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Sample records for degenerative spondylolisthesis ds

  1. Facet Joint Osteoarthritis Affects Spinal Segmental Motion in Degenerative Spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Kitanaka, Shigeyuki; Takatori, Ryota; Arai, Yuji; Nagae, Masateru; Tonomura, Hitoshi; Mikami, Yasuo; Inoue, Nozomu; Ogura, Taku; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2018-06-15

    This is a retrospective clinical case series (case-control study). To clarify the influence of facet joint osteoarthritis (FJOA) on the pathology of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) using in vivo 3-dimensional image analysis. There are no radical treatments to prevent progression of DS in patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis associated with DS. Therefore, an effective treatment method based on the pathology of DS should be developed. In total, 50 patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis involving L4/5 who underwent dynamic computed tomography were divided into 2 groups: with DS [spondylolisthesis (Sp) group; 12 male, 14 female; mean age, 74 y]; and without DS (non-Sp group; 15 male, 9 female; mean age, 70 y). Degeneration of the intervertebral disk and FJOA at L4/5 were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging. Disk and intervertebral foramen heights, the distance between the craniocaudal edges of the facet joint, and the interspinous distance were measured on dynamic computed tomographic images. Also, in vivo 3-dimensional segmental motion was evaluated using the volume merge method. There were no significant differences in degenerative findings for the intervertebral disk; however, progressive FJOA was detected in the Sp group. Dynamic changes in the distance between the craniocaudal edges of the facet joints were significantly larger in the Sp group. In this study, progressive FJOA and larger segmental motion in the distance between the craniocaudal edges of the facet joints were found in the Sp group. We clarified for the first time that DS involves ligament laxity due to FJOA that affects spinal segmental motion in vivo. We consider that a treatment method based on FJOA would be useful for treating patients with DS. Level IV.

  2. Risk factors for degenerative spondylolisthesis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    DeVine, John G.; Schenk-Kisser, Jeannette M.; Skelly, Andrea C.

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Systematic literature review. Rationale: Many authors have postulated on various risk factors associated with the pathogenesis of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS), yet controversies regarding those risk factors still exist. Objective: To critically appraise and summarize evidence on risk factors for DS. Methods: Articles published before October 15, 2011, were systematically reviewed using PubMed and bibliographies of key articles. Each article was subject to quality rating and was analyzed by two independent reviewers. Results: From 382 citations, 30 underwent full-text review. Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria. All but two were considered poor quality. Female gender and higher facet joint angle were consistently associated with an increased risk of DS across multiple studies. Multiple studies also consistently reported no association between back pain and prolonged occupational sitting. Associations between age, parity, lumbosacral angle, lumbar lordosis, facet joint tropism, and pelvic inclination angles were inconsistent. Conclusions: There appears to be consistent evidence to suggest that the risk of DS increases with increasing age and is greater for females and people with a greater facet joint angle. PMID:23230415

  3. Nursing review of diagnosis and treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.; Hollingsworth, Renee D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the lumbar spine, degenerative spondylolisthesis or degenerative (not traumatic) slippage of one vertebral body over another is divided into 4 grades – grade I (25%), grade II (50%), grade III (75%), and grade IV (100%). Dynamic X-rays, magnetic resonance (MR), and computed tomography (CT) scans document the slip secondary to arthritic changes of the facet joint plus stenosis, ossification of the yellow ligament, disc herniations, and synovial cysts. MR best demonstrates soft tissue pathology whereas CT better delineates ossific/calcified disease. Methods: Grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis, typically found at the L4–L5 level followed by L3–L4 and L5S1, is more common in females (ratio 2:1) over the age of 65. Symptoms include radiculopathy (root pain) and neurogenic claudication (e.g., pain with ambulation, requiring the patient to stop, rest, sit down). Symptoms/signs may include unilateral/bilateral radiculopathy and uni/multifocal motor, reflex, and sensory deficits in. Some may also present with a cauda equina syndrome (e.g., paraparesis/sphincter dysfunction). Results: Surgery for grade I-II spondylolisthesis may include laminectomy alone, laminectomy/noninstrumented fusion or with an instrumented fusion. Older patients with osteoporosis are more likely to have no fusion or a noninstrumented fusion. All fusions utilize autograft harvested from the laminectomy that may or may not be combined with a bone graft expander (to increase the fusion mass) combined with autogenous bone marrow aspirate. The fusion mass is placed over the transverse processes following decortication. Conclusions: Patients with multilevel spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis may require decompressive lumbar laminectomies alone or in combination with noninstrumented or instrumented fusions. PMID:29119044

  4. Radiofrequency neurotomy for treatment of low back pain in patients with minor degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Klessinger, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis is one of the major causes for low back pain. Morphological abnormalities of the zygapophysial joints are a predisposing factor in the development of degenerative spondylolisthesis. Therefore, radiofrequency neurotomy seems to be a rational therapy. To determine if radiofrequency neurotomy is effective for patients with low back pain and degenerative spondylolisthesis. Retrospective practice audit. Single spine center Charts of all patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis who underwent treatment with radiofrequency neurotomy during a time period of 3 years were reviewed. Only patients with magnetic resonance imaging confirming the diagnosis were included. Patients with a lumbar spine operation in their history, patients with neurological deficits, and patients with a follow-up less than 3 months were excluded. Patients were treated with lumbar radiofrequency neurotomy. Positive treatment response was defined as at least a 50% reduction in pain. A radiofrequency neurotomy was only performed after positive diagnostic medial branch blocks. During a time period of 3 years, 1,490 patients were treated with lumbar radiofrequency neurotomy. Forty of these patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis were included. A significant pain reduction was achieved in 65 % of the patients. This audit is retrospective and observational, and therefore does not represent a high level of evidence. However, to our knowledge, since this information has not been previously reported and no specific nonoperative treatment for lumbar pain in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis exists, it appears to be the best available research upon which to recommend treatment and to plan higher quality studies. Zygapophysial joints are a possible source of pain in patients with spondylolisthesis. Radiofrequency neurotomy is a rational, specific nonoperative therapy in addition to other nonoperative therapy methods with a success rate of 65%. This is the first

  5. Thoracic Inlet Parameters for Degenerative Cervical Spondylolisthesis Imaging Measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanbing; Wang, Xiao-Tao; Zhu, Lei; Wei, Yu-Xi

    2018-04-05

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to explore the diagnostic value of sagittal measurement of thoracic inlet parameters for degenerative cervical spondylolisthesis (DCS). MATERIAL AND METHODS We initially included 65 patients with DCS and the same number of health people as the control group by using cervical radiograph evaluations. We analyzed the x-ray and computer tomographic (CT) data in prone and standing position at the same time. Measurement of cervical sagittal parameters was carried out in a standardized supine position. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate these parameters as a diagnostic index for DCS. RESULTS There were 60 cases enrolled in the DCS group, and 62 cases included in the control group. The T1 slope and thoracic inlet angle (TIA) were significantly greater for the DCS group compared to the control group (24.33±2.85º versus 19.59±2.04º, p=0.00; 76.11±9.82º versus 72.86±7.31º, p=0.03, respectively). We observed no significant difference for the results of the neck tilt (NT), C2-C7 angle in the control and the DSC group (p>0.05). Logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve revealed that preoperative T1 slope of more than 22.0º showed significantly diagnostic value for the DCS group (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS Patients with preoperative sagittal imbalance of thoracic inlet have a statistically significant increased risk of DCS. T1 slope of more than 22.0º showed significantly diagnostic value for the incidence of DCS.

  6. Higher Improvement in Patient-Reported Outcomes Can Be Achieved After Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Clinical and Radiographic Degenerative Spondylolisthesis Classification Type D Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Xu, Liang; Qiu, Yong; Chen, Zhong-Hui; Zhou, Qing-Shuang; Li, Song; Sun, Xu

    2018-06-01

    Clinical and radiographic degenerative spondylolisthesis (CARDS) classification defines a distinct subset of patients with kyphotic angulation at the involved segment (type D). Research using CARDS classification to investigate motion characteristics at involved segments or patient-related outcomes (PROs) following surgical intervention is sparse. We investigated the relationship between CARDS type D spondylolisthesis and dynamic instability and PROs in type D versus non-type D spondylolisthesis. We reviewed consecutive patients who received transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for L4-5 spondylolisthesis between 2009 and 2015. Patients were assigned into type D and non-type D groups. Translational motion was determined by upright lumbar lateral radiography with supine sagittal magnetic resonance imaging or flexion and extension radiography. Demographics, radiographic parameters, and PROs were evaluated. Type D and non-type D groups comprised 34 and 163 patients, respectively. Compared with non-type D, type D group was characterized by lordotic angulation loss and higher degree of olisthesis on upright radiographs and demonstrated higher translational motion on upright lumbar lateral radiography with supine sagittal magnetic resonance imaging analysis. After surgery, mean reduction rate was significantly higher in type D group; type D had less slippage, but differences in slip angle and disc height were not significant. Preoperative Oswestry Disability Index and visual analog scale for back pain scores were higher in type D group. Type D spondylolisthesis and dynamic instability were associated with achieving minimal clinically important differences in PROs. CARDS type D spondylolisthesis is a distinct subset associated with dynamic instability and worse PROs. Higher improvement in PROs can be achieved in CARDS type D spondylolisthesis after surgery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nonsurgically managed patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis: a 10- to 18-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, S; Ijiri, K; Hayashi, K

    2000-10-01

    Controversy exists concerning the indications for surgery and choice of surgical procedure for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis. The goals of this study were to determine the clinical course of nonsurgically managed patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis as well as the indications for surgery. A total of 145 nonsurgically managed patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis were examined annually for a minimum of 10 years follow-up evaluation. Radiographic changes, changes in clinical symptoms, and functional prognosis were surveyed. Progressive spondylolisthesis was observed in 49 patients (34%). There was no correlation between changes in clinical symptoms and progression of spondylolisthesis. The intervertebral spaces of the slipped segments were decreased significantly in size during follow-up examination in patients in whom no progression was found. Low-back pain improved following a decrease in the total intervertebral space size. A total of 84 (76%) of 110 patients who had no neurological deficits at initial examination remained without neurological deficit after 10 years of follow up. Twenty-nine (83%) of the 35 patients who had neurological symptoms, such as intermittent claudication or vesicorectal disorder, at initial examination and refused surgery experienced neurological deterioration. The final prognosis for these patients was very poor. Low-back pain was improved by restabilization. Conservative treatment is useful for patients who have low-back pain with or without pain in the lower extremities. Surgical intervention is indicated for patients with neurological symptoms including intermittent claudication or vesicorectal disorder, provided that a good functional outcome can be achieved.

  8. Surgical Treatment of Spinal Stenosis with and without Degenerative Spondylolisthesis: Cost-Effectiveness after 2 Years

    PubMed Central

    Tosteson, Anna N.A.; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Skinner, Jonathan S.; Herkowitz, Harry; Albert, Todd; Boden, Scott D.; Bridwell, Keith; Longley, Michael; Andersson, Gunnar B.; Blood, Emily A.; Grove, Margaret R.; Weinstein, James N.

    2009-01-01

    Background The SPORT (Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial) reported favorable surgery outcomes over 2 years among patients with stenosis with and without degenerative spondylolisthesis, but the economic value of these surgeries is uncertain. Objective To assess the short-term cost-effectiveness of spine surgery relative to nonoperative care for stenosis alone and for stenosis with spondylolisthesis. Design Prospective cohort study. Data Sources Resource utilization, productivity, and EuroQol EQ-5D score measured at 6 weeks and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment among SPORT participants. Target Population Patients with image-confirmed spinal stenosis, with and without degenerative spondylolisthesis. Time Horizon 2 years. Perspective Societal. Intervention Nonoperative care or surgery (primarily decompressive laminectomy for stenosis and decompressive laminectomy with fusion for stenosis associated with degenerative spondylolisthesis). Outcome Measures Cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Results of Base-Case Analysis Among 634 patients with stenosis, 394 (62%) had surgery, most often decompressive laminectomy (320 of 394 [81%]). Stenosis surgeries improved health to a greater extent than nonoperative care (QALY gain, 0.17 [95% CI, 0.12 to 0.22]) at a cost of $77 600 (CI, $49 600 to $120 000) per QALY gained. Among 601 patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis, 368 (61%) had surgery, most including fusion (344 of 368 [93%]) and most with instrumentation (269 of 344 [78%]). Degenerative spondylolisthesis surgeries significantly improved health versus non-operative care (QALY gain, 0.23 [CI, 0.19 to 0.27]), at a cost of $115 600 (CI, $90 800 to $144 900) per QALY gained. Result of Sensitivity Analysis Surgery cost markedly affected the value of surgery. Limitation The study used self-reported utilization data, 2-year time horizon, and as-treated analysis to address treatment non-adherence among randomly assigned participants. Conclusion The

  9. A comparison of film and computer workstation measurements of degenerative spondylolisthesis: intraobserver and interobserver reliability.

    PubMed

    Bolesta, Michael J; Winslow, Lauren; Gill, Kevin

    2010-06-01

    A comparison of measurements of degenerative spondylolisthesis made on film and on computer workstations. To determine whether the 2 methodologies are comparable in some of the parameters used to assess lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Digital radiology has been replacing analog radiographs. In scoliosis, several studies have shown that measurements made on digital and analog films are similar and that they are also similar to those made on computer workstations. Such work has not been done in spondylolisthesis. Twenty-four cases of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis were identified from our clinic practice. Three observers measured anterior displacement, sagittal rotation, and lumbar lordosis on digital films using the same protractor and pencil. The same parameters were measured on the same studies at clinical workstations. All measurements were repeated 2 weeks later. A statistician determined the intra and interobserver reliability of the 2 measurement methods and the degree of agreement between the 2 methods. The differences between the first and second readings did reach statistical significance in some cases, but none of them were large enough to be clinically meaningful. The interclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were >or=0.80 except for one (0.67). The difference among the 3 observers was similarly statistically significant in a few instances but not enough to influence clinical decisions and with good ICCs (0.67 and better). Similarly, the differences in the 2 methods were small, and ICCs ranged from 0.69 to 0.98. This study supports the use of computer workstation measurements in lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. The parameters used in this study were comparable, whether measured on film or at clinical workstations.

  10. The effects of muscle weakness on degenerative spondylolisthesis: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rui; Niu, Wen-Xin; Zeng, Zhi-Li; Tong, Jian-Hua; Zhen, Zhi-Wei; Zhou, Shuang; Yu, Yan; Cheng, Li-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Whether muscle weakness is a cause, or result, of degenerative spondylolisthesis is not currently well understood. Little biomechanical evidence is available to offer an explanation for the mechanism behind exercise therapy. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the effects of back muscle weakness on degenerative spondylolisthesis and to tease out the biomechanical mechanism of exercise therapy. A nonlinear 3-D finite element model of L3-L5 was constructed. Forces representing global back muscles and global abdominal muscles, follower loads and an upper body weight were applied. The force of the global back muscles was reduced to 75%, 50% and 25% to simulate different degrees of back muscle weakness. An additional boundary condition which represented the loads from other muscles after exercise therapy was set up to keep the spine in a neutral standing position. Shear forces, intradiscal pressure, facet joint forces and von Mises equivalent stresses in the annuli were calculated. The intervertebral rotations of L3-L4 and L4-L5 were within the range of in vitro experimental data. The calculated intradiscal pressure of L4-L5 for standing was 0.57MPa, which is similar to previous in vivo data. With the back muscles were reduced to 75%, 50% and 25% force, the shear force moved increasingly in a ventral direction. Due to the additional stabilizing force and moment provided by boundary conditions, the shear force varied less than 15%. Reducing the force of global back muscles might lead to, or aggravate, degenerative spondylolisthesis with forward slipping from biomechanical point of view. Exercise therapy may improve the spinal biomechanical environment. However, the intrinsic correlation between back muscle weakness and degenerative spondylolisthesis needs more clinical in vivo study and biomechanical analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. SPORT: Radiographic Predictors of Clinical Outcomes Following Operative or Non-operative Treatment of Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Adam M.; Lurie, Jon D.; Blood, Emily A.; Frymoyer, John W.; Braeutigam, Heike; An, Howard; Girardi, Federico P.; Weinstein, James N.

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Subgroup analyses according to treatment received. OBJECTIVES To evaluate whether baseline radiographic findings predicted outcomes in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA The SPORT combined randomized and observational DS cohorts. METHODS The Meyerding listhesis grade was determined on the neutral radiograph (n=222). Patients were classified as having low disk height if disk height was less than 5 mm. Flexion-extension radiographs (n=185) were evaluated for mobility. Those with greater than 10° rotation or 4mm translation were considered Hypermobile. Changes in outcome measures were compared between listhesis (Grade 1 vs. Grade 2), disk height (Low vs. Normal) and mobility (Stable vs. Hypermobile) groups using longitudinal regression models adjusted for potential confounders. Outcome measures included SF-36 bodily pain (BP) and physical function (PF) scales, Oswestry disability index (ODI), stenosis bothersomeness index (SBI), and low back pain bothersomeness scale. RESULTS Overall, 86% had a Grade 1 listhesis, 78% had Normal disk height, and 73% were Stable. Baseline symptom severity was similar between groups. Overall, surgery patients improved more than patients treated non-operatively. At one year, outcomes were similar in surgery patients across listhesis, disk height, and mobility groups (ODI: Grade 1 -23.7 vs. Grade 2 -23.3, p=0.90; Normal disk height-23.5 vs. Low disk height -21.9, p=0.66; Stable -21.6 vs. Hypermobile -25.2, p=0.30). Among those treated nonoperatively, Grade 1 patients improved more than Grade 2 patients (BP +13.1 vs. -4.9, p=0.019; ODI -8.0 vs. +4.8, p=0.010 at 1 year), and Hypermobile patients improved more than Stable patients (ODI -15.2 vs -6.6, p=0.041; SBI -7.8 vs -2.7, p=0.002 at 1 year). DISCUSSION Regardless of listhesis grade, disk height or mobility, patients who had surgery improved more than those treated non-operatively. These differences were due, in part, to differences

  12. Predominant Leg Pain Is Associated With Better Surgical Outcomes in Degenerative Spondylolisthesis and Spinal Stenosis: Results from the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT)

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Adam; Blood, Emily; Lurie, Jon; Abdu, William; Sengupta, Dilip; Frymoyer, John W.; Weinstein, James

    2010-01-01

    Study Design As-treated analysis of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT). Objective To compare baseline characteristics and surgical and nonoperative outcomes in degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) and spinal stenosis (SpS) patients stratified by predominant pain location (i.e. leg vs. back). Summary of Background Data Evidence suggests that degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) and spinal stenosis (SpS) patients with predominant leg pain may have better surgical outcomes than patients with predominant low back pain (LBP). Methods The DS cohort included 591 patients (62% underwent surgery), and the SpS cohort included 615 patients (62% underwent surgery). Patients were classified as leg pain predominant, LBP predominant or having equal pain according to baseline pain scores. Baseline characteristics were compared between the three predominant pain location groups within each diagnostic category, and changes in surgical and nonoperative outcome scores were compared through two years. Longitudinal regression models including baseline covariates were used to control for confounders. Results Among DS patients at baseline, 34% had predominant leg pain, 26% had predominant LBP, and 40% had equal pain. Similarly, 32% of SpS patients had predominant leg pain, 26% had predominant LBP, and 42% had equal pain. DS and SpS patients with predominant leg pain had baseline scores indicative of less severe symptoms. Leg pain predominant DS and SpS patients treated surgically improved significantly more than LBP predominant patients on all primary outcome measures at one and two years. Surgical outcomes for the equal pain groups were intermediate to those of the predominant leg pain and LBP groups. The differences in nonoperative outcomes were less consistent. Conclusions Predominant leg pain patients improved significantly more with surgery than predominant LBP patients. However, predominant LBP patients still improved significantly more with surgery than with

  13. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for spondylolisthesis and degenerative spondylosis: 5-year results.

    PubMed

    Park, Yung; Ha, Joong Won; Lee, Yun Tae; Sung, Na Young

    2014-06-01

    Multiple studies have reported favorable short-term results after treatment of spondylolisthesis and other degenerative lumbar diseases with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. However, to our knowledge, results at a minimum of 5 years have not been reported. We determined (1) changes to the Oswestry Disability Index, (2) frequency of radiographic fusion, (3) complications and reoperations, and (4) the learning curve associated with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion at minimum 5-year followup. We reviewed our first 124 patients who underwent minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion to treat low-grade spondylolisthesis and degenerative lumbar diseases and did not need a major deformity correction. This represented 63% (124 of 198) of the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion procedures we performed for those indications during the study period (2003-2007). Eighty-three (67%) patients had complete 5-year followup. Plain radiographs and CT scans were evaluated by two reviewers. Trends of surgical time, blood loss, and hospital stay over time were examined by logarithmic curve fit-regression analysis to evaluate the learning curve. At 5 years, mean Oswestry Disability Index improved from 60 points preoperatively to 24 points and 79 of 83 patients (95%) had improvement of greater than 10 points. At 5 years, 67 of 83 (81%) achieved radiographic fusion, including 64 of 72 patients (89%) who had single-level surgery. Perioperative complications occurred in 11 of 124 patients (9%), and another surgical procedure was performed in eight of 124 patients (6.5%) involving the index level and seven of 124 patients (5.6%) at adjacent levels. There were slowly decreasing trends of surgical time and hospital stay only in single-level surgery and almost no change in intraoperative blood loss over time, suggesting a challenging learning curve. Oswestry Disability Index scores improved for patients with spondylolisthesis

  14. Descriptive epidemiology and prior healthcare utilization of patients in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial's (SPORT) three observational cohorts: disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Justin; Lurie, Jon D; Tosteson, Tor D; Hanscom, Brett; Abdu, William A; Birkmeyer, Nancy J O; Herkowitz, Harry; Weinstein, James

    2006-04-01

    Prospective observational cohorts. To describe sociodemographic and clinical features, and nonoperative (medical) resource utilization before enrollment, in patients who are candidates for surgical intervention for intervertebral disc herniation (IDH), spinal stenosis (SpS), and degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) according to SPORT criteria. Intervertebral disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and degenerative spondylolisthesis with stenosis are the three most common diagnoses of low back and leg symptoms for which surgery is performed. There is a paucity of descriptive literature examining large patient cohorts for the relationships among baseline characteristics and medical resource utilization with these three diagnoses. The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) conducts three randomized and three observational cohort studies of surgical and nonsurgical treatments for patients with IDH, SpS, and DS. Baseline data include demographic information, prior treatments received, and functional status measured by SF-36 and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI-AAOS/Modems version). The data presented represent all 1,411 patients (743 IDH, 365 SpS, 303 DS) enrolled in the SPORT observational cohorts. Multiple logistic regression was used to generate independent predictors of utilization adjusted for sociodemographic variables, diagnosis, and duration of symptoms. The average age was 41 years for the IDH group, 64 years for the SpS group, and 66 years for the DS group. At enrollment, IDH patients presented with the most pain as reported on the SF-36 (BP 26.3 vs. 33.2 SpS and 33.8 DS) and were the most impaired (ODI 51 vs. 42.3 SpS and 41.5 DS). IDH patients used more chiropractic treatment (42% vs. 33% SpS and 26% DS), had more Emergency Department (ED) visits (21% vs. 7% SpS and 4% DS), and used more opiate analgesics (49% vs. 29% SpS and 27% DS). After adjusting for age, gender, diagnosis, education, race, duration of symptoms, and compensation, Medicaid patients used

  15. Comparison of 368 patients undergoing surgery for lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis from the SPORT trial with 955 from the NSQIP database.

    PubMed

    Golinvaux, Nicholas S; Basques, Bryce A; Bohl, Daniel D; Yacob, Alem; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2015-03-01

    Retrospective cohort. To compare demographics and perioperative outcomes between the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis arm and a similar population from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database. SPORT is a well-known surgical trial that investigated the benefits of surgical versus nonsurgical treatment in patients with various lumbar pathologies. However, the external validity of SPORT demographics and outcomes has not been fully established. Surgical degenerative spondylolisthesis cases were identified from NSQIP between 2010 and 2012. This population was then compared with the SPORT degenerative spondylolisthesis study. These comparisons were based on published data from SPORT and included analyses of demographics, perioperative factors, and complications. The 368 surgical patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis in SPORT were compared with 955 patients identified in NSQIP. Demographic comparisons were as follows: average age and race (no difference; P > 0.05 for each), sex (9.1% more female patients in SPORT; P = 0.002), smoking status (6.6% more smokers in NSQIP; P = 0.002), and average body mass index (1.1 kg/m greater in NSQIP; P = 0.005). Larger differences were noted in what surgical procedure was performed (P < 0.001), with the most notable difference being that the NSQIP population was much more likely to include interbody fusion than the SPORT population (52.4% vs. 12.5%). Most perioperative factors and complication rates were similar, including average operative time, wound infection, wound dehiscence, postoperative transfusion, and postoperative mortality (no differences; P > 0.05 for each). Average length of stay was shorter in NSQIP compared with SPORT (3.7 vs. 5.8 d; P = 0.042). Though important differences in the distribution of surgical procedures were identified, this study supports the greater generalizability of the surgical SPORT degenerative spondylolisthesis

  16. ISSLS PRIZE IN BIOENGINEERING SCIENCE 2018: dynamic imaging of degenerative spondylolisthesis reveals mid-range dynamic lumbar instability not evident on static clinical radiographs.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Malcolm E; Rynearson, Bryan; LeVasseur, Clarissa; Adgate, Zach; Donaldson, William F; Lee, Joon Y; Aiyangar, Ameet; Anderst, William J

    2018-04-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) in the setting of symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis is commonly treated with spinal fusion in addition to decompression with laminectomy. However, recent studies have shown similar clinical outcomes after decompression alone, suggesting that a subset of DS patients may not require spinal fusion. Identification of dynamic instability could prove useful for predicting which patients are at higher risk of post-laminectomy destabilization necessitating fusion. The goal of this study was to determine if static clinical radiographs adequately characterize dynamic instability in patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) and to compare the rotational and translational kinematics in vivo during continuous dynamic flexion activity in DS versus asymptomatic age-matched controls. Seven patients with symptomatic single level lumbar DS (6 M, 1 F; 66 ± 5.0 years) and seven age-matched asymptomatic controls (5 M, 2 F age 63.9 ± 6.4 years) underwent biplane radiographic imaging during continuous torso flexion. A volumetric model-based tracking system was used to track each vertebra in the radiographic images using subject-specific 3D bone models from high-resolution computed tomography (CT). In vivo continuous dynamic sagittal rotation (flexion/extension) and AP translation (slip) were calculated and compared to clinical measures of intervertebral flexion/extension and AP translation obtained from standard lateral flexion/extension radiographs. Static clinical radiographs underestimate the degree of AP translation seen on dynamic in vivo imaging (1.0 vs 3.1 mm; p = 0.03). DS patients demonstrated three primary motion patterns compared to a single kinematic pattern in asymptomatic controls when analyzing continuous dynamic in vivo imaging. 3/7 (42%) of patients with DS demonstrated aberrant mid-range motion. Continuous in vivo dynamic imaging in DS reveals a spectrum of aberrant motion with significantly greater

  17. Guideline summary review: An evidence-based clinical guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Matz, Paul G; Meagher, R J; Lamer, Tim; Tontz, William L; Annaswamy, Thiru M; Cassidy, R Carter; Cho, Charles H; Dougherty, Paul; Easa, John E; Enix, Dennis E; Gunnoe, Bryan A; Jallo, Jack; Julien, Terrence D; Maserati, Matthew B; Nucci, Robert C; O'Toole, John E; Rosolowski, Karie; Sembrano, Jonathan N; Villavicencio, Alan T; Witt, Jens-Peter

    2016-03-01

    The North American Spine Society's (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis features evidence-based recommendations for diagnosing and treating degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. The guideline updates the 2008 guideline on this topic and is intended to reflect contemporary treatment concepts for symptomatic degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis as reflected in the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of May 2013. The NASS guideline on this topic is the only guideline on degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis included in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC). The purpose of this guideline is to provide an evidence-based educational tool to assist spine specialists when making clinical decisions for patients with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. This article provides a brief summary of the evidence-based guideline recommendations for diagnosing and treating patients with this condition. A systematic review of clinical studies relevant to degenerative spondylolisthesis was carried out. This NASS spondyolisthesis guideline is the product of the Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Work Group of NASS' Evidence-Based Guideline Development Committee. The methods used to develop this guideline are detailed in the complete guideline and technical report available on the NASS website. In brief, a multidisciplinary work group of spine care specialists convened to identify clinical questions to address in the guideline. The literature search strategy was developed in consultation with medical librarians. Upon completion of the systematic literature search, evidence relevant to the clinical questions posed in the guideline was reviewed. Work group members used the NASS evidentiary table templates to summarize study conclusions, identify study strengths and weaknesses, and assign levels of evidence. Work group members

  18. Factors affecting disability and physical function in degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis of L4-5: evaluation with axially loaded MRI.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Yuan; Lin, Ruey-Mo; Lee, Yung-Ling; Li, Jenq-Daw

    2009-12-01

    Few studies have investigated the factors related to the disability and physical function in degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis using axially loaded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effect of axial loading on the morphology of the spine and the spinal canal in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis of L4-5 and to correlate morphologic changes to their disability and physical functions. From March 2003 to January 2004, 32 consecutive cases (26 females, 6 males) with degenerative L4-5 spondylolisthesis, grade 1-2, intermittent claudication, and low back pain without sciatica were included in this study. All patients underwent unloaded and axially loaded MRI of the lumbo-sacral spine in supine position to elucidate the morphological findings and to measure the parameters of MRI, including disc height (DH), sagittal translation (ST), segmental angulation (SA), dural sac cross-sectional area (DCSA) at L4-5, and lumbar lordotic angles (LLA) at L1-5 between the unloaded and axially loaded condition. Each patient's disability was evaluated by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire, and physical functioning (PF) was evaluated by the Physical Function scale proposed by Stucki et al. (Spine 21:796-803, 1996). Three patients were excluded due to the presence of neurologic symptoms found with the axially loaded MRI. Finally, a total of 29 (5 males, 24 females) consecutive patients were included in this study. Comparisons and correlations were done to determine which parameters were critical to the patient's disability and PF. The morphologies of the lumbar spine changed after axially loaded MRI. In six of our patients, we observed adjacent segment degeneration (4 L3-L4 and 2 L5-S1) coexisting with degenerative spondylolisthesis of L4-L5 under axially loaded MRI. The mean values of the SA under pre-load and post-load were 7.14 degrees and 5.90 degrees at L4-L5 (listhetic level), respectively. The mean values of the LLA

  19. Proximal sacral deformity: a common element in lytic isthmic spondylolisthesis at L5 and in degenerative spondylolisthesis at L4-L5 segment. Two apparently very different etiopathogenic entities.

    PubMed

    Gallego-Goyanes, A; Barahona-Lorenzo, D; Díez-Ulloa, M A

    A radiographic study was carried out to investigate the relationship between proximal sacral sagittal anatomy (either kyphosis or lordosis) and either isthmic or degenerative spondylolisthesis. In addition, we studied whether there is a relationship between proximal sacral kyphosis and the degree of such listhesis in the case of L5 isthmic spondylolisthesis. Lateral standing x-rays were used from 173 patients, ninety of whom had degenerative spondylolisthesis L4-L5, and eighty-three an isthmic spondylolisthesis of L5 (67 low-grade and 16 high-grade) and compared with a control group of 100 patients adjusted by age and gender, without any type of spondylolisthesis. Listhesis was graded using Meyerding's classification and the proximal sacral kyphosis angle (CSP) was measured between S1 and S2 posterior walls, according to Harrison's method. In our series, there was a proximal sacral kyphosis in both types of spondylolisthesis, greater in the lytic type. By contrast, the control group had a proximal sacral lordosis. The differences were statistically significant. Therefore, we concluded that there was a proximal sacral kyphosis in patients with both degenerative and isthmic lytic spondylolisthesis, but with our results, we were not able to ascertain whether it is a cause or a consequence of this listhesis. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Use in the Treatment of Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingqiang; Cohen, Jeremiah R; Buser, Zorica; Park, Jong-Beom; Brodke, Darrel S; Meisel, Hans-Joerg; Youssef, Jim A; Wang, Jeffrey C; Yoon, S Tim

    2016-12-01

    Study Design  Retrospective database review. Objective  To identify trends of the recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) use in the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (LDS). Methods  PearlDiver Patient Record Database was used to identify patients who underwent lumbar fusion for LDS between 2005 and 2011. The distribution of bone morphogenetic protein use rate (BR) in various surgical procedures was recorded. Patient numbers, reoperation numbers, BR, and per year BR (PYBR) were stratified by geographic region, gender, and age. Results  There were 11,335 fusion surgeries, with 3,461 cases using rhBMP-2. Even though PYRB increased between 2005 and 2008, there was a significant decrease in 2010 for each procedure: 404 (34.5%) for posterior interbody fusion, 1,282 (34.3%) for posterolateral plus posterior interbody fusion (PLPIF), 1,477 (29.2%) for posterolateral fusion, and 335 (22.4%) for anterior lumbar interbody fusion. In patients using rhBMP-2, the reoperation rate was significantly lower than in patients not using rhBMP-2 (0.69% versus 1.07%, p  < 0.0001). Male patients had higher PYBR compared with female patients in 2008 and 2009 ( p  < 0.05). The West region and PLPIF had the highest BR and PYBR. Conclusions Our data shows that the revision rates were significantly lower in patients treated with rhBMP-2 compared with patients not treated with rhBMP-2. Furthermore, rhBMP-2 use in LDS varied by year, region, gender, and type of fusion technique. In the West region, the posterior approach and patients 65 to 69 years of age had the highest rate of rhBMP-2 use.

  1. Analysis of Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Use in the Treatment of Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qingqiang; Cohen, Jeremiah R.; Buser, Zorica; Park, Jong-Beom; Brodke, Darrel S.; Meisel, Hans-Joerg; Youssef, Jim A.; Wang, Jeffrey C.; Yoon, S. Tim

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective database review. Objective To identify trends of the recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) use in the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (LDS). Methods PearlDiver Patient Record Database was used to identify patients who underwent lumbar fusion for LDS between 2005 and 2011. The distribution of bone morphogenetic protein use rate (BR) in various surgical procedures was recorded. Patient numbers, reoperation numbers, BR, and per year BR (PYBR) were stratified by geographic region, gender, and age. Results There were 11,335 fusion surgeries, with 3,461 cases using rhBMP-2. Even though PYRB increased between 2005 and 2008, there was a significant decrease in 2010 for each procedure: 404 (34.5%) for posterior interbody fusion, 1,282 (34.3%) for posterolateral plus posterior interbody fusion (PLPIF), 1,477 (29.2%) for posterolateral fusion, and 335 (22.4%) for anterior lumbar interbody fusion. In patients using rhBMP-2, the reoperation rate was significantly lower than in patients not using rhBMP-2 (0.69% versus 1.07%, p < 0.0001). Male patients had higher PYBR compared with female patients in 2008 and 2009 (p < 0.05). The West region and PLPIF had the highest BR and PYBR. Conclusions Our data shows that the revision rates were significantly lower in patients treated with rhBMP-2 compared with patients not treated with rhBMP-2. Furthermore, rhBMP-2 use in LDS varied by year, region, gender, and type of fusion technique. In the West region, the posterior approach and patients 65 to 69 years of age had the highest rate of rhBMP-2 use. PMID:27853658

  2. Descriptive analysis of spinal neuroaxial injections, surgical interventions and physical therapy utilization for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis within Medicare beneficiaries from 2000–2011

    PubMed Central

    Sclafani, Joseph A.; Constantin, Alexandra; Ho, Pei-Shu; Akuthota, Venu; Chan, Leighton

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective, observational study. Objective To determine the utilization of various treatment modalities in the management of degenerative spondylolisthesis within Medicare beneficiaries. Summary of Background Data Degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis is a condition often identified in symptomatic low back pain. A variety of treatment algorithms including physical therapy and interventional techniques can be used to manage clinically significant degenerative spondylolisthesis. Methods This study utilized the 5% national sample of Medicare carrier claims from 2000 through 2011. A cohort of beneficiaries with a new ICD-9 diagnosis code for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis was identified. Current procedural terminology codes were used to identify the number of procedures performed each year by specialty on this cohort. Results A total of 95,647 individuals were included in the analysis. Average age at the time of initial diagnosis was 72.8 ± 9.8 years. Within this study cohort, spondylolisthesis was more prevalent in females (69%) than males and in Caucasians (88%) compared to other racial demographics. Over 40% of beneficiaries underwent at least one injection, approximately one third (37%) participated in physical therapy, one in five (22%) underwent spinal surgery, and one third (36%) did not utilize any of these interventions. Greater than half of all procedures (124,280/216,088) occurred within 2 years of diagnosis. The ratio of focal interventions (transforaminal and facet interventions) to less selective (interlaminar) procedures was greater for the specialty of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation compared to the specialties of Anesthesiology, Interventional Radiology, Neurosurgery, and Orthopedic Surgery. The majority of physical therapy was dedicated to passive treatment modalities and range of motion exercises rather than active strengthening modalities within this cohort. Conclusion Interventional techniques and physical therapy are

  3. Can cantilever transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (C-TLIF) maintain segmental lordosis for degenerative spondylolisthesis on a long-term basis?

    PubMed

    Kida, Kazunobu; Tadokoro, Nobuaki; Kumon, Masashi; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Kawazoe, Tateo; Tani, Toshikazu

    2014-03-01

    To determine if cantilever transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (C-TLIF) using the crescent-shaped titanium interbody spacer (IBS) favors acquisition of segmental and lumbar lordosis even for degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) on a long-term basis. We analyzed 23 consecutive patients who underwent C-TLIF with pedicle screw instrumentations fixed with compression for a single-level DS. Measurements on the lateral radiographs taken preoperatively, 2 weeks postoperatively and at final follow-up included disc angle (DA), segmental angle (SA), lumbar lordosis (LL), disc height (%DH) and slip rate (%slip). There was a good functional recovery with 100 % fusion rate at the mean follow-up of 62 months. Segmental lordosis (DA and SA) and %DH initially increased, but subsequently decreased with the subsidence of the interbody spacer, resulting in a significant increase (p = 0.046) only in SA from 13.2° ± 5.5° preoperatively to 14.7° ± 6.4° at the final follow-up. Changes of LL and %slip were more consistent without correction loss finally showing an increase of LL by 3.6° (p = 0.005) and a slip reduction by 6.7 % (p < 0.001). Despite the inherent limitation of placing the IBS against the anterior endplate of the upper vertebra in the presence of DS, the C-TLIF helped significantly restore segmental as well as lumbar lordosis on a long-term basis, which would be of benefit in preventing hypolordosis-induced back pain and the adjacent level disc disease.

  4. Defining the minimum clinically important difference for grade I degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: insights from the Quality Outcomes Database.

    PubMed

    Asher, Anthony L; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Bisson, Erica F; Glassman, Steven D; Foley, Kevin T; Slotkin, Jonathan; Potts, Eric A; Shaffrey, Mark E; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Coric, Domagoj; Knightly, John J; Park, Paul; Fu, Kai-Ming; Devin, Clinton J; Archer, Kristin R; Chotai, Silky; Chan, Andrew K; Virk, Michael S; Bydon, Mohamad

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) play a pivotal role in defining the value of surgical interventions for spinal disease. The concept of minimum clinically important difference (MCID) is considered the new standard for determining the effectiveness of a given treatment and describing patient satisfaction in response to that treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine the MCID associated with surgical treatment for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. METHODS The authors queried the Quality Outcomes Database registry from July 2014 through December 2015 for patients who underwent posterior lumbar surgery for grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis. Recorded PROs included scores on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), EQ-5D, and numeric rating scale (NRS) for leg pain (NRS-LP) and back pain (NRS-BP). Anchor-based (using the North American Spine Society satisfaction scale) and distribution-based (half a standard deviation, small Cohen's effect size, standard error of measurement, and minimum detectable change [MDC]) methods were used to calculate the MCID for each PRO. RESULTS A total of 441 patients (80 who underwent laminectomies alone and 361 who underwent fusion procedures) from 11 participating sites were included in the analysis. The changes in functional outcome scores between baseline and the 1-year postoperative evaluation were as follows: 23.5 ± 17.4 points for ODI, 0.24 ± 0.23 for EQ-5D, 4.1 ± 3.5 for NRS-LP, and 3.7 ± 3.2 for NRS-BP. The different calculation methods generated a range of MCID values for each PRO: 3.3-26.5 points for ODI, 0.04-0.3 points for EQ-5D, 0.6-4.5 points for NRS-LP, and 0.5-4.2 points for NRS-BP. The MDC approach appeared to be the most appropriate for calculating MCID because it provided a threshold greater than the measurement error and was closest to the average change difference between the satisfied and not-satisfied patients. On subgroup analysis, the MCID thresholds for laminectomy-alone patients were

  5. Does restoration of focal lumbar lordosis for single level degenerative spondylolisthesis result in better patient-reported clinical outcomes? A systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Chanseok; Visintini, Sarah; Dunning, Cynthia E; Oxner, William M; Glennie, R Andrew

    2017-10-01

    It is controversial whether the surgical restoration of sagittal balance and spinopelvic angulation in a single level lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis results in clinical improvements. The purpose of this study to systematically review the available literature to determine whether the surgical correction of malalignment in lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis correlates with improvements in patient-reported clinical outcomes. Literature searches were performed via Ovid Medline, Embase, CENTRAL and Web of Science using search terms "lumbar," "degenerative/spondylolisthesis" and "surgery/surgical/surgeries/fusion". This resulted in 844 articles and after reviewing the abstracts and full-texts, 13 articles were included for summary and final analysis. There were two Level II articles, four Level III articles and five Level IV articles. Most commonly used patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) were Oswestery disability index (ODI) and visual analogue scale (VAS). Four articles were included for the final statistical analysis. There was no statistically significant difference between the patient groups who achieved successful surgical correction of malalignment and those who did not for either ODI (mean difference -0.94, CI -8.89-7.00) or VAS (mean difference 1.57, CI -3.16-6.30). Two studies assessed the efficacy of manual reduction of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and their clinical outcomes after the operation, and there was no statistically significant improvement. Overall, the restoration of focal lumbar lordosis and restoration of sagittal balance for single-level lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis does not seem to yield clinical improvements but well-powered studies on this specific topic is lacking in the current literature. Future well-powered studies are needed for a more definitive conclusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cortical bone trajectory screw fixation versus traditional pedicle screw fixation for 2-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion: comparison of surgical outcomes for 2-level degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw technique is a new nontraditional pedicle screw (PS) insertion method. However, the biomechanical behavior of multilevel CBT screw/rod fixation remains unclear, and surgical outcomes in patients after 2-level posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using CBT screw fixation have not been reported. Thus, the purposes of this study were to examine the clinical and radiological outcomes after 2-level PLIF using CBT screw fixation for 2-level degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DS) and to compare these outcomes with those after 2-level PLIF using traditional PS fixation. METHODS The study included 22 consecutively treated patients who underwent 2-level PLIF with CBT screw fixation for 2-level DS (CBT group, mean follow-up 39 months) and a historical control group of 20 consecutively treated patients who underwent 2-level PLIF using traditional PS fixation for 2-level DS (PS group, mean follow-up 35 months). Clinical symptoms were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system. Bony union was assessed by dynamic plain radiographs and CT images. Surgery-related complications, including symptomatic adjacent-segment disease (ASD), were examined. RESULTS The mean operative duration and intraoperative blood loss were 192 minutes and 495 ml in the CBT group and 218 minutes and 612 ml in the PS group, respectively (p < 0.05 and p > 0.05, respectively). The mean JOA score improved significantly from 12.3 points before surgery to 21.1 points (mean recovery rate 54.4%) at the latest follow-up in the CBT group and from 12.8 points before surgery to 20.4 points (mean recovery rate 51.8%) at the latest follow-up in the PS group (p > 0.05). Solid bony union was achieved at 90.9% of segments in the CBT group and 95.0% of segments in the PS group (p > 0.05). Symptomatic ASD developed in 2 patients in the CBT group (9.1%) and 4 patients in the PS group (20.0%, p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Two-level PLIF with CBT

  7. Surgical outcomes of degenerative spondylolisthesis with L5-S1 disc degeneration: comparison between lumbar floating fusion and lumbosacral fusion at a minimum 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jen-Chung; Chen, Wen-Jer; Chen, Lih-Hui; Niu, Chi-Chien; Keorochana, Gun

    2011-09-01

    A retrospective clinical and radiographic study was performed. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes of patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis and a preexisting degenerative L5-S1 disc treated with a lumbar floating fusion (LFF) versus lumbosacral fusion (LSF). Fusion for treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis often ends at the L5 level. These patients usually had a preexisting L5-S1 disc degeneration; however, no literature mentions the role of prophylactic LSF in degenerative spondylolisthesis associated with L5-S1 disc degeneration. A total of 107 patients with a minimum 5-year follow-up who had lumbosacral or LFF with pedicle instrumentation for degenerative spondylolisthesis were included. UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) classification was used to evaluate the radiographic results of the L5-S1 segment. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and modified Brodsky's criteria were used to evaluate patients' clinical results. The incidence of adjacent segment disease (ASD) (includes radiographic and clinical ASD) of both ends was recorded. There were no statistically significant differences in sex, age distribution, or amount of follow-up between the LFF and LSF groups. The LSF group had a higher percentage of patients that underwent total L5 laminectomy with loss of L5-S1 posterior ligament integrity (LSF = 92% vs. LFF = 67%, P = 0.019). The higher incidence of cephalic ASD in the LSF group was statistically significant (LSF = 25% vs. LFF = 9.7%, P = 0.049). Although no patient in the LSF group developed L5-S1 ASD, need for L5-S1 segment revision surgery was not prevented with LSF. Clinical outcomes on the basis of the success rate (LFF = 85.5% vs.LSF = 70.8%, P = 0.103) and ODI difference (LFF = 28.97 ± 15.82 vs. LSF = 23.04 ± 10.97, P = 0.109), there were no statistically significant difference between these two groups. Posterior instrumentation with posterolateral LFF for the treatment of degenerative spondylolisthesis with

  8. Minimally invasive versus open fusion for Grade I degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: analysis of the Quality Outcomes Database.

    PubMed

    Mummaneni, Praveen V; Bisson, Erica F; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Glassman, Steven; Foley, Kevin; Slotkin, Jonathan R; Potts, Eric; Shaffrey, Mark; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Coric, Domagoj; Knightly, John; Park, Paul; Fu, Kai-Ming; Devin, Clinton J; Chotai, Silky; Chan, Andrew K; Virk, Michael; Asher, Anthony L; Bydon, Mohamad

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Lumbar spondylolisthesis is a degenerative condition that can be surgically treated with either open or minimally invasive decompression and instrumented fusion. Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) approaches may shorten recovery, reduce blood loss, and minimize soft-tissue damage with resultant reduced postoperative pain and disability. METHODS The authors queried the national, multicenter Quality Outcomes Database (QOD) registry for patients undergoing posterior lumbar fusion between July 2014 and December 2015 for Grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis. The authors recorded baseline and 12-month patient-reported outcomes (PROs), including Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), EQ-5D, numeric rating scale (NRS)-back pain (NRS-BP), NRS-leg pain (NRS-LP), and satisfaction (North American Spine Society satisfaction questionnaire). Multivariable regression models were fitted for hospital length of stay (LOS), 12-month PROs, and 90-day return to work, after adjusting for an array of preoperative and surgical variables. RESULTS A total of 345 patients (open surgery, n = 254; MIS, n = 91) from 11 participating sites were identified in the QOD. The follow-up rate at 12 months was 84% (83.5% [open surgery]; 85% [MIS]). Overall, baseline patient demographics, comorbidities, and clinical characteristics were similarly distributed between the cohorts. Two hundred fifty seven patients underwent 1-level fusion (open surgery, n = 181; MIS, n = 76), and 88 patients underwent 2-level fusion (open surgery, n = 73; MIS, n = 15). Patients in both groups reported significant improvement in all primary outcomes (all p < 0.001). MIS was associated with a significantly lower mean intraoperative estimated blood loss and slightly longer operative times in both 1- and 2-level fusion subgroups. Although the LOS was shorter for MIS 1-level cases, this was not significantly different. No difference was detected with regard to the 12-month PROs between the 1-level MIS versus the 1-level open

  9. An International Multicenter Study Assessing the Role of Ethnicity on Variation of Lumbar Facet Joint Orientation and the Occurrence of Degenerative Spondylolisthesis in Asia Pacific: A Study from the AOSpine Asia Pacific Research Collaboration Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Richard; Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Goss, Ben; Rajasekaran, Shanmuganathan; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Acharya, Shankar; Kawakami, Mamoru; Satoh, Shigenobu; Chen, Wen-Jer; Park, Chun-Kun; Lee, Chong-Suh; Foocharoen, Thanit; Nagashima, Hideki; Kuh, Sunguk; Zheng, Zhaomin; Condor, Richard; Ito, Manabu; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jeong, Je Hoon; Luk, Keith D. K.; Prijambodo, Bambang; Rege, Amol; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Luo, Zhuojing; Tassanawipas, Warat; Acharya, Narayana; Pokharel, Rohit; Shen, Yong; Ito, Takui; Zhang, Zhihai; Aithala P, Janardhana; Kumar, Gomatam Vijay; Jabir, Rahyussalim Ahmad; Basu, Saumyajit; Li, Baojun; Moudgil, Vishal; Sham, Phoebe; Samartzis, Dino

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A multinational, multiethnic, cross-sectional image-based study was performed in 33 institutions, representing 10 countries, which were part of the AOSpine Asia Pacific Research Collaboration Consortium. Objective Lumbar facet joint orientation has been reported to be associated with the development of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). The role of ethnicity regarding facet joint orientation remains uncertain. As such, the following study was performed across a wide-ranging population base to assess the role of ethnicity in facet joint orientation in patients with DS in the Asia Pacific region. Methods Lateral standing X-rays and axial magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained for patients with lumbar DS. The DS parameters and facet joint angulations were assessed from L3–S1. Sex, age, body mass index (BMI), and ethnicity were also noted. Results The study included 371 patients with known ethnic origin (mean age: 62.0 years; 64% males, 36% females). The mean BMI was 25.6 kg/m2. The level of DS was most prevalent at L4–L5 (74.7%). There were 28.8% Indian, 28.6% Japanese, 18.1% Chinese, 8.6% Korean, 6.5% Thai, 4.9% Caucasian, 2.7% Filipino, and 1.9% Malay patients. Variations in facet joint angulations were noted from L3 to S1 and between patients with and without DS (p < 0.05). No differences were noted with regards to sex and overall BMI to facet joint angulations (p > 0.05); however, increasing age was found to increase the degree of angulation throughout the lumbar spine (p < 0.05). Accounting for age and the presence or absence of DS at each level, no statistically significant differences between ethnicity and degree of facet joint angulations from L3–L5 were noted (p > 0.05). Ethnic variations were noted in non-DS L5–S1 facet joint angulations, predominantly between Caucasian, Chinese, and Indian ethnicities (p < 0.05). Conclusions This study is the first to suggest that ethnicity may not play a role in

  10. Comparison of Clinical and Radiologic Results of Mini-Open Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion Indirect Decompression for Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gen, Hogaku; Sakuma, Yoshio; Koshika, Yasuhide

    2018-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose In this study, we compared the postoperative outcomes of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) indirect decompression with that of mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature There are very few reports examining postoperative results of XLIF and minimally invasive TLIF for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis, and no reports comparing XLIF and mini-open TLIF. Methods Forty patients who underwent 1-level spinal fusion, either by XLIF indirect decompression (X group, 20 patients) or by mini-open TLIF (T group, 20 patients), for treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis were included in this study. Invasiveness of surgery was evaluated on the basis of surgery time, blood loss, hospitalization period, and perioperative complications. The Japanese Orthopedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ), disc angle (DA), disc height (DH), and slipping length (SL) were evaluated before surgery, immediately after surgery, and at 12 months after surgery. Cross-sectional spinal canal area (CSA) was also measured before surgery and at 1 month after surgery. Results There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of surgery time or hospitalization period; however, X group showed a significant decrease in blood loss (p<0.001). Serious complications were not observed in either group. In clinical assessment, no significant differences were observed between the groups with regard to the JOABPEQ results. The change in DH at 12 months after surgery increased significantly in the X group (p<0.05), and the changes in DA and SL were not significantly different between the two groups. The change in CSA was significantly greater in the T group (p<0.001). Conclusions Postoperative clinical results were equally favorable for both procedures; however, in comparison with mini-open TLIF, less blood loss and greater

  11. Comparison of Clinical and Radiologic Results of Mini-Open Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion Indirect Decompression for Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Kono, Yutaka; Gen, Hogaku; Sakuma, Yoshio; Koshika, Yasuhide

    2018-04-01

    Retrospective study. In this study, we compared the postoperative outcomes of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) indirect decompression with that of mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. There are very few reports examining postoperative results of XLIF and minimally invasive TLIF for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis, and no reports comparing XLIF and mini-open TLIF. Forty patients who underwent 1-level spinal fusion, either by XLIF indirect decompression (X group, 20 patients) or by mini-open TLIF (T group, 20 patients), for treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis were included in this study. Invasiveness of surgery was evaluated on the basis of surgery time, blood loss, hospitalization period, and perioperative complications. The Japanese Orthopedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ), disc angle (DA), disc height (DH), and slipping length (SL) were evaluated before surgery, immediately after surgery, and at 12 months after surgery. Cross-sectional spinal canal area (CSA) was also measured before surgery and at 1 month after surgery. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of surgery time or hospitalization period; however, X group showed a significant decrease in blood loss ( p <0.001). Serious complications were not observed in either group. In clinical assessment, no significant differences were observed between the groups with regard to the JOABPEQ results. The change in DH at 12 months after surgery increased significantly in the X group ( p <0.05), and the changes in DA and SL were not significantly different between the two groups. The change in CSA was significantly greater in the T group ( p <0.001). Postoperative clinical results were equally favorable for both procedures; however, in comparison with mini-open TLIF, less blood loss and greater correction of DH were observed in XLIF.

  12. The Effect of Iliac Crest Autograft on the Outcome of Fusion in the Setting of Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Radcliff, Kristen; Hwang, Raymond; Hilibrand, Alan; Smith, Harvey E.; Gruskay, Jordan; Lurie, Jon D.; Zhao, Wenyan; Albert, Todd; Weinstein, James

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is considerable controversy about the long-term morbidity associated with the use of posterior autologous iliac crest bone graft for lumbar spine fusion procedures compared with the use of bone-graft substitutes. The hypothesis of this study was that there is no long-term difference in outcome for patients who had posterior lumbar fusion with or without iliac crest autograft. Methods: The study population includes patients enrolled in the degenerative spondylolisthesis cohort of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial who underwent lumbar spinal fusion. Patients were divided according to whether they had or had not received posterior autologous iliac crest bone graft. Results: There were 108 patients who had fusion with iliac crest autograft and 246 who had fusion without iliac crest autograft. There were no baseline differences between groups in demographic characteristics, comorbidities, or baseline clinical scores. At baseline, the group that received iliac crest bone graft had an increased percentage of patients who had multilevel fusions (32% versus 21%; p = 0.033) and L5-S1 surgery (37% versus 26%; p = 0.031) compared with the group without iliac crest autograft. Operative time was higher in the iliac crest bone-graft group (233.4 versus 200.9 minutes; p < 0.001), and there was a trend toward increased blood loss (686.9 versus 582.3; p = 0.057). There were no significant differences in postoperative complications, including infection or reoperation rates, between the groups. On the basis of the numbers available, no significant differences were detected between the groups treated with or without iliac crest bone graft with regard to the scores on Short Form-36, Oswestry Disability Index, Stenosis Bothersomeness Index, and Low Back Pain Bothersomeness Scale or the percent of patient satisfaction with symptoms averaged over the study period. Conclusions: The outcome scores associated with the use of posterior iliac crest bone graft for

  13. PLIF with a titanium cage and excised facet joint bone for degenerative spondylolisthesis--in augmentation with a pedicle screw.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Koichiro; Kido, Tadato; Unoki, Eiki; Chiba, Mitsuho

    2007-02-01

    To determine the validity of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using a titanium cage filled with excised facet joint bone and a pedicle screw for degenerative spondylolisthesis. PLIF using a titanium cage filled with excised facet joint bone and a pedicle screw was performed in 28 consecutive patients (men 10, women 18). The mean age of the patients was 60 years (range, 52 to 75 y) at the time of surgery. The mean follow-up period was 2.3 years (range, 2.0 to 4.5 y). The operation was done at L3/4 in 5, L4/5 in 20, and L3/4/5 in 3 patients. The mean operative bleeding was 318+/-151 g (mean+/-standard deviation), and the mean operative time was 3.34+/-0.57 hours per fixed segment. Clinical outcome was assessed by Denis' Pain and Work scale. Radiologic assessment was done using Boxell's method. Fusion outcome was assessed using an established criteria. On Pain scale, 20 and 8 patients were rated P4 and P5 before surgery, and 11, 12, 2, 2, and 1 patients were rated P1, P2, P3, P4, and P5 at final follow-up, respectively. On Work scale (for only physical labors), 12 and 9 patients were rated W4 and W5, before surgery, and 12, 5, 1, and 3 patients were rated W1, W2, W3 and W5 at final follow-up, respectively. There was significant difference in clinical outcome (P<0.01, Wilcoxon singled-rank test) The mean %Slip and Slip Angle was 17.9+/-8.1% and 3.9+/-5.8 degrees before surgery. The mean % Slip and Slip Angle was 5.4+/-4.4% and -2.0+/-4.8 degrees at final follow-up. There was a significant difference between the values (P<0.01, paired t test). "Union" and "probable union" was determined in 29 (93.5%) and 2 (6.5%) of 31 operated segments at 2.3 years (range, 2.0 to 4.5 y), postoperatively. PLIF using a titanium cage filled with excised facet joint bone and a pedicle screw provided a satisfactory clinical outcome and an excellent union rate without harvesting and grafting the autologous iliac bone.

  14. A retrospective review comparing two-year patient-reported outcomes, costs, and healthcare resource utilization for TLIF vs. PLF for single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Elliott; Chotai, Silky; Stonko, David; Wick, Joseph; Sielatycki, Alex; Devin, Clinton J

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare patient-reported outcomes (PROs), morbidity, and costs of TLIF vs PLF to determine whether one treatment was superior in the setting of single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis. Patients undergoing TLIF or PLF for single-level spondylolisthesis were included for retrospective analysis. EQ-5D, ODI, SF-12 MCS/PCS, NRS-BP/LP scores were collected at baseline and 24 months after surgery. 90-day post-operative complications, revision surgery rates, and satisfaction scores were also collected. Two-year resource use was multiplied by unit costs based on Medicare payment amounts (direct cost). Patient and caregiver workday losses were multiplied by the self-reported gross-of-tax wage rate (indirect cost). Total cost was used to assess mean total 2-year cost per QALYs gained after surgery. 62 and 37 patients underwent TLIF and PLF, respectively. Patients in the PLF group were older (p < 0.01). No significant differences were seen in baseline or 24-month PROs between the two groups. There was a significant improvement in all PROs from baseline to 24 months after surgery (p < 0.001). Both groups had similar rates of 90-day complications, revision surgery, satisfaction, and similar gain in QALYs and cost per QALYs gained. There was no significant difference in 24-month direct, indirect, and total cost. Overall costs and health care utilization were similar in both the groups. Both TLIF and PLF for single-level degenerative spondylolisthesis provide improvement in disability, pain, quality of life, and general health.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of minimally invasive versus open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for degenerative spondylolisthesis associated low-back and leg pain over two years.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott L; Adogwa, Owoicho; Bydon, Ali; Cheng, Joseph; McGirt, Matthew J

    2012-07-01

    Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) for lumbar spondylolisthesis allows for surgical treatment of back and leg pain while theoretically minimizing tissue injury and accelerating overall recovery. Although the authors of previous studies have demonstrated shorter length of hospital stay and reduced blood loss with MIS versus open-TLIF, short- and long-term outcomes have been similar. No studies to date have evaluated the comprehensive health care costs associated with TLIF procedures or assessed the cost-utility of MIS- versus open-TLIF. As such, we set out to assess previously unstudied end points of health care cost and cost-utility associated with MIS- versus open-TLIF. Thirty patients undergoing MIS-TLIF (n=15) or open-TLIF (n=15) for grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis associated back and leg pain were prospectively studied. Total back-related medical resource use, missed work, and health-state values (quality-adjusted life years [QALYs], calculated from EQ-5D with U.S. valuation) were assessed after two-year follow-up. Two-year resource use was multiplied by unit costs on the basis of Medicare national allowable payment amounts (direct cost) and work-day losses were multiplied by the self-reported gross-of-tax wage rate (indirect cost). Difference in mean total cost per QALY gained for MIS- versus open-TLIF was assessed as incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER: COSTmis-COSTopen/QALYmis-QALYopen). MIS versus open-TLIF cohorts were similar at baseline. By two years postoperatively, patients undergoing MIS- versus open-TLIF reported similar mean QALYs gained (0.50 vs. 0.41, P=0.17). Mean total two-year cost of MIS- and open-TLIF was $35,996 and $44,727, respectively. The $8,731 two-year cost savings of MIS- versus open-TLIF did not reach statistical significance (P=0.18) for this sample size. Although our limited sample size prevented statistical significance, MIS- versus open-TLIF was associated with reduced costs over

  16. Clinical significance of achieving a flexion limitation with a tension band system in grade 1 degenerative spondylolisthesis: a minimum 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Ho-Yeon; Baek, Oon Ki; Bae, Jun Seok; Yoo, Seung-Hwa; Lee, June-Ho

    2015-03-15

    Retrospective clinical study. To evaluate the effect of the limitation of flexion rotation clinically and radiologically after interspinous soft stabilization using a tension band system in grade 1 degenerative spondylolisthesis. Although several studies have been published on the clinical effects of limiting rotatory motion using tension band systems, which mainly targets the limitation of flexion rather than that of extension, they were confined to the category of pedicle screw-based systems, revealing inconsistent long-term outcomes. Sixty-one patients with a mean age of 60.6 years (range, 28-76 yr) who underwent interspinous soft stabilization after decompression for grade 1 degenerative spondylolisthesis with stenosis between 2002 and 2004 were analyzed. At follow-up, the patients were divided into 2 groups on the basis of their achievement or failure to achieve flexion limitation. The clinical and radiological findings were analyzed. A multiple linear regression analysis was performed to determine the prognostic factors for surgical outcomes. At a mean follow-up duration of 72.5 months (range, 61-82 mo), 51 patients were classified into the flexion-limited group and 10 into the flexion-unlimited group. Statistically significant improvements were noted only in the flexion-limited group in all clinical scores. In the flexion-unlimited group, there were significant deteriorations in flexion angle (P = 0.009), axial thickness of the ligamentum flavum (P = 0.013), and the foraminal cross-sectional area (P = 0.011), resulting in significant intergroup differences. The preoperative extension angle was identified as the most influential variable for the flexion limitation and the clinical outcomes. The effects of the limitation of flexion rotation achieved through interspinous soft stabilization using a tension band system after decompression were related to the prevention of late recurrent stenosis and resultant radicular pain caused by flexion instability. The

  17. The Effect of Anxiety, Depression, and Optimism on Postoperative Satisfaction and Clinical Outcomes in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis and Degenerative Spondylolisthesis Patients: Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewon; Kim, Hong-Sik; Shim, Kyu-Dong; Park, Ye-Soo

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of depression, anxiety, and optimism on postoperative satisfaction and clinical outcomes in patients who underwent less than two-level posterior instrumented fusions for lumbar spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis. Preoperative psychological status of subjects, such as depression, anxiety, and optimism, was evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Revised Life Orientation Test (LOT-R). Clinical evaluation was determined by measuring changes in a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) before and after surgery. Postoperative satisfaction of subjects assessed using the North American Spine Society lumbar spine questionnaire was comparatively analyzed against the preoperative psychological status. The correlation between patient's preoperative psychological status (depression, anxiety, and optimism) and clinical outcomes (VAS and ODI) was evaluated. VAS and ODI scores significantly decreased after surgery ( p < 0.001), suggesting clinically favorable outcomes. Preoperative psychological status of patients (anxiety, depression, and optimism) was not related to the degree of improvement in clinical outcomes (VAS and ODI) after surgery. However, postoperative satisfaction was moderately correlated with optimism. Anxiety and optimism were more correlated with patient satisfaction than clinical outcomes. Accordingly, the surgeon can predict postoperative satisfaction of patients based on careful evaluation of psychological status before surgery.

  18. Clinical and radiographic outcomes of bilateral decompression via a unilateral approach with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis with stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Zhang, Kai; Sun, Xiaojiang; Zhao, Changqing; Li, Hua; Ni, Bin; Zhao, Jie

    2017-08-01

    Laminectomy with posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) has been shown to achieve satisfactory clinical outcomes, but it leads to potential adverse consequences associated with extensive disruption of posterior bony and soft tissue structures. This study aimed to compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of bilateral decompression via a unilateral approach (BDUA) with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and laminectomy with PLIF in the treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis (DLS) with stenosis. This is a prospective cohort study. This study compared 43 patients undergoing BDUA+TLIF and 40 patients undergoing laminectomy+PLIF. Visual analog scale (VAS) for low back pain and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ) score. The clinical outcomes were assessed, and intraoperative data and complications were collected. Radiographic outcomes included slippage of the vertebra, disc space height, segmental lordosis, and final fusion rate. This study was supported by a grant from The National Natural Science Foundation of China (81572168). There were significant improvements in clinical and radiographic outcomes from before surgery to 3 months and 2 years after surgery within each group. Analysis of leg pain VAS and ZCQ scores showed no significant differences in improvement between groups at either follow-up. The mean improvements in low back pain VAS and ODI scores were significantly greater in the BDUA+TLIF group than in the laminectomy+PLIF group. No significant difference was found in the final fusion rate at 2-year follow-up. The BDUA+TLIF group had significantly less blood loss, shorter length of postoperative hospital stay, and lower complication rate compared with the laminectomy+PLIF group. When compared with the conventional laminectomy+PLIF procedure, the BDUA+TLIF procedure achieves similar and satisfactory effects of decompression and fusion for DLS with stenosis. The BDUA+TLIF procedure

  19. Two-year comprehensive medical management of degenerative lumbar spine disease (lumbar spondylolisthesis, stenosis, or disc herniation): a value analysis of cost, pain, disability, and quality of life: clinical article.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott L; Godil, Saniya S; Mendenhall, Stephen K; Zuckerman, Scott L; Shau, David N; McGirt, Matthew J

    2014-08-01

    important difference in any outcome measure. The mean 2-year total cost (direct plus indirect) of medical management was $6606 for spondylolisthesis, $7747 for stenosis, and $7097 for herniation. In an institution-wide, prospective, longitudinal quality of life registry that measures cost and effectiveness of all spine care provided, comprehensive medical management did not result in sustained improvement in pain, disability, or quality of life for patients with surgically eligible degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis, stenosis, or disc herniation. From both the societal and payer perspective, continued medical management of patients with these lumbar pathologies in whom 6 weeks of conservative therapy failed was of minimal value given its lack of health utility and effectiveness and its health care costs. The findings from this real-world practice setting may more accurately reflect the true value and effectiveness of nonoperative care in surgically eligible patient populations.

  20. Does Navigation Improve Accuracy of Placement of Pedicle Screws in Single-level Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis?: A Comparison Between Free-hand and Three-dimensional O-Arm Navigation Techniques.

    PubMed

    Boon Tow, Benjamin Phak; Yue, Wai Mun; Srivastava, Abhishek; Lai, Jenn Ming; Guo, Chang Ming; Wearn Peng, Benedict Chan; Chen, John L T; Yew, Andy K S; Seng, Chusheng; Tan, Seang Beng

    2015-10-01

    This was a prospective, nonrandomized study. To assess the accuracy of O-arm navigation-based pedicle screw insertion in lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and to compare it with free-hand pedicle screw insertion technique in matched population. O-arm navigation is latest in navigation technology that can provide real-time intraoperative images in 3 dimensions while placing the pedicle screws to improve intraoperative pedicle screw accuracy. Degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis is a locally unstable pathology and placement of pedicle screws can cause increased rotation and translation of the vertebral body. However, is this motion detected by the tracker placed across the unstable segment, is a matter of debate. Inability to detect these positional changes can lead to pedicle perforation while inserting screws using navigation. No study has evaluated the role of O-arm navigation in this patient population. The study population was divided into 2 groups with 19 patients each, one comprising patients who underwent O-arm navigation-based pedicle screw insertion (group 1) and the other comprising patients who underwent free-hand pedicle screw insertion technique (group 2). A total of 152 pedicle screws were implanted in 38 patients for 1-level instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. Intraoperative 3-dimensional computed tomography scans using the O-arm were obtained for all patients after insertion of pedicle screws. The images were reviewed intraoperatively and postoperatively for the analysis of pedicle breaches. Assessments in either of the group included (i) accuracy of placement of screws; (ii) the rate and direction of perforation; and (iii) the number of segments the perforated screw was away from the navigation tracker. Mean age of patients in group 1 (O-arm navigation-assisted) was 60 years (SD 11.25; range, 37-73 y), whereas in group 2 (free-hand pedicle screw) was 62 years (SD 18.07; range, 36-90 y). Overall anatomic perforation

  1. [Dynamic stabilisation and compression without fusion using Dynesys for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: a prospective series of 25 cases].

    PubMed

    Ricart, O; Serwier, J-M

    2008-11-01

    We used the Dynesys stabilization to treat degenerative lumber spondylolysis by decompression without fusion with the objective of decreasing the morbidity related to instrumented arthrodesis in older patients yet preventing progression of the displacement. This was a prospective study of 25 patients with symptomatic degenerative lumber spondylolysis associated with degenerative spinal canal stenosis documented by saccoradiculography. For inclusion, static anteroposterior intervertebral displacement had to be at least 3mm in the upright position, irrespective of the displacement on the stress films. The series included 19 women and six men, mean age 71 years (range 53-83). The level was L4-L5 in all 25 cases. Instrumentations involved a single level (L4-L5) or two levels (L3-L5). All patients were explored with computed tomography and saccoradiculography. An MRI was obtained in 12 patients. Pre- and postoperative stress images and views of the entire spinal column in the upright position were used to study pelvic parameters and sagittal spinal balance before and after surgery. Lumbar incidence and lordosis was used to divide the patients into three groups. Outcome was assessed with the Beaujon classification at minimal follow-up of 24 months, mean 34, range 24-72 months. Very good results were obtained in 72% of patients (relative gain greater than 70%) and good results in 28% (relative gain 40-70%). There were not outcomes considered fair or poor. There were two complications: aggravation of preoperative crural paresia with complete recovery and replacement of one neuroaggressive pedicular screw with no consequence thereafter. The stress films confirmed the residual mobility of the instrumented level when the preserved disc was of sufficient height. Postoperative pelvic parameters after Dynesys instrumentation showed improvement in sagittal tilt for T9 by accentuated suprajacent lordosis, even in the event of anterior spinal imbalance preoperatively. Theoretically

  2. Human Amniotic Tissue-derived Allograft, NuCel, in Posteriolateral Lumbar Fusions for Degenerative Disc Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease; Spinal Stenosis; Spondylolisthesis; Spondylosis; Intervertebral Disk Displacement; Intervertebral Disk Degeneration; Spinal Diseases; Bone Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Spondylolysis

  3. Characterization of radiographic features of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yapeng; Wang, Hui; Yang, Dalong; Zhang, Nan; Yang, Sidong; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Wenyuan

    2016-11-01

    Radiographic features of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis were retrospectively analyzed in a total of 17 patients treated for this condition at the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University from June 2005 to March 2012.To investigate the radiographic features, pelvic compensatory mechanisms, and possible underlying etiologies of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis.To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report concerning the characteristics of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis.The Taillard index and the lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), sacrum slope (SS), and pelvic tilt (PT) were determined on lateral X-ray images, and the angular displacement was analyzed on flexion-extension X-ray images. Correlation between LL and various pelvic parameters and correlation between Taillard index and angular displacement were assessed by Pearson correlation analysis.A total of 20 cases of isthmic spondylolisthesis and 14 of degenerative spondylolisthesis were retrospectively studied in 17 patients. The Taillard index and the angular displacement in the lower vertebrae were both larger than those in the upper vertebrae. Statistical analysis revealed that LL was correlated with PI and PT, whereas PI was correlated with PT and SS. However, no correlation was identified between Taillard index and angular displacement.In consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis, the degree of vertebral slip and the angular displacement of the lower vertebrae were both greater than those of the upper vertebrae, indicating that the compensatory mechanism of the pelvis plays an important role in maintaining sagittal balance.

  4. Characterization of radiographic features of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yapeng; Wang, Hui; Yang, Dalong; Zhang, Nan; Yang, Sidong; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Wenyuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Radiographic features of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis were retrospectively analyzed in a total of 17 patients treated for this condition at the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University from June 2005 to March 2012. To investigate the radiographic features, pelvic compensatory mechanisms, and possible underlying etiologies of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis. To the best of our knowledge, there is no previous report concerning the characteristics of consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis. The Taillard index and the lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), sacrum slope (SS), and pelvic tilt (PT) were determined on lateral X-ray images, and the angular displacement was analyzed on flexion–extension X-ray images. Correlation between LL and various pelvic parameters and correlation between Taillard index and angular displacement were assessed by Pearson correlation analysis. A total of 20 cases of isthmic spondylolisthesis and 14 of degenerative spondylolisthesis were retrospectively studied in 17 patients. The Taillard index and the angular displacement in the lower vertebrae were both larger than those in the upper vertebrae. Statistical analysis revealed that LL was correlated with PI and PT, whereas PI was correlated with PT and SS. However, no correlation was identified between Taillard index and angular displacement. In consecutive lumbar spondylolisthesis, the degree of vertebral slip and the angular displacement of the lower vertebrae were both greater than those of the upper vertebrae, indicating that the compensatory mechanism of the pelvis plays an important role in maintaining sagittal balance. PMID:27861359

  5. [Efficacy of Coflex in the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis].

    PubMed

    Hai, Y; Meng, X L; Li, D Y; Zhang, X N; Wang, Y S

    2017-03-01

    Objective: To study the clinical results of Coflex and lumbar posterior decompression and fusion in the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis at L(4-5). Methods: Thirty-eight patients with Grade Ⅰ degenerative spondylolisthesis, from January 2008 to December 2011 in Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University were reviewed, and patients were divided into two groups by randomness. Group A was treated with Coflex and group B with pedicle instrumentation and interbody fusion. Fifteen patients were included in group A, and 23 patients were included in group B. In group A, the average age was (56.3±9.1) years. In group B, the average age was (58.2±11.2) years. The clinical results were evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disability index (ODI). Slip distance (SD) was measured before and after surgery, and the changes of intervertebral angle at index level and adjacent level were also recorded. Results: The follow-up period was 36 to 68 months, with the average of (39±14) months in the both groups. The operation time and bleeding volume of patients in group A were significantly less than that of group B ( P <0.05). In both groups, the difference of ODI and VAS before operation and postoperative follow-up were statistically significant ( P <0.05). There was no significant difference between lumbar intervertebral angle and the sliding distance in group A at all time points. In the group B, there was a significant increase in the intervertebral angle and the sliding distance at L(3-4) and L(5)-S(1 )level after surgery, the difference at upper and below adjacent segment before and after surgery were statistically significant. Conclusions: Coflex interspinous dynamic stabilization system has same excellent clinical results as pedicle screw instrumentation and fusion surgery for the treatment of L(4-5) degenerative spondylolisthesis; no significant progression of spondylolisthesis been observed during more than 3 years follow

  6. Spondylolisthesis Identified Using Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Beneck, George J; Gard, Andrea N; Fodran, Kimberly A

    2017-12-01

    57-year-old woman was recruited for a research study of muscle activation in persons with low back pain. She described a progressive worsening of left lower lumbar pain, which began 5 years prior without any precipitating incident, and intermittent pain at the left gluteal fold (diagnosed as a proximal hamstring tear 2 years prior). Ultrasound revealed marked anterior displacement of the L3-4 and L4-5 facet joints. The subject was recommended for a radiograph using a lateral recumbent view, which demonstrated a grade II spondylolisthesis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(12):970. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7363.

  7. Spondylolisthesis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Certain sports activities, such as gymnastics, weightlifting, and football, greatly stress the bones in the lower back. ... herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any ...

  8. Automatic Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Measurement in CT Images.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dong, Zhongxing; Yan, Ruyi; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Salganicoff, Marcos; Fei, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is one of the most common spinal diseases. It is caused by the anterior shift of a lumbar vertebrae relative to subjacent vertebrae. In current clinical practices, staging of spondylolisthesis is often conducted in a qualitative way. Although meyerding grading opens the door to stage spondylolisthesis in a more quantitative way, it relies on the manual measurement, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Thus, an automatic measurement algorithm becomes desirable for spondylolisthesis diagnosis and staging. However, there are two challenges. 1) Accurate detection of the most anterior and posterior points on the superior and inferior surfaces of each lumbar vertebrae. Due to the small size of the vertebrae, slight errors of detection may lead to significant measurement errors, hence, wrong disease stages. 2) Automatic localize and label each lumbar vertebrae is required to provide the semantic meaning of the measurement. It is difficult since different lumbar vertebraes have high similarity of both shape and image appearance. To resolve these challenges, a new auto measurement framework is proposed with two major contributions: First, a learning based spine labeling method that integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information is designed to detect lumbar vertebrae. Second, a hierarchical method using both the population information from atlases and domain-specific information in the target image is proposed for most anterior and posterior points positioning. Validated on 258 CT spondylolisthesis patients, our method shows very similar results to manual measurements by radiologists and significantly increases the measurement efficiency.

  9. Lower thoracic degenerative spondylithesis with concomitant lumbar spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Po-Chuan; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Chen, Jyi-Feng

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis of the spine is less common in the lower thoracic region than in the lumbar and cervical regions. However, lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis may develop secondary to intervertebral disc degeneration. Most of our patients are found to have concomitant lumbar spondylosis. By retrospective review of our cases, current diagnosis and treatments for this rare disease were discussed. We present a series of 5 patients who experienced low back pain, progressive numbness, weakness and even paraparesis. Initially, all of them were diagnosed with lumbar spondylosis at other clinics, and 1 patient had even received prior decompressive lumbar surgery. However, their symptoms continued to progress, even after conservative treatments or lumbar surgeries. These patients also showed wide-based gait, increased deep tendon reflex (DTR), and urinary difficulty. All these clinical presentations could not be explained solely by lumbar spondylosis. Thoracolumbar spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neurophysiologic studies such as motor evoked potential (MEP) or somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP), and dynamic thoracolumbar lateral radiography were performed, and a final diagnosis of lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis was made. Bilateral facet effusions, shown by hyperintense signals in T2 MRI sequence, were observed in all patients. Neurophysiologic studies revealed conduction defect of either MEP or SSEP. One patient refused surgical management because of personal reasons. However, with the use of thoracolumbar orthosis, his symptoms/signs stabilized, although partial lower leg myelopathy was present. The other patients received surgical decompression in association with fixation/fusion procedures performed for managing the thoracolumbar lesions. Three patients became symptom-free, whereas in 1 patient, paralysis set in before the operation; this patient was able to walk with assistance 6 months after surgical decompression

  10. Nonoperative Treatment in Lumbar Spondylolysis and Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Garet, Matthew; Reiman, Michael P.; Mathers, Jessie; Sylvain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Context: Both spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis can be diagnosed across the life span of sports-participating individuals. Determining which treatments are effective for these conditions is imperative to the rehabilitation professional. Data Sources: A computer-assisted literature search was completed in MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE databases (1966-April 2012) utilizing keywords related to nonoperative treatment of spondylolysis and/or spondylolisthesis. Reference lists were also searched to find all relevant articles that fit our inclusion criteria: English language, human, lumbar pain with diagnosed spondylolysis and/or spondylolisthesis, inclusion of at least 1 nonoperative treatment method, and use of a comparative study design. Data Extraction: Data were independently extracted from the selected studies by 2 authors and cross-referenced. Any disagreement on relevant data was discussed and resolved by a third author. Results: Ten studies meeting the criteria were rated for quality using the GRADE scale. Four studies found surgical intervention more successful than nonoperative treatment for treating pain and functional limitation. One study found no difference between surgery and nonoperative treatment with regard to future low back pain. Improvement was found in bracing, bracing and exercises emphasizing lumbar extension, range of motion and strengthening exercises focusing on lumbar flexion, and strengthening specific abdominal and lumbar muscles. Conclusion: No consensus can be reached on the role of nonoperative versus surgical care because of limited investigation and heterogeneity of studies reported. Studies of nonoperative care options suffered from lack of blinding assessors and control groups and decreased patient compliance with exercise programs. PMID:24427393

  11. Indications for spine surgery: validation of an administrative coding algorithm to classify degenerative diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Anna N.A.; Deyo, Richard A.; Tosteson, Tor; Weinstein, James; Mirza, Sohail K.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of Medicare claims linked to a multi-center clinical trial. Objective The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) provided a unique opportunity to examine the validity of a claims-based algorithm for grouping patients by surgical indication. SPORT enrolled patients for lumbar disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and degenerative spondylolisthesis. We compared the surgical indication derived from Medicare claims to that provided by SPORT surgeons, the “gold standard”. Summary of Background Data Administrative data are frequently used to report procedure rates, surgical safety outcomes, and costs in the management of spinal surgery. However, the accuracy of using diagnosis codes to classify patients by surgical indication has not been examined. Methods Medicare claims were link to beneficiaries enrolled in SPORT. The sensitivity and specificity of three claims-based approaches to group patients based on surgical indications were examined: 1) using the first listed diagnosis; 2) using all diagnoses independently; and 3) using a diagnosis hierarchy based on the support for fusion surgery. Results Medicare claims were obtained from 376 SPORT participants, including 21 with disc herniation, 183 with spinal stenosis, and 172 with degenerative spondylolisthesis. The hierarchical coding algorithm was the most accurate approach for classifying patients by surgical indication, with sensitivities of 76.2%, 88.1%, and 84.3% for disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and degenerative spondylolisthesis cohorts, respectively. The specificity was 98.3% for disc herniation, 83.2% for spinal stenosis, and 90.7% for degenerative spondylolisthesis. Misclassifications were primarily due to codes attributing more complex pathology to the case. Conclusion Standardized approaches for using claims data to accurately group patients by surgical indications has widespread interest. We found that a hierarchical coding approach correctly classified over 90

  12. Traumatic L7 articular processes fracture and spondylolisthesis following dorsal lumbosacral laminectomy in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Montoliu, Patricia; López, Marta; Mascort, Joan; Morales, Carles

    2018-01-01

    Case summary A 12-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat was presented to our referral hospital with a chronic history of tenesmus and lumbosacral pain. A diagnosis of degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) was made and a standard dorsal L7–S1 laminectomy was performed uneventfully, with complete recovery within 1 month. The cat was brought back 4 months later for investigation of lumbosacral pain after having suffered a minor traumatic event. Neurological examination identified a low tail carriage, weakness, exercise intolerance, left pelvic limb lameness and diminished withdrawal reflexes in both pelvic limbs with severe sacrocaudal pain. A traumatic facet fracture of the L7 articular processes and subsequent spondylolisthesis was diagnosed. A second surgery was performed to stabilise the region. The cat was normal on neurological examination 1 month later and no further clinical signs were noted. Relevance and novel information This is the first description of a fracture and spondylolisthesis as a possible postoperative complication after L7–S1 dorsal laminectomy in a cat. The case highlights the importance of postoperative changes in the supportive structures of the lumbosacral spine in cats after surgical treatment of DLSS. PMID:29552353

  13. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... may include toxins, chemicals, and viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ataxia Huntington's disease ...

  14. [Clinical outcomes of single-level lumbar spondylolisthesis by minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with bilateral tubular channels].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Z L; Jia, L; Yu, Y; Xu, W; Hu, X; Zhan, X H; Jia, Y W; Wang, J J; Cheng, L M

    2017-04-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) for single-level lumbar spondylolisthesis treatment with bilateral Spotlight tubular channels. Methods: A total of 21 patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis whom underwent MIS-TLIF via bilateral Spotlight tubular channels were retrospectively analyzed from October 2014 to November 2015. The 21 patients included 11 males and 10 females ranged from 35 to 82 years (average aged 60.7 years). In term of spondylolisthesis category, there were 18 cases of degenerative spondylolisthesis and 3 cases of isthmic spondylolisthesis. With respect to spondylolisthesis degree, 17 cases were grade Ⅰ° and 4 cases were grade Ⅱ°. Besides, 17 cases at L(4-5) and 4 cases at L(5)-S(1)were categorized by spondylolisthesis levels. Operation duration, blood loss, postoperative drainage and intraoperative exposure time were recorded, functional improvement was defined as an improvement in the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Visual Analog Scale (VAS) was also employed at pre and post-operation (3 months and the last follow-up), to evaluate low back and leg pain. Furthermore, to evaluate the recovery of the intervertebral foramen and of lumbar sagittal curvature, average height of intervertebral space, Cobb angles of lumbar vertebrae and operative segments, spondylolisthesis index were measured. At the last follow-up, intervertebral fusion was assessed using Siepe evaluation criteria and the clinical outcome was assessed using the MacNab scale. Radiographic and functional outcomes were compared pre- and post-operation using the paired T test to determine the effectiveness of MIS-TLIF. Statistical significance was defined as P <0.05. Results: All patients underwent a successful MIS-TLIF surgery. The operation time (235.2±30.2) mins, intraoperative blood loss (238.1±130.3) ml, postoperative drainage (95.7±57.1) ml and intraoperative radiation exposure (47.1±8

  15. Current evaluation and management of spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    McTimoney, C A Michelle; Micheli, Lyle J

    2003-02-01

    Spondylolysis occurs with a prevalence of 4% to 6% in the general population. Although the etiology of this lesion is still unclear, it has been shown to have both hereditary and acquired risk factors, with an increased prevalence in men and athletes participating in certain high-risk sports. Spondylolisthesis occurs in a significant proportion of individuals with bilateral spondylolysis. Predicting risk factors for progression of the slip in spondylolisthesis has proven difficult. Multiple imaging techniques are helpful in the diagnosis of spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis, with recent research addressing the utility of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and management of pars lesions. The management guidelines have remained largely unchanged since early recommendations. Recently, the addition of a bone growth stimulator to the management of difficult cases has shown promise.

  16. Adult's Degenerative Scoliosis: Midterm Results of Dynamic Stabilization without Fusion in Elderly Patients—Is It Effective?

    PubMed Central

    Di Silvestre, Mario; Lolli, Francesco; Greggi, Tiziana; Vommaro, Francesco; Baioni, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. A retrospective study. Purpose. Posterolateral fusion with pedicle screw instrumentation used for degenerative lumbar scoliosis can lead to several complications. In elderly patients without sagittal imbalance, dynamic stabilization could represent an option to avoid these adverse events. Methods. 57 patients treated by dynamic stabilization without fusion were included. All patients had degenerative lumbar de novo scoliosis (average Cobb angle 17.2°), without sagittal imbalance, associated in 52 cases (91%) with vertebral canal stenosis and in 24 (42%) with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Nineteen patients (33%) had previously undergone lumbar spinal surgery. Results. At an average followup of 77 months, clinical results improved with statistical significance. Scoliosis Cobb angle was 17.2° (range, 12° to 38°) before surgery and 11.3° (range, 4° to 26°) at last follow-up. In the patients with associated spondylolisthesis, anterior vertebral translation was 19.5% (range, 12% to 27%) before surgery, 16.7% (range, 0% to 25%) after surgery, and 17.5% (range, 0% to 27%) at followup. Complications incidence was low (14%), and few patients required revision surgery (4%). Conclusions. In elderly patients with mild degenerative lumbar scoliosis without sagittal imbalance, pedicle screw-based dynamic stabilization is an effective option, with low complications incidence, granting curve stabilization during time and satisfying clinical results. PMID:23781342

  17. Mobilisation of the thoracic spine in the management of spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, P P; Pattnaik, Monalisa

    2016-07-01

    Segmental instability due to lumbar spondylolisthesis is a potential cause of chronic low back pain. Hypomobility of the spine results in compensatory segmental hypermobility of the segment above or below restricted segments. Therefore, the aim of the study is to determine the effects of mobilisation of the hypomobile upper thoracic spine along with conventional flexion exercises and stretching of short hip flexors on the degree of slippage and the functions of the persons with lumbar spondylolisthesis. All patients with spondylolisthesis were randomly assigned into two groups: Group I - Experimental group, treated with mobilisation of the thoracic spine along with the conventional physiotherapy and Group II - Conventional group, treated with conventional stretching, strengthening, and lumbar flexion exercise programme. The experimental group treated with mobilisation of the thoracic spine shows a significant reduction in the percentage of vertebral slip from pre-treatment to post-treatment measurements. Low back pain due to spondylolisthesis may be benefited by mobilisation of the thoracic spine along with stretching of short hip flexors, piriformis, lumbar flexion range of motion exercises, core strengthening exercises, etc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Determination of spondylolisthesis in low back pain by clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kalpakcioglu, Banu; Altinbilek, Turgay; Senel, Kazim

    2009-01-01

    Current guides recommend to evaluate the patients with low back pain complaints with initial clinical assessment and history, and to utilize radiological or other imaging technics, in case of possible diagnosis. The aim of this study was to compare the findings of radiological and clinical assessment, and validate the reliability of spondylolisthesis diagnosed with clinical assessment. This study is conducted on 100 patients with, and 30 patients without (control group) radiological diagnosis of spondylolisthesis, who had applied to Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Haydarpasa Numune Hospital with low back pain complaints in one and a half year. Clinic assessment was consisted of 20 parameters including examinations of motor system such as, sign of slipping observed on palpation and inspection, extension of trunk and increase in lumbar lordosis. Antero-posterior, lateral, oblique and lateral flexion/extension radiographies were used for radiological assessment. Slipping degree and lumbar lordosis angle were measured. Women/men patients ratio was 91/9 in spondylolisthesis group and 22/8 in control group. Age of 69% of patients were 50 and over. In both groups, sciatalgia was observed in more than half of the patients, and no significant difference was detected in localization (p > 0.05). In clinical assessment, weak and drooping abdominal wall, paravertebral muscle hypertrophy, increase in lumbar lordosis, sign of slipping observed on palpation and inspection, hamstring muscle spasm, pain during lateral trunk flexion-extension tasks and during double leg raising task were found to be positively correlated with radiological assesment (p < 0.05). In our study, a systematic clinical assessment was proved to be useful in determination of possible spondylolisthesis cases. Radiological assessments are required in order to make the diagnosis clear and to determine the grade and prognosis of spondylolisthesis. Advanced imaging techniques like MRI and CT

  19. The Degenerative Spine.

    PubMed

    Clarençon, Frédéric; Law-Ye, Bruno; Bienvenot, Peggy; Cormier, Évelyne; Chiras, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine is a leading cause of back pain and radiculopathy, and is a frequent indication for spine MR imaging. Disc degeneration, disc protrusion/herniation, discarhtrosis, spinal canal stenosis, and facet joint arthrosis, as well as interspinous processes arthrosis, may require an MR imaging workup. This review presents the MR imaging patterns of these diseases and describes the benefit of the MR imaging in these indications compared with the other imaging modalities like plain radiographs or computed tomography scan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. A protocol of a randomized controlled multicenter trial for surgical treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis: the Lumbar Interbody Fusion Trial (LIFT).

    PubMed

    de Kunder, Suzanne L; Rijkers, Kim; van Kuijk, Sander M J; Evers, Silvia M A A; de Bie, Rob A; van Santbrink, Henk

    2016-10-06

    With a steep increase in the number of instrumented spinal fusion procedures, there is a need for comparative data to develop evidence based treatment recommendations. Currently, the available data on cost and clinical effectiveness of the two most frequently performed surgeries for lumbar spondylolisthesis, transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), are not sufficient. Therefore, current guidelines do not advise which is the most appropriate surgical treatment strategy for these patients. Non-randomized studies comparing TLIF and PLIF moreover suggest that TLIF is associated with fewer complications, less blood loss, shorter surgical time and hospital duration. TLIF may therefore be more cost-effective. The results of this study will provide knowledge on short- and long-term clinical and economical effects of TLIF and PLIF procedures, which will lead to recommendations for treating patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. Multicenter blinded Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT; blinding for the patient and statistician, not for the clinician and researcher). A total of 144 patients over 18 years old with symptomatic single level lumbar degenerative, isthmic or iatrogenic spondylolisthesis whom are candidates for LIF (lumbar interbody fusion) surgery through a posterior approach will be randomly allocated to TLIF or PLIF. The study will consist of three parts: 1) a clinical effectiveness study, 2) a cost-effectiveness study, and 3) a process evaluation. The primary clinical outcome measures are: change in disability measured with Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and change in quality adjusted life years (QALY) measured with EQ-5D-5L. Secondary clinical outcome measures are: Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36), VAS back pain, VAS leg pain, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), complications, productivity related costs (iPCQ) and medical costs (iMCQ). Measurements will be carried out at five fixed time points (pre

  2. The cost-effectiveness of interbody fusions versus posterolateral fusions in 137 patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Bydon, Mohamad; Macki, Mohamed; Abt, Nicholas B; Witham, Timothy F; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Ali; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2015-03-01

    Reimbursements for interbody fusions have declined recently because of their questionable cost-effectiveness. A Markov model was adopted to compare the cost-effectiveness of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (/TLIF) versus noninterbody fusion and posterolateral fusion (PLF) in patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. Decision model analysis based on retrospective data from a single institutional series. One hundred thirty-seven patients underwent first-time instrumented lumbar fusions for degenerative or isthmic spondylolisthesis. Quality of life adjustments and expenditures were assigned to each short-term complication (durotomy, surgical site infection, and medical complication) and long-term outcome (bowel/bladder dysfunction and paraplegia, neurologic deficit, and chronic back pain). Patients were divided into a PLF cohort and a PLF plus PLIF/TLIF cohort. Anterior techniques and multilevel interbody fusions were excluded. Each short-term complication and long-term outcome was assigned a numerical quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), based on time trade-off values in the Beaver Dam Health Outcomes Study. The cost data for short-term complications were calculated from charges accrued by the institution's finance sector, and the cost data for long-term outcomes were estimated from the literature. The difference in cost of PLF plus PLIF/TLIF from the cost of PLF alone divided by the difference in QALY equals the cost-effectiveness ratio (CER). We do not report any study funding sources or any study-specific appraisal of potential conflict of interest-associated biases in this article. Of 137 first-time lumbar fusions for spondylolisthesis, 83 patients underwent PLF and 54 underwent PLIF/TLIF. The average time to reoperation was 3.5 years. The mean QALY over 3.5 years was 2.81 in the PLF cohort versus 2.66 in the PLIFo/TLIF cohort (p=.110). The mean 3.5-year costs of $54,827.05 after index interbody fusion were

  3. Mild (not severe) disc degeneration is implicated in the progression of bilateral L5 spondylolysis to spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Vivek A S; Chamoli, Uphar; Viglione, Luke L; Tsafnat, Naomi; Diwan, Ashish D

    2018-04-02

    Spondylolytic (or lytic) spondylolisthesis is often associated with disc degeneration at the index-level; however, it is not clear if disc degeneration is the cause or the consequence of lytic spondylolisthesis. The main objective of this computed tomography based finite element modelling study was to examine the role of different grades of disc degeneration in the progression of a bilateral L5-lytic defect to spondylolisthesis. High-resolution computed tomography data of the lumbosacral spine from an anonymised healthy male subject (26 years old) were segmented to build a 3D-computational model of an INTACT L1-S1 spine. The INTACT model was manipulated to generate four more models representing a bilateral L5-lytic defect and the following states of the L5-S1 disc: nil degeneration (NOR LYTIC), mild degeneration (M-DEG LYTIC), mild degeneration with 50% disc height collapse (M-DEG-COL LYTIC), and severe degeneration with 50% disc height collapse(S-COL LYTIC). The models were imported into a finite element modelling software for pre-processing, running nonlinear-static solves, and post-processing of the results. Compared with the baseline INTACT model, M-DEG LYTIC model experienced the greatest increase in kinematics (Fx range of motion: 73% ↑, Fx intervertebral translation: 53%↑), shear stresses in the annulus (Fx anteroposterior: 163%↑, Fx posteroanterior: 31%↑), and strain in the iliolumbar ligament (Fx: 90%↑). The S-COL LYTIC model experienced a decrease in mobility (Fx range of motion: 48%↓, Fx intervertebral translation: 69%↓) and an increase in normal stresses in the annulus (Fx Tensile: 170%↑; Fx Compressive: 397%↑). No significant difference in results was noted between M-DEG-COL LYTIC and S-COL LYTIC models. In the presence of a bilateral L5 spondylolytic defect, a mildly degenerate index-level disc experienced greater intervertebral motions and shear stresses compared with a severely degenerate index-level disc in flexion and extension

  4. [Degenerative adult scoliosis].

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, C L; Obil-Chavarría, C A; Zárate-Kalfópulos, B; Rosales-Olivares, L M; Alpizar-Aguirre, A; Reyes-Sánchez, A A

    2015-01-01

    Adult scoliosis is a complex three-dimensional rotational deformity of the spine, resulting from the progressive degeneration of the vertebral elements in middle age, in a previously straight spine; a Cobb angle greater than 10° in the coronal plane, which also alters the sagittal and axial planes. It originates an asymmetrical degenerative disc and facet joint, creating asymmetrical loads and subsequently deformity. The main symptom is axial, radicular pain and neurological deficit. Conservative treatment includes drugs and physical therapy. The epidural injections and facet for selectively blocking nerve roots improves short-term pain. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients with intractable pain, radiculopathy and/ or neurological deficits. There is no consensus for surgical indications, however, it must have a clear understanding of the symptoms and clinical signs. The goal of surgery is to decompress neural elements with restoration, modification of the three-dimensional shape deformity and stabilize the coronal and sagittal balance.

  5. 76 FR 39465 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-573, DS-574, DS-575, and DS-576, Overseas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 7515] 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-573, DS-574, DS-575, and DS-576, Overseas Schools--Grant Request Automated Submissions Program (GRASP.... Title of Information Collection: Grant Request Automated Submissions Program (GRASP). OMB Control Number...

  6. Sagittal plane analysis of the spine and pelvis in degenerative lumbar scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Fei; Weishi, Li; Zhuoran, Sun; Qingwei, Ma; Zhongqiang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have reported the normative values of pelvic sagittal parameters, but no study has analyzed the sagittal spino-pelvic alignment in degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS) and its role in the pathogenesis. Retrospective analysis was applied to 104 patients with DLS, together with 100 cases of asymptomatic young adults as a control group and another control group consisting of 145 cases with cervical spondylosis. The coronal and sagittal parameters were measured on the anteroposterior and lateral radiograph of the whole spine in the DLS group as well as in the two control groups. Statistical analysis showed that the DLS group had a higher pelvic incidence (PI) value (50.5° ± 10.2°), than the normal control group (with PI 47.2° ± 8.8°) and the cervical spondylosis group (46.9° ± 9.1°). In DLS group, there were 38 cases (36.5%) complicated with degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis, who had higher PI values than patients without it. Besides, the lumbar lordosis (LL) and sacral slope (SS) of DLS group were lower; the scoliosis Cobb's angle was correlated with pelvic tilt (PT); thoracic kyphosis was correlated with LL, SS, and PT; and LL was correlated with other sagittal parameters. Patients with DLS may have a higher PI, which may impact the pathogenesis of DLS. A high PI value is probably associated with the high prevalence of degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis among DLS patients. In DLS patients, the lumbar spine maintains the ability of regulating the sagittal balance, and the regulation depends more on thoracic curve.

  7. Biomechanical analysis of an expandable lateral cage and a static transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion cage with posterior instrumentation in an in vitro spondylolisthesis model.

    PubMed

    Mantell, Matthew; Cyriac, Mathew; Haines, Colin M; Gudipally, Manasa; O'Brien, Joseph R

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient biomechanical data exist from comparisons of the stability of expandable lateral cages with that of static transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) cages. The purpose of this biomechanical study was to compare the relative rigidity of L4-5 expandable lateral interbody constructs with or without additive pedicle screw fixation with that of L4-5 static TLIF cages in a novel cadaveric spondylolisthesis model. Eight human cadaver spines were used in this study. A spondylolisthesis model was created at the L4-5 level by creating 2 injuries. First, in each cadaver, a nucleotomy from 2 channels through the anterior side was created. Second, the cartilage of the facet joint was burred down to create a gap of 4 mm. Light-emitting-diode tracking markers were placed at L-3, L-4, L-5, and S-1. Specimens were tested in the following scenarios: intact model, bilateral pedicle screws, expandable lateral 18-mm-wide cage (alone, with unilateral pedicle screws [UPSs], and with bilateral pedicle screws [BPSs]), expandable lateral 22-mm-wide cage (alone, with UPSs, and with BPSs), and TLIF (alone, with UPSs, and with BPSs). Four of the spines were tested with the expandable lateral cages (18-mm cage followed by the 22-mm cage), and 4 of the spines were tested with the TLIF construct. All these constructs were tested in flexion-extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. The TLIF-alone construct was significantly less stable than the 18- and 22-mm-wide lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) constructs and the TLIF constructs with either UPSs or BPSs. The LLIF constructs alone were significantly less stable than the TLIF construct with BPSs. However, there was no significant difference between the 18-mm LLIF construct with UPSs and the TLIF construct with BPSs in any of the loading modes. Expandable lateral cages with UPSs provide stability equivalent to that of a TLIF construct with BPSs in a degenerative spondylolisthesis model.

  8. Lumbar degenerative spinal deformity: Surgical options of PLIF, TLIF and MI-TLIF

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Hwee Weng Dennis; Hee, Hwan Tak

    2010-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is common in ageing populations. It causes disturbing back pain, radicular symptoms and lowers the quality of life. We will focus our discussion on the surgical options of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) for lumbar degenerative spinal deformities, which include symptomatic spondylolisthesis and degenerative scoliosis. Through a description of each procedure, we hope to illustrate the potential benefits of TLIF over PLIF. In a retrospective study of 53 ALIF/PLIF patients and 111 TLIF patients we found reduced risk of vessel and nerve injury in TLIF patients due to less exposure of these structures, shortened operative time and reduced intra-operative bleeding. These advantages could be translated to shortened hospital stay, faster recovery period and earlier return to work. The disadvantages of TLIF such as incomplete intervertebral disc and vertebral end-plate removal and potential occult injury to exiting nerve root when under experienced hands are rare. Hence TLIF remains the mainstay of treatment in degenerative deformities of the lumbar spine. However, TLIF being a unilateral transforaminal approach, is unable to decompress the opposite nerve root. This may require contralateral laminotomy, which is a fairly simple procedure. The use of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) to treat degenerative lumbar spinal deformity is still in its early stages. Although the initial results appear promising, it remains a difficult operative procedure to master with a steep learning curve. In a recent study comparing 29 MI-TLIF patients and 29 open TLIF, MI-TLIF was associated with longer operative time, less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, with no difference in SF-36 scores at six months and two years. Whether it can replace traditional TLIF as the surgery of choice for

  9. Workers' Compensation, Return to Work, and Lumbar Fusion for Spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joshua T; Haas, Arnold R; Percy, Rick; Woods, Stephen T; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar fusion for spondylolisthesis is associated with consistent outcomes in the general population. However, workers' compensation is a risk factor for worse outcomes. Few studies have evaluated prognostic factors within this clinically distinct population. The goal of this study was to identify prognostic factors for return to work among patients with workers' compensation claims after fusion for spondylolisthesis. The authors used International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, and Current Procedural Terminology codes to identify 686 subjects from the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation who underwent fusion for spondylolisthesis from 1993 to 2013. Positive return to work status was recorded in patients who returned to work within 2 years of fusion and remained working for longer than 6 months. The criteria for return to work were met by 29.9% (n=205) of subjects. The authors used multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify prognostic factors for return to work. Negative preoperative prognostic factors for postoperative return to work included: out of work for longer than 1 year before fusion (P<.001; odds ratio [OR], 0.16); depression (P=.007; OR<0.01); long-term opioid analgesic use (P=.006; OR, 0.41); lumbar stenosis (P=.043; OR, 0.55); and legal representation (P=.042; OR, 0.63). Return to work rates associated with these factors were 9.7%, 0.0%, 10.0%, 29.2%, and 25.0%, respectively. If these subjects were excluded, the return to work rate increased to 60.4%. The 70.1% (n=481) of subjects who did not return to work had markedly worse outcomes, shown by higher medical costs, chronic opioid dependence, and higher rates of failed back syndrome, total disability, and additional surgery. Psychiatric comorbidity increased after fusion but was much higher in those who did not return to work. Future studies are needed to identify how to better facilitate return to work among similar patients with workers' compensation claims. Copyright 2016

  10. Prognostic Importance of Spinopelvic Parameters in the Assessment of Conservative Treatment in Patients with Spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    M L V, Sai Krishna; Sharma, Deep; Menon, Jagdish

    2018-04-01

    This was a prospective, two-group comparative study. The present study aimed to determine the importance of the spinopelvic parameters in the causation and progression of spondylolisthesis. Spondylolisthesis is slippage of one vertebra over the vertebra below. Since the discovery of pelvic incidence (PI) in 1998 in addition to documentation of other parameters in spinopelvic balance, slippage in spondylolisthesis has been attributed to these parameters. Many studies on the Caucasian population have implicated high PI as a causative factor of spondylolisthesis. To the best of our knowledge, no study has described the role of these parameters in the progression of spondylolisthesis. The study was conducted in Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Puducherry, India. Seventy-nine patients with spondylolisthesis consented to participate in the study. All patients were advised to undergo conservative treatment and were regularly followed up according to the protocol. Seventy-five asymptomatic volunteers were recruited as a control group. Of the total of 79 patients, 54 were followed up for 6 months, during which 46 improved, eight showed no improvement, and 25 were lost to follow-up. Sagittal spinopelvic parameters were measured by a single observer using the Surgimap spine software ver. 2.1.2 (Nemaris, New York, NY, USA). Parameters measured were PI, pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), thoracic kyphosis, and lumbar lordosis. The results from patients and controls were compared using appropriate statistical methods. The normal and spondylolisthesis groups significantly differed with respect to PI, SS, and PT ( p <0.001). There were no significant differences in the measured spinopelvic parameters between patients with high- and low-grade spondylolisthesis or between those whose condition improved and those whose condition worsened. PI, the most important of all spinopelvic parameters, is responsible for the slip in spondylolisthesis, but

  11. Measurement Properties of the Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes Questionnaire in Adolescent Patients With Spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Gabriel; Joncas, Julie; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Beauséjour, Marie; Roy-Beaudry, Marjolaine; Labelle, Hubert; Parent, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Prospective validation of the Scoliosis Research Society Outcomes Questionnaire French-Canadian version (SRS-22fv) in adolescent patients with spondylolisthesis. To determine the measurement properties of the SRS-22fv. The SRS-22 is widely used for the assessment of health-related quality of life in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) and other spinal deformities. Spondylolisthesis has an important effect on quality of life. The instrument was previously used in this population, although its measurement properties remained unknown. We aim to determine its reliability, factorial, concurrent validity, and its discriminant capacity in an adolescent spondylolisthesis population. The SRS-22fv was tested in 479 subjects (272 patients with spondylolisthesis, 143 with AIS, and 64 controls) at a single institution. Its reliability was measured using the coefficient of internal consistency, concurrent validity by the short form-12 (SF-12v2 French version) and discriminant validity using multivariate analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, and multivariate linear regression. The SRS-22fv showed a good global internal consistency (spondylolisthesis: Cronbach α = 0.91, AIS: 0.86, and controls: 0.78) in all its domains for spondylolisthesis patients. It showed a factorial structure consistent with the original questionnaire, with 60% of explained variance under four factors. Moderate to high correlation coefficients were found for specifically corresponding domains between SRS-22fv and SF-12v2. Boys had higher scores than do girls, scores worsened with increasing age and body mass index. Analysis of covariance showed statistically significant differences between patients with spondylolisthesis, patients with AIS, and controls when controlling for age, sex, body mass index, pain, function, and self-image scores. In the spondylolisthesis group, scores on all domains and mean total scores were significantly lower in surgical candidates and in patients with high

  12. Intraoperative conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots associated with spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Popa, Iulian; Poenaru, Dan V; Oprea, Manuel D; Andrei, Diana

    2013-07-01

    Lumbosacral nerve roots anomalies may produce low back pain. These anomalies are reported to be a cause for failed back surgery. They are usually left undiagnosed, especially in endoscopic discectomy techniques. Any surgery for entrapment disorders, performed on a patient with undiagnosed lumbosacral nerve roots anomaly, may lead to serious neural injuries because of an improper surgical technique or decompression. In this report, we describe our experience with a case of L5-S1 spondylolisthesis and associated congenital lumbosacral nerve root anomalies discovered during the surgical intervention, and the difficulties raised by such a discovery. Careful examination of coronal and axial views obtained through high-quality Magnetic Resonance Imaging may lead to a proper diagnosis of this condition leading to an adequate surgical planning, minimizing the intraoperatory complications.

  13. Spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis in children and adolescents: I. Diagnosis, natural history, and nonsurgical management.

    PubMed

    Cavalier, Ralph; Herman, Martin J; Cheung, Emilie V; Pizzutillo, Peter D

    2006-07-01

    Spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis are often diagnosed in children presenting with low back pain. Spondylolysis refers to a defect of the vertebral pars interarticularis. Spondylolisthesis is the forward translation of one vertebral segment over the one beneath it. Isthmic spondylolysis, isthmic spondylolisthesis, and stress reactions involving the pars interarticularis are the most common forms seen in children. Typical presentation is characterized by a history of activity-related low back pain and the presence of painful spinal mobility and hamstring tightness without radiculopathy. Plain radiography, computed tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography are useful for establishing the diagnosis. Symptomatic stress reactions of the pars interarticularis or adjacent vertebral structures are best treated with immobilization of the spine and activity restriction. Spondylolysis often responds to brief periods of activity restriction, immobilization, and physiotherapy. Low-grade spondylolisthesis (< or =50% translation) is treated similarly. The less common dysplastic spondylolisthesis with intact posterior elements requires greater caution. Symptomatic high-grade spondylolisthesis (>50% translation) responds much less reliably to nonsurgical treatment. The growing child may need to be followed clinically and radiographically through skeletal maturity. When pain persists despite nonsurgical interventions, when progressive vertebral displacement increases, or in the presence of progressive neurologic deficits, surgical intervention is appropriate.

  14. Cost-utility analysis of posterior minimally invasive fusion compared with conventional open fusion for lumbar spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rampersaud, Y. Raja; Gray, Randolph; Lewis, Steven J.; Massicotte, Eric M.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Background The utility and cost of minimally invasive surgical (MIS) fusion remain controversial. The primary objective of this study was to compare the direct economic impact of 1- and 2-level fusion for grade I or II degenerative or isthmic spondylolisthesis via an MIS technique compared with conventional open posterior decompression and fusion. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed by use of prospective data from 78 consecutive patients (37 with MIS technique by 1 surgeon and 41 with open technique by 3 surgeons). Independent review of demographic, intraoperative, and acute postoperative data was performed. Oswestry disability index (ODI) and Short Form 36 (SF-36) values were prospectively collected preoperatively and at 1 year postoperatively. Cost-utility analysis was performed by use of in-hospital micro-costing data (operating room, nursing, imaging, laboratories, pharmacy, and allied health cost) and change in health utility index (SF-6D) at 1 year. Results The groups were comparable in terms of age, sex, preoperative hemoglobin, comorbidities, and body mass index. Groups significantly differed (P < .01) regarding baseline ODI and SF-6D scores, as well as number of 2-level fusions (MIS, 12; open, 20) and number of interbody cages (MIS, 45; open, 14). Blood loss (200 mL vs 798 mL), transfusions (0% vs 17%), and length of stay (LOS) (6.1 days vs 8.4 days) were significantly (P < .01) lower in the MIS group. Complications were also fewer in the MIS group (4 vs 12, P < .02). The mean cost of an open fusion was 1.28 times greater than that of an MIS fusion (P = .001). Both groups had significant improvement in 1-year outcome. The changes in ODI and SF-6D scores were not statistically different between groups. Multivariate regression analysis showed that LOS and number of levels fused were independent predictors of cost. Age and MIS were the only predictors of LOS. Baseline outcomes and MIS were predictors of 1-year outcome. Conclusion MIS posterior

  15. Study of the Decay Bs0→Ds(*)Ds(*)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Ancu, L. S.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Anzelc, M. S.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Assis Jesus, A. C. S.; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Ay, C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Barfuss, A.-F.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Benitez, J. A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Berntzon, L.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Biscarat, C.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burke, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Calfayan, P.; Calvet, S.; Cammin, J.; Caron, S.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C. K.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevallier, F.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christofek, L.; Christoudias, T.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cutts, D.; Ćwiok, M.; da Motta, H.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Degenhardt, J. D.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dong, H.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Ford, M.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Gelé, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gillberg, D.; Ginther, G.; Gollub, N.; Gómez, B.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guo, F.; Guo, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Haefner, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hansson, P.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegeman, J. G.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoeth, H.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jakobs, K.; Jarvis, C.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Juste, A.; Käfer, D.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J. M.; Kalk, J. R.; Kappler, S.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Kasper, P.; Katsanos, I.; Kau, D.; Kaur, R.; Kaushik, V.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Khatidze, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Kirby, M. H.; Klima, B.; Kohli, J. M.; Konrath, J.-P.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Koubarovsky, A.; Kozelov, A. V.; Krop, D.; Kryemadhi, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kvita, J.; Lam, D.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lazoflores, J.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Lesne, V.; Leveque, J.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Z.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lynker, M.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magass, C.; Magerkurth, A.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malbouisson, H. B.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Martin, B.; McCarthy, R.; Melnitchouk, A.; Mendes, A.; Mendoza, L.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Michaut, M.; Miettinen, H.; Millet, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Molina, J.; Mommsen, R. K.; Mondal, N. K.; Monk, J.; Moore, R. W.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulders, M.; Mulhearn, M.; Mundal, O.; Mundim, L.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nilsen, H.; Noeding, C.; Nomerotski, A.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; O'Dell, V.; O'Neil, D. C.; Obrant, G.; Ochando, C.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, N.; Onoprienko, D.; Oshima, N.; Osta, J.; Otec, R.; Otero Y Garzón, G. J.; Owen, M.; Padley, P.; Pangilinan, M.; Parashar, N.; Park, S.-J.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pawloski, G.; Perea, P. M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Pétroff, P.; Petteni, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piper, J.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pogorelov, Y.; Pol, M.-E.; Pompoš, A.; Pope, B. G.; Popov, A. V.; Potter, C.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Rani, K. J.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Renkel, P.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robinson, S.; Rodrigues, R. F.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santoro, A.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schmitt, C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Sengupta, S.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Siccardi, V.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, R. P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Spurlock, B.; Stark, J.; Steele, J.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Svoisky, P.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Tamburello, P.; Tanasijczuk, A.; Taylor, W.; Telford, P.; Temple, J.; Tiller, B.; Tissandier, F.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tomoto, M.; Toole, T.; Torchiani, I.; Trefzger, T.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Tuts, P. M.; Unalan, R.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Vachon, B.; van den Berg, P. J.; van Eijk, B.; van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vartapetian, A.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vaupel, M.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Vint, P.; Vlimant, J.-R.; von Toerne, E.; Voutilainen, M.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wahl, H. D.; Walder, J.; Wang, L.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Weerts, H.; Wenger, A.; Wermes, N.; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yan, M.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yip, K.; Yoo, H. D.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, C.; Yu, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhao, T.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.

    2007-12-01

    We report a study of the decay Bs0→Ds(*)Ds(*) using a data sample corresponding to 1.3fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment in 2002 2006 during run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. One Ds(*) meson was partially reconstructed in the decay Ds→ϕμν, and the other Ds(*) meson was identified using the decay Ds→ϕπ where no attempt was made to distinguish Ds and Ds* states. For the branching fraction Br(Bs0→Ds(*)Ds(*)) we obtain a 90% C.L. range [0.002,0.080] and central value 0.039-0.017+0.019(stat)-0.015+0.016(syst). This was subsequently used to make the most precise estimate of the width difference ΔΓsCP in the Bs0-B¯s0 system: ΔΓsCP/Γs=0.079-0.035+0.038(stat)-0.030+0.031(syst).

  16. The management of high-grade spondylolisthesis and co-existent late-onset idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Abhishek; Bayley, Edward; Boszczyk, Bronek M

    2016-10-01

    It is relatively common for a scoliosis deformity to be associated with a lumbar spondylolisthesis in adolescents (up to 48 % of spondylolistheses). In the literature two types of curve have been described: 'sciatic' or 'olisthetic'. However, there is no consensus in the literature on how best to treat these deformities. Some authors advocate a single surgical intervention, where both deformities are corrected; whereas, others advocate treating them as separate entities. In this situation, it has been shown that the scoliosis will correct with treatment of the spondylolisthesis. We present a 12-year-old girl who had a concomitant high-grade spondylolisthesis and scoliosis. Her main complaints were those of low back pain and an L5 radiculopathy. We took the decision to treat the spondylolisthesis surgically, but observe the scoliosis, rather than correcting them both surgically at the same sitting. Although the immediately post-operative radiographs showed persistence of the scoliosis, 1-year follow-up demonstrated full resolution of the deformity. This young lady also had relief of her low back pain and leg pain following the surgery. There are no standard guidelines and therefore, we discuss the management of this difficult problem, exemplifying a case of a young girl who had high-grade spondylolisthesis along with a clinically non-flexible scoliosis treated at our institution. We demonstrate that it is safe to observe the scoliosis, even in high-grade spondylolistheses.

  17. 75 FR 36463 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-1622, DS-1843, DS-1622P, and DS-1843P...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... decisions on medical suitability for a federal employee and family members for assignment abroad. DS-1622 is... maintain the health and fitness of the individual and family members within the Department of State medical... DS-1622, DS-1843, DS-1622P, and DS-1843P: Medical History and Examination for Foreign Service, OMB...

  18. Degenerative lumbar scoliosis in elderly patients: dynamic stabilization without fusion versus posterior instrumented fusion.

    PubMed

    Di Silvestre, Mario; Lolli, Francesco; Bakaloudis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Posterolateral fusion with pedicle screw instrumentation is currently the most widely accepted technique for degenerative lumbar scoliosis in elderly patients. However, a high incidence of complications has been reported in most series. Dynamic stabilization without fusion in patients older than 60 years has not previously been compared with the use of posterior fusion in degenerative lumbar scoliosis. To compare dynamic stabilization without fusion and posterior instrumented fusion in the treatment of degenerative lumbar scoliosis in elderly patients, in terms of perioperative findings, clinical outcomes, and adverse events. A retrospective study. Fifty-seven elderly patients were included. There were 45 women (78%) and 12 men (22%) with a mean age of 68.1 years (range, 61-78 years). All patients had degenerative de novo lumbar scoliosis, associated with vertebral canal stenosis in 51 cases (89.4%) and degenerative spondylolisthesis in 24 patients (42.1%). Clinical (Oswestry Disability Index, visual analog scale, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire) and radiological (scoliosis and lordosis corrections) outcomes as well as incidence of complications. Patients were divided into two groups: 32 patients (dynamic group) had dynamic stabilization without fusion and 25 patients (fusion group) underwent posterior instrumented fusion. All the patients' medical records and X-rays were reviewed. Preoperative, postoperative, and follow-up questionnaires were obtained to evaluate clinical outcomes. At an average follow-up of 64 months (range, 42-90 months), clinical results improved similarly in both groups of patients. Statistically superior scoliosis and final lordosis corrections were achieved with posterior fusion (56.9% vs. 37.3% and -46.8° vs. -35.8°, respectively). However, in the dynamic group, incidence of overall complications was lower (25% vs. 44%), and fewer patients required revision surgery (6.2% vs. 16%). Furthermore, lower average values of operative

  19. Spondylolisthesis in an Etruscan woman from Spina (Ferrara, Italy): an iron age case report.

    PubMed

    Manzon, Vanessa Samantha; Onisto, Nicoletta; Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela

    2014-06-01

    Spondylolisthesis consists of the slippage of a vertebra in relation to the one beneath. It is caused by separation of the neural arch from the vertebral body (spondylolysis), and predominantly occurs at the isthmus (pars interarticularis). Originally thought to be a congenital anomaly, its strict correlation with certain activities that seem to exert stress on lower spine was later demonstrated. This paper describes a case of progression of spondylolysis to spondylolisthesis found on an adult female skeleton from the Etruscan necropolis of Spina (Ferrara, Italy). The case in question was identified among 209 skeletons exhumed at Spina. As spondylolisthesis is strictly connected with activities that exert stress on lower spine, the evidence suggests that this woman was engaged in stressful physical activity, perhaps related to the specific trade function of the site.

  20. Treating Traumatic Lumbosacral Spondylolisthesis Using Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with three years follow up

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the surgical outcome of traumatic lumbosacral spondylolisthesis treated using posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and help spine surgeons to determine the treatment strategy. Methods: We reviewed retrospectively five cases of traumatic lumbosacral spondylolisthesis treated in our hospital from May 2005 to May 2010. There were four male and one female patient, treated surgically using posterior lumbar interbody fusion. The patients’ data including age, neurological status, operation time, blood loss, follow-up periods, X- radiographs and fusion status were collected. Results: All the cases were treated using posterior lumbar interbody fusion to realize decompression, reduction and fusion. Solid arthrodesis was found at the 12-month follow-up. No shift or breakage of the instrumentation was found, and all the patients were symptom-free at the last follow-up. Conclusion: Traumatic lumbosacral spondylolisthesis can be treated using posterior lumbar interbody fusion to realize the perfect reduction, decompression, fixation and fusion. PMID:25225542

  1. Occupational and personal factors associated with acquired lumbar spondylolisthesis of urban taxi drivers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J; Chan, W; Katz, J; Chang, W; Christiani, D

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the occupational and personal factors associated with lumbar spondylolisthesis in taxi drivers. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of the baseline data from the Taxi Drivers' Health Study cohort. Information was retrieved from the medical records of standardised lumbosacral spine plain films, age, and anthropometric measures of 1242 subjects. Acquired spondylolisthesis (ASL) was defined as non-lytic spondylolisthesis involving lumbar spines above L5. Questionnaires were used to gather information on demographic features, health behaviours, exercise, work related physical and psychosocial factors, and driving time profiles. Multiple logistic regression was used to model the odds ratio (OR) for prevalent ASL cases associated with personal and occupational factors. Results: A total of 40 cases (3.2%) of ASL were diagnosed. Among those driving ⩽5 years, 6–15 years, and >15 years, the estimated prevalence of lumbar spondylolisthesis was 1.1%, 2.4%, and 7.1% respectively. Results of multiple logistic regression suggested that taxicab driving >15 years (OR = 3.4, 95% CI 1.1 to 10.7, compared to driving ⩽5 years), age (OR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.1 to 6.6 for age 46–55; and OR = 4.8, 95% CI 1.8 to 12.9 for age >55), body mass index ⩾25 kg/m2 (OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.6), and frequent strenuous exercise (OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.5) were significantly associated with higher prevalence of spondylolisthesis. There was a consistent likely exposure-response relation between professional seniority and ASL prevalence. Conclusions: Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the observed association between professional driving and spondylolisthesis, and to examine further the specific occupational exposures accountable for this association. PMID:15550605

  2. Axial presacral lumbar interbody fusion and percutaneous posterior fixation for stabilization of lumbosacral isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Gerszten, Peter C; Tobler, William; Raley, Thomas J; Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E; Nasca, Richard J

    2012-04-01

    Case series. To describe a minimally invasive surgical technique for treatment of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis. Traditional surgical management of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis is technically challenging and associated with significant complications. Minimally invasive surgical techniques offer patients treatment alternatives with lower operative morbidity risk. The combination of percutaneous pedicle screw reduction and an axial presacral approach for lumbosacral discectomy and fusion is an option for the surgical management of low-grade lumbosacral spondylolisthesis. Twenty-six consecutive patients with symptomatic L5-S1 level isthmic spondylolisthesis (grade 1 or grade 2) underwent axial presacral lumbar interbody fusion and percutaneous posterior fixation. Study outcomes included visual analogue scale for axial pain severity, Odom criteria, and radiographic fusion. The procedure was successfully completed in all patients with no intraoperative complications reported. Intraoperative blood loss was minimal (range, 20-150 mL). Median hospital stay was 1 day (range, <1-2 d). Spondylolisthesis grade was improved after axial lumbar interbody fusion (P<0.001) with 50% (13 of 26) of patients showing a reduction of at least 1 grade. Axial pain severity improved from 8.1±1.4 at baseline to 2.8±2.3 after axial lumbar interbody fusion, representing a 66% reduction from baseline (95% confidence interval, 54.3%-77.9%). At 2-year posttreatment, all patients showed solid fusion. Using Odom criteria, 81% of patients were judged as excellent or good (16 excellent, 5 good, 3 fair, and 2 poor). There were no perioperative procedure-related complications including infection or bowel perforation. During postoperative follow-up, 4 patients required reintervention due to recurrent radicular (n=2) or screw-related (n=2) pain. The minimally invasive presacral axial interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation technique is a safe and effective treatment for low-grade isthmic

  3. Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease: Disc Degeneration Symptoms and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Shafaq; Rehmani, Muhammad Asim Khan; Raees, Aisha; Alvi, Arsalan Ahmad; Ashraf, Junaid

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional and observational. Purpose To evaluate the different aspects of lumbar disc degenerative disc disease and relate them with magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings and symptoms. Overview of Literature Lumbar disc degenerative disease has now been proven as the most common cause of low back pain throughout the world. It may present as disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis, facet joint arthropathy or any combination. Presenting symptoms of lumbar disc degeneration are lower back pain and sciatica which may be aggravated by standing, walking, bending, straining and coughing. Methods This study was conducted from January 2012 to June 2012. Study was conducted on the diagnosed patients of lumbar disc degeneration. Diagnostic criteria were based upon abnormal findings in MRI. Patients with prior back surgery, spine fractures, sacroiliac arthritis, metabolic bone disease, spinal infection, rheumatoid arthritis, active malignancy, and pregnancy were excluded. Results During the targeted months, 163 patients of lumbar disc degeneration with mean age of 43.92±11.76 years, came into Neurosurgery department. Disc degeneration was most commonly present at the level of L4/L5 105 (64.4%).Commonest types of disc degeneration were disc herniation 109 (66.9%) and lumbar spinal stenosis 37 (22.7%). Spondylolisthesis was commonly present at L5/S1 10 (6.1%) and associated mostly with lumbar spinal stenosis 7 (18.9%). Conclusions Results reported the frequent occurrence of lumbar disc degenerative disease in advance age. Research efforts should endeavor to reduce risk factors and improve the quality of life. PMID:24353850

  4. 75 FR 55625 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-1622, DS-1843, DS-1622P, and DS-1843P...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice: 7156] 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-1622, DS-1843, DS-1622P, and DS-1843P: Medical History and Examination for Foreign Service, OMB... of Information Collection: Medical History and Examination for Foreign Service . OMB Control Number...

  5. 76 FR 56271 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Forms DS-1622, DS-1843, DS-1622P and DS-1843P...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice: 7578] 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Forms DS-1622, DS-1843, DS-1622P and DS-1843P: Medical History and Examination for Foreign Service ACTION... Collection: Medical History and Examination for Foreign Service. OMB Control Number: 1405-0068. Type of...

  6. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    ending in blindness. In the United States, the total number of individuals affected by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other forms of rare inherited...AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-07-1-0720 TITLE: Inherited Retinal Degenerative...Final 3. DATES COVERED 27 Sep 2007 – 29 Sep 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Inherited Retinal Degenerative Clinical Trial Network

  7. Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Meij, Björn P; Bergknut, Niklas

    2010-09-01

    Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) is the most common disorder of the caudal lumbar spine in dogs. This article reviews the management of this disorder and highlights the most important new findings of the last decade. Dogs with DLSS are typically neuro-orthopedic patients and can be presented with varying clinical signs, of which the most consistent is lumbosacral pain. Due to the availability of advanced imaging techniques such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging that allow visualization of intervertebral disc degeneration, cauda equina compression, and nerve root entrapment, tailor-made treatments can be adopted for the individual patient. Current therapies include conservative treatment, decompressive surgery, and fixation-fusion of the L7-S1 junction. New insight into the biomechanics and pathobiology of DLSS and developments in minimally invasive surgical techniques will influence treatment options in the near future. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Asymmetric Spondylolisthesis as the Cause of Childhood Lumbar Scoliosis—Can New Imaging Modalities Help Clarify the Relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jonathan B.; Wenger, Dennis R.

    2008-01-01

    The etiology of idiopathic scoliosis is likely genetic. Research is proceeding to identify the responsible genes. Although genetics accounts for the majority of idiopathic scoliosis, a subset of curves occur secondary to mechanical “foundation”issues at the lumbosacral junction. The most common mechanical “foundation”issue at the lumbosacral junction is spondylolisthesis. A relationship between lumbar scoliosis and spondylolisthesis has been well documented. Modern imaging studies are providing an opportunity to cast new light on this inter-relationship. First, computerized tomography (CT) studies, and now 3-D CT studies of the lumbosacral area have been performed in an attempt to further elucidate this matter. The purpose of this paper is to provide an introduction to the topic and to present images that suggest an etiologic relationship between lumbar scoliosis and spondylolisthesis with mild asymmetric spondylolisthesis proposed as the cause of the lumbar curve. PMID:19223951

  9. MRI signal distribution within the intervertebral disc as a biomarker of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Julien; Périé, Delphine; Parent, Stefan; Labelle, Hubert; Aubin, Carl-Eric

    2012-12-03

    Early stages of scoliosis and spondylolisthesis entail changes in the intervertebral disc (IVD) structure and biochemistry. The current clinical use of MR T2-weighted images is limited to visual inspection. Our hypothesis is that the distribution of the MRI signal intensity within the IVD in T2-weighted images depends on the spinal pathology and on its severity. Therefore, this study aims to develop the AMRSID (analysis of MR signal intensity distribution) method to analyze the 3D distribution of the MR signal intensity within the IVD and to evaluate their sensitivity to scoliosis and spondylolisthesis and their severities. This study was realized on 79 adolescents who underwent a MRI acquisition (sagittal T2-weighted images) before their orthopedic or surgical treatment. Five groups were considered: low severity scoliosis (Cobb angle ≤50°), high severity scoliosis (Cobb angles >50°), low severity spondylolisthesis (Meyerding grades I and II), high severity spondylolisthesis (Meyerding grades III, IV and V) and control. The distribution of the MRI signal intensity within the IVD was analyzed using the descriptive statistics of histograms normalized by either cerebrospinal fluid or bone signal intensity, weighted centers and volume ratios. Differences between pathology and severity groups were assessed using one- and two-way ANOVAs. There were significant (p < 0.05) variations of indices between scoliosis, spondylolithesis and control groups and between low and high severity groups. The cerebrospinal fluid normalization was able to detect differences between healthy and pathologic IVDs whereas the bone normalization, which reflects both bone and IVD health, detected more differences between the severities of these pathologies. This study proves for the first time that changes in the intervertebral disc, non visible to the naked eye on sagittal T2-weighted MR images of the spine, can be detected from specific indices describing the distribution of the MR

  10. Comparison and correlation of pelvic parameters between low-grade and high-grade spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Min, Woo-Kie; Lee, Chang-Hwa

    2014-05-01

    This study was retrospectively conducted on 51 patients with L5-S1 spondylolisthesis. This study was conducted to compare a total of 11 pelvic parameters, such as the level of displacement by Meyerding method, lumbar lordosis, sacral inclination, lumbosacral angle, slip angle, S2 inclination, pelvic incidence (PI), L5 inclination, L5 slope, pelvic tilt (PT), and sacral slope (SS) between low-grade and high-grade spondylolisthesis, and to investigate a correlation of the level of displacement by Meyerding method with other pelvic parameters. Pelvic parameters were measured using preoperational erect lateral spinal simple radiographs. The patients were divided into 39 patients with low-grade spondylolisthesis and 12 patients with high-grade spondylolisthesis before analysis. In all patients of both groups, 11 radiographic measurements including the level of displacement by Meyerding method, lumbar lordosis, sacral inclination, lumbosacral angle, slip angle, S2 inclination, PI, L5 inclination, L5 slope, PT, and SS were performed. T test and Pearson correlation analysis were conducted to compare and analyze each measurement. As for the comparison between the 2 groups, a statistically great significance in the level of displacement by Meyerding method, lumbosacral angle, slip angle, L5 incidence, PI, and L5 slope (P≤0.001) was shown. Meanwhile, a statistical significance in the sacral inclination and PT (P<0.05) was also shown. However, no statistical significance in the S2 incidence and SS was shown. A correlation of the level of displacement by Meyerding method with each parameter was analyzed in the both the groups. A high correlation was observed in the lumbar lordosis, lumbosacral angle, slip angle, L5 incidence, and L5 slope (Pearson correlation coefficient, P=0.01), as well as the sacral inclination, PI, and PT (Pearson correlation coefficient, P=0.05). Meanwhile, no correlation was shown in the S2 incidence and SS. A significant difference in the lumbosacral

  11. Stereotypic behaviors in degenerative dementias.

    PubMed

    Prioni, S; Fetoni, V; Barocco, F; Redaelli, V; Falcone, C; Soliveri, P; Tagliavini, F; Scaglioni, A; Caffarra, P; Concari, L; Gardini, S; Girotti, F

    2012-11-01

    Stereotypies are simple or complex involuntary/unvoluntary behaviors, common in fronto-temporal dementia (FTD), but not studied in other types of degenerative dementias. The aim was to investigate stereotypy frequency and type in patients with FTD, Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD) in a multicenter observational study; and to investigate the relation of stereotypies to cognitive, behavioral and motor impairment. One hundred fifty-five consecutive outpatients (45 AD, 40 FTD, 35 PSP and 35 PDD) were studied in four hospitals in northern Italy. Stereotypies were examined by the five-domain Stereotypy Rating Inventory. Cognition was examined by the Mini Mental State and Frontal Assessment Battery, neuropsychiatric symptoms by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, and motor impairment and invalidity by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III, and activities of daily living. Stereotypies were present in all groups. FTD and PDD had the greatest frequency of one-domain stereotypies; FTD also had the greatest frequency of two-or-more domain stereotypies; movement stereotypies were the most common stereotypies in all groups. AD patients had fewer stereotypies than the other groups. Stereotypies are not exclusive to FTD, but are also fairly common in PSP and PDD, though less so in AD. Stereotypies may be underpinned by dysfunctional striato-frontal circuits, known to be damaged in PSP and PDD, as well as FTD.

  12. 75 FR 77936 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Forms DS-2053, DS-2054; Medical Examination for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... DS-2053, DS-2054; Medical Examination for Immigrant or Refugee Applicant; DS- 3024, DS-3030, Chest X... Instructions); Form DS- 3024, Chest X-Ray and Classification Worksheet (1991 Technical Instructions); Form DS-3030, Chest X-Ray and Classification Worksheet (2007 Technical Instructions); Form DS-3025, Vaccination...

  13. Effect of low-level pulsed laser 890-nm on lumbar spondylolisthesis: a case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, Seyed M. J.; Afsharpad, Mitra; Djavid, Gholam-reza E.

    2002-10-01

    Objective: Evaluating the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in alleviating the symptoms of lumbar spondylolisthesis. Materials and Methods: Laser was irradiated for 2 mm at six symmetric points along the lumbosacral spine and 5 points along the referred point ofpain, six times a week for 2 weeks (890 nm; 8 J/cm2; pulsed at 1500 Hz). Perception of benefit, level of function was assessed by the Oswestry disability index, lumbar mobility range of motion and low back pain intensity. Results and Discussion: Results showed a complete reduction in pain and improvement in function in the patient. This case report suggests that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) could play a role in conservative management of low-grade lumbar spondylolisthesis.

  14. A Blast of Mistakes: Undiagnosed Cervical Spondylolisthesis Following a Bomb Explosion.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Riccardo; Marrocco, Luigi; Piccione, Emanuele; Wierzbicki, Venceslao

    2017-03-30

    BACKGROUND A case of spinal trauma had an unusual clinical course due to medical mistakes, from which we can learn some important lessons. CASE REPORT We report a case of spondylolisthesis following a bomb explosion, which went undiagnosed for a long time because of a series of mistakes that are highlighted in this article. What makes this case unique is that the spondylolisthesis developed during hospital stay, but the patient had no loss of mobility, strength, or sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS This case shows that establishing the conditions of an organ or a body part upon admission to hospital may not be enough when a patient has suffered extensive and serious trauma, and that it is necessary to carry out more checkups over time, especially if there are new clues and symptoms.

  15. Spino-pelvic sagittal balance of spondylolisthesis: a review and classification.

    PubMed

    Labelle, Hubert; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Roussouly, Pierre

    2011-09-01

    In L5-S1 spondylolisthesis, it has been clearly demonstrated over the past decade that sacro-pelvic morphology is abnormal and that it can be associated to an abnormal sacro-pelvic orientation as well as to a disturbed global sagittal balance of the spine. The purpose of this article is to review the work done within the Spinal Deformity Study Group (SDSG) over the past decade, which has led to a classification incorporating this recent knowledge. The evidence presented has been derived from the analysis of the SDSG database, a multi-center radiological database of patients with L5-S1 spondylolisthesis, collected from 43 spine surgeons in North America and Europe. The classification defines 6 types of spondylolisthesis based on features that can be assessed on sagittal radiographs of the spine and pelvis: (1) grade of slip, (2) pelvic incidence, and (3) spino-pelvic alignment. A reliability study has demonstrated substantial intra- and inter-observer reliability similar to other currently used classifications for spinal deformity. Furthermore, health-related quality of life measures were found to be significantly different between the 6 types, thus supporting the value of a classification based on spino-pelvic alignment. The clinical relevance is that clinicians need to keep in mind when planning treatment that subjects with L5-S1 spondylolisthesis are a heterogeneous group with various adaptations of their posture. In the current controversy on whether high-grade deformities should or should not be reduced, it is suggested that reduction techniques should preferably be used in subjects with evidence of abnormal posture, in order to restore global spino-pelvic balance and improve the biomechanical environment for fusion.

  16. Adjacent segment disease after instrumented fusion for adult lumbar spondylolisthesis: Incidence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhao-Ming; Deviren, Vedat; Tay, Bobby; Burch, Shane; Berven, Sigurd H

    2017-05-01

    A potential long-term complication of lumbar fusion is the development of adjacent segment disease (ASD), which may necessitate second surgery and adversely affect outcomes. The objective of this is to determine the incidence of ASD following instrumented fusion in adult patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis and to identify the risk factors for this complication. We retrospectively assessed adult patients who had undergone decompression and instrumented fusion for lumbar spondylolisthesis between January 2006 and December 2012. The incidence of ASD was analyzed. Potential risk factors included the patient-related factors, surgery-related factors, and radiographic variables such as sagittal alignment, preexisting disc degeneration and spinal stenosis at the adjacent segment. A total of 154 patients (mean age, 58.4 years) were included. Mean duration of follow-up was 28.6 months. Eighteen patients (11.7%) underwent a reoperation for ASD; 15 patients had reoperation at cranial ASD and 3 at caudal ASD. The simultaneous decompression at adjacent segment (p=0.002) and preexisting spinal stenosis at cranial adjacent segment (p=0.01) were identified as risk factors for ASD. The occurrence of ASD was not affected by patient-related factors, the types, grades and levels of spondylolisthesis, surgical approach, fusion procedures, levels of fusion, number of levels fused, types of bone graft, use of bone morphogenetic proteins, sagittal alignment, preexisting adjacent disc degeneration and preexisting spinal stenosis at caudal adjacent segments. Our findings suggest the overall incidence of ASD is 11.7% in adult patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis after decompression and instrumented fusion at a mean follow-up of 28.6 months, the simultaneous decompression at the adjacent segment and preexisting spinal stenosis at cranial adjacent segment are risk factors for ASD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Degenerative Changes of Spine in Helicopter Pilots

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Joo Hyeon; Kim, Jung Won; Jeong, Ho Joong; Sim, Young Joo; Kim, Dong Kyu; Choi, Jong Kyoung; Im, Hyoung June

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between whole body vibration (WBV) induced helicopter flights and degenerative changes of the cervical and lumbar spine. Methods We examined 186 helicopter pilots who were exposed to WBV and 94 military clerical workers at a military hospital. Questionnaires and interviews were completed for 164 of the 186 pilots (response rate, 88.2%) and 88 of the 94 clerical workers (response rate, 93.6%). Radiographic examinations of the cervical and the lumbar spines were performed after obtaining informed consent in both groups. Degenerative changes of the cervical and lumbar spines were determined using four radiographs per subject, and diagnosed by two independent, blinded radiologists. Results There was no significant difference in general and work-related characteristics except for flight hours and frequency between helicopter pilots and clerical workers. Degenerative changes in the cervical spine were significantly more prevalent in the helicopter pilots compared with control group. In the cervical spine multivariate model, accumulated flight hours (per 100 hours) was associated with degenerative changes. And in the lumbar spine multivariate model, accumulated flight hours (per 100 hours) and age were associated with degenerative changes. Conclusion Accumulated flight hours were associated with degenerative changes of the cervical and lumbar spines in helicopter pilots. PMID:24236259

  18. First observation of the decay Bs0-->Ds-Ds+ and measurement of its branching ratio.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyria, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-01-18

    We report the observation of the exclusive decay Bs0-->Ds-Ds+ at the 7.5 standard deviation level using 355 pb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron. We measure the relative branching ratio B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)/B(B0-->D-Ds+)=1.44(-0.44)(+0.48). Using the world average value for B(B0-->D-Ds+), we find B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)=(9.4(-4.2)(+4.4))x10(-3). This provides a lower bound DeltaGammasCP/Gammas>or=2B(Bs0-->Ds-Ds+)>1.2x10(-2) at 95% C.L.

  19. Surgical results of dynamic nonfusion stabilization with the Segmental Spinal Correction System for degenerative lumbar spinal diseases with instability: Minimum 2-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Hideki; Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki; Morishita, Yuichirou; Sakai, Tsubasa; Huang, George; Kida, Hirotaka; Takemitsu, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Background When spinal fusion is applied to degenerative lumbar spinal disease with instability, adjacent segment disorder will be an issue in the future. However, decompression alone could cause recurrence of spinal canal stenosis because of increased instability on operated segments and lead to revision surgery. Covering the disadvantages of both procedures, we applied nonfusion stabilization with the Segmental Spinal Correction System (Ulrich Medical, Ulm, Germany) and decompression. Methods The surgical results of 52 patients (35 men and 17 women) with a minimum 2-year follow-up were analyzed: 10 patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis, 15 with lumbar canal stenosis with disc herniation, 20 with degenerative spondylolisthesis, 6 with disc herniation, and 1 with lumbar discopathy. Results The Japanese Orthopaedic Association score was improved, from 14.4 ± 5.3 to 25.5 ± 2.8. The improvement rate was 76%. Range of motion of the operated segments was significantly decreased, from 9.6° ± 4.2° to 2.0° ± 1.8°. Only 1 patient had adjacent segment disease that required revision surgery. There was only 1 screw breakage, but the patient was asymptomatic. Conclusions Over a minimum 2-year follow-up, the results of nonfusion stabilization with the Segmental Spinal Correction System for unstable degenerative lumbar disease were good. It is necessary to follow up the cases with a focus on adjacent segment disorders in the future. PMID:25802671

  20. The evaluation of lumbosacral dysplasia in young patients with lumbosacral spondylolisthesis: comparison with controls and relationship with the severity of slip.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit; Labelle, Hubert; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2012-11-01

    Comparison of lumbosacral dysplasia between normal individuals and patients with low and high grade spondylolisthesis has not been done previously. The objective of this study is to evaluate the relationship between lumbosacral dysplasia and severity of slip in young patients with lumbosacral spondylolisthesis. Postero-anterior and lateral radiographs of 120 normal individuals and 131 patients with developmental spondylolisthesis (91 low and 40 high grades) were reviewed. Quantitative evaluation of lumbosacral dysplasia was done using 6 criteria involving the degree of laminar dysplasia, degree of facet dysplasia, size of L5 transverse processes, L5/S1 disc height, type of sacral doming and L5 lumbar index. Subjects were categorized as having no/low, moderate or severe dysplasia based on the total dysplasia score. Comparisons in total dysplasia score between normal, low grade and high grade groups were performed and the correlation between degree of dysplasia and percentage of slip was assessed. Most normal individuals (88.3%) had no/low dysplasia; most patients with low grade spondylolisthesis (61.5%) had moderate dysplasia, while most patients with high grade spondylolisthesis (72.5%) had severe dysplasia. There was a significant difference in dysplasia between normal individuals and patients with spondylolisthesis. Dysplasia also varied significantly between low and high grade spondylolisthesis. There was a strong positive correlation (r = 0.63) between severity of dysplasia and percentage of slip. There is a significant relationship between the severity of spondylolisthesis and lumbosacral dysplasia, with mainly no/low dysplasia observed in controls and increasing total dysplasia scores in higher grades of spondylolisthesis. In addition, a variable degree of dysplasia was found within groups with low or high grade spondylolisthesis, suggesting that different subgroups of patients exist with regard to dysplasia. Thus the degree of dysplasia varies in

  1. Does hybrid fixation prevent junctional disease after posterior fusion for degenerative lumbar disorders? A minimum 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Baioni, Andrea; Di Silvestre, Mario; Greggi, Tiziana; Vommaro, Francesco; Lolli, Francesco; Scarale, Antonio

    2015-11-01

    Medium- to long-term retrospective evaluation of clinical and radiographic outcome in the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases with hybrid posterior fixation. Thirty patients were included with the mean age of 47.8 years (range 35 to 60 years). All patients underwent posterior lumbar instrumentation using hybrid fixation for lumbar stenosis with instability (13 cases), degenerative spondylolisthesis Meyerding grade I (6 cases), degenerative disc disease of one or more adjacent levels in six cases and mild lumbar degenerative scoliosis in five patients. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using Oswestry disability index (ODI), Roland and Morris disability questionnaire (RMDQ), and the visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores. All patients were assessed by preoperative, postoperative and follow-up standing plain radiographs and lateral X-rays with flexion and extension. Adjacent disc degeneration was also evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at follow-up. At a mean follow-up of 6.1 years, we observed on X-rays and/or MRI 3 cases of adjacent segment disease (10.0 %): two of them (6.6 %) presented symptoms and recurred a new surgery. The last patient (3.3 %) developed asymptomatic retrolisthesis of L3 not requiring revision surgery. The mean preoperative ODI score was 67.6, RMDQ score was 15.1, VAS back pain score was 9.5, and VAS leg pain score was 8.6. Postoperatively, these values improved to 28.1, 5.4, 3.1, and 2.9, respectively, and remained substantially unchanged at the final follow-up: (27.7, 5.2, 2.9, and 2.7, respectively). After 5-year follow-up, hybrid posterior lumbar fixation presented satisfying clinical outcomes in the treatment of degenerative disease.

  2. Measurement of the D(s)+ lifetime.

    PubMed

    Link, J M; Yager, P M; Anjos, J C; Bediaga, I; Castromonte, C; Machado, A A; Magnin, J; Massafferi, A; de Miranda, J M; Pepe, I M; Polycarpo, E; dos Reis, A C; Carrillo, S; Casimiro, E; Cuautle, E; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Uribe, C; Vázquez, F; Agostino, L; Cinquini, L; Cumalat, J P; O'Reilly, B; Segoni, I; Stenson, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chiodini, G; Gaines, I; Garbincius, P H; Garren, L A; Gottschalk, E; Kasper, P H; Kreymer, A E; Kutschke, R; Wang, M; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F L; Pacetti, S; Zallo, A; Reyes, M; Cawlfield, C; Kim, D Y; Rahimi, A; Wiss, J; Gardner, R; Kryemadhi, A; Chung, Y S; Kang, J S; Ko, B R; Kwak, J W; Lee, K B; Cho, K; Park, H; Alimonti, G; Barberis, S; Boschini, M; Cerutti, A; D'Angelo, P; DiCorato, M; Dini, P; Edera, L; Erba, S; Inzani, P; Leveraro, F; Malvezzi, S; Menasce, D; Mezzadri, M; Milazzo, L; Moroni, L; Pedrini, D; Pontoglio, C; Prelz, F; Rovere, M; Sala, S; Davenport, T F; Arena, V; Boca, G; Bonomi, G; Gianini, G; Liguori, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Merlo, M M; Pantea, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Göbel, C; Hernandez, H; Lopez, A M; Mendez, H; Paris, A; Quinones, J; Ramirez, J E; Zhang, Y; Wilson, J R; Handler, T; Mitchell, R; Engh, D; Hosack, M; Johns, W E; Luiggi, E; Moore, J E; Nehring, M; Sheldon, P D; Vaandering, E W; Webster, M; Sheaff, M

    2005-07-29

    A high statistics measurement of the D(s)+ lifetime from the Fermilab fixed-target FOCUS photoproduction experiment is presented. We describe the analysis of the two decay modes, D(s)+ --> phi(1020)pi+ and D(s)+ -->K*(892)0K+, used for the measurement. The measured lifetime is 507.4 +/- 5.5(stat) +/- 5.1(syst) fs using 8961 +/- 105 D(s)+ --> phi(1020)pi+ and 4680 +/- 90 D(s)+ --> K*(892)0K+ decays. This is a significant improvement over the present world average.

  3. Construction and validation of a three-dimensional finite element model of degenerative scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Yang, Yonghong; Lou, Shuliang; Zhang, Dongsheng; Liao, Shenghui

    2015-12-24

    With the aging of the population, degenerative scoliosis (DS) incidence rate is increasing. In recent years, increasing research on this topic has been carried out, yet biomechanical research on the subject is seldom seen and in vitro biomechanical model of DS nearly cannot be available. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a complete three-dimensional finite element model of DS in order to build the digital platform for further biomechanical study. A 55-year-old female DS patient (Suer Pan, ID number was P141986) was selected for this study. This study was performed in accordance with the ethical standards of Declaration of Helsinki and its amendments and was approved by the local ethics committee (117 hospital of PLA ethics committee). Spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning was conducted on the patient's lumbar spine from the T12 to S1. CT images were then imported into a finite element modeling system. A three-dimensional solid model was then formed from segmentation of the CT scan. The three-dimensional model of each vertebra was then meshed, and material properties were assigned to each element according to the pathological characteristics of DS. Loads and boundary conditions were then applied in such a manner as to simulate in vitro biomechanical experiments conducted on lumbar segments. The results of the model were then compared with experimental results in order to validate the model. An integral three-dimensional finite element model of DS was built successfully, consisting of 113,682 solid elements, 686 cable elements, 33,329 shell elements, 4968 target elements, 4968 contact elements, totaling 157,635 elements, and 197,374 nodes. The model accurately described the physical features of DS and was geometrically similar to the object of study. The results of analysis with the finite element model agreed closely with in vitro experiments, validating the accuracy of the model. The three-dimensional finite element model of DS built in

  4. Guideline summary review: an evidence-based clinical guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, D Scott; Baisden, Jamie; Mazanec, Daniel J; Patel, Rakesh D; Bess, Robert S; Burton, Douglas; Chutkan, Norman B; Cohen, Bernard A; Crawford, Charles H; Ghiselli, Gary; Hanna, Amgad S; Hwang, Steven W; Kilincer, Cumhur; Myers, Mark E; Park, Paul; Rosolowski, Karie A; Sharma, Anil K; Taleghani, Christopher K; Trammell, Terry R; Vo, Andrew N; Williams, Keith D

    2016-12-01

    The North American Spine Society's (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Adult Isthmic Spondylolisthesis features evidence-based recommendations for diagnosing and treating adult patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis. The guideline is intended to reflect contemporary treatment concepts for symptomatic isthmic spondylolisthesis as reflected in the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of June 2013. NASS' guideline on this topic is the only guideline on adult isthmic spondylolisthesis accepted in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's National Guideline Clearinghouse. The purpose of the guideline is to provide an evidence-based educational tool to assist spine specialists when making clinical decisions for adult patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis. This article provides a brief summary of the evidence-based guideline recommendations for diagnosing and treating patients with this condition. This is a guideline summary review. This guideline is the product of the Adult Isthmic Spondylolisthesis Work Group of NASS' Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline Development Committee. The methods used to develop this guideline are detailed in the complete guideline and technical report available on the NASS website. In brief, a multidisciplinary work group of spine care specialists convened to identify clinical questionsto address in the guideline. The literature search strategy was developed in consultation with medical librarians. Upon completion of the systematic literature search, evidence relevant to the clinical questions posed in the guideline was reviewed. Work group members utilized NASS evidentiary table templates to summarize study conclusions, identify study strengths and weaknesses, and assign levels of evidence. Work group members participated in webcasts and in-person recommendation meetings to update and formulate evidence-based recommendations and incorporate expert opinion when

  5. Geographic variation in the surgical management of lumbar spondylolisthesis: characterizing practice patterns and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Azad, Tej D; Vail, Daniel; O'Connell, Chloe; Han, Summer S; Veeravagu, Anand; Ratliff, John K

    2018-05-07

    The role of arthrodesis in the surgical management of lumbar spondylolisthesis remains controversial. We hypothesized that practice patterns and outcomes for this patient population may vary widely. To characterize geographic variation in surgical practices and outcomes for patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. Retrospective analysis on a national longitudinal database between 2007 and 2014. We calculated arthrodesis rates, inpatient and long term costs, and key quality indicators (e.g. reoperation rates). Using linear and logistic regression models, we then calculated expected quality indicator values, adjusting for patient-level demographic factors, and compared these values to the observed values, to assess quality variation apart from differences in patient populations. We identified a cohort of 67,077 patients (60.7% female, mean age of 59.8 years (SD, 12.0) with lumbar spondylolisthesis who received either laminectomy or laminectomy with arthrodesis. The majority of patients received arthrodesis (91.8%). Actual rates of arthrodesis varied from 97.5% in South Dakota to 81.5% in Oregon. Geography remained a significant predictor of arthrodesis even after adjusting for demographic factors (p<0.001). Marked geographic variation was also observed in initial costs ($32,485 in Alabama to $78,433 in Colorado), two-year post-operative costs ($15,612 in Arkansas to $34,096 in New Jersey), length of hospital stay (2.6 days in Arkansas to 4.5 in Washington, D.C.), 30-day complication rates (9.5% in South Dakota to 22.4% in Maryland), 30-day readmission rates (2.5% in South Dakota to 13.6% in Connecticut), and reoperation rates (1.8% in Maine to 12.7% in Alabama). There is marked geographic variation in the rates of arthrodesis in treatment of spondylolisthesis within the United States. This variation remains pronounced after accounting for patient-level demographic differences. Costs of surgery and quality outcomes also vary widely. Further study is necessary to

  6. Remodelling of the sacrum in high-grade spondylolisthesis: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    van Ooij, André; Weijers, René; van Rhijn, Lodewijk

    2003-06-01

    Two young patients are described, who were operated on for high-grade spondylolisthesis. A good posterolateral fusion was achieved, without decompression and without reduction. The clinical course was favourable, the tight hamstring syndrome resolved. Disappearance of the posterior-superior part of the sacrum and of the posterior part of the L5-S1 disc was observed on comparing pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance (MR) images. This resulted in normalisation of the width of the spinal canal. Around the L5 nerve roots in the L5-S1 foramina some fat reappeared. These anatomical changes on MRI could play a role in the disappearance of clinical symptoms.

  7. [POSTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION FOR DOUBLE-SEGMENTAL BILATERAL ISTHMIC LUMBAR SPONDYLOLISTHESIS].

    PubMed

    Xing, Wenhua; Huo Hongjun; Yang, Xuejun; Xiao, Yulong; Zhao, Yan; Fu, Yu; Zhu, Yong; Li, Feng; Xin, Daqi

    2015-12-01

    To explore the effectiveness of posterior lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of double-segmental bilateral isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis. Between February 2008 and December 2013, 17 patients with double-segmental bilateral isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis were treated with posterior lumbar interbody fusion. There were 12 males and 5 females, with an age ranged 48-69 years (mean, 55.4 years). The disease duration ranged from 11 months to 17 years (median, 22 months). According to the Meyerding classification, 30 vertebrea were rated as degree I, 3 as degree II, and 1 as degree III. L₄,₅ was involved in 14 cases and L₃,₄ in 3 cases. The preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) score was 8.6 ± 3.2. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in 2 cases because of intraoperative dural tear; primary healing of incision was obtained, with no operation related complication in the other patients. The patients were followed up 1-6 years (mean, 3.4 years). At last follow-up, VAS score was decreased significantly to 1.1 ± 0.4, showing significant difference when compared with preoperative score (t=7.652, P=0.008). X-ray films showed that slippage vertebral body obtained different degree of reduction, with a complete reduction rate of 85% (29/34) at 1 week after operation. All patients achieved bony union at 6-12 months (mean, 7.4 months). According to the Lenke classification, 13 cases were rated as grade A and 4 cases as grade B. No internal fixation loosening and fracture were observed during the follow-up. Intervertebral disc height was maintained, no loss of spondylolisthesis reduction was found. It can obtain satisfactory clinical result to use spinal canal decompression by posterior approach, and screw fixation for posterior fusion in treatment of double-segmental bilateral isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis. The key points to successful operation include accurate insertion of screw, effective decompression, distraction before reduction, rational use of

  8. Case report 868. Congenital bilateral spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis of the fourth cervical vertebra.

    PubMed

    Jeyapalan, K; Chavda, S V

    1994-10-01

    A case of congenital bilateral spondylolysis of fourth cervical vertebra was reported and the characteristic radiological features shown. Although the diagnosis is often suggested by the plain films, demonstration of the typical CT findings is often necessary to reach a final diagnosis. Awareness of this entity and its specific radiological features will help to differentiate this relatively benign cervical anomaly from other, more ominous, unstable causes of cervical spondylolisthesis such as those related to acute cervical injury. It may also prevent any inappropriate treatment from being undertaken.

  9. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Clinical Trial Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    strategies can be designed , tested and adopted as standard care. 2 While repeat evaluation and study of affected patients are vital to rigorously...following document is a summary of our experience and research in testing retinal structure and function in eyes with degenerative retinal diseases...Network PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Patricia Zilliox, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: National Neurovision Research Institute Owings

  10. Cartilage repair in the degenerative ageing knee

    PubMed Central

    Brittberg, Mats; Gomoll, Andreas H; Canseco, José A; Far, Jack; Lind, Martin; Hui, James

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Cartilage damage can develop due to trauma, resulting in focal chondral or osteochondral defects, or as more diffuse loss of cartilage in a generalized organ disease such as osteoarthritis. A loss of cartilage function and quality is also seen with increasing age. There is a spectrum of diseases ranging from focal cartilage defects with healthy surrounding cartilage to focal lesions in degenerative cartilage, to multiple and diffuse lesions in osteoarthritic cartilage. At the recent Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedics Symposium (AROS) 2015, regenerative challenges in an ageing population were discussed by clinicians and basic scientists. A group of clinicians was given the task of discussing the role of tissue engineering in the treatment of degenerative cartilage lesions in ageing patients. We present the outcomes of our discussions on current treatment options for such lesions, with particular emphasis on different biological repair techniques and their supporting level of evidence. Results and interpretation Based on the studies on treatment of degenerative lesions and early OA, there is low-level evidence to suggest that cartilage repair is a possible treatment for such lesions, but there are conflicting results regarding the effect of advanced age on the outcome. We concluded that further improvements are needed for direct repair of focal, purely traumatic defects before we can routinely use such repair techniques for the more challenging degenerative lesions. Furthermore, we need to identify trigger mechanisms that start generalized loss of cartilage matrix, and induce subchondral bone changes and concomitant synovial pathology, to maximize our treatment methods for biological repair in degenerative ageing joints. PMID:27910738

  11. Measurement of B(Ds+→l+ν) and the decay constant fDS+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Smith, A.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Ernst, J.; Ecklund, K. M.; Severini, H.; Love, W.; Savinov, V.; Aquines, O.; Lopez, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J.; Huang, G. S.; Miller, D. H.; Pavlunin, V.; Sanghi, B.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.; Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H.; Yang, F.; Artuso, M.; Blusk, S.; Butt, J.; Khalil, S.; Li, J.; Menaa, N.; Mountain, R.; Nisar, S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Sia, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Dubrovin, M.; Lincoln, A.; Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Naik, P.; Briere, R. A.; Ferguson, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Vogel, H.; Watkins, M. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Adam, N. E.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C. D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Mahlke-Krüger, H.; Mohapatra, D.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Pivarski, J.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Schwarthoff, H.; Shi, X.; Stroiney, S.; Sun, W. M.; Wilksen, T.; Athar, S. B.; Patel, R.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Cawlfield, C.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Karliner, I.; Kim, D.; Lowrey, N.; Selen, M.; White, E. J.; Wiss, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Shepherd, M. R.; Besson, D.

    2007-10-01

    We examine e+e-→Ds-Ds*+ and Ds*-Ds+ interactions at 4170 MeV using the CLEO-c detector in order to measure the decay constant fDs+. We use the Ds+→ℓ+ν channel, where the ℓ+ designates either a μ+ or a τ+, when the τ+→π+ν¯. Analyzing both modes independently, we determine B(Ds+→μ+ν)=(0.594±0.066±0.031)%, and B(Ds+→τ+ν)=(8.0±1.3±0.4)%. We also analyze them simultaneously to find an effective value of Beff(Ds+→μ+ν)=(0.638±0.059±0.033)% and extract fDs+=274±13±7MeV. Combining with our previous determination of B(D+→μ+ν), we also find the ratio fDs+/fD+=1.23±0.11±0.04. We compare to current theoretical estimates. Finally, we find B(Ds+→e+ν)<1.3×10-4 at 90% confidence level.

  12. Outcome of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in spondylolisthesis-A clinico-radiological correlation.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Vijay Anand; Douraiswami, Balaji; Subramani, Suresh

    2018-06-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is a common cause of morbidity in middle aged individuals. Spinal fusion with instrumentation has become the gold standard for lumbar segmental instability. Studies which correlate the improvement in radiology postoperatively with functional outcome show contrasting reports. This study is aimed at finding the correlation between clinical and radiological outcomes after surgery with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. A retrospective study in 35 patients who underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in a period of 1 year was done. Preoperative pain (VAS Score), functional ability (ODI), radiological parameters (slip angle, slip grade, disc height, foraminal height, lumbar lordosis) were compared with postoperative recordings at the last followup. Functional improvement (Macnab's criteria) and fusion (Lee's fusion criteria) were assessed. Statistical analysis was done with student's paired t -test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. VAS score, ODI improved from 8 to 2 and 70 to 15 respectively. Slip angle improved from 23°to 5° on an average. 80% patients showed fusion and 85% showed good clinical outcome at 1 year followup. Analyzing with Pearson correlation coefficient showed no significant relation between pain scores and radiological parameters. But there was statistically significant relation between radiological fusion and the final clinical outcome. TLIF produces spinal fusion in most individuals. Strong spinal fusion is essential for good clinical outcome in spondylolisthesis patients who undergo TLIF. Reduction in slip is not necessary for all patients with listhesis.

  13. Pedicle screw fixation for isthmic spondylolisthesis: does posterior lumbar interbody fusion improve outcome over posterolateral fusion?

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Giovanni; Conti, Alfredo; Cacciola, Fabio; Cardali, Salvatore; La Torre, Domenico; Gambadauro, Nicola Maria; Tomasello, Francesco

    2003-09-01

    Posterolateral fusion involving instrumentation-assisted segmental fixation represents a valid procedure in the treatment of lumbar instability. In cases of anterior column failure, such as in isthmic spondylolisthesis, supplemental posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) may improve the fusion rate and endurance of the construct. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion is, however, a more demanding procedure and increases costs and risks of the intervention. The advantages of this technique must, therefore, be weighed against those of a simple posterior lumbar fusion. Thirty-five consecutive patients underwent pedicle screw fixation for isthmic spondylolisthesis. In 18 patients posterior lumbar fusion was performed, and in 17 patients PLIF was added. Clinical, economic, functional, and radiographic data were assessed to determine differences in clinical and functional results and biomechanical properties. At 2-year follow-up examination, the correction of subluxation, disc height, and foraminal area were maintained in the group in which a PLIF procedure was performed, but not in the posterolateral fusion-only group (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, no statistical intergroup differences were demonstrated in terms of neurological improvement (p = 1), economic (p = 0.43), or functional (p = 0.95) outcome, nor in terms of fusion rate (p = 0.49). The authors' findings support the view that an interbody fusion confers superior mechanical strength to the spinal construct; when posterolateral fusion is the sole intervention, progressive loss of the extreme correction can be expected. Such mechanical insufficiency, however, did not influence clinical outcome.

  14. A systematic review of clinical outcomes in surgical treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Noorian, Shaya; Sorensen, Karen; Cho, Woojin

    2018-05-07

    A variety of surgical methods are available for the treatment of adult isthmic spondylolisthesis, but there is no consensus regarding their relative effects on clinical outcomes. To compare the effects of different surgical techniques on clinical outcomes in adult isthmic spondylolisthesis. Systematic Review PATIENT SAMPLE: A total of 1,538 patients from six randomized clinical trials and nine observational studies comparing different surgical treatments in adult isthmic spondylolisthesis. Primary outcome measures of interest included differences in pre- versus post-surgical assessments of pain, functional disability, and overall health as assessed by validated pain rating scales and questionnaires. Secondary outcome measures of interest included intraoperative blood loss, length of hospital stay, surgery duration, reoperation rates, and complication rates. A search of the literature was performed in September, 2017 for relevant comparative studies published in the prior 10-year period in the following databases: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and ClinicalTrials.Gov. PRISMA guidelines were followed and studies were included/excluded based on strict predetermined criteria. Quality appraisal was conducted using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) for observational studies and the Cochrane Collaboration's risk of bias assessment tool for randomized clinical trials. The authors received no funding support to conduct this review. A total of 15 studies (6 randomized clinical trials and 9 observational studies) were included for full text review, a majority of which only included cases of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis. 1 study examined the effects of adding pedicle screw fixation (PS) to posterolateral fusion (PLF) and 2 studies examined the effects of adding reduction to interbody fusion (IF) + PS on clinical outcomes. 5 studies compared PLF, 4 with and 1 without PS, to IF + PS. Additionally, 3 studies compared circumferential fusion (IF + PS + PLF) to IF + PS and 1

  15. Bone bridge formation across the neuroforamen 14 years after instrumented fusion for isthmic spondylolisthesis-a case report.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joel Louis; Tan, Kimberly-Anne; Hey, Hwee Weng Dennis

    2017-03-01

    This case report describes the first case of a bone bridge formation across the left L5/S1 neuroforamen after instrumented posterolateral fusion for L5/S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis. Our patient was a 70-year-old lady who had grade 2, L5/S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis and bilateral S1 nerve root compression. She suffered from mechanical low back pain and neurogenic claudication, with radicular pain over both S1 dermatomes. She underwent in-situ, instrumented, posterolateral fusion and was asymptomatic for more than 13 years before developing progressive onset of left radicular pain over the L5 dermatome. Imaging revealed a bisected left L5/S1 neuroforamen secondary to a bone bridge formation resulting in stenosis. The pars defect in this case may have had sufficient osteogenic and osteoinductive factors to heal following spinal stabilization. Although in-situ posterolateral fusion is an accepted surgical treatment for isthmic spondylolisthesis, surgeons should consider reduction of the spondylolisthesis and excision of the pars defects to avoid this possible long-term complication.

  16. Study of radially excited Ds(21 S 0) and Ds(3P)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yu; Zhao, Ze; Zhang, Ai-Lin

    2017-08-01

    The unobserved JP = 0- radial excitation Ds(21 S 0) is anticipated to have mass 2650 MeV (denoted as Ds(2650)). Study of hadronic production is an important way to identify highly excited states. We study hadronic production of Ds(2650) from higher excited resonances in a 3 P 0 model. Relevant hadronic partial decay widths are found to be very small, which implies it is difficult to observe Ds(2650) in hadronic decays of higher excited resonances. Hadronic decay widths of radially excited Ds(3P) have also been estimated. The total decay widths of four Ds(3P) are large, but the branching ratios in the Ds(2650)η channel are very small, which implies that it seems impossible to observe Ds(2650) in hadronic decays of Ds(3P). The dominant decay channels of the four Ds(3P) have been pointed out, and D1(2420), D1(2430), , D(2550), D(2600), (11D2)D(2750) and are possible to observe in hadronic production from Ds(3P). Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475111)

  17. Clinical outcome of trans-sacral interbody fusion after partial reduction for high-grade l5-s1 spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Deviren, V; Berven, S; Kleinstueck, F; Bradford, D S

    2001-10-15

    A clinical retrospective study was conducted. To evaluate the clinical and radiographic outcome of reduction followed by trans-sacral interbody fusion for high-grade spondylolisthesis. In situ posterior interbody fusion with fibula allograft has improved the fusion rates for patients with high-grade spondylolisthesis. The use of this technique in conjunction with partial reduction has not been reported. Nine consecutive patients underwent treatment of high-grade (Grade 3 or 4) spondylolisthesis with partial reduction followed by posterior interbody fusion using cortical allograft. The average age at the time of surgery was 27 years (range, 8-51 years), and the average follow-up period was 43 months (range, 24-72 months). Before surgery, eight patients had low back pain, seven patients had radiating leg pain, and five patients had hamstring tightness. The average grade of spondylolisthesis by Meyerding grading was 3.9 (range, 3-5). Charts and radiographs were evaluated, and outcomes were collected by use of the modified SRS outcomes instrument. Radiographic indexes demonstrated significant improvement with partial reduction and fusion. The slip angle, as measured from the inferior endplate of L5, improved from 41.2 degrees (range, 24-82 degrees ) before surgery to 21 degrees (range, 5-40 degrees ) after surgery. All the patients were extremely or somewhat satisfied with surgery. The two patients who underwent this operation without initial instrumentation experienced fractures of their interbody grafts. Both of these patients underwent repair of the pseudarthrosis with placement of trans-sacral pedicle screw instrumentation and subsequent fusion. Partial reduction followed by posterior interbody fusion is an effective technique for the management of high-grade spondylolisthesis in pediatric and adult patient populations, as assessed by radiographic and clinical criteria. Pedicle screw instrumentation with the sacral screws capturing L5 is recommended when this

  18. Current Evidence Regarding the Treatment of Pediatric Lumbar Spondylolisthesis: A Report From the Scoliosis Research Society Evidence Based Medicine Committee.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Charles H; Larson, A Noelle; Gates, Marilyn; Bess, R Shay; Guillaume, Tenner J; Kim, Han Jo; Oetgen, Matthew E; Ledonio, Charles G; Sanders, James; Burton, Douglas C

    2017-09-01

    Structured literature review. The Scoliosis Research Society requested an assessment of the current state of peer-reviewed evidence regarding pediatric lumbar spondylolisthesis to identify what is known and what research remains essential to further understanding. Pediatric lumbar spondylolisthesis is common, yet no formal synthesis of the published literature regarding treatment has been previously performed. A comprehensive literature search was performed. From 6600 initial citations with abstract, 663 articles underwent full-text review. The best available evidence regarding surgical and medical/interventional treatment was provided by 51 studies. None of the studies were graded Level I or II evidence. Eighteen of the studies were Level III, representing the current best available evidence. Thirty-three of the studies were Level IV. Although studies suggest a benign course for "low grade" (<50% slip) isthmic spondylolisthesis, extensive literature suggests that a substantial number of patients present for treatment with pain and activity limitations. Pain resolution and return to activity is common with both medical/interventional and operative treatment. The role of medical/interventional bracing is not well established. Uninstrumented posterolateral fusion has been reported to produce good clinical results, but concerns regarding nonunion exist. Risk of slip progression is a specific concern in the "high grade" or dysplastic type. Although medical/interventional observation has been reported to be reasonable in a small series of asymptomatic high-grade slip patients, surgical treatment is commonly recommended to prevent progression. There is Level III evidence that instrumentation and reduction lowers the risk of nonunion, and that circumferential fusion is superior to posterior-only or anterior-only fusion. There is Level III evidence that patients with a higher slip angle are more likely to fail medical/interventional treatment of high

  19. Outer Retinal Tubulation in Degenerative Retinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Naomi R.; Greenberg, Jonathan P.; Laud, Ketan; Tsang, Stephen; Freund, K. Bailey

    2013-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate outer retinal tubulation (ORT) in various degenerative retinal disorders. Methods This was a retrospective review of the multimodal imaging of 29 eyes of 15 patients with various retinal dystrophies and inflammatory maculopathies manifesting ORT. The morphologic features of ORT and its evolution over time were analyzed using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) data. Results Outer retinal tubulation was identified as round or ovoid structures with hyper-reflective borders in pattern dystrophy (6 eyes), acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (5 eyes), retinitis pigmentosa (4 eyes), Stargardt disease (4 eyes), gyrate atrophy (2 eyes), choroideremia (2 eyes), and various other degenerative conditions. These structures appeared to develop from the invagination of photoreceptors at the junction of intact and atrophic outer retina. During follow-up, the number and distribution of ORT largely remained stable. As zones of atrophy enlarged, the frequency of ORT appeared to increase. The ORT structures were found in fewer than 10% of patients with retinitis pigmentosa, Stargardt, or pattern dystrophy. Conclusion Outer retinal tubulation is found in various degenerative retinal disorders that share in common damage to the outer retina and/or retinal pigment epithelium. The presence of ORT may be in an indicator of underlying disease stage and severity. PMID:23676993

  20. Degenerative disease affecting the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Eadie, M J

    1974-03-01

    The term "degenerative disease" is one which is rather widely used in relation to the nervous system and yet one which is rarely formally and carefully defined. The term appears to be applied to disorders of the nervous system which often occur in later life and which are of uncertain cause. In the Shorter Oxford Dictionary the word degeneration is defined as "a change of structure by which an organism, or an organ, assumes the form of a lower type". However this is not quite the sense in which the word is applied in human neuropathology, where it is conventional to restrict the use of the word to those organic disorders which are of uncertain or poorly understood cause and in which there is a deterioration or regression in the level of functioning of the nervous system. The concept of degenerative disorder is applied to other organs as well as to the brain, and as disease elsewhere in the body may affect the nervous system, it seems reasonable to include within the topic of degenerative disorder affecting the nervous system those conditions in which the nervous system is involved as a result of primary degenerations in other parts of the body. Copyright © 1974 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by . All rights reserved.

  1. Modeled cost-effectiveness of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion compared with posterolateral fusion for spondylolisthesis using N(2)QOD data.

    PubMed

    Carreon, Leah Y; Glassman, Steven D; Ghogawala, Zoher; Mummaneni, Praveen V; McGirt, Matthew J; Asher, Anthony L

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) has become the most commonly used fusion technique for lumbar degenerative disorders. This suggests an expectation of better clinical outcomes with this technique, but this has not been validated consistently. How surgical variables and choice of health utility measures drive the cost-effectiveness of TLIF relative to posterolateral fusion (PSF) has not been established. The authors used health utility values derived from Short Form-6D (SF-6D) and EQ-5D and different cost-effectiveness thresholds to evaluate the relative cost-effectiveness of TLIF compared with PSF. METHODS From the National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database (N(2)QOD), 101 patients with spondylolisthesis who underwent PSF were propensity matched to patients who underwent TLIF. Health-related quality of life measures and perioperative parameters were compared. Because health utility values derived from the SF-6D and EQ-5D questionnaires have been shown to vary in patients with low-back pain, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were derived from both measures. On the basis of these matched cases, a sensitivity analysis for the relative cost per QALY of TLIF versus PSF was performed in a series of cost-assumption models. RESULTS Operative time, blood loss, hospital stay, and 30-day and 90-day readmission rates were similar for the TLIF and PSF groups. Both TLIF and PSF significantly improved back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, and EQ-5D and SF-6D scores at 3 and 12 months postoperatively. At 12 months postoperatively, patients who had undergone TLIF had greater improvements in mean ODI scores (30.4 vs 21.1, p = 0.001) and mean SF-6D scores (0.16 vs 0.11, p = 0.001) but similar improvements in mean EQ-5D scores (0.25 vs 0.22, p = 0.415) as patients treated with PSF. At a cost per QALY threshold of $100,000 and using SF-6D-based QALYs, the authors found that TLIF would be cost-prohibitive compared with PSF at a

  2. Method of quantitating dsDNA

    DOEpatents

    Stark, Peter C.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Mullen, Kenneth I.

    2002-01-01

    A method for quantitating dsDNA in an aqueous sample solution containing an unknown amount of dsDNA. A first aqueous test solution containing a known amount of a fluorescent dye-dsDNA complex and at least one fluorescence-attenutating contaminant is prepared. The fluorescence intensity of the test solution is measured. The first test solution is diluted by a known amount to provide a second test solution having a known concentration of dsDNA. The fluorescence intensity of the second test solution is measured. Additional diluted test solutions are similarly prepared until a sufficiently dilute test solution having a known amount of dsDNA is prepared that has a fluorescence intensity that is not attenuated upon further dilution. The value of the maximum absorbance of this solution between 200-900 nanometers (nm), referred to herein as the threshold absorbance, is measured. A sample solution having an unknown amount of dsDNA and an absorbance identical to that of the sufficiently dilute test solution at the same chosen wavelength is prepared. Dye is then added to the sample solution to form the fluorescent dye-dsDNA-complex, after which the fluorescence intensity of the sample solution is measured and the quantity of dsDNA in the sample solution is determined. Once the threshold absorbance of a sample solution obtained from a particular environment has been determined, any similarly prepared sample solution taken from a similar environment and having the same value for the threshold absorbance can be quantified for dsDNA by adding a large excess of dye to the sample solution and measuring its fluorescence intensity.

  3. PREPARE: presurgery physiotherapy for patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lindbäck, Yvonne; Tropp, Hans; Enthoven, Paul; Abbott, Allan; Öberg, Birgitta

    2017-12-15

    Surgery because of disc herniation or spinal stenosis results mostly in large improvement in the short-term, but mild to moderate improvements for pain and disability at long-term follow-up. Prehabilitation has been defined as augmenting functional capacity before surgery, which may have beneficial effect on outcome after surgery. The aim was to study if presurgery physiotherapy improves function, pain, and health in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorder scheduled for surgery. A single-blinded, two-arm, randomized controlled trial (RCT). A total of 197 patients were consecutively included at a spine clinic. The inclusion criteria were patients scheduled for surgery because of disc herniation, spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, or degenerative disc disease (DDD), 25-80 years of age. Primary outcome was Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Secondary outcomes were pain intensity, anxiety, depression, self-efficacy, fear avoidance, physical activity, and treatment effect. Patients were randomized to either presurgery physiotherapy or standardized information, with follow-up after the presurgery intervention as well as 3 and 12 months post surgery. The study was funded by regional research funds for US$77,342. No conflict of interest is declared. The presurgery physiotherapy group had better ODI, visual analog scale (VAS) back pain, EuroQol-5D (EQ-5D), EQ-VAS, Fear Avoidance Belief Questionnaire-Physical Activity (FABQ-PA), Self-Efficacy Scale (SES), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) depression scores and activity level compared with the waiting-list group after the presurgery intervention. The improvements were small, but larger than the study-specific minimal clinical important change (MCIC) in VAS back and leg pain, EQ-5D, and FABQ-PA, and almost in line with MCIC in ODI and Physical Component Summary (PCS) in the physiotherapy group. Post surgery, the only difference between the groups was higher activity level in the physiotherapy group

  4. Instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with interbody fusion device (Cage) in degenerative disc disease (DDD): 3 years outcome.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, M K; Hossain, M A; Sakeb, N; Khan, S I; Zaman, N

    2013-10-01

    This prospective interventional study carried out at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University and a private hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh during the period from October 2003 to September 2011. Surgical treatment of degenerative disc disease (DDD) should aim to re-expand the interbody space and stabilize until fusion is complete. The present study conducted to find out the efficacy of using interbody fusion device (Cage) to achieve interbody space re-expansion and fusion in surgical management of DDD. We have performed the interventional study on 53 patients, 42 female and 11 male, with age between 40 to 67 years. All the patients were followed up for 36 to 60 months (average 48 months). Forty seven patients were with spondylolisthesis and 06 with desiccated disc. All subjects were evaluated with regard to immediate and long term complications, radiological fusion and interbody space re-expansion and maintenance. The clinical outcome (pain and disability) was scored by standard pre and postoperative questionnaires. Intrusion, extrusion and migration of the interbody fusion cage were also assessed. Forty seven patients were considered to have satisfactory outcome in at least 36 months follow up. Pseudoarthrosis developed in 04 cases and 06 patients developed complications. In this series posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with interbody cage and instrumentation in DDD showed significant fusion rate and maintenance of interbody space. Satisfactory outcome observed in 88.68% cases.

  5. 'Lumbar Degenerative Kyphosis' Is Not Byword for Degenerative Sagittal Imbalance: Time to Replace a Misconception.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee; Jang, Jee-Soo; Kim, Sung-Min; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Jung-Kil

    2017-03-01

    Lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK) is a subgroup of the flat-back syndrome and is most commonly caused by unique life styles, such as a prolonged crouched posture during agricultural work and performing activities of daily living on the floor. Unfortunately, LDK has been used as a byword for degenerative sagittal imbalance, and this sometimes causes confusion. The aim of this review was to evaluate the exact territory of LDK, and to introduce another appropriate term for degenerative sagittal deformity. Unlike what its name suggests, LDK does not only include sagittal balance disorder of the lumbar spine and kyphosis, but also sagittal balance disorder of the whole spine and little lordosis of the lumbar spine. Moreover, this disease is closely related to the occupation of female farmers and an outdated Asian life style. These reasons necessitate a change in the nomenclature of this disorder to prevent misunderstanding. We suggest the name "primary degenerative sagittal imbalance" (PDSI), which encompasses degenerative sagittal misalignments of unknown origin in the whole spine in older-age patients, and is associated with back muscle wasting. LDK may be regarded as a subgroup of PDSI related to an occupation in agriculture. Conservative treatments such as exercise and physiotherapy are recommended as first-line treatments for patients with PDSI, and surgical treatment is considered only if conservative treatments failed. The measurement of spinopelvic parameters for sagittal balance is important prior to deformity corrective surgery. LDK can be considered a subtype of PDSI that is more likely to occur in female farmers, and hence the use of LDK as a global term for all degenerative sagittal imbalance disorders is better avoided. To avoid confusion, we recommend PDSI as a newer, more accurate diagnostic term instead of LDK.

  6. CfDS: a team effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizon, R.

    2003-02-01

    In 1989, the newly formed BAA Campaign for Dark Skies (CfDS) asked astronomical groups across the UK to nominate members who would actively spread the dark-skies message. Thirty-one 'regional officers' emerged, scattered from Plymouth to near John O'Groats, and from North Wales to the Wash. An unenviable task faced them: a CfDS survey had concluded that more than 90% of British observers, astronomers or not, experienced some degree of skyglow.

  7. [Significance of the sagittal profile and reposition of grade III-V spondylolisthesis].

    PubMed

    Dick, W; Elke, R

    1997-09-01

    The deformity in severe spondylolisthesis consists of two components: the parallel anterocaudad slip of the spondylolisthetic vertebra, and its tilt into kyphotic malposition. The influence of the two components is very different: the anterocaudad slippage has not much impact on the sagittal profile of the spine and is easily compensated for by a slight increase in lumbar lordosis. The kyphotic deformity has a high impact on trunk imbalance and the sagittal profile. There are two compensation mechanisms: hyperlordosis of the lumbar spine to its anatomical extremes and-if that is not sufficient-verticalisation of the sacral bone, performed by contracture of the hamstrings and uprighting of the pelvis around the hip joints. The latter mechanism is followed by functional disadvantages. Therefore, correction of the kyphosis of L5 may be considered during operative treatment if the lumbosacral kyphosis (angle delta) is less than 85 degrees and the sacral inclination less than 35 degrees.

  8. DS-2 Mars Microprobe Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H.; Kindler, A.; Deligiannis, F.; Davies, E.; Blankevoort, J.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Surampudi, S.

    1999-01-01

    In January of 1999 the NM DS-2 Mars microprobe will be launched to impact on Mars in December. The technical objectives of the missions are to demonstrate: key technologies, a passive atmospheric entry, highly integrated microelectronics which can withstand both low temperatures and high decelerations, and the capability to conduct in-situ, surface and subsurface science data acquisition. The scientific objectives are to determine if ice is present below the Martian surface, measure the local atmospheric pressure, characterize the thermal properties of the martian subsurface soil, and to estimate the vertical temperature gradient of the Martian soil. The battery requirements are 2-4 cell batteries, with voltage of 6-14 volts, capacity of 550 mAh at 80C, and 2Ah at 25C, shelf life of 2.5 years, an operating temperature of 60C and below, and the ability to withstand shock impact of 80,000 g's. The technical challenges and the approach is reviewed. The Li-SOCL2 system is reviewed, and graphs showing the current and voltage is displayed, along with the voltage over discharge time. The problems encountered during the testing were: (1) impact sensitivity, (2) cracking of the seals, and (3) delay in voltage. A new design resulted in no problems in the impact testing phase. The corrective actions for the seal problems involved: (1) pre weld fill tube, (2) an improved heat sink during case to cover weld and (3) change the seal dimensions to reduce stress. To correct the voltage delay problem the solutions involved: (1) drying the electrodes to reduce contamination by water, (2) assemblage of the cells within a week of electrode manufacture, (3) ensure electrolyte purity, and (4) provide second depassivation pulse after landing. The conclusions on further testing were that the battery can: (1) withstand anticipated shock of up to 80,000 g, (2) meet the discharge profile post shock at Mars temperatures, (3) meet the required self discharge rate and (4) meet environmental

  9. Assessment of lumbosacral kyphosis in spondylolisthesis: a computer-assisted reliability study of six measurement techniques

    PubMed Central

    Glavas, Panagiotis; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Parent, Stefan; de Guise, Jacques A.

    2008-01-01

    Although recognized as an important aspect in the management of spondylolisthesis, there is no consensus on the most reliable and optimal measure of lumbosacral kyphosis (LSK). Using a custom computer software, four raters evaluated 60 standing lateral radiographs of the lumbosacral spine during two sessions at a 1-week interval. The sample size consisted of 20 normal, 20 low and 20 high grade spondylolisthetic subjects. Six parameters were included for analysis: Boxall’s slip angle, Dubousset’s lumbosacral angle (LSA), the Spinal Deformity Study Group’s (SDSG) LSA, dysplastic SDSG LSA, sagittal rotation (SR), kyphotic Cobb angle (k-Cobb). Intra- and inter-rater reliability for all parameters was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). Correlations between parameters and slip percentage were evaluated with Pearson coefficients. The intra-rater ICC’s for all the parameters ranged between 0.81 and 0.97 and the inter-rater ICC’s were between 0.74 and 0.98. All parameters except sagittal rotation showed a medium to large correlation with slip percentage. Dubousset’s LSA and the k-Cobb showed the largest correlations (r = −0.78 and r = −0.50, respectively). SR was associated with the weakest correlation (r = −0.10). All other parameters had medium correlations with percent slip (r = 0.31–0.43). All measurement techniques provided excellent inter- and intra-rater reliability. Dubousset’s LSA showed the strongest correlation with slip grade. This parameter can be used in the clinical setting with PACS software capabilities to assess LSK. A computer-assisted technique is recommended in order to increase the reliability of the measurement of LSK in spondylolisthesis. PMID:19015898

  10. Measurement of the Decay Constant fDs+ Using Ds+→l+ν

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artuso, M.; Blusk, S.; Butt, J.; Khalil, S.; Li, J.; Menaa, N.; Mountain, R.; Nisar, S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Sia, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Dubrovin, M.; Lincoln, A.; Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Naik, P.; Briere, R. A.; Ferguson, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Vogel, H.; Watkins, M. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Adam, N. E.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C. D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Mahlke-Krüger, H.; Mohapatra, D.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Pivarski, J.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Schwarthoff, H.; Shi, X.; Stroiney, S.; Sun, W. M.; Wilksen, T.; Athar, S. B.; Patel, R.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Cawlfield, C.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Karliner, I.; Kim, D.; Lowrey, N.; Selen, M.; White, E. J.; Wiss, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Shepherd, M. R.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Smith, A.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Ernst, J.; Ecklund, K. M.; Severini, H.; Love, W.; Savinov, V.; Aquines, O.; Lopez, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J.; Huang, G. S.; Miller, D. H.; Pavlunin, V.; Sanghi, B.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.; Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H.; Yang, F.

    2007-08-01

    We measure the decay constant fDs+ using the Ds+→ℓ+ν channel, where the ℓ+ designates either a μ+ or a τ+, when the τ+→π+ν¯. Using both measurements we find fDs+=274±13±7MeV. Combining with our previous determination of fD+, we compute the ratio fDs+/fD+=1.23±0.11±0.04. We compare with theoretical estimates.

  11. Simple versus complex degenerative mitral valve disease.

    PubMed

    Javadikasgari, Hoda; Mihaljevic, Tomislav; Suri, Rakesh M; Svensson, Lars G; Navia, Jose L; Wang, Robert Z; Tappuni, Bassman; Lowry, Ashley M; McCurry, Kenneth R; Blackstone, Eugene H; Desai, Milind Y; Mick, Stephanie L; Gillinov, A Marc

    2018-07-01

    At a center where surgeons favor mitral valve (MV) repair for all subsets of leaflet prolapse, we compared results of patients undergoing repair for simple versus complex degenerative MV disease. From January 1985 to January 2016, 6153 patients underwent primary isolated MV repair for degenerative disease, 3101 patients underwent primary isolated MV repair for simple disease (posterior prolapse), and 3052 patients underwent primary isolated MV repair for complex disease (anterior or bileaflet prolapse), based on preoperative echocardiographic images. Logistic regression analysis was used to generate propensity scores for risk-adjusted comparisons (n = 2065 matched pairs). Durability was assessed by longitudinal recurrence of mitral regurgitation and reoperation. Compared with patients with simple disease, those undergoing repair of complex pathology were more likely to be younger and female (both P values < .0001) but with similar symptoms (P = .3). The most common repair technique was ring/band annuloplasty (3055/99% simple vs 3000/98% complex; P = .5), followed by leaflet resection (2802/90% simple vs 2249/74% complex; P < .0001). Among propensity-matched patients, recurrence of severe mitral regurgitation 10 years after repair was 6.2% for simple pathology versus 11% for complex pathology (P = .007), reoperation at 18 years was 6.3% for simple pathology versus 11% for complex pathology, and 20-year survival was 62% for simple pathology versus 61% for complex pathology (P = .6). Early surgical intervention has become more common in patients with degenerative MV disease, regardless of valve prolapse complexity or symptom status. Valve repair was associated with similarly low operative risk and time-related survival but less durability in complex disease. Lifelong annual echocardiographic surveillance after MV repair is recommended, particularly in patients with complex disease. Copyright © 2018 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery

  12. Degenerative spinal disease in large felids.

    PubMed

    Kolmstetter, C; Munson, L; Ramsay, E C

    2000-03-01

    Degenerative spinal disorders, including intervertebral disc disease and spondylosis, seldom occur in domestic cats. In contrast, a retrospective study of 13 lions (Panthera leo), 16 tigers (Panthera tigris), 4 leopards (Panthera pardis), 1 snow leopard (Panthera uncia), and 3 jaguars (Panthera onca) from the Knoxville Zoo that died or were euthanatized from 1976 to 1996 indicated that degenerative spinal disease is an important problem in large nondomestic felids. The medical record, radiographic data, and the necropsy report of each animal were examined for evidence of intervertebral disc disease or spondylosis. Eight (three lions, four tigers, and one leopard) animals were diagnosed with degenerative spinal disease. Clinical signs included progressively decreased activity, moderate to severe rear limb muscle atrophy, chronic intermittent rear limb paresis, and ataxia. The age at onset of clinical signs was 10-19 yr (median = 18 yr). Radiographic evaluation of the spinal column was useful in assessing the severity of spinal lesions, and results were correlated with necropsy findings. Lesions were frequently multifocal, included intervertebral disc mineralization or herniation with collapsed intervertebral disc spaces, and were most common in the lumbar area but also involved cervical and thoracic vertebrae. Marked spondylosis was present in the cats with intervertebral disc disease, presumably subsequent to vertebral instability. Six of the animals' spinal cords were examined histologically, and five had acute or chronic damage to the spinal cord secondary to disc protrusion. Spinal disease should be suspected in geriatric large felids with decreased appetite or activity. Radiographic evaluation of the spinal column is the most useful method to assess the type and severity of spinal lesions.

  13. Suppressed Decays of Ds+ Mesons to Two Pseudoscalar Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H.; Yang, F.; Artuso, M.; Blusk, S.; Khalil, S.; Li, J.; Menaa, N.; Mountain, R.; Nisar, S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Sia, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Dubrovin, M.; Lincoln, A.; Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Naik, P.; Briere, R. A.; Ferguson, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Vogel, H.; Watkins, M. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Adam, N. E.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C. D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Mahlke-Krüger, H.; Mohapatra, D.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Shi, X.; Stroiney, S.; Sun, W. M.; Wilksen, T.; Athar, S. B.; Patel, R.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Karliner, I.; Lowrey, N.; Selen, M.; White, E. J.; Wiss, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Shepherd, M. R.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Ernst, J.; Ecklund, K. M.; Severini, H.; Love, W.; Savinov, V.; Lopez, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J.; Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Sanghi, B.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.

    2007-11-01

    Using data collected near the Ds*+Ds- peak production energy Ecm=4170MeV by the CLEO-c detector, we study the decays of Ds+ mesons to two pseudoscalar mesons. We report on searches for the singly Cabibbo-suppressed Ds+ decay modes K+η, K+η', π+KS0, K+π0, and the isospin-forbidden decay mode Ds+→π+π0. We normalize with respect to the Cabibbo-favored Ds+ modes π+η, π+η', and K+KS0, and obtain ratios of branching fractions: B(Ds+→K+η)/B(Ds+→π+η)=(8.9±1.5±0.4)%, B(Ds+→K+η')/B(Ds+→π+η')=(4.2±1.3±0.3)%, B(Ds+→π+KS0)/B(Ds+→K+KS0)=(8.2±0.9±0.2)%, B(Ds+→K+π0)/B(Ds+→K+KS0)=(5.5±1.3±0.7)%, and B(Ds+→π+π0)/B(Ds+→K+KS0)<4.1% at 90% C.L., where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  14. Degenerative joint disease in weight-lifters. Fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, B.; McLatchie, G. R.

    1980-01-01

    A clinical and radiological study of upper and lower limb joints was carried out on 25 experienced weight-lifters to identify the extent of degenerative joint disease (Osteoarthrosis) produced by this sport. Although significant degenerative changes were found in five lifters (20%). This figure is not greater than that found in the general population within the age group studied. There were more degenerative changes found in Olympic style weight-lifters (30.7%) than in power lifters (8.3%). The significance of these figures is discussed. The upper limb joints were almost completely free of degenerative changes. Images p97-a p97-b PMID:7407459

  15. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease.

    PubMed

    Mead, Ben; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Scott, Robert A H; Leadbeater, Wendy; Scheven, Ben A

    2015-05-01

    Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs) and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs), MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC), adipose tissues (ADSC) and dental pulp (DPSC), together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. PREPARE: Pre-surgery physiotherapy for patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorder: a randomized controlled trial protocol.

    PubMed

    Lindbäck, Yvonne; Tropp, Hans; Enthoven, Paul; Abbott, Allan; Öberg, Birgitta

    2016-07-11

    Current guidelines for the management of patients with specific low back pain pathology suggest non-surgical intervention as first-line treatment, but there is insufficient evidence to make recommendations of the content in the non-surgical intervention. Opinions regarding the dose of non-surgical intervention that should be trialled prior to decision making about surgery intervention vary. The aim of the present study is to investigate if physiotherapy administrated before surgery improves function, pain and health in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorder scheduled for surgery. The patients are followed over two years. A secondary aim is to study what factors predict short and long term outcomes. This study is a single blinded, 2-arm, randomized controlled trial with follow-up after the completion of pre-surgery intervention as well as 3, 12 and 24 months post-surgery. The study will recruit men and women, 25 to 80 years of age, scheduled for surgery due to; disc herniation, spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis or degenerative disc disease. A total of 202 patients will be randomly allocated to a pre-surgery physiotherapy intervention or a waiting list group for 9 weeks. The waiting-list group will receive standardized information about surgery, post-surgical rehabilitation and advice to stay active. The pre-surgery physiotherapy group will receive physiotherapy 2 times per week, consisting of a stratified classification treatment, based on assessment findings. One of the following treatments will be selected; a) Specific exercises and mobilization, b) Motor control exercises or c) Traction. The pre-surgery physiotherapy group will also be prescribed a tailor-made general supervised exercise program. The physiotherapist will use a behavioral approach aimed at reducing patient fear avoidance and increasing activity levels. They will also receive standardized information about surgery, post-surgical rehabilitation and advice to stay active. Primary

  17. 75 FR 25911 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Forms DS-2053, DS-2054; Medical Examination for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 6995] 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Forms DS-2053, DS-2054; Medical Examination for Immigrant or Refugee Applicant; DS- 3030, Chest X-Ray and..., Medical Examination for Immigrant or Refugee Applicant (2007 Technical Instructions); and DS-3030, Chest X...

  18. First observation of the decay Ds+-->pn.

    PubMed

    Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Naik, P; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Reed, J; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hunt, J M; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Ledoux, J; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T

    2008-05-09

    Using e+e--->Ds*-Ds+ data collected near the peak Ds production energy, Ecm=4170 MeV, with the CLEO-c detector, we present the first observation of the decay Ds+-->pn. We measure a branching fraction B(Ds+-->pn)=(1.30+/-0.36(-0.16)+0.12)x10(-3). This is the first observation of a charmed meson decaying into a baryon-antibaryon final state.

  19. First Observation of the Decay Ds+→p nmacr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athar, S. B.; Patel, R.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Karliner, I.; Mehrabyan, S.; Lowrey, N.; Selen, M.; White, E. J.; Wiss, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Shepherd, M. R.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Libby, J.; Powell, A.; Wilkinson, G.; Ecklund, K. M.; Love, W.; Savinov, V.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J.; Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.; Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H.; Yang, F.; Artuso, M.; Blusk, S.; Khalil, S.; Li, J.; Mountain, R.; Nisar, S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Sultana, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Zhang, L. M.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Dubrovin, M.; Lincoln, A.; Naik, P.; Rademacker, J.; Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Reed, J.; Briere, R. A.; Ferguson, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Vogel, H.; Watkins, M. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Hunt, J. M.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Ledoux, J.; Mahlke-Krüger, H.; Mohapatra, D.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Shi, X.; Stroiney, S.; Sun, W. M.; Wilksen, T.

    2008-05-01

    Using e+e-→Ds*-Ds+ data collected near the peak Ds production energy, Ecm=4170MeV, with the CLEO-c detector, we present the first observation of the decay Ds+→p nmacr . We measure a branching fraction B(Ds+→p nmacr )=(1.30±0.36-0.16+0.12)×10-3. This is the first observation of a charmed meson decaying into a baryon-antibaryon final state.

  20. Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, F M; Arana, E

    2016-04-01

    In the last 25 years, scientific research has brought about drastic changes in the concept of low back pain and its management. Most imaging findings, including degenerative changes, reflect anatomic peculiarities or the normal aging process and turn out to be clinically irrelevant; imaging tests have proven useful only when systemic disease is suspected or when surgery is indicated for persistent spinal cord or nerve root compression. The radiologic report should indicate the key points of nerve compression, bypassing inconsequential findings. Many treatments have proven inefficacious, and some have proven counterproductive, but they continue to be prescribed because patients want them and there are financial incentives for doing them. Following the guidelines that have proven effective for clinical management improves clinical outcomes, reduces iatrogenic complications, and decreases unjustified and wasteful healthcare expenditures. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Degenerative meniscus: Pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Richard; Kumar, Neil S; Patel, Nimit; Tom, James

    2014-01-01

    The symptomatic degenerative meniscus continues to be a source of discomfort for a significant number of patients. With vascular penetration of less than one-third of the adult meniscus, healing potential in the setting of chronic degeneration remains low. Continued hoop and shear stresses upon the degenerative meniscus results in gross failure, often in the form of complex tears in the posterior horn and midbody. Patient history and physical examination are critical to determine the true source of pain, particularly with the significant incidence of simultaneous articular pathology. Joint line tenderness, a positive McMurray test, and mechanical catching or locking can be highly suggestive of a meniscal source of knee pain and dysfunction. Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging are frequently utilized to examine for osteoarthritis and to verify the presence of meniscal tears, in addition to ruling out other sources of pain. Non-operative therapy focused on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy may be able to provide pain relief as well as improve mechanical function of the knee joint. For patients refractory to conservative therapy, arthroscopic partial meniscectomy can provide short-term gains regarding pain relief, especially when combined with an effective, regular physiotherapy program. Patients with clear mechanical symptoms and meniscal pathology may benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy, but surgery is not a guaranteed success, especially with concomitant articular pathology. Ultimately, the long-term outcomes of either treatment arm provide similar results for most patients. Further study is needed regarding the short and long-term outcomes regarding conservative and surgical therapy, with a particular focus on the economic impact of treatment as well. PMID:25405088

  2. Profile of Ph.Ds in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Zur-Muehlen, Max

    A profile of the socio-economic characteristics of the permanent residents of Canada holding an earned doctorate is presented. In 1973, there were 27,410 Canadian residents who had obtained an earned doctorate. (Holders of such professional doctoral degrees as Doctor of Medicine are excluded from this study.) Only 9 percent of the Ph.Ds were…

  3. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome with status epilepticus following surgery for lumbar stenosis and spondylolisthesis: case report.

    PubMed

    Delgado-López, Pedro David; Garcés-Pérez, Gloria; García-Carrasco, Juan; Alonso-García, Esther; Gómez-Menéndez, Ana Isabel; Martín-Alonso, Javier

    2018-06-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological condition encountered in many different clinical settings, generally occurring in the context of hypertensive crisis, immunosuppressive therapy or autoimmune diseases. It is characterized by headache, stupor, seizures and visual alterations. MRI findings include white matter changes preferentially in the parieto-occipital regions. Although pathogenesis is not fully elucidated, vasoconstriction and brain hypoperfusion seem to be the cause of brain ischemia and vasogenic edema. CSF hypotension is also a reported plausible pathogenic mechanism. We present a unique case of PRES following laminectomy and fixation for L4-5 lumbar stenosis and spondylolisthesis. The patient presented with a 5-day duration status epilepticus immediately after surgery. Brain MRI showed FLAIR and T2 hyperintensities in the bilateral parietal and occipital lobes and external capsules. On the basis of her postoperative lumbar images, we hypothesize that an unnoticed CSF leak might have contributed to develop PRES in this case. The patient developed multiple postoperative complications. Following treatment for severe hypertension and seizures she ultimately recovered. Prompt recognition and treatment of this potentially life-threatening syndrome is necessary in order to increase the likelihood of favorable outcome. Spinal surgeons need to be aware of the possibility of neurological deterioration following spinal surgery and be alert about the occurrence of a dural leak, either recognized or unnoticed, as the plausible mechanism triggering PRES. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. DsJ(2860) as the First Radial Excitation of Ds0*(2317)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beveren, Eef; Rupp, George

    2006-11-01

    A coupled-channel model previously employed to describe the narrow Ds0*(2317) and broad D0*(2400) charmed scalar mesons is generalized so as to include all ground-state pseudoscalar-pseudoscalar and vector-vector two-meson channels. All parameters are chosen fixed at published values, except for the overall coupling constant, which is fine-tuned to reproduce the Ds0*(2317) mass. Thus, the radial excitations Ds0*(2850) and D0*(2740) are predicted, both with a width of about 50 MeV. The former state appears to correspond to the new DsJ(2860) resonance decaying to DK announced by BABAR in the course of this work. Also, the D0*(2400) resonance is roughly reproduced, though perhaps with a somewhat too low central resonance peak.

  5. Topical Treatment of Degenerative Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zengdong; Huang, Rongzhong

    2018-01-01

    This article reviews topical management strategies for degenerative osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. A search of Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane library using MeSH terms including "topical," "treatment," "knee" and "osteoarthritis" was carried out. Original research and review articles on the effectiveness and safety, recommendations from international published guidelines and acceptability studies of topical preparations were included. Current topical treatments included for the management of knee OA include topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, capsaicin, salicylates and physical treatments such as hot or cold therapy. Current treatment guidelines recommend topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as an alternative and even first-line therapy for OA management, especially among elderly patients. Guidelines on other topical treatments vary, from recommendations against their use, to in favor as alternative or simultaneous therapy, especially for patients with contraindications to other analgesics. Although often well-tolerated and preferred by many patients, clinical care still lags in the adoption of topical treatments. Aspects of efficacy, safety and patient quality of life data require further research. Copyright © 2018 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. DNA linkage studies of degenerative retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Daiger, S P; Heckenlively, J R; Lewis, R A; Pelias, M Z

    1987-01-01

    DNA linkage studies of human genetic diseases have led to rapid characterization of a number of otherwise intractable disease loci. Detection of a linked DNA marker, the first step in "reverse genetics", has permitted cloning of the genes for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, retinoblastoma and chronic granulomatosis disease, among others. Thus, the case for applying these techniques to retinitis pigmentosa and related diseases, and the urgency in capitalizing on molecular developments, is justified and compelling. The first major success regarding RP was in demonstrating linkage of the DNA marker DXS7 (L1.28) to XRP. For autosomal forms of the disease, conventional linkage studies have provided tentative evidence for linkage of ADRP to the Rh blood group on chromosome lp and for linkage of Usher's syndrome to Gc and 4q. These provisional assignments are, at least, an important starting point for DNA analysis. The Support Program for DNA Linkage Studies of Degenerative Retinal Diseases was established to provide access for the scientific community to appropriate families, using the resources of the Human Genetic Mutant Cell Repository to prepare, store and distribute lymphoblast lines. To date, two extensive, well-characterized families are included in the program: the autosomal dominant RP family UCLA-RP01, and the Usher's syndrome families LSU-US01. It is highly likely that rapid progress will be made in mapping and characterizing the inherited retinal dystrophies. We believe the support program will facilitate this progress.

  7. Diagnostic utility of patient history and physical examination data to detect spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis in athletes with low back pain: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Grødahl, Linn Helen J; Fawcett, Louise; Nazareth, Madeleine; Smith, Richard; Spencer, Simon; Heneghan, Nicola; Rushton, Alison

    2016-08-01

    In adolescent athletes, low back pain has a 1-year prevalence of 57% and causes include spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. An accurate diagnosis enables healing, prevention of progression and return to sport. To evaluate the diagnostic utility of patient history and physical examination data to identify spondylolysis and/or spondylolisthesis in athletes. Systematic review was undertaken according to published guidelines, and reported in line with PRISMA. Key databases were searched up to 13/11/15. athletic population with LBP, patient history and/or physical examination accuracy data for spondylolysis and/or spondylolisthesis, any study design including raw data. Two reviewers independently assessed risk of bias (ROB) using QUADAS-2. A data extraction sheet was pre-designed. Pooling of data and investigation for heterogeneity enabled a qualitative synthesis of data across studies. Of the eight included studies, two were assessed as low ROB, one of which also had no concerns regarding applicability. Age (<20 years) demonstrated 81% sensitivity and 44% specificity and gender (male) 73% sensitivity and 57% specificity for spondylolysis. Difficulty falling asleep, waking up because of pain, pain worse with sitting and walking all have sensitivity >75% for spondylolisthesis. Step-deformity palpation demonstrated 60-88% sensitivity and 87-100% specificity for spondylolisthesis. The one-legged hyperextension test was not supported for spondylolysis (sensitivity 50-73%, specificity 0-87%). No recommendations can be made utilising patient history data. Based on one low ROB study, step deformity palpation may be useful in diagnosing spondylolisthesis. No physical tests demonstrated diagnostic utility for spondylolysis. Further research is required. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 22 CFR 62.12 - Control of Forms DS-2019.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... transfer; (4) Replace a lost or stolen Form DS-2019; (5) Facilitate entry of an exchange visitor's alien spouse or minor unmarried children into the United States separately; (6) Facilitate re-entry of an... Form DS-2019. Issue the Form DS-2019 only so as to: (1) Facilitate the entry of a new participant of...

  9. 22 CFR 62.12 - Control of Forms DS-2019.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... transfer; (4) Replace a lost or stolen Form DS-2019; (5) Facilitate entry of an exchange visitor's alien spouse or minor unmarried children into the United States separately; (6) Facilitate re-entry of an... Form DS-2019. Issue the Form DS-2019 only so as to: (1) Facilitate the entry of a new participant of...

  10. 22 CFR 62.12 - Control of Forms DS-2019.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... transfer; (4) Replace a lost or stolen Form DS-2019; (5) Facilitate entry of an exchange visitor's alien spouse or minor unmarried children into the United States separately; (6) Facilitate re-entry of an... Form DS-2019. Issue the Form DS-2019 only so as to: (1) Facilitate the entry of a new participant of...

  11. 22 CFR 62.12 - Control of Forms DS-2019.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... transfer; (4) Replace a lost or stolen Form DS-2019; (5) Facilitate entry of an exchange visitor's alien spouse or minor unmarried children into the United States separately; (6) Facilitate re-entry of an... Form DS-2019. Issue the Form DS-2019 only so as to: (1) Facilitate the entry of a new participant of...

  12. 22 CFR 62.12 - Control of Forms DS-2019.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... transfer; (4) Replace a lost or stolen Form DS-2019; (5) Facilitate entry of an exchange visitor's alien spouse or minor unmarried children into the United States separately; (6) Facilitate re-entry of an... Form DS-2019. Issue the Form DS-2019 only so as to: (1) Facilitate the entry of a new participant of...

  13. Integrating the 3Ds: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Villarruel, Antonia M; Bigelow, April; Alvarez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The 3Ds (diversity, disparities, and determinants) that serve as a framework for this supplement are concepts that are key foundations of nursing education, practice, and research. Despite this fact, however, the nursing profession has faced challenges recognizing the full potential of these concepts. While their importance is documented and acknowledged, they are not clearly evident or easily recognized within the nursing profession. In fact, there are many barriers to the integration of these concepts. We identify and address two barriers to addressing health disparities and increasing diversity: disconnects and discrimination. Furthermore, we discuss three factors-dissemination, durability, and data-that may facilitate nursing's efforts to integrate the 3Ds into the profession. Five pivotal models that address these barriers and facilitators are presented as exemplars that have the potential to guide efforts to address diversity, disparities, and social determinants of health and act as catalysts for change within the nursing profession.

  14. Integrating the 3Ds: A Nursing Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bigelow, April; Alvarez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The 3Ds (diversity, disparities, and determinants) that serve as a framework for this supplement are concepts that are key foundations of nursing education, practice, and research. Despite this fact, however, the nursing profession has faced challenges recognizing the full potential of these concepts. While their importance is documented and acknowledged, they are not clearly evident or easily recognized within the nursing profession. In fact, there are many barriers to the integration of these concepts. We identify and address two barriers to addressing health disparities and increasing diversity: disconnects and discrimination. Furthermore, we discuss three factors—dissemination, durability, and data—that may facilitate nursing's efforts to integrate the 3Ds into the profession. Five pivotal models that address these barriers and facilitators are presented as exemplars that have the potential to guide efforts to address diversity, disparities, and social determinants of health and act as catalysts for change within the nursing profession. PMID:24385663

  15. Current Evidence Regarding the Diagnostic Methods for Pediatric Lumbar Spondylolisthesis: A Report From the Scoliosis Research Society Evidence Based Medicine Committee.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Jo; Crawford, Charles H; Ledonio, Charles; Bess, Shay; Larson, A Noelle; Gates, Marilyn; Oetgen, Matthew; Sanders, James O; Burton, Douglas

    Structured literature review. The Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) requested an assessment of the current state of peer-reviewed evidence regarding pediatric lumbar spondylolisthesis with the goal of identifying what is known and what gaps remain in further understanding the diagnostic methods for pediatric spondylolisthesis. Spondylolisthesis in the lumbar spine is common among children and adolescents and no formal synthesis of the published literature regarding diagnostic methods has been previously performed. A comprehensive literature search was performed. Abstracts were reviewed and data from included studies were analyzed by the committee. From 6600 initial citations with abstract, 663 articles underwent full-text review. The best available evidence for the clinical questions regarding diagnostic methods was provided by 26 included studies. Six of the studies were graded as Level III (retrospective comparative), and represent the current best available evidence whereas 20 of the studies were graded as Level IV (retrospective case series) evidence. No Level V (expert opinion) studies were included in the final list. None of the studies were graded as Level I or Level II. Plain radiography is the workhorse imaging modality for diagnosing spondylolisthesis. No association between radiologic grade of spondylolisthesis and clinical presentation were noted; however, grade III and IV slips more often required surgery, and increasing slip angles were associated with worse baseline outcome scores. There is Level III evidence that the Meyerding grade appears to be more accurate for measuring slip percentage whereas the Lonstein Slip angle and Dubousset Lumbosacral Kyphosis angles are the best for measuring lumbosacral kyphosis in spondylolisthesis. In addition, higher sacral table index, pelvic incidence, sacral slope, and lower sacral table angle were associated with spondylolisthesis. True incidence could not be determined by the current literature available

  16. Containers of DS-2 Decontaminating Solution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    percent sodium hydroxide, and the remainder is ethylene glycol monomethyl ether. Because of its reactivity, it must be protected from moisture and... carbon dioxide. It has been demonstrated that DS-2 does not corrode terneplate or steel. However, satisfactory terneplate and steel containers are...not produce a pail with a polyethylene insert. However, Mr. Wood told me that Hedwin Corporation (a subsidiary of Solvay ) does produce this kind of

  17. DS2 Container and Weatherproofing Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    compatible with polyurethane based coating systems in general? Is it compatible with alkyd -based coatings? 10. How well do the labels placed on the...of the (older) alkyd enamel and (more recently) polyurethane camouflage coatings, leading eventually to seepage of the DS2. A shrink-wrap overpack...by John Wiley and Sons, Inc., Vol. 2, pp. 118- 119; Vol. 4, p. 3 and pp. 284-295; Vol. I, p. 133. 8. Fiber Composite Hybrid Materials, N.L. Hancox

  18. Contribution of Microglia-Mediated Neuroinflammation to Retinal Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Maria H.; Boia, Raquel; Santos, Paulo F.; Ambrósio, António F.; Santiago, Ana R.

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases are major causes of vision loss and blindness worldwide and are characterized by chronic and progressive neuronal loss. One common feature of retinal degenerative diseases and brain neurodegenerative diseases is chronic neuroinflammation. There is growing evidence that retinal microglia, as in the brain, become activated in the course of retinal degenerative diseases, having a pivotal role in the initiation and propagation of the neurodegenerative process. A better understanding of the events elicited and mediated by retinal microglia will contribute to the clarification of disease etiology and might open new avenues for potential therapeutic interventions. This review aims at giving an overview of the roles of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in major retinal degenerative diseases like glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:25873768

  19. Association of catechol-O-methyltransferase genetic variants with outcome in patients undergoing surgical treatment for lumbar degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Dai, Feng; Belfer, Inna; Schwartz, Carolyn E; Banco, Robert; Martha, Julia F; Tighioughart, Hocine; Tromanhauser, Scott G; Jenis, Louis G; Kim, David H

    2010-11-01

    Surgical treatment for lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD) has been associated with highly variable results in terms of postoperative pain relief and functional improvement. Many experts believe that DDD should be considered a chronic pain disorder as opposed to a degenerative disease. Genetic variation of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene has been associated with variation in human pain sensitivity and response to analgesics in previous studies. To determine whether genetic variation of COMT is associated with clinical outcome after surgical treatment for DDD. Prospective genetic association study. Sixty-nine patients undergoing surgical treatment for lumbar DDD. Diagnosis was based on documentation of chronic disabling low back pain (LBP) present for a minimum of 6 months and unresponsive to supervised nonoperative treatment, including activity modification, medication, physical therapy, and/or injection therapy. Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging revealed intervertebral disc desiccation, tears, and/or collapse without focal herniation, nerve root compression, stenosis, spondylolisthesis, spondylolysis, or alternative diagnoses. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analog score (VAS) for LBP. Surgical treatment included 65 instrumented fusions and four disc arthroplasty procedures. All patients completed preoperative and 1-year postoperative ODI questionnaires. DNA was extracted from a sample of venous blood, and genotype analysis was performed for five common COMT single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Potential genetic association between these COMT SNPs and the primary outcome variable, 1-year change in ODI, was investigated using both single-marker and haplotype association analyses. Association with VAS scores for LBP was analyzed as a secondary outcome variable. Single-marker analysis revealed that the COMT SNP rs4633 was significantly associated with greater improvement in ODI score 1 year after surgery (p=.03), with

  20. 76 FR 25733 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-7001 and DS-7005, DOS-Sponsored Academic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... and DS- 7005, DOS-Sponsored Academic Exchange Program Application, OMB Control Number 1405-0138 ACTION... Collection: DOS-Sponsored Academic Exchange Program Application. OMB Control Number: 1405-0138. Type of... Cultural Affairs, ECA/A/E/EUR. Form Number: DS-7001, DS-7005. Respondents: Applicants for the Academic...

  1. 76 FR 58074 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-7001 and DS-7005, DOS-Sponsored Academic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ...-7001 and DS- 7005, DOS-Sponsored Academic Exchange Program Application, OMB Control Number 1405-0138.... Title of Information Collection: DOS-Sponsored Academic Exchange Program Application. OMB Control Number... Academic Exchange Program. Estimated Number of Respondents: 7160 (For DS-7001, 3842 estimated; for DS-7005...

  2. Results of instrumented posterolateral fusion in treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis with and without segmental kyphosis: A retrospective investigation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Yuan; Lu, Meng-Ling; Niu, Chi-Chien; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Liao, Jen-Chung; Chen, Lih-Huei; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2015-01-01

    Treatment by posterolateral fusion (PLF) with pedicle-screw instrumentation can be unsuccessful in one-segment and low-grade lumbar spondylolisthesis. Segmental kyphosis, either rigid or dynamic, was hypothesized to be one of the factors interfering with the fusion results. From 2004 to 2005, 239 patients with single-segment and low-grade spondylolisthesis were recruited and divided into two groups: Group 1 consisting of 129 patients without segmental kyphosis and group 2 consisting of 110 patients with segmental kyphosis. All patients underwent instrumented PLF at the same medical institute, and the average follow-up period was 31 ± 19 months. We obtained plain radiographs of the lumbosacral spine with the anteroposterior view, the lateral view, and the dynamic flexion-extension views before the operation and during the follow-ups. The results of PLF in the two groups were then compared. There was no significant difference in the demographic data of the two groups, except for gender distribution. The osseous fusion rates were 90.7% in group 1 and 68.2% in group 2 (p < 0.001). Instrumented PLF resulted in significantly higher osseous fusion rate in patients without segmental kyphosis than in the patients with segmental kyphosis. For the patients with sagittal imbalance, such as rigid or dynamic kyphosis, pedicle-screw fixation cannot ensure successful PLF. Interbody fusion by the posterior lumbar interbody fusion or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion technique might help overcome this problem.

  3. Structure of large dsDNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Thomas; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic large dsDNA viruses (NCLDVs) encompass an ever-increasing group of large eukaryotic viruses, infecting a wide variety of organisms. The set of core genes shared by all these viruses includes a major capsid protein with a double jelly-roll fold forming an icosahedral capsid, which surrounds a double layer membrane that contains the viral genome. Furthermore, some of these viruses, such as the members of the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae have a unique vertex that is used during infection to transport DNA into the host. PMID:25003382

  4. Progressive restoration of spinal sagittal balance after surgical correction of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis before skeletal maturity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Diala; Bachy, Manon; Courvoisier, Aurélien; Dubory, Arnaud; Bouloussa, Houssam; Vialle, Raphaël

    2015-03-01

    Spinopelvic alignment is crucial in assessing an energy-efficient posture in both normal and disease states, such as high-displacement developmental spondylolisthesis (HDDS). The overall effect in patients with HDDS who have undergone local surgical correction of lumbosacral imbalance for the global correction of spinal balance remains unclear. This paper reports the progressive spontaneous improvement of global sagittal balance following surgical correction of lumbosacral imbalance in patients with HDDS. The records of 15 patients with HDDS who underwent surgery between 2005 and 2010 were reviewed. The treatment consisted of L4-sacrum reduction and fusion via a posterior approach, resulting in complete correction of lumbosacral kyphosis. Preoperative, 6-month postoperative, and final follow-up postoperative angular measurements were taken from full-spine lateral radiographs obtained with the patient in a standard standing position. Radiographic measurements included pelvic incidence, sacral slope, lumbar lordosis, and thoracic kyphosis. The degree of lumbosacral kyphosis was evaluated by the lumbosacral angle. Because of the small number of patients, nonparametric tests were considered for data analysis. Preoperative lumbosacral kyphosis and L-5 anterior slip were corrected by instrumentation. Transient neurological complications were noted in 5 patients. Statistical analysis showed a significant increase of thoracic kyphosis on 6-month postoperative and final follow-up radiographs (p < 0.001). A statistically significant decrease of lumbar lordosis was noted between preoperative and 6-month control radiographs (p < 0.001) and between preoperative and final follow-up radiographs (p < 0.001). Based on the authors' observations, this technique resulted in an effective reduction of L-5 anterior slip and significant reduction of lumbosacral kyphosis (from 69.8° to 105.13°). Due to complete reduction of lumbosacral kyphosis and anterior trunk displacement associated

  5. dsRNA-protein interactions studied by molecular dynamics techniques. Unravelling dsRNA recognition by DCL1.

    PubMed

    Drusin, Salvador I; Suarez, Irina P; Gauto, Diego F; Rasia, Rodolfo M; Moreno, Diego M

    2016-04-15

    Double stranded RNA (dsRNA) participates in several biological processes, where RNA molecules acquire secondary structure inside the cell through base complementarity. The double stranded RNA binding domain (dsRBD) is one of the main protein folds that is able to recognize and bind to dsRNA regions. The N-terminal dsRBD of DCL1 in Arabidopsis thaliana (DCL1-1), in contrast to other studied dsRBDs, lacks a stable structure, behaving as an intrinsically disordered protein. DCL1-1 does however recognize dsRNA by acquiring a canonical fold in the presence of its substrate. Here we present a detailed modeling and molecular dynamics study of dsRNA recognition by DCL1-1. We found that DCL1-1 forms stable complexes with different RNAs and we characterized the residues involved in binding. Although the domain shows a binding loop substantially shorter than other homologs, it can still interact with the dsRNA and results in bending of the dsRNA A-type helix. Furthermore, we found that R8, a non-conserved residue located in the first dsRNA binding region, recognizes preferentially mismatched base pairs. We discuss our findings in the context of the function of DCL1-1 within the microRNA processing complex. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Discriminating styles (DS) and pollen-mediated pseudo-self-compatibility (PMPSC) in Nemesia strumosa Benth. : Part 1: Characteristics and inheritance of DS.

    PubMed

    Robacker, C D; Ascher, P D

    1981-09-01

    Nemesia strumosa plants were discovered which had styles capable of discriminating among incompatible pollen tubes from different pollinators, allowing growth of some but not others. All but 3 of 26 families tested had at least some members with discriminating styles (DS). Presence and level of DS was independent of S genotype. Plants with pseudo-self-compatiblity (PSC) levels greater than 10% had the trait, though many plants with strong DS had PSC levels less than 10%. Self pollination of highly DS plants produced mostly DS offspring, but of differing sensitivities. Some progenies from crosses between a family of highly DS plants and unrelated, probably low DS plants segregated half DS and half non-DS, while others consisted of mostly DS or mostly non-DS. The DS phenomenon is probably caused by PSC genes.

  7. Pathophysiology of Degenerative Mitral Regurgitation: New 3-Dimensional Imaging Insights.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Clemence; Mantovani, Francesca; Benfari, Giovanni; Mankad, Sunil V; Maalouf, Joseph F; Michelena, Hector I; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2018-01-01

    Despite its high prevalence, little is known about mechanisms of mitral regurgitation in degenerative mitral valve disease apart from the leaflet prolapse itself. Mitral valve is a complex structure, including mitral annulus, mitral leaflets, papillary muscles, chords, and left ventricular walls. All these structures are involved in physiological and pathological functioning of this valvuloventricular complex but up to now were difficult to analyze because of inherent limitations of 2-dimensional imaging. The advent of 3-dimensional echocardiography, computed tomography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging overcoming these limitations provides new insights into mechanistic analysis of degenerative mitral regurgitation. This review will detail the contribution of quantitative and qualitative dynamic analysis of mitral annulus and mitral leaflets by new imaging methods in the understanding of degenerative mitral regurgitation pathophysiology. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Synthetic biology approach for plant protection using dsRNA.

    PubMed

    Niehl, Annette; Soininen, Marjukka; Poranen, Minna M; Heinlein, Manfred

    2018-02-26

    Pathogens induce severe damages on cultivated plants and represent a serious threat to global food security. Emerging strategies for crop protection involve the external treatment of plants with double-stranded (ds)RNA to trigger RNA interference. However, applying this technology in greenhouses and fields depends on dsRNA quality, stability and efficient large-scale production. Using components of the bacteriophage phi6, we engineered a stable and accurate in vivo dsRNA production system in Pseudomonas syringae bacteria. Unlike other in vitro or in vivo dsRNA production systems that rely on DNA transcription and postsynthetic alignment of single-stranded RNA molecules, the phi6 system is based on the replication of dsRNA by an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, thus allowing production of high-quality, long dsRNA molecules. The phi6 replication complex was reprogrammed to multiply dsRNA sequences homologous to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) by replacing the coding regions within two of the three phi6 genome segments with TMV sequences and introduction of these constructs into P. syringae together with the third phi6 segment, which encodes the components of the phi6 replication complex. The stable production of TMV dsRNA was achieved by combining all the three phi6 genome segments and by maintaining the natural dsRNA sizes and sequence elements required for efficient replication and packaging of the segments. The produced TMV-derived dsRNAs inhibited TMV propagation when applied to infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants. The established dsRNA production system enables the broad application of dsRNA molecules as an efficient, highly flexible, nontransgenic and environmentally friendly approach for protecting crops against viruses and other pathogens. © 2018 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. C-reactive protein in degenerative aortic valve stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Pedro L; Mazzone, AnnaMaria

    2006-01-01

    Degenerative aortic valve stenosis includes a range of disorder severity from mild leaflet thickening without valve obstruction, "aortic sclerosis", to severe calcified aortic stenosis. It is a slowly progressive active process of valve modification similar to atherosclerosis for cardiovascular risk factors, lipoprotein deposition, chronic inflammation, and calcification. Systemic signs of inflammation, as wall and serum C-reactive protein, similar to those found in atherosclerosis, are present in patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis and may be expression of a common disease, useful in monitoring of stenosis progression. PMID:16774687

  10. Destructive discovertebral degenerative disease of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Charran, A K; Tony, G; Lalam, R; Tyrrell, P N M; Tins, B; Singh, J; Eisenstein, S M; Balain, B; Trivedi, J M; Cassar-Pullicino, V N

    2012-09-01

    The uncommon variant of degenerative hip joint disease, termed rapidly progressive osteoarthritis, and highlighted by severe joint space loss and osteochondral disintegration, is well established. We present a similar unusual subset in the lumbar spine termed destructive discovertebral degenerative disease (DDDD) with radiological features of vertebral malalignment, severe disc resorption, and "bone sand" formation secondary to vertebral fragmentation. Co-existing metabolic bone disease is likely to promote the development of DDDD of the lumbar spine, which presents with back pain and sciatica due to nerve root compression by the "bone sand" in the epidural space. MRI and CT play a complimentary role in making the diagnosis.

  11. Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    SUGAWARA, Taku

    Anterior cervical spine surgery is an established surgical intervention for cervical degenerative disease and high success rate with excellent long-term outcomes have been reported. However, indications of surgical procedures for certain conditions are still controversial and severe complications to cause neurological dysfunction or deaths may occur. This review is focused mainly on five widely performed procedures by anterior approach for cervical degenerative disease; anterior cervical discectomy, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, anterior cervical foraminotomy, and arthroplasty. Indications, procedures, outcomes, and complications of these surgeries are discussed. PMID:26119899

  12. ‘Lumbar Degenerative Kyphosis’ Is Not Byword for Degenerative Sagittal Imbalance: Time to Replace a Misconception

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee; Jang, Jee-Soo; Kim, Sung-Min; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Lee, Jung-Kil

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK) is a subgroup of the flat-back syndrome and is most commonly caused by unique life styles, such as a prolonged crouched posture during agricultural work and performing activities of daily living on the floor. Unfortunately, LDK has been used as a byword for degenerative sagittal imbalance, and this sometimes causes confusion. The aim of this review was to evaluate the exact territory of LDK, and to introduce another appropriate term for degenerative sagittal deformity. Unlike what its name suggests, LDK does not only include sagittal balance disorder of the lumbar spine and kyphosis, but also sagittal balance disorder of the whole spine and little lordosis of the lumbar spine. Moreover, this disease is closely related to the occupation of female farmers and an outdated Asian life style. These reasons necessitate a change in the nomenclature of this disorder to prevent misunderstanding. We suggest the name “primary degenerative sagittal imbalance” (PDSI), which encompasses degenerative sagittal misalignments of unknown origin in the whole spine in older-age patients, and is associated with back muscle wasting. LDK may be regarded as a subgroup of PDSI related to an occupation in agriculture. Conservative treatments such as exercise and physiotherapy are recommended as first-line treatments for patients with PDSI, and surgical treatment is considered only if conservative treatments failed. The measurement of spinopelvic parameters for sagittal balance is important prior to deformity corrective surgery. LDK can be considered a subtype of PDSI that is more likely to occur in female farmers, and hence the use of LDK as a global term for all degenerative sagittal imbalance disorders is better avoided. To avoid confusion, we recommend PDSI as a newer, more accurate diagnostic term instead of LDK. PMID:28264231

  13. Suppression of mTOR signaling pathway promotes bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into osteoblast in degenerative scoliosis: in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Yi, Xiao-Dong; Li, Chun-De

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the role of mTOR signaling pathway in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) differentiation into osteoblast in degenerative scoliosis (DS). The rat model of DS was established. Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were selected and divided into the normal control group, the positive control group (normal rats injected with rapamycin), the negative control group (DS rats injected with PBS) and the experiment group (DS rats injected with rapamycin). H&E staining was performed to observe the osteogenesis of scoliosis. The BMSCs were obtained and assigned into seven groups: the normal control group, the positive control group, the negative control group and 1.0/10.0/100.0/1000.0 nmol/L experiment groups. Flow cytometry was conducted to testify cell cycle. The mRNA and protein expressions of mTOR and osteoblastic differentiation markers were measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting. In vivo, compared with the negative control group, bone trabecular area and the number of differentiated bone cells were significantly increased in the experiment groups. In vitro, at 24 and 48 h after rapamycin treatment, compared with the negative control group, BMSCs at G0/G1 stage increased, but BMSCs at S stage decreased in the 1.0/10.0/100.0/1000.0 nmol/L experiment groups; the expressions of mTOR and p70-S6K1 proteins were reduced in the 1.0/10.0/100.0/1000.0 nmol/L experiment groups, while ALP activity, OC levels, calcium deposition, Co1-I protein expression and the mRNA expressions of OC and Co1-I were significantly increased. Suppression of mTOR signaling pathway by rapamycin could promote BMSCs differentiation into osteoblast in DS.

  14. Degenerative Changes of the Spine of Pilots of the RNLAF

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    views of the spine taken in standing 7-3 Table 2 Classification of disorders Disorder Levels General: Osteo-arthrosis / Spondylosis / Arthrosis...Deformans Cervical, thoracic, lumbar Scoliosis Cervical, thoracic, lumbar Abnormal alignment Cervical, lumbar Scheuermann’s disease / Enchondrosis Thoracic... lumbar Specific: Degenerative changes in the intervertebral disc / Discopathy Cervical, thoracic, lumbar Presence of Osteophyte’s / Osteophytic

  15. Revisions for screw malposition and clinical outcomes after robot-guided lumbar fusion for spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Marc L; Staartjes, Victor E

    2017-05-01

    24.3 ± 28.3) and ODI (from 43.4 ± 18.3 to 16.2 ± 16.7; all p < 0.001). Undergoing PLIF, a high body mass index, smoking status, and a preoperative ability to work were identified as predictors of a reduction in back pain. Length of hospital stay was 2.4 ± 1.1 days and operating time was 161 ± 50 minutes. Ability to work increased from 38.9% to 78.2% of patients (p < 0.001) at the final follow-up, and 89.1% of patients indicated they would choose to undergo the same treatment again. CONCLUSIONS In adults with low-grade spondylolisthesis, the data demonstrated a benefit in using robotic guidance to reduce the rate of revision surgery for screw malposition as compared with other techniques of pedicle screw insertion described in peer-reviewed publications. Larger comparative studies are required to assess differences in PROs following a minimally invasive approach in spinal fusion surgeries compared with other techniques.

  16. SMART-DS: Synthetic Models for Advanced, Realistic Testing: Distribution

    Science.gov Websites

    statistical summary of the U.S. distribution systems World-class, high spatial/temporal resolution of solar Systems and Scenarios | Grid Modernization | NREL SMART-DS: Synthetic Models for Advanced , Realistic Testing: Distribution Systems and Scenarios SMART-DS: Synthetic Models for Advanced, Realistic

  17. Earth & Space Science PhDs, Class of 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claudy, Nicholas; Henly, Megan; Migdalski, Chet

    This study documents the employment patterns and demographic characteristics of recent PhDs in earth and space science. It summarizes the latest annual survey of recent earth and space science PhDs conducted by the American Geological Institute, the American Geophysical Union, and the Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of…

  18. 78 FR 65450 - Agency Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ...-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune, Crystalline and Infectious Arthritis) and Dysbaric... Control No. 2900- NEW (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (including inflammatory, autoimmune, crystalline and infectious arthritis) and Dysbaric Osteonecrosis Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence...

  19. Biodegradation of furfural by Bacillus subtilis strain DS3.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dan; Bao, Jianguo; Lu, Jueming; Lv, Quanxi

    2015-07-01

    An aerobic bacterial strain DS3, capable of growing on furfural as sole carbon source, was isolated from actived sludge of wastewater treatment plant in a diosgenin factory after enrichment. Based on morphological physiological tests as well as 16SrDNA sequence and Biolog analyses it was identified as Bacillus subtilis. The study revealed that strain DS3 utilized furfural, as analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Under following conditions: pH 8.0, temperature 35 degrees C, 150 rpm and 10% inoculum, strain DS3 showed 31.2% furfural degradation. Furthermore, DS3 strain was found to tolerate furfural concentration as high as 6000 mg(-1). The ability of Bacillus subtilis strain DS3 to degrade furfural has been demonstrated for the first time in the present study.

  20. Interpedicular height as a predictor of radicular pain in adult degenerative scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Hawasli, Ammar H.; Chang, Jodie; Yarbrough, Chester K.; Steger-May, Karen; Lenke, Lawrence G.; Dorward, Ian G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Context Spine surgeons must correlate clinical presentation with radiographic findings in a patient-tailored approach. Despite the prevalence of adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS), there are few radiographic markers to predict presence of radiculopathy. Emerging data suggest that spondylolisthesis, obliquity, foraminal stenosis and curve concavity may be associated with radiculopathy in ADS. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if radicular pain in ADS is associated with reduced interpedicular heights (IPHs) as measured on routine radiographs. Study Design/Setting Retrospective case-controlled study. Patient Sample The authors carried out a retrospective chart review at a tertiary care referral center that included ADS patients referred to scoliosis surgeons between 2012 and 2014. Inclusion criteria included patients with ADS and no prior thoraco-lumbar surgery. Data were collected from initial spine surgeon clinic notes and radiographs. Outcome Measures Clinical outcome data included presence, side(s) and level(s) of radicular pain; presence of motor deficits; and presence of sensory deficits. Methods Variables included age, gender, Scoliosis Research Society-30 (SRS-30) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) questionnaire data, and radiographic measurements. Radiographic measurements included Cobb angles and L1 to S1 IPHs on upright and supine radiographs. Associations between variables and outcome measures were assessed with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. Authors have no conflicts of interests relevant to this study. Results A total of 200 patients with an average age of 51 years met the inclusion criteria. 60/200 presented with radicular pain. Increased age was associated with radicular pain, weakness and sensory deficits. Patients that were 55 years or older were approximately 8 times more likely to have a radicular pain (OR = 7.96, 95% CI 3.73, 17.0; p <0.001), 5 times more likely to have a motor deficit (OR = 5, 95

  1. 75 FR 39322 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Retail Price Schedule, DS-2020 Parts 1-4, DS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-08

    .... Originating Office: Bureau of Administration Office of Allowances (A/OPR/ALS). Form Number: DS-2020, DS-2020I...: [email protected] . Mail (paper, disk, or CD-ROM submissions): Office of Allowances (A/OPR/ALS), Room... Delivery or Courier: Office of Allowances (A/OPR/ ALS), Room L314, Department of State, 2401 E Street, NW...

  2. Measurement of the absolute branching fraction of Ds0 *(2317 )±→π0Ds±

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ahmed, S.; Albrecht, M.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Bai, Y.; Bakina, O.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Berger, N.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chai, J.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, P. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; de Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Dou, Z. L.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Fegan, S.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, X. L.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. G.; Gao, Z.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, L.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, S.; Gu, Y. T.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Han, S.; Hao, X. Q.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, X. Q.; Heinsius, F. H.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Holtmann, T.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, X. Z.; Huang, Z. L.; Hussain, T.; Ikegami Andersson, W.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiang, X. Y.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Jin, Y.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Khan, T.; Khoukaz, A.; Kiese, P.; Kliemt, R.; Koch, L.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuemmel, M.; Kuessner, M.; Kuhlmann, M.; Kupsc, A.; Kühn, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Lavezzi, L.; Leiber, S.; Leithoff, H.; Leng, C.; Li, C.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, F. Y.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, H. J.; Li, J. C.; Li, J. Q.; Li, K. J.; Li, Kang; Li, Ke; Li, Lei; Li, P. L.; Li, P. R.; Li, Q. Y.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, D.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, Huanhuan; Liu, Huihui; Liu, J. B.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, Ke; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqing; Long, Y. F.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, X. L.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, M. M.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, Y. M.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Meng, Z. X.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Mezzadri, G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales Morales, C.; Morello, G.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Musiol, P.; Mustafa, A.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pan, Y.; Papenbrock, M.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Pellegrino, J.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Pettersson, J.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Pitka, A.; Poling, R.; Prasad, V.; Qi, H. R.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Richter, M.; Ripka, M.; Rolo, M.; Rong, G.; Rosner, Ch.; Ruan, X. D.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrié, M.; Schnier, C.; Schoenning, K.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Song, J. J.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Sowa, C.; Spataro, S.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, L.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, X. H.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. K.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, G. Y.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Tiemens, M.; Tsednee, B.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, Dan; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, Meng; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, W. P.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wang, Zongyuan; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, L. J.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.; Xia, X.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, H.; Xiao, Y. J.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xie, Y. H.; Xiong, X. A.; Xiu, Q. L.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, J. J.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. J.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y. H.; Yang, Y. X.; Yang, Yifan; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; You, Z. Y.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zeng, Z.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. T.; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhou, Y. X.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, S. H.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.; Besiii Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    The process e+e-→Ds*+Ds0 *(2317 )-+c .c . is observed for the first time with the data sample of 567 pb-1 collected with the BESIII detector operating at the BEPCII collider at a center-of-mass energy √{s }=4.6 GeV . The statistical significance of the Ds0 *(2317 )± signal is 5.8 σ and the mass is measured to be (2318.3 ±1.2 ±1.2 ) MeV /c2 . The absolute branching fraction B (Ds0 *(2317 )±→π0Ds±) is measured as 1.00-0.14+0.00(stat)-0.14+0.00(syst) for the first time. The uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  3. Structure of RDE-4 dsRBDs and mutational studies provide insights into dsRNA recognition in the Caenorhabditis elegans RNAi pathway.

    PubMed

    Chiliveri, Sai Chaitanya; Deshmukh, Mandar V

    2014-02-15

    The association of RDE-4 (RNAi defective 4), a protein containing two dsRBDs (dsRNA-binding domains), with long dsRNA and Dcr-1 (Dicer1 homologue) initiates the siRNA pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans. Unlike its homologues in higher eukaryotes, RDE-4 dsRBDs possess weak (micromolar) affinity for short dsRNA. With increasing length of dsRNA, RDE-4 exhibits enhanced affinity due to co-operativity. The linker and dsRBD2 are indispensable for RDE-4's simultaneous interaction with dsRNA and Dcr-1. In the present study, we have determined the solution structures of RDE-4 constructs that contain both dsRBDs and the linker region. In addition to the canonical dsRBD fold, both dsRBDs of RDE-4 show modified structural features such as truncation in the β1-β2 loop that rationalize RDE-4's relatively weak dsRNA affinity. Structure and binding studies demonstrate that dsRBD2 plays a decisive role in the RDE-4-dsRNA interaction; however, in contrast with previous findings, we found ephemeral interaction of RDE-4 dsRBD1 with dsRNA. More importantly, mutations in two tandem lysine residues (Lys217 and Lys218) in dsRBD2 impair RDE-4's dsRNA-binding ability and could obliterate RNAi initiation in C. elegans. Additionally, we postulate a structural basis for the minimal requirement of linker and dsRBD2 for RDE-4's association with dsRNA and Dcr-1.

  4. Correction of Grade 2 Spondylolisthesis Following a Non-Surgical Structural Spinal Rehabilitation Protocol Using Lumbar Traction: A Case Study and Selective Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Fedorchuk, Curtis; Lightstone, Douglas F; McRae, Christi; Kaczor, Derek

    2017-01-01

    Objective Discuss the use of non-surgical spinal rehabilitation protocol in the case of a 69-year-old female with a grade 2 spondylolisthesis. A selective literature review and discussion are provided. Clinical Features A 69-year-old female presented with moderate low back pain (7/10 pain) and severe leg cramping (7/10 pain). Initial lateral lumbar x-ray revealed a grade 2 spondylolisthesis at L4-L5 measuring 13.3 mm. Interventions and Outcomes The patient completed 60 sessions of Mirror Image® spinal exercises, adjustments, and traction over 45 weeks. Post-treatment lateral lumbar x-ray showed a decrease in translation of L4-L5 from 13.3 mm to 2.4 mm, within normal limits. Conclusions This case provides the first documented evidence of a non-surgical or chiropractic treatment, specifically Chiropractic BioPhysics®, protocols of lumbar spondylolisthesis where spinal alignment was corrected. Additional research is needed to investigate the clinical implications and treatment methods. PMID:29299090

  5. Dalitz plot analysis of Ds+→K+K-π+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Santoro, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Sun, S.; Suzuki, K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Guttman, N.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lindsay, C.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Pennington, M. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2011-03-01

    We perform a Dalitz plot analysis of about 100 000 Ds+ decays to K+K-π+ and measure the complex amplitudes of the intermediate resonances which contribute to this decay mode. We also measure the relative branching fractions of Ds+→K+K+π- and Ds+→K+K+K-. For this analysis we use a 384 fb-1 data sample, recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider running at center-of-mass energies near 10.58 GeV.

  6. Absolute Measurement of Hadronic Branching Fractions of the Ds+ Meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, J. P.; Berkelman, K.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C. D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Mahlke-Krüger, H.; Mohapatra, D.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Shi, X.; Stroiney, S.; Sun, W. M.; Wilksen, T.; Athar, S. B.; Patel, R.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Karliner, I.; Mehrabyan, S.; Lowrey, N.; Selen, M.; White, E. J.; Wiss, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Shepherd, M. R.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Libby, J.; Powell, A.; Wilkinson, G.; Ecklund, K. M.; Love, W.; Savinov, V.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J.; Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Sanghi, B.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.; Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H.; Yang, F.; Artuso, M.; Blusk, S.; Khalil, S.; Li, J.; Mountain, R.; Nisar, S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Sultana, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Zhang, L. M.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Dubrovin, M.; Lincoln, A.; Rademacker, J.; Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Naik, P.; Briere, R. A.; Ferguson, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Vogel, H.; Watkins, M. E.; Rosner, J. L.

    2008-04-01

    The branching fractions of Ds± meson decays serve to normalize many measurements of processes involving charm quarks. Using 298pb-1 of e+e- collisions recorded at a center of mass energy of 4.17 GeV, we determine absolute branching fractions for eight Ds± decays with a double tag technique. In particular we determine the branching fraction B(Ds+→K-K+π+)=(5.50±0.23±0.16)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. We also provide partial branching fractions for kinematic subsets of the K-K+π+ decay mode.

  7. Applications of CRISPR/Cas9 in retinal degenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying-Qian; Tang, Luo-Sheng; Yoshida, Shigeo; Zhou, Ye-Di

    2017-01-01

    Gene therapy is a potentially effective treatment for retinal degenerative diseases. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system has been developed as a new genome-editing tool in ophthalmic studies. Recent advances in researches showed that CRISPR/Cas9 has been applied in generating animal models as well as gene therapy in vivo of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). It has also been shown as a potential attempt for clinic by combining with other technologies such as adeno-associated virus (AAV) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this review, we highlight the main points of further prospect of using CRISPR/Cas9 in targeting retinal degeneration. We also emphasize the potential applications of this technique in treating retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:28503441

  8. Relationship of individual scapular anatomy and degenerative rotator cuff tears.

    PubMed

    Moor, Beat K; Wieser, Karl; Slankamenac, Ksenija; Gerber, Christian; Bouaicha, Samy

    2014-04-01

    The etiology of rotator cuff disease is age related, as documented by prevalence data. Despite conflicting results, growing evidence suggests that distinct scapular morphologies may accelerate the underlying degenerative process. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the predictive power of 5 commonly used radiologic parameters of scapular morphology to discriminate between patients with intact rotator cuff tendons and those with torn rotator cuff tendons. A pre hoc power analysis was performed to determine the sample size. Two independent readers measured the acromion index, lateral acromion angle, and critical shoulder angle on standardized anteroposterior radiographs. In addition, the acromial morphology according to Bigliani and the acromial slope were determined on true outlet views. Measurements were performed in 51 consecutive patients with documented degenerative rotator cuff tears and in an age- and sex-matched control group of 51 patients with intact rotator cuff tendons. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed to determine cutoff values and to assess the sensitivity and specificity of each parameter. Patients with degenerative rotator cuff tears demonstrated significantly higher acromion indices, smaller lateral acromion angles, and larger critical shoulder angles than patients with intact rotator cuffs. However, no difference was found between the acromial morphology according to Bigliani and the acromial slope. With an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.855 and an odds ratio of 10.8, the critical shoulder angle represented the strongest predictor for the presence of a rotator cuff tear. The acromion index, lateral acromion angle, and critical shoulder angle accurately predict the presence of degenerative rotator cuff tears. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inherited Retinal Degenerative Disease Clinical Trial Network. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    by retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other forms of rare inherited retinal degenerative diseases is estimated at approximately 200,000 individuals. RP... Retinitis Pigmentosa ). NNRI is awaiting final protocol review and HRPO approval for NNRI and the three enrolling clinical sites- the CTEC site at...acid) in individuals with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa , with the ability to expand the enrollment to individuals with autosomal recessive

  10. Miniaturized Mars Probes: The DS-2 Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R.

    2008-09-01

    Two small penetrators, each with a landed mass of only 2.5kg, were launched to Mars as piggyback payloads with the Mars Polar Lander, arriving in December 1999. Although no data were received from these Mars Microprobes (the cause of the failures, and that of MPL itself, is not known with certainty, although several possible failure modes exist) they represent a paradigm shift in the scale of practicable landers, and their development provides a number of important lessons for similar mission concepts. The penetrators featured a sample acquisition drill with a crude thermal analyzer, coupled to a tunable diode laser water detector, to detect the presence of water ice in the Martian subsurface at the landing site at high southern latitude. Additionally, the cooling of the penetrator to the ambient soil temperature would be monitored to infer the thermal conductivity of the soil, perhaps indicating the presence of ice. Similarly, the violent deceleration of the probe (~20,000g) from its 200 m/s impact would be measured to infer the strength and possible layering of the soil (the author's responsibility on the DS2 Science Team) and to estimate the penetration depth. Additionally, a separate accelerometer records the deceleration in the atmosphere to recover a density profile while the probe is encased in a frangible heat shield that shatters on impact (there were no parachutes.) Particular challenges in the project were the (possibly fatal) rapid schedule, as well as the impact deceleration and the low temperature environment, particularly important factors for the lithium battery design. Remarkably, volume limitations were more constraining than mass limits (indeed, the penetrator nose was chosen to be very dense Tungsten in order to keep the center of mass forward for aerodynamic stability) which made assembly (and in particular disassembly) very time-consuming. These and other lessons learned will be discussed.

  11. Connecting Malfunctioning Glial Cells and Brain Degenerative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaminsky, Natalie; Bihari, Ofer; Kanner, Sivan; Barzilai, Ari

    2016-06-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex biological system activated by different types of DNA damage. Mutations in certain components of the DDR machinery can lead to genomic instability disorders that culminate in tissue degeneration, premature aging, and various types of cancers. Intriguingly, malfunctioning DDR plays a role in the etiology of late onset brain degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. For many years, brain degenerative disorders were thought to result from aberrant neural death. Here we discuss the evidence that supports our novel hypothesis that brain degenerative diseases involve dysfunction of glial cells (astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes). Impairment in the functionality of glial cells results in pathological neuro-glial interactions that, in turn, generate a "hostile" environment that impairs the functionality of neuronal cells. These events can lead to systematic neural demise on a scale that appears to be proportional to the severity of the neurological deficit. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. The development of biomarkers for degenerative musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed

    Jayabalan, Prakash; Sowa, Gwendolyn A

    2014-02-01

    With an aging population, degenerative musculoskeletal conditions will become more prevalent with significantly increasing costs to society over the next several decades. The majority of these conditions are diagnosed radiographically, at which point the disease process is often more advanced and challenging to treat. The commonly available radiographic studies also do not adequately provide information as to the exact pain generator and findings often do not correlate either to patient symptoms or function. Personalized medicine involves formulating treatments based on a patient's own biology. The development of biological markers (biomarkers) pertaining to disease is a rapidly growing area within this field of medicine. For degenerative musculoskeletal conditions, biomarkers have the potential to provide an early non-invasive method of assessing the location and severity of tissue damage and presence of inflammation. By outlining mechanisms of disease they could allow the formulation of further treatment targets and through sub-categorizing patients into different groups based on their biomarker profile, one could provide more efficacious treatments for patients. The present article is a review of the development of biomarkers for these purposes specifically as they pertain to degenerative musculoskeletal conditions.

  13. Spontaneous slip reduction of low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis following circumferential release via bilateral minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion: technical note and short-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Li, Lijun; Qian, Lie; Zhou, Wei; Tan, Jun; Zou, Le; Yang, Mingjie

    2011-02-15

    STUDY DESIGN.: Retrospective clinical data analysis. OBJECTIVE.: To investigate and verify our philosophy of spontaneous slip reduction following circumferential release via bilateral minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (Mini-TLIF) for treatment of low-grade symptomatic isthmic spondylolisthesis. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Symptomatic isthmic spondylolisthesis usually requires surgical intervention, and the most currently controversial focus is on method and degree of reduction; and Mini-TLIF is an attractive surgical procedure for isthmic spondylolisthesis. METHODS.: Between February 2004 and June 2008, 21 patients with low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis underwent Mini-TLIF in our institute. Total resection of the scar around the pars interarticularis liberated the nerve roots, achieving posterior release as well. The disc was thoroughly resected, and the disc space was gradually distracted and thoroughly released with sequential disc shavers until rupture of anulus conjunct with anterior longitudinal ligament, accomplishing anterior release, so as to insert Cages. Because of circumferential release, the slipped vertebrae would tend to obtain spontaneous reduction, and with pedicle screw fixation, additional reduction would be achieved without any application of posterior translation force. Radiographs, Visual Analogue Scale, and Oswestry Disability Index were documented. All the cases were followed up for 10 to 26 months. RESULTS.: Slip percentage was reduced from 24.2% ± 6.9% to 10.5% ± 4.0%, and foraminal area percentage increased from 89.1% ± 3.0% to 93.6% ± 2.1%. Visual Analogue Scale and Oswestry Disability Index decreased from 7.8 ± 1.5 to 2.1 ± 1.1 and from 53.3 ± 16.2 to 17.0 ± 7.8, respectively. No neurologic complications were encountered. There were no signs of instrumentation failure. The fusion rate approached 100%. CONCLUSION.: Slip reduction is based on circumferential release. The procedure can be well performed

  14. Comparison of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with autogenous bone chips and PLIF with cage for treatment of double-level isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Song, Deyong; Chen, Zhong; Song, Dewei; Li, Zaixue

    2015-11-01

    Spondylolytic defects involving multiple vertebral levels are rare. It is reported that only 1.48% of patients with back pain were diagnosed with multi-level spondylolysis. The incidence of multiple-level spondylolisthesis is even rarer, so far there have been few reports of multi-level isthmic spondylolisthesis in the literature. The aim of this study is to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes of two different fusion techniques for treatment of double-level isthmic spondylolisthesis. Fifty-four patients who were managed surgically for treatment of double-level symptomatic isthmic spondylolisthesis were included in this study. Between May 2004 and September 2012, 29 consecutive patients underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with autogenous bone chips (group I) at Foshan Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangdong, China. Between March 2005 and December 2013, 25 consecutive patients underwent PLIF with cage (group II) at Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangdong, China. The mean follow-up periods were 27.2 and 26.8 months, respectively. The mean VAS scores of back and leg pain significantly decreased from 7.2 to 2.2 and 5.8 to 2.1 in the group I and from 7.0 to 1.9 and 6.1 to 1.8 in the group II, respectively. In the group I, mean ODI scores improved significantly from 54% to 14.2% and, in the group II, from 60% to 12.6%. In both groups, VAS and ODI scores significantly changed from pre- to postoperatively (p<0.001), but postoperative outcome between groups was statistically not significant. Solid union was observed in 27 of 29 patients (89.6%) in the group I and in 22 of 25 patients (88%) in the group II, without statistically significant differences (p>0.05). In both groups, changes in disc height, degree of listhesis, and whole lumbar lordosis between the pre- and postoperative periods were significant. Clinical and functional outcomes demonstrate no significant differences between groups in treating back and leg pain

  15. Commentary: PhDs in Biochemistry Education--5 Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offerdahl, Erika G.; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research.

  16. Diclofenac sodium (DS) loaded bioerodible polymer based constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piras, M.; Chiellini, F.; Nikkola, L.; Ashammakhi, N.; Chiellini, E.

    2008-02-01

    Pain is a prevalent problem that can raise morbidity of patients. Pain killer releasing biodegradable materials have been developed by using different techniques and biomaterials. The objective of the current study is to evaluate the use of a new bioerodible polymer for release of diclofenac sodium (DS). 1-butanol hemiester poly(maleic anhydride-alt-2-methoxyethyl vinyl ether) (PAM14) was prepared in the university of Pisa and selected as polymer of choice for the study. Polymer solutions of 5-10% (in ethanol or in acetic acid) were prepared, half of them containing 2% DS. The solutions were then electrospun to produce nanomats that were subsequently characterized using SEM. Fiber diameter was 160 nm 1 μm. Increasing polymer concentration increased the size of the fibers but reduced the number of beads (with or without DS). In the specimens obtained from acetic acid solution, the addition of DS resulted in a reduction in fiber diameter and an increase in the inter-bead distance. Corresponding ethanol solutions gave more homogeneous specimens than did acetic acid, having a lower number of beads. With the addition of DS a reduction in fiber diameter was observed for the acetic acid specimens. However, in ethanol, adding DS resulted in increased fiber diameter. Accordingly, it can be concluded that it is feasible to develop electrospun diclofenac releasing bioerodible nanostructures that have potential use in pain management. Their further evaluation is however, needed both in vitro and in vivo.

  17. DsRNA as a stimulator of cell pacemaker activity

    SciTech Connect

    Airapetyan, S.N.; Zakharyan, R.A.; Rychkov, G.E.

    1986-03-01

    The authors study the action of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) on the characteristics of neuron pacemaker activity which permits prediction of the character of action of dsRNA on the pacemaker activity of cells and organs, and takes the investigators closer to an understanding of the membrane mechanisms underlying the action of dsRNA on the cell. The methods for isolating and fractionating dsRNA from yeasts and the intracellular recording of the electrical activity of the snail giant neuron have been described by the authors earlier. The authors determined the dependence of Ca/sup 2 +/ entry upon dsRNA concentration using the isotope /supmore » 45/Ca. Preweighed ganglia were incubated five each for an hour in 2 ml Ringer's solution containing dsRNA and 5 microliters /sup 45/CaCl/sub 2/ of 12.5 mCi activity. After incubation, the ganglia were rinsed three times for 8 min each time in normal Ringers solution. The washed ganglia were dissolved for one day in KOH. The amount of isotope entering was counted using Brav's scintillator and an RGT counter tuned to the /sup 45/Ca isotope. The physiological saline used for the isolated ganglion contained 85 mmole NaCl, 4 mmole KCl, 8 mmole CaCl/sub 2/, 10 mmole MgCl/sub 2/, 10 mmole Tris-HCl, and 5 mmole glucose.« less

  18. Unique Thermal Stability of Unnatural Hydrophobic Ds Bases in Double-Stranded DNAs.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Michiko; Hirao, Ichiro

    2017-10-20

    Genetic alphabet expansion technology, the introduction of unnatural bases or base pairs into replicable DNA, has rapidly advanced as a new synthetic biology area. A hydrophobic unnatural base pair between 7-(2-thienyl)imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds) and 2-nitro-4-propynylpyrrole (Px) exhibited high fidelity as a third base pair in PCR. SELEX methods using the Ds-Px pair enabled high-affinity DNA aptamer generation, and introducing a few Ds bases into DNA aptamers extremely augmented their affinities and selectivities to target proteins. Here, to further scrutinize the functions of this highly hydrophobic Ds base, the thermal stabilities of double-stranded DNAs (dsDNA) containing a noncognate Ds-Ds or G-Ds pair were examined. The thermal stability of the Ds-Ds self-pair was as high as that of the natural G-C pair, and apart from the generally higher stability of the G-C pair than that of the A-T pair, most of the 5'-pyrimidine-Ds-purine-3' sequences, such as CDsA and TDsA, exhibited higher stability than the 5'-purine-Ds-pyrimidine-3' sequences, such as GDsC and ADsC, in dsDNAs. This trait enabled the GC-content-independent control of the thermal stability of the designed dsDNA fragments. The melting temperatures of dsDNA fragments containing the Ds-Ds pair can be predicted from the nearest-neighbor parameters including the Ds base. In addition, the noncognate G-Ds pair can efficiently distinguish its neighboring cognate natural base pairs from noncognate pairs. We demonstrated that real-time PCR using primers containing Ds accurately detected a single-nucleotide mismatch in target DNAs. These unique properties of the Ds base that affect the stabilities of the neighboring base pairs could impart new functions to DNA molecules and technologies.

  19. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and lumbar spine configuration

    PubMed Central

    Hamoud, K.; May, H.; Hay, O.; Medlej, B.; Masharawi, Y.; Peled, N.; Hershkovitz, I.

    2010-01-01

    As life expectancy increases, degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) becomes a common health problem among the elderly. DLSS is usually caused by degenerative changes in bony and/or soft tissue elements. The poor correlation between radiological manifestations and the clinical picture emphasizes the fact that more studies are required to determine the natural course of this syndrome. Our aim was to reveal the association between lower lumbar spine configuration and DLSS. Two groups were studied: the first included 67 individuals with DLSS (mean age 66 ± 10) and the second 100 individuals (mean age 63.4 ± 13) without DLSS-related symptoms. Both groups underwent CT images (Philips Brilliance 64) and the following measurements were performed: a cross-section area of the dural sac, vertebral body dimensions (height, length and width), AP diameter of the bony spinal canal, lumbar lordosis and sacral slope angles. All measurements were taken at L3 to S1. Vertebral body lengths were significantly greater in the DLSS group at all levels compared to the control, whereas anterior vertebral body heights (L3, L4, L5) and middle vertebral heights (L3, L5) were significantly smaller in the LSS group. Lumbar lordosis, sacral slope and bony spinal canal were significantly smaller in the DLSS compared to the control. We conclude that the size and shape of vertebral bodies and canals significantly differed between the study groups. A tentative model is suggested to explain the association between these characteristics and the development of degenerative spinal stenosis. PMID:20652366

  20. Exercise pulmonary hypertension in asymptomatic degenerative mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Magne, Julien; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Piérard, Luc A

    2010-07-06

    Current guidelines recommend mitral valve surgery for asymptomatic patients with severe degenerative mitral regurgitation and preserved left ventricular systolic function when exercise pulmonary hypertension (PHT) is present. However, the determinants of exercise PHT have not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to identify the echocardiographic predictors of exercise PHT and the impact on symptoms. Comprehensive resting and exercise transthoracic echocardiography was performed in 78 consecutive patients (age, 61+/-13 years; 56% men) with at least moderate degenerative mitral regurgitation (effective regurgitant orifice area =43+/-20 mm(2); regurgitant volume =71+/-27 mL). Exercise PHT was defined as a systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (SPAP) >60 mm Hg. Exercise PHT was present in 46% patients. In multivariable analysis, exercise effective regurgitant orifice was an independent determinant of exercise SPAP (P<0.0001) and exercise PHT (P=0.002). Resting PHT and exercise PHT were associated with markedly reduced 2-year symptom-free survival (36+/-14% versus 59+/-7%, P=0.04; 35+/-8% versus 75+/-7%, P<0.0001). After adjustment, although the impact of resting PHT was no longer significant, exercise PHT was identified as an independent predictor of the occurrence of symptoms (hazard ratio=3.4; P=0.002). Receiver-operating characteristics curves revealed that exercise PHT (SPAP >56 mm Hg) was more accurate than resting PHT (SPAP >36 mm Hg) in predicting the occurrence of symptoms during follow-up (P=0.032). Exercise PHT is frequent in patients with asymptomatic degenerative mitral regurgitation. Exercise mitral regurgitation severity is a strong independent predictor of both exercise SPAP and exercise PHT. Exercise PHT is associated with markedly low 2-year symptom-free survival, emphasizing the use of exercise echocardiography. An exercise SPAP >56 mm Hg accurately predicts the occurrence of symptoms.

  1. Study of Cabibbo suppressed decays of the Ds+ charmed-strange meson involving a KS0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FOCUS Collaboration; Link, J. M.; Yager, P. M.; Anjos, J. C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A. A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Pepe, I. M.; Polycarpo, E.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Uribe, C.; Vázquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J. P.; Frisullo, V.; O'Reilly, B.; Segoni, I.; Stenson, K.; Tucker, R. S.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chiodini, G.; Gaines, I.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garren, L. A.; Gottschalk, E.; Kasper, P. H.; Kreymer, A. E.; Kutschke, R.; Wang, M.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F. L.; Zallo, A.; Reyes, M.; Cawlfield, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Rahimi, A.; Wiss, J.; Gardner, R.; Kryemadhi, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Kang, J. S.; Ko, B. R.; Kwak, J. W.; Lee, K. B.; Cho, K.; Park, H.; Alimonti, G.; Barberis, S.; Boschini, M.; Cerutti, A.; D'Angelo, P.; Dicorato, M.; Dini, P.; Edera, L.; Erba, S.; Inzani, P.; Leveraro, F.; Malvezzi, S.; Menasce, D.; Mezzadri, M.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Pontoglio, C.; Prelz, F.; Rovere, M.; Sala, S.; Davenport, T. F.; Arena, V.; Boca, G.; Bonomi, G.; Gianini, G.; Liguori, G.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Merlo, M. M.; Pantea, D.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Vitulo, P.; Göbel, C.; Otalora, J.; Hernandez, H.; Lopez, A. M.; Mendez, H.; Paris, A.; Quinones, J.; Ramirez, J. E.; Zhang, Y.; Wilson, J. R.; Handler, T.; Mitchell, R.; Engh, D.; Hosack, M.; Johns, W. E.; Luiggi, E.; Nehring, M.; Sheldon, P. D.; Vaandering, E. W.; Webster, M.; Sheaff, M.

    2008-02-01

    We study the decay of Ds+ mesons into final states involving a KS0 and report the discovery of Cabibbo suppressed decay modes Ds+→KS0πππ (179±36 events) and Ds+→KS0π (113±26 events). The branching fraction ratios for the new modes are Γ(Ds+→KS0πππ)Γ(Ds+→KS0Kππ)=0.18±0.04±0.05 and Γ(Ds+→KS0π)Γ(Ds+→KS0K)=0.104±0.024±0.014.

  2. Excited delirium syndrome (ExDS): treatment options and considerations.

    PubMed

    Vilke, Gary M; Bozeman, William P; Dawes, Donald M; Demers, Gerard; Wilson, Michael P

    2012-04-01

    The term Excited Delirium Syndrome (ExDS) has traditionally been used in the forensic literature to describe findings in a subgroup of patients with delirium who suffered lethal consequences from their untreated severe agitation.(1-5) Excited delirium syndrome, also known as agitated delirium, is generally defined as altered mental status and combativeness or aggressiveness. Although the exact signs and symptoms are difficult to define precisely, clinical findings often include many of the following: tolerance to significant pain, rapid breathing, sweating, severe agitation, elevated temperature, delirium, non-compliance or poor awareness to direction from police or medical personnel, lack of fatiguing, unusual or superhuman strength, and inappropriate clothing for the current environment. It has become increasingly recognized that individuals displaying ExDS are at high risk for sudden death, and ExDS therefore represents a true medical emergency. Recently the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) published the findings of a white paper on the topic of ExDS to better find consensus on the issues of definition, diagnosis, and treatment.(6) In so doing, ACEP joined the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME) in recognizing ExDS as a medical condition. For both paramedics and physicians, the difficulty in diagnosing the underlying cause of ExDS in an individual patient is that the presenting clinical signs and symptoms of ExDS can be produced by a wide variety of clinical disease processes. For example, agitation, combativeness, and altered mental status can be produced by hypoglycemia, thyroid storm, certain kinds of seizures, and these conditions can be difficult to distinguish from those produced by cocaine or methamphetamine intoxication.(7) Prehospital personnel are generally not expected to differentiate between the multiple possible causes of the patient's presentation, but rather simply to recognize that the patient has a medical emergency

  3. Dicer uses distinct modules for recognizing dsRNA termini.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Niladri K; Iwasa, Janet; Shen, Peter S; Bass, Brenda L

    2018-01-19

    Invertebrates rely on Dicer to cleave viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and Drosophila Dicer-2 distinguishes dsRNA substrates by their termini. Blunt termini promote processive cleavage, while 3' overhanging termini are cleaved distributively. To understand this discrimination, we used cryo-electron microscopy to solve structures of Drosophila Dicer-2 alone and in complex with blunt dsRNA. Whereas the Platform-PAZ domains have been considered the only Dicer domains that bind dsRNA termini, unexpectedly, we found that the helicase domain is required for binding blunt, but not 3' overhanging, termini. We further showed that blunt dsRNA is locally unwound and threaded through the helicase domain in an adenosine triphosphate-dependent manner. Our studies reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism for optimizing antiviral defense and set the stage for the discovery of helicase-dependent functions in other Dicers. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  4. Advances in surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Silber, Jeff S; Anderson, D Greg; Hayes, Victor M; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2002-07-01

    The past several years have seen many advances in spine technology. Some of these advances have improved the quality of life of patients suffering from disabling low back pain from degenerative disk disease. Traditional fusion procedures are trending toward less invasive approaches with less iatrogenic soft-tissue morbidity. The diversity of bone graft substitutes is increasing with the potential for significant improvements in fusion success with the future introduction of several well tested bone morphogenic proteins to the spinal market. Biologic solutions to modify the natural history of disk degeneration are being investigated. Recently, electrothermal modulation of the posterior annulus fibrosis has been published as a semi-invasive technique to relieve low back pain generated by fissures in the outer annulus and ingrowing nociceptors (intradiskal electrothermal therapy, and intradiskal electrothermal annuloplasty). Initial results are promising, however, prospective randomized studies comparing this technique with conservative therapy are still lacking. The same is true for artificial nucleus pulposus replacement using hydrogel cushions implanted in the intervertebral space after removal of the nucleus pulposus posterior or through an anterior approach. Intervertebral disk prostheses are presently being studied in small prospective patient cohorts. As with all new developments, careful prospective, long-term trials are needed to fully define the role of these technologies in the management of symptomatic lumbar degenerative disk disease.

  5. Higher spin realization of the DS/CFT correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anninos, Dionysios; Hartman, Thomas; Strominger, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We conjecture that Vasiliev’s theory of higher spin gravity in four-dimensional de Sitter space (dS4) is holographically dual to a three-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT3) living on the spacelike boundary of dS4 at future timelike infinity. The CFT3 is the Euclidean Sp(N) vector model with anticommuting scalars. The free CFT3 flows under a double-trace deformation to an interacting CFT3 in the IR. We argue that both CFTs are dual to Vasiliev dS4 gravity but with different future boundary conditions on the bulk scalar field. Our analysis rests heavily on analytic continuations of bulk and boundary correlators in the proposed duality relating the O(N) model with Vasiliev gravity in AdS4.

  6. Measurement of Bs0 and Ds- Meson Lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Baranov, A.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baryshnikov, F.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Beiter, A.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Beranek, S.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betancourt, C.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Chamont, D.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Chubykin, A.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Dembinski, H.-P.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez, G.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Funk, W.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greim, R.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Huard, Z.-C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Kopecna, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, T.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marinangeli, M.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurice, E.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morello, M. J.; Morgunova, O.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Mussini, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nogay, A.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Ossowska, A.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Placinta, V.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poli Lener, M.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Ponce, S.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, C.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Gonzalo, D.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schreiner, H. F.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Soares Lavra, l.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevens, H.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Verlage, T. A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Winn, M. A.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    We report on a measurement of the flavor-specific Bs0 lifetime and of the Ds- lifetime using proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment and corresponding to 3.0 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. Approximately 407 000 Bs0→Ds(*)-μ+νμ decays are partially reconstructed in the K+K-π-μ+ final state. The Bs0 and Ds- natural widths are determined using, as a reference, kinematically similar B0→D(*)-μ+νμ decays reconstructed in the same final state. The resulting differences between widths of Bs0 and B0 mesons and of Ds- and D- mesons are ΔΓ(B )=-0.0115 ±0.0053 (stat ) ±0.0041 (syst ) ps-1 and ΔΓ(D )=1.0131 ±0.0117 (stat ) ±0.0065 (syst ) ps-1, respectively. Combined with the known B0 and D- lifetimes, these yield the flavor-specific Bs0 lifetime, τBs 0 fs =1.547 ±0.013 (stat ) ±0.010 (syst ) ±0.004 (τB) ps and the Ds- lifetime, τDs-=0.5064 ±0.0030 (stat ) ±0.0017 (syst ) ±0.0017 (τD) ps . The last uncertainties originate from the limited knowledge of the B0 and D- lifetimes. The results improve upon current determinations.

  7. Outcomes of Posterolateral Fusion with and without Instrumentation and of Interbody Fusion for Isthmic Spondylolisthesis: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Endler, Peter; Ekman, Per; Möller, Hans; Gerdhem, Paul

    2017-05-03

    Various methods for the treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis are available. The aim of this study was to compare outcomes after posterolateral fusion without instrumentation, posterolateral fusion with instrumentation, and interbody fusion. The Swedish Spine Register was used to identify 765 patients who had been operated on for isthmic spondylolisthesis and had at least preoperative and 2-year outcome data; 586 of them had longer follow-up (a mean of 6.9 years). The outcome measures were a global assessment of leg and back pain, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) Questionnaire, the Short Form-36 (SF-36), a visual analog scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, and satisfaction with treatment. Data on additional lumbar spine surgery was searched for in the register, with the mean duration of follow-up for this variable being 10.6 years after the index procedure. Statistical analyses were performed with analysis of covariance or competing-risks proportional hazards regression, adjusted for baseline differences in the studied variables, smoking, employment status, and level of fusion. Posterolateral fusion without instrumentation was performed in 102 patients; posterolateral fusion with instrumentation, in 452; and interbody fusion, in 211. At 1 year, improvement was reported in the global assessment for back pain by 54% of the patients who had posterolateral fusion without instrumentation, 68% of those treated with posterolateral fusion with instrumentation, and 70% of those treated with interbody fusion (p = 0.009). The VAS for back pain and reported satisfaction with treatment showed similar patterns (p = 0.003 and p = 0.017, respectively), whereas other outcomes did not differ among the treatment groups at 1 year. At 2 years, the global assessment for back pain indicated improvement in 57% of the patients who had undergone posterolateral fusion without instrumentation, 70% of those who had posterolateral fusion with instrumentation

  8. Absolute measurement of hadronic branching fractions of the Ds+ meson.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G; Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L

    2008-04-25

    The branching fractions of D(s)(+/-) meson decays serve to normalize many measurements of processes involving charm quarks. Using 298 pb(-1) of e(+)e(-) collisions recorded at a center of mass energy of 4.17 GeV, we determine absolute branching fractions for eight D(s)(+/-) decays with a double tag technique. In particular we determine the branching fraction B(D(s)(+)-->K(-)K(+}pi(+))=(5.50+/-0.23+/-0.16)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. We also provide partial branching fractions for kinematic subsets of the K(-)K(+)pi(+) decay mode.

  9. Suppression of DS1 Phosphatidic Acid Phosphatase Confirms Resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Masahito; Nishihara, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Kiba, Akinori

    2013-01-01

    Nicotiana benthamiana is susceptible to Ralstonia solanacearum. To analyze molecular mechanisms for disease susceptibility, we screened a gene-silenced plant showing resistance to R. solanacearum, designated as DS1 (Disease suppression 1). The deduced amino acid sequence of DS1 cDNA encoded a phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) 2. DS1 expression was induced by infection with a virulent strain of R. solanacearum in an hrp-gene-dependent manner. DS1 rescued growth defects of the temperature-sensitive ∆lpp1∆dpp1∆pah1 mutant yeast. Recombinant DS1 protein showed Mg2+-independent PAP activity. DS1 plants showed reduced PAP activity and increased phosphatidic acid (PA) content. After inoculation with R. solanacearum, DS1 plants showed accelerated cell death, over-accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and hyper-induction of PR-4 expression. In contrast, DS1-overexpressing tobacco plants showed reduced PA content, greater susceptibility to R. solanacearum, and reduced ROS production and PR-4 expression. The DS1 phenotype was partially compromised in the plants in which both DS1 and NbCoi1 or DS1 and NbrbohB were silenced. These results show that DS1 PAP may affect plant immune responses related to ROS and JA cascades via regulation of PA levels. Suppression of DS1 function or DS1 expression could rapidly activate plant defenses to achieve effective resistance against Ralstonia solanacearum. PMID:24073238

  10. Invasive species compendium: Salvinia molesta D.S. Mitchell

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salvinia molesta D.S. Mitchell is an invasive aquatic fern native to a small area of south-eastern Brazil. It has spread throughout the world, forming thick mats of vegetation that decrease dissolved oxygen and pH while outcompeting native vegetation. It has been introduced and established into many...

  11. SLAP deficiency decreases dsDNA autoantibody production

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lisa K.; Pennington, Luke F.; Shaw, Laura A.; Brown, Meredith; Treacy, Eric C.; Friend, Samantha F.; Hatlevik, Øyvind; Rubtsova, Kira; Rubtsov, Anatoly V.; Dragone, Leonard L.

    2014-01-01

    Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP) adapts c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, to activated components of the BCR signaling complex regulating BCR levels and signaling in developing B cells. Based on this function, we asked whether SLAP deficiency could decrease the threshold for tolerance and eliminate development of autoreactive B cells in two models of autoantibody production. First, we sensitized mice with a dsDNA mimetope that causes an anti-dsDNA response. Despite equivalent production of anti-peptide antibodies compared to BALB/c controls, SLAP−/− mice did not produce anti-dsDNA. Second, we used the 56R tolerance model. SLAP−/− 56R mice had decreased levels of dsDNA-reactive antibodies compared to 56R mice due to skewed light chain usage. Thus, SLAP is a critical regulator of B-cell development and function and its deficiency leads to decreased autoreactive B cells that are otherwise maintained by inefficient receptor editing or failed negative selection. PMID:24440645

  12. SLAP deficiency decreases dsDNA autoantibody production.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lisa K; Pennington, Luke F; Shaw, Laura A; Brown, Meredith; Treacy, Eric C; Friend, Samantha F; Hatlevik, Øyvind; Rubtsova, Kira; Rubtsov, Anatoly V; Dragone, Leonard L

    2014-02-01

    Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP) adapts c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, to activated components of the BCR signaling complex regulating BCR levels and signaling in developing B cells. Based on this function, we asked whether SLAP deficiency could decrease the threshold for tolerance and eliminate development of autoreactive B cells in two models of autoantibody production. First, we sensitized mice with a dsDNA mimetope that causes an anti-dsDNA response. Despite equivalent production of anti-peptide antibodies compared to BALB/c controls, SLAP(-/-) mice did not produce anti-dsDNA. Second, we used the 56R tolerance model. SLAP(-/-) 56R mice had decreased levels of dsDNA-reactive antibodies compared to 56R mice due to skewed light chain usage. Thus, SLAP is a critical regulator of B-cell development and function and its deficiency leads to decreased autoreactive B cells that are otherwise maintained by inefficient receptor editing or failed negative selection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Statistical inconsistencies in the KiDS-450 data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, George; Lemos, Pablo

    2018-05-01

    The Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS) has been used in several recent papers to infer constraints on the amplitude of the matter power spectrum and matter density at low redshift. Some of these analyses have claimed tension with the Planck Λ cold dark matter cosmology at the ˜2σ-3σ level, perhaps indicative of new physics. However, Planck is consistent with other low-redshift probes of the matter power spectrum such as redshift-space distortions and the combined galaxy-mass and galaxy-galaxy power spectra. Here, we perform consistency tests of the KiDS data, finding internal tensions for various cuts of the data at ˜2.2σ-3.5σ significance. Until these internal tensions are understood, we argue that it is premature to claim evidence for new physics from KiDS. We review the consistency between KiDS and other weak lensing measurements of S8, highlighting the importance of intrinsic alignments for precision cosmology.

  14. Commentary: PhDs in biochemistry education-5 years later.

    PubMed

    Offerdahl, Erika G; Momsen, Jennifer L; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Lumbar subcutaneous edema and degenerative spinal disease in patients with low back pain: a retrospective MRI study.

    PubMed

    Quattrocchi, C C; Giona, A; Di Martino, A; Gaudino, F; Mallio, C A; Errante, Y; Occhicone, F; Vitali, M A; Zobel, B B; Denaro, V

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to determine the association between LSE, spondylolisthesis, facet arthropathy, lumbar canal stenosis, BMI, radiculopathy and bone marrow edema at conventional lumbar spine MR imaging. This is a retrospective radiological study; 441 consecutive patients with low back pain (224 men and 217 women; mean age 57.3 years; mean BMI 26) underwent conventional lumbar MRI using a 1.5-T magnet (Avanto, Siemens). Lumbar MR images were reviewed by consensus for the presence of LSE, spondylolisthesis, facet arthropathy, lumbar canal stenosis, radiculopathy and bone marrow edema. Descriptive statistics and association studies were conducted using STATA software 11.0. Association studies have been performed using linear univariate regression analysis and multivariate regression analysis, considering LSE as response variable. The overall prevalence of LSE was 40%; spondylolisthesis (p = 0.01), facet arthropathy (p < 0.001), BMI (p = 0.008) and lumbar canal stenosis (p < 0.001) were included in the multivariate regression model, whereas bone marrow edema, radiculopathy and age were not. LSE is highly associated with spondylolisthesis, facet arthropathy and BMI, suggesting underestimation of its clinical impact as an integral component in chronic lumbar back pain. Longitudinal simultaneous X-ray/MRI studies should be conducted to test the relationship of LSE with lumbar spinal instability and low back pain.

  16. Outcome analysis in lumbar spine: instabilities/degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Fessler, R G

    1997-01-01

    In summary, expectations for outcome analysis have changed over the last several years. It is no longer the case that outcome analysis is expected to be done by academic institutions alone. Surgeons in private practice are rapidly approaching the time when outcome analysis of personal results will be necessary for competitive marketing purposes. In addition, the definition of outcome analysis has been considerably expanded from medical outcome to include functional outcome, return to work, quality of life, patient satisfaction, and cost-effectiveness. The above discussion has considered several aspects of data outcome analysis for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. It is the intent of this review to help surgeons prepare themselves for changing expectations in their new medical environment.

  17. Complement, a target for therapy in inflammatory and degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Morgan, B Paul; Harris, Claire L

    2015-12-01

    The complement system is a key innate immune defence against infection and an important driver of inflammation; however, these very properties can also cause harm. Inappropriate or uncontrolled activation of complement can cause local and/or systemic inflammation, tissue damage and disease. Complement provides numerous options for drug development as it is a proteolytic cascade that involves nine specific proteases, unique multimolecular activation and lytic complexes, an arsenal of natural inhibitors, and numerous receptors that bind to activation fragments. Drug design is facilitated by the increasingly detailed structural understanding of the molecules involved in the complement system. Only two anti-complement drugs are currently on the market, but many more are being developed for diseases that include infectious, inflammatory, degenerative, traumatic and neoplastic disorders. In this Review, we describe the history, current landscape and future directions for anti-complement therapies.

  18. Vitamin K, osteoporosis and degenerative diseases of ageing.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Cees; Theuwissen, Elke

    2011-03-01

    The function of vitamin K is to serve as a co-factor during the post-translational carboxylation of glutamate (Glu) residues into γ-carboxyglutamate (Gla) residues. The vital importance of the Gla-proteins essential for normal haemostasis is well recognized. During recent years, new Gla-containing proteins have been discovered and the vitamin K-dependent carboxylation is also essential for their function. It seems, however, that our dietary vitamin K intake is too low to support the carboxylation of at least some of these Gla-proteins. According to the triage theory, long-term vitamin K inadequacy is an independent, but modifiable risk factor for the development of degenerative diseases of ageing including osteoporosis and atherosclerosis.

  19. Health Economics and the Management of Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Witiw, Christopher D; Smieliauskas, Fabrice; Fehlings, Michael G

    2018-01-01

    Degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM) is the leading cause of spinal cord impairment worldwide. Surgical intervention has been demonstrated to be effective and is becoming standard of care. Spine surgery, however, is costly and value needs to be demonstrated. This review serves to summarize the key health economic concepts as they relate to the assessment of the value of surgery for DCM. This is followed by a discussion of current health economic research on DCM, which suggests that surgery is likely to be cost effective. The review concludes with a summary of future questions that remain unanswered, such as which patient subgroups derive the most value from surgery and which surgical approaches are the most cost effective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Congenital Spondylolytic Spondylolisthesis of C2 Vertebra Associated With Atlanto-Axial Dislocation, Chiari Type I Malformation, and Anomalous Vertebral Artery: Case Report With Review Literature.

    PubMed

    Sardhara, Jayesh; Pavaman, Sindgikar; Das, Kuntal; Srivastava, Arun; Mehrotra, Anant; Behari, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    Congenital spondylolytic spondylolisthesis of C2 vertebra resulting from deficient posterior element of the axis is rarely described in the literature. We describe a unique case of agenesis of posterior elements of C2 with craniovertebral junction anomalies consisting of osseous, vascular, and soft tissue anomalies. A 26-year-old man presented with symptoms of upper cervical myelopathy of 12 months' duration. A computed tomography scan of the cervical spine including the craniovertebral junction revealed spondylolisthesis of C2 over C3, atlantoaxial dislocation, occipitalization of the atlas, hypoplasia of the odontoid, and cleft posterior C1 arch. Additionally, the axis vertebra was found devoid of its posterior elements except bilaterally rudimentary pedicles. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed tonsilar herniation, suggesting associated Chiari type I malformation. CT angiogram of the vertebral arteries displayed persistent bilateral first intersegmental arteries crossing the posterior aspect of the C1/2 facet joint. This patient underwent foramen magnum decompression, C3 laminectomy with occipito-C3/C4 posterior fusion using screw and rod to maintain the cervical alignment and stability. We report this rare constellation of congenital craniovertebral junction anomaly and review the relevant literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Proteomic profiling of early degenerative retina of RCS rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhi-Hong; Fu, Yan; Weng, Chuan-Huang; Zhao, Cong-Jian; Yin, Zheng-Qin

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify the underlying cellular and molecular changes in retinitis pigmentosa (RP). METHODS Label-free quantification-based proteomics analysis, with its advantages of being more economic and consisting of simpler procedures, has been used with increasing frequency in modern biological research. Dystrophic RCS rats, the first laboratory animal model for the study of RP, possess a similar pathological course as human beings with the diseases. Thus, we employed a comparative proteomics analysis approach for in-depth proteome profiling of retinas from dystrophic RCS rats and non-dystrophic congenic controls through Linear Trap Quadrupole - orbitrap MS/MS, to identify the significant differentially expressed proteins (DEPs). Bioinformatics analyses, including Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway annotation and upstream regulatory analysis, were then performed on these retina proteins. Finally, a Western blotting experiment was carried out to verify the difference in the abundance of transcript factor E2F1. RESULTS In this study, we identified a total of 2375 protein groups from the retinal protein samples of RCS rats and non-dystrophic congenic controls. Four hundred thirty-four significantly DEPs were selected by Student's t-test. Based on the results of the bioinformatics analysis, we identified mitochondrial dysfunction and transcription factor E2F1 as the key initiation factors in early retinal degenerative process. CONCLUSION We showed that the mitochondrial dysfunction and the transcription factor E2F1 substantially contribute to the disease etiology of RP. The results provide a new potential therapeutic approach for this retinal degenerative disease. PMID:28730077

  2. Proteomic profiling of early degenerative retina of RCS rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi-Hong; Fu, Yan; Weng, Chuan-Huang; Zhao, Cong-Jian; Yin, Zheng-Qin

    2017-01-01

    To identify the underlying cellular and molecular changes in retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Label-free quantification-based proteomics analysis, with its advantages of being more economic and consisting of simpler procedures, has been used with increasing frequency in modern biological research. Dystrophic RCS rats, the first laboratory animal model for the study of RP, possess a similar pathological course as human beings with the diseases. Thus, we employed a comparative proteomics analysis approach for in-depth proteome profiling of retinas from dystrophic RCS rats and non-dystrophic congenic controls through Linear Trap Quadrupole - orbitrap MS/MS, to identify the significant differentially expressed proteins (DEPs). Bioinformatics analyses, including Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway annotation and upstream regulatory analysis, were then performed on these retina proteins. Finally, a Western blotting experiment was carried out to verify the difference in the abundance of transcript factor E2F1. In this study, we identified a total of 2375 protein groups from the retinal protein samples of RCS rats and non-dystrophic congenic controls. Four hundred thirty-four significantly DEPs were selected by Student's t -test. Based on the results of the bioinformatics analysis, we identified mitochondrial dysfunction and transcription factor E2F1 as the key initiation factors in early retinal degenerative process. We showed that the mitochondrial dysfunction and the transcription factor E2F1 substantially contribute to the disease etiology of RP. The results provide a new potential therapeutic approach for this retinal degenerative disease.

  3. The knee meniscus: management of traumatic tears and degenerative lesions

    PubMed Central

    Beaufils, Philippe; Becker, Roland; Kopf, Sebastian; Matthieu, Ollivier; Pujol, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Meniscectomy is one of the most popular orthopaedic procedures, but long-term results are not entirely satisfactory and the concept of meniscal preservation has therefore progressed over the years. However, the meniscectomy rate remains too high even though robust scientific publications indicate the value of meniscal repair or non-removal in traumatic tears and non-operative treatment rather than meniscectomy in degenerative meniscal lesions In traumatic tears, the first-line choice is repair or non-removal. Longitudinal vertical tears are a proper indication for repair, especially in the red-white or red-red zones. Success rate is high and cartilage preservation has been proven. Non-removal can be discussed for stable asymptomatic lateral meniscal tears in conjunction with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Extended indications are now recommended for some specific conditions: horizontal cleavage tears in young athletes, hidden posterior capsulo-meniscal tears in ACL injuries, radial tears and root tears. Degenerative meniscal lesions are very common findings which can be considered as an early stage of osteoarthritis in middle-aged patients. Recent randomised studies found that arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) has no superiority over non-operative treatment. Thus, non-operative treatment should be the first-line choice and APM should be considered in case of failure: three months has been accepted as a threshold in the ESSKA Meniscus Consensus Project presented in 2016. Earlier indications may be proposed in cases with considerable mechanical symptoms. The main message remains: save the meniscus! Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160056. Originally published online at www.efortopenreviews.org PMID:28698804

  4. Hyperthyroidism in a population with Down syndrome (DS).

    PubMed

    Goday-Arno, Alberto; Cerda-Esteva, Mariaina; Flores-Le-Roux, Juana Antonia; Chillaron-Jordan, Juan José; Corretger, Josep Maria; Cano-Pérez, Juan Francisco

    2009-07-01

    Thyroid disorders are frequent in patients with Down syndrome (DS). It is well-known that the prevalence of hypothyroidism is high but data on hyperthyroidism are scarce. To assess the prevalence, aetiology, clinical characteristics, evolution and treatment of hyperthyroidism in a population with DS attending a specialized medical centre. Data were gathered by systematic review of 1832 medical records from the Catalan DS Foundation, in Spain, registered between January 1991 and February 2006. Patients with the diagnosis of hyperthyroidism were identified and data on clinical features, physical examination, laboratory and imaging tests, treatment and evolution were collected. Twelve patients with hyperthyroidism were recorded (6.5 cases/1000 patients with DS). There were 5 males and 7 females, with a mean age at diagnosis of 16.8 years. The most common presenting symptoms were decreased heat tolerance, sweating, increased irritability and weight loss. All patients had diffuse goitre at physical examination and two patients presented with exophthalmia. Clinical diagnosis was confirmed biochemically. Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin levels were raised (mean 128.1 U/l) and imaging tests confirmed the diagnosis of Graves' disease in all cases. Patients started treatment with carbimazole at diagnosis and after a mean period of 40 months without clinical remission, they required definitive therapy with radioactive iodine. Subjects developed hypothyroidism after radio-iodine therapy and replacement therapy with levothyroxine was necessary. Hyperthyroidism is more prevalent in patients with DS than in the general population and has no gender predominance. It is caused mainly by Graves' disease. Anti-thyroid drugs were not effective in achieving remission and radioactive iodine as a definitive treatment was required in all cases.

  5. MRI features of cervical articular process degenerative joint disease in Great Dane dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Quintana, Rodrigo; Penderis, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylomyelopathy or Wobbler syndrome commonly affects the cervical vertebral column of Great Dane dogs. Degenerative changes affecting the articular process joints are a frequent finding in these patients; however, the correlation between these changes and other features of cervical spondylomyelopathy are uncertain. We described and graded the degenerative changes evident in the cervical articular process joints from 13 Great Danes dogs with cervical spondylomyelopathy using MR imaging, and evaluated the relationship between individual features of cervical articular process joint degeneration and the presence of spinal cord compression, vertebral foraminal stenosis, intramedullary spinal cord changes, and intervertebral disc degenerative changes. Degenerative changes affecting the articular process joints were common, with only 13 of 94 (14%) having no degenerative changes. The most severe changes were evident between C4-C5 and C7-T1 intervertebral spaces. Reduction or loss of the hyperintense synovial fluid signal on T2-weighted MR images was the most frequent feature associated with articular process joint degenerative changes. Degenerative changes of the articular process joints affecting the synovial fluid or articular surface, or causing lateral hypertrophic tissue, were positively correlated with lateral spinal cord compression and vertebral foraminal stenosis. Dorsal hypertrophic tissue was positively correlated with dorsal spinal cord compression. Disc-associated spinal cord compression was recognized less frequently. © 2011 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  6. Distribution of lactate dehydrogenase in healthy and degenerative canine stifle joint cartilage.

    PubMed

    Walter, Eveline L C; Spreng, David; Schmöckel, Hugo; Schawalder, Peter; Tschudi, Peter; Friess, Armin E; Stoffel, Michael H

    2007-07-01

    In dogs, degenerative joint diseases (DJD) have been shown to be associated with increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in the synovial fluid. The goal of this study was to examine healthy and degenerative stifle joints in order to clarify the origin of LDH in synovial fluid. In order to assess the distribution of LDH, cartilage samples from healthy and degenerative knee joints were investigated by means of light and transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with immunolabeling and enzyme cytochemistry. Morphological analysis confirmed DJD. All techniques used corroborated the presence of LDH in chondrocytes and in the interterritorial matrix of healthy and degenerative stifle joints. Although enzymatic activity of LDH was clearly demonstrated in the territorial matrix by means of the tetrazolium-formazan reaction, immunolabeling for LDH was missing in this region. With respect to the distribution of LDH in the interterritorial matrix, a striking decrease from superficial to deeper layers was present in healthy dogs but was missing in affected joints. These results support the contention that LDH in synovial fluid of degenerative joints originates from cartilage. Therefore, we suggest that (1) LDH is transferred from chondrocytes to ECM in both healthy dogs and dogs with degenerative joint disease and that (2) in degenerative joints, LDH is released from chondrocytes and the ECM into synovial fluid through abrasion of cartilage as well as through enhanced diffusion as a result of increased water content and degradation of collagen.

  7. User's manual for CBS3DS, version 1.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1995-10-01

    CBS3DS is a computer code written in FORTRAN 77 to compute the backscattering radar cross section of cavity backed apertures in infinite ground plane and slots in thick infinite ground plane. CBS3DS implements the hybrid Finite Element Method (FEM) and Method of Moments (MoM) techniques. This code uses the tetrahedral elements, with vector edge basis functions for FEM in the volume of the cavity/slot and the triangular elements with the basis functions for MoM at the apertures. By virtue of FEM, this code can handle any arbitrarily shaped three-dimensional cavities filled with inhomogeneous lossy materials; due to MoM, the apertures can be of any arbitrary shape. The User's Manual is written to make the user acquainted with the operation of the code. The user is assumed to be familiar with the FORTRAN 77 language and the operating environment of the computer the code is intended to run.

  8. Network anomaly detection system with optimized DS evidence theory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Kaiyu

    2014-01-01

    Network anomaly detection has been focused on by more people with the fast development of computer network. Some researchers utilized fusion method and DS evidence theory to do network anomaly detection but with low performance, and they did not consider features of network-complicated and varied. To achieve high detection rate, we present a novel network anomaly detection system with optimized Dempster-Shafer evidence theory (ODS) and regression basic probability assignment (RBPA) function. In this model, we add weights for each sensor to optimize DS evidence theory according to its previous predict accuracy. And RBPA employs sensor's regression ability to address complex network. By four kinds of experiments, we find that our novel network anomaly detection model has a better detection rate, and RBPA as well as ODS optimization methods can improve system performance significantly.

  9. Analyses via automated mass spectrometry (MS/DS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, T.

    1985-01-01

    New or improved uses of the Finnigan 4000 quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) with its associated INCOS data system (DS) were investigated. The first phase involved an evaluative activity in which specific problems with miscalibration and gas chromatographic column conditioning were identified. This also revealed one solution to the problem of detection of substances not visible in the gas chromatography detection mode. A second phase was to seek useful applications of the direct inlet systems. This mode of sample introduction has not been previously utilized on the existing equipment and was successfully applied to the analysis of the components of TONOX 60/40 and in the thermal degradation products of some polymeric materials. Suggestions are made for improving and expanding the use of the MS/DS system in materials development and testing.

  10. Iterative Overlap FDE for Multicode DS-CDMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuaki; Tomeba, Hiromichi; Adachi, Fumiyuki

    Recently, a new frequency-domain equalization (FDE) technique, called overlap FDE, that requires no GI insertion was proposed. However, the residual inter/intra-block interference (IBI) cannot completely be removed. In addition to this, for multicode direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA), the presence of residual interchip interference (ICI) after FDE distorts orthogonality among the spreading codes. In this paper, we propose an iterative overlap FDE for multicode DS-CDMA to suppress both the residual IBI and the residual ICI. In the iterative overlap FDE, joint minimum mean square error (MMSE)-FDE and ICI cancellation is repeated a sufficient number of times. The bit error rate (BER) performance with the iterative overlap FDE is evaluated by computer simulation.

  11. RNA-dependent RNA polymerases of dsRNA bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Makeyev, Eugene V; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2004-04-01

    Genome replication and transcription of riboviruses are catalyzed by an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP). RdRPs are normally associated with other virus- or/and host-encoded proteins that modulate RNA polymerization activity and template specificity. The polymerase complex of double-stranded dsRNA viruses is a large icosahedral particle (inner core) containing RdRP as a minor constituent. In phi6 and other dsRNA bacteriophages from the Cystoviridae family, the inner core is composed of four virus-specific proteins. Of these, protein P2, or Pol subunit, has been tentatively identified as RdRP by sequence comparisons, but the role of this protein in viral RNA synthesis has not been studied until recently. Here, we overview the work on the Pol subunits of phi6 and related viruses from the standpoints of function, structure and evolution.

  12. Network Anomaly Detection System with Optimized DS Evidence Theory

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Kaiyu

    2014-01-01

    Network anomaly detection has been focused on by more people with the fast development of computer network. Some researchers utilized fusion method and DS evidence theory to do network anomaly detection but with low performance, and they did not consider features of network—complicated and varied. To achieve high detection rate, we present a novel network anomaly detection system with optimized Dempster-Shafer evidence theory (ODS) and regression basic probability assignment (RBPA) function. In this model, we add weights for each senor to optimize DS evidence theory according to its previous predict accuracy. And RBPA employs sensor's regression ability to address complex network. By four kinds of experiments, we find that our novel network anomaly detection model has a better detection rate, and RBPA as well as ODS optimization methods can improve system performance significantly. PMID:25254258

  13. FIR Filter of DS-CDMA UWB Modem Transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyu-Min; Cho, Sang-In; Won, Hui-Chul; Choi, Sang-Sung

    This letter presents low-complexity digital pulse shaping filter structures of a direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA) ultra wide-band (UWB) modem transmitter with a ternary spreading code. The proposed finite impulse response (FIR) filter structures using a look-up table (LUT) have the effect of saving the amount of memory by about 50% to 80% in comparison to the conventional FIR filter structures, and consequently are suitable for a high-speed parallel data process.

  14. Uplink Packet-Data Scheduling in DS-CDMA Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young Woo; Kim, Seong-Lyun

    In this letter, we consider the uplink packet scheduling for non-real-time data users in a DS-CDMA system. As an effort to jointly optimize throughput and fairness, we formulate a time-span minimization problem incorporating the time-multiplexing of different simultaneous transmission schemes. Based on simple rules, we propose efficient scheduling algorithms and compare them with the optimal solution obtained by linear programming.

  15. A comparison of the techniques of direct pars interarticularis repairs for spondylolysis and low-grade spondylolisthesis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Nasser; Patra, Devi Prasad; Narayan, Vinayak; Savardekar, Amey R; Dossani, Rimal Hanif; Bollam, Papireddy; Bir, Shyamal; Nanda, Anil

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Spondylosis with or without spondylolisthesis that does not respond to conservative management has an excellent outcome with direct pars interarticularis repair. Direct repair preserves the segmental spinal motion. A number of operative techniques for direct repair are practiced; however, the procedure of choice is not clearly defined. The present study aims to clarify the advantages and disadvantages of the different operative techniques and their outcomes. METHODS A meta-analysis was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. The following databases were searched: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and CINAHL ( Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature). Studies of patients with spondylolysis with or without low-grade spondylolisthesis who underwent direct repair were included. The patients were divided into 4 groups based on the operative technique used: the Buck repair group, Scott repair group, Morscher repair group, and pedicle screw-based repair group. The pooled data were analyzed using the DerSimonian and Laird random-effects model. Tests for bias and heterogeneity were performed. The I 2 statistic was calculated, and the results were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed using StatsDirect version 2. RESULTS Forty-six studies consisting of 900 patients were included in the study. The majority of the patients were in their 2nd decade of life. The Buck group included 19 studies with 305 patients; the Scott group had 8 studies with 162 patients. The Morscher method included 5 studies with 193 patients, and the pedicle group included 14 studies with 240 patients. The overall pooled fusion, complication, and outcome rates were calculated. The pooled rates for fusion for the Buck, Scott, Morscher, and pedicle screw groups were 83.53%, 81.57%, 77.72%, and 90.21%, respectively. The pooled complication rates for the Buck, Scott, Morscher, and pedicle

  16. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) in lumbar spondylolisthesis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    de Kunder, Suzanne L; van Kuijk, Sander M J; Rijkers, Kim; Caelers, Inge J M H; van Hemert, Wouter L W; de Bie, Rob A; van Santbrink, Henk

    2017-11-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) are both frequently used as a surgical treatment for lumbar spondylolisthesis. Because of the unilateral transforaminal route to the intervertebral space used in TLIF, as opposed to the bilateral route used in PLIF, TLIF could be associated with fewer complications, shorter duration of surgery, and less blood loss, whereas the effectiveness of both techniques on back or leg pain is equal. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of both TLIF and PLIF in reducing disability, and to compare the intra- and postoperative complications of both techniques in patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were carried out. We conducted a Medline (using PubMed), Embase (using Ovid), Cochrane Library, Current Controlled Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov and NHS Centre for Review and Dissemination search for studies reporting TLIF, PLIF, lumbar spondylolisthesis and disability, pain, complications, duration of surgery, and estimated blood loss. A meta-analysis was performed to compute pooled estimates of the differences between TLIF and PLIF. Forest plots were constructed for each analysis group. A total of 192 studies were identified; nine studies were included (one randomized controlled trial and eight case series), including 990 patients (450 TLIF and 540 PLIF). The pooled mean difference in postoperative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores between TLIF and PLIF was -3.46 (95% confidence interval [CI] -4.72 to -2.20, p≤.001). The pooled mean difference in the postoperative VAS scores was -0.05 (95% CI -0.18 to 0.09, p=.480). The overall complication rate was 8.7% (range 0%-25%) for TLIF and 17.0% (range 4.7-28.8%) for PLIF; the pooled odds ratio was 0.47 (95% CI 0.28-0.81, p=.006). The average duration of surgery was 169 minutes for TLIF and 190 minutes for PLIF (mean difference -20.1, 95% CI -33.5 to -6.6, p=.003). The

  17. Comparison of minimally invasive spine surgery using intraoperative computed tomography integrated navigation, fluoroscopy, and conventional open surgery for lumbar spondylolisthesis: a prospective registry-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Huang; Dubey, Navneet Kumar; Li, Yen-Yao; Lee, Ching-Yu; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Shi, Chung-Sheng; Huang, Tsung-Jen

    2017-08-01

    To date, the surgical approaches for the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) using minimally invasive spine surgery assisted with intraoperative computed tomography image-integrated navigation (MISS-iCT), fluoroscopy (MISS-FS), and conventional open surgery (OS) are debatable. This study compared TLIF using MISS-iCT, MISS-FS, and OS for treatment of one-level lumbar spondylolisthesis. This is a prospective, registry-based cohort study that compared surgical approaches for patients who underwent surgical treatment for one-level lumbar spondylolisthesis. One hundred twenty-four patients from January 2010 to March 2012 in a medical center were recruited. The outcome measures were clinical assessments, including Short-Form 12, visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index, Core Outcome Measurement Index, and patient satisfaction, and blood loss, hospital stay, operation time, postoperative pedicle screw accuracy, and superior-level facet violation. All surgeries were performed by two senior surgeons together. Ninety-nine patients (40M, 59F) who had at least 2 years' follow-up were divided into three groups according to the operation methods: MISS-iCT (N=24), MISS-FS (N=23), and OS (N=52) groups. Charts and surgical records along with postoperative CT images were assessed. MISS-iCT and MISS-FS demonstrated a significantly lowered blood loss and hospital stay compared with OS group (p<.01). Operation time was significantly lower in the MISS-iCT and OS groups compared with the MISS-FS group (p=.002). Postoperatively, VAS scores at 1 year and 2 years were significantly improved in the MISS-iCT and MISS-FS groups compared with the OS groups. No significant difference in the number of pedicle screw breach (>2 mm) was found. However, a lower superior-level facet violation rate was observed in the MISS-iCT and OS groups (p=.049). MISS-iCT TLIF demonstrated reduced operation time, blood loss, superior-level facet

  18. Early, asymptomatic stage of degenerative joint disease in canine hip joints.

    PubMed

    Lust, G; Summers, B A

    1981-11-01

    The early stages of degenerative joint disease were investigated in coxofemoral joints from dogs with a hereditary predisposition to hip dysplasia. Alterations observed included mild nonsuppurative synovitis, increased volume of both synovial fluid and the ligamentum teres, and focal degenerative articular cartilage lesions. On radiologic examination, subluxation of the femoral head was seen, but only in the most severely affected joints. Synovial inflammation with increased synovial fluid and ligament volumes were indicators of early degenerative joint disease in dogs. These changes seemed to coincide with, or perhaps to precede, microscopic evidence for articular cartilage degeneration and occurred before radiologic abnormalities were detected.

  19. Label-free characterization of degenerative changes in articular cartilage by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Yusuke; Akehi, Mayu; Kiyomatsu, Hiroshi; Miura, Hiromasa

    2017-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is very common joint disease in the aging population. Main symptom of OA is accompanied by degenerative changes of articular cartilage. Raman spectroscopy is a label-free technique which enables to analyze molecular composition in degenerative cartilage. We generated an animal OA model surgically induced by knee joint instability and performed Raman spectroscopic analysis for the articular cartilage. In the result, Raman spectral data of the articular cartilage showed drastic changes in comparison between OA and control side. The relative intensity of phosphate band increases in the degenerative cartilage.

  20. Strong decays of DJ(3000 ) and Ds J(3040 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si-Chen; Wang, Tianhong; Jiang, Yue; Tan, Xiao-Ze; Li, Qiang; Wang, Guo-Li; Chang, Chao-Hsi

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we systematically calculate two-body strong decays of newly observed DJ(3000 ) and Ds J(3040 ) with 2 P (1+) and 2 P (1+') assignments in an instantaneous approximation of the Bethe-Salpeter equation method. Our results show that both resonances can be explained as the 2 P (1+') with broad width via 3P1 and 1P1 mixing in D and Ds families. For DJ(3000 ), the total width is 229.6 MeV in our calculation, close to the upper limit of experimental data, and the dominant decay channels are D2*π , D*π , and D*(2600 )π . For Ds J(3040 ), the total width is 157.4 MeV in our calculation, close to the lower limit of experimental data, and the dominant channels are D*K and D*K*. These results are consistent with observed channels in experiments. Given the very little information that has been obtained from experiments and the large error bars of the total decay widths, we recommend the detection of dominant channels in our calculation.

  1. Discovery of the target for immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs).

    PubMed

    Ito, Takumi; Ando, Hideki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Half a century ago, the sedative thalidomide caused a serious drug disaster because of its teratogenicity and was withdrawn from the market. However, thalidomide, which has returned to the market, is now used for the treatment of leprosy and multiple myeloma (MM) under strict control. The mechanism of thalidomide action had been a long-standing question. We developed a new affinity bead technology and identified cereblon (CRBN) as a thalidomide-binding protein. We found that CRBN functions as a substrate receptor of an E3 cullin-Ring ligase complex 4 (CRL4) and is a primary target of thalidomide teratogenicity. Recently, new thalidomide derivatives, called immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), have been developed by Celgene. Among them, lenalidomide (Len) and pomalidomide (Pom) were shown to exert strong therapeutic effects against MM. It was found that Len and Pom both bind CRBN-CRL4 and recruit neomorphic substrates (Ikaros and Aiolos). More recently it was reported that casein kinase 1a (Ck1a) was identified as a substrate for CRBN-CRL4 in the presence of Len, but not Pom. Ck1a breakdown explains why Len is specifically effective for myelodysplastic syndrome with 5q deletion. It is now proposed that binding of IMiDs to CRBN appears to alter the substrate specificity of CRBN-CRL4. In this review, we introduce recent findings on IMiDs.

  2. Vertebral degenerative disc disease severity evaluation using random forest classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Hector E.; Yao, Jianhua; Burns, Joseph E.; Pham, Yasuyuki; Stieger, James; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) develops in the spine as vertebral discs degenerate and osseous excrescences or outgrowths naturally form to restabilize unstable segments of the spine. These osseous excrescences, or osteophytes, may progress or stabilize in size as the spine reaches a new equilibrium point. We have previously created a CAD system that detects DDD. This paper presents a new system to determine the severity of DDD of individual vertebral levels. This will be useful to monitor the progress of developing DDD, as rapid growth may indicate that there is a greater stabilization problem that should be addressed. The existing DDD CAD system extracts the spine from CT images and segments the cortical shell of individual levels with a dual-surface model. The cortical shell is unwrapped, and is analyzed to detect the hyperdense regions of DDD. Three radiologists scored the severity of DDD of each disc space of 46 CT scans. Radiologists' scores and features generated from CAD detections were used to train a random forest classifier. The classifier then assessed the severity of DDD at each vertebral disc level. The agreement between the computer severity score and the average radiologist's score had a quadratic weighted Cohen's kappa of 0.64.

  3. Degenerative dementias and their medical care in the movies.

    PubMed

    Segers, Kurt

    2007-01-01

    Compared with other neurologic problems, few films have been dedicated to degenerative dementia. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic review about the way in which dementia patients and their medical care are described in films. Twenty-four of the 53 relevant films that were found in online movie databases could be viewed. The author describes the demographics of the characters suffering from dementia, the clinical picture including neuropsychiatric manifestations, diagnostic procedures, medical follow-up, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment and the attitude of the caregivers. Most characters are played by actors in their seventh or eighth decade. There is an overrepresentation of highly educated people. Although the clinical picture is often accurate, some films suggest that even in the late stages of the disease patients have sudden moments of full insight in their disease. Among the neuropsychiatric signs, activity disturbances and aggressiveness are most often described. Few patients seek medical help, only 2 patients take acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and follow-up is absent for 5 of the 11 relevant patients. Only in 10 of 23 films, the term "Alzheimer" is used. Although there is a growing cinematographic interest in Alzheimer patients, even recent films tend to reinforce therapeutic and even diagnostic nihilism.

  4. Surgical versus nonsurgical treatment of lumbar degenerative kyphosis.

    PubMed

    Goh, Tae Sik; Shin, Jong Ki; Youn, Myung Soo; Lee, Hong Seok; Kim, Taek Hoon; Lee, Jung Sub

    2017-08-01

    Surgery is widely performed for lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK), but its effectiveness as compared with nonsurgical treatment has not been demonstrated. In this prospective study, surgical candidates with LDK were enrolled at three spine centres. Two treatment options were performed either surgery using a pedicle subtraction osteotomy or nonsurgical care. Outcomes were measured using a Visual analogue scale (VAS) of back pain as a primary endpoint, the Oswestry disability index (ODI), the 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36), sagittal vertical axis (SVA) and treatment-related complications. Of the 126 LDK patients treated during the reference period, 97 patients were enrolled (47 in the surgical group and 50 in the nonsurgical group). Surgical group produced statistically reduced VAS of back pain and better functional outcomes than nonsurgical group since 12 months after treatment, but the rate of serious complications was higher after surgery. Interestingly, both surgical and nonsurgical groups had improved outcomes in terms of pain intensity and function at the 2-year follow-up period. Surgery might be a preferred treatment option for LDK, but great caution is needed. And conservative treatment could be the considerable treatment option for LDK who is unwilling or has poor medical condition to operate.

  5. Music and language in degenerative disease of the brain.

    PubMed

    Polk, M; Kertesz, A

    1993-05-01

    Music and language functions were studied in two musicians with degenerative disease. Both patients were tested on a standardized language battery and a series of music tasks. In the first case with left cortical atrophy and primary progressive aphasia, expressive music functions were spared with impaired reception of rhythm. The second case with posterior cortical atrophy, greater on the right, was nonaphasic, had spatial agraphia, a visuopractic deficit, and severe expressive music deficits, but intact rhythm repetition. The aphasic patient showed dissociations between music and language in fluency and content; continuous, organized, although reiterative music production was contrasted with nonfluent language. The nonaphasic patient showed the opposite pattern of deficits; unmusical production with impaired melody and rhythm organization that was contrasted with fluent, intelligible language. The double dissociation between language and music functions supports the existence of independent cognitive systems, one consistent with conventional left lateralization models of language, temporal sequence, and analytic music processing and another with a right lateralization model of implicit music cognition.

  6. The ubiquitin-proteasome system in spongiform degenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Whatley, Brandi R.; Li, Lian; Chin, Lih-Shen

    2008-01-01

    Summary Spongiform degeneration is characterized by vacuolation in nervous tissue accompanied by neuronal death and gliosis. Although spongiform degeneration is a hallmark of prion diseases, this pathology is also present in the brains of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease, diffuse Lewy body disease, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and Canavan's spongiform leukodystrophy. The shared outcome of spongiform degeneration in these diverse diseases suggests that common cellular mechanisms must underlie the processes of spongiform change and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. Immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissues reveals increased ubiquitin immunoreactivity in and around areas of spongiform change, suggesting the involvement of ubiquitin-proteasome system dysfunction in the pathogenesis of spongiform neurodegeneration. The link between aberrant ubiquitination and spongiform neurodegeneration has been strengthened by the discovery that a null mutation in the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase mahogunin ring finger-1 (Mgrn1) causes an autosomal recessively inherited form of spongiform neurodegeneration in animals. Recent studies have begun to suggest that abnormal ubiquitination may alter intracellular signaling and cell functions via proteasome-dependent and proteasome-independent mechanisms, leading to spongiform degeneration and neuronal cell death. Further elucidation of the pathogenic pathways involved in spongiform neurodegeneration should facilitate the development of novel rational therapies for treating prion diseases, HIV infection, and other spongiform degenerative disorders. PMID:18790052

  7. Canine degenerative myelopathy: a model of human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Taylor, Alexandra C; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-02-01

    Canine degenerative myelopathy (CDM) represents a unique naturally occurring animal model for human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) because of similar clinical signs, neuropathologic findings, and involvement of the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutation. A definitive diagnosis can only be made postmortem through microscopic detection of axonal degeneration, demyelination and astroglial proliferation, which is more severe in the dorsal columns of the thoracic spinal cord and in the dorsal portion of the lateral funiculus. Interestingly, the muscle acetylcholine receptor complexes are intact in CDM prior to functional impairment, thus suggesting that muscle atrophy in CDM does not result from physical denervation. Moreover, since sensory involvement seems to play an important role in CDM progression, a more careful investigation of the sensory pathology in ALS is also warranted. The importance of SOD1 expression remains unclear, while oxidative stress and denatured ubiquinated proteins appear to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of CDM. In this updated narrative review we performed a systematic search of the published studies on CDM that may shed light on the pathophysiological mechanisms of human ALS. A better understanding of the factors that determine the disease progression in CDM may be beneficial for the development of effective treatments for ALS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Temporary Segmental Distraction in a Dog with Degenerative Lumbosacral Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Willems, Nicole; Kersten, Roel F M R; van Gaalen, Steven M; Öner, F Cumhur; Strijkers, Gustav J; Veraa, Stefanie; Beukers, Martijn; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Meij, Björn P

    2018-06-02

    Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) is characterized by intervertebral disc degeneration and causes lower back pain in dogs. Temporary distraction in rabbit models with induced intervertebral disc degeneration showed signs of intervertebral disc repair. In the present study, we assessed safety and efficacy of temporary segmental distraction in a dog with clinical signs of DLSS.  Distraction of the lumbosacral junction by pedicle screw-rod fixation was applied in a 5-year-old Greyhound with DLSS and evaluated by radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and force plate analysis before and after distraction.  Safe distraction of the lumbosacral junction was demonstrated, with improvement of clinical signs after removal of the distraction device. Signal intensity of the intervertebral disc showed no changes over time. T2 value was highest directly after removal of the distraction device but decreased by 10% of the preoperative value at 9 months of follow-up. Disc height decreased (8%) immediately after removal of the distraction device, but recovered to the initial value. A decrease in the pelvic/thoracic propulsive force during pedicle screw-rod fixation and distraction was demonstrated, which slowly increased by 4% compared with the initial value.  Temporary pedicle screw-rod fixation in combination with distraction in a dog with DLSS was safe, improved clinical signs and retained disc height at 9 months of follow-up. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  9. Degenerative Mitral Stenosis: Unmet Need for Percutaneous Interventions.

    PubMed

    Sud, Karan; Agarwal, Shikhar; Parashar, Akhil; Raza, Mohammad Q; Patel, Kunal; Min, David; Rodriguez, Leonardo L; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Mick, Stephanie L; Gillinov, A Marc; Tuzcu, E Murat; Kapadia, Samir R

    2016-04-19

    Degenerative mitral stenosis (DMS) is an important cause of mitral stenosis, developing secondary to severe mitral annular calcification. With the increase in life expectancy and improved access to health care, more patients with DMS are likely to be encountered in developed nations. These patients are generally elderly with multiple comorbidities and often are high-risk candidates for surgery. The mainstay of therapy in DMS patients is medical management with heart rate control and diuretic therapy. Surgical intervention might be delayed until symptoms are severely limiting and cannot be managed by medical therapy. Mitral valve surgery is also challenging in these patients because of the presence of extensive calcification. Hence, there is a need to develop an alternative percutaneous treatment approach for patients with DMS who are otherwise inoperable or at high risk for surgery. In this review, we summarize the available data on the epidemiology of DMS and diagnostic considerations and current treatment strategies for these patients. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in working dogs: current concepts and review.

    PubMed

    Worth, A J; Thompson, D J; Hartman, A C

    2009-12-01

    Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) is characterised by intervertebral disc degeneration, with secondary bony and soft-tissue changes leading to compression of the cauda equina. Large-breed, active and working dogs are the most commonly affected by DLSS. Specific manipulative tests allow the clinician to form a high suspicion of DLSS, and initiate investigation. Changes seen using conventional radiography are unreliable, and although contrast radiography represents an improvement, advanced imaging is accepted as the diagnostic method of choice. Treatment involves decompression and/or stabilisation procedures in working dogs, although conservative management may be acceptable in pet dogs with mild signs. Prognosis for return to work is only fair, and there is a high rate of recurrence following conventional surgery. Stabilisation procedures are associated with the potential for failure of the implant, and their use has not gained universal acceptance. A new surgical procedure, dorsolateral foramenotomy, offers a potential advance in the management of DLSS. everal aspects of the pathogenesis, heritability and optimal treatment approach remain uncertain.

  11. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ϕs in Bs(0)→Ds(+)Ds(-) decays.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellán Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elena, E; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R F; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2014-11-21

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating weak mixing phase ϕs using the decay Bs(0)→Ds(+)Ds(-) in a data sample corresponding to 3.0 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected with the LHCb detector in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. An analysis of the time evolution of the system, which does not use the constraint |λ|=1 to allow for the presence of CP violation in decay, yields ϕs=0.02±0.17(stat)±0.02(syst)  rad, |λ|=0.91(-0.15)(+0.18)(stat)±0.02(syst). This result is consistent with the standard model expectation.

  12. Delivery of lethal dsRNAs in insect diets by branched amphiphilic peptide capsules.

    PubMed

    Avila, L A; Chandrasekar, R; Wilkinson, K E; Balthazor, J; Heerman, M; Bechard, J; Brown, S; Park, Y; Dhar, S; Reeck, G R; Tomich, J M

    2018-03-10

    Development of new and specific insect pest management methods is critical for overcoming pesticide resistance and collateral off-target killings. Gene silencing by feeding dsRNA to insects shows promise in this area. Here we described the use of a peptide nano-material, branched amphiphilic peptide capsules (BAPCs), that facilitates cellular uptake of dsRNA by insects through feeding. The insect diets included dsRNA with and without complexation with BAPCs. The selected insect species come from two different orders with different feeding mechanisms: Tribolium castaneum and Acyrthosiphon pisum. The gene transcripts tested (BiP and Armet) are part of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and suppressing their translation resulted in lethality. For Acyrthosiphon pisum, ingestion of BiP-dsRNA associated with BAPCs led to the premature death of the aphids (t 1/2 =4-5days) compared to ingestion of the same amounts of free BiP-dsRNA (t 1/2 =11-12days). Tribolium castaneum was effectively killed using a combination of BiP-dsRNA and Armet-dsRNA complexed with BAPCs; most dying as larvae or during eclosion (~75%). Feeding dsRNA alone resulted in fewer deaths (~30%). The results show that complexation of dsRNA with BAPCs enhanced the oral delivery of dsRNA over dsRNA alone. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. KiDS-i-800: comparing weak gravitational lensing measurements from same-sky surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amon, A.; Heymans, C.; Klaes, D.; Erben, T.; Blake, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Hoekstra, H.; Kuijken, K.; Miller, L.; Morrison, C. B.; Choi, A.; de Jong, J. T. A.; Glazebrook, K.; Irisarri, N.; Joachimi, B.; Joudaki, S.; Kannawadi, A.; Lidman, C.; Napolitano, N.; Parkinson, D.; Schneider, P.; van Uitert, E.; Viola, M.; Wolf, C.

    2018-07-01

    We present a weak gravitational lensing analysis of 815 deg2 of i-band imaging from the Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS-i-800). In contrast to the deep r-band observations, which take priority during excellent seeing conditions and form the primary KiDS data set (KiDS-r-450), the complementary yet shallower KiDS-i-800 spans a wide range of observing conditions. The overlapping KiDS-i-800 and KiDS-r-450 imaging therefore provides a unique opportunity to assess the robustness of weak lensing measurements. In our analysis we introduce two new `null' tests. The `nulled' two-point shear correlation function uses a matched catalogue to show that the calibrated KiDS-i-800 and KiDS-r-450 shear measurements agree at the level of 1 ± 4 per cent. We use five galaxy lens samples to determine a `nulled' galaxy-galaxy lensing signal from the full KiDS-i-800 and KiDS-r-450 surveys and find that the measurements agree to 7 ± 5 per cent when the KiDS-i-800 source redshift distribution is calibrated using either spectroscopic redshifts, or the 30-band photometric redshifts from the COSMOS survey.

  14. KiDS-i-800: Comparing weak gravitational lensing measurements from same-sky surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amon, A.; Heymans, C.; Klaes, D.; Erben, T.; Blake, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Hoekstra, H.; Kuijken, K.; Miller, L.; Morrison, C. B.; Choi, A.; de Jong, J. T. A.; Glazebrook, K.; Irisarri, N.; Joachimi, B.; Joudaki, S.; Kannawadi, A.; Lidman, C.; Napolitano, N.; Parkinson, D.; Schneider, P.; van Uitert, E.; Viola, M.; Wolf, C.

    2018-04-01

    We present a weak gravitational lensing analysis of 815deg2 of i-band imaging from the Kilo-Degree Survey (KiDS-i-800). In contrast to the deep r-band observations, which take priority during excellent seeing conditions and form the primary KiDS dataset (KiDS-r-450), the complementary yet shallower KiDS-i-800 spans a wide range of observing conditions. The overlapping KiDS-i-800 and KiDS-r-450 imaging therefore provides a unique opportunity to assess the robustness of weak lensing measurements. In our analysis we introduce two new `null' tests. The `nulled' two-point shear correlation function uses a matched catalogue to show that the calibrated KiDS-i-800 and KiDS-r-450 shear measurements agree at the level of 1 ± 4%. We use five galaxy lens samples to determine a `nulled' galaxy-galaxy lensing signal from the full KiDS-i-800 and KiDS-r-450 surveys and find that the measurements agree to 7 ± 5% when the KiDS-i-800 source redshift distribution is calibrated using either spectroscopic redshifts, or the 30-band photometric redshifts from the COSMOS survey.

  15. Study of Cabibbo suppressed decays of the Ds+ charmed-strange meson involving a KS0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, J. M.; Yager, P. M.; Anjos, J. C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A. A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Pepe, I. M.; Polycarpo, E.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Uribe, C.; Vázquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J. P.; Frisullo, V.; O'Reilly, B.; Segoni, I.; Stenson, K.; Tucker, R. S.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chiodini, G.; Gaines, I.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garren, L. A.; Gottschalk, E.; Kasper, P. H.; Kreymer, A. E.; Kutschke, R.; Wang, M.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F. L.; Zallo, A.; Reyes, M.; Cawlfield, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Rahimi, A.; Wiss, J.; Gardner, R.; Kryemadhi, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Kang, J. S.; Ko, B. R.; Kwak, J. W.; Lee, K. B.; Cho, K.; Park, H.; Alimonti, G.; Barberis, S.; Boschini, M.; Cerutti, A.; D'Angelo, P.; Dicorato, M.; Dini, P.; Edera, L.; Erba, S.; Inzani, P.; Leveraro, F.; Malvezzi, S.; Menasce, D.; Mezzadri, M.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Pontoglio, C.; Prelz, F.; Rovere, M.; Sala, S.; Davenport, T. F.; Arena, V.; Boca, G.; Bonomi, G.; Gianini, G.; Liguori, G.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Merlo, M. M.; Pantea, D.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Vitulo, P.; Göbel, C.; Otalora, J.; Hernandez, H.; Lopez, A. M.; Mendez, H.; Paris, A.; Quinones, J.; Ramirez, J. E.; Zhang, Y.; Wilson, J. R.; Handler, T.; Mitchell, R.; Engh, D.; Hosack, M.; Johns, W. E.; Luiggi, E.; Nehring, M.; Sheldon, P. D.; Vaandering, E. W.; Webster, M.; Sheaff, M.; Focus Collaboration

    2008-02-01

    We study the decay of Ds+ mesons into final states involving a KS0 and report the discovery of Cabibbo suppressed decay modes Ds+ →KS0π-π+π+ (179 ± 36 events) and Ds+ →KS0π+ (113 ± 26 events). The branching fraction ratios for the new modes are Γ (Ds+ →KS0π-π+π+)/Γ (Ds+ →KS0K-π+π+) = 0.18 ± 0.04 ± 0.05 and Γ (Ds+ →KS0π+)/Γ (Ds+ →KS0K+) = 0.104 ± 0.024 ± 0.014.

  16. Measurement of the Absolute Branching Fraction of Ds+→τ+ντ Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecklund, K. M.; Love, W.; Savinov, V.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J.; Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.; Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H.; Yang, F.; Artuso, M.; Blusk, S.; Khalil, S.; Li, J.; Mountain, R.; Nisar, S.; Randrianarivony, K.; Sultana, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Zhang, L. M.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Dubrovin, M.; Lincoln, A.; Rademacker, J.; Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Naik, P.; Reed, J.; Briere, R. A.; Ferguson, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Vogel, H.; Watkins, M. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Jones, C. D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Mahlke-Krüger, H.; Mohapatra, D.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Sadoff, A. J.; Shi, X.; Stroiney, S.; Sun, W. M.; Wilksen, T.; Athar, S. B.; Patel, R.; Yelton, J.; Rubin, P.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Karliner, I.; Mehrabyan, S.; Lowrey, N.; Selen, M.; White, E. J.; Wiss, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Shepherd, M. R.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Libby, J.; Powell, A.; Wilkinson, G.

    2008-04-01

    Using a sample of tagged Ds+ decays collected near the Ds*±Ds∓ peak production energy in e+e- collisions with the CLEO-c detector, we study the leptonic decay Ds+→τ+ντ via the decay channel τ+→e+νeν¯τ. We measure B(Ds+→τ+ντ)=(6.17±0.71±0.34)%, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. Combining this result with our measurements of Ds+→μ+νμ and Ds+→τ+ντ (via τ+→π+ν¯τ), we determine fDs=(274±10±5)MeV.

  17. Transcriptomic alterations during ageing reflect the shift from cancer to degenerative diseases in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Aramillo Irizar, Peer; Schäuble, Sascha; Esser, Daniela; Groth, Marco; Frahm, Christiane; Priebe, Steffen; Baumgart, Mario; Hartmann, Nils; Marthandan, Shiva; Menzel, Uwe; Müller, Julia; Schmidt, Silvio; Ast, Volker; Caliebe, Amke; König, Rainer; Krawczak, Michael; Ristow, Michael; Schuster, Stefan; Cellerino, Alessandro; Diekmann, Stephan; Englert, Christoph; Hemmerich, Peter; Sühnel, Jürgen; Guthke, Reinhard; Witte, Otto W; Platzer, Matthias; Ruppin, Eytan; Kaleta, Christoph

    2018-01-30

    Disease epidemiology during ageing shows a transition from cancer to degenerative chronic disorders as dominant contributors to mortality in the old. Nevertheless, it has remained unclear to what extent molecular signatures of ageing reflect this phenomenon. Here we report on the identification of a conserved transcriptomic signature of ageing based on gene expression data from four vertebrate species across four tissues. We find that ageing-associated transcriptomic changes follow trajectories similar to the transcriptional alterations observed in degenerative ageing diseases but are in opposite direction to the transcriptomic alterations observed in cancer. We confirm the existence of a similar antagonism on the genomic level, where a majority of shared risk alleles which increase the risk of cancer decrease the risk of chronic degenerative disorders and vice versa. These results reveal a fundamental trade-off between cancer and degenerative ageing diseases that sheds light on the pronounced shift in their epidemiology during ageing.

  18. Detection of degenerative change in lateral projection cervical spine x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebri, Beyrem; Phillips, Michael; Knapp, Karen; Appelboam, Andy; Reuben, Adam; Slabaugh, Greg

    2015-03-01

    Degenerative changes to the cervical spine can be accompanied by neck pain, which can result from narrowing of the intervertebral disc space and growth of osteophytes. In a lateral x-ray image of the cervical spine, degenerative changes are characterized by vertebral bodies that have indistinct boundaries and limited spacing between vertebrae. In this paper, we present a machine learning approach to detect and localize degenerative changes in lateral x-ray images of the cervical spine. Starting from a user-supplied set of points in the center of each vertebral body, we fit a central spline, from which a region of interest is extracted and image features are computed. A Random Forest classifier labels regions as degenerative change or normal. Leave-one-out cross-validation studies performed on a dataset of 103 patients demonstrates performance of above 95% accuracy.

  19. CRISPR Epigenome Editing of AKAP150 in DRG Neurons Abolishes Degenerative IVD-Induced Neuronal Activation.

    PubMed

    Stover, Joshua D; Farhang, Niloofar; Berrett, Kristofer C; Gertz, Jason; Lawrence, Brandon; Bowles, Robby D

    2017-09-06

    Back pain is a major contributor to disability and has significant socioeconomic impacts worldwide. The degenerative intervertebral disc (IVD) has been hypothesized to contribute to back pain, but a better understanding of the interactions between the degenerative IVD and nociceptive neurons innervating the disc and treatment strategies that directly target these interactions is needed to improve our understanding and treatment of back pain. We investigated degenerative IVD-induced changes to dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron activity and utilized CRISPR epigenome editing as a neuromodulation strategy. By exposing DRG neurons to degenerative IVD-conditioned media under both normal and pathological IVD pH levels, we demonstrate that degenerative IVDs trigger interleukin (IL)-6-induced increases in neuron activity to thermal stimuli, which is directly mediated by AKAP and enhanced by acidic pH. Utilizing this novel information on AKAP-mediated increases in nociceptive neuron activity, we developed lentiviral CRISPR epigenome editing vectors that modulate endogenous expression of AKAP150 by targeted promoter histone methylation. When delivered to DRG neurons, these epigenome-modifying vectors abolished degenerative IVD-induced DRG-elevated neuron activity while preserving non-pathologic neuron activity. This work elucidates the potential for CRISPR epigenome editing as a targeted gene-based pain neuromodulation strategy. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Lumbar paraspinal muscle transverse area and symmetry in dogs with and without degenerative lumbosacral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Henderson, A L; Hecht, S; Millis, D L

    2015-10-01

    To investigate whether dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis have decreased lumbar paraspinal muscle transverse area and symmetry compared with control dogs. Retrospective cross-sectional study comparing muscles in transverse T2-weighted magnetic resonance images for nine dogs with and nine dogs without degenerative -lumbosacral stenosis. Mean transverse area was measured for the lumbar multifidus and sacrocaudalis dorsalis lateralis muscles bilaterally and the L7 vertebral body at the level of the caudal endplate. Transverse areas of both muscle groups relative to L7 and asymmetry indices were compared between study populations using independent t tests. Mean muscle-to-L7 transverse area ratios were significantly smaller in the degenerative lumbosacral stenosis group compared with those in the control group in both lumbar multifidus (0·84 ±0·26 versus 1·09 ±0·25; P=0·027) and sacrocaudalis dorsalis lateralis (0·5 ±0·15 versus 0·68 ±0·12; P=0·005) muscles. Mean asymmetry indices were higher for both muscles in the group with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis than in the control group, but highly variable and the difference was not statistically significant. These findings suggest that dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis have decreased lumbar paraspinal muscle mass that may be a cause or consequence of the -syndrome. Understanding altered paraspinal muscle characteristics may improve understanding of the -pathophysiology and management options for degenerative lumbosacral stenosis. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  1. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of degenerative mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ukita, Yasuyuki; Yuda, Satoshi; Sugio, Hideaki; Yonezawa, Ayaka; Takayanagi, Yuka; Masuda-Yamamoto, Hitomi; Tanaka-Saito, Norie; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Miura, Tetsuji

    2016-09-01

    Degenerative mitral stenosis (DMS) is found in the elderly population. However, there are a few reports regarding the prevalence rate of DMS and, its clinical characteristics. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between age, gender, and the prevalence rate of DMS. Patients with DMS and rheumatic mitral stenosis (RMS) were searched retrospectively in consecutive patients who underwent echocardiography from January 2011 to December 2013 in a community hospital. DMS was defined as presence of both turbulent antegrade flow with a mean transmitral pressure gradient (PG) of ≥2mmHg and mitral annular calcification without restriction of leaflets tip motion. We identified 19 patients (17 female and 2 male) with DMS (0.22%) and 19 patients with RMS in 8683 patients. The prevalence rate of DMS significantly increased with aging, especially in patients >90 years old. There was no significant difference in the prevalence rates of RMS among the age groups. Patients with DMS were older (86±8 years vs. 73±10 years, p<0.01) and had higher rates of hypertension and aortic stenosis, larger left ventricular mass index, and mean PG of aortic valve, smaller aortic valve area, less degree of left atrial dilatation, and lower rate of atrial fibrillation, compared with those values in patients with RMS. DMS is rare (0.22%) and almost exclusively found in females in routine echocardiography. The prevalence of DMS increases with aging to 2.5% in patients >90 years of age, and DMS is often associated with aortic valve stenosis. Copyright © 2015 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Degenerative effects in rat eyes after experimental ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Scarsella, G; Nebbioso, M; Stefanini, S; Pescosolido, N

    2012-10-08

    This study was used to evaluate the degenerative effects on the retina and eye-cup sections after experimental induction of acute ocular hypertension on animal models. In particular, vascular events were directly focused in this research in order to assess the vascular remodeling after transient ocular hypertension on rat models. After local anaesthesia by administration of eye drops of 0.4% oxibuprocaine, 16 male adult Wistar rats were injected in the anterior chamber of the right eye with 15 µL of methylcellulose (MTC) 2% in physiological solution. The morphology and the vessels of the retina and eye-cup sections were examined in animals sacrificed 72 h after induction of ocular hypertension. In retinal fluorescein angiographies (FAGs), by means of fluorescein isothiocyanate-coniugated dextran (FITC), the radial venules showed enlargements and increased branching, while the arterioles appeared focally thickened. The length and size of actually perfused vessels appeared increased in the whole superficial plexus. In eye-cup sections of MTC-injected animals, in deep plexus and connecting layer there was a bigger increase of vessels than in controls. Moreover, the immunolocalization of astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) revealed its increased expression in internal limiting membrane and ganglion cell layer, as well as its presence in Müller cells. Finally, the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was found to be especially expressed by neurones of ganglion cell layer, both in control and in MTC-injected eyes. The data obtained in this experimental model on the interactions among glia, vessels and neurons should be useful to evaluate if also in glaucomatous patients the activation of vessel-adjacent glial cells might play key roles in following neuronal dysfunction.

  3. Degenerative pontine lesions in patients with familial narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Stepień, Adam; Staszewski, Jacek; Domzał, Teofan M; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Skrobowska, Ewa; Durka-Kesy, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by chronic excessive daytime sleepiness with episodic sleep attacks. There are several associated symptoms of narcolepsy: cataplexy (bilateral muscle weakness without loss of consciousness provoked by an emotional trigger, e.g. laughter), sleep paralysis and hypnagogic-hypnopompic hallucinations. Most cases are sporadic; familial narcolepsy contributes to only 1-5% of all cases. While most cases of narcolepsy are idiopathic and are not associated with clinical or radiographic evidence of brain pathology, symptomatic or secondary narcolepsy may occur occasionally in association with lesions caused by tumours, demyelination or strokes of the diencephalon, midbrain, and pons. There are some examples of non-specific brainstem lesions found in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with idiopathic narcolepsy. The authors present eleven patients from a five-generation family with many members who suffer from episodic excessive daytime sleepiness. Narcolepsy was diagnosed in 9 patients. Sleepiness was frequently associated with cataplexy, hypnagogic-hypnopompic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Improvement in their clinical state was observed during the treatment with modafinil. All probands had MRI of the brain, routine blood tests, EEG, polysomnography, examination of the level of hypocretin in cerebrospinal fluid and evaluation by means of Epworth and Stanford Sleepiness Scales. In 9 patients with narcolepsy, decreased thickness of the substantia nigra was found and in six of them degenerative lesions in the pontine substantia nigra were also noticed. The significance of these changes remains unclear. No data have been published until now concerning the presence of any brain lesions in patients with familial narcolepsy.

  4. Protein chainmail variants in dsDNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Z. Hong; Chiou, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    First discovered in bacteriophage HK97, biological chainmail is a highly stable system formed by concatenated protein rings. Each subunit of the ring contains the HK97-like fold, which is characterized by its submarine-like shape with a 5-stranded β sheet in the axial (A) domain, spine helix in the peripheral (P) domain, and an extended (E) loop. HK97 capsid consists of covalently-linked copies of just one HK97-like fold protein and represents the most effective strategy to form highly stable chainmail needed for dsDNA genome encapsidation. Recently, near-atomic resolution structures enabled by cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) have revealed a range of other, more complex variants of this strategy for constructing dsDNA viruses. The first strategy, exemplified by P22-like phages, is the attachment of an insertional (I) domain to the core 5-stranded β sheet of the HK97-like fold. The atomic models of the Bordetella phage BPP-1 showcases an alternative topology of the classic HK97 topology of the HK97-like fold, as well as the second strategy for constructing stable capsids, where an auxiliary jellyroll protein dimer serves to cement the non-covalent chainmail formed by capsid protein subunits. The third strategy, found in lambda-like phages, uses auxiliary protein trimers to stabilize the underlying non-covalent chainmail near the 3-fold axis. Herpesviruses represent highly complex viruses that use a combination of these strategies, resulting in four-level hierarchical organization including a non-covalent chainmail formed by the HK97-like fold domain found in the floor region. A thorough understanding of these structures should help unlock the enigma of the emergence and evolution of dsDNA viruses and inform bioengineering efforts based on these viruses. PMID:29177192

  5. Spectroscopic identification of SNe 2004ds and SN 2004dt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2004-08-01

    A. Gal-Yam, D. Fox and S. Kulkarni, California Institute of Technology, report on red spectra (range 550-780 nm) obtained by Kulkarni and Fox on Aug. 13.5 UT at the 10-m Keck I telescope (+ LRIS). The spectrum of of SN 2004ds (IAUC #8386), shows a broad, well-developed P-Cyg H_alpha line and suggests that this is a type II supernova. The spectrum of SN 2004dt (IAUC #8386), shows the distinctive Si II 6100 absorption trough around 6100 Angstrom, indicating this is a young SN Ia.

  6. 75 FR 37519 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Forms DS-4138, Request for Escort Screening...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... to obtain or retain a benefit. Title of Information Collection: Application for OFM Web site Account...] 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Forms DS-4138, Request for Escort Screening Courtesies; DS-4139, Photograph and Signature Card; & DS-4140, Application for OFM Web Site Account; DS- 1504...

  7. Atlanto-occipital fusion and spondylolisthesis in an Anasazi skeleton from Bright Angel Ruin, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Merbs, C F; Euler, R C

    1985-08-01

    The skeleton of a middle-aged female showing an unusual pattern of congenital, traumatic, and degenerative pathology was recovered from a small Kayenta Anasazi site located near the confluence of Bright Angel Creek with the Colorado River in the Inner Gorge of Grand Canyon. The atlas is fused with the base of the skull and C2 is fused with C3. The cervical region was subjected to hyperextension, perhaps through use of a tumpline, with resultant reduction of the neural canal to 8 mm, a condition that quite likely led to neurological problems. The skeleton also includes a depression fracture of the lateral condyle of the left tibia. Complete, bilateral spondylolysis of L5 led to an olisthesis of approximately 15 mm. The disc between L5 and S1 then ossified, most likely from staphylococcus bacteremia, making the olisthesis permanent and thereby creating a unique arachaeological specimen. Although spondylolysis is usually viewed as a stress fracture, the general pattern of pathology in this individual makes it necessary to consider an etiology of acute trauma.

  8. Outcome of L5 radiculopathy after reduction and instrumented transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion of high-grade L5-S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis and the role of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Schär, Ralph T; Sutter, Martin; Mannion, Anne F; Eggspühler, Andreas; Jeszenszky, Dezsö; Fekete, Tamas F; Kleinstück, Frank; Haschtmann, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the incidence and course of iatrogenic L5 radiculopathy after reduction and instrumented fusion of high-grade L5-S1 isthmic spondylolisthesis and the role of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM). Consecutive patients treated for high-grade spondylolisthesis with IONM from 2005 to 2013 were screened for eligibility. Prospectively collected clinical and surgical data as well as radiographic outcomes were analyzed retrospectively. Patients completed the multidimensional Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) before and at 3, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Seventeen patients were included, with a mean age of 26.3 (±9.5) years. Mean preoperative L5-S1 slip was 72% (±21%) and was reduced to 19% (±13%) postoperatively. Mean loss of reduction at last follow-up [mean 19 months (±14, range 3-48 months)] was 3% (±4.3%). Rate of new L5 radiculopathy with motor deficit (L5MD) after surgery was 29% (five patients). Four patients fully recovered after 3 months, one patient was lost to neurologic follow-up. IONM sensitivity and specificity for postoperative L5MD was 20 and 100%, respectively. COMI, back pain and leg pain scores showed significant (p < 0.001) improvements at 3 months postoperatively, which were retained up to 24 months postoperatively. Transient L5 radiculopathy after reduction and instrumented fusion of high-grade spondylolisthesis is frequent. With IONM the risk of irreversible L5 radiculopathy is minimal. If IONM signal changes recover, full clinical recovery is expected within 3 months. Overall, patient-reported outcome of reduction and instrumented fusion of high-grade spondylolisthesis showed clinically important improvement.

  9. Cervical degenerative disease: systematic review of economic analyses.

    PubMed

    Alvin, Matthew D; Qureshi, Sheeraz; Klineberg, Eric; Riew, K Daniel; Fischer, Dena J; Norvell, Daniel C; Mroz, Thomas E

    2014-10-15

    Systematic review. To perform an evidence-based synthesis of the literature assessing the cost-effectiveness of surgery for patients with symptomatic cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD). Cervical DDD is a common cause of clinical syndromes such as neck pain, cervical radiculopathy, and myelopathy. The appropriate surgical intervention(s) for a given problem is controversial, especially with regard to quality-of-life outcomes, complications, and costs. Although there have been many studies comparing outcomes and complications, relatively few have compared costs and, more importantly, cost-effectiveness of the interventions. We conducted a systematic search in PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Collaboration Library, the Cost-Effectiveness Analysis registry database, and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database for full economic evaluations published through January 16, 2014. Identification of full economic evaluations that were explicitly designed to evaluate and synthesize the costs and consequences of surgical procedures or surgical intervention with nonsurgical management in patients with cervical DDD were considered for inclusion, based on 4 key questions. Five studies were included, each specific to 1 or more of our focus questions. Two studies suggested that cervical disc replacement may be more cost-effective compared with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Two studies comparing anterior with posterior surgical procedures for cervical spondylotic myelopathy suggested that anterior surgery was more cost-effective than posterior surgery. One study suggested that posterior cervical foraminotomy had a greater net economic benefit than anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in a military population with unilateral cervical radiculopathy. No studies assessed the cost-effectiveness of surgical intervention compared with nonoperative treatment of cervical myelopathy or radiculopathy, although it is acknowledged that existing studies

  10. The Coracohumeral Distance in Shoulders With Traumatic and Degenerative Subscapularis Tendon Tears.

    PubMed

    Balke, Maurice; Banerjee, Marc; Greshake, Oliver; Hoeher, Juergen; Bouillon, Bertil; Liem, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    A reduced coracohumeral distance (CHD) is thought to be responsible for subcoracoid impingement. This only accounts for degenerative tendon tears. In traumatic tears, the subcoracoid space should be normal. The CHD in patients with traumatic subscapularis tendon tears is larger than that in patients with degenerative tears and does not differ from patients with an intact subscapularis tendon. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 83 patients with arthroscopically certified subscapularis tendon tears were included in the study. Forty-four patients had degenerative causes (group 1), and 39 had traumatic causes (group 2). The control group consisted of 20 patients with traumatic supraspinatus tendon tears and arthroscopically proven, intact subscapularis tendons (group 3). On preoperative axial magnetic resonance imaging, the distance between the CHD was measured, and the values of the 3 groups were compared using the t test. The mean (±SD) CHD in patients with degenerative subscapularis tendon tears was 8.6 ± 2.0 mm (range, 4.0-13.2 mm) and was significantly (P = .0003) smaller than that in patients with traumatic tears (10.2 ± 2.0 mm; range, 6.6-16.2 mm) or controls (10.4 ± 1.8 mm; range, 6.8-14.0 mm). The CHD of controls and patients with traumatic tears did not differ significantly (P = .7875). A CHD of less than 6 mm only occurred in patients with degenerative subscapularis tendon tears. The hypothesis that the CHD in patients with degenerative subscapularis tendon tears is significantly smaller than that in patients with traumatic tears or intact subscapularis tendons was confirmed. The CHD in patients with traumatic tears does not differ from that in controls. A CHD of less than 6 mm only occurs in patients with degenerative subscapularis tendon tears. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. Evaluation of Serum Cytokines in Cats with and without Degenerative Joint Disease and Associated Pain

    PubMed Central

    Gruen, Margaret E.; Messenger, Kristen M.; Thomson, Andrea E.; Griffith, Emily H.; Aldrich, Lauren A.; Vaden, Shelly; Lascelles, BDX

    2017-01-01

    Degenerative joint disease is common in cats, with signs of pain frequently found on orthopedic examination and radiographs often showing evidence of disease. However, understanding of the pathophysiology of degenerative joint disease and associated pain remains limited. Several cytokines have been identified as having a role in pain in humans, but this has not been investigated in cats. The present study was performed to use a multiplex platform to evaluate the concentration of 19 cytokines and chemokines in serum samples obtained from cats with and without degenerative joint disease and associated pain. Samples from a total of 186 cats were analyzed, with cats representing a range of severity on radiographic and orthopedic evaluations and categorized by degenerative joint disease scores and pain scores. Results showed that cats with higher radiographic degenerative joint disease scores have higher serum concentrations of IL-4 and IL-8, while cats with higher orthopedic exam pain scores have higher concentrations of IL-8, IL-2, and TNF-α increased concentration of IL-8 in degenerative joint disease and pain may be confounded by the association with age. Discriminant analysis was unable to identify one or more cytokines that distinguish between groups of cats classified based on degenerative joint disease score category or pain score category. Finally, cluster analysis driven by analyte concentrations show separation of groups of cats, but features defining the groups remain unknown. Further studies are warranted to investigate any changes in cytokine concentrations in response to analgesic therapies, and further evaluate the elevations in cytokine concentrations found here, particularly focused on studies of local cytokines present in synovial fluid. PMID:28063477

  12. Leptonic decays of charged D and Ds mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menaa, Nabil

    Using 281 pb--1 of data taken on the psi(3770) resonance and 314 pb--1 of data near or at 4170 MeV collected with the CLEO-c detector, we present two analyses to study the purely leptonic decays of charmed and charmed strange charged mesons. In the first analysis, we extract a relatively precise value for the decay constant of the D+ meson by measuring B (D+ → mu+nu) = (4.40 +/- 0.66+0.09-0.12 ) x 10-4. We find fD + = (222.6 +/- 16.7+2.8-3.4 ) MeV, and compare with current theoretical calculations. We also set a 90% confidence upper limit on B (D+ → e +nu) < 2.4 x 10-5 which constrains new physics models. Finally with this data sample, we test whether or not the tau lepton manifests the same couplings as the mu lepton by investigating the relative decay rates in purely leptonic D+ meson decays. We limit B (D+ → tau+nu) < 2.1 x 10--3 at 90% confidence level (C. L.), thus allowing us to place the first upper limit on the ratio R = Gamma (D+ → tau+nu)/Gamma( D+ → mu+nu). The ratio of R to the Standard Model expectation of 2.65 then is <1.8 at 90% C. L., consistent with the prediction of lepton universality. In the second analysis, we examine e+ e-- → D-sD*+s and D-*sD+s interactions at 4170 MeV using the CLEO-c detector in order to measure the decay constant fD+s . We use the D+s → ℓ+nu channel, where the ℓ+ designates either a mu+ or a tau+, when the tau+ → pi+nu. Analyzing both modes independently, we determine B ( D+s → mu+nu) = (0.594 +/- 0.066 +/- 0.031)%, B ( D+s → tau+nu) = (8.0 +/- 1.3 +/- 0.4)%. We also analyze them simultaneously to find an effective value of B ( D+s → mu+nu) = (0.621 +/- 0.058 +/- 0.032)% and extract fD+s = 270 +/- 13 +/- 7 MeV. Combining with our previous determination of B (D+ → mu+nu), we also find the ratio fD+s/fD+ = 1.21 +/- 0.11 +/- 0.04. We compare with current theoretical estimates. Finally, we limit B ( D+s → e+nu) < 1.3 x 10 --4 at 90% confidence level.

  13. Asynchronous, Decentralized DS-CDMA Using Feedback-Controlled Spreading Sequences for Time-Dispersive Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyatake, Teruhiko; Chiba, Kazuki; Hamamura, Masanori; Tachikawa, Shin'ichi

    We propose a novel asynchronous direct-sequence codedivision multiple access (DS-CDMA) using feedback-controlled spreading sequences (FCSSs) (FCSS/DS-CDMA). At the receiver of FCSS/DS-CDMA, the code-orthogonalizing filter (COF) produces a spreading sequence, and the receiver returns the spreading sequence to the transmitter. Then the transmitter uses the spreading sequence as its updated version. The performance of FCSS/DS-CDMA is evaluated over time-dispersive channels. The results indicate that FCSS/DS-CDMA greatly suppresses both the intersymbol interference (ISI) and multiple access interference (MAI) over time-invariant channels. FCSS/DS-CDMA is applicable to the decentralized multiple access.

  14. DS-Connect™: A Promising Tool to Improve Lives and Engage Down Syndrome Communities Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Melissa A.; Kaeser, Lisa; Bardhan, Sujata; Oster-Granite, MaryLou; Maddox, Yvonne T.

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDDs) in the United States with an estimated birth prevalence of 1:691 births (http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/birthdefects/data.html); however, worldwide estimates of the number of individuals with IDDs, including DS, remain speculative. Little is known about the global health impact of DS, such as heart defects, gastrointestinal malformations, and other medical and behavioral issues. Further research is needed to develop the next generation of novel therapies and compounds aimed at improving cognition, reducing dementia and mitigating other manifestations of DS. To address these challenges, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has created the first web-based, voluntary registry and data resource called DS-Connect™: The Down Syndrome Registry (https://DSConnect.nih.gov) to collect demographic and health information about individuals with DS. PMID:26271554

  15. A novel mycovirus from Aspergillus fumigatus contains four unique dsRNAs as its genome and is infectious as dsRNA

    PubMed Central

    Kanhayuwa, Lakkhana; Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Özkan, Selin; Gunning, A. Patrick; Coutts, Robert H. A.

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery and characterization of a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycovirus isolated from the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus fumigatus tetramycovirus-1 (AfuTmV-1), which reveals several unique features not found previously in positive-strand RNA viruses, including the fact that it represents the first dsRNA (to our knowledge) that is not only infectious as a purified entity but also as a naked dsRNA. The AfuTmV-1 genome consists of four capped dsRNAs, the largest of which encodes an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) containing a unique GDNQ motif normally characteristic of negative-strand RNA viruses. The third largest dsRNA encodes an S-adenosyl methionine–dependent methyltransferase capping enzyme and the smallest dsRNA a P-A-S–rich protein that apparently coats but does not encapsidate the viral genome as visualized by atomic force microscopy. A combination of a capping enzyme with a picorna-like RdRP in the AfuTmV-1 genome is a striking case of chimerism and the first example (to our knowledge) of such a phenomenon. AfuTmV-1 appears to be intermediate between dsRNA and positive-strand ssRNA viruses, as well as between encapsidated and capsidless RNA viruses. PMID:26139522

  16. RDE-4 preferentially binds long dsRNA and its dimerization is necessary for cleavage of dsRNA to siRNA.

    PubMed

    Parker, Greg S; Eckert, Debra M; Bass, Brenda L

    2006-05-01

    In organisms ranging from Arabidopsis to humans, Dicer requires dsRNA-binding proteins (dsRBPs) to carry out its roles in RNA interference (RNAi) and micro-RNA (miRNA) processing. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the dsRBP RDE-4 acts with Dicer during the initiation of RNAi, when long dsRNA is cleaved to small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). RDE-4 is not required in subsequent steps, and how RDE-4 distinguishes between long dsRNA and short siRNA is unclear. We report the first detailed analysis of RDE-4 binding, using purified recombinant RDE-4 and various truncated proteins. We find that, similar to other dsRBPs, RDE-4 is not sequence-specific. However, consistent with its in vivo roles, RDE-4 binds with higher affinity to long dsRNA. We also observe that RDE-4 is a homodimer in solution, and that the C-terminal domain of the protein is required for dimerization. Using extracts from wild-type and rde-4 mutant C. elegans, we show that the C-terminal dimerization domain is required for the production of siRNA. Our findings suggest a model for RDE-4 function during the initiation of RNAi.

  17. RDE-4 preferentially binds long dsRNA and its dimerization is necessary for cleavage of dsRNA to siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Greg S.; Eckert, Debra M.; Bass, Brenda L.

    2006-01-01

    In organisms ranging from Arabidopsis to humans, Dicer requires dsRNA-binding proteins (dsRBPs) to carry out its roles in RNA interference (RNAi) and micro-RNA (miRNA) processing. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the dsRBP RDE-4 acts with Dicer during the initiation of RNAi, when long dsRNA is cleaved to small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). RDE-4 is not required in subsequent steps, and how RDE-4 distinguishes between long dsRNA and short siRNA is unclear. We report the first detailed analysis of RDE-4 binding, using purified recombinant RDE-4 and various truncated proteins. We find that, similar to other dsRBPs, RDE-4 is not sequence-specific. However, consistent with its in vivo roles, RDE-4 binds with higher affinity to long dsRNA. We also observe that RDE-4 is a homodimer in solution, and that the C-terminal domain of the protein is required for dimerization. Using extracts from wild-type and rde-4 mutant C. elegans, we show that the C-terminal dimerization domain is required for the production of siRNA. Our findings suggest a model for RDE-4 function during the initiation of RNAi. PMID:16603715

  18. Measurement of the decay constant f(Ds+) using D(s+)-->l+ nu.

    PubMed

    Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Khalil, S; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Ernst, J; Ecklund, K M; Severini, H; Love, W; Savinov, V; Aquines, O; Lopez, A; Mehrabyan, S; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F

    2007-08-17

    We measure the decay constant f(Ds+) using the D(s+)-->l+ nu channel, where the l+ designates either a mu+ or a tau+, when the tau+ -->pi+ nu. Using both measurements we find f(Ds+)=274+/-13+/-7 MeV. Combining with our previous determination of f(D+), we compute the ratio f(Ds+)/f(D+)=1.23+/-0.11+/-0.04. We compare with theoretical estimates.

  19. Coded DS-CDMA Systems with Iterative Channel Estimation and no Pilot Symbols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    ar X iv :1 00 8. 31 96 v1 [ cs .I T ] 1 9 A ug 2 01 0 1 Coded DS - CDMA Systems with Iterative Channel Estimation and no Pilot Symbols Don...sequence code-division multiple-access ( DS - CDMA ) systems with quadriphase-shift keying in which channel estimation, coherent demodulation, and decoding...amplitude, phase, and the interference power spectral density (PSD) due to the combined interference and thermal noise is proposed for DS - CDMA systems

  20. Bovine Progressive Degenerative Myeloencephalopathy (Weaver Syndrome) in Brown Swiss Cattle in Canada: A Literature Review and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Baird, John D.; Sarmiento, Ulla M.; Basrur, Parvathi K.

    1988-01-01

    A 15-month-old purebred Brown Swiss heifer was presented because of posterior paresis and ataxia. Histopathological examination of the brain and spinal cord showed evidence of a mild diffuse degenerative myeloencephalopathy. The most severe degenerative lesions were located in the white matter of the thoracic spinal cord. We believe this to be the first documented case of bovine progressive degenerative myeloencephalopathy (“weaver syndrome”) in Canada. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2., Figure 3., Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:17423028

  1. Expression of Activating KIR2DS2 and KIR2DS4 genes following hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT): relevance to cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection

    PubMed Central

    Gallez-Hawkins, Ghislaine M.; Franck, Anne E.; Li, Xiuli; Thao, Lia; Oki, Arisa; Gendzekhadze, Ketevan; Dagis, Andrew; Palmer, Joycelynne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Forman, Stephen J.; Senitzer, David; Zaia, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The important role of activating Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (aKIR) in protecting against cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation has been described previously in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). More specifically, the presence of multiple aKIR and the presence of at least KIR2DS2 and KIR2DS4 in the donor genotype identified a group of HCT patients that were at low risk for CMV reactivation. However, CMV infection still occurs in patients with KIR protective genotype and the question was raised as to whether this was due to the lack of KIR expression. In this report, the expression of KIR2DS2 and 2DS4 gene, as measured by mRNA-based Q-PCR both in the donor cells and in the HCT recipient cells was studied relative to CMV reactivation. In the control samples from healthy HCT donors, the median range of for KIR2DS2 and KIR2DS4 expression was low with 35% considered null-expressers. Interestingly, KIR2DS2 and KIR2DS4 expression was elevated after HCT when compared to donor expression prior to transplant, and significantly elevated in the CMV viremic (V) compared to non-viremic (NV) HCT recipients. CMV seropositivity of donors was not associated with aKIR expression, and donor null-expression in those with KIR2DS2 or KIR2DS4 genotype did not predict for CMV reactivation in the recipient. After controlling for other transplant factors that included donor type (sibling or unrelated), transplant source -bone marrow (BM) or peripheral blood stem cells (PB) and acute GVHD grade, the result of the regression analysis of elevated KIR gene expression was found to be associated for both KIR2DS2 and KIR2DS4, with seven fold increase in risk for CMV reactivation. We speculate that the elevated aKIR expression in CMV viremic HCT recipients is either coincidental with factors that activate CMV or is initiated by CMV or cellular processes responsive to such CMV infection reactivation. PMID:21596150

  2. Degenerative changes of the canine cervical spine after discectomy procedures, an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Grunert, Peter; Moriguchi, Yu; Grossbard, Brian P; Ricart Arbona, Rodolfo J; Bonassar, Lawrence J; Härtl, Roger

    2017-06-23

    Discectomies are a common surgical treatment for disc herniations in the canine spine. However, the effect of these procedures on intervertebral disc tissue is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to assess degenerative changes of cervical spinal segments undergoing discectomy procedures, in vivo. Discectomies led to a 60% drop in disc height and 24% drop in foraminal height. Segments did not fuse but showed osteophyte formation as well as endplate sclerosis. MR imaging revealed terminal degenerative changes with collapse of the disc space and loss of T2 signal intensity. The endplates showed degenerative type II Modic changes. Quantitative MR imaging revealed that over 95% of Nucleus Pulposus tissue was extracted and that the nuclear as well as overall disc hydration significantly decreased. Histology confirmed terminal degenerative changes with loss of NP tissue, loss of Annulus Fibrosus organization and loss of cartilage endplate tissue. The bony endplate displayed sclerotic changes. Discectomies lead to terminal degenerative changes. Therefore, these procedures should be indicated with caution specifically when performed for prophylactic purposes.

  3. Nanotechnology and nanocarrier-based approaches on treatment of degenerative diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Anindita; Kunjiappan, Selvaraj; Panneerselvam, Theivendren; Somasundaram, Balasubramanian; Bhattacharjee, Chiranjib

    2017-04-01

    Degenerative diseases are results of deterioration of cells and tissues with aging either by unhealthy lifestyle or normal senescence. The degenerative disease likely affects central nervous system and cardiovascular system to a great extent. Certain medications and therapies have emerged for the treatment of degenerative diseases, but in most cases bearing with poor solubility, lower bioavailability, drug resistance, and incapability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Hence, it has to be overcome with conventional treatment system; in this connection, nanotechnology has gained a great deal of interest in recent years. Moreover, nanotechnology and nanocarrier-based approach drug delivery system could revolutionize the treatment of degenerative diseases by faster absorption of drug, targeted interaction at specific site, and its release in a controlled manner into human body with minimal side effects. The core objective of this review is to customize and formulate therapeutically active molecules with specific site of action and without affecting other organs and tissues to obtain effective result in the improvement of quality of health. In addition, the review provides a concise insight into the recent developments and applications of nanotech and nanocarrier-based drug delivery for the treatment of various degenerative diseases.

  4. Pedicle screw-rod fixation: a feasible treatment for dogs with severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Tellegen, Anna R; Willems, Nicole; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Meij, Björn P

    2015-12-07

    Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis is a common problem in large breed dogs. For severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis, conservative treatment is often not effective and surgical intervention remains as the last treatment option. The objective of this retrospective study was to assess the middle to long term outcome of treatment of severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis with pedicle screw-rod fixation with or without evidence of radiological discospondylitis. Twelve client-owned dogs with severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis underwent pedicle screw-rod fixation of the lumbosacral junction. During long term follow-up, dogs were monitored by clinical evaluation, diagnostic imaging, force plate analysis, and by using questionnaires to owners. Clinical evaluation, force plate data, and responses to questionnaires completed by the owners showed resolution (n = 8) or improvement (n = 4) of clinical signs after pedicle screw-rod fixation in 12 dogs. There were no implant failures, however, no interbody vertebral bone fusion of the lumbosacral junction was observed in the follow-up period. Four dogs developed mild recurrent low back pain that could easily be controlled by pain medication and an altered exercise regime. Pedicle screw-rod fixation offers a surgical treatment option for large breed dogs with severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis with or without evidence of radiological discospondylitis in which no other treatment is available. Pedicle screw-rod fixation alone does not result in interbody vertebral bone fusion between L7 and S1.

  5. trans- cis Isomerism and acylimine formation in DsRed chromophore models: Intrinsic rotation barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Seth; Smith, Sean C.

    2006-07-01

    The chromophore of the red fluorescent protein DsRed contains an acylimine substituent to a GFP-like chromophore structure. The acylimine is formed from the trans peptide linkage between residues F65 and Q66 in immature DsRed, but has a cis configuration in the mature protein. The relationship between acylimine formation and trans- cis isomerization is unresolved. We have calculated bond rotation profiles for models of mature and immature DsRed chromophores using B3LYP DFT. The isomerization barrier is substantially reduced in acylimine-substituted models, providing prima facie evidence that acylimine formation precedes trans- cis isomerization in DsRed chromophores.

  6. Nucleic acid encoding DS-CAM proteins and products related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Korenberg, Julie R.

    2005-11-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there are provided Down Syndrome-Cell Adhesion Molecule (DS-CAM) proteins. Nucleic acid sequences encoding such proteins and assays employing same are also disclosed. The invention DS-CAM proteins can be employed in a variety of ways, for example, for the production of anti-DS-CAM antibodies thereto, in therapeutic compositions and methods employing such proteins and/or antibodies. DS-CAM proteins are also useful in bioassays to identify agonists and antagonists thereto.

  7. dsRNA binding properties of RDE-4 and TRBP reflect their distinct roles in RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Greg S.; Maity, Tuhin Subhra; Bass, Brenda L.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY dsRNA binding proteins (dsRBPs) facilitate Dicer functions in RNAi. C. elegans RDE-4 facilitates cleavage of long dsRNA to siRNA, while human TRBP functions downstream to pass siRNA to RISC. We show that these distinct in vivo roles are reflected in in vitro binding properties. RDE-4 preferentially binds long dsRNA, while TRBP binds siRNA with an affinity that is independent of dsRNA length. These properties are mechanistically based in the fact that RDE-4 binds cooperatively, via contributions from multiple domains, while TRBP binds non-cooperatively. Our studies offer a paradigm for how dsRBPs, which are not sequence-specific, discern dsRNA length. Additionally, analyses of the ability of RDE-4 deletion constructs and RDE-4/TRBP chimeras to reconstitute Dicer activity suggest RDE-4 promotes activity using its dsRBM2 to bind dsRNA, its linker region to interact with Dicer, and its C-terminus for Dicer activation. PMID:18948111

  8. Correlation between CHA2DS2-VASc Score and Glaucoma Treatment and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Pikkel, Yoav Y; Krebs, Daniel; Igal, Vadim; Sharabi-Nov, Adi; Epstein, Irena; Pikkel, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    To find if CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc scale can accurately predict the treatment, prognosis, and outcome for primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). A survey of 250,000 patient years was taken, using the records of the Ophthalmology Department at Ziv Medical Center. Data was collected regarding the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), visual field (VF), line of treatment (LOT) of glaucoma, and all the data needed to accurately calculate CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score for each patient. Sixty-seven patients were included in the statistical analysis. The mean age was 72.5 years. The mean CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score was 3.27 + -1.7. Positive Pearson's correlation coefficients were found for LOT and CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score, 0.35, and for RNFL grade and CHA2DS2-VASc score, 0.37. The correlation was negative for RNFL width and CHA2DS2-VASc score, -0.35. CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score was shown to be correlated with glaucoma. This correlation was manifested positively by the LOT needed to stop glaucoma progression, with higher CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc scores correlated with more aggressive treatment. Since glaucoma is a disease with a progressing nature, it is important to treat patients aggressively on one hand, while offering the most benign treatment as possible on the other hand. Modification of the CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score could achieve an even higher correlation.

  9. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus with and without Anti-dsDNA Antibodies: Analysis from a Large Monocentric Cohort.

    PubMed

    Conti, Fabrizio; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Perricone, Carlo; Massaro, Laura; Marocchi, Elisa; Miranda, Francesca; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Truglia, Simona; Alessandri, Cristiano; Valesini, Guido

    2015-01-01

    The anti-dsDNA antibodies are a marker for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and 70-98% of patients test positive. We evaluated the demographic, clinical, laboratory, and therapeutical features of a monocentric SLE cohort according to the anti-dsDNA status. We identified three groups: anti-dsDNA + (persistent positivity); anti-dsDNA ± (initial positivity and subsequent negativity during disease course); anti-dsDNA - (persistent negativity). Disease activity was assessed by the European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement (ECLAM). We evaluated 393 patients (anti-dsDNA +: 62.3%; anti-dsDNA ±: 13.3%; anti-dsDNA -: 24.4%). The renal involvement was significantly more frequent in anti-dsDNA + (30.2%), compared with anti-dsDNA ± and anti-dsDNA - (21.1% and 18.7%, resp.; P = 0.001). Serositis resulted significantly more frequent in anti-dsDNA - (82.3%) compared to anti-dsDNA + and anti-dsDNA ± (20.8% and 13.4%, resp.; P < 0.0001). The reduction of C4 serum levels was identified significantly more frequently in anti-dsDNA + and anti-dsDNA ± (40.0% and 44.2%, resp.) compared with anti-dsDNA - (21.8%, P = 0.005). We did not identify significant differences in the mean ECLAM values before and after modification of anti-dsDNA status (P = 0.7). Anti-dsDNA status influences the clinical and immunological features of SLE patients. Nonetheless, it does not appear to affect disease activity.

  10. Sacroiliac joint motion in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders.

    PubMed

    Nagamoto, Yukitaka; Iwasaki, Motoki; Sakaura, Hironobu; Sugiura, Tsuyoshi; Fujimori, Takahito; Matsuo, Yohei; Kashii, Masafumi; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sugamoto, Kazuomi

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Usually additional anchors into the ilium are necessary in long fusion to the sacrum for degenerative lumbar spine disorders (DLSDs), especially for adult spine deformity. Although the use of anchors is becoming quite common, surgeons must always keep in mind that the sacroiliac (SI) joint is mobile and they should be aware of the kinematic properties of the SI joint in patients with DLSDs, including adult spinal deformity. No previous study has clarified in vivo kinematic changes in the SI joint with respect to patient age, sex, or parturition status or the presence of DLSDs. The authors conducted a study to clarify the mobility and kinematic characteristics of the SI joint in patients with DLSDs in comparison with healthy volunteers by using in vivo 3D motion analysis with voxel-based registration, a highly accurate, noninvasive method. METHODS Thirteen healthy volunteers (the control group) and 20 patients with DLSDs (the DLSD group) underwent low-dose 3D CT of the lumbar spine and pelvis in 3 positions (neutral, maximal trunk flexion, and maximal trunk extension). SI joint motion was calculated by computer processing of the CT images (voxel-based registration). 3D motion of the SI joint was expressed as both 6 df by Euler angles and translations on the coordinate system and a helical axis of rotation. The correlation between joint motion and the cross-sectional area of the trunk muscles was also investigated. RESULTS SI joint motion during trunk flexion-extension was minute in healthy volunteers. The mean rotation angles during trunk flexion were 0.07° around the x axis, -0.02° around the y axis, and 0.16° around the z axis. The mean rotation angles during trunk extension were 0.38° around the x axis, -0.08° around the y axis, and 0.08° around the z axis. During trunk flexion-extension, the largest amount of motion occurred around the x axis. In patients with DLSDs, the mean rotation angles during trunk flexion were 0.57° around the x axis, 0.01

  11. A Joint Optimization Criterion for Blind DS-CDMA Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán-Díaz, Iván; Cruces-Alvarez, Sergio A.

    2006-12-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the blind detection of a desired user in an asynchronous DS-CDMA communications system with multipath propagation channels. Starting from the inverse filter criterion introduced by Tugnait and Li in 2001, we propose to tackle the problem in the context of the blind signal extraction methods for ICA. In order to improve the performance of the detector, we present a criterion based on the joint optimization of several higher-order statistics of the outputs. An algorithm that optimizes the proposed criterion is described, and its improved performance and robustness with respect to the near-far problem are corroborated through simulations. Additionally, a simulation using measurements on a real software-radio platform at 5 GHz has also been performed.

  12. User's Manual for FEMOM3DS. Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C.J.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    FEMOM3DS is a computer code written in FORTRAN 77 to compute electromagnetic(EM) scattering characteristics of a three dimensional object with complex materials using combined Finite Element Method (FEM)/Method of Moments (MoM) technique. This code uses the tetrahedral elements, with vector edge basis functions for FEM in the volume of the cavity and the triangular elements with the basis functions similar to that described for MoM at the outer boundary. By virtue of FEM, this code can handle any arbitrarily shaped three-dimensional cavities filled with inhomogeneous lossy materials. The User's Manual is written to make the user acquainted with the operation of the code. The user is assumed to be familiar with the FORTRAN 77 language and the operating environment of the computers on which the code is intended to run.

  13. Preparing the future of astronomy PhDs in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boissier, S.; Buat, V.; Cambresy, L.

    2015-12-01

    The numbers of doctors in astronomy formed in France has been increasing for 15 years, a time during which the number of openings for permanent positions has remained constant. As it is well known by the young generations, the pressure on the research position is high, putting many post-doctoral researchers in difficult situations for up to 10 years after their defence. We have to prepare students and post-doctoral researchers to maximize their chances for both academia and the private sector. In this spirit, the 2015 SF2A conference included a lunch meeting with former members of hiring committee and a workshop on the valorization of the astronomy thesis. We believe awareness of both young and senior researchers is important to provide PhDs with a robust background and modern methods, valuable in their future, whichever it is.

  14. Clinical psychopharmacology and medical malpractice: the four Ds.

    PubMed

    Preskorn, Sheldon H

    2014-09-01

    The four Ds of medical malpractice are duty, dereliction (negligence or deviation from the standard of care), damages, and direct cause. Each of these four elements must be proved to have been present, based on a preponderance of the evidence, for malpractice to be found. The principles of psychopharmacology and the information in the package insert for a drug often play a central role in deciding whether dereliction and direct cause for damages were or were not applicable in a particular case. The author uses data from two cases in which patients were inadvertently fatally poisoned by medication to illustrate two ways in which such information can affect the outcome. In one case, the clinician should have known that he was giving a toxic dose to the patient, whereas that was not true in the other case.

  15. Artificial chordae for degenerative mitral valve disease: critical analysis of current techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Michael; Rao, Christopher; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2012-01-01

    The surgical repair of degenerative mitral valve disease involves a number of technical points of importance. The use of artificial chordae for the repair of degenerative disease has increased as a part of the move from mitral valve replacement to repair of the mitral valve. The use of artificial chordae provides an alternative to the techniques pioneered by Carpentier (including the quadrangular resection, transfer of native chordae and papillary muscle shortening/plasty), which can be more technically difficult. Despite a growth in their uptake and the indications for their use, a number of challenges remain for the use of artificial chordae in mitral valve repair, particularly in the determination of the correct length to ensure optimal leaflet coaptation. Here, we analyse over 40 techniques described for artificial chordae mitral valve repair in the setting of degenerative disease. PMID:22962321

  16. The immediate effects of taping therapy on knee pain and depression in patients with degenerative arthritis.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji-Won; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Park, Chi-Bok

    2018-05-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to identify the immediate effects of taping therapy on knee pain and depression among patients with degenerative arthritis. [Subjects and Methods] In total, 32 patients with degenerative arthritis were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the experimental group that underwent taping therapy and the control group that underwent regular treatment (16 patients per group). In the experimental group, therapeutic tape was wrapped all around the knee joint. Pain and depression were measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), respectively. [Results] The intra-group comparison showed significant differences in VAS and BDI for the experimental group. The intergroup comparison showed that the differences in VAS and BDI within the experimental group appeared significant relative to the control group. [Conclusion] It was observed that taping therapy showed an immediate effect in decreasing knee pain and depression among patients with degenerative arthritis.

  17. Layered video transmission over multirate DS-CDMA wireless systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondi, Lisimachos P.; Srinivasan, Deepika; Pados, Dimitris A.; Batalama, Stella N.

    2003-05-01

    n this paper, we consider the transmission of video over wireless direct-sequence code-division multiple access (DS-CDMA) channels. A layered (scalable) video source codec is used and each layer is transmitted over a different CDMA channel. Spreading codes with different lengths are allowed for each CDMA channel (multirate CDMA). Thus, a different number of chips per bit can be used for the transmission of each scalable layer. For a given fixed energy value per chip and chip rate, the selection of a spreading code length affects the transmitted energy per bit and bit rate for each scalable layer. An MPEG-4 source encoder is used to provide a two-layer SNR scalable bitstream. Each of the two layers is channel-coded using Rate-Compatible Punctured Convolutional (RCPC) codes. Then, the data are interleaved, spread, carrier-modulated and transmitted over the wireless channel. A multipath Rayleigh fading channel is assumed. At the other end, we assume the presence of an antenna array receiver. After carrier demodulation, multiple-access-interference suppressing despreading is performed using space-time auxiliary vector (AV) filtering. The choice of the AV receiver is dictated by realistic channel fading rates that limit the data record available for receiver adaptation and redesign. Indeed, AV filter short-data-record estimators have been shown to exhibit superior bit-error-rate performance in comparison with LMS, RLS, SMI, or 'multistage nested Wiener' adaptive filter implementations. Our experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of multirate DS-CDMA systems for wireless video transmission.

  18. Decay properties of 256-339Ds superheavy nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.; Nithya, C.

    2017-09-01

    The decay properties of 84 isotopes of darmstadtium superheavy nuclei ( Z = 110) have been studied using various theoretical models. The proton emission half-lives, the alpha decay half-lives, the spontaneous fission half-lives and the cluster decay half-lives of all the isotopes are evaluated. The one-proton emission half-lives and the alpha decay half-lives are predicted using the Coulomb and proximity potential model for deformed nuclei (CPPMDN). The calculated alpha half-lives are compared with the available experimental results as well as with the predictions of other theoretical models. The predicted half-lives matches well with the experimental results. The one-proton half-lives are also compared with the predictions using other formalisms. The shell-effect-dependent formula of Santhosh et al. has been employed for calculating the spontaneous fission half-lives. A theoretical comparison of spontaneous fission half-lives with four different formalisms is performed. By comparing the one-proton emission half-lives, the alpha decay half-lives and the spontaneous fission half-lives decay modes are predicted for all the isotopes of Ds. It is seen that the isotopes within the range 256 ≤ A ≤ 263 and 279 ≤ A ≤ 339 decay through spontaneous fission and the isotopes 264 ≤ A ≤ 278 exhibit alpha decay. Cluster decay half-lives are calculated using different models including the Coulomb and proximity potential (CPPM), for determining the magicities in the superheavy region. The effect of magicity at N = 184 and N = 202 were confirmed from the plot of log_{10}T_{1/2} versus neutron number of the daughter nuclei for the emission of different clusters. We hope that the systematic and detailed study of all the possible decay modes of 256-339Ds using various theoretical models will be helpful in the experimental identification of the isotopes of the element in the future.

  19. Degenerative Pannus Mimicking Clival Chordoma Resected via an Endoscopic Transnasal Approach.

    PubMed

    Khaldi, Ahmad; Griauzde, Julius; Duckworth, Edward A M

    2011-05-01

    Lesions of the lower clivus represent a technically challenging subset of skull base disease that requires careful treatment. A 75-year-old woman with tongue atrophy was referred for resection of a presumed clival chordoma. The lesion was resected via an endoscopic transnasal transclival approach with no complications. Pathology revealed only chronic inflammatory tissue consistent with a degenerative pannus. Degenerative pannus should be included in the differential diagnosis of lower clival extradural lesions. The endoscopic transnasal transclival corridor should be considered for resection of such lesions as an alternative to larger, more morbid, traditional skull base approaches.

  20. Degenerative Pannus Mimicking Clival Chordoma Resected via an Endoscopic Transnasal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Khaldi, Ahmad; Griauzde, Julius; Duckworth, Edward A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Lesions of the lower clivus represent a technically challenging subset of skull base disease that requires careful treatment. A 75-year-old woman with tongue atrophy was referred for resection of a presumed clival chordoma. The lesion was resected via an endoscopic transnasal transclival approach with no complications. Pathology revealed only chronic inflammatory tissue consistent with a degenerative pannus. Degenerative pannus should be included in the differential diagnosis of lower clival extradural lesions. The endoscopic transnasal transclival corridor should be considered for resection of such lesions as an alternative to larger, more morbid, traditional skull base approaches. PMID:23984195

  1. 48 CFR 9903.202-10 - Illustration of Disclosure Statement Form, CASB DS-2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of Disclosure Statement Form, CASB DS-2. The data which are required to be disclosed by educational institutions are set forth in detail in the Disclosure Statement Form, CASB DS-2, which is illustrated below... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Illustration of Disclosure...

  2. 48 CFR 9903.202-10 - Illustration of Disclosure Statement Form, CASB DS-2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of Disclosure Statement Form, CASB DS-2. The data which are required to be disclosed by educational institutions are set forth in detail in the Disclosure Statement Form, CASB DS-2, which is illustrated below... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Illustration of Disclosure...

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Sphingobium lactosutens Strain DS20T, Isolated from a Hexachlorocyclohexane Dumpsite

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Roshan; Dwivedi, Vatsala; Negi, Vivek; Khurana, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingobium lactosutens DS20T has been isolated from the hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) dumpsite in Lucknow, India, but does not degrade any of the HCH isomers. Here, we present the ~5.36-Mb draft genome sequence of strain DS20T, which consists of 110 contigs and 5,288 coding sequences, with a G+C content of 63.1%. PMID:24051323

  4. 76 FR 10082 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-157, Supplemental Nonimmigrant Visa Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... Information Collection: DS-157, Supplemental Nonimmigrant Visa Application ACTION: Notice of request for...: Supplemental Nonimmigrant Visa Application. OMB Control Number: 1405-0134. Type of Request: Extension of a...). Form Number: DS-157. Respondents: Nonimmigrant visa applicants legally required to provide additional...

  5. dsRNA binding properties of RDE-4 and TRBP reflect their distinct roles in RNAi.

    PubMed

    Parker, Greg S; Maity, Tuhin Subhra; Bass, Brenda L

    2008-12-26

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding proteins facilitate Dicer functions in RNA interference. Caenorhabditis elegans RDE-4 facilitates cleavage of long dsRNA to small interfering RNA (siRNA), while human trans-activation response RNA-binding protein (TRBP) functions downstream to pass siRNA to the RNA-induced silencing complex. We show that these distinct in vivo roles are reflected in in vitro binding properties. RDE-4 preferentially binds long dsRNA, while TRBP binds siRNA with an affinity that is independent of dsRNA length. These properties are mechanistically based on the fact that RDE-4 binds cooperatively, via contributions from multiple domains, while TRBP binds noncooperatively. Our studies offer a paradigm for how dsRNA-binding proteins, which are not sequence specific, discern dsRNA length. Additionally, analyses of the ability of RDE-4 deletion constructs and RDE-4/TRBP chimeras to reconstitute Dicer activity suggest RDE-4 promotes activity using its dsRNA-binding motif 2 to bind dsRNA, its linker region to interact with Dicer, and its C-terminus for Dicer activation.

  6. The Effects of Green Cards on the Wages and Innovations of New PhDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lan, Xiaohuan

    2013-01-01

    Visa policies in the United States restrict job opportunities and job mobility for U.S.-trained PhDs who hold a temporary visa, a group that accounts for 40 percent of newly graduated PhDs in science and engineering. The Chinese Student Protection Act of 1992 (CSPA) allowed Chinese students to be eligible for permanent residence in the United…

  7. [Effects of robot-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and traditional open surgery in the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis].

    PubMed

    Cui, G Y; Tian, W; He, D; Xing, Y G; Liu, B; Yuan, Q; Wang, Y Q; Sun, Y Q

    2017-07-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical effects of robot-assisted minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and traditional open TLIF in the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis. Methods: A total of 41 patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis accepted surgical treatment in Department of Spinal Surgery of Beijing Jishuitan Hospital From July 2015 to April 2016 were retrospectively analyzed. There were 16 cases accepted robot-assisted minimally invasive TLIF and 25 accepted traditional open TLIF. The operation time, X-ray radiation exposure time, perioperative bleeding, drainage volume, time of hospitalization, time for pain relief, time for ambulatory recovery, visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI) and complications were compared. T test and χ(2) were used to analyze data. Results: There were no significant difference in gender, age, numbers, degrees, pre-operative VAS and ODI in spondylolisthesis (all P >0.05). Compared with traditional open TLIF group, the robot-assisted minimally invasive TLIF group had less perioperative bleeding ((187.5±18.4) ml vs . (332.1±23.5) ml), less drainage volume ((103.1±15.6) ml vs . (261.3±19.8) ml), shorter hospitalization ((7.8±1.9) days vs . (10.0±1.6) days), shorter time for pain relief ((2.8±1.0) days vs . (5.2±1.1) days), shorter time for ambulatory recovery ((1.7±0.9) days vs . (2.9±1.3) days) and less VAS of the third day postoperatively (2.2±0.9 vs . 4.2±2.4) ( t =2.762-16.738, all P <0.05), but need more operation time ((151.3±12.3) minutes vs . (102.2±7.1) minutes) and more X-ray radiation exposure ((26.1±3.3) seconds vs . (5.5±2.1) seconds) ( t =6.125, 15.168, both P <0.01). In both groups ODI was significantly lower in final follow-up than that of the pre-operation ( t =12.215, 14.036, P <0.01). Intervertebral disc height of the final follow-up in both groups were significantly larger than that of the preoperation (robot-assisted minimally invasive TLIF group: (11

  8. Creating opportunities for science PhDs to pursue careers in high school education.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Kari M H; Vale, Ronald D

    2013-11-01

    The United States is confronting important challenges at both the early and late stages of science education. At the level of K-12 education, a recent National Research Council report (Successful K-12 STEM Education) proposed a bold restructuring of how science is taught, moving away from memorizing facts and emphasizing hands-on, inquiry-based learning and a deeper understanding of the process of science. At higher levels of training, limited funding for science is leading PhDs to seek training and careers in areas other than research. Might science PhDs play a bigger role in the future of K-12 education, particularly at the high school level? We explore this question by discussing the roles that PhDs can play in high school education and the current and rather extensive barriers to PhDs entering the teaching profession and finally suggest ways to ease the entrance of qualified PhDs into high school education.

  9. Evaluation of a new automated enzyme fluoroimmunoassay using recombinant plasmid dsDNA for the detection of anti-dsDNA antibodies in SLE.

    PubMed

    Villalta, D; Bizzaro, N; Corazza, D; Tozzoli, R; Tonutti, E

    2002-01-01

    ELISA methods to detect anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies are highly sensitive, but are less specific for the diagnosis of SLE than the immunofluorescence test on Crithidia luciliae (CLIFT) and the Farr assay because they also detect low-avidity antibodies. This study evaluated the specificity, sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of a new automated fluoroimmunoassay (EliA dsDNA; Pharmacia, Freiburg, Germany). We compared the results with those obtained using a commercial CLIFT and an in-house anti-dsDNA IgG ELISA method, and verified its putative ability to detect only high-avidity anti-dsDNA antibodies. Sera from 100 SLE patients and 120 controls were studied. The control group included 20 healthy donors, 70 patients with other rheumatic diseases (32 systemic sclerosis (SSc); 18 primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS), 20 rheumatoid arthritis (RA)), and 30 patients with various infectious diseases (ID). Anti-dsDNA avidity was estimated using an ELISA method based upon the law of mass action, and a simplified Scatchard plot analysis for data elaboration; the apparent affinity constant (Kaa) was calculated and expressed as arbitrary units (L/U). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for SLE were 64%, 95.8%, 93.8% and 72.7%, respectively, for the EliA anti-dsDNA assay; 55%, 99.2%, 98.5%, and 68.8%, respectively, for the CLIFT; and 64%, 93.3%, 90.6%, and 72.3%, respectively, for the in-house ELISA. Although EliA anti-dsDNA was positive mainly in SLE patients with high- (Kaa>80 L/U) and intermediate- (Kaa 30-80 L/U) avidity antibodies (45.3% and 49.9%, respectively), it was also positive in five (7.8%) SLE patients with low-avidity anti-dsDNA antibodies, and five controls (three SSc, one pSS, and one ID) (mean Kaa = 16.4 +/- 9.04 L/U). In conclusion, EliA anti-dsDNA assay showed a higher sensitivity than the CLIFT, and a good specificity and PPV for SLE. Its putative ability to detect only high-avidity anti-ds

  10. Diversity of citrus tristeza virus isolates indicated by dsRNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Dodds, J A; Jordan, R L; Roistacher, C N; Jarupat, T

    1987-01-01

    One major dsRNA of molecular weight (MW) 13.3 X 10(6) and two others (MW 1.9 X 10(6) and 0.8 X 10(6] were routinely detected by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in extracts from sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) or citron (Citrus medica) infected with each of 66 isolates of citrus tristeza virus (CTV). Several additional dsRNA were also commonly detected, usually as weakly stained bands in reproducible positions in gels, but some were very prominent, e.g., a dsRNA of MW 1.7 X 10(6) associated with a seedling yellows isolate (sy-1). No dsRNA was detected in equivalent extracts from noninoculated sweet orange and citron. End-labeled [32P] probes were made from purified full-length viral RNA or polyacrylamide gel-purified full-length dsRNA of a nonseedling yellows (nsy-1) and a seedling yellows (sy-1) isolate of CTV. Each of the four probes was able to hybridize to all major and most minor dsRNAs of both isolates in composite polyacrylamide/agrarose gels, including the 1.7 X 10(6) dsRNA specific to the seedling yellows isolate, and could readily detect CTV nucleic acid sequences in extracts from bark of infected sweet orange plants spotted onto nitrocellulose membranes. One dsRNA (MW 0.5 X 10(6] was very prominent in some isolates and much less so, or undetectable, in other isolates and 66 isolates have been screened for the presence of this dsRNA. There was a strong correlation between inability to detect the 0.5 X 10(6) dsRNA and the designation of an isolate as neither a seedling yellows type nor a stem pitting isolate of grapefruit; these properties were typical for isolates of CTV from southern California.

  11. DS — Software for analyzing data collected using double sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bart, Jonathan; Hartley, Dana

    2011-01-01

    DS analyzes count data to estimate density or relative density and population size when appropriate. The software is available at http://iwcbm.dev4.fsr.com/IWCBM/default.asp?PageID=126. The software was designed to analyze data collected using double sampling, but it also can be used to analyze index data. DS is not currently configured to apply distance methods or methods based on capture-recapture theory. Double sampling for the purpose of this report means surveying a sample of locations with a rapid method of unknown accuracy and surveying a subset of these locations using a more intensive method assumed to yield unbiased estimates. "Detection ratios" are calculated as the ratio of results from rapid surveys on intensive plots to the number actually present as determined from the intensive surveys. The detection ratios are used to adjust results from the rapid surveys. The formula for density is (results from rapid survey)/(estimated detection ratio from intensive surveys). Population sizes are estimated as (density)(area). Double sampling is well-established in the survey sampling literature—see Cochran (1977) for the basic theory, Smith (1995) for applications of double sampling in waterfowl surveys, Bart and Earnst (2002, 2005) for discussions of its use in wildlife studies, and Bart and others (in press) for a detailed account of how the method was used to survey shorebirds across the arctic region of North America. Indices are surveys that do not involve complete counts of well-defined plots or recording information to estimate detection rates (Thompson and others, 1998). In most cases, such data should not be used to estimate density or population size but, under some circumstances, may be used to compare two densities or estimate how density changes through time or across space (Williams and others, 2005). The Breeding Bird Survey (Sauer and others, 2008) provides a good example of an index survey. Surveyors record all birds detected but do not record

  12. Long-term Outcomes of Mitral Valve Repair Versus Replacement for Degenerative Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    McNeely, Christian A; Vassileva, Christina M

    2015-01-01

    The short-term advantage of mitral valve repair versus replacement for degenerative disease has been extensively documented. These advantages include lower operative mortality, improved survival, better preservation of left-ventricular function, shorter post-operative hospital stay, lower total costs, and fewer valve-related complications, including thromboembolism, anticoagulation-related bleeding events and late prosthetic dysfunction. More recent written data are available indicating the long-term advantage of repair versus replacement. While at some institutions, the repair rate for degenerative disease may exceed 90%, the national average in 2007 was only 69%. Making direct comparisons between mitral valve repair and replacement using the available studies does present some challenges however, as there are often differences in baseline characteristics between patient groups as well as other dissimilarities between studies. The purpose of this review is to systematically summarize the long-term survival and reoperation data of mitral valve repair versus replacement for degenerative disease. A PubMed search was done and resulted in 12 studies that met our study criteria for comparing mitral valve repair versus replacement for degenerative disease. A systematic review was then conducted abstracting survival and reoperation data. PMID:25158683

  13. Dietary Phytochemicals: Natural Swords Combating Inflammation and Oxidation-Mediated Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cumulatively, degenerative disease is one of the most fatal groups of diseases, and it contributes to the mortality and poor quality of life in the world while increasing the economic burden of the sufferers. Oxidative stress and inflammation are the major pathogenic causes of degenerative diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), diabetes mellitus (DM), and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although a number of synthetic medications are used to treat these diseases, none of the current regimens are completely safe. Phytochemicals (polyphenols, carotenoids, anthocyanins, alkaloids, glycosides, saponins, and terpenes) from natural products such as dietary fruits, vegetables, and spices are potential sources of alternative medications to attenuate the oxidative stress and inflammation associated with degenerative diseases. Based on in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials, some of these active compounds have shown good promise for development into novel agents for treating RA, DM, and CVD by targeting oxidative stress and inflammation. In this review, phytochemicals from natural products with the potential of ameliorating degenerative disease involving the bone, metabolism, and the heart are described. PMID:27721914

  14. Prevalence of Late Functional Tricuspid Regurgitation in Degenerative Mitral Regurgitation Surgery.

    PubMed

    Vaturi, Mordehay; Kotler, Tali; Shapira, Yaron; Weisenberg, Daniel; Monakier, Daniel; Sagie, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Although significant late tricuspid regurgitation (TR) may develop after surgery for degenerative mitral regurgitation (MR), the use of routine tricuspid annuloplasty is debatable. The study aim was to determine the prevalence and predictors of significant late TR after surgery for degenerative MR. A total of 112 patients who had undergone surgery for degenerative MR without concomitant tricuspid valve repair (average follow up 7.7 ± 4.0 years) was studied retrospectively. The prevalence of post-surgical TR and predictors of progression were determined. The majority of patients (97%) had non-significant TR (less than moderate) prior to surgery, although an overall trend of progression towards significant TR (grades 2 or 3) was noted in 17 patients (p = 0.0006). Of the 18 patients (16%) with late postoperative significant TR, only nine (8%) had severe TR with only a single referral to surgery. New-onset post-surgical atrial fibrillation was more common in patients who developed late significant TR (p = 0.002). Multivariate analysis of the pre-surgery variables, age >65 years and left ventricular dysfunction were shown to be independent predictors of late functional TR. Significant progression in TR after surgery for degenerative MR was rare in this patient cohort. The impact of older age and left ventricular dysfunction at the time of surgery showed a strong association with post-surgical atrial fibrillation.

  15. Degenerative joint disease: multiple joint involvement in young and mature dogs.

    PubMed

    Olsewski, J M; Lust, G; Rendano, V T; Summers, B A

    1983-07-01

    Radiologic, pathologic, and ancillary methods were used to determine the occurrence of degenerative joint disease involving multiple joints of immature and adult dogs. Animals were selected for the development of hip joint dysplasia and chronic degenerative joint disease. Of disease-prone dogs, 82% (45 of 55 dogs) had radiologic changes, indicative of hip dysplasia, by 1 year of age. At necropsy, more abnormal joints were identified than by radiographic examination. Among 92 dogs between 3 to 11 months of age that had joint abnormalities, 71% had hip joint involvement; 38%, shoulder joint involvement; 22%, stifle joint involvement; and 40% had multiple joint involvement. Polyarthritis was asymptomatic and unexpected. Radiographic examination of older dogs also revealed evidence of degenerative joint disease in many joints. Multiple joint involvement was substantiated at necropsy of young and mature dogs. A similar pattern of polyarticular osteoarthritis was revealed in a survey (computer search) of necropsy reports from medical case records of 100 adult and elderly dogs. Usually, the joint disease was an incidental observation, unrelated to the clinical disease or to the cause of death. The frequent occurrence of degenerative changes in several joints of dogs aged 6 months to 17 years indicated that osteoarthritis may be progressive in these joints and raises the possibility that systemic factors are involved in the disease process.

  16. Dietary Phytochemicals: Natural Swords Combating Inflammation and Oxidation-Mediated Degenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Asiful; Alam, Fahmida; Solayman, Md; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cumulatively, degenerative disease is one of the most fatal groups of diseases, and it contributes to the mortality and poor quality of life in the world while increasing the economic burden of the sufferers. Oxidative stress and inflammation are the major pathogenic causes of degenerative diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), diabetes mellitus (DM), and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although a number of synthetic medications are used to treat these diseases, none of the current regimens are completely safe. Phytochemicals (polyphenols, carotenoids, anthocyanins, alkaloids, glycosides, saponins, and terpenes) from natural products such as dietary fruits, vegetables, and spices are potential sources of alternative medications to attenuate the oxidative stress and inflammation associated with degenerative diseases. Based on in vitro , in vivo , and clinical trials, some of these active compounds have shown good promise for development into novel agents for treating RA, DM, and CVD by targeting oxidative stress and inflammation. In this review, phytochemicals from natural products with the potential of ameliorating degenerative disease involving the bone, metabolism, and the heart are described.

  17. Motor Training in Degenerative Spinocerebellar Disease: Ataxia-Specific Improvements by Intensive Physiotherapy and Exergames

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is essentially involved in movement control and plays a critical role in motor learning. It has remained controversial whether patients with degenerative cerebellar disease benefit from high-intensity coordinative training. Moreover, it remains unclear by which training methods and mechanisms these patients might improve their motor performance. Here, we review evidence from different high-intensity training studies in patients with degenerative spinocerebellar disease. These studies demonstrate that high-intensity coordinative training might lead to a significant benefit in patients with degenerative ataxia. This training might be based either on physiotherapy or on whole-body controlled videogames (“exergames”). The benefit shown in these studies is equal to regaining one or more years of natural disease progression. In addition, first case studies indicate that even subjects with advanced neurodegeneration might benefit from such training programs. For both types of training, the observed clinical improvements are paralleled by recoveries in ataxia-specific dysfunctions (e.g., multijoint coordination and dynamic stability). Importantly, for both types of training, the retention of the effects seems to depend on the frequency and continuity of training. Based on these studies, we here present preliminary recommendations for clinical practice, and articulate open questions that might guide future studies on neurorehabilitation in degenerative spinocerebellar disease. PMID:24877117

  18. Evaluation of degenerative changes in articular cartilage of osteoarthritis by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Yusuke; Ishimaru, Yasumitsu; Kiyomatsu, Hiroshi; Hino, Kazunori; Miura, Hiromasa

    2018-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a very common joint disease in the aging population. Main symptom of OA is accompanied by degenerative changes of articular cartilage. Cartilage contains mostly type II collagen and proteoglycans, so it is difficult to access the quality and morphology of cartilage tissue in situ by conventional diagnostic tools (X-ray, MRI and echography) directly or indirectly. Raman spectroscopy is a label-free technique which enables to analyze molecular composition in degenerative cartilage. In this proposal, we aim to develop Raman spectroscopic system for the quality assessment of articular cartilage during arthroscopic surgery. Toward this goal, we are focusing on the proteoglycan content and collagen fiber alignment in cartilage matrix which may be associated with degenerative changes in OA, and we designed an original Raman device for remote sensing during arthroscopic surgery. In this project, we define the grading system for cartilage defect based on Raman spectroscopy, and we complete the evaluation of the Raman probing system which makes it possible to detect early stage of degenerative cartilage as a novel tool for OA diagnosis using human subject.

  19. First sternocostal degenerative arthritis with intrarticular fluid collection. A case report.

    PubMed

    Chalazonitis, Athanasios N; Condilis, Nicolas; Tilentzoglou, Anastasia C; Pontikis, John; Tzovara, Joannie

    2006-01-01

    A rare case with clinical condition of first sternocostal degenerative arthritis with intra-articular fluid collection that developed after long-lasting intense exercise (weight-lifting) for twenty years is reported. Imaging findings and differential diagnoses of the case are presented.

  20. Teaching Early Braille Literacy Skills within a Stimulus Equivalence Paradigm to Children with Degenerative Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toussaint, Karen A.; Tiger, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the need for braille literacy, there has been little attempt to systematically evaluate braille-instruction programs. The current study evaluated an instructive procedure for teaching early braille-reading skills with 4 school-aged children with degenerative visual impairments. Following a series of pretests, braille instruction involved…

  1. Short-term results of physiotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed degenerative cervical spine disease.

    PubMed

    Hey, H W; Lau, P H; Hee, H T

    2012-03-01

    Degenerative cervical spine diseases are common, and physiotherapy is widely used as an initial form of treatment. We aimed to analyse the effects of the initial sessions of physiotherapy for patients who were newly diagnosed with degenerative cervical spine disorders. A prospective series of 30 patients with newly diagnosed degenerative cervical spine disease were referred to our department and followed up for the initial two sessions of physiotherapy. The patients were assessed after each session. Outcome parameters studied included pain using a visual analogue scale (VAS), neck range of movements and activities of daily living (ADL). Our study subjects comprised mainly females (60%) in their fifties (46.7%) who worked as clerks or secretaries (53.3%). There was an improvement in the patients' pain score (VAS) from a median of 8 to 4 after two visits to the physiotherapists. Slight improvement in the neck range of movements was also observed. Marked improvement was seen in ADL, especially in the ability to carry heavy objects. Physiotherapy is an effective initial option for patients with newly presented degenerative cervical spine disease. The results of this study can be used to advise patients on the short-term benefits of physiotherapy.

  2. Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: A Spectrum of Related Disorders Affecting the Aging Spine.

    PubMed

    Tetreault, Lindsay; Goldstein, Christina L; Arnold, Paul; Harrop, James; Hilibrand, Alan; Nouri, Aria; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Cervical spinal cord dysfunction can result from either traumatic or nontraumatic causes, including tumors, infections, and degenerative changes. In this article, we review the range of degenerative spinal disorders resulting in progressive cervical spinal cord compression and propose the adoption of a new term, degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). DCM comprises both osteoarthritic changes to the spine, including spondylosis, disk herniation, and facet arthropathy (collectively referred to as cervical spondylotic myelopathy), and ligamentous aberrations such as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum. This review summarizes current knowledge of the pathophysiology of DCM and describes the cascade of events that occur after compression of the spinal cord, including ischemia, destruction of the blood-spinal cord barrier, demyelination, and neuronal apoptosis. Important features of the diagnosis of DCM are discussed in detail, and relevant clinical and imaging findings are highlighted. Furthermore, this review outlines valuable assessment tools for evaluating functional status and quality of life in these patients and summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of each. Other topics of this review include epidemiology, the prevalence of degenerative changes in the asymptomatic population, the natural history and rates of progression, risk factors of diagnosis (clinical, imaging and genetic), and management strategies.

  3. Plasma and tissue oxidative stress index in patients with rheumatic and degenerative heart valve disease.

    PubMed

    Rabus, Murat; Demirbağ, Recep; Sezen, Yusuf; Konukoğlu, Oğuz; Yildiz, Ali; Erel, Ozcan; Zeybek, Rahmi; Yakut, Cevat

    2008-12-01

    We investigated whether patients with rheumatic and degenerative heart valve disease (HVD) differed with regard to plasma and tissue oxidative stress index (OSI). The study included 56 patients who underwent valve replacement due to rheumatic (n=32; 15 males; mean age 47+/-10 years) and degenerative (n=24; 13 males; mean age 55+/-12 years) HVD. Plasma and tissue total oxidative status (TOS) and total antioxidative capacity (TAC) levels were measured and OSI was calculated. Patients with degenerative HVD had significantly higher age, increased interventricular septum thickness, and higher frequency of aortic stenosis, whereas the incidence of mitral stenosis was higher in patients with rheumatic HVD (p<0.05). Plasma oxidative characteristics did not differ between the two HVD groups (p>0.05). Tissue TAC was significantly lower in patients with rheumatic HVD (p=0.027), whereas tissue TOS and OSI were similar between the two HVD groups (p>0.05). In bivariate analysis, plasma OSI did not show any correlation with clinical, laboratory, and echocardiographic variables (p>0.05). Our data show that plasma and tissue OSI levels are similar in patients with rheumatic and degenerative HVD.

  4. Chronic In Vivo Load Alteration Induces Degenerative Changes in the Rat Tibiofemoral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Roemhildt, M. L.; Beynnon, B. D.; Gauthier, A. E.; Gardner-Morse, M.; Ertem, F.; Badger, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We investigated the relationship between the magnitude and duration of sustained compressive load alteration and the development of degenerative changes in the rat tibiofemoral joint. Methods A varus loading device was attached to the left hind limb of mature rats to apply increased compression to the medial compartment and decreased compression to the lateral compartment of the tibiofemoral joint of either 0% or 100% body weight for 0, 6 or 20 weeks. Compartment-specific assessment of the tibial plateaus included biomechanical measures (articular cartilage aggregate modulus, permeability and Poisson’s ratio, and subchondral bone modulus) and histological assessments (articular cartilage, calcified cartilage, and subchondral bone thicknesses, degenerative scoring parameters, and articular cartilage cellularity). Results Increased compression in the medial compartment produced significant degenerative changes consistent with the development of osteoarthritis including a progressive decrease in cartilage aggregate modulus (43% and 77% at 6 and 20 weeks), diminished cellularity (38% and 51% at 6 and 20 weeks), and increased histological degeneration. At 20 weeks, medial compartment articular cartilage thickness deceased 30% while subchondral bone thickness increased 32% and subchondral bone modulus increased 99%. Decreased compression in the lateral compartment increased calcified cartilage thickness, diminished region-specific subchondral bone thickness and revealed trends for reduced cellularity and decreased articular cartilage thickness at 20 weeks. Conclusions Altered chronic joint loading produced degenerative changes consistent with those observed clinically with the development of osteoarthritis and may replicate the slow development of non-traumatic osteoarthritis in which mechanical loads play a primary etiological role. PMID:23123358

  5. Differential Genetic Associations for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Based on Anti–dsDNA Autoantibody Production

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sharon A.; Taylor, Kimberly E.; Graham, Robert R.; Nititham, Joanne; Lee, Annette T.; Ortmann, Ward A.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Tsao, Betty P.; Harley, John B.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Moser, Kathy L.; Petri, Michelle; Demirci, F. Yesim; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Manzi, Susan; Gregersen, Peter K.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Criswell, Lindsey A.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a clinically heterogeneous, systemic autoimmune disease characterized by autoantibody formation. Previously published genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have investigated SLE as a single phenotype. Therefore, we conducted a GWAS to identify genetic factors associated with anti–dsDNA autoantibody production, a SLE–related autoantibody with diagnostic and clinical importance. Using two independent datasets, over 400,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were studied in a total of 1,717 SLE cases and 4,813 healthy controls. Anti–dsDNA autoantibody positive (anti–dsDNA +, n = 811) and anti–dsDNA autoantibody negative (anti–dsDNA –, n = 906) SLE cases were compared to healthy controls and to each other to identify SNPs associated specifically with these SLE subtypes. SNPs in the previously identified SLE susceptibility loci STAT4, IRF5, ITGAM, and the major histocompatibility complex were strongly associated with anti–dsDNA + SLE. Far fewer and weaker associations were observed for anti–dsDNA – SLE. For example, rs7574865 in STAT4 had an OR for anti–dsDNA + SLE of 1.77 (95% CI 1.57–1.99, p = 2.0E-20) compared to an OR for anti–dsDNA – SLE of 1.26 (95% CI 1.12–1.41, p = 2.4E-04), with pheterogeneity<0.0005. SNPs in the SLE susceptibility loci BANK1, KIAA1542, and UBE2L3 showed evidence of association with anti–dsDNA + SLE and were not associated with anti–dsDNA – SLE. In conclusion, we identified differential genetic associations with SLE based on anti–dsDNA autoantibody production. Many previously identified SLE susceptibility loci may confer disease risk through their role in autoantibody production and be more accurately described as autoantibody propensity loci. Lack of strong SNP associations may suggest that other types of genetic variation or non-genetic factors such as environmental exposures have a greater impact on susceptibility to anti–dsDNA – SLE. PMID

  6. Do the disc degeneration and osteophyte contribute to the curve rigidity of degenerative scoliosis?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Bao, Hongda; Yan, Peng; Liu, Shunan; Bao, Mike; Zhu, Zezhang; Liu, Zhen; Qiu, Yong

    2017-03-29

    The factors associated with lateral curve flexibility in degenerative scoliosis have not been well documented. Disc degeneration could result in significant change in stiffness and range of motion in lateral bending films. The osteophytes could be commonly observed in degenerative spine but the relationship between osteophyte formation and curve flexibility remains controversial. The aim of the current study is to clarify if the disc degeneration and osteophyte formation were both associated with curve flexibility of degenerative scoliosis. A total of 85 patients were retrospectively analyzed. The inclusion criteria were as follow: age greater than 45 years, diagnosed as degenerative scoliosis and coronal Cobb angle greater than 20°. Curve flexibility was calculated based on Cobb angle, and range of motion (ROM) was based on disc angle evaluation. Regional disc degeneration score (RDS) was obtained according to Pfirrmann classification and osteophyte formation score (OFS) was based on Nanthan classification. Spearman correlation was performed to analyze the relationship between curve flexibility and RDS as well as OFS. Moderate correlation was found between RDS and curve flexibility with a Spearman coefficient of -0.487 (P = 0.009). Similarly, moderate correlation was observed between curve flexibility and OFS with a Spearman coefficient of -0.429 (P = 0.012). Strong correlation was found between apical ROM and OFS compared to the relationship between curve flexibility and OFS with a Spearman coefficient of -0.627 (P < 0.001). Both disc degeneration and osteophytes formation correlated with curve rigidity. The pre-operative evaluation of both features may aid in the surgical decision-making in degenerative scoliosis patients.

  7. Lumbar scoliosis associated with spinal stenosis in idiopathic and degenerative cases.

    PubMed

    Le Huec, J C; Cogniet, A; Mazas, S; Faundez, A

    2016-10-01

    Degenerative de novo scoliosis is commonly present in older adult patients. The degenerative process including disc bulging, facet arthritis, and ligamentum flavum hypertrophy contributes to the appearance of symptoms of spinal stenosis. Idiopathic scoliosis has also degenerative changes that can lead to spinal stenosis. The aetiology, prevalence, biomechanics, classification, symptomatology, and treatment of idiopathic and degenerative lumbar scoliosis in association with spinal stenosis are reviewed. Review study is based on a review of pertinent but non-exhaustive literature of the last 20 years in PubMed in English language. Retrospective analysis of studies focused on all parameters concerning scoliosis associated with stenosis. Very few publications have focused specifically on idiopathic scoliosis and stenosis, and this was before the advent of modern segmental instrumentation. On the other hand, many papers were found for degenerative scoliosis and stenosis with treatment methods based on aetiology of spinal canal stenosis and analysis of global sagittal and frontal parameters. Satisfactory clinical results after operative treatment range from 83 to 96 % but with increased percentage of complications. Recent literature analysed the importance of stabilizing or not the spine after decompression in such situation knowing the increasing risk of instability after facet resection. No prospective randomized studies were found to support short instrumentation. Long instrumentation and fusion to prevent distabilization after decompression were always associated with higher complication rates. Imbalance patients with unsatisfactory compensation capacities were at risk of complications. Operative treatment using newly proposed classification system of lumbar scoliosis with associated canal stenosis is useful. Sagittal balance and rotatory dislocation are the main parameters to analyse to determine the length of fusion.

  8. On the D*s and charmonia leptonic decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailas, Gabriela; Blossier, Benoît; Heitger, Jochen; Morénas, Vincent; Post, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    Among the different scenarios of New Physics, those with an extended Higgs sector are examined with a lot of attention. Recent experimental observations of several anomalies in flavour physics with respect to expectations of the Standard Model further motivate the effort of phenomenologists. First, informations about the RDs ratio, a test of lepton flavour universality equivalent to RD, already measured, but with the s quark as spectator, are awaited in coming years to constrain the corner of an extended Higgs sector with charged doublets. On another side, leptonic widths of pseudoscalar quarkonia are particularly interesting to test an extended Higgs sector with a light CP-odd Higgs boson singlet, through the study of its mixing with quarkonia states. Hadronic parameters entering those processes have to be determined from lattice QCD with enough confidence on the control of systematic errors. We report on the very first step of a long-term program tackled with Nf = 2 Wilson-Clover fermions to put relevant constraints on extensions of the Higgs sector: extraction of decay constants of D*s, ƞc, ƞc (2S), J/Ψ and Ψ(2S) with lattice ensembles provided by the CLS effort, considering 2 lattice spacings and a large range of pion masses to estimate cut-off effects and extrapolate results to the chiral limit.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: KiDS-ESO-DR3 multi-band source catalog (de Jong+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, J. T. A.; Verdoes Kleijn, G. A.; Erben, T.; Hildebrandt, H.; Kuijken, K.; Sikkema, G.; Brescia, M.; Bilicki, M.; Napolitano, N. R.; Amaro, V.; Begeman, K. G.; Boxhoorn, D. R.; Buddelmeijer, H.; Cavuoti, S.; Getman, F.; Grado, A.; Helmich, E.; Huang, Z.; Irisarri, N.; La Barbera, F.; Longo, G.; McFarland, J. P.; Nakajima, R.; Paolillo, M.; Puddu, E.; Radovich, M.; Rifatto, A.; Tortora, C; Valentijn, E. A.; Vellucci, C.; Vriend, W-J.; Amon, A.; Blake, C.; Choi, A.; Fenech, Conti I.; Herbonnet, R.; Heymans, C.; Hoekstra, H.; Klaes, D.; Merten, J.; Miller, L.; Schneider, P.; Viola, M.

    2017-04-01

    KiDS-ESO-DR3 contains a multi-band source catalogue encompassing all publicly released tiles, a total of 440 survey tiles including the coadded images, weight maps, masks and source lists of 292 survey tiles of KiDS-ESO-DR3, adding to the 148 tiles released previously (50 in KiDS-ESO-DR1 and 98 in KiDS-ESO-DR2). (1 data file).

  10. Measurement of the mass and width of the Ds1(2536)+ meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Buenger, C.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Santoro, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Sun, S.; Suzuki, K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Chen, X. R.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Guttman, N.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lindsay, C.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2011-04-01

    The decay width and mass of the Ds1(2536)+ meson are measured via the decay channel Ds1+→D*+KS0 using 385fb-1 of data recorded with the BABAR detector in the vicinity of the Υ(4S) resonance at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy electron-positron collider. The result for the decay width is Γ(Ds1+)=0.92±0.03(stat.)±0.04(syst.)MeV. For the mass, a value of m(Ds1+)=2535.08±0.01(stat.)±0.15(syst.)MeV/c2 is obtained. The mass difference between the Ds1+ and the D*+ is measured to be m(Ds1+)-m(D*+)=524.83±0.01(stat.)±0.04(syst.)MeV/c2, representing a significant improvement compared to the current world average. The unnatural spin-parity assignment for the Ds1+ meson is confirmed.

  11. A novel pathway to detect and cope with exogenous dsDNA.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shouhei; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2015-01-01

    How a living cell responds to exogenous materials is one of the fundamental questions in the life sciences. In particular, understanding the mechanisms by which a cell recognizes exogenous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is important for immunology research because it will facilitate the control of pathogen infections that entail the presence of exogenous dsDNA in the cytoplasm of host cells. Several cytosolic dsDNA sensor proteins that trigger innate immune responses have been identified and the downstream signaling pathways have been investigated. However, the events that occur at the site of exogenous dsDNA when it is exposed to the cytosol of the host cell remain unknown. Using dsDNA-coated polystyrene beads incorporated into living cells, we recently found that barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) binds to the exogenous dsDNA immediately after its appearance in the cytosol and plays a role in DNA avoidance of autophagy. Our findings reveal a novel pathway in which BAF plays a key role in the detection of and response to exogenous dsDNA.

  12. Structural basis for dsRNA recognition and interferon antagonism by Ebola VP35

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Daisy W.; Prins, Kathleen C.; Borek, Dominika M.

    2010-03-12

    Ebola viral protein 35 (VP35), encoded by the highly pathogenic Ebola virus, facilitates host immune evasion by antagonizing antiviral signaling pathways, including those initiated by RIG-I-like receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain (IID) bound to short double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which together with in vivo results reveals how VP35-dsRNA interactions contribute to immune evasion. Conserved basic residues in VP35 IID recognize the dsRNA backbone, whereas the dsRNA blunt ends are 'end-capped' by a pocket of hydrophobic residues that mimic RIG-I-like receptor recognition of blunt-end dsRNA. Residues critical for RNA binding are also importantmore » for interferon inhibition in vivo but not for viral polymerase cofactor function of VP35. These results suggest that simultaneous recognition of dsRNA backbone and blunt ends provides a mechanism by which Ebola VP35 antagonizes host dsRNA sensors and immune responses.« less

  13. Anti-dsDNA Antibodies Bind to Mesangial Annexin II in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Susan; Cheung, Kwok Fan; Zhang, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Production of anti-dsDNA antibodies is a hallmark of lupus nephritis, but how these antibodies deposit in organs and elicit inflammatory damage remains unknown. In this study, we sought to identify antigens on the surface of human mesangial cells (HMC) that mediate the binding of human anti-dsDNA antibodies and the subsequent pathogenic processes. We isolated anti-dsDNA antibodies from patients with lupus nephritis by affinity chromatography. We used multiple methods to identify and characterize antigens from the plasma membrane fraction of mesangial cells that crossreacted with the anti-dsDNA antibodies. We found that annexin II mediated the binding of anti-dsDNA antibodies to HMC. After binding to the mesangial cell surface, anti-dsDNA antibodies were internalized into the cytoplasm and nucleus. This also led to induction of IL-6 secretion and annexin II synthesis, mediated through activation of p38 MAPK, JNK, and AKT. Binding of anti-dsDNA antibodies to annexin II correlated with disease activity in human lupus nephritis. Glomerular expression of annexin II correlated with the severity of nephritis, and annexin II colocalized with IgG and C3 deposits in both human and murine lupus nephritis. Gene silencing of annexin II in HMC reduced binding of anti-dsDNA antibody and partially decreased IL-6 secretion. In summary, our data demonstrate that annexin II mediates the binding of anti-dsDNA antibodies to mesangial cells, contributing to the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. This interaction provides a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:20847146

  14. New materials for high temperature turbines; ONERA's DS composites confronted with blade problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibring, H.

    1977-01-01

    ONERA's refractory DS composites were cited as materials required for use in advanced aircraft turbines, operating at high temperatures. These materials were found to be reliable in the construction of turbine blades. Requirements for a blade material in aircraft turbines operating at higher temperatures were compared with the actual performance as found in COTAC DS composite testing. The structure and properties of the more fully developed 74 and 741 types were specified. High temperature structural stability, impact of thermal and mechanical fatigue, oxidation resistance and coating capability were thoroughly evaluated. The problem of cooling passages in DS eutectic blades is also outlined.

  15. [COMPARISON OF EFFECTIVENESS AND CHANGE OF SAGITTAL SPINO-PELVIC PARAMETERS BETWEEN MINIMALLY INVASIVE TRANSFORAMINAL AND CONVENTIONAL OPEN POSTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSIONS IN TREATMENT OF LOW-DEGREE ISTHMIC LUMBAR SPONDYLOLISTHESIS].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin; Zeng, Rong; Li, Guangsheng; Wei, Bo; Hu, Zibing; Lin, Hao; Chen, Guanghua; Chen, Siyuan; Sun, Jiecong

    2015-12-01

    To compare the effectiveness and changes of sagittal spino-pelvic parameters between minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and conventional open posterior lumbar interbody fusion in treatment of the low-degree isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis. Between May 2012 and May 2013, 86 patients with single segmental isthmic lumbar spondylolisthesis (Meyerding degree I or II) were treated by minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (minimally invasive group) in 39 cases, and by open posterior lumbar interbody fusion in 47 cases (open group). There was no significant difference in gender, age, disease duration, degree of lumbar spondylolisthesis, preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) score, and Oswestry disability index (ODI) between 2 groups (P>0.05). The following sagittal spino-pelvic parameters were compared between 2 groups before and after operation: the percentage of slipping (PS), intervertebral height, angle of slip (AS), thoracolumbar junction (TLJ), thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), sagittal vertical axis (SVA), spino-sacral angle (SSA), sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT), and pelvic incidence (PI). Pearson correlation analysis of the changes between pre- and post-operation was done. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients of 2 groups. The postoperative hospital stay of minimally invasive group [(5.1 ± 1.6) days] was significantly shorter than that of open group [(7.2 ± 2.1) days] (t = 2.593, P = 0.017). The patients were followed up 11-20 months (mean, 15 months). The reduction rate was 68.53% ± 20.52% in minimally invasive group, and was 64.21% ± 30.21% in open group, showing no significant difference (t = 0.725, P = 0.093). The back and leg pain VAS scores, and ODI at 3 months after operation were significantly reduced when compared with preoperative ones (P < 0.05), but no significant difference was found between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The postoperative other sagittal spino

  16. Helical Structure Determines Different Susceptibilities of dsDNA, dsRNA, and tsDNA to Counterion-Induced Condensation

    PubMed Central

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Leikin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies of counterion-induced condensation of nucleic acid helices into aggregates produced several puzzling observations. For instance, trivalent cobalt hexamine ions condensed double-stranded (ds) DNA oligomers but not their more highly charged dsRNA counterparts. Divalent alkaline earth metal ions condensed triple-stranded (ts) DNA oligomers but not dsDNA. Here we show that these counterintuitive experimental results can be rationalized within the electrostatic zipper model of interactions between molecules with helical charge motifs. We report statistical mechanical calculations that reveal dramatic and nontrivial interplay between the effects of helical structure and thermal fluctuations on electrostatic interaction between oligomeric nucleic acids. Combining predictions for oligomeric and much longer helices, we also interpret recent experimental studies of the role of counterion charge, structure, and chemistry. We argue that an electrostatic zipper attraction might be a major or even dominant force in nucleic acid condensation. PMID:23663846

  17. Bilateral versus unilateral interlaminar approach for bilateral decompression in patients with single-level degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: a multicenter retrospective study of 175 patients on postoperative pain, functional disability, and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    den Boogert, Hugo F; Keers, Joost C; Marinus Oterdoom, D L; Kuijlen, Jos M A

    2015-09-01

    The bilateral and unilateral interlaminar techniques for bilateral decompression both demonstrate good results for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS). Although there is some discussion about which approach is more effective, studies that directly compare these two popular techniques are rare. To address this shortcoming, this study compares postoperative functional disability, pain, and patient satisfaction among patients with single-level DLSS who underwent bilateral decompression using either a bilateral or unilateral approach. This retrospective study included patients who underwent operations between November 1, 2009, and October 1, 2011. These patients underwent single-level bilateral decompressive surgery using either the bilateral or unilateral interlaminar approach at one of 5 participating hospitals. Exclusion criteria included previous lumbar surgery, additional disc surgery, and spondylolisthesis requiring fusion surgery. Primary outcome measures included bodily pain (as reported using the visual analog scale [VAS]), the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). In addition, reductions in leg and back symptoms and the patient's general evaluation of the procedure were queried. Finally, patient satisfaction and surgical parameters were evaluated. Questionnaires were sent to each patient's home, and electronic patient files were used to collect the data. One hundred and seventy-five patients returned the questionnaire (74.4% response rate; 68 and 107 patients who underwent the bilateral or unilateral approach, respectively). Mean age at surgery was 68 years (range 34-89 years), and the mean follow-up period was 14.2 months (range 3.3-27.4 years). There were no significant differences in ODI (20.3 vs 22.6 for the bilateral and unilateral approaches, respectively), RMDQ (3.99 vs 4.8, respectively), or pain scores between treatment groups. Back symptoms were reduced in 74.8% (bilateral: 74

  18. Characterization of cellulose acetates according to DS and molar mass using two-dimensional chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ghareeb, Hewa Othman; Radke, Wolfgang

    2013-11-06

    A two-dimensional liquid chromatographic method (2D LC) was developed to analyze the heterogeneities of cellulose acetates (CA) in the DS-range DS=1.5-2.9 with respect to both, molar mass and degree of substitution (DS). The method uses gradient liquid chromatography (HPLC) as the first dimension in order to separate by DS followed by separation of the different fractions by size (SEC) in the second dimension. The 2D experiments revealed different correlations between gradient and SEC elution volume. These correlations might arise from differences in the synthetic conditions. The newly developed 2D LC separation therefore provides new insights into the heterogeneity of CAs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel anti-EPHA2 antibody, DS-8895a for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Jun; Sue, Mayumi; Yamato, Michiko; Ichikawa, Junya; Ishida, Saori; Shibutani, Tomoko; Kitamura, Michiko; Wada, Teiji; Agatsuma, Toshinori

    2016-11-01

    Overexpression of EPHA2 has been observed in multiple cancers and reported to be associated with poor prognosis. Here, we produced an afucosylated humanized anti-EPHA2 monoclonal antibody (mAb), DS-8895a for cancer treatment. The antibody recognizes the extracellular juxtamembrane region of EPHA2 and therefore can bind to both full-length and truncated forms of EPHA2, which are anchored to cell membranes and recently reported to be produced by post-translational cleavage in tumors. DS-8895a exhibited markedly increased antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro and also inhibited tumor growth in EPHA2-positive human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and human gastric cancer SNU-16 xenograft mouse models. Moreover, DS-8895a in combination with cisplatin (CDDP) showed better efficacy than each of the monotherapies did in the human gastric cancer model. These results suggest that a novel antibody, DS-8895a has therapeutic potential against EPHA2-expressing tumors.

  20. A Charrelation Matrix-Based Blind Adaptive Detector for DS-CDMA Systems

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhongqiang; Zhu, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a blind adaptive detector is proposed for blind separation of user signals and blind estimation of spreading sequences in DS-CDMA systems. The blind separation scheme exploits a charrelation matrix for simple computation and effective extraction of information from observation signal samples. The system model of DS-CDMA signals is modeled as a blind separation framework. The unknown user information and spreading sequence of DS-CDMA systems can be estimated only from the sampled observation signals. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the improved performance of the proposed algorithm in comparison with the existing conventional algorithms used in DS-CDMA systems. Especially, the proposed scheme is suitable for when the number of observation samples is less and the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is low. PMID:26287209

  1. A Charrelation Matrix-Based Blind Adaptive Detector for DS-CDMA Systems.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhongqiang; Zhu, Lidong

    2015-08-14

    In this paper, a blind adaptive detector is proposed for blind separation of user signals and blind estimation of spreading sequences in DS-CDMA systems. The blind separation scheme exploits a charrelation matrix for simple computation and effective extraction of information from observation signal samples. The system model of DS-CDMA signals is modeled as a blind separation framework. The unknown user information and spreading sequence of DS-CDMA systems can be estimated only from the sampled observation signals. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the improved performance of the proposed algorithm in comparison with the existing conventional algorithms used in DS-CDMA systems. Especially, the proposed scheme is suitable for when the number of observation samples is less and the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is low.

  2. SMART-DS: Synthetic Models for Advanced, Realistic Testing: Distribution Systems and Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Palmintier, Bryan: Hodge, Bri-Mathias

    This presentation provides a Smart-DS project overview and status update for the ARPA-e GRID DATA program meeting 2017, including distribution systems, models, and scenarios, as well as opportunities for GRID DATA collaborations.

  3. Thermally driven spin-Seebeck transport in chiral dsDNA-based molecular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nian, L. L.; Zhang, Rong; Tang, F. R.; Tang, Jun; Bai, Long

    2018-03-01

    By employing the nonequilibrium Green's function technique, we study the thermal-induced spin-Seebeck transport through a chiral double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) connected to a normal-metal and a ferromagnetic lead. How the main parameters of the dsDNA-based system influence the spin-Seebeck transport is analyzed at length, and the thermally created charge (spin-related) current displays the rectification effect and the negative differential thermal conductance feature. More importantly, the spin current exhibits the rectification behavior of the spin-Seebeck effect; even the perfect spin-Seebeck effect can be obtained with the null charge current. Thus, the chiral dsDNA-based system can act as a spin(charge)-Seebeck diode, spin(charge)-Seebeck switch, and spin(charge)-Seebeck transistor. Our results provide new ways to design spin caloritronic devices based on dsDNA or other organic molecules.

  4. 75 FR 10338 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-2031, Shrimp Exporter's/Importer's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ... accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Title of Information Collection: Shrimp Exporter's..., Office of Marine Conservation (OES/OMC) Form Number: DS-2031 Respondents: Business or other for-profit...

  5. Structural insights into RISC assembly facilitated by dsRNA-binding domains of human RNA helicase A (DHX9).

    PubMed

    Fu, Qinqin; Yuan, Y Adam

    2013-03-01

    Intensive research interest has focused on small RNA-processing machinery and the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), key cellular machines in RNAi pathways. However, the structural mechanism regarding RISC assembly, the primary step linking small RNA processing and RNA-mediated gene silencing, is largely unknown. Human RNA helicase A (DHX9) was reported to function as an RISC-loading factor, and such function is mediated mainly by its dsRNA-binding domains (dsRBDs). Here, we report the crystal structures of human RNA helicase A (RHA) dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 domains in complex with dsRNAs, respectively. Structural analysis not only reveals higher siRNA duplex-binding affinity displayed by dsRBD1, but also identifies a crystallographic dsRBD1 pair of physiological significance in cooperatively recognizing dsRNAs. Structural observations are further validated by isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) assay. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assay coupled with mutagenesis demonstrated that both dsRBDs are required for RISC association, and such association is mediated by dsRNA. Hence, our structural and functional efforts have revealed a potential working model for siRNA recognition by RHA tandem dsRBDs, and together they provide direct structural insights into RISC assembly facilitated by RHA.

  6. Structural insights into RISC assembly facilitated by dsRNA-binding domains of human RNA helicase A (DHX9)

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qinqin; Yuan, Y. Adam

    2013-01-01

    Intensive research interest has focused on small RNA-processing machinery and the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), key cellular machines in RNAi pathways. However, the structural mechanism regarding RISC assembly, the primary step linking small RNA processing and RNA-mediated gene silencing, is largely unknown. Human RNA helicase A (DHX9) was reported to function as an RISC-loading factor, and such function is mediated mainly by its dsRNA-binding domains (dsRBDs). Here, we report the crystal structures of human RNA helicase A (RHA) dsRBD1 and dsRBD2 domains in complex with dsRNAs, respectively. Structural analysis not only reveals higher siRNA duplex-binding affinity displayed by dsRBD1, but also identifies a crystallographic dsRBD1 pair of physiological significance in cooperatively recognizing dsRNAs. Structural observations are further validated by isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) assay. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assay coupled with mutagenesis demonstrated that both dsRBDs are required for RISC association, and such association is mediated by dsRNA. Hence, our structural and functional efforts have revealed a potential working model for siRNA recognition by RHA tandem dsRBDs, and together they provide direct structural insights into RISC assembly facilitated by RHA. PMID:23361462

  7. Simulated Lidar Images of Human Pose using a 3DS Max Virtual Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    developed in Autodesk 3DS Max, with an animated, biofidelic 3D human mesh biped character ( avatar ) as the subject. The biped animation modifies the digital...character ( avatar ) as the subject. The biped animation modifies the digital human model through a time sequence of motion capture data representing an...AFB. Mr. Isiah Davenport from Infoscitex Corp developed the method for creating the biofidelic avatars from laboratory data and 3DS Max code for

  8. A fully organic retinal prosthesis restores vision in a rat model of degenerative blindness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maya-Vetencourt, José Fernando; Ghezzi, Diego; Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Colombo, Elisabetta; Mete, Maurizio; Feyen, Paul; Desii, Andrea; Buschiazzo, Ambra; di Paolo, Mattia; di Marco, Stefano; Ticconi, Flavia; Emionite, Laura; Shmal, Dmytro; Marini, Cecilia; Donelli, Ilaria; Freddi, Giuliano; Maccarone, Rita; Bisti, Silvia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Pertile, Grazia; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Benfenati, Fabio

    2017-06-01

    The degeneration of photoreceptors in the retina is one of the major causes of adult blindness in humans. Unfortunately, no effective clinical treatments exist for the majority of retinal degenerative disorders. Here we report on the fabrication and functional validation of a fully organic prosthesis for long-term in vivo subretinal implantation in the eye of Royal College of Surgeons rats, a widely recognized model of retinitis pigmentosa. Electrophysiological and behavioural analyses reveal a prosthesis-dependent recovery of light sensitivity and visual acuity that persists up to 6-10 months after surgery. The rescue of the visual function is accompanied by an increase in the basal metabolic activity of the primary visual cortex, as demonstrated by positron emission tomography imaging. Our results highlight the possibility of developing a new generation of fully organic, highly biocompatible and functionally autonomous photovoltaic prostheses for subretinal implants to treat degenerative blindness.

  9. Age-related carbonylation of fibrocartilage structural proteins drives tissue degenerative modification.

    PubMed

    Scharf, Brian; Clement, Cristina C; Yodmuang, Supansa; Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Suadicani, Sylvia O; Aphkhazava, David; Thi, Mia M; Perino, Giorgio; Hardin, John A; Cobelli, Neil; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Santambrogio, Laura

    2013-07-25

    Aging-related oxidative stress has been linked to degenerative modifications in different organs and tissues. Using redox proteomic analysis and illustrative tandem mass spectrometry mapping, we demonstrate oxidative posttranslational modifications in structural proteins of intervertebral discs (IVDs) isolated from aging mice. Increased protein carbonylation was associated with protein fragmentation and aggregation. Complementing these findings, a significant loss of elasticity and increased stiffness was measured in fibrocartilage from aging mice. Studies using circular dichroism and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence revealed a significant loss of secondary and tertiary structures of purified collagens following oxidation. Collagen unfolding and oxidation promoted both nonenzymatic and enzymatic degradation. Importantly, induction of oxidative modification in healthy fibrocartilage recapitulated the biochemical and biophysical modifications observed in the aging IVD. Together, these results suggest that protein carbonylation, glycation, and lipoxidation could be early events in promoting IVD degenerative changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Electromagnetic fields in the treatment of chronic lower back pain in patients with degenerative disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Arneja, Amarjit S; Kotowich, Alan; Staley, Doug; Summers, Randy; Tappia, Paramjit S

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To examine the effects of low-amplitude, low frequency electromagnetic field therapy (EMF) therapy in patients with persistent chronic lower back pain associated with degenerative disc disease. Design: Double-blind, randomized and placebo controlled. Intervention: EMF using a medical device resonator; control group underwent same procedures, except the device was turned off. Outcome measures: Pain reduction and mobility. Results: Improvements in overall physical health, social functioning and reduction in bodily pain were observed in the EMF group. The pain relief rating scale showed a higher level of pain relief at the target area in the EMF group. An increase in left lateral mobility was seen only in the EMF group. Conclusion: EMF treatment may be of benefit to patients with chronic nonresponsive lower back pain associated with degenerative disc disease. PMID:28031951

  11. Biological insight, high-throughput datasets and the nature of neuro-degenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Valente, André X C N; Oliveira, Paulo J; Khaiboullina, Svetlana F; Palotás, András; Rizvanov, Albert A

    2013-09-01

    Life sciences are experiencing a historical shift towards a quantitative, data-rich regime. This transition has been associated with the advent of bio-informatics: mathematicians, physicists, computer scientists and statisticians are now commonplace in the field, working on the analysis of ever larger data-sets. An open question regarding what should drive scientific progress in this new era remains: will biological insight become increasingly irrelevant in a world of hypothesis-free, unbiased data analysis? This piece offers a different perspective, pin-pointing that biological thought is more-than-ever relevant in a data-rich setting. Some of the novel highthroughput information being acquired in the field of neuro-degenerative disorders is highlighted here. As but one example of how theory and experiment can interact in this new reality, our efforts in developing an idiopathic neuro-degenerative disease hematopoietic stemcell ageing theory are described.

  12. A fully organic retinal prosthesis restores vision in a rat model of degenerative blindness

    PubMed Central

    Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Colombo, Elisabetta; Mete, Maurizio; Feyen, Paul; Desii, Andrea; Buschiazzo, Ambra; Di Paolo, Mattia; Di Marco, Stefano; Ticconi, Flavia; Emionite, Laura; Shmal, Dmytro; Marini, Cecilia; Donelli, Ilaria; Freddi, Giuliano; Maccarone, Rita; Bisti, Silvia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Pertile, Grazia; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Benfenati, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    The degeneration of photoreceptors in the retina is one of the major causes of adult blindness in humans. Unfortunately, no effective clinical treatments exist for the majority of retinal degenerative disorders. Here we report on the fabrication and functional validation of a fully organic prosthesis for long-term in vivo subretinal implantation in the eye of Royal College of Surgeons rats, a widely recognized model of Retinitis pigmentosa. Electrophysiological and behavioral analyses reveal a prosthesis-dependent recovery of light-sensitivity and visual acuity that persists up to 6-10 months after surgery. The rescue of the visual function is accompanied by an increase in the basal metabolic activity of the primary visual cortex, as demonstrated by positron emission tomography imaging. Our results highlight the possibility of developing a new generation of fully organic, highly biocompatible and functionally autonomous photovoltaic prostheses for subretinal implants to treat degenerative blindness. PMID:28250420

  13. [Virtual clinical diagnosis support system of degenerative stenosis of the lumbar spinal canal].

    PubMed

    Shevelev, I N; Konovalov, N A; Cherkashov, A M; Molodchenkov, A A; Sharamko, T G; Asiutin, D S; Nazarenko, A G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a virtual clinical diagnostic support system of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis on database of spine registry. Choice of criteria's for diagnostic system was made on symptom analysis of 298 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Also was analysed a group of patient with disc herniation's for sensitivity and specify assessment of developed diagnostic support system. Represented clinical diagnostic support system allows identifying patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis on stage of patient's primary visit. System sensitivity and specify are 90 and 71% respectively. "Online" mode of diagnostic system in structure of spine registry provides maximal availability for specialists, regardless of their locations. Development of tools "medicine 2.0" is the actual direction for carrying out further researches with which carrying out the centralized baea collection by means of specialized registers helps.

  14. The role of arthroscopy in ankle and subtalar degenerative joint disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J C; Ferkel, R D

    1998-04-01

    Treatment options for degenerative joint disease of the ankle and subtalar joints are limited. When conservative management fails, the only effective procedure is arthrodesis. With the advent of the small arthroscope and the development of better instrumentation and distraction techniques, small joint arthroscopy has gained popularity as an important diagnostic and therapeutic tool in the treatment of ankle and subtalar disorders. Although the benefits of arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis are well established, and arthroscopic subtalar arthrodesis has been described recently, the role of arthroscopic debridement for degenerative joint disease of the ankle and subtalar joints remains controversial. Traditionally, operative arthroscopy for ankle arthritis has not met with great success; however, recent studies have shown that it can provide an interim alternative to arthrodesis in early arthritis with preserved range of motion. Lesions associated with arthritis, such as impinging osteophytes and loose bodies, can be treated effectively with arthroscopy.

  15. In-medium properties of pseudoscalar D_s and B_s mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, Rahul; Kumar, Arvind

    2017-11-01

    We calculate the shift in the masses and decay constants of D_s(1968) and B_s(5370) mesons in hot and dense asymmetric strange hadronic matter using QCD sum rules and chiral SU(3) model. In-medium strange quark condensates < \\bar{s}s> _{ρ _B}, and gluon condensates < α s/π {G^a}_{μ ν } {G^a}^{μ ν } > _{ρ _B}, to be used in the QCD sum rules for pseudoscalar D_s and B_s mesons, are calculated using a chiral SU(3) model. As an application of our present work, we calculate the in-medium decay widths of the excited (c\\bar{s}) states D_s^*(2715) and D_s^*(2860) decaying to (D_s(1968),η ) mesons. The medium effects in their decay widths are incorporated through the mass modification of the D_s(1968) and η mesons. The results of the present investigation may be helpful in understanding the possible outcomes of the future experiments like CBM and PANDA under the FAIR facility.

  16. Immunomodulatory Effects of dsRNA and Its Potential as Vaccine Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Bo; Sun, Tao; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Chao-Qun; Yang, Ying-Xiang; Lu, Ping; Fu, Shan-Feng; Qiu, Hui-Bin; Yeo, Anthony E. T.

    2010-01-01

    dsRNA can be detected by pattern recognition receptors, for example, TLR3, MDA-5, NLRP3 to induce proinflammatory cytokines responsible for innate/adaptive immunity. Recognized by endosomal TLR3 in myeloid DCs (mDCs), dsRNA can activate mDCs into mature antigen presenting cells (mAPCs) which in turn present antigen epitopes with MHC-I molecules to naïve T cells. Coadministration of protein and synthetic dsRNA analogues can elicit an antigen-specific Th1-polarized immune response which stimulates the CD8+ CTL response and possibly dampen Th17 response. Synthetic dsRNA analogues have been tested as vaccine adjuvant against viral infections in animal models. However, a dsRNA receptor, TLR3 can be expressed in tumor cells while other members of TLR family, for example, TLR4 and TLR2 have been shown to promote tumor progression, metastasis, and chemoresistance. Thus, the promising potential of dsRNA analogues as a tumor therapeutic vaccine adjuvant should be evaluated cautiously. PMID:20671921

  17. Stem cells in degenerative orthopaedic pathologies: effects of aging on therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; Fu, Freddie H; Sekiya, Ichiro; Stolzing, Alexandra; Ochi, Mitsuo; Rodeo, Scott A

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize the current evidence on the use of stem cells in the elderly population with degenerative orthopaedic pathologies and to highlight the pathophysiologic mechanisms behind today's therapeutic challenges in stem cell-based regeneration of destructed tissues in the elderly patients with osteoarthritis (OA), degenerative disc disease (DDD), and tendinopathies. Clinical and basic science studies that report the use of stem cells in the elderly patients with OA, DDD, and tendinopathies were identified using a PubMed search. The studies published in English have been assessed, and the best and most recent evidence was included in the current study. Evidence suggests that, although short-term results regarding the effects of stem cell therapy in degenerative orthopaedic pathologies can be promising, stem cell therapies do not appear to reverse age-related tissue degeneration. Causes of suboptimal outcomes can be attributed to the decrease in the therapeutic potential of aged stem cell populations and the regenerative capacity of these cells, which might be negatively influenced in an aged microenvironment within the degenerated tissues of elderly patients with OA, DDD, and tendinopathies. Clinical protocols guiding the use of stem cells in the elderly patient population are still under development, and high-level randomized controlled trials with long-term outcomes are lacking. Understanding the consequences of age-related changes in stem cell function and responsiveness of the in vivo microenvironment to stem cells is critical when designing cell-based therapies for elderly patients with degenerative orthopaedic pathologies.

  18. [3-Tesla MRI vs. arthroscopy for diagnostics of degenerative knee cartilage diseases: preliminary clinical results].

    PubMed

    von Engelhardt, L V; Schmitz, A; Burian, B; Pennekamp, P H; Schild, H H; Kraft, C N; von Falkenhausen, M

    2008-09-01

    The literature contains only a few studies investigating the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnostics of degenerative cartilage diseases. Studies on MRI diagnostics of the cartilage using field strengths of 3-Tesla demonstrate promising results. To assess the value of 3-Tesla MRI for decision making regarding conservative or operative treatment possibilities, this study focused on patients with degenerative cartilage diseases. Thirty-two patients with chronic knee pain, a minimum age of 40 years, a negative history of trauma, and at least grade II degenerative cartilage disease were included. Cartilage abnormalities detected at preoperative 3-Tesla MRI (axial/koronar/sagittal PD-TSE-SPAIR, axial/sagittal 3D-T1-FFE, axial T2-FFE; Intera 3.0T, Philips Medical Systems) were classified (grades I-IV) and compared with arthroscopic findings. Thirty-six percent (70/192) of the examined cartilage surfaces demonstrated no agreement between MRI and arthroscopic grading. In most of these cases, grades II and III cartilage lesions were confounded with each other. Regarding the positive predictive values, the probability that a positive finding in MRI would be exactly confirmed by arthroscopy was 39-72%. In contrast, specificities and negative predictive values of different grades of cartilage diseases were 85-95%. Regarding the high specificities and negative predictive values, 3-Tesla MRI is a reliable method for excluding even slight cartilage degeneration. In summary, in degenerative cartilage diseases, 3-Tesla MRI is a supportive, noninvasive method for clinical decision making regarding conservative or operative treatment possibilities. However, the value of diagnostic arthroscopy for a definitive assessment of the articular surfaces and for therapeutic planning currently cannot be replaced by 3-Tesla MRI. This applies especially to treatment options in which a differentiation between grade II and III cartilage lesions is of interest.

  19. Cervical Radiculopathy due to Cervical Degenerative Diseases : Anatomy, Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae

    2010-01-01

    A cervical radiculopathy is the most common symptom of cervical degenerative disease and its natural course is generally favorable. With a precise diagnosis using appropriate tools, the majority of patients will respond well to conservative treatment. Cervical radiculopathy with persistent radicular pain after conservative treatment and progressive or profound motor weakness may require surgery. Options for surgical management are extensive. Each technique has strengths and weaknesses, so the choice will depend on the patient's clinical profile and the surgeon's judgment. PMID:21430971

  20. Correlation between degenerative spine disease and bone marrow density: a retrospective investigation.

    PubMed

    Grams, Astrid Ellen; Rehwald, Rafael; Bartsch, Alexander; Honold, Sarah; Freyschlag, Christian Franz; Knoflach, Michael; Gizewski, Elke Ruth; Glodny, Bernhard

    2016-02-24

    Spondylosis leads to an overestimation of bone mineral density (BMD) with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) but not with quantitative computed tomography (QCT). The correlation between degenerative changes of the spine and QCT-BMD was therefore investigated for the first time. One hundred thirty-four patients (66 female and 68 male) with a mean age of 49.0 ± 14.6 years (range: 19-88 years) who received a CT scan and QCT-BMD measurements of spine and hip were evaluated retrospectively. The occurrence and severity of spondylosis, osteochondrosis, and spondylarthrosis and the height of the vertebral bodies were assessed. A negative correlation was found between spinal BMD and number of spondylophytes (ρ = -0.35; p < 0.01), disc heights (r = -0.33; p < 0.01), number of discal air inclusions (ρ = -0.34; p < 0.01), the number of Schmorl nodules (ρ = -0.25; p < 0.01), the number (ρ = -0.219; p < 0.05) and the degree (ρ = -0.220; p < 0.05) of spondylarthrosis. Spinal and hip BMD correlated moderately, but the latter did not correlate with degenerative changes of the spine. In linear regression models age, osteochondrosis and spondylarthrosis were factors influencing spinal BMD. Degenerative spinal changes may be associated with reduced regional spinal mineralization. This knowledge could lead to a modification of treatment of degenerative spine disease with early treatment of osteopenia to prevent secondary fractures.

  1. A Multicenter Radiographic Evaluation of the Rates of Preoperative and Postoperative Malalignment in Degenerative Spinal Fusions.

    PubMed

    Leveque, Jean-Christophe A; Segebarth, Bradley; Schroerlucke, Samuel R; Khanna, Nitin; Pollina, John; Youssef, Jim A; Tohmeh, Antoine G; Uribe, Juan S

    2018-07-01

    Multicenter, retrospective, institutional-review-board -approved study at 18 institutions in the United States with 24 treating investigators. This study was designed to retrospectively assess the prevalence of spinopelvic malalignment in patients who underwent one- or two-level lumbar fusions for degenerative (nondeformity) indications and to assess the incidence of malalignment after fusion surgery as well as the rate of alignment preservation and/or correction in this population. Spinopelvic malalignment after lumbar fusion has been associated with lower postoperative health-related quality of life and elevated risk of adjacent segment failure. The prevalence of spinopelvic malalignment in short-segment degenerative lumbar fusion procedures from a large sample of patients is heretofore unreported and may lead to an under-appreciation of these factors in surgical planning and ultimate preservation or correction of alignment. Lateral preoperative and postoperative lumbar radiographs were retrospectively acquired from 578 one- or two-level lumbar fusion patients and newly measured for lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), and pelvic tilt. Patients were categorized at preop and postop time points as aligned if PI-LL < 10° or malaligned if PI-LL≥10°. Patients were grouped into categories based on their alignment progression from pre- to postoperative, with preserved (aligned to aligned), restored (malaligned to aligned), not corrected (malaligned to malaligned), and worsened (aligned to malaligned) designations. Preoperatively, 173 (30%) patients exhibited malalignment. Postoperatively, 161 (28%) of patients were malaligned. Alignment was preserved in 63%, restored in 9%, not corrected in 21%, and worsened in 7% of patients. This is the first multicenter study to evaluate the preoperative prevalence and postoperative incidence of spinopelvic malalignment in a large series of short-segment degenerative lumbar fusions, finding over 25% of patients out of

  2. Evaluation of lumbar segmental instability in degenerative diseases by using a new intraoperative measurement system.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Kitahara, Ko; Hara, Toshiaki; Takano, Ko; Shimoda, Haruka; Homma, Takao

    2008-03-01

    In vivo quantitative measurement of lumbar segmental stability has not been established. The authors developed a new measurement system to determine intraoperative lumbar stability. The objective of this study was to clarify the biomechanical properties of degenerative lumbar segments by using the new method. Twenty-two patients with a degenerative symptomatic segment were studied and their measurements compared with those obtained in normal or asymptomatic degenerative segments (Normal group). The measurement system produces cyclic flexion-extension through spinous process holders by using a computer-controlled motion generator with all ligamentous structures intact. The following biomechanical parameters were determined: stiffness, absorption energy (AE), and neutral zone (NZ). Discs with degeneration were divided into 2 groups based on magnetic resonance imaging grading: degeneration without collapse (Collapse[-]) and degeneration with collapse (Collapse[+]). Biomechanical parameters were compared among the groups. Relationships among the biomechanical parameters and age, diagnosis, or radiographic parameters were analyzed. The mean stiffness value in the Normal group was significantly greater than that in Collapse(-) or Collapse(+) group. There was no significant difference in the average AE value among the Normal, Collapse(-), and Collapse(+) groups. The NZ in the Collapse(-) was significantly higher than in the Normal or Collapse(+) groups. Stiffness was negatively and NZ was positively correlated with age. Stiffness demonstrated a significant negative and NZ a significant positive relationship with disc height, however. There were no significant differences in stiffness between spines in the Collapse(-) and Collapse(+) groups. The values of a more sensitive parameter, NZ, were higher in Collapse(-) than in Collapse(+) groups, demonstrating that degenerative segments with preserved disc height have a latent instability compared to segments with collapsed

  3. Study of metabolism and energetics in hypogravity: Degenerative effects of prolonged hypogravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    The role of gravity in the formation of rigid, lignified plant cell walls hence to the development of the erect land plant body is examined. An experiment was proposed with a general hypothesis that a chosen plant, a dwarf marigold, would display degenerative changes in mechanical supportive systems under hypogravity because normal lignin-cellulose wall structure fails to develop. Observational and experimental results are given.

  4. Does football cause an increase in degenerative disease of the lumbar spine?

    PubMed

    Gerbino, Peter G; d'Hemecourt, Pierre A

    2002-02-01

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is exceedingly common. Whether any specific activity increases the likelihood of developing degenerative disc disease (DDD) or facet degeneration (FD) has enormous implications. Within the field of occupational medicine there are specific activities, occupations, and morphologic characteristics that have been related to low back pain. Several specific risk factors have been conclusively linked to low back pain, and in particular DDD and FD. Within the sport of American football, there has long been the feeling that many athletes have or will develop low back pain, DDD, and FD. Proving that certain risk factors present in football will predictably lead to an increase in LBP, DDD, and FD is more difficult. At this time, it can be said that football players, in general, increase their risk of developing low back pain, DDD, and FD as their years of involvement with their sport increase. Because specific spine injuries like fracture, disc herniation, and spondylolysis are more frequent in football players, the resulting DDD and FD are greater than that of the general population. The weightlifting and violent hyperextension that are part of American football are independent risk factors for degenerative spine disease.

  5. Bilateral coxofemoral degenerative joint disease in a juvenile male yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes).

    PubMed

    Buckle, Kelly N; Alley, Maurice R

    2011-08-01

    A juvenile, male, yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes) with abnormal stance and decreased mobility was captured, held in captivity for approximately 6 weeks, and euthanized due to continued clinical signs. Radiographically, there was bilateral degenerative joint disease with coxofemoral periarticular osteophyte formation. Grossly, the bird had bilaterally distended, thickened coxofemoral joints with increased laxity, and small, roughened and angular femoral heads. Histologically, the left femoral articular cartilage and subchondral bone were absent, and the remaining femoral head consisted of trabecular bone overlain by fibrin and granulation tissue. There was no gross or histological evidence of infection. The historic, gross, radiographic, and histopathologic findings were most consistent with bilateral aseptic femoral head degeneration resulting in degenerative joint disease. Although the chronicity of the lesions masked the initiating cause, the probable underlying causes of aseptic bilateral femoral head degeneration in a young animal are osteonecrosis and osteochondrosis of the femoral head. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral coxofemoral degenerative joint disease in a penguin.

  6. Identifying Degenerative Brain Disease Using Rough Set Classifier Based on Wavelet Packet Method.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Hsue; Liu, Wei-Xiang

    2018-05-28

    Population aging has become a worldwide phenomenon, which causes many serious problems. The medical issues related to degenerative brain disease have gradually become a concern. Magnetic Resonance Imaging is one of the most advanced methods for medical imaging and is especially suitable for brain scans. From the literature, although the automatic segmentation method is less laborious and time-consuming, it is restricted in several specific types of images. In addition, hybrid techniques segmentation improves the shortcomings of the single segmentation method. Therefore, this study proposed a hybrid segmentation combined with rough set classifier and wavelet packet method to identify degenerative brain disease. The proposed method is a three-stage image process method to enhance accuracy of brain disease classification. In the first stage, this study used the proposed hybrid segmentation algorithms to segment the brain ROI (region of interest). In the second stage, wavelet packet was used to conduct the image decomposition and calculate the feature values. In the final stage, the rough set classifier was utilized to identify the degenerative brain disease. In verification and comparison, two experiments were employed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method and compare with the TV-seg (total variation segmentation) algorithm, Discrete Cosine Transform, and the listing classifiers. Overall, the results indicated that the proposed method outperforms the listing methods.

  7. Multimedia psychoeducational interventions to support patient self-care in degenerative conditions: A realist review.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Peter; Scott, David; Reid, Joanne; Porter, Sam

    2015-10-01

    Multimedia interventions are increasingly used to deliver information in order to promote self-care among patients with degenerative conditions. We carried out a realist review of the literature to investigate how the characteristics of multimedia psychoeducational interventions combine with the contexts in which they are introduced to help or hinder their effectiveness in supporting self-care for patients with degenerative conditions. Electronic databases (Medline, Science Direct, PSYCHinfo, EBSCO, and Embase) were searched in order to identify papers containing information on multimedia psychoeducational interventions. Using a realist review approach, we reviewed all relevant studies to identify theories that explained how the interventions work. Ten papers were included in the review. All interventions sought to promote self-care behaviors among participants. We examined the development and content of the multimedia interventions and the impact of patient motivation and of the organizational context of implementation. We judged seven studies to be methodologically weak. All completed studies showed small effects in favor of the intervention. Multimedia interventions may provide high-quality information in an accessible format, with the potential to promote self-care among patients with degenerative conditions, if the patient perceives the information as important and develops confidence about self-care. The evidence base is weak, so that research is needed to investigate effective modes of delivery at different resource levels. We recommend that developers consider how an intervention will reduce uncertainty and increase confidence in self-care, as well as the impact of the context in which it will be employed.

  8. The cervical spine of professional front-row rugby players: correlation between degenerative changes and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hogan, B A; Hogan, N A; Vos, P M; Eustace, S J; Kenny, P J

    2010-06-01

    Injuries to the cervical spine (C-spine) are among the most serious in rugby and are well documented. Front-row players are particularly at risk due to repetitive high-intensity collisions in the scrum. This study evaluates degenerative changes of the C-spine and associated symptomatology in front-row rugby players. C-spine radiographs from 14 professional rugby players and controls were compared. Players averaged 23 years of playing competitive rugby. Two consultant radiologists performed a blind review of radiographs evaluating degeneration of disc spaces and apophyseal joints. Clinical status was assessed using a modified AAOS/NASS/COSS cervical spine outcomes questionnaire. Front-row rugby players exhibited significant radiographic evidence of C-spine degenerative changes compared to the non-rugby playing controls (P < 0.005). Despite these findings the rugby players did not exhibit increased symptoms. This highlights the radiologic degenerative changes of the C-spine of front-row rugby players. However, these changes do not manifest themselves clinically or affect activities of daily living.

  9. Agreement between computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and surgical findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Suwankong, Niyada; Voorhout, George; Hazewinkel, Herman A W; Meij, Björn P

    2006-12-15

    To assess the extent of agreement between computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and surgical findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis. Observational study. 35 dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis. Results of preoperative CT and MRI were compared with surgical findings with respect to degree and location of disk protrusion, position of the dural sac, amount of epidural fat, and swelling of spinal nerve roots. A lumbosacral step was seen on radiographic images from 22 of 32 (69%) dogs, on CT images from 23 of 35 (66%) dogs, and on MR images from 21 of 35 (60%) dogs. Most dogs had slight or moderate disk protrusion that was centrally located. There was substantial or near perfect agreement between CT and MRI findings in regard to degree of disk protrusion (kappa, 0.88), location of disk protrusion (0.63), position of the dural sac (0.89), amount of epidural fat (0.72), and swelling of spinal nerve roots (0.60). The degree of agreement between CT and surgical findings and between MRI and surgical findings was moderate in regard to degree and location of disk protrusion (kappa, 0.44 to 0.56) and swelling of spinal nerve roots (0.40 and 0.50). Results indicate that there is a high degree of agreement between CT and MRI findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis but that the degree of agreement between diagnostic imaging findings and surgical findings is lower.

  10. Analysis of Reasons for Failure of Surgery for Degenerative Disease of Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Baranowska, Alicja; Baranowska, Joanna; Baranowski, Paweł

    2016-03-23

    In the aging society, there is a growing number of patients with advanced degenerative disease of the spine. These patients frequently require surgical treatment. This paper aims to analyse the reasons for failure of surgery for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Histories of patients operated on by one group of surgeons in the Neuroorthopaedic Department of "STOCER" in 2014 and 2015 due to degenerative disease of the lumbar spine were analysed retrospectively. Out of the cohort, patients who had undergone a revision surgery were selected for the study and divided into two groups: group A (60) of patients previously operated on in another centre and group B (47) of patients previously operated on in "STOCER". The reasons for failure of the surgery were analysed in detail based on history, physical examination, imaging studies and surgery reports. Surgery was performed in 601 patients, of whom 107 patients had been previously operated on. The most frequent reasons for revision surgery of the same motor segment were recurrent disc herniation, inadequate decompression and inappropriate surgical technique. In the group of patients who had implants inserted to stabilise the spine, the revision surgery in most cases was due to adjacent segment disease. Use of implants and spinal fusion is always associated with a risk of complications and is frequently independent of the surgeon. 2. In order to reduce the rate of revision surgeries, it is important to perform complete decompression and select an adequate surgical technique.

  11. Local Stability of the Trunk in Patients with Degenerative Cerebellar Ataxia During Walking.

    PubMed

    Chini, Giorgia; Ranavolo, Alberto; Draicchio, Francesco; Casali, Carlo; Conte, Carmela; Martino, Giovanni; Leonardi, Luca; Padua, Luca; Coppola, Gianluca; Pierelli, Francesco; Serrao, Mariano

    2017-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate trunk local stability in a group of patients with degenerative primary cerebellar ataxia and to correlate it with spatio-temporal parameters, clinical variables, and history of falls. Sixteen patients affected by degenerative cerebellar ataxia and 16 gender- and age-matched healthy adults were studied by means of an inertial sensor to measure trunk kinematics and spatio-temporal parameters during over-ground walking. Trunk local dynamic stability was quantified by the maximum Lyapunov exponent with short data series of the acceleration data. According to this index, low values indicate more stable trunk dynamics, while high values denote less stable trunk dynamics. Disease severity was assessed by means of International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS) according to which higher values correspond to more severe disease, while lower values correspond to less severe disease.Patients displayed a higher short-term maximum Lyapunov exponent than controls in all three spatial planes, which was correlated with the age, onset of the disease, and history of falls. Furthermore, the maximum Lyapunov exponent was negatively correlated with ICARS balance, ICARS posture, and ICARS total scores.These findings indicate that trunk local stability during gait is lower in patients with cerebellar degenerative ataxia than that in healthy controls and that this may increase the risk of falls. Local dynamic stability of the trunk seems to be an important aspect in patients with ataxia and could be a useful tool in the evaluation of rehabilitative and pharmacological treatment outcomes.

  12. Cryo-EM near-atomic structure of a dsRNA fungal virus shows ancient structural motifs preserved in the dsRNA viral lineage

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Daniel; Gómez-Blanco, Josué; Garriga, Damiá; Brilot, Axel F.; González, José M.; Havens, Wendy M.; Carrascosa, José L.; Trus, Benes L.; Verdaguer, Nuria; Ghabrial, Said A.; Castón, José R.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses evolve so rapidly that sequence-based comparison is not suitable for detecting relatedness among distant viruses. Structure-based comparisons suggest that evolution led to a small number of viral classes or lineages that can be grouped by capsid protein (CP) folds. Here, we report that the CP structure of the fungal dsRNA Penicillium chrysogenum virus (PcV) shows the progenitor fold of the dsRNA virus lineage and suggests a relationship between lineages. Cryo-EM structure at near-atomic resolution showed that the 982-aa PcV CP is formed by a repeated α-helical core, indicative of gene duplication despite lack of sequence similarity between the two halves. Superimposition of secondary structure elements identified a single “hotspot” at which variation is introduced by insertion of peptide segments. Structural comparison of PcV and other distantly related dsRNA viruses detected preferential insertion sites at which the complexity of the conserved α-helical core, made up of ancestral structural motifs that have acted as a skeleton, might have increased, leading to evolution of the highly varied current structures. Analyses of structural motifs only apparent after systematic structural comparisons indicated that the hallmark fold preserved in the dsRNA virus lineage shares a long (spinal) α-helix tangential to the capsid surface with the head-tailed phage and herpesvirus viral lineage. PMID:24821769

  13. Use of transfer learning to detect diffuse degenerative hepatic diseases from ultrasound images in dogs: A methodological study.

    PubMed

    Banzato, T; Bonsembiante, F; Aresu, L; Gelain, M E; Burti, S; Zotti, A

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this methodological study was to develop a deep convolutional neural network (DNN) to detect degenerative hepatic disease from ultrasound images of the liver in dogs and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the newly developed DNN with that of serum biochemistry and cytology on the same samples, using histopathology as a standard. Dogs with suspected hepatic disease that had no prior history of neoplastic disease, no hepatic nodular pathology, no ascites and ultrasonography performed 24h prior to death were included in the study (n=52). Ultrasonography and serum biochemistry were performed as part of the routine clinical evaluation. On the basis of histopathology, dogs were categorised as 'normal' (n=8), or having 'vascular abnormalities'(n=8), or 'inflammatory'(n=0), 'neoplastic' (n=4) or 'degenerative'(n=32) disease; dogs with 'neoplastic' disease were excluded from further analysis. On cytological evaluation, dogs were categorised as 'normal' (n=11), or having 'inflammatory' (n=0), 'neoplastic' (n=4) or 'degenerative' (n=37) disease. Dogs were categorised as having 'degenerative' (n=32) or 'non-degenerative' (n=16) liver disease for analysis due to the limited sample size. The DNN was developed using a transfer learning methodology on a pre-trained neural network that was retrained and fine-tuned to our data set. The resultant DNN had a high diagnostic accuracy for degenerative liver disease (area under the curve 0.91; sensitivity 100%; specificity 82.8%). Cytology and serum biochemical markers (alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase) had poor diagnostic accuracy in the detection of degenerative liver disease. The DNN outperformed all the other non-invasive diagnostic tests in the detection of degenerative liver disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Surgical Management of Degenerative Meniscus Lesions: The 2016 ESSKA Meniscus Consensus

    PubMed Central

    Beaufils, P.; Becker, R.; Kopf, S.; Englund, M.; Verdonk, R.; Ollivier, M.; Seil, R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose  A degenerative meniscus lesion is a slowly developing process typically involving a horizontal cleavage in a middle-aged or older person. When the knee is symptomatic, arthroscopic partial meniscectomy has been practised for a long time with many case series reporting improved patient outcomes. Since 2002, several randomised clinical trials demonstrated no additional benefit of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy compared to non-operative treatment, sham surgery or sham arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. These results introduced controversy in the medical community and made clinical decision-making challenging in the daily clinical practice. To facilitate the clinical decision-making process, a consensus was developed. This initiative was endorsed by ESSKA. Methods  A degenerative meniscus lesion was defined as a lesion occurring without any history of significant acute trauma in a patient older than 35 years. Congenital lesions, traumatic meniscus tears and degenerative lesions occurring in young patients, especially in athletes, were excluded. The project followed the so-called formal consensus process, involving a steering group, a rating group and a peer-review group. A total of 84 surgeons and scientists from 22 European countries were included in the process. Twenty questions, their associated answers and an algorithm based on extensive literature review and clinical expertise, were proposed. Each question and answer set was graded according to the scientific level of the corresponding literature. Results  The main finding was that arthroscopic partial meniscectomy should not be proposed as a first line of treatment for degenerative meniscus lesions. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy should only be considered after a proper standardised clinical and radiological evaluation and when the response to non-operative management has not been satisfactory. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee is typically not indicated in the first-line work-up, but

  15. Dynamic stabilization using the Dynesys system versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal disease: a clinical and radiological outcomes-based meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Chi Heon; Park, Sung-Bae; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Chung, Chun Kee; Kim, Hyun-Jib; Lee, Soo-Eon

    2016-01-01

    United States is the biggest market for Dynesys, no eligible study from the United States was found, and 4 of 8 enrolled studies were performed in China. The results must be interpreted with caution because of publication bias. During Dynesys implantation, surgeons have to decide the length of the spacer and cord pretension. These values are debatable and can vary according to the surgeon's experience and the patient's condition. Differences between the surgical procedures were not considered in this study. CONCLUSIONS Fusion still remains the method of choice for advanced degeneration and gross instability. However, spinal degenerative disease with or without Grade I spondylolisthesis, particularly in patients who require a quicker recovery, will likely constitute the main indication for PDS using the Dynesys system.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide-binding alkylpolyamine DS-96 inhibits Chlamydia trachomatis infection by blocking attachment and entry.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Ichie; Hefty, P Scott

    2014-06-01

    Vaginally delivered microbicides are being developed to offer women self-initiated protection against transmission of sexually transmitted infections such as Chlamydia trachomatis. A small molecule, DS-96, rationally designed for high affinity to Escherichia coli lipid A, was previously demonstrated to bind and neutralize lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria (D. Sil et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 51: 2811-2819, 2007, doi:10.1128/AAC.00200-07). Aside from the lack of the repeating O antigen, chlamydial lipooligosaccharide (LOS) shares general molecular architecture features with E. coli LPS. Importantly, the portion of lipid A where the interaction with DS-96 is expected to take place is well conserved between the two organisms, leading to the hypothesis that DS-96 inhibits Chlamydia infection by binding to LOS and compromising the function. In this study, antichlamydial activity of DS-96 was examined in cell culture. DS-96 inhibited the intercellular growth of Chlamydia in a dose-dependent manner and offered a high level of inhibition at a relatively low concentration (8 μM). The data also revealed that infectious elementary bodies (EBs) were predominantly blocked at the attachment step, as indicated by the reduced number of EBs associated with the host cell surface following pretreatment. Of those EBs that were capable of attachment, the vast majority was unable to gain entry into the host cell. Inhibition of EB attachment and entry by DS-96 suggests that Chlamydia LOS is critical to these processes during the developmental cycle. Importantly, given the low association of host toxicity previously reported by Sil et al., DS-96 is expected to perform well in animal studies as an active antichlamydial compound in a vaginal microbicide. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Clinical evaluation of cobas core anti-dsDNA EIA quant.

    PubMed

    González, Concepción; Guevara, Paloma; García-Berrocal, Belén; Alejandro Navajo, José; Manuel González-Buitrago, José

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of antibodies to double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) is a useful tool for the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with connective tissue diseases, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of the present study was to compare a new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the measurement of anti-dsDNA antibodies, which uses purified double-stranded plasmid DNA as the antigen (anti-dsDNA EIA Quant; Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany), with an established ELISA. The clinical usefulness of this new ELISA was also assessed. We measured anti-dsDNA antibodies in 398 serum samples that were divided into four groups: 1). routine samples sent to our laboratory for an antinuclear antibody (ANA) test (n=229), 2). samples from blood donors (n=74), 3). samples from patients with SLE (n=48), and 4) samples from patients with other autoimmune diseases (n=47). The methods used were the Cobas Core Anti-dsDNA EIA Quant (Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany) and the Anti-dsDNA test (Gull Diagnostics, Bois d'Arcy, France). We obtained a kappa index and Spearman correlation coefficient in the comparative study, and sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios in the clinical study. The results obtained show a good agreement between the two methods in both the qualitative results (kappa=0.91) and the quantitative data (r=0.854). The best accuracy, predictive values, likelihood ratios, and correlation with active disease were obtained with the Roche anti-dsDNA assay. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. [22q11.2DS Syndrome as a Genetic Subtype of Schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Huertas-Rodríguez, Cindy Katherin; Payán-Gómez, César; Forero-Castro, Ruth Maribel

    2015-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is associated with the microdeletion of this chromosomal region, and represents the second most common genetic syndrome after Down's syndrome. In patients with schizophrenia, 22q11.2DS has a prevalence of 2%, and in selected groups can be increased to between 32-53%. To describe the generalities of 22q11.2DS syndrome as a genetic subtype of schizophrenia, its clinical characteristics, molecular genetic aspects, and frequency in different populations. A review was performed from 1967 to 2013 in scientific databases, compiling articles about 22q11.2DS syndrome and its association with schizophrenia. The 22q11.2 DS syndrome has a variable phenotype associated with other genetic syndromes, birth defects in many tissues and organs, and a high rate of psychiatric disorders, particularly schizophrenia. Likewise, it has been identified in clinical populations with schizophrenia selected by the presence of common syndromic characteristics. FISH, qPCR and MLPA techniques, and recently, aCGH and NGS technologies, are being used to diagnose this microdeletion. It is important in clinical practice to remember that people suffering the 22q11.2DS have a high genetic risk for developing schizophrenia, and it is considered that the simultaneous presence of this disease and 22q11.2DS represents a genetic subtype of schizophrenia. There are clear phenotypic criteria, molecular and cytogenetic methods to diagnose this group of patients, and to optimize a multidisciplinary approach in their monitoring. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Creating opportunities for science PhDs to pursue careers in high school education

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Kari M. H.; Vale, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    The United States is confronting important challenges at both the early and late stages of science education. At the level of K–12 education, a recent National Research Council report (Successful K–12 STEM Education) proposed a bold restructuring of how science is taught, moving away from memorizing facts and emphasizing hands-on, inquiry-based learning and a deeper understanding of the process of science. At higher levels of training, limited funding for science is leading PhDs to seek training and careers in areas other than research. Might science PhDs play a bigger role in the future of K–12 education, particularly at the high school level? We explore this question by discussing the roles that PhDs can play in high school education and the current and rather extensive barriers to PhDs entering the teaching profession and finally suggest ways to ease the entrance of qualified PhDs into high school education. PMID:24174464

  20. The Folding of de Novo Designed Protein DS119 via Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Moye; Hu, Jie; Zhang, Zhuqing

    2016-04-26

    As they are not subjected to natural selection process, de novo designed proteins usually fold in a manner different from natural proteins. Recently, a de novo designed mini-protein DS119, with a βαβ motif and 36 amino acids, has folded unusually slowly in experiments, and transient dimers have been detected in the folding process. Here, by means of all-atom replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations, several comparably stable intermediate states were observed on the folding free-energy landscape of DS119. Conventional molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations showed that when two unfolded DS119 proteins bound together, most binding sites of dimeric aggregates were located at the N-terminal segment, especially residues 5-10, which were supposed to form β-sheet with its own C-terminal segment. Furthermore, a large percentage of individual proteins in the dimeric aggregates adopted conformations similar to those in the intermediate states observed in REMD simulations. These results indicate that, during the folding process, DS119 can easily become trapped in intermediate states. Then, with diffusion, a transient dimer would be formed and stabilized with the binding interface located at N-terminals. This means that it could not quickly fold to the native structure. The complicated folding manner of DS119 implies the important influence of natural selection on protein-folding kinetics, and more improvement should be achieved in rational protein design.

  1. The best management of SuDS treatment trains: a holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Bastien, Nicolas; Arthur, Scott; Wallis, Stephen; Scholz, Miklas

    2010-01-01

    The use of Sustainable Drainage Systems (SuDS) or Best Management Practice (BMP) is becoming increasingly common. However, rather than adopting the preferred "treatment train" implementation, many developments opt for end of pipe control ponds. This paper discusses the use of SuDS in series to form treatment trains and compares their potential performance and effectiveness with end of pipe solutions. Land-use, site and catchment characteristics have been used alongside up-to-date guidance, Infoworks CS and MUSIC to determine whole-life-costs, land-take, water quality and water quantity for different SuDS combinations. The results presented show that the use of a treatment train allows approaches differing from the traditional use of single SuDS, either source or "end of pipe", to be proposed to treat and attenuate runoff. The outcome is a more flexible solution where the footprint allocated to SuDS, costs and water quality can be managed differently to satisfy more efficiently the holistically stakeholders' objectives.

  2. Quadriphase DS-CDMA wireless communication systems employing the generalized detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuzlukov, Vyacheslav

    2012-05-01

    Probability of bit-error Per performance of asynchronous direct-sequence code-division multiple-access (DS-CDMA) wireless communication systems employing the generalized detector (GD) constructed based on the generalized approach to signal processing in noise is analyzed. The effects of pulse shaping, quadriphase or direct sequence quadriphase shift keying (DS-QPSK) spreading, aperiodic spreading sequences are considered in DS-CDMA based on GD and compared with the coherent Neyman-Pearson receiver. An exact Per expression and several approximations: one using the characterristic function method, a simplified expression for the improved Gaussian approximation (IGA) and the simplified improved Gaussian approximation are derived. Under conditions typically satisfied in practice and even with a small number of interferers, the standard Gaussian approximation (SGA) for the multiple-access interference component of the GD statistic and Per performance is shown to be accurate. Moreover, the IGA is shown to reduce to the SGA for pulses with zero excess bandwidth. Second, the GD Per performance of quadriphase DS-CDMA is shown to be superior to that of bi-phase DS-CDMA. Numerical examples by Monte Carlo simulation are presented to illustrate the GD Per performance for square-root raised-cosine pulses and spreading factors of moderate to large values. Also, a superiority of GD employment in CDMA systems over the Neyman-Pearson receiver is demonstrated

  3. Observation of the decay B- → D(s)((*)+) K- ℓ- ν(ℓ).

    PubMed

    Sanchez, P del Amo; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Dubrovin, M S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Nicolaci, M; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Ebert, M; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Perez, A; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, L; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Anderson, J; Cenci, R; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Sciolla, G; Zhao, M; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Santoro, V; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Sun, S; Suzuki, K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Guttman, N; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2011-07-22

    We report the observation of the decay B- → D(s)((*)+) K- ℓ- ν(ℓ) based on 342  fb(-1) of data collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+ e- storage rings at SLAC. A simultaneous fit to three D(s)(+) decay chains is performed to extract the signal yield from measurements of the squared missing mass in the B meson decay. We observe the decay B- → D(s)((*)+) K- ℓ- ν(ℓ) with a significance greater than 5 standard deviations (including systematic uncertainties) and measure its branching fraction to be B(B- → D(s)((*)+) K- ℓ- ν(ℓ)) = [6.13(-1.03)(+1.04)(stat)±0.43(syst)±0.51(B(D(s)))]×10(-4), where the last error reflects the limited knowledge of the D(s) branching fractions.

  4. The Folding of de Novo Designed Protein DS119 via Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Moye; Hu, Jie; Zhang, Zhuqing

    2016-01-01

    As they are not subjected to natural selection process, de novo designed proteins usually fold in a manner different from natural proteins. Recently, a de novo designed mini-protein DS119, with a βαβ motif and 36 amino acids, has folded unusually slowly in experiments, and transient dimers have been detected in the folding process. Here, by means of all-atom replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations, several comparably stable intermediate states were observed on the folding free-energy landscape of DS119. Conventional molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations showed that when two unfolded DS119 proteins bound together, most binding sites of dimeric aggregates were located at the N-terminal segment, especially residues 5–10, which were supposed to form β-sheet with its own C-terminal segment. Furthermore, a large percentage of individual proteins in the dimeric aggregates adopted conformations similar to those in the intermediate states observed in REMD simulations. These results indicate that, during the folding process, DS119 can easily become trapped in intermediate states. Then, with diffusion, a transient dimer would be formed and stabilized with the binding interface located at N-terminals. This means that it could not quickly fold to the native structure. The complicated folding manner of DS119 implies the important influence of natural selection on protein-folding kinetics, and more improvement should be achieved in rational protein design. PMID:27128902

  5. Computational sequence analysis of predicted long dsRNA transcriptomes of major crops reveals sequence complementarity with human genes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Peter D; Zhang, Yuanji; Wiggins, B Elizabeth; Petrick, Jay S; Zhu, Jin; Kerstetter, Randall A; Heck, Gregory R; Ivashuta, Sergey I

    2013-01-01

    Long double-stranded RNAs (long dsRNAs) are precursors for the effector molecules of sequence-specific RNA-based gene silencing in eukaryotes. Plant cells can contain numerous endogenous long dsRNAs. This study demonstrates that such endogenous long dsRNAs in plants have sequence complementarity to human genes. Many of these complementary long dsRNAs have perfect sequence complementarity of at least 21 nucleotides to human genes; enough complementarity to potentially trigger gene silencing in targeted human cells if delivered in functional form. However, the number and diversity of long dsRNA molecules in plant tissue from crops such as lettuce, tomato, corn, soy and rice with complementarity to human genes that have a long history of safe consumption supports a conclusion that long dsRNAs do not present a significant dietary risk.

  6. Evidence Report: Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects from Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana; Huff, Janice; Saha, Janapriya; Wang, Minli; Blattnig, Steve; Wu, Honglu; Cucinotta, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Occupational radiation exposure from the space environment may result in non-cancer or non-CNS degenerative tissue diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cataracts, and respiratory or digestive diseases. However, the magnitude of influence and mechanisms of action of radiation leading to these diseases are not well characterized. Radiation and synergistic effects of radiation cause DNA damage, persistent oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and accelerated tissue aging and degeneration, which may lead to acute or chronic disease of susceptible organ tissues. In particular, cardiovascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis are of major concern following gamma-ray exposure. This provides evidence for possible degenerative tissue effects following exposures to ionizing radiation in the form of the GCR or SPEs expected during long-duration spaceflight. However, the existence of low dose thresholds and dose-rate and radiation quality effects, as well as mechanisms and major risk pathways, are not well-characterized. Degenerative disease risks are difficult to assess because multiple factors, including radiation, are believed to play a role in the etiology of the diseases. As additional evidence is pointing to lower, space-relevant thresholds for these degenerative effects, particularly for cardiovascular disease, additional research with cell and animal studies is required to quantify the magnitude of this risk, understand mechanisms, and determine if additional protection strategies are required.The NASA PEL (Permissive Exposure Limit)s for cataract and cardiovascular risks are based on existing human epidemiology data. Although animal and clinical astronaut data show a significant increase in cataracts following exposure and a reassessment of atomic bomb (A-bomb) data suggests an increase in cardiovascular disease from radiation exposure, additional research is required to fully understand and quantify these adverse outcomes at lower doses (less than 0.5 gray

  7. Accumulation of dsRNA in endosomes contributes to inefficient RNA interference in the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Yoon, June-Sun; Gurusamy, Dhandapani; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2017-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) efficiency varies among insects studied. The barriers for successful RNAi include the presence of double-stranded ribonucleases (dsRNase) in the lumen and hemolymph that could potentially digest double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and the variability in the transport of dsRNA into and within the cells. We recently showed that the dsRNAs are transported into lepidopteran cells, but they are not processed into small interference RNAs (siRNAs) because they are trapped in acidic bodies. In the current study, we focused on the identification of acidic bodies in which dsRNAs accumulate in Sf9 cells. Time-lapse imaging studies showed that dsRNAs enter Sf9 cells and accumulate in acidic bodies within 20 min after their addition to the medium. CypHer-5E-labeled dsRNA also accumulated in the midgut and fat body dissected from Spodoptera frugiperda larvae with similar patterns observed in Sf9 cells. Pharmacological inhibitor assays showed that the dsRNAs use clathrin mediated endocytosis pathway for transport into the cells. We investigated the potential dsRNA accumulation sites employing LysoTracker and double labeling experiments using the constructs to express a fusion of green fluorescence protein with early or late endosomal marker proteins and CypHer-5E-labeled dsRNA. Interestingly, CypHer-5E-labeled dsRNA accumulated predominantly in early and late endosomes. These data suggest that entrapment of internalized dsRNA in endosomes is one of the major factors contributing to inefficient RNAi response in lepidopteran insects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison between two pedicle screw augmentation instrumentations in adult degenerative scoliosis with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The operative treatment of adult degenerative scoliosis combined with osteoporosis increase following the epidemiological development. Studies have confirmed that screws in osteoporotic spines have significant lower-screw strength with more frequent screw movements within the vertebra than normal spines. Screws augmented with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or with autogenous bone can offer more powerful corrective force and significant advantages. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted on 31 consecutive patients with degenerative lumbar scoliosis combined with osteoporosis who had surgery from December 2000. All had a minimum of 2-year follow-up. All patients had posterior approach surgery. 14 of them were fixed with pedicle screw by augmentation with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and the other 17 patients with autogenous bone. Age, sex and whether smoking were similar between the two groups. Surgical time, blood loss, blood transfusion, medical cost, post surgery ICU time, hospital day, length of oral pain medicines taken, Pre-and postoperative Oswestry disability index questionnaire and surgical revision were documented and compared. Preoperative, postoperative and final follow up Cobb angle, sagittal lumbar curve, correction rate, and Follow up Cobb loss were also compared. Results No significant differences were found between the autogenous bone group and Polymethylmethacrylate group with regards to all the targets above except for length of oral pain medicines taken and surgery cost. 2 patients were seen leakage during operation, but there is neither damage of nerve nor symptom after operation. No revision was needed. Conclusion Both augmentation pedicle screw with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and autogenous bone treating degenerative lumbar scoliosis combined with osteoporosis can achieve a good surgical result. Less oral pain medicines taken are the potential benefits of Polymethylmethacrylate augmentation, but that is at the cost of more

  9. Surgical apgar score in patients undergoing lumbar fusion for degenerative spine diseases.

    PubMed

    Ou, Chien-Yu; Hsu, Shih-Yuan; Huang, Jian-Hao; Huang, Yu-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar fusion is a procedure broadly performed for degenerative diseases of spines, but it is not without significant morbidities. Surgical Apgar Score (SAS), based on intraoperative blood loss, blood pressure, and heart rate, was developed for prognostic prediction in general and vascular operations. We aimed to examine whether the application of SAS in patients undergoing fusion procedures for degeneration of lumbar spines predicts in-hospital major complications. One hundred and ninety-nine patients that underwent lumbar fusion operation for spine degeneration were enrolled in this retrospective study. Based on whether major complications were present (N=16) or not (N=183), the patients were subdivided. We identified the intergroup differences in SAS and clinical parameters. The incidence of in-hospital major complications was 8%. The duration of hospital stay for the morbid patents was significantly prolonged (p=0.04). In the analysis of multivariable logistic regression, SAS was an independent predicting factor of the complications after lumbar fusion for degenerative spine diseases [p=0.001; odds ratio (95% confidence interval)=0.35 (0.19-0.64)]. Lower scores were accompanied with higher rates of major complications, and the area was 0.872 under the receiver operating characteristic curve. SAS is an independent predicting factor of major complications in patients after fusion surgery for degenerative diseases of lumbar spines, and provides good risk discrimination. Since the scoring system is relatively simple, objective, and practical, we suggest that SAS be included as an indicator in the guidance for level of care after lumbar fusion surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison between two pedicle screw augmentation instrumentations in adult degenerative scoliosis with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yang; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Zi-qiang; Shi, Zhi-cai; Zhu, Xiao-dong; Wang, Chuan-feng; Li, Ming

    2011-12-21

    The operative treatment of adult degenerative scoliosis combined with osteoporosis increase following the epidemiological development. Studies have confirmed that screws in osteoporotic spines have significant lower-screw strength with more frequent screw movements within the vertebra than normal spines. Screws augmented with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or with autogenous bone can offer more powerful corrective force and significant advantages. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 31 consecutive patients with degenerative lumbar scoliosis combined with osteoporosis who had surgery from December 2000. All had a minimum of 2-year follow-up. All patients had posterior approach surgery. 14 of them were fixed with pedicle screw by augmentation with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and the other 17 patients with autogenous bone. Age, sex and whether smoking were similar between the two groups. Surgical time, blood loss, blood transfusion, medical cost, post surgery ICU time, hospital day, length of oral pain medicines taken, Pre-and postoperative Oswestry disability index questionnaire and surgical revision were documented and compared. Preoperative, postoperative and final follow up Cobb angle, sagittal lumbar curve, correction rate, and Follow up Cobb loss were also compared. No significant differences were found between the autogenous bone group and polymethylmethacrylate group with regards to all the targets above except for length of oral pain medicines taken and surgery cost. 2 patients were seen leakage during operation, but there is neither damage of nerve nor symptom after operation. No revision was needed. Both augmentation pedicle screw with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and autogenous bone treating degenerative lumbar scoliosis combined with osteoporosis can achieve a good surgical result. Less oral pain medicines taken are the potential benefits of polymethylmethacrylate augmentation, but that is at the cost of more medical spending.

  11. Spine Degenerative Conditions and Their Treatments: National Trends in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Buser, Zorica; Ortega, Brandon; D'Oro, Anthony; Pannell, William; Cohen, Jeremiah R; Wang, Justin; Golish, Ray; Reed, Michael; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2018-02-01

    Retrospective database study. Low back and neck pain are among the top leading causes of disability worldwide. The aim of our study was to report the current trends on spine degenerative disorders and their treatments. Patients diagnosed with lumbar or cervical spine conditions within the orthopedic subset of Medicare and Humana databases (PearlDiver). From the initial cohorts we identified subgroups based on the treatment: fusion or nonoperative within 1 year from diagnosis. Poisson regression was used to determine demographic differences in diagnosis and treatment approaches. Within the Medicare database there were 6 206 578 patients diagnosed with lumbar and 3 156 215 patients diagnosed with cervical degenerative conditions between 2006 and 2012, representing a 16.5% (lumbar) decrease and 11% (cervical) increase in the number of diagnosed patients. There was an increase of 18.5% in the incidence of fusion among lumbar patients. For the Humana data sets there were 1 160 495 patients diagnosed with lumbar and 660 721 patients diagnosed with cervical degenerative disorders from 2008 to 2014. There was a 33% (lumbar) and 42% (cervical) increases in the number of diagnosed patients. However, in both lumbar and cervical groups there was a decrease in the number of surgical and nonoperative treatments. There was an overall increase in both lumbar and cervical conditions, followed by an increase in lumbar fusion procedures within the Medicare database. There is still a burning need to optimize the spine care for the elderly and people in their prime work age to lessen the current national economic burden.

  12. Can the pattern of vertebral marrow oedema differentiate intervertebral disc infection from degenerative changes?

    PubMed

    Shrot, S; Sayah, A; Berkowitz, F

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate whether various patterns of bone marrow oedema could be used to discriminate between infection and degenerative change. Seventy patients with imaging features suspicious for discitis and available clinical follow-up were blindly reviewed for vertebral marrow oedema on sagittal short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) images according to the following patterns: I, vertebra oedema is adjacent to the intervertebral space and sharply-marginated; II, vertebral oedema is adjacent to the intervertebral space but not sharply marginated from normal marrow or involves the entire vertebral body; and III, vertebral oedema is distant from the endplate with intervening hypointense marrow signal. Of 45 patients with a clinical diagnosis of discitis, pattern II was the most common oedema pattern (64%). Approximately 20% and 9% of discitis patients showed patterns I and III, respectively. In patients with degenerative changes, 44% patients showed pattern I, 32% showed pattern II, and 24% showed pattern III. Pattern II had a sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 0.64, 0.68, and 0.78 for diagnosing spine infection, respectively. Although bone marrow oedema in infective discitis most often extends from the disc space and has indistinct margins, the oedema may also have sharp margins or be remote from the involved intervertebral space. Bone marrow oedema patterns of infective discitis overlap with those of degenerative disease and are not sufficiently reliable to exclude infection in cases with magnetic resonance imaging findings suggestive of discitis. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Degenerative changes in adolescent spines: a comparison of motocross racers and age-matched controls.

    PubMed

    Daniels, David J; Luo, T David; Puffer, Ross; McIntosh, Amy L; Larson, A Noelle; Wetjen, Nicholas M; Clarke, Michelle J

    2015-03-01

    Motocross racing is a popular sport; however, its impact on the growing/developing pediatric spine is unknown. Using a retrospective cohort model, the authors compared the degree of advanced degenerative findings in young motocross racers with findings in age-matched controls. Patients who had been treated for motocross-related injury at the authors' institution between 2000 and 2007 and had been under 18 years of age at the time of injury and had undergone plain radiographic or CT examination of any spinal region were eligible for inclusion. Imaging was reviewed in a blinded fashion by 3 physicians for degenerative findings, including endplate abnormalities, loss of vertebral body height, wedging, and malalignment. Acute pathological segments were excluded. Spine radiographs from age-matched controls were similarly reviewed and the findings were compared. The motocross cohort consisted of 29 riders (mean age 14.7 years; 82% male); the control cohort consisted of 45 adolescents (mean age 14.3 years; 71% male). In the cervical spine, the motocross cohort had 55 abnormalities in 203 segments (average 1.90 abnormalities/patient) compared with 20 abnormalities in 213 segments in the controls (average 0.65/patient) (p = 0.006, Student t-test). In the thoracic spine, the motocross riders had 51 abnormalities in 292 segments (average 2.04 abnormalities/patient) compared with 25 abnormalities in 299 segments in the controls (average 1.00/patient) (p = 0.045). In the lumbar spine, the motocross cohort had 11 abnormalities in 123 segments (average 0.44 abnormalities/patient) compared with 15 abnormalities in 150 segments in the controls (average 0.50/patient) (p = 0.197). Increased degenerative changes in the cervical and thoracic spine were identified in adolescent motocross racers compared with age-matched controls. The long-term consequences of these changes are unknown; however, athletes and parents should be counseled accordingly about participation in motocross

  14. Assessing the clinical utility of combined movement examination in symptomatic degenerative lumbar spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Monie, A P; Price, R I; Lind, C R P; Singer, K P

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to report the development and validation of a low back computer-aided combined movement examination protocol in normal individuals and record treatment outcomes of cases with symptomatic degenerative lumbar spondylosis. Test-retest, following intervention. Self-report assessments and combined movement examination were used to record composite spinal motion, before and following neurosurgical and pain medicine interventions. 151 normal individuals aged from 20 years to 69 years were assessed using combined movement examination between L1 and S1 spinal levels to establish a reference range. Cases with degenerative low back pain and sciatica were assessed before and after therapeutic interventions with combined movement examination and a battery of self-report pain and disability questionnaires. Change scores for combined movement examination and all outcome measures were derived. Computer-aided combined movement examination validation and intraclass correlation coefficient with 95% confidence interval and least significant change scores indicated acceptable reliability of combined movement examination when recording lumbar movement in normal subjects. In both clinical cases lumbar spine movement restrictions corresponded with self-report scores for pain and disability. Post-intervention outcomes all showed significant improvement, particularly in the most restricted combined movement examination direction. This study provides normative reference data for combined movement examination that may inform future clinical studies of the technique as a convenient objective surrogate for important clinical outcomes in lumbar degenerative spondylosis. It can be used with good reliability, may be well tolerated by individuals in pain and appears to change in concert with validated measures of lumbar spinal pain, functional limitation and quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Imaging of degenerative lumbar intervertebral discs; linking anatomy, pathology and imaging.

    PubMed

    Adams, Ashok; Roche, Oran; Mazumder, Asif; Davagnanam, Indran; Mankad, Kshitij

    2014-09-01

    Low back pain is a common medical condition that has significant implications for healthcare providers and the UK economy. Low back pain can be classified as 'specific' in which an underlying pathophysiological mechanism is identified (eg, herniated intervertebral disc). Advanced imaging should be performed in this situation and in those patients in whom systemic disease is strongly suspected. In the majority (approximately 90%), low back pain in 'non specific' and there is a weak correlation with imaging abnormalities. This is an area of ongoing research and remains controversial in terms of imaging approach and treatment (eg, theory of discogenic pain, interpretation and treatment of endplate changes). With regards Modic endplate changes, current research suggests that an infective component may be involved that may identify novel potential treatments in patients with chronic low back pain refractory to other treatment modalities. MRI is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of degenerative changes in intervertebral discs. MRI has superior soft tissue contrast resolution when compared to other imaging modalities (eg, plain radiography, CT). An understanding of normal anatomy and MR appearances of intervertebral discs, particularly with regards to how these appearances change with advancing age, is required to aid image interpretation. Knowledge of the spectrum of degenerative processes that may occur in the intervertebral discs is required in order to identify and explain abnormal MRI appearances. As the communication of MRI findings may guide therapeutic decision making and surgical intervention, the terminology used by radiologists must be accurate and consistent. Therefore, description of degenerative disc changes in the current paper is based on the most up-to-date recommendations, the aim being to aid reporting by radiologists and interpretation of reports by referring clinicians. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to

  16. The high prevalence of symptomatic degenerative lumbar osteoarthritis in Chinese adults: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Lv, Yanwei; Liu, Yajun; Xiao, Bin; Han, Xiao

    2014-07-15

    A population-based study. To study the prevalence and features of symptomatic degenerative lumbar osteoarthritis in adults. Lumbar osteoarthritis adversely affects individuals and is a heavy burden. There are limited data on the prevalence of lumbar osteoarthritis. A representative, multistage sample of adults was collected. Symptomatic degenerative lumbar osteoarthritis was diagnosed by clinical symptoms, physical examinations, and imaging examinations. Personal information was obtained by face-to-face interview. Information included the place of residence, age, sex, income, type of medical insurance, education level, body mass index, habits of smoking and drinking, type of work, working posture, duration of the same working posture during the day, mode of transportation, exposure to vibration, and daily amount of sleep. Crude and adjusted prevalence was calculated. The features of populations were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression in total and subgroup populations. The study included 3859 adults. The crude and adjusted prevalence of lumbar osteoarthritis was 9.02% and 8.90%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of lumbar osteoarthritis between urban, suburban, and rural populations (7.66%, 9.97%, and 9.44%) (P = 0.100). The prevalence of lumbar osteoarthritis was higher in females (10.05%) than in males (9.1%, P = 0.021). The prevalence of lumbar osteoarthritis increased with increasing age. Obese people (body mass index >28 kg/m), those engaged in physical work, those who maintained the same work posture for 1 to 1.9 hours per day, those who were exposed to vibration during daily work, and those who got less than 7 hours of sleep per day had a higher prevalence. These features differed by subgroup. This study established epidemiological baseline data for degenerative lumbar osteoarthritis in adults, especially for people younger than 45 years. Lumbar osteoarthritis is epidemic in Beijing and will become a more severe

  17. Comparing surgical repair with conservative treatment for degenerative rotator cuff tears: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lambers Heerspink, Frederik O; van Raay, Jos J A M; Koorevaar, Rinco C T; van Eerden, Pepijn J M; Westerbeek, Robin E; van 't Riet, Esther; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ronald L

    2015-08-01

    Good clinical results have been reported for both surgical and conservative treatment of rotator cuff tears. The primary aim of this randomized controlled trial was to compare functional and radiologic improvement after surgical and conservative treatment of degenerative rotator cuff tears. We conducted a randomized controlled trial that included 56 patients with a degenerative full-thickness rotator cuff tear between January 2009 and December 2012; 31 patients were treated conservatively, and rotator cuff repair was performed in 25 patients. Outcome measures, including the Constant-Murley score (CMS), visual analog scale (VAS) pain and VAS disability scores, were assessed preoperatively and after 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed preoperatively and at 12 months postoperatively. At 12 months postoperatively, the mean CMS was 81.9 (standard deviation [SD], 15.6) in the surgery group vs 73.7 (SD, 18.4) in the conservative group (P = .08). VAS pain (P = .04) and VAS disability (P = .02) were significantly lower in the surgery group at the 12-month follow-up. A subgroup analysis showed postoperative CMS results were significantly better in surgically treated patients without a retear compared with conservatively treated patients (88.5 [SD, 6.2] vs 73.7 [SD, 18.4]). In our population of patients with degenerative rotator cuff tears who were randomly treated by surgery or conservative protocol, we did not observe differences in functional outcome as measured with the CMS 1 year after treatment. However, significant differences in pain and disabilities were observed in favor of surgical treatment. The best outcomes in function and pain were seen in patients with an intact rotator cuff postoperatively. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Oral delivery of dsRNA by microbes: Beyond pest control.

    PubMed

    Abrieux, Antoine; Chiu, Joanna C

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) by oral delivery of dsRNA in insects has great potential as a tool for integrated pest management (IPM), especially with respect to addressing the need to reduce off-target effect and slow down resistance development to chemical insecticides. Employing the natural association existing between insect and yeast, we developed a novel method to enable the knock down of vital genes in the pest insect Drosophila suzukii through oral delivery of species-specific dsRNA using genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisae. D. suzukii that were fed with our "yeast biopesticide" showed a significant decrease in fitness. In this perspective article, we postulate that this approach could be adapted to a large number of species, given the great diversity of symbiotic interactions involving microorganisms and host species. Furthermore, we speculate that beyond its application as biopesticide, dsRNA delivery by genetically modified microbes can also serve to facilitate reverse genetic applications, specifically in non-model organisms.

  19. Local gene silencing in plants via synthetic dsRNA and carrier peptide.

    PubMed

    Numata, Keiji; Ohtani, Misato; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Demura, Taku; Kodama, Yutaka

    2014-10-01

    Quick and facile transient RNA interference (RNAi) is one of the most valuable plant biotechnologies for analysing plant gene functions. To establish a novel double-strand RNA (dsRNA) delivery system for plants, we developed an ionic complex of synthetic dsRNA with a carrier peptide in which a cell-penetrating peptide is fused with a polycation sequence as a gene carrier. The dsRNA-peptide complex is 100-300 nm in diameter and positively charged. Infiltration of the complex into intact leaf cells of Arabidopsis thaliana successfully induced rapid and efficient down-regulation of exogenous and endogenous genes such as yellow fluorescent protein and chalcone synthase. The present method realizes quick and local gene silencing in specific tissues and/or organs in plants. © 2014 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A performance analysis of DS-CDMA and SCPC VSAT networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, David P.; Ha, Tri T.

    1990-01-01

    Spread-spectrum and single-channel-per-carrier (SCPC) transmission techniques work well in very small aperture terminal (VSAT) networks for multiple-access purposes while allowing the earth station antennas to remain small. Direct-sequence code-division multiple-access (DS-CDMA) is the simplest spread-spectrum technique to use in a VSAT network since a frequency synthesizer is not required for each terminal. An examination is made of the DS-CDMA and SCPC Ku-band VSAT satellite systems for low-density (64-kb/s or less) communications. A method for improving the standardf link analysis of DS-CDMA satellite-switched networks by including certain losses is developed. The performance of 50-channel full mesh and star network architectures is analyzed. The selection of operating conditions producing optimum performance is demonstrated.

  1. TEACHING EARLY BRAILLE LITERACY SKILLS WITHIN A STIMULUS EQUIVALENCE PARADIGM TO CHILDREN WITH DEGENERATIVE VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Toussaint, Karen A; Tiger, Jeffrey H

    2010-01-01

    Despite the need for braille literacy, there has been little attempt to systematically evaluate braille-instruction programs. The current study evaluated an instructive procedure for teaching early braille-reading skills with 4 school-aged children with degenerative visual impairments. Following a series of pretests, braille instruction involved providing a sample braille letter and teaching the selection of the corresponding printed letter from a comparison array. Concomitant with increases in the accuracy of this skill, we assessed and captured the formation of equivalence classes through tests of symmetry and transitivity among the printed letters, the corresponding braille letters, and their spoken names. PMID:21119894

  2. Teaching early braille literacy skills within a stimulus equivalence paradigm to children with degenerative visual impairments.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Karen A; Tiger, Jeffrey H

    2010-01-01

    Despite the need for braille literacy, there has been little attempt to systematically evaluate braille-instruction programs. The current study evaluated an instructive procedure for teaching early braille-reading skills with 4 school-aged children with degenerative visual impairments. Following a series of pretests, braille instruction involved providing a sample braille letter and teaching the selection of the corresponding printed letter from a comparison array. Concomitant with increases in the accuracy of this skill, we assessed and captured the formation of equivalence classes through tests of symmetry and transitivity among the printed letters, the corresponding braille letters, and their spoken names.

  3. Vertebral rotatory subluxation in degenerative scoliosis: facet joint tropism is related.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hongda; Zhu, Feng; Liu, Zhen; Bentley, Mark; Mao, Saihu; Zhu, Zezhang; Ding, Yitao; Qiu, Yong

    2014-12-15

    A cross-sectional study. To identify facet tropism as one of the possible risk factors leading to vertebral rotatory subluxation (VRS). VRS has been considered as one of the prognostic factors for degenerative scoliosis. Although several risk factors of VRS, including age and Cobb angle, have been investigated, few studies exist that have evaluated the correlation between VRS and anatomical structures of the vertebral column. This retrospective study recruited 23 patients diagnosed with degenerative lumbar scoliosis with VRS and 20 patients with degenerative scoliosis without VRS. The lateral translation on coronal radiographs was measured and 5 mm was used as the cutoff value to define rotatory subluxation. Computed tomographic scans for facet joints were made for all lumbar levels. The difference between right and left facet angles was recorded as ΔFA. Facet tropism was defined as a difference between the bilateral facet angles of more than 10°. In this study, VRS was most commonly found at the L3-L4 level (49%) and, with decreasing frequency at L2-L3 (24%), L4-L5 (20%), and L1-L2 (7%). On the convex side of the main curve, face joints at levels with VRS were more coronally oriented compared with those at levels without VRS (41.64° ± 11.65° vs. 36.30° ± 10.99°, P = 0.034). ΔFA was also significantly different between levels with and without VRS (P = 0.005). A strong correlation was found between ΔFA and lateral translation, with a coefficient of 0.33 (P < 0.001). In addition, ΔFA and a larger Cobb angle were found to be significantly associated with VRS based on binary regression analysis, with an odds ratio of 4.68 and 2.14, respectively. Facet tropism was more significantly observed at levels with VRS. On the convex side of the main curve, facet joints at levels with VRS were more coronally oriented. A larger Cobb angle and severe facet tropism in degenerative scoliosis should be considered to be related to VRS.

  4. [Locomotive syndrome and frailty. Locomotive syndrome due to the underlying disease of degenerative arthritis].

    PubMed

    Chosa, Etsuo

    2012-04-01

    Japan became a superaging society. We have been putting a new focus on locomotive syndrome and frailty. The prevention and treatment of locomotive syndromes, such as osteoarthritis, degenerative spondylosis, lumbar canal stenosis, osteoporosis, upper extremity diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, and many other disorders of the locomotive organs are important. Because, the locomotive syndrome results in deterioration of the exercise function and loss of mental and physical health. The aim of locomotive syndrome exercises are: to reduce pain, to restore and improve joint function. We need to take a comprehensive approach to locomotive syndrome, including lifestyle modification, muscle exercise, stretching and therapeutic exercise.

  5. Common multiple dsRNAs are present in populations of the fungus Discula destructiva originating from widely separated geographic locations.

    PubMed

    Rong, R; Rao, S; Scott, S W; Tainter, F H

    2001-02-01

    DsRNAs were detected in 85/108 isolates of Discula destructiva, the cause of dogwood anthracnose, collected in South Carolina, Idaho, and Alabama. The eastern isolates contained a greater diversity of dsRNA than did Idaho isolates, but most isolates, irrespective of state of origin, contained two small bands (ca. 1.5-2.5 kb) with sequence homology indicated by Northern hybridization. Differences in the banding patterns suggest that genetic diversity of dsRNA in D. destructiva is generated rapidly and that D. destructiva can be simultaneously infected by multiple dsRNA viruses.

  6. Incidence of diverse dsRNA mycoviruses in Trichoderma spp. causing green mold disease of shiitake Lentinula edodes.

    PubMed

    Yun, Suk-Hyun; Lee, Song Hee; So, Kum-Kang; Kim, Jung-Mi; Kim, Dae-Hyuk

    2016-09-22

    A total of 315 fungal isolates causing green mold disease were collected from contaminated artificial logs and sawdust bags used for cultivating shiitake Lentinula edodes in Korea and were analyzed for the presence of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). dsRNA, which was purified using dsRNA-specific chromatography and verified by dsRNA-specific RNaseIII digestion, was detected in 32 isolates. The molecular taxonomy of dsRNA-infected isolates indicated that all isolates belonged to the Trichoderma spp.. The number and size of dsRNAs varied among isolates and the band patterns could be categorized into 15 groups. Although there were seven dsRNA groups observed in multiple isolates, eight groups were found to occur in single isolates. The most common dsRNA group, group VI, which contained a band of 10 kb, occurred in 10 isolates encompassing three species of Trichoderma Partial sequence analysis of two selected dsRNA groups revealed a high degree of similarity to sequences of a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, hypothetical protein, and polyprotein genes of other hypoviruses such as Macrophomina phaseolina hypovirus 1, Trichoderma hypovirus, and Fusarium graminearum hypovirus 2, respectively, indicating the occurrence of mycoviruses in Trichoderma spp.. Northern blot analysis suggested that many different mycoviruses, which have not been identified yet, exist in Trichoderma. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. High Avidity dsDNA Autoantibodies in Brazilian Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Correlation with Active Disease and Renal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Rodrigo C.; Oliveira, Isabela S.; Santiago, Mittermayer B.; Sousa Atta, Maria L. B.; Atta, Ajax M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated in Brazilian women with SLE the prevalence and levels of high avidity (HA) dsDNA antibodies and tested their correlation with lupus activity and biomarkers of renal disease. We also compared these correlations to those observed with total dsDNA antibodies and antibodies against nucleosome (ANuA). Autoantibodies were detected by ELISA, while C3 and C4 levels were determined by nephelometry. Urine protein/creatinine ratio was determined, and lupus activity was measured by SLEDAI-2K. The prevalence of total and HA dsDNA antibodies was similar to but lower than that verified for ANuA. The levels of the three types of antibodies were correlated, but the correlation was more significant between HA dsDNA antibodies and ANuA. High avidity dsDNA antibodies correlated positively with ESR and SLEDAI and inversely with C3 and C4. Similar correlations were observed for ANuA levels, whereas total dsDNA antibodies only correlated with SLEDAI and C3. The levels of HA dsDNA antibodies were higher in patients with proteinuria, but their levels of total dsDNA antibodies and ANuA were unaltered. High avidity dsDNA antibodies can be found in high prevalence in Brazilian women with SLE and are important biomarkers of active disease and kidney dysfunction. PMID:26583157

  8. High Avidity dsDNA Autoantibodies in Brazilian Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Correlation with Active Disease and Renal Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rodrigo C; Oliveira, Isabela S; Santiago, Mittermayer B; Sousa Atta, Maria L B; Atta, Ajax M

    2015-01-01

    We investigated in Brazilian women with SLE the prevalence and levels of high avidity (HA) dsDNA antibodies and tested their correlation with lupus activity and biomarkers of renal disease. We also compared these correlations to those observed with total dsDNA antibodies and antibodies against nucleosome (ANuA). Autoantibodies were detected by ELISA, while C3 and C4 levels were determined by nephelometry. Urine protein/creatinine ratio was determined, and lupus activity was measured by SLEDAI-2K. The prevalence of total and HA dsDNA antibodies was similar to but lower than that verified for ANuA. The levels of the three types of antibodies were correlated, but the correlation was more significant between HA dsDNA antibodies and ANuA. High avidity dsDNA antibodies correlated positively with ESR and SLEDAI and inversely with C3 and C4. Similar correlations were observed for ANuA levels, whereas total dsDNA antibodies only correlated with SLEDAI and C3. The levels of HA dsDNA antibodies were higher in patients with proteinuria, but their levels of total dsDNA antibodies and ANuA were unaltered. High avidity dsDNA antibodies can be found in high prevalence in Brazilian women with SLE and are important biomarkers of active disease and kidney dysfunction.

  9. Nuclear factor 90 uses an ADAR2-like binding mode to recognize specific bases in dsRNA.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Uma; Grey, Heather; Cook, Atlanta G

    2016-02-29

    Nuclear factors 90 and 45 (NF90 and NF45) form a protein complex involved in the post-transcriptional control of many genes in vertebrates. NF90 is a member of the dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) family of proteins. RNA binding partners identified so far include elements in 3' untranslated regions of specific mRNAs and several non-coding RNAs. In NF90, a tandem pair of dsRBDs separated by a natively unstructured segment confers dsRNA binding activity. We determined a crystal structure of the tandem dsRBDs of NF90 in complex with a synthetic dsRNA. This complex shows surprising similarity to the tandem dsRBDs from an adenosine-to-inosine editing enzyme, ADAR2 in complex with a substrate RNA. Residues involved in unusual base-specific recognition in the minor groove of dsRNA are conserved between NF90 and ADAR2. These data suggest that, like ADAR2, underlying sequences in dsRNA may influence how NF90 recognizes its target RNAs. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xiaofei; College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310036; Deng, Ping

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings themore » split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.« less

  11. Reliability and validity of DS-ADHD: A decision support system on attention deficit hyperactivity disorders.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kuo-Chung; Huang, Yu-Shu; Tseng, Chien-Fu; Huang, Hsin-Jou; Wang, Chih-Huan; Tai, Hsin-Yi

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the reliability of the clinical use of the self-built decision support system, diagnosis-supported attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (DS-ADHD), in an effort to develop the DS-ADHD system, by probing into the development of indicating patterns of past screening support systems for ADHD. The study collected data based on 107 subjects, who were divided into two groups, non-ADHD and ADHD, based on the doctor's determination, using the DSM-IV diagnostic standards. The two groups then underwent Test of Variables of Attention (TOVA) and DS-ADHD testing. The survey and testing results underwent one-way ANOVA and split-half method statistical analysis, in order to further understand whether there were any differences between the DS-ADHD and the identification tools used in today's clinical trials. The results of the study are as follows: 1) The ROC area between the TOVA and the clinical identification rate is 0.787 (95% confidence interval: 0.701-0.872); 2) The ROC area between the DS-ADHD and the clinical identification rate is 0.867 (95% confidence interval: 0.801-0.933). The study results show that DS-ADHD has the characteristics of screening for ADHD, based on its reliability and validity. It does not display any statistical differences when compared with TOVA systems that are currently on the market. However, the system is more effective and the accuracy rate is better than TOVA. It is a good tool to screen ADHD not only in Chinese children, but also in western country. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Maternal uterine NK cell–activating receptor KIR2DS1 enhances placentation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Shiqiu; Sharkey, Andrew M.; Kennedy, Philippa R.; Gardner, Lucy; Farrell, Lydia E.; Chazara, Olympe; Bauer, Julien; Hiby, Susan E.; Colucci, Francesco; Moffett, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Reduced trophoblast invasion and vascular conversion in decidua are thought to be the primary defect of common pregnancy disorders including preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction. Genetic studies suggest these conditions are linked to combinations of polymorphic killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) genes expressed by maternal decidual NK cells (dNK) and HLA-C genes expressed by fetal trophoblast. Inhibitory KIR2DL1 and activating KIR2DS1 both bind HLA-C2, but confer increased risk or protection from pregnancy disorders, respectively. The mechanisms underlying these genetic associations with opposing outcomes are unknown. We show that KIR2DS1 is highly expressed in dNK, stimulating strong activation of KIR2DS1+ dNK. We used microarrays to identify additional responses triggered by binding of KIR2DS1 or KIR2DL1 to HLA-C2 and found different responses in dNK coexpressing KIR2DS1 with KIR2DL1 compared with dNK only expressing KIR2DL1. Activation of KIR2DS1+ dNK by HLA-C2 stimulated production of soluble products including GM-CSF, detected by intracellular FACS and ELISA. We demonstrated that GM-CSF enhanced migration of primary trophoblast and JEG-3 trophoblast cells in vitro. These findings provide a molecular mechanism explaining how recognition of HLA class I molecules on fetal trophoblast by an activating KIR on maternal dNK may be beneficial for placentation. PMID:24091323

  13. Association between disk position and degenerative bone changes of the temporomandibular joints: an imaging study in subjects with TMD.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Daniel; Sylvester, Daniel Cortés; Exss, Eduardo; Marholz, Carlos; Millas, Rodrigo; Moncada, Gustavo

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and relationship between disk position and degenerative bone changes in the temporomandibular joints (TMJ), in subjects with internal derangement (ID). MRI and CT scans of 180 subjects with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were studied. Different image parameters or characteristics were observed, such as disk position, joint effusion, condyle movement, degenerative bone changes (flattened, cortical erosions and irregularities), osteophytes, subchondral cysts and idiopathic condyle resorption. The present study concluded that there is a significant association between disk displacement without reduction and degenerative bone changes in patients with TMD. The study also found a high probability of degenerative bone changes when disk displacement without reduction is present. No association was found between TMD and condyle range of motion, joint effusion and/or degenerative bone changes. The following were the most frequent morphological changes observed: flattening of the anterior surface of the condyle; followed by erosions and irregularities of the joint surfaces; flattening of the articular surface of the temporal eminence, subchondral cysts, osteophytes; and idiopathic condyle resorption, in decreasing order.

  14. Thermo-sensitive injectable glycol chitosan-based hydrogel for treatment of degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengzheng; Shim, Hyeeun; Cho, Myeong Ok; Cho, Ik Sung; Lee, Jin Hyun; Kang, Sun-Woong; Kwon, Bosun; Huh, Kang Moo

    2018-03-15

    The use of injectable hydrogel formulations have been suggested as a promising strategy for the treatment of degenerative disc disease to both restore the biomechanical function and reduce low back pain. In this work, a new thermo-sensitive injectable hydrogels with tunable thermo-sensitivity and enhanced stability were developed with N-hexanoylation of glycol chitosan (GC) for treatment of degenerative disc disease, and their physico-chemical and biological properties were evaluated. The sol-gel transition temperature of the hydrogels was controlled in a range of 23-56 °С, depending on the degree of hexanoylation and the polymer concentration. In vitro and in vivo tests showed no cytotoxicity and no adverse effects in a rat model. The hydrogel filling of the defective IVD site in an ex vivo porcine model maintained its stability for longer than 28 days. These results suggest that the hydrogel can be used as an alternative material for treatment of disc herniation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Proximal Junctional Failure After Long-Segment Instrumentation for Degenerative Lumbar Kyphosis With Ankylosing Spinal Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Daisuke; Matsuoka, Takashi; Miyoshi, Yuji; Murata, Yoichi; Aoki, Yasuaki

    2015-06-15

    Case report. We report a case of proximal junctional failure at the ankylosed, but not the mobile, junction after segmental instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar kyphosis with ankylosing spinal disorder. Proximal junctional failure (PJF) and proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) are important complications that occur subsequent to long-segment instrumentation for correction of adult spinal deformity. Thus far, most studies have focused on the mobile junction as a site at which PJK/PJF can occur, and little is known about the relationship between PJK/PJF and ankylosing spinal disorders such as diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. The patient was an 82-year-old female with degenerative lumbar kyphosis. She had abnormal confluent hyperostosis in the anterior longitudinal ligaments from Th5 to Th10. The patient was treated operatively with spinal instrumented fusion from Th10 to the sacrum. Four weeks subsequent to initial surgery, the patient developed progressive lower extremity paresis caused by the uppermost instrumented vertebrae fracture (Th10) and adjacent subluxation (Th9). Extension of fusion to Th5 with decompression at Th9-Th10 was performed. However, the patient showed no improvement in neurological function. PJF can occur at the ankylosing site above the uppermost instrumented vertebrae after long-segment instrumentation for adult spinal deformity. PJF in the ankylosed spine may cause severe fracture instability and cord deficit. The ankylosed spine should be integrated into the objective determination of materials contributing to the appropriate selection of fusion levels. 3.

  16. Novel Strategies for the Improvement of Stem Cells' Transplantation in Degenerative Retinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nicoară, Simona Delia; Șușman, Sergiu; Tudoran, Oana; Bărbos, Otilia; Cherecheș, Gabriela; Aștilean, Simion; Potara, Monica; Sorițău, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no cure for the permanent vision loss caused by degenerative retinal diseases. One of the novel therapeutic strategies aims at the development of stem cells (SCs) based neuroprotective and regenerative medicine. The main sources of SCs for the treatment of retinal diseases are the embryo, the bone marrow, the region of neuronal genesis, and the eye. The success of transplantation depends on the origin of cells, the route of administration, the local microenvironment, and the proper combinative formula of growth factors. The feasibility of SCs based therapies for degenerative retinal diseases was proved in the preclinical setting. However, their translation into the clinical realm is limited by various factors: the immunogenicity of the cells, the stability of the cell phenotype, the predilection of SCs to form tumors in situ, the abnormality of the microenvironment, and the association of a synaptic rewiring. To improve SCs based therapies, nanotechnology offers a smart delivery system for biomolecules, such as growth factors for SCs implantation and differentiation into retinal progenitors. This review explores the main advances in the field of retinal transplantology and applications of nanotechnology in the treatment of retinal diseases, discusses the challenges, and suggests new therapeutic approaches in retinal transplantation. PMID:27293444

  17. Cytokine Involvement in Biological Inflammation Related to Degenerative Disorders of the Intervertebral Disk: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    De Geer, Christopher M

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this narrative literature review is to discuss the literature regarding the potential role that cytokines play in degenerative disk disease. The inclusion criteria were studies that used inflammatory mediators in advancing disk disease processes. Research studies were limited to the last 3 decades that had free full-text available online in English. Exclusion criteria were review articles and articles pertaining to temporomandibular joints and other joints of the body other than the intervertebral disk. The following databases were searched: PubMed, EBSCOhost, and Google Scholar through March 13, 2017. A total of 82 studies were included in this review. The papers were reviewed for complex mechanisms behind the degenerative cascade, emphasizing the role of proinflammatory cytokines, which may be instrumental in processes of inflammation, neurologic pain, and disk degeneration. Interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor α were among the more notable cytokines involved in this cascade. Because monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 stimulates and activates macrophages in the event of infiltration, additional proinflammatory cytokines are released to act on molecules to promote blood and nerve ingrowth, resulting in pain signaling and tissue degradation. Excessive inflammation and/or tissue damage initiates a pathologic imbalance between anabolic and catabolic processes. This literature review describes how inflammatory and biochemical changes may trigger disk degeneration. Proinflammatory cytokines stimulate microvascular blood and nerve ingrowth, resulting in pain signaling and tissue degradation. This may sensitize a person to chemical and/or mechanical stimuli, contributing to severe low back pain.

  18. Cervical and lumbar MRI in asymptomatic older male lifelong athletes: Frequency of degenerative findings

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, J.F.; Healy, B.B.; Wong, W.H.M.

    The athletic activity of the adult U.S. population has increased markedly in the last 20 years. To evaluate the possible long-term effects of such activity on the cervical and lumbar spine, we studied a group of asymptomatic currently very active lifelong male athletes over age 40 (41-69 years old, av. age 53). Nineteen active, lifelong male athletes were studied with MRI and the results compared with previous imaging studies of other populations. An athletic history and a spine history were also taken. Evidence of asymptomatic degenerative spine disease was similar to that seen in published series of other populations. Degenerativemore » changes including disk protrusion and herniation, spondylosis, and spinal stenosis were present and increased in incidence with increasing patient age. In this group, all MRI findings proved to be asymptomatic and did not limit athletic activity. The incidence of lumbar degenerative changes in our study population of older male athletes was similar to those seen in other populations. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.« less

  19. Homeostatic Plasticity Mediated by Rod-Cone Gap Junction Coupling in Retinal Degenerative Dystrophic RCS Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Baoke; Fu, Yan; Weng, Chuanhuang; Liu, Weiping; Zhao, Congjian; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2017-01-01

    Rod-cone gap junctions open at night to allow rod signals to pass to cones and activate the cone-bipolar pathway. This enhances the ability to detect large, dim objects at night. This electrical synaptic switch is governed by the circadian clock and represents a novel form of homeostatic plasticity that regulates retinal excitability according to network activity. We used tracer labeling and ERG recording in the retinae of control and retinal degenerative dystrophic RCS rats. We found that in the control animals, rod-cone gap junction coupling was regulated by the circadian clock via the modulation of the phosphorylation of the melatonin synthetic enzyme arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT). However, in dystrophic RCS rats, AANAT was constitutively phosphorylated, causing rod-cone gap junctions to remain open. A further b/a-wave ratio analysis revealed that dystrophic RCS rats had stronger synaptic strength between photoreceptors and bipolar cells, possibly because rod-cone gap junctions remained open. This was despite the fact that a decrease was observed in the amplitude of both a- and b-waves as a result of the progressive loss of rods during early degenerative stages. These results suggest that electric synaptic strength is increased during the day to allow cone signals to pass to the remaining rods and to be propagated to rod bipolar cells, thereby partially compensating for the weak visual input caused by the loss of rods. PMID:28473754

  20. Diagnostic value of clinical tests for degenerative rotator cuff disease in medical practice.

    PubMed

    Lasbleiz, S; Quintero, N; Ea, K; Petrover, D; Aout, M; Laredo, J D; Vicaut, E; Bardin, T; Orcel, P; Beaudreuil, J

    2014-06-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of clinical tests for degenerative rotator cuff disease (DRCD) in medical practice. Patients with DRCD were prospectively included. Eleven clinical tests of the rotator cuff have been done. One radiologist performed ultrasonography (US) of the shoulder. Results of US were expressed as normal tendon, tendinopathy or full-thickness tear (the reference). For each clinical test and each US criteria, sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and positive predictive value, accuracy, negative likelihood ratio (NLR) and positive likelihood ratio (PLR) were calculated. Clinical relevance was defined as PLR ≥2 and NLR ≤0.5. For 35 patients (39 shoulders), Jobe (PLR: 2.08, NLR: 0.31) and full-can (2, 0.5) test results were relevant for diagnosis of supraspinatus tears and resisted lateral rotation (2.42, 0.5) for infraspinatus tears, with weakness as response criteria. The lift-off test (8.50, 0.27) was relevant for subscapularis tears with lag sign as response criteria. Yergason's test (3.7, 0.41) was relevant for tendinopathy of the long head of the biceps with pain as a response criterion. There was no relevant clinical test for diagnosis of tendinopathy of supraspinatus, infraspinatus or subscapularis. Five of 11 clinical tests were relevant for degenerative rotator cuff disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Cell-based therapeutic strategies for replacement and preservation in retinal degenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Melissa K.; Lu, Bin; Girman, Sergey; Wang, Shaomei

    2017-01-01

    Cell-based therapeutics offer diverse options for treating retinal degenerative diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). AMD is characterized by both genetic and environmental risks factors, whereas RP is mainly a monogenic disorder. Though treatments exist for some patients with neovascular AMD, a majority of retinal degenerative patients have no effective therapeutics, thus indicating a need for universal therapies to target diverse patient populations. Two main cell-based mechanistic approaches are being tested in clinical trials. Replacement therapies utilize cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to supplant lost or defective host RPE cells. These cells are similar in morphology and function to native RPE cells and can potentially supplant the responsibilities of RPE in vivo. Preservation therapies utilize supportive cells to aid in visual function and photoreceptor preservation partially by neurotrophic mechanisms. The goal of preservation strategies is to halt or slow the progression of disease and maintain remaining visual function. A number of clinical trials are testing the safety of replacement and preservation cell therapies in patients; however, measures of efficacy will need to be further evaluated. In addition, a number of prevailing concerns with regards to the immune-related response, longevity, and functionality of the grafted cells will need to be addressed in future trials. This review will summarize the current status of cell-based preclinical and clinical studies with a focus on replacement and preservation strategies and the obstacles that remain regarding these types of treatments. PMID:28111323

  2. dsRNA binding characterization of full length recombinant wild type and mutants Zaire ebolavirus VP35.

    PubMed

    Zinzula, Luca; Esposito, Francesca; Pala, Daniela; Tramontano, Enzo

    2012-03-01

    The Ebola viruses (EBOVs) VP35 protein is a multifunctional major virulence factor involved in EBOVs replication and evasion of the host immune system. EBOV VP35 is an essential component of the viral RNA polymerase, it is a key participant of the nucleocapsid assembly and it inhibits the innate immune response by antagonizing RIG-I like receptors through its dsRNA binding function and, hence, by suppressing the host type I interferon (IFN) production. Insights into the VP35 dsRNA recognition have been recently revealed by structural and functional analysis performed on its C-terminus protein. We report the biochemical characterization of the Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) full-length recombinant VP35 (rVP35)-dsRNA binding function. We established a novel in vitro magnetic dsRNA binding pull down assay, determined the rVP35 optimal dsRNA binding parameters, measured the rVP35 equilibrium dissociation constant for heterologous in vitro transcribed dsRNA of different length and short synthetic dsRNA of 8bp, and validated the assay for compound screening by assessing the inhibitory ability of auryntricarboxylic acid (IC(50) value of 50μg/mL). Furthermore, we compared the dsRNA binding properties of full length wt rVP35 with those of R305A, K309A and R312A rVP35 mutants, which were previously reported to be defective in dsRNA binding-mediated IFN inhibition, showing that the latter have measurably increased K(d) values for dsRNA binding and modified migration patterns in mobility shift assays with respect to wt rVP35. Overall, these results provide the first characterization of the full-length wt and mutants VP35-dsRNA binding functions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 77 FR 2601 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-4164 OMB Control #1405-XXXX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 7753] 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-4164 OMB Control 1405-XXXX ACTION: Notice of request for public comment and submission to OMB of proposed collection of information. SUMMARY: The Department of State has submitted the following information...

  4. 75 FR 25307 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-4100, Iran Program Grants Vetting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ...-4100, Iran Program Grants Vetting, Information Collection 1405-0176 ACTION: Notice of request for... Collection: Iran Program Grants. OMB Control Number: 1405-0176. Type of Request: Extension of a Currently...). Form Number: DS-4100. Respondents: Potential grantees and participants for Iran programs. Estimated...

  5. Parameters on plant absortion of double-stranded Ribonucleic acid, dsRNA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Efficient absorption of double-stranded Ribonucleic acid, dsRNA, into citrus is critical for effective psyllid management by RNA interference, RNAi. Parameters which might affect absorption into citrus trees and subsequent ingestion by Asian citrus psyllid were evaluated. Age of leaves, variety of c...

  6. "Get an Education in Case He Leaves You": "Consejos" for Mexican American Women PhDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espino, Michelle M.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Michelle M. Espino uncovers the ways in which twenty-five Mexican American women PhDs made meaning of conflicting messages about the purpose of higher education as they navigated within and through educational structures and shifting familial expectations. Participants received "consejos", or nurturing advice, from parents…

  7. 22 CFR 62.71 - Control and production of the electronic Form DS-2019.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Control and production of the electronic Form DS-2019. 62.71 Section 62.71 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) § 62.71 Control and...

  8. A DS106 Thing Happened on the Way to the 3M Tech Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockridge, Rochelle; Levine, Alan; Funes, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    This case study illustrates how DS106, a computer science course in Digital Storytelling from the University of Mary Washington (UMW) and accessible as an open course on the web, is being explored in a corporate environment at 3M, an American multinational corporation based in St. Paul, Minnesota, to build community, collaboration, and more…

  9. Societal Production and Careers of PhDs in Chemistry and Biochemistry in France and Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanciano-Morandat, Caroline; Nohara, Hiroatsu

    2013-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, the production of PhDs has become a much-discussed political issue, and the reforms and tensions surrounding this category of graduates have gathered momentum. Vocational fields and the contents of PhD education have evolved everywhere, partly because, as academic competition has intensified, the American "graduate…

  10. Benzoate-mediated changes on expression profile of soluble proteins in Serratia sp. DS001.

    PubMed

    Pandeeti, E V P; Chinnaboina, M R; Siddavattam, D

    2009-05-01

    To assess differences in protein expression profile associated with shift in carbon source from succinate to benzoate in Serratia sp. DS001 using a proteomics approach. A basic proteome map was generated for the soluble proteins extracted from Serratia sp. DS001 grown in succinate and benzoate. The differently and differentially expressed proteins were identified using ImageMaster 2D Platinum software (GE Healthcare). The identity of the proteins was determined by employing MS or MS/MS. Important enzymes such as Catechol 1,2 dioxygenase and transcriptional regulators that belong to the LysR superfamily were identified. Nearly 70 proteins were found to be differentially expressed when benzoate was used as carbon source. Based on the protein identity and degradation products generated from benzoate it is found that ortho pathway is operational in Serratia sp. DS001. Expression profile of the soluble proteins associated with shift in carbon source was mapped. The study also elucidates degradation pathway of benzoate in Serratia sp. DS001 by correlating the proteomics data with the catabolites of benzoate.

  11. Robust MOE Detector for DS-CDMA Systems with Signature Waveform Mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsui-Tsai

    In this letter, a decision-directed MOE detector with excellent robustness against signature waveform mismatch is proposed for DS-CDMA systems. Both the theoretic analysis and computer simulation results demonstrate that the proposed detector can provide better SINR performance than that of conventional detectors.

  12. Orthogonal Multi-Carrier DS-CDMA with Frequency-Domain Equalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ken; Tomeba, Hiromichi; Adachi, Fumiyuki

    Orthogonal multi-carrier direct sequence code division multiple access (orthogonal MC DS-CDMA) is a combination of orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) and time-domain spreading, while multi-carrier code division multiple access (MC-CDMA) is a combination of OFDM and frequency-domain spreading. In MC-CDMA, a good bit error rate (BER) performance can be achieved by using frequency-domain equalization (FDE), since the frequency diversity gain is obtained. On the other hand, the conventional orthogonal MC DS-CDMA fails to achieve any frequency diversity gain. In this paper, we propose a new orthogonal MC DS-CDMA that can obtain the frequency diversity gain by applying FDE. The conditional BER analysis is presented. The theoretical average BER performance in a frequency-selective Rayleigh fading channel is evaluated by the Monte-Carlo numerical computation method using the derived conditional BER and is confirmed by computer simulation of the orthogonal MC DS-CDMA signal transmission.

  13. Are PhDs Winners or Losers? Wage Premiums for Doctoral Degrees in Private Sector Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Heidi Skovgaard

    2016-01-01

    Policy makers expect increasing numbers of PhDs to find employment in the private sector. However, the incentive structure for completing a PhD and subsequently seeking private sector employment has not been adequately assessed in the literature. This paper investigates the financial incentives for this career choice of recent Danish PhD…

  14. 75 FR 66412 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-156, Nonimmigrant Visa Application, OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-28

    ..., Nonimmigrant Visa Application, OMB Control Number 1405-0018 ACTION: Notice of request for public comments... the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Title of Information Collection: Nonimmigrant Visa Application.... Originating Office: Bureau of Consular Affairs (CA/VO). Form Number: DS-156. Respondents: Nonimmigrant visa...

  15. 76 FR 20070 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-156, Nonimmigrant Visa Application, OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ..., Nonimmigrant Visa Application, OMB Control Number 1405-0018 ACTION: Notice of request for public comment and... accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Title of Information Collection: Nonimmigrant Visa.... Originating Office: Bureau of Consular Affairs (CA/VO). Form Number: DS-156. Respondents: Nonimmigrant visa...

  16. 76 FR 62494 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-157, Supplemental Nonimmigrant Visa Form...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ..., Supplemental Nonimmigrant Visa Form, OMB Control Number 1405-0134 ACTION: Notice of request for public comment...: Supplemental Nonimmigrant Visa Application. OMB Control Number: 1405-0134. Type of Request: Extension of a...). Form Number: DS-157. Respondents: Nonimmigrant visa applicants legally required to provide additional...

  17. 75 FR 77935 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-160, Online Application for Nonimmigrant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ..., Online Application for Nonimmigrant Visa, OMB 1405-0182 ACTION: Notice of request for public comment and... Nonimmigrant Visa. OMB Control Number: 1405-0182. Type of Request: Revision. Originating Office: Bureau of Consular Affairs, Visa Services (CA/VO). Form Number: DS-160. Respondents: All nonimmigrant visa applicants...

  18. Novel anti-EPHA2 antibody, DS-8895a for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Jun; Sue, Mayumi; Yamato, Michiko; Ichikawa, Junya; Ishida, Saori; Shibutani, Tomoko; Kitamura, Michiko; Wada, Teiji; Agatsuma, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Overexpression of EPHA2 has been observed in multiple cancers and reported to be associated with poor prognosis. Here, we produced an afucosylated humanized anti-EPHA2 monoclonal antibody (mAb), DS-8895a for cancer treatment. The antibody recognizes the extracellular juxtamembrane region of EPHA2 and therefore can bind to both full-length and truncated forms of EPHA2, which are anchored to cell membranes and recently reported to be produced by post-translational cleavage in tumors. DS-8895a exhibited markedly increased antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro and also inhibited tumor growth in EPHA2-positive human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and human gastric cancer SNU-16 xenograft mouse models. Moreover, DS-8895a in combination with cisplatin (CDDP) showed better efficacy than each of the monotherapies did in the human gastric cancer model. These results suggest that a novel antibody, DS-8895a has therapeutic potential against EPHA2-expressing tumors. PMID:27653549

  19. KiDS-450: tomographic cross-correlation of galaxy shear with Planck lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Tröster, Tilman; Chisari, Nora Elisa; Heymans, Catherine; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Asgari, Marika; Bilicki, Maciej; Choi, Ami; Erben, Thomas; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hoekstra, Henk; Joudaki, Shahab; Kuijken, Konrad; Merten, Julian; Miller, Lance; Robertson, Naomi; Schneider, Peter; Viola, Massimo

    2017-10-01

    We present the tomographic cross-correlation between galaxy lensing measured in the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS-450) with overlapping lensing measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), as detected by Planck 2015. We compare our joint probe measurement to the theoretical expectation for a flat Λ cold dark matter cosmology, assuming the best-fitting cosmological parameters from the KiDS-450 cosmic shear and Planck CMB analyses. We find that our results are consistent within 1σ with the KiDS-450 cosmology, with an amplitude re-scaling parameter AKiDS = 0.86 ± 0.19. Adopting a Planck cosmology, we find our results are consistent within 2σ, with APlanck = 0.68 ± 0.15. We show that the agreement is improved in both cases when the contamination to the signal by intrinsic galaxy alignments is accounted for, increasing A by ∼0.1. This is the first tomographic analysis of the galaxy lensing - CMB lensing cross-correlation signal, and is based on five photometric redshift bins. We use this measurement as an independent validation of the multiplicative shear calibration and of the calibrated source redshift distribution at high redshifts. We find that constraints on these two quantities are strongly correlated when obtained from this technique, which should therefore not be considered as a stand-alone competitive calibration tool.

  20. 77 FR 1777 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-260, Electronic Application for Immigration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ..., Electronic Application for Immigration Visa and Alien Registration, 1405-0185 ACTION: Notice of request for... for Immigration Visa and Alien Registration. OMB Control Number: 1405-0185. Type of Request: Extension... determine the eligibility of aliens applying for immigrant visas. Methodology: The DS-260 will be submitted...

  1. 77 FR 28921 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-260, Electronic Application for Immigration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ..., Electronic Application for Immigration Visa and Alien Registration, 1405-0185 ACTION: Notice of request for... Collection: Electronic Application for Immigration Visa and Alien Registration. OMB Control Number: 1405-0185... collection: Form DS-260 will be used to elicit information to determine the eligibility of aliens applying...

  2. Implementation of Distance Support (DS) to Reduce Total Ownership Cost (R-TOC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    ATIS ) for technical documentation,  PMS Scheduling (SKED)  Food Service Management (FSM3). For morale and welfare support, local web content...Development ( TD ) phase and use a systems engineering (SE) approach (similar to Figure 6 above) to help understand ramifications for deleting DS. For

  3. Dietary risk assessment of v-ATPase A dsRNAs on monarch butterfly larvae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The goal of this study is to assess the risks of RNA interference (RNAi)-based genetically engineered crops on a non-target arthropod, monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus. We hypothesize that an insecticidal double-stranded (ds) RNA targeting western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, ha...

  4. Which Firms Want PhDs? An Analysis of the Determinants of the Demand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Quevedo, Jose; Mas-Verdu, Francisco; Polo-Otero, Jose

    2012-01-01

    PhD graduates hold the highest education degree, are trained to conduct research and can be considered a key element in the creation, commercialization and diffusion of innovations. The impact of PhDs on innovation and economic development takes place through several channels such as the accumulation of scientific capital stock, the enhancement of…

  5. The Labor Market for PhDs in Science and Engineering: Career Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solmon, Lewis C.; Hurwicz, Margo-Lea

    The outcomes of the employment situation for science and engineering PhDs were assessed through a survey of college and university departments and faculty members who had accepted new academic jobs or who had left academic jobs for other positions within the last three years. Faculty members who had accepted their first job after receiving the…

  6. Changes in rates of arthroscopy due to degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland and Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, Ville M; Sihvonen, Raine; Paloneva, Juha; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Knee arthroscopy is commonly performed to treat degenerative knee disease symptoms and traumatic meniscal tears. We evaluated whether the recent high-quality randomized control trials not favoring arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee disease affected the procedure incidence and trends in Finland and Sweden. Patients and methods We conducted a bi-national registry-based study including all adult (aged ≥18 years) inpatient and outpatient arthroscopic surgeries performed for degenerative knee disease (osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative meniscal tears) and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland between 1997 and 2012, and in Sweden between 2001 and 2012. Results In Finland, the annual number of operations was 16,389 in 1997, reached 20,432 in 2007, and declined to 15,018 in 2012. In Sweden, the number of operations was 9,944 in 2001, reached 11,711 in 2008, and declined to 8,114 in 2012. The knee arthroscopy incidence for OA was 124 per 105 person-years in 2012 in Finland and it was 51 in Sweden. The incidence of knee arthroscopies for meniscal tears coded as traumatic steadily increased in Finland from 64 per 105 person-years in 1997 to 97 per 105 person-years in 2012, but not in Sweden. Interpretation The incidence of arthroscopies for degenerative knee disease declined after 2008 in both countries. Remarkably, the incidence of arthroscopy for degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears is 2 to 4 times higher in Finland than in Sweden. Efficient implementation of new high-quality evidence in clinical practice could reduce the number of ineffective surgeries. PMID:26122621

  7. Gene Expression in Human Meniscal Tears has Limited Association with Early Degenerative Changes in Knee Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Robert H.; Sandell, Linda J.; Cheverud, James M.; Rai, Muhammad Farooq

    2018-01-01

    Purpose/Aim Meniscus tears are a common injury to the knee associated with the development of osteoarthritis. Gene expression in the injured meniscus may be associated with early degeneration in the articular cartilage. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that gene expression in meniscus tears is associated with early degenerative changes in the articular cartilage at the time of partial meniscectomy. Materials and Methods Torn meniscus was removed at the time of partial meniscectomy in 63 patients without radiographic osteoarthritis. Meniscal mRNA expression was measured by quantitative PCR for multiple molecular markers of osteoarthritis and cartilage homeostasis. The presence of early degenerative changes in the knee was recorded by X-ray (N=63), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, N=48) and arthroscopy (N=63). Gene expression was tested for correlation with the presence/absence of degenerative changes after adjusting for age, sex and body mass index. Results Overall gene expression varied significantly with degenerative changes based on X-ray (P=0.047) and MRI (P=0.018). The linear combination of gene variation was also significant. However, only adiponectin (ADIPOQ) (P=0.015) was expressed at a significantly lower level in patients with chondrosis on MRI while the expression of ADIPOQ (P=0.035) and resistin (RETN) (P=0.017) was higher in patients with early degenerative changes on X-ray. Conclusions There is an overall association of gene expression in meniscal tears to early degenerative changes in the knee, but only a limited number of specific genes demonstrate this relationship. The roles of adiponectin and resistin in knee injury and osteoarthritis deserve further study. PMID:27435997

  8. 76 FR 43742 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-4155, Vendor Application for OFM Web...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 7531] 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-4155, Vendor Application for OFM Web Site Account; & Form DS-7576, Foreign Mission Emergency Afterhours... submission to OMB of proposed collection of information. SUMMARY: The Department of State has submitted the...

  9. The Effects of Spatial Diversity and Imperfect Channel Estimation on Wideband MC-DS-CDMA and MC-CDMA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    In our previous work, we compared the theoretical bit error rates of multi-carrier direct sequence code division multiple access (MC- DS - CDMA ) and...consider only those cases where MC- CDMA has higher frequency diversity than MC- DS - CDMA . Since increases in diversity yield diminishing gains, we conclude

  10. 75 FR 54690 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-160, Online Application for Nonimmigrant Visa

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  13. Dramatically reduced surface expression of NK cell receptor KIR2DS3 is attributed to multiple residues throughout the molecule.

    PubMed

    VandenBussche, C J; Mulrooney, T J; Frazier, W R; Dakshanamurthy, S; Hurley, C K

    2009-03-01

    Using flow cytometry, fluorescent microscopy and examination of receptor glycosylation status, we demonstrate that an entire killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) locus (KIR2DS3)--assumed earlier to be surface expressed--appears to have little appreciable surface expression in transfected cells. This phenotype was noted for receptors encoded by three allelic variants including the common KIR2DS3*001 allele. Comparing the surface expression of KIR2DS3 with that of the better-studied KIR2DS1 molecule in two different cell lines, mutational analysis identified multiple polymorphic amino-acid residues that significantly alter the proportion of molecules present on the cell surface. A simultaneous substitution of five residues localized to the leader peptide (residues -18 and -7), second domain (residues 123 and 150) and transmembrane region (residue 234) was required to restore KIR2DS3 to the expression level of KIR2DS1. Corresponding simultaneous substitutions of KIR2DS1 to the KIR2DS3 residues resulted in a dramatically decreased surface expression. Molecular modeling was used to predict how these substitutions contribute to this phenotype. Alterations in receptor surface expression are likely to affect the balance of immune cell signaling impacting the characteristics of the response to pathogens or malignancy.

  14. 75 FR 58012 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: DS-156E Nonimmigrant Treaty Trader/Investor...

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