the holmium laser group had a longer recovery time than the traditional operation group in large and deep nidus. Multiple-factor analysis of prognostic parameters of 61 patients confirmed that any of these two methods chosen was not a prognostic parameter for recurrence-free survival. The holmium laser therapy might prove to be a preferable alternative to the traditional operative therapy of extramammary Paget's disease. However, the holmium laser therapy did not demonstrate to have an obvious advantage over traditional operative therapy in the recurrence-free survival and the disease-specific survival.

  4. Predicting cardiovascular disease from handgrip strength: the potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Leong, Darryl P; Teo, Koon K

    2015-12-01

    The measurement of handgrip strength has proven prognostic value for all-cause and cardiovascular death, and for cardiovascular disease. It is also an important indicator of frailty and vulnerability. The measurement of handgrip strength may be most useful in the context of multi-morbidity, where it may be a simple tool to identify the individual at particularly high risk of adverse outcomes, who may benefit from closer clinical attention. Research into dietary, exercise, and pharmacologic strategies to increase muscle strength is ongoing. Important issues will be the feasibility and sustainability of increases in muscle strength, and whether these increases translate into clinical benefit. PMID:26513210

  5. Predicting cardiovascular disease from handgrip strength: the potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Leong, Darryl P; Teo, Koon K

    2015-12-01

    The measurement of handgrip strength has proven prognostic value for all-cause and cardiovascular death, and for cardiovascular disease. It is also an important indicator of frailty and vulnerability. The measurement of handgrip strength may be most useful in the context of multi-morbidity, where it may be a simple tool to identify the individual at particularly high risk of adverse outcomes, who may benefit from closer clinical attention. Research into dietary, exercise, and pharmacologic strategies to increase muscle strength is ongoing. Important issues will be the feasibility and sustainability of increases in muscle strength, and whether these increases translate into clinical benefit.

  6. Clinical presentation of osgood- schlatter disease in the adolescent population.

    PubMed

    Antich, T J; Lombardo, S J

    1985-01-01

    Osgood-Schlatter disease is a condition affecting knees of adolescents. Males are affected more frequently than females, and unilateral involvement is more common than bilateral. In the 75 cases seen in our clinic in 4l/3 years, participation in basketball was twice as common among our patients as was any other sport. With the addition of our clinical cases to those documented in the literature, the left knee is significantly more involved than the right (P < 0.05). Relationship to hand dominance is discussed as a possible explanation for the unusual prevalence for left knee involvement. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1985;7(1):1-4.

  7. Ovarian autoimmune disease: clinical concepts and animal models

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Bryce D; Kinsey, William K; McGinnis, Lynda K; Christenson, Lane K; Jasti, Susmita; Stevens, Anne M; Petroff, Brian K; Petroff, Margaret G

    2014-01-01

    The ovary is not an immunologically privileged organ, but a breakdown in tolerogenic mechanisms for ovary-specific antigens has disastrous consequences on fertility in women, and this is replicated in murine models of autoimmune disease. Isolated ovarian autoimmune disease is rare in women, likely due to the severity of the disease and the inability to transmit genetic information conferring the ovarian disease across generations. Nonetheless, autoimmune oophoritis is often observed in association with other autoimmune diseases, particularly autoimmune adrenal disease, and takes a toll on both society and individual health. Studies in mice have revealed at least two mechanisms that protect the ovary from autoimmune attack. These mechanisms include control of autoreactive T cells by thymus-derived regulatory T cells, as well as a role for the autoimmune regulator (AIRE), a transcriptional regulator that induces expression of tissue-restricted antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells during development of T cells. Although the latter mechanism is incompletely defined, it is well established that failure of either results in autoimmune-mediated targeting and depletion of ovarian follicles. In this review, we will address the clinical features and consequences of autoimmune-mediated ovarian infertility in women, as well as the possible mechanisms of disease as revealed by animal models. PMID:25327908

  8. Clinical Progression in Parkinson's Disease and the Neurobiology of Axons

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hsiao-Chun; Ulane, Christina M.; Burke, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    In spite of tremendous growth in recent years in our knowledge of the molecular basis of Parkinson's disease and the molecular pathways of cell injury and death, we remain without therapies that forestall disease progression. While there are many possible explanations for this lack of success, one is that experimental therapeutics to date have not adequately focused on an important component of the disease process, that of axon degeneration. It remains unknown what neuronal compartment, either the soma or the axon, is involved at disease onset, although some have proposed that it is the axons and their terminals that take the initial brunt of injury. Nevertheless, this concept has not been formally incorporated into many of the current theories of disease pathogenesis, and it has not achieved a wide consensus. More importantly, in view of growing evidence that the molecular mechanisms of axon degeneration are separate and distinct from the canonical pathways of programmed cell death that mediate soma destruction, the possibility of early involvement of axons in PD has not been adequately emphasized as a rationale to explore the neurobiology of axons for novel therapeutic targets. We propose that it is ongoing degeneration of axons, not cell bodies, that is the primary determinant of clinically apparent progression of disease, and that future experimental therapeutics intended to forestall disease progression will benefit from a new focus on the distinct mechanisms of axon degeneration. PMID:20517933

  9. Ledderhose Disease: Clinical, Radiological (Ultrasound and MRI), and Anatomopathological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Omor, Y.; Dhaene, B.; Grijseels, S.; Alard, S.

    2015-01-01

    Plantar fibromatosis, or Ledderhose disease, is a rare hyperproliferative disorder of the plantar aponeurosis. It may occur at any age, with the greatest prevalence at middle age and beyond. This disorder is more common in men than woman and it is sometimes associated with other forms of fibromatosis. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination. Ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be useful to confirm the diagnosis. A 44-year-old man with Ledderhose disease who underwent ultrasound and MR is described in this paper. PMID:26425380

  10. Hypercalcemia of advanced chronic liver disease: a forgotten clinical entity!

    PubMed Central

    Kuchay, Mohammad Shafi; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Farooqui, Khalid Jamal; Bansal, Beena; Wasir, Jasjeet Singh; Mithal, Ambrish

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hypercalcemia caused by advanced chronic liver disease (CLD) without hepatic neoplasia is uncommonly reported and poorly understood condition. We are reporting two cases of advanced CLD who developed hypercalcemia in the course of the disease. This diagnosis of exclusion was made only after meticulous ruling out of all causes of hypercalcemia. The unique feature of this type of hypercalcemia is its transient nature that may or may not require treatment. This clinical condition in patients with CLD should be kept in mind while evaluating the cause of hypercalcemia in them. PMID:27252737

  11. Clinical trials in Huntington's disease: Interventions in early clinical development and newer methodological approaches.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Cristina; Borowsky, Beth; Reilmann, Ralf

    2014-09-15

    Since the identification of the Huntington's disease (HD) gene, knowledge has accumulated about mechanisms directly or indirectly affected by the mutated Huntingtin protein. Transgenic and knock-in animal models of HD facilitate the preclinical evaluation of these targets. Several treatment approaches with varying, but growing, preclinical evidence have been translated into clinical trials. We review major landmarks in clinical development and report on the main clinical trials that are ongoing or have been recently completed. We also review clinical trial settings and designs that influence drug-development decisions, particularly given that HD is an orphan disease. In addition, we provide a critical analysis of the evolution of the methodology of HD clinical trials to identify trends toward new processes and endpoints. Biomarker studies, such as TRACK-HD and PREDICT-HD, have generated evidence for the potential usefulness of novel outcome measures for HD clinical trials, such as volumetric imaging, quantitative motor (Q-Motor) measures, and novel cognitive endpoints. All of these endpoints are currently applied in ongoing clinical trials, which will provide insight into their reliability, sensitivity, and validity, and their use may expedite proof-of-concept studies. We also outline the specific opportunities that could provide a framework for a successful avenue toward identifying and efficiently testing and translating novel mechanisms of action in the HD field.

  12. [Sudeck disease--pathology, clinical aspects and therapy].

    PubMed

    Schulz, R H; Buch, K

    1998-06-01

    In our opinion the etiology of Sudeck's disease (acute reflex bone atrophy) plays a decisive role in therapeutic planning. The therapy is based on clinical and radiological findings. Physiotherapy addresses the symptom complex of pain, hyperemia, edema formation, and limitations of movement which act in a vicious circle and its intensity is modified according to the prevailing clinical and possibly also radiological findings. A strict coupling of the therapy to a classification according to stage is not recommended. Pharmacological therapy is merely a supporting element and focuses on the sympathetic overexcitability. The best therapy for Sudeck's disease is prophylaxis. Interventions collected under the general term early functional mobilization are, especially after surgical measures, a major factor in the avoidance of neurovegetative dysregulation in the sense of sympathetic reflex dystrophy. PMID:9738286

  13. Computational Approaches for Translational Clinical Research in Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Mary F.; Iyengar, M. Sriram; Mercer, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Today, there is an ever-increasing amount of biological and clinical data available that could be used to enhance a systems-based understanding of disease progression through innovative computational analysis. In this paper we review a selection of published research regarding computational methodologies, primarily from systems biology, that support translational research from the molecular level to the bedside, with a focus on applications in trauma and critical care. Trauma is the leading cause of mortality in Americans under 45 years of age, and its rapid progression offers both opportunities and challenges for computational analysis of trends in molecular patterns associated with outcomes and therapeutic interventions. This review presents methods and domain-specific examples that may inspire the development of new algorithms and computational methods that utilize both molecular and clinical data for diagnosis, prognosis and therapy in disease progression. PMID:21712727

  14. Insulin resistance in clinical and experimental alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Rotonya M.; Correnti, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the number one cause of liver failure worldwide; its management costs billions of health care dollars annually. Since the advent of the obesity epidemic, insulin resistance and diabetes have become common clinical findings in patients with ALD; and the development of insulin resistance predicts the progression from simple steatosis to cirrhosis in ALD patients. Both clinical and experimental data implicate the impairment of several mediators of insulin signaling in ALD, and experimental data suggest that insulin-sensitizing therapies improve liver histology. This review explores the contribution of impaired insulin signaling in ALD and summarizes the current understanding of the synergistic relationship between alcohol and nutrient excess in promoting hepatic inflammation and disease. PMID:25998863

  15. Clinical features of Crohn disease concomitant with ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Song; Ding, Jie; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wanqing; Feng, Min; Guan, Wenxian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) cause increased morbidity and decreased quality of life in Crohn disease (CD). Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) belongs to EIMs. Very little is known on the clinical features of CD concomitant with AS. This study is to investigate the clinical features of CD patients with AS. We retrospectively collected all CD patients with AS in our hospital, and established a comparison group (CD without AS) with age, sex, and duration of Crohn disease matched. Clinical information was retrieved for comparison. Eight CD + AS patients were identified from 195 CD patients. Sixteen CD patients were randomly selected into comparison group. All CD + AS patients were male, HLA-B27 (+), and rheumatoid factor (−) with an average age of 40.8 ± 4.52 years. Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and AS was revealed (r = 0.857, P = 0.011). Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and functional limitation associated with AS was identified (r = 0.881, P < 0.01). C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and globulin were positively correlated to Crohn disease activity index (CDAI), Bath AS disease activity index, and Bath AS functional index(BASFI) scores (r = 0.73–0.93, P < 0.05). Albumin was negatively associated with CDAI and BASFI (r = −0.73 to −0.91, P < 0.05). The ratio of albumin to globulin (Alb/Glo) was significantly related to all 3 scores (r = −0.81 to −0.91, P < 0.05). Male predominance with a 4.12% concomitant incidence of AS is observed in CD patients. Disease activity of CD correlates with disease activity of AS and functional limitation caused by AS. CRP, ESR, and Alb/Glo may serve as biomarkers for disease activity and functional limitation in CD patients concomitant with AS, although future studies are expected. PMID:27428240

  16. [Ibuprofen in rheumatic, degenerative and traumatic disorders of the locomotor system. Local effects and tolerance].

    PubMed

    Pollter, J

    1983-10-27

    The clinical trials carried out on Dolgit Creme containing 5% of the nonsteroidal antirheumatic active principle ibuprofen were carried out by 12 clinical examiners. The experimental and clinical tests were carried out on a total of 464 patients and/or volunteers. It has been proved that the active principle ibuprofen of the tested creme penetrates throughout the skin without causing serum concentrations which could lead to the appearance of undesirable side effects. The metabolization of ibuprofen after topical administration coincides with that following oral administration. In comparative studies with nonsteroidal antirheumatic gel it has been possible to prove the efficacy of Dolgit Creme in the treatment of the different forms of rheumatic diseases and degenerative articular changes as well as in cases of accident and sports injuries. The efficacy of Dolgit Creme compared to Placebo in a double blind trial for the assessment of the onset of action, pain alleviation, decrease of swelling, improvement of motility was at the 1%-level significantly superior. The effective dosage assessed was three or more times daily to apply a 4-10 cm strip of the creme on the affected part of the tissue and massage. Undesirable side effects appeared in less than 4% of the cases in the form of allergic skin reactions.

  17. Clinical Trials for Rare Lung Diseases: Lessons from Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Francis X.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare, slowly progressive neoplasm that causes gradual but often life-threatening cystic destruction of the lung. Advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular pathogenesis have LAM have identified a number of promising targets for testing in therapeutic trials. However, the design, prioritization, organization, and implementation of clinical trials in rare lung diseases poses unique challenges, including geographically disperse populations, sluggish enrollment, off- label drug use, burdensome regulations, and paucity of validated surrogate endpoints. PMID:20235889

  18. Clinical and molecular insights into tuberous sclerosis complex renal disease.

    PubMed

    Siroky, Brian J; Yin, Hong; Bissler, John J

    2011-06-01

    Patients with tuberous sclerosis complex are at great risk of developing renal lesions as part of their disease. These lesions include renal cysts and tumors. Significant advances in understanding the cell biology of these renal lesions has already led to clinical trials demonstrating that pharmacological interventions are likely possible. This review focuses on the pathology of these renal lesions, their underlying cell biology, and the possible therapeutic strategies that may prove to significantly improve care for these patients.

  19. Clinical and biochemical landmarks in systemic autoinflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Cantarini, Luca; Rigante, Donato; Brizi, Maria Giuseppina; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Vitale, Antonio; Gianneramo, Valentina; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2012-11-01

    Systemic autoinflammatory diseases are a group of inherited disorders of the innate immune system characterized by seemingly unprovoked inflammation recurring at variable intervals and involving skin, serosal membranes, joints, and gastrointestinal apparatus, with reactive amyloidosis as a possible severe long-term complication. Recent advances in genetics and molecular biology have improved our understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases, including familial Mediterranean fever, mevalonate kinase deficiency syndrome, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes, and hereditary pyogenic and granulomatous disorders: the vast majority of these conditions are related to the activation of the interleukin-1 pathway, which results in (or from?) a common unifying pathogenetic mechanism. Their diagnostic identification derives from the combination of clinical data, evaluation of acute phase reactants, clinical efficacy in response to specific drugs, and recognition of specific mutations in the relevant genes, although genetic tests may be unconstructive in some cases. This review will discuss clinical and laboratory clues useful for a diagnostic approach to systemic autoinflammatory diseases.

  20. Renal diseases in haemophilic patients: pathogenesis and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Pasquale; Rampino, Teresa; Gregorini, Marilena; Fasoli, Gianluca; Gamba, Gabriella; Dal Canton, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Haemophilia A and B are genetic X-linked bleeding disorders, caused by mutations in genes encoding factors VIII and IX, respectively. Clinical manifestations of haemophilia are spontaneous haemorrhage or acute bleeding caused by minor trauma, resulting in severe functional consequences that can culminate in a debilitating arthropathy. Life expectancy and quality of life of patients with haemophilia have dramatically improved over the last years, mainly for new therapeutic options and the awareness to the risk of HCV and HIV infections. Different clinical problems arise from this important change in history of patients with haemophilia. In particular, ageing-related diseases, such as diabetes, hypertension and cancer, and chronic viral infections are emerging as new challenges in this patient population. Among the different types of chronic illnesses, renal diseases are of special interest as they involve some difficult management issues. In fact, decisions regarding adequate preventive strategies and viral infection treatment, the choice of the dialytic modality, placement of vascular access and prescription of dialytic treatments are particularly complicated, because only few data are available. In this review, we discuss the pathogenesis of renal damage in patients with haemophilia, especially in those with blood-transmitted viral infections, and the major issues about the management of renal diseases, including problems related to dialytic treatment and kidney transplantation, providing practical algorithms to guide the clinical decision-making process.

  1. Clinical holistic medicine: chronic infections and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav

    2005-02-23

    The consciousness-based (holistic) medical toolbox might be useful in general practice and in cases of recurrent infections and chronic infection or inflammation. From our clinical experiences, there is hope for improvement from a number of diseases caused by disorders affecting the regulation of the immune system when the physician includes the holistic medical approach. Our scientific understanding of the connection between consciousness and cellular order is still limited. Consciousness-based holistic medicine removes (as explained by the holistic process theory of healing) the "blockages" in the tissues of the body and facilitates function and informational exchange of the cells of the body. Many blockages and repressed feelings in an area would imply "noise and disturbances" on the level of intercellular communications, which in turn means major difficulties for the cells of the immune system. For this they are totally dependent on the body information system, which the holistic treatment aims to recover. Processing the blockages increases the coherence of the cells and organism, thus increasing the intercellular flow of information in the area and thus strengthening the immune defense and healing the disease. The area of clinical holistic medicine is going through a rapid development and the toolbox of consciousness-based medicine is available for dealing with many diseases arising from disturbances in the regulation of the immune system. Holistic medicine has yet to be better explained scientifically and our proposed holistic cures have yet to be documented clinically. We invite the medical community to cooperate on this important challenge.

  2. Clinical Assessment of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Marc A.; Griffin, Kathryn J.; Scott, D. Julian A.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) describes the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis affecting the circulation in the legs. The severity of PAD is classified according to symptom severity, time course, and anatomical distribution. The signs and symptoms of PAD reflect the degree of circulatory compromise and whether there has been a gradual reduction in the circulation or an abrupt, uncompensated decrease. Accurate clinical assessment underpins decisions on management strategy and should objectively assess the severity of the ischemia and need for revascularization. Clinical history should discriminate symptoms of PAD from other conditions presenting with leg pain, elucidate cardiovascular risk factors and the effect of symptoms on the patient's quality of life. Clinical examination includes signs of general cardiovascular disease and associated conditions before assessing the circulation and viability of the limb. Palpation of peripheral pulses must be augmented by determination of the ankle brachial pressure index using hand held Doppler. A whole patient approach to management is required and must include modification of cardiovascular risk status as well as dealing with the local circulatory manifestation of PAD. PMID:25435653

  3. Clinical assessment of patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Marc A; Griffin, Kathryn J; Scott, D Julian A

    2014-12-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) describes the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis affecting the circulation in the legs. The severity of PAD is classified according to symptom severity, time course, and anatomical distribution. The signs and symptoms of PAD reflect the degree of circulatory compromise and whether there has been a gradual reduction in the circulation or an abrupt, uncompensated decrease. Accurate clinical assessment underpins decisions on management strategy and should objectively assess the severity of the ischemia and need for revascularization. Clinical history should discriminate symptoms of PAD from other conditions presenting with leg pain, elucidate cardiovascular risk factors and the effect of symptoms on the patient's quality of life. Clinical examination includes signs of general cardiovascular disease and associated conditions before assessing the circulation and viability of the limb. Palpation of peripheral pulses must be augmented by determination of the ankle brachial pressure index using hand held Doppler. A whole patient approach to management is required and must include modification of cardiovascular risk status as well as dealing with the local circulatory manifestation of PAD. PMID:25435653

  4. Glucocerebrosidase mutations in clinical and pathologically proven Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Juliane; Bras, Jose; Deas, Emma; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Parkkinen, Laura; Lachmann, Robin H.; Li, Abi; Holton, Janice; Guerreiro, Rita; Paudel, Reema; Segarane, Badmavady; Singleton, Andrew; Lees, Andrew; Hardy, John; Houlden, Henry; Revesz, Tamas; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) are associated with Gaucher's disease, the most common lysosomal storage disorder. Parkinsonism is an established feature of Gaucher's disease and an increased frequency of mutations in GBA has been reported in several different ethnic series with sporadic Parkinson's disease. In this study, we evaluated the frequency of GBA mutations in British patients affected by Parkinson's disease. We utilized the DNA of 790 patients and 257 controls, matched for age and ethnicity, to screen for mutations within the GBA gene. Clinical data on all identified GBA mutation carriers was reviewed and analysed. Additionally, in all cases where brain material was available, a neuropathological evaluation was performed and compared to sporadic Parkinson's disease without GBA mutations. The frequency of GBA mutations among the British patients (33/790 = 4.18%) was significantly higher (P = 0.01; odds ratio = 3.7; 95% confidence interval = 1.12–12.14) when compared to the control group (3/257 = 1.17%). Fourteen different GBA mutations were identified, including three previously undescribed mutations, K7E, D443N and G193E. Pathological examination revealed widespread and abundant α-synuclein pathology in all 17 GBA mutation carriers, which were graded as Braak stage of 5–6, and had McKeith's limbic or diffuse neocortical Lewy body-type pathology. Diffuse neocortical Lewy body-type pathology tended to occur more frequently in the group with GBA mutations compared to matched Parkinson's disease controls. Clinical features comprised an early onset of the disease, the presence of hallucinations in 45% (14/31) and symptoms of cognitive decline or dementia in 48% (15/31) of patients. This study demonstrates that GBA mutations are found in British subjects at a higher frequency than any other known Parkinson's disease gene. This is the largest study to date on a non-Jewish patient sample with a detailed genotype/phenotype/pathological analyses

  5. [Diagnosing Alzheimer's disease: from research to clinical practice and ethics].

    PubMed

    Tarquini, Daniela; Pucci, Eugenio; Gasparini, Maddalena; Zullo, Silvia; Tiraboschi, Pietro; Bonito, Virginio; Defanti, Carlo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, the so-called Dubois criteria introduced the use of biomarkers in research (in particular, brain amyloid positron emission tomography imaging and the cerebrospinal fluid levels of tau/fosfo-tau and beta-amyloid 1-42) for the early or preclinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Even so, we are looking at an increased use of these markers in clinical practice. In the 1960s, Alzheimer's disease was considered a rare form of presenile dementia, but gradually it has been recognized as the prevalent form of old-age dementia. As a consequence, what was once regarded as an inevitable outcome of old age is now recognized as a true disease. Several factors contributed to this paradigm shift, in particular a longer lifespan, new techniques of in vivo study of the central nervous system, and the pressure exerted by the pharmaceutical industry and patient groups. The current lack of disease-modifying therapies and the high incidence of mild cognitive impairment, which is a risk factor for dementia, raise a series of clinical ethical problems ranging from how diagnosis is communicated to how resources are used. This article offers a conceptual scheme through which these issues can be addressed.

  6. Endothelial Dysfunction: Clinical Implications in Cardiovascular Disease and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Ha; Park, Woo Jung

    2015-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic progressive vascular disease. It starts early in life, has a long asymptomatic phase, and a progression accelerated by various cardiovascular risk factors. The endothelium is an active inner layer of the blood vessel. It generates many factors that regulate vascular tone, the adhesion of circulating blood cells, smooth muscle proliferation, and inflammation, which are the key mechanisms of atherosclerosis and can contribute to the development of cardiovascular events. There is growing evidence that functional impairment of the endothelium is one of the first recognizable signs of development of atherosclerosis and is present long before the occurrence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Therefore, understanding the endothelium's central role provides not only insights into pathophysiology, but also a possible clinical opportunity to detect early disease, stratify cardiovascular risk, and assess response to treatments. In the present review, we will discuss the clinical implications of endothelial function as well as the therapeutic issues for endothelial dysfunction in cardiovascular disease as primary and secondary endothelial therapy.

  7. Clinical spectrum of chronic interstitial lung disease in children.

    PubMed

    Fan, L L; Mullen, A L; Brugman, S M; Inscore, S C; Parks, D P; White, C W

    1992-12-01

    To describe the clinical spectrum of interstitial lung disease in children, we reviewed our experience with 48 patients during a 12-year period. Most patients initially had typical findings of restrictive lung disease and hypoxemia. Growth failure or pulmonary hypertension or both were found in more than one third. Specific diagnosis, made in 35 patients (70%), most often required invasive studies, particularly open lung biopsy. Although the diagnostic yield from open lung biopsy was high, the diagnosis of many patients remained uncertain. Many different disorders were encountered. The response to corticosteroids, bronchodilators, and chloroquine was inconsistent. Six patients died, five within 1 year after the initial evaluation. The spectrum of pediatric interstitial lung disease includes a large, heterogeneous group of rare disorders associated with high morbidity and mortality rates.

  8. Clinical experiences with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Szucs, Anna; Várallyay, Péter; Osztie, Eva; Papp, Erzsébet; Sólyom, András; Finta, Lehel; Varga, Dániel; Barcs, Gábor; Holló, András; Kamondi, Anita

    2012-11-30

    The clinical picture, electroencephalographic, imaging and cerebrospinal fluid parameters as well as the molecular background of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have been well explored. The diagnostic criteria, offering clinicians a fair chance to identify these patients in vivo, have recently been updated. However, the diagnosis is still a challenge in everyday neurological routine. We report on three of our Creutzfeldt-Jakob patients for calling attention to the classical and the recently defined features of the disease. We conclude that based on the rapidly progressing neuropsychiatric syndrome Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease may be suspected; follow-up EEG may reveal the typical (pseudo)-periodic pattern with progressive deterioration of the background activity. In addition, diffusion-weighted brain MRI imaging (DWI) has high diagnostic value. Detection of 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid supports the in vivo diagnosis.

  9. Mitochondrial Disease: Clinical Aspects, Molecular Mechanisms, Translational Science, and Clinical Frontiers

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Ben; Cohen, Bruce; Copeland, William; Maria, Bernard L.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial medicine provides a metabolic perspective on the pathology of conditions linked with inadequate oxidative phosphorylation. Dysfunction in the mitochondrial machinery can result in improper energy production, leading to cellular injury or even apoptosis. Clinical presentations are often subtle, so clinicians must have a high index of suspicion to make early diagnoses. Symptoms could include muscle weakness and pain, seizures, loss of motor control, decreased visual and auditory functions, metabolic acidosis, acute developmental regression, and immune system dysfunction. The 2013 Neurobiology of Disease in Children Symposium, held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Child Neurology Society, aimed to (1) describe accepted clinical phenotypes of mitochondrial disease produced from various mitochondrial mutations, (2) discuss contemporary understanding of molecular mechanisms that contribute to disease pathology, (3) highlight the systemic effects produced by dysfunction within the mitochondrial machinery, and (4) introduce current strategies that are being translated from bench to bedside as potential therapeutics. PMID:24916430

  10. ADCOMS: a composite clinical outcome for prodromal Alzheimer's disease trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinping; Logovinsky, Veronika; Hendrix, Suzanne B; Stanworth, Stephanie H; Perdomo, Carlos; Xu, Lu; Dhadda, Shobha; Do, Ira; Rabe, Martin; Luthman, Johan; Cummings, Jeffrey; Satlin, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background Development of new therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is increasingly focused on more mildly affected populations, and requires new assessment and outcome strategies. Patients in early stages of AD have mild cognitive decline and no, or limited, functional impairment. To respond to these assessment challenges, we developed a measurement approach based on established scale items that exhibited change in previous amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) trials. Methods Partial least squares regression with a longitudinal clinical decline model identified items from commonly used clinical scales with the highest combined sensitivity to change over time in aMCI and weighted these items according to their relative contribution to detecting clinical progression in patients’ early stages of AD. The resultant AD Composite Score (ADCOMS) was assessed for its ability to detect treatment effect in aMCI/prodromal AD (pAD) clinical trial populations. Results ADCOMS consists of 4 Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale–cognitive subscale items, 2 Mini-Mental State Examination items, and all 6 Clinical Dementia Rating—Sum of Boxes items. ADCOMS demonstrated improved sensitivity to clinical decline over individual scales in pAD, aMCI and in mild AD dementia. ADCOMS also detected treatment effects associated with the use of cholinesterase inhibitors in these populations. Improved sensitivity predicts smaller sample size requirements when ADCOMS is used in early AD trials. Conclusions ADCOMS is proposed as new standard outcome for pAD and mild AD dementia trials, and is progressing in a CAMD-sponsored qualification process for use in registration trials of pAD. PMID:27010616

  11. Management of upper extremity dysfunction in people with Parkinson disease and Huntington disease: facilitating outcomes across the disease lifespan.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Lori; Busse, Monica; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson Disease (PD) and Huntington Disease (HD) are degenerative neurological diseases, which can result in impairments and activity limitations affecting the upper extremities from early in the disease process. The progressive nature of these diseases poses unique challenges for therapists aiming to effectively maximize physical functioning and minimize participation restrictions in these patient groups. Research is underway in both diseases to develop effective disease-modifying agents and pharmacological interventions, as well as mobility-focused rehabilitation protocols. Rehabilitation, and in particular task-specific interventions, has the potential to influence the upper extremity functional abilities of patients with these degenerative conditions. However to date, investigations of interventions specifically addressing upper extremity function have been limited in both PD, and in particular HD. In this paper, we provide an update of the known pathological features of PD and HD as they relate to upper extremity function. We further review the available literature on the use of outcome measures, and the clinical management of upper extremity function in both conditions. Due to the currently limited evidence base in both diseases, we recommend utilization of a clinical management framework specific for degenerative conditions that can serve as a guideline for disease management.

  12. [Clinical and pathological study on early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies].

    PubMed

    Orimo, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    [123I] Meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy has been used to evaluate postganglionic cardiac sympathetic innervation in heart diseases and some neurological disorders. To see clinical usefulness of MIBG myocardial scintigraphy to differentiate Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) from related movement disorders and Alzheimer disease (AD), we performed MIBG myocardial scintigraphy in patients with these disorders. Cardiac uptake of MIBG is specifically reduced in PD and DLB, and this imaging approach is a sensitive diagnostic tool that possibly differentiates PD and DLB from related movement disorders and AD. To see pathological basis of the reduced cardiac uptake of MIBG in Lewy body disease, we immunohistochemically examined cardiac tissues from patients with PD, DLB, related movement disorders and AD using antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and phosphorylated neurofilament (NF). Not only TH- but also NF-immunoreactive (ir) axons in the epicardial nerve fascicles were markedly decreased in Lewy body disease, namely cardiac sympathetic denervation, which accounts for the reduced cardiac uptake of MIBG in Lewy body disease. Patients with PD and DLB have Lewy bodies (LBs) in the nervous system, whereas patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, parkin-associated PD and AD have no LBs in the nervous system. Even in patients with MSA, cardiac sympathetic denervation was associated with the presence of LBs. Therefore, cardiac sympathetic denervation is closely related to the presence of LBs in a wide range of neurodegenerative processes. Taken together, we conclude that the reduced cardiac uptake of MIBG is a potential biomarker for the presence of LBs. Because alpha-synuclein is one of the key molecules in the pathogenesis of PD, we further investigate how alpha-synuclein aggregates are involved in degeneration of the cardiac sympathetic nerve in PD. We

  13. Dissociating emotional and cognitive empathy in pre-clinical and clinical Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Maurage, Pierre; Lahaye, Magali; Grynberg, Delphine; Jeanjean, Anne; Guettat, Lamia; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Halkin, Stéphane; Heeren, Alexandre; Billieux, Joël; Constant, Eric

    2016-03-30

    Huntington's disease (HD) is centrally characterized by motor, neurocognitive and psychiatric symptoms, but impaired emotional decoding abilities have also been reported. However, more complex affective abilities are still to be explored, and particularly empathy, which is essential for social relations and is impaired in various psychiatric conditions. This study evaluates empathic abilities and social skills in pre-clinical and clinical HD, and explores the distinction between two empathy sub-components (emotional-cognitive). Thirty-six HD patients (17 pre-clinical) and 36 matched controls filled in the Empathy Quotient Scale, while controlling for psychopathological comorbidities. At the clinical stage of HD, no global empathy impairment was observed but rather a specific deficit for the cognitive sub-component, while emotional empathy was preserved. A deficit was also observed for social skills. Pre-clinical HD was not associated with any empathy deficit. Emotional deficits in clinical HD are thus not limited to basic emotion decoding but extend towards complex interpersonal abilities. The dissociation between impaired cognitive and preserved emotional empathy in clinical HD reinforces the proposal that empathy subtypes are sustained by distinct processes. Finally, these results underline the extent of distinct affective and social impairments in HD and the need to grasp them in clinical contexts.

  14. Systems Pharmacology Links GPCRs with Retinal Degenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    In most biological systems, second messengers and their key regulatory and effector proteins form links between multiple cellular signaling pathways. Such signaling nodes can integrate the deleterious effects of genetic aberrations, environmental stressors, or both in complex diseases, leading to cell death by various mechanisms. Here we present a systems (network) pharmacology approach that, together with transcriptomics analyses, was used to identify different G protein–coupled receptors that experimentally protected against cellular stress and death caused by linked signaling mechanisms. We describe the application of this concept to degenerative and diabetic retinopathies in appropriate mouse models as an example. Systems pharmacology also provides an attractive framework for devising strategies to combat complex diseases by using (repurposing) US Food and Drug Administration–approved pharmacological agents. PMID:25839098

  15. Analysis of surgeries for Degenerative lumbarstenosis in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bin; Li, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the effect of decompression alone and combined decompression, fusion and internal fixation procedure for degenerative lumbar stenosis in elderly patients. Methods: We reviewed 168 lumbar stenosis patients treated using decompression alone or with combined procedures in the department of orthopaedics of Tianjin 4th Centre Hospital from October 2010 to January 2014. The clinical data including age, gender, procedure type, operation time, follow-up period, blood loss, preoperative and postoperative JOA and ODI scores were recorded. The patients were divided into decompression alone group and combined surgeries group according to the procedure type. Results: The combined surgeries group presented with larger blood loss (p<0.05) and more operation time (p<0.05), compared with the group of decompression alone. The preoperative and postoperative JOA scores were significantly higher (p<0.05), and the ODI scores significantly lower in the decompression alone group (P<0.05), but at the final follow-up, there were no significant difference between the two groups (p>0.05). The complication rate was lower in the group of decompression alone, but there was no significant difference between the two groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: Both the decompression alone and combined surgeries can result in a satisfactory effects in elderly patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis, but the combined surgeries presented with a relatively higher complication rate. PMID:27022361

  16. Integrating degenerative mechanisms in bone and cartilage: a multiscale approach.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Justin W; Shim, Vickie B; Hunter, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    At the whole organ level, degenerative mechanisms in bone and cartilage are primarily attributed to modifications in loading pattern. Either a change in magnitude or location can initiate a degenerative path. At the micro scale we often see changes in structure such as porosity increase in bone and fibrillation in cartilage. These changes contribute to a reduced structural integrity that weakens the bulk strength of tissue. Finally, at the cell level we have modeling and remodeling pathways that may be disrupted through disease, drugs and altered stimulus from the micro and macro scales. In order to understand this entire process and the roles each level plays a multiscale modeling framework is necessary. This framework can take whole body loadings and pass information through finer spatial scales in order to understand how everyday dynamic movements influence micro and cellular response. In a similar manner, cellular and microstructural processes regulate whole bulk properties and modify whole organ strength. In this study we highlight the multiscale links developed as part of the open-source ontologies for the Physiome Project using the lower limb as an example. We consider the influence of remodeling in (i) anabolic treatments in cortical bone; and (ii) subchondral bone and cartilage degeneration. PMID:23367446

  17. Clinical and postextraction evaluation of periodontal disease indicators

    PubMed Central

    Kolte, Rajashri; Kolte, Abhay; Wattamwar, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical attachment level is the most frequently used and acceptable parameter in monitoring periodontal status in diseased individual and denotes patterns of periodontal destruction. Awareness of root morphology and the condition of the periodontal tissues is essential for reliable periodontal pocket probing and for effective debridement of root surfaces. Clinically, it is challenging to observe exact nature of complex periodontal attachment loss. The aim of the present study was to evaluate patterns of periodontal destruction based on vertical and horizontal attachment loss. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 extracted teeth were obtained from chronic periodontitis patients. Prior to extraction, clinical measurements were recorded and after extraction, the teeth were stained with crystal violet. Root length, vertical and horizontal attachment loss were measured using digital caliper. Results: There was a significant difference between clinical attachment level and vertical attachment loss for both maxillary and mandibular teeth. Mean vertical attachment loss varied between 5.17 mm and 9.17 mm. Interproximal surfaces exhibited statistically significant vertical attachment loss in both maxillary and mandibular dentition. Results indicated that vertical attachment loss was more severe with teeth belonging to the anterior sextant whereas the horizontal attachment loss was more pronounced with posterior teeth. Conclusion: Both vertical and horizontal attachment loss were observed in all periodontally involved teeth. There was a difference in clinical measurements and actual periodontal status denoted by postextraction staining. These findings have an impact on determining the prognosis and appropriate treatment plan for patients. PMID:27143828

  18. Infertility etiologies are genetically and clinically linked with other diseases in single meta-diseases.

    PubMed

    Tarín, Juan J; García-Pérez, Miguel A; Hamatani, Toshio; Cano, Antonio

    2015-04-15

    The present review aims to ascertain whether different infertility etiologies share particular genes and/or molecular pathways with other pathologies and are associated with distinct and particular risks of later-life morbidity and mortality. In order to reach this aim, we use two different sources of information: (1) a public web server named DiseaseConnect ( http://disease-connect.org ) focused on the analysis of common genes and molecular mechanisms shared by diseases by integrating comprehensive omics and literature data; and (2) a literature search directed to find clinical comorbid relationships of infertility etiologies with only those diseases appearing after infertility is manifested. This literature search is performed because DiseaseConnect web server does not discriminate between pathologies emerging before, concomitantly or after infertility is manifested. Data show that different infertility etiologies not only share particular genes and/or molecular pathways with other pathologies but they have distinct clinical relationships with other diseases appearing after infertility is manifested. In particular, (1) testicular and high-grade prostate cancer in male infertility; (2) non-fatal stroke and endometrial cancer, and likely non-fatal coronary heart disease and ovarian cancer in polycystic ovary syndrome; (3) osteoporosis, psychosexual dysfunction, mood disorders and dementia in premature ovarian failure; (4) breast and ovarian cancer in carriers of BRCA1/2 mutations in diminished ovarian reserve; (5) clear cell and endometrioid histologic subtypes of invasive ovarian cancer, and likely low-grade serous invasive ovarian cancer, melanoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in endometriosis; and (6) endometrial and ovarian cancer in idiopathic infertility. The present data endorse the principle that the occurrence of a disease (in our case infertility) is non-random in the population and suggest that different infertility etiologies are genetically and clinically

  19. Wilson disease: pathogenesis and clinical considerations in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosencrantz, Richard; Schilsky, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Nearly a century after Dr. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson composed his doctoral thesis on the pathologic findings of "lenticular degeneration" in the brain associated with cirrhosis of the liver we know that the underlying molecular basis for this autosomal recessive inherited disorder that now bears his name is mutation of a copper transporting ATPase, ATP7B, an intracellular copper transporter mainly expressed in hepatocytes. Loss of ATP7B function is the basis for reduced hepatic biliary copper excretion and reduced incorporation of copper into ceruloplasmin. During the intervening years, there was recognition of the clinical signs, histologic, biochemical features, and mutation analysis of ATP7B that characterize and enable diagnosis of this disorder. These include the presence of signs of liver or neurologic disease and detection of Kayser-Fleischer rings, low ceruloplasmin, elevated urine and hepatic copper, and associated histologic changes in the liver. Medical therapies and liver transplantation can effectively treat patients with this once uniformly fatal disorder. The earlier detection of the disease led to the initiation of treatment to prevent disease progression and reverse pathologic findings if present, and family screening to detect the disorder in first-degree relatives is warranted. Gene therapy and hepatocyte cell transplantation for Wilson disease has only been tested in animal models but represent future areas for study. Despite all the advances we still have to consider the diagnosis of Wilson disease to test patients for this disorder and properly establish the diagnosis before committing to life-long treatment.

  20. Wilson disease: pathogenesis and clinical considerations in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rosencrantz, Richard; Schilsky, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Nearly a century after Dr. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson composed his doctoral thesis on the pathologic findings of "lenticular degeneration" in the brain associated with cirrhosis of the liver we know that the underlying molecular basis for this autosomal recessive inherited disorder that now bears his name is mutation of a copper transporting ATPase, ATP7B, an intracellular copper transporter mainly expressed in hepatocytes. Loss of ATP7B function is the basis for reduced hepatic biliary copper excretion and reduced incorporation of copper into ceruloplasmin. During the intervening years, there was recognition of the clinical signs, histologic, biochemical features, and mutation analysis of ATP7B that characterize and enable diagnosis of this disorder. These include the presence of signs of liver or neurologic disease and detection of Kayser-Fleischer rings, low ceruloplasmin, elevated urine and hepatic copper, and associated histologic changes in the liver. Medical therapies and liver transplantation can effectively treat patients with this once uniformly fatal disorder. The earlier detection of the disease led to the initiation of treatment to prevent disease progression and reverse pathologic findings if present, and family screening to detect the disorder in first-degree relatives is warranted. Gene therapy and hepatocyte cell transplantation for Wilson disease has only been tested in animal models but represent future areas for study. Despite all the advances we still have to consider the diagnosis of Wilson disease to test patients for this disorder and properly establish the diagnosis before committing to life-long treatment. PMID:21901655

  1. Clinical Utility of Serologic Testing for Celiac Disease in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    tests in the diagnosis celiac disease? What is the clinical validity of serologic tests in the diagnosis of celiac disease? The clinical validity was defined as the ability of the test to change diagnosis. What is the clinical utility of serologic tests in the diagnosis of celiac disease? The clinical utility was defined as the impact of the test on decision making. What is the budget impact of serologic tests in the diagnosis of celiac disease? What is the cost-effectiveness of serologic tests in the diagnosis of celiac disease? Methods Literature Search A literature search was performed on November 13th, 2009 using OVID MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Cochrane Library, and the International Agency for Health Technology Assessment (INAHTA) for studies published from January 1st 2003 and November 13th 2010. Abstracts were reviewed by a single reviewer and, for those studies meeting the eligibility criteria, full-text articles were obtained. Reference lists were also examined for any additional relevant studies not identified through the search. Articles with unknown eligibility were reviewed with a second clinical epidemiologist, then a group of epidemiologists until consensus was established. The quality of evidence was assessed as high, moderate, low or very low according to GRADE methodology. Inclusion Criteria Inclusion Criteria Exclusion Criteria Studies that evaluated diagnostic accuracy, i.e., both sensitivity and specificity of serology tests in the diagnosis of celiac disease. Study population consisted of untreated patients with symptoms consistent with celiac disease. Studies in which both serologic celiac disease tests and small bowel biopsy (gold standard) were used in all subjects. Systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, prospective observational studies, and retrospective cohort studies. At least 20 subjects included in

  2. Generalizability in two clinical trials of Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To examine the generalizability of two National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials in patients with chronic Lyme disease and to determine whether selection factors resulted in the unfavorable outcomes. Design Epidemiologic review of the generalizability of two trials conducted by Klempner et al. This paper considers whether the study group was representative of the general chronic Lyme disease population. Results In their article in The New England Journal of Medicine, Klempner et al. failed to discuss the limitations of their clinical trials. This epidemiologic review argues that their results are not generalizable to the overall Lyme disease population. The treatment failure reported by the authors may be the result of enrolling patients who remained ill after an average of 4.7 years and an average of 3 previous courses of treatment. The poor outcome cited in these trials may be explained by having selected patients who had undergone delayed treatment or multiple treatments unsuccessfully. These selection factors were not addressed by the studies' authors, nor have they been discussed by reviewers. The trials have been over-interpreted by the NIH and widely publicized in a press release. The results have been extrapolated to other groups of Lyme disease patients by commentators, by a case discussant in an influential medical journal, and by health insurance companies to deny antibiotic treatment. Conclusion The Klempner et al. trials are assumed to be internally valid based on a Randomized Control Trial (RCT) design. However, this review argues that the trials have limited generalizability beyond the select group of patients with characteristics like those in the trial. Applying the findings to target populations with characteristics that differ from those included in these trials is inappropriate and may limit options for chronic Lyme disease patients who might benefit from antibiotic treatment

  3. [Clinical study on development of nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease].

    PubMed

    Kurashima, Atsuyuki

    2004-12-01

    DEVELOPEMENT OF MAC LUNG DISEASE: An increase of nodular bronchiectatic type of MAC lung disease becomes a problem among respiratory physician today. The reason is still unknown, but it seems to be globally recognized that this type of MAC disease is developing particularly in middle-aged woman. Some papers mentioned the existence of such type of MAC lung disease already early in the 70s, in Japan. Yamamoto described that 17 cases of middle lobe type lung disease out of 154 non-photochoromogen cases, and 76.5% were female, in 1970. Shimoide also pointed such type of 39 cases out of 240 MAC lung disease and 84.6% were female, in 1980. Prince reported MAC lung disease seen in old and middle age female of 21 cases including lethality example of 4 cases without a precedent disease in 1989. After his report, the international consensus of this peculiar type of MAC lung disease seems to be spread. In 1989, we compared 72 cases of nodular bronchiectatic type of MAC lung disease and 56 cases of diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) that was a most typical chronic airway disease at that time in Japan. The average age of disease onset of DPB group was 37.0 +/- 16.3 years old and that of MAC group was 54.5 +/- 16.3 years old. The percentage of female was 32% in DPB group and 87.5% in MAC group. It was highly possible that two groups belong different parent population. We could grasp that nodular bronchiectatic type of MAC lung disease patients is a unique group. We observed the serial films of 21 cases of nodular bronchiectatic MAC lung disease, and divide the progression of the disease to sequential 7 steps as Fig. 1. Small nodules progress to cavities in mean about 10 years. However, why is MAC which is opportunistic pathogen with weak virulence, able to form a lesion at unimpaired lung parenchyma? Is there really normal site? Why dose it start from lingula? Why is MAC seen a lot in woman? While it is extremely pathognomonic clinical picture, and, is an extremely interesting

  4. Prevalence of clinical signs of disease in Danish finisher pigs.

    PubMed

    Petersen, H H; Nielsen, E O; Hassing, A-G; Ersbøll, A K; Nielsen, J P

    2008-03-22

    Between December 1999 and February 2001, two visits, eight weeks apart, were made to 90 herds of Danish finisher pigs. The prevalence of clinical signs was recorded by three veterinary technicians from the Danish Bacon and Meat Council according to a standardised procedure; they had been trained and their observations were monitored and validated before and during the study. A total of 154,347 finisher pigs were examined and 22,136 clinical signs were recorded. Vices accounted for 43 per cent of the signs. The highest mean prevalence was observed for ear necrosis (4.44 per cent), followed by respiratory signs (2.17 per cent), lameness (1.92 per cent), other skin diseases (1.73 per cent), tail bites (1.26 per cent), umbilical hernia (0.78 per cent), flank bites (0.52 per cent), diarrhoea (0.27 per cent), respiratory distress (0.12 per cent), atrophic rhinitis (0.10 per cent), recumbency (0.09 per cent) and central nervous disease (0.05 per cent). The prevalence of atrophic rhinitis was higher in conventional herds than in specific pathogen-free herds. The prevalence of clinical signs of atrophic rhinitis was higher among finishers weighing 51 to 75 kg than among finishers weighing up to 50 kg, and the prevalence of respiratory signs was higher among finishers weighing 51 to 75 kg then among finishers weighing 76 to 100 kg. PMID:18359931

  5. Prodromal clinical manifestations of neuropathologically confirmed Lewy body disease.

    PubMed

    Jicha, G A; Schmitt, F A; Abner, E; Nelson, P T; Cooper, G E; Smith, C D; Markesbery, W R

    2010-10-01

    The mild cognitive impairment (MCI) stage of dementia with Lewy bodies (MCI-DLB) has not yet been defined, but is likely to differ in the MCI stage of Alzheimer's disease (MCI-AD). To determine whether clinical features distinguish MCI-DLB and MCI-AD, 9 cases of neuropathologically confirmed MCI-DLB and 12 cases of MCI-AD were compared. No significant differences were found between MCI-DLB and MCI-AD cases in age at death, gender, ApoE status, education, time followed while clinically normal, or duration of MCI. MCI-DLB and MCI-AD cases differed clinically in the expression of Parkinsonism (P=0.012), provoked hallucinations or delirium (P=0.042), or the presence of any of these noncognitive symptoms of DLB (P<0.0001). Letter fluency (P=0.007) was significantly lower and Wechsler Logical Memory I (P=0.019) was significantly higher in MCI-DLB compared to MCI-AD cases. These data demonstrate the feasibility of differentiating underlying pathologic processes responsible for cognitive decline in the preclinical disease state and suggest that further refinement in diagnostic criteria may allow more accurate early detection of prodromal DLB and AD.

  6. [Infectious diseases as a clinical specialty in Germany and Europe].

    PubMed

    Kern, Winfried V; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Tacconelli, Evelina; Ullmann, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Clinical infectious diseases have only slowly been established as a medical specialty in Germany. The density of infectious diseases (ID) specialists and the number of ID divisions in general hospitals is still limited when compared with the situation in many other European countries, and there is also a lack of hospital-based medical microbiologists and infection control doctors for many reasons. Often, there is a lack of understanding of the roles and the performance of ID specialists versus microbiologists. Experience in other countries shows that ID specialists are important as clinical experts at the bedside, can help ascertain healthcare quality and patient safety, and are perfectly suited for undertaking strategic tasks in the field of cost-effective antimicrobial therapy algorithms and antibiotic stewardship (ABS) in hospitals. ID specialists are responsible for infection control in several countries, can improve the utility of diagnostic microbiology and are key partners in translational research. We estimate that more than 1,000 additional ID specialists are needed in this country, and believe that specially trained ABS experts can take over parts of their responsibilities and tasks in smaller hospitals. More capacity and flexibility in postgraduate training in infectious diseases, antibiotic stewardship and infection control in Germany will be critical to address the problem of antimicrobial resistance. (As supplied by publisher).

  7. Clinical Profiles Associated with Influenza Disease in the Ferret Model

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Gregory V.; Long, James P.; Ortiz, Diana I.; Gainey, Melicia; Carper, Benjamin A.; Feng, Jingyu; Miller, Stephen M.; Bigger, John E.; Vela, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A viruses continue to pose a threat to human health; thus, various vaccines and prophylaxis continue to be developed. Testing of these products requires various animal models including mice, guinea pigs, and ferrets. However, because ferrets are naturally susceptible to infection with human influenza viruses and because the disease state resembles that of human influenza, these animals have been widely used as a model to study influenza virus pathogenesis. In this report, a statistical analysis was performed to evaluate data involving 269 ferrets infected with seasonal influenza, swine influenza, and highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) from 16 different studies over a five year period. The aim of the analyses was to better qualify the ferret model by identifying relationships among important animal model parameters (endpoints) and variables of interest, which include survival, time-to-death, changes in body temperature and weight, and nasal wash samples containing virus, in addition to significant changes from baseline in selected hematology and clinical chemistry parameters. The results demonstrate that a disease clinical profile, consisting of various changes in the biological parameters tested, is associated with various influenza A infections in ferrets. Additionally, the analysis yielded correlates of protection associated with HPAI disease in ferrets. In all, the results from this study further validate the use of the ferret as a model to study influenza A pathology and to evaluate product efficacy. PMID:23472182

  8. Treatment of Anemia in Patients with Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ... Physicians The full report is titled “Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ...

  9. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva-dos-Santos, Amílcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires' disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms. PMID:27547478

  10. Acute Psychosis as Major Clinical Presentation of Legionnaires' Disease.

    PubMed

    Coentre, Ricardo; Silva-Dos-Santos, Amílcar; Talina, Miguel Cotrim

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old woman who presented with acute psychosis as a major manifestation of Legionnaires' disease in the absence of other neuropsychiatric symptoms. Clinical history revealed dry cough and nausea. Observation showed fever and auscultation crackles in the lower lobe of the right lung. Laboratory testing demonstrated elevated C-reactive protein and lung chest radiograph showed patchy peribronchial and right lower lobe consolidation. Soon after admission, she started producing purulent sputum. Epidemiological data suggested Legionella pneumophila as possible cause of the clinical picture that was confirmed by urinary antigen detection and polymerase chain reaction of the sputum. She was treated with levofloxacin 750 mg/day for 10 days with complete remission of pulmonary and psychiatric symptoms. She has not had further psychotic symptoms. PMID:27547478

  11. Clinical Research Priorities in Adult Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cotts, Timothy; Khairy, Paul; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; John, Anitha S.; Valente, Anne Marie; Zaidi, Ali N.; Cook, Stephen C.; Aboulhosn, Jamil; Ting, Jennifer Grando; Gurvitz, Michelle; Landzberg, Michael J.; Verstappen, Amy; Kay, Joseph; Earing, Michael; Franklin, Wayne; Kogon, Brian; Broberg, Craig S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) clinicians are hampered by the paucity of data to inform clinical decision-making. The objective of this study was to identify priorities for clinical research in ACHD. Methods A list of 45 research questions was developed by the Alliance for Adult Research in Congenital Cardiology (AARCC), compiled into a survey, and administered to ACHD providers. Patient input was sought via the Adult Congenital Heart Association at community meetings and online forums. The 25 top questions were sent to ACHD providers worldwide via an online survey. Each question was ranked based on perceived priority and weighted based on time spent in ACHD care. The top 10 topics identified are presented and discussed. Results The final online survey yielded 139 responses. Top priority questions related to tetralogy of Fallot (timing of pulmonary valve replacement and criteria for primary prevention ICDs), patients with systemic right ventricles (determining the optimal echocardiographic techniques for measuring right ventricular function, and indications for tricuspid valve replacement and primary prevention ICDs), and single ventricle/Fontan patients (role of pulmonary vasodilators, optimal anticoagulation, medical therapy for preservation of ventricular function, treatment for protein losing enteropathy). In addition, establishing criteria to refer ACHD patients for cardiac transplantation was deemed a priority. Conclusions The ACHD field is in need of prospective research to address fundamental clinical questions. It is hoped that this methodical consultation process will inform researchers and funding organizations about clinical research topics deemed to be of high priority. PMID:24411207

  12. Gallstone disease. The clinical manifestations of infectious stones.

    PubMed

    Smith, A L; Stewart, L; Fine, R; Pellegrini, C A; Way, L W

    1989-05-01

    Gallstones from 82 patients were examined under a scanning electron microscope for evidence of bacteria, and the findings were compared with the clinical manifestations of the disease. Bacteria were present in 68% of pigment stones and the pigment portions of 80% of composite stones. These gallstones were referred to as infectious stones. No bacteria were found in cholesterol gallstones. Acute cholangitis was diagnosed in 52% of patients with infectious stones and in 18% of patients with noninfectious stones. Over half of the patients with noninfectious stones presented with mild symptoms. Infectious stones were more often associated with a previous common duct exploration, an urgent operation, infected bile, a common duct procedure, and complications. These data show that gallstone disease is more virulent in patients whose gallstones contain bacteria.

  13. Clinical and genetic characteristics of Mexican Huntington's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Alonso, María Elisa; Ochoa, Adriana; Boll, Marie-Catherine; Sosa, Ana Luisa; Yescas, Petra; López, Marisol; Macias, Rosario; Familiar, Itziar; Rasmussen, Astrid

    2009-10-15

    We report the characteristics of 691 Mexican patients with Huntington's disease (HD). These patients, representing 401 families, constitute the largest series of Mexican HD cases as yet described in the literature. We found the clinical characteristics of these patients to be similar to those of other populations, but we observed a higher frequency of infantile cases, a shorter disease duration and a lower suicide rate. In 626 cases, for which molecular analyses were available, CAG-trinucleotide expansion size ranged from 37-106 repeats. The large number of CAG repeats (19.04 +/- 3.02) in normal alleles and the presence of new mutations suggest that the overall prevalence of HD in the Mexican population could be expected to be within range of, or higher than, that reported for Europeans.

  14. Clinical Features of Genetic Cardiac Diseases Related to Potassium Channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Adler, Arnon; Viskin, Sami

    2016-06-01

    Genetic cardiac diseases related to potassium channelopathies are a group of relatively rare syndromes that includes long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and early repolarization syndrome. Patients with these syndromes share a propensity for the development of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in the absence of significant cardiac structural abnormalities. Familial atrial fibrillation has also been associated with potassium channel dysfunction but differs from the other syndromes by being a rare cause of a common condition. This article focuses on the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes. PMID:27261827

  15. Nonmotor Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease in 2012: Relevant Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Anne Marie; Jutras, Marie France; Czernecki, Virginie; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Vidailhet, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Nonmotor symptoms (NMSs) of Parkinson's disease (PD) are common, but they are often underrecognized in clinical practice, because of the lack of spontaneous complaints by the patients, and partly because of the absence of systematic questioning by the consulting physician. However, valid specific instruments for identification and assessment of these symptoms are available in 2012. The administration of the self-completed screening tool, NMSQuest, associated with questioning during the consultation, improves the diagnosis of NMSs. NMSs play a large role in degradation of quality of life. More relevant NMSs are described in this review, mood disorders, impulse control disorders, cognitive deficits, hallucinations, pain, sleep disorders, and dysautonomia. PMID:22888466

  16. Clinical therapeutic strategies for early stage of diabetic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kitada, Munehiro; Kanasaki, Keizo; Koya, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease, leading to end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular disease. The overall number of patients with DKD will continue to increase in parallel with the increasing global pandemic of type 2 diabetes. Based on landmark clinical trials, DKD has become preventable by controlling conventional factors, including hyperglycemia and hypertension, with multifactorial therapy; however, the remaining risk of DKD progression is still high. In this review, we show the importance of targeting remission/regression of microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetic patients, which may protect against the progression of DKD and cardiovascular events. To achieve remission/regression of microalbuminuria, several steps are important, including the early detection of microalbuminuria with continuous screening, targeting HbA1c < 7.0% for glucose control, the use of renin angiotensin system inhibitors to control blood pressure, the use of statins or fibrates to control dyslipidemia, and multifactorial treatment. Reducing microalbuminuria is therefore an important therapeutic goal, and the absence of microalbuminuria could be a pivotal biomarker of therapeutic success in diabetic patients. Other therapies, including vitamin D receptor activation, uric acid-lowering drugs, and incretin-related drugs, may also be promising for the prevention of DKD progression. PMID:24936255

  17. Clinical aspects of Chagas disease and implications for novel therapies.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Cristiane; Costa, Germano Carneiro; Gollob, Kenneth J; Dutra, Walderez O

    2011-09-01

    The interaction between the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and the human host dates back 9000 years, as demonstrated by molecular analysis of material obtained from Andean mummies indicating the presence of the parasite's kinetoplast DNA in populations from Chile and Peru. This long-established interaction, which persists today, demonstrates that T. cruzi has established a very well adapted relationship with the human host. From a host-parasite relationship point-of-view this is desirable, however, such a high degree of adaptation is perhaps the foundation for many of the unknowns that surround this disease. Unveiling of the immunological mechanisms that underlie the establishment of pathology, identification of parasite-associated factors that determine strain-differential tissue tropism, discovery of host genetic elements that influence the development of different clinical forms of the disease, and understanding environmental factors that may influence the host-parasite interactions, are some of the key questions remaining to be answered. The response to these questions will aid in addressing some of the current challenges in Chagas disease: fulfilling the need for efficient diagnosis, developing effective prophylactic measures, discovering effective therapeutics, and finding methods to control disease progression.

  18. Cardiovascular diseases and other evidence for primary care clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2012-01-01

    This issue includes several articles about various cardiovascular illnesses.(1-4) and another on a disease with increased risk for heart disease: hereditary hemochromatosis.(5) Yet another explores some myth busting about mortality and diabetes.(6) Two articles provide data with the support of patient and/or family organizations (Parent Heart Watch(1) and the Iron Disorders Institute(5)). Another 2 articles address maternal-child health, one considers treatment of hyperbilirubinemia,(7) and one describes an innovative team structure for pre-, post-, and intrapartum care.(8) We also provide preliminary data on azithromycin for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Pop quiz: What is the common contaminant with cocaine that causes serious side effects? What are these side effects? And another: What nonliver disease should be considered for children with elevated transaminase levels? (See the brief reports for answers.) Two reviews provide up-to-the minute practical facts for vaccinations and treatment-resistant hypertension that can be immediately incorporated into clinical practice. We also have an update on physician perspectives after 2 years of electronic medical record use and another with insights about the satisfaction of family physicians who are working in health centers in the first few years out of their residency. PMID:22773706

  19. [Pick's disease. Anatomo-clinical point of view].

    PubMed

    Brion, S; Plas, J; Jeanneau, A

    1991-01-01

    For historical reasons, Pick's disease is sometimes misunderstood in the medical literature. However, clinical signs are quite typical, and different from those of Alzheimer's disease. The disease is characterized by a circumscribed fronto-temporal atrophy, without senile lesions. Neuronal loss and ballooned neurons are present in the atrophic cortex. In about 30 p. 100 of cases, Pick's bodies are present, with various shapes, perhaps depending upon the duration of the disease process. Other lesions are described. The symptomatology is characterized by personality changes of the frontal type, associated with verbal and behavioural stereotypies, and bulimia. There is a striking normality of the EEG, and CT scan shows the fronto-temporal cortical atrophy and atrophy of the caudate nucleus. In most cases, memory for recent events is quite normal, but sometimes an amnestic syndrome is closely related with an unusually severe atrophy of the hippocampus. The consequences of atrophy of the caudate nucleus are debated, since extrapyramidal symptoms appear to be mild and late.

  20. Clinical significance of upper airway dysfunction in motor neurone disease.

    PubMed Central

    García-Pachón, E.; Martí, J.; Mayos, M.; Casan, P.; Sanchis, J.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--To assess the occurrence, functional characteristics and prognostic value of upper airway dysfunction in motor neurone disease, 27 patients unselected for respiratory symptoms were studied. METHODS--Upper airway function was evaluated by analysis of the maximal flow-volume loop. Neurological diagnosis was established from the clinical history and physical examination. The degree of impairment was quantified by the Appel score. RESULTS--Twelve patients (group A) showed abnormalities of the maximal flow-volume loop consistent with flow limitation (seven patients) or instability of upper airway function (gross oscillations of airflow, five patients). The remaining 15 patients (group B) exhibited a normal or generally reduced maximal flow-volume loop, suggestive of muscle weakness. No differences were observed between groups in general physical condition, rate of disease progression, or duration of disease. CONCLUSIONS--Upper airway dysfunction in patients with motor neurone disease was a frequent finding. It was present more often, but not exclusively, in patients with bulbar features and was unrelated to prognosis. PMID:7940430

  1. Smoking in Crohn's disease: effect on localisation and clinical course.

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, E; Järnerot, G; Huitfeldt, B

    1992-01-01

    The effects of smoking on the localisation and clinical course of Crohn's disease is evaluated in 231 patients. Heavy smokers (greater than 10 cigarettes/day) had an increased risk of operation at least once--odds ratios for heavy smokers compared with never smokers after five and 10 years were 1.14 and 1.24 respectively (p = 0.03 and p = 0.017). The risk of further operations was even higher and after 10 years the odds ratio was 1.79 (p = 0.015). The accumulated number of fistulae and/or abscesses was higher for smokers than for never smokers (p = 0.046). Patients with a high life time tobacco exposure (greater than 150 cigarette years) and heavy smokers (greater than 10 cigarettes/day) had small bowel disease more often than patients with lower life time exposure (less than or equal to 150 cigarette years) and patients smoking less than or equal to 10 cigarettes/day (p = 0.002 and p = 0.045 respectively). The course of Crohn's disease analysed in different ways was unfavourable for smokers, especially heavy smokers. Patients with Crohn's disease should be dissuaded from smoking. PMID:1624159

  2. [Pathological and metabolic bone diseases: Clinical importance for fracture treatment].

    PubMed

    Oheim, R

    2015-12-01

    Pathological and metabolic bone diseases are common and relevant occurrences in orthopedics and trauma surgery; however, fractures are often treated as being the illness itself and not seen as the symptom of an underlying bone disease. This is why further diagnostics and systemic treatment options are often insufficiently considered in the routine treatment of fractures. This review focuses on osteoporosis, osteopetrosis, hypophosphatasia and Paget's disease of bone.In patients with osteoporotic vertebral or proximal femur fractures, pharmaceutical treatment to prevent subsequent fractures is an integral part of fracture therapy together with surgical treatment. Osteopetrosis is caused by compromised osteoclastic bone resorption; therefore, even in the face of an elevated bone mass, vitamin D3 supplementation is crucial to avoid clinically relevant hypocalcemia. Unspecific symptoms of the musculoskeletal system, especially together with stress fractures, are typically found in patients suffering from hypophosphatasia. In these patients measurement of alkaline phosphatase shows reduced enzyme activity. Elevated levels of alkaline phosphatase are found in Paget's disease of bone where bisphosphonates are still the treatment of choice.

  3. Measurement of leukocyte rheology in vascular disease: clinical rationale and methodology. International Society of Clinical Hemorheology.

    PubMed

    Wautier, J L; Schmid-Schönbein, G W; Nash, G B

    1999-01-01

    The measurement of leukocyte rheology in vascular disease is a recent development with a wide range of new opportunities. The International Society of Clinical Hemorheology has asked an expert panel to propose guidelines for the investigation of leukocyte rheology in clinical situations. This article first discusses the mechanical, adhesive and related functional properties of leukocytes (especially neutrophils) which influence their circulation, and establishes the rationale for clinically-related measurements of parameters which describe them. It is concluded that quantitation of leukocyte adhesion molecules, and of their endothelial receptors may assist understanding of leukocyte behaviour in vascular disease, along with measurements of flow resistance of leukocytes, free radical production, degranulation and gene expression. For instance, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) is abnormally present on endothelial cells in atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus and inflammatory conditions. Soluble forms of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) or VCAM can be found elevated in the blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis or infections disease. In the second part of the article, possible technical approaches are presented and possible avenues for leukocyte rheological investigations are discussed. PMID:10517484

  4. Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: A Spectrum of Related Disorders Affecting the Aging Spine.

    PubMed

    Tetreault, Lindsay; Goldstein, Christina L; Arnold, Paul; Harrop, James; Hilibrand, Alan; Nouri, Aria; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Cervical spinal cord dysfunction can result from either traumatic or nontraumatic causes, including tumors, infections, and degenerative changes. In this article, we review the range of degenerative spinal disorders resulting in progressive cervical spinal cord compression and propose the adoption of a new term, degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). DCM comprises both osteoarthritic changes to the spine, including spondylosis, disk herniation, and facet arthropathy (collectively referred to as cervical spondylotic myelopathy), and ligamentous aberrations such as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum. This review summarizes current knowledge of the pathophysiology of DCM and describes the cascade of events that occur after compression of the spinal cord, including ischemia, destruction of the blood-spinal cord barrier, demyelination, and neuronal apoptosis. Important features of the diagnosis of DCM are discussed in detail, and relevant clinical and imaging findings are highlighted. Furthermore, this review outlines valuable assessment tools for evaluating functional status and quality of life in these patients and summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of each. Other topics of this review include epidemiology, the prevalence of degenerative changes in the asymptomatic population, the natural history and rates of progression, risk factors of diagnosis (clinical, imaging and genetic), and management strategies. PMID:26378358

  5. Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: A Spectrum of Related Disorders Affecting the Aging Spine.

    PubMed

    Tetreault, Lindsay; Goldstein, Christina L; Arnold, Paul; Harrop, James; Hilibrand, Alan; Nouri, Aria; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Cervical spinal cord dysfunction can result from either traumatic or nontraumatic causes, including tumors, infections, and degenerative changes. In this article, we review the range of degenerative spinal disorders resulting in progressive cervical spinal cord compression and propose the adoption of a new term, degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). DCM comprises both osteoarthritic changes to the spine, including spondylosis, disk herniation, and facet arthropathy (collectively referred to as cervical spondylotic myelopathy), and ligamentous aberrations such as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum. This review summarizes current knowledge of the pathophysiology of DCM and describes the cascade of events that occur after compression of the spinal cord, including ischemia, destruction of the blood-spinal cord barrier, demyelination, and neuronal apoptosis. Important features of the diagnosis of DCM are discussed in detail, and relevant clinical and imaging findings are highlighted. Furthermore, this review outlines valuable assessment tools for evaluating functional status and quality of life in these patients and summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of each. Other topics of this review include epidemiology, the prevalence of degenerative changes in the asymptomatic population, the natural history and rates of progression, risk factors of diagnosis (clinical, imaging and genetic), and management strategies.

  6. A clinical and immunological study of adrenocortical insufficiency (Addison's disease)

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, W. J.; Stewart, A. G.; Scarth, Laura

    1967-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with adrenocortical insufficiency were subdivided into three groups according to the nature of their adrenal disease; twelve patients with idiopathic, twenty-three patients with probable idiopathic and sixteen patients with tuberculous adrenal insufficiency. The importance of objective confirmation of a clinical diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency is stressed and the difficulties of classification of many patients with adult onset adrenal insufficiency are discussed. Idiopathic and probable idiopathic adrenal insufficiency had a sex ratio that was predominantly female (2·5:1) with a mean age of onset of 33 years. Antibodies to adrenal cortex were detected by the methods of immunofluorescence and complement fixation. They were detected in the serum of 80% (20:25) of the females with idiopathic or probable idiopathic adrenal insufficiency and in only 10% (1:10) of the males. The titre of the adrenal antibody was low (≤32) as tested either by immunofluorescence or complement fixation. The serum of only one patient with tuberculous adrenal insufficiency reacted with adrenal tissue in the complement fixation test but the immunofluorescence method showed that this serum reacted with the vascular endothelium and not the secretory cells. No correlation was observed between the duration of the clinical illness and the presence, or absence, or titre of the adrenal antibody. Adrenal antibody was not detected in the sera of fifty-one control subjects matched for age and sex. Four of sixty-nine patients with lymphadenoid goitre, one out of ninety-three patients with diabetes mellitus and none of 230 patients with thyrotoxicosis, primary hypothyroidism or pernicious anaemia had antibody in the serum specific for adrenocortical secretory cells. There is a clinical and immunological overlap between idiopathic adrenal insufficiency and other diseases associated with autoimmune phenomena— thyroid disease, atrophic gastritis and hypoparathyroidism. It is

  7. Molecular Analysis and Clinical Significance of Lactobacillus spp. Recovered from Clinical Specimens Presumptively Associated with Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Raquel M.; Hulten, Kristina G.; Bui, Uyen

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus spp. are part of the normal human flora and are generally assumed to be nonpathogenic. We determined the genotypic identification of >100 Lactobacillus isolates from clinical specimens in the context of presumed pathogenic potential (e.g., recovered as the single/predominant isolate from a sterile site or at ≥105 CFU/ml from urine). This study assessed the clinical significance and the frequency of occurrence of each Lactobacillus sp. We identified 16 species of Lactobacillus by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, 10 of which could not be associated with disease. While Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus gasseri, and Lactobacillus paracasei were associated with infections, L. gasseri was also a common colonizing/contaminating species. Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus johnsonii, and Lactobacillus delbrueckii were associated with at least one infection. Species commonly used in probiotic products (e.g., L. rhamnosus and L. casei) were identical, by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, to our isolates associated with disease. Human isolates of Lactobacillus spp. have differing site associations and levels of clinical significance. Knowing the niche and pathogenic potential of each Lactobacillus sp. can be of importance to both clinical microbiology and the food and probiotic supplement industry. PMID:24131686

  8. Nutritional Risk, Micronutrient Status and Clinical Outcomes: A Prospective Observational Study in an Infectious Disease Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Dizdar, Oguzhan Sıtkı; Baspınar, Osman; Kocer, Derya; Dursun, Zehra Bestepe; Avcı, Deniz; Karakükcü, Cigdem; Çelik, İlhami; Gundogan, Kursat

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to determine the nutritional status and micronutrient levels of hospitalized patients in an infectious disease clinic and investigate their association with adverse clinical outcomes. The nutritional status of the study participants was assessed using the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS 2002) and micronutrient levels and routine biochemical parameters were tested within the first 24 h of the patient’s admission. The incidence of zinc, selenium, thiamine, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 deficiency were 66.7% (n = 40), 46.6% (n = 29), 39.7% (n = 27), 35.3% (n = 24), 14.1% (n = 9), respectively. Selenium levels were significantly higher in patients with urinary tract infections, but lower in soft tissue infections. Copper levels were significantly higher in patients with soft tissue infections. In the Cox regression models, lower albumin, higher serum lactate dehydrogenase levels and higher NRS-2002 scores were associated with increased death. Thiamine, selenium, zinc and vitamin B6 deficiencies but not chromium deficiencies are common in infectious disease clinics. New associations were found between micronutrient levels and infection type and their adverse clinical outcomes. Hypoalbuminemia and a high NRS-2002 score had the greatest accuracy in predicting death, systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis on admission. PMID:26938553

  9. Clinical and Radiologic Disease in Smokers With Normal Spirometry

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Elizabeth A.; Lynch, David A.; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Austin, John H. M.; Grenier, Philippe A.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Bailey, William C.; DeMeo, Dawn L.; Casaburi, Richard H.; Friedman, Paul; Van Beek, Edwin J. R.; Hokanson, John E.; Bowler, Russell P.; Beaty, Terri H.; Washko, George R.; Han, MeiLan K.; Kim, Victor; Kim, Song Soo; Yagihashi, Kunihiro; Washington, Lacey; McEvoy, Charlene E.; Tanner, Clint; Mannino, David M.; Make, Barry J.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James D.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Airflow obstruction on spirometry is universally used to define chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and current or former smokers without airflow obstruction may assume that they are disease free. OBJECTIVE To identify clinical and radiologic evidence of smoking-related disease in a cohort of current and former smokers who did not meet spirometric criteria for COPD, for whom we adopted the discarded label of Global Initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 0. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Individuals from the Genetic Epidemiology of COPD (COPDGene) cross-sectional observational study completed spirometry, chest computed tomography (CT) scans, a 6-minute walk, and questionnaires. Participants were recruited from local communities at 21 sites across the United States. The GOLD 0 group (n = 4388) (ratio of forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration [FEV1] to forced vital capacity >0.7 and FEV1 ≥80% predicted) from the COPDGene study was compared with a GOLD 1 group (n = 794), COPD groups (n = 3690), and a group of never smokers (n = 108). Recruitment began in January 2008 and ended in July 2011. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Physical function impairments, respiratory symptoms, CT abnormalities, use of respiratory medications, and reduced respiratory-specific quality of life. RESULTS One or more respiratory-related impairments were found in 54.1% (2375 of 4388) of the GOLD 0 group. The GOLD 0 group had worse quality of life (mean [SD] St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire total score, 17.0 [18.0] vs 3.8 [6.8] for the never smokers; P < .001) and a lower 6-minute walk distance, and 42.3% (127 of 300) of the GOLD 0 group had CT evidence of emphysema or airway thickening. The FEV1 percent predicted distribution and mean for the GOLD 0 group were lower but still within the normal range for the population. Current smoking was associated with more respiratory symptoms, but former smokers had greater emphysema and gas trapping

  10. (18)F Sodium Fluoride PET/CT in Patients with Prostate Cancer: Quantification of Normal Tissues, Benign Degenerative Lesions, and Malignant Lesions.

    PubMed

    Oldan, Jorge D; Hawkins, A Stewart; Chin, Bennett B

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the range and variability of normal, benign degenerative, and malignant (18)F sodium fluoride ((18)F NaF) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) uptake is important in influencing clinical interpretation. Further, it is essential for the development of realistic semiautomated quantification techniques and simulation models. The purpose of this study is to determine the range of these values in a clinically relevant patient population with prostate cancer. (18)F NaF PET/CT scans were analyzed in patients with prostate cancer (n = 47) referred for evaluation of bone metastases. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values [SUVs (SUVmean and SUVmax)] were made in normal background regions (n = 470) including soft tissues (liver, aorta, bladder, adipose, brain, and paraspinal muscle) and osseous structures (T12 vertebral body, femoral diaphyseal cortex, femoral head medullary space, and ribs). Degenerative joint disease (DJD; n = 281) and bone metastases (n = 159) were identified and quantified by an experienced reader using all scan information including coregistered CT. For normal bone regions, the highest (18)F NaF PET SUVmean occurred in T12 (6.8 ± 1.4) and it also showed the lowest coefficient of variation (cv = 21%). For normal soft tissues, paraspinal muscles showed very low SUVmean (0.70 ± 0.11) and also showed the lowest variability (cv = 16%). Average SUVmean in metastatic lesions is higher than uptake in benign degenerative lesions but values showed a wide variance and overlapping values (16.3 ± 13 vs 11.1 ± 3.8; P < 0.00001). The normal (18)F NaF PET uptake values for prostate cancer patients in normal background, benign degenerative disease, and osseous metastases are comparable to those reported for a general population with a wide variety of diagnoses. These normal ranges, specifically for prostate cancer patients, will aid in clinical interpretation and also help to establish the basis of normal limits in a

  11. 18F Sodium Fluoride PET/CT in Patients with Prostate Cancer: Quantification of Normal Tissues, Benign Degenerative Lesions, and Malignant Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Oldan, Jorge D.; Hawkins, A. Stewart; Chin, Bennett B.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the range and variability of normal, benign degenerative, and malignant 18F sodium fluoride (18F NaF) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) uptake is important in influencing clinical interpretation. Further, it is essential for the development of realistic semiautomated quantification techniques and simulation models. The purpose of this study is to determine the range of these values in a clinically relevant patient population with prostate cancer. 18F NaF PET/CT scans were analyzed in patients with prostate cancer (n = 47) referred for evaluation of bone metastases. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values [SUVs (SUVmean and SUVmax)] were made in normal background regions (n = 470) including soft tissues (liver, aorta, bladder, adipose, brain, and paraspinal muscle) and osseous structures (T12 vertebral body, femoral diaphyseal cortex, femoral head medullary space, and ribs). Degenerative joint disease (DJD; n = 281) and bone metastases (n = 159) were identified and quantified by an experienced reader using all scan information including coregistered CT. For normal bone regions, the highest 18F NaF PET SUVmean occurred in T12 (6.8 ± 1.4) and it also showed the lowest coefficient of variation (cv = 21%). For normal soft tissues, paraspinal muscles showed very low SUVmean (0.70 ± 0.11) and also showed the lowest variability (cv = 16%). Average SUVmean in metastatic lesions is higher than uptake in benign degenerative lesions but values showed a wide variance and overlapping values (16.3 ± 13 vs 11.1 ± 3.8; P < 0.00001). The normal 18F NaF PET uptake values for prostate cancer patients in normal background, benign degenerative disease, and osseous metastases are comparable to those reported for a general population with a wide variety of diagnoses. These normal ranges, specifically for prostate cancer patients, will aid in clinical interpretation and also help to establish the basis of normal limits in a semiautomated data

  12. [Refsum's disease. Epidemiologic, clinical and biological correlation. 6 cases].

    PubMed

    Petit, H; Leys, D; Skjeldal, O H; Caron, J C; Lambert, P; Lehembre, P; Hache, J C

    1986-01-01

    Nine patients with symptoms and signs of Refsum's disease are reported. In 6 a systemic accumulation of phytanic acid was demonstrated, together with low phytanic acid oxidase activity in skin fibroblasts in 5 of them. In 3, no disorder of phytanic acid metabolism was demonstrated. In 3, the diagnosis was made during the pre-clinical period. The disease seems more frequent in Northern France, which agrees with the hypothesis of a genetic mutation which would have taken place in Scandinavia some centuries ago and was subsequently spread by the Vikings. The effects of a dietary treatment on serum phytanic acid levels and clinical disorders are reported. The general condition of the patients improved remarkably but only partially. The diet is unpalatable and in some patients the level of serum phytanic acid increased, due to the mobilization of body fat. Patients with very high levels of phytanic acid might be initially treated by plasmapheresis. For the same reason, the diet should supply enough calories to keep body weight unchanged, and body weight loss whatever its cause should be avoided.

  13. Genetic studies in chronic kidney disease: interpretation and clinical applicability.

    PubMed

    Witasp, Anna; Nordfors, Louise; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Luttropp, Karin; Lindholm, Bengt; Schalling, Martin; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The tools of modern molecular biology are evolving rapidly, resulting in vastly more efficient approaches to illuminating human genetic variations and their effects on common multifactorial disorders such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, candidate gene association studies and genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have generated novel genetic variants in previously unrecognized biological pathways, highlighting disease mechanisms with a potential role in CKD etiology, morbidity and mortality. Nephrologists now need to find ways to make use of these advancements and meet the increasingly stringent requirements for valid study design, data handling and interpretation of genetic studies. Adding to our prior article in this journal, which introduced the basics of genotype-phenotype association studies in CKD, this second article focuses on how to ascertain robust and reproducible findings by applying adequate methodological and statistical approaches to genotype-phenotype studies in CKD populations. Moreover, this review will briefly discuss genotype-based risk prediction, pharmacotherapy, drug target identification and individualized treatment solutions, specifically highlighting potentially important findings in CKD patients. This increased knowledge will hopefully facilitate the exciting transition from conventional clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. However, before this can be accomplished, unsolved issues regarding the complex human genetic architecture as well technical and clinically oriented obstacles will have to be overcome. Additionally, new policies and standardized risk evaluations for genetic testing in the clinical setting will have to be established to guarantee that CKD patients are provided with high-quality genotype-guided counseling that will help to improve their poor outcomes.

  14. Urate predicts rate of clinical decline in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Ascherio, Alberto; LeWitt, Peter A.; Xu, Kui; Eberly, Shirley; Watts, Arthur; Matson, Wayne R.; Marras, Connie; Kieburtz, Karl; Rudolph, Alice; Bogdanov, Mikhail B.; Schwid, Steven R.; Tennis, Marsha; Tanner, Caroline M.; Beal, M. Flint; Lang, Anthony E.; Oakes, David; Fahn, Stanley; Shoulson, Ira; Schwarzschild, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Context The risk of Parkinson disease (PD) and its rate of progression may decline with increasing blood urate, a major antioxidant. Objective To determine whether serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of urate predict clinical progression in patients with PD. Design, Setting, and Participants 800 subjects with early PD enrolled in the DATATOP trial. Pre-treatment urate was measured in serum for 774 subjects and in CSF for 713. Main Outcome Measures Treatment-, age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for clinical disability requiring levodopa therapy, the pre-specified primary endpoint. Results The HR of progressing to endpoint decreased with increasing serum urate (HR for 1 standard deviation increase = 0.82; 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.93). In analyses stratified by α-tocopherol treatment (2,000 IU/day), a decrease in the HR for the primary endpoint was seen only among subjects not treated with α-tocopherol (HR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.62 to 0.89, versus those treated HR = 0.90; 95% CI = 0.75 to 1.08). Results were similar for the rate of change in the United Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). CSF urate was also inversely related to both the primary endpoint (HR for highest versus lowest quintile = 0.65; 95% CI: 0.54 to 0.96) and to the rate of change in UPDRS. As with serum urate, these associations were present only among subjects not treated with α-tocopherol. Conclusion Higher serum and CSF urate at baseline were associated with slower rates of clinical decline. The findings strengthen the link between urate and PD and the rationale for considering CNS urate elevation as a potential strategy to slow PD progression. PMID:19822770

  15. Clinical Markers for Identifying Cholinergic Deficits in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Martijn L.T.M.; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Kotagal, Vikas; Scott, Peter J.H.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Frey, Kirk A.; Albin, Roger L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cholinergic projection systems degeneration is associated with dopamine non-responsive features of Parkinson's disease (PD). Cholinergic deficits are variable in non-demented PD. Identification of cholinergic deficits in PD may help with selection of suitable patients for targeted cholinergic drug treatment in PD. The objective of this retrospective multivariate predictor analysis study was to identify clinical markers indicative of cholinergic deficits in PD patients, as assessed by acetylcholinesterase ([11C]PMP) positron emission tomography. Methods One hundred thirty-seven PD patients (34 female) participated; median modified Hoehn and Yahr score was 2.5 (range 1–4), average age of 65.6 ± 7.4 years, and average duration of motor disease symptoms of 6.0 ± 4.2 years. Subjects were dichotomized as “normocholinergic” or “hypocholinergic” based on a 5th percentile cutoff from normal for the basal forebrain-cortical and pedunculopontine nucleus-thalamic cholinergic projection systems. Previously identified clinical indices of cholinergic denervation were used for statistical prediction of cholinergic deficits. Logistic regression determined which risk factors predicted cholinergic deficits. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were determined for the (combinations of) significant predictor variables. Results There were 49 (35.8%) hypocholinergic PD subjects. The combination of RBD symptoms and fall history showed highest diagnostic accuracy (81.1%) for predicting combined thalamic and cortical cholinergic deficits. A combined assessment of 8.5 meter walk time and lower score on the Montreal cognitive assessment scale provided diagnostic accuracy of 80.7 % for predicting isolated cortical cholinergic denervation. Conclusion Assessment of clinical indices of cholinergic denervation may be useful for identifying suitable subjects for trials of targeted cholinergic drug treatments in PD. PMID:25393613

  16. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: A clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Chaix, Marie A; Andelfinger, Gregor; Khairy, Paul

    2016-02-26

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient follow-up. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel. PMID:26981213

  17. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: A clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Marie A; Andelfinger, Gregor; Khairy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient follow-up. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel. PMID:26981213

  18. Clinical features of rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Zheng, Xing-Ju; Liang, Bin-Miao; Liang, Zong-An

    2015-10-07

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the most common extra-articular manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the lung. This study aimed to identify clinical features of RA-associated ILD (RA-ILD). Patients with RA were retrospectively enrolled and sub-classified as RA-ILD or RA without ILD based on high-resolution computed tomography imaging. Pulmonary function testing parameters and levels of RA-related biomarkers, tumour markers, and acute-phase proteins were compared between the two groups. Logistic regression model was used to assess the strength of association between RA-ILD and clinical features of interest. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to assess potential predictive value of clinical features for detecting RA-ILD. Comparison analysis indicated that the percentage of predicted value of total lung capacity, inspiratory capacity, and diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were reduced in patients with RA-ILD. Tumour markers CA15-3 and CA125 were increased in patients with RA-ILD. Logistic regression analysis revealed that decreased DLCO was related to the increased likelihood of RA-ILD (OR = 0.94, 95%CI = [0.91, 0.98]). The cut-off point at 52.95 percent of predicted value could sensitively discriminate RA patients with or without ILD. Our study suggested that DLCO value could be a useful tool for detecting ILD in patients with RA.

  19. DEGENERATIVE STENOSIS OF THE LUMBAR SPINE

    PubMed Central

    Zylbersztejn, Sérgio; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Rodrigues, Nilson Rodinei; Werlang, Pablo Mariotti; Kisaki, Yorito; Rios, Aldemar Roberto Mieres; Bello, Cesar Dall

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an update on degenerative stenosis of the lumbar spine, which is a common pathological condition among patients over the age of 65 years. The anamnesis and physical examination need to be precise, since radiography often only provides indirect signs. Magnetic resonance imaging is necessary if the symptoms persist. The treatment for lumbar stenosis is a matter of controversy. However, there seems to be some benefit from surgical treatment rather than conservative treatment, such that surgery brings improvements in symptoms and functions for a period of up to two years. PMID:27042635

  20. Updates on chikungunya epidemiology, clinical disease, and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Sam, I-Ching; Kümmerer, Beate M; Chan, Yoke-Fun; Roques, Pierre; Drosten, Christian; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an Aedes-borne alphavirus, historically found in Africa and Asia, where it caused sporadic outbreaks. In 2004, CHIKV reemerged in East Africa and spread globally to cause epidemics, including, for the first time, autochthonous transmission in Europe, the Middle East, and Oceania. The epidemic strains were of the East/Central/South African genotype. Strains of the Asian genotype of CHIKV continued to cause outbreaks in Asia and spread to Oceania and, in 2013, to the Americas. Acute disease, mainly comprising fever, rash, and arthralgia, was previously regarded as self-limiting; however, there is growing evidence of severe but rare manifestations, such as neurological disease. Furthermore, CHIKV appears to cause a significant burden of long-term morbidity due to persistent arthralgia. Diagnostic assays have advanced greatly in recent years, although there remains a need for simple, accurate, and affordable tests for the developing countries where CHIKV is most prevalent. This review focuses on recent important work on the epidemiology, clinical disease and diagnostics of CHIKV.

  1. Disease-specific clinical problems associated with the subchondral bone.

    PubMed

    Pape, Dietrich; Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elisaveta; van Dijk, C Niek; Madry, Henning

    2010-04-01

    The subchondral bone is involved in a variety of diseases affecting both the articular cartilage and bone. Osteochondral defects in distinct locations and of variable sizes are the final results of different etiologies. These include traumatic osteochondral defects, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Traumatic osteochondral defects are caused by osteochondral fractures, separating an osteochondral fragment that includes articular cartilage and both subchondral and trabecular bone from the joint surface. In osteochondritis dissecans, the disease originates in the subchondral bone and secondarily affects the articular cartilage. Location, stage, size, and depth of osteochondral lesions play a role in the treatment of traumatic osteochondral defects and osteochondritis dissecans. Surgical options include fragment refixation, transplantation of osteochondral autografts, or bone restoration by impacted cancellous bone grafts combined with autologous chondrocyte transplantation. An insufficiency fracture of the subchondral bone may be the initiating factor of what was formerly believed to be a spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK). Recent histopathological studies suggest that each stage of SPONK reflects different types of bone repair reactions following a fracture of the subchondral bone plate. Osteoarthritis is a disease that does affect not only the articular cartilage, but also the subchondral bone. Reconstructive surgical techniques aim at preserving joint function, inducing fibrocartilaginous repair, and at correcting malalignment. This review summarizes the current status of the clinical treatment of traumatic osteochondral defects, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis as they affect the subchondral bone region and its adjacent structures.

  2. Hemineglect and seizures in Binswanger's disease: clinical-pathological report.

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, S A; Tatemichi, T K; Hair, L S; Goldman, J E; Camac, A; Mohr, J P

    1993-01-01

    The range of clinical effects from ischaemic damage to white matter in Binswanger's disease has not been fully characterised. Although focal deficits and seizures occur frequently, superficial infarcts often coexist, making the cause of these symptoms unclear. The case of a 69 year old woman is described who presented with acute left sided weakness and hemispatial neglect, followed a year later by electrographically documented seizures originating from the right hemisphere. Interim examinations showed bilateral pyramidal signs and mild intellectual decline. Serial CT and MRI studies showed bilateral diffuse ischaemic lesions of the cerebral white matter and old left sided lacunar infarcts but no evidence of acute infarction. Post-mortem examination showed gliosis and demyelination of the deep white matter which spared the subcortical arcuate fibres; this is consistent with Binswanger's disease. The neocortex was normal. This case and previous reports indicate that focal symptoms typically referable to the grey matter, including hemineglect and seizures, may occur as a manifestation of subcortical ischaemic injury to white matter in Binswanger's disease. Images PMID:8331360

  3. Correlations of clinical, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological features in Hirayama disease

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Ming-Feng; Chang, Hong-Shiu; Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Ro, Long-Sun; Chu, Chun-Che; Kuo, Hung-Chou; Lyu, Rong-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hirayama disease (HD) is characterized by development of asymmetric forearm muscle atrophy during adolescence with or without focal cervical spinal cord atrophy. The purpose of this study is to assess the correlation of clinical symptoms, disease progression, and electrophysiological findings with cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. The medical records, cervical spine MRIs, and electrophysiological findings of 44 HD patients were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Denervation changes in any single C5 to C7 root-innervated muscle (deltoid, biceps, triceps, or extensor digitorum communis) occurred more frequently in the 25 patients with cord atrophy than the 19 patients without cord atrophy (88% vs 53%, P = 0.02). Onset age, duration of disease progression, neurological examinations, nerve conduction study, and electromyographic findings from individual muscles were similar between patient groups. Compared with HD patients without cord atrophy, HD patients with cord atrophy experience a more severe denervation change in C5 to C7 root-innervated muscles. PMID:27428223

  4. Tarui disease and distal glycogenoses: clinical and genetic update.

    PubMed

    Toscano, A; Musumeci, O

    2007-10-01

    Phosphofructokinase deficiency (Tarui disease) was the first disorder recognized to directly affect glycolysis. Since the discovery of the disease, in 1965, a wide range of biochemical, physiological and molecular studies have greatly contributed to our knowledge concerning not only phosphofructokinase function in normal muscle but also on the general control of glycolysis and glycogen metabolism. Studies on phosphofructokinase deficiency vastly enriched the field of glycogen storage diseases, making a relevant improvement also in the molecular genetic area. So far, more than one hundred patients have been described with prominent clinical symptoms characterized by muscle cramps, exercise intolerance, rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria, often associated with haemolytic anaemia and hyperuricaemia. The muscle phosphofructokinase gene is located on chromosome 12 and about 20 mutations have been described. Other glycogenoses have been recognised in the distal part of the glycolytic pathway: these are infrequent but some may induce muscle cramps, exercise intolerance and rhabdomyolysis. Phosphoglycerate Kinase, Phosphoglycerate Mutase, Lactate Dehydrogenase, beta-Enolase and Aldolase A deficiencies have been described as distal glycogenoses. From the molecular point of view, the majority of these enzyme deficiencies are sustained by "private" mutations. PMID:18421897

  5. Clinical potential of aclidinium bromide in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    Three long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) are now available in Europe, providing clinicians and patients with a choice of interventions, which is important in COPD, which is clinically a heterogeneous disease. The first LAMA, tiotropium, has been widely used over the last decade as a once-daily maintenance therapy in stable COPD to improve patients' health-related quality of life and to reduce the risk of exacerbations. Administered via the HandiHaler(®) device, it is safe and well tolerated. Another new once-daily LAMA, glycopyrronium, has also been shown to improve health status and reduce exacerbations, and is well tolerated. The subject of this review is a third LAMA, aclidinium bromide, which was approved as a twice-daily maintenance bronchodilator treatment. In the pivotal Phase III clinical trials, patients receiving aclidinium achieved significantly greater improvements in lung function, reductions in breathlessness, and improvements in health status compared with placebo, for up to 24 weeks. In continuation studies, these improvements were sustained for up to 52 weeks. Pooled data showed exacerbation frequency was significantly reduced with aclidinium versus placebo. Preclinical and pharmacological studies demonstrating low systemic bioavailability and a low propensity to induce cardiac arrhythmias were translated into a favorable tolerability profile in the clinical trial program - the adverse event profile of aclidinium was similar to placebo, with a low incidence of anticholinergic and cardiac adverse events. While additional studies are needed to evaluate its full clinical potential, aclidinium is an important part of this recent expansion of LAMA therapeutic options, providing clinicians and patients with an effective and well-tolerated COPD treatment. PMID:25848244

  6. Clinical potential of aclidinium bromide in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    Three long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) are now available in Europe, providing clinicians and patients with a choice of interventions, which is important in COPD, which is clinically a heterogeneous disease. The first LAMA, tiotropium, has been widely used over the last decade as a once-daily maintenance therapy in stable COPD to improve patients’ health-related quality of life and to reduce the risk of exacerbations. Administered via the HandiHaler® device, it is safe and well tolerated. Another new once-daily LAMA, glycopyrronium, has also been shown to improve health status and reduce exacerbations, and is well tolerated. The subject of this review is a third LAMA, aclidinium bromide, which was approved as a twice-daily maintenance bronchodilator treatment. In the pivotal Phase III clinical trials, patients receiving aclidinium achieved significantly greater improvements in lung function, reductions in breathlessness, and improvements in health status compared with placebo, for up to 24 weeks. In continuation studies, these improvements were sustained for up to 52 weeks. Pooled data showed exacerbation frequency was significantly reduced with aclidinium versus placebo. Preclinical and pharmacological studies demonstrating low systemic bioavailability and a low propensity to induce cardiac arrhythmias were translated into a favorable tolerability profile in the clinical trial program – the adverse event profile of aclidinium was similar to placebo, with a low incidence of anticholinergic and cardiac adverse events. While additional studies are needed to evaluate its full clinical potential, aclidinium is an important part of this recent expansion of LAMA therapeutic options, providing clinicians and patients with an effective and well-tolerated COPD treatment. PMID:25848244

  7. Lumpy Skin Disease in Jordan: Disease Emergence, Clinical Signs, Complications and Preliminary-associated Economic Losses.

    PubMed

    Abutarbush, S M; Ababneh, M M; Al Zoubi, I G; Al Sheyab, O M; Al Zoubi, M G; Alekish, M O; Al Gharabat, R J

    2015-10-01

    The objectives of this study are to report the emergence of lumpy skin disease (LSD) in Jordan and associated clinical signs, complications and preliminary economic losses. In mid-April, 2013, two adult dairy cattle developed clinical signs suggestive of LSD and were confirmed as positive by PCR. The two cases were in Bani Kenanah district, Irbid governorate, on the Jordanian border of Israel and Syria. The disease spread rapidly to all the districts of Irbid governorate. During the month following the emergence of the disease, data were collected related to the epidemiology of the disease and the numbers of affected cattle on the premises. Forty-one dairy cattle holdings were surveyed. The morbidity rate ranged from 3% to 100%, (Mean = 35.1%, SD ±28.5%). The mortality rate ranged from 0% to 20%, (Mean = 1.3%, SD ±4.4%). The case fatality rate ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean = 6.2%, SD ±22%). The overall morbidity rate was 26%, mortality rate 1.9% and case fatality rate 7.5%. Skin nodules, anorexia, decreased milk production and decreased body weight were common clinical signs, while mastitis and myiasis were seen as complications in a few affected animals. Decreased body weight ranged from 0% to 80%, (Mean = 23.1%, SD ±15.7%). Decreased milk production ranged from 0% to 100%, (Mean = 51.5%, SD ±22.2%). Affected cattle were treated mainly with broad-spectrum antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. The cost of treatment ranged from 0 to 84.3 British Pound/animal, (Mean = 27.9 GBP, SD ±22.5 GBP). LSD continues to spread through the Middle East region and poses a serious threat to the rest of Asia and Europe. International collaboration and communication is warranted to prevent the further spread of the disease to the rest of Asia and Europe.

  8. Clinical presentation and management of severe Ebola virus disease.

    PubMed

    West, T Eoin; von Saint André-von Arnim, Amélie

    2014-11-01

    Clinicians caring for patients infected with Ebola virus must be familiar not only with screening and infection control measures but also with management of severe disease. By integrating experience from several Ebola epidemics with best practices for managing critical illness, this report focuses on the clinical presentation and management of severely ill infants, children, and adults with Ebola virus disease. Fever, fatigue, vomiting, diarrhea, and anorexia are the most common symptoms of the 2014 West African outbreak. Profound fluid losses from the gastrointestinal tract result in volume depletion, metabolic abnormalities (including hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and hypocalcemia), shock, and organ failure. Overt hemorrhage occurs infrequently. The case fatality rate in West Africa is at least 70%, and individuals with respiratory, neurological, or hemorrhagic symptoms have a higher risk of death. There is no proven antiviral agent to treat Ebola virus disease, although several experimental treatments may be considered. Even in the absence of antiviral therapies, intensive supportive care has the potential to markedly blunt the high case fatality rate reported to date. Optimal treatment requires conscientious correction of fluid and electrolyte losses. Additional management considerations include searching for coinfection or superinfection; treatment of shock (with intravenous fluids and vasoactive agents), acute kidney injury (with renal replacement therapy), and respiratory failure (with invasive mechanical ventilation); provision of nutrition support, pain and anxiety control, and psychosocial support; and the use of strategies to reduce complications of critical illness. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation may be appropriate in certain circumstances, but extracorporeal life support is not advised. Among other ethical issues, patients' medical needs must be carefully weighed against healthcare worker safety and infection control concerns. However, meticulous attention

  9. Clinical presentation and management of severe Ebola virus disease.

    PubMed

    West, T Eoin; von Saint André-von Arnim, Amélie

    2014-11-01

    Clinicians caring for patients infected with Ebola virus must be familiar not only with screening and infection control measures but also with management of severe disease. By integrating experience from several Ebola epidemics with best practices for managing critical illness, this report focuses on the clinical presentation and management of severely ill infants, children, and adults with Ebola virus disease. Fever, fatigue, vomiting, diarrhea, and anorexia are the most common symptoms of the 2014 West African outbreak. Profound fluid losses from the gastrointestinal tract result in volume depletion, metabolic abnormalities (including hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and hypocalcemia), shock, and organ failure. Overt hemorrhage occurs infrequently. The case fatality rate in West Africa is at least 70%, and individuals with respiratory, neurological, or hemorrhagic symptoms have a higher risk of death. There is no proven antiviral agent to treat Ebola virus disease, although several experimental treatments may be considered. Even in the absence of antiviral therapies, intensive supportive care has the potential to markedly blunt the high case fatality rate reported to date. Optimal treatment requires conscientious correction of fluid and electrolyte losses. Additional management considerations include searching for coinfection or superinfection; treatment of shock (with intravenous fluids and vasoactive agents), acute kidney injury (with renal replacement therapy), and respiratory failure (with invasive mechanical ventilation); provision of nutrition support, pain and anxiety control, and psychosocial support; and the use of strategies to reduce complications of critical illness. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation may be appropriate in certain circumstances, but extracorporeal life support is not advised. Among other ethical issues, patients' medical needs must be carefully weighed against healthcare worker safety and infection control concerns. However, meticulous attention

  10. Clinical approaches towards asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease based on the heterogeneity of disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hizawa, N

    2016-05-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are each heterogeneous disease classifications that include several clinical and pathophysiological phenotypes. This heterogeneity complicates characterization of each disease and, in some cases, hinders the selection of appropriate treatment. Therefore, in recent years, emphasis has been placed on improving our understanding of the various phenotypes of asthma and of COPD and identifying biomarkers for each phenotype. Likewise, the concept of the endotype has been gaining acceptance; an endotype is a disease subtype that is defined by unique or distinctive functional or pathophysiological mechanisms. Endotypes of asthma or COPD may be primarily characterized by increased susceptibility to type 2 inflammation, increased susceptibility to viral infections, bacterial colonization or impaired lung development. The 'Dutch hypothesis' is as follows: gene variants underlying particular endotypes interact with detrimental environmental stimuli (e.g. smoking, viral infection and air pollution) and contribute to the ultimate development of asthma, COPD or both. Novel approaches that involve multidimensional assessment should facilitate identification and management of the components that generate this heterogeneity. Ultimately, patients with chronic inflammatory lung diseases may be treated based on these endotypes as determined by the respective biomarkers that correspond to individual endotypes instead of on disease labels such as asthma, COPD or even asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). PMID:27009427

  11. Bone disease in multiple myeloma and precursor disease: novel diagnostic approaches and implications on clinical management.

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Minter, Alex R; Korde, Neha; Tan, Est