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Sample records for degree female cone

  1. Hypersonic Flows About a 25 degree Sharp Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a numerical study that examines the surface heating discrepancies observed between computed and measured values along a sharp cone. With Mach numbers of an order of 10 and the freestream length Reynolds number of an order of 10 000, the present computations have been made with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method by using the G2 code of Bird. The flow conditions are those specified for two experiments conducted in the Veridian 48-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel. Axisymmetric simulations are made since the test model was assumed to be at zero incidence. Details of the current calculations are presented, along with comparisons between the experimental data, for surface heating and pressure distributions. Results of the comparisons show major differences in measured and calculated results for heating distributions, with differences in excess of 25 percent for the two cases examined.

  2. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... biopsy; Pap smear - cone biopsy; HPV - cone biopsy; Human papilloma virus - cone biopsy; Cervix - cone biopsy; Colposcopy - cone biopsy Images Female reproductive anatomy Cold cone biopsy Cold cone removal References American ...

  3. Completing a Graduate Degree: A Case of a Female Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regmi, Kapil Dev

    2011-01-01

    This paper was written as an assignment for one of my courses while pursuing a graduate degree in the Department of Education Studies at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Canada. I have made an attempt to explore perceptions and experiences of a female graduate student on four different aspects of her family and academic life. The four…

  4. Isolation and expression profiles of gibberellin metabolism genes in developing male and female cones of Pinus tabuliformis.

    PubMed

    Niu, Shihui; Yuan, Lu; Zhang, Yuncheng; Chen, Xiaoyang; Li, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are important in the floral regulatory networks of angiosperm plants. Several lines of evidence suggest that GAs also play a pivotal role in conifer male and female cone development. To gain new insights into the GA metabolism pathway in conifer trees and the role of GA metabolism in male and female cone development, we identified GA metabolism genes in Pinus tabuliformis. These included one PtCPS gene, one PtKS gene, one PtKO gene, TWO PtKAO genes, one PtGA20ox gene, two PtGA3ox genes and 12 PtGA2ox genes. According to phylogenetic analysis, the GA biosynthesis pathway evolved after the divergence of mosses from ferns, but the GA-deactivating gene family underwent divided expansion after divergence of the angiosperms from gymnosperms. However, the active sites of all GA metabolism enzymes were conserved during the evolution of land plants. During male and female cone development of P. tabuliformis, the expression of most of the PtGA2ox genes, especially PtGA2ox10, was higher than GA biosynthesis genes. However, the expression of PtKAO1 in cones peaked at a very early developmental stage. The expression pattern of GA metabolism genes indicated that GAs play different roles at the early and late stages of cone development.

  5. Experimental Study of Second-Mode Instabilities on a 7-Degree Cone at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rufer, Shann J.; Berridge, Dennis C.

    2011-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel to measure the second-mode boundary-layer instability on a 7deg half-angle cone using high-frequency pressure sensors. Data were obtained with both blunt and sharp nosetips installed on the cone. The second-mode wave amplitudes were observed to saturate and then begin to decrease in the Langley tunnels, indicating wave breakdown. Pressure fluctuation measurements and thermocouple data indicated the location of transition along the cone at the different conditions tested. Comparisons between the power density spectra obtained during the current test and previous data from the Langley 15-Inch Mach 6 High Temperature Tunnel and the Boeing/AFOSR Mach 6 Quiet tunnel illustrate the effect of tunnel noise on instability growth and transition.

  6. Turbulent Spot Observations within a Hypervelocity Boundary Layer ona 5-degree Half-Angle Cone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    thermocouples in 20 rows. Bottom, from right to left: molybdenum tip, plastic holder with 316L stainless steel 10 micron porous section, aluminum cone...porous injector section is 4.13 cm in length and consists of sintered 316L stainless steel, with an average pore size of 10 microns. A detail view of

  7. DSMC simulations of Mach 20 nitrogen flows about a 70 degree blunted cone and its wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Dogra, Virendra K.; Wilmoth, Richard G.

    1993-01-01

    Numerical results obtained with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method are presented for Mach 20 nitrogen flow about a 70-deg blunted cone. The flow conditions simulated are those that can be obtained in existing low-density hypersonic wind tunnels. Three sets of flow conditions are simulated with freestream Knudsen numbers ranging from 0.03 to 0.001. The focus is to characterize the wake flow under rarefied conditions. This is accomplished by calculating the influence of rarefaction on wake structure along with the impact that an afterbody has on flow features. This data report presents extensive information concerning flowfield features and surface quantities.

  8. Assessment of optimal condylar position with cone-beam computed tomography in south Indian female population

    PubMed Central

    Manjula, W. S.; Tajir, Faizal; Murali, R. V.; Kumar, S. Kishore; Nizam, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate, the condyle-fossa relationship, in clinically asymptomatic orthodontically untreated south Indian female volunteers, by cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 13 clinically symptom-free and orthodontically untreated angle's Class I female subjects with the mean age of 18 years (ranges from 17 years to 20 years). The normal disc position of the 13 subjects was confirmed by history, clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging scan. Then, the images of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ)of the subjects were taken using CBCT to evaluate the optimal condylar position. Posterior joint space (PS), superior joint space (SS) and anterior joint space (AS) were measured, and the values were subjected to statistical analysis. Mean PS, SS and AS of right and left side TMJ ' and AS of right sid 's were calculated. Paired samples t-test were used for each measurement to evaluate the average differences between the right and left side for each element of the sample. Results: The mean value of PS, SS and AS of right side TMJ 's were 2.1385, 2.2769 and 1.7615, respectively. The mean value of PS, SS and AS of left side TMJ 's were 2.1385, 2.5308 and 1.8538, respectively. Statistical analysis with the t-test indicated no significant differences in the AS, SS, or PS values between the right and left side. TMJ 's mean PS, SS, and AS measurements were2.1 mm (standard deviation [SD] ±0.65 mm), 2.4 mm (SD ± 0.58 mm), and 1.8 mm (SD ± 0.52 mm), respectively. The ratios of SS and PS to AS, with AS set to 1.0, were 1.3 and 1.2, respectively. Conclusion: These data from optimal joints might serve as norms for the clinical assessment of condylar position obtained by CBCT. PMID:26015688

  9. First-Generation Female College Students' Financial Literacy: Real and Perceived Barriers to Degree Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eitel, Susan J.; Martin, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    First-generation female college students (FGFCS) make up a large portion of the diversity in higher education. Unfortunately "access" to education does not translate to success. Persistence and degree completion for these students is often undermined by seemingly insurmountable obstacles. The purposes of this study were to identify the financial…

  10. Transition Within a Hypervelocity Boundary Layer on a 5-Degree Half-Angle Cone in Air/CO2 Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    into the T5 nozzle at run time, in order to maximize the linear extent of the cone within the test rhombus defined by the expansion fan radiating from...reservoir, which serves as the inflow for the nozzle flow simulations. The reservoir conditions are obtained by solving for chemical and thermal...CEA) code. These conditions are allowed to expand through the nozzle using the CFD solver described below. For the current computational analysis

  11. To grow or to seed: ecotypic variation in reproductive allocation and cone production by young female Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis, Pinaceae).

    PubMed

    Climent, José; Prada, M Aránzazu; Calama, Rafael; Chambel, M Regina; de Ron, David Sánchez; Alía, Ricardo

    2008-07-01

    Age and size at the first reproduction and the reproductive allocation of plants are linked to different life history strategies. Aleppo pine only reproduces through seed, and, as such, early female reproduction confers high fitness in its infertile highly fire-prone habitats along the Mediterranean coast because life expectancy is short. We investigated the extent of ecotypic differentiation in female reproductive allocation and examined the relation between early female reproduction and vegetative growth. In a common-garden experiment, the threshold age and size at first female reproduction and female reproductive allocation at age seven differed significantly among Aleppo pine provenances of ecologically distinct origin. Significant correlations among reproductive features of the provenances and the ecological traits of origin were found using different analytical tools. In nonlinear models of cone counts vs. stem volume, medium-sized trees (not the largest trees) produced the highest cone yield, confirming that, at the individual level, early female reproduction is incompatible with fast vegetative growth. The contribution of founder effects and adaptation to contrasting fire regimes may be confounding factors. But considering all traits analyzed, the geographical patterns of resource allocation by Aleppo pine suggest ecotypic specialization for either resource-poor (favoring early reproduction) or resource-rich (favoring vegetative growth) habitats.

  12. Supersonic Free-Flight Measurements of Heat Transfer and Transition on a 10 degree Cone having a Low Temperature Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merlet, Charles F.; Rumsey, Charles B.

    1961-01-01

    Heat-transfer coefficients in the form of Stanton number and boundary-layer transition data were obtained from a free-flight test of a 100-inch-long 10 deg. total-angle cone with a 1/16-inch tip radius which penetrated deep into the region of infinite stability of laminar boundary layer over a range of wall-to-local-stream temperature radius and for local Mach numbers from 1.8 to 3.5. Experimental heat-transfer coefficients, obtained at Reynolds numbers up to 160 x 10(exp 6), were in general somewhat higher than theoretical values. A maximum Reynolds number of transition of only 33 x 10(exp 6) was obtained. Contrary to theoretical and some other experimental investigations, the transition Reynolds number initially increased while the wall temperature ratio increased at relatively constant Mach number. Further increases in wall temperature ratio were accompanied by a decrease in transition Reynolds number. Increasing transition Reynolds number with increasing Mach number was also indicated at a relatively constant wall temperature ratio.

  13. SU-E-J-46: Evaluation of the Accuracy of a Six Degree of Freedom Robotic Couch Using ConeBeam CT Images of the Isocal Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q; Driewer, J; Wang, S; Li, S; Zheng, D; Zhu, X; Zhen, W; Wahl, A; Lin, C; Thompson, R; Zhou, S; Enke, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose The accuracy of Varian PerfectPitch six degree of freedom (DOF) robotic couch was examined using Varian Isocal phantom and cone-beam CT (CBCT) system. Methods CBCT images of the Isocal phantom were taken at different pitch and roll angles. The pitch and roll angles were varied from 357 to 3 degrees in one degree increments by input from service console, generating a total of 49 combinations with couch angle (yaw) zero. The center positions of the 16 tungsten carbide BBs contained in the Isocal were determined with in-house image processing software. Expected BBs positions at different rotation angles were determined mathematically by applying a combined translation/rotation operator to BB positions at zero pitch and roll values. A least square method was used to minimize the difference between the expected BB positions and their measured positions. In this way rotation angles were obtained and compared with input values from the console. Results A total of 49 CBCT images with voxel sizes 0.51 mm × 0.51 mm × 1 mm were used in analysis. Among the 49 calculations, the maximum rotation angle differences were 0.1 degree, 0.15 degree, and 0.09 degree, for pitch, roll, and couch rotation, respectively. The mean ± standard-deviation angle differences were 0.028±0.001 degree, −0.043±0.003 degree, and −0.009±0.001 degree, for pitch, roll, and couch rotation, respectively. The maximum isocenter shifts were 0.3 mm, 0.5 mm, 0.4 mm in x, y, z direction respectively following IEC6127 convention. The mean isocenter shifts were 0.07±0.02 mm, −0.05±0.06 mm, and −0.12±0.02 mm in x, y and z directions. Conclusion The accuracy of the Varian PerfectPitch six DOF couch was studied with CBCTs of the Isocal phantom. The rotational errors were less than 0.15 degree and isocenter shifts were less than 0.5 mm in any direction. This accuracy is sufficient for stereotactic radiotherapy clinical applications.

  14. Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Utilizing Cone-Beam CT Image-Guidance With a Robotic Couch: Intrafraction Motion Analysis Accounting for all Six Degrees of Freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Derek; Lochray, Fiona; Korol, Renee; Davidson, Melanie; Wong, C. Shun; Ma, Lijun; Sahgal, Arjun

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the residual setup error and intrafraction motion following kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance, for immobilized spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients, with positioning corrected for in all six degrees of freedom. Methods and Materials: Analysis is based on 42 consecutive patients (48 thoracic and/or lumbar metastases) treated with a total of 106 fractions and 307 image registrations. Following initial setup, a CBCT was acquired for patient alignment and a pretreatment CBCT taken to verify shifts and determine the residual setup error, followed by a midtreatment and posttreatment CBCT image. For 13 single-fraction SBRT patients, two midtreatment CBCT images were obtained. Initially, a 1.5-mm and 1 Degree-Sign tolerance was used to reposition the patient following couch shifts which was subsequently reduced to 1 mm and 1 Degree-Sign degree after the first 10 patients. Results: Small positioning errors after the initial CBCT setup were observed, with 90% occurring within 1 mm and 97% within 1 Degree-Sign . In analyzing the impact of the time interval for verification imaging (10 {+-} 3 min) and subsequent image acquisitions (17 {+-} 4 min), the residual setup error was not significantly different (p > 0.05). A significant difference (p = 0.04) in the average three-dimensional intrafraction positional deviations favoring a more strict tolerance in translation (1 mm vs. 1.5 mm) was observed. The absolute intrafraction motion averaged over all patients and all directions along x, y, and z axis ({+-} SD) were 0.7 {+-} 0.5 mm and 0.5 {+-} 0.4 mm for the 1.5 mm and 1 mm tolerance, respectively. Based on a 1-mm and 1 Degree-Sign correction threshold, the target was localized to within 1.2 mm and 0.9 Degree-Sign with 95% confidence. Conclusion: Near-rigid body immobilization, intrafraction CBCT imaging approximately every 15-20 min, and strict repositioning thresholds in six degrees of freedom yields minimal intrafraction motion

  15. Pursuing and Completing an Undergraduate Computing Degree from a Female Perspective: A Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragsdale, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The computing profession in the United States would benefit from an increasingly diverse workforce, specifically a larger female presence, because a more gender-balanced workforce would likely result in better technological solutions to difficulties in many areas of American life. However, to achieve this balance, more women with a solid…

  16. Personality Profiles of Noncollege-degreed Women in Male and Female Typical Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazen, A. Magid

    Research on women in atypical occupations has generally focused on highly educated women and has neglected to compare atypically employed women to equally educated women in sex-typical occupations. Since the median American worker has only 13.6 years of schooling, the lack of research on the personality characteristics of noncollege-degreed women…

  17. Morphological changes in the pharyngeal airway of female skeletal class III patients following bimaxillary surgery: a cone beam computed tomography evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Y-M; Liu, J-L; Zhao, J-L; Dai, J; Wang, L; Chen, J-W

    2014-07-01

    Using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), the present study compared three-dimensional (3D) changes in the pharyngeal airway and surrounding tissues in female skeletal class III patients treated with bimaxillary surgery. Twenty-nine female skeletal class III patients with both maxillary hypoplasia and a mandibular excess underwent bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy for mandibular setback combined with Le Fort I osteotomy for maxillary advancement. Volumetric measurements were performed using CBCT scans taken at 1 week presurgery and 6 months post-surgery. The oropharynx volumes and the cross-sectional area behind the soft palate decreased significantly. There was an insignificant change in the volume of the nasopharynx (P>0.05). The hyoid bone moved downward and posteriorly after surgery. The morphology of the soft palate also changed dramatically, with an increase in the length and thickness. Negative correlations were found between the pharyngeal airway space and the position of the hyoid bone. The change in morphology of the soft palate was significantly correlated with the changes in hyoid bone position. These 3D results suggest that bimaxillary orthognathic surgery significantly changes the position of the hyoid bone and the soft palate together with a significant decrease in the pharyngeal airway space in the correction of skeletal class III malocclusion.

  18. Who Will Do Science? Trends, and Their Causes in Minority and Female Representation among Holders of Advanced Degrees in Science and Mathematics. A Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berryman, Sue E.

    This paper describes trends in and causes of minority and female representation among holders of advanced science and math degrees. The minority groups studied are Blacks, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, and Asian Americans, all of whom are compared with Whites. The degrees looked at include those in math, the computer sciences, physical…

  19. The cone dysfunction syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Aboshiha, Jonathan; Dubis, Adam M; Hardcastle, Alison J; Michaelides, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The cone dysfunction syndromes are a heterogeneous group of inherited, predominantly stationary retinal disorders characterised by reduced central vision and varying degrees of colour vision abnormalities, nystagmus and photophobia. This review details the following conditions: complete and incomplete achromatopsia, blue-cone monochromatism, oligocone trichromacy, bradyopsia and Bornholm eye disease. We describe the clinical, psychophysical, electrophysiological and imaging findings that are characteristic to each condition in order to aid their accurate diagnosis, as well as highlight some classically held notions about these diseases that have come to be challenged over the recent years. The latest data regarding the genetic aetiology and pathological changes observed in the cone dysfunction syndromes are discussed, and, where relevant, translational avenues of research, including completed and anticipated interventional clinical trials, for some of the diseases described herein will be presented. Finally, we briefly review the current management of these disorders. PMID:25770143

  20. The Effect of Required Cooperative Education (Co-Op) on the Pursuit of an Undergraduate Engineering Degree for Female Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntz, Vickie L.

    2009-01-01

    Female enrollment in engineering has been historically low. Researchers claim chilly classroom environments and societal expectations of gender and work as reasons why so few women pursue engineering. This qualitative study explores the effects of required cooperative education on a female student's choice of and persistence in an undergraduate…

  1. Tenth value layers for 60Co gamma rays and for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV x rays in concrete for beams of cone angles between 0 degrees and 14 degrees calculated by Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Jaradat, Adnan K; Biggs, Peter J

    2007-05-01

    The calculation of shielding barrier thicknesses for radiation therapy facilities according to the NCRP formalism is based on the use of broad beams (that is, the maximum possible field sizes). However, in practice, treatment fields used in radiation therapy are, on average, less than half the maximum size. Indeed, many contemporary treatment techniques call for reduced field sizes to reduce co-morbidity and the risk of second cancers. Therefore, published tenth value layers (TVLs) for shielding materials do not apply to these very small fields. There is, hence, a need to determine the TVLs for various beam modalities as a function of field size. The attenuation of (60)Co gamma rays and photons of 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV bremsstrahlung x ray beams by concrete has been studied using the Monte Carlo technique (MCNP version 4C2) for beams of half-opening angles of 0 degrees , 3 degrees , 6 degrees , 9 degrees , 12 degrees , and 14 degrees . The distance between the x-ray source and the distal surface of the shielding wall was fixed at 600 cm, a distance that is typical for modern radiation therapy rooms. The maximum concrete thickness varied between 76.5 cm and 151.5 cm for (60)Co and 18 MV x rays, respectively. Detectors were placed at 630 cm, 700 cm, and 800 cm from the source. TVLs have been determined down to the third TVL. Energy spectra for 4, 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV x rays for 10 x 10 cm(2) and 40 x 40 cm(2) field sizes were used to generate depth dose curves in water that were compared with experimentally measured values.

  2. Body-Building: A Female Student's Use of the Transitional Spaces of a Painting Degree Course to Explore Her Sexual Desirability and Aesthetics as a "Grotesque" Female Body

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chittenden, Tara

    2013-01-01

    Whilst a part of the fine art degree course is about teaching technical skills and learning from tutor/peer group crits, a larger part is about the facilitation of a "safe" and structured space in which students gain the confidence to experiment with personal ideas, to hone a self-critical reflection and understand who they are as individuals,…

  3. Operating in the Middle: The Experiences of African American Female Transfer Students in STEM Degree Programs at HBCUs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dimitra Jackson

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the representation of African American females is essential to ensure the United States (U.S.) remains a viable competitor in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) workforce. With minorities anticipated to represent half of the resident U.S population by 2050, fostering STEM talent among this population is vital.…

  4. GENERALIZED CONVEXITY CONES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Introduction The dual cone of C (psi sub 1,..., psi sub n) Extreme rays The cone dual to an intersection of generalized convexity cones... Generalized difference quotients and multivariate convexity Miscellaneous applications of generalized convexity.

  5. Longitudinal effects of college type and selectivity on degrees conferred upon undergraduate females in physical science, life science, math and computer science, and social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Stacy Mckimm

    There has been much research to suggest that a single-sex college experience for female undergraduate students can increase self-confidence and leadership ability during the college years and beyond. The results of previous studies also suggest that these students achieve in the workforce and enter graduate school at higher rates than their female peers graduating from coeducational institutions. However, some researchers have questioned these findings, suggesting that it is the selectivity level of the colleges rather than the comprised gender of the students that causes these differences. The purpose of this study was to justify the continuation of single-sex educational opportunities for females at the post-secondary level by examining the effects that college selectivity, college type, and time have on the rate of undergraduate females pursuing majors in non-traditional fields. The study examined the percentage of physical science, life science, math and computer science, and social science degrees conferred upon females graduating from women's colleges from 1985-2001, as compared to those at comparable coeducational colleges. Sampling for this study consisted of 42 liberal arts women's (n = 21) and coeducational (n = 21) colleges. Variables included the type of college, the selectivity level of the college, and the effect of time on the percentage of female graduates. Doubly multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance testing revealed significant main effects for college selectivity on social science graduates, and time on both life science and math and computer science graduates. Significant interaction was also found between the college type and time on social science graduates, as well as the college type, selectivity level, and time on math and computer science graduates. Implications of the results and suggestions for further research are discussed.

  6. Homologies among Coniferophyte cones: further observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauvogel-Stamm, Léa; Galtier, Jean

    1998-04-01

    A reinvestigation of the Triassic conifer pollen cone of Darneya shows evidence that clusters of pollen sacs are attached (adnate), at regular intervals, to the upper side of the stalk and that the distribution of stomata is restricted to the apical part of the abaxial side of the peltate scale. These features and others, such as the commissure visible on the stalk and the scale, suggest a dual nature of the male scale complex of Darneya which therefore is interpreted as an abaxial bract fused with an adaxial fertile shoot bearing several clusters of pollen sacs. This conifer pollen cone is thus considered as a compound strobilus (inflorescence) homologous with the female cone of the conifers and therefore with the cones, both male and female, of the cordaites.

  7. Uncooked rice of relatively low gelatinization degree resulted in lower metabolic glucose and insulin responses compared with cooked rice in female college students.

    PubMed

    Jung, Eun Young; Suh, Hyung Joo; Hong, Wan Soo; Kim, Dong Geon; Hong, Yang Hee; Hong, In Sun; Chang, Un Jae

    2009-07-01

    Cooking processes that gelatinize granules or disrupt structure might increase the glucose and insulin responses because a disruption of the structure of starch by gelatinization increases its availability for digestion and absorption in the small intestine. We hypothesized that the uncooked form of rice, which has a relatively low degree of gelatinization even though in powder form, would result in lower metabolic glucose and insulin responses compared with cooked rice (CR). To assess the effects of the gelatinization of rice on metabolic response of glucose and insulin, we investigated the glucose and insulin responses to 3 rice meals of different gelatinization degree in female college students (n = 12): CR (76.9% gelatinized), uncooked rice powder (UP; 3.5% gelatinized), and uncooked freeze-dried rice powder (UFP; 5.4% gelatinized). Uncooked rice powders (UP and UFP) induced lower glucose and insulin responses compared with CR. The relatively low gelatinization degree of UPs resulted in low metabolic responses in terms of the glycemic index (CR: 72.4% vs UP: 49.7%, UFP: 59.8%) and insulin index (CR: 94.8% vs UP: 74.4%, UFP: 68.0%). In summary, UPs that were less gelatinized than CR induced low postprandial glucose and insulin responses.

  8. Measurement and Empirical Correlation of Transpiration-Cooling Parameters on a 25 degree Cone in a Turbulent Boundary Layer in Both Free Flight and a Hot-Gas Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Thomas E., Jr.; Rashis, Bernard

    1961-01-01

    Transpiration-cooling parameters are presented for a turbulent boundary layer on a cone configuration with a total angle of 250 which was tested in both free flight and in an ethylene-heated high-temperature jet at a Mach number of 2.0. The flight-tested cone was flown to a maximum Mach number of 4.08 and the jet tests were conducted at stagnation temperatures ranging from 937 R to 1,850 R. In general, the experimental heat transfer was in good agreement with the theoretical values. Inclusion of the ratio of local stream temperature to wall temperature in the nondimensional flow rate parameter enabled good correlation of both sets of transpiration data. The measured pressure at the forward station coincided with the theoretical pressure over a sharp cone; however, the measured pressure increased with distance from the nose tip.

  9. Structural and Function Correlation of Cone Packing Utilizing Adaptive Optics and Microperimetry

    PubMed Central

    Supriya, Dabir; Shwetha, Mangalesh; Kiran Anupama, Kumar; Kummelil Mathew, Kurian; Berendschot, Tos T. J. M.; Schouten, Jan S. A. G.; Bharamshetter, Roopa; Naresh, Yadav K.; Rohit, Shetty; Hegde, Bharath

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To assess the functional aspects of cone mosaic and correlate cone packing with retinal sensitivity utilizing microperimetry in emmetropes at different eccentricities. Methods. Twenty-four healthy volunteers underwent microperimetry (MAIA Centervue, Italy) and assessment of photoreceptors using adaptive optics retinal camera, rtx1 (Imagine Eyes, Orsay, France), at 2 and 3 degrees from the foveal centre in 4 quadrants: superior, inferior, temporal, and nasal. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 17 (IBM). Spearman's correlation tests were used to establish correlation between mean cone packing density and retinal sensitivity at different quadrants. Results. Thirteen females and 11 males (age range 20–40 years) were included. The cone density was found to be significantly different among all quadrants (temporal = 25786.68/mm2 ± 4367.07/mm2, superior = 23009.35/mm2 ± 5415.81/mm2, nasal = 22838.09/mm2 ± 4166.22/mm2, and inferior = 21097.53/mm2 ± 4235.84/mm2). A statistical significance (P < 0.008) was found between orthogonal meridians, that is, temporal, nasal (48624.77/mm2)> superior, inferior (44106.88/mm2). A drop in retinal sensitivity was observed as the eccentricity increased (P < 0.05). It was also found that as cone packing density decreased retinal sensitivity also decreased (P < 0.05) in all quadrants. This was observed at both 2 and 3 degrees. Conclusion. It is of crucial importance to establish normative variations in cone structure-function correlation. This may help in detection of subtle pathology and its early intervention. PMID:26167509

  10. Berkeley Lighting Cone

    SciTech Connect

    Lask, Kathleen; Gadgil, Ashok

    2016-10-24

    A lighting cone is a simple metal cone placed on the fuel bed of a stove during ignition to act as a chimney, increasing the draft through the fuel bed. Many stoves tend to be difficult to light due to poor draft through the fuel bed, so lighting cones are used in various parts of the world as an inexpensive accessory to help with ignition.

  11. Experimental Determination of the Recovery Factor and Analytical Solution of the Conical Flow Field for a 20 deg Included Angle Cone at Mach Numbers of 4.6 and 6.0 and Stagnation Temperatures to 2600 degree R

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfyl, Frank A.; Presley, Leroy L.

    1961-01-01

    The local recovery factor was determined experimentally along the surface of a thin-walled 20 deg included angle cone for Mach numbers near 6.0 at stagnation temperatures between 1200 deg R and 2600 deg R. In addition, a similar cone configuration was tested at Mach numbers near 4.5 at stagnation temperatures of approximately 612 deg R. The local Reynolds number based on flow properties at the edge of the boundary layer ranged between 0.1 x 10(exp 4) and 3.5 x 10(exp 4) for tests at temperatures above 1200 deg R and between 6 x 10(exp 4) and 25 x 10(exp 4) for tests at temperatures near 612 deg R. The results indicated, generally, that the recovery factor can be predicted satisfactorily using the square root of the Prandtl number. No conclusion could be made as to the necessity of evaluating the Prandtl number at a reference temperature given by an empirical equation, as opposed to evaluating the Prandtl number at the wall temperature or static temperature of the gas at the cone surface. For the tests at temperatures above 1200 deg R (indicated herein as the tests conducted in the slip-flow region), two definite trends in the recovery data were observed - one of increasing recovery factor with decreasing stagnation pressure, which was associated with slip-flow effects and one of decreasing recovery factor with increasing temperature. The true cause of the latter trend could not be ascertained, but it was shown that this trend was not appreciably altered by the sources of error of the magnitude considered herein. The real-gas equations of state were used to determine accurately the local stream properties at the outer edge of the boundary layer of the cone. Included in the report, therefore, is a general solution for the conical flow of a real gas using the Beattie-Bridgeman equation of state. The largest effect of temperature was seen to be in the terms which were dependent upon the internal energy of the gas. The pressure and hence the pressure drag terms were

  12. Exploring the topographic evolution of cinder cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrowsmith, R.; Zibart, S.; Gleeman, E.; Alfano, F.; Clarke, A. B.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Dekko, R.

    2013-12-01

    The simple original form and monogenetic character of cinder cones make them interesting targets for the study of landscape evolution. Topographic metrics such as cone height-width ratios and histograms of topographic slope yield useful and portable characterizations of cinder cone relative ages. We explored the topographic evolution of cinder cones by simulating surface processes using numerical and physical experimentation approaches and by collecting high resolution topography over exemplary elements of the San Francisco Volcanic field in northern Arizona. We identified a clear distinction in cone form development between those composed of transport-limited cinder only and those with a capping hard agglutinated rim. We employed a fully 2 dimensional numerical implementation of non linear diffusion with spatially variable transport rates. The agglutinate was idealized as an annulus of diminished transport rate. In the laboratory, we used a simple erosion model consisting of fine mist over a cone of fine sand. The agglutinate was represented with a spray adhesive cap. Non-agglutinated cones show a steady decrease in height and increase in width over time, resulting in a lower height-to-width ratios and greater rounding of profiles than agglutinated cones. The presence of an agglutinate top lessens the degree of rounding, producing a concave profile with a resistant 'neck' as the cone flank erodes, in contrast with non-agglutinated cones which develop into convex-concave profiles. The resistant agglutinate protects itself and the material directly underneath it from erosion; this material stays in place while the sediments around it are transported downslope. The slope distributions start out as bimodal: flat and angle of repose. In the non-agglutinated case, the rounding of the cone and broadening of the base produces a more continuous slope distribution with overall progressive slope decrease from the angle of repose and slope increase from the flat base. The

  13. Residual Foveal Cone Structure in CNGB3-Associated Achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    Langlo, Christopher S.; Patterson, Emily J.; Higgins, Brian P.; Summerfelt, Phyllis; Razeen, Moataz M.; Erker, Laura R.; Parker, Maria; Collison, Frederick T.; Fishman, Gerald A.; Kay, Christine N.; Zhang, Jing; Weleber, Richard G.; Yang, Paul; Wilson, David J.; Pennesi, Mark E.; Lam, Byron L.; Chiang, John; Chulay, Jeffrey D.; Dubra, Alfredo; Hauswirth, William W.; Carroll, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Congenital achromatopsia (ACHM) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which cone function is absent or severely reduced. Gene therapy in animal models of ACHM have shown restoration of cone function, though translation of these results to humans relies, in part, on the presence of viable cone photoreceptors at the time of treatment. Here, we characterized residual cone structure in subjects with CNGB3-associated ACHM. Methods High-resolution imaging (optical coherence tomography [OCT] and adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy [AOSLO]) was performed in 51 subjects with CNGB3-associated ACHM. Peak cone density and inter-cone spacing at the fovea was measured using split-detection AOSLO. Foveal outer nuclear layer thickness was measured in OCT images, and the integrity of the photoreceptor layer was assessed using a previously published OCT grading scheme. Results Analyzable images of the foveal cones were obtained in 26 of 51 subjects, with nystagmus representing the major obstacle to obtaining high-quality images. Peak foveal cone density ranged from 7,273 to 53,554 cones/mm2, significantly lower than normal (range, 84,733–234,391 cones/mm2), with the remnant cones being either contiguously or sparsely arranged. Peak cone density was correlated with OCT integrity grade; however, there was overlap of the density ranges between OCT grades. Conclusions The degree of residual foveal cone structure varies greatly among subjects with CNGB3-associated ACHM. Such measurements may be useful in estimating the therapeutic potential of a given retina, providing affected individuals and physicians with valuable information to more accurately assess the risk-benefit ratio as they consider enrolling in experimental gene therapy trials. (www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01846052.) PMID:27479814

  14. Growth cone collapse assay.

    PubMed

    Cook, Geoffrey M W; Jareonsettasin, Prem; Keynes, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    The growth cone collapse assay has proved invaluable in detecting and purifying axonal repellents. Glycoproteins/proteins present in detergent extracts of biological tissues are incorporated into liposomes, added to growth cones in culture and changes in morphology are then assessed. Alternatively purified or recombinant molecules in aqueous solution may be added directly to the cultures. In both cases after a defined period of time (up to 1 h), the cultures are fixed and then assessed by inverted phase contrast microscopy for the percentage of growth cones showing a collapsed profile with loss of flattened morphology, filopodia, and lamellipodia.

  15. 2017 Eclipse Shadow Cones

    NASA Video Gallery

    A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's shadow falls on the Earth. The shadow comprises two concentric cones called the umbra and the penumbra. Within the smaller, central umbra, the Sun is complete...

  16. Individual variations in human cone photoreceptor packing density

    PubMed Central

    Chui, Toco Yuen Ping; Song, HongXin; Burns, Stephen A.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE To measure the variation in human cone photoreceptor packing density across the retina both within an individual and between individuals with different refractive errors. METHODS A high resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope was used to image the cones of eleven human eyes. Five emmetropes and six myopes were tested (+0.50D to -7.50D). For each subject we obtained four approximately 10 degree by 1.5 degree strips of cone images. Each strip started at the fovea, and proceeded towards the periphery along the four primary meridians. The position of each cone within the sampling windows was digitized manually by the investigator. From these cone counts, the density of cones was calculated for a set of fixed distances from the fovea for locations throughout the image. RESULTS Cone photoreceptor packing density decreased from 27,712 cells/mm2 to 7,070 cells/mm2 from the retinal eccentricity of 0.30mm to 3.40mm along the superior meridian in five emmetropic eyes. Cone photoreceptor packing density in cells/mm2 was significantly lower in myopic eyes than in emmetropic eyes. At a given location, there was considerable individual variation in cone photoreceptor packing density, although more than 20% of the variance could be accounted for by differences in axial length. CONCLUSIONS Our results provide a baseline analysis of individual difference in cone photoreceptor packing density in healthy human eyes. As predicted by retinal stretching models, cone photoreceptor packing density is lower in highly myopic eyes than in emmetropic eyes. PMID:18552378

  17. HSURIA Cone Centration.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    laser. b. Interferometer configuration. This configuration (Fig. 4) uses a Twyman -Green interferometer to measure the cone centration for comparison...autocollimator. The interferometer mode, as was explained in Section Ill-l, gave very little information about the alignment of the cone. c. Physical...the camera turning flat (5) must be removed and the centration sensor laser is used. The interferometer laser is turned off. For the interferometer

  18. High degree of multiple paternity in the viviparous Shiner Perch, Cymatogaster aggregata, a fish with long-term female sperm storage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Xian; Avise, John C

    2011-01-01

    The Shiner Perch (Cymatogaster aggregata Gibbons) exhibits a viviparous reproductive mode and long-term female sperm storage, two biological features that may predispose this fish species for both intense sperm competition and frequent multiple paternity within broods. To test these hypotheses, we used polymorphic microsatellite markers to identify sires and quantify paternal contributions to the progeny arrays of 27 pregnant females from a natural population of C. aggregata. The number of sires per brood ranged from one to eight (mean 4.6), typically with skewed distributions of fertilization success by the fathers but no correlation between sire number and brood size. The extraordinarily high incidences of multiple paternity in this species probably are due in part to high rates of mate encounter, but selection pressures related to the avoidance of maternal-fetal incompatibility may further have promoted the evolution of polyandrous mating behaviors in this female-pregnant species. Our genetic data are consistent with the hypothesis that viviparity, long-term sperm storage, and extreme polyandry are interrelated reproductive phenomena that should promote the evolution of post-copulatory sperm competition and/or cryptic female choice in these fishes.

  19. The Degree of Applying the Theoretical Frameworks of Child-Raising Specialty Courses in the Field of Training among the Female Students of Princess Alia University College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweeikat, Mashhour Mohammad; AL-Kaddah, Muhammad Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims at studying to what extent the female students in Child Education department at Princess Alia University College manage to apply the theoretical part in field training program. The data, which is the scope of this study, consists of 42 staff members and 36 educational supervisors responsible for the program. The two researchers…

  20. F-16B Pacer Aircraft Trailing Cone Length Extension Tube Investigative Study (HAVE CLETIS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    9 3 35-foot System Nylaflow® Tube Twist (0.92 Mach number, 10,000 feet PA) ......... 10 4 Guitar Stringing...some degree of “cone rocking” and “ guitar stringing”. Cone rocking consisted of the drag cone partially rotating between +/- 15 to 30 degrees left and...axial loads due to incompressible dynamic pressure. (R4) “ Guitar stringing” was used to describe the high frequency vibration of the pressure tube

  1. Adaptive optics retinal imaging reveals S-cone dystrophy in tritan color-vision deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraas, Rigmor C.; Carroll, Joseph; Gunther, Karen L.; Chung, Mina; Williams, David R.; Foster, David H.; Neitz, Maureen

    2007-05-01

    Tritan color-vision deficiency is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with mutations in the short-wavelength-sensitive- (S-) cone-pigment gene. An unexplained feature of the disorder is that individuals with the same mutation manifest different degrees of deficiency. To date, it has not been possible to examine whether any loss of S-cone function is accompanied by physical disruption in the cone mosaic. Two related tritan subjects with the same novel mutation in their S-cone-opsin gene, but different degrees of deficiency, were examined. Adaptive optics was used to obtain high-resolution retinal images, which revealed distinctly different S-cone mosaics consistent with their discrepant phenotypes. In addition, a significant disruption in the regularity of the overall cone mosaic was observed in the subject completely lacking S-cone function. These results taken together with other recent findings from molecular genetics indicate that, with rare exceptions, tritan deficiency is progressive in nature.

  2. [Chronic administration of estrogen receptors antagonist reduces degree of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension caused by chronic injections of estrogen in ovariectomised female Wistar rats].

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, Iu O; Artem'eva, M M; Medvedev, O S; Medvedeva, N A

    2013-01-01

    As we showed previously, administration of estradiol in different doses (5 and 15 mcg per day for 21 day) initiates the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in ovariectomised female Wistar rats. The aim of current study was to analyze the involvement of antagonist of estrogen receptors type a- and beta- ICI 182,780 (fulvestrant) in development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension. Ovariectomised female rats were separated into 5 groups received subcutaneously for 1 month : 1. Estrogen 15 mcg per day. 2. Estrogen 60 mcg per day 3. Antagonist of estrogen receptors type alpha- and beta- fulvestrant 150 mcg per day. 4. Estrogen 15 mcg/d + fulvestrant 150 mcg/d. 5. Propylenglycol as a control group. PAH was induced by exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Rats were housed in a hypobaric chamber at simulated altitude of 5000 m, 10 h a day, 2 wk (O2 concentration reduced to 10%). We suppose that the development of pulmonary hypertension in ovariectomised female Wistar rats caused by administration of estrogen (15 mcg and 60 mcg per day for 1 month) is mediated by estrogen receptors type alpha- and beta-.

  3. Elliptic Cones Alone and with Wings at Supersonic Speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Leland H

    1958-01-01

    To help fill the gap in the knowledge of aerodynamics of shapes intermediate between bodies of revolution and flat triangular wings, force and moment characteristics for elliptic cones have been experimentally determined for Mach numbers of 1.97 and 2.94. Elliptic cones having cross-sectional axis ratios from 1 through 6 and with lengths and base areas equal to circular cones of fineness ratios 3.67 and 5 have been studied for angles of bank of 0 degree and 90 degrees. Elliptic and circular cones in combination with triangular wings of aspect ratios 1 and 1.5 also have been considered. The angle-of-attack range was from 0 degree to about 16 degrees, and the Reynolds number was 8 x 10(6), based on model length. In addition to the forces and moments at angle of attack, pressure distributions for elliptic cones at zero angle of attack have been determined. The results of this investigation indicate that there are distinct aerodynamic advantages to the use of elliptic cones.

  4. Scoria Cone Construction Mechanism, Lathrop Wells Volcano, Southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    G. Valentine; D. Krier; F. Perry; G. Heiken

    2005-01-18

    Scoria cones are commonly assumed to have been constructed by the accumulation of ballistically-ejected clasts from discrete and relatively coarse-grained Strombolian bursts and subsequent avalanching such that the cone slopes are at or near the angle of repose for loose scoria. The cone at the hawaiitic Lathrop Wells volcano, southern Nevada, contains deposits that are consistent with the above processes during early cone-building phases; these early deposits are composed mainly of coarse lapilli and fluidal bombs and are partially welded, indicating relatively little cooling during flight. However, the bulk of the cone is comprised of relatively fine-grained (ash and lapilli), planar beds with no welding, even within a few tens of meters of the vent. This facies is consistent with deposition by direct fallout from sustained eruption columns of relatively well-fragmented material, primarily mantling cone slopes and with a lesser degree of avalanching than is commonly assumed. A laterally extensive fallout deposit (up to 20 km from the vent) is inferred to have formed contemporaneously with these later cone deposits. This additional mechanism for construction of scoria cones may also be important at other locations, particularly where the magmas are relatively high in volatile content and where conditions promote the formation of abundant microlites in the rising mafic magma.

  5. Deletion of the X-linked Opsin Gene Array Locus Control Region (LCR) Results in Disruption of the Cone Mosaic

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Joseph; Rossi, Ethan A.; Porter, Jason; Neitz, Jay; Roorda, Austin; Williams, David; Neitz, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Blue-cone monochromacy (BCM) is an X-linked condition in which long- (L−) and middle- (M−) wavelength-sensitive cone function is absent. Due to the X-linked nature of the condition, female carriers are spared from a full manifestation of the associated defects but can show visual symptoms, including abnormal cone electroretinograms. Here we imaged the cone mosaic in four females carrying an L/M array with deletion of the locus control region, resulting in an absence of L/M opsin gene expression (effectively acting as a cone opsin knockout). On average, they had cone mosaics with reduced density and disrupted organization compared to normal trichromats. This suggests that the absence of opsin in a subset of cones results in their early degeneration, with X-inactivation the likely mechanism underlying phenotypic variability in BCM carriers. PMID:20638402

  6. Protoptiline Caddisfly Genera Endemic to the Southern Cone Region of South America (Trichoptera: Glossosomatidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, D. R.; Holzenthal, R. W.

    2005-05-01

    The Trichoptera fauna of the Southern Cone region of South America (Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, and SE Brazil) is well known for its high degree of endemism, at both the species and genus level. This is also true for the saddle or tortoise case-making family Glossosomatidae, represented entirely in the region by members of the subfamily Protoptilinae. The Southern Cone includes six endemic protoptiline genera: Canoptila, Itauara, Mastigoptila, Merionoptila, Scotiotrichia, and Tolhuaca, containing 19 described species. Although not particularly species diverse when compared to the rest of the Neotropical Trichoptera fauna, these endemics are note-worthy: some genera display morphological characteristics that may be considered very primitive and others are very evolutionarily derived. Additionally, there are at least 11 new species whose placement is uncertain. This points out the need to reexamine the taxonomy and evaluate the evolutionary relationships among these genera. Recently several new species of Mastigoptila and Tolhuaca were described, including some females. Taxonomic revisions of the remaining genera based on careful examination of the male and female genitalia, wing venation, and other adult morphological characters, are currently underway. Included in the revisions are descriptions of new species, new illustrations of previously described species, and a phylogenetic assessment.

  7. Light cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Matthew B

    2009-01-01

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  8. Shatter cones: Diagnostic impact signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchone, J. F.; Dietz, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Uniquely fractured target rocks known as shatter cones are associated with more than one half the world's 120 or so presently known impact structures. Shatter cones are a form of tensile rock failure in which a positive conical plug separates from a negative outer cup or mold and delicate ornaments radiating from an apex are preserved on surfaces of both portions. Although distinct, shatter cones are sometimes confused with other striated geologic features such as ventifacts, stylolites, cone-in-cone, slickensides, and artificial blast plumes. Complete cones or solitary cones are rare, occurrences are usually as swarms in thoroughly fractured rock. Shatter cones may form in a zone where an expanding shock wave propagating through a target decays to form an elastic wave. Near this transition zone, the expanding primary wave may strike a pebble or other inhomogeneity whose contrasting transmission properties produce a scattered secondary wave. Interference between primary and secondary scattered waves produce conical stress fields with axes perpendicular to the plane of an advancing shock front. This model supports mechanism capable of producing such shatter cone properties as orientation, apical clasts, lithic dependence, and shock pressure zonation. Although formational mechanics are still poorly understood, shatter cones have become the simplest geologic field criterion for recognizing astroblemes (ancient terrestrial impact structures).

  9. Shatter cones: Diagnostic impact signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHone, J. F.; Dietz, R. S.

    Uniquely fractured target rocks known as shatter cones are associated with more than one half the world's 120 or so presently known impact structures. Shatter cones are a form of tensile rock failure in which a positive conical plug separates from a negative outer cup or mold and delicate ornaments radiating from an apex are preserved on surfaces of both portions. Although distinct, shatter cones are sometimes confused with other striated geologic features such as ventifacts, stylolites, cone-in-cone, slickensides, and artificial blast plumes. Complete cones or solitary cones are rare, occurrences are usually as swarms in thoroughly fractured rock. Shatter cones may form in a zone where an expanding shock wave propagating through a target decays to form an elastic wave. Near this transition zone, the expanding primary wave may strike a pebble or other inhomogeneity whose contrasting transmission properties produce a scattered secondary wave. Interference between primary and secondary scattered waves produce conical stress fields with axes perpendicular to the plane of an advancing shock front. This model supports mechanism capable of producing such shatter cone properties as orientation, apical clasts, lithic dependence, and shock pressure zonation. Although formational mechanics are still poorly understood, shatter cones have become the simplest geologic field criterion for recognizing astroblemes (ancient terrestrial impact structures).

  10. k-cones and kirigami metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Seffen, Keith A

    2016-09-01

    We are inspired by the tensile buckling of a thin sheet with a slit to create a foldable planar metamaterial. The buckled shape comprises two pairs of identical e-cones connected to the slit, which we refer to as a k-cone. We approximate this shape as discrete vertices that can be folded out of plane as the slit is pulled apart. We determine their kinematics and we calculate generic shape properties using a simple elastic model of the folded shape. We then show how the folded sheet may be tessellated as a unit cell within a larger sheet, which may be constructed a priori by cutting and folding the latter in a regular way, in order to form a planar kirigami structure with a single degree of freedom.

  11. k-cones and kirigami metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seffen, Keith A.

    2016-09-01

    We are inspired by the tensile buckling of a thin sheet with a slit to create a foldable planar metamaterial. The buckled shape comprises two pairs of identical e-cones connected to the slit, which we refer to as a k-cone. We approximate this shape as discrete vertices that can be folded out of plane as the slit is pulled apart. We determine their kinematics and we calculate generic shape properties using a simple elastic model of the folded shape. We then show how the folded sheet may be tessellated as a unit cell within a larger sheet, which may be constructed a priori by cutting and folding the latter in a regular way, in order to form a planar kirigami structure with a single degree of freedom.

  12. Dishonorary Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Carlin

    2008-01-01

    If an honorary degree lacks values to begin with, does withdrawing it deliver a rebuke to the recipient? Is whatever honor that comes with the distinction embedded in the fancy paper, or is it wholly in the eye of the degree holder? Are honorary degrees really such silly things that individuals should mock their bestowal or withdrawal? The case of…

  13. A comprehensive proteome map of glandular trichomes of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) female cones: Identification of biosynthetic pathways of the major terpenoid-related compounds and possible transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Antoine; Boutry, Marc

    2017-02-15

    Female flowers of hop (Humulus lupulus) are an essential source of terpenoid-related compounds, which are mainly used as flavoring in the beer brewing process. The compounds involved are bitter acids, terpenophenolics, as well as mono- and sesquiterpenoids. In this work, we analyzed the proteome of purified glandular trichomes (lupulin glands) from female flowers, which produce and accumulate these compounds. An extensive 2D-LC-MS/MS analysis identified 1,015 proteins. Of these, most correspond to housekeeping and primary metabolism-related proteins, albeit predominantly including amino acid and lipid metabolism, which feeds the specialized (secondary) metabolism. Indeed, 75 proteins belong to the specialized metabolism. No less than 40 enzymes are involved in the synthesis of terpenoid-derived compounds and 21 are predicted transporters, some of which might be involved in the transport of specialized metabolites. We discuss the possible routes involved in the intra- and intercellular translocation of terpenoids and their precursors. This comprehensive proteomic map of the glandular trichomes of hop female flowers represents a valuable resource to improve our knowledge on the function of glandular trichomes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. The Holographic Entropy Cone

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Ning; Nezami, Sepehr; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan; Sully, James; Walter, Michael

    2015-09-21

    We initiate a systematic enumeration and classification of entropy inequalities satisfied by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for conformal field theory states with smooth holographic dual geometries. For 2, 3, and 4 regions, we prove that the strong subadditivity and the monogamy of mutual information give the complete set of inequalities. This is in contrast to the situation for generic quantum systems, where a complete set of entropy inequalities is not known for 4 or more regions. We also find an infinite new family of inequalities applicable to 5 or more regions. The set of all holographic entropy inequalities bounds the phase space of Ryu-Takayanagi entropies, defining the holographic entropy cone. We characterize this entropy cone by reducing geometries to minimal graph models that encode the possible cutting and gluing relations of minimal surfaces. We find that, for a fixed number of regions, there are only finitely many independent entropy inequalities. To establish new holographic entropy inequalities, we introduce a combinatorial proof technique that may also be of independent interest in Riemannian geometry and graph theory.

  15. The Holographic Entropy Cone

    DOE PAGES

    Bao, Ning; Nezami, Sepehr; Ooguri, Hirosi; ...

    2015-09-21

    We initiate a systematic enumeration and classification of entropy inequalities satisfied by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for conformal field theory states with smooth holographic dual geometries. For 2, 3, and 4 regions, we prove that the strong subadditivity and the monogamy of mutual information give the complete set of inequalities. This is in contrast to the situation for generic quantum systems, where a complete set of entropy inequalities is not known for 4 or more regions. We also find an infinite new family of inequalities applicable to 5 or more regions. The set of all holographic entropy inequalities bounds the phasemore » space of Ryu-Takayanagi entropies, defining the holographic entropy cone. We characterize this entropy cone by reducing geometries to minimal graph models that encode the possible cutting and gluing relations of minimal surfaces. We find that, for a fixed number of regions, there are only finitely many independent entropy inequalities. To establish new holographic entropy inequalities, we introduce a combinatorial proof technique that may also be of independent interest in Riemannian geometry and graph theory.« less

  16. Kinematics of Cone-In-Cone Growth, with Implications for Timing and Formation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, J. N.; Cartwright, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Cone-in-cone is an enigmatic structure. Similar to many fibrous calcite veins, cone-in-cone is generally formed of calcite and present in bedding-parallel vein-like accumulations within fine-grained rocks. Unlike most fibrous veins, cone-in-cone contains conical inclusions of host-rock material, creating nested, parallel cones throughout. A long-debated aspect of cone-in-cone structures is whether the calcite precipitated with its conical form (primary cone-in-cone), or whether the cones formed afterwards (secondary cone-in-cone). Trace dolomite within a calcite cone-in-cone structure from the Cretaceous of Jordan supports the primary hypothesis. The host sediment is a siliceous mud containing abundant rhombohedral dolomite grains. Dolomite rhombohedra are also distributed throughout the cone-in-cone. The rhombohedra within the cones are randomly oriented yet locally have dolomite overgrowths having boundaries that are aligned with calcite fibers. Evidence that dolomite co-precipitated with calcite, and did not replace calcite, includes (i) preferential downward extension of dolomite overgrowths, in the presumed growth-direction of the cone-in-cone, and (ii) planar, vertical borders between dolomite crystals and calcite fibers. Because dolomite overgrows host-sediment rhombohedra and forms fibers within the cones, it follows that the host-sediment was included within the growing cone-in-cone as the calcite precipitated, and not afterward. The host-sediment was not injected into the cone-in-cone along fractures, as the secondary-origin hypothesis suggests. This finding implies that cone-in-cone in general does not form over multiple stages, and thus has greater potential to preserve the chemical signature of its original precipitation. Because cone-in-cone likely forms before complete lithification of the host, and because the calcite displaces the host material against gravity, this chemical signature can preserve information about early overpressures in fine

  17. Making An Impact: Shatter Cones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Lisa M.; Plautz, Michael R.; Crews, Jeffrey W.

    2004-01-01

    In 1990, a group of geologists discovered a large number of shatter cones in southwestern Montana. Shatter cones are a type of metamorphosed rock often found in impact structures (the remains of a crater after a meteor impact and years of Earth activity). Scientists have discovered only 168 impact craters around the world. If rocks could talk,…

  18. Laser range profile of cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenzhen; Gong, Yanjun; Wang, Mingjun; Gong, Lei

    2016-10-01

    technology. Laser one-dimensional range profile can reflect the characteristics of the target shape and surface material. These techniques were motivated by applications of laser radar to target discrimination in ballistic missile defense. The radar equation of pulse laser about cone is given in this paper. This paper demonstrates the analytical model of laser one-dimensional range profile of cone based on the radar equation of the pulse laser. Simulations results of laser one-dimensional range profiles of some cones are given. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface material with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retroreflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. Laser one-dimensional range profiles of different pulse width of cone is given in this paper. The influences of surface material, pulse width, attitude on the one-dimensional range are analyzed. The laser two-dimensional range profile is two-dimensional scattering imaging of pulse laser of target. The two-dimensional range profile of roughness target can provide range resolved information. An analytical model of two-dimensional laser range profile of cone is proposed. The simulations of two-dimensional laser range profiles of some cones are given. Laser two-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse lambertian reflectance, is given in this paper. Laser two-dimensional range profiles of cone, whose surface mater with diffuse materials whose retroreflectance can be modeled closely with an exponential term that decays with increasing incidence angles, is given in this paper. The influence of pulse width, surface material on laser two-dimensional range profile is analyzed. Laser one-dimensional range profile and laser two-dimensional range profile are called as laser

  19. Development of Partial Ontogenic Resistance to Powdery Mildew in Hop Cones and Its Management Implications

    PubMed Central

    Twomey, Megan C.; Wolfenbarger, Sierra N.; Woods, Joanna L.; Gent, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of processes leading to crop damage is central to devising rational approaches to disease management. Multiple experiments established that infection of hop cones by Podosphaera macularis was most severe if inoculation occurred within 15 to 21 days after bloom. This period of infection was associated with the most pronounced reductions in alpha acids, cone color, and accelerated maturation of cones. Susceptibility of cones to powdery mildew decreased progressively after the transition from bloom to cone development, although complete immunity to the disease failed to develop. Maturation of cone tissues was associated with multiple significant affects on the pathogen manifested as reduced germination of conidia, diminished frequency of penetration of bracts, lengthening of the latent period, and decreased sporulation. Cones challenged with P. macularis in juvenile developmental stages also led to greater frequency of colonization by a complex of saprophytic, secondary fungi. Since no developmental stage of cones was immune to powdery mildew, the incidence of powdery mildew continued to increase over time and exceeded 86% by late summer. In field experiments with a moderately susceptible cultivar, the incidence of cones with powdery mildew was statistically similar when fungicide applications were made season-long or targeted only to the juvenile stages of cone development. These studies establish that partial ontogenic resistance develops in hop cones and may influence multiple phases of the infection process and pathogen reproduction. The results further reinforce the concept that the efficacy of a fungicide program may depend largely on timing of a small number of sprays during a relatively brief period of cone development. However in practice, targeting fungicide and other management tactics to periods of enhanced juvenile susceptibility may be complicated by a high degree of asynchrony in cone development and other factors that are situation

  20. Development of partial ontogenic resistance to powdery mildew in hop cones and its management implications.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Megan C; Wolfenbarger, Sierra N; Woods, Joanna L; Gent, David H

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of processes leading to crop damage is central to devising rational approaches to disease management. Multiple experiments established that infection of hop cones by Podosphaera macularis was most severe if inoculation occurred within 15 to 21 days after bloom. This period of infection was associated with the most pronounced reductions in alpha acids, cone color, and accelerated maturation of cones. Susceptibility of cones to powdery mildew decreased progressively after the transition from bloom to cone development, although complete immunity to the disease failed to develop. Maturation of cone tissues was associated with multiple significant affects on the pathogen manifested as reduced germination of conidia, diminished frequency of penetration of bracts, lengthening of the latent period, and decreased sporulation. Cones challenged with P. macularis in juvenile developmental stages also led to greater frequency of colonization by a complex of saprophytic, secondary fungi. Since no developmental stage of cones was immune to powdery mildew, the incidence of powdery mildew continued to increase over time and exceeded 86% by late summer. In field experiments with a moderately susceptible cultivar, the incidence of cones with powdery mildew was statistically similar when fungicide applications were made season-long or targeted only to the juvenile stages of cone development. These studies establish that partial ontogenic resistance develops in hop cones and may influence multiple phases of the infection process and pathogen reproduction. The results further reinforce the concept that the efficacy of a fungicide program may depend largely on timing of a small number of sprays during a relatively brief period of cone development. However in practice, targeting fungicide and other management tactics to periods of enhanced juvenile susceptibility may be complicated by a high degree of asynchrony in cone development and other factors that are situation-dependent.

  1. Ejecta evolution during cone impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Jeremy; Vakarelski, Ivan; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2013-11-01

    We present results from an experimental study of the impact of conical shaped bodies into a pool of liquid. By varying the cone angle, impact speed and liquid physical properties, we examine a broad parameter space and seek to find conditions when self-similarity can be observed during this phenomena. We use high-speed imaging to capture the early-time motion of the liquid ejecta which emanates from the tip of the cone and travels up along the cone surface. Surprisingly, we find that the detachment of the ejecta can be simply described by air entrainment relationships derived from coating experiments.

  2. Transonic Flow Past Cone Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, George E

    1955-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for transonic flow post cone-cylinder, axially symmetric bodies. The drag coefficient and surface Mach number are studied as the free-stream Mach number is varied and, wherever possible, the experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions. Interferometric results for several typical flow configurations are shown and an example of shock-free supersonic-to-subsonic compression is experimentally demonstrated. The theoretical problem of transonic flow past finite cones is discussed briefly and an approximate solution of the axially symmetric transonic equations, valid for a semi-infinite cone, is presented.

  3. Embryonic markers of cone differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Helen M.; Belcastro, Marycharmain; Sokolov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Photoreceptor cells are born in two distinct phases of vertebrate retinogenesis. In the mouse retina, cones are born primarily during embryogenesis, while rod formation occurs later in embryogenesis and early postnatal ages. Despite this dichotomy in photoreceptor birthdates, the visual pigments and phototransduction machinery are not reactive to visual stimulus in either type of photoreceptor cell until the second postnatal week. Several markers of early cone formation have been identified, including Otx2, Crx, Blimp1, NeuroD, Trβ2, Rorβ, and Rxrγ, and all are thought to be involved in cellular determination. However, little is known about the expression of proteins involved in cone visual transduction during early retinogenesis. Therefore, we sought to characterize visual transduction proteins that are expressed specifically in photoreceptors during mouse embryogenesis. Methods Eye tissue was collected from control and phosducin-null mice at embryonic and early postnatal ages. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qPCR) were used to measure the spatial and temporal expression patterns of phosducin (Pdc) and cone transducin γ (Gngt2) proteins and transcripts in the embryonic and early postnatal mouse retina. Results We identified the embryonic expression of phosducin (Pdc) and cone transducin γ (Gngt2) that coincides temporally and spatially with the earliest stages of cone histogenesis. Using immunohistochemistry, the phosducin protein was first detected in the retina at embryonic day (E)12.5, and cone transducin γ was observed at E13.5. The phosducin and cone transducin γ proteins were seen only in the outer neuroblastic layer, consistent with their expression in photoreceptors. At the embryonic ages, phosducin was coexpressed with Rxrγ, a known cone marker, and with Otx2, a marker of photoreceptors. Pdc and Gngt2 mRNAs were detected as early as E10.5 with qPCR, although at low levels. Conclusions Visual transduction

  4. Visual Pigments of Goldfish Cones

    PubMed Central

    Hárosi, Ferenc I.; MacNichol, Edward F.

    1974-01-01

    Freshly isolated retinal photoreceptors of goldfish were studied microspectrophotometrically. Absolute absorptance spectra obtained from dark-adapted cone outer segments reaffirm the existence of three spectrally distinct cone types with absorption maxima at 455 ± 3,530 ± 3, and 625 ± 5 nm. These types were found often recognizable by gross cellular morphology. Side-illuminated cone outer segments were dichroic. The measured dichroic ratio for the main absorption band of each type was 2–3:1. Rapidly bleached cells revealed spectral and dichroic transitions in regions near 400–410, 435–455, and 350–360 nm. These photoproducts decay about fivefold as fast as the intermediates in frog rods. The spectral maxima of photoproducts, combined with other evidence, indicate that retinene2 is the chromophore of all three cone pigments. The average specific optical density for goldfish cone outer segments was found to be 0.0124 ± 0.0015/µm. The spectra of the blue-, and green-absorbing cones appeared to match porphyropsin standards with half-band width Δν = 4,832 ± 100 cm–1. The red-absorbing spectrum was found narrower, having Δν = 3,625 ± 100 cm–1. The results are consistent with the notion that visual pigment concentration within the outer segments is about the same for frog rods and goldfish cones, but that the blue-, and green-absorbing pigments possess molar extinctions of 30,000 liter/mol cm. The red-absorbing pigment was found to have extinction of 40,000 liter/mol cm, assuming invariance of oscillator strength among the three cone spectra. PMID:4817352

  5. Experience of direct percutaneous sac injection in type II endoleak using cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoong-Seok; Do, Young Soo; Park, Hong Suk; Park, Kwang Bo; Kim, Dong-Ik

    2015-04-01

    Cone beam CT, usually used in dental area, could easily obtain 3-dimensional images using cone beam shaped ionized radiation. Cone beam CT is very useful for direct percutaneous sac injection (DPSI) which needs very precise measurement to avoid puncture of inferior vena cava or vessel around sac or stent graft. Here we describe two cases of DPSI using cone beam CT. In case 1, a 79-year-old male had widening of preexisted type II endoleak after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). However, transarterial embolization failed due to tortuous collateral branches of lumbar arteries. In case 2, a 72-year-old female had symptomatic sac enlargement by type II endoleak after EVAR. However, there was no route to approach the lumbar arteries. Therefore, we performed DPSI assisted by cone beam CT in cases 1, 2. Six-month CT follow-up revealed no sign of sac enlargement by type II endoleak.

  6. Formation of shatter cones by symmetric fracture bifurcation: Phenomenological modeling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, Thomas; Hergarten, Stefan; Kuhn, Thomas; Wilk, Jakob

    2016-08-01

    Several models of shatter cone formation require a heterogeneity at the cone apex of high impedance mismatch to the surrounding bulk rock. This heterogeneity is the source of spherically expanding waves that interact with the planar shock front or the following release wave. While these models are capable of explaining the overall conical shape of shatter cones, they are not capable of explaining the subcone structure and the diverging and branching striations that characterize the surface of shatter cones and lead to the so-called horse-tailing effect. Here, we use the hierarchical arrangement of subcone ridges of shatter cone surfaces as key for understanding their formation. Tracing a single subcone ridge from its apex downward reveals that each ridge branches after some distance into two symmetrically equivalent subcone ridges. This pattern is repeated to form new branches. We propose that subcone ridges represent convex-curved fracture surfaces and their intersection corresponds to the bifurcation axis. The characteristic diverging striations are interpreted as the intersection lineations delimiting each subcone. Multiple symmetric crack branching is the result of rapid fracture propagation that may approach the Raleigh wave speed. We present a phenomenological model that fully constructs the shatter cone geometry to any order. The overall cone geometry including apex angle of the enveloping cone and the degree of concavity (horse-tailing) is largely governed by the convexity of the subcone ridges. Straight cones of various apical angles, constant slope, and constant bifurcation angles form if the subcone convexity is low (30°). Increasing subcone convexity leads to a stronger horse-tailing effect and the bifurcation angles increase with increasing distance from the enveloping cone apex. The model predicts possible triples of enveloping cone angle, bifurcation angle, and subcone angle. Measurements of these quantities on four shatter cones from different

  7. Cone Photoreceptor Structure in Patients With X-Linked Cone Dysfunction and Red-Green Color Vision Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Emily J.; Wilk, Melissa; Langlo, Christopher S.; Kasilian, Melissa; Ring, Michael; Hufnagel, Robert B.; Dubis, Adam M.; Tee, James J.; Kalitzeos, Angelos; Gardner, Jessica C.; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Sisk, Robert A.; Larsen, Michael; Sjoberg, Stacy; Connor, Thomas B.; Dubra, Alfredo; Neitz, Jay; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Neitz, Maureen; Michaelides, Michel; Carroll, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in the coding sequence of the L and M opsin genes are often associated with X-linked cone dysfunction (such as Bornholm Eye Disease, BED), though the exact color vision phenotype associated with these disorders is variable. We examined individuals with L/M opsin gene mutations to clarify the link between color vision deficiency and cone dysfunction. Methods We recruited 17 males for imaging. The thickness and integrity of the photoreceptor layers were evaluated using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Cone density was measured using high-resolution images of the cone mosaic obtained with adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy. The L/M opsin gene array was characterized in 16 subjects, including at least one subject from each family. Results There were six subjects with the LVAVA haplotype encoded by exon 3, seven with LIAVA, two with the Cys203Arg mutation encoded by exon 4, and two with a novel insertion in exon 2. Foveal cone structure and retinal thickness was disrupted to a variable degree, even among related individuals with the same L/M array. Conclusions Our findings provide a direct link between disruption of the cone mosaic and L/M opsin variants. We hypothesize that, in addition to large phenotypic differences between different L/M opsin variants, the ratio of expression of first versus downstream genes in the L/M array contributes to phenotypic diversity. While the L/M opsin mutations underlie the cone dysfunction in all of the subjects tested, the color vision defect can be caused either by the same mutation or a gene rearrangement at the same locus. PMID:27447086

  8. The light-cone Fock state expansion and hadron physics phenomenology

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1997-06-01

    The light-cone Fock expansion is defined in the following way: one first constructs the light-cone time evolution operator and the invariant mass operator in light-cone gauge from the QCD Lagrangian. The total longitudinal momentum and transverse momenta are conserved, i.e. are independent of the interactions. The matrix elements of the invariant mass operator on the complete orthonormal basis of the free theory can then be constructed. The matrix elements connect Fock states differing by 0, 1, or 2 quark or gluon quanta, and they include the instantaneous quark and gluon contributions imposed by eliminating dependent degrees of freedom in light-cone gauge. Applications of light-cone methods to QCD phenomenology are briefly described.

  9. Light-cone quantization and hadron structure

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Quantum chromodynamics provides a fundamental description of hadronic and nuclear structure and dynamics in terms of elementary quark and gluon degrees of freedom. In practice, the direct application of QCD to reactions involving the structure of hadrons is extremely complex because of the interplay of nonperturbative effects such as color confinement and multi-quark coherence. In this talk, the author will discuss light-cone quantization and the light-cone Fock expansion as a tractable and consistent representation of relativistic many-body systems and bound states in quantum field theory. The Fock state representation in QCD includes all quantum fluctuations of the hadron wavefunction, including fax off-shell configurations such as intrinsic strangeness and charm and, in the case of nuclei, hidden color. The Fock state components of the hadron with small transverse size, which dominate hard exclusive reactions, have small color dipole moments and thus diminished hadronic interactions. Thus QCD predicts minimal absorptive corrections, i.e., color transparency for quasi-elastic exclusive reactions in nuclear targets at large momentum transfer. In other applications, such as the calculation of the axial, magnetic, and quadrupole moments of light nuclei, the QCD relativistic Fock state description provides new insights which go well beyond the usual assumptions of traditional hadronic and nuclear physics.

  10. Shatter cones: (Mis)understood?

    PubMed Central

    Osinski, Gordon R.; Ferrière, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Meteorite impact craters are one of the most common geological features in the solar system. An impact event is a near-instantaneous process that releases a huge amount of energy over a very small region on a planetary surface. This results in characteristic changes in the target rocks, from vaporization and melting to solid-state effects, such as fracturing and shock metamorphism. Shatter cones are distinctive striated conical fractures that are considered unequivocal evidence of impact events. They are one of the most used and trusted shock-metamorphic effects for the recognition of meteorite impact structures. Despite this, there is still considerable debate regarding their formation. We show that shatter cones are present in several stratigraphic settings within and around impact structures. Together with the occurrence of complete and “double” cones, our observations are most consistent with shatter cone formation due to tensional stresses generated by scattering of the shock wave due to heterogeneities in the rock. On the basis of field mapping, we derive the relationship Dsc = 0.4 Da, where Dsc is the maximum spatial extent of in situ shatter cones, and Da is the apparent crater diameter. This provides an important, new, more accurate method to estimate the apparent diameter of eroded complex craters on Earth. We have reestimated the diameter of eight well-known impact craters as part of this study. Finally, we suggest that shatter cones may reduce the strength of the target, thus aiding crater collapse, and that their distribution in central uplifts also records the obliquity of impact. PMID:27532050

  11. Shatter cones: (Mis)understood?

    PubMed

    Osinski, Gordon R; Ferrière, Ludovic

    2016-08-01

    Meteorite impact craters are one of the most common geological features in the solar system. An impact event is a near-instantaneous process that releases a huge amount of energy over a very small region on a planetary surface. This results in characteristic changes in the target rocks, from vaporization and melting to solid-state effects, such as fracturing and shock metamorphism. Shatter cones are distinctive striated conical fractures that are considered unequivocal evidence of impact events. They are one of the most used and trusted shock-metamorphic effects for the recognition of meteorite impact structures. Despite this, there is still considerable debate regarding their formation. We show that shatter cones are present in several stratigraphic settings within and around impact structures. Together with the occurrence of complete and "double" cones, our observations are most consistent with shatter cone formation due to tensional stresses generated by scattering of the shock wave due to heterogeneities in the rock. On the basis of field mapping, we derive the relationship D sc = 0.4 D a, where D sc is the maximum spatial extent of in situ shatter cones, and D a is the apparent crater diameter. This provides an important, new, more accurate method to estimate the apparent diameter of eroded complex craters on Earth. We have reestimated the diameter of eight well-known impact craters as part of this study. Finally, we suggest that shatter cones may reduce the strength of the target, thus aiding crater collapse, and that their distribution in central uplifts also records the obliquity of impact.

  12. Design of metallic electron beam cones for an intraoperative therapy linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Hogstrom, K R; Boyer, A L; Shiu, A S; Ochran, T G; Kirsner, S M; Krispel, F; Rich, T

    1990-05-01

    A set of circular collimators and treatment cones from 5 to 12 cm diameter has been designed for an intraoperative accelerator (6-18 MeV) that has an optical docking system. Electron beam scattering theory has been used to minimize their weight while minimizing leakage radiation. Both acrylic and brass were evaluated as possible materials; however, because of substantial electron leakage through the lateral cone wall for acrylic, we have concluded that 2 mm thick brass walls are more desirable than acrylic walls. At 18 MeV, isodose measurements beneath the cones showed hot spots as great as 120% for both materials. The placement and dimension of an internal trimmer ring inside the brass cone was studied as a method for reducing the hot spots, and it was found this could only be accomplished at the expense of decreasing coverage of the 90% isodose surface. The effects of 1 degree cone misalignment on the dose distribution has been studied and found to generate changes of less than 5% in the dose and 3 mm in position of the 90% isodose surface. In a study of the contribution of the cone and its matching collimator assembly to x-ray room leakage, it was noted that although the treatment cone had a negligible contribution, the upper annuli of the upper collimator assembly contributed as much as 80% of the leakage at 16 MeV for the 5-cm cone.

  13. The frequency split method for helical cone-beam reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Shechter, G; Köhler, Th; Altman, A; Proksa, R

    2004-08-01

    A new approximate method for the utilization of redundant data in helical cone-beam CT is presented. It is based on the observation that the original WEDGE method provides excellent image quality if only little more than 180 degrees data are used for back-projection, and that significant low-frequency artifacts appear if a larger amount of redundant data are used. This degradation is compensated by the frequency split method: The low-frequency part of the image is reconstructed using little more than 180 degrees of data, while the high frequency part is reconstructed using all data. The resulting algorithm shows no cone-beam artifacts in a simulation of a 64-row scanner. It is further shown that the frequency split method hardly degrades the signal-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed images and that it behaves robustly in the presence of motion.

  14. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  15. A Clinical Evaluation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-31

    multidetector computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography in the assessment of dental implant site dimensions. Dentomaxillofac Radiol 2011;40:67-75...submitted to the Faculty of the Endodontics Graduate Program Naval Postgraduate Dental School Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences...in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the degree of Master of Science in Oral Biology June 2013 Naval Postgraduate Dental

  16. Relationship Between Foveal Cone Structure and Clinical Measures of Visual Function in Patients With Inherited Retinal Degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, Kavitha; Carroll, Joseph; Porco, Travis C.; Duncan, Jacque L.; Roorda, Austin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To study the relationship between cone spacing and density and clinical measures of visual function near the fovea. Methods. High-resolution images of the photoreceptor mosaic were obtained with adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy from 26 patients with inherited retinal degenerations. Cone spacing measures were made close to or at the foveal center (mean [SD] eccentricity, 0.02 [0.03] degree; maximum eccentricity, 0.13 degree) and were converted to Z-scores, fraction of cones, and percentage-of-cones-below-average compared with normal values for each location (based on 37 age-similar visually normal eyes). Z-scores and percentage of cones below average were compared with best-corrected visual acuity (VA) and foveal sensitivity. Results. Visual acuity was significantly correlated with cone spacing (Spearman rank correlation ρ = −0.60, P = 0.003) and was preserved (≥80 letters), despite cone density measures that were 52% below normal. Foveal sensitivity showed significant correlation with cone spacing (ρ = −0.47, P = 0.017) and remained normal (≥35 decibels), despite density measures that were approximately 52% to 62% below normal. Conclusions. Cone density was reduced by up to 62% below normal at or near the fovea in eyes with VA and sensitivity that remained within normal limits. Despite a significant correlation with foveal cone spacing, VA and sensitivity are insensitive indicators of the integrity of the foveal cone mosaic. Direct, objective measures of cone structure may be more sensitive indicators of disease severity than VA or foveal sensitivity in eyes with inherited retinal degenerations. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00254605.) PMID:23908179

  17. Cone positioning device for oral radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Mahanna, G K; Ivanhoe, J R; Attanasio, R A

    1994-06-01

    This article describes the fabrication and modification of a peroral cone-positioning device. The modification provides added cone stability and prevents tongue intrusion into the radiation field. This device provides a repeatable accurate cone/lesion relationship and the fabrication technique is simplified, accurate, and minimizes patient discomfort.

  18. Small Molecules in the Cone Snail Arsenal.

    PubMed

    Neves, Jorge L B; Lin, Zhenjian; Imperial, Julita S; Antunes, Agostinho; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Olivera, Baldomero M; Schmidt, Eric W

    2015-10-16

    Cone snails are renowned for producing peptide-based venom, containing conopeptides and conotoxins, to capture their prey. A novel small-molecule guanine derivative with unprecedented features, genuanine, was isolated from the venom of two cone snail species. Genuanine causes paralysis in mice, indicating that small molecules and not just polypeptides may contribute to the activity of cone snail venom.

  19. Autonomous regulation of growth cone filopodia.

    PubMed

    Rehder, V; Cheng, S

    1998-02-05

    The fan-shaped array of filopodia is the first site of contact of a neuronal growth cone with molecules encountered during neuronal pathfinding. Filopodia are highly dynamic structures, and the "action radius" of a growth cone is strongly determined by the length and number of its filopodia. Since interactions of filopodia with instructive cues in the vicinity of the growth cone can have effects on growth cone morphology within minutes, it has to be assumed that a large part of the signaling underlying such morphological changes resides locally within the growth cone proper. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that two important growth cone parameters-namely, the length and number of its filopodia-are regulated autonomously in the growth cone. We previously demonstrated in identified neurons from the snail Helisoma trivolvis that filopodial length and number are regulated by intracellular calcium. Here, we investigated filopodial dynamics and their regulation by the second-messenger calcium in growth cones which were physically isolated from their parent neuron by neurite transection. Our results show that isolated growth cones have longer but fewer filopodia than growth cones attached to their parent cell. These isolated growth cones, however, are fully capable of undergoing calcium-induced cytoskeletal changes, suggesting that the machinery necessary to perform changes in filopodial length and number is fully intrinsic to the growth cone proper.

  20. Cone selectivity derived from the responses of the retinal cone mosaic to natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Wachtler, Thomas; Doi, Eizaburo; Lee, Te- Won; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2007-06-18

    To achieve color vision, the brain has to process signals of the cones in the retinal photoreceptor mosaic in a cone-type-specific way. We investigated the possibility that cone-type-specific wiring is an adaptation to the statistics of the cone signals. We analyzed estimates of cone responses to natural scenes and found that there is sufficient information in the higher order statistics of L- and M-cone responses to distinguish between cones of different types, enabling unsupervised learning of cone-type specificity. This was not the case for a fourth cone type with spectral sensitivity between L and M cones, suggesting an explanation for the lack of strong tetrachromacy in heterozygous carriers of color deficiencies.

  1. Cone selectivity derived from the responses of the retinal cone mosaic to natural scenes

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Eizaburo; Lee, Te-Won; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    To achieve color vision, the brain has to process signals of the cones in the retinal photoreceptor mosaic in a cone-type-specific way. We investigated the possibility that cone-type-specific wiring is an adaptation to the statistics of the cone signals. We analyzed estimates of cone responses to natural scenes and found that there is sufficient information in the higher order statistics of L- and M-cone responses to distinguish between cones of different types, enabling unsupervised learning of cone-type specificity. This was not the case for a fourth cone type with spectral sensitivity between L and M cones, suggesting an explanation for the lack of strong tetrachromacy in heterozygous carriers of color deficiencies. PMID:17685813

  2. Measured and predicted shock shapes and aerodynamic coefficients for blunted cones at incidence in helium at Mach 20.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calloway, R. L.; White, N. H.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental values of shock shapes (alpha = 0 degrees and 10 degrees) and static aerodynamic coefficients (alpha = -4 degrees to 12 degrees) for sharp and spherically blunted cones having cone half-angles of 30, 45, 60, and 70 degrees and nose bluntness ratios of 0, 0.25, and 0.50 are presented. Shock shapes were also measured at 0 degree angle of attack by using a flat-faced cylinder (90 degree cone) and a hemispherically blunted cylinder (sphere). All tests were conducted in helium (gamma = 5/3) at a free-stream Mach number of 20.3 and a unit free-stream Reynolds number of 22,400,000 per meter. Comparisons between measured values and predicted values were made by using several numerical and simple engineering methods.

  3. DOS cones along atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwapiński, Tomasz

    2017-03-01

    The electron transport properties of a linear atomic chain are studied theoretically within the tight-binding Hamiltonian and the Green’s function method. Variations of the local density of states (DOS) along the chain are investigated. They are crucial in scanning tunnelling experiments and give important insight into the electron transport mechanism and charge distribution inside chains. It is found that depending on the chain parity the local DOS at the Fermi level can form cone-like structures (DOS cones) along the chain. The general condition for the local DOS oscillations is obtained and the linear behaviour of the local density function is confirmed analytically. DOS cones are characterized by a linear decay towards the chain which is in contrast to the propagation properties of charge density waves, end states and Friedel oscillations in one-dimensional systems. We find that DOS cones can appear due to non-resonant electron transport, the spin–orbit scattering or for chains fabricated on a substrate with localized electrons. It is also shown that for imperfect chains (e.g. with a reduced coupling strength between two neighboring sites) a diamond-like structure of the local DOS along the chain appears.

  4. Female condoms

    MedlinePlus

    Condoms for women; Contraception - female condom; Family planning - female condom; Birth control - female condom ... care provider or pharmacy for information about emergency contraception (Plan B) if the condom tears or the ...

  5. Directional imaging of the retinal cone mosaic.

    PubMed

    Vohnsen, Brian; Iglesias, Ignacio; Artal, Pablo

    2004-05-01

    We describe a near-IR scanning laser ophthalmoscope that allows the retinal cone mosaic to be imaged in the human eye in vivo without the use of wave-front correction techniques. The method takes advantage of the highly directional quality of cone photoreceptors that permits efficient coupling of light to individual cones and subsequent detection of most directional components of the backscattered light produced by the light-guiding effect of the cones. We discuss details of the system and describe cone-mosaic images obtained under different conditions.

  6. Filling the missing cone in protein electron crystallography.

    PubMed

    Dorset, D L

    1999-07-15

    The hyper-resolution property of the Sayre equation is explored for extrapolating amplitudes and phases into the missing cone of data left after tilting a representative protein (rubredoxin) to restricted limits in the electron microscope. At 0.6 nm resolution, a reasonable prediction of crystallographic phases can be made to reconstruct the lost information. Best results are obtained if the goniometer tilt value is greater than approximately +/-60 degrees, but some missing information can be restored if the tilt is restricted to +/-45 degrees.

  7. Journey of water in pine cones

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kahye; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Seung-Jun; Kim, Kiwoong; Kim, Hyejeong; Lim, Jae-Hong; Joon Lee, Sang

    2015-01-01

    Pine cones fold their scales when it rains to prevent seeds from short-distance dispersal. Given that the scales of pine cones consist of nothing but dead cells, this folding motion is evidently related to structural changes. In this study, the structural characteristics of pine cones are studied on micro-/macro-scale using various imaging instruments. Raindrops fall along the outer scales to the three layers (bract scales, fibers and innermost lignified structure) of inner pine cones. However, not all the layers but only the bract scales get wet and then, most raindrops move to the inner scales. These systems reduce the amount of water used and minimize the time spent on structural changes. The result shows that the pine cones have structural advantages that could influence the efficient motion of pine cones. This study provides new insights to understand the motion of pine cones and would be used to design a novel water transport system. PMID:25944117

  8. Journey of water in pine cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kahye; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Seung-Jun; Kim, Kiwoong; Kim, Hyejeong; Lim, Jae-Hong; Joon Lee, Sang

    2015-05-01

    Pine cones fold their scales when it rains to prevent seeds from short-distance dispersal. Given that the scales of pine cones consist of nothing but dead cells, this folding motion is evidently related to structural changes. In this study, the structural characteristics of pine cones are studied on micro-/macro-scale using various imaging instruments. Raindrops fall along the outer scales to the three layers (bract scales, fibers and innermost lignified structure) of inner pine cones. However, not all the layers but only the bract scales get wet and then, most raindrops move to the inner scales. These systems reduce the amount of water used and minimize the time spent on structural changes. The result shows that the pine cones have structural advantages that could influence the efficient motion of pine cones. This study provides new insights to understand the motion of pine cones and would be used to design a novel water transport system.

  9. Understanding the changes of cone reflectance in adaptive optics flood illumination retinal images over three years.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, Letizia; Devaney, Nicholas; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Lombardo, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Although there is increasing interest in the investigation of cone reflectance variability, little is understood about its characteristics over long time scales. Cone detection and its automation is now becoming a fundamental step in the assessment and monitoring of the health of the retina and in the understanding of the photoreceptor physiology. In this work we provide an insight into the cone reflectance variability over time scales ranging from minutes to three years on the same eye, and for large areas of the retina (≥ 2.0 × 2.0 degrees) at two different retinal eccentricities using a commercial adaptive optics (AO) flood illumination retinal camera. We observed that the difference in reflectance observed in the cones increases with the time separation between the data acquisitions and this may have a negative impact on algorithms attempting to track cones over time. In addition, we determined that displacements of the light source within 0.35 mm of the pupil center, which is the farthest location from the pupil center used by operators of the AO camera to acquire high-quality images of the cone mosaic in clinical studies, does not significantly affect the cone detection and density estimation.

  10. RPE65 gene therapy slows cone loss in Rpe65-deficient dogs.

    PubMed

    Mowat, F M; Breuwer, A R; Bartoe, J T; Annear, M J; Zhang, Z; Smith, A J; Bainbridge, J W B; Petersen-Jones, S M; Ali, R R

    2013-05-01

    Recent clinical trials of retinal pigment epithelium gene (RPE65) supplementation therapy in Leber congenital amaurosis type 2 patients have demonstrated improvements in rod and cone function, but it may be some years before the effects of therapy on photoreceptor survival become apparent. The Rpe65-deficient dog is a very useful pre-clinical model in which to test efficacy of therapies, because the dog has a retina with a high degree of similarity to that of humans. In this study, we evaluated the effect of RPE65 gene therapy on photoreceptor survival in order to predict the potential benefit and limitations of therapy in patients. We examined the retinas of Rpe65-deficient dogs after RPE65 gene therapy to evaluate the preservation of rods and cone photoreceptor subtypes. We found that gene therapy preserves both rods and cones. While the moderate loss of rods in the Rpe65-deficient dog retina is slowed by gene therapy, S-cones are lost extensively and gene therapy can prevent that loss, although only within the treated area. Although LM-cones are not lost extensively, cone opsin mislocalization indicates that they are stressed, and this can be partially reversed by gene therapy. Our results suggest that gene therapy may be able to slow cone degeneration in patients if intervention is sufficiently early and also that it is probably important to treat the macula in order to preserve central function.

  11. Understanding the changes of cone reflectance in adaptive optics flood illumination retinal images over three years

    PubMed Central

    Mariotti, Letizia; Devaney, Nicholas; Lombardo, Giuseppe; Lombardo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Although there is increasing interest in the investigation of cone reflectance variability, little is understood about its characteristics over long time scales. Cone detection and its automation is now becoming a fundamental step in the assessment and monitoring of the health of the retina and in the understanding of the photoreceptor physiology. In this work we provide an insight into the cone reflectance variability over time scales ranging from minutes to three years on the same eye, and for large areas of the retina (≥ 2.0 × 2.0 degrees) at two different retinal eccentricities using a commercial adaptive optics (AO) flood illumination retinal camera. We observed that the difference in reflectance observed in the cones increases with the time separation between the data acquisitions and this may have a negative impact on algorithms attempting to track cones over time. In addition, we determined that displacements of the light source within 0.35 mm of the pupil center, which is the farthest location from the pupil center used by operators of the AO camera to acquire high-quality images of the cone mosaic in clinical studies, does not significantly affect the cone detection and density estimation. PMID:27446708

  12. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  13. Missile and Spacecraft Coning Instabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    181-192. "Mingori, D. L., and Yam, T., " Nutational Stability of a Spinning Space- craft with Internal Mass Motion and Axial Thrust," AIAA Paper 86...Nomenclature 1 Introduction 1 Equations of Motion 2 Yaw Moment Damping or Undamping 2 Spacecraft Precession Damper 3 Vehicle Coning with Axial ...with Axial Thrust and Variable Mass The variable mass accompanying thrust from a spin-stabilized rocket motor or PAM produces a destabilizing effect

  14. Relationship Between Foveal Cone Specialization and Pit Morphology in Albinism

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Melissa A.; McAllister, John T.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubis, Adam M.; Patitucci, Teresa N.; Summerfelt, Phyllis; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Stepien, Kimberly E.; Costakos, Deborah M.; Connor, Thomas B.; Wirostko, William J.; Chiang, Pei-Wen; Dubra, Alfredo; Curcio, Christine A.; Brilliant, Murray H.; Summers, C. Gail; Carroll, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Albinism is associated with disrupted foveal development, though intersubject variability is becoming appreciated. We sought to quantify this variability, and examine the relationship between foveal cone specialization and pit morphology in patients with a clinical diagnosis of albinism. Methods. We recruited 32 subjects with a clinical diagnosis of albinism. DNA was obtained from 25 subjects, and known albinism genes were analyzed for mutations. Relative inner and outer segment (IS and OS) lengthening (fovea-to-perifovea ratio) was determined from manually segmented spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) B-scans. Foveal pit morphology was quantified for eight subjects from macular SD-OCT volumes. Ten subjects underwent imaging with adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), and cone density was measured. Results. We found mutations in 22 of 25 subjects, including five novel mutations. All subjects lacked complete excavation of inner retinal layers at the fovea, though four subjects had foveal pits with normal diameter and/or volume. Peak cone density and OS lengthening were variable and overlapped with that observed in normal controls. A fifth hyper-reflective band was observed in the outer retina on SD-OCT in the majority of the subjects with albinism. Conclusions. Foveal cone specialization and pit morphology vary greatly in albinism. Normal cone packing was observed in the absence of a foveal pit, suggesting a pit is not required for packing to occur. The degree to which retinal anatomy correlates with genotype or visual function remains unclear, and future examination of larger patient groups will provide important insight on this issue. PMID:24845642

  15. Functional significance of the taper of vertebrate cone photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Hárosi, Ferenc I.

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate photoreceptors are commonly distinguished based on the shape of their outer segments: those of cones taper, whereas the ones from rods do not. The functional advantages of cone taper, a common occurrence in vertebrate retinas, remain elusive. In this study, we investigate this topic using theoretical analyses aimed at revealing structure–function relationships in photoreceptors. Geometrical optics combined with spectrophotometric and morphological data are used to support the analyses and to test predictions. Three functions are considered for correlations between taper and functionality. The first function proposes that outer segment taper serves to compensate for self-screening of the visual pigment contained within. The second function links outer segment taper to compensation for a signal-to-noise ratio decline along the longitudinal dimension. Both functions are supported by the data: real cones taper more than required for these compensatory roles. The third function relates outer segment taper to the optical properties of the inner compartment whereby the primary determinant is the inner segment’s ability to concentrate light via its ellipsoid. In support of this idea, the rod/cone ratios of primarily diurnal animals are predicted based on a principle of equal light flux gathering between photoreceptors. In addition, ellipsoid concentration factor, a measure of ellipsoid ability to concentrate light onto the outer segment, correlates positively with outer segment taper expressed as a ratio of characteristic lengths, where critical taper is the yardstick. Depending on a light-funneling property and the presence of focusing organelles such as oil droplets, cone outer segments can be reduced in size to various degrees. We conclude that outer segment taper is but one component of a miniaturization process that reduces metabolic costs while improving signal detection. Compromise solutions in the various retinas and retinal regions occur between

  16. Quantifying the morphometric variability of monogenetic cones in volcanic fields: the Virunga Volcanic Province, East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, Sam; Grosse, Pablo; Barette, Florian; Smets, Benoît; Albino, Fabien; Kervyn, François; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic cone fields are generally made up of tens to hundreds of monogenetic cones, sometimes related to larger polygenetic edifices, which can exhibit a wide range of morphologies and degrees of preservation. The Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP) developed itself in a transfer zone which separates two rift segments (i.e. Edward and Kivu rift) within the western branch of the East-African Rift. As the result of volcanic activity related to this tectonic regime of continental extension, the VVP hosts eight large polygenetic volcanoes, surrounded by over 500 monogenetic cones and eruptive fissures, scattered over the vast VVP lava flow fields. Some cones lack any obvious geo-structural link to a specific Virunga volcano. Using recent high-resolution satellite images (SPOT, Pléiades) and a newly created 5-m-resolution digital elevation model (TanDEM-X), we have mapped and classified all monogenetic cones and eruptive fissures of the VVP. We analysed the orientation of all mapped eruptive fissures and, using the MORVOLC program, we calculated a set of morphometric parameters to highlight systematic spatial variations in size or morphometric ratios of the cones. Based upon morphological indicators, we classified the satellite cones into 4 categories: 1. Simple cones with one closed-rim crater; 2. Breached cones with one open-rim crater; 3. Complex cones with two or more interconnected craters and overlapping cones; 4. Other edifices without a distinguishable crater or cone shape (e.g. spatter mounds and levees along eruptive fissures). The results show that cones are distributed in clusters and along alignments, in some cases parallel with the regional tectonic orientations. Contrasts in the volumes of cones positioned on the rift shoulders compared to those located on the rift valley floor can possibly be attributed to contrasts in continental crust thickness. Furthermore, higher average cone slopes in the East-VVP (Bufumbira zone) and central-VVP cone clusters suggest

  17. Bursting the Taylor cone bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2014-11-01

    A soap bubble fixed on a surface and placed in an electric field will take on the shape of a cone rather than constant curvature (dome) when the electrical field is not present. The phenomenon was introduced by J. Zeleny (1917) and studied extensively by C.T. Wilson & G.I. Taylor (1925). We revisit the Taylor cone problem by studying the deformation and bursting of soap bubbles in a point charge electric field. A single bubble takes on the shape of a cone in the electric field and a high-speed camera equipped with a micro-lens is used to observe the unsteady dynamics at the tip. Rupture occurs as a very small piece of the tip is torn away from the bubble toward the point charge. Based on experiments, a theoretical model is developed that predicts when rupture should occur. This study may help in the design of foam-removal techniques in engineering and provide a better understanding of an electrified air-liquid interface.

  18. MMTF DISCOVERY OF GIANT IONIZATION CONES IN MR 2251-178: IMPLICATIONS FOR QUASAR RADIATIVE FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect

    Kreimeyer, Kory; Veilleux, Sylvain E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2013-07-20

    We report the discovery of giant ionization cones in the 140 kpc nebula around quasar MR 2251-178 based on deep [O III] {lambda}5007/H{beta} and [N II] {lambda}6583/H{alpha} flux ratio maps obtained with the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter on the Baade-Magellan 6.5 m Telescope. These cones are aligned with the weak double-lobed radio source observed on smaller scale (<30 kpc). They have an opening angle {approx}120 Degree-Sign {+-} 10 Degree-Sign and subtend {approx}65%-90% of 4{pi} sr, where the uncertainty takes into account possible projection effects. The material in the outer ionization cones is matter-bounded, indicating that all ionizing photons emitted through the cones escape from the system. The quasar ionizing flux is {approx}2-3 times fainter outside of these cones, despite the largely symmetric geometry of the nebula in [O III]. Overall, adding up the contributions from both inside and outside the cones, we find that {approx}65%-95% of the quasar ionizing radiation makes its way out of the system. These results emphasize the need for line ratio maps to quantify the escape fraction of ionizing radiation from quasars and the importance of quasar radiative feedback on the intergalactic medium.

  19. Shock detachment process on cones in hypervelocity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, Ivett Alejandra

    1999-11-01

    The shock detachment process on cones in hypervelocity flows is one of the most sensitive flows to relaxation effects. The critical angle for shock detachment under frozen conditions can be very different from the critical angle under chemical and thermal equilibrium. The rate of increase of the detachment distance with cone angle is also affected by the relaxation rate. The purpose of this study is to explain the effects of nonequilibrium on the shock detachment distance and its growth rate on cones in hypervelocity flows. The study consists of an experimental and a computational program. The experimental part has been carried out at Caltech's hypervelocity reflected shock tunnel. Six free-stream conditions were chosen, using both N2 and CO2 as test gases. The experimental data obtained are holographic interferograms, surface temperature, and pressure measurements. The code employed for the numerical simulations is a Navier-Stokes solver that can account for thermal and chemical nonequilibrium in axisymmetric flows. The data obtained for the shock detachment distance confirms a previous theoretical model that predicts the detachment distance will grow more slowly for relaxing flows than for frozen or equilibrium flows. This difference is due to the behavior of the sonic line inside the shock layer. Different growth rates result when the detachment distance is controlled by the diameter of the cone (frozen and equilibrium cases) than when it is controlled by the relaxation length (nonequilibrium flows). The behavior of the detachment distance from the frozen to equilibrium limits for a given cone half-angle and free-stream condition has also been studied. It was confirmed that the ratio of the detachment distance to the cone diameter is constant in the two extremes and rapidly switches from one value to the other for cone diameters of about 2 cm to 16 cm. The experimental interferograms are also compared with numerical ones in terms of the detachment distance, the

  20. Tables for Supersonic Flow of Helium Around Right Circular Cones at Zero Angle of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The results of the calculation of supersonic flow of helium about right circular cones at zero angle of attack are presented in tabular form. The calculations were performed using the Taylor-Maccoll theory. Numerical integrations were performed using a Runge-Kutta method for second-order differential equations. Results were obtained for cone angles from 2.5 to 30 degrees in regular increments of 2.5 degrees. In all calculations the desired free-stream Mach number was obtained to five or more significant figures.

  1. Cone Penetrometer Off-Surface Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Smail, T.R.; French, p.J.; Huffman, R.K.; Hebert, P.S.

    1999-10-20

    Cone penetrometer technology accounts for approximately 50 percent of the subsurface drilling done at the Savannah River Site. This technology provides a means of collecting data for use in the characterization of the subsurface. The cone penetrometer consists of a steel cone attached to a pipe column that is hydraulically inserted into the ground. To allow researchers to accurately measure subsurface properties, without the inherent problems of cone penetrometer equipment, the Savannah River Technology Center has developed the Cone Penetrometer Off-Surface Sensor (CPOSS). The CPOSS design consists of a knife-blade mechanism mounted along the surface of a module capable of attaching to existing cone penetrometer equipment and being deployed at depths of up to 200 feet. CPOSS development is the subject of this report.

  2. Programming Retinal Stem Cells into Cone Photoreceptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    to program human stem cells directly into cones. Using RNA -seq, we identified several genes that are upregulated in advance of the earliest...reverse vision loss. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cone photoreceptor, retina, retinal stem cell, Otx2, Onecut1, Blimp1, RNA -seq., transcription factors, and...1 Keywords: 1. Cone photoreceptor 2. Retina 3. Retinal stem cell 4. Otx2 5. Onecut1 6. Blimp1 7. RNA -seq. 8. Transcription factors 9

  3. Shock detachment process on cones in hypervelocity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, Ivett A.

    1999-11-01

    distance from the frozen to equilibrium limits for a given cone half-angle and free-stream condition. As deduced by a previous simple scaling argument, the ratio of the detachment distance to the diameter of the cone is constant in the two extremes and rapidly switches from one value to the other for cone diameters of about 2 cm to 16 cm. The experimental interferograms are also compared with numerical ones in terms of the detachment distance, the number of fringes in the shock layer, and the shape of the fringes. The heat flux traces obtained from the temperature measurements show different behaviors for the attached and detached cases, but these effects can be related to the conditions at the edge of and inside the boundary layer and to the Reynolds number of the flow rather than to nonequilibrium effects. The pressure measurements were insensitive to the degree of nonequilibrium.

  4. Cone opsins, colour blindness and cone dystrophy: Genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Gardner, J C; Michaelides, M; Hardcastle, A J

    2016-05-25

    X-linked cone photoreceptor disorders caused by mutations in the OPN1LW (L) and OPN1MW (M) cone opsin genes on chromosome Xq28 include a range of conditions from mild stable red-green colour vision deficiencies to severe cone dystrophies causing progressive loss of vision and blindness. Advances in molecular genotyping and functional analyses of causative variants, combined with deep retinal phenotyping, are unravelling genetic mechanisms underlying the variability of cone opsin disorders.

  5. Scoria Cone and Tuff Ring Stratigraphy Interpreted from Ground Penetrating Radar, Rattlesnake Crater, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, S. E.; McNiff, C. M.; Marshall, A. M.; Courtland, L. M.; Connor, C.; Charbonnier, S. J.; Abdollahzadeh, M.; Connor, L.; Farrell, A. K.; Harburger, A.; Kiflu, H. G.; Malservisi, R.; Njoroge, M.; Nushart, N.; Richardson, J. A.; Rookey, K.

    2013-12-01

    Numerous recent studies have demonstrated that detailed investigation of scoria cone and maar morphology can reveal rich details the eruptive and erosion histories of these volcanoes. A suite of geophysical surveys were conducted to images Rattlesnake Crater in the San Francisco Volcanic Field, AZ, US. We report here the results of ~3.4 km of ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys that target the processes of deposition and erosion on the pair of cinder cones that overprint the southeast edge of Rattlesnake crater and on the tuff ring that forms the crater rim. Data were collected with 500, 250, 100, and 50 MHz antennas. The profiles were run in a radial direction down the northeast flanks of the cones (~1 km diameter, ~120 meters height) , and on the inner and outer margins of the oblong maar rim (~20-80 meters height). A maximum depth of penetration of GPR signal of ~15m was achieved high on the flanks of scoria cones. A minimum depth of essentially zero penetration occurred in the central crater. We speculate that maximum penetration occurs near the peaks of the cones and crater rim because ongoing erosion limits new soil formation. Soil formation would tend to increase surface conductivity and hence decrease GPR penetration. Soil is probably better developed within the crater, precluding significant radar penetration there. On the northeast side of the gently flattened rim of the easternmost scoria cone, the GPR profile shows internal layering that dips ~20 degrees northeast relative to the current ground surface. This clearly indicates that the current gently dipping surface is not a stratigraphic horizon, but reflects instead an erosive surface into cone strata that formed close to the angle of repose. Along much of the cone flanks GPR profiles show strata dipping ~4-5 degrees more steeply than the current surface, suggesting erosion has occurred over most of the height of the cone. An abrupt change in strata attitude is observed at the gradual slope

  6. Nested-cone transformer antenna

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1991-05-28

    A plurality of conical transmission lines are concentrically nested to form an output antenna for pulsed-power, radio-frequency, and microwave sources. The diverging conical conductors enable a high power input density across a bulk dielectric to be reduced below a breakdown power density at the antenna interface with the transmitting medium. The plurality of cones maintain a spacing between conductors which minimizes the generation of high order modes between the conductors. Further, the power input feeds are isolated at the input while enabling the output electromagnetic waves to add at the transmission interface. Thus, very large power signals from a pulse rf, or microwave source can be radiated. 6 figures.

  7. Nested-cone transformer antenna

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1991-01-01

    A plurality of conical transmission lines are concentrically nested to form n output antenna for pulsed-power, radio-frequency, and microwave sources. The diverging conical conductors enable a high power input density across a bulk dielectric to be reduced below a breakdown power density at the antenna interface with the transmitting medium. The plurality of cones maintain a spacing between conductors which minimizes the generation of high order modes between the conductors. Further, the power input feeds are isolated at the input while enabling the output electromagnetic waves to add at the transmission interface. Thus, very large power signals from a pulse rf, or microwave source can be radiated.

  8. Possible Tuff Cones In Isidis Planitia, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabrook, A. M.; Rothery, D. A.; Bridges, J. C.; Wright, I. P.

    The Beagle 2 lander of the ESA Mars Express mission will touch down on the martian surface in December 2003 to conduct a primarily exobiological mission. The landing site will be within Isidis Planitia, an 1100 km diameter impact basin. Isidis contains many sub-kilometre-sized cones. These can be found singly, in clusters, and in straight or arcuate chains extending many kilometres. In some areas of the basin these cones can occupy over 10% of the surface, with the most densely populated areas being in the older western half of the basin. There are few cones around the basin rim. There is also variation in the erosional state of the cones both across the basin, and within smaller areas, implying a range in time of formation for the cones. We currently favour a tuff cone origin as an explanation for these features. Tuff cones on Earth are rooted volcanic features formed at vents by the interaction between magma or magmatic heat and surface or near-surface water. Lava flows likely to be associated with at least some of the cones if they had a cinder cone (rooted eruptions at vents in a dry environment) origin are absent. This suggests the involvement of suffi- cient volatiles both to explosively fragment the erupting magma, and to cool the ejecta enough to prevent the formation of clastogenic flows. If our tuff cone interpretation is correct, this has implications for the presence, abundance and long-term persistence of sub-surface volatiles (water or carbon dioxide) on Mars. An understanding of the mechanism of formation of the Isidis cones will assist the characterisation of the basin in preparation for the landing of Beagle 2, by providing information about the history of volatiles and volcanism in the basin, and the processes that resulted in the surface we see today.

  9. Panoramic cone beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Jenghwa; Zhou Lili; Wang Song; Clifford Chao, K. S.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is the main imaging tool for image-guided radiotherapy but its functionality is limited by a small imaging volume and restricted image position (imaged at the central instead of the treatment position for peripheral lesions to avoid collisions). In this paper, the authors present the concept of ''panoramic CBCT,'' which can image patients at the treatment position with an imaging volume as large as practically needed. Methods: In this novel panoramic CBCT technique, the target is scanned sequentially from multiple view angles. For each view angle, a half scan (180 deg. + {theta}{sub cone} where {theta}{sub cone} is the cone angle) is performed with the imaging panel positioned in any location along the beam path. The panoramic projection images of all views for the same gantry angle are then stitched together with the direct image stitching method (i.e., according to the reported imaging position) and full-fan, half-scan CBCT reconstruction is performed using the stitched projection images. To validate this imaging technique, the authors simulated cone-beam projection images of the Mathematical Cardiac Torso (MCAT) thorax phantom for three panoramic views. Gaps, repeated/missing columns, and different exposure levels were introduced between adjacent views to simulate imperfect image stitching due to uncertainties in imaging position or output fluctuation. A modified simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (modified SART) was developed to reconstruct CBCT images directly from the stitched projection images. As a gold standard, full-fan, full-scan (360 deg. gantry rotation) CBCT reconstructions were also performed using projection images of one imaging panel large enough to encompass the target. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and geometric distortion were evaluated to quantify the quality of reconstructed images. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate the effect of scattering on the image quality and

  10. Cone beam 3D reconstruction with double circular trajectory

    SciTech Connect

    Rizo, P. CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 . Lab. d'Electronique et de Technologie de l'Informatique); Grangeat, P.; Sire, P.; Lemasson, P. . Lab. d'Electronique et de Technologie de l'Informatique); Delageniere, S. )

    1990-11-01

    In x-ray cone beam tomography the only planar source trajectory which do not produce incomplete data is the infinite line. This kind of source trajectory is not experimentally doable. To ensure a complete data acquisition with cone beam radiographs, a set of non planar trajectory has been studied. Among the trajectories proposed in the literature a simple one is the set of 2 circular trajectories with intersection of the two circular trajectories with intersection of the two trajectory axis. The angle between the two axis is related to the maximum aperture of the cone beam. We propose here an exact method to perform this reconstruction using the 3D radon transform of the object. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of this algorithm remain identical to the MTF on the central slice of reconstruction with single circular trajectory. The density relative mean square error stays within 2% for an aperture of {plus minus}30{degree}. With single circular trajectory the relative mean square error may reach 20% at the same aperture. With double circular trajectory, horizontal artifacts are almost suppressed. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Raked circular-cone aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Chul (Inventor); Davies, Carol B. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An aerobraking orbital transfer vehicle (AOTV) (80) has aerobrake (82) with a blunted raked-off circular-cone configuration. The other components of the AOTV, including command/control module (95), fuel tanks (86, 88, 89 and 91), rocket engines (94) and afterbody (84), are positioned substantially along resultant force axis (104) of the AOTV (80). The axis (104) coincides with the resultant (sum of lift and drag) force vector. Afterbody (84) is mounted behind the aerobrake (82) with its length extending rearwardly from the aerobrake. The base flow clearance angle .phi. of the aerobrake (80) is 25.degree., thus allowing the afterbody (84) to extend rearwardly from the aerobrake (82) to a much greater extent than possible with a raked-off elliptic-cone aerobraking shield configuration. Afterbody size limitation and other problems associated with the raked-off elliptic-cone aerobraking shield configuration are alleviated by the combination of the aerobrake shape and positioning of the fuel tanks (86, 88, 89 and 91), rocket engines (94) and afterbody (84).

  12. Beyond spectral tuning: human cone visual pigments adopt different transient conformations for chromophore regeneration.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sundaramoorthy; Cordomí, Arnau; Ramon, Eva; Garriga, Pere

    2016-03-01

    Human red and green visual pigments are seven transmembrane receptors of cone photoreceptor cells of the retina that mediate color vision. These pigments share a very high degree of homology and have been assumed to feature analogous structural and functional properties. We report on a different regeneration mechanism among red and green cone opsins with retinal analogs using UV-Vis/fluorescence spectroscopic analyses, molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis. We find that photoactivated green cone opsin adopts a transient conformation which regenerates via an unprotonated Schiff base linkage with its natural chromophore, whereas red cone opsin forms a typical protonated Schiff base. The chromophore regeneration kinetics is consistent with a secondary retinal uptake by the cone pigments. Overall, our findings reveal, for the first time, structural differences in the photoactivated conformation between red and green cone pigments that may be linked to their molecular evolution, and support the proposal of secondary retinal binding to visual pigments, in addition to binding to the canonical primary site, which may serve as a regulatory mechanism of dark adaptation in the phototransduction process.

  13. Measurements and Slope Analyses of Quaternary Cinder Cones, Camargo Volcanic Field, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos, M. I.; Espejel-Garcia, V. V.

    2012-12-01

    The Camargo volcanic field (CVF) covers ~3000 km2 and is located in the southeast part of the state of Chihuahua, within the Basin and Range province. The CVF represents the largest mafic alkali volcanic field in northern Mexico. Over a 300 cinder cones have been recognized in the Camargo volcanic field. Volcanic activity ranges from 4.7 to 0.09 Ma revealed by 40Ar/39Ar dating methods. Previous studies say that there is a close relationship between the cinder cone slope angle, due to mechanical weathering, and age. This technique is considered a reliable age indicator, especially in arid climates, such as occur in the CVF. Data were acquired with digital topographic maps (DRG) and digital elevation models (DEM) overlapped in the Global Mapper software. For each cone, the average radius (r) was calculated from six measurements, the height (h) is the difference between peak elevation and the altitude of the contour used to close the radius, and the slope angle was calculated using the equation Θ = tan-1(h/r). The slope angles of 30 cinder cones were calculated showing angles ranging from 4 to 15 degrees. A diffusion model, displayed by an exponential relationship between slope angle and age, places the ages of these 30 cones from 215 to 82 ka, within the range marked by radiometric methods. Future work include the analysis of more cinder cones to cover the whole CVF, and contribute to the validation of this technique.

  14. Recoverin depletion accelerates cone photoresponse recovery

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Jingjing; Keim, Jennifer; Kastenhuber, Edda; Gesemann, Matthias; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal Ca2+-binding protein Recoverin has been shown to regulate phototransduction termination in mammalian rods. Here we identify four recoverin genes in the zebrafish genome, rcv1a, rcv1b, rcv2a and rcv2b, and investigate their role in modulating the cone phototransduction cascade. While Recoverin-1b is only found in the adult retina, the other Recoverins are expressed throughout development in all four cone types, except Recoverin-1a, which is expressed only in rods and UV cones. Applying a double flash electroretinogram (ERG) paradigm, downregulation of Recoverin-2a or 2b accelerates cone photoresponse recovery, albeit at different light intensities. Exclusive recording from UV cones via spectral ERG reveals that knockdown of Recoverin-1a alone has no effect, but Recoverin-1a/2a double-knockdowns showed an even shorter recovery time than Recoverin-2a-deficient larvae. We also showed that UV cone photoresponse kinetics depend on Recoverin-2a function via cone-specific kinase Grk7a. This is the first in vivo study demonstrating that cone opsin deactivation kinetics determine overall photoresponse shut off kinetics. PMID:26246494

  15. Cone penetrometer demonstration standard startup review checklist

    SciTech Connect

    KRIEG, S.A.

    1998-11-09

    Startup readiness for the Cone Penetrometer Demonstration in AX Tank Farm will be verified through the application of a Standard Startup Review Checklist. This is a listing of those items essential to demonstrating readiness to start the Cone Penetrometer Demonstration in AX Tank Farm.

  16. System design description cone penetrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Seda, R.Y., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-12

    The system design description documents in detail the design of the cone penetrometer system. The systems includes the cone penetrometer physical package, raman spectroscopy package and moisture sensor package. Information pertinent to the system design, development, fabrication and testing is provided.

  17. Morphology of pyroclastic cones and tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaldi, Alessandro

    1995-12-01

    The relationships between morphology and spatial distribution of 1315 Quaternary pyroclastic cones and coeval faulting of the volcanic substrate are analyzed in the following regions with different structural settings: Tepic Rift (Mexico), Ethiopian Rift, Mexican Volcanic Belt, Canary Archipelago, and Mount Etna. Field data and analog experiments of tephra cone emplacement and collapse enable the definition of a number of parameters which can be used to infer the geometry of the fracture feeding the magma to a pyroclastic cone. The strike of the feeding plane is directly related to: (1) the elongation of cone base and crater, (2) the location of depressions on the crater rim, and (3) the alignment of pyroclastic cones in relation to a given vent spacing. In addition, the strike and dip of faults affect the direction of cone breaching. These relationships are valid for volcanic substrate topographic surfaces with an inclination of less than 9° and are especially sensitive to fault escarpment and cone height, lava and cone density, and fault orientation with respect to the dip of the volcanic substrate topography. Relations 1 and 2 become more pronounced for regions undergoing extensional tectonics, where edifices also have a larger dimension. Whereas breaching in the direction of the fault dip is more widespread in regions under extension, breaching along the fault strike as well as the coincidence between fault strike and vent alignment are more frequent in regions with transcurrent or transtensional tectonics.

  18. Targeting gene expression to cones with human cone opsin promoters in recombinant AAV.

    PubMed

    Komáromy, A M; Alexander, J J; Cooper, A E; Chiodo, V A; Glushakova, L G; Acland, G M; Hauswirth, W W; Aguirre, G D

    2008-07-01

    Specific cone-directed therapy is of high priority in the treatment of human hereditary retinal diseases. However, not much information exists about the specific targeting of photoreceptor subclasses. Three versions of the human red cone opsin promoter (PR0.5, 3LCR-PR0.5 and PR2.1), and the human blue cone opsin promoter HB569, were evaluated for their specificity and robustness in targeting green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene expression to subclasses of cones in the canine retina when used in recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors of serotype 5. The vectors were administered by subretinal injection. The promoter PR2.1 led to most effective and specific expression of GFP in the long- and medium-wavelength-absorbing cones (L/M cones) of normal and diseased retinas. The PR0.5 promoter was not effective. Adding three copies of the 35-bp LCR in front of PR0.5 lead to weak GFP expression in L/M cones. The HB569 promoter was not specific, and GFP was expressed in a few L/M cones, some rods and the retinal pigment epithelium. These results suggest that L/M cones, the predominant class of cone photoreceptors in the retinas of dogs and most mammalian species can be successfully targeted using the human red cone opsin promoter.

  19. Mechanochemical regulation of growth cone motility

    PubMed Central

    Kerstein, Patrick C.; Nichol, Robert H.; Gomez, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal growth cones are exquisite sensory-motor machines capable of transducing features contacted in their local extracellular environment into guided process extension during development. Extensive research has shown that chemical ligands activate cell surface receptors on growth cones leading to intracellular signals that direct cytoskeletal changes. However, the environment also provides mechanical support for growth cone adhesion and traction forces that stabilize leading edge protrusions. Interestingly, recent work suggests that both the mechanical properties of the environment and mechanical forces generated within growth cones influence axon guidance. In this review we discuss novel molecular mechanisms involved in growth cone force production and detection, and speculate how these processes may be necessary for the development of proper neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:26217175

  20. Unique characteristics of cones in Central Elysium Planitia, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Rina; Kurita, Kei

    2015-06-01

    Martian magmatism within recent several hundreds of millions years is still controversial. Central Elysium Planitia (CEP) is suspected as a site of the latest magmatism on Mars, but hot debates have been caused as for the origin of this flat plain. Cones in CEP are expected to be a key to resolve this controversy. In previous works, there are 2 models proposed for the origin of CEP cones: volcanic rootless cone (e.g. Jaeger et al., 2007) and periglacial pingo (e.g. Burr et al., 2002; Page et al., 2009). In this study, we described detail morphology, distribution and size of CEP cones by using high-resolution images and topographic data. CEP cones are classified into 3 morphological types: Single Cone (SC), Double Cone (DC), and Lotus Fruit Cone (LC). DC has an inner cone in the summit crater of the outer cone, and LC has several inner cones in the summit crater of the outer cone. Several cones have moat structure around the edifice with peripheral rise. DCs and LCs are located in very flat areas of Athabasca Valles in the vicinity of Cerberus Fossae, while SCs distribute in the entire region of CEP. We compared CEP cones with terrestrial rootless cones and pingos in aerial photos. In Lake Myvatn, Iceland, there exist rootless cones which resemble DCs and LCs in CEP. Based on the similarities with terrestrial analogies, we concluded that the most feasible origin of CEP cones is rootless cones.

  1. Icelandic Pseudocraters as Analogs to some Volcanic Cones on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Fagents, Sarah A.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudocraters are rootless vents formed by the interaction of lava flows with surface or near-surface water. This interaction can produce mild explosions and the accumulation of scoria and spatter into small constructs. Pseudocraters in several localities in Iceland were examined in the field and compared to similar appearing features observed on Mars. The Icelandic pseudocrater cones in this study range in size from 6 to 70 m in diameter, have summit craters which range from 2 to 28 m in diameter (many cones lack craters entirely), and have flanks that am either concave- up or convex-up. The size and spacing of Icelandic pseudo-craters might be a function of the availability of water, in which larger, closely spaced features result from efficient lava-water interaction, as suggested by the environments in which the features formed. Possible Martian pseudocrater cones in Amamnis Planitia range in diameter from 30 to 180 m and have craters 12 to 80 m in diameter. A numerical model for volcanic explosions was adapted to study the formation of pseudocraters under terrestrial and Martian conditions. The results suggest that explosions forming Martian cones require significantly less water (calculated masses am less by a factor of 4 to 16) than those forming Icelandic pseudokers, despite their larger sizes, This is attributed to the low gravity and atmospheric pressure in the Mars environment and is consistent with the likely lower abundance of water, which might be present as interstitial ice at shallow depths in the regolith. Locations of potential pseudocraters on Mars at latitudes as low as approximately 8 degrees N, imply the presence of crustal ice stores at the time of their formation.

  2. Female circumcision.

    PubMed

    Abu Daia, J M

    2000-10-01

    It is uncertain when female circumcision was first practiced, but it certainly preceded the founding of both Christianity and Islam. A review of past and current historical, popular and professional literature was undertaken, and 4 types of female circumcision were identified. Typically female circumcision is performed by a local village practitioner, lay person or by untrained midwives. Female genital mutilation is not accepted by any religious or medical opinion, and is a violation of human rights against helpless individuals who are unable to provide informed consent and who must therefore be protected through education and legislation. Complications of female circumcision can present after many years. Any medical practitioner (either for adult or pediatric) can be confronted with this issue of female circumcision, even in countries where this custom is not present, thus mandating the understanding of this complex issue.

  3. Time to Advanced Degree: A Profile of Recent Advanced Degree Recipients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wolf, Virginia A.; Eeckhoudt, Jeannette

    All students receiving master's degrees, doctoral candidacy status, and doctorates at the University of Washington between fall 1974 and the summer quarter 1975 were studied. Data are reported for male, female, and total groups on source of bachelor's degree, age at entry, number of years since receipt of the most recent degree, credits earned,…

  4. Modal content of living human cone photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Turner, Timothy L.; Miller, Donald T.

    2015-01-01

    Decades of experimental and theoretical investigations have established that photoreceptors capture light based on the principles of optical waveguiding. Yet considerable uncertainty remains, even for the most basic prediction as to whether photoreceptors support more than a single waveguide mode. To test for modal behavior in human cone photoreceptors in the near infrared, we took advantage of adaptive-optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT, λc = 785 nm) to noninvasively image in three dimensions the reflectance profile of cones. Modal content of reflections generated at the cone inner segment and outer segment junction (IS/OS) and cone outer segment tip (COST) was examined over a range of cone diameters in 1,802 cones from 0.6° to 10° retinal eccentricity. Second moment analysis in conjunction with theoretical predictions indicate cone IS and OS have optical properties consistent of waveguides, which depend on segment diameter and refractive index. Cone IS was found to support a single mode near the fovea (≤3°) and multiple modes further away (>4°). In contrast, no evidence of multiple modes was found in the cone OSs. The IS/OS and COST reflections share a common optical aperture, are most circular near the fovea, show no orientation preference, and are temporally stable. We tested mode predictions of a conventional step-index fiber model and found that in order to fit our AO-OCT results required a lower estimate of the IS refractive index and introduction of an IS focusing/tapering effect. PMID:26417509

  5. The Cone-specific Visual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin-Shan; Kefalov, Vladimir J

    2010-01-01

    Cone photoreceptors mediate our daytime vision and function under bright and rapidly-changing light conditions. As their visual pigment is destroyed in the process of photoactivation, the continuous function of cones imposes the need for rapid recycling of their chromophore and regeneration of their pigment. The canonical retinoid visual cycle through the retinal pigment epithelium cells recycles chromophore and supplies it to both rods and cones. However, shortcomings of this pathway, including its slow rate and competition with rods for chromophore, have led to the suggestion that cones might use a separate mechanism for recycling of chromophore. In the past four decades biochemical studies have identified enzymatic activities consistent with recycling chromophore in the retinas of cone-dominant animals, such as chicken and ground squirrel. These studies have led to the hypothesis of a cone-specific retina visual cycle. The physiological relevance of these studies was controversial for a long time and evidence for the function of this visual cycle emerged only in very recent studies and will be the focus of this review. The retina visual cycle supplies chromophore and promotes pigment regeneration only in cones but not in rods. This pathway is independent of the pigment epithelium and instead involves the Müller cells in the retina, where chromophore is recycled and supplied selectively to cones. The rapid supply of chromophore through the retina visual cycle is critical for extending the dynamic range of cones to bright light and for their rapid dark adaptation following exposure to light. The importance of the retina visual cycle is emphasized also by its preservation through evolution as its function has now been demonstrated in species ranging from salamander to zebrafish, mouse, primate, and human. PMID:21111842

  6. Female hair restoration.

    PubMed

    Unger, Robin H

    2013-08-01

    Female hair loss is a devastating issue for women that has only relatively recently been publicly acknowledged as a significant problem. Hair transplant surgery is extremely successful in correcting the most cosmetically problematic areas of alopecia. This article discusses the surgical technique of hair transplantation in women in detail, including pearls to reduce postoperative sequelae and planning strategies to ensure a high degree of patient satisfaction. A brief overview of some of the medical treatments found to be helpful in slowing or reversing female pattern hair loss is included, addressing the available hormonal and topical treatments.

  7. Polymorphism of the long-wavelength cone in normal human colour vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neitz, Jay; Jacobs, Gerald H.

    1986-10-01

    Colour vision is based on the presence of multiple classes of cone each of which contains a different type of photopigment1. Colour matching tests have long revealed that the normal human has three cone types. Results from these tests have also been used to provide estimates of cone spectral sensitivities2. There are significant variations in colour matches made by individuals whose colour vision is classified as normal3-6. Some of this is due to individual differences in preretinal absorption and photopigment density, but some is also believed to arise because there is variation in the spectral positioning of the cone pigments among those who have normal colour vision. We have used a sensitive colour matching test to examine the magnitude and nature of this individual variation and here report evidence for the existence of two different long-wavelength cone mechanisms in normal humans. The different patterns of colour matches made by male and female subjects indicate these two mechanisms are inherited as an X-chromosome linked trait.

  8. Classical Yang-Mills Mechanics: Instant vs. Light-cone Form

    SciTech Connect

    Mladenov, D.

    2010-11-25

    Two different forms of relativistic dynamics, the instant and the light-cone form, for the pure SU(2) Yang-Mills field theory in 4-dimensional Minkowski space are examined under the supposition that the gauge fields depend on the time evolution parameter only. The obtained under that restriction of gauge potential space homogeneity mechanical matrix model, sometimes called Yang-Mills classical mechanics, is systematically studied in its instant and light-cone form of dynamics using the Dirac's generalized Hamiltonian approach. In the both cases the constraint content of the obtained mechanical systems is found. In contrast to its well-known instant-time counterpart the light-cone version of SU(2) Yang-Mills classical mechanics has in addition to the constraints generating the SU(2) gauge transformations the new first and second class constraints also. On account of all of these constraints a complete reduction in number of the degrees of freedom is performed. In the instant form of dynamics it is shown that after elimination of the gauge degrees of freedom from the classical SU(2) Yang-Mills mechanics the resulting unconstrained system represents the ID{sub 3} Euler-Calogero-Moser model with a certain external fourth-order potential, whereas in the light-cone form it is argued that the classical evolution of the unconstrained degrees of freedom is equivalent to a free one-dimensional particle dynamics.

  9. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Assessment of Bifid Mandibular Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Khojastepour, Leila; Kolahi, Shirin; Panahi, Nazi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Differential diagnosis of bifid mandibular condyle (BMC) is important, since it may play a role in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunctions and joint symptoms. In addition, radiographic appearance of BMC may mimic tumors and/or fractures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and orientation of BMC based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on CBCT scans of paranasal sinuses of 425 patients. In a designated NNT station, all CBCT scans were evaluated in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes to find the frequency of BMC. The condylar head horizontal angulations were also determined in the transverse plane. T-test was used to compare the frequency of BMC between the left and right sides and between males and females. Results: Totally, 309 patients with acceptable visibility of condyles on CBCT scans were entered in the study consisting of 170 (55%) females and 139 (45%) males with a mean age of 39.43±9.7 years. The BMC was detected in 14 cases (4.53%). Differences between males and females, sides and horizontal angulations of condyle of normal and BMC cases were not significant. Conclusion: The prevalence of BMC in the studied population was 4.53%. No significant difference was observed between males and females, sides or horizontal angulations of the involved and uninvolved condyles. PMID:27559345

  10. Evaluation of PNS-computed heating and hypersonic shock tunnel data on sharp and inclined blunt cones

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    As part of the ongoing development and verification of the Parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) technique, computed heat transfer rates have been compared with recently acquired experimental data. The flow fields were computer for laminar and turbulent flow over sharp, blunt tripped sphere-cones at 0/degree/ to 20/degree/ angle of attack in a hypersonic shock tunnel flow at Mach numbers of 11, 13, and 16. Grid refinement studies were performed and minimum smoothing parameters were sought. The average percent difference between the measured mean heat transfer rate and the PNS-computed value was 12% for the sharp and blunt cones at 0/degree/ angle of attack. For the blunt cones at angle of attack, the average percent difference was 11% on the windward ray and 36% on the leeward ray. PNS-predicted flow physics such as boundary layer thickness, shock standoff distance, and crossflow separation were examined. 15 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Cone Quasi-Concave Multi-Objective Programming Theory and Dominance Cone Constructions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    4 Cone Quasi-Concave Multi-Objective Prog ramm in(I Theory and Dominance Cone Constructions by A. Chames Z. M. Huang J. J. Rousseau 0. B. Sun 0. L...Report 606 Cone Quasi-Concave Multi-Objective Programming: Theory and Dominance Cone Constructions by A. Chames Z. M. Huang J. J. Rousseau D. B. Sun...permitted for any purpose of the U.S. Govemement. Tr% C CENTER FOR CYBERNETIC STUDIES cV- A. Chames , Director V 3 D 1 College of Business Administration

  12. DEFORMATION OF SCORIA CONE BY CONDUIT PRESSURIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    E.S. Gaffney; B. Damjanac; D. Krier; G. Valentine

    2005-08-26

    A simplified mechanical model is used to simulate the deformation of a scoria cone due to pressurization of magma in a feeder conduit. The scoria cone is modeled as consisting of a cone of stabilized scoria with an axial region of loose scoria (height h{sub 1}), all overlying a vertically oriented cylindrical conduit intruded into rhyolite tuff country rock. For our analyses, the conduit is filled with basalt magma, usually with the upper length (h{sub 2}) solidified. The style of deformation of the cone depends on both h{sub 1} and h{sub 2}. If magma is prevented from hydrofracturing out of the conduit (as, for example, might be the case if the magma is surrounded by a solidified, but plastically deformable layer acting as a gasket backed up by the brittle country rock) pressures in the magma can build to 10s of MPa. When h{sub 1} is 100 m, not unusual for a small isolated basaltic cinder cone, the magma pressure needed to destabilize the cone when molten magma extends all the way to the original ground surface (h{sub 2} = 0) is only about one-third of the pressure when the upper part of the conduit is solidified (h{sub 2} = 25m). In the former case, almost the entire upper third of the cone is at failure in tension when the configuration becomes unstable. In the latter case, small portions of the surface of the cone are failing in tension when instability occurs, but a large volume in the central core of the cone is failing in shear or compressions. These results may provide insight into the status of volcanic plumbing, either past or present, beneath scoria cones. Field observations at the Lathrop Wells volcano in southern Nevada identify structures at the outer edge just below the crater rim that appear to be inward-dipping listric normal faults. This may indicate that, near the end of its active stage, the cone was close to failing in this fashion. A companion paper suggests that such a failure could have been quite energetic had it occurred.

  13. Female Condom

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nov. 13, 2014. Hatcher RA, et al. Contraceptive Technology. 20th ed. New York, N.Y.: Ardent Media; 2011:391. FC2 female condom. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/ ...

  14. Quasilocal energy exchange and the null cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzun, Nezihe

    2016-10-01

    Energy is at best defined quasilocally in general relativity. Quasilocal energy definitions depend on the conditions one imposes on the boundary Hamiltonian, i.e., how a finite region of spacetime is "isolated." Here, we propose a method to define and investigate systems in terms of their matter plus gravitational energy content. We adopt a generic construction, that involves embedding of an arbitrary dimensional world sheet into an arbitrary dimensional spacetime, to a 2 +2 picture. In our case, the closed 2-dimensional spacelike surface S , that is orthogonal to the 2-dimensional timelike world sheet T at every point, encloses the system in question. The integrability conditions of T and S correspond to three null tetrad gauge conditions once we transform our notation to the one of the null cone observables. We interpret the Raychaudhuri equation of T as a work-energy relation for systems that are not in equilibrium with their surroundings. We achieve this by identifying the quasilocal charge densities corresponding to rotational and nonrotational degrees of freedom, in addition to a relative work density associated with tidal fields. We define the corresponding quasilocal charges that appear in our work-energy relation and which can potentially be exchanged with the surroundings. These charges and our tetrad conditions are invariant under type-III Lorentz transformations, i.e., the boosting of the observers in the directions orthogonal to S . We apply our construction to a radiating Vaidya spacetime, a C -metric and the interior of a Lanczos-van Stockum dust metric. The delicate issues related to the axially symmetric stationary spacetimes and possible extensions to the Kerr geometry are also discussed.

  15. Tantalum Cones in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eric G; Patel, Nirav K; Chughtai, Morad; Elmallah, Randa D K; Delanois, Ronald E; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-11-01

    The best strategy to address large bony defects in revision total knee arthroplasty has yet to be determined. The relatively recent development of porous tantalum cones and their use to address massive bone loss in knee arthroplasty has shown promising short- and intermediate-term results. The purpose of this review is to present the current literature on: (1) basic science of porous tantalum, (2) classification and treatment for bone loss, (3) clinical results, and (4) evolution of newer generation cones.

  16. Causes and consequences of inherited cone disorders.

    PubMed

    Roosing, Susanne; Thiadens, Alberta A H J; Hoyng, Carel B; Klaver, Caroline C W; den Hollander, Anneke I; Cremers, Frans P M

    2014-09-01

    Hereditary cone disorders (CDs) are characterized by defects of the cone photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium underlying the macula, and include achromatopsia (ACHM), cone dystrophy (COD), cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), color vision impairment, Stargardt disease (STGD) and other maculopathies. Forty-two genes have been implicated in non-syndromic inherited CDs. Mutations in the 5 genes implicated in ACHM explain ∼93% of the cases. On the contrary, only 21% of CRDs (17 genes) and 25% of CODs (8 genes) have been elucidated. The fact that the large majority of COD and CRD-associated genes are yet to be discovered hints towards the existence of unknown cone-specific or cone-sensitive processes. The ACHM-associated genes encode proteins that fulfill crucial roles in the cone phototransduction cascade, which is the most frequently compromised (10 genes) process in CDs. Another 7 CD-associated proteins are required for transport processes towards or through the connecting cilium. The remaining CD-associated proteins are involved in cell membrane morphogenesis and maintenance, synaptic transduction, and the retinoid cycle. Further novel genes are likely to be identified in the near future by combining large-scale DNA sequencing and transcriptomics technologies. For 31 of 42 CD-associated genes, mammalian models are available, 14 of which have successfully been used for gene augmentation studies. However, gene augmentation for CDs should ideally be developed in large mammalian models with cone-rich areas, which are currently available for only 11 CD genes. Future research will aim to elucidate the remaining causative genes, identify the molecular mechanisms of CD, and develop novel therapies aimed at preventing vision loss in individuals with CD in the future.

  17. A novel mechanism of cone photoreceptor adaptation.

    PubMed

    Howlett, Marcus H C; Smith, Robert G; Kamermans, Maarten

    2017-04-01

    An animal's ability to survive depends on its sensory systems being able to adapt to a wide range of environmental conditions, by maximizing the information extracted and reducing the noise transmitted. The visual system does this by adapting to luminance and contrast. While luminance adaptation can begin at the retinal photoreceptors, contrast adaptation has been shown to start at later stages in the retina. Photoreceptors adapt to changes in luminance over multiple time scales ranging from tens of milliseconds to minutes, with the adaptive changes arising from processes within the phototransduction cascade. Here we show a new form of adaptation in cones that is independent of the phototransduction process. Rather, it is mediated by voltage-gated ion channels in the cone membrane and acts by changing the frequency response of cones such that their responses speed up as the membrane potential modulation depth increases and slow down as the membrane potential modulation depth decreases. This mechanism is effectively activated by high-contrast stimuli dominated by low frequencies such as natural stimuli. However, the more generally used Gaussian white noise stimuli were not effective since they did not modulate the cone membrane potential to the same extent. This new adaptive process had a time constant of less than a second. A critical component of the underlying mechanism is the hyperpolarization-activated current, Ih, as pharmacologically blocking it prevented the long- and mid- wavelength sensitive cone photoreceptors (L- and M-cones) from adapting. Consistent with this, short- wavelength sensitive cone photoreceptors (S-cones) did not show the adaptive response, and we found they also lacked a prominent Ih. The adaptive filtering mechanism identified here improves the information flow by removing higher-frequency noise during lower signal-to-noise ratio conditions, as occurs when contrast levels are low. Although this new adaptive mechanism can be driven by

  18. Study of boundary-layer transition using transonic-cone preston tube data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, T. D.; Moretti, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    The laminar boundary layer on a 10 degree cone in a transonic wind tunnel was studied. The inviscid flow and boundary layer development were simulated by computer programs. The effects of pitch and yaw angles on the boundary layer were examined. Preston-tube data, taken on the boundary-layer-transition cone in the NASA Ames 11 ft transonic wind tunnel, were used to develope a correlation which relates the measurements to theoretical values of laminar skin friction. The recommended correlation is based on a compressible form of the classical law-of-the-wall. The computer codes successfully simulates the laminar boundary layer for near-zero pitch and yaw angles. However, in cases of significant pitch and/or yaw angles, the flow is three dimensional and the boundary layer computer code used here cannot provide a satisfactory model. The skin-friction correlation is thought to be valid for body geometries other than cones.

  19. Limonene: attractant kairomone for white pine cone beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in an eastern white pine seed orchard in western North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel R

    2007-06-01

    I report on the attraction of the white pine cone beetle, Conophthoru.s coniperda (Schwarz) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), to traps baited with the host monoterpene limonene in western North Carolina. Both (+)- and (-)-limonene attracted male and female cone beetles to Japanese beetle traps in an eastern white pine, Pinus strobus L., seed orchard near Murphy, NC. Catches of cone beetles were directly proportional to the release rate of (-)-limonene; (+)-limonene was not tested for dose response. Attraction of cone beetles to the pheromone (+/-)-trans-pityol was increased significantly by both enantiomers of limonene. In all experiments, catches of C. coniperda were strongly male biased with no treatment effect on sex ratio. (- )-Limonene had no effect on trap catches of the predator Enoclerus nigripes (Say) to pityol, whereas (+)-limonene interrupted the attraction of E. nigripes to traps baited with pityol. Of six monoterpenes commonly found in white pine cones, only (-)-alpha-pinene elicited attraction of E. nigripes to Japanese beetle traps.

  20. Microspectrophotometric evidence for cone monochromacy in sharks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Nathan Scott; Theiss, Susan Michelle; Harahush, Blake Kristin; Collin, Shaun Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Sharks are apex predators, and their evolutionary success is in part due to an impressive array of sensory systems, including vision. The eyes of sharks are well developed and function over a wide range of light levels. However, whilst close relatives of the sharks—the rays and chimaeras—are known to have the potential for colour vision, an evolutionary trait thought to provide distinct survival advantages, evidence for colour vision in sharks remains equivocal. Using single-receptor microspectrophotometry, we measured the absorbance spectra of visual pigments located in the retinal photoreceptors of 17 species of shark. We show that, while the spectral tuning of the rod (wavelength of maximum absorbance, λmax 484-518 nm) and cone (λmax 532-561 nm) visual pigments varies between species, each shark has only a single long-wavelength-sensitive cone type. This suggests that sharks may be cone monochromats and, therefore, potentially colour blind. Whilst cone monochromacy on land is rare, it may be a common strategy in the marine environment: many aquatic mammals (whales, dolphins and seals) also possess only a single, green-sensitive cone type. It appears that both sharks and marine mammals may have arrived at the same visual design by convergent evolution. The spectral tuning of the rod and cone pigments of sharks is also discussed in relation to their visual ecology.

  1. Microspectrophotometric evidence for cone monochromacy in sharks.

    PubMed

    Hart, Nathan Scott; Theiss, Susan Michelle; Harahush, Blake Kristin; Collin, Shaun Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Sharks are apex predators, and their evolutionary success is in part due to an impressive array of sensory systems, including vision. The eyes of sharks are well developed and function over a wide range of light levels. However, whilst close relatives of the sharks-the rays and chimaeras-are known to have the potential for colour vision, an evolutionary trait thought to provide distinct survival advantages, evidence for colour vision in sharks remains equivocal. Using single-receptor microspectrophotometry, we measured the absorbance spectra of visual pigments located in the retinal photoreceptors of 17 species of shark. We show that, while the spectral tuning of the rod (wavelength of maximum absorbance, λ(max) 484-518 nm) and cone (λ(max) 532-561 nm) visual pigments varies between species, each shark has only a single long-wavelength-sensitive cone type. This suggests that sharks may be cone monochromats and, therefore, potentially colour blind. Whilst cone monochromacy on land is rare, it may be a common strategy in the marine environment: many aquatic mammals (whales, dolphins and seals) also possess only a single, green-sensitive cone type. It appears that both sharks and marine mammals may have arrived at the same visual design by convergent evolution. The spectral tuning of the rod and cone pigments of sharks is also discussed in relation to their visual ecology.

  2. Design of a Trichromatic Cone Array

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Jennifer M.; Sterling, Peter; Brainard, David H.; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    2010-01-01

    Cones with peak sensitivity to light at long (L), medium (M) and short (S) wavelengths are unequal in number on the human retina: S cones are rare (<10%) while increasing in fraction from center to periphery, and the L/M cone proportions are highly variable between individuals. What optical properties of the eye, and statistical properties of natural scenes, might drive this organization? We found that the spatial-chromatic structure of natural scenes was largely symmetric between the L, M and S sensitivity bands. Given this symmetry, short wavelength attenuation by ocular media gave L/M cones a modest signal-to-noise advantage, which was amplified, especially in the denser central retina, by long-wavelength accommodation of the lens. Meanwhile, total information represented by the cone mosaic remained relatively insensitive to L/M proportions. Thus, the observed cone array design along with a long-wavelength accommodated lens provides a selective advantage: it is maximally informative. PMID:20168996

  3. Photonic Landau levels on cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Creating photonic materials with nontrivial topological characteristics has seen burgeoning interest in recent years; however, a major route to topology, a magnetic field for continuum photons, has remained elusive. We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We will discuss the conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids.

  4. Photonic Landau levels on cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Using a digital micromirror device to control both amplitude and phase, we inject arbitrary optical modes into our resonator. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We show that there is a conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids.

  5. Distributional geometry of squashed cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fursaev, Dmitri V.; Patrushev, Alexander; Solodukhin, Sergey N.

    2013-08-01

    A regularization procedure developed by D. V. Fursaev and S. N. Solodukhin, [Phys. Rev. D 52, 2133 (1995)PRVDAQ0556-2821] for the integral curvature invariants on manifolds with conical singularities is generalized to the case of squashed cones. In general, the squashed conical singularities do not have rotational O(2) symmetry in a subspace orthogonal to a singular surface Σ so that the surface is allowed to have extrinsic curvatures. A new feature of the squashed conical singularities is that the surface terms in the integral invariants, in the limit of a small angle deficit, now depend also on the extrinsic curvatures of Σ. A case of invariants which are quadratic polynomials of the Riemann curvature is elaborated in different dimensions and applied to several problems related to entanglement entropy. The results are in complete agreement with computations of the logarithmic terms in entanglement entropy of 4D conformal theories [S. N. Solodukhin, Phys. Lett. B 665, 305 (2008)PYLBAJ0370-2693]. Among other applications of the suggested method are logarithmic terms in entanglement entropy of nonconformal theories and a holographic formula for entanglement entropy in theories with gravity duals.

  6. Effects of Nose Bluntness on Stability of Hypersonic Boundary Layers over Blunt Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kara, K.; Balakumar, P.; Kandil, O. A.

    2007-01-01

    Receptivity and stability of hypersonic boundary layers are numerically investigated for boundary layer flows over a 5-degree straight cone at a free-stream Mach number of 6.0. To compute the shock and the interaction of shock with the instability waves, we solve the Navier-Stokes equations in axisymmetric coordinates. The governing equations are solved using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. After the mean flow field is computed, disturbances are introduced at the upstream end of the computational domain. Generation of instability waves from leading edge region and receptivity of boundary layer to slow acoustic waves are investigated. Computations are performed for a cone with nose radii of 0.001, 0.05 and 0.10 inches that give Reynolds numbers based on the nose radii ranging from 650 to 130,000. The linear stability results showed that the bluntness has a strong stabilizing effect on the stability of axisymmetric boundary layers. The transition Reynolds number for a cone with the nose Reynolds number of 65,000 is increased by a factor of 1.82 compared to that for a sharp cone. The receptivity coefficient for a sharp cone is about 4.23 and it is very small, approx.10(exp -3), for large bluntness.

  7. Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Slender Cone-cylinder Body of Revolution at a Mach Number of 3.85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, John R

    1951-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the aerodynamics of a slender cone-cylinder body of revolution was conducted at a Mach number of 3.85 for angles of attack of 0 degree to 10 degrees and a Reynolds number of 3.85x10(exp 6). Boundary-layer measurements at zero angle of attack are compared with the compressible-flow formulations for predicting laminar boundary-layer characteristics. Comparison of experimental pressure and force values with theoretical values showed relatively good agreement for small angles of attack. The measured mean skin-friction coefficients agreed well with theoretical values obtained for laminar flow over cones.

  8. Your College Degree: The External Degree Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haponski, William C.; And Others

    Information on undertaking an external degree program to obtain a college education is presented. An external degree program is one that has no, or minimal requirements for residence (on-campus attendance). Most often it can be entered at any time of the year and usually grants credit for documented learning already acquired. An external degree…

  9. Incidental Findings on Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veeratrishul; Vincent, Steven D.; Hellstein, John W.; Qian, Fang; Smoker, Wendy R. K.; Ruprecht, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has gained widespread acceptance in dentistry for a variety of applications. Most dentists who are not radiologists/trained in radiology are generally not familiar with interpretation of anatomical structures and/or pathosis outside their area of primary interest, as often this was not within the scope of their training. Objectives. To assess that the number of incidental findings on a CBCT scan is high both within and outside of the primary area of interest, thereby emphasizing the importance of interpretation of all areas visualized on the scan. Materials and Methods. An oral and maxillofacial radiologist reviewed 1000 CBCT scans (382 males and 618 females) for findings both in- and outside the area of interest. Results. Of the 1000 subjects that were reviewed, 943 scans showed findings in the primary regions of interest and/or outside the regions of interest, and 76 different conditions were visualized in these scans both in and outside the areas of interest. Conclusion. From the wide scope of findings noted on these scans, it can be concluded that it is essential that a person trained in advanced interpretation techniques in radiology interprets cone beam computed tomography scans. PMID:23304148

  10. A distinct contribution of short-wavelength-sensitive cones to light-evoked activity in the mouse pretectal olivary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Allen, Annette E; Brown, Timothy M; Lucas, Robert J

    2011-11-16

    Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) combine inputs from outer-retinal rod/cone photoreceptors with their intrinsic phototransduction machinery to drive a wide range of so-called non-image-forming (NIF) responses to light. Defining the contribution of each photoreceptor class to evoked responses is vital for determining the degree to which our sensory capabilities depend on melanopsin and for optimizing NIF responses to benefit human health. We addressed this problem by recording electrophysiological responses in the mouse pretectal olivary nucleus (PON) (a target of ipRGCs and origin of the pupil light reflex) to a range of gradual and abrupt changes in light intensity. Dim stimuli drove minimal changes in PON activity, suggesting that rods contribute little under these conditions. To separate cone from melanopsin influences, we compared responses to short (460 nm) and longer (600/655 nm) wavelengths in mice carrying a red shifted cone population (Opn1mw®) or lacking melanopsin (Opn4⁻/⁻). Our data reveal a surprising difference in the quality of information available from medium- and short-wavelength-sensitive cones. The majority cone population (responsive to 600/655 nm) supported only transient changes in firing and responses to relatively sudden changes in light intensity. In contrast, cones uniquely sensitive to the shorter wavelength (S-cones) were better able to drive responses to gradual changes in illuminance, contributed a distinct off inhibition, and at least partially recapitulated the ability of melanopsin to sustain responses under continuous illumination. These data reveal a new role for S-cones unrelated to color vision and suggest renewed consideration of cone contributions to NIF vision at shorter wavelengths.

  11. Pulsating Electrohydrodynamic Cone-Jets: from Choked Jet to Oscillating Cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bober, David; Chen, Chuan-Hua

    2011-11-01

    Pulsating cone-jets occur in a variety of electrostatic spraying and printing systems. We report an experimental study of the pulsation frequency to reconcile two models based on a choked jet and an oscillating cone, respectively. The two regimes are demarcated by the ratio of the supplied flow rate (Qs) to the minimum flow rate (Qm) required for a steady Taylor cone-jet. When Qs Qm , the Taylor cone anchored at the nozzle experiences a capillary oscillation analogous to the Rayleigh mode of a free drop; the pulsation frequency in the oscillating cone regime plateaus to the capillary oscillation frequency which is independent of Qs /Qm .

  12. The External Degree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Cyril O.

    This book examines the external degree in relation to the extremes of attitudes, myths, and data. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of the American external degree, foreign external-degree programs, the purpose of the external degree, the current scene, institutional issues, and problems of general policy. (MJM)

  13. Modelling and control of double-cone dielectric elastomer actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branz, F.; Francesconi, A.

    2016-09-01

    Among various dielectric elastomer devices, cone actuators are of large interest for their multi-degree-of-freedom design. These objects combine the common advantages of dielectric elastomers (i.e. solid-state actuation, self-sensing capability, high conversion efficiency, light weight and low cost) with the possibility to actuate more than one degree of freedom in a single device. The potential applications of this feature in robotics are huge, making cone actuators very attractive. This work focuses on rotational degrees of freedom to complete existing literature and improve the understanding of such aspect. Simple tools are presented for the performance prediction of the device: finite element method simulations and interpolating relations have been used to assess the actuator steady-state behaviour in terms of torque and rotation as a function of geometric parameters. Results are interpolated by fit relations accounting for all the relevant parameters. The obtained data are validated through comparison with experimental results: steady-state torque and rotation are determined at a given high voltage actuation. In addition, the transient response to step input has been measured and, as a result, the voltage-to-torque and the voltage-to-rotation transfer functions are obtained. Experimental data are collected and used to validate the prediction capability of the transfer function in terms of time response to step input and frequency response. The developed static and dynamic models have been employed to implement a feedback compensator that controls the device motion; the simulated behaviour is compared to experimental data, resulting in a maximum prediction error of 7.5%.

  14. The absolute threshold of cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Koeing, Darran; Hofer, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of the absolute threshold of cone vision, which has been previously underestimated due to sub-optimal conditions or overly strict subjective response criteria. We avoided these limitations by using optimized stimuli and experimental conditions while having subjects respond within a rating scale framework. Small (1′ fwhm), brief (34 msec), monochromatic (550 nm) stimuli were foveally presented at multiple intensities in dark-adapted retina for 5 subjects. For comparison, 4 subjects underwent similar testing with rod-optimized stimuli. Cone absolute threshold, that is, the minimum light energy for which subjects were just able to detect a visual stimulus with any response criterion, was 203 ± 38 photons at the cornea, ∼0.47 log units lower than previously reported. Two-alternative forced-choice measurements in a subset of subjects yielded consistent results. Cone thresholds were less responsive to criterion changes than rod thresholds, suggesting a limit to the stimulus information recoverable from the cone mosaic in addition to the limit imposed by Poisson noise. Results were consistent with expectations for detection in the face of stimulus uncertainty. We discuss implications of these findings for modeling the first stages of human cone vision and interpreting psychophysical data acquired with adaptive optics at the spatial scale of the receptor mosaic. PMID:21270115

  15. Strain engineering of Dirac cones in graphyne

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gaoxue; Kumar, Ashok; Pandey, Ravindra; Si, Mingsu

    2014-05-26

    6,6,12-graphyne, one of the two-dimensional carbon allotropes with the rectangular lattice structure, has two kinds of non-equivalent anisotropic Dirac cones in the first Brillouin zone. We show that Dirac cones can be tuned independently by the uniaxial compressive strain applied to graphyne, which induces n-type and p-type self-doping effect, by shifting the energy of the Dirac cones in the opposite directions. On the other hand, application of the tensile strain results into a transition from gapless to finite gap system for the monolayer. For the AB-stacked bilayer, the results predict tunability of Dirac-cones by in-plane strains as well as the strain applied perpendicular to the plane. The group velocities of the Dirac cones show enhancement in the resistance anisotropy for bilayer relative to the case of monolayer. Such tunable and direction-dependent electronic properties predicted for 6,6,12-graphyne make it to be competitive for the next-generation electronic devices at nanoscale.

  16. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, B. R. B.; Ding, G. X.; Kramer, R.; Kawrakow, I.

    2009-07-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12x0.12x0.12 cm{sup 3}, with 17x17x17 {mu}m{sup 3} microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens ({approx}8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only {approx}50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment.

  17. Quantitative genetic parameters for yield, plant growth and cone chemical traits in hop (Humulus lupulus L.)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Most traits targeted in the genetic improvement of hop are quantitative in nature. Improvement based on selection of these traits requires a comprehensive understanding of their inheritance. This study estimated quantitative genetic parameters for 20 traits related to three key objectives for the genetic improvement of hop: cone chemistry, cone yield and agronomic characteristics. Results Significant heritable genetic variation was identified for α-acid and β-acid, as well as their components and relative proportions. Estimates of narrow-sense heritability for these traits (h 2  = 0.15 to 0.29) were lower than those reported in previous hop studies, but were based on a broader suite of families (108 from European, North American and hybrid origins). Narrow-sense heritabilities are reported for hop growth traits for the first time (h 2  = 0.04 to 0.20), relating to important agronomic characteristics such as emergence, height and lateral morphology. Cone chemistry and growth traits were significantly genetically correlated, such that families with more vigorous vegetative growth were associated with lower α-acid and β-acid levels. This trend may reflect the underlying population structure of founder genotypes (European and North American origins) as well as past selection in the Australian environment. Although male and female hop plants are thought to be indistinguishable until flowering, sex was found to influence variation in many growth traits, with male and female plants displaying differences in vegetative morphology from emergence to cone maturity. Conclusions This study reveals important insights into the genetic control of quantitative hop traits. The information gained will provide hop breeders with a greater understanding of the additive genetic factors which affect selection of cone chemistry, yield and agronomic characteristics in hop, aiding in the future development of improved cultivars. PMID:24524684

  18. Fast electron generation in cones with ultraintense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Van Woerkom, L.; Chowdhury, E.; Link, A.; Offermann, D.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Schumacher, D. W.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Chawla, S.; King, J. A.; Ma, T.; Chen, C. D.; Freeman, R. R.; Hey, D.; Key, M. H.; MacKinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Patel, P. K.

    2008-05-15

    Experimental results from copper cones irradiated with ultraintense laser light are presented. Spatial images and total yields of Cu K{sub {alpha}} fluorescence were measured as a function of the laser focusing properties. The fluorescence emission extends into the cone approximately 300 {mu}m from the cone tip and cannot be explained by ray tracing including cone wall absorption. In addition, the total fluorescence yield from cones is an order of magnitude higher than for equivalent mass foil targets. Indications are that the physics of the laser-cone interaction is dominated by preplasma created from the long duration, low-energy prepulse from the laser.

  19. Whiskers, cones and pyramids created in sputtering by ion bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehner, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    A thorough study of the role which foreign atoms play in cone formation during sputtering of metals revealed many experimental facts. Two types of cone formation were distinquished, deposit cones and seed cones. Twenty-six combinations of metals for seed cone formation were tested. The sputtering yield variations with composition for combinations which form seed cones were measured. It was demonstrated that whisker growth becomes a common occurrence when low melting point material is sputter deposited on a hot nonsputtered high melting point electrode.

  20. Optimization over Multi-order Cones

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    Department of Mathematics Technical Report 2011-1 Optimization over multi-order cones Baha ’ M. Alzalg and K. A. Ariyawansa February 2011 Postal...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Optimization over multi-order cones Baha M. Alzalg∗ and K. A. Ariyawansa† Abstract In this paper we propose multi-order cone...that x ∈ Qnp , and x 〈n〉 〈p〉 y to mean that x− y 〈n〉 〈p〉 0. Given 1 ≤ pi ≤ ∞ for i = 1, 2, · · · , r. Let Q 〈n1,n2,··· ,nr〉 〈p1,p2,··· ,pr〉 := Qn1p1

  1. Hygroscopic motions of fossil conifer cones

    PubMed Central

    Poppinga, Simon; Nestle, Nikolaus; Šandor, Andrea; Reible, Bruno; Masselter, Tom; Bruchmann, Bernd; Speck, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Conifer cones represent natural, woody compliant structures which move their scales as passive responses to changes in environmental humidity. Here we report on water-driven opening and closing motions in coalified conifer cones from the Eemian Interglacial (approx. 126,000–113,000 years BP) and from the Middle Miocene (approx. 16.5 to 11.5 million years BP). These cones represent by far the oldest documented evidence of plant parts showing full functionality of such passive hydraulically actuated motion. The functional resilience of these structures is far beyond the biological purpose of seed dispersal and protection and is because of a low level of mineralization of the fossils. Our analysis emphasizes the functional-morphological integrity of these biological compliant mechanisms which, in addition to their biological fascination, are potentially also role models for resilient and maintenance-free biomimetic applications (e.g., adaptive and autonomously moving structures including passive hydraulic actuators). PMID:28074936

  2. Hygroscopic motions of fossil conifer cones.

    PubMed

    Poppinga, Simon; Nestle, Nikolaus; Šandor, Andrea; Reible, Bruno; Masselter, Tom; Bruchmann, Bernd; Speck, Thomas

    2017-01-11

    Conifer cones represent natural, woody compliant structures which move their scales as passive responses to changes in environmental humidity. Here we report on water-driven opening and closing motions in coalified conifer cones from the Eemian Interglacial (approx. 126,000-113,000 years BP) and from the Middle Miocene (approx. 16.5 to 11.5 million years BP). These cones represent by far the oldest documented evidence of plant parts showing full functionality of such passive hydraulically actuated motion. The functional resilience of these structures is far beyond the biological purpose of seed dispersal and protection and is because of a low level of mineralization of the fossils. Our analysis emphasizes the functional-morphological integrity of these biological compliant mechanisms which, in addition to their biological fascination, are potentially also role models for resilient and maintenance-free biomimetic applications (e.g., adaptive and autonomously moving structures including passive hydraulic actuators).

  3. Hygroscopic motions of fossil conifer cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppinga, Simon; Nestle, Nikolaus; Šandor, Andrea; Reible, Bruno; Masselter, Tom; Bruchmann, Bernd; Speck, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Conifer cones represent natural, woody compliant structures which move their scales as passive responses to changes in environmental humidity. Here we report on water-driven opening and closing motions in coalified conifer cones from the Eemian Interglacial (approx. 126,000–113,000 years BP) and from the Middle Miocene (approx. 16.5 to 11.5 million years BP). These cones represent by far the oldest documented evidence of plant parts showing full functionality of such passive hydraulically actuated motion. The functional resilience of these structures is far beyond the biological purpose of seed dispersal and protection and is because of a low level of mineralization of the fossils. Our analysis emphasizes the functional-morphological integrity of these biological compliant mechanisms which, in addition to their biological fascination, are potentially also role models for resilient and maintenance-free biomimetic applications (e.g., adaptive and autonomously moving structures including passive hydraulic actuators).

  4. Tilted cone beam VCT reconstruction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Jiang; Tang, Xiangyang

    2005-04-01

    Reconstruction algorithms for volumetric CT have been the focus of many studies. Several exact and approximate reconstruction algorithms have been proposed for step-and-shoot and helical scanning trajectories to combat cone beam related artifacts. In this paper, we present a closed form cone beam reconstruction formula for tilted gantry data acquisition. Although several algorithms were proposed to compensate for errors induced by the gantry tilt, none of the algorithms addresses the case in which the cone beam geometry is first rebinned to a set of parallel beams prior to the filtered backprojection. Because of the rebinning process, the amount of iso-center adjustment depends not only on the projection angle and tilt angle, but also on the reconstructed pixel location. The proposed algorithm has been tested extensively on both 16 and 64 slice VCT with phantoms and clinical data. The efficacy of the algorithm is clearly demonstrated by the experiments.

  5. Hurricane track forecast cones from fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Meuel, T; Prado, G; Seychelles, F; Bessafi, M; Kellay, H

    2012-01-01

    Trajectories of tropical cyclones may show large deviations from predicted tracks leading to uncertainty as to their landfall location for example. Prediction schemes usually render this uncertainty by showing track forecast cones representing the most probable region for the location of a cyclone during a period of time. By using the statistical properties of these deviations, we propose a simple method to predict possible corridors for the future trajectory of a cyclone. Examples of this scheme are implemented for hurricane Ike and hurricane Jimena. The corridors include the future trajectory up to at least 50 h before landfall. The cones proposed here shed new light on known track forecast cones as they link them directly to the statistics of these deviations.

  6. Assessing mechanical properties from cone indentation hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicarlo, Anthony Albert

    This dissertation investigates methods for assessing the mechanical properties of materials using hardness values obtained from cone indentations. A broad range of isotropic metallic materials was simulated using finite element analysis. In particular, the elastic and plastic bulk properties, which define the stress-strain behavior of materials that exhibit power law hardening, are studied. Other investigators have found that the Young's modulus, E, can be determined from the unloading data of a cone indentation. Therefore, the remaining properties of interest, in this study, are the yield strength, Y, and the work hardening exponent, n. Atkins and Tabor have conducted pioneering work in the area of determining the stress-strain behavior of a metallic material from cone indentation experiments. This work has been re-visited in this study using computational models implementing an expanded range of mechanical properties. Consequently, discrepancies in this prediction method were uncovered when the mechanical properties were outside of the original range studied. As a result, two new prediction methods have been developed using the data collected from the finite element simulations in conjunction with a regression technique. The first method correlates the non-dimensional hardness values, H/E, collected from five cone indentations to the non-dimensional mechanical properties, Y/E and n. The second method is similar in principle, but uses two hardness values as opposed to five. The yield strength can be estimated with a priori knowledge of E. Both of these methods are compared to the method developed by Atkins and Tabor. Although the majority of the work mentioned is focused on the macro-scale, bulk mechanical properties, there is some investigation of meso-scale cone indentations. At the meso-scale, the number of geometric dislocations is significant enough to noticeably increase the strength of a material. This length scale effect is studied for various angled cone

  7. Understanding Cone Photoreceptor Cell Death in Achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Livia S; Vandenberghe, Luk H

    2016-01-01

    Colour vision is only achieved in the presence of healthy and functional cone photoreceptors found in the retina. It is an essential component of human vision and usually the first complaint patients undergoing vision degeneration have is the loss of daylight colour vision. Therefore, an understanding of the biology and basic mechanisms behind cone death under the degenerative state of retinal dystrophies and how the activation of the apoptotic pathway is triggered will provide valuable knowledge. It will also have broader applications for a spectrum of visual disorders and will be critical for future advances in translational research.

  8. Longitudinal Study of Cone Photoreceptors during Retinal Degeneration and in Response to Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Talcott, Katherine E.; Ratnam, Kavitha; Sundquist, Sanna M.; Lucero, Anna S.; Lujan, Brandon J.; Tao, Weng; Porco, Travis C.; Roorda, Austin

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To study cone photoreceptor structure and function in patients with inherited retinal degenerations treated with sustained-release ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). Methods. Two patients with retinitis pigmentosa and one with Usher syndrome type 2 who participated in a phase 2 clinical trial received CNTF delivered by an encapsulated cell technology implant in one eye and sham surgery in the contralateral eye. Patients were followed longitudinally over 30 to 35 months. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) provided high-resolution images at baseline and at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. AOSLO measures of cone spacing and density and optical coherence tomography measures of retinal thickness were correlated with visual function, including visual acuity (VA), visual field sensitivity, and full-field electroretinography (ERG). Results. No significant changes in VA, visual field sensitivity, or ERG responses were observed in either eye of the three patients over 24 months. Outer retinal layers were significantly thicker in CNTF-treated eyes than in sham-treated eyes (P < 0.005). Cone spacing increased by 2.9% more per year in sham-treated eyes than in CNTF-treated eyes (P < 0.001, linear mixed model), and cone density decreased by 9.1%, or 223 cones/degree2 more per year in sham-treated than in CNTF-treated eyes (P = 0.002, linear mixed model). Conclusions. AOSLO images provided a sensitive measure of disease progression and treatment response in patients with inherited retinal degenerations. Larger studies of cone structure using high-resolution imaging techniques are urgently needed to evaluate the effect of CNTF treatment in patients with inherited retinal degenerations. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00447980.) PMID:21087953

  9. Female physicists in Ugandan universities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'ujanga, Florence M.; Ssentongo, Grace Spencer; Ayugi, Gertrude; Akoba, Rashida; Saphina, Biira

    2015-12-01

    For a long time, only one public university in Uganda had a department of physics. Several women graduated from this department, but not many showed much interest in pursuing higher degrees in physics. Currently, there are five public universities in Uganda with departments of physics, and there has been an increase in the number of female graduates in physics. At the same time, the number of women pursuing higher degrees in physics has increased, and the universities have registered an increase in female physics lecturers.

  10. Female sexuality.

    PubMed

    Rao, T S Sathyanarana; Nagaraj, Anil Kumar M

    2015-07-01

    Sex is a motive force bringing a man and a woman into intimate contact. Sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy, and reproduction. Sexuality is experienced and expressed in thoughts, fantasies, desires, beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviors, practices, roles and relationships. Though generally, women are sexually active during adolescence, they reach their peak orgasmic frequency in their 30 s, and have a constant level of sexual capacity up to the age of 55 with little evidence that aging affects it in later life. Desire, arousal, and orgasm are the three principle stages of the sexual response cycle. Each stage is associated with unique physiological changes. Females are commonly affected by various disorders in relation to this sexual response cycle. The prevalence is generally as high as 35-40%. There are a wide range of etiological factors like age, relationship with a partner, psychiatric and medical disorders, psychotropic and other medication. Counseling to overcome stigma and enhance awareness on sexuality is an essential step in management. There are several effective psychological and pharmacological therapeutic approaches to treat female sexual disorders. This article is a review of female sexuality.

  11. Female sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Rao, T.S. Sathyanarana; Nagaraj, Anil Kumar M.

    2015-01-01

    Sex is a motive force bringing a man and a woman into intimate contact. Sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy, and reproduction. Sexuality is experienced and expressed in thoughts, fantasies, desires, beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviors, practices, roles and relationships. Though generally, women are sexually active during adolescence, they reach their peak orgasmic frequency in their 30 s, and have a constant level of sexual capacity up to the age of 55 with little evidence that aging affects it in later life. Desire, arousal, and orgasm are the three principle stages of the sexual response cycle. Each stage is associated with unique physiological changes. Females are commonly affected by various disorders in relation to this sexual response cycle. The prevalence is generally as high as 35–40%. There are a wide range of etiological factors like age, relationship with a partner, psychiatric and medical disorders, psychotropic and other medication. Counseling to overcome stigma and enhance awareness on sexuality is an essential step in management. There are several effective psychological and pharmacological therapeutic approaches to treat female sexual disorders. This article is a review of female sexuality. PMID:26330647

  12. Geodesic-light-cone coordinates and the Bianchi I spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Pierre; Nugier, Fabien; Fanizza, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    The geodesic-light-cone (GLC) coordinates are a useful tool to analyse light propagation and observations in cosmological models. In this article, we propose a detailed, pedagogical, and rigorous introduction to this coordinate system, explore its gauge degrees of freedom, and emphasize its interest when geometric optics is at stake. We then apply the GLC formalism to the homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi I cosmology. More than a simple illustration, this application (i) allows us to show that the Weinberg conjecture according to which gravitational lensing does not affect the proper area of constant-redshift surfaces is significantly violated in a globally anisotropic universe; and (ii) offers a glimpse into new ways to constrain cosmic isotropy from the Hubble diagram.

  13. The First Three Dimensional Digital Models of Shatter Cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratoux, D.; Bouley, S.; Reimold, W. U.; Baratoux, L.

    2014-09-01

    Shatter cones are used as a diagnostic evidence for impact, but model of formation is unclear. Geometrical parameters may offer critical tests. The first 3-D models of 30 shatter cones from 16 different impact structures are reported here.

  14. Basaltic Cone Suggests Constructional Origin of Some Guyots.

    PubMed

    Christensen, M N; Gilbert, C M

    1964-01-17

    A basaltic cinder cone was built beneath the waters of Mono Lake in Pleistocene time. This cone is now exposed. Its internal structure, external form, and petrography suggest that it was constructed with a flat top.

  15. Growing degree day calculator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Degree-day benchmarks indicate discrete biological events in the development of insect pests. For the Sparganothis fruitworm, we have isolated all key development events and linked them to degree-day accumulations. These degree-day accumulations can greatly improve treatment timings for cranberry IP...

  16. Associate Degree Preferred.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parnell, Dale, Ed.

    Designed to encourage dialogue and inform decision making about the associate degree, this book presents perspectives on the role of the associate degree in the nation's two-year colleges. First, "Toward a Greater Degree: A Plan of Action," by Dale Parnell, suggests a plan for preserving and enhancing the value of the education being provided by…

  17. Three-dimensional computed tomography from interferometric measurements within a narrow cone of views

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Izen, Steven H.

    1991-01-01

    A theory to determine the properties of a fluid from measurements of its projections was developed and tested. Viewing cones as small as 10 degrees were evaluated, with the only assumption being that the property was space limited. The results of applying the theory to numerical and actual interferograms of a spherical discontinuity of refractive index are presented. The theory was developed to test the practicality and limits of using three-dimensional computer tomography in internal fluid dynamics.

  18. Restoration of cone vision in a mouse model of achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Alexander, John J; Umino, Yumiko; Everhart, Drew; Chang, Bo; Min, Seok H; Li, Qiuhong; Timmers, Adrian M; Hawes, Norman L; Pang, Ji-Jing; Barlow, Robert B; Hauswirth, William W

    2007-06-01

    Loss of cone function in the central retina is a pivotal event in the development of severe vision impairment for many prevalent blinding diseases. Complete achromatopsia is a genetic defect resulting in cone vision loss in 1 in 30,000 individuals. Using adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy, we show that it is possible to target cones and rescue both the cone-mediated electroretinogram response and visual acuity in the Gnat2 ( cpfl3 ) mouse model of achromatopsia.

  19. Funnel cone for focusing intense ion beams on a target

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.

    2009-10-05

    We describe a funnel cone for concentrating an ion beam on a target. The cone utilizes the reflection characteristic of ion beams on solid walls to focus the incident beam andincrease beam intensity on target. The cone has been modeled with the TRIM code. A prototype has been tested and installed for use in the 350-keV K+ NDCX target chamber.

  20. Low Activation and Fast Inactivation of Transducin in Carp Cones*

    PubMed Central

    Tachibanaki, Shuji; Yonetsu, Shin-Ichi; Fukaya, Satoshi; Koshitani, Yuki; Kawamura, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    Cone photoreceptors show lower light sensitivity and briefer light responses than rod photoreceptors. The light detection signal in these cells is amplified through a phototransduction cascade. The first step of amplification in the cascade is the activation of a GTP-binding protein, transducin (Tr), by light-activated visual pigment (R*). We quantified transducin activation by measuring the binding of GTPγS in purified carp rod and cone membrane preparations with the use of a rapid quench apparatus and found that transducin activation by an R* molecule is ∼5 times less efficient in cones than in rods. Transducin activation terminated in less than 1 s in cones, more quickly than in rods. The rate of GTP hydrolysis in Tr*, and thus the rate of Tr* inactivation, was ∼25 times higher in cones than in rods. This faster inactivation of Tr* ensures briefer light responses in cones. The expression level of RGS9 was found to be ∼20 times higher in cones than in rods, which explains higher GTP hydrolytic activity and, thus, faster Tr* inactivation in cones than in rods. Although carp rods and cones express rod- or cone-versions of visual pigment and transducin, these molecules themselves do not seem to induce the differences significantly in the transducin activation and Tr* inactivation in rods and cones. Instead, the differences seem to be brought about in a rod or cone cell-type specific manner. PMID:23045532

  1. Final design report for cone penetrometer platform

    SciTech Connect

    Seda, R.Y., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-13

    The final design report documents the completion of the design review meetings for acceptance of the cone penetrometer from the vendor. All design comments have been dispositioned and closed. Open items dealt with completion of the safety assessment,operational procedures, operational testing and readiness review.

  2. OSM's cone design and installation experience

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, M.W.

    1983-06-29

    The concrete filled steel cone offers an alternative solution in sealing vertical mine shafts. This paper gives the design and installation experiences of the Office of Surface Mining when dealing with abandoned coal mines. This same solution can also be used with other types of shaft closures. 4 figures.

  3. Epigenomic landscapes of retinal rods and cones

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Alisa; Luo, Chongyuan; Davis, Fred P; Mukamel, Eran A; Henry, Gilbert L; Nery, Joseph R; Urich, Mark A; Picard, Serge; Lister, Ryan; Eddy, Sean R; Beer, Michael A; Ecker, Joseph R; Nathans, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Rod and cone photoreceptors are highly similar in many respects but they have important functional and molecular differences. Here, we investigate genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation and chromatin accessibility in mouse rods and cones and correlate differences in these features with gene expression, histone marks, transcription factor binding, and DNA sequence motifs. Loss of NR2E3 in rods shifts their epigenomes to a more cone-like state. The data further reveal wide differences in DNA methylation between retinal photoreceptors and brain neurons. Surprisingly, we also find a substantial fraction of DNA hypo-methylated regions in adult rods that are not in active chromatin. Many of these regions exhibit hallmarks of regulatory regions that were active earlier in neuronal development, suggesting that these regions could remain undermethylated due to the highly compact chromatin in mature rods. This work defines the epigenomic landscapes of rods and cones, revealing features relevant to photoreceptor development and function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11613.001 PMID:26949250

  4. Programming Retinal Stem Cells into Cone Photoreceptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    this grant, we sought to investigate the mechanisms that regulate the earliest events in cone photoreceptor development and to exploit this knowledge ...identified 236 genes that were differentially expressed (P < 0.01, false discovery rate < 0.25) between DMSO and DAPT conditions at times that preceded

  5. Novel pharmacological targets from Indian cone snails.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, M Santhana; Manikandan, S

    2011-02-01

    The oceans are a source of combinatorial library of unique natural products, 'not found in the terrestrial environment'. Marine invertebrates such as sponges, molluscs, bryozoans, tunicates (Urochordata) and their associated microorganisms are the major representatives of promising bioactive compounds. Among these, the predatory molluscan cone snails have evolved with highly structured small and complex array of peptides (more than 50,000) linked to their prey capture and defence. These peptides have become a valuable source of neuro pharmacological targets as many of them selectively modulate ion channels and transporters. A group of scientists from United States, Europe, Australia, Israel and China have been characterized drugs for neuropathic pain and pharmacological targets from the peptides of a few cone snail species. Several are now in Clinical and preclinical development. Less than 1% of the cono peptides are pharmacologically characterized. India has a diversity of 20-30% of total cone snail species distributed worldwide. A group of Indian Scientists have made promising drug discovery programs from Conus peptides. This review will focus on the Conus peptides from Indian cone snails species, their neuro pharmacological targets and future directions.

  6. Perturbation theory in light-cone quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Langnau, A.

    1992-01-01

    A thorough investigation of light-cone properties which are characteristic for higher dimensions is very important. The easiest way of addressing these issues is by analyzing the perturbative structure of light-cone field theories first. Perturbative studies cannot be substituted for an analysis of problems related to a nonperturbative approach. However, in order to lay down groundwork for upcoming nonperturbative studies, it is indispensable to validate the renormalization methods at the perturbative level, i.e., to gain control over the perturbative treatment first. A clear understanding of divergences in perturbation theory, as well as their numerical treatment, is a necessary first step towards formulating such a program. The first objective of this dissertation is to clarify this issue, at least in second and fourth-order in perturbation theory. The work in this dissertation can provide guidance for the choice of counterterms in Discrete Light-Cone Quantization or the Tamm-Dancoff approach. A second objective of this work is the study of light-cone perturbation theory as a competitive tool for conducting perturbative Feynman diagram calculations. Feynman perturbation theory has become the most practical tool for computing cross sections in high energy physics and other physical properties of field theory. Although this standard covariant method has been applied to a great range of problems, computations beyond one-loop corrections are very difficult. Because of the algebraic complexity of the Feynman calculations in higher-order perturbation theory, it is desirable to automatize Feynman diagram calculations so that algebraic manipulation programs can carry out almost the entire calculation. This thesis presents a step in this direction. The technique we are elaborating on here is known as light-cone perturbation theory.

  7. Rod-cone interactions and the temporal impulse response of the cone pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zele, Andrew J.; Cao, Dingcai; Pokorny, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Dark-adapted rods suppress cone-mediated flicker detection. This study evaluates the effect that rod activity has on cone temporal processing by investigating whether rod mediated suppression changes the cone pathway impulse response function, regardless of the form of the temporal signal. Stimuli were generated with a 2-channel photostimulator that has four primaries for the central field and four primaries for the surround. Cone pathway temporal impulse response functions were derived from temporal contrast sensitivity data with periodic stimuli, and from two-pulse discrimination data in which pairs of briefly pulsed stimuli were presented successively at a series of stimulus onset asynchronies. Dark-adapted rods altered the amplitude and timing of cone pathway temporal impulse response functions, irrespective of whether they were derived from measurements with temporally periodic stimuli or in a brief presentation temporal resolution task with pulsed stimuli. Rod-cone interactions are a fundamental operation in visual temporal processing under mesopic light levels, acting to decrease the temporal bandwidth of the visual system. PMID:18486960

  8. Female condoms.

    PubMed

    Bounds, W

    1997-06-01

    Early versions of a female condom were available in the 1920s and 1960s, but they were little used and soon forgotten. It took the arrival of AIDS, and the urgent need for a wider range of female-controlled barrier techniques, to rekindle scientific interest in this method. In the 1980s, three groups in Europe and the USA began development of new female condom designs, comprising 'Femidom (Reality)', the 'Bikini Condom', and 'Women's Choice'. Apart from differences in their physical design, Femidom differs from the others in that it is made of a polyurethane membrane, which has several advantages over latex. Of the three, Femidom is the most advanced in terms of development and clinical testing, and it is the only one to have reached the marketing stage. Laboratory studies and clinical trials suggest that its contraceptive efficacy is similar to that documented for the male condom, though a direct comparison is not possible because no comparative clinical trials have, as yet, been undertaken. Reported 'typical-use' pregnancy rates range from 12.4 to 22.2% at 6 months of use in the USA and Latin America, respectively, while a study in the UK observed a rate of 15% at 12 months. As with all barrier methods, most failures appear to be associated with poor compliance or incorrect use. 'Perfect-use' pregnancy rates were substantially lower, indicating that Femidom can be very effective, if used consistently and correctly. Evidence for Femidom's effectiveness to protect against transmission of sexual disease-causing organisms, including HIV, is still very limited and based largely on laboratory studies. Whilst, in theory, the condom should confer reliable protection, its efficacy in clinical use will depend upon correct and consistent use and upon the product's ability to maintain an effective physical barrier throughout penetrative intercourse. In this respect, the results of recent and ongoing clinical studies are expected with much interest. How valuable Femidom will

  9. Intracranial physiological calcifications evaluated with cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Sedghizadeh, P P; Nguyen, M; Enciso, R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate cone beam CT (CBCT) scans for the presence of physiological and pathological intracranial calcifications. Methods CBCT scans from male and female patients that met our ascertainment criteria were evaluated retrospectively (n = 500) for the presence of either physiological or pathological intracranial calcifications. Results Out of the 500 patients evaluated, 176 had evidence of intracranial physiological calcification (35.2% prevalence), and none had evidence of pathological calcification. There was a 3:2 male-to-female ratio and no ethnic predilection; the ages of affected patients ranged from 13 years to 82 years with a mean age of 52 years. The majority of calcifications appeared in the pineal/habenular region (80%), with some also appearing in the choroid plexus region bilaterally (12%), and a smaller subset appearing in the petroclinoid ligament region bilaterally (8%). Conclusions Intracranial physiological calcifications can be a common finding on CBCT scans, whereas pathological intracranial calcifications are rare. PMID:22842632

  10. Analysis of Instabilities in Non-Axisymmetric Hypersonic Boundary Layers Over Cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; White, Jeffery A.

    2010-01-01

    Hypersonic flows over circular cones constitute one of the most important generic configurations for fundamental aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic studies. In this paper, numerical computations are carried out for Mach 6 flows over a 7-degree half-angle cone with two different flow incidence angles and a compression cone with a large concave curvature. Instability wave and transition-related flow physics are investigated using a series of advanced stability methods ranging from conventional linear stability theory (LST) and a higher-fidelity linear and nonlinear parabolized stability equations (PSE), to the 2D eigenvalue analysis based on partial differential equations. Computed N factor distribution pertinent to various instability mechanisms over the cone surface provides initial assessments of possible transition fronts and a guide to corresponding disturbance characteristics such as frequency and azimuthal wave numbers. It is also shown that strong secondary instability that eventually leads to transition to turbulence can be simulated very efficiently using a combination of advanced stability methods described above.

  11. Receptivity of Supersonic Boundary Layers Due To Acoustic Disturbances Over Blunt Cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2007-01-01

    Receptivity and stability of supersonic boundary layers over a 5-degree straight cone with a blunt tip are numerically investigated at a free stream Mach number of 3.5 and at a high Reynolds number of 106/inch. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. The linear stability results showed that bluntness has less stabilizing effects on the stability of boundary layers over cones than on flat plates and wedges. The unsteady simulations of the interaction of plane threedimensional acoustic waves with the cone showed that the modulation of wavelength and the generation of instability waves first occurred near the leading edge in the plane where the constant acoustic phase lines are perpendicular to the cone axis. Further downstream, this instability region spreads in the azimuthal direction from this plane.

  12. Bright and durable field-emission source derived from frozen refractory-metal Taylor cones

    DOE PAGES

    Hirsch, Gregory

    2017-02-22

    A novel method for creating conical field-emission structures possessing unusual and desirable physical characteristics is described. This process is accomplished by solidification of electrostatically formed high-temperature Taylor cones created on the ends of laser melted refractory-metal wires. Extremely rapid freezing ensures that the resultant solid structures preserve the shape and surface smoothness of the flawless liquid Taylor-cones to a very high degree. The method also enables in situ and rapid restoration of the frozen cones to their initial pristine state after undergoing physical degradation during use. This permits maximum current to be delivered without excessive concern for any associated reductionmore » in field-emitter lifetime resulting from operation near or even above the damage threshold. In addition to the production of field emitters using polycrystalline wires as a substrate, the feasibility of producing monocrystalline frozen Taylor-cones having reproducible crystal orientation by growth on single-crystal wires was demonstrated. Finally, the development of the basic field-emission technology, progress to incorporate it into a pulsed electron gun employing laser-assisted field emission for ultrafast experiments, and some additional advances and opportunities are discussed.« less

  13. Coherent imaging of the cone mosaic in the living human eye.

    PubMed

    Marcos, S; Navarro, R; Artal, P

    1996-05-01

    A new system for the recording of high-resolution images of the cone mosaic in the living room fovea has been developed. The experimental method is inspired by stellar speckle interferometry, used in astronomy to resolve binary stars. Series of short-exposure images of small areas of the fovea are registered under coherent illumination. These images show speckle patterns that have some correlation with the topography of the cone mosaic and retain high-resolution information. Such correlation is better revealed in the power spectrum (square modulus of the Fourier transform). The signal-to-noise ratio is increased, without loss of high frequencies, by averaging the power spectra of a number of such speckle patterns. The average power spectra show, in most of the cases, an elliptical ring (or hexagon), whose mean radius corresponds to the characteristic spatial frequency of the cone mosaic (or the inverse of the mean row-to-row cone spacing) at a given retinal location. Good results are obtained in the five normal observers tested, at various retinal eccentricities, up to 1 visual degree, including the center of the fovea for two eyes. We find a decrease in the spatial frequency of the mosaic with the eccentricity and an important intersubject variability, in agreement with anatomical studies.

  14. The Indispensability of Ghost Fields in the Light-Cone Gauge Quantization of Gauge Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakawaki, Y.; McCartor, G.

    1999-07-01

    We continue McCartor and Robertson's recent demonstration of the indispensability of ghost fields in the light-cone gauge quantization of gauge fields. It is shown that the ghost fields are indispensable in deriving well-defined antiderivatives and in regularizing the most singular component of the gauge field propagator. To this end it is sufficient to confine ourselves to noninteracting abelian fields. Furthermore, to circumvent dealing with constrained systems, we construct the temporal gauge canonical formulation of the free electromagnetic field in auxiliary coordinates xμ=(x-, x+, x1, x2), where x- = x0 cos {θ}-x3 sin θ x+ = x0 sin θ +x3 cos θ and x- plays the role of time. In so doing we can quantize the fields canonically without any constraints, unambiguously introduce ``static ghost fields" as residual gauge degrees of freedom and construct the light-cone gauge solution in the light-cone representation by simply taking the light-cone limit (θ --> (π / 4) ). As a by product we find that, with a suitable choice of vacuum, the Mandelstam-Leibbrandt form of the propagator can be derived in the θ=0 case (the temporal gauge formulation in the equal-time representation).

  15. Radiation protection enrollments and degrees, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J R; Shirley, D L; Blair, L M

    1982-05-01

    This report presents data on the number of students enrolled and the degrees awarded in academic year 1980-81 from 61 U.S. universities offering degree programs in radiation protection or related areas that would enable students to work in the health physics field. The report includes historical survey data for the last decade and provides information such as trends by degree level, foreign national student participation, female and minority student participation, and placement of graduates. Also included is a listing of the universities by type of program and number of students.

  16. Investigation of Adaptive Optics Imaging Biomarkers for Detecting Pathological Changes of the Cone Mosaic in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Marco; Parravano, Mariacristina; Serrao, Sebastiano; Ziccardi, Lucia; Giannini, Daniela; Lombardo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate a set of adaptive optics (AO) imaging biomarkers for the assessment of changes of the cone mosaic spatial arrangement in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1). Methods 16 patients with ≥20/20 visual acuity and a diagnosis of DM1 in the past 8 years to 37 years and 20 age-matched healthy volunteers were recruited in this study. Cone density, cone spacing and Voronoi diagrams were calculated on 160x160 μm images of the cone mosaic acquired with an AO flood illumination retinal camera at 1.5 degrees eccentricity from the fovea along all retinal meridians. From the cone spacing measures and Voronoi diagrams, the linear dispersion index (LDi) and the heterogeneity packing index (HPi) were computed respectively. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to discriminate DM1 patients without diabetic retinopathy from controls using the cone metrics as predictors. Results Of the 16 DM1 patients, eight had no signs of diabetic retinopathy (noDR) and eight had mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) on fundoscopy. On average, cone density, LDi and HPi values were significantly different (P<0.05) between noDR or NPDR eyes and controls, with these differences increasing with duration of diabetes. However, each cone metric alone was not sufficiently sensitive to discriminate entirely between membership of noDR cases and controls. The complementary use of all the three cone metrics in the logistic regression model gained 100% accuracy to identify noDR cases with respect to controls. Conclusion The present set of AO imaging biomarkers identified reliably abnormalities in the spatial arrangement of the parafoveal cones in DM1 patients, even when no signs of diabetic retinopathy were seen on fundoscopy. PMID:26963392

  17. Simulated and empiric wind pollination patterns of conifer ovulate cones

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Karl J.

    1982-01-01

    Wind tunnel analyses of conifer ovulate cones indicate that the total geometry of the cone enhances the probability of pollen entrapment. Aerodynamic characteristics of cone scale-bract complexes are such that suspended pollen is directed toward the micropyles of attached ovules. Within the taxa examined, there appears to be a preferential entrapment by ovulate cones of pollen of the same species. The data are interpreted as evidence for an aerodynamic reciprocity between wind-suspended pollen and the structure of ovulate cones which increases the frequency of pollination and the potential for fertilization. Images PMID:16593147

  18. Unpaired Dirac cones in photonic lattices and networks (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Yidong; Leykam, Daniel; Rechtsman, Mikael C.

    2016-09-01

    Unpaired Dirac cones are bandstructures with two bands crossing at a single point in the Brillouin zone. It is known that photonic bandstructures can exhibit pairs of Dirac cones, similar to graphene; unpaired cones, however, have not observed in photonics, and have been observed in condensed-matter systems only among topological insulator surface states. We show that unpaired Dirac cones occur in a 2D photonic lattice that is not the surface of a 3D system. These modes have unusual properties, including conical diffraction and antilocalization immune to short-range disorder, due to the absence of "intervalley" scattering between Dirac cones.

  19. Female Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Astronauts Dr. N. Jan Davis (left) and Dr. Mae C. Jemison (right) were mission specialists on board the STS-47 mission. Born on November 1, 1953 in Cocoa Beach, Florida, Dr. N. Jan Davis received a Master degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1983 followed by a Doctorate in Engineering from the University of Alabama in Huntsville in 1985. In 1979 she joined NASA Marshall Space Flight Center as an aerospace engineer. A veteran of three space flights, Dr. Davis has logged over 678 hours in space since becoming an astronaut in 1987. She flew as a mission specialist on STS-47 in 1992 and STS-60 in 1994, and was the payload commander on STS-85 in 1997. In July 1999, she transferred to the Marshall Space Flight Center, where she became Director of Flight Projects. Dr. Mae C. Jemison, the first African-American woman in space, was born on October 17, 1956 in Decatur, Alabama but considers Chicago, Illinois her hometown. She received a Bachelor degree in Chemical Engineering (and completed the requirements for a Bachelor degree in African and Afro-American studies) at Stanford University in 1977, and a Doctorate degree in medicine from Cornell University in 1981. After receiving her doctorate, she worked as a General Practitioner while attending graduate engineering classes in Los Angeles. She was named an astronaut candidate in 1987, and flew her first flight as a science mission specialists on STS-47, Spacelab-J, in September 1992, logging 190 hours, 30 minutes, 23 seconds in space. In March 1993, Dr. Jemison resigned from NASA, thought she still resides in Houston, Texas. She went on to publish her memoirs, Find Where the Wind Goes: Moments from My Life, in 2001. The astronauts are shown preparing to deploy the lower body negative pressure (LBNP) apparatus in this 35mm frame taken in the science module aboard the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavor. Fellow astronauts Robert L. Gibson (Commander), Curtis L. Brown (Junior Pilot), Mark C. Lee (Payload Commander), Jay Apt

  20. Prospects for retinal cone-targeted gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Alexander, John J; Hauswirth, William W

    2008-06-01

    Gene therapy strategies that target therapeutic genes to retinal cones are a worthy goal both because cone photoreceptor diseases are severely vision limiting and because many retinal diseases that do not affect cones directly eventually lead to cone loss, the reason for eventual blindness. Human achromatopsia is a genetic disease of cones that renders them nonfunctional but otherwise intact. Thus, animal models of achromatopsia were used in conjunction with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors whose serotype efficiently transduces cones and with a promoter that limits transgene expression to cones. In the Gnat2(cpfl3) mouse model of one genetic form of human achromatopsia, we were able to demonstrate recovery of normal cone function and visual acuity after a single subretinal treatment of vector that supplied wild-type Gnat2 protein to cones. This validates the overall strategy of targeting cones using recombinant viral vectors and justifies a more complete examination of animal models of cone disease as a prelude to considering a clinical gene therapy trial.

  1. Labor market penalties for foreign degrees among college educated immigrants.

    PubMed

    Arbeit, Caren A; Warren, John Robert

    2013-05-01

    Are college degrees earned abroad worth less in the American economy than degrees earned in the United States? Do the labor market penalties associated with holding a foreign degree vary as a function of the country or region in which it was earned? Do these processes differ for men and women? We use data on 18,361 college-educated immigrants from the National Survey of College Graduates (NSCG) to address these questions. Female immigrants with foreign degrees are less likely to be employed than immigrant women who earned their degrees in the US. When employed, both female and male immigrants with foreign degrees are less likely to work in a job related to their highest college degree. Among employed female immigrants, the wage returns to foreign degrees are about 17% less than for US degrees; among male immigrants, this figure is about 11%. For both female and male immigrants, the labor market penalties associated with holding a foreign degree vary as a function of the region from which the foreign degree was obtained.

  2. Market Penalties for Foreign Degrees Among College Educated Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Arbeit, Caren A.; Warren, John Robert

    2014-01-01

    Are college degrees earned abroad worth less in the American economy than degrees earned in the United States? Do the labor market penalties associated with holding a foreign degree vary as a function of the country or region in which it was earned? Do these processes differ for men and women? We use data on 18,365 college-educated immigrants from the National Survey of College Graduates (NSCG) to address these questions. Female immigrants with foreign degrees are less likely to be employed than immigrant women who earned their degrees in the US. When employed, both female and male immigrants with foreign degrees are less likely to work in a job related to their highest college degree. Among employed female immigrants, the wage returns to foreign degrees are about 17% less than for U.S. degrees; among male immigrants, this figure is about 11%. For both female and male immigrants, the labor market penalties associated with holding a foreign degree vary as a function of the region from which the foreign degree was obtained. PMID:23521999

  3. Using electrostatic modelling to study cone discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, W.

    2015-10-01

    Cone discharges, also known as bulking brush discharges, can arise when charged insulating powder accumulates in a heap in silos. They can be an effective ignition source to relatively ignition sensitive powders and therefore represent a possible electrostatic hazard. The current international guidance on control of electrostatic hazards (IEC/TS 60079-32-1 [1]), endorses the usage of electrostatic modelling to estimate the electric field above the powder heap. “Such model calculations should be based on the charge to mass ratio, bulk density and filling rate of the powder, the relative permittivity and resistivity of the bulked powder as well as the silo geometry.” This study shows a practical demonstration of this modelling technique. It also examines whether the shape of the heap affects the strength of the electric field above the powder heap, and thus the likelihood of cone discharges from occurring.

  4. An Investigation of the Damping in Pitch Characteristics of a Ten Degree Cone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-01

    nm-ecure, levi grouna te Ung as currently -A.he m-c ract-lcal -way to obt-aIn aeroc vnar .2c data Teblitcrre hevnerveloclitv’ wind t unn _ie ar -he...Ballisitcs Research :ab., Aberdeen Proving Grounds, i4aryland, AIAA Paper -70, 197A 2 0 .. en,K. B., Sawyer, F. 1., Walchner, 0., "Stability Jer.vaives o.f

  5. Iodine contrast cone beam CT imaging of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partain, Larry; Prionas, Stavros; Seppi, Edward; Virshup, Gary; Roos, Gerhard; Sutherland, Robert; Boone, John

    2007-03-01

    An iodine contrast agent, in conjunction with an X-ray cone beam CT imaging system, was used to clearly image three, biopsy verified, cancer lesions in two patients. The lesions were approximately in the 10 mm to 6 mm diameter range. Additional regions were also enhanced with approximate dimensions down to 1 mm or less in diameter. A flat panel detector, with 194 μm pixels in 2 x 2 binning mode, was used to obtain 500 projection images at 30 fps with an 80 kVp X-ray system operating at 112 mAs, for an 8-9 mGy dose - equivalent to two view mammography for these women. The patients were positioned prone, while the gantry rotated in the horizontal plane around the uncompressed, pendant breasts. This gantry rotated 360 degrees during the patient's 16.6 sec breath hold. A volume of 100 cc of 320 mg/ml iodine-contrast was power injected at 4 cc/sec, via catheter into the arm vein of the patient. The resulting 512 x 512 x 300 cone beam CT data set of Feldkamp reconstructed ~(0.3 mm) 3 voxels were analyzed. An interval of voxel contrast values, characteristic of the regions with iodine contrast enhancement, were used with surface rendering to clearly identify up to a total of 13 highlighted volumes. This included the three largest lesions, that were previously biopsied and confirmed to be malignant. The other ten highlighted regions, of smaller diameters, are likely areas of increased contrast trapping unrelated to cancer angiogenesis. However the technique itself is capable of resolving lesions that small.

  6. Hadronic wavefunctions in light-cone quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, T.

    1994-05-01

    The analysis of light-cone wavefunctions seems the most promising theoretical approach to a detailed understanding of the structure of relativistic bound states, particularly hadrons. However, there are numerous complications in this approach. Most importantly, the light-cone approach sacrifices manifest rotational invariance in exchange for the elimination of negative-energy states. The requirement of rotational invariance of the full theory places important constraints on proposed light-cone wavefunctions, whether they are modelled or extracted from some numerical procedure. A formulation of the consequences of the hidden rotational symmetry has been sought for some time; it is presented in Chapter 2. In lattice gauge theory or heavy-quark effective theory, much of the focus is on the extraction of numerical values of operators which are related to the hadronic wavefunction. These operators are to some extent interdependent, with relations induced by fundamental constraints on the underlying wavefunction. The consequences of the requirement of unitarity are explored in Chapter 3, and are found to have startling phenomenological relevance. To test model light-cone wavefunctions, experimental predictions must be made. The reliability of perturbative QCD as a tool for making such predictions has been questioned. In Chapter 4, the author presents a computation of the rates for nucleon-antinucleon annihilation, improving the reliability of the perturbative computation by taking into account the Sudakov suppression of exclusive processes at large transverse impact parameter. In Chapter 5, he develops the analysis of semiexclusive production. This work focuses on processes in which a single isolated meson is produced perturbatively and recoils against a wide hadronizing system. At energies above about 10 GeV, semiexclusive processes are shown to be the most sensitive experimental probes of hadronic structure.

  7. Cone beam computed tomography use in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Nervina, J M

    2012-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is widely used by orthodontists to obtain three-dimensional (3-D) images of their patients. This is of value as malocclusion results from discrepancies in three planes of space. This review tracks the use of CBCT in orthodontics, from its validation as an accurate and reliable tool, to its use in diagnosing and treatment planning, and in assessing treatment outcomes in orthodontics.

  8. Ichthyotoxicity caused by marine cone snail venoms?

    PubMed

    Mebs, Dietrich; Kauferstein, Silke

    2005-09-01

    Ten venoms from marine cone snails were tested for ichthyotoxic effects on zebra fish (Brachydanio rerio) when added to the water. Only two venoms, from Conus capitaneus and Conus episcopatus, produced lethal effects at high concentrations (50-300 microg/ml) within 20-90 min. No sedative or hypnotic symptoms were observed. The experiments confirm that Conus venoms exert a quick and prompt activity only by parenteral injection into the prey as it is performed by the snail.

  9. Reconfiguration of broad leaves into cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Laura

    2013-11-01

    Flexible plants, fungi, and sessile animals are thought to reconfigure in the wind and water to reduce the drag forces that act upon them. Simple mathematical models of a flexible beam immersed in a two-dimensional flow will also exhibit this behavior. What is less understood is how the mechanical properties of a leaf in a three-dimensional flow will passively allow roll up and reduce drag. This presentation will begin by examining how leaves roll up into drag reducing shapes in strong flow. The dynamics of the flow around the leaf of the wild ginger Hexastylis arifolia are described using particle image velocimetry. The flows around the leaves are compared with those of simplified sheets using 3D numerical simulations and physical models. For some reconfiguration shapes, large forces and oscillations due to strong vortex shedding are produced. In the actual leaf, a stable recirculation zone is formed within the wake of the reconfigured cone. In physical and numerical models that reconfigure into cones, a similar recirculation zone is observed with both rigid and flexible tethers. These results suggest that the three-dimensional cone structure in addition to flexibility is significant to both the reduction of vortex-induced vibrations and the forces experienced by the leaf.

  10. Large-Cone Nonnegative Matrix Factorization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongliang; Gong, Mingming; Tao, Dacheng

    2016-06-15

    Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) has been greatly popularized by its parts-based interpretation and the effective multiplicative updating rule for searching local solutions. In this paper, we study the problem of how to obtain an attractive local solution for NMF, which not only fits the given training data well but also generalizes well on the unseen test data. Based on the geometric interpretation of NMF, we introduce two large-cone penalties for NMF and propose large-cone NMF (LCNMF) algorithms. Compared with NMF, LCNMF will obtain bases comprising a larger simplicial cone, and therefore has three advantages. 1) the empirical reconstruction error of LCNMF could mostly be smaller; (2) the generalization ability of the proposed algorithm is much more powerful; and (3) the obtained bases of LCNMF have a low-overlapping property, which enables the bases to be sparse and makes the proposed algorithms very robust. Experiments on synthetic and real-world data sets confirm the efficiency of LCNMF.

  11. Inverted cones and their elastic creases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seffen, Keith A.

    2016-12-01

    We study the elastic inversion of a right circular cone, in particular, the uniform shape of the narrow crease that divides its upright and inverted parts. Our methodology considers a cylindrical shell analogy for simplicity where the crease is the boundary layer deformation. Solution of its governing equation of deformation requires careful crafting of the underlying assumptions and boundary conditions in order to reveal an expression for the crease shape in closed form. We can then define the characteristic width of crease exactly, which is compared to a geometrically nonlinear, large displacement finite element analysis. This width is shown to be accurately predicted for shallow and steep cones, which imparts confidence to our original assumptions. Using the shape of crease, we compute the strain energy stored in the inverted cone, in order to derive an expression for the applied force of inversion by a simple energy method. Again, our predictions match finite element data very well. This study may complement other studies of creases traditionally formed in a less controlled manner, for example, during crumpling of lightweight sheets.

  12. Internal Reflection Sensor for the Cone Penetrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Job Bello

    1998-05-29

    The objectives of this project are to design, assemble, test, and demonstrate a prototype Internal Reflection Sensor (IRS) for the cone penetrometer. The sensor will ultimately be deployed during site characterization with the goal of providing real-time, in situ detection of NonAqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) in the subsurface. In the first phase of this program, we have designed and assembled an IRS module that interfaces directly to a standard cone penetrometer system. Laboratory tests demonstrated that the sensor responds in real-time to a wide variety of free phase NAPLs without interference from natural materials such as water and soil of various types or dissolved contaminants. In a preliminary field test, the sensor was able to locate NAPLs at thin, discrete depths in a soil test pit when deployed with a cone penetrometer. Ruggedness of the device was tested with a series of penetrometer pushes to the depth of refusal at a clean location. There was no visible damage to the sensor and its performance did not change in the course of these experiments. Based on the successes of the Phase I program, it is recommended that the project proceed to full-scale demonstration in Phase II.

  13. CRALBP supports the mammalian retinal visual cycle and cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yunlu; Shen, Susan Q.; Jui, Jonathan; Rupp, Alan C.; Byrne, Leah C.; Hattar, Samer; Flannery, John G.; Corbo, Joseph C.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the cellular retinaldehyde–binding protein (CRALBP, encoded by RLBP1) can lead to severe cone photoreceptor–mediated vision loss in patients. It is not known how CRALBP supports cone function or how altered CRALBP leads to cone dysfunction. Here, we determined that deletion of Rlbp1 in mice impairs the retinal visual cycle. Mice lacking CRALBP exhibited M-opsin mislocalization, M-cone loss, and impaired cone-driven visual behavior and light responses. Additionally, M-cone dark adaptation was largely suppressed in CRALBP-deficient animals. While rearing CRALBP-deficient mice in the dark prevented the deterioration of cone function, it did not rescue cone dark adaptation. Adeno-associated virus–mediated restoration of CRALBP expression specifically in Müller cells, but not retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, rescued the retinal visual cycle and M-cone sensitivity in knockout mice. Our results identify Müller cell CRALBP as a key component of the retinal visual cycle and demonstrate that this pathway is important for maintaining normal cone–driven vision and accelerating cone dark adaptation. PMID:25607845

  14. GATEWAYS: Degree program alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Strong, K.R.; Thayer, M.M.

    1991-11-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is using non-traditional solutions to assist employees in attaining degrees required for essential Laboratory operations. Varieties of distance learning technologies have been implemented to meet some degree needs. While distance learning is not always a perfect solution, it enables the Laboratory to provide education that would otherwise not be practical for full-time employees. The Laboratory has also formed partnerships with local colleges to design programs to fill particular needs. Meeting the challenge of providing cost-effective, viable degree programs in an isolated location requires both patience and innovation.

  15. Iterative image reconstruction for limited-angle inverse helical cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei; Zeng, Li

    2016-01-01

    Helical trajectory satisfying the condition of exact reconstruction, has been widely utilized in the commercial computed tomography (CT). While limited by the scanning environment in some practical applications, the conventional helical cone-beam CT imaging is hard to complete, thus, developing an imaging system suited for long-object may be valuable. Three-dimensional C-arm CT is an innovative imaging technique which has been greatly concerned. Since there is a high degree of freedom of C-arm, more flexible image acquisition trajectories for 3D imaging can be achieved. In this work, a fast iterative reconstruction algorithm based on total variation minimization is developed for a trajectory of limited-angle inverse helical cone-beam CT, which can be applied to detect long-object without slip-ring technology. The experimental results show that the developed algorithm can yield reconstructed images of low noise level and high image quality.

  16. Are you looking my way? Ostracism widens the cone of gaze.

    PubMed

    Lyyra, Pessi; Wirth, James H; Hietanen, Jari K

    2017-08-01

    Ostracized individuals demonstrate an increased need for belonging. To satisfy this need, they search for signals of inclusion, one of which may be another person's gaze directed at oneself. We tested if ostracized, compared to included, individuals judge a greater degree of averted gaze as still being direct. This range of gaze angles still viewed as direct has been dubbed "the cone of (direct) gaze". In the current research, ostracized and included participants viewed friendly-looking face stimuli with direct or slightly averted gaze (0°, 2°, 4°, 6°, and 8° to the left and to the right) and judged whether stimulus persons were looking at them or not. Ostracized individuals demonstrated a wider gaze cone than included individuals.

  17. Degree by Thesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtis, Barbara

    1974-01-01

    Discusses a student's experience with a research project on the synthesis and reactions of an organo-platinum complex with an organo-Group IV linkage, including the advantages and disadvantages of such a degree by thesis course. (CC)

  18. Boundary Layer Transition on Slender Cones in Conventional and Low Disturbance Mach 6 Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Berry, Scott A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Singer, Bart A.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on a 5-degree half-angle cone and a 5-degree half-angle flared cone in a conventional Mach 6 wind tunnel to examine the effects of facility noise on boundary layer transition. The influence of tunnel noise was inferred by comparing transition onset locations determined from the present test to that previously obtained in a Mach 6 low disturbance quiet tunnel. Together, the two sets of experiments are believed to represent the first direct comparison of transition onset between a conventional and a low disturbance wind tunnel using a common test model and transition detection technique. In the present conventional hypersonic tunnel experiment, separate measurements of heat transfer and adiabatic wall temperatures were obtained on the conical models at small angles of attack over a range of Reynolds numbers, which resulted in laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow. Smooth model turbulent heating distributions are compared to that obtained with transition forced via discrete surface roughness. The model nosetip radius was varied to examine the effects of bluntness on transition onset. Despite wall to total temperature differences between the transient heating measurements and the adiabatic wall temperature measurement, the two methods for determining sharp cone transition onset generally yielded equivalent locations. In the 'noisy' mode of the hypersonic low disturbance tunnel, transition onset occurred earlier than that measured in the conventional hypersonic tunnel, suggesting higher levels of freestream acoustic radiation relative to the conventional tunnel. At comparable freestream conditions, the transition onset Reynolds number under low disturbance conditions was a factor of 1.3 greater than that measured on flared cone in the LaRC conventional hypersonic tunnel and a factor of 1.6 greater that the flared cone run in the low disturbance tunnel run 'noisy'. Navier-Stokes mean flow computations and linear stability

  19. Restoration of cone vision in the CNGA3-/- mouse model of congenital complete lack of cone photoreceptor function.

    PubMed

    Michalakis, Stylianos; Mühlfriedel, Regine; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Krishnamoorthy, Vidhyasankar; Koch, Susanne; Fischer, M Dominik; Becirovic, Elvir; Bai, Lin; Huber, Gesine; Beck, Susanne C; Fahl, Edda; Büning, Hildegard; Paquet-Durand, François; Zong, Xiangang; Gollisch, Tim; Biel, Martin; Seeliger, Mathias W

    2010-12-01

    Congenital absence of cone photoreceptor function is associated with strongly impaired daylight vision and loss of color discrimination in human achromatopsia. Here, we introduce viral gene replacement therapy as a potential treatment for this disease in the CNGA3(-/-) mouse model. We show that such therapy can restore cone-specific visual processing in the central nervous system even if cone photoreceptors had been nonfunctional from birth. The restoration of cone vision was assessed at different stages along the visual pathway. Treated CNGA3(-/-) mice were able to generate cone photoreceptor responses and to transfer these signals to bipolar cells. In support, we found morphologically that treated cones expressed regular cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel complexes and opsins in outer segments, which previously they did not. Moreover, expression of CNGA3 normalized cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels in cones, delayed cone cell death and reduced the inflammatory response of Müller glia cells that is typical of retinal degenerations. Furthermore, ganglion cells from treated, but not from untreated, CNGA3(-/-) mice displayed cone-driven, light-evoked, spiking activity, indicating that signals generated in the outer retina are transmitted to the brain. Finally, we demonstrate that this newly acquired sensory information was translated into cone-mediated, vision-guided behavior.

  20. Tantalum cones and bone defects in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boureau, F; Putman, S; Arnould, A; Dereudre, G; Migaud, H; Pasquier, G

    2015-04-01

    Management of bone loss is a major challenge in revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The development of preformed porous tantalum cones offers new possibilities, because they seem to have biological and mechanical qualities that facilitate osseointegration. Compared to the original procedure, when metaphyseal bone defects are too severe, a single tantalum cone may not be enough and we have developed a technique that could extend the indications for this cone in these cases. We used 2 cones to fill femoral bone defects in 7 patients. There were no complications due to wear of the tantalum cones. Radiological follow-up did show any migration or loosening. The short-term results confirm the interest of porous tantalum cones and suggest that they can be an alternative to allografts or megaprostheses in case of massive bone defects.

  1. Pulsar average waveforms and hollow cone beam models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backer, D. C.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of pulsar average waveforms at radio frequencies from 40 MHz to 15 GHz is presented. The analysis is based on the hypothesis that the observer sees one cut of a hollow-cone beam pattern and that stationary properties of the emission vary over the cone. The distributions of apparent cone widths for different observed forms of the average pulse profiles (single, double/unresolved, double/resolved, triple and multiple) are in modest agreement with a model of a circular hollow-cone beam with random observer-spin axis orientation, a random cone axis-spin axis alignment, and a small range of physical hollow-cone parameters for all objects.

  2. Rod-cone interactions and analysis of retinal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Arden, G B; Hogg, C R

    1985-01-01

    Cone flicker threshold rises as the rods dark adapt, though the cone threshold to continuous light remains constant. The rise is normally about 1 log unit, but in certain patients who complain of night blindness it may be as great as 2.5 log units. In these persons the kinetics of the rod-cone interaction are those of the recovery of rod sensitivity. The rods impose a low-pass filter on the cones. This effect is absent in congenital nyctalopia and X-linked retinoschisis. We suggest that cone flicker is maintained through a feedback system involving horizontal cells, and when the rod dark current returns in dark adaptation this feedback is altered. Rod cone interaction thus tests rod dark current, and cases of abnormal interaction in patients with retinitis pigmentosa occur, which indicate that the transduction mechanism and the membrane dark current may be differentially affected. Images PMID:3873959

  3. Monogenetic scoria cones, proxies of an evolutive magma chamber. Llaima volcano, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonwalder, D. A.; Cortes, J. A.; Calder, E. S.; Ruth, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    Stratovolcanoes are often associated with monogenetic scoria cones (MSC) around their flanks, which can show compositional variations compared to a main volcanic edifice (ME). Such variations are the representation of the state of the magma chamber at the time the MSC were formed. Using textural analysis, whole-rock and mineral chemistry, we investigate the relationship between the products of the ME and MSC at Llaima volcano, Chile; to make inferences about the plumbing system and determine the evolutionary changes of the magma chamber. Thirty MSC and their associated lava flows have been recognized, occurring on the NE, NW and SW flanks of the ME. They do not show clear stratigraphic relationships. Only three lava flows had been dated by C14, ages ranging from 3340 to 320 × 50 yr B.P1, the ages of the other cones have been inferred based in their morphologic state and degree of vegetation. Whole-rock XRF analyses show relevant compositional variations: SiO2 from 50-61 wt%, Na2O+K2O from 2.5-6 wt%, MgO from 2-6 wt% and CaO from 5-12 wt%. At the NE flank, such variations seem to be related to the distance from the ME, where the distal cones have a relatively more primitive composition. The petrography shows that plagioclase is the main mineral phase, with variable contents of olivine and clinopyroxene. At the NE, the olivine-clinopyroxene ratio varies from 3:1 to 1:10, from the closest to the farthest cones. The compositional range of plagioclase (Andesine-Bytownite) and olivine (Fo60-80) is the average, with a few cones to the NE displaying an intermediate olivine composition (Fo40-60). The pyroxene is mainly Augite, with presence of Diopside at the ME. Crystal Size Distribution (CSD) measurements of the mineral phases have also been undertaken. The CSDs of Plagioclase show linear yet slightly curved trends with similar slopes, which is typical of open magmatic systems2. For Olivine, the CSDs are generally convex, but lavas from the ME and the younger MSC display

  4. Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia: A rare case report evaluated with cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Eren; Bağlar, Serdar; Ciftci, Mehmet Ertugrul; Ozcan, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    A 29-year-old systemically healthy female patient presented to our department. Cone-beam computed tomographic images showed multiple well-defined sclerotic masses with radiolucent border in both right and left molar regions of the mandible. These sclerotic masses were surrounded by a thin radiolucent border. We diagnosed the present pathology as florid cemento-osseous dysplasia and decided to follow the patient without taking biopsy. For the patient, who did not have any clinical complaints, radiographic followupis recommended twice a year. The responsibility of the dentist is to ensure the follow-up of the diagnosed patients and take necessary measures for preventing the infections. PMID:27601835

  5. Mach Cones in Weakly and Strongly Coupled Dusty Magnetoplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mamun, A.A.; Shukla, P.K.

    2005-10-31

    A theoretical investigation on the formation of Mach cones in weakly and strongly coupled dusty magnetoplasmas has been presented. The salient features of dust-acoustic and dust-magnetoacoustic Mach cones in a weakly coupled dusty magnetoplasma as well as dust-acoustic Mach cones in a strongly coupled dusty magnetoplasma have been clearly explained. The relevance of this theoretical investigation to the formation of such dust-acoustic and dust-magnetoacoustic Mach cones in Saturn's dusty rings and laboratory dusty plasma experiments are discussed.

  6. Identifying Dirac cones in carbon allotropes with square symmetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinying; Huang, Huaqing; Duan, Wenhui; Liu, Zhirong

    2013-11-14

    A theoretical study is conducted to search for Dirac cones in two-dimensional carbon allotropes with square symmetry. By enumerating the carbon atoms in a unit cell up to 12, an allotrope with octatomic rings is recognized to possess Dirac cones under a simple tight-binding approach. The obtained Dirac cones are accompanied by flat bands at the Fermi level, and the resulting massless Dirac-Weyl fermions are chiral particles with a pseudospin of S = 1, rather than the conventional S = 1∕2 of graphene. The spin-1 Dirac cones are also predicted to exist in hexagonal graphene antidot lattices.

  7. Hydroburst test of a carbon-carbon involute exit cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    1986-01-01

    A hydroburst test of the aft portion of the PAM-D exit cone and the test procedure are described in detail. The hydrostatic pressure required to buckle the cone was 9.75 psi. Meanwhile, the PAM-D exit cone was modeled using the finite element method and a theoretical bucking pressure (8.76 psi) was predicted using the SPAR finite element code. The modeling technique employed is discussed. By comparing the theoretical to predicted critical pressures, this report verifies the modeling technique and calculates a material knockdown factor for the carbon-carbon exit cone.

  8. Rapid Measurement of Individual Cone Photoreceptor Pointing using Focus Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Hugh J.; Codona, Johanan L.; Blanco, Leonardo; Doble, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    A novel method is presented to rapidly measure the pointing direction of individual human cone photoreceptors using adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging. For a fixed entrance pupil position, the focal plane is rapidly modulated to image the guided light in various axial planes. For cones with different pointing directions, this focus diversity will cause a shift in their apparent position, allowing for their relative pointing to be determined. For four normal human subjects, retinal images were acquired, registered and the positions of individual cones tracked throughout the dataset. Variation in cone tilt was 0.02 radians, agreeing with other objective measurements on the same subjects at the same retinal locations. PMID:26368692

  9. The trip of the tip: understanding the growth cone machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Laura Anne; Van Vactor, David

    2009-01-01

    Preface The central player in the road trip of axon guidance is the growth cone, a dynamic structure located at the tip of the growing axon. During its journey, the growth cone comprises both `vehicle' and `navigator'. Whereas the `vehicle' maintains growth cone movement and provides the cytoskeletal structural elements of its framework, a motor to move forward, and a mechanism to provide traction on the road, the `navigator' aspect guides this system in a spatially-biased way to translate environmental signals into directional movement. Understanding the functions and regulation of the vehicle and navigator provides new insights into the cell biology of growth cone guidance. PMID:19373241

  10. Dynamics on the cone: Closed orbits and superintegrability

    SciTech Connect

    Brihaye, Y.; Kosiński, P.

    2014-05-15

    The generalization of Bertrand’s theorem to the case of the motion of point particle on the surface of a cone is presented. The superintegrability of such models is discussed. The additional integrals of motion are analysed for the case of Kepler and harmonic oscillator potentials. -- Highlights: •Bertrand’s theorem is generalized to the case of the motion on a cone. •The superintegrability of the dynamics on a cone is discussed. •The W-algebra of integrals of motion for Kepler and harmonic oscillator problems on a cone is derived.

  11. Cone penetrometer: Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Cone penetrometer technology (CPT) provides cost-effective, real-time data for use in the characterization of the subsurface. Recent innovations in this baseline technology allow for improved access to the subsurface for environmental restoration applications. The technology has been improved by both industry and government agencies and is constantly advancing due to research efforts. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology (formerly Technology Development) has contributed significantly to these efforts. This report focuses on the advancements made in conjunction with DOE`s support but recognizes Department of Defense (DOD) and industry efforts.

  12. S-IB Nose Cone Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's 'building block' approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the manned lunar missions. The Saturn IB vehicle was a two-stage rocket and had a payload capability about 50 percent greater than the Saturn I vehicle. The first stage, S-IB stage, was a redesigned first stage of the Saturn I. This photograph is of the S-IB nose cone #3 during assembly in building 4752.

  13. A spectral isoperimetric inequality for cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exner, Pavel; Lotoreichik, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    In this note, we investigate three-dimensional Schrödinger operators with δ -interactions supported on C^2-smooth cones, both finite and infinite. Our main results concern a Faber-Krahn-type inequality for the principal eigenvalue of these operators. The proofs rely on the Birman-Schwinger principle and on the fact that circles are unique minimizers for a class of energy functionals. The main novel idea consists in the way of constructing test functions for the Birman-Schwinger principle.

  14. Cone Beam Computed Tomography - Know its Secrets

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mohan; Shanavas, Muhammad; Sidappa, Ashwin; Kiran, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an advanced imaging modality that has high clinical applications in the field of dentistry. CBCT proved to be a successful investigative modality that has been used for dental and maxillofacial imaging. Radiation exposure dose from CBCT is 10 times less than from conventional CT scans during maxillofacial exposure. Furthermore, CBCT is highly accurate and can provide a three-dimensional volumetric data in axial, sagittal and coronal planes. This article describes the basic technique, difference in CBCT from CT and main clinical applications of CBCT. PMID:25859112

  15. Comparison of the human multifocal electroretinogram a-wave response and adaptive optics imaging of cone photoreceptor numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Michael W.

    Studies that have used pharmacological agents in non human primates (e.g., Hood et al., IOVS 2002) indicate that electrical activity of cone photoreceptors, depolarizing cone bipolar cells and horizontal cells are all likely to contribute to the multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) a-wave. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the mfERG a-wave and co-localized cone spatial density individually measured in young healthy human subjects. mfERGs (0.1-300Hz) were recorded from 4 subjects (20-29 years) with a system from Veris Science (EDI, Inc.) using 2.4 degree unstretched hexagons from 206 retinal locations presented at 30 frames per m-step on a 75Hz monitor with m-sequence exponent of 9 and flash strength 9.9 cd-s/m 2. mfERG a-wave amplitude was measured from baseline at 10 milliseconds on the leading edge of the a-wave. In vivo cone images were obtained at 24 retinal locations using a custom-built Adaptive Optics Confocal Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope. Cone spatial density was measured from a 100x100mum centered on the mfERG hexagons at 24 retinal locations. mfERG a-wave amplitude as well as cone density reduced with increase in retinal eccentricity from the fovea and the a-wave amplitude and cone density were positively correlated for each subject (r2=0.35 to 0.49 and p = 0.0049 to 0.0002). The coefficient of variation (CV) of the mfERG a-wave amplitude across subjects at each retinal location (16-62%) was larger than the CV of the cone density (8-37%) at the same location. The results indicate that underlying cone density accounts for a significant portion (up to nearly 70%) of the variance in the mfERG a-wave amplitude across retinal eccentricity. Other factors likely contribute to the variance (approximately 30%) of the measured mfERG parameters.

  16. Mapping the topography and cone morphology of the Dalinor volcanic swarm in Inner Mongolia with remote sensing and DEM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Liwen; Li, Ni; Fan, Qicheng; Zhao, Yongwei; Zhang, Liuyi; Zhang, Chuanjie

    2016-09-01

    The Dalinor volcanic swarm, located south of Xilinhot, Inner Mongolia of China, was a result of multistage eruptions that occurred since the Neogene period. This swarm is mainly composed of volcanic cones and lava tablelands. The objective of this study is to map the topography and morphology of this volcanic swarm. It is based on a variety of data collected from various sources, such as the digital elevation model (DEM), Landsat images, and a 1:50,000 topographic map, in addition to various software platforms, including ArcGIS, Envi4.8, Global Mapper, and Google Earth for data processing and interpretation. The results show that the overall topography of the volcanic swarm is a platform with a central swell having great undulation, sizable gradient variations, a rough surface, and small terrain relief. According to the undulating characteristics of the line profile, the volcanic swarm can be divided into four stairs with heights of 1,280 m, 1,360 m, 1,440 m, and 1,500 m. The analysis of the swath profile characterizes the two clusters of volcanoes with different height ranges and evolution. The lava tablelands and volcanic cones are distributed in nearly EW-trending belts, where tableland coverage was delineated with superposed layers of gradients and degrees of relief. According to the morphology, the volcanic cones were classified into four types: conical, composite, dome, and shield. The formation causes and classification basis for each type of volcanic cone were analyzed and their parameters were extracted. The H/D ratios of all types of volcanic cones were then statistically determined and projected to create a map of volcanic density distribution. Based on the relationship between distribution and time sequence of the formation of different volcanic cones, it can be inferred that the volcanic eruptions migrated from the margins to the center of the lava plateau. The central area was formed through superposition of multi-stage eruptive materials. In addition

  17. Why do different people choose different university degrees? Motivation and the choice of degree

    PubMed Central

    Skatova, Anya; Ferguson, Eamonn

    2014-01-01

    Different people choose undergraduate degrees to study at university for different reasons. To date, there have been limited attempts to identify individual differences in motivation that drive undergraduate degree choice. We identified that people choose university degrees for four reasons: career concerns (Career), intrinsic interest in the subject (Interest), an opportunity to help others (Helping) and because they are looking for an easy option to get into higher education (Loafing). We investigated whether these motivations apply to the choice of undergraduate degree in two samples: (1) undergraduate (N = 989) and (2) prospective (N = 896) students. We developed the Motivations Influencing Course Choice (MICC) questionnaire to measure these motivations. Scales of Helping, Career, Loafing, and Interest showed good psychometric properties, showed validity with respect to general life goals and personality traits, and predicted actual and prospective degree choices. We demonstrated that medical degrees were chosen due to a mixture of Helping and Career, while engineering degrees were associated with Career and low Interest in the degree. The choice of arts and humanities degrees was driven by Interest and low concern about future career, accompanied with high Loafing. We also demonstrated gender differences: females were high in Helping (both samples) and Interest (only in the undergraduate sample) motivation, while males scored higher in Career (only in the undergraduate sample) and Loafing (both samples). The findings can feed into both theoretical accounts of proximal motivation as well as provide help to improve degree programmes at universities and support better career advice. PMID:25431561

  18. A One-Step Cone-Beam CT-Enabled Planning-to-Treatment Model for Palliative Radiotherapy-From Development to Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Letourneau, Daniel; Varma, Anita; Bissonnette, Jean Pierre; Fitzpatrick, David; Grabarz, Daniel; Elder, Christine; Martin, Melanie; Bezjak, Andrea; Panzarella, Tony; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Jaffray, David A.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To develop a cone-beam computed tomography (CT)-enabled one-step simulation-to-treatment process for the treatment of bone metastases. Methods and Materials: A three-phase prospective study was conducted. Patients requiring palliative radiotherapy to the spine, mediastinum, or abdomen/pelvis suitable for treatment with simple beam geometry ({<=}2 beams) were accrued. Phase A established the accuracy of cone-beam CT images for the purpose of gross tumor target volume (GTV) definition. Phase B evaluated the feasibility of implementing the cone-beam CT-enabled planning process at the treatment unit. Phase C evaluated the online cone-beam CT-enabled process for the planning and treatment of patients requiring radiotherapy for bone metastases. Results: Eighty-four patients participated in this study. Phase A (n = 9) established the adequacy of cone-beam CT images for target definition. Phase B (n = 45) established the quality of treatment plans to be adequate for clinical implementation for bone metastases. When the process was applied clinically in bone metastases (Phase C), the degree of overlap between planning computed tomography (PCT) and cone-beam CT for GTV and between PCT and cone-beam CT for treatment field was 82% {+-} 11% and 97% {+-} 4%, respectively. The oncologist's decision to accept the plan under a time-pressured environment remained of high quality, with the cone-beam CT-generated treatment plan delivering at least 90% of the prescribed dose to 100% {+-} 0% of the cone-beam CT planning target volume (PTV). With the assumption that the PCT PTV is the gold-standard target, the cone-beam CT-generated treatment plan delivered at least 90% and at least 95% of dose to 98% {+-} 2% and 97% {+-} 5% of the PCT PTV, respectively. The mean time for the online planning and treatment process was 32.7 {+-} 4.0 minutes. Patient satisfaction was high, with a trend for superior satisfaction with the cone-beam CT-enabled process. Conclusions: The cone-beam CT

  19. Belarusian female physicists: Statistics and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotova, Julia; Tashlykova-Bushkevich, Iya

    2013-03-01

    The experience for women in physics remains challenging in Belarus. The proportion of female physics master's degree recipients is approximately 30%, while the percentage of female physics PhD recipients is 50%. Still, only a few female physicists occupy top positions in research laboratories, institutes, or universities. The basic problem for career-oriented female physicists in Belarus is public opinion, which cultivates a passive and dependent life philosophy for women. The Belarusian Women in Physics group was formed in 2003 as part of the Belarusian Physical Society.

  20. The "Clinical" Masters Degree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Baron; Lane, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Discusses issues surrounding the clinical master's degree: the belief that the only true psychologist is a PhD, public confusion between doctoral and subdoctoral psychologists, training guidelines, role responsibility, employment, licensing and competency, accreditation, and supervision. Suggests an APA sponsored conference to discuss and resolve…

  1. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  2. Microcomputed tomography and shock microdeformation studies on shatter cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaag, Patrice Tristan; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Hipsley, Christy Anna

    2016-08-01

    One of the aspects of impact cratering that are still not fully understood is the formation of shatter cones and related fracturing phenomena. Yet, shatter cones have been applied as an impact-diagnostic criterion for decades without the role of shock waves and target rock defects in their formation having been elucidated ever. We have tested the application of the nondestructive microcomputed tomography (μCT) method to visualize the interior of shatter cones in order to possibly resolve links between fracture patterns and shatter cone surface features (striations and intervening "valleys"). Shatter-coned samples from different impact sites and in different lithologies were investigated for their μCT suitability, with a shatter cone in sandstone from the Serra da Cangalha impact structure (Brazil) remaining as the most promising candidate because of the fracture resolution achieved. To validate the obtained CT data, the scanned specimen was cut into three orthogonal sets of thin sections. Scans with 13 μm resolution were obtained. μCT scans and microscopic analysis unraveled an orientation of subplanar fractures and related fluid inclusion trails, and planar fracture (PF) orientations in the interior of shatter cones. Planar deformation features (PDF) were observed predominantly near the shatter cone surface. Previously undescribed varieties of feather features (FF), in the form of lamellae emanating from curviplanar and curved fractures, as well as an "arrowhead"-like FF development with microlamellae originating from both sides of a PF, were observed. The timing of shatter cone formation was investigated by establishing temporal relations to the generation of various shock microscopic effects. Shatter cones are, thus, generated post- or syn-formation of PF, FF, subplanar fractures, and PDF. The earliest possible time for shatter cone formation is during the late stage of the compressional phase, that is, shock wave passage, of an impact event.

  3. Real Gas/Blunt Cone. Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.; Eitelberg, Georg

    1998-01-01

    In this chapter recent activity in real-gas database definition and code validation will be summarized. In the Phase I report of the Working Group (WG) 181, aerothermodynamic problems were classified, for purpose of discussion, into seven types: aerodynamic parameters, viscous/shock interaction, boundary-layer transition, forebody-heating/heat-transfer, radiation and ablation, lee and base-region flow, and low-density flow. Several of these problem types were the subject of various chapters of the Phase 1 report describing real-gas effects and ground test facility issues. In this chapter some background and objectives outlined in the real-Gas effects Chapter V of the Phase 1 report will be reviewed. The results of the blunt cone test campaign developed under the auspices of the WG18 activity to study real-gas phenomena will be summarized, including the experimental and computational programs, issues and questions, and recommendations. Further, recent progress in other real-gas areas beyond the blunt cone test campaign will be discussed. Finally, a summary in which the present status of our understanding of real-gas issues will be presented.

  4. Primary succession on slopes exposed to intense erosion: the case of Vesuvius Grand Cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinca, Adriano; Battista Chirico, Giovanni; Bonanomi, Giuliano

    2014-05-01

    Mt. Vesuvius (1281 m a.s.l.) is an active volcano dominating the central part of the Campania Region coastline, with a distinctive barren crater summit, known as Grand Cone, formed during the eruption of AD 79. Local environmental factors hindered the colonization of the Vesuvius Grand Cone by vascular plants after the last eruptions of 1906 and 1944. The Grand Cone exhibits very steep planar slopes (33-35 degrees), covered by unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits, mainly formed by lapilli and gravels, characterized by an extremely low water holding capacity and very low organic matter and nitrogen contents, and exposed to intense water and wind erosion. In the last decade Genista aetnensis (Biv.) DC. (Fabaceae), has been expanding over the Grand Cone, facilitating the colonization by other species, especially herbaceous, with a dramatic change of the landscape appearance of the Vesuvius Grand Cone. G. aetnensis is a plant endemic of Mt. Etna and Eastern Sardinia and was firstly introduced at the base of Mt. Vesuvius within reforestation programs after the eruption of 1906. This plant is a nitrogen fixing species with a strong ability to colonize andosols, much more pronounced than the indigenous brooms (Cytisus scoparius and Spartium junceum). An intensive investigation has been conducted to explore the eco-hydrological processes driving the vegetation dynamics observed on the slopes of Grand Cone. Specific field surveys and laboratory experiments have been carried out to assess the effects of the G. aetnensis on soil physical and chemical properties, on the above- and below-ground microclimate, on the soil hydrological regime and on the distribution of coexisting species. The G. aetnensis triggers a pedogenetic process that contributes to a rapid increase of carbon and nitrogen stocks, available phosphorous, cation exchange capacity and a reduction of soil pH. The increase of carbon content also significantly improves the water retention properties in this coarse

  5. Gluon structure function of a color dipole in the light-cone limit of lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenewald, D.; Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Pirner, H. J.

    2009-10-01

    We calculate the gluon structure function of a color dipole in near-light-cone SU(2) lattice QCD as a function of x{sub B}. The quark and antiquark are external nondynamical degrees of freedom which act as sources of the gluon string configuration defining the dipole. We compute the color dipole matrix element of transversal chromo-electric and chromo-magnetic field operators separated along a direction close to the light cone, the Fourier transform of which is the gluon structure function. As vacuum state in the pure glue sector, we use a variational ground state of the near-light-cone Hamiltonian. We derive a recursion relation for the gluon structure function on the lattice similar to the perturbative Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi equation. It depends on the number of transversal links assembling the Schwinger string of the dipole. Fixing the mean momentum fraction of the gluons to the 'experimental value' in a proton, we compare our gluon structure function for a dipole state with four links with the next-to-leading-order MRST 2002 and the CTEQ AB-0 parametrizations at Q{sup 2}=1.5 GeV{sup 2}. Within the systematic uncertainty we find rather good agreement. We also discuss the low x{sub B} behavior of the gluon structure function in our model calculation.

  6. Female Genital Mutilation

    MedlinePlus

    ... practice of FGM. In 2010, WHO published a "Global strategy to stop health care providers from performing female ... practices Health risks of female genital mutilation (FGM) Global strategy to stop health-care providers from performing female ...

  7. Normal Female Reproductive Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the female reproductive system; drawing shows the uterus, myometrium (muscular outer layer ...

  8. Self catheterization - female

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder. You have signs of infection (a burning sensation when you urinate, fever, fatigue, or chills). Alternative Names Clean intermittent catheterization - female; CIC - female Images Bladder catheterization, female References Cepedes RD, Gerboc JL. Other therapies for storage ...

  9. Value of cone-beam computed tomography in the process of diagnosis and management of disorders of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    de Boer, E W J; Dijkstra, P U; Stegenga, B; de Bont, L G M; Spijkervet, F K L

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the value of cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) images in the primary diagnosis and management of 128 outpatients with disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Before a diagnosis was made and treatment planned, the history was taken, physical examination made, and the orthopantomogram studied. After assessment of the cone-beam CT, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon (specialist or resident) was allowed to revise the provisional primary diagnosis and management. The degree of certainty was rated by the clinician before and after the cone-beam CT had been assessed. The primary diagnosis was changed in 32 patients (25%), additional diagnostic procedures were changed in 57 (45%), and the treatment was changed in 15 (12%) (in 4 the treatment was changed to a (minimally) invasive procedure). A total of 74 patients (58%) had their diagnosis and management changed after the cone-beam CT had been assessed. Changes in diagnosis and management were clinically relevant in 9/32 and 9/61 patients, respectively. The clinician's certainty about the primary diagnosis increased after the cone-beam CT had been assessed in 57 patients. Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds in favour of changes in primary diagnosis and management increased when limited mandibular function was a primary symptom, the patient was taking medication for pain, and the articular eminence could not be assessed on OPT. Assessment of cone-beam CT led to changes in primary diagnosis and management in more than half the patients with disorders of the TMJ.

  10. Anti-aliased three-dimensional cone-beam reconstruction of low-contrast objects with algebraic methods.

    PubMed

    Mueller, K; Yagel, R; Wheller, J J

    1999-06-01

    This paper examines the use of the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) and related techniques to reconstruct 3-D objects from a relatively sparse set of cone-beam projections. Although ART has been widely used for cone-beam reconstruction of high-contrast objects, e.g., in computed angiography, the work presented here explores the more challenging low-contrast case which represents a little-investigated scenario for ART. Preliminary experiments indicate that for cone angles greater than 20 degrees, traditional ART produces reconstructions with strong aliasing artifacts. These artifacts are in addition to the usual off-midplane inaccuracies of cone-beam tomography with planar orbits. We find that the source of these artifacts is the nonuniform reconstruction grid sampling and correction by the cone-beam rays during the ART projection-backprojection procedure. A new method to compute the weights of the reconstruction matrix is devised, which replaces the usual constant-size interpolation filter by one whose size and amplitude is dependent on the source-voxel distance. This enables the generation of reconstructions free of cone-beam aliasing artifacts, at only little extra cost. An alternative analysis reveals that simultaneous ART (SART) also produces reconstructions without aliasing artifacts, however, at greater computational cost. Finally, we thoroughly investigate the influence of various ART parameters, such as volume initialization, relaxation coefficient lambda, correction scheme, number of iterations, and noise in the projection data on reconstruction quality. We find that ART typically requires only three iterations to render satisfactory reconstruction results.

  11. Cone beam CT tumor vasculature dynamic study (Murine model)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David; Ricardo, Betancourt; Liu, Shaohua

    2008-03-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is the process by which new blood vessels are formed from the existing vessels in a tumor to promote tumor growth. Tumor angiogenesis has important implications in the diagnosis and treatment of various solid tumors. Flat panel detector based cone beam CT opens up a new way for detection of tumors, and tumor angiogenesis associated with functional CBCT has the potential to provide more information than traditional functional CT due to more overall coverage during the same scanning period and the reconstruction being isotropic resulting in a more accurate 3D volume intensity measurement. A functional study was conducted by using CBCT to determine the degree of the enhancement within the tumor after injecting the contrast agent intravenously. For typical doses of contrast material, the amount of enhancement is proportional to the concentration of this material within the region of interest. A series of images obtained at one location over time allows generation of time-attenuation data from which a number of semi-quantitative parameters, such as enhancement rate, can be determined. An in vivo mice study with and without mammo tumor was conducted on our prototype CBCT system, and half scan scheme is used to determine the time-intensity curve within the VOI of the mouse. The CBCT has an x-ray tube, a gantry with slip ring technology, and a 40×30 cm Varian Paxscan 4030CB real time FPD.

  12. Implosion of indirectly driven reentrant cone shell target

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Stephens; S.P. Hatchett; R.E. Turner; K.A. Tanaka; R. Kodama

    2003-10-31

    In an x-ray driven reentrant cone fast ignition target the x-ray spectrum contains a high energy component that casuses preheating of the reentrant cone and mixing of the gold into the collapsing shell. Direct laser drive might avoid this problem.

  13. Galileo Spacecraft Scan Platform Celestial Pointing Cone Control Gain Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    In, C-H. C.; Hilbert, K. B.

    1994-01-01

    During September and October 1991, pictures of the Gaspra asteroid and neighboring stars were taken by the Galileo Optical Navigation (OPNAV) Team for the purpose of navigation the spacecraft for a successful Gaspra encounter. The star tracks in these pictures showed that the scan platform celestial pointing cone controller performed poorly in compensating for wobble-induced cone offsets.

  14. Numerical Modeling of Shatter Cones Development in Impact Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratoux, D.; Melosh, H. J.

    2003-03-01

    We present a new model for the formation of shatter cones in impact craters. Our model has been tested by means of numerical simulations. Our results are consistent with the observations of shatter cones in natural impact craters and explosions experiments.

  15. Gene therapy rescues cone function in congenital achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    Komáromy, András M.; Alexander, John J.; Rowlan, Jessica S.; Garcia, Monique M.; Chiodo, Vince A.; Kaya, Asli; Tanaka, Jacqueline C.; Acland, Gregory M.; Hauswirth, William W.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2010-01-01

    The successful restoration of visual function with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene replacement therapy in animals and humans with an inherited disease of the retinal pigment epithelium has ushered in a new era of retinal therapeutics. For many retinal disorders, however, targeting of therapeutic vectors to mutant rods and/or cones will be required. In this study, the primary cone photoreceptor disorder achromatopsia served as the ideal translational model to develop gene therapy directed to cone photoreceptors. We demonstrate that rAAV-mediated gene replacement therapy with different forms of the human red cone opsin promoter led to the restoration of cone function and day vision in two canine models of CNGB3 achromatopsia, a neuronal channelopathy that is the most common form of achromatopsia in man. The robustness and stability of the observed treatment effect was mutation independent, but promoter and age dependent. Subretinal administration of rAAV5–hCNGB3 with a long version of the red cone opsin promoter in younger animals led to a stable therapeutic effect for at least 33 months. Our results hold promise for future clinical trials of cone-directed gene therapy in achromatopsia and other cone-specific disorders. PMID:20378608

  16. Gene therapy rescues cone function in congenital achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Komáromy, András M; Alexander, John J; Rowlan, Jessica S; Garcia, Monique M; Chiodo, Vince A; Kaya, Asli; Tanaka, Jacqueline C; Acland, Gregory M; Hauswirth, William W; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2010-07-01

    The successful restoration of visual function with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene replacement therapy in animals and humans with an inherited disease of the retinal pigment epithelium has ushered in a new era of retinal therapeutics. For many retinal disorders, however, targeting of therapeutic vectors to mutant rods and/or cones will be required. In this study, the primary cone photoreceptor disorder achromatopsia served as the ideal translational model to develop gene therapy directed to cone photoreceptors. We demonstrate that rAAV-mediated gene replacement therapy with different forms of the human red cone opsin promoter led to the restoration of cone function and day vision in two canine models of CNGB3 achromatopsia, a neuronal channelopathy that is the most common form of achromatopsia in man. The robustness and stability of the observed treatment effect was mutation independent, but promoter and age dependent. Subretinal administration of rAAV5-hCNGB3 with a long version of the red cone opsin promoter in younger animals led to a stable therapeutic effect for at least 33 months. Our results hold promise for future clinical trials of cone-directed gene therapy in achromatopsia and other cone-specific disorders.

  17. The Double Cone: A Mechanical Paradox or a Geometrical Constraint?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallitto, Aurelio Agliolo; Fiordilino, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the Italian National Plan "Lauree Scientifiche" (PLS) in collaboration with secondary schools, we have investigated the mechanical paradox of the double cone. We have calculated the geometric condition for obtaining an upward movement. Based on this result, we have built a mechanical model with a double cone made of aluminum…

  18. The spatial arrangement of cones in the primate fovea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollon, J. D.; Bowmaker, J. K.

    1992-12-01

    THE retinae of Old World primates contain three classes of light-sensitive cone, which exhibit peak absorption in different spectral regions1-4. But how are the different types of cone arranged in the hexagonal mosaic of the fovea? This question has often been answered with artists' impressions5-7, but never with direct measurements. Staining for antibodies specific to the short-wave photopigment has revealed a sparse, semiregular array of cones8; but nothing is known about the arrangement of the more numerous long- and middle-wave cones. Are they randomly distributed, with chance aggregations of one type, as Hartridge postulated in these columns nearly 50 years ago9,10? Or do they exhibit a regular alternation, recalling the systematic mosaics seen in some non-mammalian species6,11? Or, conversely, is there positive clumping of particular cone types, as might be expected if local patches of cones were descended from a single precursor cell? We have made direct microspectrophotometric measurements of patches of foveal retina from Old World monkeys, and report here that the distribu tion of long- and middle-wave cones is locally random. These two cone types are present in almost equal numbers, and not in the ratio of 2:1 that has been postulated for the human fovea.

  19. Unsupervised Learning of Cone Spectral Classes from Natural Images

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Noah C.; Manning, Jeremy R.; Brainard, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The first step in the evolution of primate trichromatic color vision was the expression of a third cone class not present in ancestral mammals. This observation motivates a fundamental question about the evolution of any sensory system: how is it possible to detect and exploit the presence of a novel sensory class? We explore this question in the context of primate color vision. We present an unsupervised learning algorithm capable of both detecting the number of spectral cone classes in a retinal mosaic and learning the class of each cone using the inter-cone correlations obtained in response to natural image input. The algorithm's ability to classify cones is in broad agreement with experimental evidence about functional color vision for a wide range of mosaic parameters, including those characterizing dichromacy, typical trichromacy, anomalous trichromacy, and possible tetrachromacy. PMID:24967877

  20. Unsupervised learning of cone spectral classes from natural images.

    PubMed

    Benson, Noah C; Manning, Jeremy R; Brainard, David H

    2014-06-01

    The first step in the evolution of primate trichromatic color vision was the expression of a third cone class not present in ancestral mammals. This observation motivates a fundamental question about the evolution of any sensory system: how is it possible to detect and exploit the presence of a novel sensory class? We explore this question in the context of primate color vision. We present an unsupervised learning algorithm capable of both detecting the number of spectral cone classes in a retinal mosaic and learning the class of each cone using the inter-cone correlations obtained in response to natural image input. The algorithm's ability to classify cones is in broad agreement with experimental evidence about functional color vision for a wide range of mosaic parameters, including those characterizing dichromacy, typical trichromacy, anomalous trichromacy, and possible tetrachromacy.

  1. 'Parabolic' trapped modes and steered Dirac cones in platonic crystals.

    PubMed

    McPhedran, R C; Movchan, A B; Movchan, N V; Brun, M; Smith, M J A

    2015-05-08

    This paper discusses the properties of flexural waves governed by the biharmonic operator, and propagating in a thin plate pinned at doubly periodic sets of points. The emphases are on the design of dispersion surfaces having the Dirac cone topology, and on the related topic of trapped modes in plates for a finite set (cluster) of pinned points. The Dirac cone topologies we exhibit have at least two cones touching at a point in the reciprocal lattice, augmented by another band passing through the point. We show that these Dirac cones can be steered along symmetry lines in the Brillouin zone by varying the aspect ratio of rectangular lattices of pins, and that, as the cones are moved, the involved band surfaces tilt. We link Dirac points with a parabolic profile in their neighbourhood, and the characteristic of this parabolic profile decides the direction of propagation of the trapped mode in finite clusters.

  2. Two-Step Reactivation of Dormant Cones in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Lee, Sang Joon; Scott, Patrick A.; Lu, Xiaoqin; Emery, Douglas; Liu, Yongqin; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Roberts, Michael R.; Ross, Jason W.; Kaplan, Henry J.; Dean, Douglas C.

    2016-01-01

    Most Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) mutations arise in rod photoreceptor genes, leading to diminished peripheral and nightime vision. Using a pig model of autosomal-dominant RP, we show glucose becomes sequestered in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and thus is not transported to photoreceptors. The resulting starvation for glucose metabolites impairs synthesis of cone visual pigment -rich outer segments (OS), and then their mitochondrial-rich inner segments dissociate. Loss of these functional structures diminishes cone-dependent high-resolution central vision, which is utilized for most daily tasks. By transplanting wild-type rods, to restore glucose transport, or directly replacing glucose in the subretinal space, to bypass its retention in the RPE, we can regenerate cone functional structures, reactivating the dormant cells. Beyond providing metabolic building blocks for cone functional structures, we show glucose induces thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) to regulate Akt signaling, thereby shunting metabolites toward aerobic glucose metabolism and regenerating cone OS synthesis. PMID:27050517

  3. Granular flow along the interior surface of rotating cones

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J.H.; Walton, O.R.

    1984-04-26

    Relationships are developed between the effective cone half-angle, ..cap alpha../sub eff/, and the actual cone half-angle, ..cap alpha.., for subcritical flow of granular material along the inside surface of a rotating cone. Rotational speed must be high enough to keep the granular material against the wall. If ..cap alpha../sub eff/ is between the wall friction angle, phi/sub w/ and the angle of repose, phi/sub r/, the flowrate may be controlled at the exit and depends on the exit aperture area and the rotational speed. Laboratory experiments show that exit control is possible over the entire range of effective cone half-angles from phi/sub w/ < ..cap alpha../sub eff/ < phi/sub r/ and even beyond these limits. The most uniform thickness of granular material is obtained when the cone half-angle is close to phi/sub r/.

  4. Salamander Blue-sensitive Cones Lost During Metamorphosis†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Znoiko, Sergey; DeGrip, Willem J.; Crouch, Rosalie K.; Ma, Jian-xing

    2009-01-01

    The tiger salamander lives in shallow water with bright light in the aquatic phase, and in dim tunnels or caves in the terrestrial phase. In the aquatic phase, there are five types of photoreceptors—two types of rods and three types of cones. Our previous studies showed that the green rods and blue-sensitive cones contain the same visual pigment and have the same absorbance spectra; however, the green rods have a larger photon-catch area and thus have higher light sensitivity than the blue-sensitive cones. Here we show that after metamorphosis, the terrestrial salamander looses the blue-sensitive cones, while the density of the green rods increases. Moreover, the size of the green rod outer segments is increased in the terrestrial phase, compared to that in the aquatic phase. This switch from the blue-sensitive cones to the green rods may represent an adaptation to the dim light environment of the terrestrial phase. PMID:18331398

  5. The hydrogen atom confined by one and two hard cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarsa, A.; Alcaraz-Pelegrina, J. M.; Le Sech, C.

    2017-02-01

    The bound states of the H atom in a semi-infinite space limited by one or two conical boundaries are studied. The exact solution when the nucleus is located at the apex of the conical boundaries is obtained. A rapid increase of the energy when the cone angle opens and tends to π / 2 is found. A second situation with the atom separated from the summit of the cone is considered. The changes on the energy and the electronic structure are analyzed. The quantum force is evaluated by calculating the energy derivative versus the distance to the cone vertex. One of the forces exerted on the tip of an Atomic Force Microscope can be modelized by a hard cone probing the electron cloud in the contact mode. Our numerical results show that the quantum force present an important dependence with the cone angle and it vanishes rapidly as the distance increases.

  6. Measurements of entropy-layer instabilities over cone-ogive-cylinders at Mach 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Roger T.

    Predicting the onset of boundary layer transition is critical in hypersonic flight. To improve transition prediction methods, it is necessary to understand the underlying instability mechanisms that cause transition. Entropy-layer instabilities are of particular interest in the design of blunt reentry vehicles and other blunt supersonic and hypersonic vehicles. Entropy-layer instabilities from outside the boundary layer may enter the boundary layer and have a significant effect on transition. There is little experimental data for entropy-layer instabilities. Experimental measurements of what appear to be entropy-layer instabilities have been made in the Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel (BAM6QT) using surface pressure transducers and hot-wire anemometry. A long cone-ogive-cylinder model with interchangeable cone-ogive noses was used to generate the shock curvature that resulted in an entropy layer conducive to instability growth. The nosetip angles of the cone-ogive range from 25 to 40 degrees, with a majority of the measurements taken with the sharp 30 to 35-degree nosetips. Surface measurements of the entropy-layer instabilities using the 30 to 35-degree configurations show disturbances between 15 and 50 kHz. As the nosetip angle increases, the frequency of the instability decreases slightly. Results also show that the instability magnitude as measured on the model surface increases with downstream distance, then decreases, before starting to increase again. The decrease is likely due to stabilization that occurs during the entropy-layer swallowing process. Off-surface measurements using hot wires have also been made for each of the cone-ogive-cylinder configurations. These measurements show the location, frequency, and relative magnitude of the entropy-layer instability. As the instability progresses downstream, it grows inside the entropy layer, then at a certain distance downstream, the instability approaches the model surface and enters the boundary layer

  7. Reduction of beam hardening artifacts in cone-beam CT imaging via SMART-RECON algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinsheng; Garrett, John; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2016-03-01

    When an automatic exposure control is introduced in C-arm cone beam CT data acquisition, the spectral inconsistencies between acquired projection data are exacerbated. As a result, conventional water/bone correction schemes are not as effective as in conventional diagnostic x-ray CT acquisitions with a fixed tube potential. In this paper, a new method was proposed to reconstruct several images with different degrees of spectral consistency and thus different levels of beam hardening artifacts. The new method relies neither on prior knowledge of the x-ray beam spectrum nor on prior compositional information of the imaging object. Numerical simulations were used to validate the algorithm.

  8. A method for determining the gantry angle for megavoltage cone beam imaging.

    PubMed

    Sillanpaa, J; Chang, J; Amols, H; Mageras, G

    2005-02-01

    Accurate knowledge of gantry angle is essential in megavoltage cone beam imaging (MVCBI) with an electronic portal imager. We present a method for determining the gantry angle by detecting multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf positions in projection images. During image acquisition the gantry moves continuously and the MLC operates in dynamic arc mode. Our algorithm detects the leaf positions in the images and compares them with a stationary reference leaf. Comparison of the algorithm against angles determined from the locations of fiducial markers shows the accuracy (0.26 degrees rms error) to be sufficient for MVCBI.

  9. TULP1 Mutations Causing Early-Onset Retinal Degeneration: Preserved but Insensitive Macular Cones

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Samuel G.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Huang, Wei Chieh; Sumaroka, Alexander; Roman, Alejandro J.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Luo, Xunda; Sheplock, Rebecca; Dauber, Joanna M.; Swider, Malgorzata; Stone, Edwin M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate visual function and outer and inner retinal structure in the rare form of retinal degeneration (RD) caused by TULP1 (tubby-like protein 1) mutations. Methods. Retinal degeneration patients with TULP1 mutations (n = 5; age range, 5–36 years) were studied by kinetic and chromatic static perimetry, en face autofluorescence imaging, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans. Outer and inner retinal laminar thickness were measured and mapped across the central retina. Comparisons were made with results from patients with RD associated with four ciliopathy genotypes (MAK, RPGR, BBS1, and USH2A). Results. The TULP1-RD patients were severely affected already in the first decade of life and there was rapidly progressive visual loss. No evidence of rod function was present at any age. Small central islands showed melanized retinal pigment epithelium by autofluorescence imaging and well-preserved photoreceptor laminar thickness by OCT imaging. There was extracentral loss of laminar architecture and increased inner retinal thickening. Structure-function relationships in residual foveal cone islands were made in TULP1-RD patients and in other retinopathies considered ciliopathies. Patients with TULP1-RD, unlike the others, had greater dysfunction for the degree of foveal structural preservation. Conclusions. Retinal degeneration with TULP1 mutations leads to a small central island of residual foveal cones at early ages. These cones are less sensitive than expected from the residual structure. The human phenotype is consistent with experimental evidence in the Tulp1 knockout mouse model that visual dysfunction could be complicated by abnormal processes proximal to cone outer segments. PMID:25074776

  10. CT thermometry for cone-beam CT guided ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeStefano, Zachary; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Li, Ming; Wood, Bradford J.; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring temperature during a cone-beam CT (CBCT) guided ablation procedure is important for prevention of over-treatment and under-treatment. In order to accomplish ideal temperature monitoring, a thermometry map must be generated. Previously, this was attempted using CBCT scans of a pig shoulder undergoing ablation.1 We are extending this work by using CBCT scans of real patients and incorporating more processing steps. We register the scans before comparing them due to the movement and deformation of organs. We then automatically locate the needle tip and the ablation zone. We employ a robust change metric due to image noise and artifacts. This change metric takes windows around each pixel and uses an equation inspired by Time Delay Analysis to calculate the error between windows with the assumption that there is an ideal spatial offset. Once the change map is generated, we correlate change data with measured temperature data at the key points in the region. This allows us to transform our change map into a thermal map. This thermal map is then able to provide an estimate as to the size and temperature of the ablation zone. We evaluated our procedure on a data set of 12 patients who had a total of 24 ablation procedures performed. We were able to generate reasonable thermal maps with varying degrees of accuracy. The average error ranged from 2.7 to 16.2 degrees Celsius. In addition to providing estimates of the size of the ablation zone for surgical guidance, 3D visualizations of the ablation zone and needle are also produced.

  11. S cones: Evolution, retinal distribution, development, and spectral sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hunt, David M; Peichl, Leo

    2014-03-01

    S cones expressing the short wavelength-sensitive type 1 (SWS1) class of visual pigment generally form only a minority type of cone photoreceptor within the vertebrate duplex retina. Hence, their primary role is in color vision, not in high acuity vision. In mammals, S cones may be present as a constant fraction of the cones across the retina, may be restricted to certain regions of the retina or may form a gradient across the retina, and in some species, there is coexpression of SWS1 and the long wavelength-sensitive (LWS) class of pigment in many cones. During retinal development, SWS1 opsin expression generally precedes that of LWS opsin, and evidence from genetic studies indicates that the S cone pathway may be the default pathway for cone development. With the notable exception of the cartilaginous fishes, where S cones appear to be absent, they are present in representative species from all other vertebrate classes. S cone loss is not, however, uncommon; they are absent from most aquatic mammals and from some but not all nocturnal terrestrial species. The peak spectral sensitivity of S cones depends on the spectral characteristics of the pigment present. Evidence from the study of agnathans and teleost fishes indicates that the ancestral vertebrate SWS1 pigment was ultraviolet (UV) sensitive with a peak around 360 nm, but this has shifted into the violet region of the spectrum (>380 nm) on many separate occasions during vertebrate evolution. In all cases, the shift was generated by just one or a few replacements in tuning-relevant residues. Only in the avian lineage has tuning moved in the opposite direction, with the reinvention of UV-sensitive pigments.

  12. Cone-based electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidlisecky, Adam

    Determining the 3-D spatial distribution of subsurface properties is a critical part of managing the clean-up of contaminated sites. Most standard hydrologic methods sample small regions immediately adjacent to wells or testing devices. This provides data which are not representative of the entire region of interest. Furthermore, at many contaminated sites invasive methods are not acceptable, due to the risks associated with contacting and spreading the contaminants. To address these issues, I have developed a minimally invasive technology that provides information about the 3-D distribution of electrical conductivity. This new technique, cone-based electrical resistivity tomography (C-bert), integrates the existing technologies of resistivity cone penetration testing (RCPT) with electrical resistivity tomography. Development of this tool included the creation of new software and modeling algorithms, the design of field equipment, field testing, and processing and interpretation of the resulting data. I present a 2.5-D forward modeling algorithm that incorporates an effective correction for the errors caused by boundary effects and source singularities. The algorithm includes an optimization technique for acquiring the Fourier coefficients required for the solution. A 3-D inversion algorithm is presented that has two major improvements over existing algorithms. First, it includes a 3-D version of the boundary correction/source singularity correction developed for the 2.5-D problem. Second, the algorithm can handle any type of acquisition geometry; this was a requirement for the development of C-bert. C-bert involves placing several permanent current electrodes in the subsurface and using electrodes mounted on a cone penetrometer and at the surface to measure the resultant potential field. In addition to these measurements, we obtain the standard suite of RCPT data, including high resolution resistivity logs. The RCPT data can be used to generate a realistic

  13. Relativistic quantum dynamics on a double cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, F. A.; Silva, Edilberto O.; Lima, Jonas R. F.; Filgueiras, C.; Moraes, F.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we study the relativistic quantum problem of a particle constrained to a double cone surface. For this purpose, we build the Dirac equation in a curved space using the tetrads formalism. Two cases are analysed. First, we consider a free particle on the conical surface, and then we add an uniform magnetic field. In the first case, the exact energy spectrum is obtained and its non-relativistic limit compared to previously published results. In the second case, the spectrum is also exactly obtained and a detailed analysis considering all possible combinations of signs of the quantum numbers reveals the occurrence of highly degenerate zero energy modes. The results obtained here can be applied, for instance, in the investigation of the electronic and transport properties of condensed matter systems that can be described by an effective Dirac equation, such as graphene and topological insulators.

  14. The Southern Cone Initiative against Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Schofield, C J; Dias, J C

    1999-01-01

    Chagas disease (also known as American trypanosomiasis) is now ranked as the most serious parasitic disease of the Americas, with an economic impact far outranking the combined effects of other parasitic diseases such as malaria, schistosomiasis and leishmaniasis. Although the chronic infection remains virtually incurable, transmission can be halted by eliminating the domestic insect vectors and screening blood donors to avoid transfusional transmission. In line with this strategy, governments of the six Southern Cone countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay) launched in 1991 an ambitious initiative to control Chagas disease through elimination of the main vector, Triatoma infestans, and large-scale screening of blood donors. Now at its mid-point, the programme has achieved remarkable success, with transmission halted over vast areas of the previously endemic regions. Well over 2 million rural houses have been sprayed to eliminate T. infestans, and the programme has already shown significant economic rates of return in addition to the medical and social benefits.

  15. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon

    2012-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillo-facial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontics. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice.

  16. Handling data redundancy in helical cone beam reconstruction with a cone-angle-based window function and its asymptotic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Xiangyang; Hsieh Jiang

    2007-06-15

    A cone-angle-based window function is defined in this manuscript for image reconstruction using helical cone beam filtered backprojection (CB-FBP) algorithms. Rather than defining the window boundaries in a two-dimensional detector acquiring projection data for computed tomographic imaging, the cone-angle-based window function deals with data redundancy by selecting rays with the smallest cone angle relative to the reconstruction plane. To be computationally efficient, an asymptotic approximation of the cone-angle-based window function is also given and analyzed in this paper. The benefit of using such an asymptotic approximation also includes the avoidance of functional discontinuities that cause artifacts in reconstructed tomographic images. The cone-angle-based window function and its asymptotic approximation provide a way, equivalent to the Tam-Danielsson-window, for helical CB-FBP reconstruction algorithms to deal with data redundancy, regardless of where the helical pitch is constant or dynamically variable during a scan. By taking the cone-parallel geometry as an example, a computer simulation study is conducted to evaluate the proposed window function and its asymptotic approximation for helical CB-FBP reconstruction algorithm to handle data redundancy. The computer simulated Forbild head and thorax phantoms are utilized in the performance evaluation, showing that the proposed cone-angle-based window function and its asymptotic approximation can deal with data redundancy very well in cone beam image reconstruction from projection data acquired along helical source trajectories. Moreover, a numerical study carried out in this paper reveals that the proposed cone-angle-based window function is actually equivalent to the Tam-Danielsson-window, and rigorous mathematical proofs are being investigated.

  17. Female Stereotyping in Advertising: An Experiment on Male-Female Perceptions of Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilbourne, William E.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the impact of sex role stereotyping in advertising on the perception of the degree to which women possess managerial attributes considered requisite for success in business. Finds that depicting women in professional roles in magazine ads results in higher evaluations by male subjects of the degree to which the nonrole female possessed…

  18. Female Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Female Reproductive System KidsHealth > For Parents > Female Reproductive System A A ... the egg or sperm. continue Parts of the Female Reproductive System Unlike the male, the human female has a ...

  19. When Graduate Degrees Prostitute the Educational Process: Degrees Gone Wild

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumadue, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    Graduate degrees prostitute the educational process when they are sold to consumers by unaccredited degree/diploma mills as being equivalent to legitimate, bona-fide degrees awarded by accredited graduate schools. This article carefully analyzes the serious problems of bogus degrees and their association with the religious higher education…

  20. Optics of cone photoreceptors in the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Wilby, David; Toomey, Matthew B.; Olsson, Peter; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M. Carter; Oulton, Ruth; Kelber, Almut; Corbo, Joseph C.; Roberts, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Vision is the primary sensory modality of birds, and its importance is evident in the sophistication of their visual systems. Coloured oil droplets in the cone photoreceptors represent an adaptation in the avian retina, acting as long-pass colour filters. However, we currently lack understanding of how the optical properties and morphology of component structures (e.g. oil droplet, mitochondrial ellipsoid and outer segment) of the cone photoreceptor influence the transmission of light into the outer segment and the ultimate effect they have on receptor sensitivity. In this study, we use data from microspectrophotometry, digital holographic microscopy and electron microscopy to inform electromagnetic models of avian cone photoreceptors to quantitatively investigate the integrated optical function of the cell. We find that pigmented oil droplets primarily function as spectral filters, not light collection devices, although the mitochondrial ellipsoid improves optical coupling between the inner segment and oil droplet. In contrast, unpigmented droplets found in violet-sensitive cones double sensitivity at its peak relative to other cone types. Oil droplets and ellipsoids both narrow the angular sensitivity of single cone photoreceptors, but not as strongly as those in human cones. PMID:26423439

  1. Optics of cone photoreceptors in the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Wilby, David; Toomey, Matthew B; Olsson, Peter; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M Carter; Oulton, Ruth; Kelber, Almut; Corbo, Joseph C; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2015-10-06

    Vision is the primary sensory modality of birds, and its importance is evident in the sophistication of their visual systems. Coloured oil droplets in the cone photoreceptors represent an adaptation in the avian retina, acting as long-pass colour filters. However, we currently lack understanding of how the optical properties and morphology of component structures (e.g. oil droplet, mitochondrial ellipsoid and outer segment) of the cone photoreceptor influence the transmission of light into the outer segment and the ultimate effect they have on receptor sensitivity. In this study, we use data from microspectrophotometry, digital holographic microscopy and electron microscopy to inform electromagnetic models of avian cone photoreceptors to quantitatively investigate the integrated optical function of the cell. We find that pigmented oil droplets primarily function as spectral filters, not light collection devices, although the mitochondrial ellipsoid improves optical coupling between the inner segment and oil droplet. In contrast, unpigmented droplets found in violet-sensitive cones double sensitivity at its peak relative to other cone types. Oil droplets and ellipsoids both narrow the angular sensitivity of single cone photoreceptors, but not as strongly as those in human cones.

  2. Rb suppresses human cone-precursor-derived retinoblastoma tumours.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoliang L; Singh, Hardeep P; Wang, Lu; Qi, Dong-Lai; Poulos, Bradford K; Abramson, David H; Jhanwar, Suresh C; Cobrinik, David

    2014-10-16

    Retinoblastoma is a childhood retinal tumour that initiates in response to biallelic RB1 inactivation and loss of functional retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. Although Rb has diverse tumour-suppressor functions and is inactivated in many cancers, germline RB1 mutations predispose to retinoblastoma far more strongly than to other malignancies. This tropism suggests that retinal cell-type-specific circuitry sensitizes to Rb loss, yet the nature of the circuitry and the cell type in which it operates have been unclear. Here we show that post-mitotic human cone precursors are uniquely sensitive to Rb depletion. Rb knockdown induced cone precursor proliferation in prospectively isolated populations and in intact retina. Proliferation followed the induction of E2F-regulated genes, and depended on factors having strong expression in maturing cone precursors and crucial roles in retinoblastoma cell proliferation, including MYCN and MDM2. Proliferation of Rb-depleted cones and retinoblastoma cells also depended on the Rb-related protein p107, SKP2, and a p27 downregulation associated with cone precursor maturation. Moreover, Rb-depleted cone precursors formed tumours in orthotopic xenografts with histological features and protein expression typical of human retinoblastoma. These findings provide a compelling molecular rationale for a cone precursor origin of retinoblastoma. More generally, they demonstrate that cell-type-specific circuitry can collaborate with an initiating oncogenic mutation to enable tumorigenesis.

  3. Dynamics of dikes versus cone sheets in volcanic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Olivier; Burchardt, Steffi; Hallot, Erwan; Mourgues, Régis; Bulois, Cédric

    2015-04-01

    Igneous sheet intrusions of various shapes, such as dikes and cone sheets, coexist as parts of complex volcanic plumbing systems likely fed by common sources. How they form is fundamental regarding volcanic hazards, but yet no dynamic model simulates and predicts satisfactorily their diversity. Here we present scaled laboratory experiments that reproduced dikes and cone sheets under controlled conditions (Galland et al., 2014). Our models show that their formation is governed by a dimensionless ratio (Π1), which describes the shape of the magma source, and a dynamic dimensionless ratio (Π2), which compares the viscous stresses in the flowing magma to the host-rock strength. Plotting our experiments against these two numbers results in a phase diagram evidencing a dike and a cone-sheet field, separated by a sharp transition that fits a power law. This result shows that dikes and cone sheets correspond to distinct physical regimes of magma emplacement in the crust. For a given host-rock strength, cone sheets preferentially form when the source is shallow, relative to its lateral extent, or when the magma influx velocity (or viscosity) is high. Conversely, dikes form when the source is deep compared to its size, or when magma influx rate (or viscosity) is low. Both dikes and cone sheets may form from the same source, the shift from one regime to the other being then controlled by magma dynamics, i.e., different values of Π2. The extrapolated empirical dike-to-cone sheet transition is in good agreement with the occurrence of dikes and cone sheets in various natural volcanic settings. Galland, O., Burchardt, S., Hallot, E., Mourgues, R., Bulois, C., 2014. Dynamics of dikes versus cone sheets in volcanic systems. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 2014JB011059, 10.1002/2014jb011059.

  4. Directionality of Individual Cone Photoreceptors in the Parafoveal Region

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Hugh J.; Blanco, Leonardo; Codona, Johanan L.; Li, Simone; Choi, Stacey S.; Doble, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The pointing direction of cone photoreceptors can be inferred from the Stiles-Crawford Effect of the First Kind (SCE-I) measurement. Healthy retinas have tightly packed cones with a SCE-I function peak either centered in the pupil or with a slight nasal bias. Various retinal pathologies can change the profile of the SCE-I function implying that the arrangement or the light capturing properties of the cone photoreceptors are affected. Measuring the SCE-I may reveal early signs of photoreceptor change before actual cell apoptosis occurs. In vivo retinal imaging with adaptive optics (AO) was used to measure the pointing direction of individual cones at eight retinal locations in four control human subjects. Retinal images were acquired by translating an aperture in the light delivery arm through 19 different locations across a subject’s entrance pupil. Angular tuning properties of individual cones were calculated by fitting a Gaussian to the reflected intensity profile of each cone projected onto the pupil. Results were compared to those from an accepted psychophysical SCE-I measurement technique. The maximal difference in cone directionality of an ensemble of cones, ρ̄, between the major and minor axes of the Gaussian fit was 0.05 versus 0.29 mm−2 in one subject. All four subjects were found to have a mean nasal bias of 0.81 mm with a standard deviation of ±0.30 mm in the peak position at all retinal locations with mean ρ̄ value decreasing by 23% with increasing retinal eccentricity. Results show that cones in the parafoveal region converge towards the center of the pupillary aperture, confirming the anterior pointing alignment hypothesis. PMID:26494187

  5. Local calcium changes regulate the length of growth cone filopodia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Su; Geddis, Matthew S; Rehder, Vincent

    2002-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in growth cones can act as an important regulator of growth cone behavior. Here we investigated whether there is a spatial and temporal correlation between [Ca(2+)](i) and one particular aspect of growth cone behavior, namely the regulation of growth cone filopodia. Calcium was released from the caged compound NP-EGTA (o-nitrophenyl EGTA tetrapotassium salt) to simulate a signaling event in the form of a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](i). In three different experimental paradigms, we released calcium either globally (within an entire growth cone), regionally (within a small area of the lamellipodium), or locally (within a single filopodium). We demonstrate that global photolysis of NP-EGTA in growth cones caused a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](i) throughout the growth cone and elicited subsequent filopodial elongation that was restricted to the stimulated growth cone. Pharmacological blockage of either calmodulin or the Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, inhibited the effect of uncaging calcium, suggesting that these enzymes are acting downstream of calcium. Regional uncaging of calcium in the lamellipodium caused a regional increase in [Ca(2+)](i), but induced filopodial elongation on the entire growth cone. Elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) locally within an individual filopodium resulted in the elongation of only the stimulated filopodium. These findings suggest that the effect of an elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) on filopodial behavior depends on the spatial distribution of the calcium signal. In particular, calcium signals within filopodia can cause filopodial length changes that are likely a first step towards directed filopodial steering events seen during pathfinding in vivo.

  6. Comparison of Cone Model Parameters for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Y.-J.; Jang, Soojeong; Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Kim, Hae-Yeon

    2013-11-01

    Halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) are a major cause of geomagnetic storms, hence their three-dimensional structures are important for space weather. We compare three cone models: an elliptical-cone model, an ice-cream-cone model, and an asymmetric-cone model. These models allow us to determine three-dimensional parameters of HCMEs such as radial speed, angular width, and the angle [ γ] between sky plane and cone axis. We compare these parameters obtained from three models using 62 HCMEs observed by SOHO/LASCO from 2001 to 2002. Then we obtain the root-mean-square (RMS) error between the highest measured projection speeds and their calculated projection speeds from the cone models. As a result, we find that the radial speeds obtained from the models are well correlated with one another ( R > 0.8). The correlation coefficients between angular widths range from 0.1 to 0.48 and those between γ-values range from -0.08 to 0.47, which is much smaller than expected. The reason may be the different assumptions and methods. The RMS errors between the highest measured projection speeds and the highest estimated projection speeds of the elliptical-cone model, the ice-cream-cone model, and the asymmetric-cone model are 376 km s-1, 169 km s-1, and 152 km s-1. We obtain the correlation coefficients between the location from the models and the flare location ( R > 0.45). Finally, we discuss strengths and weaknesses of these models in terms of space-weather application.

  7. Lateral suppression of mesopic rod and cone flicker detection

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dingcai; Lu, Yolanda H.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanisms of flicker detection suppression by measuring mesopic rod and cone critical flicker frequencies (CFFs) at different center and surround illuminance levels. Stimuli were generated with a four-primary photostimulator that provided independent control of rod and cone excitations. The results showed that dim surrounds ≤0.2 Td suppressed cone-mediated CFFs at ≥20 Td but not rod-mediated CFFs. These results can be understood in terms of peak amplitudes of photoreceptor impulse response functions under different stimulation conditions. PMID:22330377

  8. Pulsar average wave forms and hollow-cone beam models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backer, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    Pulsar wave forms have been analyzed from observations conducted over a wide radio-frequency range to assess the wave-form morphologies and to measure wave-form widths. The results of the analysis compare favorably with the predictions of a model with a hollow-cone beam of fixed dimensions and with random orientation of both the observer and the cone axis with respect to the pulsar spin axis. A class of three-component wave forms is included in the model by adding a central pencil beam to the hollow-cone hypothesis. The consequences of a number of discrepancies between observations and quantitative predictions of the model are discussed.

  9. Light-cone averaging in cosmology: formalism and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperini, M.; Marozzi, G.; Nugier, F.; Veneziano, G.

    2011-07-01

    We present a general gauge invariant formalism for defining cosmological averages that are relevant for observations based on light-like signals. Such averages involve either null hypersurfaces corresponding to a family of past light-cones or compact surfaces given by their intersection with timelike hypersurfaces. Generalized Buchert-Ehlers commutation rules for derivatives of these light-cone averages are given. After introducing some adapted ``geodesic light-cone'' coordinates, we give explicit expressions for averaging the redshift to luminosity-distance relation and the so-called ``redshift drift'' in a generic inhomogeneous Universe.

  10. Light-cone averaging in cosmology: formalism and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperini, M.; Marozzi, G.; Veneziano, G.; Nugier, F. E-mail: giovanni.marozzi@college-de-france.fr E-mail: gabriele.veneziano@cern.ch

    2011-07-01

    We present a general gauge invariant formalism for defining cosmological averages that are relevant for observations based on light-like signals. Such averages involve either null hypersurfaces corresponding to a family of past light-cones or compact surfaces given by their intersection with timelike hypersurfaces. Generalized Buchert-Ehlers commutation rules for derivatives of these light-cone averages are given. After introducing some adapted ''geodesic light-cone'' coordinates, we give explicit expressions for averaging the redshift to luminosity-distance relation and the so-called ''redshift drift'' in a generic inhomogeneous Universe.

  11. Actin-binding proteins take the reins in growth cones.

    PubMed

    Pak, Chi W; Flynn, Kevin C; Bamburg, James R

    2008-02-01

    Higher-order actin-based networks (actin superstructures) are important for growth-cone motility and guidance. Principles for generating, organizing and remodelling actin superstructures have emerged from recent findings in cell-free systems, non-neuronal cells and growth cones. This Review examines how actin superstructures are initiated de novo at the leading-edge membrane and how the spontaneous organization of actin superstructures is driven by ensembles of actin-binding proteins. How the regulation of actin-binding proteins can affect growth-cone turning and axonal regeneration is also discussed.

  12. Attitude reorientation of spacecraft by means of impulse coning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martz, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    Minimum maneuver costs for attitude reorientation of spacecraft of all possible inertial distribution over a wide range of maneuver angles by use of the impulse coning method of reorientation was studied. Maneuver cost is proportional to the product of fuel consumed and time expended during a maneuver. Assumptions included impulsive external control torques, rigid-body spacecraft, rest-to-rest maneuvers, and no disturbance torques. Also, coning maneuvers were constrained to have equal initial and final cone angles. Maneuver costs are presented for general reorientations as well as for spin-axis reorientations where final attitude about the spin axis is arbitrary.

  13. Alopecia associated with unexpected leakage from electron cone

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, B.C.; Pennington, E.C.; Hussey, D.H.; Jani, S.K.

    1989-06-01

    Excessive irradiation due to unexpected leakage was found on a patient receiving electron beam therapy. The cause of this leakage was analyzed and the amount of leakage was measured for different electron beam energies. The highest leakage occurred with a 6 x 6 cm cone using a 12 MeV electron beam. The leakage dose measured along the side of the cone could be as great as 40%. Until the cones are modified or redesigned, it is advised that all patient setups be carefully reviewed to assure that no significant patient areas are in the side scatter region.

  14. Degrees of understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    America's most famous journalism school has teamed up with the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory to try to improve science communication. This fall, Columbia University combined two of its greatest assets—Lamont-Doherty and the Columbia School of Journalism—to offer a joint degree program for would-be writers to specialize in Earth and environmental science.“Science journalists are translators between those with the knowledge and those with the need to know,” said Kenneth Goldstein, a professor of journalism at Columbia. “The new Earth and environmental sciences journalism program seeks to produce students who are fluently bilingual in the language of Earth science and the language of public debate.”

  15. Molecular control of normal and acrocona mutant seed cone development in Norway spruce (Picea abies) and the evolution of conifer ovule-bearing organs.

    PubMed

    Carlsbecker, Annelie; Sundström, Jens F; Englund, Marie; Uddenberg, Daniel; Izquierdo, Liz; Kvarnheden, Anders; Vergara-Silva, Francisco; Engström, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Reproductive organs in seed plants are morphologically divergent and their evolutionary history is often unclear. The mechanisms controlling their development have been extensively studied in angiosperms but are poorly understood in conifers and other gymnosperms. Here, we address the molecular control of seed cone development in Norway spruce, Picea abies. We present expression analyses of five novel MADS-box genes in comparison with previously identified MADS and LEAFY genes at distinct developmental stages. In addition, we have characterized the homeotic transformation from vegetative shoot to female cone and associated changes in regulatory gene expression patterns occurring in the acrocona mutant. The analyses identified genes active at the onset of ovuliferous and ovule development and identified expression patterns marking distinct domains of the ovuliferous scale. The reproductive transformation in acrocona involves the activation of all tested genes normally active in early cone development, except for an AGAMOUS-LIKE6/SEPALLATA (AGL6/SEP) homologue. This absence may be functionally associated with the nondeterminate development of the acrocona ovule-bearing scales. Our morphological and gene expression analyses give support to the hypothesis that the modern cone is a complex structure, and the ovuliferous scale the result of reductions and compactions of an ovule-bearing axillary short shoot in cones of Paleozoic conifers.

  16. Simulation analysis of the effects of an initial cone position and opening angle on a cone-guided implosion

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagawa, T.; Sakagami, H.; Nagatomo, H.

    2013-10-15

    In inertial confinement fusion, the implosion process is important in forming a high-density plasma core. In the case of a fast ignition scheme using a cone-guided target, the fuel target is imploded with a cone inserted. This scheme is advantageous for efficiently heating the imploded fuel core; however, asymmetric implosion is essentially inevitable. Moreover, the effect of cone position and opening angle on implosion also becomes critical. Focusing on these problems, the effect of the asymmetric implosion, the initial position, and the opening angle on the compression rate of the fuel is investigated using a three-dimensional pure hydrodynamic code.

  17. Does the Dirac cone of germanene exist on metal substrates?

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangyang; Li, Jingzhen; Xiong, Junhua; Pan, Yuanyuan; Ye, Meng; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Han; Quhe, Ruge; Lu, Jing

    2016-07-28

    Germanene, a germanium analogue of graphene and silicene, has been synthesized on metal substrates. It is predicted that the intrinsic germanene has a Dirac cone in its band structure, just like graphene and silicene. Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the geometrical structures and electronic properties of germanene on the Ag, Au, Cu, Al, Pt and Ir substrates. The Dirac cone of germanene is destroyed on the Al, Pt and Ir substrates but preserved on the Ag and Au substrates with a slight band hybridization. The upper part of the Dirac cone is destroyed for germanene on the Cu substrate while the lower part remains preserved. By contrast, the Dirac cone is always destroyed for silicene on these metal substrates because of a strong band hybridization. Our study suggests that it is possible to extract the intrinsic properties of germanene on the Ag and Au substrates although it appears impossible for silicene on these two substrates.

  18. Cone monochromacy and visual pigment spectral tuning in wobbegong sharks.

    PubMed

    Theiss, Susan M; Davies, Wayne I L; Collin, Shaun P; Hunt, David M; Hart, Nathan S

    2012-12-23

    Much is known regarding the evolution of colour vision in nearly every vertebrate class, with the notable exception of the elasmobranchs. While multiple spectrally distinct cone types are found in some rays, sharks appear to possess only a single class of cone and, therefore, may be colour blind. In this study, the visual opsin genes of two wobbegong species, Orectolobus maculatus and Orectolobus ornatus, were isolated to verify the molecular basis of their monochromacy. In both species, only two opsin genes are present, RH1 (rod) and LWS (cone), which provide further evidence to support the concept that sharks possess only a single cone type. Examination of the coding sequences revealed substitutions that account for interspecific variation in the photopigment absorbance spectra, which may reflect the difference in visual ecology between these species.

  19. Ideal illuminants for rod/L-cone color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Humans see multicolor complex images with illuminants that have very low amounts of 400 to 580nm light when there is enough long-wave light greater than 590nm. Interactions between rods and long-wave (L) cones generate these colors. They are observed when there is insufficient light for a threshold response from M- and S-cones. This paper measures the spectral emission of a wood fire and a wax candle and it compares these low-color temperature spectral radiant exitances with the sensitivities of rods and long-wave cones. The paper reviews some of the literature on the evolution of human cone pigments and the early use of fire by hominids.

  20. Conifer ovulate cones accumulate pollen principally by simple impaction

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, James E.; Henning, Kevin; Pennel, Christophe; Lahoubi, Mohamed; Patrick, Michael A.; Young, Phillipe G.; Tabor, Gavin R.

    2007-01-01

    In many pine species (Family Pinaceae), ovulate cones structurally resemble a turbine, which has been widely interpreted as an adaptation for improving pollination by producing complex aerodynamic effects. We tested the turbine interpretation by quantifying patterns of pollen accumulation on ovulate cones in a wind tunnel and by using simulation models based on computational fluid dynamics. We used computer-aided design and computed tomography to create computational fluid dynamics model cones. We studied three species: Pinus radiata, Pinus sylvestris, and Cedrus libani. Irrespective of the approach or species studied, we found no evidence that turbine-like aerodynamics made a significant contribution to pollen accumulation, which instead occurred primarily by simple impaction. Consequently, we suggest alternative adaptive interpretations for the structure of ovulate cones. PMID:17986613

  1. Shape measurement and vibration analysis of moving speaker cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qican; Liu, Yuankun; Lehtonen, Petri

    2014-06-01

    Surface three-dimensional (3-D) shape information is needed for many fast processes such as structural testing of material, standing waves on loudspeaker cone, etc. Usually measurement is done from limited number of points using electrical sensors or laser distance meters. Fourier Transform Profilometry (FTP) enables fast shape measurement of the whole surface. Method is based on angled sinusoidal fringe pattern projection and image capturing. FTP requires only one image of the deformed fringe pattern to restore the 3-D shape of the measured object, which makes real-time or dynamic data processing possible. In our experiment the method was used for loudspeaker cone distortion measurement in dynamic conditions. For sound quality issues it is important that the whole cone moves in same phase and there are no partial waves. Our imaging resolution was 1280x1024 pixels and frame rate was 200 fps. Using our setup we found unwanted spatial waves in our sample cone.

  2. Further observations on resonance cones in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemann, H.; Singh, N.

    1983-01-01

    Results on the angular distribution of the electrostatic potential of a pulsating point charge in a warm magnetized plasma permeated by an electron beam are presented. The theoretical formulation for a finite magnetic field is given, and the solution of the resonance cone dispersion relation is presented. Numerical results on the angular distribution of the potential are shown, and the propagation of waves outside the resonance cones is described. It is demonstrated that with the inclusions of a finite magnetic field, the field patterns of a point charge are qualitatively similar to those obtained for a uniaxial plasma. The Cerenkov radiation occurs at angles much smaller than the cold-cone angle, even with the finite magnetic field. When the beam velocity is well above the thermal velocity of the background electrons, a characteristic wave propagation occurs between the cold-cone angles.

  3. Supersonic flow around circular cones at angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferri, Antonio

    1951-01-01

    The properties of conical flow without axial symmetry are analyzed. The flow around cones of circular cross section at small angles of attack is determined by correctly considering the effect of the entropy gradients in the flow.

  4. Microhabitats within venomous cone snails contain diverse actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Peraud, Olivier; Biggs, Jason S; Hughen, Ronald W; Light, Alan R; Concepcion, Gisela P; Olivera, Baldomero M; Schmidt, Eric W

    2009-11-01

    Actinomycetes can be symbionts in diverse organisms, including both plants and animals. Some actinomycetes benefit their host by producing small molecule secondary metabolites; the resulting symbioses are often developmentally complex. Actinomycetes associated with three cone snails were studied. Cone snails are venomous tropical marine gastropods which have been extensively examined because of their production of peptide-based neurological toxins, but no microbiological studies have been reported on these organisms. A microhabitat approach was used in which dissected tissue from each snail was treated as an individual sample in order to explore bacteria in the tissues separately. Our results revealed a diverse, novel, and highly culturable cone snail-associated actinomycete community, with some isolates showing promising bioactivity in a neurological assay. This suggests that cone snails may represent an underexplored reservoir of novel actinomycetes of potential interest for drug discovery.

  5. 26. LONE CONE AND OLD ROAD GRADE TO LEFT SEEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. LONE CONE AND OLD ROAD GRADE TO LEFT SEEN FROM PARKING LOT ADJACENT TO LAUNDROMAT AT MOREFIELD CAMPGROUND STORE, FACING NW. - Mesa Verde National Park Main Entrance Road, Cortez, Montezuma County, CO

  6. The Mitochondrial Genome of the Venomous Cone Snail Conus consors

    PubMed Central

    Brauer, Age; Kurz, Alexander; Stockwell, Tim; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Heidler, Juliana; Wittig, Ilka; Kauferstein, Silke; Mebs, Dietrich; Stöcklin, Reto; Remm, Maido

    2012-01-01

    Cone snails are venomous predatory marine neogastropods that belong to the species-rich superfamily of the Conoidea. So far, the mitochondrial genomes of two cone snail species (Conus textile and Conus borgesi) have been described, and these feed on snails and worms, respectively. Here, we report the mitochondrial genome sequence of the fish-hunting cone snail Conus consors and describe a novel putative control region (CR) which seems to be absent in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of other cone snail species. This possible CR spans about 700 base pairs (bp) and is located between the genes encoding the transfer RNA for phenylalanine (tRNA-Phe, trnF) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (cox3). The novel putative CR contains several sequence motifs that suggest a role in mitochondrial replication and transcription. PMID:23236512

  7. 68. Water Delivery Pipes for Menzie Cone, date unknown Historic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. Water Delivery Pipes for Menzie Cone, date unknown Historic Photograph, Photographer Unknown; Collection of William Everett, Jr. (Wilkes-Barre, PA), photocopy by Joseph E.B. Elliot - Huber Coal Breaker, 101 South Main Street, Ashley, Luzerne County, PA

  8. Microhabitats within Venomous Cone Snails Contain Diverse Actinobacteria▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Peraud, Olivier; Biggs, Jason S.; Hughen, Ronald W.; Light, Alan R.; Concepcion, Gisela P.; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Schmidt, Eric W.

    2009-01-01

    Actinomycetes can be symbionts in diverse organisms, including both plants and animals. Some actinomycetes benefit their host by producing small molecule secondary metabolites; the resulting symbioses are often developmentally complex. Actinomycetes associated with three cone snails were studied. Cone snails are venomous tropical marine gastropods which have been extensively examined because of their production of peptide-based neurological toxins, but no microbiological studies have been reported on these organisms. A microhabitat approach was used in which dissected tissue from each snail was treated as an individual sample in order to explore bacteria in the tissues separately. Our results revealed a diverse, novel, and highly culturable cone snail-associated actinomycete community, with some isolates showing promising bioactivity in a neurological assay. This suggests that cone snails may represent an underexplored reservoir of novel actinomycetes of potential interest for drug discovery. PMID:19749071

  9. Nano-cone resistive memory for ultralow power operation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungjun; Jung, Sunghun; Kim, Min-Hwi; Kim, Tae-Hyeon; Bang, Suhyun; Cho, Seongjae; Park, Byung-Gook

    2017-03-24

    SiN x -based nano-structure resistive memory is fabricated by fully silicon CMOS compatible process integration including particularly designed anisotropic etching for the construction of a nano-cone silicon bottom electrode (BE). Bipolar resistive switching characteristics have significantly reduced switching current and voltage and are demonstrated in a nano-cone BE structure, as compared with those in a flat BE one. We have verified by systematic device simulations that the main cause of reduction in the performance parameters is the high electric field being more effectively concentrated at the tip of the cone-shaped BE. The greatly improved nonlinearity of the nano-cone resistive memory cell will be beneficial in the ultra-high-density crossbar array.

  10. Enhanced light trapping in periodically truncated cone silicon nanowire structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Qiu; Yuhua, Zuo; Tianwei, Zhou; Zhi, Liu; Jun, Zheng; Chuanbo, Li; Buwen, Cheng

    2015-10-01

    Light trapping plays an important role in improving the conversion efficiency of thin-film solar cells. The good wideband light trapping is achieved using our periodically truncated cone Si nanowire (NW) structures, and their inherent mechanism is analyzed and simulated by FDTD solution software. Ordered cylinder Si NW structure with initial size of 80 nm and length of 200 nm is grown by pattern transfer and selective epitaxial growth. Truncated cone Si NW array is then obtained by thermal oxidation treatment. Its mean reflection in the range of 300-900 nm is lowered to be 5% using 140 nm long truncated cone Si NW structure, compared with that of 20% using cylinder counterparts. It indicates that periodically truncated Si cone structures trap the light efficiently to enhance the light harvesting in a wide spectral range and have the potential application in highly efficient NW solar cells. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51072194, 61021003, 61036001, 61376057).

  11. The mitochondrial genome of the venomous cone snail Conus consors.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Age; Kurz, Alexander; Stockwell, Tim; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Heidler, Juliana; Wittig, Ilka; Kauferstein, Silke; Mebs, Dietrich; Stöcklin, Reto; Remm, Maido

    2012-01-01

    Cone snails are venomous predatory marine neogastropods that belong to the species-rich superfamily of the Conoidea. So far, the mitochondrial genomes of two cone snail species (Conus textile and Conus borgesi) have been described, and these feed on snails and worms, respectively. Here, we report the mitochondrial genome sequence of the fish-hunting cone snail Conus consors and describe a novel putative control region (CR) which seems to be absent in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of other cone snail species. This possible CR spans about 700 base pairs (bp) and is located between the genes encoding the transfer RNA for phenylalanine (tRNA-Phe, trnF) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (cox3). The novel putative CR contains several sequence motifs that suggest a role in mitochondrial replication and transcription.

  12. Testing the reliability of ice-cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zonghao; Shen, Chenglong; Wang, Chuanbing; Liu, Kai; Xue, Xianghui; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui

    2015-04-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CME)'s properties are important to not only the physical scene itself but space-weather prediction. Several models (such as cone model, GCS model, and so on) have been raised to get rid of the projection effects within the properties observed by spacecraft. According to SOHO/ LASCO observations, we obtain the 'real' 3D parameters of all the FFHCMEs (front-side full halo Coronal Mass Ejections) within the 24th solar cycle till July 2012, by the ice-cream cone model. Considering that the method to obtain 3D parameters from the CME observations by multi-satellite and multi-angle has higher accuracy, we use the GCS model to obtain the real propagation parameters of these CMEs in 3D space and compare the results with which by ice-cream cone model. Then we could discuss the reliability of the ice-cream cone model.

  13. Conifer ovulate cones accumulate pollen principally by simple impaction.

    PubMed

    Cresswell, James E; Henning, Kevin; Pennel, Christophe; Lahoubi, Mohamed; Patrick, Michael A; Young, Phillipe G; Tabor, Gavin R

    2007-11-13

    In many pine species (Family Pinaceae), ovulate cones structurally resemble a turbine, which has been widely interpreted as an adaptation for improving pollination by producing complex aerodynamic effects. We tested the turbine interpretation by quantifying patterns of pollen accumulation on ovulate cones in a wind tunnel and by using simulation models based on computational fluid dynamics. We used computer-aided design and computed tomography to create computational fluid dynamics model cones. We studied three species: Pinus radiata, Pinus sylvestris, and Cedrus libani. Irrespective of the approach or species studied, we found no evidence that turbine-like aerodynamics made a significant contribution to pollen accumulation, which instead occurred primarily by simple impaction. Consequently, we suggest alternative adaptive interpretations for the structure of ovulate cones.

  14. On the dynamics of a particle on a cone

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, K. Rembielinski, J.

    2013-02-15

    A detailed study of the classical and quantum mechanics of a free particle on a double cone and a particle bound to its tip by a harmonic oscillator potential is presented. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the classical and quantum free particle and harmonic oscillator on a double cone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyze the solutions of classical equations and show that the motion in a generator is unstable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify the observables and Hilbert space for the quantum particle on a double cone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The case of the quantization on the double cone is compared with a single-nappe case. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We solve the Schroedinger equations and discuss them in the context of the classical instabilities.

  15. 127. Moses H. Cone Memorial Park. View of the flat ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    127. Moses H. Cone Memorial Park. View of the flat top manor from the bass lake carriage road. Looking north-northwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  16. Nano-cone resistive memory for ultralow power operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungjun; Jung, Sunghun; Kim, Min-Hwi; Kim, Tae-Hyeon; Bang, Suhyung; Cho, Seongjae; Park, Byung-Gook

    2017-03-01

    SiN x -based nano-structure resistive memory is fabricated by fully silicon CMOS compatible process integration including particularly designed anisotropic etching for the construction of a nano-cone silicon bottom electrode (BE). Bipolar resistive switching characteristics have significantly reduced switching current and voltage and are demonstrated in a nano-cone BE structure, as compared with those in a flat BE one. We have verified by systematic device simulations that the main cause of reduction in the performance parameters is the high electric field being more effectively concentrated at the tip of the cone-shaped BE. The greatly improved nonlinearity of the nano-cone resistive memory cell will be beneficial in the ultra-high-density crossbar array.

  17. Does L/M cone opponency disappear in human periphery?

    PubMed

    Mullen, Kathy T; Sakurai, Masato; Chu, William

    2005-01-01

    We have assessed the optimal cone contrast sensitivity across eccentricity in human vision of the two cone-opponent mechanisms [L/M or red-green, and S/(L + M) or blue-yellow] and the luminance mechanism. We have used a novel stimulus, termed a 'sinring', that is a radially modulated sine-wave arc, Gaussian enveloped in both angular and radial directions. This stimulus overcomes the problem inherent in Gabor stimuli of confounding stimulus spatial frequency, size, and eccentricity and so allows contrast sensitivity to be tracked accurately into the periphery. Our results show that L/M cone opponency declines steeply across the human periphery and becomes behaviourally absent by 25-30 deg (in the nasal field). This result suggests that any L/M cone-opponent neurons found in primate peripheral retina beyond this limit are unlikely to be significant for colour contrast detection measured behaviourally.

  18. Freeform solar concentrator with a highly asymmetric acceptance cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelwright, Brian; Angel, J. Roger P.; Coughenour, Blake; Hammer, Kimberly

    2014-10-01

    A solar concentrator with a highly asymmetric acceptance cone is investigated. Concentrating photovoltaic systems require dual-axis sun tracking to maintain nominal concentration throughout the day. In addition to collecting direct rays from the solar disk, which subtends ~0.53 degrees, concentrating optics must allow for in-field tracking errors due to mechanical misalignment of the module, wind loading, and control loop biases. The angular range over which the concentrator maintains <90% of on-axis throughput is defined as the optical acceptance angle. Concentrators with substantial rotational symmetry likewise exhibit rotationally symmetric acceptance angles. In the field, this is sometimes a poor match with azimuth-elevation trackers, which have inherently asymmetric tracking performance. Pedestal-mounted trackers with low torsional stiffness about the vertical axis have better elevation tracking than azimuthal tracking. Conversely, trackers which rotate on large-footprint circular tracks are often limited by elevation tracking performance. We show that a line-focus concentrator, composed of a parabolic trough primary reflector and freeform refractive secondary, can be tailored to have a highly asymmetric acceptance angle. The design is suitable for a tracker with excellent tracking accuracy in the elevation direction, and poor accuracy in the azimuthal direction. In the 1000X design given, when trough optical errors (2mrad rms slope deviation) are accounted for, the azimuthal acceptance angle is +/- 1.65°, while the elevation acceptance angle is only +/-0.29°. This acceptance angle does not include the angular width of the sun, which consumes nearly all of the elevation tolerance at this concentration level. By decreasing the average concentration, the elevation acceptance angle can be increased. This is well-suited for a pedestal alt-azimuth tracker with a low cost slew bearing (without anti-backlash features).

  19. Solar concentrating properties of truncated hexagonal, pyramidal and circular cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhard, D. G.; Strobel, G. L.; Shealy, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The solar concentrating properties of specularly reflecting truncated pyramidal, hexagonal, and circular cones are evaluated. Pyramidal and hexagonal configurations are discussed with reference to the concentration factor as a function of half apex angle and the length of the side over the width, and to the irradiance distribution. Expressions are derived for the concentration factor and the irradiance at the base of a circular cone when the sunlight is incident normal to the aperture and for oblique incidence.

  20. Processing Cones: A Computational Structure for Image Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    image analysis applications, referred to as a processing cone, is described and sample algorithms are presented. A fundamental characteristic of the structure is its hierarchical organization into two-dimensional arrays of decreasing resolution. In this architecture, a protypical function is defined on a local window of data and applied uniformly to all windows in a parallel manner. Three basic modes of processing are supported in the cone: reduction operations (upward processing), horizontal operations (processing at a single level) and projection operations (downward

  1. Female Reproductive System (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Female Reproductive System KidsHealth > For Teens > Female Reproductive System A A ... and female reproductive systems. continue What Is the Female Reproductive System? Most species have two sexes: male and female. ...

  2. Female Reproductive System (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Female Reproductive System KidsHealth > For Teens > Female Reproductive System Print A ... and female reproductive systems. continue What Is the Female Reproductive System? Most species have two sexes: male and female. ...

  3. Organizational motifs for ground squirrel cone bipolar cells.

    PubMed

    Light, Adam C; Zhu, Yongling; Shi, Jun; Saszik, Shannon; Lindstrom, Sarah; Davidson, Laura; Li, Xiaoyu; Chiodo, Vince A; Hauswirth, William W; Li, Wei; DeVries, Steven H

    2012-09-01

    In daylight vision, parallel processing starts at the cone synapse. Cone signals flow to On and Off bipolar cells, which are further divided into types according to morphology, immunocytochemistry, and function. The axons of the bipolar cell types stratify at different levels in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and can interact with costratifying amacrine and ganglion cells. These interactions endow the ganglion cell types with unique functional properties. The wiring that underlies the interactions among bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells is poorly understood. It may be easier to elucidate this wiring if organizational rules can be established. We identify 13 types of cone bipolar cells in the ground squirrel, 11 of which contact contiguous cones, with the possible exception of short-wavelength-sensitive cones. Cells were identified by antibody labeling, tracer filling, and Golgi-like filling following transduction with an adeno-associated virus encoding for green fluorescent protein. The 11 bipolar cell types displayed two organizational patterns. In the first pattern, eight to 10 of the 11 types came in pairs with partially overlapping axonal stratification. Pairs shared morphological, immunocytochemical, and functional properties. The existence of similar pairs is a new motif that might have implications for how signals first diverge from a cone to bipolar cells and then reconverge onto a costratifying ganglion cell. The second pattern is a mirror symmetric organization about the middle of the IPL involving at least seven bipolar cell types. This anatomical symmetry may be associated with a functional symmetry in On and Off ganglion cell responses.

  4. Cone size is related to branching architecture in conifers.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Andrew B; Beaulieu, Jeremy M; Crane, Peter R; Donoghue, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    The relationship between branch diameter and leaf size has been widely used to understand how vegetative resources are allocated in plants. Branching architecture influences reproductive allocation as well, but fewer studies have explored this relationship at broad phylogenetic or ecological scales. In this study, we tested whether pollen-producing and seed-producing cone size scales with branch diameter in conifers, a diverse and globally distributed lineage of nonflowering seed plants. Branch diameter and cone size were analyzed using multiple regression models and evolutionary models of trait evolution for a data set of 293 extant conifer species within an explicit phylogenetic framework. Branch diameter is a strong predictor of cone size across conifer species, particularly for pollen cones and dry seed cones. However, these relationships are complex in detail because leaf morphology and seed dispersal biology influence the specific ways in which they are expressed. The ubiquity and strength of these scaling relationships across conifers suggest that reproductive and vegetative morphologies are coupled in the group, and it is therefore difficult to disentangle the evolution of cone size from the evolution of branching architecture.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Shatter Cones Development in Impact Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baratoux, D.; Melosh, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    Shatter cones are the characteristic forms of rock fractures in impact structures. They have been used for decades as unequivocal fingerprints of meteoritic impacts on Earth. The abundant data about shapes, apical angles, sizes and distributions of shatter cones for many terrestrial impact structures should provide insights for the determination of impact conditions and characteristics of shock waves produced by high-velocity projectiles in geologic media. However, previously proposed models for the formation of shatter cones do not agree with observations. For example, the widely accepted Johnson-Talbot mechanism requires that the longitudinal stress drops to zero between the arrival of the elastic precursor and the main plastic wave. Unfortunately, observations do not support such a drop. A model has been also proposed to explain the striated features on the surface of shatter cones but can not invoked for their conical shape. The mechanism by which shatter cones form thus remains enigmatic to date. In this paper we present a new model for the formation of shatter cones. Our model has been tested by means of numerical simulations using the hydrocodes SALE 2D enhanced with the Grady-Kipp-Melosh fragmentation model.

  6. Color vision, cones, and color-coding in the cortex.

    PubMed

    Conway, Bevil R

    2009-06-01

    Color processing begins with the absorption of light by cone photoreceptors, and progresses through a series of hierarchical stages: Retinal signals carrying color information are transmitted through the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus (LGN) up to the primary visual cortex (V1). From V1, the signals are processed by the second visual area (V2); then by cells located in subcompartments ("globs") within the posterior inferior temporal (PIT) cortex, a brain region that encompasses area V4 and brain regions immediately anterior to V4. Color signals are then processed by regions deep within the inferior temporal (IT) cortex including area TE. As a heuristic, one can consider each of these stages to be involved in constructing a distinct aspect of the color percept. The three cone types are the basis for trichromacy; retinal ganglion cells that respond in an opponent fashion to activation of different cone classes are the basis for color opponency (these "cone-opponent" cells increase their firing rate above baseline to activation of one cone class and decrease their firing rate below baseline to activation of a different cone class); double-opponent neurons in the V1 generate local color contrast and are the building blocks for color constancy; glob cells elaborate the perception of hue; and IT integrates color perception in the context of behavior. Finally, though nothing is known, these signals presumably interface with motor programs and emotional centers of the brain to mediate the widely acknowledged emotional salience of color.

  7. Loss cone-driven cyclotron maser instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Yi, Sibaek; Lim, Dayeh; Kim, Hee-Eun; Seough, Jungjoon; Yoon, Peter H.

    2013-11-01

    The weakly (or mildly) relativistic cyclotron maser instability has been successfully applied to explain the Earth's auroral kilometric radiation and other radio sources in nature and laboratory. Among the most important physical parameters that determine the instability criteria is the ratio of plasma-to-electron cyclotron frequencies, ωp/Ω. It is therefore instructive to consider how the normalized maximum growth rate, γmax/Ω, varies as a function of ωp/Ω. Although many authors have already discussed this problem, in order to complete the analysis, one must also understand how the radiation emission angle corresponding to the maximum growth, θmax, scales with ωp/Ω, since the propagation angle determines the radiation beaming pattern. Also, the behavior of the frequency corresponding to the maximum growth rate at each harmonic, (ωmax-sΩ)/Ω, where s=1,2,3,ċ , as a function of ωp/Ωis of importance for a complete understanding of the maser excitation. The present paper computes these additional quantities for the first time, making use of a model loss cone electron distribution function.

  8. Manipulation of Dirac Cones in Mechanical Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariyado, Toshikaze; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Recently, quantum Hall state analogs in classical mechanics attract much attention from topological points of view. Topology is not only for mathematicians but also quite useful in a quantum world. Further it even governs the Newton’s law of motion. One of the advantages of classical systems over solid state materials is its clear controllability. Here we investigate mechanical graphene, which is a spring-mass model with the honeycomb structure as a typical mechanical model with nontrivial topological phenomena. The vibration spectrum of mechanical graphene is characterized by Dirac cones serving as sources of topological nontriviality. We find that the spectrum has dramatic dependence on the spring tension at equilibrium as a natural control parameter, i.e., creation and annihilation of the Dirac particles are realized as the tension increases. Just by rotating the system, the manipulated Dirac particles lead to topological transition, i.e., a jump of the “Chern number” occurs associated with flipping of propagating direction of chiral edge modes. This is a bulk-edge correspondence governed by the Newton’s law. A simple observation that in-gap edge modes exist only at the fixed boundary, but not at the free one, is attributed to the symmetry protection of topological phases.

  9. Nugget hardfacing toughens roller cone bits

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-25

    A new hardfacing material made of pure sintered tungsten carbide nuggets has improved roller cone rock bit performance in extremely hard lithologies, increasing penetration rates and extending bit life through multiple formations. In a recent test run in the Shushufindi 95 wells in Ecuador, a Security DBS 9 7/8-in. MPSF IADC 117M (International Association of Drilling Contractors bit code) bit with this new hardfacing drilled out the float equipment, cement, and show and then 3,309 ft of hard formations. The bit drilled through the Orteguaza claystone/shale/sand and chert formations and then to total depth at 6,309 ft in the Tiyuyacu shale/sand. The 3,309-ft interval was drilled at an average penetration rate (ROP) of 52.5 ft/hr. The proprietary nugget material was tested according to the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) G65 wear test method, a standard industry method of measuring wear resistance. The nugget material had ASTM wear test resistance more than twice that of standard hardfacing from conventional tungsten carbide.

  10. Manipulation of Dirac Cones in Mechanical Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kariyado, Toshikaze; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Recently, quantum Hall state analogs in classical mechanics attract much attention from topological points of view. Topology is not only for mathematicians but also quite useful in a quantum world. Further it even governs the Newton’s law of motion. One of the advantages of classical systems over solid state materials is its clear controllability. Here we investigate mechanical graphene, which is a spring-mass model with the honeycomb structure as a typical mechanical model with nontrivial topological phenomena. The vibration spectrum of mechanical graphene is characterized by Dirac cones serving as sources of topological nontriviality. We find that the spectrum has dramatic dependence on the spring tension at equilibrium as a natural control parameter, i.e., creation and annihilation of the Dirac particles are realized as the tension increases. Just by rotating the system, the manipulated Dirac particles lead to topological transition, i.e., a jump of the “Chern number” occurs associated with flipping of propagating direction of chiral edge modes. This is a bulk-edge correspondence governed by the Newton’s law. A simple observation that in-gap edge modes exist only at the fixed boundary, but not at the free one, is attributed to the symmetry protection of topological phases. PMID:26667580

  11. Manipulation of Dirac Cones in Mechanical Graphene.

    PubMed

    Kariyado, Toshikaze; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro

    2015-12-15

    Recently, quantum Hall state analogs in classical mechanics attract much attention from topological points of view. Topology is not only for mathematicians but also quite useful in a quantum world. Further it even governs the Newton's law of motion. One of the advantages of classical systems over solid state materials is its clear controllability. Here we investigate mechanical graphene, which is a spring-mass model with the honeycomb structure as a typical mechanical model with nontrivial topological phenomena. The vibration spectrum of mechanical graphene is characterized by Dirac cones serving as sources of topological nontriviality. We find that the spectrum has dramatic dependence on the spring tension at equilibrium as a natural control parameter, i.e., creation and annihilation of the Dirac particles are realized as the tension increases. Just by rotating the system, the manipulated Dirac particles lead to topological transition, i.e., a jump of the "Chern number" occurs associated with flipping of propagating direction of chiral edge modes. This is a bulk-edge correspondence governed by the Newton's law. A simple observation that in-gap edge modes exist only at the fixed boundary, but not at the free one, is attributed to the symmetry protection of topological phases.

  12. 360-degree Color Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is a 'geometrically improved' version of the 360- degree panorama heretofore known as the 'Gallery Pan', the first contiguous, uniform panorama taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) over the course of Sols 8, 9, and 10. Different regions were imaged at different times over the three Martian days to acquire consistent lighting and shadow conditions for all areas of the panorama.

    The IMP is a stereo imaging system that, in its fully deployed configuration, stands 1.8 meters above the Martian surface, and has a resolution of two millimeters at a range of two meters. In this geometrically improved version of the panorama, distortion due to a 2.5 degree tilt in the IMP camera mast has been removed, effectively flattening the horizon.

    The IMP has color capability provided by 24 selectable filters -- twelve filters per 'eye'. Its red, green, and blue filters were used to take this image.

    At left is a Lander petal and a metallic mast which is a portion of the low-gain antenna. Misregistration in the antenna and other Lander features is due to parallax in the extreme foreground. On the horizon the double 'Twin Peaks' are visible, about 1-2 kilometers away. The rock 'Couch' is the dark, curved rock at right of Twin Peaks. Another Lander petal is at left-center, showing the fully deployed forward ramp at far left, and rear ramp at right, which rover Sojourner used to descend to the surface of Mars on July 5. Immediately to the left of the rear ramp is the rock 'Barnacle Bill', which scientists found to be andesitic, possibly indicating that it is a volcanic rock (a true andesite) or a physical mixture of particles. Just beyond Barnacle Bill, rover tracks lead to Sojourner, shown using its Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument to study the large rock 'Yogi'. Yogi, low in quartz content, appears to be more primitive than Barnacle Bill, and appears more like the common basalts found on Earth.

    The tracks and circular pattern in the soil

  13. Two Universities, Two Degrees: A Dual Degree Program for Pharmacists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milio, Frank

    2001-01-01

    Describes a dual degree program between Towson University and the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, which allows a student to receive both a B.S. degree in Medicinal Chemistry and a Doctor of Pharmacy degree in a combined 7-year program. It also allows flexibility in pursuing alternate career goals. (EV)

  14. Computation of supersonic laminar viscous flow past a pointed cone at angle of attack in spinning and coning motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, R.; Rakich, J. V.

    1978-01-01

    Computational results obtained with a parabolic Navier-Stokes marching code are presented for supersonic viscous flow past a pointed cone at angle of attack undergoing a combined spinning and coning motion. The code takes into account the asymmetries in the flow field resulting from the motion and computes the asymmetric shock shape, crossflow and streamwise shear, heat transfer, crossflow separation and vortex structure. The side force and moment are also computed. Reasonably good agreement is obtained with the side force measurements of Schiff and Tobak. Comparison is also made with the only available numerical inviscid analysis. It is found that the asymmetric pressure loads due to coning motion are much larger than all other viscous forces due to spin and coning, making viscous forces negligible in the combined motion.

  15. Evaluation of the cone biopsy excisor compared with the large loop for electrosurgical excision of cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Fischer; Alexandarian; Gagliardi; Oglesby; Scribner; Asuncion; Mesologitis

    1998-07-01

    Data incorporated from August 1994 to July 30, 1997.Objective: To compare a newly designed triangular electrode, the Cone Biopsy Excisor to the loop electrode with respect to the margin evaluation, fragmentation, and thermal damage of the conization specimen.Methods: After approval by the Institutional Review Boards of Hartford Hospital, St. Francis Hospital, and New Britain General Hospital/University of Connecticut, patients were randomly assigned to undergo conization with the Cone Biopsy Excisor or with the large loop. Inclusion criteria included biopsy proven CIN II, CIN III, inadequate colposcopy, positive endocervical curettage, or cytohistological discrepancy. Exclusion criteria included pregnancy, undiagnosed uterine bleeding, and invasive carcinoma. The procedures were performed by senior residents on clinic patients at the respective institutions. In addition, after FDA approval November 18, 1996, private OB/GYN practitioners performed cases and added those results to the study. Seventy-eight patients were randomized to the Cone Biopsy Excisor, while 77 patients were randomized to the loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP). To obtain the surgical specimen, Force 2 Valley Lab generators were used with wattage ranging from 35 to 50 according to the size of the instrument chosen, 40/60 blend of coagulation, and cutting current.Pathology reports were reviewed to determine the amount of fragmentation that occurred during the procedure and for tissue diagnosis. Specimens were then evaluated by two gynecologic pathologists blinded to the instrument used. The specimens were analyzed for the ability to evaluate the margins and for degree of thermal damage. A thermal damage score was assigned to each specimen. The scoring system results in 4 levels of thermal damage, from one (minimal thermal damage) to four (heavy thermal damage). Follow-up data was obtained from the patients' medical and pathology records.Results: Seventy-two of 78 (92%) Cone Biopsy

  16. Female Prisoners in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teh, Yik Koon

    2006-01-01

    This is a study on 422 female prisoners in peninsular Malaysia. More than half of the female prisoners are foreigners, mainly from Indonesia and Thailand. This study surveys the background of the respondents and identifies factors that may have influenced them to commit the offences. Female prisoners in Malaysia, particularly those who are…

  17. Out-of-plane magnetized cone-shaped magnetic nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, D. K.; Günther, S.; Fritzsche, M.; Lenz, K.; Varvaro, G.; Laureti, S.; Makarov, D.; Mücklich, A.; Facsko, S.; Albrecht, M.; Fassbender, J.

    2017-03-01

    The geometry of a magnetic nano-object, namely its shape and dimensions determines the complex electromagnetic responses. Here, we address the geometry-induced changes of the magnetic properties of thin ferromagnetic Co/Pd multilayers with out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy deposited on three-dimensionally curved templates. For this purpose, arrays of self-assembled cone-shaped nano-objects with a chracteristic size of either 30 or 70 nm were created in GaSb(0 0 1) by the ion erosion technique. The templates are designed in the way that the shape of the cone remains the same for all the samples; namely, we keep the opening angle at about 55° by adjusting the ratio between the cone height and its base diameter to be about 1. In this case, we are able to address the impact of the linear dimensions of the object on the magnetic properties and exclude the impact of the shape from the consideration. The deposition of 15 nm thick Co/Pd multilayers on top of the cone templates results in the formation of a close-packed array of 2D magnetic cone-shaped shells. Integral angle-dependent magnetometry measurements demonstrate that the local curvature results in the spread of the easy axes of magnetization following the shape of the nanocones independent of the linear dimensions of the cones. At the same time different local magnetic domain patterns are observed for samples prepared on 30 and 70 nm large cones. When the thickness of the magnetic shell is only half of the linear dimension of a cone, a clear multidomain state is observed. Remarkably, we find that the neighboring magnetic cone-shaped shells are exchange decoupled when the linear dimension of a cone is four times larger compared to the thickness of the magnetic shell. These findings are relevant for the further development of tilted bit patterned magnetic recording media as well as for the emergent field of magnetism in curved geometries.

  18. Eruptive and Geomorphic Processes at the Lathrop Wells Scoria Cone

    SciTech Connect

    G. Valentine; D.J. Krier; F.V. Perry; G. Heiken

    2006-08-03

    The {approx}80 ka Lathrop Wells volcano (southern Nevada, U.S.A.) preserves evidence for a range of explosive processes and emplacement mechanisms of pyroclastic deposits and lava fields in a small-volume basaltic center. Early cone building by Strombolian bursts was accompanied by development of a fan-like lava field reaching {approx}800 m distance from the cone, built upon a gently sloping surface. Lava flows carried rafts of cone deposits, which provide indirect evidence for cone facies in lieu of direct exposures in the active quarry. Subsequent activity was of a violent Strombolian nature, with many episodes of sustained eruption columns up to a few km in height. These deposited layers of scoria lapilli and ash in different directions depending upon wind direction at the time of a given episode, reaching up to {approx}20 km from the vent, and also produced the bulk of the scoria cone. Lava effusion migrated from south to north around the eastern base of the cone as accumulation of lavas successively reversed the topography at the base of the cone. Late lavas were emplaced during violent Strombolian activity and continued for some time after explosive eruptions had waned. Volumes of the eruptive products are: fallout--0.07 km{sup 3}, scoria cone--0.02 km{sup 3}, and lavas--0.03 km{sup 3}. Shallow-derived xenolith concentrations suggest an upper bound on average conduit diameter of {approx}21 m in the uppermost 335 m beneath the volcano. The volcano was constructed over a period of at least seven months with cone building occurring only during part of that time, based upon analogy with historical eruptions. Post-eruptive geomorphic evolution varied for the three main surface types that were produced by volcanic activity: (1) scoria cone, (2) low relief surfaces (including lavas) with abundant pyroclastic material, and (3) lavas with little pyroclastic material. The role of these different initial textures must be accounted for in estimating relative ages of

  19. Foundation Degrees: A Risky Business?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Foundation degrees, the new proposal for sub-degree vocational education in the UK, are characterised by innovation both in their design (curriculum, teaching, learning and assessment) and in the marketplace for which they are designed. This article argues that the development and delivery of foundation degrees carry a high level of risk,…

  20. Students' Perceptions of Foundation Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ooms, A.; Burke, L. M.; Marks-Maran, D. J.; Webb, M.; Cooper, D.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 there were 87,339 people enrolled on foundation degrees (FDs) in the UK (Foundation Degree Forward, 2009), and educational institutions in the UK offered 1700 different foundation degrees in over 25 subjects, with nearly 900 more in development (Action on Access, 2010). In addition, student views are seen to be of importance, as…

  1. Retinal bipolar cells: temporal filtering of signals from cone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Dwight A; Fahey, Patrick K; Sikora, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of the response of neurons in the outer retina were investigated by intracellular recording from cones, bipolar, and horizontal cells in the intact, light-adapted retina of the tiger salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), with special emphasis on comparing the two major classes of bipolars cells, the ON depolarizing bipolars (Bd) and the OFF hyperpolarizing bipolars (Bh). Transfer functions were computed from impulse responses evoked by a brief light flash on a steady background of 20 cd/m(2). Phase delays ranged from about 89 ms for cones to 170 ms for Bd cells, yielding delays relative to that of cones of about 49 ms for Bh cells and 81 ms for Bd cells. The difference between Bd and Bh cells, which may be due to a delay introduced by the second messenger G-protein pathway unique to Bd cells, was further quantified by latency measurements and responses to white noise. The amplitude transfer functions of the outer retinal neurons varied with light adaptation in qualitative agreement with results for other vertebrates and human vision. The transfer functions at 20 cd/m(2) were predominantly low pass with 10-fold attenuation at about 13, 14, 9.1, and 7.7 Hz for cones, horizontal, Bh, and Bd cells, respectively. The transfer function from the cone voltage to the bipolar voltage response, as computed from the above measurements, was low pass and approximated by a cascade of three low pass RC filters ("leaky integrators"). These results for cone-->bipolar transmission are surprisingly similar to recent results for rod-->bipolar transmission in salamander slice preparations. These and other findings suggest that the rate of vesicle replenishment rather than the rate of release may be a common factor shaping synaptic signal transmission from rods and cones to bipolar cells.

  2. Regulation of neuronal growth cone filopodia by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Van Wagenen, S; Rehder, V

    1999-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play an important role during neuronal development. Since many of its effects occur during the time of growth cone pathfinding and target interaction, we here test the hypothesis that part of NO's effects might be exerted at the growth cone. We found that low concentrations of the NO-donors DEA/NO, SIN-1, and SNP caused a rapid and transient elongation of filopodia as well as a reduction in filopodial number. These effects resulted from distinct changes in filopodial extension and retraction rates. Our novel findings suggest that NO could play a physiological role by temporarily changing a growth cone's morphology and switching its behavior from a close-range to a long-range exploratory mode. We subsequently dissected the pathway by which NO acted on growth cones. The effect of NO donors on filopodial length could be blocked by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), indicating that NO acted via sGC. Supporting this idea, injection of cyclic GMP (cGMP) mimicked the effect of NO donors on growth cone filopodia. Moreover, application of NO-donors as well as injection of cGMP elicited a rapid and transient rise in intracellular calcium in growth cones, indicating that NO acted via cGMP to elevate calcium. This calcium rise, as well as the morphological effects of SIN-1 on filopodia, were blocked by preventing calcium entry. Given the role of filopodia in axonal guidance, our new data suggest that NO could function at the neuronal growth cone as an intracellular and/or intercellular signaling molecule by affecting steering decisions during neuronal pathfinding.

  3. The adaptation of megavoltage cone beam CT for use in standard radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Thomas, T Hannah Mary; Devakumar, D; Purnima, S; Ravindran, B Paul

    2009-04-07

    Potential areas where megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) could be used are second- and third-phase treatment planning in 3D conformal radiotherapy and IMRT, adaptive radiation therapy, single fraction palliative treatment and for the treatment of patients with metal prostheses. A feasibility study was done on using MV cone beam CT (CBCT) images generated by proprietary 3D reconstruction software based on the FDK algorithm for megavoltage treatment planning. The reconstructed images were converted to a DICOM file set. The pixel values of megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) were rescaled to those of kV CT for use with a treatment planning system. A calibration phantom was designed and developed for verification of geometric accuracy and CT number calibration. The distance measured between two marker points on the CBCT image and the physical dimension on the phantom were in good agreement. Point dose verification for a 10 cm x 10 cm beam at a gantry angle of 0 degrees and SAD of 100 cm were performed for a 6 MV beam for both kV and MV CBCT images. The point doses were found to vary between +/-6.1% of the dose calculated from the kV CT image. The isodose curves for 6 MV for both kV CT and MV CBCT images were within 2% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement. A plan with three beams was performed on MV CBCT, simulating a treatment plan for cancer of the pituitary. The distribution obtained was compared with those corresponding to that obtained using the kV CT. This study has shown that treatment planning with MV cone beam CT images is feasible.

  4. Genital evolution: why are females still understudied?

    PubMed

    Ah-King, Malin; Barron, Andrew B; Herberstein, Marie E

    2014-05-01

    The diversity, variability, and apparent rapid evolution of animal genitalia are a vivid focus of research in evolutionary biology, and studies exploring genitalia have dramatically increased over the past decade. These studies, however, exhibit a strong male bias, which has worsened since 2000, despite the fact that this bias has been explicitly pointed out in the past. Early critics argued that previous investigators too often considered only males and their genitalia, while overlooking female genitalia or physiology. Our analysis of the literature shows that overall this male bias has worsened with time. The degree of bias is not consistent between subdisciplines: studies of the lock-and-key hypothesis have been the most male focused, while studies of cryptic female choice usually consider both sexes. The degree of bias also differed across taxonomic groups, but did not associate with the ease of study of male and female genital characteristics. We argue that the persisting male bias in this field cannot solely be explained by anatomical sex differences influencing accessibility. Rather the bias reflects enduring assumptions about the dominant role of males in sex, and invariant female genitalia. New research highlights how rapidly female genital traits can evolve, and how complex coevolutionary dynamics between males and females can shape genital structures. We argue that understanding genital evolution is hampered by an outdated single-sex bias.

  5. Rare appearance of an odontogenic myxoma in cone-beam computed tomography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Dabbaghi, Arash; Nikkerdar, Nafiseh; Bayati, Soheyla; Golshah, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an infiltrative benign bone tumor that occurs almost exclusively in the facial skeleton. The radiographic characteristics of odontogenic myxoma may produce several patterns, making diagnosis difficult. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) may prove extremely useful in clarifying the intraosseous extent of the tumor and its effects on surrounding structures. Here, we report a case of odontogenic myxoma of the mandible in a 27-year-old female. The patient exhibited a slight swelling in the left mandible. Surgical resection was performed. No recurrence was noted. In the CBCT sections, we observed perforation of the cortical plate and radiopaque line that extended from the periosteum, resembling "sunray" appearance—a rare feature of OM—which could not be assessed by panoramic radiography. PMID:27092217

  6. Circadian regulation of teleost retinal cone movements in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    In the retinas of many species of lower vertebrates, retinal photoreceptors and pigment epithelium pigment granules undergo daily movements in response to both diurnal, and in the case of teleost cone photoreceptors, endogenous circadian signals. Typically, these cone movements take place at dawn and at dusk when teleosts are maintained on a cyclic light (LD) regime, and at expected dawn and expected dusk when animals are maintained in continuous darkness (DD). Because these movements are so strictly controlled, they provide an overt indicator of the stage of the underlying clock mechanism. In this study we report that both light-induced and circadian-driven cone myoid movements in the Midas cichlid (Cichlasoma citrinellum), occur normally in vitro. Many of the features of retinomotor movements found in vivo also occur in our culture conditions, including responses to light and circadian stimuli and dopamine. Circadian induced predawn contraction and maintenance of expected day position in response to circadian modulation, are also normal. Our studies suggest that circadian regulation of cone myoid movement in vitro is mediated locally by dopamine, acting via a D2 receptor. Cone myoid contraction can be induced at midnight and expected mid-day by dark culture with dopamine or the D2 receptor agonist LY171555. Further, circadian induced predawn contraction can be increased with either dopamine or LY171555, or may be reversed with the dopamine D2 antagonist, sulpiride. Sulpiride will also induce cone myoid elongation in retinal cultures at expected mid- day, but will not induce cone myoid elongation at dusk. In contrast, circadian cone myoid movements in vitro were unaffected by the D1 receptor agonist SCH23390, or the D1 receptor antagonist SKF38393. Our short-term culture experiments indicate that circadian regulation of immediate cone myoid movement does not require humoral control but is regulated locally within the retina. The inclusion of dopamine, or dopamine

  7. Graduate Physics Degrees: Largest Departments and Degree Distribution. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Patrick J.; Nicholson, Starr

    2014-01-01

    In the 2011-12 academic year there were 751 degree-granting physics departments in the U.S. Of these, 195 offered a PhD and 62 departments offered a master's as the highest physics degree. The remaining 494 departments offered a bachelor's as their highest physics degree. There were six universities that had two doctoral-granting physics…

  8. Generalized Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuang-Ren; Jiang, Dazong; Yang, Kevin; Yang, Kang

    2015-01-01

    The cone-beam reconstruction theory has been proposed by Kirillov in 1961, Tuy in 1983, Feldkamp in 1984, Smith in 1985, Pierre Grangeat in 1990. The Fourier slice theorem is proposed by Bracewell 1956, which leads to the Fourier image reconstruction method for parallel-beam geometry. The Fourier slice theorem is extended to fan-beam geometry by Zhao in 1993 and 1995. By combining the above mentioned cone-beam image reconstruction theory and the above mentioned Fourier slice theory of fan-beam geometry, the Fourier slice theorem in cone-beam geometry is proposed by Zhao 1995 in short conference publication. This article offers the details of the derivation and implementation of this Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam geometry. Especially the problem of the reconstruction from Fourier domain has been overcome, which is that the value of in the origin of Fourier space is 0/0. The 0/0 type of limit is proper handled. As examples, the implementation results for the single circle and two perpendicular circle source orbits are shown. In the cone-beam reconstruction if a interpolation process is considered, the number of the calculations for the generalized Fourier slice theorem algorithm is O(N^4), which is close to the filtered back-projection method, here N is the image size of 1-dimension. However the interpolation process can be avoid, in that case the number of the calculations is O(N5).

  9. Basal bodies exhibit polarized positioning in zebrafish cone photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Michelle; Perkins, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    The asymmetric positioning of basal bodies, and therefore cilia, is often critical for proper cilia function. This planar polarity is critical for motile cilia function but has not been extensively investigated for non-motile cilia or for sensory cilia such as vertebrate photoreceptors. Zebrafish photoreceptors form an organized mosaic ideal for investigating cilia positioning. We report that in the adult retina, the basal bodies of red, green-, and blue-sensitive cone photoreceptors localized asymmetrically on the cell edge nearest to the optic nerve. In contrast, no patterning was seen in the basal bodies of ultraviolet-sensitive cones or in rod photoreceptors. The asymmetric localization of basal bodies was consistent in all regions of the adult retina. Basal body patterning was unaffected in the cones of the XOPS-mCFP transgenic line, which lacks rod photoreceptors. Finally, the adult pattern was not seen in 7 day post fertilization (dpf) larvae as basal bodies were randomly distributed in all the photoreceptor subtypes. These results establish the asymmetrical localization of basal bodies in red-, green-, and blue-sensitive cones in adult zebrafish retinas but not in larvae. This pattern suggests an active cellular mechanism regulated the positioning of basal bodies after the transition to the adult mosaic and that rods do not seem to be necessary for the patterning of cone basal bodies. PMID:23171982

  10. Strong topological metal material with multiple Dirac cones

    DOE PAGES

    Ji, Huiwen; Valla, T.; Pletikosic, I.; ...

    2016-01-25

    We report a new, cleavable, strong topological metal, Zr2Te2P, which has the same tetradymite-type crystal structure as the topological insulator Bi2Te2Se. Instead of being a semiconductor, however, Zr2Te2P is metallic with a pseudogap between 0.2 and 0.7 eV above the Fermi energy (EF). Inside this pseudogap, two Dirac dispersions are predicted: one is a surface-originated Dirac cone protected by time-reversal symmetry (TRS), while the other is a bulk-originated and slightly gapped Dirac cone with a largely linear dispersion over a 2 eV energy range. A third surface TRS-protected Dirac cone is predicted, and observed using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, making Zr2Te2Pmore » the first system, to our knowledge, to realize TRS-protected Dirac cones at M¯ points. The high anisotropy of this Dirac cone is similar to the one in the hypothetical Dirac semimetal BiO2. As a result, we propose that if EF can be tuned into the pseudogap where the Dirac dispersions exist, it may be possible to observe ultrahigh carrier mobility and large magnetoresistance in this material.« less

  11. Strong topological metal material with multiple Dirac cones

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Huiwen; Valla, T.; Pletikosic, I.; Gibson, Q. D.; Sahasrabudhe, Girija; Cava, R. J.

    2016-01-25

    We report a new, cleavable, strong topological metal, Zr2Te2P, which has the same tetradymite-type crystal structure as the topological insulator Bi2Te2Se. Instead of being a semiconductor, however, Zr2Te2P is metallic with a pseudogap between 0.2 and 0.7 eV above the Fermi energy (EF). Inside this pseudogap, two Dirac dispersions are predicted: one is a surface-originated Dirac cone protected by time-reversal symmetry (TRS), while the other is a bulk-originated and slightly gapped Dirac cone with a largely linear dispersion over a 2 eV energy range. A third surface TRS-protected Dirac cone is predicted, and observed using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, making Zr2Te2P the first system, to our knowledge, to realize TRS-protected Dirac cones at M¯ points. The high anisotropy of this Dirac cone is similar to the one in the hypothetical Dirac semimetal BiO2. As a result, we propose that if EF can be tuned into the pseudogap where the Dirac dispersions exist, it may be possible to observe ultrahigh carrier mobility and large magnetoresistance in this material.

  12. AN IONIZATION CONE IN THE DWARF STARBURST GALAXY NGC 5253

    SciTech Connect

    Zastrow, Jordan; Oey, M. S.; Veilleux, Sylvain; McDonald, Michael; Martin, Crystal L.

    2011-11-01

    There are few observational constraints on how the escape of ionizing photons from starburst galaxies depends on galactic parameters. Here we report on the first major detection of an ionization cone in NGC 5253, a nearby starburst galaxy. This high-excitation feature is identified by mapping the emission-line ratios in the galaxy using [S III] {lambda}9069, [S II] {lambda}6716, and H{alpha} narrowband images from the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter at Las Campanas Observatory. The ionization cone appears optically thin, which suggests the escape of ionizing photons. The cone morphology is narrow with an estimated solid angle covering just 3% of 4{pi} steradians, and the young, massive clusters of the nuclear starburst can easily generate the radiation required to ionize the cone. Although less likely, we cannot rule out the possibility of an obscured active galactic nucleus source. An echelle spectrum along the minor axis shows complex kinematics that are consistent with outflow activity. The narrow morphology of the ionization cone supports the scenario that an orientation bias contributes to the difficulty in detecting Lyman continuum emission from starbursts and Lyman break galaxies.

  13. RASGRF2 controls nuclear migration in postnatal retinal cone photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Jimeno, David; Gómez, Carmela; Calzada, Nuria; de la Villa, Pedro; Lillo, Concepción; Santos, Eugenio

    2016-02-15

    Detailed immunocytochemical analyses comparing wild-type (WT), GRF1-knockout (KO), GRF2-KO and GRF1/2 double-knockout (DKO) mouse retinas uncovered the specific accumulation of misplaced, 'ectopic' cone photoreceptor nuclei in the photoreceptor segment (PS) area of retinas from GRF2-KO and GRF1/2-DKO, but not of WT or GRF1-KO mice. Localization of ectopic nuclei in the PS area of GRF2-depleted retinas occurred postnatally and peaked between postnatal day (P)11 and P15. Mechanistically, the generation of this phenotype involved disruption of the outer limiting membrane and intrusion into the PS layer by cone nuclei displaying significant perinuclear accumulation of signaling molecules known to participate in nuclear migration and cytoskeletal reorganization, such as PAR3, PAR6 and activated, phosphorylated forms of PAK, MLC2 and VASP. Electroretinographic recordings showed specific impairment of cone-mediated retinal function in GRF2-KO and GRF1/2-DKO retinas compared with WT controls. These data identify defective cone nuclear migration as a novel phenotype in mouse retinas lacking GRF2 and support a crucial role of GRF2 in control of the nuclear migration processes required for proper postnatal development and function of retinal cone photoreceptors.

  14. Fast Electron Generation in Cones with Ultra-Intense Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; VanWoerkom, L; Akli, K; Bartal, T; Beg, F; Chawla, S; Chen, C; Chowdhury, E; Freeman, R; Hey, D; Key, M; King, J; Link, A; MacPhee, A; Offermann, D; Ovchinnikov, V; Patel, P; Schumacher, D; Stephens, R; Tsui, Y; Ma, T

    2007-12-07

    Experimental results from copper cones irradiated with ultra-intense laser light are presented. Spatial images and total yields of Cu K{sub {alpha}} fluorescence were measured as a function of the laser focusing properties. The fluorescence emission extends into the cone approximately 300 {micro}m from the cone tip and cannot be explained by ray tracing including cone wall absorption. In addition the total fluorescence yield from cones is an order of magnitude higher than for equivalent mass foil targets. Indications are that the physics of the laser cone interaction is dominated by preplasma created from the long duration, low energy pre-pulse from the laser.

  15. Discrimination of cone contrast changes as evidence for colour constancy in cerebral achromatopsia.

    PubMed

    Hurlbert, A C; Bramwell, D I; Heywood, C; Cowey, A

    1998-11-01

    One proposed mechanism for underpinning colour constancy is computation of the relative activity of cones within one class--cone ratios, or cone contrasts--between surfaces in a fixed scene undergoing a change in illuminant. Although there is evidence that cone ratios do determine colour appearance under many conditions, the site or sites of their computation is unknown. Here, we report that a cerebrally achromatopsic observer, MS, displayed evidence of colour constancy in asymmetric colour matching tasks and was able to discriminate changes in cone ratios for simple, but not complex scenes. We hypothesise that the site of local cone-ratio computation is therefore early in the visual system, probably retinal.

  16. Condylar asymmetry in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis assessed by cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Huntjens, Elisabeth; Kiss, Gabriel; Wouters, Carine; Carels, Carine

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of condylar asymmetry in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and analysis software. For 20 patients (14 girls and six boys; mean age 11.21 +/- 3.54 years), resultant cross-sectional images of the left and right temporomandibular joints (TMJs) were semi-automatically segmented, and exact registration of the right, with respect to the flipped left grey-level condyle, was obtained. Visual inspection of the volume images in 360 degree rotation showed a wide variety of condylar destruction patterns, ranging from small erosions within the cortex to almost complete deformation of the condylar head. Because segmentation was restricted to the delineation of the cortical region, possible changes in the deeper zones were not reproduced. Descriptive statistics [median and interquartile range (IQR)] and diagrams (frequency distribution) were used to assess the results. Initial analysis of condylar volume (including both flipped left and right) showed a median value for volume of 0.844 cm(3) (IQR 0.323), while the median value for volume difference between both condyles was 0.051 cm(3) (IQR 0.098). Analysis of the degree of asymmetry showed a median value of 26.18 per cent (IQR 14.46). Using the CBCT-based method, it was shown that condylar asymmetry was a common feature in children with JIA. The degree of asymmetry was variable, but significant in the majority of the subjects.

  17. Secondary Instability of Stationary Crossflow Vortices in Mach 6 Boundary Layer Over a Circular Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Paredes-Gonzalez, Pedro; Duan, Lian

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic boundary layer flows over a circular cone at moderate incidence can support strong crossflow instability. Due to more efficient excitation of stationary crossflow vortices by surface roughness, such boundary layer flows may transition to turbulence via rapid amplification of the high-frequency secondary instabilities of finite amplitude stationary crossflow vortices. The amplification characteristics of these secondary instabilities are investigated for crossflow vortices generated by an azimuthally periodic array of roughness elements over a 7-degree half-angle circular cone in a Mach 6 free stream. Depending on the local amplitude of the stationary crossflow mode, the most unstable secondary disturbances either originate from the second (i.e., Mack) mode instabilities of the unperturbed boundary layer or correspond to genuine secondary instabilities that reduce to stable disturbances at sufficiently small amplitudes of the stationary crossflow vortex. The predicted frequencies of dominant secondary disturbances are similar to those measured during wind tunnel experiments at Purdue University and the Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany.

  18. Motion correction for improved target localization with on-board cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Li, T; Schreibmann, E; Yang, Y; Xing, L

    2006-01-21

    On-board imager (OBI) based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has become available in radiotherapy clinics to accurately identify the target in the treatment position. However, due to the relatively slow gantry rotation (typically about 60 s for a full 360 degrees scan) in acquiring the CBCT projection data, the patient's respiratory motion causes serious problems such as blurring, doubling, streaking and distortion in the reconstructed images, which heavily degrade the image quality and the target localization. In this work, we present a motion compensation method for slow-rotating CBCT scans by incorporating into image reconstruction a patient-specific motion model, which is derived from previously obtained four-dimensional (4D) treatment planning CT images of the same patient via deformable registration. The registration of the 4D CT phases results in transformations representing a temporal sequence of three-dimensional (3D) deformation fields, or in other words, a 4D model of organ motion. The algorithm was developed heuristically in two-dimensional (2D) parallel-beam geometry and extended to 3D cone-beam geometry. By simulations with digital phantoms capable of translational motion and other complex motion, we demonstrated that the algorithm can reduce the motion artefacts locally, and restore the tumour size and shape, which may thereby improve the accuracy of target localization and patient positioning when CBCT is used as the treatment guidance.

  19. Receptivity of Hypersonic Boundary Layers Due to Acoustic Disturbances over Blunt Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kara, K.; Balakumar, P.; Kandil, O. A.

    2007-01-01

    The transition process induced by the interaction of acoustic disturbances in the free-stream with boundary layers over a 5-degree straight cone and a wedge with blunt tips is numerically investigated at a free-stream Mach number of 6.0. To compute the shock and the interaction of shock with the instability waves the Navier-Stokes equations are solved in axisymmetric coordinates. The governing equations are solved using the 5th -order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. After the mean flow field is computed, acoustic disturbances are introduced at the outer boundary of the computational domain and unsteady simulations are performed. Generation and evolution of instability waves and the receptivity of boundary layer to slow and fast acoustic waves are investigated. The mean flow data are compared with the experimental results. The results show that the instability waves are generated near the leading edge and the non-parallel effects are stronger near the nose region for the flow over the cone than that over a wedge. It is also found that the boundary layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic wave (by almost a factor of 67) as compared to the fast wave.

  20. Laser transit anemometer measurements on a slender cone in the Langley unitary plan wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Hunter, William W., Jr.; Covell, Peter F.; Nichols, Cecil E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A laser transit anemometer (LTA) system was used to probe the boundary layer on a slender (5 degree half angle) cone model in the Langley unitary plan wind tunnel. The anemometer system utilized a pair of laser beams with a diameter of 40 micrometers spaced 1230 micrometers apart to measure the transit times of ensembles of seeding particles using a cross-correlation technique. From these measurements, boundary layer profiles around the model were constructed and compared with CFD calculations. The measured boundary layer profiles representing the boundary layer velocity normalized to the edge velocity as a function of height above the model surface were collected with the model at zero angle of attack for four different flow conditions, and were collected in a vertical plane that bisected the model's longitudinal center line at a location 635 mm from the tip of the forebody cone. The results indicate an excellent ability of the LTA system to make velocity measurements deep into the boundary layer. However, because of disturbances in the flow field caused by onboard seeding, premature transition occurred implying that upstream seeding is mandatory if model flow field integrity is to be maintained. A description and results of the flow field surveys are presented.

  1. Optimized x-ray source scanning trajectories for iterative reconstruction in high cone-angle tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingston, Andrew M.; Myers, Glenn R.; Latham, Shane J.; Li, Heyang; Veldkamp, Jan P.; Sheppard, Adrian P.

    2016-10-01

    With the GPU computing becoming main-stream, iterative tomographic reconstruction (IR) is becoming a com- putationally viable alternative to traditional single-shot analytical methods such as filtered back-projection. IR liberates one from the continuous X-ray source trajectories required for analytical reconstruction. We present a family of novel X-ray source trajectories for large-angle CBCT. These discrete (sparsely sampled) trajectories optimally fill the space of possible source locations by maximising the degree of mutually independent information. They satisfy a discrete equivalent of Tuy's sufficiency condition and allow high cone-angle (high-flux) tomog- raphy. The highly isotropic nature of the trajectory has several advantages: (1) The average source distance is approximately constant throughout the reconstruction volume, thus avoiding the differential-magnification artefacts that plague high cone-angle helical computed tomography; (2) Reduced streaking artifacts due to e.g. X-ray beam-hardening; (3) Misalignment and component motion manifests as blur in the tomogram rather than double-edges, which is easier to automatically correct; (4) An approximately shift-invariant point-spread-function which enables filtering as a pre-conditioner to speed IR convergence. We describe these space-filling trajectories and demonstrate their above-mentioned properties compared with a traditional helical trajectories.

  2. Female Suicide Bombers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT FEMALE SUICIDE BOMBERS by Ms. Debra D. Zedalis Department of the Army Civilian Dr. Anna Waggener Project Advisor This... Female Suicide Bombers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Debra Zedalis 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...ii iii ABSTRACT AUTHOR: Debra D. Zedalis TITLE: Female Suicide Bombers FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 19 March 2004 PAGES: 43

  3. Alouatta trichromatic color vision: cone spectra and physiological responses studied with microspectrophotometry and single unit retinal electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Luiz Carlos L; Saito, Cézar A; da Silva Filho, Manoel; Kremers, Jan; Bowmaker, James K; Lee, Barry B

    2014-01-01

    The howler monkeys (Alouatta sp.) are the only New World primates to exhibit routine trichromacy. Both males and females have three cone photopigments. However, in contrast to Old World monkeys, Alouatta has a locus control region upstream of each opsin gene on the X-chromosome and this might influence the retinal organization underlying its color vision. Post-mortem microspectrophotometry (MSP) was performed on the retinae of two male Alouatta to obtain rod and cone spectral sensitivities. The MSP data were consistent with only a single opsin being expressed in each cone and electrophysiological data were consistent with this primate expressing full trichromacy. To study the physiological organization of the retina underlying Alouatta trichromacy, we recorded from retinal ganglion cells of the same animals used for MSP measurements with a variety of achromatic and chromatic stimulus protocols. We found MC cells and PC cells in the Alouatta retina with similar properties to those previously found in the retina of other trichromatic primates. MC cells showed strong phasic responses to luminance changes and little response to chromatic pulses. PC cells showed strong tonic response to chromatic changes and small tonic response to luminance changes. Responses to other stimulus protocols (flicker photometry; changing the relative phase of red and green modulated lights; temporal modulation transfer functions) were also similar to those recorded in other trichromatic primates. MC cells also showed a pronounced frequency double response to chromatic modulation, and with luminance modulation response saturation accompanied by a phase advance between 10-20 Hz, characteristic of a contrast gain mechanism. This indicates a very similar retinal organization to Old-World monkeys. Cone-specific opsin expression in the presence of a locus control region for each opsin may call into question the hypothesis that this region exclusively controls opsin expression.

  4. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Guidance System for a Dedicated Intracranial Radiosurgery Treatment Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Ruschin, Mark; Komljenovic, Philip T.; Ansell, Steve; Menard, Cynthia; Bootsma, Gregory; Cho, Young-Bin; Chung, Caroline; Jaffray, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Image guidance has improved the precision of fractionated radiation treatment delivery on linear accelerators. Precise radiation delivery is particularly critical when high doses are delivered to complex shapes with steep dose gradients near critical structures, as is the case for intracranial radiosurgery. To reduce potential geometric uncertainties, a cone beam computed tomography (CT) image guidance system was developed in-house to generate high-resolution images of the head at the time of treatment, using a dedicated radiosurgery unit. The performance and initial clinical use of this imaging system are described. Methods and Materials: A kilovoltage cone beam CT system was integrated with a Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery unit. The X-ray tube and flat-panel detector are mounted on a translational arm, which is parked above the treatment unit when not in use. Upon descent, a rotational axis provides 210 Degree-Sign of rotation for cone beam CT scans. Mechanical integrity of the system was evaluated over a 6-month period. Subsequent clinical commissioning included end-to-end testing of targeting performance and subjective image quality performance in phantoms. The system has been used to image 2 patients, 1 of whom received single-fraction radiosurgery and 1 who received 3 fractions, using a relocatable head frame. Results: Images of phantoms demonstrated soft tissue contrast visibility and submillimeter spatial resolution. A contrast difference of 35 HU was easily detected at a calibration dose of 1.2 cGy (center of head phantom). The shape of the mechanical flex vs scan angle was highly reproducible and exhibited <0.2 mm peak-to-peak variation. With a 0.5-mm voxel pitch, the maximum targeting error was 0.4 mm. Images of 2 patients were analyzed offline and submillimeter agreement was confirmed with conventional frame. Conclusions: A cone beam CT image guidance system was successfully adapted to a radiosurgery unit. The system is capable of

  5. Spin-Cherenkov effect and magnonic Mach cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ming; Kákay, Attila; Andreas, Christian; Hertel, Riccardo

    2013-12-01

    We report on the Cherenkov-type excitation of spin waves (SWs) in ferromagnets. Our micromagnetic simulations show that a localized magnetic field pulse moving sufficiently fast along the surface of a ferromagnet generates a SW boom, with a Mach-type cone of propagating wave fronts. The SWs are formed when the velocity of the source exceeds the propagation speed of SWs. Unlike the single cone of the usual Cherenkov effect, we find that the magnetic Mach cone consists of two wave fronts with different wave numbers. In patterned thin strips, this magnetic analog of the Cherenkov effect should enable the excitation of SWs with well-defined and velocity-dependent frequency. It thereby provides a promising route towards tunable SW generation, with important potential for applications in magnonic devices.

  6. Concrescence: Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Imaging Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Alluri, LeelaSubhashini Choudary; Mallela, Dhiraj

    2016-01-01

    Concrescence is a form of twinning, formed by the confluence of cementum of two teeth at the root level. The diagnosis of concrescence has largely relied on the conventional 2D imaging. The 2D imaging has inherent limitations such as distortion and superimposition. Cone-Beam CT eliminates these limitations. The aim of this article was to describe a case of dental abnormality using Cone-Beam CT imaging modality. Volumetric data demonstrated confluence of left mandibular third molar with a paramolar, a supernumerary tooth. To our knowledge, this is the second case in the dental literature reported demonstrating the use of Cone-Beam CT in the diagnosis of concrescence. PMID:27800194

  7. The oral cone of Anomalocaris is not a classic ``peytoia''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, Allison C.; Bergström, Jan

    2012-06-01

    The Cambro-Ordovician anomalocaridids are large ecdysozoans commonly regarded as ancestors of the arthropods and apex predators. Predation is indicated partly by the presence of an unusual "peytoia"-type oral cone, which is a tetraradial outer ring of 32 plates, four of which are enlarged and in perpendicular arrangement. This oral cone morphology was considered a highly consistent and defining characteristic of well-known Burgess Shale taxa. It is here shown that Anomalocaris has a different oral cone, with only three large plates and a variable number of smaller and medium plates. Its functional morphology suggests that suction, rather than biting, was used for food ingestion, and that anomalocaridids in general employed a range of different scavenging and predatory feeding strategies. Removing anomalocaridids from the position of highly specialized trilobite predators forces a reconsideration of the ecological structure of the earliest marine animal communities in the Cambrian.

  8. The oral cone of Anomalocaris is not a classic ''peytoia''.

    PubMed

    Daley, Allison C; Bergström, Jan

    2012-06-01

    The Cambro-Ordovician anomalocaridids are large ecdysozoans commonly regarded as ancestors of the arthropods and apex predators. Predation is indicated partly by the presence of an unusual "peytoia"-type oral cone, which is a tetraradial outer ring of 32 plates, four of which are enlarged and in perpendicular arrangement. This oral cone morphology was considered a highly consistent and defining characteristic of well-known Burgess Shale taxa. It is here shown that Anomalocaris has a different oral cone, with only three large plates and a variable number of smaller and medium plates. Its functional morphology suggests that suction, rather than biting, was used for food ingestion, and that anomalocaridids in general employed a range of different scavenging and predatory feeding strategies. Removing anomalocaridids from the position of highly specialized trilobite predators forces a reconsideration of the ecological structure of the earliest marine animal communities in the Cambrian.

  9. Light-cone Wilson loop in classical lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, M.; Rothkopf, A.

    2013-07-01

    The transverse broadening of an energetic jet passing through a non-Abelian plasma is believed to be described by the thermal expectation value of a light-cone Wilson loop. In this exploratory study, we measure the light-cone Wilson loop with classical lattice gauge theory simulations. We observe, as suggested by previous studies, that there are strong interactions already at short transverse distances, which may lead to more efficient jet quenching than in leading-order perturbation theory. We also verify that the asymptotics of the Wilson loop do not change qualitatively when crossing the light cone, which supports arguments in the literature that infrared contributions to jet quenching can be studied with dimensionally reduced simulations in the space-like domain. Finally we speculate on possibilities for full four-dimensional lattice studies of the same observable, perhaps by employing shifted boundary conditions in order to simulate ensembles boosted by an imaginary velocity.

  10. Jet maximization, axis minimization, and stable cone finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaler, Jesse

    2015-10-01

    Jet finding is a type of optimization problem, where hadrons from a high-energy collision event are grouped into jets based on a clustering criterion. As three interesting examples, one can form a jet cluster that (i) optimizes the overall jet four-vector, (ii) optimizes the jet axis, or (iii) aligns the jet axis with the jet four-vector. In this paper, we show that these three approaches to jet finding, despite being philosophically quite different, can be regarded as descendants of a mother optimization problem. For the special case of finding a single cone jet of fixed opening angle, the three approaches are genuinely identical when defined appropriately, and the result is a stable cone jet with the largest value of a quantity J . This relationship is only approximate for cone jets in the rapidity-azimuth plane, as used at the Large Hadron Collider, though the differences are mild for small radius jets.

  11. An ice-cream cone model for coronal mass ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, X. H.; Wang, C. B.; Dou, X. K.

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we use an ice-cream cone model to analyze the geometrical and kinematical properties of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Assuming that in the early phase CMEs propagate with near-constant speed and angular width, some useful properties of CMEs, namely the radial speed (v), the angular width (α), and the location at the heliosphere, can be obtained considering the geometrical shapes of a CME as an ice-cream cone. This model is improved by (1) using an ice-cream cone to show the near real configuration of a CME, (2) determining the radial speed via fitting the projected speeds calculated from the height-time relation in different azimuthal angles, (3) not only applying to halo CMEs but also applying to nonhalo CMEs.

  12. Testing the reliability of ice-cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Shen, C.; Wang, Y.; Liu, K.

    2013-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CME)'s properties are important to not only the physical scene itself but spaceweather prediction. Several models(such as cone model, GCS model, and so on) have been raised to get rid of the projection effects within the properties observated by spacecraft. According to SOHO/ LASCO observations, we obtain the 'real' 3D parameters of 33 FFHCMEs (front-side full halo Coronal Mass Ejections) within the 24th solar cycle by the ice-cream cone model. Considering that the method to obtain 3D parameters from the CME observations by multi-satellite and multi-angle has higher accuracy, we use the GCS model to obtain the real propagation parameters of these CMEs in 3D space and compare the results with which by ice-cream cone model. It was demonstrated that the correlation coefficient for the speeds by using these both methods is 0.97.

  13. CONE - An STS-based cryogenic fluid management experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, R. S.; Vento, D. M.; Hanna, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the CONE program is presented which includes a definition of the technology addressed by CONE and a baseline experiment set, a description of the experimental and support subsystems, interface requirements between the STS and the experiment carrier (Hitchhiker M), and the reusability and expansion capacity for additional experiment flights. CONE evaluates three primary technologies: the active thermodynamic vent system, the passive thermodynamic vent system, and liquid acquisition device performance. The cryogenic fluid management technology database that the system offers will allow for efficient subcritical cryogenic system designs for operation in a low-gravity environment. This system maximizes the balance between existing component technology and the need for the development of a cryogenic-fluid-management (CFM) test bed to investigate and demonstrate methods of storage and handling arenas.

  14. Ultra-short pulses to signal neuronal growth cone machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Manoj; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Andres, Rosa; Cormack, Iain G.; Artigas, David; Soriano, Eduardo; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2007-02-01

    Measurable change in the sensory motor machinery of growth cones are induced by non contact femtosecond laser. The focused laser beam with an average power of 3 mW was positioned at some distance away from the closest fillopodia of cortical neurons from primary cell cultures (mice E15). By identifying a set of preliminary parameters we were able to statistically analyze the phenomenological behavior of the fillopodia and classify the effects different conditions of laser light has on the growth cone. Results show that fillopodia become significantly biased towards the focused femtosecond laser light. The same experiment performed with continuous wave (CW) produced results which were indistinguishable from the case where there is no laser light present (placebo condition) indicating no clear effects of the CW laser light on the fillopodia at a distance. These findings show the potential for ultrashort pulsed light to become a new type of pathfinding cue for neuronal growth cones.

  15. Dirac cones in transition metal doped boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Min; Cao, Xuewei; Shao, Bin; Zuo, Xu

    2015-05-07

    The transition metal (TM) doped zinc blende boron nitride (c-BN) is studied by using the first principle calculation. TM atoms fill in the interstitials in c-BN and form two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. The generalized gradient approximation and projector augmented wave method are used. The calculated density of states and band structures show that d electrons of TM atoms form impurity bands in the gap of c-BN. When the TM-BN system is in ferromagnetic or non-magnetic state, Dirac cones emerge at the K point in Brillouin zone. When TM is Ti and Co, the Dirac cones are spin polarized and very close to the Fermi level, which makes them promising candidates of Dirac half-metal [H. Ishizuka and Y. Motome, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 237207 (2012)]. While TM is Ni and Cu, the system is non-magnetic and Dirac cones located above the Fermi level.

  16. String/flux tube duality on the light cone

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, Richard C.; Tan, C.-I; Thorn, Charles B.

    2006-06-15

    The equivalence of quantum field theory and string theory as exemplified by the AdS/CFT correspondence is explored from the point of view of light cone quantization. On the string side we discuss the light cone version of the static string connecting a heavy external quark source to a heavy external antiquark source, together with small oscillations about the static string configuration. On the field theory side we analyze the weak/strong coupling transition in a ladder diagram model of the quark-antiquark system, also from the point of view of the light cone. Our results are completely consistent with those obtained by more standard covariant methods in the limit of infinitely massive quarks.

  17. Furrows in the wake of propagating d-cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottesman, Omer; Efrati, Efi; Rubinstein, Shmuel M.

    2015-06-01

    A crumpled sheet of paper displays an intricate pattern of creases and point-like singular structures, termed d-cones. It is typically assumed that elongated creases form when ridges connecting two d-cones fold beyond the material yielding threshold, and scarring is thus a by-product of the folding dynamics that seek to minimize elastic energy. Here we show that rather than merely being the consequence of folding, plasticity can act as its instigator. We introduce and characterize a different type of crease that is inherently plastic and is formed by the propagation of a single point defect. When a pre-existing d-cone is strained beyond a certain threshold, the singular structure at its apex sharpens abruptly. The resulting focusing of strains yields the material just ahead of the singularity, allowing it to propagate, leaving a furrow-like scar in its wake. We suggest an intuitive fracture analogue to explain the creation of furrows.

  18. Familiality of female and male homosexuality.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J M; Bell, A P

    1993-07-01

    We examined data from a large cohort of homosexual and heterosexual females and males concerning their siblings' sexual orientations. As in previous studies, both male and female homosexuality were familial. Homosexual females had an excess of homosexual brothers compared to heterosexual subjects, thus providing evidence that similar familial factors influence both male and female homosexuality. Furthermore, despite the large sample size, homosexual females and males did not differ significantly from each other in their proportions of either homosexual sisters or homosexual brothers. Thus, results were most consistent with the possibility that similar familial factors influence male and female sexual orientation. However, because results conflicted with those of some other studies, and because siblings' sexual orientations were obtained in a manner likely to yield more errors than in these other, smaller studies, further work is needed using large samples and more careful methods before the degree of cofamiliality of male and female homosexuality can be resolved definitively. We also examined whether some parental influences comprised shared environmental effects on sexual orientation. Scales attempting to measure such influences failed to distinguish subjects with homosexual siblings from subjects with only heterosexual siblings and, thus, did not appear to measure shared environmental determinants of sexual orientation.

  19. Spawning rings of exceptional points out of Dirac cones.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Bo; Hsu, Chia Wei; Igarashi, Yuichi; Lu, Ling; Kaminer, Ido; Pick, Adi; Chua, Song-Liang; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin

    2015-09-17

    The Dirac cone underlies many unique electronic properties of graphene and topological insulators, and its band structure--two conical bands touching at a single point--has also been realized for photons in waveguide arrays, atoms in optical lattices, and through accidental degeneracy. Deformation of the Dirac cone often reveals intriguing properties; an example is the quantum Hall effect, where a constant magnetic field breaks the Dirac cone into isolated Landau levels. A seemingly unrelated phenomenon is the exceptional point, also known as the parity-time symmetry breaking point, where two resonances coincide in both their positions and widths. Exceptional points lead to counter-intuitive phenomena such as loss-induced transparency, unidirectional transmission or reflection, and lasers with reversed pump dependence or single-mode operation. Dirac cones and exceptional points are connected: it was theoretically suggested that certain non-Hermitian perturbations can deform a Dirac cone and spawn a ring of exceptional points. Here we experimentally demonstrate such an 'exceptional ring' in a photonic crystal slab. Angle-resolved reflection measurements of the photonic crystal slab reveal that the peaks of reflectivity follow the conical band structure of a Dirac cone resulting from accidental degeneracy, whereas the complex eigenvalues of the system are deformed into a two-dimensional flat band enclosed by an exceptional ring. This deformation arises from the dissimilar radiation rates of dipole and quadrupole resonances, which play a role analogous to the loss and gain in parity-time symmetric systems. Our results indicate that the radiation existing in any open system can fundamentally alter its physical properties in ways previously expected only in the presence of material loss and gain.

  20. Numerical simulation of electrospray in the cone-jet mode.

    PubMed

    Herrada, M A; López-Herrera, J M; Gañán-Calvo, A M; Vega, E J; Montanero, J M; Popinet, S

    2012-08-01

    We present a robust and computationally efficient numerical scheme for simulating steady electrohydrodynamic atomization processes (electrospray). The main simplification assumed in this scheme is that all the free electrical charges are distributed over the interface. A comparison of the results with those calculated with a volume-of-fluid method showed that the numerical scheme presented here accurately describes the flow pattern within the entire liquid domain. Experiments were performed to partially validate the numerical predictions. The simulations reproduced accurately the experimental shape of the liquid cone jet, providing correct values of the emitted electric current even for configurations very close to the cone-jet stability limit.

  1. Automatic cone photoreceptor segmentation using graph theory and dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Stephanie J; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Dubis, Adam M; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Izatt, Joseph A; Farsiu, Sina

    2013-06-01

    Geometrical analysis of the photoreceptor mosaic can reveal subclinical ocular pathologies. In this paper, we describe a fully automatic algorithm to identify and segment photoreceptors in adaptive optics ophthalmoscope images of the photoreceptor mosaic. This method is an extension of our previously described closed contour segmentation framework based on graph theory and dynamic programming (GTDP). We validated the performance of the proposed algorithm by comparing it to the state-of-the-art technique on a large data set consisting of over 200,000 cones and posted the results online. We found that the GTDP method achieved a higher detection rate, decreasing the cone miss rate by over a factor of five.

  2. Cone snail venomics: from novel biology to novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Prashanth, Jutty Rajan; Brust, Andreas; Jin, Ai-Hua; Alewood, Paul F; Dutertre, Sébastien; Lewis, Richard J

    2014-10-01

    Peptide neurotoxins from cone snails called conotoxins are renowned for their therapeutic potential to treat pain and several neurodegenerative diseases. Inefficient assay-guided discovery methods have been replaced by high-throughput bioassays integrated with advanced MS and next-generation sequencing, ushering in the era of 'venomics'. In this review, we focus on the impact of venomics on the understanding of cone snail biology as well as the application of venomics to accelerate the discovery of new conotoxins. We also discuss the continued importance of medicinal chemistry approaches to optimize conotoxins for clinical use, with a descriptive case study of MrIA featured.

  3. Configuration of singular optical cones in gyrotropic crystals with dichroism

    SciTech Connect

    Merkulov, V. S.

    2015-02-15

    Optical conic singularities in crystals with linear dichroism and natural optical activity at the point of intersection of dispersion curves for the main refractive indices are considered. The possible existence of singularities like a nodal point, tangency point, triple point, and cusps of the first and second order is demonstrated. Forty-nine different types of irreducible fourth-order optical cones obtained by sequential bifurcations of eight main singular cones are established. The classification is based on the concept of roughness of systems depending on parameters.

  4. The Female Athlete Triad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Roberta Trattner; Thompson, Ron A.

    2004-01-01

    The Female Athlete Triad is a syndrome of the interrelated components of disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. Sometimes inadvertently, but more often by willful dietary restriction, many female athletes do not ingest sufficient calories to adequately fuel their physical or sport activities, which can disrupt menstrual functioning,…

  5. [Female sexual disorders nowadays].

    PubMed

    Rajtman, Marta

    2013-01-01

    This article makes a brief overview of the most frequent female sexual disorders seen in our clinical practice. It highlights the increasing number of women presenting with hypoactive sexual desire and the efforts practitioners put on helping these female patients. The article also shows the pharmacological strategies that are investigated to solve these dysfuntions.

  6. Female Sexuality: An Enigma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniluk, Judith

    1991-01-01

    Describes constructions of sexuality that have occurred within social context in which language, culture, and behavior interact to reinforce male power. Against backdrop of these patriarchal examples of female sexual expression and experience, discusses difficulties of female clients. Addresses critical counseling concerns in terms of contextual…

  7. Crossflow Instability on a Wedge-Cone at Mach 3.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeler, George B.; Wilkinson, Stephen P.; Balakumar, P.; McDaniel, Keith S.

    2012-01-01

    As a follow-on activity to the HyBoLT flight experiment, a six degree half angle wedge-cone model at zero angle of attack has been employed to experimentally and computationally study the boundary layer crossflow instability at Mach 3.5 under low disturbance freestream conditions. Computed meanflow and linear stability analysis results are presented along with corresponding experimental Pitot probe data. Using a model-mounted probe survey apparatus, data acquired to date show a well defined stationary crossflow vortex pattern on the flat wedge surface. This effort paves the way for additional detailed, calibrated flow field measurements of the crossflow instability, both stationary and traveling modes, and transition-to-turbulence under quiet flow conditions as a means of validating existing stability theory and providing a foundation for dynamic flight instrumentation development.

  8. The female athlete triad.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Roberta Trattner; Thompson, Ron A

    2004-08-01

    The Female Athlete Triad is a syndrome of the interrelated components of disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. Sometimes inadvertently, but more often by willful dietary restriction, many female athletes do not ingest sufficient calories to adequately fuel their physical or sport activities, which can disrupt menstrual functioning, thereby increasing their risk of bone loss. Although its prevalence is unknown, the Female Athlete Triad is believed to affect many athletes at all ages and all sport competition levels. Even though the Triad affects athletes in all sports, girls and women in sports that emphasize a thin or small body size or shape appear to be most at risk. This article focuses on the risks of the Female Athlete Triad for middle- and high-school-age female athletes as well as the unique issues related to the identification, management, and treatment of the various components of the Triad in this special adolescent subpopulation.

  9. Filopodial dynamics and growth cone stabilization in Drosophila visual circuit development.

    PubMed

    Özel, Mehmet Neset; Langen, Marion; Hassan, Bassem A; Hiesinger, P Robin

    2015-10-29

    Filopodial dynamics are thought to control growth cone guidance, but the types and roles of growth cone dynamics underlying neural circuit assembly in a living brain are largely unknown. To address this issue, we have developed long-term, continuous, fast and high-resolution imaging of growth cone dynamics from axon growth to synapse formation in cultured Drosophila brains. Using R7 photoreceptor neurons as a model we show that >90% of the growth cone filopodia exhibit fast, stochastic dynamics that persist despite ongoing stepwise layer formation. Correspondingly, R7 growth cones stabilize early and change their final position by passive dislocation. N-Cadherin controls both fast filopodial dynamics and growth cone stabilization. Surprisingly, loss of N-Cadherin causes no primary targeting defects, but destabilizes R7 growth cones to jump between correct and incorrect layers. Hence, growth cone dynamics can influence wiring specificity without a direct role in target recognition and implement simple rules during circuit assembly.

  10. Horizontal Cells of the Primate Retina: Cone Specificity Without Spectral Opponency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dacey, Dennis M.; Lee, Barry B.; Stafford, Donna K.; Pokorny, Joel; Smith, Vivianne C.

    1996-02-01

    The chromatic dimensions of human color vision have a neural basis in the retina. Ganglion cells, the output neurons of the retina, exhibit spectral opponency; they are excited by some wavelengths and inhibited by others. The hypothesis that the opponent circuitry emerges from selective connections between horizontal cell interneurons and cone photoreceptors sensitive to long, middle, and short wavelengths (L-, M-, and S-cones) was tested by physiologically and anatomically characterizing cone connections of horizontal cell mosaics in macaque monkeys. H1 horizontal cells received input only from L- and M-cones, whereas H2 horizontal cells received a strong input from S-cones and a weaker input from L- and M-cones. All cone inputs were the same sign, and both horizontal cell types lacked opponency. Despite cone type selectivity, the horizontal cell cannot be the locus of an opponent transformation in primates, including humans.

  11. NLN: Celebrating Associate Degree Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoddick, Nancy A.

    1981-01-01

    Introduces a project celebrating the thirtieth anniversary of associate degree nursing (ADN) education. Reviews the efforts and plans of two national associations to identify and resolve recurring ADN issues and recognize the associate degree nurse's contributions. Describes the forums and publications planned to meet these objectives. Includes…

  12. Employers Often Distrust Online Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Dan

    2007-01-01

    This article explains why employers are reluctant to accept potential employees with online degrees. The results of several surveys of those who evaluate potential employees and make hiring decisions indicate a bias against online degrees, even as more and more colleges are offering programs online. To those officials, the words "online…

  13. Degree, Yes--Education, No

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheahan, Sister Dorothy

    1974-01-01

    The external degree program, based solely on test proficiency, offers to its students not an educational opportunity; not a learning situation but a schema for securing a degree, with any kind of socialization into the profession conspicuously missing from the program. (Author/DS)

  14. Six Degrees of "Visual" Separation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Whether referring to psychologist Stanley Milgram's intriguing theory, John Guare's successful play and film, or Kevin Bacon's party game, six degrees of separation may also be used as a way to help students make visual connections. The six degrees of separation is the concept that everyone is connected to everyone else in the world by only six…

  15. Individualized Degree Program Student Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, Jan

    This student handbook describes the process and components of Whatcom Community College's Individualized Degree Program (IDP), which offers students the opportunity to design an associate degree or certificate plan to meet their educational goals. After introductory material presents a history of the IDP's development and the purpose of the…

  16. Associate/Bachelor Degree Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochberg, L. Jim, Sr.

    Policies and procedures to promote articulation of associate degree with bachelor degree study are recommended based on the experience of Hawaii Pacific College, Honolulu. Consideration is given to: flexibility versus rigidity, competency versus curriculum specifics, corroboration and substantiation, and contingency versus once-for-all-award. It…

  17. Guide to Teaching Degrees 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee

    2011-01-01

    Getting a master's degree means lots of late nights, busy weekends, and probably taking on student loan debt. The commitment raises the question: Is it worth it? This article takes a comprehensive look at how much a master's is worth, which degree one should pursue, and how one can find a balance in graduate school.

  18. High-resolution-cone beam tomography analysis of bone microarchitecture in patients with acromegaly and radiological vertebral fractures.

    PubMed

    Maffezzoni, Filippo; Maddalo, Michele; Frara, Stefano; Mezzone, Monica; Zorza, Ivan; Baruffaldi, Fabio; Doglietto, Francesco; Mazziotti, Gherardo; Maroldi, Roberto; Giustina, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Vertebral fractures are an emerging complication of acromegaly but their prediction is still difficult occurring even in patients with normal bone mineral density. In this study we evaluated the ability of high-resolution cone-beam computed tomography to provide information on skeletal abnormalities associated with vertebral fractures in acromegaly. 40 patients (24 females, 16 males; median age 57 years, range 25-72) and 21 healthy volunteers (10 females, 11 males; median age 60 years, range: 25-68) were evaluated for trabecular (bone volume/trabecular volume ratio, mean trabecular separation, and mean trabecular thickness) and cortical (thickness and porosity) parameters at distal radius using a high-resolution cone-beam computed tomography system. All acromegaly patients were evaluated for morphometric vertebral fractures and for mineral bone density by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at lumbar spine, total hip, femoral neck, and distal radius. Acromegaly patients with vertebral fractures (15 cases) had significantly (p < 0.05) lower bone volume/trabecular volume ratio, greater mean trabecular separation, and higher cortical porosity vs. nonfractured patients, without statistically significant differences in mean trabecular thickness and cortical thickness. Fractured and nonfractured acromegaly patients did not have significant differences in bone density at either skeletal site. Patients with acromegaly showed lower bone volume/trabecular volume ratio (p = 0.003) and mean trabecular thickness (p < 0.001) and greater mean trabecular separation (p = 0.02) as compared to control subjects, without significant differences in cortical thickness and porosity. This study shows for the first time that abnormalities of bone microstructure are associated with radiological vertebral fractures in acromegaly. High-resolution cone-beam computed tomography at the distal radius may be useful to evaluate and predict the effects of acromegaly on bone

  19. Set our Master's degrees free

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padman, Rachael

    2010-04-01

    Making UK undergraduate physics degrees longer must have seemed like a good idea at the time. Back in the early 1990s the standard three-year Bachelor's physics degree (four years in Scotland) was under pressure at both ends. The A-level curriculum - one of the requirements for entry onto a degree course - was being increasingly modularized, and dumbed down. Physics students were arriving at university less well prepared than in the past and there was an increasing awareness that graduates of five-year continental degree courses were better equipped for a professional scientific career than those in the UK. At the same time, local education authorities in the UK were required to provide full funding for a first degree, whether for three or four years.

  20. Study of boundary-layer transition using transonic cone Preston tube data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, T. D.; Abu-Mostafa, A.

    1982-01-01

    Laminar layer Preston tube data on a sharp nose, ten degree cone obtained in the Ames 11 ft TWT and in flight tests are analyzed. During analyses of the laminar-boundary layer data, errors were discovered in both the wind tunnel and the flight data. A correction procedure for errors in the flight data is recommended which forces the flight data to exhibit some of the orderly characteristics of the wind tunnel data. From corrected wind tunnel data, a correlation is developed between Preston tube pressures and the corresponding values of theoretical laminar skin friction. Because of the uncertainty in correcting the flight data, a correlation for the unmodified data is developed, and, in addition, three other correlations are developed based on different correction procedures. Each of these correlations are used in conjunction with the wind tunnel correlation to define effective freestream unit Reynolds numbers for the 11 ft TWT over a Mach number range of 0.30 to 0.95. The maximum effective Reynolds numbers are approximately 6.5% higher than the normal values. These maximum values occur between freestream Mach numbers of 0.60 and 0.80. Smaller values are found outside this Mach number range. These results indicate wind tunnel noise affects the average laminar skin friction much less than it affects boundary layer transition. Data on the onset, extent, and end of boundary layer transition are summarized. Application of a procedure for studying the relative effects of varying nose radius on a ten degree cone at supercritical speeds indicates that increasing nose radius promotes boundary layer transition and separation of laminar boundary layers.

  1. Cone photoreceptor types in zebrafish are generated by symmetric terminal divisions of dedicated precursors

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sachihiro C.; Bleckert, Adam; Williams, Philip R.; Takechi, Masaki; Kawamura, Shoji; Wong, Rachel O. L.

    2013-01-01

    Proper functioning of sensory systems requires the generation of appropriate numbers and proportions of neuronal subtypes that encode distinct information. Perception of color relies on signals from multiple cone photoreceptor types. In cone-dominated retinas, each cone expresses a single opsin type with peak sensitivity to UV, long (L) (red), medium (M) (green), or short (S) (blue) wavelengths. The modes of cell division generating distinct cone types are unknown. We report here a mechanism whereby zebrafish cone photoreceptors of the same type are produced by symmetric division of dedicated precursors. Transgenic fish in which the thyroid hormone receptor β2 (trβ2) promoter drives fluorescent protein expression before L-cone precursors themselves are produced permitted tracking of their division in vivo. Every L cone in a local region resulted from the terminal division of an L-cone precursor, suggesting that such divisions contribute significantly to L-cone production. Analysis of the fate of isolated pairs of cones and time-lapse observations suggest that other cone types can also arise by symmetric terminal divisions. Such divisions of dedicated precursors may help to rapidly attain the final numbers and proportions of cone types (L > M, UV > S) in zebrafish larvae. Loss- and gain-of-function experiments show that L-opsin expression requires trβ2 activity before cone differentiation. Ectopic expression of trβ2 after cone differentiation produces cones with mixed opsins. Temporal differences in the onset of trβ2 expression could explain why some species have mixed, and others have pure, cone types. PMID:23980162

  2. Aerodynamic characteristics of the standard dynamics model in coning motion at Mach 0.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jermey, C.; Schiff, L. B.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted on the Standard Dynamics Model (a simplified generic fighter aircraft shape) undergoing coning motion at Mach 0.6. Six component force and moment data are presented for a range of angle of attack, sideslip, and coning rates. At the relatively low non-dimensional coning rate employed (omega b/2V less than or equal to 0.04), the lateral aerodynamic characteristics generally show a linear variation with coning rate.

  3. Center is at Latitude 30 Degrees South, Longitude 210 Degrees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Center of the orthographic projection is at latitude 30 degrees S., longitude 210 degrees. Toward the top, the lowland plains of Elysium and Utopia Planitiae are separated from the darker heavily cratered highlands by a broad escarpment. The far bottom left is marked by the large light-colored ancient Hellas impact basin. The permanent south polar residual ice cap is located near the bottom.

  4. Rootless Cone? Pingo? or Mud Volcano? in Central Elysium Planitia, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, R.; Kurita, K.

    2011-03-01

    It is possible that Mars has experienced recent (~100 Ma) magmatism. In central Elysium Planitia, the identification of cone-like landforms are discussed: rootless cones, pingos, or mud volcanos. From their morphology, the landforms are thought to be rootless cones.

  5. Apparatus and process for an off-surface cone penetrometer sensor

    DOEpatents

    Smail, Timothy R.; French, Phillip J.; Huffman, Russell K.

    2003-04-29

    A cone penetrometer is provided having a pivoting arm which deploys a variable distance from the surface of the cone penetrometer. Sensors placed on the end of the deployable arm provide for data collection outside a compression zone created by the insertion of the cone penetrometer.

  6. Horizontal Stress In-Situ by Cone Penetrometers and Related Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-20

    the factors that increase the liquefaction resistance of a given soil also increase the cone resistance. A cone resistance prediction method based on...results were used to validate cone resistance prediction method for four different sands. namely, Monterey #0 sand, Ticino sand, Hokksund sand, and

  7. The eddy-eliminating method of guide cone in the closed sump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. J.; Cheng, L.; Xia, C. Z.; Zhou, J. R.; Yan, H. Q.; Jiang, H. Y.

    2016-05-01

    In order to explore the effect on eddy-eliminating method of guide cone in the closed sump, the simple factor analysis and CFD numerical simulation are applied to calculate the flow field of closed sump and select ω-shaped back wall. ω-shaped back wall is consistent with the stream line in the suction sump, on this basis, CFD numerical simulation is conducted with the eddy-eliminating of the triangle guide cone and traditional guide cone. The results show that, for eddy-eliminating measures, with the height of triangular guide cone from 0 to 0.407HZ/DL , the excessive triangle guide cone hinder water into the flared pipe. With the width of triangular guide cone from 0.5 to 1.0BZ/DL , increasing width of triangular guide cone may increase the pumping hydraulic performance and pumping efficiency. However with the width of triangular guide cone from 0.5 to 1.0 BZ/DL , too broad traditional guide cone hinder water into the flared pipe. In the design discharge, whether triangle guide cone or traditional guide cone have a little effect on the efficiency of the pumping station. But in terms of the eddy-eliminating on the bottom of suction sump, it is necessary to set up guide cone.

  8. 36. EASTERN VIEW OF BOTTOM CONE OF GAS COOLING TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. EASTERN VIEW OF BOTTOM CONE OF GAS COOLING TOWER No. 1 AND TWO GAS COOLING TOWER SERVICE WATER PUMPS IN THE GAS WASHER PUMP HOUSE. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  9. 95. VIEW OF ZINC FEEDER FROM SOUTHEAST. NOTE FEEDER CONE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    95. VIEW OF ZINC FEEDER FROM SOUTHEAST. NOTE FEEDER CONE AND PIPING FROM VACUUM RECEIVER ON LEFT. PRECIPITATE PUMP MOTOR MOUNT VISIBLE BELOW FEEDER STAIRS, PUMP AND MOTOR MISSING. SUMPS ARE LOCATED UNDER THIS FLOOR, WITH ACCESS TO HATCH TO THE RIGHT OF FEEDER STAIR. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  10. Dirac cones in the spectrum of bond-decorated graphenes

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Heuvel, Willem Soncini, Alessandro

    2014-06-21

    We present a two-band model based on periodic Hückel theory, which is capable of predicting the existence and position of Dirac cones in the first Brillouin zone of an infinite class of two-dimensional periodic carbon networks, obtained by systematic perturbation of the graphene connectivity by bond decoration, that is by inclusion of arbitrary π-electron Hückel networks into each of the three carbon–carbon π-bonds within the graphene unit cell. The bond decoration process can fundamentally modify the graphene unit cell and honeycomb connectivity, representing a simple and general way to describe many cases of graphene chemical functionalization of experimental interest, such as graphyne, janusgraphenes, and chlorographenes. Exact mathematical conditions for the presence of Dirac cones in the spectrum of the resulting two-dimensional π-networks are formulated in terms of the spectral properties of the decorating graphs. Our method predicts the existence of Dirac cones in experimentally characterized janusgraphenes and chlorographenes, recently speculated on the basis of density functional theory calculations. For these cases, our approach provides a proof of the existence of Dirac cones, and can be carried out at the cost of a back of the envelope calculation, bypassing any diagonalization step, even within Hückel theory.

  11. Cone-beam image reconstruction using spherical harmonics.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, K; Zeng, G L; Gullberg, G T

    2001-06-01

    Image reconstruction from cone-beam projections is required for both x-ray computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Grangeat's algorithm accurately performs cone-beam reconstruction provided that Tuy's data sufficiency condition is satisfied and projections are complete. The algorithm consists of three stages: (a) Forming weighted plane integrals by calculating the line integrals on the cone-beam detector, and obtaining the first derivative of the plane integrals (3D Radon transform) by taking the derivative of the weighted plane integrals. (b) Rebinning the data and calculating the second derivative with respect to the normal to the plane. (c) Reconstructing the image using the 3D Radon backprojection. A new method for implementing the first stage of Grangeat's algorithm was developed using spherical harmonics. The method assumes that the detector is large enough to image the whole object without truncation. Computer simulations show that if the trajectory of the cone vertex satisfies Tuy's data sufficiency condition, the proposed algorithm provides an exact reconstruction.

  12. Supersonic flow calculations for a cone with an elliptic flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehrhaupt, H.

    1970-01-01

    A three-dimensional supersonic flow program is presented for calculating the flow field about a cone at zero angle of attack with an elliptical flare. The program is irrotational, and results remain valid in the region ahead of the first relected characteristic from the points of shock where the shock is no longer axisymmetric.

  13. Analysis: Prediction of Pile Capacity Using the Cone Penetration Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    capacity measurements with frictional resistance measurements, many theoretical and empirical correlations have been developed to determine various...geotechnical parameters. Cone penetration test results have been commonly used to determine such parameters as soil classification, friction angle ...tensile strength were added to the sand resulting in an increased stiffness, but the friction angle of the sand remained essentially unchanged. In

  14. Operational Based Vision Assessment Cone Contrast Test: Description and Operation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-02

    test for identifying and classifying protanomalous and deuteranomalous (red/ green ) color deficient individuals. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Color vision...protanomalous and deuteranomalous (red/ green ) color deficient individuals. 2.0 PURPOSE/BACKGROUND The Operational Based Vision Assessment cone contrast...clearly demonstrated that observed colors on the Rabin CCT change dramatically with head movement . These changes will, of course, invalidate the test

  15. Growth Cone Biomechanics in Peripheral and Central Nervous System Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Jeffrey; Koch, Daniel; Rosoff, Will; Geller, Herbert

    2012-02-01

    The growth cone, a highly motile structure at the tip of an axon, integrates information about the local environment and modulates outgrowth and guidance, but little is known about effects of external mechanical cues and internal mechanical forces on growth-cone mediated guidance. We have investigated neurite outgrowth, traction forces and cytoskeletal substrate coupling on soft elastic substrates for dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (from the peripheral nervous system) and hippocampal neurons (from the central) to see how the mechanics of the microenvironment affect different populations. We find that the biomechanics of DRG neurons are dramatically different from hippocampal, with DRG neurons displaying relatively large, steady traction forces and maximal outgrowth and forces on substrates of intermediate stiffness, while hippocampal neurons display weak, intermittent forces and limited dependence of outgrowth and forces on substrate stiffness. DRG growth cones have slower rates of retrograde actin flow and higher density of localized paxillin (a protein associated with substrate adhesion complexes) compared to hippocampal neurons, suggesting that the difference in force generation is due to stronger adhesions and therefore stronger substrate coupling in DRG growth cones.

  16. Local translation of RhoA regulates growth cone collapse

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Llewellyn J.; Macosko, Evan Z.; Jeromin, Andreas; Urquhart, Erica R.; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2005-01-01

    Neuronal development requires highly coordinated regulation of the cytoskeleton within the developing axon. This dynamic regulation manifests itself in axonal branching, turning, and pathfinding, presynaptic differentiation, and growth cone collapse and extension. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A), a secreted guidance cue that primarily acts to repel axons from inappropriate targets, induces cytoskeletal rearrangements that results in growth cone collapse 1. These effects require intra-axonal mRNA translation. Here we show that transcripts for RhoA, a small GTPase that regulates the actin cytoskeleton, are localized to developing axons and growth cones, and this localization is mediated by an axonal targeting element located in the RhoA 3’UTR. Sema3A induces intra-axonal translation of RhoA mRNA and this local translation of RhoA is necessary and sufficient for Sema3A-mediated growth cone collapse. These studies indicate that local RhoA translation regulates the neuronal cytoskeleton and identify a novel mechanism for the regulation of RhoA signaling. PMID:16107849

  17. Variability and Reliabiltiy in Axon Growth Cone Navigation Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnelo, Marta; Ricoult, Sébastien G.; Juncker, David; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Faisal, Aldo A.

    2015-03-01

    The nervous system's wiring is a result of axon growth cones navigating through specific molecular environments during development. In order to reach their target, growth cones need to make decisions under uncertainty as they are faced with stochastic sensory information and probabilistic movements. The overall system therefore exhibits features of whole organisms (perception, decision making, action) in the subset of a single cell. We aim to characterise growth cone navigation in defined nano-dot guidance cue environments, by using the tools of computational neuroscience to conduct ``molecular psychophysics.'' We start with a generative model of growth cone behaviour and we 1. characterise sensory and internal sources of noise contributing to behavioural variables, by combining knowledge of the underlying stochastic dynamics in cue sensing and the growth of the cytoskeleton. This enables us to 2. produce bottom-up lower limit estimates of behavioural response reliability and visualise it as probability distributions over axon growth trajectories. Given this information we can match our in silico model's ``psychometric'' decision curves with empirical data. Finally we use a Monte-Carlo approach to predict response distributions of axon trajectories from our model.

  18. Non-dissipative electromagnetic media with two Lorentz null cones

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, Matias F.

    2013-03-15

    We study Maxwell's equations on a 4-manifold where the electromagnetic medium is modeled by an antisymmetric (2/2 )-tensor with 21 real coefficients. In this setting the Fresnel surface is a fourth-order polynomial surface that describes the dynamical response of the medium in the geometric optics limit. For example, in an isotropic medium the Fresnel surface is a Lorentz null cone. The contribution of this paper is the pointwise description of all electromagnetic medium tensors {kappa} with real coefficients that satisfy the following three conditions: (i)medium {kappa} is invertible, (ii)medium {kappa} is skewon-free, or non-dissipative, (iii)the Fresnel surface of {kappa} is the union of two distinct Lorentz null cones. We show that there are only three classes of media with these properties and give explicit expressions in local coordinates for each class. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find two new electromagnetic media classes for which the Fresnel surface decomposes into two light cones. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In a suitable setting we classify all electromagnetic media where this is the case. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find an electromagnetic medium tensor with three different signal speeds in one direction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The work is related to [5], which classifies all media with one light cone (in a suitable setting).

  19. Directing collagen fibers using counter-rotating cone extrusion.

    PubMed

    Hoogenkamp, Henk R; Bakker, Gert-Jan; Wolf, Louis; Suurs, Patricia; Dunnewind, Bertus; Barbut, Shai; Friedl, Peter; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Daamen, Willeke F

    2015-01-01

    The bio-inspired engineering of tissue equivalents should take into account anisotropic morphology and the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix. This especially applies to collagen fibrils, which have various, but highly defined, orientations throughout tissues and organs. There are several methods available to control the alignment of soluble collagen monomers, but the options to direct native insoluble collagen fibers are limited. Here we apply a controlled counter-rotating cone extrusion technology to engineer tubular collagen constructs with defined anisotropy. Driven by diverging inner and outer cone rotation speeds, collagen fibrils from bovine skin were extruded and precipitated onto mandrels as tubes with oriented fibers and bundles, as examined by second harmonic generation microscopy and quantitative image analysis. A clear correlation was found whereby the direction and extent of collagen fiber alignment during extrusion were a function of the shear forces caused by a combination of the cone rotation and flow direction. A gradual change in the fiber direction, spanning +50 to -40°, was observed throughout the sections of the sample, with an average decrease ranging from 2.3 to 2.6° every 10μm. By varying the cone speeds, the collagen constructs showed differences in elasticity and toughness, spanning 900-2000kPa and 19-35mJ, respectively. Rotational extrusion presents an enabling technology to create and control the (an)isotropic architecture of collagen constructs for application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  20. Cone Penetrometer Load Cell Temperature and Radiation Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2013-08-28

    This report summarizes testing activities performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to verify the cone penetrometer load cell can withstand the tank conditions present in 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106. The tests demonstrated the load cell device will operate under the elevated temperature and radiation levels expected to be encountered during tank farm deployment of the device.

  1. 63. Historic detail drawing of inlet duct cone on exhaust ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. Historic detail drawing of inlet duct cone on exhaust scrubber at building 202, June 18, 1955. NASA GRC drawing no. CD-101266. (On file at NASA Glenn Research Center). - Rocket Engine Testing Facility, GRC Building No. 202, NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  2. Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Donald F

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report 14 new cases of unilateral retinitis pigmentosa and three new cases of cone-rod dystrophy and to compare the similarities and dissimilarities to those found in the bilateral forms of these disorders. Methods: A total of 272 cases of retinitis pigmentosa and 167 cases of cone-rod dystrophy were studied by corneal full field electroretinograms and electrooculograms. The student t-test was used to compare categories. Results: The percentage of familial and nonfamilial cases was the same for the bilateral and unilateral forms of the disease. In our series, unilateral retinitis pigmentosa makes up approximately 5% of the total population of retinitis pigmentosa, while unilateral cone-rod dystrophy makes up only about 2% of the total. In the familial forms of unilateral retinitis pigmentosa the most common inheritance pattern was autosomal dominant and all affected relatives had bilateral disease. Conclusion: Unilateral retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy appear to be directly related to the more common bilateral forms of these disorders. The genetic mechanisms which account for asymmetric disorders are not currently understood. It may be a different unidentified mutation at a single loci or it is possible that nonlinked mutations in multiple loci account for this unusual disorder. PMID:19668577

  3. Use of Stone Cone minimizes stone migration during percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Springhart, W Patrick; Tan, Yeh Hong; Albala, David M; Perelman, Jason; Teichman, Joel M; Preminger, Glenn M

    2006-05-01

    We describe a simple and effective method using the Stone Cone to prevent migration of stone fragments into the ureter during percutaneous nephrolithotomy. This maneuver may reduce the need for antegrade ureteroscopy to remove residual fragments, thereby saving time and obviating the need for placement of an occlusion balloon.

  4. Actin, microvilli, and the fertilization cone of sea urchin eggs

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    Sea urchin eggs and oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage were fixed at various times after insemination, and thin sections were examined. Actin filaments can first be found in the cortical cytoplasm 1 min after insemination, and by 2 min enormous numbers of filaments are present. At these early stages, the filaments are only occasionally organized into bundles, but one end of many filaments contacts the plasma membrane. By 3 min, and even more dramatically by 5 min after insemination, the filaments become progressively more often found in bundles that lie parallel to the long axis of the microvilli and the fertilization cones. By 7 min, the bundles of filaments in the cone are maximally pronounced, with virtually all the filaments lying parallel to one another. Decoration of the filaments with subfragment 1 of myosin shows that, in both the microvilli and the cones, the filaments are unidirectionally polarized with the arrowheads pointing towards the cell center. The efflux of H+ from the eggs was measured as a function of time after insemination. The rapid phase of H+ efflux occurs at the same time as actin polymerization. From these results it appears that the formation of bundles of actin filaments in microvilli and in cones is a two-step process, involving actin polymerization to form filaments, randomly oriented but in most cases having one end in contact with the plasma membrane, followed by the zippering together of the filaments by macromolecular bridges. PMID:6893988

  5. A Case Study in Mathematics--The Cone Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damaskos, Nickander J.

    1969-01-01

    A case study in mathematics designed to illustrate how the computer may be instructed to solve complicated problems. The problem is to find the volume of a right truncated cone given the altitude and a half angle or the base radius. (RP)

  6. Ideal female brow aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Garrett R; Kim, Jennifer C

    2013-01-01

    The concept of the ideal female eyebrow has changed over time. Modern studies examining youthful brow aesthetics are reviewed. An analysis of ideal female brow characteristics as depicted in the Western print media between 1945 and 2011 was performed. This analysis provided objective evidence that the ideal youthful brow peak has migrated laterally over time to lie at the lateral canthus. There has been a nonstatistically significant trend toward lower and flatter brows. These findings are discussed in relation to current concepts of female brow aging, with repercussions regarding endoscopic brow lift and aesthetic forehead surgery.

  7. Killing Horizons Kill Horizon Degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamin, L.; Grumiller, D.

    Frequently, it is argued that the microstates responsible for the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy should arise from some physical degrees of freedom located near or on the black hole horizon. In this essay, we elucidate that instead entropy may emerge from the conversion of physical degrees of freedom, attached to a generic boundary, into unobservable gauge degrees of freedom attached to the horizon. By constructing the reduced phase space, it can be demonstrated that such a transmutation indeed takes place for a large class of black holes, including Schwarzschild.

  8. Cone beam computed tomography radiation dose and image quality assessments.

    PubMed

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology has undergone profound changes in the last 30 years. New technologies are available to the dental field, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as one of the most important. CBCT is a catch-all term for a technology comprising a variety of machines differing in many respects: patient positioning, volume size (FOV), radiation quality, image capturing and reconstruction, image resolution and radiation dose. When new technology is introduced one must make sure that diagnostic accuracy is better or at least as good as the one it can be expected to replace. The CBCT brand tested was two versions of Accuitomo (Morita, Japan): 3D Accuitomo with an image intensifier as detector, FOV 3 cm x 4 cm and 3D Accuitomo FPD with a flat panel detector, FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm. The 3D Accuitomo was compared with intra-oral radiography for endodontic diagnosis in 35 patients with 46 teeth analyzed, of which 41 were endodontically treated. Three observers assessed the images by consensus. The result showed that CBCT imaging was superior with a higher number of teeth diagnosed with periapical lesions (42 vs 32 teeth). When evaluating 3D Accuitomo examinations in the posterior mandible in 30 patients, visibility of marginal bone crest and mandibular canal, important anatomic structures for implant planning, was high with good observer agreement among seven observers. Radiographic techniques have to be evaluated concerning radiation dose, which requires well-defined and easy-to-use methods. Two methods: CT dose index (CTDI), prevailing method for CT units, and dose-area product (DAP) were evaluated for calculating effective dose (E) for both units. An asymmetric dose distribution was revealed when a clinical situation was simulated. Hence, the CTDI method was not applicable for these units with small FOVs. Based on DAP values from 90 patient examinations effective dose was estimated for three diagnostic tasks: implant planning in posterior mandible and

  9. Molecular phylogeny and evolution of the cone snails (Gastropoda, Conoidea).

    PubMed

    Puillandre, N; Bouchet, P; Duda, T F; Kauferstein, S; Kohn, A J; Olivera, B M; Watkins, M; Meyer, C

    2014-09-01

    We present a large-scale molecular phylogeny that includes 320 of the 761 recognized valid species of the cone snails (Conus), one of the most diverse groups of marine molluscs, based on three mitochondrial genes (COI, 16S rDNA and 12S rDNA). This is the first phylogeny of the taxon to employ concatenated sequences of several genes, and it includes more than twice as many species as the last published molecular phylogeny of the entire group nearly a decade ago. Most of the numerous molecular phylogenies published during the last 15years are limited to rather small fractions of its species diversity. Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses are mostly congruent and confirm the presence of three previously reported highly divergent lineages among cone snails, and one identified here using molecular data. About 85% of the species cluster in the single Large Major Clade; the others are divided between the Small Major Clade (∼12%), the Conus californicus lineage (one species), and a newly defined clade (∼3%). We also define several subclades within the Large and Small major clades, but most of their relationships remain poorly supported. To illustrate the usefulness of molecular phylogenies in addressing specific evolutionary questions, we analyse the evolution of the diet, the biogeography and the toxins of cone snails. All cone snails whose feeding biology is known inject venom into large prey animals and swallow them whole. Predation on polychaete worms is inferred as the ancestral state, and diet shifts to molluscs and fishes occurred rarely. The ancestor of cone snails probably originated from the Indo-Pacific; rather few colonisations of other biogeographic provinces have probably occurred. A new classification of the Conidae, based on the molecular phylogeny, is published in an accompanying paper.

  10. Calcium regulates vesicle replenishment at the cone ribbon synapse.

    PubMed

    Babai, Norbert; Bartoletti, Theodore M; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2010-11-24

    Cones release glutamate-filled vesicles continuously in darkness, and changing illumination modulates this release. Because sustained release in darkness is governed by vesicle replenishment rates, we analyzed how cone membrane potential regulates replenishment. Synaptic release from cones was measured by recording postsynaptic currents in Ambystoma tigrinum horizontal or OFF bipolar cells evoked by depolarization of simultaneously voltage-clamped cones. We measured replenishment after attaining a steady state between vesicle release and replenishment using trains of test pulses. Increasing Ca(2+) currents (I(Ca)) by changing the test step from -30 to -10 mV increased replenishment. Lengthening -30 mV test pulses to match the Ca(2+) influx during 25 ms test pulses to -10 mV produced similar replenishment rates. Reducing Ca(2+) driving force by using test steps to +30 mV slowed replenishment. Using UV flashes to reverse inhibition of I(Ca) by nifedipine accelerated replenishment. Increasing [Ca(2+)](i) by flash photolysis of caged Ca(2+) also accelerated replenishment. Replenishment, but not the initial burst of release, was enhanced by using an intracellular Ca(2+) buffer of 0.5 mm EGTA rather than 5 mm EGTA, and diminished by 1 mm BAPTA. This suggests that although release and replenishment exhibited similar Ca(2+) dependencies, release sites are <200 nm from Ca(2+) channels but replenishment sites are >200 nm away. Membrane potential thus regulates replenishment by controlling Ca(2+) influx, principally by effects on replenishment mechanisms but also by altering releasable pool size. This in turn provides a mechanism for converting changes in light intensity into changes in sustained release at the cone ribbon synapse.

  11. The female athlete triad.

    PubMed

    Hobart, J A; Smucker, D R

    2000-06-01

    The female athlete triad is defined as the combination of disordered eating, amenorrhea and osteoporosis. This disorder often goes unrecognized. The consequences of lost bone mineral density can be devastating for the female athlete. Premature osteoporotic fractures can occur, and lost bone mineral density may never be regained. Early recognition of the female athlete triad can be accomplished by the family physician through risk factor assessment and screening questions. Instituting an appropriate diet and moderating the frequency of exercise may result in the natural return of menses. Hormone replacement therapy should be considered early to prevent the loss of bone density. A collaborative effort among coaches, athletic trainers, parents, athletes and physicians is optimal for the recognition and prevention of the triad. Increased education of parents, coaches and athletes in the health risks of the female athlete triad can prevent a potentially life-threatening illness.

  12. Female Athlete Triad

    MedlinePlus

    ... some competitive female athletes, problems such as low self-esteem, a tendency toward perfectionism, and family stress place ... pressure from coaches or family members, or low self-esteem and can help her find ways to deal ...

  13. Female Pattern Hair Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... New Program Application Process Resident Awards AOCD Residency Leadership Award A.P. Ulbrich Resident Research Award Daniel ... Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Female Pattern Hair Loss Share | The most common type ...

  14. Female pattern baldness

    MedlinePlus

    Alopecia in women; Baldness - female; Hair loss in women; Androgenetic alopecia in women; Hereditary balding or thinning in women ... male hormones). For example, after reaching menopause , many women find that the hair on their head is ...

  15. Prevalence and Morphologic Characteristics of Ponticulus Posticus: Analysis Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Soylu, Emrah; Arikan, Mehtap Payveren; Ozcan, Gozde; Amuk, Mehmet; Kocoglu, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the prevalence and morphologic characteristics of ponticulus posticus (PP) by using cervical 3-dimensional (3-D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan images. Methods This was a retrospective study conducted by selecting cervical 3-D CBCT images of 698 patients, which were examined for the presence and types of PP. Results In 257 patients, 438 PPs, complete or partial, bilateral or unilateral, were identified on the 698 cervical 3-D CBCT scans; therefore, the prevalence was 36.8%. Bilateral complete PP and partial PP were observed in 6.3% and 16.2% of subjects, respectively. There was a significant difference in the prevalence between males and females (P = .001) and between the right and left sides between males and females, but not between age groups. Conclusion Ponticulus posticus is a relatively common anomaly in this Turkish sample, which may have implications for those who perform clinical procedures on the upper cervical spine. PMID:26778928

  16. Discovery and description of giant submarine smectite cones on the seafloor in Eyjafjordur, northern Iceland, and a novel thermal microbial habitat.

    PubMed

    Marteinsson, V T; Kristjánsson, J K; Kristmannsdóttir, H; Dahlkvist, M; Saemundsson, K; Hannington, M; Pétursdóttir, S K; Geptner, A; Stoffers, P

    2001-02-01

    With the submersible JAGO and by scuba diving we discovered three remarkable geothermal cones, rising 33, 25, and 45 m from the seafloor at a depth of 65 m in Eyjafjordur, northern Iceland. The greatest geothermal activity was on the highest cone, which discharged up to 50 liters of freshwater per s at 72 degrees C and pH 10.0. The cones were built up from precipitated smectite, formed by mixing of the hot SiO2-rich geothermal fluid with the cold Mg-rich seawater. By connecting a rubber hose to one outflow, about 240 liters of pure geothermal fluids was concentrated through a 0.2-microm-pore-size filter. Among 50 thermophilic isolates, we found members of Bacillus and Thermonema and a new unidentified low-G+C gram-positive member of the Bacteria as well as one member of the Archaea, Desulfurococcus mobilis. Analysis of small-subunit rRNA genes PCR amplified and cloned directly from environmental DNA showed that 41 out of 45 Bacteria sequences belonged to members of the Aquificales, whereas all of the 10 Archaea sequences belonged to the Korarchaeota. The physiological characteristics of isolates from different parts of the cones indicate a completely freshwater habitat, supporting the possibility of subterranean transmittance of terrestrial organisms.

  17. Male sexual harassment alters female social behaviour towards other females.

    PubMed

    Darden, Safi K; Watts, Lauren

    2012-04-23

    Male harassment of females to gain mating opportunities is a consequence of an evolutionary conflict of interest between the sexes over reproduction and is common among sexually reproducing species. Male Trinidadian guppies Poecilia reticulata spend a large proportion of their time harassing females for copulations and their presence in female social groups has been shown to disrupt female-female social networks and the propensity for females to develop social recognition based on familiarity. In this study, we investigate the behavioural mechanisms that may lead to this disruption of female sociality. Using two experiments, we test the hypothesis that male presence will directly affect social behaviours expressed by females towards other females in the population. In experiment one, we tested for an effect of male presence on female shoaling behaviour and found that, in the presence of a free-swimming male guppy, females spent shorter amounts of time with other females than when in the presence of a free-swimming female guppy. In experiment two, we tested for an effect of male presence on the incidence of aggressive behaviour among female guppies. When males were present in a shoal, females exhibited increased levels of overall aggression towards other females compared with female only shoals. Our work provides direct evidence that the presence of sexually harassing males alters female-female social behaviour, an effect that we expect will be recurrent across taxonomic groups.

  18. Effects of roundabout on growth cone dynamics, filopodial length, and growth cone morphology at the midline and throughout the neuropile.

    PubMed

    Murray, M J; Whitington, P M

    1999-09-15

    roundabout (robo) encodes an axon guidance receptor that controls midline crossing in the Drosophila CNS. In robo mutants, axons that normally project ipsilaterally can cross and recross the midline. Growth cones expressing Robo are believed to be repelled from the midline by the interaction of Robo and its ligand Slit, an extracellular protein expressed by the midline glia. To help understand the cellular basis for the midline repulsion mediated by Robo, we used time-lapse observations to compare the growth cone behavior of the ipsilaterally projecting motorneuron RP2 in robo and wild-type embyros. In wild-type embryos, filopodia can project across the midline but are quickly retracted. In robo mutants, medial filopodia can remain extended for longer periods and can develop into contralateral branches. In many cases RP2 produces both ipsilateral and contralateral branches, both of which can extend into the periphery. The growth cone also exhibits longer filopodia and more extensive branching both at the midline and throughout the neuropile. Cell injections in fixed stage 13 embryos confirmed and quantified these results for both RP2 and the interneuron pCC. The results suggest that Robo both repels growth cones at the midline and inhibits branching throughout the neuropile by promoting filopodial retraction.

  19. Test Re-Test Reliability of Four Versions of the 3-Cone Test in Non-Athletic Men

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Jason G.; Chetlin, Robert D.

    2017-01-01

    L” to the left instead of to the right) is also reliable for evaluating collegiate males. A modification of the 3-cone that includes reaction and a choice of a cut to the left or right remains reliable as now an agility test version in collegiate males. There are moderate to high correlation between the 4 versions of the tests. Reaction remains a critical to the design of testing and training agility protocols, and should be investigated similarly to various athletes including novice/expert, male/female, and nearly every sporting event. PMID:28344450

  20. A class of coning algorithms based on a half-compressed structure.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chuanye; Chen, Xiyuan

    2014-08-06

    Aiming to advance the coning algorithm performance of strapdown inertial navigation systems, a new half-compressed coning correction structure is presented. The half-compressed algorithm structure is analytically proven to be equivalent to the traditional compressed structure under coning environments. The half-compressed algorithm coefficients allow direct configuration from traditional compressed algorithm coefficients. A type of algorithm error model is defined for coning algorithm performance evaluation under maneuver environment conditions. Like previous uncompressed algorithms, the half-compressed algorithm has improved maneuver accuracy and retained coning accuracy compared with its corresponding compressed algorithm. Compared with prior uncompressed algorithms, the formula for the new algorithm coefficients is simpler.

  1. Short Wavelength Cone Opsin Is Not Expressed in the Retina of Arboreal African Pangolin (Manis tricuspis).

    PubMed

    Adekanmbi, Adejoke J; Adekanmbi, Adefisayo A; Akinola, Oluwole B

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of cone photoreceptors present in the retina of Manis tricuspis. Specifically, the LWS (L-) opsin expressed in longwave-sensitive cones and SWS1 (S-) opsin shortwave-sensitive cones were targeted. Vertical sections revealed reactivity to a cone marker, peanut agglutinin (PNA), and to an LWS antibody, but not to an SWS1 antibody. This suggests that the Manis tricuspis visual system is not able to discriminate shorter wavelengths from longer wavelengths because the short wavelength cones are not expressed in their retina.

  2. Short Wavelength Cone Opsin Is Not Expressed in the Retina of Arboreal African Pangolin (Manis tricuspis)

    PubMed Central

    Adekanmbi, Adejoke J.; Adekanmbi, Adefisayo A.; Akinola, Oluwole B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a study of cone photoreceptors present in the retina of Manis tricuspis. Specifically, the LWS (L-) opsin expressed in longwave-sensitive cones and SWS1 (S-) opsin shortwave-sensitive cones were targeted. Vertical sections revealed reactivity to a cone marker, peanut agglutinin (PNA), and to an LWS antibody, but not to an SWS1 antibody. This suggests that the Manis tricuspis visual system is not able to discriminate shorter wavelengths from longer wavelengths because the short wavelength cones are not expressed in their retina. PMID:27242946

  3. Comparison of shaped charge liner cone and recovered jet fragment microstructures to elucidate dynamic recrystallization phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murr, L. E.; Niou, C.-S.; Sanchez, J. C.; Zernow, L.

    1995-01-01

    In order to prove the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) following detonation of copper and tantalum shape charge liner cones, reductions in the starting grain size of the liner cones and recovered slug and jet fragments were compared. Forged copper cone liner having a grain size of 15 micrometer was also produced and the end point microstructures were compared with previous results and observations for a starting cone grain size of 35 micrometer. Microstructures in shaped charge starting liner cones and recovered jet fragments were observed by both optical metallography and transmission electron microscopy.

  4. Are UK undergraduate Forensic Science degrees fit for purpose?

    PubMed

    Welsh, Charles; Hannis, Marc

    2011-09-01

    In October 2009 Skills for Justice published the social research paper 'Fit for purpose?: Research into the provision of Forensic Science degree programmes in UK Higher Education Institutions.' The research engaged employers representing 95% of UK Forensic Science providers and 79% of UK universities offering Forensic Science or Crime Scene degree programmes. In addition to this, the research collected the views of 430 students studying these degrees. In 2008 there were approximately 9000 people working in the Forensic Science sector in the UK. The research found that the numbers of students studying Forensic Science or Crime Scene degrees in the UK have more than doubled since 2002-03, from 2191 in to 5664 in 2007-08. Over the same period there were twice as many females as males studying for these degrees. The research concluded that Forensic Science degree programmes offered by UK universities were of a good quality and they provided the student with a positive learning experience but the content was not relevant for Forensic Science employers. This echoed similar research by the former Government Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills on graduates from wider science, technology, engineering and mathematics degree programmes. The research also found that 75% of students studying Forensic Science or Crime Scene degrees expected to have a career in the Forensic Science sector, meaning that ensuring these courses are relevant for employers is a key challenge for universities. This paper reflects on the original research and discusses the implications in light of recent government policy.

  5. Three-dimensional ultrashort echo time cones T1ρ (3D UTE-cones-T1ρ ) imaging.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ya-Jun; Carl, Michael; Shao, Hongda; Tadros, Anthony S; Chang, Eric Y; Du, Jiang

    2017-03-20

    We report a novel three-dimensional (3D) ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence employing Cones trajectory and T1ρ preparation (UTE-Cones-T1ρ ) for quantitative T1ρ assessment of short T2 tissues in the musculoskeletal system. A basic 3D UTE-Cones sequence was combined with a spin-locking preparation pulse for T1ρ contrast. A relatively short TR was used to decrease the scan time, which required T1 measurement and compensation using 3D UTE-Cones data acquisitions with variable TRs. Another strategy to reduce the total scan time was to acquire multiple Cones spokes (Nsp ) after each T1ρ preparation and fat saturation. Four spin-locking times (TSL = 0-20 ms) were acquired over 12 min, plus another 7 min for T1 measurement. The 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence was compared with a two-dimensional (2D) spiral-T1ρ sequence for the imaging of a spherical CuSO4 phantom and ex vivo meniscus and tendon specimens, as well as the knee and ankle joints of healthy volunteers, using a clinical 3-T scanner. The CuSO4 phantom showed a T1ρ value of 76.5 ± 1.6 ms with the 2D spiral-T1ρ sequence, as well as 85.7 ± 3.6 and 89.2 ± 1.4 ms for the 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequences with Nsp of 1 and 5, respectively. The 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence provided shorter T1ρ values for the bovine meniscus sample relative to the 2D spiral-T1ρ sequence (10-12 ms versus 16 ms, respectively). The cadaveric human Achilles tendon sample could only be imaged with the 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence (T1ρ  = 4.0 ± 0.9 ms), with the 2D spiral-T1ρ sequence demonstrating near-zero signal intensity. Human studies yielded T1ρ values of 36.1 ± 2.9, 18.3 ± 3.9 and 3.1 ± 0.4 ms for articular cartilage, meniscus and the Achilles tendon, respectively. The 3D UTE-Cones-T1ρ sequence allows volumetric T1ρ measurement of short T2 tissues in vivo.

  6. Experimental investigation of boundary layer transition on rotating cones in axial flow in 0 and 35 degrees angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargar, Ali; Mansour, Kamyar

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, experimental results using hot wire anemometer and smoke visualization are presented. The results obtained from the hot wire anemometer for critical Reynolds number and transitional Reynolds number are compared with previous results. Excellent agreement is found for the transitional Reynolds number. The results for the transitional Reynolds number are also compared to previous linear stability results. The results from the smoke visualization clearly show the crossflow vortices which arise in the transition process from a laminar to a turbulent flow. A non-zero angle of attack is also considered. we compare our results by linear stability theory which was done by. We just emphasis. Also we compare visualization and hot wire anemometer results graphically, our goal in this paper is to check reliability of using hot wire anemometer and smoke visualization in stability problem and check reliability of linear stability theory for this two cases and compare our results with some trusty experimental works.

  7. Pilot-error accidents: male vs female.

    PubMed

    Vail, G J; Ekman, L G

    1986-12-01

    In this study, general aviation accident records from the files of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), have been analysed by gender to observe the number and rate of pilot-error related accidents from 1972 to 1981 inclusive. If both females and males have no difference in performance, then data would have indicated similarities of accident rates and types of injuries. Males had a higher rate of accidents than females, and a higher portion of the male accidents resulted in fatalities or serious injuries than for females. Type of certificate, age, total flight time, flight time in type of aircraft, phase of operation, category of flying, degree of injury, specific cause factors, cause factor miscellaneous acts/conditions were analysed, taking the total number of United States Active Civilian General Aviation Pilots into consideration. The data did indicate a difference in all variables.

  8. Phenotypic Characteristics Including In Vivo Cone Photoreceptor Mosaic in KCNV2-Related “Cone Dystrophy with Supernormal Rod Electroretinogram”

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Ajoy; Wright, Tom; Garcia-Sanchez, Yaiza; Kisilak, Marsha; Campbell, Melanie; Westall, Carol; Héon, Elise

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report phenotypic characteristics including macular cone photoreceptor morphology in KCNV2-related “cone dystrophy with supernormal rod electroretinogram” (CDSR). Methods Seven patients, aged 9 to 18 years at last visit, with characteristic full-field electroretinographic (ERG) features of CDSR were screened for mutations in the KCNV2 gene. All patients underwent detailed ophthalmological evaluation, which included distance and color vision testing, contrast sensitivity measurement, fundus photography, fundus auto-fluorescence (FAF) imaging, and spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Follow-up visits were available in six cases. Rod photoreceptor function was assessed using a bright white flash ERG protocol (240 cd·s/m2). Macular cone photoreceptor morphology was assessed from 2° by 2° zonal images obtained using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) in six cases. Results Pathogenic mutations in KCNV2 were identified in all seven cases. Best corrected vision was 20/125 or worse in all cases at the latest visit (20/125–20/400). Vision loss was progressive in two cases. Color vision and contrast sensitivity was abnormal in all cases. Retinal exam revealed minimal pigment epithelial changes at the fovea in four cases. A peri- or parafoveal ring of hyperfluorescence was the most common FAF abnormality noted (five cases). The SD-OCT showed outer retinal abnormalities in all cases. The rod photoreceptor maximal response was reduced but rod sensitivity was normal. AOSLO showed markedly reduced cone density in all six patients tested. Conclusions Central vision parameters progressively worsen in CDSR. Structural retinal and lipofuscin accumulation abnormalities are commonly present. Macular cone photoreceptor mosaic is markedly disrupted early in the disease. PMID:23221069

  9. Does cone-beam CT alter treatment plans? Comparison of preoperative implant planning using panoramic versus cone-beam CT images

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Maria Eugenia; Noriega, Jorge; Castro, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The present study was performed to compare the planning of implant placement based on panoramic radiography (PAN) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, and to study the impact of the image dataset on the treatment planning. Materials and Methods One hundred five partially edentulous patients (77 males, 28 females, mean age: 46 years, range: 26-67 years) seeking oral implant rehabilitation were referred for presurgical imaging. Imaging consisted of PAN and CBCT imaging. Four observers planned implant treatment based on the two-dimensional (2D) image datasets and at least one month later on the three-dimensional (3D) image dataset. Apart from presurgical diagnostic and dimensional measurement tasks, the observers needed to indicate the surgical confidence levels and assess the image quality in relation to the presurgical needs. Results All observers confirmed that both imaging modalities (PAN and CBCT) gave similar values when planning implant diameter. Also, the results showed no differences between both imaging modalities for the length of implants with an anterior location. However, significant differences were found in the length of implants with a posterior location. For implant dimensions, longer lengths of the implants were planned with PAN, as confirmed by two observers. CBCT provided images with improved scores for subjective image quality and surgical confidence levels. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, there was a trend toward PAN-based preoperative planning of implant placement leading towards the use of longer implants within the posterior jaw bone. PMID:24944961

  10. Development of a full ice-cream cone model for halo CME structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae

    2015-04-01

    The determination of three dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, source location) of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is very important for space weather forecast. To estimate these parameters, several cone models based on a flat cone or a shallow ice-cream cone with spherical front have been suggested. In this study, we investigate which cone model is proper for halo CME morphology using 33 CMEs which are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or STEREO-A or B) and as limb CMEs by the other ones. From geometrical parameters of these CMEs such as their front curvature, we find that near full ice-cream cone CMEs (28 events) are dominant over shallow ice-cream cone CMEs (5 events). So we develop a new full ice-cream cone model by assuming that a full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. This model is carried out by the following steps: (1) construct a cone for given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection points with the observed ones. We apply this model to several halo CMEs and compare the results with those from other methods such as a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model and a geometrical triangulation method.

  11. The uniqueness of the solution of cone-like inversion models for halo CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X. P.

    2006-12-01

    Most of elliptic halo CMEs are believed to be formed by the Thompson scattering of the photospheric light by the 3-D cone-like shell of the CME plasma. To obtain the real propagation direction and angular width of the halo CMEs, such cone-like inversion models as the circular cone, the elliptic cone and the ice-cream cone models have been suggested recently. Because the number of given parameters that are used to characterize 2-D elliptic halo CMEs observed by one spacecraft are less than the number of unknown parameters that are used to characterize the 3-D elliptic cone model, the solution of the elliptic cone model is not unique. Since it is difficult to determine whether or not an observed halo CME is formed by an circular cone or elliptic cone shell, the solution of circular cone model may often be not unique too. To fix the problem of the uniqueness of the solution of various 3-D cone-like inversion models, this work tries to develop the algorithm for using the data from multi-spacecraft, such as the STEREO A and B, and the Solar Sentinels.

  12. Role of the 9-methyl group of retinal in cone visual pigments.

    PubMed

    Das, Joydip; Crouch, Rosalie K; Ma, Jian-xing; Oprian, Daniel D; Kono, Masahiro

    2004-05-11

    In rhodopsin, the 9-methyl group of retinal has previously been identified as being critical in linking the ligand isomerization with the subsequent protein conformational changes that result in the activation of its G protein, transducin. Here, we report studies on the role of this methyl group in the salamander rod and cone pigments. Pigments were generated by combining proteins expressed in COS cells with 11-cis 9-demethyl retinal, where the 9-methyl group on the polyene chain has been deleted. The absorption spectra of all pigments were blue-shifted. The red cone and blue cone/green rod pigments were unstable to hydroxylamine; whereas, the rhodopsin and UV cone pigments were stable. The lack of the 9-methyl group of the chromophore did not affect the ability of the red cone and blue cone/green rod pigments to activate transducin. On the other hand, with the rhodopsin and UV cone pigments, activation was diminished. Interestingly, the red cone pigment containing the retinal analogue remained active longer than the native pigment. Thus, the 9-methyl group of retinal is not important in the activation pathway of the red cone and blue cone/green rod pigments. However, for the red cone pigment, the 9-methyl group of retinal appears to be critical in the deactivation pathway.

  13. Activated mTORC1 promotes long-term cone survival in retinitis pigmentosa mice

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Aditya; Ma, Shan; Le, Yun Z.; Hall, Michael N.; Rüegg, Markus A.; Punzo, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited photoreceptor degenerative disorder that results in blindness. The disease is often caused by mutations in genes that are specific to rod photoreceptors; however, blindness results from the secondary loss of cones by a still unknown mechanism. Here, we demonstrated that the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is required to slow the progression of cone death during disease and that constitutive activation of mTORC1 in cones is sufficient to maintain cone function and promote long-term cone survival. Activation of mTORC1 in cones enhanced glucose uptake, retention, and utilization, leading to increased levels of the key metabolite NADPH. Moreover, cone death was delayed in the absence of the NADPH-sensitive cell death protease caspase 2, supporting the contribution of reduced NADPH in promoting cone death. Constitutive activation of mTORC1 preserved cones in 2 mouse models of RP, suggesting that the secondary loss of cones is caused mainly by metabolic deficits and is independent of a specific rod-associated mutation. Together, the results of this study address a longstanding question in the field and suggest that activating mTORC1 in cones has therapeutic potential to prolong vision in RP. PMID:25798619

  14. Human dental age estimation by calculation of pulp-tooth volume ratios yielded on clinically acquired cone beam computed tomography images of monoradicular teeth.

    PubMed

    Star, Hazha; Thevissen, Patrick; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Fieuws, Steffen; Solheim, Tore; Willems, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Secondary dentine is responsible for a decrease in the volume of the dental pulp cavity with aging. The aim of this study is to evaluate a human dental age estimation method based on the ratio between the volume of the pulp and the volume of its corresponding tooth, calculated on clinically taken cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images from monoradicular teeth. On the 3D images of 111 clinically obtained CBCT images (Scanora(®) 3D dental cone beam unit) of 57 female and 54 male patients ranging in age between 10 and 65 years, the pulp-tooth volume ratio of 64 incisors, 32 canines, and 15 premolars was calculated with Simplant(®) Pro software. A linear regression model was fit with age as dependent variable and ratio as predictor, allowing for interactions of specific gender or tooth type. The obtained pulp-tooth volume ratios were the strongest related to age on incisors.

  15. Effect of rod–cone interactions on mesopic visual performance mediated by chromatic and luminance pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zele, Andrew J.; Maynard, Michelle L.; Joyce, Daniel S.; Cao, Dingcai

    2014-01-01

    We studied the effect of rod–cone interactions on mesopic visual reaction time (RT). Rod and cone photoreceptor excitations were independently controlled using a four-primary photostimulator. It was observed that (1) lateral rod–cone interactions increase the cone-mediated RTs; (2) the rod–cone interactions are strongest when rod sensitivity is maximal in a dark surround, but weaker with increased rod activity in a light surround; and (3) the presence of a dark surround nonselectively increased the mean and variability of chromatic (+L−M, S-cone) and luminance (L + M + S) RTs independent of the level of rod activity. The results demonstrate that lateral rod–cone interactions must be considered when deriving mesopic luminous efficiency using RT. PMID:24695205

  16. Decay resistance of thermally-modified Eucalyptus grandis wood at 140 degrees C, 160 degrees C, 180 degrees C, 200 degrees C and 220 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Calonego, Fred Willians; Severo, Elias Taylor Durgante; Furtado, Edson Luiz

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of thermal treatment on the biological resistance of Eucalyptus grandis wood to the decay fungus Picnoporus sanguineus. Boards from 5 years and 11 months old E. grandis trees, taken from the stock possessed by the Duratex-SA company, were thermally-modified at 140 degrees C, 160 degrees C, 180 degrees C, 200 degrees C and 220 degrees C in the Laboratory of Wood Drying and Preservation from UNESP, Botucatu, SP, Brazil. Samples of each treatment were treated according to ASTM D-2017 (1994). The experiment tested the accelerated decay caused by the decay fungus P. sanguineus on a system of soil-block wood. The results of thermal treatment showed that an increase of temperature of 180-220 degrees C caused reductions of between 15.7% and 82.4% in the weight loss in the samples from E. grandis incubated with P. sanguineus.

  17. Neurosurgeon as innovator: William V. Cone (1897-1959).

    PubMed

    Preul, M C; Stratford, J; Bertrand, G; Feindel, W

    1993-10-01

    Neurosurgeons are well known for being productive researchers and innovators. Few, however, have possessed the prolific ingenuity of William Cone. In 1934, he and William Penfield were cofounders of the Montreal Neurological Institute where, until 1959, he filled the twin roles of neurosurgeon-in-chief and neuropathologist. Because he did not find writing easy, many of his technical inventions and refinements remained unpublished. His numerous innovations included the extensive use of twist-drill technique for biopsy, drainage for subdural hematoma and cerebral abscess, and ventriculography. In the mid-1940's, he developed power tools driven by nitrogen that led to the modern, universally used air-driven tool systems. He had a special interest in the treatment of spinal dysfunction, for which he invented the Cone-Barton skull-traction tongs along with the Cone spinal operating table. He also devised operative procedures for vertebral fracture-dislocation and craniospinal anomalies. For the maintenance of muscle tone in the paralyzed bladder, he constructed a tidal drainage system. He introduced and popularized ventriculoperitoneal shunting techniques and carried out some of the earliest experimental trails to treat brain infections with sulphonamide and antibiotic drugs. He designed his own set of surgical suction devices, bone rongeurs, and a personal suction "air-conditioning" system for each surgeon. He had a keen early interest in intracranial tumors, and also demonstrated on monkeys how subdural mass lesions caused pupillary dilation and mesial temporal lobe damage due to cerebral compression. His work for the military during World War II on effects of altitude on brain pressure remained classified for many years. The first clipping and excision of an intracranial aneurysm is attributed to Cone. Although Penfield was known as "the Chief," Cone was referred to as "the Boss." His fervent dedication to provide total care to his patients was expressed in round

  18. ETHANOL ALTERS CALCIUM SIGNALING IN AXONAL GROWTH CONES

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Stephanie J.; Fleck, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) channels are sensitive to ethanol and Ca2+ signaling is a critical regulator of axonal growth and guidance. Effects of acute and chronic exposure to ethanol (22, 43, or 87 mM) on voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) in whole cells, and KCl-induced Ca2+ transients in axonal growth cones, were examined using dissociated hippocampal cultures. Whole-cell patch-clamp analysis in neurons with newly-formed axons (Stage 3) revealed that rapidly inactivating, low-voltage activated (LVA) and non-inactivating, high-voltage activated (HVA) currents were both inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by acute ethanol, with relatively greater inhibition of HVA currents. When assessed by Fluo-4-AM imaging, baseline fluorescence and Ca2+ response to ethanol in Stage 3 neurons was similar compared to neurons without axons, but peak Ca2+ transient amplitudes in response to bath-applied KCl were greater in Stage 3 neurons and were decreased by acute ethanol. The amplitude of Ca2+ transients elicited specifically in axonal growth cones by focal application of KCl was also inhibited by acute exposure to moderate-to-high concentrations of ethanol (43 or 87 mM), whereas a lower concentration (22 mM) had no effect. When 43 or 87 mM ethanol was present continuously in the medium, KCl-evoked Ca2+ transient amplitudes were also reduced in growth cones. In contrast, Ca2+ transients were increased by continuous exposure to 22 mM ethanol. Visualization using a fluorescent dihydropyridine analog revealed that neurons continuously exposed to ethanol expressed increased amounts of L-type Ca2+ channels, with greater increases in axonal growth cones than cell bodies. Thus, acute ethanol reduces Ca2+ current and KCl-induced Ca2+ responses in whole cells and axonal growth cones, respectively, and chronic exposure is also generally inhibitory despite apparent up-regulation of L-type channel expression. These results are consistent with a role for altered growth cone Ca2+ signaling in abnormal

  19. Determination of HCME 3-D parameters using a full ice-cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae; Lee, Harim

    2016-05-01

    It is very essential to determine three dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, source location) of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) for space weather forecast. Several cone models (e.g., an elliptical cone model, an ice-cream cone model, an asymmetric cone model) have been examined to estimate these parameters. In this study, we investigate which cone type is close to a halo CME morphology using 26 CMEs: halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or STEREO-A or B) and as limb CMEs by the other ones. From cone shape parameters of these CMEs such as their front curvature, we find that near full ice-cream cone type CMEs are much closer to observations than shallow ice-cream cone type CMEs. Thus we develop a new cone model in which a full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. This model is carried out by the following steps: (1) construct a cone for given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO/LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3-D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (a geometrical triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model) based on multi-spacecraft data. We are developing a general ice-cream cone model whose front shape is a free parameter determined by observations.

  20. Distribution of S- and M-cones in normal and experimentally detached cat retina.

    PubMed

    Linberg, K A; Lewis, G P; Shaaw, C; Rex, T S; Fisher, S K

    2001-02-12

    The lectin peanut agglutinin (PNA) and antibodies to short (S)- and medium to long wavelength (M/L)-sensitive cones were utilized in order to define the relative distributions of the two spectral types of cone across the domestic cat's retina. These values, in turn, were compared to those from retinas that had been experimentally detached from the retinal pigment epithelium. The pattern of cone distribution in the normal cat's retina is established by the preponderance of M-cones that constitute between 80% and 90% of all cones. Their peak density of over 26,000 cells/mm(2) resides at the area centralis. Though M-cone density decreases smoothly to the ora serrata where they have densities as low as 2,200 cells/mm(2), the density decrease along the nasotemporal axis is slower,creating a horizontal region of higher cone density. S-cones constitute between 10% and 20% of all cones, the number being quite variable even between individual animals of similar age. The highest S-cone densities are found in three distinct locations: at the superior far periphery near the ora serrata, immediately at the area centralis itself, and in a broad zone comprising the central and lower half of the inferior hemiretina. S-cones in the cat retina do not form a regular geometrical array at any eccentricity. As for the detached cat retina, the density of labeled S-cone outer segments (OS) decreases rapidly as early as 1 day postdetachment and continues decreasing to day 28 when the density of cones labeling with anti-S opsin has dropped to less than 10% of normal. This response points to a profound difference between rods and cones; essentially all rods, including those without OS, continue to express their opsin even in long-term detachments. The implications of these results for visual recovery after retinal reattachment are discussed.

  1. Female genital mutilation.

    PubMed

    Ladjali, M; Rattray, T W; Walder, R J

    1993-08-21

    Female genital mutilation, also misleadingly known as female circumcision, is usually performed on girls ranging in from 1 week to puberty. Immediate physical complications include severe pain, shock, infection, bleeding, acute urinary infection, tetanus, and death. Longterm problems include chronic pain, difficulties with micturition and menstruation, pelvic infection leading to infertility, and prolonged and obstructed labor during childbirth. An estimated 80 million girls and women have undergone female genital mutilation. In Britain alone an estimated 10,000 girls are currently at risk. Religious, cultural, medical, and moral grounds rationalize the custom which is practiced primarily in sub-Saharan Africa, the Arab world, Malaysia, Indonesia, and among migrant populations in Western countries. According to WHO it is correlated with poverty, illiteracy, and the low status of women. Women who escape mutilation are not sought in marriage. WHO, the UN Population Fund, the UN Children's Fund, the International Planned Parenthood Federation, and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child have issued declarations on the eradication of female genital mutilation. In Britain, local authorities have intervened to prevent parents from mutilating their daughters. In 1984, the Inter-African Committee Against Harmful Traditional Practices Affecting Women and Children was established to work toward eliminating female genital mutilation and other damaging customs. National committees in 26 African countries coordinate projects run by local people using theater, dance, music, and storytelling for communication. In Australia, Canada, Europe, and the US women have organized to prevent the practice among vulnerable migrants and refugees.

  2. Stalking by females.

    PubMed

    Carabellese, F; La Tegola, D; Alfarano, E; Tamma, M; Candelli, C; Catanesi, R

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this review was to study "female stalking" in the sense of the specific traits characterizing the phenomenon of stalking behaviour committed by women. The main medical databases were searched (Medline, Social Science Research Network, Apa Psyc Net), and 67 articles were selected, reporting studies conducted in clinical populations, case series, reports, reviews, retrospective studies and original articles. We outline a variety of different tactics adopted by female stalkers and a lesser propensity to pass on to physical violence. Nevertheless, female stalkers are more frequently affected by erotomania, and this condition generally increases the risk of violence. If there have previously been intimate relations between the stalker and her victim, this will increase the risk of violence. In a significant proportion of female stalkers, the behavior is carried out in the occupational setting, especially in the field of psychotherapy, where the male-female ratio is reversed. No significant differences emerged between the motivations of heterosexual or homosexual stalkers. In the category of crimes of harassment committed by women, stalking, at least in Italy, seems to be among the most prominent.

  3. Maintenance of polymorphic females: do parasites play a role?

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guillén, R A; Martínez-Zamilpa, S M J; Jiménez-Cortés, J G; Forbes, M R L; Córdoba-Aguilar, A

    2013-01-01

    The role of parasites in explaining maintenance of polymorphism is an unexplored research avenue. In odonates, female-limited color polymorphism (one female morph mimicking the conspecific male and one or more gynochromatic morphs) is widespread. Here we investigated whether parasitism contributes to color polymorphism maintenance by studying six species of female dimorphic damselflies using large databases of field-collected animals. We predicted that androchrome females (male mimics) would be more intensively parasitized than gynochrome females which is, according to previous studies, counterbalanced by the advantages of the former when evading male harassment compared to gynochrome females. Here we show that in Ischnura denticollis and Enallagma novahispaniae, androchrome females suffer from a higher degree of parasitism than gynochromatic females, and contrary to prediction, than males. Thus, our study has detected a correlation between color polymorphism and parasitic burden in odonates. This leads us to hypothesize that natural selection, via parasite pressure, can explain in part how androchrome and gynochrome female color morphs can be maintained. Both morphs may cope with parasites in a different way: given that androchrome females are more heavily parasitized, they may pay a higher fecundity costs, in comparison to gynochrome females.

  4. Lifetime Number of Mates Interacts with Female Age to Determine Reproductive Success in Female Guppies

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    In many species, mating with multiple males confers benefits to females, but these benefits may be offset by the direct and indirect costs associated with elevated mating frequency. Although mating frequency (number of mating events) is often positively associated with the degree of multiple mating (actual number of males mated), most studies have experimentally separated these effects when exploring their implications for female fitness. In this paper I describe an alternative approach using the guppy Poecilia reticulata, a livebearing freshwater fish in which females benefit directly and indirectly from mating with multiple males via consensual matings but incur direct and indirect costs of mating as a consequence of male sexual harassment. In the present study, females were experimentally assigned different numbers of mates throughout their lives in order to explore how elevated mating frequency and multiple mating combine to influence lifetime reproductive success (LRS) and survival (i.e. direct components of female fitness). Under this mating design, survival and LRS were not significantly affected by mating treatment, but there was a significant interaction between brood size and reproductive cycle (a correlate of female age) because females assigned to the high mating treatment produced significantly fewer offspring later in life compared to their low-mating counterparts. This negative effect of mating treatment later in life may be important in these relatively long-lived fishes, and this effect may be further exacerbated by the known cross-generational fitness costs of sexual harassment in guppies. PMID:23071816

  5. When Do Short-Wave Cones Signal Blue or Red? A Solution Introducing the Concept of Primary and Secondary Cone Outputs.

    PubMed

    Pridmore, Ralph W

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper by Oh and Sakata investigates the "incompletely solved mystery" of how the three cone responses map onto perceived hue, and particularly the S cone's well-known problematic contribution to blueness and redness. Citing previous workers, they argue the twentieth century traditional multistage model does not satisfactorily account for color appearance. In their experiment, increasing S cone excitation with shortening wavelength from about 480-460 nm increased perceived blueness up to the unique Blue point at 470 nm, when (a) it began decreasing and (b) redness perception began increasing. The authors asked, What mechanism can be responsible for such functions? I demonstrate a solution. First, it is shown the problem does not lie in the traditional opponent color chromatic responses yellow-blue, red-green (y-b, r-g, which accurately predict the above functions), but in the traditional multistage model of mapping cone responses to chromatic response functions. Arguably, this is due to the S cone's hypothetically signaling both blueness and redness by the same mechanism rather than by different, independent, mechanisms. Hence a new distinction or mechanism is proposed for a more accurate model, that introduces the new terms primary and secondary cone outputs. However, this distinction requires that the cones S, M, L each directly produce one of the three spectral chromatic responses b, g, y. Such a model was recently published, based on extremely high correlation of SML cone responsivities with the three spectral (bgy) chromatic responses. This model encodes the former directly onto the latter one-to-one as cone primary outputs, whilst S and L cones have a further or secondary function where each produces one of the two spectral lobes of r chromatic response. The proposed distinction between primary and secondary cone outputs is a new concept and useful tool in detailing cone outputs to chromatic channels, and provides a solution to the above "incompletely

  6. The effects of longitudinal chromatic aberration and a shift in the peak of the middle-wavelength sensitive cone fundamental on cone contrast.

    PubMed

    Rucker, F J; Osorio, D

    2008-09-01

    Longitudinal chromatic aberration is a well-known imperfection of visual optics, but the consequences in natural conditions, and for the evolution of receptor spectral sensitivities are less well understood. This paper examines how chromatic aberration affects image quality in the middle-wavelength sensitive (M-) cones, viewing broad-band spectra, over a range of spatial frequencies and focal planes. We also model the effects on M-cone contrast of moving the M-cone fundamental relative to the long- and middle-wavelength (L- and M-cone) fundamentals, while the eye is accommodated at different focal planes or at a focal plane that maximizes luminance contrast. When the focal plane shifts towards longer (650 nm) or shorter wavelengths (420 nm) the effects on M-cone contrast are large: longitudinal chromatic aberration causes total loss of M-cone contrast above 10-20 c/d. In comparison, the shift of the M-cone fundamental causes smaller effects on M-cone contrast. At 10 c/d a shift in the peak of the M-cone spectrum from 560 to 460 nm decreases M-cone contrast by 30%, while a 10 nm blue-shift causes only a minor loss of contrast. However, a noticeable loss of contrast may be seen if the eye is focused at focal planes other than that which maximizes luminance contrast. The presence of separate long- and middle-wavelength sensitive cones therefore has a small, but not insignificant cost to the retinal image via longitudinal chromatic aberration. This aberration may therefore be a factor limiting evolution of visual pigments and trichromatic color vision.

  7. Geochemical Characteristics of the Lavas from the "Adventive Cones" of Piton de La Fournaise Volcano (La Reunion Island)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valer, M.; Bachelery, P.; Schiano, P.; Upton, B. G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Piton de la Fournaise, the youngest volcano of La Réunion Island, is renowned for being frequently active. Whereas the current activity is mainly located within the "Enclos Fouqué" caldera, ~100 strombolian cones lie on the volcano's flanks, thought to date from ~300 years to a few thousand years. Our study focuses on these "adventive cones", by studying bulk-rock major and trace element compositions, mineral phase compositions and olivine-hosted melt inclusions. The Piton de la Fournaise lavas (younger than ~450 ka) have been subdivided into three compositional groups (see attached figure, and Lénat et al. 2012). Almost all recent and historical lavas belong to two of these groups: "cotectic basalts" and "olivine-rich basalts", marked by a constant CaO/Al2O3 ratio of ~0.8, and MgO content ranging from 5 to 30 wt % reflecting different degrees of olivine accumulation. The third group, called here "mid-alkaline basalts", corresponds to compositions commonly encountered for the "adventive cones". It mainly consists of magnesian basalts at 7.55 - 10.24 wt% MgO and CaO/Al2O3 values down to 0.55. At constant MgO content, this group shows higher alkali content and a relative deficiency in Ca compared to the historic basalts. The "adventive cones" lavas usually contain magnesian olivines (Fo > 86). Such crystals are not at the equilibrium with their host lava, raising thus the question of the recycling processes. According to Bureau et al. (1998; 1999), magnesian olivines come from deep storage levels. The specific geochemistry of the "adventive cones" lavas is attributed either to a high-pressure fractionation of a clinopyroxene-rich assemblage (Albarède et al. 1997), or to an assimilation process involving wehrlite-gabbro cumulates (e.g. Salaün et al. 2010). Our new data show that the source of these magmas is chemically homogeneous to that of current magmas. However, their ascent clearly bypasses the current lava reservoirs, especially the shallow magma chamber.

  8. The female athlete triad.

    PubMed

    Horn, Elizabeth; Gergen, Nicole; McGarry, Kelly A

    2014-11-03

    The female athlete triad is a spectrum of interrelated pathophysiologic consequences of low energy availability, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone mineral density. Components of the triad are not only counterproductive to athletic performance goals, but can lead to serious long-term negative health outcomes. Practitioners caring for female athletes play an important role detecting at-risk athletes early in their course along the disease spectrum. Importantly, women who are evaluated for one component of the triad should always be screened for the other two. Detecting the disorder early is the most important factor for preventing the potentially severe consequences, and requires heightened vigilance on the part of all those who work with this special patient population. In this article, we discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, evaluation, and management of the female athlete triad.

  9. Female athlete triad update.

    PubMed

    Beals, Katherine A; Meyer, Nanna L

    2007-01-01

    The passage of Title IX legislation in 1972 provided enormous opportunities for women to reap the benefits of sports participation. For most female athletes, sports participation is a positive experience, providing improved physical fitness, enhanced self-esteem, and better physical and mental health. Nonetheless, for a few female athletes, the desire for athletic success combined with the pressure to achieve a prescribed body weight may lead to the development of a triad of medical disorders including disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone mineral density (BMD)--known collectively as the female athlete triad. Alone or in combination, the disorders of the triad can have a negative impact on health and impair athletic performance.

  10. Effects of Wall Cooling on Hypersonic Boundary Layer Receptivity Over a Cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kara, K.; Balakumar, P.; Kandil, O. A.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of wall cooling on the receptivity process induced by the interaction of slow acoustic disturbances in the free-stream are numerically investigated for a boundary layer flow over a 5-degrees straight cone. The free-stream Mach number is 6.0 and the Reynolds number is 7.8x10(exp 6)/ft. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using 3rd-order total variation diminishing (T VD) Runge-K utta scheme for time integration. Computations are performed for a cone with nose radius of 0.001 inch for adiabatic wall temperature (T(sub aw)), 0.75*T(sub aw), 0.5*T(sub aw), 0.40*T(sub aw), 0.30*T(sub aw), and 0.20*T(sub aw). Once the mean flow field is computed, disturbances are introduced at the upstream end of the computational domain. Generation of instability waves from leading edge region and receptivity of boundary layer to slow acoustic waves are investigated. Computations showed that wall cooling has strong stabilization effect on the first mode disturbances as was observed in the experiments. T ransition location moved to upstream when wall cooling was applied It is also found that the boundary layer is much more receptive to fast acoustic wave (by almost a factor of 50). When simulations performed using the same forcing frequency growth of the second mode disturbances are delayed with wall cooling and they attained values two times higher than that of adiabatic case. In 0.20*T(sub aw) case the transition Reynolds number is doubled compared to adiabatic conditions. The receptivity coefficient for adiabatic wall case (804 R) is 1.5225 and for highly cooled cones (241, and 161 R); they are in the order of 10(exp -3).

  11. Competition, breeding success and ageing rates in female meerkats.

    PubMed

    Sharp, S P; Clutton-Brock, T H

    2011-08-01

    Competition between females is particularly intense in cooperatively breeding mammals, where one female monopolises reproduction in each group. Chronic competition often affects stress and may therefore have long-term consequences for fitness, but no studies have yet investigated whether intrasexual competition has effects of this kind and, in particular, whether it affects rates of reproductive senescence. Here, we use long-term data from a wild population of meerkats to test whether reproductive success and senescence in dominant females are affected by the degree of intrasexual competition experienced prior to dominance acquisition. Females that experienced greater competition had lower breeding success and higher rates of reproductive senescence. Furthermore, females that were evicted from the group more frequently as subordinates had lower breeding success when dominant. We conclude that the intense intrasexual competition between females in cooperatively breeding groups may carry fitness costs over a longer period than is usually recognised.

  12. Examining how discussing underrepresentation may mediate female engagement in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, Robynne M.; Tompkins, Reganne; Hazari, Zahra

    2013-04-01

    Despite the large number of female students taking high school physics, only about a fifth of physics bachelor's degrees are awarded to women. In a previous study, we tested five factors commonly proposed to positively impact female students' choice of a physical science career using multivariate matching methods on national survey data. Four of these factors (having a single-sex class, having female scientist guest speakers, having a female physics teacher, and discussing the work of female scientists) were found to have no effect. The only factor found to have a positive effect was the explicit discussion of the underrepresentation of women in physics. In order to explore this further, a case study of the classes of one teacher reported to discuss the underrepresentation of women was conducted. Two classroom underrepresentation discussions were recorded, students and teacher were interviewed, and relevant student work was collected. Analyzing the case study data, we report on how discussing underrepresentation may mediate female engagement in physics.

  13. The one loop gluon emission light cone wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappi, T.; Paatelainen, R.

    2017-04-01

    Light cone perturbation theory has become an essential tool to calculate cross sections for various small- x dilute-dense processes such as deep inelastic scattering and forward proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions. Here we set out to do one loop calculations in an explicit helicity basis in the four dimensional helicity scheme. As a first process we calculate light cone wave function for one gluon emission to one-loop order in Hamiltonian perturbation theory on the light front. We regulate ultraviolet divergences with transverse dimensional regularization and soft divergences using a cut-off on longitudinal momentum. We show that when all the renormalization constants are combined, the ultraviolet divergences can be absorbed into the standard QCD running coupling constant, and give an explicit expression for the remaining finite part.

  14. Light-cone fluctuations in the cosmic string spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mota, H. F.; Bezerra de Mello, E. R.; Bessa, C. H. G.; Bezerra, V. B.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we consider light-cone fluctuations arising as a consequence of the nontrivial topology of the locally flat cosmic string spacetime. By setting the light-cone along the z -direction we are able to develop a full analysis to calculate the renormalized graviton two-point function, as well as the mean square fluctuation in the geodesic interval function and the time delay (or advance) in the propagation of a light pulse. We found that all these expressions depend upon the parameter characterizing the conical topology of the cosmic string spacetime and vanish in the absence of it. We also point out that at large distances from the cosmic string the mean square fluctuation in the geodesic interval function is extremely small while in the opposite limit it logarithmically increases.

  15. Feasibility study for the Cryogenic Orbital Nitrogen Experiment (CONE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, R. S.; Crouch, M. A.; Hanna, G. J.; Cady, E. C.; Meserole, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    An improved understanding of low gravity subcritical cryogenic fluid behavior is critical for the continued development of space based systems. Although early experimental programs provided some fundamental understanding of zero gravity cryogenic fluid behavior, more extensive flight data are required to design space based cryogenic liquid storage and transfer systems with confidence. As NASA's mission concepts evolve, the demand for optimized in-space cryogenic systems is increasing. Cryogenic Orbital Nitrogen Experiment (CONE) is an attached shuttle payload experiment designed to address major technological issues associated with on-orbit storage and supply of cryogenic liquids. During its 7 day mission, CONE will conduct experiments and technology demonstrations in active and passive pressure control, stratification and mixing, liquid delivery and expulsion efficiency, and pressurant bottle recharge. These experiments, conducted with liquid nitrogen as the test fluid, will substantially extend the existing low gravity fluid data base and will provide future system designers with vital performance data from an orbital environment.

  16. Interplay between Mach cone and radial expansion in jet events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Y.; Hirano, T.

    2016-12-01

    We study the hydrodynamic response to jet propagation in the expanding QGP and investigate how the particle spectra after the hydrodynamic evolution of the QGP reflect it. We perform simulations of the space-time evolution of the QGP in gamma-jet events by solving (3+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamic equations with source terms. Mach cone is induced by the jet energy deposition and pushes back the radial flow of the expanding background. Especially in the case when the jet passage is off-central one, the number of particles emitted in the direction of the push back decreases. This is the signal including the information about the formation of the Mach cone and the jet passage in the QGP fluid.

  17. Effect of Charge Density on the Taylor Cone in Electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanger, Jonathan; Tucker, Nick; Kirwan, Kerry; Staiger, Mark P.

    A detailed understanding of charge density and its origins during the electrospinning process is desirable for developing new electrospinnable polymer-solvent systems and ensuring mathematical models of the process are accurate. In this work, two different approaches were taken to alter the charge density in order to measure its effect on the Taylor cone, mass deposition rate and initial jet diameter. It was found that an increase in charge density results in a decrease in the mass deposition rate and initial jet diameter. A theory is proposed for this behaviour in that an increase in charge density leads to the tip of the Taylor cone forming a smaller radius of curvature resulting in the concentration of electric stresses at the tip. This leads to the electrostatic forces drawing the initial jet from a smaller effective area or "virtual orifice".

  18. Dirac Cones in two-dimensional conjugated polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjizian, Jean-Joseph; Briddon, Patrick; Humbert, Bernard; Duvail, Jean-Luc; Wagner, Philipp; Adda, Coline; Ewels, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Linear electronic band dispersion and the associated Dirac physics has to date been limited to special-case materials, notably graphene and the surfaces of three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators. Here we report that it is possible to create two-dimensional fully conjugated polymer networks with corresponding conical valence and conduction bands and linear energy dispersion at the Fermi level. This is possible for a wide range of polymer types and connectors, resulting in a versatile new family of experimentally realisable materials with unique tuneable electronic properties. We demonstrate their stability on substrates and possibilities for doping and Dirac cone distortion. Notably, the cones can be maintained in 3D-layered crystals. Resembling covalent organic frameworks, these materials represent a potentially exciting new field combining the unique Dirac physics of graphene with the structural flexibility and design opportunities of organic-conjugated polymer chemistry.

  19. The female athlete.

    PubMed

    Thein, L A; Thein, J M

    1996-02-01

    Since the passage of Title IX in 1972, women's participation in physical activity and sports has increased significantly. A concurrent expansion in the body of knowledge regarding women and sports has occurred. Questions regarding menstrual dysfunction and exercise continue, while new questions about menstrual dysfunction and its effect on bone mineral density have arisen. Physical and physiological differences between men and women not only guide treatment, but help fuel policy decisions regarding competition between males and females. It is essential for the physical therapist to remain current on issues related to women and sports in order to better advise and treat the female athlete.

  20. Data consistency-driven scatter kernel optimization for x-ray cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changhwan; Park, Miran; Sung, Younghun; Lee, Jaehak; Choi, Jiyoung; Cho, Seungryong

    2015-08-01

    Accurate and efficient scatter correction is essential for acquisition of high-quality x-ray cone-beam CT (CBCT) images for various applications. This study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using the data consistency condition (DCC) as a criterion for scatter kernel optimization in scatter deconvolution methods in CBCT. As in CBCT, data consistency in the mid-plane is primarily challenged by scatter, we utilized data consistency to confirm the degree of scatter correction and to steer the update in iterative kernel optimization. By means of the parallel-beam DCC via fan-parallel rebinning, we iteratively optimized the scatter kernel parameters, using a particle swarm optimization algorithm for its computational efficiency and excellent convergence. The proposed method was validated by a simulation study using the XCAT numerical phantom and also by experimental studies using the ACS head phantom and the pelvic part of the Rando phantom. The results showed that the proposed method can effectively improve the accuracy of deconvolution-based scatter correction. Quantitative assessments of image quality parameters such as contrast and structure similarity (SSIM) revealed that the optimally selected scatter kernel improves the contrast of scatter-free images by up to 99.5%, 94.4%, and 84.4%, and of the SSIM in an XCAT study, an ACS head phantom study, and a pelvis phantom study by up to 96.7%, 90.5%, and 87.8%, respectively. The proposed method can achieve accurate and efficient scatter correction from a single cone-beam scan without need of any auxiliary hardware or additional experimentation.

  1. 126. Moses H. Cone Memorial Park. View of barbed wire ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    126. Moses H. Cone Memorial Park. View of barbed wire fence along carriage trail with a concrete box culvert for the carriage trail in the background. It is the only culvert on the parkway with stone veneer finished with a roman arch. It was constructed in 1960. Looking south-southeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  2. Holographic entanglement entropy for hollow cones and banana shaped regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Harald

    2016-06-01

    We consider banana shaped regions as examples of compact regions, whose boundary has two conical singularities. Their regularised holographic entropy is calculated with all divergent as well as finite terms. The coefficient of the squared logarithmic divergence, also in such a case with internally curved boundary, agrees with that calculated in the literature for infinite circular cones with their internally flat boundary. For the otherwise conformally invariant coefficient of the ordinary logarithmic divergence an anomaly under exceptional conformal transformations is observed.

  3. Structure of the Nucleon Spin on the Light Cone

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquini, B.

    2008-10-13

    The spin structure of the nucleon is studied in a light-cone description of the nucleon where the Fock expansion is truncated to consider only valence quarks. Transverse momentum dependent parton distributions and transverse-spin densities, defined through the generalized parton distributions in the impact parameter space, are investigated as new tools to reveal the spin-spin and spin-orbit correlations for different quark and nucleon polarizations.

  4. Evaluating Descriptive Metrics of the Human Cone Mosaic

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Robert F.; Wilk, Melissa A.; Tarima, Sergey; Carroll, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate how metrics used to describe the cone mosaic change in response to simulated photoreceptor undersampling (i.e., cell loss or misidentification). Methods Using an adaptive optics ophthalmoscope, we acquired images of the cone mosaic from the center of fixation to 10° along the temporal, superior, inferior, and nasal meridians in 20 healthy subjects. Regions of interest (n = 1780) were extracted at regular intervals along each meridian. Cone mosaic geometry was assessed using a variety of metrics − density, density recovery profile distance (DRPD), nearest neighbor distance (NND), intercell distance (ICD), farthest neighbor distance (FND), percentage of six-sided Voronoi cells, nearest neighbor regularity (NNR), number of neighbors regularity (NoNR), and Voronoi cell area regularity (VCAR). The “performance” of each metric was evaluated by determining the level of simulated loss necessary to obtain 80% statistical power. Results Of the metrics assessed, NND and DRPD were the least sensitive to undersampling, classifying mosaics that lost 50% of their coordinates as indistinguishable from normal. The NoNR was the most sensitive, detecting a significant deviation from normal with only a 10% cell loss. Conclusions The robustness of cone spacing metrics makes them unsuitable for reliably detecting small deviations from normal or for tracking small changes in the mosaic over time. In contrast, regularity metrics are more sensitive to diffuse loss and, therefore, better suited for detecting such changes, provided the fraction of misidentified cells is minimal. Combining metrics with a variety of sensitivities may provide a more complete picture of the integrity of the photoreceptor mosaic. PMID:27273598

  5. Cone venom--from accidental stings to deliberate injection.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, J M; Jones, R M

    2001-10-01

    Cone snails have long been of note due to their colorful shells and deadly venom. Over the years, a number of people who have encountered these molluscs have been injured or killed by their sting. Biochemical analysis of the venom components has revealed a plethora of peptides and proteins that target a variety of receptors and ion channels. Pharmaceutical companies are now utilizing the selectivity and potency of Conus-derived peptides to develop novel medications for pain, epilepsy and other disorders.

  6. Multi-Cone Model for Estimating GPS Ionospheric Delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Lawrence; Komjathy, Attila; Mannucci, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    The multi-cone model is a computational model for estimating ionospheric delays of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals. It is a direct descendant of the conical-domain model. A primary motivation for the development of this model is the need to find alternatives for modeling slant delays at low latitudes, where ionospheric behavior poses an acute challenge for GPS signal-delay estimates based upon the thin-shell model of the ionosphere.

  7. Cone beam CT in orthodontics: the current picture.

    PubMed

    Makdissi, Jimmy

    2013-03-01

    The introduction of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) technology to dentistry and orthodontics revolutionized the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of orthodontic patients. This review article discusses the use of CBCT in diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics. The steps required to install and operate a CBCT facility within the orthodontic practice as well as the challenges are highlighted. The available guidelines in relation to the clinical applications of CBCT in orthodontics are explored.

  8. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Durack, C; Abella, F; Shemesh, H; Roig, M; Lemberg, K

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on the applications and limitations of CBCT; (ii) make recommendations for the use of CBCT in Endodontics; (iii) highlight areas of further research of CBCT in Endodontics.

  9. Cone Beam Computed Tomography for the Implant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Angelopoulos, Christos; Aghaloo, Tara

    2017-01-01

    Cone beam CT scanning has brought a new dimension to dentistry for the implant patient. In all aspects of diagnosis, treatment planning, surgical preparation and execution, follow-up, and management of complications, we now can treat our patients with increased precision and predictability. However, as with all new technology, we must consider the added cost to the overall treatment and the risks vs. benefits to each individual patient. PMID:21094723

  10. Prevention of retrograde calculus migration with the Stone Cone.

    PubMed

    Pardalidis, N P; Papatsoris, A G; Kosmaoglou, E V

    2005-02-01

    Retrograde calculus migration during ureteroscopic lithotripsy remains a problem in 5-40% of cases. We assessed the safety and efficacy of the Stone Cone device, in comparison with the standard flat wire basket. A total of 56 consecutive patients with ureteral calculi, suitable for ureteroscopic extraction and/or lithotripsy, where included in this prospective study. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups. In group A (30 patients), we used the Stone Cone, while in group B (26 patients) we used the standard flat wire basket. The Stone Cone was placed through a cystoscope under fluoroscopic guidance, or when necessary under direct ureteroscopic control. Whenever necessary, intracorporeal electrohydraulic lithotripsy took place in both groups. Statistical significance was assessed by the paired t-test. The mean operative time was 48.5 min in group A, and 42.4 min in group B. Intact calculus extraction was possible in 16.6% in group A, and in 7.6% in group B (P < 0.01). Retrograde stone migration was revealed in 23% in group B only (P < 0.001). Also, residual fragments > 3 mm were recorded in 30.7% in group B only (P < 0.001). None of the patients in group A required auxiliary procedures, in contrary to 23% in group B (P < 0.001). No major complications were recorded in group A, while in group B a case of major ureteral mucosal abrasion was recorded. The Stone Cone is safe and efficient in preventing retrograde stone migration and in minimizing residual fragments during ureteroscopic lithotripsy in comparison with the flat wire basket.

  11. Dedicated Cone-Beam CT System for Extremity Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Al Muhit, Abdullah; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Thawait, Gaurav K.; Stayman, J. Webster; Packard, Nathan; Senn, Robert; Yang, Dong; Foos, David H.; Yorkston, John; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To provide initial assessment of image quality and dose for a cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) scanner dedicated to extremity imaging. Materials and Methods A prototype cone-beam CT scanner has been developed for imaging the extremities, including the weight-bearing lower extremities. Initial technical assessment included evaluation of radiation dose measured as a function of kilovolt peak and tube output (in milliampere seconds), contrast resolution assessed in terms of the signal difference–to-noise ratio (SDNR), spatial resolution semiquantitatively assessed by using a line-pair module from a phantom, and qualitative evaluation of cadaver images for potential diagnostic value and image artifacts by an expert CT observer (musculoskeletal radiologist). Results The dose for a nominal scan protocol (80 kVp, 108 mAs) was 9 mGy (absolute dose measured at the center of a CT dose index phantom). SDNR was maximized with the 80-kVp scan technique, and contrast resolution was sufficient for visualization of muscle, fat, ligaments and/or tendons, cartilage joint space, and bone. Spatial resolution in the axial plane exceeded 15 line pairs per centimeter. Streaks associated with x-ray scatter (in thicker regions of the patient—eg, the knee), beam hardening (about cortical bone—eg, the femoral shaft), and cone-beam artifacts (at joint space surfaces oriented along the scanning plane—eg, the interphalangeal joints) presented a slight impediment to visualization. Cadaver images (elbow, hand, knee, and foot) demonstrated excellent visibility of bone detail and good soft-tissue visibility suitable to a broad spectrum of musculoskeletal indications. Conclusion A dedicated extremity cone-beam CT scanner capable of imaging upper and lower extremities (including weight-bearing examinations) provides sufficient image quality and favorable dose characteristics to warrant further evaluation for clinical use. © RSNA, 2013 Online supplemental material is available for

  12. Hanford tank initiative cone penetrometer stand alone grouting module

    SciTech Connect

    CALLAWAY, W.S.

    1998-10-15

    The HTI subsurface characterization task will use the Hanford Cone Penetrometer platform (CPP) to deploy contaminant sensor and soil sampling probes into the vadose zone surrounding SST 241-AX-104. Closure of the resulting penetration holes may be stipulated by WAC requirements. A stand alone grouting capability deployable by the CPP has been developed. This qualification test plan defines testing of this capability to be performed at the Immobilized Low Activity Waste Disposal Complex.

  13. The Disruption of the Cytoskeleton during Semaphorin 3A induced Growth Cone Collapse Correlates with Differences in Actin Organization and Associated Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacquelyn A; Bridgman, Paul C

    2010-01-01

    Repulsive guidance cues induce growth cone collapse or collapse and retraction. Collapse results from disruption and loss of the actin cytoskeleton. Actin rich regions of growth cones contain binding proteins that influence filament organization, such as Arp2/3, cortactin, and fascin, but little is known about the role that these proteins play in collapse. Here we show that Semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A), which is repulsive to mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, has unequal effects on actin binding proteins and their associated filaments. The immunofluorescence staining intensity of Arp-2 and cortactin decreases relative to total protein, while in unextracted growth cones fascin increases. Fascin and myosin IIB staining redistribute and show increased overlap. The degree of actin filament loss during collapse correlates with filament superstructures detected by rotary shadow electron microscopy. Collapse results in the loss of branched f-actin meshworks, while actin bundles are partially retained to varying degrees. Taken together with the known affects of Sema 3A on actin, this suggests a model for collapse that follows a sequence; depolymerization of actin meshworks followed by partial depolymerization of fascin associated actin bundles and their movement to the neurite to complete collapse. The relocated fascin associated actin bundles may provide the substrate for actomyosin contractions that produce retraction. PMID:19513995

  14. Life after a Humanities Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masola, Athambile

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of a humanities graduate after leaving the academy. The author considers her own education in light of the historical changes in South Africa's education system. The article is a personal account of the questions and challenges encountered in choosing a humanities degree in a context where a tertiary education…

  15. The Top Theological Degree Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Each year, "Diverse: Issues in Higher Education" publishes a list of the Top 100 producers of associate, bachelor's and graduate degrees awarded to minority students based on research conducted by Dr. Victor M. H. Borden, professor of educational leadership and policy studies at Indiana University Bloomington. This year, for the first…

  16. The Top STEM Degree Producers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a list of the top Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) degree producers in the U.S. This list is broken down into seven categories: (1) Total Minority Research/Scholarship and Other Doctoral: Mathematics and Statistics; (2) Total Minority Bachelors: Biological and Biomedical Sciences; (3) Total Minority…

  17. Feedback-induced glutamate spillover enhances negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones

    PubMed Central

    Vroman, Rozan; Kamermans, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    Key points In the retina, horizontal cells feed back negatively to cone photoreceptors. Glutamate released from cones can spill over to neighbouring cones. Here we show that cone glutamate release induced by negative feedback can also spill over to neighbouring cones. This glutamate activates the glutamate transporter-associated chloride current in these neighbouring cones, which leads to a change in their membrane potential and thus modulates their output. In this way, feedback-induced glutamate spillover enhances negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones, thus forming an additional feedback pathway. This effect will be particularly prominent in cones that are strongly hyperpolarized by light. Abstract Inhibition in the outer retina functions via an unusual mechanism. When horizontal cells hyperpolarize the activation potential of the Ca2+ current of cones shifts to more negative potentials. The underlying mechanism consists of an ephaptic component and a Panx1/ATP-mediated component. Here we identified a third feedback component, which remains active outside the operating range of the Ca2+ current. We show that the glutamate transporters of cones can be activated by glutamate released from their neighbours. This pathway can be triggered by negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones, thus providing an additional feedback pathway. This additional pathway is mediated by a Cl− current, can be blocked by either removing the gradient of K+ or by adding the glutamate transporter blocker TBOA, or low concentrations of Zn2+. These features point to a glutamate transporter-associated Cl− current. The pathway has a delay of 4.7 ± 1.7 ms. The effectiveness of this pathway in modulating the cone output depends on the equilibrium potential of Cl− (ECl) and the membrane potential of the cone. Because estimates of ECl show that it is around the dark resting membrane potential of cones, the activation of the glutamate transporter-associated Cl− current

  18. IMPLOSION OF INDIRECTLY DRIVEN REENTRANT CONE SHELL TARGET

    SciTech Connect

    STEPHENS,RB

    2003-08-01

    OAK-B135 The authors have examined the implosion of an indirectly driven reentrant-cone shell target to clarify the issues attendant on compressing fuel for a fast ignition target. The target design is roughly hydrodynamic equivalent to a NIF cryo-ignition target, but scaled down to be driven by Omega. A sequence of backlit x-radiographs recorded each implosion. The collapse was also modeled with LASNEX, generating simulated radiographs. They compare experimental and simulated diameter, density and symmetry as functions of time near stagnation. The simulations were generally in good agreement with the experiments with respect to the shell, but did not show the opacity due to ablation of gold off the cone; non-thermal gold M-line radiation from the hohlraum wall penetrates the shell and drives this ablation causing some Au to mix into the low density center of the core and into the region between the core and cone. This might be a problem in a cryo-ignition target.

  19. Orthogonal-rotating tetrahedral scanning for cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ivan B.; Wang, Ge

    2012-10-01

    In this article, a cone-beam CT scanning mode is designed assuming four x-ray sources and a spherical sample. The x-ray sources are mounted at the vertices of a regular tetrahedron. On the circumsphere of the tetrahedron, four detection panels are mounted opposite to each vertex. To avoid x-ray interference, the largest half angle of each x-ray cone beam is 27°22', while the radius of the largest ball fully covered by all the cone beams is 0.460, when the radius of the circumsphere is 1. Several scanning schemes are proposed which consist of two rotations about orthogonal axes, such that each quarter turn provides sufficient data for theoretically exact and stable reconstruction. This design can be used in biomedical or industrial settings, such as when a sequence of reconstructions of an object is desired. Similar scanning schemes based on other regular or irregular polyhedra and various rotation speeds are also discussed.

  20. SWCX Emission from the Helium Focusing Cone - Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snowden, S. L.; Kuntz, K. D.; Collier, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary results from an XMM-Newton campaign to study solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from the heliospheric focusing cone of interstellar helium are presented. The detections of enhanced O VII and O VIII emission from the cone are at the 2(sigma) and 4(sigma) levels. The solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission in the heliosphere not associated with distinct objects (e.g., comets and planets including exospheric material in and near Earth s magnetosheath) is proportional to the flux of the solar wind and the space density of neutral material. The neutral material originates in the interstellar medium (ISM) and passes through the solar system due to the relative motion of the Sun and the ISM. The flow of the neutral material through the solar system is strongly perturbed by the Sun both by gravity and by radiation pressure. Because of the relative radiative scattering cross sections and the effect of solar gravitation the density of interstellar hydrogen near the Sun is reduced while interstellar helium is gravitationally focused. This creates a helium focusing cone downstream of the Sun [e.g., 1, and references therein].