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Sample records for dehydration condensation reaction

  1. Free energy landscape for glucose condensation and dehydration reactions in dimethyl sulfoxide and the effects of solvent.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xianghong; Liu, Dajiang

    2014-03-31

    The mechanisms and free energy surfaces (FES) for the initial critical steps during proton-catalyzed glucose condensation and dehydration reactions were elucidated in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) coupled with metadynamics (MTD) simulations. Glucose condensation reaction is initiated by protonation of C1--OH whereas dehydration reaction is initiated by protonation of C2--OH. The mechanisms in DMSO are similar to those in aqueous solution. The DMSO molecules closest to the C1--OH or C2--OH on glucose are directly involved in the reactions and act as proton acceptors during the process. However, the energy barriers are strongly solvent dependent. Moreover, polarization from the long-range electrostatic interaction affects the mechanisms and energetics of glucose reactions. Experimental measurements conducted in various DMSO/Water mixtures also show that energy barriers are solvent dependent in agreement with our theoretical results.

  2. Relation of the number of cross-links and mechanical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube films formed by a dehydration condensation reaction.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Shin-Ichi; Sato, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Go; Sasamori, Kenichiro; Kimura, Hisamichi; Hashida, Toshiyuki; Motomiya, Kenichi; Jeyadevan, Balachandran; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2006-11-23

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films were prepared by employing a condensation reaction utilizing 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) to cross-link each MWCNT with carboxylic acid and hydroxyl groups. Morphological changes in the resultant MWCNT films were monitored using scanning electron microscopy and showed that the MWCNTs were randomly intertwined in the films. The prepared MWCNT films were 17 mm in diameter and 20 microm in thickness, and the apparent density was 0.59 g/cm(3). Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy confirmed that each MWCNT modified with carboxylic acid and hydroxyl groups was cross-linked through the ester bond. It was found that the ratio of the number of ester cross-links and carbon atoms of the nanotubes per unit apparent volume (cm(3)) of condensed-MWCNT films was 5.27 x 10(-3) using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The tensile strength and Vickers hardness of condensed-MWCNT films achieved an average of 15 and 9.2 MPa, respectively, and were greater than those of free-standing MWCNT films without ester bond.

  3. The possible role of solid surface area in condensation reactions during chemical evolution - Reevaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahav, N.; Chang, S.

    1976-01-01

    Using surface concentration and reaction rate as the main criteria for the feasibility of condensation reactions, four types of prebiotic environments were analyzed: (1) an ocean-sediment system, (2) a dehydrated lagoon bed produced by evaporation, (3) the surface of a frozen sediment, and (4) a fluctuating system where hydration (rainstorms, tidal variations, flooding) and dehydration (evaporation) take place in a cyclic manner. With the possible exception of nucleotides, low adsorption of organomonomers on sediment surfaces of a prebiotic ocean (pH 8) is expected, and significant condensation is considered unlikely. In dehydrated and frozen systems, high surface concentrations are probable and condensation is more likely. In fluctuating environments, condensation rates will be enhanced and the size distribution of the oligomers formed during dehydration may be influenced by a 'redistribution mechanism' in which adsorbed oligomers and monomers are desorbed and redistributed on the solid surface during the next hydration-dehydration cycle.

  4. Dehydration

    MedlinePlus

    ... to be a little more careful. Signs of dehydration in adults include Being thirsty Urinating less often ... skin Feeling tired Dizziness and fainting Signs of dehydration in babies and young children include a dry ...

  5. Spatiotemporal evolution of dehydration reactions in subduction zones (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padron-Navarta, J.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale deep water cycling takes place through subduction zones in the Earth, making our planet unique in the solar system. This idiosyncrasy is the result of a precise but unknown balance between in-gassing and out-gassing fluxes of volatiles. Water is incorporated into hydrous minerals during seafloor alteration of the oceanic lithosphere. The cycling of volatiles is triggered by dehydration of these minerals that release fluids from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and eventually to the crust or to the deep mantle. Whereas the loci of such reactions are reasonably well established, the mechanisms of fluid migration during dehydration reactions are still barely known. One of the challenges is that dehydration reactions are dynamic features evolving in time and space. Experimental data on low-temperature dehydration reactions (i.e. gypsum) and numerical models applied to middle-crust conditions point to a complex spatiotemporal evolution of the dehydration process. The extrapolation of these inferences to subduction settings has not yet been explored but it is essential to understand the dynamism of these settings. Here I propose an alternative approach to tackle this problem through the textural study of high-pressure terrains that experienced dehydration reactions. Spatiotemporal evolution of dehydration reactions should be recorded during mineral nucleation and growth through variations in time and space of the reaction rate. Insights on the fluid migration mechanism could be inferred therefore by noting changes in the texture of prograde assemblages. The dehydration of antigorite in serpentinite is a perfect candidate to test this approach as it releases a significant amount of fluid and produces a concomitant porosity. Unusual alternation of equilibrium and disequilibrium textures observed in Cerro del Almirez (Betic Cordillera, S Spain)[1, 2] attest for a complex fluid migration pattern for one of the most relevant reactions in subduction zones

  6. The possible role of solid surface area in condensation reactions during chemical evolution: reevaluation.

    PubMed

    Lahav, N; Chang, S

    1976-12-30

    Published data on adsorption and condensation of amino acids, purine and pyrimidine bases, sugars, nucleosides, and nucleotides are analyzed in connection with Bernal's hypothesis that clays and other minerals may have provided the most likely surface for adsorption and condensation of these molecules in prebiotic times. Using surface concentration and reaction rate as the main criteria for the feasibility of condensation reactions, four types of prebiotic environments were analyzed: (1) an ocean-sediment system, (2) a dehydrated lagoon bed produced by evaporation, (3) the surface of a frozen sediment, and (4) a fluctuating system where hydration (rainstorms, tidal variations, flooding) and dehysration (evaporation) take place in a cyclic manner. With the possible exception of nucleotides, low adsorption of organomonomers on sediment surfaces of a prebiotic ocean (pH 8) is expected, and significant condensation is considered unlikely. In dehydrated and frozen systems, high surface concentrations are probable and condensation is more likely. In fluctuating environments, condensation rates will be enhanced and the size distribution of the oligomers formed during dehydration may be influenced by a "redistribution mechanism" in which adsorbed oligomers and monomers are desorbed and redistributed on the solid surface during the next hydration-dehydration cycle.

  7. Dehydrative cross-coupling reactions of allylic alcohols with olefins.

    PubMed

    Gumrukcu, Yasemin; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2014-08-25

    The direct dehydrative activation of allylic alcohols and subsequent cross-coupling with alkenes by using palladium catalyst containing a phosphoramidite ligand is described. The activation of the allyl alcohol does not require stoichiometric additives, thus allowing clean, waste-free reactions. The scope is demonstrated by application of the protocol to a series allylic alcohols and vinyl arenes, leading to variety of 1,4-diene products. Based on kinetic studies, a mechanism is proposed that involves a palladium hydride species that activates the allyl alcohol to form the allyl intermediate.

  8. Slow slip generated by dehydration reaction coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Teruo; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-10-01

    Sustained slow slip, which is a distinctive feature of slow slip events (SSEs), is investigated theoretically, assuming a fault embedded within a fluid-saturated 1D thermo-poro-elastic medium. The object of study is specifically SSEs occurring at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone in hot subduction zones, where mineral dehydrations (antigorite, lawsonite, chlorite, and glaucophane) are expected to occur near locations where deep slow slip events are observed. In the modeling, we introduce dehydration reactions, coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization, and slip evolution is assumed to interact with fluid pressure change through Coulomb's frictional stress. Our calculations show that sustained slow slip events occur when the dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Specifically, slow slip is favored by a low initial stress drop, an initial temperature of the medium close to that of the dehydration reaction equilibrium temperature, a low permeability, and overall negative volume change associated with the reaction (i.e., void space created by the reaction larger than the space occupied by the fluid released). Importantly, if we do not assume slip-induced dilatancy, slip is accelerated with time soon after the slip onset even if the dehydration reaction is assumed. This suggests that slow slip is sustained for a long time at hot subduction zones because dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Such slip-induced dilatancy may occur at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone at hot subduction zones because of repetitive occurrence of dehydration reaction there.

  9. A Puzzling Alcohol Dehydration Reaction Solved by GC-MS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelter, Michael W.; Macudzinski, Rebecca M.

    1999-06-01

    We have adapted the dehydration of 2-methyl-2-propanol to a "puzzle" approach for use in our second-semester chemistry major organic laboratory. The reaction of 2-methyl-2-propanol with ~50% sulfuric acid at 100 °C yields isobutylene, which reacts further by a "puzzling" reaction. By coupling the GC/MS analysis of the product mixture with their knowledge of the mechanism of alcohol dehydration and alkene reactivity, students are able to identify the major products of this reaction.

  10. (100) facets of γ-Al2O3: the active surfaces for alcohol dehydration reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Mei, Donghai; Peden, Charles HF; Rousseau, Roger J.; Szanyi, Janos

    2011-05-01

    Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of ethanol, and methanol dehydration reaction were studied on γ-Al2O3 in order to identify the catalytic active sites for alcohol dehydration reactions. Two high temperature (> 473 K) desorption features were observed following ethanol adsorption. Samples calcined at T≤473 K displayed a desorption feature in the 523-533 K temperature range, while those calcined at T ≥ 673 K showed a single desorption feature at 498 K. The switch from the high to low temperature ethanol desorption correlated well with the dehydroxylation of the (100) facets of γ-Al2O3 that was predicted at 550 K DFT calculations. Theoretical DFT simulations of the mechanism of dehydration. on clean and hydroxylated γ-Al2O3(100) surfaces, find that a concerted elimination of ethylene from an ethanol molecule chemisorbed at an Al3+ pentacoordinated site is the rate limiting step for catalytic cycle on both surfaces. Furthermore, titration of the pentacoordinate Al3+ sites on the (100) facets of γ-Al2O3 by BaO completely turned off the methanol dehydration reaction activity. These results unambiguously demonstrate that only the (100) facets on γ-Al2O3 are the catalytic active surfaces for alcohol dehydration.

  11. Multicomponent Condensation Reactions via ortho-Quinone Methides.

    PubMed

    Allen, Emily E; Zhu, Calvin; Panek, James S; Schaus, Scott E

    2017-03-30

    Iron(III) salts promote the condensation of aldehydes or acetals with electron-rich phenols to generate ortho-quinone methides that undergo Diels-Alder condensations with alkenes. The reaction sequence occurs in a single vessel to afford benzopyrans in up to 95% yield. The reaction was discovered while investigating a two-component strategy using 2-(hydroxy(phenyl)methyl)phenols to access the desired ortho-quinone methide in a Diels-Alder condensation. The two-component condensation also afforded the corresponding benzopyran products in yields up to 97%. Taken together, the two- and three-component strategies using ortho-quinone methide intermediates provide efficient access to benzopyrans in good yields and selectivities.

  12. Lewis acid catalyzed cascade reaction to carbazoles and naphthalenes via dehydrative [3 + 3]-annulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoyin; Chai, Zhuo; Wei, Yun; Zhu, Xiancui; Zhou, Shuangliu; Wang, Shaowu

    2014-07-03

    A novel Lewis acid catalyzed dehydrative [3 + 3]-annulation of readily available benzylic alcohols and propargylic alcohols was developed to give polysubstituted carbazoles and naphthalenes in moderate to good yields with water as the only byproduct. The reaction was presumed to proceed via a cascade process involving Friedel-Crafts-type allenylation, 1,5-hydride shift, 6π-eletrocyclization, and Wagner-Meerwein rearrangement.

  13. Unconventional application of the Mitsunobu reaction: Selective flavonolignan dehydration yielding hydnocarpins

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guozheng; Schramm, Simon; Heilmann, Jörg; Biedermann, David; Křen, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Summary Various Mitsunobu conditions were investigated for a series of flavonolignans (silybin A, silybin B, isosilybin A, and silychristin A) to achieve either selective esterification in position C-23 or dehydration in a one-pot reaction yielding the biologically important enantiomers of hydnocarpin D, hydnocarpin and isohydnocarpin, respectively. This represents the only one-pot semi-synthetic method to access these flavonolignans in high yields. PMID:27340458

  14. Theoretical study of the reactions of 2-chlorophenol over the dehydrated and hydroxylated silica clusters.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wenxiao; Zhong, Wenhui; Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Chengbu

    2012-01-12

    Silica is the main component of combustion-generated fly ash and is expected to have an important impact on the formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in municipal waste incinerators. In this work, we theoretically studied the reactions of 2-chlorinated phenol (2-CP) over the clusters (SiO(2))(3) and (SiO(2))(3)O(2)H(4), which mimic the dehydrated and hydroxylated silica structures, respectively. The dehydrated cluster is much more active toward the attack of 2-CP to form highly stable 2-chlorophenolate than the hydroxylated silica cluster. The further dissociation of chlorophenolates to form CP radicals (CPRs) is calculated to be very difficult. The calculated energy barrier of the reaction of 2-CP over the dehydrated (SiO(2))(3) cluster and IR data are in good agreement with early experimental observations. On the basis of the calculated results, we propose that the formation of PCDD/Fs from CPs over silica surfaces may not involve CPRs, but be relevant to the further conversion of chlorophenolates over silica surfaces. This mechanism is very different from the corresponding reactions mediated by transition metal oxides. The results presented here may be helpful to understand the chemisorption mechanism of CPs on silica surfaces in real waste combustion.

  15. Detonation Reaction Zones in Condensed Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2005-07-14

    Experimental measurements using nanosecond time resolved embedded gauges and laser interferometric techniques, combined with Non-Equilibrium Zeldovich--von Neumann--Doring (NEZND) theory and Ignition and Growth reactive flow hydrodynamic modeling, have revealed the average pressure/particle velocity states attained in reaction zones of self-sustaining detonation waves in several solid and liquid explosives. The time durations of these reaction zone processes is discussed for explosives based on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), nitromethane, octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), triaminitrinitrobenzene(TATB) and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  16. Reversion and dehydration reactions of glucose during the dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The inaccessibility of all glycosidic bonds necessitates industrial conversion schemes which employ a dilute acid catalyst at high temperatures. Process conditions also promote further reactions of glucose via the reversion and dehydration pathways. Quantitative determination of the yields of the major reversion and dehydration products is important for understanding and predicting the amounts of these materials expected under envisioned industrial operating conditions. Microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) was hydrolyzed with sulfuric acid (0.0-1.25 wt.%), at high temperatures (160-250/sup 0/C), and at a 3:1 liquid-to-solid ratio. The hydrolysis was monitored by evaluating the amount of cellulose remaining and the yields of glucose, solid humin, levulinic acid, formic acid, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), and reversion products as a function of the aforementioned reaction conditions. Analysis of the reversion products required the development of a technique for the quantitation of trace carbohydrates in complex mixtures and led to the development of a reduction/permethylation gas chromatographic procedure. Cellulose hydrolysis followed pseudo-homogeneous first-order kinetics. Glucose yield was adequately described as consecutive first-order reactions. Anhydrosugars formed via reversion followed equilibrium reaction kinetics whereas the disaccharides did not. Total reversion product yields approached 10% at 250/sup 0/C. Quantitative determination of the major dehydration products provided important information concerning the destruction of glucose. HMF was produced in up to 12% yields based on the theoretical amount of glucose available, and furfural was detected in up to 5% yields. A carbon mass balance based on the determined product yields revealed that approximately 90% of all carbon was accounted for at maximum glucose yields.

  17. Direct Assembly of Prenylated Heteroarenes through a Cascade Minisci Reaction/Dehydration Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dong‐Hang; Zeng, Yao‐Fu; Liu, Yao; Lv, Wen‐Xin; Li, Qingjiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The prenyl group is an important component in bioactive compounds. Herein, we report the assembly of prenylated heteroarenes through a cascade Minisci reaction and acid‐promoted dehydration sequence. The use of potassium (3‐hydroxy‐3‐methylbut‐1‐yl)trifluoroborate as a new coupling reagent allows the direct introduction of prenyl and 3‐hydroxy‐3‐methylbutyl groups to a wide variety of electron‐deficient heteroarenes. Synthetic application is also demonstrated. PMID:28032022

  18. Modeling reaction fronts of separated condensed phase reactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koundinyan, Sushilkumar; Stewart, D. Scott; Matalon, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    We present a Gibbs free energy approach to modeling reaction fronts in condensed phase reactive materials. The current interest is in chemical reactions of condensed phase reactants that are initially separated. In energetic materials such reactions are observed to occur extremely fast and at relatively sharp fronts. The condensed phase combustion process differs in several aspects from classical gaseous combustion due to the disparity between the characteristic thermal conductivity length and the mass diffusion lengths and a volume, temperature, stress, mass fraction equation of state that principally depends only on the component reference volumes and the current mixture composition. To retain a simple planar configuration, we consider the two reactants, in solid phase, are in motion towards each other characterized by counter-flow geometry. We apply the model to a simplified Titanium-Boron system and present the analysis of reaction zone length for various strain rates. The numerical results are validated with asymptotic approximations at the Burke-Schumann (complete combustion) limit.

  19. Modeling the Reactions of Energetic Materials in the Condensed Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E; Manaa, M R; Lewis, J P

    2003-12-03

    High explosive (HE) materials are unique for having a strong exothermic reactivity, which has made them desirable for both military and commercial applications. Although the history of HE materials is long, condensed-phase properties are poorly understood. Understanding the condensed-phase properties of HE materials is important for determining stability and performance. Information regarding HE material properties (for example, the physical, chemical, and mechanical behaviors of the constituents in plastic-bonded explosive, or PBX, formulations) is necessary in efficiently building the next generation of explosives as the quest for more powerful energetic materials (in terms of energy per volume) moves forward. In addition, understanding the reaction mechanisms has important ramifications in disposing of such materials safely and cheaply, as there exist vast stockpiles of HE materials with corresponding contamination of earth and groundwater at these sites, as well as a military testing sites The ability to model chemical reaction processes in condensed phase energetic materials is rapidly progressing. Chemical equilibrium modeling is a mature technique with some limitations. Progress in this area continues, but is hampered by a lack of knowledge of condensed phase reaction mechanisms and rates. Atomistic modeling is much more computationally intensive, and is currently limited to very short time scales. Nonetheless, this methodology promises to yield the first reliable insights into the condensed phase processes responsible for high explosive detonation. Further work is necessary to extend the timescales involved in atomistic simulations. Recent work in implementing thermostat methods appropriate to shocks may promise to overcome some of these difficulties. Most current work on energetic material reactivity assumes that electronically adiabatic processes dominate. The role of excited states is becoming clearer, however. These states are not accessible in perfect

  20. Shock-Induced Chemical Reactions in Condensed Matter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    Technical, 4/1/78 - 6/30/82 Matter 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMUER(e) George E. Duvall, Principal Investigator...CHEMICAL REACTIONS IN CONDENSED MATTER George E. Duvall, Principal Investigator Stephen A. Sheffield* Kendal M. OgilvieT 4 C. Robert Wilson Paul...Temperture," in Sixth Symposium (International on Detonation (Office of Naval Research, Arlington, 1976), ACR-Z21, p. 36. 24. G. Gamow , "Tentative

  1. Modeling reaction fronts of separated condensed phase reactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koundinyan, Sushilkumar; Matalon, Moshe; Stewart, D. Scott; Bdzil, John

    2015-06-01

    We present a Gibbs free energy approach to modeling reaction fronts in condensed phase reactive materials. The current interest is in chemical reactions of condensed phase reactants that are initially separated. In energetic materials such reactions are observed to occur extremely fast and at relatively sharp fronts. The solid-to-solid combustion process differs in several aspects from classical gaseous combustion due to the disparity between the characteristic thermal conductivity length and the mass diffusion lengths and a volume, temperature, stress, mass fraction equation of state that principally depends only on the component reference volumes and the current mixture composition. To retain a simple planar configuration, we consider the two reactants, in solid phase, are in motion towards each other characterized by counter-flow geometry. We apply the model to a simplified Titanium-Boron system and present the analysis of reaction zone length for various strain rates. The numerical results are validated with asymptotic approximations at the Burke-Schumann limit. Supported by HDTRA1-10-1-0020 (DTRA), AF Sub MO C00039417-1 (AFOSR/TRE).

  2. Mechanistic insights into the rhenium-catalyzed alcohol-to-olefin dehydration reaction.

    PubMed

    Korstanje, Ties J; Jastrzebski, Johann T B H; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M

    2013-09-23

    Rhenium-based complexes are powerful catalysts for the dehydration of various alcohols to the corresponding olefins. Here, we report on both experimental and theoretical (DFT) studies into the mechanism of the rhenium-catalyzed dehydration of alcohols to olefins in general, and the methyltrioxorhenium-catalyzed dehydration of 1-phenylethanol to styrene in particular. The experimental and theoretical studies are in good agreement, both showing the involvement of several proton transfers, and of a carbenium ion intermediate in the catalytic cycle.

  3. The reaction mechanism for dehydration process catalyzed by type I dehydroquinate dehydratase from Gram-negative Salmonella enterica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    The fundamental reaction mechanism for the dehydration process catalyzed by type I dehydroquinate dehydratase from Gram-negative Salmonella enterica has been studied by density functional theory calculations. The results indicate that the dehydration process undergoes a two-step cis-elimination mechanism, which is different from the previously proposed one. The catalytic roles of both the highly conserved residue His143 and the Schiff base formed between the substrate and Lys170 have also been elucidated. The structural and mechanistic insight presented here may direct the design of type I dehydroquinate dehydratase enzyme inhibitors as non-toxic antimicrobials, anti-fungals, and herbicides.

  4. Solvation mechanisms of nedocromil sodium from activation energy and reaction enthalpy measurements of dehydration and dealcoholation.

    PubMed

    Richards, Alison C; McColm, Ian J; Harness, J Barrie

    2002-04-01

    Two independent athermal methods of analysis have been used to determine the activation energies associated with the dehydration of nedocromil sodium hydrates. For the highest temperature reaction, monohydrate to the anhydrate, the differences in the measured activation energies indicate a three-dimensional nucleation mechanism in the bulk of the crystal with subsequent three-dimensional anhydrate crystal growth. The number of critical nuclei varies inversely with heating rate. Measured enthalpy values for successive removal of water molecules at 31.7 +/- 1.0, 91.3 +/- 0.8, and 193 +/- 0.6 degrees C are the same, within experimental error, at 21.6 +/- 2.6 kJ (mol H(2)O)(-1), as determined from differential thermal analysis traces. This result implies that an earlier concept of "strong" and "weak" water binding is not relevant and temperatures at which H(2)O molecules are removed is related to nucleation effects and not bond energies. The low temperature shoulder on the 91.3 degrees C peak is identified as an effect arising from open pan analysis conditions. The appearance of "transient" peaks in the conditioning stage of nedocromil sodium trihydrate thermal analysis experiments have been investigated and an explanation based on the presence of alcoholates [(NS)(4) small middle dot 5CH(3)OH, (NS)(5) small middle dot 9C(2)H(5)OH, and (NS)(2) small middle dot C(3)H(7)OH] in the preparations is proposed.

  5. Homogeneous catalysis on the gas-phase dehydration reaction of tertiary alcohols by hydrogen bromide. Density functional theory calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Alexis; Rosas, Felix; Mora, Jose R.; Brusco, Yannely; Córdova-Sintjago, Tania C.; Chuchani, Gabriel

    2015-02-01

    The gas-phase thermal dehydration mechanism of tert-butanol, 2-methyl-2-butanol, 2-methyl-2-pentanol and 2,3-dimethyl-2-butanol by homogeneous catalysis of hydrogen bromide was examined by density functional theory calculations with the hybrid functionals: M062X, CAMB3LYP and WB97XD. Reasonable agreements were found between theoretical and experimental enthalpy values at the WB97XD/6-311++G(d,p) level. The dehydration mechanism of tert-butanol with and without catalysis was evaluated in order to examine the catalyst effect on the mechanism. The elimination reaction without catalysis involves a four-membered transition state (TS), while the reaction with catalysis involves a six-membered TS. The mechanism without catalysis has enthalpy activation over 150 kJ mol-1 greater than the catalysed reaction. In all these reactions, the elongation of the C-O bond is significant in the TS. The un-catalysed reaction is controlled by breaking of C-O bond, and it was found to be more synchronous (Sy ≈ 0.91) than the hydrogen bromide catalysed reactions (Sy ≈ 0.75-0.78); the latter reactions are dominated by the three reaction coordinates associated with water formation. No significant effect on the enthalpies of activation was observed when the size of the alkyl chain was increased.

  6. Theoretical insights into the sites and mechanisms for base catalyzed esterification and aldol condensation reactions over Cu.

    PubMed

    Neurock, Matthew; Tao, Zhiyuan; Chemburkar, Ashwin; Hibbitts, David D; Iglesia, Enrique

    2017-03-23

    metal oxide catalysts, that rapidly catalyze dehydration of the hemiacetal or hemiacetalate over decarbonylation. The basic surface propoxide that forms on Cu can also attack the carbonyl of a surface propanal to form propyl propionate. Theoretical results indicate that the rates for both aldol condensation and esterification are controlled by reactions between surface propoxide and propanal intermediates. In the condensation reaction, the alkoxide abstracts the weakly acidic hydrogen of the Cα-H of the adsorbed alkanal to form the surface enolate whereas in the esterification reaction the alkoxide nucleophilically attacks the carbonyl group of a vicinal bound alkanal. As both condensation and esterification involve reactions between the same two species in the rate-limiting step, they result in the same rate expression which is consistent with experimental results. The theoretical results indicate that the barriers between condensation and esterification are within 3 kJ mol(-1) of one another with esterification being slightly more favored. Experimental results also report small differences in the activation barriers but suggest that condensation is slightly preferred.

  7. Quaternary Sediment Accumulation in the Aleutian Trench: Implications for Dehydration Reaction Progress and Pore Pressure Development Offshore Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meridth, L. N.; Screaton, E.; Jaeger, J. M.; James, S. R.; Villaseñor, T. G.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment inputs to subduction zones impart a significant control on diagenetic reaction progress, fluid production and pore pressure development and thus affect hydrologic and tectonic behavior during subduction. Intensified glaciation following the mid-Pleistocene transition increased sediment flux to the Gulf of Alaska. Rapid sediment accumulation (>1 km/my) in the Aleutian Trench increases overburden and should accelerate dehydration of hydrous sedimentary components by elevating temperatures in the incoming sediment column. These processes have the potential to generate fluid overpressures in the mud-dominated, low permeability sediments deposited on the incoming plate, offshore SE Alaska. Mineralogical analyses on incoming sediments from Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 18 and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 341 show that both smectite and Opal-A are present as hydrous mineral phases. A 1-D numerical model was developed to track dehydration reaction progress and pore pressures in the incoming sediment column from the abyssal plain to the Aleutian Trench. Simulated temperatures in the incoming column increase due to the insulating effect of trench sediments. As a result, trench sedimentation causes smectite dehydration to begin and Opal-A dehydration to nearly reach completion at the deformation front. Simulated excess pore pressures in the proto-decollement zone increase from nearly hydrostatic to almost half of lithostatic due to the rapid deposition of trench sediments. The 1-D modeling results were incorporated into a 2-D model that follows the underthrust column at the deformation front into the subduction zone. Simulated results of the 2-D flow model illustrate the effects of lateral flow on pore pressure distribution following subduction.

  8. Mining chemical reactions using neighborhood behavior and condensed graphs of reactions approaches.

    PubMed

    de Luca, Aurélie; Horvath, Dragos; Marcou, Gilles; Solov'ev, Vitaly; Varnek, Alexandre

    2012-09-24

    This work addresses the problem of similarity search and classification of chemical reactions using Neighborhood Behavior (NB) and Condensed Graphs of Reaction (CGR) approaches. The CGR formalism represents chemical reactions as a classical molecular graph with dynamic bonds, enabling descriptor calculations on this graph. Different types of the ISIDA fragment descriptors generated for CGRs in combination with two metrics--Tanimoto and Euclidean--were considered as chemical spaces, to serve for reaction dissimilarity scoring. The NB method has been used to select an optimal combination of descriptors which distinguish different types of chemical reactions in a database containing 8544 reactions of 9 classes. Relevance of NB analysis has been validated in generic (multiclass) similarity search and in clustering with Self-Organizing Maps (SOM). NB-compliant sets of descriptors were shown to display enhanced mapping propensities, allowing the construction of better Self-Organizing Maps and similarity searches (NB and classical similarity search criteria--AUC ROC--correlate at a level of 0.7). The analysis of the SOM clusters proved chemically meaningful CGR substructures representing specific reaction signatures.

  9. Simultaneous observations of reaction kinetics, creep behavior, and AE activities during syndeformational antigorite dehydration at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, T.; Iwasato, T.; Higo, Y.; Kato, T.; Kaneshima, S.; Uehara, S.; Koizumi, S.; Imamura, M.; Tange, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Intermediate-depth earthquakes are seismic activities in Wadati-Benioff zone at depths from 60 km to 300 km, where subducting plates deform plastically rather than brittle failure. Although it has been reported that unstable faulting occurred during antigorite dehydration even at higher pressures than ~2 GPa (e.g., Jung et al., 2009), the recent study by Chernak and Hirth (2011) revealed that the syndefromational antigorite dehydration does not produces stick-slip instabilities but stable fault slip. In the present study, we newly developed an AE monitoring system for high-pressure reaction-deformation processes combined with D-DIA and synchrotron monochromatic X-ray to observe reaction kinetics, creep behaviors, and AE activities simultaneously. We applied this technique to investigate shear instability during syndeformational antigorite dehydration. High-pressure deformation experiments were conducted up to ~8 GPa, ~1050 K, and strain rates of 3.4-9.2 x 10-5 s-1 in compression using a D-DIA type apparatus installed at BL-04B1, SPring-8. 50 keV mono X-ray were used to measure reaction kinetics and stress-strain data. To monitor shear instabilities by detecting AEs, six piezoelectric devices were positioned between first and second stage anvils of MA 6-6 type system. We used three kinds of starting materials of polycrystalline antigorite, fine-grained forsterite polycrystal, and two-phase mixtures of antigorite and San Carlos olivine (10%, 30%, and 50%atg). Clear contrasts were observed in AE activities between forsterite and antigorite samples. AE activities detected within the forsterite polycrystal suggested (semi) brittle behaviors at low pressures during the cold compression stage.
Almost no AEs were detected within the antigorite samples during any stages of cold compression, ramping, deformation, and syndeformational dehydration although localized deformation textures were observed in recovered samples. Instead, we detected some AEs outside the sample

  10. Dicarboxylic acid anhydride condensation with compounds containing active methylene groups. 4: Some 4-nitrophthalic anhydride condensation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oskaja, V.; Rotberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    By 4-nitrophthalic anhydride condensation with acetoacetate in acetic anhydride and triethylamine solution with subsequent breakdown of the intermediate condensation product, 5-nitroindanedione-1,3 was obtained. A 4-nitrophthalic anhydride with acetic anhydride, according to reaction conditions, may yield two products: in the presence of potassium acetate and at high temperatures 4-(or 5-)-nitro-2-acetylbenzoic acid is formed: in the presence of triethylamine and at room temperature 5-( or 6-)-nitrophthalic acetic acid is isolated. A 4-nitrophthalic anhydride and malonic acid in pyridine solution according to temperature yield either 5-( or 6-)-nitrophthalic acetic acid or 4-(or 5-)-nitro-2-acetylbenzoic acid.

  11. Direct and Indirect Determinations of Elementary Rate Constants H + O2: Chain Branching; the Dehydration of tertiary-Butanol; the Retro Diels-Alder Reaction of Cyclohexene; the Dehydration of Isopropanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyne, Joshua S.

    Due to growing environmental concern over the continued use of fossil fuels, methods to limit emissions and partially replace fossil fuel use with renewable biofuels are of considerable interest. Developing chemical kinetic models for the chemistry that affects combustion properties is important to understanding how new fuels affect combustion energy conversion processes in transportation devices. This thesis reports the experimental study of several important reactions (the H + O2 branching reaction, the key decomposition reactions of tertiary-butanol, the dehydration reaction of isopropanol, and the retro Diels-Alder reaction of cyclohexene) and develops robust analysis methods to estimate the absolute uncertainties of specific elementary rate constants derived from the experimental data. In the study of the above reactions, both a direct and indirect rate constant determination technique with associated uncertainty estimation methodologies are developed. In the study of the decomposition reactions, a direct determination technique is applied to experimental data gathered in preparation of this thesis. In the case of the dehydration reaction of tertiary-butanol and the retro Diels-Alder reaction of cyclohexene, both of which are used as internal standards for relative rate studies (Herzler et al. 1997) and chemical thermometry (Rosado-Reyes et al. 2013) , analysis showed an ˜20 K difference in the reaction rate between the reported results and the previous recommendations. In light of these discrepancies, an uncertainty estimation of previous recommendations illuminated an uncertainty of at least 20 K for the dehydration reaction of tertiary-butanol and the retro Diels-Alder reaction of cyclohexene, thus resolving the discrepancies. The determination of the H + O2 branching reaction and decomposition reactions of isopropanol used an indirect determination technique. The uncertainty of the H + O2 branching reaction rate is shown to be underestimated by previous

  12. A Solvent-Free Claisen Condensation Reaction for the Organic Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteb, John J.; Stockton, Matthew B.

    2003-12-01

    An experiment involving the Claisen condensation reaction for a first-year organic chemistry laboratory is presented. Claisen condensations are routinely covered in organic textbooks but owing to the long reaction times required to reach equilibrium in solution they are seldom explored in the undergraduate teaching laboratory. In this experiment, potassium tert-butoxide and ethyl phenylacetate are heated to 100 °C for 30 minutes under solvent-free conditions to produce 2,4-diphenyl acetoacetate in 80% yield. The solvent-free nature of this procedure greatly reduces the quantity of waste generated by students relative to typical carbonyl condensation experiments.

  13. The effects of water on beta-D-xylose condensation reactions.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haitao; Nimlos, Mark R; Himmel, Michael E; Johnson, David K; Qian, Xianghong

    2009-07-30

    Car-Parrinello-based ab initio molecular dynamics simulations (CPMD) combined with metadynamics (MTD) simulations were used to determine the reaction energetics for the beta-D-xylose condensation reaction to form beta-1,4-linked xylobiose in a dilute acid solution. Protonation of the hydroxyl group on the xylose molecule and the subsequent breaking of the C-O bond were found to be the rate-limiting step during the xylose condensation reaction. Water and water structure was found to play a critical role in these reactions due to the proton's high affinity for water molecules. The reaction free energy and reaction barrier were determined using CPMD-MTD. We found that solvent reorganization due to proton partial desolvation must be taken into account in order to obtain the correct reaction activation energy. Our calculated reaction free energy and reaction activation energy compare well with available experimental results.

  14. Kinetic versus Thermodynamic Control in the Dehydration of 2-Methylcyclopentanol: A Two-Part Laboratory Experiment Utilizing the Gignard Reaction and GC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Thomas; Mundy, Bradford P.; McIntyre, Jean; Woods, Lesley; Favaloro, Frank G., Jr.; Goudreau, Christina A.

    1997-10-01

    A two part organic laboratory experiment illustrating the Grignard reaction and the concept of kinetic versus thermodynamic control is described. The reaction of phenylmagnesium bromide with 2-methylcyclopentanone yileds an unsymmetrical benzylic alcohol which can be dehydrated using toluenesulfonic acid to give predominately the less substituted alkene. Application of heat to the reaction mixture over a period of two hours reverses the trend to give the more substituted alkene as the major product in 91% relative yield. The dehydration is monitored by GC/MS and the experiment can be performed using macro and microscale techniques.

  15. Chitosan as a reusable solid base catalyst for Knoevenagel condensation reaction.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Balasubramanian; Dhakshinamoorthy, Amarajothi

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, the commercially available chitosan is reported as a heterogeneous solid base catalyst for Knoevenagel condensation reaction of carbonyl compounds with malononitrile under mild reaction conditions. Chitosan is characterized by powder XRD, IR and elemental analysis. The catalytic activity of chitosan is evaluated in Knoevenagel condensation reaction of benzaldehyde and malononitrile as model substrates and the optimized reaction conditions are further used to expand its activity with various substrates. In addition, the catalyst stability is also examined by performing reusability, leaching experiments and it is observed that the catalyst can be reused for four times with no significant drop in its activity.

  16. On the reaction mechanism of tirapazamine reduction chemistry: unimolecular N-OH homolysis, stepwise dehydration, or triazene ring-opening.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jian; Glaser, Rainer; Gates, Kent S

    2012-03-19

    The initial steps of the activation of tirapazamine (TPZ, 1, 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-N,N-dioxide) under hypoxic conditions consist of the one-electron reduction of 1 to radical anion 2 and the protonation of 2 at O(N4) or O(N1) to form neutral radicals 3 and 4, respectively. There are some questions, however, as to whether radicals 3 and/or 4 will then undergo N-OH homolyses 3 → 5 + ·OH and 4 → 6 + ·OH or, alternatively, whether 3 and/or 4 may react by dehydration and form aminyl radicals via 3 → 11 + H(2)O and 4 → 12 + H(2)O or phenyl radicals via 3 → 17 + H(2)O. These outcomes might depend on the chemistry after the homolysis of 3 and/or 4, that is, dehydration may be the result of a two-step sequence that involves N-OH homolysis and formation of ·OH aggregates of 5 and 6 followed by H-abstraction within the ·OH aggregates to form hydrates of aminyls 11 and 12 or of phenyl 17. We studied these processes with configuration interaction theory, perturbation theory, and density functional theory. All stationary structures of OH aggregates of 5 and 6, of H(2)O aggregates of 11, 12, and 17, and of the transition state structures for H-abstraction were located and characterized by vibrational analysis and with methods of electron and spin-density analysis. The doublet radical 17 is a normal spin-polarized radical, whereas the doublet radicals 11 and 12 feature quartet instabilities. The computed reaction energies and activation barriers allow for dehydration in principle, but the productivity of all of these channels should be low for kinetic and dynamic reasons. With a view to plausible scenarios for the generation of latent aryl radical species without dehydration, we scanned the potential energy surfaces of 2-4 as a function of the (O)N1-Y (Y = C5a, N2) and (O)N4-Z (Z = C4a, C3) bond lengths. The elongation of any one of these bonds by 0.5 Å requires less than 25 kcal/mol, and this finding strongly suggests the possibility of bimolecular

  17. Enantioselective Multicomponent Condensation Reactions of Phenols, Aldehydes, and Boronates Catalyzed by Chiral Biphenols.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Keith S; Luan, Yi; Ramella, Daniele; Panek, James S; Schaus, Scott E

    2015-12-04

    Chiral diols and biphenols catalyze the multicomponent condensation reaction of phenols, aldehydes, and alkenyl or aryl boronates. The condensation products are formed in good yields and enantioselectivities. The reaction proceeds via an initial Friedel-Crafts alkylation of the aldehyde and phenol to yield an ortho-quinone methide that undergoes an enantioselective boronate addition. A cyclization pathway was discovered while exploring the scope of the reaction that provides access to chiral 2,4-diaryl chroman products, the core of which is a structural motif found in natural products.

  18. Enantioselective Multicomponent Condensation Reactions of Phenols, Aldehydes, and Boronates Catalyzed by Chiral Biphenols

    PubMed Central

    Barbato, Keith S.; Luan, Yi; Ramella, Daniele; Panek, James S.; Schaus, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Chiral diols and biphenols catalyze the multicomponent condensation reaction of phenols, aldehydes, and alkenyl or aryl boronates. The condensation products are formed in good yields and enantioselectivities. The reaction proceeds via an initial Friedel Crafts alkylation of the aldehyde and phenol to yield an ortho-quinone methide that undergoes an enantioselective boronate addition. A cyclization pathway was discovered while exploring the scope of the reaction that provides access to chiral 2,4-diaryl chroman products, the core of which is a structural motif found in natural products. PMID:26576776

  19. Forward Analyses of Dehydration Reactions in Mafic Rocks Along the P-T Trajectories of the Subducting Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwatani, T.; Okamoto, A.; Toriumi, M.

    2005-12-01

    Fluids in the subduction zone play an important role in magmatism, metamorphism, and mechanical processes involving seismic activity. Additionally, recent geophysical researches found low-frequency tremors which may be related to the movement of fluid (Obara, 2002) and a zone of high Poisson_fs ratio which reflects high pore fluid pressure (Kodaira et al.,2004) in the Southwest Japan fore-arc. It is widely accepted that these fluids are supplied by the dehydration of hydrous metamorphic minerals in the subducting oceanic plate. Although many previous studies attempted to estimate the water content of the subducting oceanic crust experimentally and theoretically (e.g., Schmidt and Poli, 1998; Hacker et al., 2003), there have been no studies which quantify the continuous dehydration reactions in detail. The aim of this study is to quantify the progress of the continuous dehydration reactions of mafic rocks in the condition of greenschist facies, corresponding to low-intermediate depth (10-50km) of warm subduction zone. We use the differential thermodynamics (Spear 1993) which include mass balance to predict the continuous metamorphic reaction history of mafic rocks along the P-T trajectory of the subducting slab. With fixed bulk chemical composition the thermodynamic system is divariant, as specified in Duhem_fs theorem. In differential thermodynamics, applying a series of changes in pressure and temperature (ΔP and ΔT, respectively) from initial conditions (P0, T0, X0s, M0s), we can trace ΔXs and ΔMs, that is, the progress (history) of the metamorphic reactions along the arbitrary P-T trajectory (Thermodynamic forward modeling). According to Okamoto and Toriumi, 2001, we modeled the greenschist/ blueschist/ (epidote -) amphibolite assemblage of mafic rocks, which consist of the following phases: Amphibole ± Epidote ± Chlorite + Plagioclase + Quartz + Fluid (H2O), in the system of Na2O - CaO - MgO - FeO - Fe2O3 - Al2O3 - SiO2 - H2O. The reference compositions

  20. Chemical Probes Allow Structural Insight into the Condensation Reaction of Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases.

    PubMed

    Bloudoff, Kristjan; Alonzo, Diego A; Schmeing, T Martin

    2016-03-17

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) synthesize a vast variety of small molecules, including antibiotics, antitumors, and immunosuppressants. The NRPS condensation (C) domain catalyzes amide bond formation, the central chemical step in nonribosomal peptide synthesis. The catalytic mechanism and substrate determinants of the reaction are under debate. We developed chemical probes to structurally study the NRPS condensation reaction. These substrate analogs become covalently tethered to a cysteine introduced near the active site, to mimic covalent substrate delivery by carrier domains. They are competent substrates in the condensation reaction and behave similarly to native substrates. Co-crystal structures show C domain-substrate interactions, and suggest that the catalytic histidine's principle role is to position the α-amino group for nucleophilic attack. Structural insight provided by these co-complexes also allowed us to alter the substrate specificity profile of the reaction with a single point mutation.

  1. Elemental sulfur disproportionation in the redox condensation reaction between o-halonitrobenzenes and benzylamines.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Binh; Ermolenko, Ludmila; Retailleau, Pascal; Al-Mourabit, Ali

    2014-12-08

    The disproportionation of elemental sulfur at moderate temperatures is investigated in the redox condensation involving o-halonitrobenzenes 1 and benzylamines 2. As a redox moderator, elemental sulfur plays the dual role of both electron donor and acceptor, generating its lowest and highest oxidation states: S(-2) (sulfide equivalent) in benzothiazole 3 and S(+6) (sulfate equivalent) in sulfamate 4, and filling the electron gap of the global redox condensation process. Along with this process, a cascade of reactions of reduction of the nitro group of 1, oxidation of the aminomethyl group of 2, metal-free aromatic halogen substitution, and condensation finally led to 2-arylbenzothiazoles 3.

  2. Initial Reaction Steps in the Condensed-Phase Decomposition of Propellants

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C F; Piqueras, M C

    2001-12-11

    Understanding the reaction mechanisms for the decomposition of energetic materials in the condensed phase is critical to our development of detailed kinetic models of propellant combustion. To date, the reaction mechanisms in the condensed phase have been represented by global, reactions. The detailed elementary reactions subsequent to the initial NO{sub 2} bond scissioning are not known. Using quantum chemical calculations, we have investigated the possible early steps in the decomposition of energetic materials that can occur in the condensed phase. We have used methylnitrate, methylnitramine, and nitroethane as prototypes for O-NO{sub 2}, N-NO{sub 2} and C-NO{sub 2} nitro compounds. We find the energetic radicals formed from the initial NO{sub 2} bond scissioning can be converted to unsaturated non-radical intermediates as an alternative to the unzipping of the energetic radical. We propose a new, prompt oxidation mechanism in which the trapped HONO can add back onto the energetic molecule. This produces oxidation products in the condensed phase that normally would not be produced until much later in the flame. We have shown that this prompt oxidation mechanism is a general feature of both nitramines and nitrate esters. The resulting HONO formed by the H-atom abstraction will be strongly influenced by the cage effect of the condensed phase. The applicability of this mechanism is demonstrated for decomposition of ethylnitrate, illustrating the importance of the cage effect in enabling this mechanism to occur at low temperatures.

  3. Onion dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.; Lienau, P.J.

    1994-07-01

    This article describes the onion dehydration process as generally practiced in the United States. The actual processing steps from harvest to final product, and geothermal applications for power production and energy requirements in the dehydration industry are discussed. A design of a dehydrator converted to geothermal energy usage is included.

  4. First observation of a mass independent isotopic fractionation in a condensation reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiemens, M. H.; Nelson, R.; Dong, Q. W.; Nuth, Joseph A., III

    1994-01-01

    Thiemens and Heidenreich (1983) first demonstrated that a chemically produced mass independent isotopic fractionation process could produce an isotopic composition which is identical to that observed in Allende inclusions. This raised the possibility that the meteoritic components could be produced by chemical, rather than nuclear processes. In order to develop a mechanistic model of the early solar system, it is important that relevant reactions be studied, particularly, those which may occur in the earliest condensation reactions. The isotopic results for isotopic fractionations associated with condensation processes are reported. A large mass independent isotopic fractionation is observed in one of the experiments.

  5. A biocompatible condensation reaction for controlled assembly of nanostructures in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Gaolin; Ren, Hongjun; Rao, Jianghong

    2011-01-01

    Through controlled synthesis and molecular assembly, biological systems are able to organize molecules into supramolecular structures that carry out sophisticated processes. Although chemists have reported a few examples of supramolecular assembly in water, the controlled covalent synthesis of large molecules and structures in vivo has remained challenging. Here we report a condensation reaction between 1,2-aminothiol and 2-cyanobenzothiazole that occurs in vitro and in living cells under the control of pH, disulfide reduction and enzymatic cleavage. In vitro, the size and shape of the condensation products, and nanostructures subsequently assembled, were different in each case and could thus be controlled by tuning the structure of the monomers. Direct imaging of the products obtained in the cells revealed their locations – near the Golgi bodies under enzymatic cleavage control – demonstrating the feasibility of a controlled and localized reaction in living cells. This intracellular condensation process enabled the imaging of the proteolytic activity of furin. PMID:21124381

  6. Contribution from 3 α-Condensed States to the Triple-Alpha Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katō, Kiyoshi; Kurokawa, Chie; Arai, Koji

    2010-06-01

    The α-condensed state in nuclear systems has been proposed by Tohsaki et al. and has given rise to interesting discussions. The Hoyle state of 12C has been studied as the most typical example of such an α-condensed state. A new resonant 03+ state (Er = 1.66 MeV, Γ = 1.48 MeV) is predicted as an excited α-condensed state in addition to the second 0+ state of the Hoyle state by calculations of the 3 α orthogonality condition model (3 α OCM) using the complex scaling method. Based on this result, the breakup strengths of the inversion reaction for sequential (8Be+α-->12C+γ) and direct (α+α+α-->12C+γ) processes are calculated. It is discussed that a large reaction strength calculated recently by Ogata et al. in non-resonant energies is considered as a contribution from the excited 03+ state.

  7. A biocompatible condensation reaction for controlled assembly of nanostructures in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Gaolin; Ren, Hongjun; Rao, Jianghong

    2010-01-01

    Through controlled synthesis and molecular assembly, biological systems are able to organize molecules into supramolecular structures that carry out sophisticated processes. Although chemists have reported a few examples of supramolecular assembly in water, the controlled covalent synthesis of large molecules and structures in vivo has remained challenging. Here we report a condensation reaction between 1,2-aminothiol and 2-cyanobenzothiazole that occurs in vitro and in living cells under the control of either pH, disulfide reduction or enzymatic cleavage. In vitro, the size and shape of the condensation products, and the nanostructures subsequently assembled, were different in each case and could thus be controlled by tuning the structure of the monomers. Direct imaging of the products obtained in the cells revealed their locations-near the Golgi bodies under enzymatic cleavage control-demonstrating the feasibility of a controlled and localized reaction in living cells. This intracellular condensation process enabled the imaging of the proteolytic activity of furin.

  8. Hydrolysis/dehydration/aldol-condensation/hydrogenation of lignocellulosic biomass and biomass-derived carbohydrates in the presence of Pd/WO3-ZrO2 in a single reactor.

    PubMed

    Dedsuksophon, W; Faungnawakij, K; Champreda, V; Laosiripojana, N

    2011-01-01

    Hydrolysis/dehydration/aldol-condensation/hydrogenation of lignocellulosic-biomass (corncobs) and biomass-derived carbohydrates (tapioca flour) to produce water-soluble C5-C15 compounds was developed in a single reactor system. WO3-ZrO2 efficiently catalyzed the hydrolysis/dehydration of these feedstocks to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and furfural, while the impregnation of WO3-ZrO2 with Pd allowed sequential aldolcondensation/hydrogenation of these furans to C5-C15 compounds. The highest C5-C15 yields of 14.8-20.3% were observed at a hydrolysis/dehydration temperature of 573 K for 5 min, an aldol-condensation temperature of 353 K for 30 h, and a hydrogenation temperature of 393 K for 6 h. The C5-C15 yield from tapioca flour was higher than that from corncobs (20.3% compared to 14.8%). Tapioca flour produced more C6/C9/C15, whereas corncobs generated more C5/C8/C13 compounds due to the presence of hemicellulose in the corncobs. These water-soluble organic compounds can be further converted to liquid alkanes with high cetane numbers for replacing diesel fuel in transportation applications.

  9. Probing the Rate-Determining Step of the Claisen-Schmidt Condensation by Competition Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Kendrew K. W.; Chan, Wing-Fat; Lung, Ka-Ying; Lam, Wai-Yee; Ng, Weng-Cheong; Lee, Siu-Fung

    2007-01-01

    Competition experiments are a useful tool for preliminary study of the linear free energy relationship of organic reactions. This article describes a physical organic experiment for upper-level undergraduates to identify the rate-determining step of the Claisen-Schmidt condensation of benzaldehyde and acetophenone by studying the linear free…

  10. The dynamics of serpentinite dehydration reactions in subduction zones: Constrains from the Cerro del Almirez ultramafic massif (Betic Cordillera, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilissen, Nicole; Garrido, Carlos J.; López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Arc volcanism, earthquakes and subduction dynamics are controlled by fluids from downgoing slabs and their effect on the melting and rheology of the overlying mantle wedge. High pressure dehydration of serpentinite in the slab and the subduction channel is considered as one of the main sources of fluids in subduction zones. Even though this metamorphic reaction is essential in subduction activities, the behavior of the fluids, the kinetics and thermodynamics during the breakdown reaction are still poorly understood. The Cerro del Almirez (Nevado-Filábride Complex, Betic Cordillera, SE Spain) uniquely preserves the dehydration front from antigorite serpentinite to chlorite-harzburgite and constitutes a unique natural laboratory to investigate high-pressure dehydration of serpentinite. This reaction occurred in a subduction setting releasing up to 13 wt% of water, contributing significantly to the supply of fluids to the overlying mantle wedge. A key to the understanding of the metamorphic conditions prevailing during serpentinite dehydration is to study the two prominent textures -granofels and spinifex-like chlorite harzburgite- occurring in this reaction product. The detailed texture differences in the Chl-harzburgite can provide insights into diverse kinetic and thermodynamic conditions of this dehydration reaction due to variations in effective pressure and drainage conditions. It has been proposed that difference in overpressure (P') and deviation from growth equilibrium, i.e. overstepping, is responsible for these two types of textures [Padrón-Navarta et al., 2011]. The magnitude and duration of P' is highly dependent on dehydration kinetics [Connolly, 1997]. The fast pressure drop, with spinifex-texture as a product, can be linked to draining events expected after hydrofracturing, which are recorded in grain size reduction zones in this massif. According to this hypothesis, mapping of textural variation in Chl-harzburgite might be used as a proxy to

  11. A combined experimental and computational study of the catalytic dehydration of glycerol on microporous zeolites: an investigation of the reaction mechanism and acrolein selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xufeng; Lv, Yanhong; Qu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Guodong; Xi, Yanyan; Phillips, David L; Liu, Chenguang

    2013-12-14

    The catalytic activity and the acrolein selectivity for liquid phase glycerol dehydration on β zeolites (HNa-β-k) were found to be dependent on the reaction temperature as well as on the amount of acid sites on the zeolites. An increase in the reaction temperature favors the acrolein selectivity. The acrolein selectivity increases with the Na(+)/H(+) ratio and the glycerol conversion decreases with it so that a maximum acrolein yield is obtained when a certain amount of acidic sites are replaced by non-active Na(+) sites. The computational results indicate that 3-hydoxylpropanal (HPA) is an important intermediate that determines the final product selectivity. The relative rates of the different reaction pathways for HAP can be affected by the amount of water molecules involved in its homogeneous reaction. Based on the reaction mechanism proposed, it was hypothesized that smaller pores reduce activity but increase selectivity to acrolein, and results of the H-MFI zeolite were consistent with this hypothesis. Our work provides important insight into the overall landscape of the reaction mechanism and can be used to help design reaction systems that have good acrolein selectivity for the liquid phase glycerol dehydration reactions.

  12. Highly efficient and recyclable basic mesoporous zeolite catalyzed condensation, hydroxylation, and cycloaddition reactions.

    PubMed

    Sarmah, Bhaskar; Satpati, Biswarup; Srivastava, Rajendra

    2017-05-01

    Crystalline mesoporous ZSM-5 zeolite was prepared in the presence of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane derived multi-cationic structure directing agent. The calcined form of the mesoprous zeolite was treated with NH4OH to obtain basic mesoporous ZSM-5. Catalyst was characterized by the complementary combination of X-ray diffraction, N2-adsorption, electron microscopes, and temperature programme desorption techniques. Catalytic activity of the basic mesoporous ZSM-5 was systematically assessed using Knoevenagel condensation reaction for the synthesis a wide range of substituted styrene. Applications of the catalyst were investigated in the benzamide hydroxylation for the synthesis of carbinolamides and one-pot, multi-component condensation reaction for the synthesis of naphthopyrans. Finally, the catalyst was evaluated in the cycloaddition of CO2 to epoxide for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates. Recycling study shows that no significant decrease in the catalytic activity was observed after five recycles.

  13. Non-isothermal kinetics of the dehydration reaction of 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one rubidium and cesium complexes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haixia; Song, Jirong; Xiao, Heming; Hu, Rongzu; Wang, Huali; Jin, Penggang; Wang, Yuan

    2006-02-06

    3-Nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO) rubidium and cesium complexes were synthesized by mixing the aqueous solution of NTO and their respective metal carbonates. Their thermal decomposition and the non-isothermal kinetics of the dehydration reaction were studied under the non-isothermal condition by DSC and TG-DTG methods. The kinetic parameters were obtained from analysis of the DSC and TG-DTG curves by Kissinger method, Ozawa method, the differential method and the integral method. The most probable mechanism functions for the dehydration reaction of the title complexes were suggested by comparing the kinetic parameters. The dehydration decomposition reaction of RbNTO.H2O and CsNTO.H2O appears to be the same as Avrami-Erofeev equation: f(alpha) = (5/2)(1-alpha)[-ln(1-alpha)](3/5), G(alpha)=[-ln(1-alpha)](2/5), n = 2/5. The critical temperature of thermal explosion is 240.88 degrees C for RbNTO.H2O and 246.27 degrees C for CsNTO.H2O.

  14. Interaction of yeasts with the products resulting from the condensation reaction between (+)-catechin and acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Toledano, Azahara; Villaño-Valencia, Debora; Mayen, Manuel; Merida, Julieta; Medina, Manuel

    2004-04-21

    The condensation reaction between (+)-catechin and acetaldehyde was studied in model solutions in the presence and absence yeasts in order to evaluate its contribution to color changes in fermented drinks such as white wine. On the basis of the results, the yeasts retain the oligomers produced in the reaction, their retention ability increasing for higher polymerization degrees. As a result, the color of model solutions, measured as the absorbance at 420 nm, was found to decrease after the addition of yeasts. On the other hand, the yeasts exhibited no inhibitory effect on the condensation reaction, which took place at the same rate in their presence and absence. At acidity levels and reactant concentrations similar to those in wine, with acetaldehyde in high concentration as it is present in sherry wines, the reaction was found to occur very slowly. Taking into account that Yeasts are present during most of the winemaking process; consequently, they retain oligomers, and the studied reaction could mainly contribute to the alteration of the color of white wine after bottling.

  15. Contribution from 3 alpha-Condensed States to the Triple-Alpha Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Kiyoshi; Kurokawa, Chie; Arai, Koji

    2010-06-01

    The alpha-condensed state in nuclear systems has been proposed by Tohsaki et al. and has given rise to interesting discussions. The Hoyle state of {sup 12}C has been studied as the most typical example of such an alpha-condensed state. A new resonant 0{sub 3}{sup +} state (E{sub r} = 1.66 MeV, GAMMA = 1.48 MeV) is predicted as an excited alpha-condensed state in addition to the second 0{sup +} state of the Hoyle state by calculations of the 3 alpha orthogonality condition model (3 alpha OCM) using the complex scaling method. Based on this result, the breakup strengths of the inversion reaction for sequential ({sup 8}Be+alpha->{sup 12}C+gamma) and direct (alpha+alpha+alpha->{sup 12}C+gamma) processes are calculated. It is discussed that a large reaction strength calculated recently by Ogata et al. in non-resonant energies is considered as a contribution from the excited 0{sub 3}{sup +} state.

  16. Two-step synthesis of hexaammonium triptycene: an air-stable building block for condensation reactions to extended triptycene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Mastalerz, Michael; Sieste, Stefanie; Cenić, Mila; Oppel, Iris M

    2011-08-05

    A simple two-step synthesis of an air-stable hexaammoniumtriptycene is introduced, which can be used for a variety of transformations by condensation reactions, e.g., to benzimidazole, benzotriazole, and quinoxaline derivatives in high yields.

  17. Classical Keggin Intercalated into Layered Double Hydroxides: Facile Preparation and Catalytic Efficiency in Knoevenagel Condensation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yueqing; Fang, Yanjun; Zhang, Yingkui; Miras, Haralampos N; Song, Yu-Fei

    2015-10-12

    The family of polyoxometalate (POM) intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH) composite materials has shown great promise for the design of functional materials with numerous applications. It is known that intercalation of the classical Keggin polyoxometalate (POM) of [PW12 O40 ](3-) (PW12 ) into layered double hydroxides (LDHs) is very unlikely to take place by conventional ion exchange methods due to spatial and geometrical restrictions. In this paper, such an intercalated compound of Mg0.73 Al0.22 (OH)2 [PW12 O40 ]0.04 ⋅0.98 H2 O (Mg3 Al-PW12 ) has been successfully obtained by applying a spontaneous flocculation method. The Mg3 Al-PW12 has been fully characterized by using a wide range of methods (XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, EDX, XPS, FT-IR, NMR, BET). XRD patterns of Mg3 Al-PW12 exhibit no impurity phase usually observed next to the (003) diffraction peak. Subsequent application of the Mg3 Al-PW12 as catalyst in Knoevenagel condensation reactions of various aldehydes and ketones with Z-CH2 -Z' type substrates (ethyl cyanoacetate and malononitrile) at 60 °C in mixed solvents (V2-propanol :Vwater =2:1) demonstrated highly efficient catalytic activity. The synergistic effect between the acidic and basic sites of the Mg3 Al-PW12 composite proved to be crucial for the efficiency of the condensation reactions. Additionally, the Mg3 Al-PW12 -catalyzed Knoevenagel condensation of benzaldehyde with ethyl cyanoacetate demonstrated the highest turnover number (TON) of 47 980 reported so far for this reaction.

  18. Combustion Characteristics of Condensed Phase Reactions in Sub-Centimeter Geometries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-10

    reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of...condensed phase reactions Ti/C, Ni/Al, and 3Ni/Al. Several other thermochemical codes ( Cheetah v6.0 [6], NASA CEA [7] and “thermo program” [8]) were...Glaesemann, K.R.; Howard, W.M;, Souers, P.C.; Vitello, P.A. CHEETAH 4.0 User’s Manual, Technical Report for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  19. Quantum and Molecular Mechanical (QM/MM) Monte Carlo Techniques for Modeling Condensed-Phase Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Wiliiam L.

    2014-01-01

    A recent review (Acc. Chem. Res. 2010, 43:142–151) examined our use and development of a combined quantum and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) technique for modelling organic and enzymatic reactions. Advances included the PDDG/PM3 semiempirical QM (SQM) method, computation of multi-dimensional potentials of mean force (PMF), incorporation of on-the-fly QM in Monte Carlo simulations, and a polynomial quadrature method for rapidly treating proton-transfer reactions. The current article serves as a follow up on our progress. Highlights include new reactions, alternative SQM methods, a polarizable OPLS force field, and novel solvent environments, e.g., “on water” and room temperature ionic liquids. The methodology is strikingly accurate across a wide range of condensed-phase and antibody-catalyzed reactions including substitution, decarboxylation, elimination, isomerization, and pericyclic classes. Comparisons are made to systems treated with continuum-based solvents and ab initio or density functional theory (DFT) methods. Overall, the QM/MM methodology provides detailed characterization of reaction paths, proper configurational sampling, several advantages over implicit solvent models, and a reasonable computational cost. PMID:25431625

  20. Formation of activated biomolecules by condensation on mineral surfaces--a comparison of peptide bond formation and phosphate condensation.

    PubMed

    Georgelin, Thomas; Jaber, Maguy; Bazzi, Houssein; Lambert, Jean-François

    2013-10-01

    Many studies have reported condensation reactions of prebiotic molecules, such as the formation of peptide bonds between amino acids, to occur to some degree on mineral surfaces. We have studied several such reactions on the same divided silica. When drying steps are applied, the equilibria of peptide formation from glycine, and polyphosphate formation from monophosphate, are displaced to the right because these reactions are dehydrating condensations, accompanied by the emission of water. In contrast, the equilibrium of AMP dismutation is not significantly favored by drying. The silica surface plays little role (if any) in the thermochemistry of the condensation reactions, but is does play a significant kinetic role by acting as a catalyst, lowering the condensation temperatures with respect to bulk solids. Of course, the surface also catalyzes the inverse hydrolysis reactions.

  1. Technical Note: Analytical Solution for Transient Partitioning and Reaction of a Condensing Vapor Species in a Droplet

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Albert T.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2014-03-28

    We present the exact analytical solution of the transient equation of gas-phase diffusion of a condensing vapor to, and diffusion and reaction in, an aqueous droplet. Droplet-phase reaction is represented by first-order chemistry. The solution facilitates study of the dynamic nature of the vapor uptake process as a function of droplet size, Henry’s law coefficient, and first-order reaction rate constant for conversion in the droplet phase.

  2. Effects of dehydration on light-induced conformational changes in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers probed by optical and differential FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Malferrari, Marco; Mezzetti, Alberto; Francia, Francesco; Venturoli, Giovanni

    2013-03-01

    Following light-induced electron transfer between the primary donor (P) and quinone acceptor (Q(A)) the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center (RC) undergoes conformational relaxations which stabilize the primary charge separated state P(+)Q(A)(-). Dehydration of RCs from Rhodobacter sphaeroides hinders these conformational dynamics, leading to acceleration of P(+)Q(A)(-) recombination kinetics [Malferrari et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115 (2011) 14732-14750]. To clarify the structural basis of the conformational relaxations and the involvement of bound water molecules, we analyzed light-induced P(+)Q(A)(-)/PQ(A) difference FTIR spectra of RC films at two hydration levels (relative humidity r=76% and r=11%). Dehydration reduced the amplitude of bands in the 3700-3550cm(-1) region, attributed to water molecules hydrogen bonded to the RC, previously proposed to stabilize the charge separation by dielectric screening [Iwata et al., Biochemistry 48 (2009) 1220-1229]. Other features of the FTIR difference spectrum were affected by partial depletion of the hydration shell (r=11%), including contributions from modes of P (9-keto groups), and from NH or OH stretching modes of amino acidic residues, absorbing in the 3550-3150cm(-1) range, a region so far not examined in detail for bacterial RCs. To probe in parallel the effects of dehydration on the RC conformational relaxations, we analyzed by optical absorption spectroscopy the kinetics of P(+)Q(A)(-) recombination following the same photoexcitation used in FTIR measurements (20s continuous illumination). The results suggest a correlation between the observed FTIR spectral changes and the conformational rearrangements which, in the hydrated system, strongly stabilize the P(+)Q(A)(-) charge separated state over the second time scale.

  3. Progress toward chemcial accuracy in the computer simulation of condensed phase reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bash, P.A.; Levine, D.; Hallstrom, P.; Ho, L.L.; Mackerell, A.D. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    A procedure is described for the generation of chemically accurate computer-simulation models to study chemical reactions in the condensed phase. The process involves (1) the use of a coupled semiempirical quantum and classical molecular mechanics method to represent solutes and solvent, respectively; (2) the optimization of semiempirical quantum mechanics (QM) parameters to produce a computationally efficient and chemically accurate QM model; (3) the calibration of a quantum/classical microsolvation model using ab initio quantum theory; and (4) the use of statistical mechanical principles and methods to simulate, on massively parallel computers, the thermodynamic properties of chemical reactions in aqueous solution. The utility of this process is demonstrated by the calculation of the enthalpy of reaction in vacuum and free energy change in aqueous solution for a proton transfer involving methanol, methoxide, imidazole, and imidazolium, which are functional groups involved with proton transfers in many biochemical systems. An optimized semiempirical QM model is produced, which results in the calculation of heats of formation of the above chemical species to within 1.0 kcal/mol of experimental values. The use of the calibrated QM and microsolvation QM/MM models for the simulation of a proton transfer in aqueous solution gives a calculated free energy that is within 1.0 kcal/mol (12.2 calculated vs. 12.8 experimental) of a value estimated from experimental pKa`s of the reacting species.

  4. An investigation of the role of water on retrograde/condensation reactions and enhanced liquefaction yields

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-07-01

    The overall objectives of this work are to conduct research that will provide the basis for an improved liquefaction process, and to facilitate our understanding of those processes that occur when coals are initially dissolved. Changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying and steam pretreatments will be measured in order to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine the mechanism by which water enhances coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods for coal drying will be investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction, thereby making coal drying a relatively economical and efficient method for coal pretreatment. Coal drying methods will include conventional thermal drying, microwave drying, and chemical drying at low temperature. State-of-the-art solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques using combined rotation and multiple pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) and cross polarization with magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) will be employed: (1) to measures changes in coal structure brought about by the different methods of drying and by low temperature oxidation, and (2) to obtain direct measurements of changes in the aromatic hydrogen-to-carbon ratio of the solid/semi-solid material formed or remaining during pretreatment and the initial stages of liquefaction. The aromatic hydrogen-to-carbon ratios are difficult, if not impossible, to measure without the use of solid-state NMR, and as a result this ratio will be used to monitor the retrograde/condensation reactions that take place during coal liquefaction in the presence and absence of steam and various inert gases.

  5. Oxidative dehydration reaction of glycerol into acrylic acid: A first-principles prediction of structural and thermodynamic parameters of a bifunctional catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerda, Lívia Clara T.; dos Santos Pires, Maíra; Corrêa, Silviana; Oliveira, Luiz Carlos A.; Ramalho, Teodorico C.

    2016-05-01

    The production of biodiesel generates crude glycerol as a byproduct. The search for glycerol conversion routes has attracted the attention of researchers and thus, this work evaluated the properties of the catalysts T-Nb2O5 and T-Nb2O5/V treated with H2O2 applied to the reaction of oxidative dehydration of glycerol. The peroxo groups from the treatment with H2O2 had a greater oxidation capacity in relation to those in the pure catalyst. Furthermore, the catalyst doped with vanadium presented lower energy costs during the process. Those results might be helpful for designing new catalysts for the production of strategic chemical products from glycerol.

  6. Simultaneous Upgrading of Furanics and Phenolics through Hydroxyalkylation/Aldol Condensation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Bui, Tuong V; Sooknoi, Tawan; Resasco, Daniel E

    2017-04-10

    The simultaneous conversion of cyclopentanone and m-cresol has been investigated on a series of solid-acid catalysts. Both compounds are representative of biomass-derived streams. Cyclopentanone can be readily obtained from sugar-derived furfurals through Piancatelli rearrangement under reducing conditions. Cresol represents a family of phenolic compounds, typically obtained from the depolymerization of lignin. In the first biomass conversion strategy proposed here, furfural is converted in high yields and selectivity to cyclopentanone (CPO) over metal catalysts such as Pd-Fe/SiO2 at 600 psi (∼4.14 MPa) H2 and 150 °C. Subsequently, CPO and cresol are further converted through acid-catalyzed hydroxyalkylation. This C-C coupling reaction may be used to generate products in the molecular weight range that is appropriate for transportation fuels. As molecules beyond this range may be undesirable for fuel production, a catalyst with a suitable porous structure may be advantageous for controlling the product distribution in the desirable range. If Amberlyst resins were used as a catalyst, C12 -C24 products were obtained whereas when zeolites with smaller pore sizes were used, they selectively produced C10 products. Alternatively, CPO can undergo the acid-catalyzed self-aldol condensation to form C10 bicyclic adducts. As an illustration of the potential for practical implementation of this strategy for biofuel production, the long-chain oxygenates obtained from hydroxyalkylation/aldol condensation were successfully upgraded through hydrodeoxygenation to a mixture of linear alkanes and saturated cyclic hydrocarbons, which in practice would be direct drop-in components for transportation fuels. Aqueous acidic environments, which are typically encountered during the liquid-phase upgrading of bio-oils, would inhibit the efficiency of base-catalyzed processes. Therefore, the proposed acid-catalyzed upgrading strategy is advantageous for biomass conversion in terms of

  7. An Investigation of the Solid-State Condensation Polymerization Reaction in Vapor-Deposited Poly(amic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthamatten, Mitchell; Letts, Stephan A.; Day, Katherine; Cook, Robert C.; Gies, Anthony P.; Nonidez, William K.

    2004-03-01

    The condensation polymerization reaction of 4,4'-oxydianiline (ODA) with pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) to form poly(amic acid) and the subsequent imidization reaction to form polyimide were investigated for films prepared using vapor deposition polymerization techniques. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal analysis, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of films prepared at different temperatures indicate that additional solid-state polymerization occurs prior to imidization reactions. Experiments suggest that poly(amic acid) oligomers form upon vapor-deposition and have a number-average molecular weights of about 1500 Daltons. Between 100-130 °C these chains undergo additional condensation reactions to form slightly higher molecular weight oligomers. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  8. Photochemical reactions in dehydrated photosynthetic organisms, leaves, chloroplasts and photosystem II particles: reversible reduction of pheophytin and chlorophyll and oxidation of β-carotene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuvalov, Vladimir A.; Heber, Ulrich

    2003-11-01

    Photoreactions of dehydrated leaves, isolated broken chloroplasts and PSII membrane fragments of spinach ( Spinacia oleracea) were studied at different air humidities and compared with photoreactions of dry fronds of a fern, Polypodium vulgare, and a dry lichen, Parmelia sulcata, which in contrast to spinach are insensitive to photoinactivation in the dry state. Even in very dry air, P700 in the reaction center of photosystem I of dry leaves was oxidized, and the primary quinone acceptor Q A in the reaction center of photosystem II was photoreduced by low light. These reactions were only very slowly reversed in the dark and saturated under low light intensity. Light-minus-dark difference absorption spectra of the dry leaves, isolated chloroplasts and PSII membrane fragments measured at higher light intensities revealed absorbance changes of β-carotene at 500 nm (light-dependent bleaching) and 980 nm (light-dependent band formation) and bleaching of chlorophyll at 436 and 680 nm with appearance of bands at 450 and 800 nm. Decrease of chlorophyll fluorescence upon strong illumination indicated photoaccumulation of a quencher. All these changes were kinetically related and readily reversible. They are interpreted to show light-induced oxidation of β-carotene (Car) and reduction of chlorophyll-680 (Chl-680) in the reaction center of photosystem II of the dried leaves, chloroplasts and photosystem II particles. The fluorescence quencher was suggested to be Chl-680 - or Car + in close proximity to P680, the primary electron donor. Appreciable photoaccumulation of reduced pheophytin was only observed in dry leaves after Q A reduction had been lost during heat treatment of hydrated leaves prior to dehydration. The observations are interpreted to show light-dependent cyclic electron flow within the reaction center of photosystem II in which Chl-680 (or Pheo) is reduced by P680 * and Car is oxidized by P680 + with consequent recombination of Car + and Chl-680 - (or Pheo

  9. Onion dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    Onion dehydration consists of a continuous operation, belt conveyor using fairly low-temperature hot air from 38-104{degrees}C (100 to 200{degrees}F). Typical processing plants will handle 4500 kg (10,000 pounds) of raw product per hour (single line), reducing the moisture from around 83 % to 4 % (680 to 820 kg - 1,500 to 1,800 pounds finished product). An example of a geothermal processing plant is Integrate Ingredients at Empire, Nevada, in the San Emidio Desert. A total of 6.3 million kg (14 million pounds) of dry product are produced annually: 60% onion and 40% garlic. A 130{degrees}C (266{degrees}F) well provide the necessary heat for the plant.

  10. Evaporation dehydrator

    SciTech Connect

    Bland, L.

    1985-08-06

    A method and apparatus for the treatment of oilfield heavy oil emulsions is provided. The method utilizes, in combination, the steps of evaporation, vapor/liquid separation, and solids settling to dehydrate, degassify and remove solids from the heavy oil emulsion and produce oil having less than 0.5% by volume basic solids and water. The apparatus comprises an insulated, horizontal, cylindrical vessel. Mounted in the upper end of the vessel chamber is an inclined, tubular member having a closed upper end and an open lower end. At its closed end, the member forms a receiving chamber. A mechanical foam breaker extends transversely across the interior of the tubular member, downstream of the chamber. A stack of angularly inclined, heated trays, arranged in zigzag fashion, are positioned beneath the tubular member, to provide an elongate flowpath. The lower end of the tubular member is positioned to feed onto the upper end of the first tray. The flowpath formed by the stack of trays terminates at a level above the bottom of the vessel, so that a quiescent settling sump is provided by the base of the vessel. The vessel includes a feed inlet opening into the receiving chamber, a vapor outlet leading from the top of said vessel, and liquid and solids outlets leading from the sump. A stream of pre-heated heavy oil emulsion is fed to the receiving chamber, wherein part of the contained water in the vapor form breaks out. The foaming stream is contained by the tubular member and is substantially disintegrated by the foam breaker. The stream then issues onto the upper end of the stack of trays and is heated as it passes as a shallow, broad layer over the trays, to gradually evaporate the remaining water from the emulsion and solids. The dehydrated solids are settled out in the sump, leaving oil containing less than 0.5% basic solids and water.

  11. Condensation reaction between carbohydrazide and salicylaldehyde: in-line vibrational spectroscopy monitoring and characterization of the reaction products in solution and solid state.

    PubMed

    Jednačak, Tomislav; Novak, Predrag; Hodzic, Aden; Scheibelhofer, Otto; Khinast, Johannes G; Plavec, Janez; Sket, Primož; Parlov, Vuković Jelena

    2014-01-01

    The condensation reaction between carbohydrazide and salicylaldehyde was monitored in-line by using vibrational NIR and Raman spectroscopies and statistical methods. Prior to in-line data analysis the reaction products were fully characterized in solution and solid state in order to check the potential of the in-line approach as a tool for in-process Schiff bases reaction control. It was demonstrated that a combination of vibrational spectroscopy and principal component analysis made it possible to detect and identify the reaction products, e.g. mono(salicylidene)carbohydrazide (1) and bis(salicylidene)carbohydrazide (2) in different solvents, and to determine the reaction end points in real time. Owing to complexity of the reaction mixtures and band overlapping, it was not possible to determine the relative ratio of the reaction products in-line. The off-line analysis showed that 1 was predominant in methanol while the highest portion of 2 was obtained in ethanol.

  12. Modeling reaction histories to study chemical pathways in condensed phase detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott Stewart, D.; Hernández, Alberto; Lee, Kibaek

    2016-03-01

    The estimation of pressure and temperature histories, which are required to understand chemical pathways in condensed phase explosives during detonation, is discussed. We argue that estimates made from continuum models, calibrated by macroscopic experiments, are essential to inform modern, atomistic-based reactive chemistry simulations at detonation pressures and temperatures. We present easy to implement methods for general equation of state and arbitrarily complex chemical reaction schemes that can be used to compute reactive flow histories for the constant volume, the energy process, and the expansion process on the Rayleigh line of a steady Chapman-Jouguet detonation. A brief review of state-of-the-art of two-component reactive flow models is given that highlights the Ignition and Growth model of Lee and Tarver [Phys. Fluids 23, 2362 (1980)] and the Wide-Ranging Equation of State model of Wescott, Stewart, and Davis [J. Appl. Phys. 98, 053514 (2005)]. We discuss evidence from experiments and reactive molecular dynamic simulations that motivate models that have several components, instead of the two that have traditionally been used to describe the results of macroscopic detonation experiments. We present simplified examples of a formulation for a hypothetical explosive that uses simple (ideal) equation of state forms and detailed comparisons. Then, we estimate pathways computed from two-component models of real explosive materials that have been calibrated with macroscopic experiments.

  13. Intramolecular condensation reactions of {alpha}, {omega}- bis(triethoxy-silyl)alkanes. Formation of cyclic disilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D.A.; Carpenter, J.P.; Myers, S.A.; Assink, R.A.; Small, J.H.; Greaves, J.; Shea, K.J.

    1996-08-01

    Under acidic sol-gel polymerization conditions, 1,3-bis(triethoxysilyl)-propane (1) and 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)butane (2) were shown to preferentially form cyclic disilsesquioxanes 3 and 4 rather than the expected 1,3-propylene- and 1,4-butylene-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels. Formation of 3 and 4 is driven by a combination of an intramolecular cyclization to six and seven membered rings, and a pronounced reduction in reactivity under acidic conditions as a function of increasing degree of condensation. The ease with which these relatively unreactive cyclic monomers and dimers are formed (under acidic conditions) helps to explain the difficulties in forming gels from 1 and 2. The stability of cyclic disilsesquioxanes was confirmed withe the synthesis of 3 and 4 in gram quantities; the cyclic disilsesquioxanes react slowly to give tricyclic dimers containing a thermodynamically stable eight membered siloxane ring. Continued reactions were shown to perserve the cyclic structure, opening up the possibility of utilizing cyclic disilsesquioxanes as sol-gel monomers. Preliminary polymerization studies with these new, carbohydrate-like monomers revealed the formation of network poly(cyclic disilsesquioxanes) under acidic conditions and polymerization with ring-opening under basic conditions.

  14. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: The microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilevsky, M. V.; Odinokov, A. V.; Titov, S. V.; Mitina, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    postulated in the existing theories of the ET. Our alternative dynamic ET model for local modes immersed in the continuum harmonic medium is formulated for both classical and quantum regimes, and accounts explicitly for the mode/medium interaction. The kinetics of the energy exchange between the local ET subsystem and the surrounding environment essentially determine the total ET rate. The efficient computer code for rate computations is elaborated on. The computations are available for a wide range of system parameters, such as the temperature, external field, local mode frequency, and characteristics of mode/medium interaction. The relation of the present approach to the Marcus ET theory and to the quantum-statistical reaction rate theory [V. G. Levich and R. R. Dogonadze, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. Fiz. Khim. 124, 213 (1959); J. Ulstrup, Charge Transfer in Condensed Media (Springer, Berlin, 1979); M. Bixon and J. Jortner, Adv. Chem. Phys. 106, 35 (1999)] underlying it is discussed and illustrated by the results of computations for practically important target systems.

  15. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: the microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices.

    PubMed

    Basilevsky, M V; Odinokov, A V; Titov, S V; Mitina, E A

    2013-12-21

    postulated in the existing theories of the ET. Our alternative dynamic ET model for local modes immersed in the continuum harmonic medium is formulated for both classical and quantum regimes, and accounts explicitly for the mode∕medium interaction. The kinetics of the energy exchange between the local ET subsystem and the surrounding environment essentially determine the total ET rate. The efficient computer code for rate computations is elaborated on. The computations are available for a wide range of system parameters, such as the temperature, external field, local mode frequency, and characteristics of mode/medium interaction. The relation of the present approach to the Marcus ET theory and to the quantum-statistical reaction rate theory [V. G. Levich and R. R. Dogonadze, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. Fiz. Khim. 124, 213 (1959); J. Ulstrup, Charge Transfer in Condensed Media (Springer, Berlin, 1979); M. Bixon and J. Jortner, Adv. Chem. Phys. 106, 35 (1999)] underlying it is discussed and illustrated by the results of computations for practically important target systems.

  16. Dehydration, Dehydrogenation, and Condensation of Alcohols on Supported Oxide Catalysts Based on Cyclic (WO3)3 and (MoO3)3 Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, Roger J.; Dixon, David A.; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    Supported early transition metal oxides have important applications in numerous catalytic reactions. In this article we review preparation and activity of well-defined model WO3 and MoO3 catalysts prepared via deposition of cyclic gas-phase (WO3)3 and (MoO3)3 clusters generated by sublimation of WO3 and MoO3 powders. Conversion of small aliphatic alcohols to alkenes, aldehydes/ketons, and ethers is employed to probe the structure-activity relationships on model WO3 and MoO3 catalysts ranging from unsupported (WO3)3 and (MoO3)3 clusters embedded in alcohol matrices, to (WO3)3 clusters supported on surfaces of other oxides, and epitaxial and nanoporous WO3 films. Detailed theoretical calculations reveal the underlying reaction mechanisms and provide insight into the origin of the differences in the WO3 and MoO3 reactivity. For the range of interrogated (WO3)3 they further shed light into the role structure and binding of (WO3)3 clusters with the support play in determining their catalytic activity.

  17. Catalytic performance of Metal-Organic-Frameworks vs. extra-large pore zeolite UTL in condensation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Shamzhy, Mariya; Opanasenko, Maksym; Shvets, Oleksiy; Čejka, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic behavior of isomorphously substituted B-, Al-, Ga-, and Fe-containing extra-large pore UTL zeolites was investigated in Knoevenagel condensation involving aldehydes, Pechmann condensation of 1-naphthol with ethylacetoacetate, and Prins reaction of β-pinene with formaldehyde and compared with large-pore aluminosilicate zeolite beta and representative Metal-Organic-Frameworks Cu3(BTC)2 and Fe(BTC). The yield of the target product over the investigated catalysts in Knoevenagel condensation increases in the following sequence: (Al)beta < (Al)UTL < (Ga)UTL < (Fe)UTL < Fe(BTC) < (B)UTL < Cu3(BTC)2 being mainly related to the improving selectivity with decreasing strength of active sites of the individual catalysts. The catalytic performance of Fe(BTC), containing the highest concentration of Lewis acid sites of the appropriate strength is superior over large-pore zeolite (Al)beta and B-, Al-, Ga-, Fe-substituted extra-large pore zeolites UTL in Prins reaction of β-pinene with formaldehyde and Pechmann condensation of 1-naphthol with ethylacetoacetate. PMID:24790940

  18. Catalytic performance of Metal-Organic-Frameworks vs. extra-large pore zeolite UTL in condensation reactions.

    PubMed

    Shamzhy, Mariya; Opanasenko, Maksym; Shvets, Oleksiy; Cejka, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic behavior of isomorphously substituted B-, Al-, Ga-, and Fe-containing extra-large pore UTL zeolites was investigated in Knoevenagel condensation involving aldehydes, Pechmann condensation of 1-naphthol with ethylacetoacetate, and Prins reaction of β-pinene with formaldehyde and compared with large-pore aluminosilicate zeolite beta and representative Metal-Organic-Frameworks Cu3(BTC)2 and Fe(BTC). The yield of the target product over the investigated catalysts in Knoevenagel condensation increases in the following sequence: (Al)beta < (Al)UTL < (Ga)UTL < (Fe)UTL < Fe(BTC) < (B)UTL < Cu3(BTC)2 being mainly related to the improving selectivity with decreasing strength of active sites of the individual catalysts. The catalytic performance of Fe(BTC), containing the highest concentration of Lewis acid sites of the appropriate strength is superior over large-pore zeolite (Al)beta and B-, Al-, Ga-, Fe-substituted extra-large pore zeolites UTL in Prins reaction of β-pinene with formaldehyde and Pechmann condensation of 1-naphthol with ethylacetoacetate.

  19. First Aid: Dehydration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aid: Heat Illness Sun Safety Dehydration Diarrhea Vomiting Word! Dehydration What's the Big Sweat About Dehydration? How to Be Safe When You're in the Sun What's Sweat? Dehydration Is It Important to Drink a Lot of Water? Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  20. Di- and triheteroarylalkanes via self-condensation and intramolecular Friedel-Crafts type reaction of heteroaryl alcohols.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Seema; Ramasastry, S S V

    2013-12-14

    An efficient synthetic approach to diheteroarylmethanes and 1,3-diheteroarylpropenes has been developed via Yb(III)-catalyzed sequential self-condensation of 2-furfuryl (or 2-thienyl or 3-indolyl) alcohols followed by intramolecular Friedel-Crafts type reaction and elimination of an aldehyde. This method offers a powerful entry and a potential alternative to the traditional synthesis of diheteroarylalkanes, which are precursors to the synthesis of several intriguing heteroaryls and more significantly, to the synthesis of biofuels.

  1. Synthesis of 1,5-Benzodiazepine and Its Derivatives by Condensation Reaction Using H-MCM-22 as Catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Sheikh Abdul; Khanday, Waheed Ahmad; Tomar, Radha

    2012-01-01

    A simple and versatile method for the synthesis of 1,5-benzodiazepines is via condensation of o-phenylenediamines (OPDA) and ketones in the presence of catalytic amount of H-MCM-22 using acetonitrile as solvent at room temperature. In all the cases, the reactions are highly selective and are completed within 1–3 h. The method is applicable to both cyclic and acyclic ketones without significant differences. The reaction proceeds efficiently under ambient conditions with good-to-excellent yields. PMID:22570531

  2. Quantum chemical approach for condensed-phase thermochemistry (II): Applications to formation and combustion reactions of liquid organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Atsushi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    The harmonic solvation model (HSM), which was recently developed for evaluating condensed-phase thermodynamics by quantum chemical calculations (Nakai and Ishikawa, 2014), was applied to formation and combustion reactions of simple organic molecules. The conventional ideal gas model (IGM) considerably overestimated the entropies of the liquid molecules. The HSM could significantly improve this overestimation; mean absolute deviations for the Gibbs energies of the formation and combustion reactions were (49.6, 26.7) for the IGM and (9.7, 5.4) for the HSM in kJ/mol.

  3. Origin of saline, neutral-pH, reduced epithermal waters by reaction of acidic magmatic gas condensates with wall rock

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, M.H. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Fluid inclusions in quartz and sphalerite of epithermal veins containing galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite with silver sulfides and electrum commonly have salinities of 2 to 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Examples include Bohemia, OR, Comstock, NV, and Creede, CO. Salinities in such base metal-rich systems are apparently greater than those in gold-adularia, base metal-poor systems such as Sleeper, NV, Republic, WA, and Hishikare, Kyushu. Saline epithermal fluids are commonly assumed to have been derived from saline magmatic brines, from local host formations, as has been suggested for Creede, or from evaporative concentration (boiling) of more dilute meteoric ground water. Another possibility, which may be the most common origin, is reaction of wall rocks with magmatic gas condensates rich in HCl and sulfuric acid. A mixture of one part Augustine Volcanic gas condensate in 10 parts cold ground water has a pH of 0.7 and the dominant cation is H[sup +] by a factor of 10[sup 4]. Calculated reaction of this condensate mixture with andesite at 300 C to a water/rock ratio (w/r) of 4.6 yields an NaCl-dominated fluid with a total salinity of 2.1 wt %. and pH 3.7. Further reaction, to w/r 0.14 yields a fluid salinity of 2.6 wt % and pH of 5.7; this fluid is in equilibrium with a propylitic alteration assemblage. Aqueous sulfide accumulates during the rock reaction as sulfate is reduced to sulfide when ferrous iron is oxidized to ferric iron. Sulfide concentration in the latter fluid is 32 ppm, far exceeding sulfate concentration. In the overall reaction, hydrogen ion is exchanged for base cations (including base metals) and sulfate is reduced to sulfide.

  4. Slab dehydration and fluid-producing metamorphic reactions in early subduction stages: the record of the metamorphic sole of the Mont Albert ophiolite (Quebec, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewison, Ella; Soret, Mathieu; Dubacq, Benoït; Agard, Philippe; Labrousse, Loïc

    2015-04-01

    Metamorphic soles found at the base of obducted ophiolites provide valuable information on the early history of the subduction / obduction system. Metamorphic soles are characterised by rocks originating from the ocean floor (basalts and sediments in variable proportions) metamorphosed up to granulite facies, where the intensity of metamorphism increases to the top of the unit, towards the contact with peridotite. Their mafic and less frequently pelitic lithologies make them sensitive recorders of their pressure-temperature conditions of crystallization and allow radiometric dating. In addition, metamorphic soles have directly witnessed slab dehydration as they underwent similar fluid-producing metamorphic reactions before being accreted to the mantle wedge peridotites (i.e. before "underplating"). The mechanisms of underplating remain uncertain, because of the somewhat obscure link between weakening through fluid production and hardening via garnet crystallization, with direct consequences on the rheology of the plate interface. In this study, we document fluid-producing reactions occurring during the prograde history of the metamorphic sole of the Taconian (ca. 460 Ma) ophiolite from Mont Albert (Quebec, Canada). This metamorphic sole shows variably metamorphosed mafic and pelitic rocks with metamorphic gradients over the scale of 10 metres, with clinopyroxene-garnet-amphibole granulite facies mafic rocks at the contact with the overlying peridotites. Evidences of melting of pelitic lithologies increase towards the contact, and no remains of metapelites have been found within about 20 m from the contact. Fluid channelization and melt migration is evidenced by decimetric dykes and veins. Away from the contact, metamorphism intensity gradually decreases to greenschist facies with abundant hydrated silicates. The aim of the study is to provide constraints (i) on the nature of the fluids produced (aqueous versus melt), (ii) on their composition and (iii) on the

  5. Oxidative condensation reactions of (diethylenetriamine)cobalt(III) complexes with substituted bis(pyridin-2-yl)methane ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangting; Hockless, David C. R.; Willis, Anthony C.; Jackson, W. Gregory

    2005-04-01

    The synthesis and characterisation of Co(III) complexes derived from a condensation reaction with a central or terminal nitrogen of a dien ligand and the α-carbon of a range of substituted bis(pyridin-2-yl)methane ligands are described. Aerial oxidation of bpm {bis(pyridin-2-yl)methane with Co(II)/dien or direct reaction with Co(dien)Cl 3 provided in low yield a single C-N condensation product 1 (at the primary terminal NH 2) after the pyridyl -CH 2- is formally oxidised to -CH +-. The methyl substituted ligand bpe {1,1-bis(pyridin-2-yl)ethane} behaves likewise, except both terminal (prim) and central (sec) amines condense to yield isomeric products 2 and 3. Two of these three materials have been characterised by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The corresponding reactions for the bis(pyridyl) ligand bpk {bis(pyridin-2-yl)ketone} provided C-N condensation products without the requirement for oxidation at the α-C center; two carbinolamine complexes in different geometrical configurations resulted, mer-anti-[Co(dienbpc)Cl]ZnCl 4, 5, and unsym- fac-[Co(dienbpc)Cl]ZnCl 4, 6, {dienbpc=[2-(2-aminoethylamino)-ethylamino]-di-pyridin-2-yl-methanol}. In addition, a novel complex, [Co(bpk)(bpd-OH)Cl]ZnCl 4, 4, in which one bidentate N, N-bonded bpk ligand and one tridentate N, O, N-bonded bpd (the diol from bpk+OH -) were coordinated, was obtained via the Co(II)/O 2 synthetic route. When the bpc ligand (bpc=bis(pyridin-2-yl)methanol) was employed directly as a reagent along with dien, no condensation reactions were observed, but rather a single isomeric complex [Co(dien)(bpc)]Cl.ZnCl 4, 7, in which the ligand bpc acted as a N,N,O-bonded tridentate ligand rather than as a N,N-bidentate ligand was isolated. 13C, 1D and 2D 1H NMR studies are reported for all the complexes; they establish the structures unambiguously.

  6. Dehydration kinetics of shocked serpentine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyburczy, James A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental rates of dehydration of shocked and unshocked serpentine were determined using a differential scanning calorimetric technique. Dehydration rates in shocked serpentine are enhanced by orders of magnitude over corresponding rates in unshocked material, even though the impact experiments were carried out under conditions that inhibited direct impact-induced devolatilization. Extrapolation to temperatures of the Martian surface indicates that dehydration of shocked material would occur 20 to 30 orders of magnitude more rapidly than for unshocked serpentine. The results indicate that impacted planetary surfaces and associated atmospheres would reach chemical equilibrium much more quickly than calculations based on unshocked material would indicate, even during the earliest, coldest stages of accretion. Furthermore, it is suggested that chemical weathering of shocked planetary surfaces by solid-gas reactions would be sufficiently rapid that true equilibrium mineral assemblages should form.

  7. METHOD OF DEHYDRATING URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    DOEpatents

    Davis, J.O.; Fogel, C.C.; Palmer, W.E.

    1962-12-18

    Drying and dehydration of aqueous-precipitated uranium tetrafluoride are described. The UF/sub 4/ which normally contains 3 to 4% water, is dispersed into the reaction zone of an operating reactor wherein uranium hexafluoride is being reduced to UF/sub 4/ with hydrogen. The water-containing UF/sub 4/ is dried and blended with the UF/sub 4/ produced in the reactor without interfering with the reduction reaction. (AEC)

  8. Purification and Characterization of OleA from Xanthomonas campestris and Demonstration of a Non-decarboxylative Claisen Condensation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Frias, JA; Richman, JE; Erickson, JS; Wackett, LP

    2011-03-25

    OleA catalyzes the condensation of fatty acyl groups in the first step of bacterial long-chain olefin biosynthesis, but the mechanism of the condensation reaction is controversial. In this study, OleA from Xanthomonas campestris was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein was shown to be active with fatty acyl-CoA substrates that ranged from C(8) to C(16) in length. With limiting myristoyl-CoA (C(14)), 1 mol of the free coenzyme A was released/mol of myristoyl-CoA consumed. Using [(14)C] myristoyl-CoA, the other products were identified as myristic acid, 2-myristoylmyristic acid, and 14-heptacosanone. 2-Myristoylmyristic acid was indicated to be the physiologically relevant product of OleA in several ways. First, 2-myristoylmyristic acid was the major condensed product in short incubations, but over time, it decreased with the concomitant increase of 14-heptacosanone. Second, synthetic 2-myristoylmyristic acid showed similar decarboxylation kinetics in the absence of OleA. Third, 2-myristoylmyristic acid was shown to be reactive with purified OleC and OleD to generate the olefin 14-heptacosene, a product seen in previous in vivo studies. The decarboxylation product, 14-heptacosanone, did not react with OleC and OleD to produce any demonstrable product. Substantial hydrolysis of fatty acyl-CoA substrates to the corresponding fatty acids was observed, but it is currently unclear if this occurs in vivo. In total, these data are consistent with OleA catalyzing a non-decarboxylative Claisen condensation reaction in the first step of the olefin biosynthetic pathway previously found to be present in at least 70 different bacterial strains.

  9. Synthesis of novel dendritic 2,2'-bipyridine ligands and their application to Lewis acid-catalyzed diels-alder and three-component condensation reactions.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Takahito; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Kujime, Masato

    2007-10-12

    A series of dendritic ligands with a 2,2'-bipyridine core was synthesized through the coupling of 4,4'-dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridine with poly(aryl ether) dendrons. The corresponding dendritic Cu(OTf)2 catalysts were used for Diels-Alder and three-component condensation reactions. The dendritic Cu(OTf)2-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction proceeded smoothly, and these dendritic catalysts could be recycled without deactivation by reprecipitation. Three-component condensation reactions such as Mannich-type reactions also proceeded not only in dichloromethane but also in water. Furthermore, a positive dendritic effect on chemical yields was observed in both Diels-Alder reactions and aqueous-media three-component condensation reactions.

  10. Rate-promoting vibrations and coupled hydrogen-electron transfer reactions in the condensed phase: A model for enzymatic catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mincer, Joshua S.; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2004-04-01

    A model is presented for coupled hydrogen-electron transfer reactions in condensed phase in the presence of a rate promoting vibration. Large kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) are found when the hydrogen is substituted with deuterium. While these KIEs are essentially temperature independent, reaction rates do exhibit temperature dependence. These findings agree with recent experimental data for various enzyme-catalyzed reactions, such as the amine dehydrogenases and soybean lipoxygenase. Consistent with earlier results, turning off the promoting vibration results in an increased KIE. Increasing the barrier height increases the KIE, while increasing the rate of electron transfer decreases it. These results are discussed in light of other views of vibrationally enhanced tunneling in enzymes.

  11. An investigation of the role of water on retrograde/condensation reactions and enhanced liquefaction yields. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.; Netzel, D.A.; Wallace, J.C. Jr.; Butcher, C.H.; Mitzel, J.M.; Turner, T.F.

    1995-02-01

    While great strides have been made in developing the technology of coal liquefaction processes in recent years, many unsolved problems still remain before a viable and economical process can be achieved. The technological problems that still exist can be solved through a more fundamental understanding of the chemistry associated with each stage of the coal liquefaction process, starting with any pretreatment steps that may be carried out on the coal itself. Western Research Institute, under the a contract from the US Department of Energy, has conducted a study of different methods of coal drying as pretreatment steps before liquefaction. The results of that study are the subject of this report. Coals that were dried or partially dried thermally and with microwaves had lower liquefaction conversions than coals containing equilibrium moisture contents. However, chemically dried coals had conversions equal to or greater than the premoisturized coals. The conversion behavior is consistent with changes in the physical structure and cross linking reactions because of drying. Thermal and microwave drying appear to cause a collapse in the pore structure, thus preventing donor solvents such as tetralin from contacting reactive sites inside the coals. Chemical dehydration does not appear to collapse the pore structure. From the study of the kinetics of the chemical dehydration of coals, it was possible to quantify the amount of water on the surface, the amount readily accessible in pores, and the amount more strongly bonded in the internal structure of the coals. The results indicate that high-rank coals have proportionally less surface and easily accessible water than the lower rank coals.

  12. Energy- and carbon-efficient synthesis of functionalized small molecules in bacteria using non-decarboxylative Claisen condensation reactions.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Seokjung; Clomburg, James M; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2016-05-01

    Anabolic metabolism can produce an array of small molecules, but yields and productivities are low owing to carbon and energy inefficiencies and slow kinetics. Catabolic and fermentative pathways, on the other hand, are carbon and energy efficient but support only a limited product range. We used carbon- and energy-efficient non-decarboxylative Claisen condensation reactions and subsequent β-reduction reactions, which can accept a variety of functionalized primers and functionalized extender units and operate in an iterative manner, to synthesize functionalized small molecules. Using different ω- and ω-1-functionalized primers and α-functionalized extender units in combination with various termination pathways, we demonstrate the synthesis of 18 products from 10 classes, including ω-phenylalkanoic, α,ω-dicarboxylic, ω-hydroxy, ω-1-oxo, ω-1-methyl, 2-methyl, 2-methyl-2-enolic and 2,3-dihydroxy acids, β-hydroxy-ω-lactones, and ω-1-methyl alcohols.

  13. Reactions of pulsed laser produced boron and nitrogen atoms in a condensing argon stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Lester; Hassanzadeh, Parviz; Burkholder, Thomas R.; Martin, J. M. L.

    1993-01-01

    Reactions of pulsed laser produced B and N atoms at high dilution in argon favored diboron species. At low laser power with minimum radiation, the dominant reaction with N2 gave BBNN (3Π). At higher laser power, reactions of N atoms contributed the B2N (2B2), BNB (2Σu+), NNBN (1Σ+), and BNBN (3Π) species. These new transient molecules were identified from mixed isotopic patterns, isotopic shifts, and ab initio calculations of isotopic spectra.

  14. The Aldol Addition and Condensation: The Effect of Conditions on Reaction Pathway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouch, R. David; Richardson, Amie; Howard, Jessica L.; Harker, Rebecca L.; Barker, Kathryn H.

    2007-01-01

    The reaction of a ketone and an aldehyde in aqueous Na[subscript 2]CO[subscript 2] is described. This experiment is performed in the absence of strong bases or organic solvents and offers the opportunity for students to observe the critical role that reaction temperature and base strength have in determining the product of the base-mediated…

  15. Experimental Deformation of Dehydrating Antigorite: Challenging Models of Dehydration Embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, Greg; Chernak, Linda

    2010-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that intermediate depth earthquakes in subduction zones are caused by the dehydration of hydrous phases, we conducted temperature-ramping experiments on antigorite serpentinite. Cold-pressed powdered samples of antigorite were deformed to a high differential stress at 400°C and 1.0 GPa, within the antigorite stability field, where we have shown that deformation localizes. Temperature was then increased at different rates, 1800°C/hr and 180°C/hr, to cross the reaction boundary while the sample continued to deform; samples were deformed at strain rates of 10-4 s-1, 10-5 s-1 and 10-6 s-1. Two additional experiments were conducted in a similar manner at 300°C, 1.5 GPa and 10-5 s-1 but samples remained 'statically' at high stress during the temperature increase. Our results show that although the decrease in stress during temperature ramping is large, stress relaxes stably, even after dehydration. We find that the slopes of the unloading curves are approximately the same for constant values of the ratio (strain rate/ramp rate) and that the unloading slope is greater for higher values of this ratio. In addition, we find that the unloading curves with the greatest slopes are similar to the apparatus compliance, suggesting that we are generating 'slow earthquakes' in our experiments over the course 5 to 10s of minutes. A strain rate stepping experiment indicates that antigorite has velocity strengthening behavior at 700°C and 1.5 GPa suggesting that as soon as an instability develops in the antigorite, the material strengthens sufficiently to not go unstable. Our results thus suggest that antigorite dehydration does not result in 'dehydration embrittlement' but that it may promote slow earthquakes. We have also conducted a preliminary experiment to study the role of effective pressure on deformation behavior after dehydration. A cold-pressed powdered sample of antigorite with a small core of coarse-grained olivine at one end was deformed at 700

  16. Models of glycolysis: Glyceraldehyde as a source of energy and monomers for prebiotic condensation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    All organisms require energy in a chemical form for maintenance and growth. In contemporary life this chemical energy is obtained by the synthesis of the phosphoanhydride bonds of ATP. Among the biological processes that yield ATP, fermentation is generally considered primitive, because it operates under anaerobic conditions by substrate-level phosphorylation which does not require compartmentation by membranes. Fermentation by the glycolytic pathway, which is found in almost every living cell, is an especially attractive energy source for primitive life. Glycolysis not only produces useful chemical energy (ATP), but intermediates of this pathway are also involved in amino acid synthesis and photosynthetic carbon-fixation. It is believed that energy and substrates needed for the origin of life were provided by nonenzymatic chemical reactions that resemble the enzyme-mediated reactions of glycolysis. These nonenzymatic reactions would have provided a starting point for the evolutionary development of glycolysis.

  17. Reaction Matrix Calculations in Neutron Matter with Alternating-Layer-Spin Structure under π0 Condensation. II ---Numerical Results---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamiya, K.; Tamagaki, R.

    1981-10-01

    Results obtained by applying a formulation based on the reaction matrix theory developed in I are given. Calculations by making use of a modified realistic potential, the Reid soft-core potential with the OPEP-part enhanced due to the isobar (Δ)-mixing, show that the transition to the [ALS] phase of quasi-neutrons corresponding to a typical π0 condensation occurs in the region of (2 ˜ 3) times the nuclear density. The most important ingredients responsible for this transition are the growth of the attractive 3P2 + 3F2 contribution mainly from the spin-parallel pairs in the same leyers and the reduction of the repulsive 3P1 contribution mainly from the spin-antiparallel pairs in the nearest layers; these mainfest themselves as the [ALS]-type localization develops. Properties of the matter under the new phase thus obtained such as the shape of the Fermi surface and the effective mass are discussed.

  18. Experimental evidence for condensation reactions between sugars and proteins in carbonate skeletons

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M.J.; Westbroek, P.; Muyzer, G. ); De Leeuw, J.W. )

    1992-04-01

    Melanoidins, condensation products formed from protein and polysaccharide precursors, were once thought to be an important geological sink for organic carbon. The active microbial recycling of the precursors, coupled with an inability to demonstrate the formation of covalent linkages between amino acids and sugars in melanoidins, has shaped a powerful argument against this view. Yet, melanoidins may still be an abundant source of macromolecules in fossil biominerals such as shells, in which the proteins and polysaccharides are well protected from microbial degradation. The authors have modeled diagenetic changes in a biomineral by heating at 90C mixtures of protein, polysaccharides, and finely ground calcite crystals in sealed glass vials. Changes to the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA, fraction V) were monitored by means of gel electrophoresis and immunology. In the presence of water, BSA was rapidly hydrolyzed and remained immunologically reactive for less than 9 h. Under anhydrous conditions the protein was immunologically reactive for the whole period of the experiment (1,281 h), unless mono- or disaccharide sugars were also present. In the presence of these reactive sugars, browning, a discrete increase in molecular weight of the protein, and a concomitant loss of antigenicity confirmed that the sugars were attaching covalently to the protein, forming melanoidins. The authors roughly estimate that, at the global scale, 2.4 {times} 10{sup 6} tons of calcified tissue matrix glycoproteins is processed annually through the melanoidin pathway. This amount would be equivalent to 7 per mil of the total flux of organic carbon into marine sediments.

  19. Hydrous mineral dehydration around heat-generating nuclear waste in bedded salt formations.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Caporuscio, Florie A; Robinson, Bruce A; Stauffer, Philip H

    2015-06-02

    Heat-generating nuclear waste disposal in bedded salt during the first two years after waste emplacement is explored using numerical simulations tied to experiments of hydrous mineral dehydration. Heating impure salt samples to temperatures of 265 °C can release over 20% by mass of hydrous minerals as water. Three steps in a series of dehydration reactions are measured (65, 110, and 265 °C), and water loss associated with each step is averaged from experimental data into a water source model. Simulations using this dehydration model are used to predict temperature, moisture, and porosity after heating by 750-W waste canisters, assuming hydrous mineral mass fractions from 0 to 10%. The formation of a three-phase heat pipe (with counter-circulation of vapor and brine) occurs as water vapor is driven away from the heat source, condenses, and flows back toward the heat source, leading to changes in porosity, permeability, temperature, saturation, and thermal conductivity of the backfill salt surrounding the waste canisters. Heat pipe formation depends on temperature, moisture availability, and mobility. In certain cases, dehydration of hydrous minerals provides sufficient extra moisture to push the system into a sustained heat pipe, where simulations neglecting this process do not.

  20. Cd-Based metal-organic frameworks from solvothermal reactions involving in situ aldimine condensation and the highly sensitive detection of Fe(3+) ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Wang, Zhong-Jie; Chen, Shu-Guang; Shi, Zhen-Zhen; Chen, Jin-Xi; Zheng, He-Gen

    2017-02-14

    Four Cd(ii)-based compounds (1-4) were synthesized from solvothermal reactions involving the in situ aldimine condensation of an o-diamino-functionalized precursor 3,6-di(4H-imidazol-4-yl)benzene-1,2-diamine (L), Cd(NO3)2·4H2O and aldehyde. Two modes of cycloaddition ([4 + 1] cycloaddition and [4 + 2] cycloaddition) occurred during condensation, causing the in situ generation of two benzimidazole derivative ligands (L1 and L3) and a quinoxaline derivative ligand (L2). Furthermore, the chemical selectivity of the condensation was studied, where the condensation of o-diamino and the aldehyde is more stable and easy to operate. This strategy enriches the synthesis method of MOFs. Additionally, compound 2 containing uncoordinated quinoxaline N atoms showed excellent luminescent sensitivity for Fe(3+) detection.

  1. Condensation reactions of guanidines with bis-electrophiles: Formation of highly nitrogenous heterocyclesa

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, David M.; LaPorte, Matthew G.; Anderson, Shelby M.; Wipf, Peter

    2013-01-01

    2-Amino-1,4-dihydropyrimidines were reacted with bis-electrophiles to produce novel fused bi-pyrimidine, pyrimido-aminotriazine, and pyrimido-sulfonamide scaffolds. In addition, a quinazoline library was constructed using a guanidine Atwal-Biginelli reaction with 1-(quinazolin-2-yl)guanidines. The product heterocycles have novel constitutions with high nitrogen atom counts and represent valuable additions to screening libraries for the discovery of new modulators of biological targets. PMID:23976798

  2. Thirst, Drinking Behavior, And Dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John

    1996-01-01

    Report describes review of physiological mechanisms of involuntary dehydration. Researchers considered cellular dehydration and effects of sodium on thirst, as well as extracellular dehydration and restoration of vascular volume, effects of renin on thirst, and effects of heat.

  3. A microscopic frictional theory for reactions in condensed phases: Influence of nonlinear couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Masataka; Yoshida, Naoto; Yamabe, Tokio

    1996-10-01

    On the assumption of external bath equilibrium, a set of simultaneous linear generalized Langevin equations (GLE) for a microscopic Hamiltonian is derived, whose potential function includes cubic (i.e., nonlinear) coupling terms, which are linear in internal coordinates but quadratic in external bath coordinates. Furthermore, on the linear GLE treatment, a closed expression of time-dependent friction coefficient and a rate constant in the Grote-Hynes theory (GHT) are derived microscopically, reflecting the reactant and solvent structures. By comparing the rate constant of GHT with that of the multidimensional transition-state theory (TST) for the whole solution system, we conclude that these rate expressions are different from each other and the deviation is due to the dynamic effect via the nonlinear coupling among the reaction, internal, and external normal coordinates. Moreover, the friction coefficient depends on temperature and the deviation becomes larger with temperature increasing. By the second-order perturbation theory, we have estimated the deviation which is approximately equal to a transmission coefficient κ, for a real cluster reaction system: the formic acid-water-water system. We have obtained κ of 0.92, which is smaller than unity. A mode analysis shows that two hindered translational motions of the solvent with low frequencies prevent the reaction from proceeding. Besides, we have investigated the isotope effect of a medium water molecule and found that the dynamic isotope effect for the reaction is quite large, i.e., κ for heavy water is much smaller than that for light water. Not the change of the reactive frequency on the free energy surface but that of the frictional effect in the deuterium substitution mainly contributes to the isotope effect. Further, the temperature dependence of κ for the reaction has been estimated and it is found that κ becomes smaller with temperature increasing and the change of the frictional effect in

  4. The Role of Metal Oxides in Nanothermite Reactions: Evidence of Condensed Phase Initiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Al/WO3, and Al/ Bi2O3 were all tested with this system along with 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The...Fe2O3, Al/WO3, and Al/ Bi2O3 were all tested with this system along with the neat Al and metal oxide powders. High speed imaging was also used to...visually compare reaction rates of each sample showing that, contradictory to some previous works, Al/ Bi2O3 reacts much faster than the other

  5. Possible mechanism of structural incorporation of Al into diatomite during the deposition process I. Via a condensation reaction of hydroxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Yu, Wenbin; Deng, Liangliang; Yuan, Weiwei; Ma, Lingya; Yuan, Peng; Du, Peixin; He, Hongping

    2016-01-01

    The structural incorporation of aluminium (Al) into diatomite is investigated by preparing several Al-diatomite composites by loading an Al precursor, hydroxyl aluminum polymer (Al13), onto the surface of diatomite and heating at various temperatures. The results indicate that Al was incorporated and implanted into the structure of diatomite by the condensation reaction of the hydroxyl groups of Al13 and diatomite, and the Si-O-Al(OH) groups were formed during the condensation reaction. Al incorporation by the condensation reaction of hydroxyl groups of Al13 with single silanols of diatomite occurred more readily than that with geminal silanols. The Al incorporation increased solid acidity of diatomite after Al incorporation. The acidity improvement was various for different types of acid sites, depending on the preparation temperature of the Al-incorporated diatomite. Both Brønsted and Lewis acid sites increased greatly after heating at 250 and 350 °C, but only L acid sites significantly improved after heating at 500 °C. These results demonstrate that the structural incorporation of Al(3+) ions into diatomite can occur by the condensation reaction of the hydroxyl groups of the Al precursors and diatomite. Moreover, the rich solid acid sites of Al-incorporated diatomite show its promising application as a solid acid catalyst.

  6. Dehydrohalogenation and Dehydration Reactions of i-C3H7Br and i-C3H7OH by Sodium Ions Studied by Guided Ion Beam Techniques and Quantum Chemical Methods.

    PubMed

    López, E; Lucas, J M; de Andrés, J; Albertí, M; Bofill, J M; Aguilar, A

    2016-07-14

    Dehydrohalogenation and dehydration reactions of gas-phase i-C3H7Br and i-C3H7OH molecules induced by collision with Na(+), all participants being in their electronic ground state, were studied experimentally in our laboratory using a radiofrequency-guided ion beam apparatus and covering the 0.10-10.00 eV center of mass (CM) energy range. In Na(+) + i-C3H7Br collisions the formation of [C3H6-Na](+) and [HBr-Na](+) by dehydrohalogenation was observed and quantified, as well as that of the ion-molecule adduct [Na-i-C3H7Br](+) together with its decomposition products C3H7(+) and NaBr. In Na(+) + i-C3H7OH collisions the dehydration product [H2O-Na](+) was also found, while [C3H6-Na](+) was hardly detected. Moreover, the [Na-i-C3H7OH](+) adduct formation as well as its decomposition into C3H7(+) and NaOH were also quantified. For all these processes, absolute reaction cross sections were measured as a function of the CM collision energy. From measured excitation functions, rate constants for the formation of [C3H6-Na](+), [HBr-Na](+), and [H2O-Na](+) at 303 K were obtained. Complementing the experiments, exhaustive ab initio structure calculations at the MP2 level of theory were performed, giving information on the most relevant features of the potential energy surfaces (PESs) where the dehydrohalogenation, dehydration, and decomposition reactions take place adiabatically for both collision systems. On these PESs different stationary points associated with potential energy minima and transition state barriers were characterized, and their connectivity was ensured using the intrinsic-reaction-coordinate method. The main topology features of the ab initio calculated PESs allowed a qualitative interpretation of the experimental data also exposing the role of the sodium ion as a catalyst in elimination reactions.

  7. Numerical study of the evaporation/condensation phase transition of droplets for an irreversible reaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loscar, E. S.; Albano, E. V.

    2009-02-01

    The ZGB model (Ziff M. R., Gulari E. and Barshad Y., Phys. Rev. Lett., 56 (1986) 2553) for a monomer-dimer catalytic reaction exhibits both second-order and first-order irreversible phase transitions. We report a numerical simulation study of the ZGB model close to coexistence, performed by using the constant-coverage monomer ensemble (CC). By means of CC stationary measurements we found that, in the super-saturated region, there is a phase-transition-like behaviour, for finite systems, between a super-saturated state and a phase where solid monomer droplets coexist with the super-saturated state. Also, we show that the transition point converges, according to a power law behaviour, towards coexistence, so that it is no longer possible to measure any (thermodynamic) spinodal point by using the CC stationary approach. However, by using a dynamic CC ensemble, evidence of the upper spinodal point can clearly be identified: scale invariance of the monomer-droplet size distribution and a maximum in the susceptibility. It is also discussed how to define a spinodal point in the thermodynamic limit for this model.

  8. Intramolecular condensation reactions of {alpha},{omega}-bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes. Formation of cyclic disilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D.A.; Carpenter, J.P.; Myers, S.A.; Assink, R.A.; Small, J.H.; Greaves, J.; Shea, K.J.

    1996-09-04

    In this paper, we used mass spectrometry and {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy to discover that the length of the alkylene-bridging groups had a pronounced effect on the competition between cyclization and polymerization of {alpha},{omega}-bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes and on the formation of polymeric gels. While the intramolecular reaction clearly slows gelation, the cyclic disilsesquioxanes are still tetrafunctional monomers theoretically capable of forming polymeric gels. If the ring structures, which bear a striking resemblence to carbohydrates, are preserved through the polymerization, the resulting poly(cyclic disilsesquioxane) gels may have structural similarities to branched or cross-linked carbohydrates, such as cellulose or chitosan. Under base-catalyzed sol-gel polymerization conditions, 3 and 4 (six- and seven-membered cyclic disilsesquioxanes, respectively) quickly reacted to give gels with significant ring opening as determined from the {sup 29}Si chemical shifts in solid-state (CP MAS) NMR spectra. However, gels prepared under acidic conditions reveal some or all of the cyclic disilsesquioxane functionality was preserved in the polymers. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Dehydration (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Am I in a Healthy Relationship? Who ... from lots of physical activity, especially on a hot day. Even mild dehydration can affect an athlete's ...

  10. Dehydration (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sun "Stomach Flu" A Kid's Guide to Fever Word! Gastroenteritis Food Poisoning What's Sweat? Dehydration Is It Important to Drink a Lot of Water? What's a Healthy Alternative to Water? Gastrointestinal Infections ...

  11. Electrolyte Concentrates Treat Dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Wellness Brands Inc. of Boulder, Colorado, exclusively licensed a unique electrolyte concentrate formula developed by Ames Research Center to treat and prevent dehydration in astronauts returning to Earth. Marketed as The Right Stuff, the company's NASA-derived formula is an ideal measure for athletes looking to combat dehydration and boost performance. Wellness Brands also plans to expand with products that make use of the formula's effective hydration properties to help treat conditions including heat stroke, altitude sickness, jet lag, and disease.

  12. Cognitive performance and dehydration.

    PubMed

    Adan, Ana

    2012-04-01

    No matter how mild, dehydration is not a desirable condition because there is an imbalance in the homeostatic function of the internal environment. This can adversely affect cognitive performance, not only in groups more vulnerable to dehydration, such as children and the elderly, but also in young adults. However, few studies have examined the impact of mild or moderate dehydration on cognitive performance. This paper reviews the principal findings from studies published to date examining cognitive skills. Being dehydrated by just 2% impairs performance in tasks that require attention, psychomotor, and immediate memory skills, as well as assessment of the subjective state. In contrast, the performance of long-term and working memory tasks and executive functions is more preserved, especially if the cause of dehydration is moderate physical exercise. The lack of consistency in the evidence published to date is largely due to the different methodology applied, and an attempt should be made to standardize methods for future studies. These differences relate to the assessment of cognitive performance, the method used to cause dehydration, and the characteristics of the participants.

  13. Reaction Matrix Calculations in Neutron Matter with Alternating-Layer-Spin Structure under π0 Condensation. I ---Formulation---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamiya, K.; Tamagaki, R.

    1981-09-01

    Based on the viewpoint that a typical π0 condensation is realized with the [ALS] (Alternating-Layer-Spin) structure of nucleon system, a framework to calculate the energy of neutron matter under such a new phase is presented in the reaction matrix theory. This enables us to treat both effects on equal footing; the long-range effect dominated by the OPEP tensor component with the enhancement due to the mixing of Δ(1236MeV) and the sort-range effect much influenced by repulsive core and spin-orbit force. Starting with the [ALS] model wave function constructed on the Bloch basis which assures to take the limit of no localization, we have the expressions for energy quantities expressed by the partial-wave contributions. This scheme provides a way to understand the mechanism of energy gain in the new phase, by making use of the notions of the ordinary unclear matter theory such as the potential picture and the partial waves. Some numerical examples are shown.

  14. Catalytic solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry for the determination of trace rhamnose based on its condensation reaction with calcein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Lin, Li-Ping; Wang, Hong-Xin; Lin, Shao-Qin; Zhang, Li-Hong; Cai, Wen-Lian; Lin, Xuan; Pan, You-Zhu; Wang, Xin-Xing; Li, Zhi-Ming; Jiao, Li; Cui, Ma-Lin

    2011-12-01

    Calcein (R) could not only emit strong and stable room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on filter paper using I - as perturber, but also could be oxidized by H 2O 2 to form a non-phosphorescence compound (R'), resulting in the quenching of RTP signal of R. Moreover, the ortho-hydrogen of phenolic hydroxyl in R took condensation reaction with rhamnose (Rha) to produce non-phosphorescence compound (R-Rha) causing the RTP signal of R to further quench, and R-Rha was oxidized by H 2O 2 to form R' and Rha, bringing about the sharp RTP signal quenching of R. Thus, a new solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry (SSRTP) for the determination of trace Rha based on its strong catalytic effect on H 2O 2 oxidizing R has been established, with the detection limit (LD) of 7.8 zg spot -1 (corresponding concentration: 2.0 × 10 -17 g ml -1, sample volume: 0.40 μl spot -1). This method has been applied to determine trace Rha in cigarettes and jujubes, with the results coinciding well with those determined by a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The component of R-Rha also was analyzed by means of HPLC, mass spectrometer and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. The mechanism of catalytic SSRTP for the determination of trace Rha was discussed.

  15. Microwave-Assisted Condensation Reactions of Acetophenone Derivatives and Activated Methylene Compounds with Aldehydes Catalyzed by Boric Acid under Solvent-Free Conditions.

    PubMed

    Brun, Elodie; Safer, Abdelmounaim; Carreaux, François; Bourahla, Khadidja; L'helgoua'ch, Jean-Martial; Bazureau, Jean-Pierre; Villalgordo, Jose Manuel

    2015-06-23

    We here disclosed a new protocol for the condensation of acetophenone derivatives and active methylene compounds with aldehydes in the presence of boric acid under microwave conditions. Implementation of the reaction is simple, healthy and environmentally friendly owing to the use of a non-toxic catalyst coupled to a solvent-free procedure. A large variety of known or novel compounds have thus been prepared, including with substrates bearing acid or base-sensitive functional groups.

  16. Synthesis of oxazolidine-2,4-diones by a tandem phosphorus-mediated carboxylative condensation-cyclization reaction using atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Zhen; Xia, Tian; Yang, Xu-Tong; Lu, Xiao-Bing

    2015-04-11

    The oxazolidine-2,4-dione motif is found frequently in biologically important compounds. A tandem phosphorus-mediated carboxylative condensation of primary amines and α-ketoesters/base-catalyzed cyclization reaction have been developed. These processes provide a novel and convenient access to various oxazolidine-2,4-diones in a one-pot fashion using atmospheric carbon dioxide and readily available substrates under very mild and transition-metal-free conditions.

  17. Plastic and dehydration instabilities of antigorite serpentinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, J.; Katayama, I.; Ohfuji, H.; Terada, Y.

    2008-12-01

    We conducted a constant displacement rate test of antigorite serpentinite by a triaxial solid medium deformation apparatus installed at Hiroshima University. Experimental conditions were P = ca. 1.0 GPa, T = 450 C to 800 C, which cover from stability to dehydration conditions of antigorite, and strain rate of digit of 10-5 /sec. Samples were cylindrical shape cored from serpentinite and their sizes were 7 mm x 7 mm and 5 mm x 5 mm in diameter by length. Faults were observed in recovered samples from all temperature conditions. Mechanical data of faulted samples showed stress drop of several 10 MPa during experiments. The followings summarize microstructural observations of the recovered samples, and propose generation processes of fault at stability and dehydration conditions. 1) Stability field (plastic instability): Antigorite grains develop a lattice preferred orientation (LPO) along a fault, which characterized by (001) cleavage face parallel to fault plane. This fact suggests the fault is generated by the following process. i) Antigorite grains on the plane applied by maximum shear stress are preferentially deformed by plastic manner, and then develop the LPO. ii) The arrangement of cleavage face gradually reduces the strength of this plane. iii) Eventually, embrittlement occurs at the critical point when the rock strength along this weak plane becomes smaller than shear stress. 2) Dehydration condition (dehydration instability): Fine grained dehydration phases less than 1 micrometer in size such as olivine and talc are detected as a thin vein along the fault. Moreover, talc and olivine, or antigorite ca. 1 - 5 micrometers in size with angular shape are observed within the fault as a fault gauge. These facts suggest the following generation process of fault. i) Dehydration reaction of antigorite begins on the plane applied by maximum shear stress and expands along this plane. ii) The dehydration gradually reduces the strength of this plane. iii) Eventually

  18. Interstellar silicate analogs for grain-surface reaction experiments: Gas-phase condensation and characterization of the silicate dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Sabri, T.; Jäger, C.; Gavilan, L.; Lemaire, J. L.; Vidali, G.; Henning, T.

    2014-01-10

    Amorphous, astrophysically relevant silicates were prepared by laser ablation of siliceous targets and subsequent quenching of the evaporated atoms and clusters in a helium/oxygen gas atmosphere. The described gas-phase condensation method can be used to synthesize homogeneous and astrophysically relevant silicates with different compositions ranging from nonstoichiometric magnesium iron silicates to pyroxene- and olivine-type stoichiometry. Analytical tools have been used to characterize the morphology, composition, and spectral properties of the condensates. The nanometer-sized silicate condensates represent a new family of cosmic dust analogs that can generally be used for laboratory studies of cosmic processes related to condensation, processing, and destruction of cosmic dust in different astrophysical environments. The well-characterized silicates comprising amorphous Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, as well as the corresponding crystalline silicates forsterite and fayalite, produced by thermal annealing of the amorphous condensates, have been used as real grain surfaces for H{sub 2} formation experiments. A specifically developed ultra-high vacuum apparatus has been used for the investigation of molecule formation experiments. The results of these molecular formation experiments on differently structured Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} described in this paper will be the topic of the next paper of this series.

  19. The Reductive Dehydration of Cellulose by Solid/Gas Reaction with TiCl4 at Low Temperature: A Cheap, Simple, and Green Process for Preparing Anatase Nanoplates and TiO2 /C Composites.

    PubMed

    Plumejeau, Sandrine; Rivallin, Matthieu; Brosillon, Stephan; Ayral, André; Heux, Laurent; Boury, Bruno

    2016-11-21

    Metal oxides and metal oxide/carbon composites are entering the development of new technologies and should therefore to be prepared by sustainable chemistry processes. Therefore, a new aspect of the reactivity of cellulose is presented through its solid/gas reaction with vapour of titanium(IV) chloride in anhydrous conditions at low temperature (80 °C). This reaction leads to two transformations both for cellulose and titanium(IV) chloride. A reductive dehydration of cellulose is seen at the lowest temperature ever reported and results in the formation of a carbonaceous fibrous solid as the only carbon-containing product. Simultaneously, the in situ generation of water leads to the formation of titanium dioxide with an unexpected nanoplate morphology (ca. 50 nm thickness) and a high photocatalytic activity. We present the evidence showing the evolution of the cellulose and the TiO2 nanostructure formation, along with its photocatalytic activity. This low-temperature process avoids any other reagents and is among the greenest processes for the preparation of anatase and also for TiO2 /carbon composites. The anisotropic morphology of TiO2 questions the role of the cellulose on the growing process of these nanoparticles.

  20. Transport-induced shifts in condensate dew-point and composition in multicomponent systems with chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Nagarajan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Partial heterogeneous condensation phenomena in multicomponent reacting systems are analyzed taking into consideration the chemical element transport phenomena. It is demonstrated that the dew-point surface temperature in chemically reactive systems is not a purely thermodynamic quantity, but is influenced by the multicomponent diffusion and Soret-mass diffusion phenomena. Several distinct dew-points are shown to exist in such systems and, as a result of transport constraints, the 'sharp' locus between two chemically distinct condensates is systematically moved to a difference mainstream composition.

  1. Fruits and vegetables dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ita, A.; Flores, G.; Franco, F.

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration diagrams were determined by means of Differential Thermal Analysis, DTA, and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis, TGA, curves of several simultaneous fruits and vegetables, all under the same conditions. The greater mass loss is associated with water containing in the structure of the investigated materials at low temperature. In poblano chile water is lost in a single step. The banana shows a very sharply two stages, while jicama can be observed although with a little difficulty three stages. The major mass loss occurs in the poblano chile and the lower in banana. The velocity and temperature of dehydration vary within a small range for most materials investigated, except for banana and cactus how are very different.

  2. Control of Transient Slip Weakening During Gypsum Dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclere, H.; Faulkner, D.; Wheeler, J.; Mariani, E.

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of fault mechanics is of first order importance to unravel earthquake triggering. Among the parameters influencing fault reactivation and earthquake triggering, the influence of pore-fluid pressure and friction on stability of fault zones have been a focus of recent work based on geological, geophysical and experimental analyses. Here, the effects of dehydration reactions on hydraulic and mechanical properties of rock are analysed to better understand the conditions required to trigger earthquakes. Triaxial experiments are conducted using gypsum and a direct shear sample assembly that allows a constant normal stress to be applied and permeability to be measured during sliding. The evolutions of shear stress, pore-fluid pressure and permeability are continuously measured throughout the experiment until dehydration reaction reached completion. Tests are conducted with a temperature ramp from 70 to 150 °C and with different effective confining pressures (50, 100 and 150 MPa) and velocities (0.1 and 0.4 μm.s-1). Results show that gypsum dehydration induces transient stable slip weakening that is controlled by pore-fluid pressure and permeability evolutions followed by unstable slip on fully dehydrated product.The evolution of microstructures and mineralogy during the experiment are inferred from SEM and XRD analyses of deformed samples collected at different key stages during repeated tests. The microstructural analysis shows clear evidence of dehydration reactions related to the development of S-C-C' structures where dehydration product is preferentially localized along shear and schistosity planes. A conceptual model is then proposed to explain transient slip weakening during dehydration reactions incorporating the key role played by permeability, and to provide a framework to define the conditions required to trigger unstable events during dehydration reactions.

  3. An Asymmetric Organocatalytic Quadruple Domino Reaction Employing a Vinylogous Friedel-Crafts/Michael/Michael/Aldol Condensation Sequence.

    PubMed

    Philipps, Arne R; Fritze, Lars; Erdmann, Nico; Enders, Dieter

    2015-04-02

    An organocatalytic quadruple cascade initiated by a Friedel-Crafts-type reaction is described. The (S)-diphenylprolinol trimethylsilyl ether catalyzed reaction yields highly functionalized cyclohexenecarbaldehydes bearing a 1,1-bis[4-(dialkylamino)phenyl]ethene moiety and three contiguous stereogenic centers. The reaction tolerates various functional groups and all products are obtained with very good diastereoselectivity and with virtually complete enantiomeric excess.

  4. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  5. Dehydration in the Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Miller, Hayley J

    2015-09-01

    Dehydration affects 20% to 30% of older adults. It has a greater negative outcome in this population than in younger adults and increases mortality, morbidity, and disability. Dehydration is often caused by water deprivation in older adults, although excess water loss may also be a cause. Traditional markers for dehydration do not take into consideration many of the physiological differences present in older adults. Clinical assessment of dehydration in older adults poses different findings, yet is not always diagnostic. Treatment of dehydration should focus on prevention and early diagnosis before it negatively effects health and gives rise to comorbidities. The current article discusses what has most thoroughly been studied; the best strategies and assessment tools for evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of dehydration in older adults; and what needs to be researched further. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 41(9), 8-13.].

  6. Combined QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Study on a Condensed-Phase SN2 Reaction at Nitrogen:  The Effect of Explicitly Including Solvent Polarization.

    PubMed

    Geerke, Daan P; Thiel, Stephan; Thiel, Walter; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2007-07-01

    In a previous combined QM/MM molecular dynamics (MD) study from our laboratory on the identity SN2 reaction between a chloride anion and an amino chloride in liquid dimethyl ether (DME), an increase in the free energy activation barrier was observed in the condensed phase when compared to the gas-phase activation energy. Here we reproduce these findings, but when comparing the condensed-phase potential of mean force (PMF) with the free energy profile in the gas phase (obtained from Monte Carlo simulations), we observe a smaller solvent effect on the activation barrier of the reaction. In a next step, we introduce an explicit description of electronic polarization in the MM (solvent) part of the system. A polarizable force field for liquid DME was developed based on the charge-on-spring (COS) model, which was calibrated to reproduce thermodynamic properties of the nonpolarizable model in classical MD simulations. The COS model was implemented into the MNDO/GROMOS interface in a special version of the QM/MM software ChemShell, which was used to investigate the effect of solvent polarization on the free energy profile of the reaction under study. A higher activation barrier was obtained using the polarizable solvent model than with the nonpolarizable force field, due to a better solvation of and a stronger polarization of solvent molecules around the separate reactants. The obtained PMFs were subjected to an energy-entropy decomposition of the relative solvation free energies of the reactant complex along the reaction coordinate, to investigate in a quantitative manner whether the solvent (polarization) effects are mainly due to favorable QM-MM (energetic) interactions.

  7. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Catalyzed Condensation Reaction of Isocoumarins and 1,7-Heptadiamine in the Formation of Bis-Isoquinolinones

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, Varadhan; Mohan Kumar, Kesarla; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Khan, Fazlur-Rahman Nawaz

    2012-01-01

    The diversified bis-isoquinolinones were obtained in two steps, utilizing homophthalic acid and various acid chlorides providing 3-substituted isocoumarins in the first step which on further condensation with 1,7-heptadiamine involving C–N bond formation from the lactone in the presence of 10 mol% zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) (<150 nm) afforded the desired bis-isoquinolinones in high yield and purity. The synthesized compounds were then characterized using FTIR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and HRMS techniques. PMID:22536149

  8. Onion dehydration: a review.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Jayeeta; Shrivastava, S L; Rao, P S

    2012-06-01

    Onion (Allium cepa), a very commonly used vegetable, ranks third in the world production of major vegetables. Apart from imparting a delicious taste and flavour due to its pungency in many culinary preparations, it serves several medicinal purposes also. Processing and preservation of onion by suitable means is a major thrust area since a long time. The various kinds of treatments followed for dehydration of onion such as convective air drying, solar drying, fluidized bed drying, vacuum microwave drying, infrared drying and osmotic drying are reviewed here. These techniques are mainly used for preservation and value addition of onion. Several researchers have tried for decades to model the drying kinetics and quality parameters, which are also compiled here briefly.

  9. 7 CFR 989.12 - Dehydrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 989.12 Dehydrator. Dehydrator means any person who produces raisins by dehydrating grapes by artificial means....

  10. Kinetics of volatile extraction from carbonaceous chondrites: Dehydration of talc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Ganguly, Jibamitra

    1991-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are believed to be the primary constituents of near-Earth asteroids and Phobos and Deimos, and are potential resources of fuels that may be exploited for future planetary missions. Calculations of equilibrium phase relations suggest that talc (Ta) and antigorite (Ant) are likely to be the major hydrous phases in the C1 and C2 meteorites (Ganguly and Saxena, 1989), which constitute the most volatile rich classes of carbonaceous chondrites. The dehydration kinetics of talc are studied as a function of temperature, grain size, composition and fluid fugacity, as part of a systematic study of the reaction kinetics of the volatile bearing phases that are either known or likely to be present in carbonaceous chondrites. The dehydration kinetics were investigated at 1 bar, 775 to 875 C by monitoring the in-situ weight loss as a function of time of a natural talc. The talc platelets had a dimension of 0.8 to 1 micron. The run durations varied from 233.3 hours at 775 C (48 percent dehydration) to 20.8 hours at 875 C (80 pct. dehydration). The results can be adequately represented by a given rate equation. Theoretical analysis suggests that the reduction in the concentration of H2O in the environment of dehydrating talc, as would be encountered in processing chondritic materials, will have negligible effect on the rate of dehydration, unless there is a change of reaction mechanism owing to the presence of other volatile species.

  11. An AFM Study of the Effects of Silanization Temperature, Hydration, and Annealing on the Nucleation and Aggregation of Condensed OTS Domains on Mica.

    PubMed

    Britt, David W; Hlady, Vladimir

    1996-03-25

    Partial monolayers of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) were formed on mica under different reaction conditions in which the silanization temperature, time, and amount of water adsorbed on the mica substrates were varied. OTS surface coverage increased with silanization time for all samples; however, the amount and distribution of adsorbed OTS varied greatly under these different reaction conditions. AFM analysis showed that OTS formed two phases on mica silanized at 25°C: condensed "island-like" domains and expanded "liquid-like" domains. Partially dehydrated mica silanized at 9°C, however, displayed only condensed domains which were of smaller size compared to those on the 25°C samples. The lateral diffusion and aggregation of small condensed OTS domains to form larger aggregates was evident on all surfaces except the 25°C partially dehydrated mica. A uniform distribution of many small condensed domains surrounded by expanded OTS phases was seen instead. Extended annealing resulted in surface diffusion and aggregation of these domains and nucleation of new condensed domains from the surrounding expanded OTS phases. These observations are consistent with a deposition, diffusion, and aggregation model (DDA) which allows for activated diffusion; however, rigorous modeling is not presented here.

  12. Voluntary dehydration and cognitive performance in trained college athletes.

    PubMed

    D'anci, Kristen E; Vibhakar, Arjun; Kanter, Jordan H; Mahoney, Caroline R; Taylor, Holly A

    2009-08-01

    Cognitive and mood decrements resulting from mild dehydration and glucose consumption were studied. Men and women (total N = 54; M age = 19.8 yr., SD = 1.2) were recruited from college athletic teams. Euhydration or dehydration was achieved by athletes completing team practices with or without water replacement. Dehydration was associated with higher thirst and negative mood ratings as well as better Digit Span performance. Participants showed better Vigilance Attention with euhydration. Hydration status and athlete's sex interacted with performance on Choice Reaction Time and Vigilance Attention. In a second study, half of the athletes received glucose prior to cognitive testing. Results for negative mood and thirst ratings were similar, but for cognitive performance the results were mixed. Effects of glucose on cognition were independent of dehydration.

  13. Survey of quality indicators in commercial dehydrated fruits.

    PubMed

    Megías-Pérez, Roberto; Gamboa-Santos, Juliana; Soria, Ana Cristina; Villamiel, Mar; Montilla, Antonia

    2014-05-01

    Physical and chemical quality parameters (dry matter, aw, protein, carbohydrates, vitamin C, 2-furoylmethyl amino acids, rehydration ratio and leaching loss) have been determined in 30 commercial dehydrated fruits (strawberry, blueberry, raspberry, cranberry, cherry, apple, grapefruit, mango, kiwifruit, pineapple, melon, coconut, banana and papaya). For comparison purposes, strawberry samples processed in the laboratory by freeze-drying and by convective drying were used as control samples. Overall quality of dehydrated fruits seemed to be greatly dependent on processing conditions and, in a cluster analysis, samples which were presumably subjected to osmotic dehydration were separated from the rest of fruits. These samples presented the lowest concentration of vitamin C and the highest evolution of Maillard reaction, as evidenced by its high concentration of 2-furoylmethyl amino acids. This is the first study on the usefulness of this combination of chemical and physical indicators to assess the overall quality of commercial dehydrated fruits.

  14. Condensation of chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blander, M.

    1983-01-01

    Analysis of current experimental results concerned with the kinetic constraints on chondrule formation showed that the major physical properties of chondrules could have been produced by direct condensation of metastable liquid silicates droplets from a hot gas in the primordial nebula. It is argued that such a condensation process would have to be followed by crystallization, accretion, and partial comminution of the droplets. The chemical mechanisms driving this process are described, including: nucleation constraints on comminution and crystallization; slow transformations and chemical reactions in chain silicates; and the slow diffusion of ions. It is shown that the physical mechanisms for chondrule condensation are applicable to a broad spectrum of chondrule sources.

  15. Control of reaction efficiency by two-color two-pulse excitation: Photoisomerization of indocyanine green in condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuyuki, Masanori; Furuta, Koichi; Wada, Akihide

    2011-07-01

    In cyanine dye, photoisomerization paths involving multiphoton processes were found by two-color two-pulse correlation of ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy. The reaction efficiency depended on the interval between two pump pulses, UV and NIR pulses, as well as the fluence of the NIR pulse, but was little dependent on that of the UV pulse. These results indicate that the new photoisomerization paths involve the NIR multiphoton process and/or the UV one-photon process. The difference in two-pulse correlation between positive and negative time regions revealed a new reaction path that had the highest branching ratio of cis isomer to other leuco forms.

  16. Mechanistic Investigation of Catalyst-Transfer Suzuki-Miyaura Condensation Polymerization of Thiophene-Pyridine Biaryl Monomers with the Aid of Model Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Yu; Katoh, Masaru; Ohta, Yoshihiro; Yokozawa, Tsutomu

    2016-11-21

    We have investigated the requirements for efficient Pd-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura catalyst-transfer condensation polymerization (Pd-CTCP) reactions of 2-alkoxypropyl-6-(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)-3-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl)pyridine (12) as a donor-acceptor (D-A) biaryl monomer. As model reactions, we first carried out the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction of X-Py-Th-X' (Th=thiophene, Py=pyridine, X, X'=Br or I) 1 with phenylboronic acid ester 2 by using tBu3 PPd(0) as the catalyst. Monosubstitution with a phenyl group at Th-I mainly took place in the reaction of Br-Py-Th-I (1 b) with 2, whereas disubstitution selectively occurred in the reaction of I-Py-Th-Br (1 c) with 2, indicating that the Pd catalyst is intramolecularly transferred from acceptor Py to donor Th. Therefore, we synthesized monomer 12 by introduction of a boronate moiety and bromine into Py and Th, respectively. However, examination of the relationship between monomer conversion and the Mn of the obtained polymer, as well as the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra, indicated that Suzuki-Miyaura coupling polymerization of 12 with (o-tolyl)tBu3 PPdBr initiator 13 proceeded in a step-growth polymerization manner through intermolecular transfer of the Pd catalyst. To understand the discrepancy between the model reactions and polymerization reaction, Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions of 1 c with thiopheneboronic acid ester instead of 2 were carried out. This resulted in a decrease of the disubstitution product. Therefore, step-growth polymerization appears to be due to intermolecular transfer of the Pd catalyst from Th after reductive elimination of the Th-Pd-Py complex formed by transmetalation of polymer Th-Br with (Pin)B-Py-Th-Br monomer 12 (Pin=pinacol). Catalysts with similar stabilization energies of metal-arene η(2) -coordination for D and A monomers may be needed for CTCP reactions of biaryl D-A monomers.

  17. An investigation of the role of water on retrograde/condensation reactions and enhanced liquefaction yields. Quarterly progress report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F.P.

    1992-07-01

    The overall objectives of this work are to conduct research that will provide the basis for an improved liquefaction process, and to facilitate our understanding of those processes that occur when coals are initially dissolved. Changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying and steam pretreatments will be measured in order to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine the mechanism by which water enhances coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods for coal drying will be investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction, thereby making coal drying a relatively economical and efficient method for coal pretreatment. Coal drying methods will include conventional thermal drying, microwave drying, and chemical drying at low temperature. State-of-the-art solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques using combined rotation and multiple pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) and cross polarization with magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) will be employed: (1) to measures changes in coal structure brought about by the different methods of drying and by low temperature oxidation, and (2) to obtain direct measurements of changes in the aromatic hydrogen-to-carbon ratio of the solid/semi-solid material formed or remaining during pretreatment and the initial stages of liquefaction. The aromatic hydrogen-to-carbon ratios are difficult, if not impossible, to measure without the use of solid-state NMR, and as a result this ratio will be used to monitor the retrograde/condensation reactions that take place during coal liquefaction in the presence and absence of steam and various inert gases.

  18. The kinetics of the bimolecular A+B --> 0 reaction in condensed matter: Effects of non-equilibrium charge screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzovkov, V. N.; Kotomin, E. A.; von Niessen, W.

    1996-12-01

    The kinetics of the bimolecular A+B→0 reaction between charged reactants is studied in two dimensions, i.e., on a surface. The theory is based on the Kirkwood superposition approximation for three-particle densities and the self-consistent treatment of the electrostatic interactions defined by the non-uniform spatial distribution of similar and dissimilar reactants. Special attention is paid to pattern formation and many-particle effects arising from reaction-induced formation of loose domains containing similar reactants only. It is shown that the critical exponent α characterizing the algebraic concentration decay law, n(t)∝t-α, differs strongly between symmetric (DA=DB) and asymmetric (DA=0) reactant mobilities. This effect is abnormal from the point of view of standard chemical kinetics. It arises directly from the specific spatial distribution in the system as in ``raisins A in a dough B.'' At long reaction times the asymptotics of the interaction potentials is of non-equilibrium type at large relative distances. The accumulation kinetics in the presence of a permanent source is studied. Results of the microscopic formalism are compared with a previous mesoscopic theory.

  19. [Dehydration due to "mouth broken"].

    PubMed

    Meijler, D P M; van Mossevelde, P W J; van Beek, R H T

    2012-09-01

    Two children were admitted to a medical centre due to dehydration after an oral injury and the extraction of a tooth. One child complained of "mouth broken". Dehydration is the most common water-electrolyte imbalance in children. Babies and young children are prone to dehydration due to their relatively large body surface area, the high percentage extracellular fluid, and the limited ability of the kidneys to conserve water. After the removal ofa tooth, after an oral trauma or in case of oral discomfort, a child is at greater risk of dehydration by reduced fluid and food intake due to oral pain and/or discomfort and anxiety to drink. In those cases, extra attention needs to be devoted to the intake of fluids.

  20. Acid-catalyzed condensed-phase reactions of limonene and terpineol and their impacts on gas-to-particle partitioning in the formation of organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong Jie; Cheong, Gema Y L; Lau, Arthur P S; Chan, Chak K

    2010-07-15

    We investigated the condensed-phase reactions of biogenic VOCs with C double bond C bonds (limonene, C(10)H(16), and terpineol, C(10)H(18)O) catalyzed by sulfuric acid by both bulk solution (BS) experiments and gas-particle (GP) experiments using a flow cell reactor. Product analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that cationic polymerization led to dimeric and trimeric product formation under conditions of relative humidity (RH) <20% (in the GP experiments) and a sulfuric acid concentration of 57.8 wt % (in the BS experiments), while hydration occurred under conditions of RH > 20% (in the GP experiments) and sulfuric acid concentrations of 46.3 wt % or lower (in the BS experiments). Apparent partitioning coefficients (K(p,rxn)) were estimated from the GP experiments by including the reaction products. Only under extremely low RH conditions (RH < 5%) did the values of K(p,rxn) ( approximately 5 x 10(-6) m(3)/microg for limonene and approximately 2 x 10(-5) m(3)/microg for terpineol) substantially exceed the physical partitioning coefficients (K(p) = 6.5 x 10(-8) m(3)/microg for limonene and =2.3 x 10(-6) m(3)/microg for terpineol) derived from the absorptive partitioning theory. At RH higher than 5%, the apparent partitioning coefficients (K(p,rxn)) of both limonene and terpineol were in the same order of magnitude as the K(p) values derived from the absorptive partitioning theory. Compared with other conditions including VOC concentration and degree of neutralization (by ammonium) of acidic particles, RH is a critical parameter that influences both the reaction mechanisms and the uptake ability (K(p,rxn) values) of these processes. The finding suggests that RH needs to be considered when taking the effects of acid-catalyzed reactions into account in estimating organic aerosol formation from C double bond C containing VOCs.

  1. Heterogeneous ceria catalyst with water-tolerant Lewis acidic sites for one-pot synthesis of 1,3-diols via Prins condensation and hydrolysis reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yehong; Wang, Feng; Song, Qi; Xin, Qin; Xu, Shutao; Xu, Jie

    2013-01-30

    The use of a heterogeneous Lewis acid catalyst, which is insoluble and easily separable during the reaction, is a promising option for hydrolysis reactions from both environmental and practical viewpoints. In this study, ceria showed excellent catalytic activity in the hydrolysis of 4-methyl-1,3-dioxane to 1,3-butanediol in 95% yield and in the one-pot synthesis of 1,3-butanediol from propylene and formaldehyde via Prins condensation and hydrolysis reactions in an overall yield of 60%. In-depth investigations revealed that ceria is a water-tolerant Lewis acid catalyst, which has seldom been reported previously. The ceria catalysts showed rather unusual high activity in hydrolysis, with a turnover number (TON) of 260, which is rather high for bulk oxide catalysts, whose TONs are usually less than 100. Our conclusion that ceria functions as a Lewis acid catalyst in hydrolysis reactions is firmly supported by thorough characterizations with IR and Raman spectroscopy, acidity measurements with IR and (31)P magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy, Na(+)/H(+) exchange tests, analyses using the in situ active-site capping method, and isotope-labeling studies. A relationship between surface vacancy sites and catalytic activity has been established. CeO(2)(111) has been confirmed to be the catalytically active crystalline facet for hydrolysis. Water has been found to be associatively adsorbed on oxygen vacancy sites with medium strength, which does not lead to water dissociation to form stable hydroxides. This explains why the ceria catalyst is water-tolerant.

  2. Condensed Matter Cluster Reactions in LENR Power Cells for a Radical New Type of Space Power Source

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiaoling; Miley, George H.; Hora, Heinz

    2009-03-16

    This paper reviews previous theoretical and experimental study on the possibility of nuclear events in multilayer thin film electrodes (Lipson et al., 2004 and 2005; Miley et al., 2007), including the correlation between excess heat and transmutations (Miley and Shrestha, 2003) and the cluster theory that predicts it. As a result of this added understanding of cluster reactions, a new class of electrodes is under development at the University of Illinois. These electrodes are designed to enhance cluster formation and subsequent reactions. Two approaches are under development. The first employs improved loading-unloading techniques, intending to obtain a higher volumetric density of sites favoring cluster formation. The second is designed to create nanostructures on the electrode where the cluster state is formed by electroless deposition of palladium on nickel micro structures. Power units employing these electrodes should offer unique advantages for space applications. This is a fundamental new nuclear energy source that is environmentally compatible with a minimum of radiation involvement, high specific power, very long lifetime, and scalable from micro power to kilowatts.

  3. Carbohydrate Dehydration Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the impact of various factors on the "charring reaction" of a carbohydrate with concentrated sulfuric acid including the type of sugar, the degree of fineness of the sugar crystals, and the amount of water added. (JRH)

  4. CONDENSATION CAN

    DOEpatents

    Booth, E.T. Jr.; Pontius, R.B.; Jacobsohn, B.A.; Slade, C.B.

    1962-03-01

    An apparatus is designed for condensing a vapor to a solid at relatively low back pressures. The apparatus comprises a closed condensing chamber, a vapor inlet tube extending to the central region of the chamber, a co-axial tubular shield surrounding the inlet tube, means for heating the inlet tube at a point outside the condensing chamber, and means for refrigeratirg the said chamber. (AEC)

  5. Dehydration-driven topotaxy in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Tommasi, Andréa; Garrido, Carlos J.

    2014-05-01

    Mineral replacement reactions play a fundamental role in the chemistry and the strength of the lithosphere. When externally or internally derived fluids are present, interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation is the driving mechanism for such reactions [1]. One of the microstructural features of this process is a 3D arrangement of crystallographic axes across internal interfaces (topotaxy) between reactant and product phases. Dehydration reactions are a special case of mineral replacement reaction that generates a transient fluid-filled porosity. Among others, the dehydration serpentinite is of special relevance in subduction zones because of the amount of fluids involved (potentially up to 13 wt.%). Two topotatic relationships between olivine and antigorite (the serpentine mineral stable at high temperature and pressure) have been reported in partially hydrated mantle wedge xenoliths [2]. Therefore, if precursor antigorite serpentine has a strong crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) its dehydration might result in prograde peridotite with a strong inherited CPO. However for predicting the importance of topotactic reactions for seismic anisotropy of subduction zones we also need to consider the crystallization orthopyroxene + chlorite in the prograde reaction and, more importantly, the fact that this dehydration reaction produces a transient porosity of ca. 20 % vol. that results in local fluctuations of strain during compaction and fluid migration. We address this issue by a microstructural comparison between the CPO developed in olivine, orthopyroxene and chlorite during high-pressure antigorite dehydration in piston cylinder experiments (at 750ºC and 20 kbar and 1000ºC and 30 kbar, 168 h) and that recorded in natural samples (Cerro del Almirez, Betic Cordillera, Spain). Experimentally developed CPOs are strong. Prograde minerals show a significant inheritance of the former antigorite foliation. Topotactic relations are dominated by (001)atg//(100)ol

  6. Iron Oxide-Supported Copper Oxide Nanoparticles (Nanocat-Fe-CuO): Magnetically Recyclable Catalysts for the Synthesis of Pyrazole Derivatives, 4-Methoxyaniline, and Ullmann-type Condensation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    An efficient and benign protocol is reported for the synthesis of 4-methoxyaniline, medicinally important pyrazole derivatives, and Ullmann-type condensation reaction using magnetically separable and reusable magnetite-supported copper (nanocat-Fe-CuO) nanoparticles under mild co...

  7. Physiologic basis for understanding quantitative dehydration assessment.

    PubMed

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W; Charkoudian, Nisha; Sawka, Michael N

    2013-03-01

    Dehydration (body water deficit) is a physiologic state that can have profound implications for human health and performance. Unfortunately, dehydration can be difficult to assess, and there is no single, universal gold standard for decision making. In this article, we review the physiologic basis for understanding quantitative dehydration assessment. We highlight how phenomenologic interpretations of dehydration depend critically on the type (dehydration compared with volume depletion) and magnitude (moderate compared with severe) of dehydration, which in turn influence the osmotic (plasma osmolality) and blood volume-dependent compensatory thresholds for antidiuretic and thirst responses. In particular, we review new findings regarding the biological variation in osmotic responses to dehydration and discuss how this variation can help provide a quantitative and clinically relevant link between the physiology and phenomenology of dehydration. Practical measures with empirical thresholds are provided as a starting point for improving the practice of dehydration assessment.

  8. Amine catalyzed condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S.

    2001-01-01

    The catalysis of the condensation of hydrolyzed metal alkoxides by amines has been mentioned in the literature, but there has been no systematic study of their influence on the rate of the condensation reaction of the alkoxide and the microstructure of the resultant gel.

  9. May eclogite dehydration cause slab fracturation ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loury, Chloé; Lanari, Pierre; Rolland, Yann; Guillot, Stéphane; Ganino, Clément

    2015-04-01

    Petrological and geophysical evidences strongly indicate that fluids releases play a fundamental role in subduction zones as in subduction-related seismicity and arc magmatism. It is thus important to assess quantitatively their origin and to try to quantify the amount of such fluids. In HP metamorphism, it is well known that pressure-dependent dehydration reactions occur during the prograde path. Many geophysical models show that the variations in slab physical properties along depth could be linked to these fluid occurrences. However it remains tricky to test such models on natural sample, as it is difficult to assess or model the water content evolution in HP metamorphic rocks. This difficulty is bound to the fact that these rocks are generally heterogeneous, with zoned minerals and preservation of different paragenesis reflecting changing P-T conditions. To decipher the P-T-X(H2O) path of such heterogeneous rocks the concept of local effective bulk (LEB) composition is essential. Here we show how standardized X-ray maps can be used to constrain the scale of the equilibration volume of a garnet porphyroblast and to measure its composition. The composition of this equilibrium volume may be seen as the proportion of the rock likely to react at a given time to reach a thermodynamic equilibrium with the growing garnet. The studied sample is an eclogite coming from the carboniferous South-Tianshan suture (Central Asia) (Loury et al. in press). Compositional maps of a garnet and its surrounding matrix were obtained from standardized X-ray maps processed with the program XMapTools (Lanari et al, 2014). The initial equilibration volume was modeled using LEB compositions combined together with Gibbs free energy minimization. P-T sections were calculated for the next stages of garnet growth taking into account the fractionation of the composition at each stage of garnet growth. The modeled P-T-X(H2O) path indicates that the rock progressively dehydrates during the

  10. Dehydration and Rehydration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    osmolality near 295 mmol/kg will produce an arginine vasopressin (AVP) level of around 5 pg/mL, which results in a maximal urine concentrat- ing...associated hyponatremia. In general, consumption of water should never exceed 12 quarts (~11 L). Consumption of an electrolyte- supplemented drink...physiological reactions to thermal stress, J Appl Physiol 22:526-532, 1967. 131. Moskowitz H, Burns MM, Williams AF: Skills performance at low blood

  11. Identification of 4-methylspinaceamine, a pictet-spengler condensation reaction product of histamine with acetaldehyde, in fermented foods and its metabolite in human urine.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Takeshi

    2006-09-06

    Previous study demonstrated that 4-methylspinaceamine (4-methyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine), a Pictet-Spengler condensation reaction product of histamine with acetaldehyde, is present in human urine. The current study sought to determine whether 4-methylspinaceamine is present in fermented foods; its presence might be expected since both histamine and acetaldehyde are often present in these foods. Soy sauce, fish sauce, cheese, and shao hsing wine (Chinese wine) were found to contain 4-methylspinaceamine. The concentration of 4-methylspinaceamine excreted in human urine was greatly elevated after ingestion of a meal containing soy sauce as a dietary source of 4-methylspinaceamine, demonstrating that the level of 4-methylspinaceamine in human urine was affected by dietary foods. In addition, a metabolite of 4-methylspinaceamine in human urine was investigated. An enhanced peak in the HPLC chromatogram of human urine samples after ingestion of 4-methylspinaceamine-containing foods was observed. A peak at the same retention time was also observed from a human urine sample after administration of 4-methylspinaceamine, suggesting that the peak was due to a metabolite. By comparison with the newly synthesized authentic compound, the metabolite was identified as 1,4-dimethylspinaceamine.

  12. Self-Organizing Reactive Fluid Escape from Dehydrating Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, T.; Pluemper, O.; Podladchikov, Y.; Vrijmoed, J. C.; Scambelluri, M.

    2014-12-01

    Water escape from dehydrating rocks within the Earth's interior is a key process for long-term global water and element cycles, eg. at subduction zones a fluid escape mechanism must exist that prevents ocean water to be drained into the mantle. Existing fluid flow models require a priori physical assumptions (eg. preexisting porosity) and cannot resolve the evolution from initial fluid production to flow channelization. In order to develop a model of this evolution, we need to unravel natural laboratories that display the incipient dehydration stages and the micro- to macro-scale fluid escape route evolution. The Erro-Tobbio meta-serpentinites (Italy) provide a unique snapshot into these early dehydration stages, recording the breakdown of hydrous antigorite to anhydrous olivine plus fluid and the formation of an olivine-vein network. We find that dehydration, fluid pooling, and flow initiation are controlled by micro-scale compositional rock differences. Our model starts with a rock in which all water is stored in solid and any preexisting porosity is negligible (zero-porosity case). As the rock descents into the mantle increasing T will initiate dehydration reactions, dividing the rock continuously into a dry solid and a fluid-filled porosity. Spatially variable reaction progress results in dynamically evolving porosity/permeability and heterogeneous fluid-pore pressure distributions. Fluid-pressure gradient relaxation causes fluid flow and its thermodynamic feedback triggers reactions to progress, resulting in a self-amplifying process. Our new thermodynamic-mechanical model for reaction-porosity waves shows that fluid flow occurs solely in the reaction products and self-organizes into channelized fluid escape networks. This holds the key to formulating future quantitative models that address spatiotemporal processes such as the coupling between fluid release at depth and volcanic eruptions and the amounts of structurally bound water transferred into deep Earth.

  13. Dehydration: physiology, assessment, and performance effects.

    PubMed

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a comprehensive review of dehydration assessment and presents a unique evaluation of the dehydration and performance literature. The importance of osmolality and volume are emphasized when discussing the physiology, assessment, and performance effects of dehydration. The underappreciated physiologic distinction between a loss of hypo-osmotic body water (intracellular dehydration) and an iso-osmotic loss of body water (extracellular dehydration) is presented and argued as the single most essential aspect of dehydration assessment. The importance of diagnostic and biological variation analyses to dehydration assessment methods is reviewed and their use in gauging the true potential of any dehydration assessment method highlighted. The necessity for establishing proper baselines is discussed, as is the magnitude of dehydration required to elicit reliable and detectable osmotic or volume-mediated compensatory physiologic responses. The discussion of physiologic responses further helps inform and explain our analysis of the literature suggesting a ≥ 2% dehydration threshold for impaired endurance exercise performance mediated by volume loss. In contrast, no clear threshold or plausible mechanism(s) support the marginal, but potentially important, impairment in strength, and power observed with dehydration. Similarly, the potential for dehydration to impair cognition appears small and related primarily to distraction or discomfort. The impact of dehydration on any particular sport skill or task is therefore likely dependent upon the makeup of the task itself (e.g., endurance, strength, cognitive, and motor skill).

  14. [Study of erythrocyte dehydration using spin labels].

    PubMed

    Moiseev, V A; Mezhidov, S Kh; Nardid, O A

    1989-01-01

    Possibility of studying erythrocyte dehydration by ESR-spin probe is substantiated. Dehydration of erythrocytes in relation to osmolarity of sodium chloride solutions is investigated. The results are shown to agree with the data obtained by radioisotope method.

  15. Condensation polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    Polyimides belong to a class of polymers known as polyheterocyclics. Unlike most other high temperature polymers, polyimides can be prepared from a variety of inexpensive monomers by several synthetic routes. The glass transition and crystalline melt temperature, thermooxidative stability, toughness, dielectric constant, coefficient of thermal expansion, chemical stability, mechanical performance, etc. of polyimides can be controlled within certain boundaries. This versatility has permitted the development of various forms of polyimides. These include adhesives, composite matrices, coatings, films, moldings, fibers, foams and membranes. Polyimides are synthesized through both condensation (step-polymerization) and addition (chain growth polymerization) routes. The precursor materials used in addition polyimides or imide oligomers are prepared by condensation method. High molecular weight polyimide made via polycondensation or step-growth polymerization is studied. The various synthetic routes to condensation polyimides, structure/property relationships of condensation polyimides and composite properties of condensation polyimides are all studied. The focus is on the synthesis and chemical structure/property relationships of polyimides with particular emphasis on materials for composite application.

  16. Effect of leaf dehydration duration and dehydration degree on PSII photochemical activity of papaya leaves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meijun; Zhang, Zishan; Gao, Huiyuan; Yang, Cheng; Fan, Xingli; Cheng, Dandan

    2014-09-01

    Although the effect of dehydration on photosynthetic apparatus has been widely studied, the respective effect of dehydration duration and dehydration degree was neglected. This study showed that, when leaves dehydrated in air, the PSII activities of leaves decreased with the decline of leaf relative water content (RWC). Unexpectedly, when leaves dehydrated to same RWC, the decreases in Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm were lower in leaves dehydrating at 43 °C than those at 25 °C. However, to reach the same RWC, leaves dehydrating at 43 °C experienced 1/6 of the dehydration duration for leaves dehydrating at 25 °C. To distinguish the respective effect of dehydration degree and dehydration duration on photosynthetic apparatus, we studied the PSII activities of leaves treated with different concentration of PEG solutions. Increasing dehydration degree aggravated the decline of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in leaves with the same dehydration duration, while prolonging the dehydration duration also exacerbated the decline of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in leaves with identical dehydration degree. With the same dehydration degree and duration, high temperature enhanced the decrease of Fv/Fm, Ψo and RC/CSm in the leaves. When leaves dehydrated in air, the effect of high temperature was underestimated due to reduction of dehydration duration. The results demonstrated that, dehydration degree and duration both play important roles in damage to photosynthetic apparatus. We suggest that, under combined stresses, the effects of dehydration degree and duration on plants should be considered comprehensively, otherwise, partial or incorrect results may be obtained.

  17. Slab dehydration recorded in subducted serpentine sea-mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, K.; Fukumura, S.; Ishimori, C.; Jung, H.

    2014-12-01

    It has been considered that there is a correlation between the double seismic zones and metamorphic dehydration reaction in deep slab. The lower seismic plane of the double seismic zone is considered to be located on the 600 oC isotherm in the subducting lithosphere. Antigorite terminal reaction is highly temperature sensitive around 600 oC. Therefore it has been proposed that the oceanic lithosphere was hydrated forming serpentine prior to subduction, then serpentine was decomposed to release fluid causing dehydration embrittlement in the slab. In order to unravel relation between dehydration and seismic deformation, we have investigated dehydration process of natural metamorphic rocks recording very cold geothermal history in the crust and lithosphere in the slab. Metamorphic olivine after antigorite has been described in Italian Alps and also from the Mt. Shiraga, Japan [1]. However, the olivine was formed with talc and fluid by antigorite breakdown reaction in pressures lower than 1.5 GPa. Spinifex olivine with opx in the Cerro del Almirez [2], is the product at pressures (P > 1.5 GPa) relevant to the lower seismic plane beneath Northeast Japan. It clearly indicates the presence of large amount of water facilitate crystallization of elongated olivine with opx. It is also supported by LPO pattern of olivines determined by EBSD. Fine-grained olivine-rich samples shows that Type-C fabric pattern is dominant, suggesting deformation under water-rich condition [3]. With metamorphic olivines, chlorite was also recrystallized, suggesting that water would be transported farther down to deep. The estimated dehydration reaction has a negative P-T slope at pressures higher than 1.5 GPa. The reaction is volume reducing reaction and the olivine-opx spinifex texture was formed under volume reducing reaction. In the warm slab beneath SW Japan, the reaction has a positive slope in P-T space and forms olivine+talc+fluid. From microstrucral and petrological analysis of the

  18. Chemical and physicochemical quality parameters in carrots dehydrated by power ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Soria, Ana Cristina; Corzo-Martínez, Marta; Montilla, Antonia; Riera, Enrique; Gamboa-Santos, Juliana; Villamiel, Mar

    2010-07-14

    Preservation of the quality and bioactivity of carrots dehydrated by power ultrasound (US) under different experimental conditions including prior blanching has been evaluated for the first time by measuring the evolution of the Maillard reaction and the changes in soluble sugars, proteins, total polyphenols, antioxidant activity, and rehydration ability. This study also includes a comparison with a freeze-dried sample and data of commercial dehydrated carrots. The synergic effect of US and temperature (60 degrees C) increased the dehydration rate of carrots (90% moisture loss in only 75 min) while still providing carrots with a level of 2-furoylmethyl-amino acids significantly lower than that of dehydrated commercial samples. Whereas a decrease in the content of reducing soluble sugars was observed with processing temperature, minor carbohydrates (scyllo- and myo-inositol and sedoheptulose) were rather stable, irrespective of the US dehydration parameters. Blanching significantly improved the rehydration ability of US-dehydrated carrots without increasing the loss of soluble sugars by leaching. As supported by the similarity of most quality indicators studied in both US-treated and freeze-dried carrots, the mild processing conditions employed in US dehydration gave rise to premium quality dehydrated carrots.

  19. Permeability control on transient slip weakening during gypsum dehydration: Implications for earthquakes in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclère, Henri; Faulkner, Daniel; Wheeler, John; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2016-05-01

    A conflict has emerged from recent laboratory experiments regarding the question of whether or not dehydration reactions can promote unstable slip in subduction zones leading to earthquakes. Although reactions produce mechanical weakening due to pore-fluid pressure increase, this weakening has been associated with both stable and unstable slip. Here, new results monitoring strength, permeability, pore-fluid pressure, reaction progress and microstructural evolution during dehydration reactions are presented to identify the conditions necessary for mechanical instability. Triaxial experiments are conducted using gypsum and a direct shear sample assembly with constant normal stress that allows the measurement of permeability during sliding. Tests are conducted with temperature ramp from 70 to 150 °C and with different effective confining pressures (50, 100 and 150 MPa) and velocities (0.1 and 0.4 μm s-1). Results show that gypsum dehydration to bassanite induces transient stable-slip weakening that is controlled by pore-fluid pressure and permeability evolution. At the onset of dehydration, the low permeability promoted by pore compaction induces pore-fluid pressure build-up and stable slip weakening. The increase of bassanite content during the reaction shows clear evidence of dehydration related with the development of R1 Riedel shears and P foliation planes where bassanite is preferentially localized along these structures. The continued production of bassanite, which is stronger than gypsum, provides a supporting framework for newly formed pores, thus resulting in permeability increase, pore-fluid pressure drop and fault strength increase. After dehydration reaction, deformation is characterized by unstable slip on the fully dehydrated reaction product, controlled by the transition from velocity-strengthening to velocity-weakening behaviour of bassanite at temperature above ∼140 °C and the localization of deformation along narrow Y-shear planes. This study

  20. The physiological effects of dehydration caused by sweat loss. [athletes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, S.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanisms of fluid loss in the human body while sweating due to physical exercise are discussed. Trained and untrained persons were examined and compared. Since sweat is hypotonous, a disruption in the hydrosalinic balance occurs; the consequences of this finding, also pertaining to the fluid and electrolytic substitution, are presented. Further explanations on the problem of dehydration refer to reactions of individual organ systems, to alterations in bodily capabilities as well as to questions relating to sex and age.

  1. Dehydration-induced porosity waves and episodic tremor and slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarbek, Rob M.; Rempel, Alan W.

    2016-02-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) along the subduction interface takes place where there is abundant evidence for elevated, near-lithostatic pore pressures, at sufficiently great depths (30-45 km) that chemical dehydration reactions must act as their dominant source. We simulate fluid and heat flow while tracking the location of a vertically oriented, one-dimensional column of material as it subducts through the slow slip and tremor zone. The material in the column is transformed through a pressure-dependent and temperature-dependent dehydration reaction that we describe with a generalized nonlinear kinetic rate law. Column deformation is largely dominated by viscous creep, with a closure rate that depends linearly on porosity. This behavior causes the dehydration reaction to generate traveling porosity waves that transport increased fluid pressures within the slow slip region. To explore the possibility that the observed periodicity of slow slip and tremor in subduction zones can be explained by the migration of such porosity waves, we derive a dispersion relation that accurately describes our numerical results. We also obtain an expression for how the thickness of the dehydrating layer is expected to vary as a function of the parameters in the reaction rate law. Although the amplitudes of pore pressure perturbations rival those that are produced by known external forcings (e.g., tides or passing surface waves), our analysis suggests that given reasonable estimates of rock viscosity, permeabilities in the range 6.5×10-15 to 5×10-10 m2 are required for porosity wave trains to form at periods comparable to those of slow slip and tremor.

  2. Dehydration

    MedlinePlus

    ... too much, for example, from exercising in hot weather Fever Vomiting or diarrhea Urinating too much (uncontrolled ... when you are well. Drink more when the weather is hot or you are exercising. If anyone ...

  3. Epimerization in peptide thioester condensation.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Akaji, Kenichi; Aimoto, Saburo

    2012-11-01

    Peptide segment couplings are now widely utilized in protein chemical synthesis. One of the key structures for the strategy is the peptide thioester. Peptide thioester condensation, in which a C-terminal peptide thioester is selectively activated by silver ions then condensed with an amino component, is a powerful tool. But the amino acid adjacent to the thioester is at risk of epimerization. During the preparation of peptide thioesters by the Boc solid-phase method, no substantial epimerization of the C-terminal amino acid was detected. Epimerization was, however, observed during a thioester-thiol exchange reaction and segment condensation in DMSO in the presence of a base. In contrast, thioester-thiol exchange reactions in aqueous solutions gave no epimerization. The epimerization during segment condensation was significantly suppressed with a less polar solvent that is applicable to segments in thioester peptide condensation. These results were applied to a longer peptide thioester condensation. The epimer content of the coupling product of 89 residues was reduced from 27% to 6% in a condensation between segments of 45 and 44 residues for the thioester and the amino component, respectively.

  4. Formation and dehydration enthalpy of potassium hexaniobate

    DOE PAGES

    Sahu, Sulata K.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2016-09-15

    The formation energetics of hydrous and dehydrated potassium hexaniobates are investigated using high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The enthalpies of formation of K4Nb6O17 and K4Nb6O17•3H2O from oxides are (–864.42 ± 10.63) and (–899.32 ± 11.48) kJ/mol, respectively. The formation enthalpy of K4Nb6O17 from elements is (–7289.64 ± 12.50) kJ/mol, and of K4Nb6O17•3H2O is (–8181.94 ± 13.24) kJ/mol. The enthalpy of dehydration (ΔHdehy) for the reaction K4Nb6O173H2O (xl, 25 °C) = K4Nb6O17 (xl, 25 °C) + 3H2O (l, 25 °C) is endothermic and is 34.60 ± 7.56 kJ/mol. The ΔHdehy per mole of water, 11.53 ± 2.52 kJ/mol, indicates the watermore » molecules in K4Nb6O17•3H2O are not just physically adsorbed, but loosely bonded in the K4Nb6O17 phase, presumably in specific interlayer sites. As a result, the loss of this water near 100 °C on heating is consistent with the weak bonding of water.« less

  5. Detecting dehydration in older people: useful tests.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Lee; Bunn, Diane

    Dehydration is common in older people, leading to longer hospital stays and increased disability and mortality. Health professionals can diagnose water-loss dehydration by taking a blood sample and measuring serum osmolality, but a less-invasive test would be useful. Evidence that tests, clinical signs or questions tested to date are useful when screening for dehydration in older people is limited. This article looks at known risk factors, signs and test for dehydration, and outlines evidence on how useful they have proven to be. Part 2 describes how a care home has used a multicomponent strategy to improve hydration.

  6. A dehydration mechanism for the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielsen, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    Although mean circulations are generally credited with dehydration of the earth's stratosphere, convective instability in the tropics converts mean circulations to small residuals of local convective circulations. The effects of large cumulonimbus which penetrate the stratosphere and form huge anvils in the lower stratosphere are discussed with respect to hydration and dehydration of the stratosphere. Radiative heating at anvil base combined with cooling at anvil top drives a dehydration engine considered essential to explain the dry stratosphere. Seasonal and longitudinal variations in dehydration potentials are examined with maximum potential attributed to Micronesian area during winter and early spring.

  7. Non-volcanic tremor and discontinuous slab dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, Åke; Diener, Johann F. A.

    2011-08-01

    Non-volcanic tremor is a recently discovered fault slip style occurring with remarkable regularity in space near the down-dip end of the locked zone on several subduction thrust interfaces. The physical mechanisms and the controls on the location of tremor have not yet been determined. We calculate the stable mineral assemblages and their water content in the subducting slab, and find that slab dehydration is not continuous, but rather restricted to a few reactions localised in pressure-temperature space. Along geothermal gradients applicable to Shikoku and Cascadia - where tremor has been relatively easy to detect - tremor locations correlate with discontinuous and localised voluminous water release from the breakdown of lawsonite and chlorite + glaucophane respectively. The shape of the pressure-temperature path for subducting slabs prevents fluid release at depths above and below where these dehydration reactions occur. We conclude that abundant tremor activity requires metamorphic conditions where localised dehydration occurs during subduction, and this may explain why tremor appears more abundant in some subduction zones than others.

  8. Spectral effects of dehydration on phyllosilicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckenthal, E. A.; Singer, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    Six phyllosilicates were progressively dehydrated under controlled conditions in an effort to study the spectral effects of their dehydration. The spectra obtained at each level of hydration provide information that may be used in future spectroscopic observations of the planets, as well as a data set which compliments the existing body of terrestrial soil knowledge.

  9. Leveraging the micellar effect: gold-catalyzed dehydrative cyclizations in water at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Minkler, Stefan R K; Isley, Nicholas A; Lippincott, Daniel J; Krause, Norbert; Lipshutz, Bruce H

    2014-02-07

    The first examples of gold-catalyzed cyclizations of diols and triols to the corresponding hetero- or spirocycles in an aqueous medium are presented. These reactions take place within nanomicelles, where the hydrophobic effect is operating, thereby driving the dehydrations, notwithstanding the surrounding water. By the addition of simple salts such as sodium chloride, reaction times and catalyst loadings can be significantly decreased.

  10. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any commercial process....

  11. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any commercial process....

  12. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any commercial process....

  13. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any commercial process....

  14. 7 CFR 929.11 - To can, freeze, or dehydrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES OF... dehydrate. To can, freeze, or dehydrate means to convert cranberries into canned, frozen, or dehydrated cranberries or other cranberry products by any commercial process....

  15. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biberian, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    1. General. A tribute to gene Mallove - the "Genie" reactor / K. Wallace and R. Stringham. An update of LENR for ICCF-11 (short course, 10/31/04) / E. Storms. New physical effects in metal deuterides / P. L. Hagelstein ... [et al.]. Reproducibility, controllability, and optimization of LENR experiments / D. J. Nagel -- 2. Experiments. Electrochemistry. Evidence of electromagnetic radiation from Ni-H systems / S. Focardi ... [et al.]. Superwave reality / I. Dardik. Excess heat in electrolysis experiments at energetics technologies / I. Dardik ... [et al.]. "Excess heat" during electrolysis in platinum/K[symbol]CO[symbol]/nickel light water system / J. Tian ... [et al.]. Innovative procedure for the, in situ, measurement of the resistive thermal coefficient of H(D)/Pd during electrolysis; cross-comparison of new elements detected in the Th-Hg-Pd-D(H) electrolytic cells / F. Celani ... [et al.]. Emergence of a high-temperature superconductivity in hydrogen cycled Pd compounds as an evidence for superstoihiometric H/D sites / A. Lipson ... [et al.]. Plasma electrolysis. Calorimetry of energy-efficient glow discharge - apparatus design and calibration / T. B. Benson and T. O. Passell. Generation of heat and products during plasma electrolysis / T. Mizuno ... [et al.]. Glow discharge. Excess heat production in Pd/D during periodic pulse discharge current in various conditions / A. B. Karabut. Beam experiments. Accelerator experiments and theoretical models for the electron screening effect in metallic environments / A. Huke, K. Czerski, and P. Heide. Evidence for a target-material dependence of the neutron-proton branching ratio in d+d reactions for deuteron energies below 20keV / A. Huke ... [et al.]. Experiments on condensed matter nuclear events in Kobe University / T. Minari ... [et al.]. Electron screening constraints for the cold fusion / K. Czerski, P. Heide, and A. Huke. Cavitation. Low mass 1.6 MHz sonofusion reactor / R. Stringham. Particle detection. Research

  16. Influence of environmental conditions on the kinetics and mechanism of dehydration of carbamazepine dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Suryanarayanan, R

    1998-11-01

    The object of this project was to study the influence of temperature and water vapor pressure on the kinetics and mechanism of dehydration of carbamazepine dihydrate and to establish the relationship between the dehydration mechanism and the solid-state of the anhydrous phase formed. Three experimental techniques were utilized to study the kinetics of dehydration of carbamazepine dihydrate (C15H12N2O.2H2O)-thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and variable temperature powder X-ray diffractometry (VTXRD). These techniques respectively provide information about the changes in weight, heat flow and solid-state (phase) during the dehydration process. The instrumental setup was modified so that simultaneous control of both the temperature and the water vapor pressure was possible. The experiments were carried out at different temperatures, ranging from 26 to 64 degrees C. In the absence of water vapor, the dehydration followed the 2-dimensional phase boundary controlled model at all the temperatures studied. In the next stage, the water vapor pressure was altered while the studies were carried out at a single temperature of 44 degrees C. The dehydration was 2-dimensional phase boundary controlled at water vapor pressures < or = 5.1 torr while the Avrami-Erofeev kinetics (3-dimensional nucleation) was followed at water vapor pressures > or = 12.0 torr. In the former case, the anhydrous phase formed was X-ray amorphous while it was the crystalline anhydrous gamma-carbamazepine in the latter. Thus a relationship between the mechanism of dehydration and the solid-state of the product phase was evident. The dehydration conditions influence not only the mechanism but also the solid-state of the anhydrous phase formed. While the techniques of TGA and DSC have found extensive use in studying dehydration reactions, VTXRD proved to be an excellent complement in characterizing the solid-states of the reactant and product phases.

  17. Linked strategy for the production of fuels via formose reaction

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jin; Pan, Tao; Xu, Qing; Chen, Meng-Yuan; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Qing-Xiang; Fu, Yao

    2013-01-01

    Formose reaction converts formaldehyde to carbohydrates. We found that formose reaction can be used linking the biomass gasification with the aqueous-phase processing (APP) to produce liquid transportation fuel in three steps. First, formaldehyde from syn-gas was converted to triose. This was followed by aldol condensation and dehydration to 4-hydroxymethylfurfural (4-HMF). Finally, 4-HMF was hydrogenated to produce 2,4-dimethylfuran (2,4-DMF) or C9-C15 branched-chain alkanes as liquid transportation fuels. In the linked strategy, high energy-consuming pretreatment as well as expensive and polluting hydrolysis of biomass were omitted, but the high energy recovery of APP was inherited. In addition, the hexoketoses via formose reaction could be converted to HMFs directly without isomerization. A potential platform molecule 4-HMF was formed simultaneously in APP. PMID:23393625

  18. Kinetic heterogeneity of F-actin polymers. Further evidence that the elongation reaction may occur through condensation of the actin filaments with small aggregates.

    PubMed Central

    Grazi, E; Magri, E

    1987-01-01

    We have shown that F-actin, polymerized in 50 mM-KCl at 20 degrees C and pH 8.0, can be resolved by centrifugation into two polymer populations, which differ morphologically as well as kinetically. The first population represents about 10% of the overall polymer and is composed of small amorphous aggregates. It rapidly exchanges the bound nucleotide with free ATP in the medium, either directly or through the monomers. The second population is composed of long actin filaments. These are labelled by free ATP in the medium only through condensation with labelled small amorphous aggregates. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3435480

  19. Water-loss dehydration and aging.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Lee; Bunn, Diane; Jimoh, Florence O; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    This review defines water-loss and salt-loss dehydration. For older people serum osmolality appears the most appropriate gold standard for diagnosis of water-loss dehydration, but clear signs of early dehydration have not been developed. In older adults, lower muscle mass, reduced kidney function, physical and cognitive disabilities, blunted thirst, and polypharmacy all increase dehydration risk. Cross-sectional studies suggest a water-loss dehydration prevalence of 20-30% in this population. Water-loss dehydration is associated with higher mortality, morbidity and disability in older people, but evidence is still needed that this relationship is causal. There are a variety of ways we may be able to help older people reduce their risk of dehydration by recognising that they are not drinking enough, and being helped to drink more. Strategies to increase fluid intake in residential care homes include identifying and overcoming individual and institutional barriers to drinking, such as being worried about not reaching the toilet in time, physical inability to make or to reach drinks, and reduced social drinking and drinking pleasure. Research needs are discussed, some of which will be addressed by the FP7-funded NU-AGE (New dietary strategies addressing the specific needs of elderly population for a healthy ageing in Europe) trial.

  20. A study of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose dissolved in ionic liquids and the factors influencing the dehydration of glucose and the formation of humins.

    PubMed

    Dee, Sean J; Bell, Alexis T

    2011-08-22

    An investigation was carried out into the hydrolysis of cellulose dissolved in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Emim][Cl]) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim][Cl]) catalyzed by mineral acids. Glucose, cellobiose, and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) were observed as the primary reaction products. The initial rate of glucose formation was determined to be of first order in the concentrations of dissolved glucan and protons and of zero order in the concentration of water. The absence of a dependence on water concentration suggests that cleavage of the β-1,4-glycosidic linkages near chain ends is irreversible. The apparent activation energy for glucose formation is 96 kJ mol(-1). The absence of oligosaccharides longer than cellobiose suggests that cleavage of interior glycosidic bonds is reversible due to the slow diffusional separation of cleaved chains in the highly viscous glucan/ionic liquid solution. Progressive addition of water during the course of glucan hydrolysis inhibited the rate of glucose dehydration to 5-HMF and the formation of humins. The inhibition of glucose dehydration is attributed to stronger interaction of protons with water than the 2-OH atom of the pyranose ring of glucose, the critical step in the proposed mechanism for the formation of 5-HMF. The reduction in humin formation associated with water addition is ascribed to the lowered concentration of 5-HMF, since the formation of humins is suggested to proceed through the condensation polymerization of 5-HMF with glucose.

  1. Formation and dehydration enthalpy of potassium hexaniobate

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Sulata K.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2016-09-15

    The formation energetics of hydrous and dehydrated potassium hexaniobates are investigated using high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The enthalpies of formation of K4Nb6O17 and K4Nb6O17•3H2O from oxides are (–864.42 ± 10.63) and (–899.32 ± 11.48) kJ/mol, respectively. The formation enthalpy of K4Nb6O17 from elements is (–7289.64 ± 12.50) kJ/mol, and of K4Nb6O17•3H2O is (–8181.94 ± 13.24) kJ/mol. The enthalpy of dehydration (ΔHdehy) for the reaction K4Nb6O173H2O (xl, 25 °C) = K4Nb6O17 (xl, 25 °C) + 3H2O (l, 25 °C) is endothermic and is 34.60 ± 7.56 kJ/mol. The ΔHdehy per mole of water, 11.53 ± 2.52 kJ/mol, indicates the water molecules in K4Nb6O17•3H2O are not just physically adsorbed, but loosely bonded in the K4Nb6O17 phase, presumably in specific interlayer sites. As a result, the loss of this water near 100 °C on heating is consistent with the weak bonding of water.

  2. Slab crustal dehydration, melting and dynamics through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hunen, Jeroen; Bouilhol, Pierre; Magni, Valentina; Maunder, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Melting subducted mafic crust is commonly assumed to be the main process leading to silicic melts with an adakitic signature, which may form Archaean granitoids and generate early continental crust. Alternatively, melting of the overriding lower mafic crust and near-Moho depth fractional crystallisation of mantle melts can form differentiated magmas with an adakitic signature. Previous work shows how only very young slabs melt through dehydration melting, or depict melting of dry eclogites via water addition from deeper slab dehydration. We quantify subduction dehydration and melting reactions in a warm subduction system using a thermo-mechanical subduction model with a thermodynamic database. We find that even young (hot) slabs dehydrate before reaching their solidus, which suppresses any slab dehydration melting and creates significant amounts of mantle wedge melting irrespective of slab age. Significant slab crust melting is only achieved in young slabs via water present melting if metamorphic fluids from the subducted mantle flux through the dry eclogites. These slab melts, however, are affected by massive mantle wedge melting and unlikely to participate in the overriding plate felsic magmatism, unlike the shallower, primitive mantle wedge melts. Understanding the overall flux of water carried by the descending slab mantle is therefore of prime importance. We thus inverstigated the deeper dehydration processes in subduction zones and implications for the water cycle throughout Earth's history. We estimate that presently ~26% of the global influx water is recycled into the mantle, and that deep water recycling was also significant (although less efficient, 2-13% at 2.8 Ga) in early Earth conditions, which has important implications for mantle dynamics and tectonic processes in the Early Earth. Alternatively, delamination and underplating of the mafic subducted crust would be a suitable mechanism to fit the geological record. We thus explore the conditions for

  3. Illustrating the Utility of X-Ray Crystallography for Structure Elucidation through a Tandem Aldol Condensation/Diels-Alder Reaction Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoang, Giang T.; Kubo, Tomohiro; Young, Victor G., Jr.; Kautzky, Jacob A.; Wissinger, Jane E.

    2015-01-01

    Two introductory organic chemistry laboratory experiments are described based on the Diels-Alder reaction of 2,3,4,5-tetraphenylcyclopentadienone, which is synthesized prior to or in a one-pot reaction, with styrene. Students are presented with three possible products, the "endo" and "exo" diastereomers and the decarbonylated…

  4. Dehydration Processes of Sugar Glasses and Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jeong-Ah; Kwon, Hyun-Joung; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2006-05-01

    The dehydration processes of sugar glasses and sugar crystals were studied by using Thermogravimetry — Differential Thermal Analysis method. We used three monosaccharide sugars (fructose, galactose, and glucose) and three disaccharide sugars (sucrose, maltose and trehalose). It was found that a trehalose showed different dehydration process compared to the other sugars. The amount of mass reductions in sugar glasses is larger than that in sugar crystals. However, in the case of trehalose, the amount of mass reduction in trehalose glasses is smaller than that in trehalose crystals. It seems to be possible that this unique dehydration property of trehalose glasses maybe relate to the cell protection ability during an anhydrobiosis process.

  5. Glycerol Dehydration to Acrolein Catalyzed by ZSM‐5 Zeolite in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Medium

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Bin; Ren, Shoujie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC‐CO2) has been used for the first time as a reaction medium for the dehydration of glycerol to acrolein catalyzed by a solid acid. Unprecedented catalyst stability over 528 hours of time‐on‐stream was achieved and the rate of coke deposition on the zeolite catalyst was the lowest among extensive previous studies, showing potential for industrial application. Coking pathways in SC‐CO2 were also elucidated for future development. The results have potential implications for other dehydration reactions catalyzed by solid acids. PMID:27796088

  6. Microcrystalline hexagonal tungsten bronze. 2. Dehydration dynamics.

    PubMed

    Luca, Vittorio; Griffith, Christopher S; Hanna, John V

    2009-07-06

    Low-temperature (25-600 degrees C) thermal transformations have been studied for hydrothermally prepared, microcrystalline hexagonal tungsten bronze (HTB) phases A(x)WO(3+x/2).zH(2)O as a function of temperature, where A is an exchangeable cation (in this case Na(+) or Cs(+)) located in hexagonal structural tunnels. Thermal treatment of the as-prepared sodium- and cesium-exchanged phases in air were monitored using a conventional laboratory-based X-ray diffractometer, while thermal transformations in vacuum were studied using synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction. Concurrent thermogravimetric, diffuse reflectance infrared (DRIFT), and (23)Na and (133)Cs magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopic studies have also been undertaken. For the cesium variant, cell volume contraction occurred from room temperature to about 350 degrees C, the regime in which water was "squeezed" out of tunnel sites. This was followed by a lattice expansion in the 350-600 degrees C temperature range. Over the entire temperature range, a net thermal contraction was observed, and this was the result of an anisotropic change in the cell dimensions which included a shortening of the A-O2 bond length. These changes explain why Cs(+) ions are locked into tunnel positions at temperatures as low as 400 degrees C, subsequently inducing a significant reduction in Cs(+) extractability under low pH (nitric acid) conditions. The changing Cs(+) speciation as detected by (133)Cs MAS NMR showed a condensation from multiple Cs sites, presumably associated with differing modes of Cs(+) hydration in the tunnels, to a single Cs(+) environment upon thermal transformation and water removal. While similar lattice contraction was observed for the as-prepared sodium variant, the smaller radius of Na(+) caused it to be relatively easily removed with acid in comparison to the Cs(+) variant. From (23)Na MAS NMR studies of the parent material, complex Na(+) speciation was observed with dehydrated and various

  7. Aldol Condensation Products and Polyacetals in Organic Films Formed from Reactions of Propanal in Sulfuric Acid at Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere (UT/LS) Aerosol Acidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, J. V. H.; Perez-Montano, S.; Li, E. S. W.; Nelson, T. E.; Ha, K. T.; Leong, L.; Iraci, L. T.; Van Wyngarden, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) consist mostly of concentrated sulfuric acid (40-80 wt. %) which is highly reflective towards UV and visible radiation. However, airborne measurements have shown that these particles may also contain a significant amount of organic material. Experiments combining organics (propanal, glyoxal and/or methylglyoxal) with sulfuric acid at concentrations typical of UT/LS aerosols produced highly colored surface films (and solutions) that have the potential to impact chemical, optical and/or cloud-forming properties of aerosols. In order to assess the potential for such films to impact aerosol chemistry or climate properties, experiments were performed to identify the chemical processes responsible for film formation. Surface films were analyzed via Attenuated Total Reflectance-FTIR and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopies and are shown to consist primarily of aldol condensation products and cyclic and linear polyacetals, the latter of which are likely responsible for separation from the aqueous phase.

  8. Dehydration resistance of liposomes containing trehalose glycolipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyberg, Kendra; Goulding, Morgan; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2010-03-01

    The pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has an unusual outer membrane containing trehalose glycolipids that may contribute to its ability to survive freezing and dehydration. Based on our recent discovery that trehalose glycolipids confer dehydration resistance to supported lipid monolayers (Biophys. J. 94: 4718-4724 (2008); Langmuir 25: 5193-5198, (2009)), we hypothesized that liposomes containing synthetic trehalose glycolipids may be dehydration-resistant as well. To test this, we measured the leakage of encapsulated fluorophores and larger macromolecular cargo from such liposomes subject to freeze drying. Both leakage assays and size measurements show that the liposomes are dehydration-resistant. In addition to demonstrating a possibly technologically useful encapsulation platform, our results corroborate the view that encapsulation in a trehalose-glycolipid-rich membrane is a biophysically viable route to protection of mycobacteria from environmental stresses.

  9. DEHYDRATION OF LOW WATER CONTENT ETHANOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation has emerged as an economically viable alternative technology for the dehydration of organic solvents, removal of organic compounds from water and organic/organic separations. Development of a membrane system with suitable flux and selectivity characteristics plays a...

  10. Problem: Thirst, Drinking Behavior, and Involuntary Dehydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenon of involuntary dehydration, the delay in full restoration of a body water deficit by drinking, has been described extensively but relatively little is known about its physiological mechanism. It occurs primarily in humans when they are exposed to various stresses including exercise, environmental heat and cold, altitude, water immersion, dehydration, and perhaps microgravity, singly and in various combinations. The level of involuntary dehydration is approximately proportional to the degree of total stress imposed on the body. Involuntary dehydration appears to be controlled by more than one factor including social customs that influence what is consumed, the capacity and rate of fluid absorption from the gastrointestinal system, the level of cellular hydration involving the osmotic-vasopressin interaction with sensitive cells or structures in the central nervous system, and, to a lesser extent, hypovolemic-angiotensin II stimuli. Since humans drink when there is no apparent physiological stimulus, the psychological component should always be considered when investigating the total mechanisms for drinking.

  11. Dehydration processes using membranes with hydrophobic coating

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Yu; Baker, Richard W; Aldajani, Tiem; Ly, Jennifer

    2013-07-30

    Processes for removing water from organic compounds, especially polar compounds such as alcohols. The processes include a membrane-based dehydration step, using a membrane that has a dioxole-based polymer selective layer or the like and a hydrophilic selective layer, and can operate even when the stream to be treated has a high water content, such as 10 wt % or more. The processes are particularly useful for dehydrating ethanol.

  12. Freeze-Dehydration by Microwave Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    MATHEMATICAL MODEL DEHYDRATED FOODS ENERGY BEEF EQUATIONS FREEZE DRIED FOODS BEATING ANALYSIS MELTING FREEZE DRYING MICROWAVES MICROWAVE DIELECTRIC ...d) 20. Abstract (continued) The model is applied to simulate the freeze-dehydration of beef meat by microwave dielectric heating at 2450 MHz . The...8 3.3 Dielectric Properties •••.•. .••••....• 8 3.4 Specific Heat of Frozen and Dried Beef

  13. Observations of denitrification and dehydration in the winter polar stratospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, D. W.; Kelly, K. K.; Kawa, S. R.; Tuck, A. F.; Loewenstein, M.

    1990-01-01

    It is argued that denitrification of the Arctic stratosphere can be explained by the selective growth and sedimentation of aerosol particles rich in nitric acid. Because reactive nitrogen species moderate the destruction of ozone by chlorine-catalyzed reactions by sequestering chlorine in reservoir species such as ClONO2, the possibility of the removal of reactive nitrogen without dehydration should be allowed for in attempts to model ozone depletion in the Arctic. Indeed, denitrification along with elevated concentrations of reactive chlorine observed in 1989 indicate that the Arctic was chemically primed for ozone destruction without an extended period of temperatures below the frost point, as is characteristic of the Antarctic.

  14. Condensation model for the ESBWR passive condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Revankar, S. T.; Zhou, W.; Wolf, B.; Oh, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the General Electric's Economic simplified boiling water reactor (GE-ESBWR) the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) plays a major role in containment pressure control in case of an loss of coolant accident. The PCCS condenser must be able to remove sufficient energy from the reactor containment to prevent containment from exceeding its design pressure following a design basis accident. There are three PCCS condensation modes depending on the containment pressurization due to coolant discharge; complete condensation, cyclic venting and flow through mode. The present work reviews the models and presents model predictive capability along with comparison with existing data from separate effects test. The condensation models in thermal hydraulics code RELAP5 are also assessed to examine its application to various flow modes of condensation. The default model in the code predicts complete condensation well, and basically is Nusselt solution. The UCB model predicts through flow well. None of condensation model in RELAP5 predict complete condensation, cyclic venting, and through flow condensation consistently. New condensation correlations are given that accurately predict all three modes of PCCS condensation. (authors)

  15. Crystal structures of phosphoketolase: thiamine diphosphate-dependent dehydration mechanism.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Katayama, Takane; Kim, Byung-Jun; Wakagi, Takayoshi; Shoun, Hirofumi; Ashida, Hisashi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2010-10-29

    Thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzymes are ubiquitously present in all organisms and catalyze essential reactions in various metabolic pathways. ThDP-dependent phosphoketolase plays key roles in the central metabolism of heterofermentative bacteria and in the pentose catabolism of various microbes. In particular, bifidobacteria, representatives of beneficial commensal bacteria, have an effective glycolytic pathway called bifid shunt in which 2.5 mol of ATP are produced per glucose. Phosphoketolase catalyzes two steps in the bifid shunt because of its dual-substrate specificity; they are phosphorolytic cleavage of fructose 6-phosphate or xylulose 5-phosphate to produce aldose phosphate, acetyl phosphate, and H(2)O. The phosphoketolase reaction is different from other well studied ThDP-dependent enzymes because it involves a dehydration step. Although phosphoketolase was discovered more than 50 years ago, its three-dimensional structure remains unclear. In this study we report the crystal structures of xylulose 5-phosphate/fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase from Bifidobacterium breve. The structures of the two intermediates before and after dehydration (α,β-dihydroxyethyl ThDP and 2-acetyl-ThDP) and complex with inorganic phosphate give an insight into the mechanism of each step of the enzymatic reaction.

  16. Effective hepatitis A virus inactivation during low-heat dehydration of contaminated green onions.

    PubMed

    Laird, David T; Sun, Yan; Reineke, Karl F; Shieh, Y Carol

    2011-08-01

    Preserving fruits and vegetables by dehydration is common; however, information is limited concerning viral survival on the produce during the process. This work demonstrated the effects of low heat dehydration on inactivating hepatitis A virus (HAV) on contaminated green onions. Inoculated and uninoculated onion samples were dehydrated at target temperatures of 45-65 °C for 20 h. HAV from artificially contaminated onions (fresh or dehydrated) was eluted by shaking at 145 rpm at 20 °C for 20 min with 3% beef extract, pH 8, and followed by 0.2 μM-membrane filtration before plaque assay and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis. Dilutions of the filtrates were made for obtaining countable plaques on FRhK-4 cell monolayers in 6-well plates, and also for eliminating inhibitors in qRT-PCR. Average water activity of the onions after 20 h-dehydration was 0.227, regardless of temperature used (47.9 °C or 65.1 °C). Eight dehydration trials resulted in a linear relationship between HAV inactivation and dehydration temperature, with HAV log reduction = 0.1372x(°C) - 5.5572, r(2) = 0.88. Therefore, the 20 h-heating at 47.8, 55.1, and 62.4 °C reduced infectious HAV in onions by 1, 2, and 3 logs respectively, the Z value being 7.3 °C. It was concluded that low heat dehydration using 62.5 °C or above could effectively inactivate HAV on contaminated onions by >3 logs.

  17. The mechanism of dehydration in chromophore maturation of wild-type green fluorescent protein: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yingying; Yu, Jian-Guo; Sun, Qiao; Li, Zhen; Smith, Sean C.

    2015-07-01

    An interesting aspect of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is its autocatalytic chromophore maturation. Numerous experimental studies have indicated that dehydration is the last step in the chromophore maturation process of wild-type GFP. Based on the crystal structure of wild-type GFP, the mechanism of the reverse reaction of dehydration was investigated by using density functional theory (DFT) in this study. Our results proposed that the dehydration is exothermic. Moreover, the rate-limiting step of the mechanism is the proton on guanidinium of Arg96 transferring to the β-carbon anion of Tyr66, which is consistent with the experimental observation.

  18. Clusters: Elucidating the dynamics of ionization events and ensuing reactions in the condensed phase. Final technical report, March 1, 1991--February 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1994-10-01

    Chemical reactions that proceed following either a photophysical or ionizing event, are directly influenced by the mechanisms of energy transfer and dissipation away from the site of absorption. Neighboring solvent or solute molecules can affect this by collisional deactivation (removal of energy), through effects in which dissociating molecules are kept in relatively close proximity for comparatively long periods of time due to the presence of the solvent, and in other ways where the solvent influences the energetics of the reaction coordinate. Research on clusters offers promise of elucidating the molecular details of these processes. The studies have focused on providing critical information on problems in radiation biology through investigations of reactions of molecules which simulate functional groups in biological systems, as they proceed following the absorption of ionizing radiation. The overall objective of the program has been to undertake basic underpinning research that contributes to a quantification of the behavior of radionuclides and pollutants associated with advanced energy activities after these materials emanate from their source and are transferred through the environment to the biota and human receptor. Some of the studies have dealt with the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter yielding new data that finds value in assessing photoinduced transformation of pollutants including reactions which take place on aerosol particles, as well as those of species which become transformed into aerosols as a result of their chemical and physical interactions.

  19. Dehydration of Glucose to 5‐Hydroxymethylfurfural Using Nb‐doped Tungstite

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Chaochao; Li, Guanna; Pidko, Evgeny A.; Wiesfeld, Jan J.; Rigutto, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dehydration of glucose to 5‐hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) remains a significant problem in the context of the valorization of lignocellulosic biomass. Hydrolysis of WCl6 and NbCl5 leads to precipitation of Nb‐containing tungstite (WO3⋅H2O) at low Nb content and mixtures of tungstite and niobic acid at higher Nb content. Tungstite is a promising catalyst for the dehydration of glucose to HMF. Compared with Nb2O5, fewer by‐products are formed because of the low Brønsted acidity of the (mixed) oxides. In water, an optimum yield of HMF was obtained for Nb–W oxides with low Nb content owing to balanced Lewis and Brønsted acidity. In THF/water, the strong Lewis acidity and weak Brønsted acidity caused the reaction to proceed through isomerization to fructose and dehydration of fructose to a partially dehydrated intermediate, which was identified by LC‐ESI‐MS. The addition of HCl to the reaction mixture resulted in rapid dehydration of this intermediate to HMF. The HMF yield obtained in this way was approximately 56 % for all tungstite catalysts. Density functional theory calculations show that the Lewis acid centers on the tungstite surface can isomerize glucose into fructose. Substitution of W by Nb lowers the overall activation barrier for glucose isomerization by stabilizing the deprotonated glucose adsorbate. PMID:27493127

  20. Effect of zeolite catalyst on sugar dehydration for 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostapha, Marhaini; Jahar, Noorhasmiera Abu; Chin, Siew Xian; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed; Zakaria, Sarani; Aizat, Wan M.; Azizan, Kamalrul Azlan

    2016-11-01

    The effectiveness in the dehydration of sugars into 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural is related to the catalyst existence. A comprehensive synthesis of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural from fructose, glucose and sucrose (3.73 mmol) with and without addition zeolite catalyst was performed in this study. The reactions were carried out in water-methanol solvent system for 3 hours reaction time at 180°C temperature. The catalytic results from HPLC showed that the reaction with zeolite increases the yield of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural with 51.72 %, 34.01% and 50.10% for fructose, glucose and sucrose respectively. The study suggests that zeolites promote the isomerization of glucose into fructose to occur and simultaneously catalyze the dehydration of fructose into 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural. Only slight changes on FT-IR spectra of use zeolite after the reaction was observed. Thus suggest that zeolite was a potential catalyst for catalytic reaction for the conversion of sugar into 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural.

  1. Fragmentation of chloroperoxides: hypochlorite-mediated dehydration of hydroperoxyacetals to esters

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Thomas J.; Dussault, Patrick H.

    2010-01-01

    Hypochlorites efficently dehydrate hydroperoxyacetals to furnish the corresponding esters. The reaction, which can be accomplished with stoichometric Ca(OCl)2 or with catalytic amounts of t-BuOCl, appears to involve formation and heterolytic fragmentation of secondary chloroperoxides, species not previously described in solution chemistry. PMID:20865135

  2. Discovery-Oriented Approach To Organic Synthesis: Tandem Aldol Condensation-Michael Addition Reactions. Identifying Diastereotopic Hydrogens in an Achiral Molecule by NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachter-Jurcsak, Nanette; Reddin, Kendra

    2001-09-01

    We have found a beautiful example of anisochrony of diastereotopic acyclic methylene hydrogens in a symmetric diketone, synthesized by techniques traditionally performed in an introductory organic laboratory course. Synthesis of the diketone is high-yielding and easy to carry out, and the products can be directly isolated with a good degree of purity with no need of further manipulation. The reaction can be accomplished in a single laboratory session.

  3. Dehydration kinetics of talc at 1 bar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, J.; Bose, K.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results on the dehydration kinetics of talc, which is likely to be a major potential resource for water and hydrogen in carbonaceous chondrites, is presented. The rate of dehydration of an essentially pure Mg-end member natural talc, (Mg(.99)Fe(.01))3Si4O10(OH)2, was studied by measuring in situ weight change under isothermal condition at 1 bar as a function of time in the temperature range 775 to 985 C. The grain size of the starting material was 0.7 to 1 micron. It was found that the data up to 50 to 60 percent dehydration can be fitted by an equation of the form alpha = exp(-Kt(exp n)), where alpha is the weight fraction of talc remaining, K is a rate constant and n is a numerical constant for a given temperature. For any set of isothermal data, there is a major change in the value of n for larger dehydration. For up to approximately 50 percent dehydration, all rate constants can be described by an Arrheniun relation with an activation energy of 432 (+/- 30) kJ/mol; n has a nearly constant value of 0.54 between 775 and 875 C, but increases almost linearly according to n = -10.77 + 0.012T C at T greater than or equal to 875 C.

  4. Geothermal demonstration: Zunil food dehydration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, O. ); Altseimer, J.; Thayer, G.R. ); Cooper, L. ); Caicedo, A. . Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion)

    1991-08-01

    A food dehydration facility was constructed near the town of Zunil, Guatemala, to demonstrate the use of geothermal energy for industrial applications. The facility, with some modifications to the design, was found to work quite satisfactorily. Tests using five different products were completed during the time geothermal energy was used in the plant. During the time the plant was not able to use geothermal energy, a temporary diesel-fueled boiler provided the energy to test dehydration on seven other crops available in this area. The system demonstrates that geothermal heat can be used successfully for dehydrating food products. Many other industrial applications of geothermal energy could be considered for Zunil since a considerable amount of moderate-temperature heat will become available when the planned geothermal electrical facility is constructed there. 6 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Oxidative stress and its effects during dehydration.

    PubMed

    França, M B; Panek, A D; Eleutherio, E C A

    2007-04-01

    Water is usually thought to be required for the living state, but several organisms are capable of surviving complete dehydration (anhydrobiotes). Elucidation of the mechanisms of tolerance against dehydration may lead to development of new methods for preserving biological materials that do not normally support drying, which is of enormous practical importance in industry, in clinical medicine as well as in agriculture. One of the molecular mechanisms of damage leading to death in desiccation-sensitive cells upon drying is free-radical attack to phospholipids, DNA and proteins. This review aims to summarize the strategies used by anhydrobiotes to cope with the danger of oxygen toxicity and to present our recent results about the importance of some antioxidant defense systems in the dehydration tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a usual model in the study of stress response.

  6. Synthesis of pyrazole containing α-amino acids via a highly regioselective condensation/aza-Michael reaction of β-aryl α,β-unsaturated ketones.

    PubMed

    Gilfillan, Lynne; Artschwager, Raik; Harkiss, Alexander H; Liskamp, Rob M J; Sutherland, Andrew

    2015-04-21

    A synthetic approach for the preparation of a new class of highly conjugated unnatural α-amino acids bearing a 5-arylpyrazole side-chain has been developed. Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons reaction of an aspartic acid derived β-keto phosphonate ester with a range of aromatic aldehydes gave β-aryl α,β-unsaturated ketones. Treatment of these with phenyl hydrazine followed by oxidation allowed the regioselective synthesis of pyrazole derived α-amino acids. As well as evaluating the fluorescent properties of the α-amino acids, their synthetic utility was also explored with the preparation of a sulfonyl fluoride derivative, a potential probe for serine proteases.

  7. Condensed imidazo-1,2,4-azines. 15. Reaction of 1,2-diaminobenzimidazole with 5-phenyl-2,3-dihydrofuran-2,3-dione

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglenko, V.P.; Gnidets, V.P.; Klyuev, N.A.; Povstyanoi, M.V.

    1987-10-01

    The reaction of 1,2-diaminobenzimidazole with 5-phenyl-2,3-dihydrofuran-2,3-dione in acetic acid gave a mixture of 2-benzoylmethyl-1,2,4-triazino (2,3-..cap alpha..)-benzimidazol-4H-3-one and 3-benzoylmethyl-1,2,4-triazino(2,3-..cap alpha..)benzimidazol-1H-2-one, the intramolecular cyclization of which gave isomeric 2-phenylfuro-(5,4-e)- and 2-phenylfuro(4,5-e)-1,2,4-triazino(2,3-..cap alpha..)benzimidazoles. Only the corresponding furo(4,5-e)-1,2,4-triazino(2,3-..cap alpha..)benzimidazole was isolated when the reaction was carried out in sulfuric acid. The IR spectra of KBr pellets of the compounds were recorded with a UR-20 spectrometer. The electronic absorption spectra of solutions in dioxane were obtained with a Specord UV-vis spectrophotometer. The mass spectra were recorded with a Varian MAT-311a spectrometer. The quantum-chemical calculations were made by the Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) method with the standard parametrization.

  8. Dehydration of 1-octadecanol over H-BEA: A combined experimental and computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Wenji; Liu, Yuanshuai; Barath, Eszter; Wang, Lucy; Zhao, Chen; Mei, Donghai; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2016-02-05

    Liquid phase dehydration of 1-octdecanol, which is intermediately formed during the hydrodeoxygenation of microalgae oil, has been explored in a combined experimental and computational study. The alkyl chain of C18 alcohol interacts with acid sites during diffusion inside the zeolite pores, resulting in an inefficient utilization of the Brønsted acid sites for samples with high acid site concentrations. The parallel intra- and inter- molecular dehydration pathways having different activation energies pass through alternative reaction intermediates. Formation of surface-bound alkoxide species is the rate-limiting step during intramolecular dehydration, whereas intermolecular dehydration proceeds via a bulky dimer intermediate. Octadecene is the primary dehydration product over H-BEA at 533 K. Despite of the main contribution of Brønsted acid sites towards both dehydration pathways, Lewis acid sites are also active in the formation of dioctadecyl ether. The intramolecular dehydration to octadecene and cleavage of the intermediately formed ether, however, require strong BAS. L. Wang, D. Mei and J. A. Lercher, acknowledge the partial support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). EMSL is a national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  9. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  10. Multiple Condensation Reactions Involving Pt(II) /Pd(II) -OH2 , Pt-NH3 , and Cytosine-NH2 Groups: New Twists in Cisplatin-Nucleobase Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yin-Bandur, Lu; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J; Rodríguez-Santiago, Luis; Sodupe, Mariona; Berghaus, Melanie; Lippert, Bernhard

    2016-09-12

    The coordination chemistry of the antitumor agent cisplatin and related complexes with DNA and its constituents, that is, the nucleobases, appears to be dominated by 1:1 and 1:2 adducts of the types cis-[Pta2 (nucleobase)X] and cis-[Pta2 (nucleobase)2 ] (a=NH3 or amine; a2 =diamine or diimine; X=Cl, OH or OH2 ). Here, we have studied the interactions of the putative 1:1 adducts cis-[Pta2 (1-MeC-N3)(OH2 )](2+) (with a=NH3 , a2 =2,2'-bpy (2,2'-bipyridine), 1-MeC=model nucleobase 1-methylcytosine) with additional cis-[Pt(NH3 )2 (OH2 )2 ](2+) or its kinetically superior analogues [Pd(en)(OH2 )2 ](2+) (en=ethylenediamine) and [Pd(2,2'-bpy)(OH2 )2 ](2+) . Depending upon the conditions applied different compounds of different nuclearity are formed. Without exception they represent condensation products of the components, containing μ-1-MeC-H , μ-OH(-) , as well as μ-NH2 (-) bridges. In the presence of Ag(+) ions, the isolated products in several cases display additionally Pt→Ag dative bonds. On the basis of the cytosine-containing structures established by X-ray crystallography, it is proposed that any of the feasible initial 1:1 nucleobase adducts of cisplatin could form dinuclear Pt complexes upon reaction with additional hydrolyzed cisplatin, thereby generating nucleobase adducts other than the presently established ones. Two findings appear to be of particular significance: First, hydrolyzed cisplatin can have a moderately accelerating effect on the formation of a secondary nucleobase product. Second, NH3 ligands of the cisplatin moiety can be converted into bridging amido ligands following condensation with the diaqua species of cisplatin.

  11. Condensates in Jovian Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermochemical equilibrium theory which starts with temperature/pressure profiles, compositional information and thermodynamic data for condensable species in the jovian planet atmospheres predicts layers of condensate clouds in the upper troposphere.

  12. Ethanol dehydration in HZSM-5 studied by density functional theory: evidence for a concerted process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seonah; Robichaud, David J; Beckham, Gregg T; Paton, Robert S; Nimlos, Mark R

    2015-04-16

    Dehydration over acidic zeolites is an important reaction class for the upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapors to hydrocarbon fuels or to precursors for myriad chemical products. Here, we examine the dehydration of ethanol at a Brønsted acid site, T12, found in HZSM-5 using density functional theory (DFT). The geometries of both cluster and mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM:MM) models are prepared from the ZSM-5 crystal structure. Comparisons between these models and different DFT methods are conducted to show similar results among the models and methods used. Inclusion of the full catalyst cavity through a QM:MM approach is found to be important, since activation barriers are computed on average as 7 kcal mol(-1) lower than those obtained with a smaller cluster model. Two different pathways, concerted and stepwise, have been considered when examining dehydration and deprotonation steps. The current study shows that a concerted dehydration process is possible with a lower (4-5 kcal mol(-1)) activation barrier while previous literature studies have focused on a stepwise mechanism. Overall, this work demonstrates that fairly high activation energies (∼50 kcal mol(-1)) are required for ethanol dehydration. A concerted mechanism is favored over a stepwise mechanism because charge separation in the transition state is minimized. QM:MM approaches appear to provide superior results to cluster calculations due to a more accurate representation of charges on framework oxygen atoms.

  13. Dehydration in the Winter Arctic Tropopause Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Jensen, Eric; Podolske, James; Selkirk, Henry; Anderson, Bruce; Avery, Melody; Diskin. Glenn

    2004-01-01

    Recent work has shown that limited amounts of tropospheric air can penetrate as much as 1 km into the middleworld stratosphere during the arctic winter. This, coupled with temperatures that are cold enough to produce saturation mixing ratios of less than 5 ppmv at the tropopause, results in stratospheric cloud formation and upper tropospheric dehydration. Even though these "cold outbreaks" occupy only a small portion of the area in the arctic (1-2%), their importance is magnified by an order of magnitude because of the air flow through them. This is reinforced by evidence of progressive drying through the winter measured during SOLVE-1. The significance of this process lies in its effect on the upper tropospheric water content of the middle and high latitude tropopause region, which plays an important role in regulating the earth's radiative balance. There appears to be significant year-to-year variability in the incidence of the cold outbreaks. This work has two parts. First, we describe case studies of dehydration taken from the SOLVE and SOLVE2 aircraft sampling missions during the Arctic winters of 2000 and 2003 respectively. Trajectory based microphysical modeling is employed to examine the sensitivity of the dehydration to microphysical parameters and the nature of sub-grid scale temperature fluctuations. We then examine the year-to-year variations in potential dehydration using a trajectory climatology.

  14. Thermoelastic behavior and dehydration process of cancrinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatta, G. D.; Comboni, D.; Alvaro, M.; Lotti, P.; Cámara, F.; Domeneghetti, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    The high-temperature thermoelastic behavior of a natural cancrinite has been investigated by in situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The unit-cell volume variation as a function of temperature ( T) exhibits a continuous trend up to 748 K (hydrous expansion regime). The unit-cell edges expansion clearly shows an anisotropic expansion scheme ( α a < α c ). At 748 K, a dehydration process takes place, and a series of unit-cell parameter measurements at constant temperature (748 K) for a period of 12 days indicate that the dehydration process continued for the entire period of time, until the cell parameters were found to be constant. After the dehydration process is completed, the structure expands almost linearly with increasing temperature up to 823 K, where a sudden broadening of the diffraction peaks, likely due to the impending decomposition, did not allow the collection of further data points. Even with a very limited temperature range for the anhydrous regime, we observed that the behavior of the two (i.e., hydrous and anhydrous) high-temperature structures is similar in terms of (1) volume thermal expansion coefficient and (2) thermoelastic anisotropy. The structure refinements based on the data collected at 303, 478 and 748 K (after the dehydration), respectively, showed a change in the mechanism of tilting of the quasi-rigid (Si,Al)O4 tetrahedra, following the loss of H2O molecules, ascribable to the high-temperature Na+ coordination environment within the cages.

  15. Voluntary Dehydration and Alliesthesia for Water,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-13

    of the extracellular fluid are maintained in dynamic balance, and partially controlled by antidiuretic hormone and thirst (2). The drive to drink...dehydration which limits sweating, adversely affects cardiovascular and thermoregulatory functions , and predisposes to heat illness. Emphasis on drinking by

  16. Thermodynamic stability considerations for isostructural dehydrates.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brendan J; Casteel, Melissa J; Samas, Brian; Krzyzaniak, Joseph F

    2012-04-01

    Nonstoichiometric channel hydrates are a class of crystalline hydrates that can incorporate a range of water levels as a function of temperature and relative humidity (RH). When a nonstoichiometric channel hydrate can dehydrate to yield a physically stable isostructural crystalline lattice, it may become challenging to accurately evaluate the thermodynamic stability relationship associated with a polymorphic system using traditional methods. This work demonstrates application of a eutectic-melting method to determine the stability relationship between a nonstoichiometric channel dehydrate and an anhydrous form. A transition temperature (122°C) between the isostructural dehydrate of the nonstoichiometric channel hydrate and the anhydrous polymorph was identified, with the nonstoichiometric channel hydrate being the thermodynamically stable anhydrous form at room temperature (RT). Solid-state storage at a range of RH conditions demonstrated that the nonstoichiometric channel hydrate is also the stable form at RT above an RH of 94%. These results demonstrate that the nonstoichiometric channel hydrate is the stable form at low temperatures, independent of its hydration state. It has been demonstrated that the eutectic-melting method is applicable to the study of thermodynamic stability relationships between anhydrous forms and dehydrated channel hydrates.

  17. Pelagic sea snakes dehydrate at sea

    PubMed Central

    Lillywhite, Harvey B.; Sheehy, Coleman M.; Brischoux, François; Grech, Alana

    2014-01-01

    Secondarily marine vertebrates are thought to live independently of fresh water. Here, we demonstrate a paradigm shift for the widely distributed pelagic sea snake, Hydrophis (Pelamis) platurus, which dehydrates at sea and spends a significant part of its life in a dehydrated state corresponding to seasonal drought. Snakes that are captured following prolonged periods without rainfall have lower body water content, lower body condition and increased tendencies to drink fresh water than do snakes that are captured following seasonal periods of high rainfall. These animals do not drink seawater and must rehydrate by drinking from a freshwater lens that forms on the ocean surface during heavy precipitation. The new data based on field studies indicate unequivocally that this marine vertebrate dehydrates at sea where individuals may live in a dehydrated state for possibly six to seven months at a time. This information provides new insights for understanding water requirements of sea snakes, reasons for recent declines and extinctions of sea snakes and more accurate prediction for how changing patterns of precipitation might affect these and other secondarily marine vertebrates living in tropical oceans. PMID:24648228

  18. Pelagic sea snakes dehydrate at sea.

    PubMed

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Sheehy, Coleman M; Brischoux, François; Grech, Alana

    2014-05-07

    Secondarily marine vertebrates are thought to live independently of fresh water. Here, we demonstrate a paradigm shift for the widely distributed pelagic sea snake, Hydrophis (Pelamis) platurus, which dehydrates at sea and spends a significant part of its life in a dehydrated state corresponding to seasonal drought. Snakes that are captured following prolonged periods without rainfall have lower body water content, lower body condition and increased tendencies to drink fresh water than do snakes that are captured following seasonal periods of high rainfall. These animals do not drink seawater and must rehydrate by drinking from a freshwater lens that forms on the ocean surface during heavy precipitation. The new data based on field studies indicate unequivocally that this marine vertebrate dehydrates at sea where individuals may live in a dehydrated state for possibly six to seven months at a time. This information provides new insights for understanding water requirements of sea snakes, reasons for recent declines and extinctions of sea snakes and more accurate prediction for how changing patterns of precipitation might affect these and other secondarily marine vertebrates living in tropical oceans.

  19. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound... specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not more than 0.5 percent. Lead...

  20. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound... specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not more than 0.5 percent. Lead...

  1. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound... specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not more than 0.5 percent. Lead...

  2. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound... specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not more than 0.5 percent. Lead...

  3. 21 CFR 73.40 - Dehydrated beets (beet powder).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive dehydrated beets is a dark red powder prepared by dehydrating sound... specifications: Volatile matter, not more than 4 percent. Acid insoluble ash, not more than 0.5 percent. Lead...

  4. ADVANCED DEHYDRATOR DESIGN SAVES GAS AND REDUCES HAP EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glycol dehydrators remove water from gas pipe lines. An advanced dehydrator by Engineered Concepts, Farmington, NM, saves a significant amount of gas, while reducing hazardous air pollutants, volatile organic compounds and CO2 air pollutants

  5. Mechanistic insights into aqueous phase propanol dehydration in H-ZSM-5 zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2016-10-06

    Aqueous phase dehydration of 1-propanol over H-ZSM-5 zeolite was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The water molecules in the zeolite pores prefer to aggregate via the hydrogen bonding network and be protonated at the Brønsted acidic sites (BAS). Two typical configurations, i.e., dispersed and clustered, of water molecules were identified by ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of the mimicking aqueous phase H-ZSM-5 zeolite unit cell with 20 water molecules per unit cell. DFT calculated Gibbs free energies suggest that the dimeric propanol-propanol, the propanol-water complex, and the trimeric propanol-propanol-water are formed at high propanol concentrations, which provide a kinetically feasible dehydration reaction channel of 1-propanol to propene. However, calculation results also indicate that the propanol dehydration via the unimolecular mechanism becomes kinetically discouraged due to the enhanced stability of the protonated dimeric propanol and the protonated water cluster acting as the BAS site for alcohol dehydration reaction. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). EMSL is a national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  6. Dehydration of water-pyridine mixtures by pervaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, W. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique-UA 494, Nancy ); Nguyen, T.Q.; Neel, J. )

    1991-08-01

    The pervaporation technique, in which the liquid feed mixture is maintained in contact with one side of a nonporous membrane and the permeate is continuously removed from the other side as a vapor, is one of the new methods to attain separation of azeotropic mixtures, structural isomers, or even to displace the equilibrium of chemical reactions. Several ion-exchange and neutral membranes were examined in the pervaporation of water-pyridine mixtures. Carboxylic and sulfonic ion-exchange membranes were used with hydrogen counterion and additionally with trimethylammonium, triethylammonium, and tributylammonium counterions. All membranes were selective to water, but the transport mode and selectivity properties of membranes were dependent on both the character of the ion-exchange group and the ionic form of the membrane. The results obtained suggest that pervaporation of water-pyridine mixtures could be used with standard distillation in the large-scale dehydration process of pyridine.

  7. Treatment of Dredged Sludge By Mechanical Dehydration,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    there is an urgent need to reduce both the volume of dredged sludge and the size of the disposal area. This mechanical method is different from the...conventional engineering dehydration by loading, consolidation, and drainage in that the dredged sludge is separated into sludge cakes and clean water...turbidity in water. This mechanical sludge treatment technique can be most efficient when used in combination with a pump dredge. This method offers

  8. Dehydration, Hyperthermia, and Athletes: Science and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To present the recent research that underscores the value of preventing both dehydration and hyperthermia. Such efforts will improve the athlete's capacity to perform physical activity and reduce the risk of heat-related problems. Data Sources: Data were drawn from an extensive review of the scientific literature over the past 50 years with an emphasis on recent research (> 1990) that focuses on the physiological and performance benefits of fluid replacement. Data Synthesis: Even low levels of dehydration (eg, less than a 2% loss of body weight) impair cardiovascular and thermoregulatory response and reduce the capacity for exercise. Heat exposure also reduces the athlete's ability to train and compete, an effect that can be independent of hydration status. Even if athletes are well hydrated, hot weather alone will reduce their capacity to exercise. Optimal performance is possible only when dehydration and hyperthermia are minimized by ingesting ample volumes of fluid during exercise and by taking common-sense precautions in keeping cool. Recent research has demonstrated that consuming fluid in volumes approximating sweat loss maintains important physiological functions and significantly improves exercise performance, even during exercise lasting only 1 hour. Carbohydrate ingestion also improves exercise performance, an effect that is independent of, and additive to, preventing dehydration. Conclusion/Application: Athletes should follow an aggressive fluid replacement and temperature regulation regimen. Successful implementation of this regimen requires that athletic trainers, coaches, athletes, and support personnel are made aware of the benefits of adequate fluid replacement, that appropriate fluid replacement strategies are developed and implemented, that athletes have the opportunity to train themselves to ingest larger volumes of fluid more frequently, and that other practical steps are taken to keep athletes cool during both training and

  9. Dehydration-induced drinking in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The human tendency to experience a delay in rehydration (involuntary dehydration) after fluid loss is considered. The two primary factors contributing to involuntary dehydration are probably upright posture, and extracellular fluid and electrolyte loss by sweating from exercise and heat exposure. First, as the plasma sodium and osmotic concentrations remain virtually unchanged for supine to upright postural changes, the major stimuli for drinking appear to be associated with the hypovolemia and increase in the renin-angiotension system. Second, voluntary drinking during the heat experiments was 146% greater than in cool experiments; drinking increased by 109% with prior dehydration as opposed to normal hydration conditions; and drinking was increased by 41% after exercise as compared with the resting condition. Finally, it is concluded that the rate of sweating and the rate of voluntary fluid intake are highly correlated, and that the dispogenic factors of plasma volume, osmolality, and plasma renin activity are unrelated to sweat rate, but are likely to induce drinking in humans.

  10. Fasting headache, weight loss, and dehydration.

    PubMed

    Mosek, A; Korczyn, A D

    1999-03-01

    Recently, we showed that fasting is a strong headache precipitator unrelated to coffee, tea, or smoking withdrawal or to oversleeping. In the current study, we evaluated the role of dehydration as a possible precipitator of fasting headache. The effects of a 25-hour fast of the Jewish Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) were studied in women who participated in our previous Yom Kippur study. We asked the subjects to weigh themselves at the beginning and at the end of the Yom Kippur fast, assuming that the weight loss would largely reflect dehydration. In all but 1 of the 56 participants, the fast resulted in weight loss but only 28 (50%) reported headache. The average weight loss was 1.4 +/- 0.8 kg in those who developed headache and 1.2 +/- 0.5 kg in those who did not. This small difference was not statistically significant. We conclude that dehydration, as reflected by acute weight loss, is an unlikely cause of headache during a single day of fasting. The mechanism of fasting headache remains unclear.

  11. Biomass energy analysis for crop dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, J.P.; Haase, S.G.; Quinn, M.W.; Zachritz, W.; Lansford, R.; Swanson, D.

    1995-06-01

    In 1994, an agricultural processing facility began constructing a new spice and herb dehydration facility in southern New Mexico. Because of the considerable energy intensity of the dehydration operation, management of energy costs is of special concern to the facility. Biomass energy conversion offers the potential for firms to reduce annual operating costs-especially firms with access to low-cost resources. Because the selected facility produces a biomass by-product as a result of its dehydration operation, it is appropriate to explore the technical, regulatory, institutional and economic conditions that affect the successful utilization of biomass resources. The facility is characterized as a small-scale installation, relative to other energy users. In this context, small-scale represents less than 100 million Btu per hour of thermal load and less than 1 MWe of electrical load. However, the projected annual energy bill is approximately $1.1 million and represents a significant portion of operational costs for the firm. For this study, the biomass resources in southern New Mexico and western Texas are detailed. Annual supplies of various biomass resources (i.e., wood chips, pecan shells, discarded tires and cotton gin trash) were inventoried. Further, delivered costs are projected for each of the resource forms. A technical assessment for the small-scale gasification and combustion systems is presented.

  12. Condensed phase preparation of 2,3-pentanedione

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Dennis J.; Perry, Scott M.; Fanson, Paul T.; Jackson, James E.

    1998-01-01

    A condensed phase process for the preparation of purified 2,3-pentanedione from lactic acid and an alkali metal lactate is described. The process uses elevated temperatures between about 200.degree. to 360.degree. C. for heating a reaction mixture of lactic acid and an alkali metal lactate to produce the 2,3-pentanedione in a reaction vessel. The 2,3-pentanedione produced is vaporized from the reaction vessel and condensed with water.

  13. Condensed phase preparation of 2,3-pentanedione

    DOEpatents

    Miller, D.J.; Perry, S.M.; Fanson, P.T.; Jackson, J.E.

    1998-11-03

    A condensed phase process for the preparation of purified 2,3-pentanedione from lactic acid and an alkali metal lactate is described. The process uses elevated temperatures between about 200 to 360 C for heating a reaction mixture of lactic acid and an alkali metal lactate to produce the 2,3-pentanedione in a reaction vessel. The 2,3-pentanedione produced is vaporized from the reaction vessel and condensed with water. 5 figs.

  14. Sub-Equimolar Hydrolysis and Condensation of Organophosphates

    DOE PAGES

    Alam, Todd M.; Kinnan, Mark K.; Wilson, Brendan W.; ...

    2016-07-16

    We characterized the in-situ hydrolysis and subsequent condensation reaction of the chemical agent simulant diethyl chlorophosphate (DECP) by high-resolution 31P NMR spectroscopy following the addition of water in sub-equimolar concentrations. Moreover, the identification and quantification of the multiple pyrophosphate and larger polyphosphate chemical species formed through a series of self-condensation reactions are reported. Finally, the DECP hydrolysis kinetics and distribution of breakdown species was strongly influenced by the water concentration and reaction temperature.

  15. Evolution of microstructure and elastic wave velocities in dehydrated gypsum samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milsch, Harald; Priegnitz, Mike

    2012-12-01

    We report on changes in P and S-wave velocities and rock microstructure induced by devolatilization reactions using gypsum as a reference analog material. Cylindrical samples of natural alabaster were dehydrated in air, at ambient pressure, and temperatures between 378 and 423 K. Dehydration did not proceed homogeneously but via a reaction front moving sample inwards separating an outer highly porous rim from the remaining gypsum which, above approximately 393 (±5) K, concurrently decomposed into hemihydrate. Overall porosity was observed to continuously increase with reaction progress from approximately 2% for fully hydrated samples to 30% for completely dehydrated ones. Concurrently, P and S-wave velocities linearly decreased with porosity from 5.2 and 2.7 km/s to 1.0 and 0.7 km/s, respectively. It is concluded that a linearized empirical Raymer-type model extended by a critical porosity term and based on the respective time dependent mineral and pore volumes reasonably replicates the P and S-wave data in relation to reaction progress and porosity.

  16. EPRI condensate polisher guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, B.A.; Webb, L.C.; Sawochka, S.G.; Crits, G.J.; Pocock, F.J.; Wirth, L.

    1995-01-01

    Cycle chemistry is one of the most important contributors to the loss of availability of generating units. Condensate polishing can significantly improve cycle chemistry by improving cycle water quality and minimizing the transport of contaminants in the power cycle. The EPRI-funded project described in this paper developed comprehensive guidelines for condensate polishing based upon information gathered from utility surveys, equipment vendors, and resin suppliers. Existing literature was also surveyed for pertinent input. Comprehensive guidelines which outline guidance for design, operation, maintenance, surveillance, management, and retrofitting of condensate polishing systems were developed. Economics of condensate polishing were evaluated and a roadmap for economic evaluation for utilities to follow was produced.

  17. Effect of hydrothermal circulation on slab dehydration for the subduction zone of Costa Rica and Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, Juan Carlos; Currie, Claire A.; Harris, Robert N.; He, Jiangheng

    2016-06-01

    Dehydration of subducting oceanic plates is associated with mantle wedge melting, arc volcanism, intraslab earthquakes through dehydration embrittlement, and the flux of water into the mantle. In this study, we present two-dimensional thermal models of the Costa Rica-Nicaragua subduction zone to investigate dehydration reactions within the subducting Cocos plate. Seismic and geochemical observations indicate that the mantle wedge below Nicaragua is more hydrated than that below Costa Rica. These trends have been hypothesized to be due to a variation in either the thermal state or the hydration state of the subducting slab. Despite only small variations in plate age along strike, heat flow measurements near the deformation front reveal significantly lower heat flow offshore Nicaragua than offshore Costa Rica. These measurements are interpreted to reflect an along-strike change in the efficiency of hydrothermal circulation in the oceanic crust. We parameterize thermal models in terms of efficient and inefficient hydrothermal circulation and explore their impact on slab temperature in the context of dehydration models. Relative to models without fluid flow, efficient hydrothermal circulation reduces slab temperature by as much at 60 °C to depths of ∼75 km and increases the predicted depth of eclogitization by ∼15 km. Inefficient hydrothermal circulation has a commensurately smaller influence on slab temperatures and the depth of eclogitization. For both regions, the change in eclogitization depth better fits the observed intraslab crustal seismicity, but there is not a strong contrast in the slab thermal structure or location of the main dehydration reactions. Consistent with other studies, these results suggest that observed along-strike differences in mantle wedge hydration may be better explained by a northwestward increase in the hydration state of the Cocos plate before it is subducted.

  18. Condensed Matter Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akito; Ota, Ken-Ichiro; Iwamura, Yashuhiro

    Preface -- 1. General. Progress in condensed matter nuclear science / A. Takahashi. Summary of ICCF-12 / X. Z. Li. Overview of light water/hydrogen-based low-energy nuclear reactions / G. H. Miley and P. J. Shrestha -- 2. Excess heat and He detection. Development of "DS-reactor" as the practical reactor of "cold fusion" based on the "DS-cell" with "DS-cathode" / Y. Arata and Y.-C. Zhang. Progress in excess of power experiments with electrochemical loading of deuterium in palladium / V. Violante ... [et al.]. Anomalous energy generation during conventional electrolysis / T. Mizuno and Y. Toriyabe. "Excess heat" induced by deuterium flux in palladium film / B. Liu ... [et al.]. Abnormal excess heat observed during Mizuno-type experiments / J.-F. Fauvarque, P. P. Clauzon and G. J.-M. Lallevé. Seebeck envelope calorimetry with a Pd|D[symbol]O + H[symbol]SO[symbol] electrolytic cell / W.-S. Zhang, J. Dash and Q. Wang. Observation and investigation of nuclear fusion and self-induced electric discharges in liquids / A. I. Koldamasov ... [et al.]. Description of a sensitive seebeck calorimeter used for cold fusion studies / E. Storms. Some recent results at ENEA / M. Apicella ... [et al.]. Heat measurement during plasma electrolysis / K. Iizumi ... [et al.]. Effect of an additive on thermal output during electrolysis of heavy water with a palladium cathode / Q. Wang and J. Dash. Thermal analysis of calorimetric systems / L. D'Aulerio ... [et al.]. Surface plasmons and low-energy nuclear reactions triggering / E. Castagna ... [et al.]. Production method for violent TCB jet plasma from cavity / F. Amini. New results and an ongoing excess heat controversy / L. Kowalski ... [et al.] -- 3. Transmutation. Observation of surface distribution of products by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry during D[symbol] gas permeation through Pd Complexes / Y. Iwamura ... [et al.]. Discharge experiment using Pd/CaO/Pd multi-layered cathode / S. Narita ... [et al.]. Producing transmutation

  19. Effects of catalyst pore structure and acid properties on the dehydration of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youngbo; Park, Hongseok; Yun, Yang Sik; Yi, Jongheop

    2015-03-01

    Hierarchical porous catalysts have recently attracted increasing interest because of the enhanced accessibility to active sites on such materials. In this context, previously reported hierarchically mesoporous ASN and ASPN materials are evaluated by applying them to the dehydration of glycerol, and demonstrate excellent catalytic performance. In addition, a comprehensive understanding of the effects of pore structures and the acid properties on the reaction through comparative studies with microporous HZSM-5 and mesoporous AlMCM-41 is provided.

  20. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    This measure guideline on evaporative condensers provides information on properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices.

  1. Geothermal steam condensate reinjection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chasteen, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Geothermal electric generating plants which use condensing turbines and generate and excess of condensed steam which must be disposed of are discussed. At the Geysers, California, the largest geothermal development in the world, this steam condensate has been reinjected into the steam reservoir since 1968. A total of 3,150,000,000 gallons of steam condensate has been reinjected since that time with no noticeable effect on the adjacent producing wells. Currently, 3,700,000 gallons/day from 412 MW of installed capacity are being injected into 5 wells. Reinjection has also proven to be a satisfactory method of disposing of geothermal condensate a Imperial Valley, California, and at the Valles Caldera, New Mexico.

  2. Hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics-Based Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Polyols in Liquid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Caratzoulas, Stavros; Courtney, Timothy; Vlachos, Dionisios G.

    2011-01-01

    We use the conversion of protonated glycerol to acrolein for a case study of the mechanism of acid-catalyzed dehydration of polyols in aqueous environments. We employ hybrid Quamtum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Molecular Dynamics (QM/MM MD) simulations with biased sampling and perform free energy calculations for the elementary steps of the reaction. We investigate the effects of solvent dynamics and in particular the role of quantum mechanical water in the dehydration mechanism. We present results supporting a mechanism that proceeds via water-mediated proton transfers and thus through an enol intermediate. We find that the first dehydration may take place by two, low-energy pathways requiring, respectively, 20.9 and 18.8 kcal/mol of activation free energy. The second dehydration requires 19.9 kcal/mol of activation free energy while for the overall reaction we compute a free energy change of -8 kcal/mol.

  3. Dehydration of lawsonite could directly trigger earthquakes in subducting oceanic crust.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Keishi; Hirth, Greg

    2016-02-04

    Intermediate-depth earthquakes in cold subduction zones are observed within the subducting oceanic crust, as well as the mantle. In contrast, intermediate-depth earthquakes in hot subduction zones predominantly occur just below the Mohorovičić discontinuity. These observations have stimulated interest in relationships between blueschist-facies metamorphism and seismicity, particularly through dehydration reactions involving the mineral lawsonite. Here we conducted deformation experiments on lawsonite, while monitoring acoustic emissions, in a Griggs-type deformation apparatus. The temperature was increased above the thermal stability of lawsonite, while the sample was deforming, to test whether the lawsonite dehydration reaction induces unstable fault slip. In contrast to similar tests on antigorite, unstable fault slip (that is, stick-slip) occurred during dehydration reactions in the lawsonite and acoustic emission signals were continuously observed. Microstructural observations indicate that strain is highly localized along the fault (R1 and B shears), and that the fault surface develops slickensides (very smooth fault surfaces polished by frictional sliding). The unloading slope during the unstable slip follows the stiffness of the apparatus at all experimental conditions, regardless of the strain rate and temperature ramping rate. A thermomechanical scaling factor for the experiments is within the range estimated for natural subduction zones, indicating the potential for unstable frictional sliding within natural lawsonite layers.

  4. Dehydration of football referees during a match

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, A I; Fernandez, R

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To study hydration status in referees (main) and assistant referees (linesmen) during official football matches. Methods: Twelve male football referees were evaluated; all were volunteers. Before and after each match, the referee and one of the assistants were weighed without clothes and a blood sample was taken. Total water loss was determined for each subject from the change in body weight. The main haematological variables were analysed in the blood samples. Total plasma protein concentration and osmolarity were also determined. Variation in plasma volume was determined from changes in packed cell volume and a combination of changes in packed cell volume and haemoglobin concentrations. Results: During a match, total body water loss was 1.60 (0.13) litres, equivalent to 2.05 (0.18)% of body weight. Body weight was reduced by 1.55 (0.12)%, showing that water ingestion during the interval replaces only 24.4% of the body fluids lost during the match. The assistants lost 0.79 (0.19) litre of water, equivalent to 1.05 (0.25)% of body weight. The referees showed a significant decrease in plasma volume of 4.99 (1.33)%. The assistants showed a non-significant increase in plasma volume. The reduction in plasma volume observed in the referees correlated significantly with total body water loss (r = 0.9623). From these data, it is possible to predict that a dehydration of 1% reflects a reduction in plasma volume of nearly 2.5%. Conclusions: Referees are moderately dehydrated after a football match (2%), whereas assistants show a non-significant dehydration of 1% of their body weight. PMID:14665588

  5. Dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene in a slurry reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Latshaw, B.E.

    1994-02-01

    The April 1990 Alternative Fuels Proposal to the Department of Energy involved the development of new technology, based on the liquid phase process, for conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels, fuel additives, and fuel intermediates. The objective of this work was to develop a slurry reactor based process for the dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene. The isobutene can serve as a feedstock for the high octane oxygenated fuel additive methyl tertiary-butyl either (MTBE). Alumina catalysts were investigated because of their wide use as a dehydration catalyst. Four commercially available alumina catalysts (Catapal B, Versal B, Versal GH, and Al-3996R) were evaluated for both activity and selectivity to the branched olefin. All four catalysts demonstrated conversions greater than 80% at 290 C, while conversions of near 100% could be obtained at 330 C. The reaction favors low pressures and moderate to low space velocities. A yield of 0.90 mole isobutene per mole reacted isobutanol or better was obtained at conversions of 60--70% and higher. From 75 to 98% conversion, the four catalysts all provide isobutene yields ranging from 0.92 to 0.94 with the maximum occurring around 90% conversion. At low conversions, the concentration of diisobutyl ether becomes significant while the concentration of linear butenes is essentially a linear function of isobutanol conversion. Doping the catalyst with up to 0.8 wt % potassium showed a modest increase in isobutene selectivity; however, this increase was more than offset by a reduction in activity. Investigations using a mixed alcohols feed (consistent with isobutanol synthesis from syngas) demonstrated a small increase in the C4 iso-olefin selectivity over that observed for a pure isobutanol feed. 55 refs.

  6. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, Jr., Jerry; Avens, Larry R.; Trujillo, Eddie A.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride is provided.

  7. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.; Avens, L.R.; Trujillo, E.A.

    1992-03-24

    A process is described for preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride.

  8. Intrastab Earthquakes: Dehydration of the Cascadia Slab

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Preston, L.A.; Creager, K.C.; Crosson, R.S.; Brocher, T.M.; Trehu, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    We simultaneously invert travel times of refracted and wide-angle reflected waves for three-dimensional compressional-wave velocity structure, earthquake locations, and reflector geometry in northwest Washington state. The reflector, interpreted to be the crust-mantle boundary (Moho) of the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, separates intrastab earthquakes into two groups, permitting a new understanding of the origins of intrastab earthquakes in Cascadia. Earthquakes up-dip of the Moho's 45-kilometer depth contour occur below the reflector, in the subducted oceanic mantle, consistent with serpentinite dehydration; earthquakes located down-dip occur primarily within the subducted crust, consistent with the basalt-to-eclogite transformation.

  9. Dehydration anorexia is attenuated in oxytocin-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Rinaman, Linda; Vollmer, Regis R; Karam, Joseph; Phillips, Donnesha; Li, Xia; Amico, Janet A

    2005-06-01

    Evidence in rats suggests that central oxytocin (OT) signaling pathways contribute to suppression of food intake during dehydration (i.e., dehydration anorexia). The present study examined water deprivation-induced dehydration anorexia in wild-type and OT -/- mice. Mice were deprived of food alone (fasted, euhydrated) or were deprived of both food and water (fasted, dehydrated) for 18 h overnight. Fasted wild-type mice consumed significantly less chow during a 60-min refeeding period when dehydrated compared with their intake when euhydrated. Conversely, fasting-induced food intake was slightly but not significantly suppressed by dehydration in OT -/- mice, evidence for attenuated dehydration anorexia. In a separate experiment, mice were deprived of water (but not food) overnight for 18 h; then they were anesthetized and perfused with fixative for immunocytochemical analysis of central Fos expression. Fos was elevated similarly in osmo- and volume-sensitive regions of the basal forebrain and hypothalamus in wild-type and OT -/- mice after water deprivation. OT-positive neurons expressed Fos in dehydrated wild-type mice, and vasopressin-positive neurons were activated to a similar extent in wild-type and OT -/- mice. Conversely, significantly fewer neurons within the hindbrain dorsal vagal complex were activated in OT -/- mice after water deprivation compared with activation in wild-type mice. These findings support the view that OT-containing projections from the hypothalamus to the hindbrain are necessary for the full expression of compensatory behavioral and physiological responses to dehydration.

  10. Effects of Dehydration on Fish Muscles at Chilled Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Hidemasa; Seto, Fuminori; Nishimoto, Motomi; Nishimoto, Junichi

    Recently,new method of removing water from fish fillet at low temperature using dehydration sheet have been reported. The present study is concerned with the factors to affect the quality during dehydration of horse mackerel muscle at low temperature. The rate of dehydration at -3 °C was about two times faster than that at 0 °C. The rate of denaturation of fish muscle protein was kept less than about 10 % (ATPase activity) of the undenaturated initial values after removing free water content. Present results suggest the practical possibility of the dehydration at -3 °C for keeping quality of fish flesh.

  11. Role of iron content on serpentinite dehydration depth in subduction zones: Experiments and thermodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulova, Margarita; Muñoz, Manuel; Vidal, Olivier; Brunet, Fabrice

    2016-11-01

    A series of dehydration experiments in the piston-cylinder apparatus was carried out at 2 GPa and 550-850 °C on a natural antigorite sample mixed with 5 wt.% of magnetite. Chemical analyses of experimental products show a progressive decrease of the Mg# in antigorite and clinopyroxene between 550 and 675 °C, whereas the Mg# of olivine increases. The observed behavior of Mg# signifies Fe-Mg exchange between coexisting minerals. At higher temperatures, between 700 and 850 °C, compositions remain stable for all minerals in experimental assemblages. Thermodynamic parameters of the ferrous antigorite end-member were refined with the use of Holland and Powell (1998) data set and added to the antigorite solid solution. Good agreement between theoretical calculations performed for the studied bulk composition and experimental results confirms extrapolated thermodynamic data for Fe-antigorite. Constrained parameters allowed to calculate phase relationships for various serpentinite compositions. First, we assessed the effect of bulk iron content, from 0 to 10 wt.% FeO, on the stability field of antigorite. The results show significant decrease of the antigorite thermal stability with increasing bulk Fe content. Second, we demonstrated the influence of bulk iron content on dehydration reactions in subduction zones along typical thermal gradients. Dehydration observed in pure MSH (MgO-SiO2-H2O) systems comprised of antigorite appears as a univariant reaction, which happens at 710 °C/3.7 GPa and 640 °C/6 GPa in "hot" and "cold" subduction, respectively. In contrast, more complex in composition Fe-bearing serpentinites show spread dehydration profiles through divariant reactions from 300 °C/0.8 GPa to 700 °C/3.6 GPa and from 450 °C/4 GPa to 650 °C/7.4 GPa for "hot" and "cold" thermal gradients respectively. A comparison between depths of "water-release events" and "earthquake occurrence" in the South Chile slab ("hot" subduction) highlights a clear correlation between

  12. Sedimentary condensation and authigenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föllmi, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Most marine authigenic minerals form in sediments, which are subjected to condensation. Condensation processes lead to the formation of well individualized, extremely thin (< 1m) beds, which were accumulated during extremely long time periods (> 100ky), and which experienced authigenesis and the precipitation of glaucony, verdine, phosphate, iron and manganese oxyhydroxides, iron sulfide, carbonate and/or silica. They usually show complex internal stratigraphies, which result from an interplay of sediment accumulation, halts in sedimentation, sediment winnowing, erosion, reworking and bypass. They may include amalgamated faunas of different origin and age. Hardgrounds may be part of condensed beds and may embody strongly condensed beds by themselves. Sedimentary condensation is the result of a hydrodynamically active depositional regime, in which sediment accumulation, winnowing, erosion, reworking and bypass are processes, which alternate as a function of changes in the location and intensity of currents, and/or as the result of episodic high-energy events engendered by storms and gravity flow. Sedimentary condensation has been and still is a widespread phenomenon in past and present-day oceans. The present-day distribution of glaucony and verdine-rich sediments on shelves and upper slopes, phosphate-rich sediments and phosphorite on outer shelves and upper slopes, ferromanganese crusts on slopes, seamounts and submarine plateaus, and ferromanganese nodules on abyssal seafloors is a good indication of the importance of condensation processes today. In the past, we may add the occurrence of oolitic ironstone, carbonate hardgrounds, and eventually also silica layers in banded iron formations as indicators of the importance of condensation processes. Besides their economic value, condensed sediments are useful both as a carrier of geochemical proxies of paleoceanographic and paleoenvironmental change, as well as the product of episodes of paleoceanographic and

  13. Biomass energy analysis for crop dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, J.P.; Haase, S.G.; Quinn, M.W.

    1994-12-31

    In 1994, an agricultural processing facility was constructed in southern New Mexico for spice and herb dehydration. Annual operational costs are dominated by energy costs, due primarily to the energy intensity of dehydration. A feasibility study was performed to determine whether the use of biomass resources as a feedstock for a cogeneration system would be an economical option. The project location allowed access to unusual biomass feedstocks including cotton gin trash, pecan shells and in-house residues. A resource assessment of the immediate project area determined that approximately 120,000 bone dry tons of biomass feedstocks are available annually. Technology characterization for the plant energy requirements indicated gasification systems offer fuel flexibility advantages over combustion systems although vendor support and commercial experience are limited. Regulatory siting considerations introduce a level of uncertainty because of a lack of a precedent in New Mexico for gasification technology and because vendors of commercial gasifiers have little experience operating such a facility nor gathering emission data. A public opinion survey indicated considerable support for renewable energy use and biomass energy utilization. However, the public opinion survey also revealed limited knowledge of biomass technologies and concerns regarding siting of a biomass facility within the geographic area. The economic analysis conducted for the study is based on equipment vendor quotations, and indicates there will be difficulty competing with current prices of natural gas.

  14. Cryoprotective dehydration is widespread in Arctic springtails.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Holmstrup, Martin

    2011-08-01

    Cryoprotective dehydration (CPD) is a cold tolerance strategy employed by small invertebrates that readily lose water by evaporation when subjected to sub-zero temperatures in the presence of ice. Until now, relatively few species have been investigated using methods by which CPD can be shown. In the present study we investigated the cold tolerance strategy of seven soil arthropod species from the high Arctic Spitzbergen, and compared water content and water loss, body fluid melting points (MP) and survival under cold and desiccating conditions. We tested the hypothesis that CPD is a commonly occurring cold hardiness strategy among soil arthropods. We found that four springtail species (Hypogastrura viatica, Folsomia quadrioculata, Oligaphorura groenlandica and Megaphorura arctica; Collembola) went through severe dehydration and MP equilibration with ambient temperature, and thus overwinter by employing CPD, whereas a beetle (Atheta graminicola) and one of the springtails (Isotoma anglicana) were typical freeze avoiding species over-wintering by supercooling. Desiccation tolerance of the red velvet mite (Neomolgus littoralis) was also investigated; very low water loss rates of this species indicated that it does not survive winter by use of CPD. All in all, the results of the present study confirm the hypothesis that CPD is an effective over-wintering strategy which is widespread within soil arthropods.

  15. Dehydration-mediated cluster formation of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Joon Lee, Sang

    2015-06-01

    Drying procedure is a powerful method to modulate the bottom-up assembly of basic building component. The initially weak attraction between the components screened in a solution strengthens as the solvent evaporates, organizing the components into structures. Drying is process-dependent, irreversible, and nonequilibrated, thus the mechanism and the dynamics are influenced by many factors. Therefore, the interaction of the solvent and the elements during the drying procedure as well as the resulting pattern formations are strongly related. Nonetheless still many things are open in questions in terms of their dynamics. In this study, nanoscale dehydration procedure is experimentally investigated using a nanoparticle (NP) model system. The role of water is verified in a single NP scale and the patterns of collective NP clusters are determined. Stepwise drying procedures are proposed based on the location from which water is removed. Effective water exodus from a unit NP surface enhances the attractive interaction in nanoscale and induces heterogeneous distribution in microscale. This study provides fundamental proof of systematic relation between the dehydration process and the resultant cluster patterns in hierarchical multiscales.

  16. Electrolyte vapor condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sederquist, R.A.; Szydlowski, D.F.; Sawyer, R.D.

    1983-02-08

    A system is disclosed for removing electrolyte from a fuel cell gas stream. The gas stream containing electrolyte vapor is supercooled utilizing conventional heat exchangers and the thus supercooled gas stream is passed over high surface area passive condensers. The condensed electrolyte is then drained from the condenser and the remainder of the gas stream passed on. The system is particularly useful for electrolytes such as phosphoric acid and molten carbonate, but can be used for other electrolyte cells and simple vapor separation as well. 3 figs.

  17. The effects of dehydration, moderate alcohol consumption, and rehydration on cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Christopher; Leveritt, Michael; Shum, David; Desbrow, Ben

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated the impact of mild-moderate dehydration on alcohol-induced deteriorations in cognitive functions. Sixteen healthy males participated in a single-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over design study involving 4 experimental trials (separated by ≥7 d). In each trial, participants were dehydrated by 2.5% body mass through exercise. After 1 h recovery in a thermo-neutral environment (22 ± 2 °C, 60-70% relative humidity) 4 tasks from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) were administered to the participants (test 1). In two of the trials, participants were provided with water equivalent to either 50% or 150% body mass loss and given salt (NaCl) capsules (50 mmol/L). A set volume of alcohol or placebo was then consumed in each trial, incorporating the conditions: dehydration-placebo (DP), dehydration-alcohol (DA), partial rehydration-alcohol (PA), and full rehydration-alcohol (FA). The same 4 CANTAB tasks were then re-administered (test 2). Subjective ratings of mood and estimates of alcohol intoxication and driving impairment were also recorded in each trial. Alcohol consumption caused deterioration on 3 of the 4 CANTAB measures (viz., choice reaction time, executive function and response inhibition). This reduction in performance was exacerbated when participants were dehydrated compared to trials where full rehydration occurred. Subjective ratings of impairment and intoxication were not significantly different between any of the trials where alcohol was consumed; however ratings for alcohol trials were significantly higher than in the placebo trial. These findings suggest that rehydration after exercise that causes fluid loss can attenuate alcohol-related deterioration of cognitive functions. This may pose implications for post match fluid replacement if a moderate amount of alcohol is also consumed.

  18. New experimental data on the antigorite dehydration in silica enriched serpentinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Hermann, Jörg; Garrido, Carlos J.; López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Gómez-Pugnaire, María. Teresa

    2010-05-01

    There is a growing body of evidences for complex interaction between highly reactive fluids and ultramafic lithologies. Silica metasomatism, for example, can occur at the basement of slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges and during prograde metamorphism of chaotically intermixing in mélange zones of ultramafic rocks, metasediments and metabasites in subduction settings. The resulting assemblage diagnostic of metaperidotites that experienced silica metasomatism are talc-schist and talc-bearing serpentinite. These lithologies may hence be common in subduction settings and will undergo different dehydration reactions. Antigorite and talc will react at lower temperature than the terminal antigorite dehydration. Although this reaction is not expected to be as important in the transfer of water to mantle depth as the breakdown of antigorite, it represents nevertheless a dehydration event in subduction zones that has not been considered so far. We anticipate that this reaction might be particularly important for the fore-arc mantle wedge. Piston cylinder experiments were performed to constrain the pressure and temperature conditions for two high-pressure antigorite dehydration reactions found in silica-enriched serpentinites from Cerro del Almirez (Nevado-Filábride Complex, Betic Cordillera, southern Spain) [1]. At 630-660°C and pressures greater than 1.6 GPa, antigorite first reacts with talc to form orthopyroxene ± chlorite + fluid. We show that orthopyroxene + antigorite is restricted to high-pressure metamorphism of silica-enriched serpentinite. This uncommon assemblage is helpful in constraining metamorphic conditions in cold subduction environments, where antigorite serpentinites have no diagnostic assemblages over a large range in PT space [2,3]. The second dehydration reaction leads to the breakdown of antigorite to olivine + orthopyroxene + chlorite + fluid. The maximum stability of antigorite is found at 680°C at 1.9 GPa, which also corresponds to the maximum

  19. Dehydration softening of serpentine and its roles in the intermediate-depth earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, I.; Watanabe, Y.; Michibayashi, K.

    2010-12-01

    A popular hypothesis for the occurrence of double seismic zones in subducting slabs, located at the depth of about 50-200 km, is dehydration embrittlement of serpentinized mantle. Brittle failure of serpentinite has been attributed to excess pore fluid pressure caused by dehydration reaction (Raleigh and Paterson, 1965, JGR; Murrell and Ismail, 1976, Tectonophysics). However, in previous deformation experiments of serpentinites and other hydrous minerals using gas-medium apparatus, confining pressure was limited to 500 MPa, which corresponds to the depth of the middle crust (~15 km). It is questionable if the same mechanism could be effective in subducting slabs at higher pressures. We conducted constant strain-rate experiments of a serpentinite sample, which consists of almost pure antigorite, using solid-medium deformation apparatus. Cylindrical specimens of serpentinite with the diameter of 10 mm and the length of 15 mm were cut from the serpentinite sample and jacketed in Ag tubes. Deformation experiments were conducted at 500 oC and 700 oC under the confining pressure of 800 MPa. The temperature of the dehydration reaction is about 650 oC at this pressure. The strain rate ranges from 3.3x10-5 to 2x10-4 sec-1. At 500 oC, antigorite was very hard and not yielded even after differential stress exceeded 900 MPa. The samples deformed at 700 oC without pre-heating exhibited brittle failures and strain hardening. Dehydration reaction had not occurred in these samples. On the contrary, samples deformed at 700 oC after static heating exhibited steady creep behaviors. The yield strength of preheated samples were 200-280 MPa. The differential stress was slightly increased when the sample strain exceeds 5%. Velocity step tests indicated that the yield stress is insensitive to the strain rate. In the pre-heated samples, intergranular pores were developed. No cracks nor microfaults were observed after deformation experiments. The color of antigorite changed from dark green

  20. Catalytic Performance of a New 1D Cu(II) Coordination Polymer {Cu(NO₃)(H₂O)}(HTae)(4,4'-Bpy) for Knoevenagel Condensation.

    PubMed

    Larrea, Edurne S; Fernández de Luis, Roberto; Arriortua, María I

    2016-12-01

    The {Cu(NO₃)(H₂O)}(HTae)(4,4'-Bpy) (H₂Tae = 1,1,2,2-tetraacetylethane, 4,4'-Bpy = 4,4'-Dipyridyl) 1D coordination polymer has been obtained by slow evaporation. The crystal structure consists of parallel and oblique {Cu(HTae)(4,4'-Bpy)} zig-zag metal-organic chains stacked along the [100] crystallographic direction. Copper(II) ions are in octahedral coordination environment linked to two nitrogen atoms of two bridging 4,4'-Bpy and to two oxygen atoms of one HTae molecule in the equatorial plane. The occupation of the axial positions varies from one copper atom to another, with different combinations of water molecules and nitrate anions, giving rise to a commensurate super-structure. By means of the thermal removal of water molecules, copper coordinatively unsaturated centres are obtained. These open metal sites could act as Lewis acid active sites in several heterogeneous catalytic reactions. The dehydrated compound, CuHTaeBpy_HT, has been tested as a heterogeneous recoverable catalyst for Knoevenagel condensation reactions. The catalyst is active and heterogeneous for the condensation of aldehydes with malononitrile at 60 °C using a molar ratio catalyst:substrate of 3 % and toluene as solvent. The catalyst suffers a partial loss of activity when reusing it, but can be reused at least four times.

  1. Observations on saliva osmolality during progressive dehydration and partial rehydration.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nigel A S; van den Heuvel, Anne M J; Kerry, Pete; McGhee, Sheena; Peoples, Gregory E; Brown, Marc A; Patterson, Mark J

    2012-09-01

    A need exists to identify dehydrated individuals under stressful settings beyond the laboratory. A predictive index based on changes in saliva osmolality has been proposed, and its efficacy and sensitivity was appraised across mass (water) losses from 1 to 7%. Twelve euhydrated males [serum osmolality: 286.1 mOsm kg(-1) H(2)O (SD 4.3)] completed three exercise- and heat-induced dehydration trials (35.6°C, 56% relative humidity): 7% dehydration (6.15 h), 3% dehydration (with 60% fluid replacement: 2.37 h), repeat 7% dehydration (5.27 h). Expectorated saliva osmolality, measured at baseline and at each 1% mass change, was used to predict instantaneous hydration state relative to mass losses of 3 and 6%. Saliva osmolality increased linearly with dehydration, although its basal osmolality and its rate of change varied among and within subjects across trials. Receiver operating characteristic curves indicated a good predictive power for saliva osmolality when used with two, single-threshold cutoffs to differentiate between hydrated and dehydrated individuals (area under curve: 3% cutoff = 0.868, 6% cutoff = 0.831). However, when analysed using a double-threshold detection technique (3 and 6%), as might be used in a field-based monitor, <50% of the osmolality data could correctly identify individuals who exceeded 3% dehydration. Indeed, within the 3-6% dehydration range, its sensitivity was 64%, while beyond 6% dehydration, this fell to 42%. Therefore, while expectorated saliva osmolality tracked mass losses within individuals, its large intra- and inter-individual variability limited its predictive power and sensitivity, rendering its utility questionable within a universal dehydration monitor.

  2. Key condenser failure mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, B.

    2009-04-15

    Eight practical lessons highlight many of the factors that can influence condenser tube corrosion at coal-fired utilities and the effects contaminant in-leakage can have on steam generating units. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  3. Measure Guideline: Evaporative Condensers

    SciTech Connect

    German, A.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on evaporative condensers is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for energy and demand savings in homes with cooling loads. This is a prescriptive approach that outlines selection criteria, design and installation procedures, and operation and maintenance best practices. This document has been prepared to provide a process for properly designing, installing, and maintaining evaporative condenser systems as well as understanding the benefits, costs, and tradeoffs.

  4. Molecular equilibrium with condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, C. M.; Huebner, W. F.

    1990-02-01

    Minimization of the Gibbs energy of formation for species of chemical elements and compounds in their gas and condensed phases determines their relative abundances in a mixture in chemical equilibrium. The procedure is more general and more powerful than previous abundance determinations in multiphase astrophysical mixtures. Some results for astrophysical equations of state are presented, and the effects of condensation on opacity are briefly indicated.

  5. Condensate dark matter stars

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.Y.; Harko, T.; Cheng, K.S. E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.hk

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the structure and stability properties of compact astrophysical objects that may be formed from the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. Once the critical temperature of a boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein Condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the universe. Therefore we model the dark matter inside the star as a Bose-Einstein condensate. In the condensate dark matter star model, the dark matter equation of state can be described by a polytropic equation of state, with polytropic index equal to one. We derive the basic general relativistic equations describing the equilibrium structure of the condensate dark matter star with spherically symmetric static geometry. The structure equations of the condensate dark matter stars are studied numerically. The critical mass and radius of the dark matter star are given by M{sub crit} ≈ 2(l{sub a}/1fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2}M{sub s}un and R{sub crit} ≈ 1.1 × 10{sup 6}(l{sub a}/1 fm){sup 1/2}(m{sub χ}/1 GeV){sup −3/2} cm respectively, where l{sub a} and m{sub χ} are the scattering length and the mass of dark matter particle, respectively.

  6. Dehydration and Dehydrogenation of Ethylene Glycol on Rutile TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhenjun; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2013-08-07

    The interactions of ethylene glycol (EG) with partially reduced rutile TiO2(110) surface have been studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The saturation coverage on the surface Ti rows is determined to be 0.43 monolayer (ML), slightly less than one EG per two Ti sites. Most of the adsorbed ethanol (~80%) undergoes further reactions to other products. Two major channels are observed, dehydration yielding ethylene and water and dehydrogenation yielding acetaldehyde and hydrogen. Hydrogen formation is rather surprising as it has not been observed previously on TiO2(110) from simple organic molecules. The coverage dependent yields of ethylene and acetaldehyde correlate well with that of water and hydrogen, respectively. Dehydration dominates at lower EG coverages (< 0.2 ML) and plateaus as the coverage is increased to saturation. Dehydrogenation is observed primarily at higher EG coverages (>0.2 ML). Our results suggest that the observed dehydration and dehydrogenation reactions proceed via different surface intermediates.

  7. What's the Big Sweat about Dehydration? (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video: Getting an X-ray What's the Big Sweat About Dehydration? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's the Big Sweat About Dehydration? Print A A A What's in ... When it's hot outside and you've been sweating, you get thirsty. Why? Thirst can be a ...

  8. Dehydration and drinking responses in a pelagic sea snake.

    PubMed

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Brischoux, François; Sheehy, Coleman M; Pfaller, Joseph B

    2012-08-01

    Recent investigations of water balance in sea snakes demonstrated that amphibious sea kraits (Laticauda spp.) dehydrate in seawater and require fresh water to restore deficits in body water. Here, we report similar findings for Pelamis platurus, a viviparous, pelagic, entirely marine species of hydrophiine ("true") sea snake. We sampled snakes at Golfo de Papagayo, Guanacaste, Costa Rica and demonstrated they do not drink seawater but fresh water at variable deficits of body water incurred by dehydration. The threshold dehydration at which snakes first drink fresh water is -18.3 ± 1.1 % (mean ± SE) loss of body mass, which is roughly twice the magnitude of mass deficit at which sea kraits drink fresh water. Compared to sea kraits, Pelamis drink relatively larger volumes of water and make up a larger percentage of the dehydration deficit. Some dehydrated Pelamis also were shown to drink brackish water up to 50% seawater, but most drank at lower brackish values and 20% of the snakes tested did not drink at all. Like sea kraits, Pelamis dehydrate when kept in seawater in the laboratory. Moreover, some individuals drank fresh water immediately following capture, providing preliminary evidence that Pelamis dehydrate at sea. Thus, this widely distributed pelagic species remains subject to dehydration in marine environments where it retains a capacity to sense and to drink fresh water. In comparison with sea kraits, however, Pelamis represents a more advanced stage in the evolutionary transition to a fully marine life and appears to be less dependent on fresh water.

  9. Smackerels of Somethings: Dehydrating Food and How to Use It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditzler, Carmen

    1994-01-01

    Provides ideas about how to add variety, flavor, texture, and nutrition to outdoor meals by dehydrating food and using it on camping trips. The goal is to prepare nutritious and appealing meals without spending a lot of money on commercially dehydrated or freeze-dried foods. Includes instructions for rehydrating foods. (LP)

  10. Mechanism of Brønsted acid-catalyzed glucose dehydration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Tsilomelekis, George; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2015-04-24

    We present the first DFT-based microkinetic model for the Brønsted acid-catalyzed conversion of glucose to 5-hydroxylmethylfurfural (HMF), levulinic acid (LA), and formic acid (FA) and perform kinetic and isotopic tracing NMR spectroscopy mainly at low conversions. We reveal that glucose dehydrates through a cyclic path. Our modeling results are in excellent agreement with kinetic data and indicate that the rate-limiting step is the first dehydration of protonated glucose and that the majority of glucose is consumed through the HMF intermediate. We introduce a combination of 1) automatic mechanism generation with isotopic tracing experiments and 2) elementary reaction flux analysis of important paths with NMR spectroscopy and kinetic experiments to assess mechanisms. We find that the excess formic acid, which appears at high temperatures and glucose conversions, originates from retro-aldol chemistry that involves the C6 carbon atom of glucose.

  11. Dehydration polycondensation of dicarboxylic acids and diols using sublimating strong brønsted acids.

    PubMed

    Moyori, Takaya; Tang, Tang; Takasu, Akinori

    2012-05-14

    We investigated catalytic activities of strong brønsted acids for dehydration polycondensations of dicarboxylic acids and diols, which were carried out at low temperature (<100 °C) under reduced pressure (0.3-3 mmHg). Strong Brønsted acids, bis(perfluoroalkanesulfonyl)imide and perfluoroalkanesulfonic acid, showed higher activity than p-toluenesulfonic acid or rare-earth catalysts at 60 °C. In particular, bis(nonafluorobutanesulfonyl)imide (Nf(2)NH) showed the highest activity to synthesize not only aliphatic polyester (M(n) > 19000) but also aromatic polyester (M(n) > 7000). The used Nf(2)NH was sublimated from the reaction flask during polycondensation, and the sublimate, Nf(2)NH, was extra pure so that we can reuse the catalyst without loss of the activity in the dehydration polycondensations.

  12. Inorganic compounds for passive solar energy storage: Solid-state dehydration materials and high specific heat materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struble, L. J.; Brown, P. W.

    1986-04-01

    Two classes of hydrated inorganic salts have been studied to assess their potential as materials for passive solar energy storage. The materials are part of the quaternary system CaO-Al2O3-SO3-H2O and related chemical systems, and the two classes are typified by ettringite, a trisubstituted salt, and Friedel's salt, a monosubstituted salt. The trisubstituted salts were studied for their possible application in latent heat storage, utilizing a low-temperature dehydration reaction, and both classes were studies for their application in sensible heat storage. In order to assess their potential for energy storage, the salts have been synthesized, characterized by several analytical techniques, and thermal properties measured. The dehydration data of that the trisubstituted salts vary somewhat with chemical composition, with the temperature of the onset of dehydration ranging from 6(0)C to 33(0)C, and enthalpy changes on dehydration ranging from 60 to 200 cal/g. Heat capacity is less variable with composition; values for the trisubstituted phases are 30 cal/g/(0)C and for the monosubstituted phases between 0.23 and 0.28 cal/g/(0)C. Preliminary experiments indicate that the dehydration is reversible, and suggest that the materials might have additional potential as solar desiccant materials. These thermal data demonstrate the trisubstituted salts have potential as latent heat storage materials, and that both classes of salts have potential as sensible heat storage materials.

  13. Response of Chinese wampee axes and maize embryos to dehydration at different rates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Song, Song-Quan; Wu, Xian-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Survival of wampee (Clausena lansiumSkeels) axes and maize (Zea mays L.) embryos decreased with rapid and slow dehydration. Damage of wampee axes by rapid dehydration was much less than by slow dehydration, and that was contrary to maize embryos. The malondialdehyde contents of wampee axes and maize embryos rapidly increased with dehydration, those of wampee axes were lower during rapid dehydration than during slow dehydration, and those of maize embryos were higher during rapid dehydration than during slow dehydration. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and catalase (CAT) of wampee axes markedly increased during the early phase of dehydration, and then rapidly decreased, and those of rapidly dehydrated axes were higher than those of slow dehydrated axes when they were dehydrated to low water contents. Activities of SOD and APX of maize embryos notable decreased with dehydration. There were higher SOD activities and lower APX activities of slowly dehydrated maize embryos compared with rapidly dehydrated maize embryos. CAT activities of maize embryos markedly increased during the early phase of dehydration, and then decreased, and those of slowly dehydrated embryos were higher than those of rapidly dehydrated embryos during the late phase of dehydration.

  14. Two-stage dehydration of sugars

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Johnathan E.; Hu, Jianli; Wang, Yong; Werpy, Todd A.

    2009-11-10

    The invention includes methods for producing dianhydrosugar alcohol by providing an acid catalyst within a reactor and passing a starting material through the reactor at a first temperature. At least a portion of the staring material is converted to a monoanhydrosugar isomer during the passing through the column. The monoanhydrosugar is subjected to a second temperature which is greater than the first to produce a dianhydrosugar. The invention includes a method of producing isosorbide. An initial feed stream containing sorbitol is fed into a continuous reactor containing an acid catalyst at a temperature of less than 120.degree. C. The residence time for the reactor is less than or equal to about 30 minutes. Sorbitol converted to 1,4-sorbitan in the continuous reactor is subsequently provided to a second reactor and is dehydrated at a temperature of at least 120.degree. C. to produce isosorbide.

  15. Improving diffraction resolution using a new dehydration method.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qingqiu; Szebenyi, Doletha M E

    2016-02-01

    The production of high-quality crystals is one of the major obstacles in determining the three-dimensional structure of macromolecules by X-ray crystallography. It is fairly common that a visually well formed crystal diffracts poorly to a resolution that is too low to be suitable for structure determination. Dehydration has proven to be an effective post-crystallization treatment for improving crystal diffraction quality. Several dehydration methods have been developed, but no single one of them is suitable for all crystals. Here, a new convenient and effective dehydration method is reported that makes use of a dehydrating solution that will not dry out in air for several hours. Using this dehydration method, the resolution of Archaeoglobus fulgidus Cas5a crystals has been increased from 3.2 to 1.95 Å and the resolution of Escherichia coli LptA crystals has been increased from <5 to 3.4 Å.

  16. DMSO induces dehydration near lipid membrane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Song, Jinsuk; Pas, Jolien; Meijer, Lenny H H; Han, Songi

    2015-07-21

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been broadly used in biology as a cosolvent, a cryoprotectant, and an enhancer of membrane permeability, leading to the general assumption that DMSO-induced structural changes in cell membranes and their hydration water play important functional roles. Although the effects of DMSO on the membrane structure and the headgroup dehydration have been extensively studied, the mechanism by which DMSO invokes its effect on lipid membranes and the direct role of water in this process are unresolved. By directly probing the translational water diffusivity near unconfined lipid vesicle surfaces, the lipid headgroup mobility, and the repeat distances in multilamellar vesicles, we found that DMSO exclusively weakens the surface water network near the lipid membrane at a bulk DMSO mole fraction (XDMSO) of <0.1, regardless of the lipid composition and the lipid phase. Specifically, DMSO was found to effectively destabilize the hydration water structure at the lipid membrane surface at XDMSO <0.1, lower the energetic barrier to dehydrate this surface water, whose displacement otherwise requires a higher activation energy, consequently yielding compressed interbilayer distances in multilamellar vesicles at equilibrium with unaltered bilayer thicknesses. At XDMSO >0.1, DMSO enters the lipid interface and restricts the lipid headgroup motion. We postulate that DMSO acts as an efficient cryoprotectant even at low concentrations by exclusively disrupting the water network near the lipid membrane surface, weakening the cohesion between water and adhesion of water to the lipid headgroups, and so mitigating the stress induced by the volume change of water during freeze-thaw.

  17. Dehydration of xylose to furfural over MCM-41-supported niobium-oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    García-Sancho, Cristina; Sádaba, Irantzu; Moreno-Tost, Ramón; Mérida-Robles, Josefa; Santamaría-González, José; López-Granados, Manuel; Maireles-Torres, Pedro

    2013-04-01

    A series of silica-based MCM-41-supported niobium-oxide catalysts are prepared, characterized by using XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and pyridine adsorption coupled to FTIR spectroscopy, and tested for the dehydration of D-xylose to furfural. Under the operating conditions used all materials are active in the dehydration of xylose to furfural (excluding the MCM-41 silica support). The xylose conversion increases with increasing Nb2 O5 content. At a loading of 16 wt % Nb2 O5 , 74.5 % conversion and a furfural yield of 36.5 % is achieved at 170 °C, after 180 min reaction time. Moreover, xylose conversion and furfural yield increase with the reaction time and temperature, attaining 82.8 and 46.2 %, respectively, at 190 °C and after 100 min reaction time. Notably, the presence of NaCl in the reaction medium further increases the furfural yield (59.9 % at 170 °C after 180 min reaction time). Moreover, catalyst reutilization is demonstrated by performing at least three runs with no loss of catalytic activity and without the requirement for an intermediate regeneration step. No significant niobium leaching is observed, and a relationship between the structure of the catalyst and the activity is proposed.

  18. Catalytic Upgrading of Biomass-Derived Compounds via C-C Coupling Reactions. Computational and Experimental Studies of Acetaldehyde and Furan Reactions in HZSM-5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cong; Evans, Tabitha J.; Cheng, Lei; Nimlos, Mark R.; Mukarakate, Calvin; Robichaud, David J.; Assary, Rajeev S.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2015-10-02

    These catalytic C–C coupling and deoxygenation reactions are essential for upgrading of biomass-derived oxygenates to fuel-range hydrocarbons. Detailed understanding of mechanistic and energetic aspects of these reactions is crucial to enabling and improving the catalytic upgrading of small oxygenates to useful chemicals and fuels. Using periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have investigated the reactions of furan and acetaldehyde in an HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, a representative system associated with the catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis vapors. Comprehensive energy profiles were computed for self-reactions (i.e., acetaldehyde coupling and furan coupling) and cross-reactions (i.e., acetaldehyde + furan) of this representative mixture. Major products proposed from the computations are further confirmed using temperature controlled mass spectra measurements. Moreover, the computational results show that furan interacts with acetaldehyde in HZSM-5 via an alkylation mechanism, which is more favorable than the self-reactions, indicating that mixing furans with aldehydes could be a promising approach to maximize effective C–C coupling and dehydration while reducing the catalyst deactivation (e.g., coke formation) from aldehyde condensation.

  19. Semi-brittle flow during dehydration of lizardite chrysotile serpentinite deformed in torsion: Implications for the rheology of oceanic lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Takehiro; Bystricky, Misha; Kunze, Karsten; Stünitz, Holger

    2006-09-01

    Serpentinite is a significant component of the oceanic lithosphere and plays an important role in subduction dynamics. However, the rheology of serpentine-bearing rocks is poorly understood, especially at large strains and during the dehydration of serpentine. We have investigated the mechanical behavior and microstructural evolution of serpentinite during dehydration reaction to olivine, talc and water at temperatures of 550 and 600 °C, pressures of 300 and 400 MPa and shear strain rates of 1 × 10 - 5 to 1 × 10 - 4 s - 1 under drained conditions. The non-coaxial deformation experiments were performed in a gas-medium apparatus equipped with a torsion system to shear strains of up to 3.3. Strong crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) of partially dehydrated serpentine, shear localization through the development of S-C structures and widespread microfracturing in deformed specimens indicate that deformation took place in the semi-brittle field. Microstructural observations reveal that the CPO results from slip and rotation of (001) planes in partially dehydrated lizardite, possibly assisted by fluid released by the reaction. Despite the development of a strong CPO and shear localization, strain hardening accompanied by repeated transitory stress drops of a few MPa was observed and may be explained by the following combined effects: (1) progressive decrease of excess local pore pressures due to specimen dilatancy and the formation of pore networks during the reaction, leading to an increase in effective pressure, (2) subsequent collapse of this pore space by shear-enhanced compaction, resulting in work hardening, and (3) formation of a mechanically stronger assemblage of reaction products. The experiments imply that the bulk strength of a serpentinized subducting slab increases during dehydration as fluid escapes from the slab, while local embrittlement and shear localization take place.

  20. Processes forming Gas, Tar, and Coke in Cellulose Gasification from Gas-Phase Reactions of Levoglucosan as Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fukutome, Asuka; Kawamoto, Haruo; Saka, Shiro

    2015-07-08

    The gas-phase pyrolysis of levoglucosan (LG), the major intermediate species during cellulose gasification, was studied experimentally over the temperature range of 400-900 °C. Gaseous LG did not produce any dehydration products, which include coke, furans, and aromatic substances, although these are characteristic products of the pyrolysis of molten LG. Alternatively, at >500 °C, gaseous LG produced only fragmentation products, such as noncondensable gases and condensable C1 -C3 fragments, as intermediates during noncondensable gas formation. Therefore, it was determined that secondary reactions of gaseous LG can result in the clean (tar- and coke-free) gasification of cellulose. Cooling of the remaining LG in the gas phase caused coke formation by the transition of the LG to the molten state. The molecular mechanisms that govern the gas- and molten-phase reactions of LG are discussed in terms of the acid catalyst effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding to promote the molten-phase dehydration reactions.

  1. Immobilisation increases yeast cells' resistance to dehydration-rehydration treatment.

    PubMed

    Borovikova, Diana; Rozenfelde, Linda; Pavlovska, Ilona; Rapoport, Alexander

    2014-08-20

    This study was performed with the goal of revealing if the dehydration procedure used in our new immobilisation method noticeably decreases the viability of yeast cells in immobilised preparations. Various yeasts were used in this research: Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells that were rather sensitive to dehydration and had been aerobically grown in an ethanol-containing medium, a recombinant strain of S. cerevisiae grown in aerobic conditions which were completely non-resistant to dehydration and an anaerobically grown bakers' yeast strain S. cerevisiae, as well as a fairly resistant Pichia pastoris strain. Experiments performed showed that immobilisation of all these strains essentially increased their resistance to a dehydration-rehydration treatment. The increase of cells' viability (compared with control cells dehydrated in similar conditions) was from 30 to 60%. It is concluded that a new immobilisation method, which includes a dehydration stage, does not lead to an essential loss of yeast cell viability. Correspondingly, there is no risk of losing the biotechnological activities of immobilised preparations. The possibility of producing dry, active yeast preparations is shown, for those strains that are very sensitive to dehydration and which can be used in biotechnology in an immobilised form. Finally, the immobilisation approach can be used for the development of efficient methods for the storage of recombinant yeast strains.

  2. Keeping condensers clean

    SciTech Connect

    Wicker, K.

    2006-04-15

    The humble condenser is among the biggest contributors to a steam power plant's efficiency. But although a clean condenser can provide great economic benefit, a dirty one can raise plant heat rate, resulting in large losses of generation revenue and/or unnecessarily high fuel bills. Conventional methods for cleaning fouled tubes range form chemicals to scrapers to brushes and hydro-blasters. This article compares the available options and describes how one power station, Omaha Public Power District's 600 MW North Omaha coal-fired power station, cleaned up its act. The makeup and cooling water of all its five units comes from the Missouri River. 6 figs.

  3. Pathways for Ethanol Dehydrogenation and Dehydration Catalyzed by Ceria (111) and (100) Surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Beste, Ariana; Steven Overbury

    2015-01-08

    We have performed computations to better understand how surface structure affects selectivity in dehydrogenation and dehydration reactions of alcohols. Ethanol reactions on the (111) and (100) ceria surfaces were studied starting from the dominant surface species, ethoxy. We used DFT (PBE+U) to explore reaction pathways leading to ethylene and acetaldehyde and calculated estimates of rate constants employing transition state theory. To assess pathway contributions, we carried out kinetic analysis. Our results show that intermediate and transition state structures are stabilized on the (100) surface compared to the (111) surface. Formation of acetaldehyde over ethylene is kinetically and thermodynamically preferred onmore » both surfaces. Our results are consistent with temperature programmed surface reaction and steady-state experiments, where acetaldehyde was found as the main product and evidence was presented that ethylene formation at higher temperature originates from changes in adsorbate and surface structure.« less

  4. Regeneration of silica-supported silicotungstic acid as a catalyst for the dehydration of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Katryniok, Benjamin; Paul, Sébastien; Capron, Mickaël; Bellière-Baca, Virginie; Rey, Patrick; Dumeignil, Franck

    2012-07-01

    The dehydration reaction of glycerol to acrolein is catalyzed by acid catalysts. These catalysts tend to suffer from the formation of carbonaceous species on their surface (coking), which leads to substantial degradation of their performances (deactivation). To regenerate the as-deactivated catalysts, various techniques have been proposed so far, such as the co-feeding of oxygen, continuous regeneration by using a moving catalytic bed, or alternating between reaction and regeneration. Herein, we study the regeneration of supported heteropolyacid catalysts. We show that the support has a strong impact on the thermal stability of the active phase. In particular, zirconia has been found to stabilize silicotungstic acid, thus enabling the nondestructive regeneration of the catalyst. Furthermore, the addition of steam to the regeneration feed has a positive impact by hindering the degradation reaction by equilibrium displacement. The catalysts are further used in a periodic reaction/regeneration process, whereby the possibility of maintaining long-term catalytic performances is evidenced.

  5. Pathways for Ethanol Dehydrogenation and Dehydration Catalyzed by Ceria (111) and (100) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Steven Overbury

    2015-01-08

    We have performed computations to better understand how surface structure affects selectivity in dehydrogenation and dehydration reactions of alcohols. Ethanol reactions on the (111) and (100) ceria surfaces were studied starting from the dominant surface species, ethoxy. We used DFT (PBE+U) to explore reaction pathways leading to ethylene and acetaldehyde and calculated estimates of rate constants employing transition state theory. To assess pathway contributions, we carried out kinetic analysis. Our results show that intermediate and transition state structures are stabilized on the (100) surface compared to the (111) surface. Formation of acetaldehyde over ethylene is kinetically and thermodynamically preferred on both surfaces. Our results are consistent with temperature programmed surface reaction and steady-state experiments, where acetaldehyde was found as the main product and evidence was presented that ethylene formation at higher temperature originates from changes in adsorbate and surface structure.

  6. The mechanism of the dehydration of alcohols and the hydration of alkenes in acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinnik, M. I.; Obraztsov, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    Kinetic data for the hydration of unsaturated compounds, the dehydration of alcohols, and the isotope exchange of the oxygen atom in alcohols and aqueous solutions of strong acids are analysed to establish the detailed mechanisms of these reactions. The catalytic action of the acid is caused not only by its ability to protonate the reactant but also by the possibility of the formation of reactive complexes of the reactant with the acid hydrates or the molecules of the undissociated acids. Equations are presented whereby the influence of the ionising capacity of the medium on the effective rate constants for the reactions indicated can be taken into account quantitatively. The question of the involvement of carbonium ions as reactive intermediates in reactions involving the dehydration of alcohols, the hydration of unsaturated compounds, and the isotope exchange of the oxygen atom in alcohols is examined. Complexes of the reactant with a solvated proton, the acid molecules, and the acid hydrates are the intermediates in these reactions. The relative contributions of the complexes to the effective rate constant depend on the acid concentration in the aqueous solution. The bibliography includes 65 references

  7. Dehydration indicators for broiler chickens at slaughter.

    PubMed

    Vanderhasselt, R F; Buijs, S; Sprenger, M; Goethals, K; Willemsen, H; Duchateau, L; Tuyttens, F A M

    2013-03-01

    Freedom of (prolonged) thirst is considered to be of paramount importance for animal welfare. This emotion normally results from dehydration, which can be measured using physiological indicators. Because no reliable physiological indicator for thirst was available for broilers, we aimed to identify such a measure in this study. This indicator would ideally be integrated into quality control systems in commercial slaughter plants. In the first experiment, water deprivation was manipulated systematically by withdrawing water for different durations (total water withdrawal for 0 (control), 24, 36, or 48 h, or a 10-d period with restricted access to water for 2 times 10 min per day). A significant decrease in drained blood content and BW occurred from 36 h of total water deprivation onward (both P = 0.03), whereas long-term restricted access tended to decrease drained blood content (P = 0.05). No effect of water deprivation or restriction on skin turgor was found. In the second experiment, water was withdrawn for 0 (control), 6, 12, 24, or 48 h. Plasma chloride concentration was increased after 6 h of water withdrawal, but did not rise further with longer withdrawal. If assessed at slaughter, chloride will thus mainly reflect the catching-to-slaughter interval. In contrast, plasma creatinine and hematocrit levels showed a numerical decrease after 6 h of water withdrawal, but rose again after prolonged withdrawal. Plasma creatinine values were significantly higher in 24-h-deprived birds than in 6-h-deprived birds (P < 0.01), allowing for discernment between water withdrawal during catching and transport from dehydration that had occurred on the farm. Blood sodium concentrations and plasma osmolality showed a steady increment between 0 and 24 h of water deprivation (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001 for both), and may thus be used to assess the combined effects of water deprivation on farm and during the catching-to-slaughter interval. These findings may form the basis of an on

  8. Change in hydrogen bonding structures of a hydrogel with dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naohara, Ryo; Narita, Kentaro; Ikeda-Fukazawa, Tomoko

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of structural changes in polymer network and water during dehydration, X-ray diffraction of poly-N,N-dimethylacrylamide (PDMAA) hydrogels was measured. The variation process in the individual structures of water and PDMAA were analyzed by decomposition of the diffraction patterns to separate the respective contributions. The results show that the short-range structures of PDMAA expand during dehydration, whereas the network structure as a whole shrinks. The average length of the hydrogen bonds between water molecules increases with the process. The present results provide a direct evidence of the structural changes of water and polymer in the hydrogel during dehydration.

  9. Transient dehydration of lungs in tail-suspended rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Steskal, J.; Morey-Holton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    The fluid balance in the lungs of rats exposed to head-down tilt is examined. Six Munich-Wister rats were suspended for 7 days and 10 Sprague-Dawley rats for 14 days using the technique of Morey (1979). The water contents of the lungs of the suspended and a control group are calculated and compared. The data reveal that the two-days suspended rats had dehydrated lungs; however, the lungs of the 14-day suspended and control group rats were similar. It is noted that the dehydration in the 2-day suspended rats is caused by general dehydration not the head-tilt position.

  10. Thermal dehydration of magnesium acetate tetrahydrate: formation and in situ crystallization of anhydrous glass.

    PubMed

    Koga, Nobuyoshi; Suzuki, Yasumichi; Tatsuoka, Tomoyuki

    2012-12-13

    The kinetics and mechanism of the thermal dehydration of magnesium acetate tetrahydrate were investigated as a typical example of the glass formation process via the thermal decomposition of solids. Formation of an intermediate fluid phase was identified as the characteristic phenomenon responsible for the formation of anhydrous glass. Thermal dehydration from the surface fluid layer regulates the zero-order-like rate behavior of the mass-loss process with an apparent activation energy E(a) ≈ 70-80 kJ mol(-1). Because of variations in the mechanism of release of the water vapor with changes in the reaction temperature range, the mass-loss behavior is largely dependent on the particle size of the sample and heating conditions. The formation of hollow anhydrous glass is the novel finding of the present study. The mechanism of formation is discussed in terms of complementary interpretations of the morphological changes and kinetic behavior of the thermal dehydration. On further heating, the as-produced anhydrous glass exhibits a glass transition phenomenon at approximately 470 K with an E(a) ≈ 550-560 kJ mol(-1), and subsequently crystallizes via the three-dimensional growth of nuclei controlled by diffusion. The crystallization process is characterized by an E(a) ≈ 280 kJ mol(-1) and an enthalpy change ΔH = -13.3 kJ mol(-1), resulting in the formation of smaller, rounded particles of crystalline anhydrate.

  11. Protection of dehydrated chicken meat by natural antioxidants as evaluated by electron spin resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nissen, L R; Månsson, L; Bertelsen, G; Huynh-Ba, T; Skibsted, L H

    2000-11-01

    Dehydrated chicken meat (a(w) = 0.20-0.35) made from mechanically deboned chicken necks can be protected against oxidative deterioration during storage by rosemary extract (at a sensory acceptable level of 1000 ppm, incorporated prior to drying). The efficiency of the rosemary extract was similar to that obtained by synthetic antioxidants in a reference product (70 ppm butylated hydroxyanisole and 70 ppm octyl gallate). Tea extract and coffee extract were less efficient than rosemary and synthetic antioxidants. Among the natural antioxidants tested, grape skin extract provided the least protection against oxidative changes in dehydrated chicken meat. Radicals in the product, quantified by direct measurement by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry, developed similarly to headspace ethane, pentane, and hexanal, and to oxygen depletion both in unprotected and protected products. The ESR signal intensity and headspace hexanal both correlated with the sensory descriptor "rancidity" as evaluated by a trained sensory panel. Hexanal, as a secondary lipid oxidation product, showed an exponential dependence on the level of radicals in the product in agreement with a chain reaction mechanism for autoxidation, and direct ESR measurement may be used in quality control of dehydrated food products.

  12. Protection of the photosynthetic apparatus against dehydration stress in the resurrection plant Craterostigma pumilum.

    PubMed

    Zia, Ahmad; Walker, Berkley J; Oung, Hui Min Olivia; Charuvi, Dana; Jahns, Peter; Cousins, Asaph B; Farrant, Jill M; Reich, Ziv; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2016-09-01

    The group of homoiochlorophyllous resurrection plants evolved the unique capability to survive severe drought stress without dismantling the photosynthetic machinery. This implies that they developed efficient strategies to protect the leaves from reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by photosynthetic side reactions. These strategies, however, are poorly understood. Here, we performed a detailed study of the photosynthetic machinery in the homoiochlorophyllous resurrection plant Craterostigma pumilum during dehydration and upon recovery from desiccation. During dehydration and rehydration, C. pumilum deactivates and activates partial components of the photosynthetic machinery in a specific order, allowing for coordinated shutdown and subsequent reinstatement of photosynthesis. Early responses to dehydration are the closure of stomata and activation of electron transfer to oxygen accompanied by inactivation of the cytochrome b6 f complex leading to attenuation of the photosynthetic linear electron flux (LEF). The decline in LEF is paralleled by a gradual increase in cyclic electron transport to maintain ATP production. At low water contents, inactivation and supramolecular reorganization of photosystem II becomes apparent, accompanied by functional detachment of light-harvesting complexes and interrupted access to plastoquinone. This well-ordered sequence of alterations in the photosynthetic thylakoid membranes helps prepare the plant for the desiccated state and minimize ROS production.

  13. Support Effects on Bronsted acid site densities and alcohol dehydration turnover rates on tungsten oxide domains

    SciTech Connect

    Macht, Josef; Baertsch, Chelsey D.; May-Lozano, Marcos; Soled, Stuart L.; Wang, Yong; Iglesia, Enrique

    2005-03-01

    Initial activity and acid site density of several WAl, WSi (MCM41) and one WSn sample were determined. Trans/cis 2-butene selectivity is dependent on the support. Presumably, these differences are due to subtle differences in base strengths. 2-Butanol dehydration rates (per W-atom) reached maximum values at intermediate WOx surface densities on WAl, as reported for 2-butanol dehydration reactions on WZr. Titration results indicate that Bronsted acid sites are required for 2-butanol dehydration on WAl, WSi and WSn. UV-visible studies suggest that WAl is much more difficult to reduce than WZr. The detection of reduced centers on WAl, the number of which correlates to Bronsted acid site density and catalyst activity, as well as the temperature dependence of Bronsted acid site density indicate the in-situ formation of these active sites. We infer that this mechanism is common among all supported WOx samples described in this study. Turnover rates are a function of Bronsted acid site density only. High acid site densities lead to high turnover rates. Higher active site densities may cause stronger conjugate bases, as a higher electron density has to be stabilized, and thus weaker acidity, enabling a faster rate of product desorption. The maximum achievable active site density is dependent on the support. WZr reaches a higher active site density than WAl.

  14. Simple simulations of DNA condensation.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, M J

    2001-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a simple, bead-spring model of semiflexible polyelectrolytes such as DNA are performed. All charges are explicitly treated. Starting from extended, noncondensed conformations, condensed structures form in the simulations with tetravalent or trivalent counterions. No condensates form or are stable for divalent counterions. The mechanism by which condensates form is described. Briefly, condensation occurs because electrostatic interactions dominate entropy, and the favored coulombic structure is a charge-ordered state. Condensation is a generic phenomenon and occurs for a variety of polyelectrolyte parameters. Toroids and rods are the condensate structures. Toroids form preferentially when the molecular stiffness is sufficiently strong. PMID:11159388

  15. Simple Simulations of DNA Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-07-12

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a simple, bead-spring model of semiflexible polyelectrolytes such as DNA are performed. All charges are explicitly treated. Starting from extended, noncondensed conformations, condensed structures form in the simulations with tetravalent or trivalent counterions. No condensates form or are stable for divalent counterions. The mechanism by which condensates form is described. Briefly, condensation occurs because electrostatic interactions dominate entropy, and the favored Coulombic structure is a charge ordered state. Condensation is a generic phenomena and occurs for a variety of polyelectrolyte parameters. Toroids and rods are the condensate structures. Toroids form preferentially when the molecular stiffness is sufficiently strong.

  16. Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of Bright Angel stone vault, containing condenser, Hoffman condensation pump, Jennings vacuum heating pump, and misc. pipes and valves. - Grand Canyon Village Utilities, Grand Canyon National Park, Grand Canyon Village, Coconino County, AZ

  17. Effects of prior experience with dehydration and water on the time course of dehydration-induced drinking in weanling rats.

    PubMed

    Myers, K P; Hall, W G

    2001-04-01

    Although cellular dehydration increases oral responding and swallowing of orally infused water in rats as young as 2 days old, it is not until well after the time of weaning that dehydration stimulates immediate water-seeking and initiation of drinking in situations where the water source must be approached voluntarily. Recent work has shown that the goal-directed appetitive sequence for drinking-orienting, approaching, and initiating contact with water-matures much later than the more precocial oral licking and swallowing behaviors, and normally comes to be elicited by dehydration only after post-weaning experience with dry food. In the current experiments we evaluate some critical features of post-weaning experience with dehydration and drinking, and find that prior experience with initiating drinking while dehydrated, but not experience with dehydration nor water per se, alters the time course of water intake during a subsequent hydrational challenge. The effects of experience are manifested as an increased proportion of water consumed in the early portion of the test, rather than a general increase in total consumption. These findings are consistent with the interpretation that prior experience is necessary for the coordination of water-oriented appetitive behaviors that lead to the initiation and maintenance of drinking bouts, and provide further evidence for an associative learning account of the acquisition of dehydration-induced drinking.

  18. Condensate removal device

    DOEpatents

    Maddox, James W.; Berger, David D.

    1984-01-01

    A condensate removal device is disclosed which incorporates a strainer in unit with an orifice. The strainer is cylindrical with its longitudinal axis transverse to that of the vapor conduit in which it is mounted. The orifice is positioned inside the strainer proximate the end which is remoter from the vapor conduit.

  19. Renal tubular vasopressin receptors downregulated by dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, M.; Phillips, M.I. )

    1988-03-01

    Receptors for arginine vasopressin (AVP) were characterized in tubular epithelial basolateral membranes (BL membranes) prepared from the kidneys of male Spraque-Dawley rats. Association of ({sup 3}H)AVP was rapid, reversible, and specific. Saturation studies revealed a single class of saturable binding sites with a maximal binding (B{sub max}) of 184 {plus minus} 15 fmol/mg protein. The V{sub 2} receptor antagonist was more than 3,700 times as effective in displacing ({sup 3}H)AVP than was the V{sub 1} antagonist. To investigate the physiological regulation of vasopressin receptors, the effects of elevated levels of circulating AVP on receptor characteristics were studied. Seventy-two-hour water deprivation significantly elevated plasma osmolality and caused an 11.5-fold increase in plasma (AVP). Scatchard analysis revealed a 38% decreased in the number of AVP receptors on the BL membranes from dehydrated animals. The high-affinity binding sites on the BL membranes fit the pharmacological profile for adenylate cyclase-linked vasopressin receptors (V{sub 2}), which mediate the antidiuretic action of the hormone. The authors conclude that physiologically elevated levels of AVP can downregulate vasopressin receptors in the kidney.

  20. Comparison of clinical and biochemical markers of dehydration with the clinical dehydration scale in children: a case comparison trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The clinical dehydration scale (CDS) is a quick, easy-to-use tool with 4 clinical items and a score of 1–8 that serves to classify dehydration in children with gastroenteritis as no, some or moderate/severe dehydration. Studies validating the CDS (Friedman JN) with a comparison group remain elusive. We hypothesized that the CDS correlates with a wide spectrum of established markers of dehydration, making it an appropriate and easy-to-use clinical tool. Methods This study was designed as a prospective double-cohort trial in a single tertiary care center. Children with diarrhea and vomiting, who clinically required intravenous fluids for rehydration, were compared with minor trauma patients who required intravenous needling for conscious sedation. We compared the CDS with clinical and urinary markers (urinary electrolytes, proteins, ratios and fractional excretions) for dehydration in both groups using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine the area under the curve (AUC). Results We enrolled 73 children (male = 36) in the dehydration group and 143 (male = 105) in the comparison group. Median age was 32 months (range 3–214) in the dehydration and 96 months (range 2.6-214 months, p < 0.0001) in the trauma group. Median CDS was 3 (range 0–8) within the dehydration group and 0 in the comparison group (p < 0.0001). The following parameters were statistically significant (p < 0.05) between the comparison group and the dehydrated group: difference in heart rate, diastolic blood pressure, urine sodium/potassium ratio, urine sodium, fractional sodium excretion, serum bicarbonate, and creatinine measurements. The best markers for dehydration were urine Na and serum bicarbonate (ROC AUC = 0.798 and 0.821, respectively). CDS was most closely correlated with serum bicarbonate (Pearson r = -0.3696, p = 0.002). Conclusion Although serum bicarbonate is not the gold standard for dehydration, this study provides

  1. Hospital Admissions for Malnutrition and Dehydration in Patients With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Katherine A; Burson, Rosanne; Gall, Kristyn; Saunders, Mitzi M

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration and malnutrition are commonly experienced by patients with dementia and can result in hospitalizations and decreased quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe retrospectively, the incidence and correlations of variables that may precede hospitalizations for dehydration/malnutrition in the community-dwelling patient with dementia. Data from the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) Start of Care (SOC) on 44 patients served by a Michigan home care agency were retrieved for analysis. This study did not reveal any single or collection of variables that would predict risk for hospitalization for dehydration/malnutrition. With the lack of specific predictors of hospitalization related to dehydration and malnutrition, clinicians need to place high priority on risk-lowering strategies and preventive education for patients, family, and caregivers.

  2. NOVEL POLYMERIC MEMBRANE FOR DEHYDRATION OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation has emerged as an economically viable alternative technology for dehydration of organic solvents, removal of organic compounds and organic/organic separations. Development of a membrane system with suitable flux and selectivity characteristics plays a critical role...

  3. Effects of dehydration on performance in man: Annotated bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A compilation of studies on the effect of dehydration on human performance and related physiological mechanisms. The annotations are listed in alphabetical order by first author and cover material through June 1973.

  4. Dehydration and crystallization kinetics of zirconia-yttria gels

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, S.; Muraleedharan, R.V.; Roy, S.K.; Nayar, P.K.K.

    1995-02-01

    Zirconia and zirconia-yttria gels containing 4 and 8 mol% yttria were obtained by coprecipitation and drying at 373 K. The dehydration and crystallization behavior of the dried gels was studied by DSC, TG, and XRD. The gels undergo elimination of water over a wide temperature range of 373--673 K. The peak temperature of the endotherm corresponding to dehydration and the kinetic constants for the process were not influenced by the yttria content of the gel. The enthalpy of dehydration observed was in good agreement with the heat of vaporization data. The dehydration was followed by a sharp exothermic crystallization process. The peak temperature of the exotherm and the activation energy of the process increased with an increase in yttria content, while the enthalpy of crystallization showed a decrease. The ``glow effect`` reduced with increasing yttria content. Pure zirconia crystallizes in the tetragonal form while the zirconia containing 4 and 8 mol% yttria appears to crystallize in the cubic form.

  5. Neuropsychological Performance, Postural Stability, and Symptoms After Dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Akshay V; Mihalik, Jason P; Notebaert, Andrew J; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Prentice, William E

    2007-01-01

    Context: Dehydration and concussion are common in athletic performance. Some experts have speculated that dehydration may negatively influence performance on tests commonly used for concussion assessment. Objective: To determine how the signs and symptoms, neuropsychological performance, and postural stability are affected by dehydration. Design: Repeated-measures design assessing subjects in the euhydrated and dehydrated conditions. Setting: Sports Medicine Research Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Twenty-four healthy, male recreational athletes participated in the study. Intervention(s): Subjects participated in 2 counterbalanced sessions (euhydrated and dehydrated) separated by at least 7 days. Subjects were dehydrated using fluid restriction and an exercise task. No direct intervention was provided for the euhydrated condition. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used the Standardized Assessment of Concussion to test mental status, the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) to evaluate neuropsychological performance, the NeuroCom Sensory Organization Test and Balance Error Scoring System to test postural stability, the Graded Symptom Checklist to assess symptom presence and severity in our participants, and urine specific gravity and body mass to determine hydration status. Results: No differences were noted for the Standardized Assessment of Concussion, total Balance Error Scoring System errors, composite Sensory Organization Test, and composite ANAM scores between conditions. Subjects in the dehydrated condition had significant deterioration in visual memory (t23 = 2.130, P < .001) and fatigue measures (t23 = −7.880, P < .001) as assessed by ANAM. The dehydrated condition resulted in subjects reporting a significantly higher number (t23 = −8.585, P < .001) and severity (t23 = −7.673, P < .001) of symptoms than the euhydrated subjects on the Graded Symptom Checklist. Conclusions: Our results suggest that moderate dehydration (−2.5

  6. [Use of zinc-containing dehydrating fixatives for neurohistological studies].

    PubMed

    Korzhevskiĭ, D E; Grigor'ev, I P; Otellin, V A

    2006-01-01

    The suitability of zinc-containing dehydrating fixatives for neurohistological study of paraffin sections using Nissl staining and immunocytochemical techniques was examined. It was found that zinc-containing dehydrating fixatives (zinc-ethanol-formaldehyde and zinc-acetone-isopropanol-formaldehyde) had a capacity for good preservation of both structure and antigenic properties of the nervous tissue and could be recommended for application in neurohistological studies.

  7. External Validation and Comparison of Three Pediatric Clinical Dehydration Scales

    PubMed Central

    Jauregui, Joshua; Nelson, Daniel; Choo, Esther; Stearns, Branden; Levine, Adam C.; Liebmann, Otto; Shah, Sachita P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prospectively validate three popular clinical dehydration scales and overall physician gestalt in children with vomiting or diarrhea relative to the criterion standard of percent weight change with rehydration. Methods We prospectively enrolled a non-consecutive cohort of children ≤ 18 years of age with an acute episode of diarrhea or vomiting. Patient weight, clinical scale variables and physician clinical impression, or gestalt, were recorded before and after fluid resuscitation in the emergency department and upon hospital discharge. The percent weight change from presentation to discharge was used to calculate the degree of dehydration, with a weight change of ≥ 5% considered significant dehydration. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were constructed for each of the three clinical scales and physician gestalt. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated based on the best cut-points of the ROC curve. Results We approached 209 patients, and of those, 148 were enrolled and 113 patients had complete data for analysis. Of these, 10.6% had significant dehydration based on our criterion standard. The Clinical Dehydration Scale (CDS) and Gorelick scales both had an area under the ROC curve (AUC) statistically different from the reference line with AUCs of 0.72 (95% CI 0.60, 0.84) and 0.71 (95% CI 0.57, 0.85) respectively. The World Health Organization (WHO) scale and physician gestalt had AUCs of 0.61 (95% CI 0.45, 0.77) and 0.61 (0.44, 0.78) respectively, which were not statistically significant. Conclusion The Gorelick scale and Clinical Dehydration Scale were fair predictors of dehydration in children with diarrhea or vomiting. The World Health Organization scale and physician gestalt were not helpful predictors of dehydration in our cohort. PMID:24788134

  8. Nanostructure-induced DNA condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ting; Llizo, Axel; Wang, Chen; Xu, Guiying; Yang, Yanlian

    2013-08-01

    The control of the DNA condensation process is essential for compaction of DNA in chromatin, as well as for biological applications such as nonviral gene therapy. This review endeavours to reflect the progress of investigations on DNA condensation effects of nanostructure-based condensing agents (such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, cationic polymer and peptide agents) observed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and other techniques. The environmental effects on structural characteristics of nanostructure-induced DNA condensates are also discussed.

  9. An anomalous hydration/dehydration sequence for the mild generation of a nitrile oxide.

    PubMed

    Nishiwaki, Nagatoshi; Kobiro, Kazuya; Kiyoto, Hideyuki; Hirao, Shotaro; Sawayama, Jun; Saigo, Kazuhiko; Okajima, Yoshikazu; Uehara, Toshiharu; Maki, Asaka; Ariga, Masahiro

    2011-04-21

    A nitrile oxide containing a carbamoyl group is readily generated upon the treatment of 2-methyl-4-nitro-3-isoxazolin-5(2H)-one with water under mild reaction conditions, even in the absence of special reagents. The obtained nitrile oxide undergoes cycloaddition with dipolarophiles, alkynes and alkenes, to afford the corresponding isoxazol(in)es, which are useful intermediates in the synthesis of polyfunctionalized compounds. A plausible mechanism underlying the formation of the nitrile oxide is proposed, which involves an anomalous hydration/dehydration sequence. DFT calculations were also performed to support this mechanism.

  10. Seawater drinking restores water balance in dehydrated harp seals.

    PubMed

    How, Ole-Jakob; Nordøy, Erling S

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to answer the question of whether dehydrated harp seals (Phoca groenlandica) are able to obtain a net gain of water from the intake of seawater. Following 24 h of fasting, three subadult female harp seals were dehydrated by intravenous administration of the osmotic diuretic, mannitol. After another 24 h of fasting, the seals were given 1,000 ml seawater via a stomach tube. Urine and blood were collected for measurement of osmolality and osmolytes, while total body water (TBW) was determined by injections of tritiated water. In all seals, the maximum urinary concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) were higher than in seawater, reaching 540 and 620 mM, respectively, compared to 444 and 535 mM in seawater. In another experiment, the seals were given ad lib access to seawater for 48 h after mannitol-induced hyper-osmotic dehydration. In animals without access to seawater, the mean blood osmolality increased from 331 to 363 mOsm kg(-1) during dehydration. In contrast, the blood osmolality, hematocrit and TBW returned to normal when the seals were permitted ad lib access to seawater after dehydration. In conclusion, this study shows that harp seals have the capacity to gain net water from mariposa (voluntarily drinking seawater) and are able to restore water balance after profound dehydration by drinking seawater.

  11. Fructokinase activity mediates dehydration-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Roncal Jimenez, Carlos A; Ishimoto, Takuji; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Rivard, Christopher J; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Ejaz, A Ahsan; Cicerchi, Christina; Inaba, Shinichiro; Le, MyPhuong; Miyazaki, Makoto; Glaser, Jason; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; González, Marvin A; Aragón, Aurora; Wesseling, Catharina; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Johnson, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    The epidemic of chronic kidney disease in Nicaragua (Mesoamerican nephropathy) has been linked with recurrent dehydration. Here we tested whether recurrent dehydration may cause renal injury by activation of the polyol pathway, resulting in the generation of endogenous fructose in the kidney that might subsequently induce renal injury via metabolism by fructokinase. Wild-type and fructokinase-deficient mice were subjected to recurrent heat-induced dehydration. One group of each genotype was provided water throughout the day and the other group was hydrated at night, after the dehydration. Both groups received the same total hydration in 24 h. Wild-type mice that received delayed hydration developed renal injury, with elevated serum creatinine, increased urinary NGAL, proximal tubular injury, and renal inflammation and fibrosis. This was associated with activation of the polyol pathway, with increased renal cortical sorbitol and fructose levels. Fructokinase-knockout mice with delayed hydration were protected from renal injury. Thus, recurrent dehydration can induce renal injury via a fructokinase-dependent mechanism, likely from the generation of endogenous fructose via the polyol pathway. Access to sufficient water during the dehydration period can protect mice from developing renal injury. These studies provide a potential mechanism for Mesoamerican nephropathy.

  12. Traditional Male Circumcision: Ways to Prevent Deaths Due to Dehydration.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Mbuyiselo; Maluleke, Thelmah Xavela

    2016-02-01

    Deaths of initiates occurring in the circumcision initiation schools are preventable. Current studies list dehydration as one of the underlying causes of deaths among traditional male circumcision initiates in the Eastern Cape, a province in South Africa, but ways to prevent dehydration in the initiation schools have not been adequately explored. The goals of this study were to (a) explore the underlying determinants of dehydration among initiates aged from 12 to 18 years in the traditional male circumcision initiation schools and (b) determine knowledge of participants on the actions to be taken to prevent dehydration. The study was conducted at Libode, a rural area falling under Nyandeni municipality. A simple random sampling was used to select three focus group discussions with 36 circumcised boys. A purposive sampling was used to select 10 key informants who were matured and experienced people with knowledge of traditional practices and responsible positions in the communities. The research findings indicate that the practice has been neglected to inexperienced, unskillful, and abusive traditional attendants. The overall themes collated included traditional reasons for water restriction, imbalanced food nutrients given to initiates, poor environmental conditions in the initiation hut, and actions that should be taken to prevent dehydration. This article concludes with discussion and recommendation of ways to prevent dehydration of initiates in the form of a comprehensive circumcision health promotion program.

  13. Decarboxylative and dehydrative coupling of dienoic acids and pentadienyl alcohols to form 1,3,6,8-tetraenes

    PubMed Central

    Hyatt, I F Dempsey; Nagy, Emma E; Gettys, Kristen E; Sayed, Sommayah S; Joliat, Christine M; Daniel, Paige E; Vummalaneni, Rupa M; Morehead, Andrew T; Sargent, Andrew L

    2017-01-01

    Dienoic acids and pentadienyl alcohols are coupled in a decarboxylative and dehydrative manner at ambient temperature using Pd(0) catalysis to generate 1,3,6,8-tetraenes. Contrary to related decarboxylative coupling reactions, an anion-stabilizing group is not required adjacent to the carboxyl group. Of mechanistic importance, it appears that both the diene of the acid and the diene of the alcohol are required for this reaction. To further understand this reaction, substitutions at every unique position of both coupling partners was examined and two potential mechanisms are presented. PMID:28382176

  14. Recovery of condensate water quality in power generator's surface condenser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurniawan, Lilik Adib

    2017-03-01

    In PT Badak NGL Plant, steam turbines are used to drive major power generators, compressors, and pumps. Steam exiting the turbines is condensed in surface condensers to be returned to boilers. Therefore, surface condenser performance and quality of condensate water are very important. One of the recent problem was caused by the leak of a surface condenser of Steam Turbine Power Generator. Thesteam turbine was overhauled, leaving the surface condenser idle and exposed to air for more than 1.5 years. Sea water ingress due to tube leaks worsens the corrosionof the condenser shell. The combination of mineral scale and corrosion product resulting high conductivity condensate at outlet condenser when we restarted up, beyond the acceptable limit. After assessing several options, chemical cleaning was the best way to overcome the problem according to condenser configuration. An 8 hour circulation of 5%wt citric acid had succeed reducing water conductivity from 50 μmhos/cm to below 5 μmhos/cm. The condensate water, then meets the required quality, i.e. pH 8.3 - 9.0; conductivity ≤ 5 μmhos/cm, therefore the power generator can be operated normally without any concern until now.

  15. Feshbach-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, V. G.; Denteneer, P. J. H.

    2009-01-09

    We investigate the phase diagram of a two-species Bose-Hubbard model describing atoms and molecules on a lattice, interacting via a Feshbach resonance. We identify a region where the system exhibits an exotic super-Mott phase and regions with phases characterized by atomic and/or molecular condensates. Our approach is based on a recently developed exact quantum Monte Carlo algorithm: the stochastic Green function algorithm with tunable directionality. We confirm some of the results predicted by mean-field studies, but we also find disagreement with these studies. In particular, we find a phase with an atomic but no molecular condensate, which is missing in all mean-field phase diagrams.

  16. Gravity triggered neutrino condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Barenboim, Gabriela

    2010-11-01

    In this work we use the Schwinger-Dyson equations to study the possibility that an enhanced gravitational attraction triggers the formation of a right-handed neutrino condensate, inducing dynamical symmetry breaking and generating a Majorana mass for the right-handed neutrino at a scale appropriate for the seesaw mechanism. The composite field formed by the condensate phase could drive an early epoch of inflation. We find that to the lowest order, the theory does not allow dynamical symmetry breaking. Nevertheless, thanks to the large number of matter fields in the model, the suppression by additional powers in G of higher order terms can be compensated, boosting them up to their lowest order counterparts. This way chiral symmetry can be broken dynamically and the infrared mass generated turns out to be in the expected range for a successful seesaw scenario.

  17. Gravitational vacuum condensate stars

    PubMed Central

    Mazur, Pawel O.; Mottola, Emil

    2004-01-01

    A new final state of gravitational collapse is proposed. By extending the concept of Bose–Einstein condensation to gravitational systems, a cold, dark, compact object with an interior de Sitter condensate pv = -ρv and an exterior Schwarzschild geometry of arbitrary total mass M is constructed. These regions are separated by a shell with a small but finite proper thickness ℓ of fluid with equation of state p = +ρ, replacing both the Schwarzschild and de Sitter classical horizons. The new solution has no singularities, no event horizons, and a global time. Its entropy is maximized under small fluctuations and is given by the standard hydrodynamic entropy of the thin shell, which is of the order kBℓMc/, instead of the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy formula, SBH = 4πkBGM2/c. Hence, unlike black holes, the new solution is thermodynamically stable and has no information paradox. PMID:15210982

  18. Sidestream condensate polishing for PWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Shor, S.W.W.; Yim, S.L.; Rios, J.; Liu, J.

    1986-06-01

    Condensate polishers are used in power plant condensate system to remove both particulate matter and ionized corrodents. Their conventional location is just downstream of the hotwell pumps (condensate pumps). Most polisher installations have enough flow capacity to polish 100% of the condensate. This inline configuration has some disadvantage, including a flow that varies with unit load and tends to disturb the polisher beds and reduce their effectiveness, and a potential for interrupting flow to the feedwater pumps. An alternate arrangement where water is extracted from either the condenser or the condensate system, polished and returned to the system, has been used in a few plants. Three different ways of doing this have been used: divide the condenser hotwell into two parts, one of which receives condensate from the tube bundles and the other of which is sheltered. Take unpolished condensate from the first part, purify it and return it to the other part from which the condensate pumps take suction; take unpolished condensate from one end of a divided header on the suction side of the hotwell pumps and after polishing it return it to the other end; and take unpolished condensate from a header on the discharge side of the condensate pumps, purify it and return it to the condensate system a short distance downstream. The three variants are analyzed in this report. It is concluded that the variant where the connections are on the discharge side of the condensate pumps is the most desirable for retrofitting, in all cases being far easier to retrofit than an inline polisher. In many cases it will be most desirable for new construction.

  19. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2005-03-17

    This article gives a brief review of Bose-Einstein condensation. It is an exotic quantum phenomenon that was observed in dilute atomic gases for the first time in 1995. It exhibits a new state of matter in which a group of atoms behaves as a single particle. Experiments on this form of matter are relevant to many different areas of physics- from atomic clocks and quantum computing to super fluidity, superconductivity and quantum phase transition.

  20. Asymmetric condensed dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, Anthony; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto E-mail: alberto.diez@fisica.ugto.mx

    2016-04-01

    We explore the viability of a boson dark matter candidate with an asymmetry between the number densities of particles and antiparticles. A simple thermal field theory analysis confirms that, under certain general conditions, this component would develop a Bose-Einstein condensate in the early universe that, for appropriate model parameters, could survive the ensuing cosmological evolution until now. The condensation of a dark matter component in equilibrium with the thermal plasma is a relativistic process, hence the amount of matter dictated by the charge asymmetry is complemented by a hot relic density frozen out at the time of decoupling. Contrary to the case of ordinary WIMPs, dark matter particles in a condensate must be lighter than a few tens of eV so that the density from thermal relics is not too large. Big-Bang nucleosynthesis constrains the temperature of decoupling to the scale of the QCD phase transition or above. This requires large dark matter-to-photon ratios and very weak interactions with standard model particles.

  1. Orientation Dependence of Jumping Droplet Condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrier, Austin; Boreyko, Jonathan; Nature-Inspired Fluids; Interfaces Team

    2015-11-01

    On nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces, microscopic condensate exhibits out-of-plane jumping that minimizes the average droplet size for maximal phase-change heat transfer. This jumping-droplet phenomenon occurs independently of gravity and is due to surface energy being partially converted to kinetic energy upon coalescence events. Although the initial departure of the jumping droplets is independent of gravity, the subsequent trajectories exhibit a dependence upon the orientation of the substrate. The drop size distribution of jumping-droplet condensation growing on a superhydrophobic substrate was characterized for both horizontal and vertical surface orientations. With the horizontal orientation, jumping condensate returns to the substrate by gravity. While this can result in chain reactions with other droplets to trigger further jumping events, eventually the rebounding droplets become too large to jump and are stuck on the surface. In contrast, droplets jumping off a vertically oriented surface do not return to the substrate. For this reason, the maximum droplet diameters during condensation growth were found to be significantly larger on the horizontally oriented superhydrophobic surface than on the vertical orientation.

  2. New technology in condensate polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Kunin, R.; Salem, E.; Libutti, B. . Water Div.)

    1992-08-01

    Sulfonic acid ion exchange resins. when carried into a boiler or steam generator, thermally decompose releasing large amounts of corrosive, sulfates. Replacement of the sulfonic acid resin with a carboxylic acid resin would eliminate this source of contamination. The sulfonic acid resin is a strong acid: the carboxylic acid resin is a weak acid. The carboxylic acid resin alone is not capable of splitting salts which limits its use to mixed resin beds or to its use in single or individual beds with feeds of high alkalinity or high pH values. Laboratory, pilot plant and full scale plant tests compared the two resins in precoat filters. When the resins in mixed beds were in the acid form, the weakly acid resin was almost as effective in removing sodium ion as the strongly acid resin. In the ammonium form. the weakly acid resin was generally more effective in removing sodium than the strongly acid resin. Condensate polishing reduced the sodium ion to a few parts per billion (ppB). Complete resin separation before regeneration is more important for the weakly acid resin than for the strongly acid resin. Another development found that the hydrazine reaction with oxygen could be catalyzed by powdered activated carbon combined with microfibers on a Powdex substrate. The carbon should be thoroughly washed to reduce its residual sodium content. In plant tests, the carbon reduced the oxygen concentration in condensate about 50% during startup. In preliminary tests believed to be typical, carbon lowered the oxygen concentration below 10 ppB in about 6 hours compared to 18 hours without the carbon. Oxygen is also reduced during normal operation.

  3. Dehydration softening of serpentine as a trigger of intermediate-depth earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, I.; Watanabe, Y.; Michibayashi, K.; Uehara, S.; Takahashi, M.; Katsuta, N.

    2011-12-01

    A popular hypothesis for the occurrence of double seismic zones in subducting slabs is dehydration embrittlement of serpentinized mantle. Deformation experiments of serpentinites using gas-medium apparatus demonstrated the role of pore pressure in the ductile-to-brittle transition at the dehydration temperature (e.g., Raleigh and Paterson, 1965, JGR). However, it is questionable if the same mechanism could be effective in subducting slabs at the depth. Deformation experiments of serpentinites have been also conducted at higher pressure using multi-anvil and Griggs-type apparatus but little is known about the effects of dehydration reaction on the mechanical behavior of serpentinite. We conducted deformation experiments of antigorite-serpentinite (Oeyama ultramafic body, Japan). Cylindrical samples of serpentinite with the diameter of 10 mm and the length of 15 mm were jacketed in Ag tubes and disks. "Slow" and "fast" experiments were conducted at strain rates of 3.3x10-5 sec -1 and 2x10-4 sec-1, respectively. Axial compression tests were conducted at 800 MPa confining pressure using a solid-medium deformation apparatus. The dehydration temperature is about 650 oC at this pressure. Antigorite was hard at 500oC and not yielded up to 900 MPa differential stress. The experimental run at 700oC without pre-heating is characterized by strain hardening. The sample was deformed by foliation-parallel slip, kinking, and micro-faulting of antigorite. On the contrary, samples deformed at 700oC after static heating showed drastic weakening and steady creep behaviors. A velocity step test indicated that the flow stress is insensitive to the strain rate. The deformed samples contain forsterite and enstatite in the antigorite matrix. Antigorite changed in color from dark green to pink, possibly due to highly oxidized atmosphere resulting from free water release. Intergranular pores were well developed. No microcracks or microfaults were observed. No evidence for intracrystalline

  4. Ice Cloud Formation and Dehydration in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stratospheric water vapor is important not only for its greenhouse forcing, but also because it plays a significant role in stratospheric chemistry. Several recent studies have focused on the potential for dehydration due to ice cloud formation in air rising slowly through the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Holton and Gettelman showed that temperature variations associated with horizontal transport of air in the TTL can drive ice cloud formation and dehydration, and Gettelman et al. recently examined the cloud formation and dehydration along kinematic trajectories using simple assumptions about the cloud properties. In this study, a Lagrangian, one-dimensional cloud model has been used to further investigate cloud formation and dehydration as air is transported horizontally and vertically through the TTL. Time-height curtains of temperature are extracted from meteorological analyses. The model tracks the growth, advection, and sedimentation of individual cloud particles. The regional distribution of clouds simulated in the model is comparable to the subvisible cirrus distribution indicated by SAGE II. The simulated cloud properties and cloud frequencies depend strongly on the assumed supersaturation threshold for ice nucleation. The clouds typically do not dehydrate the air along trajectories down to the temperature minimum saturation mixing ratio. Rather the water vapor mixing ratio crossing the tropopause along trajectories is 10-50% larger than the saturation mixing ratio. I will also discuss the impacts of Kelvin waves and gravity waves on cloud properties and dehydration efficiency. These simulations can be used to determine whether observed lower stratospheric water vapor mixing ratios can be explained by dehydration associated with in situ TTL cloud formation alone.

  5. Dehydration affects brain structure and function in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kempton, Matthew J; Ettinger, Ulrich; Foster, Russell; Williams, Steven C R; Calvert, Gemma A; Hampshire, Adam; Zelaya, Fernando O; O'Gorman, Ruth L; McMorris, Terry; Owen, Adrian M; Smith, Marcus S

    2011-01-01

    It was recently observed that dehydration causes shrinkage of brain tissue and an associated increase in ventricular volume. Negative effects of dehydration on cognitive performance have been shown in some but not all studies, and it has also been reported that an increased perceived effort may be required following dehydration. However, the effects of dehydration on brain function are unknown. We investigated this question using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 10 healthy adolescents (mean age = 16.8, five females). Each subject completed a thermal exercise protocol and nonthermal exercise control condition in a cross-over repeated measures design. Subjects lost more weight via perspiration in the thermal exercise versus the control condition (P < 0.0001), and lateral ventricle enlargement correlated with the reduction in body mass (r = 0.77, P = 0.01). Dehydration following the thermal exercise protocol led to a significantly stronger increase in fronto-parietal blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response during an executive function task (Tower of London) than the control condition, whereas cerebral perfusion during rest was not affected. The increase in BOLD response after dehydration was not paralleled by a change in cognitive performance, suggesting an inefficient use of brain metabolic activity following dehydration. This pattern indicates that participants exerted a higher level of neuronal activity in order to achieve the same performance level. Given the limited availability of brain metabolic resources, these findings suggest that prolonged states of reduced water intake may adversely impact executive functions such as planning and visuo-spatial processing.

  6. Enantioselective dehydration of butan-2-ol using zeolite Y modified with dithiane oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Feast, S.; Siddiqui, H.; Bethell, D.

    1997-04-15

    Modification of zeolite H-Y by dithiane oxides (2-R-1,3-dithiane 1-oxide; R = H, CH{sub 3}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) is shown to enhance significantly its activity for the acid catalyzed gas phase dehydration of butan-2-ol. The rate enhancement is observed for catalysts that are prepared by adding the dithiane oxide to the zeolite synthesis gel or by adsorption of the dithiane oxide onto commercial samples of zeolite H-Y. The origin of the rate enhancement is considered to result from a specific interaction between the dithiane oxide modifier with both the extra-framework and framework aluminum in the zeolite. Modification of zeolite H-Y with (R)-1,3-dithiane 1-oxide enhances the conversion of (S)-butan-2-ol compared to (R)-butan-2-ol in the temperature range 110-150{degrees}C when the two enantiomers are reacted separately. Modification with (S)-2-phenyl-1,3-dithiane 1-oxide gives a catalyst for which (R)-butan-2-ol is the most reactive of the two enantiomers. Reaction of racemic butan-2-ol over these chirally modified H-Y zeolites demonstrates that this modification procedure makes the zeolite enantiomerically discriminating and one enantiomer preferentially reacts, although both are present in the micropores under the reaction conditions. This effect is considered to be due to enantioselective rate enhancement, since, although the rate of dehydration of both enantiomers is enhanced in the chiral environment, the dehydration rate of one enantiomer is accelerated relative to the other. It is suggested that the effect is due to preferential adsorption at the chiral active site. 34 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Effect of spontaneous condensation on condensation heat transfer in the presence of non-condensable gases

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, J.; Hein, D.

    1999-07-01

    The presence of non condensable gases like nitrogen or air reduces the condensation heat transfer during condensation of binary steam mixtures. The non condensable gas accumulates in the vapor phase boundary layer and causes a high heat transfer resistance. Especially with high pressures and low water temperatures spontaneous condensation reduces heat transfer additionally. Fog forms within the steam-nitrogen boundary layer and the steam condenses on the water droplets of the fog layer. The convective mass transfer to the cooling water interface diminishes. Raman spectroscopy and film theory are used to quantify this effect locally. The calculation of overall condensation rates in large steam nitrogen systems requires to use three dimensional CFD codes. The paper presents equations to predict fog formation in the boundary layer which can be implemented in CFD codes.

  8. Dehydration of Methylcyclohexanol Isomers in the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory and Product Analysis by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clennan, Malgorzata M.; Clennan, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    Dehydrations of "cis"- and "trans"-2-methylcyclohexanol mixtures were carried out with 60% sulfuric acid at 78-80 [degrees]C as a function of time and the products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis. The compounds identified in the reaction mixtures include alkenes, 1-, 3-, and 4-methylcyclohexenes and…

  9. Dehydration and Cognition in Geriatrics: A Hydromolecular Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Sfera, Adonis; Cummings, Michael; Osorio, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration is one of the ten most frequent diagnoses responsible for the hospital admission of elderly in the United States. It is associated with increased mortality, morbidity and an estimated cost of 1.14 billion per year (Xiao et al., 2004; Schlanger et al., 2010; Pretorius et al., 2013; Frangeskou et al., 2015). Older individuals are predisposed to dehydration encephalopathy as a result of decreased total body water (TBW) and diminished sensation of thirst. We hypothesize that thirst blunting in older individuals is the result of a defective microRNA-6842-3p failing to silence the expression of the vesicular GABA transporters (VGAT) and alpha 7 cholinergic nicotinic receptors in the subfornical organ (SFO) of the hypothalamus. We hypothesize further that resultant dehydration facilitates protein misfolding and aggregation, predisposing to neurocognitive disorders. We completed a search of predicted microRNA targets, utilizing the public domain tool miRDB and found that microRNA-6842-3p modulates the SLC6A1 and CHRNA7 genes both of which were previously hypothesized to inhibit the thirst sensation by their action on SFO. The primary aim of this article is to answer two questions: Can prevention and correction of dehydration in elderly lower age-related cognitive deterioration? Can exosomal miR-6842 in the peripheral blood predict dehydration encephalopathy in elderly? PMID:27252943

  10. Urinary caffeine after coffee consumption and heat dehydration.

    PubMed

    Chambaz, A; Meirim, I; Décombaz, J

    2001-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of heat-induced dehydration on urinary caffeine excretion after the consumption of a strong coffee solution. Following ingestion of coffee (caffeine 4.9+/-0.1 [SE] mg/kg, 3-4 cups), ten healthy males were intermittently exposed to heat in a sauna until they had lost 2.9 % of lean mass. On a separate occasion, they consumed the same amount of coffee but remained quiet and euhydrated (control). Urine flow was reduced 7-fold in dehydration. At these low excretion rates (< 30 ml/h), caffeine concentration was negatively correlated with flow. Peak urinary caffeine (Cmax) was 7.6 +/- 0.4 (SE) microg/ml in dehydration and 7.1 +/- 0.2 microg/ml in the control (p > 0.05). Compared with the control, dehydration delayed Cmax by 1 hour, maintained higher saliva caffeine concentration (6.1 vs 5.2 microg/ml, p < 0.05) and a lower saliva paraxanthine/caffeine ratio (p < 0.001). The 24h-recovery of caffeine in urine was reduced (1.2 vs 2.8% of dose, p < 0.001), however at least 2.6% of dose were lost in sweat. These results suggest that the rise in circulating caffeine due to delayed metabolic clearance was partly opposed by a sizeable elimination in sweat. Therefore, heat dehydration did not lead to higher concentration of caffeine in urine after coffee ingestion.

  11. Nanocarbon condensation in detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastea, Sorin

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the definition of the Gibbs free energy of a nanoparticle in a reactive fluid environment, and propose an approach for predicting the size of carbon nanoparticles produced by the detonation of carbon-rich explosives that regards their condensation as a nucleation process and takes into account absolute entropy effects of the cluster population. The results are consistent with experimental observations and indicate that such entropy considerations are important for determining chemical equilibrium states in energetic materials that contain an excess of carbon. The analysis may be useful for other applications that deal with the nucleation of nanoparticles under reactive conditions.

  12. Condensed Plasmas under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Thomas, H. M.; Konopka, U.; Rothermel, H.; Zuzic, M.; Ivlev, A.; Goree, J.; Rogers, Rick (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Experiments under microgravity conditions were carried out to study 'condensed' (liquid and crystalline) states of a colloidal plasma (ions, electrons, and charged microspheres). Systems with approximately 10(exp 6) microspheres were produced. The observed systems represent new forms of matter--quasineutral, self-organized plasmas--the properties of which are largely unexplored. In contrast to laboratory measurements, the systems under microgravity are clearly three dimensional (as expected); they exhibit stable vortex flows, sometimes adjacent to crystalline regions, and a central 'void,' free of microspheres.

  13. Nanocarbon condensation in detonation

    PubMed Central

    Bastea, Sorin

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the definition of the Gibbs free energy of a nanoparticle in a reactive fluid environment, and propose an approach for predicting the size of carbon nanoparticles produced by the detonation of carbon-rich explosives that regards their condensation as a nucleation process and takes into account absolute entropy effects of the cluster population. The results are consistent with experimental observations and indicate that such entropy considerations are important for determining chemical equilibrium states in energetic materials that contain an excess of carbon. The analysis may be useful for other applications that deal with the nucleation of nanoparticles under reactive conditions. PMID:28176827

  14. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  15. Strain rate and shear stress at the grain scale generated during near equilibrium antigorite dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Tommasi, Andréa; Garrido, Carlos J.; Mainprice, David; Clément, Maxime

    2016-04-01

    Dehydration reactions are an outstanding case of mineral replacement reactions because they produce a significant transient fluid-filled porosity. Because fluids are present, these reactions occur by interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation. Under poorly drained conditions corresponding to foliated metamorphic rocks, they generate fluid pressure gradients that evolve in time and space eventually controlling fluid migration [1]. Despite the general agreement on this fact, we still lack of a precise knowledge of the complex coupling between the stresses generated during the reaction and the timescales for mineral growth and how they ultimate control the rate of fluid migration. Constraining these rates is challenge because the timescales of the feedback between fluid flow and mineral growth rates at near equilibrium are beyond the current experimental capabilities. For instance, numerical simulations suggest that the draining times of a dehydration front by compaction are in the order of 10-100 ky [1] difficult to translate into experimental strain rates. On the other hand, the natural record of dehydration reaction might potentially provide unique constrains on this feedback, but we need to identify microstructures related to compaction and quantify them. Features interpreted as due to compaction have been identified in a microstructural study [2] of the first stages of the antigorite dehydration at high-pressure conditions in Cerro del Almirez, Spain (ca. 1.6-1.9 GPa and 630-710 ° C). Compaction features can be mostly observed in the metamorphic enstatite in the form of (1) gradual crystallographic misorientation (up to 16°) of prismatic crystals due to buckling, (3) localized orthoenstatite(Pbca)/low clinoenstatite (P21/c) inversion (confirmed optically and by means of Electron Backscattered Diffraction) and (4) brittle fracturing of prismatic enstatite wrapped by plastically deformed chlorite. The coexistence of enstatite buckling and clinoenstatite lamellae

  16. Evolution of microstructure and elastic wave velocities in dehydrated gypsum samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milsch, H.; Priegnitz, M.

    2012-04-01

    This study aims at contributing to the experimental database of changes in rock physical properties, particularly elastic wave velocities, induced by devolatilization reactions. Cylindrical samples of natural gypsum were dehydrated in air for up to 800 h at ambient pressure and temperatures between 378 and 423 K. Subsequently, the transformation kinetics, reaction induced changes in microstructure and porosity and the concurrent evolution of the sample P and S-wave velocities were constrained. Weighing the heated samples in predefined time intervals yielded the reaction progress where the stoichiometric mass balance indicated an ultimate dehydration to anhydrite regardless of temperature. Porosity was observed to continuously increase with reaction progress from approximately 2 % for fully hydrated samples to 30 % for completely dehydrated ones, whilst the initial bulk volume was preserved. In a first set, P-wave velocity was measured at ambient conditions with ultrasonic transducers indicating a linear decrease with porosity from 5.2 km/s at 2 % to 1.0 km/s at 30 %. Results of a second set of ultrasonic measurements for both P and S-waves will be presented as well aiming at a spatially resolved wave velocity dependence on microstructure. For P-waves three different effective medium models - Voigt, Wyllie (Reuss), and Nur - were compared to the data. The linear dependence of P-wave velocity on porosity observed is best represented by the Voigt bound. The Voigt bound, however, overestimates the measured values significantly. The Wyllie-Equation (the Reuss bound) does not replicate the linear decrease in P-wave velocity with porosity and generally underestimates the data. However, at porosities above approximately 25 % the agreement with measured values is excellent. The Nur-Model yields a nonlinear dependence but replicates the data best for model-inherent critical porosities between 0.25 and 0.3. Thin section micrographs taken on selected samples reveal a sharp

  17. Luminescence induced by dehydration of kaolin - Association with electron-spin-active centers and with surface activity for dehydration-polymerization of glycine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, L.; Hovatter, W.; Sweeney, M.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental data concerning emission of light upon dehydration as a function of preheating and pre-gamma-irradiation are correlated with reported studies of electron-spin resonance (ESR) activity after similar pretreatments. The effect of these pretreatments on the kaolin-promoted incorporation of glycine into peptide oligomers in a wet/cold, hot/dry fluctuating environment is compared to their effect on the ESR and luminescent signals. The existence of spectroscopically active centers appears to be loosely anticorrelated with reaction yield; these yields are increased by increasing the overall energy content of the material. It is concluded that some part of the chemical yield is produced by a mechanism involving intrinsic, excited electronic states of the clay crystal lattice. These states may be derived from thermally, interfacially, and/or mechanically induced charge reorganization within interspersed energy levels in the band structure of the material.

  18. Geothermal vegetable dehydration at Brady`s Hot Springs, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1994-07-01

    This article describes the utilization of the Brady`s Springs geothermal resource for heat generation used in the food dehydration process. This geothermal system is located in the Forty-Mile Desert area of Nevada. Geothermal Food Processors, Inc. of Reno, Nevada started construction of the geothermal vegetable dehydration plant in 1978, and the plant started operations in 1979. The industrial process of vegetable dehydration at the plant is described. In July of 1992, the Brady`s Springs geothermal system began being used for power generation by the Brady`s Hot Springs geothermal power plant, operated by Oxbow Power Services, Inc. As a result, the water levels in the food processing plant wells have dropped below usable levels and the geothermal brine is now being supplied by the Oxbow power plant.

  19. Isothermal dehydration of thin films of water and sugar solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Heyd, R.; Rampino, A.; Bellich, B.; Elisei, E.; Cesàro, A.; Saboungi, M.-L.

    2014-03-28

    The process of quasi-isothermal dehydration of thin films of pure water and aqueous sugar solutions is investigated with a dual experimental and theoretical approach. A nanoporous paper disk with a homogeneous internal structure was used as a substrate. This experimental set-up makes it possible to gather thermodynamic data under well-defined conditions, develop a numerical model, and extract needed information about the dehydration process, in particular the water activity. It is found that the temperature evolution of the pure water film is not strictly isothermal during the drying process, possibly due to the influence of water diffusion through the cellulose web of the substrate. The role of sugar is clearly detectable and its influence on the dehydration process can be identified. At the end of the drying process, trehalose molecules slow down the diffusion of water molecules through the substrate in a more pronounced way than do the glucose molecules.

  20. On topotaxy and compaction during antigorite and chlorite dehydration: an experimental and natural study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Tommasi, Andréa; Garrido, Carlos J.; Mainprice, David

    2015-04-01

    Dehydration reactions result in minerals' replacement and a transient fluid-filled porosity. These reactions involve interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation and might therefore lead to fixed crystallographic orientation relations between reactant (protolith) and product phases (i.e. topotaxy). We investigate these two phenomena in the dehydration of a foliated antigorite (atg) serpentinite by comparing the crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) developed by olivine (ol), orthopyroxene (opx) and chlorite (chl) during high-pressure antigorite and chlorite dehydration in piston-cylinder experiments and in natural samples recording the dehydration of antigorite (Cerro del Almirez, Betic Cordillera, Spain). Experiments were performed under undrained conditions resulting in fluid-filled porosity and in strong CPO of the prograde minerals, controlled by the pre-existing antigorite CPO in the reactant foliated serpentinite. The orientation of a ol,opx and is parallel to from the protolith. The Cerro del Almirez samples show similar, locally well-developed topotactic relations between orthopyroxene, chlorite and antigorite, but the product CPOs are weaker and more complex at the thin section scale. In contrast to the experiments, olivine from natural samples shows a weak correlation between b ol and the former . We relate the strengthening of local topotactic relations and the weakening of the inherited CPO at a larger scale in natural samples to compaction and associated fluid migration. Microstructural features that might be related to compaction in the natural samples include: (1) smooth bending of the former foliation, (2) gradual crystallographic misorientation (up to 16°) of prismatic orthopyroxene due to buckling by dislocation creep, (3) inversion of enstatite to low clinoenstatite (P21/c) along lamellae and (4) brittle fracturing of prismatic orthopyroxene enclosed by plastically deformed chlorite. The coexistence of orthopyroxene buckling and

  1. Effect of experimental and sample factors on dehydration kinetics of mildronate dihydrate: mechanism of dehydration and determination of kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Bērziņš, Agris; Actiņš, Andris

    2014-06-01

    The dehydration kinetics of mildronate dihydrate [3-(1,1,1-trimethylhydrazin-1-ium-2-yl)propionate dihydrate] was analyzed in isothermal and nonisothermal modes. The particle size, sample preparation and storage, sample weight, nitrogen flow rate, relative humidity, and sample history were varied in order to evaluate the effect of these factors and to more accurately interpret the data obtained from such analysis. It was determined that comparable kinetic parameters can be obtained in both isothermal and nonisothermal mode. However, dehydration activation energy values obtained in nonisothermal mode showed variation with conversion degree because of different rate-limiting step energy at higher temperature. Moreover, carrying out experiments in this mode required consideration of additional experimental complications. Our study of the different sample and experimental factor effect revealed information about changes of the dehydration rate-limiting step energy, variable contribution from different rate limiting steps, as well as clarified the dehydration mechanism. Procedures for convenient and fast determination of dehydration kinetic parameters were offered.

  2. Cosmic curvature and condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, Martin

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that the universe may consist of a patchwork of domains with different Riemann curvature constants k = 0, +/-1. Features of a phase transition in which flat space breaks up in a transition 2k0 - k(-) + k(+) with initial scale factors R(-) = R(+) are postulated and explored. It is shown that such a transition is energetically permitted, has the equivalent of a Curie temperature, and can lead in a natural way to the formation of voids and galaxies. It is predicted that, if the ambient universe on average is well fitted by a purely k(-) space, with only occasional domains of k(+) containing galaxies, a density parameter of (A(z sub c + 1)) super -1 should be expected, where z sub c represents the redshift of the earliest objects to have condensed, and A takes on values ranging from about 5 to 3. Present observations of quasars would suggest a density of about 0.03 or 0.05, respectively, but it could be lower if earlier condensation took place.

  3. Modeling the effects of geological heterogeneity and metamorphic dehydration on slow slip and shallow deformation in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarbek, Robert M.

    Slow slip and tectonic tremor in subduction zones take place at depths (˜20 - 50 km) where there is abundant evidence for distributed shear over broad zones (˜10 - 103 m) composed of rocks with marked differences in mechanical properties and for near lithostatic pore pressures along the plate interface where the main source of fluids must be attributed to chemical dehydration reactions. In Chapter II, I model quasi-dynamic rupture along faults composed of material mixtures characterized by different rate-and-state-dependent frictional properties to determine the parameter regime capable of producing slow slip in an idealized subduction zone setting. Keeping other parameters fixed, the relative proportions of velocity-weakening (VW) and velocity-strengthening (VS) materials control the sliding character (stable, slow, or dynamic) along the fault. The stability boundary between slow and dynamic is accurately described by linear analysis of a double spring-slider system with VW and VS blocks. In Chapter III, I model viscoelastic compaction of material subducting through the slow slip and tremor zone in the presence of pressure and temperature-dependent dehydration reactions. A dehydration fluid source is included using 1) a generalized basalt dehydration reaction in subducting oceanic crust or 2) a general nonlinear kinetic reaction rate law parameterized for an antigorite dehydration reaction. Pore pressures in excess of lithostatic values are a robust feature of simulations that employ parameters consistent with the geometry of the Cascadia subduction margin. Simulations that include viscous deformation uniformly generate traveling porosity waves that transport increased fluid pressures within the slow slip region. Slow slip and tremor also occur in shallow (< 10 km depth) accretionary prism sections of subduction zones. In Chapter IV, I examine how geologic heterogeneities affect the mechanics of accretionary prisms in subduction zones by showing how spatial

  4. Dehydration decreases saliva antimicrobial proteins important for mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Matthew B; Diment, Bethany C; Di Felice, Umberto; Walsh, Neil P

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of exercise-induced dehydration and subsequent overnight fluid restriction on saliva antimicrobial proteins important for host defence (secretory IgA (SIgA), α-amylase, and lysozyme). On two randomized occasions, 13 participants exercised in the heat, either without fluid intake to evoke progressive body mass losses (BML) of 1%, 2%, and 3% with subsequent overnight fluid restriction until 0800 h in the following morning (DEH) or with fluids to offset losses (CON). Participants in the DEH trial rehydrated from 0800 h until 1100 h on day 2. BML, plasma osmolality (Posm), and urine specific gravity (USG) were assessed as hydration indices. Unstimulated saliva samples were assessed for flow rate (SFR), SIgA, α-amylase, and lysozyme concentrations. Posm and USG increased during dehydration and remained elevated after overnight fluid restriction (BML = 3.5% ± 0.3%, Posm = 297 ± 6 mosmol·kg⁻¹, and USG = 1.026 ± 0.002; P < 0.001). Dehydration decreased SFR (67% at 3% BML, 70% at 0800 h; P < 0.01) and increased SIgA concentration, with no effect on SIgA secretion rate. SFR and SIgA responses remained unchanged in the CON trial. Dehydration did not affect α-amylase or lysozyme concentration but decreased secretion rates of α-amylase (44% at 3% BML, 78% at 0800 h; P < 0.01) and lysozyme (46% at 3% BML, 61% at 0800 h; P < 0.01), which were lower than in CON at these time points (P < 0.05). Rehydration returned all saliva variables to baseline. In conclusion, modest dehydration (~3% BML) decreased SFR, α-amylase, and lysozyme secretion rates. Whether the observed magnitude of decrease in saliva AMPs during dehydration compromises host defence remains to be shown.

  5. Ice Cloud Formation and Dehydration in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric; Pfister, Leonhard; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stratospheric water vapor is important not only for its greenhouse forcing, but also because it plays a significant role in stratospheric chemistry. several recent studies have focused on the potential for dehydration due to ice cloud formation in air rising slowly through the tropical tropopause layer. Holton and Gettelman showed that temperature variations associated with horizontal transport of air in the tropopause layer can drive ice cloud formation and dehydration, and Gettelman et al. recently examined the cloud formation and dehydration along kinematic trajectories using simple assumptions about the cloud properties. In this study, we use a Lagrangian, one-dimensional cloud model to further investigate cloud formation and dehydration as air is transported horizontally and vertically through the tropical tropopause layer. Time-height curtains of temperature are extracted from meteorological analyses. The model tracks the growth and sedimentation of individual cloud particles. The regional distribution of clouds simulated in the model is comparable to the subvisible cirrus distribution indicated by SAGE II. The simulated cloud properties depend strongly on the assumed ice supersaturation threshold for ice nucleation. with effective nuclei present (low supersaturation threshold), ice number densities are high (0.1--10 cm(circumflex)-3), and ice crystals do not grow large enough to fall very far, resulting in limited dehydration. With higher supersaturation thresholds, ice number densities are much lower (less than 0.01 cm(circumflex)-3), and ice crystals grow large enough to fall substantially; however, supersaturated air often crosses the tropopause without cloud formation. The clouds typically do not dehydrate the air along trajectories down to the temperature minimum saturation mixing ratio. Rather the water vapor mixing ratio crossing the tropopause along trajectories is typically 10-50% larger than the saturation mixing ratio.

  6. Pion condensation in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Dylan; Erlich, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    We study pion condensation at zero temperature in a hard-wall holographic model of hadrons with isospin chemical potential. We find that the transition from the hadronic phase to the pion condensate phase is first order except in a certain limit of model parameters. Our analysis suggests that immediately across the phase boundary the condensate acts as a stiff medium approaching the Zel'dovich limit of equal energy density and pressure.

  7. Anaerobic stabilization of waste activated sludge at different temperatures and solid retention times: Evaluation by sludge reduction, soluble chemical oxygen demand release and dehydration capability.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiyao; Peng, Yongzhen; He, Yuelan; Wang, Shuying; Guo, Siyu; Li, Lukai

    2017-03-01

    Anaerobic treatment is the most widely used method of waste activated sludge (WAS) stabilization. Using a semi-continuous stirring tank with condensed WAS, we investigated effects of decreasing the solid retention time (SRT) from 32days to 6.4days on sludge reduction, soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) release and dehydration capability, along with anaerobic digestion operated at medium temperature (MT-AD) or anaerobic digestion operated at room temperature (RT-AD). Results showed that effects of temperature on SCOD release were greater at SRT of 32d and 6.4d. When SRT was less than 8d, total solids (TS), volatile solids (VS) and capillary suction time (CST) did not change significantly. CST was lowest at SRT of 10.7days, indicating best condition for sludge dehydration. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the most optimum SRT was higher than 10.7d both in MT-AD or RT-AD.

  8. Boria modified alumina probed by methanol dehydration and IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Farias, Andréa M. Duarte; Esteves, Angela M. Lavogade; Ziarelli, Fabio; Caldarelli, Stefano; Fraga, Marco A.; Appel, Lucia G.

    2004-04-01

    Al 2O 3·B 2O 3 catalysts were synthesized by co-precipitation and impregnation methods applying two calcination temperatures and boria loadings. Catalysts were analyzed by IR spectroscopy of pyridine and CO 2 adsorption and were evaluated in methanol dehydration. Results showed that boron addition to alumina causes a decrease of the number of basic and Lewis acid sites on alumina surface. It could also be observed an enhancement in acid strength of Lewis sites for impregnated samples. The results of methanol dehydration show that strong Brönsted sites are not formed on borate alumina.

  9. Ductile Deformation of Dehydrating Serpentinite Evidenced by Acoustic Signal Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasc, J.; Hilairet, N.; Wang, Y.; Schubnel, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Serpentinite dehydration is believed to be responsible for triggering earthquakes at intermediate depths (i.e., 60-300 km) in subduction zones. Based on experimental results, some authors have proposed mechanisms that explain how brittle deformation can occur despite high pressure and temperature conditions [1]. However, reproducing microseismicity in the laboratory associated with the deformation of dehydrating serpentinite remains challenging. A recent study showed that, even for fast dehydration kinetics, ductile deformation could take place rather than brittle faulting in the sample [2]. This latter study was conducted in a multi-anvil apparatus without the ability to control differential stress during dehydration. We have since conducted controlled deformation experiments in the deformation-DIA (D-DIA) on natural serpentinite samples at sector 13 (GSECARS) of the APS. Monochromatic radiation was used with both a 2D MAR-CCD detector and a CCD camera to determine the stress and the strain of the sample during the deformation process [3]. In addition, an Acoustic Emission (AE) recording setup was used to monitor the microseismicity from the sample, using piezo-ceramic transducers glued on the basal truncation of the anvils. The use of six independent transducers allows locating the AEs and calculating the corresponding focal mechanisms. The samples were deformed at strain rates of 10-5-10-4 s-1 under confining pressures of 3-5 GPa. Dehydration was triggered during the deformation by heating the samples at rates ranging from 5 to 60 K/min. Before the onset of the dehydration, X-ray diffraction data showed that the serpentinite sustained ~1 GPa of stress which plummeted when dehydration occurred. Although AEs were recorded during the compression and decompression stages, no AEs ever accompanied this stress drop, suggesting ductile deformation of the samples. Hence, unlike many previous studies, no evidence for fluid embrittlement and anticrack generation was found

  10. EPR study on gamma-irradiated fruits dehydrated via osmosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Aleksieva, K.

    2007-06-01

    The shape and time stability of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of non- and γ-irradiated papaya, melon, cherry and fig samples dehydrated via osmosis are reported. It is shown that non-irradiated samples are generally EPR silent whereas γ-irradiated exhibit "sugar-like" EPR spectra. The recorded EPR spectra are monitored for a period of 7 months after irradiation (stored at low humidity and in the dark). The results suggest longer period of unambiguous identification of the radiation processing of osmose dehydrated fruits. Therefore, the Protocol EN 13708,2001 issued by CEN is fully applicable for the studied fruit samples.

  11. Condensation heat transfer in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, L. C.; Parish, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    In the present treatment of the condensation heat transfer process in a microgravity environment, two mechanisms for condensate removal are analyzed in light of two problems: (1) film condensation on a flat, porous plate, with condensate being removed by wall suction; and (2) the analytical prediction of the heat transfer coefficient of condensing annular flows, where the condensate film is driven by vapor shear. Both suction and vapor shear can effectively drain the condensate, ensuring continuous operation in microgravity.

  12. Pd-Catalyzed Autotandem Reactions with N-Tosylhydrazones. Synthesis of Condensed Carbo- and Heterocycles by Formation of a C-C Single Bond and a C═C Double Bond on the Same Carbon Atom.

    PubMed

    Paraja, Miguel; Valdés, Carlos

    2017-04-05

    A new Pd-catalyzed autotandem reaction is introduced that consists of the cross-coupling of a benzyl bromide with a N-tosylhydrazone followed by an intramolecular Heck reaction with an aryl bromide. During the process, a single and a double C-C bond are formed on the same carbon atom. Two different arrangements for the reactive functional groups are possible, rendering great flexibility to the transformation. The same strategy led to 9-methylene-9H-fluorenes, 9-methylene-9H-xanthenes, 9-methylene-9,10-dihydroacridines, and also dihydropyrroloisoquinoline and dihydroindoloisoquinoline derivatives.

  13. Alteration and Dehydration in the Parent Asteroid of Allende

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krot, A. N.; Scott, E. R. D.; Zolensky, M. E.

    1995-09-01

    CV3 chondrites experienced various degrees of late-stage modification, including: fayalitic rims around forsteritic grains, secondary mineralization (e.g., nepheline, sodalite, magnetite) in CAIs and chondrules, and formation of phyllosilicates [1]. Our literature survey show that these secondary features probably have a related origin [2]. Although an asteroidal origin is generally accepted for most phyllosilicates [3] and proposed for magnetite [4], the other secondary features have been attributed to reactions of CV3 components with a hot (> 1500 K) and oxidized (H2O/H2 about 1) nebular gas [5]. The Allende meteorite is considered to be a primitive CV3, because phyllosilicates are absent in the matrix and metamorphic effects are not apparent [6]. However, all other secondary features are well-developed. Studies of dark inclusions (DIs) in CV3s [7] provide a key to understanding the secondary features in Allende. Mineralogical, chemical and isotopic data indicate that DIs and CV3s have related origins. Matrices of the DIs resemble the Allende matrix, but the chondrules show a wider range of alteration textures. In some DIs, the chondrules have only fayalitic rims like those in Allende, but in others there are chondrule-shaped regions of porous fayalitic olivine. In DIs of intermediate type, the chondrules consist of forsteritic cores, which have fayalitic rims, surrounded by porous fayalitic olivine. We conclude that the sequence observed among DIs reflects various degrees of replacement of chondrules by fayalitic olivine. The presence of veins of fayalitic olivine, nepheline and Ca-pyroxene throughout DIs [7] which experienced the most pervasive alteration argues for asteroidal processing of DIs. Like Kojima and Tomeoka [7], we infer that porous fayalitic olivine formed by metamorphic dehydration of phyllosilicates on an asteroid. We suggest that the Allende host and Allende-like DIs represent the initial stages of the alteration sequence from material similar

  14. Physiological Investigation and Transcriptome Analysis of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)-Induced Dehydration Stress in Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lili; Ding, Zehong; Han, Bingying; Hu, Wei; Li, Yajun; Zhang, Jiaming

    2016-01-01

    Cassava is an important tropical and sub-tropical root crop that is adapted to drought environment. However, severe drought stress significantly influences biomass accumulation and starchy root production. The mechanism underlying drought-tolerance remains obscure in cassava. In this study, changes of physiological characters and gene transcriptome profiles were investigated under dehydration stress simulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) treatments. Five traits, including peroxidase (POD) activity, proline content, malondialdehyde (MDA), soluble sugar and soluble protein, were all dramatically induced in response to PEG treatment. RNA-seq analysis revealed a gradient decrease of differentially expressed (DE) gene number in tissues from bottom to top of a plant, suggesting that cassava root has a quicker response and more induced/depressed DE genes than leaves in response to drought. Overall, dynamic changes of gene expression profiles in cassava root and leaves were uncovered: genes related to glycolysis, abscisic acid and ethylene biosynthesis, lipid metabolism, protein degradation, and second metabolism of flavonoids were significantly induced, while genes associated with cell cycle/organization, cell wall synthesis and degradation, DNA synthesis and chromatin structure, protein synthesis, light reaction of photosynthesis, gibberelin pathways and abiotic stress were greatly depressed. Finally, novel pathways in ABA-dependent and ABA-independent regulatory networks underlying PEG-induced dehydration response in cassava were detected, and the RNA-Seq results of a subset of fifteen genes were confirmed by real-time PCR. The findings will improve our understanding of the mechanism related to dehydration stress-tolerance in cassava and will provide useful candidate genes for breeding of cassava varieties better adapted to drought environment. PMID:26927071

  15. Vapor Phase Dehydration of Glycerol to Acrolein Over SBA-15 Supported Vanadium Substituted Phosphomolybdic Acid Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Viswanadham, Balaga; Srikanth, Amirineni; Kumar, Vanama Pavan; Chary, Komandur V R

    2015-07-01

    Vapor phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was investigated over heteropolyacid (HPA) catalysts containing vanadium substituted phosphomolybdic acid (H4PMo11VO40) supported on mesoporous SBA-15. A series of HPA catalysts with HPA loadings varying from 10-50 wt% were prepared by impregnation method on SBA-15 support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy, temperature-programmed desorption of NH3, pyridine adsorbed FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, pore size distribution and specific surface area measurements. The nature of acidic sites was examined by pyridine adsorbed FT-IR spectroscopy. XRD results suggest that the active phase containing HPA was highly dispersed at lower loadings on the support. FT-IR and Raman spectra results confirm that the presence of primary Keggin ion structure of HPA on the support and it was not affected during the preparation of catalysts. Pore size distribution results reveal that all the samples show unimodel pore size distribution with well depicted mesoporous structure. NH3-TPD results suggest that the acidity of catalysts increased with increase of HPA loading. The findings of acidity measurements by FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption reveals that the catalysts consist both the Brønsted and Lewis acidic sites and the amount of Brønsted acidic sites are increasing with HPA loading. SBA-15 supported vanadium substituted phosphomolybdic acid catalysts are found to be highly active during the dehydration reaction and exhibited 100% conversion of glycerol (10 wt% of glycerol) and the acrolein selectivity was appreciably changed with HPA active phase loading. The catalytic functionalities during glycerol dehydration are well correlated with surface acidity of the catalysts.

  16. Physiological Investigation and Transcriptome Analysis of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)-Induced Dehydration Stress in Cassava.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lili; Ding, Zehong; Han, Bingying; Hu, Wei; Li, Yajun; Zhang, Jiaming

    2016-02-25

    Cassava is an important tropical and sub-tropical root crop that is adapted to drought environment. However, severe drought stress significantly influences biomass accumulation and starchy root production. The mechanism underlying drought-tolerance remains obscure in cassava. In this study, changes of physiological characters and gene transcriptome profiles were investigated under dehydration stress simulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) treatments. Five traits, including peroxidase (POD) activity, proline content, malondialdehyde (MDA), soluble sugar and soluble protein, were all dramatically induced in response to PEG treatment. RNA-seq analysis revealed a gradient decrease of differentially expressed (DE) gene number in tissues from bottom to top of a plant, suggesting that cassava root has a quicker response and more induced/depressed DE genes than leaves in response to drought. Overall, dynamic changes of gene expression profiles in cassava root and leaves were uncovered: genes related to glycolysis, abscisic acid and ethylene biosynthesis, lipid metabolism, protein degradation, and second metabolism of flavonoids were significantly induced, while genes associated with cell cycle/organization, cell wall synthesis and degradation, DNA synthesis and chromatin structure, protein synthesis, light reaction of photosynthesis, gibberelin pathways and abiotic stress were greatly depressed. Finally, novel pathways in ABA-dependent and ABA-independent regulatory networks underlying PEG-induced dehydration response in cassava were detected, and the RNA-Seq results of a subset of fifteen genes were confirmed by real-time PCR. The findings will improve our understanding of the mechanism related to dehydration stress-tolerance in cassava and will provide useful candidate genes for breeding of cassava varieties better adapted to drought environment.

  17. The role of Li(+) ions in the gas phase dehydrohalogenation and dehydration reactions of i-C3H7Br and i-C3H7OH molecules studied by radiofrequency-guided ion beam techniques and ab initio methods.

    PubMed

    López, E; Lucas, J M; de Andrés, J; Albertí, M; Bofill, J M; Aguilar, A

    2017-04-07

    Gas phase reactive collisions between lithium ions and i-C3H7X (X = Br, OH) molecules have been studied under single collision conditions in the center of mass (CM) 0.01-10.00 eV energy range using a radiofrequency-guided ion beam apparatus. Mass spectrometry analysis of the products did show the presence of [C3H6-Li](+), [HX-Li](+), C3H7(+), and C2H3(+) as well as of the [Li-i-C3H7Br](+) adduct while [Li-i-C3H7OH](+) was hardly detected. For all these reactive processes, the corresponding cross sections have been measured in absolute units as a function of the CM collision energy. Quantum chemistry ab initio calculations done at the second order Möller Plesset level have provided relevant information on the topology of the potential energy surfaces (PESs) where a reaction takes place allowing the characterization of the stationary points on the respective PESs along their reaction pathways. The connectivity of the different stationary points localized on the PESs was ensured by using the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) method, confirming the adiabatic character of the reactions. The main topology features of the reactive PESs, in the absence of dynamical calculations, were used to interpret at the qualitative level the behavior of the experimental excitations functions, evidencing the role played by the potential energy barriers on the experimental dynamics of the reactions. Reaction rate constants at 303.2 K for different reactions have been calculated from measured excitation functions.

  18. Condenser for photolithography system

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.

    2004-03-02

    A condenser for a photolithography system, in which a mask image from a mask is projected onto a wafer through a camera having an entrance pupil, includes a source of propagating radiation, a first mirror illuminated by the radiation, a mirror array illuminated by the radiation reflected from said first mirror, and a second mirror illuminated by the radiation reflected from the array. The mirror array includes a plurality of micromirrors. Each of the micromirrors is selectively actuatable independently of each other. The first mirror and the second mirror are disposed such that the source is imaged onto a plane of the mask and the mirror array is imaged into the entrance pupil of the camera.

  19. Microgravity condensing heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Christopher M. (Inventor); Ma, Yonghui (Inventor); North, Andrew (Inventor); Weislogel, Mark M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A heat exchanger having a plurality of heat exchanging aluminum fins with hydrophilic condensing surfaces which are stacked and clamped between two cold plates. The cold plates are aligned radially along a plane extending through the axis of a cylindrical duct and hold the stacked and clamped portions of the heat exchanging fins along the axis of the cylindrical duct. The fins extend outwardly from the clamped portions along approximately radial planes. The spacing between fins is symmetric about the cold plates, and are somewhat more closely spaced as the angle they make with the cold plates approaches 90.degree.. Passageways extend through the fins between vertex spaces which provide capillary storage and communicate with passageways formed in the stacked and clamped portions of the fins, which communicate with water drains connected to a pump externally to the duct. Water with no entrained air is drawn from the capillary spaces.

  20. Potentially Prebiotic Syntheses of Condensed Phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, Anthony D.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1996-01-01

    In view of the importance of a prebiotic source of high energy phosphates, we have investigated a number of potentially prebiotic processes to produce condensed phosphates from orthophosphate and cyclic trimetaphosphate from tripolyphosphate. The reagents investigated include polymerizing nitriles, acid anhydrides, lactones, hexamethylene tetramine and carbon suboxide. A number of these processes give substantial yields of pyrophosphate from orthophosphate and trimetaphosphate from tripolyphosphate. Although these reactions may have been applicable in local areas, they are not sufficiently robust to have been of importance in the prebiotic open ocean.

  1. Increased efficiency using the encapsulation-dehydration cryopreservation technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arabidopsis thaliana shoot tips were successfully cryopreserved using encapsulation-dehydration cryopreservation methods. Between one and seven shoot tips were encapsulated within 4 mm calcium-alginate beads. Beads were formed in the presence of 2 M glycerol+0.4M sucrose. The time required to mak...

  2. Diagnosis of pneumonia in children with dehydrating diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Saha, Debasish; Ronan, Anne; Khan, Wasif Ali; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2014-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia are based on the history of cough or difficult breathing and age-adjusted respiration rates. Metabolic acidosis associated with dehydrating diarrhoea also influences the respiration rate. Two hundred and four children, aged 2 to 59 months, with dehydrating diarrhoea and a history of cough and/or fast breathing, were enrolled in a prospective study. Pneumonia diagnoses were made on enrollment and again 6 hours post-enrollment (after initial rehydration), using the WHO guidelines. These were compared with investigators' clinical diagnosis based on history and findings of physical examination and a chest x-ray at the same time points. Using the WHO guidelines, 149/152 (98%) infants in the 2-11 months age-group and 38/40 (95%) children in the 12-59 months age-group were diagnosed to have pneumonia on enrollment, which dropped to 107 (70%) and 30 (75%) respectively at 6 hours post-enrollment. The specificity of the WHO guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia was very low (6.9%) at enrollment but increased to 65.5% at 6 hours post-enrollment, after initial rehydration. The specificity of the WHO guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia in young children is significantly reduced in dehydrating diarrhoea. For young children with dehydrating diarrhoea, rehydration, clinical and radiological assessments are useful in identifying those with true pneumonia.

  3. [Oral rehydration in newborns with dehydration caused by diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Mota-Hernández, F; Rillman-Pinagel, M L; Velásquez-Jones, L

    1990-08-01

    The clinical experience obtained while treating 43 dehydrated newborns due to diarrhea with oral rehydration solution (ORS) using the formula recommended by the World Health Organization is reported. Of the 43 patients, 26 were severely dehydrated (greater than equal to 10% of weight recovery once rehydrated). The averaged time need to correct the dehydration was 4.7 +/- 2.7 hours, with a average intake of ORS of 26.5 +/- 7.5 mL/kg/hour. Children who were being breastfed continued so during the rehydration period. Two of the patients were hospitalized for intravenous treatment, one was due to persistent vomiting during rehydration and probably due to sepsis, and the other due to necrosing enterocolitis. The oral rehydration therapy was successful in 95% of the newborns included in the study, which proved the method to be safe and adequate for the correction of dehydration due to diarrhea among these patients. Similar experiences are reported in Mexico as well as from other countries, which also suggest the use of this therapeutic procedure in children of this age.

  4. Mechanisms by Which Dehydration May Lead to Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Roncal-Jimenez, C; Lanaspa, M A; Jensen, T; Sanchez-Lozada, L G; Johnson, R J

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration, a condition that characterizes excessive loss of body water, is well known to be associated with acute renal dysfunction; however, it has largely been considered reversible and to be associated with no long-term effects on the kidney. Recently, an epidemic of chronic kidney disease has emerged in Central America in which the major risk factor seems to be recurrent heat-associated dehydration. This has led to studies investigating whether recurrent dehydration may lead to permanent kidney damage. Three major potential mechanisms have been identified, including the effects of vasopressin on the kidney, the activation of the aldose reductase-fructokinase pathway, and the effects of chronic hyperuricemia. The discovery of these pathways has also led to the recognition that mild dehydration may be a risk factor in progression of all types of chronic kidney diseases. Furthermore, there is some evidence that increasing hydration, particularly with water, may actually prevent CKD. Thus, a whole new area of investigation is developing that focuses on the role of water and osmolarity and their influence on kidney function and health.

  5. DEHYDRATION OF ALCOHOLS VIA PERVAPORATION USING A NOVEL HYDROHILIC MEMBRANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation has emerged as an economically viable alternative technology for the dehydration of organic solvents, removal of organic compounds from water and organic/organic separations. Development of a suitable membrane system with high flux and high selectivity plays a criti...

  6. DEHYDRATION OF ALCOHOLS VIA PREVAPORATION USING A NOVEL HYDROPHILIC MEMBRANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pervaporation has emerged as an economically viable alternative technology for the dehydration of organic solvents, removal of organic compounds from water and organic/organic separations. Development of a suitable membrane system with high flux and high selectivity plays a criti...

  7. Science Study Aids 1: Dehydration for Food Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeschen, John; And Others

    This publication is the first of a series of seven supplementary investigative materials for use in secondary science classes providing up-to-date research-related investigations. This unit is structured for grades 9 through 12. It is concerned with the osmatic dehydration of fruits. The guide provides students with information about food…

  8. Diagnosis of Pneumonia in Children with Dehydrating Diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Ronan, Anne; Khan, Wasif Ali; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia are based on the history of cough or difficult breathing and age-adjusted respiration rates. Metabolic acidosis associated with dehydrating diarrhoea also influences the respiration rate. Two hundred and four children, aged 2 to 59 months, with dehydrating diarrhoea and a history of cough and/or fast breathing, were enrolled in a prospective study. Pneumonia diagnoses were made on enrollment and again 6 hours post-enrollment (after initial rehydration), using the WHO guidelines. These were compared with investigators’ clinical diagnosis based on history and findings of physical examination and a chest x-ray at the same time points. Using the WHO guidelines, 149/152 (98%) infants in the 2-11 months age-group and 38/40 (95%) children in the 12-59 months age-group were diagnosed to have pneumonia on enrollment, which dropped to 107 (70%) and 30 (75%) respectively at 6 hours post-enrollment. The specificity of the WHO guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia was very low (6.9%) at enrollment but increased to 65.5% at 6 hours post-enrollment, after initial rehydration. The specificity of the WHO guidelines for diagnosis of pneumonia in young children is significantly reduced in dehydrating diarrhoea. For young children with dehydrating diarrhoea, rehydration, clinical and radiological assessments are useful in identifying those with true pneumonia. PMID:24847588

  9. Study of wound dressing structure and hydration/dehydration properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugão, A. B.; Machado, L. D. B.; Miranda, L. F.; Alvarez, M. R.; Rosiak, J. M.

    1998-06-01

    Hydrogels manufactured by radio-induced crosslinking and simultaneous sterilisation of hydrogels of PVP, PEG and agar, according to the Rosiak method, have many desirable properties for using as wound dressings. However, some properties need to be improved or better controlled. The membranes need to be strong enough to be freely used. Another important property to be controlled is the capacity of absorption of exudate and the kinetics of drying. Therefore, it was necessary to understand the role of main parameters (agar, PVP, PEG concentration and dose) in the structure of the net and in the hydration and dehydration properties. The structure of the membranes was studied by sol analysis and the hydrating/dehydrating properties were studied by isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. The gel content for all samples were always in agreement with expected values considering that only PVP undergoes crosslinking. The hydrating and dehydration results did not show variation with the tested parameters. It was concluded that the network was solely composed of crosslinked PVP plasticezed by the other compounds. The properties of hydration/dehydration is related rather to diffusion than to capillarity or osmose and to the chemical retention of water in the polymeric matrix.

  10. Compositional Constraints on Dehydration Embrittlement in Serpentinized Peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, G.; Zhang, J.; Green, H. W.

    2012-12-01

    Double seismic zones (DSZ) which have two parallel planes of seismicity separated by 15-40 km are a global feature of subduction zones in the 70-250 km depth range (Brudzinski et al., 2007). While the physical mechanism of lower plane seismicity is still controversial, the leading hypotheses currently are associated with dehydration of antigorite serpentine within the subducting mantle plate (Peacock, 2001; Jung et al., 2004). In this study, we are conducting high-pressure (1-3GPa), high-temperature (720-750 Celsius), deformation experiments on specimens of varying compositions of serpentine plus peridotite in our 4GPa Modified Griggs apparatus. Using samples composed of interlayered thin discs of antigorite and harzburgite, we find that dehydration embrittlement occurs down to less than ~30 vol % antigorite. Interlayered mineralogy was impractical at lower antigorite fractions so we prepared homogeneous mixtures of powders of the two rock types (35-75 μm grain-size) and "warm" pressed them to a coherent solid with little porosity. Subsequent deformation of these specimens extended the faulting regime to as little as ~8 vol % antigorite. In summary, we find that faulting occurs during dehydration in a wide range of serpentinized peridotite compositions but not during dehydration of nearly pure serpentinite nor nearly pure peridotite. We suggest that the lack of faulting in nearly pure peridotite is a consequence of too little H2O production and the lack of faulting in nearly pure serpentine is due to extensive crystal plasticity.

  11. APPARATUS FOR CONDENSATION AND SUBLIMATION

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, R.J.; Fuis, F. Jr.

    1958-10-01

    An apparatus is presented for the sublimation and condensation of uranium compounds in order to obtain an improved crystalline structure of this material. The apparatus comprises a vaporizing chamber and condensing structure connected thereto. There condenser is fitted with a removable liner having a demountable baffle attached to the liner by means of brackets and a removable pin. The baffle is of spiral cross-section and is provided with cooling coils disposed between the surfaces of the baffle for circulation of a temperature controlling liquid within the baffle. The cooling coll provides for controlllng the temperature of the baffle to insure formatlon of a satisfactory condensate, and the removable liner facilitates the removal of condensate formed during tbe sublimation process.

  12. Chromatin condensation during terminal erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baobing; Yang, Jing; Ji, Peng

    2016-09-02

    Mammalian terminal erythropoiesis involves gradual but dramatic chromatin condensation steps that are essential for cell differentiation. Chromatin and nuclear condensation is followed by a unique enucleation process, which is believed to liberate more spaces for hemoglobin enrichment and enable the generation of a physically flexible mature red blood cell. Although these processes have been known for decades, the mechanisms are still unclear. Our recent study reveals an unexpected nuclear opening formation during mouse terminal erythropoiesis that requires caspase-3 activity. Major histones, except H2AZ, are partially released from the opening, which is important for chromatin condensation. Block of the nuclear opening through caspase inhibitor or knockdown of caspase-3 inhibits chromatin condensation and enucleation. We also demonstrate that nuclear opening and histone release are cell cycle regulated. These studies reveal a novel mechanism for chromatin condensation in mammalia terminal erythropoiesis.

  13. Fe and S redox states during serpentinite dehydration in subduction settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulova, Margarita; Munoz, Manuel; Vidal, Olivier; Brunet, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    Serpentinite rocks formed by hydrothermal alteration of oceanic peridotites compose ~70% of the oceanic crust (Hacker et al., 2003), which later sinks into subduction zone and experiences metamorphic reactions. Serpentinites carry ~12 wt.% H2O and thereby introduces large amount of water in the upper mantle during dehydration in subduction (Ulmer and Trommsdorff, 1995). In addition, serpentinites are known to contain such minerals as magnetite Fe3O4 and pyrite FeS2 in the amounts of ~5 wt.% (Debret et al., 2014) and 1.5 wt.% (Alt et al., 2013), respectively. During metamorphic reactions speciations of Fe and S are tended to change and affect oxygen fugacity. In turn, oxygen fugacity influences the mobility of fluid mobile elements and metals (Pokrovski and Dubrovinsky 2011). We characterized Fe and S speciation and amount of released water during serpentinite dehydration at different temperature and pressure intervals along a subduction zone. We performed three sets of experiments using piston-cylinder apparatus. Three different starting materials composed of powdered mineral mixtures were used: Fe(III)-antigorite (atg), atg + magnetite, atg + pyrite. Experimental runs were performed at 2 GPa, between 400 and 900°C. Experimental products were first characterized by X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe. Speciation of Fe and S were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) at iron and sulfur K-edges. In addition, thermodynamic modeling was applied in this work with constrained thermodynamical data for Fe-bearing antigorite. The results demonstrate the continuous dehydration of serpentinites with the main water releasing domain between 670 and 700°C, which is happening due to breakdown of antigorite. Fe K-edge XANES measurements show that the amount of ferric iron dramatically decreases between 550-650°C, leading to a release of free oxygen in the system. As a result, we show that the first fluids released from the slab dehydration most likely

  14. mPGES-1-derived PGE2 mediates dehydration natriuresis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhanjun; Liu, Gang; Sun, Ying; Kakizoe, Yutaka; Guan, Guangju; Zhang, Aihua; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Yang, Tianxin

    2013-01-15

    PGE(2) is a natriuretic factor whose production is elevated after water deprivation (WD) but its role in dehydration natriuresis is not well-defined. The goal of the present study was to investigate the role of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) in dehydration natriuresis. After 24-h WD, wild-type (WT) mice exhibited a significant increase in 24-h urinary Na(+) excretion accompanied with normal plasma Na(+) concentration and osmolality. In contrast, WD-induced elevation of urinary Na(+) excretion was completely abolished in mPGES-1 knockout (KO) mice in parallel with increased plasma Na(+) concentration and a trend increase in plasma osmolality. WD induced a 1.8-fold increase in urinary PGE(2) output and a 1.6-fold increase in PGE(2) content in the renal medulla of WT mice, both of which were completely abolished by mPGES-1 deletion. Similar patterns of changes were observed for urinary nitrate/nitrite and cGMP. The natriuresis in dehydrated WT mice was associated with a significant downregulation of renal medullary epithelial Na channel-α mRNA and protein, contrasting to unaltered expressions in dehydrated KO mice. By quantitative RT-PCR, WD increased the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), inducible NOS, and neuronal NOS expressions in the renal medulla of WT mice by 3.9-, 1.48-, and 2.6-fold, respectively, all of which were significantly blocked in mPGES-1 KO mice. The regulation of eNOS expression was further confirmed by immunoblotting. Taken together, our results suggest that mPGES-1-derived PGE(2) contributes to dehydration natriuresis likely via NO/cGMP.

  15. Evolution of nanostructure and specific surface area during thermally driven dehydration of Mg(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimminger, H.; Habler, G.; Freiberger, N.; Abart, R.

    2016-01-01

    The thermally induced dehydration of micrometer-sized particles of Mg(OH)2 was investigated experimentally at ambient pressure and temperatures ranging from 350 to 1300 °C. Reaction progress is correlated with the evolution of the specific surface area and of the particle internal nanostructure. The maximum specific surface area of about 320 m2/g corresponding to a 70-fold increase relative to the starting material is obtained after heat treatment at 350 °C for about 2 h. This is due to the formation of a highly porous, particle-internal nanostructure comprised of newly crystallized strictly aligned, cube-shaped and nanometer-sized crystals of MgO and about 50 vol% porosity. Associated with the dehydration, intensive fracturing and defoliation occurs parallel to the (0001) plane of the original Mg(OH)2 or (111) of the topotaxially grown MgO. After heat treatment at increasingly higher temperatures, enhanced coarsening and sintering of the MgO crystals and healing of cracks leads to a successive decrease of the specific surface area. After heat treatment at 1300 °C for 2.5 h, the specific surface area has decreased to 5 m2/g close to the value typical for the original Mg(OH)2.

  16. Mantle wedge infiltrated with saline fluids from dehydration and decarbonation of subducting slab

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Yoshikawa, Masako; Kumagai, Yoshitaka; Mirabueno, Ma. Hannah T.; Okuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    Slab-derived fluids play an important role in heat and material transfer in subduction zones. Dehydration and decarbonation reactions of minerals in the subducting slab have been investigated using phase equilibria and modeling of fluid flow. Nevertheless, direct observations of the fluid chemistry and pressure–temperature conditions of fluids are few. This report describes CO2-bearing saline fluid inclusions in spinel-harzburgite xenoliths collected from the 1991 Pinatubo pumice deposits. The fluid inclusions are filled with saline solutions with 5.1 ± 1.0% (wt) NaCl-equivalent magnesite crystals, CO2-bearing vapor bubbles, and a talc and/or chrysotile layer on the walls. The xenoliths contain tremolite amphibole, which is stable in temperatures lower than 830 °C at the uppermost mantle. The Pinatubo volcano is located at the volcanic front of the Luzon arc associated with subduction of warm oceanic plate. The present observation suggests hydration of forearc mantle and the uppermost mantle by slab-derived CO2-bearing saline fluids. Dehydration and decarbonation take place, and seawater-like saline fluids migrate from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge. The presence of saline fluids is important because they can dissolve more metals than pure H2O and affect the chemical evolution of the mantle wedge. PMID:23716664

  17. Mantle wedge infiltrated with saline fluids from dehydration and decarbonation of subducting slab.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Tatsuhiko; Yoshikawa, Masako; Kumagai, Yoshitaka; Mirabueno, Ma Hannah T; Okuno, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2013-06-11

    Slab-derived fluids play an important role in heat and material transfer in subduction zones. Dehydration and decarbonation reactions of minerals in the subducting slab have been investigated using phase equilibria and modeling of fluid flow. Nevertheless, direct observations of the fluid chemistry and pressure-temperature conditions of fluids are few. This report describes CO2-bearing saline fluid inclusions in spinel-harzburgite xenoliths collected from the 1991 Pinatubo pumice deposits. The fluid inclusions are filled with saline solutions with 5.1 ± 1.0% (wt) NaCl-equivalent magnesite crystals, CO2-bearing vapor bubbles, and a talc and/or chrysotile layer on the walls. The xenoliths contain tremolite amphibole, which is stable in temperatures lower than 830 °C at the uppermost mantle. The Pinatubo volcano is located at the volcanic front of the Luzon arc associated with subduction of warm oceanic plate. The present observation suggests hydration of forearc mantle and the uppermost mantle by slab-derived CO2-bearing saline fluids. Dehydration and decarbonation take place, and seawater-like saline fluids migrate from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge. The presence of saline fluids is important because they can dissolve more metals than pure H2O and affect the chemical evolution of the mantle wedge.

  18. 40 CFR 407.50 - Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dehydrated potato products subcategory. 407.50 Section 407.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Dehydrated Potato Products Subcategory § 407.50 Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  19. 40 CFR 407.50 - Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dehydrated potato products subcategory. 407.50 Section 407.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Dehydrated Potato Products Subcategory § 407.50 Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  20. 40 CFR 407.50 - Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dehydrated potato products subcategory. 407.50 Section 407.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Dehydrated Potato Products Subcategory § 407.50 Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  1. 40 CFR 407.50 - Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dehydrated potato products subcategory. 407.50 Section 407.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Dehydrated Potato Products Subcategory § 407.50 Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  2. 40 CFR 407.50 - Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dehydrated potato products subcategory. 407.50 Section 407.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Dehydrated Potato Products Subcategory § 407.50 Applicability; description of the dehydrated potato products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  3. Dehydration Injury in Germinating Soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Senaratna, Tissa; McKersie, Bryan D.

    1983-01-01

    The sensitivity of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Maple Arrow) seeds to dehydration changed during germination. Seeds were tolerant of dehydration to 10% moisture if dried at 6 hours of imbibition, but were susceptible to dehydration injury if dried at 36 hours of imbibition. Dehydration injury appeared as loss of germination, slower growth rates of isolated axes, hypocotyl and root curling, and altered membrane permeability. Increased electrolyte leakage due to dehydration treatment was observed only from isolated axes but not from cotyledons, suggesting that cotyledons are more tolerant of dehydration. The transition from a dehydration-tolerant to a dehydration-susceptible state coincided with radicle elongation. However, the prevention of cell elongation by osmotic treatment in polyethylene glycol (−6 bars) or imbibition in 20 micrograms per milliliter cycloheximide did not prevent the loss of dehydration tolerance suggesting that neither cell elongation nor cytoplasmic protein synthesis was responsible for the change in sensitivity of soybean seeds to dehydration. Furthermore, the rate of dehydration or rate of rehydration did not alter the response to the dehydration stress. PMID:16663056

  4. Characterization of spacecraft humidity condensate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muckle, Susan; Schultz, John R.; Sauer, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    When construction of Space Station Freedom reaches the Permanent Manned Capability (PMC) stage, the Water Recovery and Management Subsystem will be fully operational such that (distilled) urine, spent hygiene water, and humidity condensate will be reclaimed to provide water of potable quality. The reclamation technologies currently baselined to process these waste waters include adsorption, ion exchange, catalytic oxidation, and disinfection. To ensure that the baseline technologies will be able to effectively remove those compounds presenting a health risk to the crew, the National Research Council has recommended that additional information be gathered on specific contaminants in waste waters representative of those to be encountered on the Space Station. With the application of new analytical methods and the analysis of waste water samples more representative of the Space Station environment, advances in the identification of the specific contaminants continue to be made. Efforts by the Water and Food Analytical Laboratory at JSC were successful in enlarging the database of contaminants in humidity condensate. These efforts have not only included the chemical characterization of condensate generated during ground-based studies, but most significantly the characterization of cabin and Spacelab condensate generated during Shuttle missions. The analytical results presented in this paper will be used to show how the composition of condensate varies amongst enclosed environments and thus the importance of collecting condensate from an environment close to that of the proposed Space Station. Although advances were made in the characterization of space condensate, complete characterization, particularly of the organics, requires further development of analytical methods.

  5. Condensation in Nanoporous Packed Beds.

    PubMed

    Ally, Javed; Molla, Shahnawaz; Mostowfi, Farshid

    2016-05-10

    In materials with tiny, nanometer-scale pores, liquid condensation is shifted from the bulk saturation pressure observed at larger scales. This effect is called capillary condensation and can block pores, which has major consequences in hydrocarbon production, as well as in fuel cells, catalysis, and powder adhesion. In this study, high pressure nanofluidic condensation studies are performed using propane and carbon dioxide in a colloidal crystal packed bed. Direct visualization allows the extent of condensation to be observed, as well as inference of the pore geometry from Bragg diffraction. We show experimentally that capillary condensation depends on pore geometry and wettability because these factors determine the shape of the menisci that coalesce when pore filling occurs, contrary to the typical assumption that all pore structures can be modeled as cylindrical and perfectly wetting. We also observe capillary condensation at higher pressures than has been done previously, which is important because many applications involving this phenomenon occur well above atmospheric pressure, and there is little, if any, experimental validation of capillary condensation at such pressures, particularly with direct visualization.

  6. Water condensation: a multiscale phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kasper Risgaard; Fojan, Peter; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Gurevich, Leonid

    2014-02-01

    The condensation of water is a phenomenon occurring in multiple situations in everyday life, e.g., when fog is formed or when dew forms on the grass or on windows. This means that this phenomenon plays an important role within the different fields of science including meteorology, building physics, and chemistry. In this review we address condensation models and simulations with the main focus on heterogeneous condensation of water. The condensation process is, at first, described from a thermodynamic viewpoint where the nucleation step is described by the classical nucleation theory. Further, we address the shortcomings of the thermodynamic theory in describing the nucleation and emphasize the importance of nanoscale effects. This leads to the description of condensation from a molecular viewpoint. Also presented is how the nucleation can be simulated by use of molecular models, and how the condensation process is simulated on the macroscale using computational fluid dynamics. Finally, examples of hybrid models combining molecular and macroscale models for the simulation of condensation on a surface are presented.

  7. Steam condenser thermal design theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, B. J.

    Test data and prediction methods for condensation in steam condenser tube banks are reviewed. Standards for thermal rating; effect of vapor velocity; vapor shear and inundation in tube banks; correction factors to the Nusselt equation; and equations for the combined effect of vapor shear and inundation are discussed. Effects of noncondensible gases; tube side heat transfer; and expressions for combined tube side and shell side heat transfer are considered. Frictional, gravitational, momentum, and pressure drop trends; and the role of access lanes to reduce pressure drop are outlined. Computer models of condensers, including algebraic representations of the field equations, are summarized.

  8. Photosynthetic limitations and volatile and non-volatile isoprenoids in the poikilochlorophyllous resurrection plant Xerophyta humilis during dehydration and rehydration.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Megan; Loreto, Francesco; Velikova, Violeta; Brunetti, Cecilia; Di Ferdinando, Martina; Tattini, Massimiliano; Calfapietra, Carlo; Farrant, Jill M

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the photosynthetic limitations occurring during dehydration and rehydration of Xerophyta humilis, a poikilochlorophyllous resurrection plant, and whether volatile and non-volatile isoprenoids might be involved in desiccation tolerance. Photosynthesis declined rapidly after dehydration below 85% relative water content (RWC). Raising intercellular CO(2) concentrations during desiccation suggest that the main photosynthetic limitation was photochemical, affecting energy-dependent RuBP regeneration. Imaging fluorescence confirmed that both the number of photosystem II (PSII) functional reaction centres and their efficiency were impaired under progressive dehydration, and revealed the occurrence of heterogeneous photosynthesis during desiccation, being the basal leaf area more resistant to the stress. Full recovery in photosynthetic parameters occurred on rehydration, confirming that photosynthetic limitations were fully reversible and that no permanent damage occurred. During desiccation, zeaxanthin and lutein increased only when photosynthesis had ceased, implying that these isoprenoids do not directly scavenge reactive oxygen species, but rather protect photosynthetic membranes from damage and consequent denaturation. X. humilis was found to emit isoprene, a volatile isoprenoid that acts as a membrane strengthener in plants. Isoprene emission was stimulated by drought and peaked at 80% RWC. We surmise that isoprene and non-volatile isoprenoids cooperate in reducing membrane damage in X. humilis, isoprene being effective when desiccation is moderate while non-volatile isoprenoids operate when water deficit is more extreme.

  9. Biochars with excellent Pb(II) adsorption property produced from fresh and dehydrated banana peels via hydrothermal carbonization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Chen, Honggang; Xi, Junting; Yao, Denghui; Zhou, Zhi; Tian, Yun; Lu, Xiangyang

    2017-05-01

    Fresh and dehydrated banana peels were used as biomass feedstock to produce highly effective sorbent biochars through a facile one-step hydrothermal carbonization approach with 20%vol phosphoric acid as the reaction medium. The elemental ratio of oxygen content of the two as-prepared biochars were about 20%, and the FT-IR analysis confirmed the existence of abundant surface functional groups such as hydroxyl and carboxyl which greatly enhanced the adsorption performance. The sorbents showed excellent lead clarification capability of 359mg·g(-1) and 193mg·g(-1) for dehydrated and fresh banana peels based biochars, respectively. The change of the CO/OCO and the appearance of PbO/PbOC on the surface after adsorption confirmed that the ion exchange might be the dominant mechanism. The dehydration and pulverization pre-treatment and the addition of phosphoric acid can benefit the formation of those functional groups and hydrothermal carbonization can be a promising method to transfer biomass like fruit peels into biochars with excellent adsorption performance.

  10. Kinetic, spectroscopic, and theoretical assessment of associative and dissociative methanol dehydration routes in zeolites.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew J; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-11-03

    Mechanistic interpretations of rates and in situ IR spectra combined with density functionals that account for van der Waals interactions of intermediates and transition states within confining voids show that associative routes mediate the formation of dimethyl ether from methanol on zeolitic acids at the temperatures and pressures of practical dehydration catalysis. Methoxy-mediated dissociative routes become prevalent at higher temperatures and lower pressures, because they involve smaller transition states with higher enthalpy, but also higher entropy, than those in associative routes. These enthalpy-entropy trade-offs merely reflect the intervening role of temperature in activation free energies and the prevalence of more complex transition states at low temperatures and high pressures. This work provides a foundation for further inquiry into the contributions of H-bonded methanol and methoxy species in homologation and hydrocarbon synthesis reactions from methanol.

  11. Kinetic, Spectroscopic, and Theoretical Assessment of Associative and Dissociative Methanol Dehydration Routes in Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Andrew J.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-11-03

    Mechanistic interpretations of rates and in situ IR spectra combined with density functionals that account for van der Waals interactions of intermediates and transition states within confining voids show that associative routes mediate the formation of dimethyl ether from methanol on zeolitic acids at the temperatures and pressures of practical dehydration catalysis. Methoxy-mediated dissociative routes become prevalent at higher temperatures and lower pressures, because they involve smaller transition states with higher enthalpy, but also higher entropy, than those in associative routes. These enthalpy–entropy trade-offs merely reflect the intervening role of temperature in activation free energies and the prevalence of more complex transition states at low temperatures and high pressures. This work provides a foundation for further inquiry into the contributions of H-bonded methanol and methoxy species in homologation and hydrocarbon synthesis reactions from methanol.

  12. Condensation heat transfer under a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    A description of the condensation heat transfer process in microgravity is given. A review of the literature is also reported. The most essential element of condensation heat transfer in microgravity is the condensate removal mechanism. Two mechanisms for condensate removal are analyzed by looking into two problems. The first problem is concerned with film condensation on a flat porous plate with the condensate being removed by suction at the wall. The second problem is an analytical prediction of the heat transfer coefficient for condensing annular flows with the condensate film driven by the vapor shear. It is concluded that both suction and vapor shear can effectively drain the condensate to ensure continuous operation of the condensers operated under a microgravity environment. It is recommended that zero-g flight experiments be carried out to verify the prediction made in the present report. The results contained in this report should also aid in the design of future space condensers.

  13. Monitoring by Control Technique - Condensers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about condenser control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  14. Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment is another investigation that examines the flow of a mixture of liquids and the vapors they produce when in contact with hot space system equipment. Coo...

  15. Methods for dehydration of sugars and sugar alcohols

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Johnathan E [Kennewick, WA; Hu, Jianli [Kennewick, WA; Zhang, Xinjie [Burlington, MA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2010-08-10

    The invention includes a method of dehydration of a sugar using a dehydration catalyst and a co-catalyst within a reactor. A sugar is introduced and H.sub.2 is flowed through the reactor at a pressure of less than or equal to about 300 psig to convert at least some of the sugar into an anhydrosugar product. The invention includes a process for producing isosorbide. A starting material comprising sorbitol is flowed into a reactor. H.sub.2 is counter flowed through the reactor. The starting material is exposed to a catalyst in the presence of a co-catalyst which comprises at least one metal. The exposing is conducted at a hydrogen pressure of less than or equal to 300 psig within the reactor and the hydrogen removes at least some of any water present during the exposing and inhibits formation of colored byproducts.

  16. The hydration/dehydration behavior of aspartame revisited.

    PubMed

    Guguta, C; Meekes, H; de Gelder, R

    2008-03-13

    Aspartame, l-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine methyl ester, has two hydrates (IA and IB), a hemi-hydrate (IIA) and an anhydrate (IIB). The hydration/dehydration behavior of aspartame was investigated using hot-humidity stage X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and molecular mechanics modeling in combination with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results of this study are compared to earlier studies on aspartame as described in literature. It is shown that earlier transition studies were hampered by incomplete conversions and wrong assignment of the forms. The combination of the techniques applied in this study now shows consistent results for aspartame and yields a clear conversion scheme for the hydration/dehydration behavior of the four forms.

  17. Integrated Rig for the Production of Boron Nitride Nanotubes via the Pressurized Vapor-Condenser Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An integrated production apparatus for production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressure vapor-condenser method. The apparatus comprises: a pressurized reaction chamber containing a continuously fed boron containing target having a boron target tip, a source of pressurized nitrogen and a moving belt condenser apparatus; a hutch chamber proximate the pressurized reaction chamber containing a target feed system and a laser beam and optics.

  18. Integrated rig for the production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressurized vapor-condenser method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin C

    2014-03-25

    An integrated production apparatus for production of boron nitride nanotubes via the pressure vapor-condenser method. The apparatus comprises: a pressurized reaction chamber containing a continuously fed boron containing target having a boron target tip, a source of pressurized nitrogen and a moving belt condenser apparatus; a hutch chamber proximate the pressurized reaction chamber containing a target feed system and a laser beam and optics.

  19. Dehydration melting of tonalites. Part II. Composition of melts and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J.; Johannes, Wilhelm

    1996-09-01

    Dehydration melting of tonalitic compositions (phlogopite or biotite-plagioclase-quartz assemblages) is investigated within a temperature range of 700 1000°C and pressure range of 2 15 kbar. The solid reaction products in the case of the phlogopite-plagioclase(An45)-quartz starting material are enstatite, clinopyroxene and potassium feldspar, with amphiboles occurring occasionally. At 12 kbar, zoisite is observed below 800°C, and garnet at 900°C. The reaction products of dehydration melting of the biotite (Ann50)-plagioclase (An45)-quartz assemblage are melt, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, amphibole and potassium feldspar. At pressures > 8 kbar and temperatures below 800°C, epidote is also formed. Almandine-rich garnet appears above 10 kbar at temperatures ≥ 750°C. The composition of melts is granitic to granodioritic, hence showing the importance of dehydration melting of tonalites for the formation of granitic melts and granulitic restites at pressure-temperature conditions within the continental crust. The melt compositions plot close to the cotectic line dividing the liquidus surfaces between quartz and potassium feldspar in the haplogranite system at 5 kbar and a H 2O = 1. The composition of the melts changes with the composition of the starting material, temperature and pressure. With increasing temperature, the melt becomes enriched in Al2O3 and FeO+MgO. Potash in the melt is highest just when biotite disappears. The amount of CaO decreases up to 900°C at 5 kbar whereas at higher temperatures it increases as amphibole, clinopyroxene and more An-component dissolve in the melt. The Na2O content of the melt increases slightly with increase in temperature. The composition of the melt at temperatures > 900°C approaches that of the starting assemblage. The melt fraction varies with composition and proportion of hydrous phases in the starting composition as well as temperature and pressure. With increasing modal biotite from 20 to 30 wt%, the melt

  20. The Mechanism of 2-Furaldehyde Formation from d-Xylose Dehydration in the Gas Phase. A Tandem Mass Spectrometric Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Andreina; Piccolella, Simona; Pepi, Federico; Garzoli, Stefania; Giacomello, Pierluigi

    2013-07-01

    The mechanism of reactions occurring in solution can be investigated also in the gas phase by suited mass spectrometric techniques, which allow to highlight fundamental mechanistic features independent of the influence of the medium and to clarifying controversial hypotheses proposed in solution studies. In this work, we report a gas-phase study performed by electrospray triple stage quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-TSQ/MS) on the dehydration of d-xylose, leading mainly to the formation of 2-furaldehyde (2-FA). It is generally known in carbohydrate chemistry that the thermal acid catalyzed dehydration of pentoses leads to the formation of 2-FA, but several aspects on the solution-phase mechanism are controversial. Here, gaseous reactant ions corresponding to protonated xylose molecules obtained from ESI of a solution containing d-xylose and ammonium acetate as protonating reagent were allowed to undergo collisionally activated decomposition (CAD) into the triple stage quadrupole analyzer. The product ion mass spectra of protonated xylose are characterized by the presence of ionic intermediates arising from xylose dehydration, which were structurally characterized by their fragmentation patterns. As expected, the xylose triple dehydration leads to the formation of the ion at m/z 97, corresponding to protonated 2-FA. On the basis of mass spectrometric evidences, we demonstrated that in the gas phase, the formation of 2-FA involves protonation at the OH group bound to the C1 atom of the sugar, the first ionic intermediate being characterized by a cyclic structure. Finally, energy resolved product ion mass spectra allowed to obtain information on the energetic features of the d-xylose→2-FA conversion.

  1. Enhanced Catalysis Activity in a Coordinatively Unsaturated Cobalt-MOF Generated via Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Dehydration.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hai-Yun; Yao, Ru-Xin; Zhang, Xian-Ming

    2015-07-06

    Hydrothermal reaction of Co(NO3)2 and terphenyl-3,2",5",3'-tetracarboxyate (H4tpta) generated Co3(OH)2 chains based 3D coordination framework Co3(OH)2(tpta)(H2O)4 (1) that suffered from single-crystal-to-single-crystal dehydration by heating at 160 °C and was transformed into dehydrated Co3(OH)2(tpta) (1a). During the dehydration course, the local coordination environment of part of the Co atoms was transformed from saturated octahedron to coordinatively unsaturated tetrahedron. Heterogenous catalytic experiments on allylic oxidation of cyclohexene show that dehydrated 1a has 6 times enhanced catalytic activity than as-synthesized 1 by using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) as oxidant. The activation energy for the oxidation of cylcohexene with 1a catalyst was 67.3 kJ/mol, far below the value with 1 catalysts, which clearly suggested that coordinatively unsaturated Co(II) sites in 1a have played a significant role in decreasing the activation energy. It is interestingly found that heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of cyclohexene in 1a not only gives the higher conversion of 73.6% but also shows very high selectivity toward 2-cyclohexene-1-one (ca. 64.9%), as evidenced in high turnover numbers (ca. 161) based on the open Co(II) sites of 1a catalyst. Further experiments with a radical trap indicate a radical chain mechanism. This work demonstrates that creativity of coordinatively unsaturated metal sites in MOFs could significantly enhance heterogeneous catalytic activity and selectivity.

  2. Improvements in the order, isotropy and electron density of glypican-1 crystals by controlled dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Awad, Wael; Svensson Birkedal, Gabriel; Thunnissen, Marjolein M. G. M.; Mani, Katrin; Logan, Derek T.

    2013-12-01

    The anisotropy of crystals of glypican-1 was significantly reduced by controlled dehydration using the HC1 device, allowing the building of previously disordered parts of the structure. The use of controlled dehydration for improvement of protein crystal diffraction quality is increasing in popularity, although there are still relatively few documented examples of success. A study has been carried out to establish whether controlled dehydration could be used to improve the anisotropy of crystals of the core protein of the human proteoglycan glypican-1. Crystals were subjected to controlled dehydration using the HC1 device. The optimal protocol for dehydration was developed by careful investigation of the following parameters: dehydration rate, final relative humidity and total incubation time T{sub inc}. Of these, the most important was shown to be T{sub inc}. After dehydration using the optimal protocol the crystals showed significantly reduced anisotropy and improved electron density, allowing the building of previously disordered parts of the structure.

  3. 30. BUILDING NO. 527, DEHYDRATING PRESSES, LOOKING SOUTH. ALUMINUM NARROWGUAGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. BUILDING NO. 527, DEHYDRATING PRESSES, LOOKING SOUTH. ALUMINUM NARROW-GUAGE GONDOLA CAR IN LEFT BACKGROUND BROUGHT MOISTENED GUN COTTON FROM REST HOUSE (BUILDING NO. 320-B) IN CANS. (ONE OF THESE CANS IS ON UNLOADING PLATFORM RUNNING BESIDE PRESSES). CONTENTS OF CANS WERE UNLOADED INTO PRESSES BY HAND. - Picatinny Arsenal, 500 Area, Powder Factory & Power House, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  4. Skeletal muscle water and electrolytes following prolonged dehydrating exercise.

    PubMed

    Mora-Rodríguez, R; Fernández-Elías, V E; Hamouti, N; Ortega, J F

    2015-06-01

    We studied if dehydrating exercise would reduce muscle water (H2Omuscle ) and affect muscle electrolyte concentrations. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were collected prior, immediately after, and 1 and 4 h after prolonged dehydrating exercise (150 min at 33 ± 1 °C, 25% ± 2% humidity) on nine endurance-trained cyclists (VO2max  = 54.4 ± 1.05 mL/kg/min). Plasma volume (PV) changes and fluid shifts between compartments (Cl(-) method) were measured. Exercise dehydrated subjects 4.7% ± 0.3% of body mass by losing 2.75 ± 0.15 L of water and reducing PV 18.4% ± 1% below pre-exercise values (P < 0.05). Right after exercise H2Omuscle remained at pre-exercise values (i.e., 398 ± 6 mL/100 g dw muscle(-1)) but declined 13% ± 2% (342 ± 12 mL/100 g dw muscle(-1); P < 0.05) after 1 h of supine rest. At that time, PV recovered toward pre-exercise levels. The Cl(-) method corroborated the shift of fluid between extracellular and intracellular compartments. After 4 h of recovery, PV returned to pre-exercise values; however, H2Omuscle remained reduced at the same level. Muscle Na(+) and K(+) increased (P < 0.05) in response to the H2Omuscle reductions. Our findings suggest that active skeletal muscle does not show a net loss of H2O during prolonged dehydrating exercise. However, during the first hour of recovery H2Omuscle decreases seemly to restore PV and thus cardiovascular stability.

  5. 28. BUILDING NO. 527, DEHYDRATING HOUSE, LOOKING SOUTH AT NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. BUILDING NO. 527, DEHYDRATING HOUSE, LOOKING SOUTH AT NORTH (REAR) ELEVATION OF PRELIMINARY SOLVENT RECOVERY WING. RAILS LEADING FROM DOORS CARRIED STANDARD GUAGE R.R. CARTS ONTO SMALL FLATCARS RIDING IN TRACKS IN FOREGROUND. FROM HERE THE CARS WERE TAKEN TO BUILDING NO. 533, SOLVENT RECOVERY. BUILDING NO. 540, LOADING DOCK (STORAGE FOR POWDER BUGGIES) IN BACKGROUND LEFT. - Picatinny Arsenal, 500 Area, Powder Factory & Power House, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  6. Dehydration Influences Mood and Cognition: A Plausible Hypothesis?

    PubMed Central

    Benton, David

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis was considered that a low fluid intake disrupts cognition and mood. Most research has been carried out on young fit adults, who typically have exercised, often in heat. The results of these studies are inconsistent, preventing any conclusion. Even if the findings had been consistent, confounding variables such as fatigue and increased temperature make it unwise to extrapolate these findings. Thus in young adults there is little evidence that under normal living conditions dehydration disrupts cognition, although this may simply reflect a lack of relevant evidence. There remains the possibility that particular populations are at high risk of dehydration. It is known that renal function declines in many older individuals and thirst mechanisms become less effective. Although there are a few reports that more dehydrated older adults perform cognitive tasks less well, the body of information is limited and there have been little attempt to improve functioning by increasing hydration status. Although children are another potentially vulnerable group that have also been subject to little study, they are the group that has produced the only consistent findings in this area. Four intervention studies have found improved performance in children aged 7 to 9 years. In these studies children, eating and drinking as normal, have been tested on occasions when they have and not have consumed a drink. After a drink both memory and attention have been found to be improved. PMID:22254111

  7. When less means more: dehydration improves innate immunity in rattlesnakes.

    PubMed

    Brusch, George A; DeNardo, Dale F

    2017-04-12

    Immune function can vary based on availability of resources, and most studies of such influences have focused on the co-investment of energy into immune and other physiological functions. When energy resources are limited, trade-offs exist, which can compromise immunity for other functions. As with energy, water limitation can also alter various physiological processes, yet water has received little consideration for its role in possibly modulating immune functions. We examined the relationship between immunocompetence and hydration state using the western diamond-backed rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox). This species is known to undergo substantial seasonal fluctuations in water availability with extreme limitations during the hot, dry season. We collected blood samples from free-ranging C. atrox to compare osmolality and innate immune function (lysis, agglutination, bacterial growth inhibition) during the milder and relatively moister early spring season, the hot-dry season, and the hot-wet season. To isolate effects of dehydration from other possible seasonal influences, we complemented this field study with a laboratory study in which we withheld food and water from individually housed adult C. atrox for up to 16 weeks. We collected blood samples from each snake as it dehydrated and collected a final sample after the snake was given ad lib water at the end of the experiment. Our results demonstrate that C. atrox experience significant dehydration during the hot-dry season, and that, in general, innate immune function is highly correlated with osmolality, whether natural or artificially manipulated.

  8. Dehydration influences mood and cognition: a plausible hypothesis?

    PubMed

    Benton, David

    2011-05-01

    The hypothesis was considered that a low fluid intake disrupts cognition and mood. Most research has been carried out on young fit adults, who typically have exercised, often in heat. The results of these studies are inconsistent, preventing any conclusion. Even if the findings had been consistent, confounding variables such as fatigue and increased temperature make it unwise to extrapolate these findings. Thus in young adults there is little evidence that under normal living conditions dehydration disrupts cognition, although this may simply reflect a lack of relevant evidence. There remains the possibility that particular populations are at high risk of dehydration. It is known that renal function declines in many older individuals and thirst mechanisms become less effective. Although there are a few reports that more dehydrated older adults perform cognitive tasks less well, the body of information is limited and there have been little attempt to improve functioning by increasing hydration status. Although children are another potentially vulnerable group that have also been subject to little study, they are the group that has produced the only consistent findings in this area. Four intervention studies have found improved performance in children aged 7 to 9 years. In these studies children, eating and drinking as normal, have been tested on occasions when they have and not have consumed a drink. After a drink both memory and attention have been found to be improved.

  9. Inhibition of plasma vasopressin after drinking in dehydrated humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geelen, G.; Keil, L. C.; Kravik, S. E.; Wade, C. E.; Thrasher, T. N.; Barnes, P. R.; Pyka, G.; Nesvig, C.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of nonosmotic and nonvolumetric factors on vasopressin secretion in dehydrated humans has been investigated experimentally, before and after drinking. The subjects of the experiment were five adult men and three adult women weighing 69-77 kg. In order to determine the influence of nonosmotic and nonvolumetric factors on vasopressin secretion, measurements were obtained of the following blood hematological indices: serum Na(+) content; serum K(+) content; osmolality; and hemoglobin. Measurements of hematocrit, plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP), aldosterone, and renin activity were also obtained. It is found that dehydration increased mean serum Na(+) content, osmolality,and AVP. No significant changes were observed in renin activity, hemoglobin, hematocrit, or plasma volume, while plasma aldosterone increased from 11.1 ng/dl after dehydration to 15.6 ng/dl between 30 and 60 min after drinking. A rapid fall of AVP content following rehydration occurred in the absence of changes in the primary regulators of AVP osmolality and plasma volume, with no change in blood pressure. On the basis of the experimental results, it is suggested that oropharyngeal factors may be the mechanism, for the observed decrease in AVP following rehydration.

  10. Inhibition of chloroplastic respiration by osmotic dehydration. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Willeford, K.O.; Ahluwalia, K.J.K.; Gibbs, M. )

    1989-04-01

    The respiratory capacity of isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts, measured as the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolved from the oxidative pentose phosphate cycle in darkened chloroplasts exogenously supplied with ({sup 14}C)glucose, was progressively diminished by escalating osmotic dehydration with betaine or sorbitol. Comparing the inhibitions of CO{sub 2} evolution generated by osmotic dehydration in chloroplasts given C-1 and C-6 labeled glucose, 54% and 84%, respectively, indicates that osmotic dehydration effects to a greater extent the recycling of the oxidative pentose phosphate intermediates, fructose-6P and glyceraldehyde-3P. Respiratory inhibition in the darkened chloroplast could be alleviated by addition of NH{sub 4}Cl (a stromal alkylating agent), iodoacetamide (an inhibitor of glyceraldehyde-3P dehydrogenase), or glycolate-2P (an inhibitor of phosphofructokinase). It is concluded that the site which primarily mediates respiratory inhibition in the darkened chloroplast occurs at the fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase/phosphofructokinase junction.

  11. Modelling of mass transfer kinetic in osmotic dehydration of kiwifruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabrayili, Sharokh; Farzaneh, Vahid; Zare, Zahra; Bakhshabadi, Hamid; Babazadeh, Zahra; Mokhtarian, Mohsen; Carvalho, Isabel S.

    2016-04-01

    Osmotic dehydration characteristics of kiwifruit were predicted by different activation functions of an artificial neural network. Osmotic solution concentration (y1), osmotic solution temperature (y2), and immersion time (y3) were considered as the input parameters and solid gain value (x1) and water loss value (x2) were selected as the outlet parameters of the network. The result showed that logarithm sigmoid activation function has greater performance than tangent hyperbolic activation function for the prediction of osmotic dehydration parameters of kiwifruit. The minimum mean relative error for the solid gain and water loss parameters with one hidden layer and 19 nods were 0.00574 and 0.0062% for logarithm sigmoid activation function, respectively, which introduced logarithm sigmoid function as a more appropriate tool in the prediction of the osmotic dehydration of kiwifruit slices. As a result, it is concluded that this network is capable in the prediction of solid gain and water loss parameters (responses) with the correlation coefficient values of 0.986 and 0.989, respectively.

  12. Unstable fault slip induced by lawsonite dehydration in blueschist: Implication for the seismicity in the subducting oceanic crusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okazaki, K.; Hirth, G.

    2015-12-01

    Intermediate-depth earthquakes in cold subduction zones are observed within the subducting oceanic crust, as well as the subducting mantle In contrast, intermediate-depth earthquakes in hot subduction zones predominantly occur just below the Moho. These observations have stimulated interest in potential relationships between blueschist-facies metamorphism and seismicity, particularly through the dehydration reactions involving lawsonite. The rheology of these high-pressure and low-temperature metamorphic minerals is largely unknown. We conducted experiments on lawsonite accompanied by monitoring of acoustic emission (AE) in a Griggs-type deformation apparatus. Deformation was started at the confining pressure of 1.0 GPa, the temperature of 300 ˚C, and constant displacement rates of 0.16 to 0.016 μm/s, that correspond to equivalent strain rates (ɛ) of 9 × 10-5 to 9 × 10-6 1/s. In these experiments, temperature was increased at the temperature ramp rate of 0.5 to 0.05˚C/s above the thermal stability of lawsonite (600˚C) while the sample was deforming to test whether the dehydration reaction induces unstable fault slip. In contrast to similar tests on antigorite, unstable fault slip (i.e., stick-slip) occurred during dehydration reactions in the lawsonite gouge layer, and AE signals were continuously observed. Microstructural observations indicate that strain is highly localized along the fault (R1 and B shear), and the fault surface shows mirror-like slickensides. The unloading slope (i.e., rate of stress drop as a function of slip) during the unstable slip follows the stiffness of the apparatus at all experimental conditions regardless of the strain rate and temperature ramping rate. A thermal-mechanical scaling factor in the experiments covers the range estimated for natural subduction zones, indicating the potential for unstable frictional sliding within natural lawsonite layers to induce seismicity in cold subduction zones.

  13. Atomic structure and dehydration mechanism of amorphous silica: Insights from 29Si and 1H solid-state MAS NMR study of SiO2 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Na; Lee, Sung Keun

    2013-11-01

    Detailed knowledge of the atomic structure of hydrous species on surface of amorphous silica and the effect of temperature and particle size on their atomic configurations are essential to understand the nature of fluids-amorphous silicates interactions and the dehydration processes in the amorphous oxides. Here, we report the 29Si, 1H MAS, and 1H-29Si heteronuclear correlation (HetCor) NMR spectra of 7 nm and 14 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles—a model system for natural amorphous silica—where previously unknown details of changes in their atomic structures with varying dehydration temperature and particle size are revealed. Diverse hydroxyl groups with varying atomic configurations and molecular water apparently show distinct dehydration trends. The dehydration (i.e., removal of water) of amorphous silica nanoparticles mostly results in the increase of isolated silanol by removing water molecules from hydrogen-bonded silanols associated water molecules. With further increase in dehydration temperature, the intensity of isolated silanol peak decreases above ˜873 K, suggesting that the condensation of isolated silanol may occur mainly above ˜873 K. The entire dehydration (and dehydroxylation) process completes at ˜1473 K. Both the water (i.e., physisorbed water and hydrogen-bonded water) and hydrogen-bonded silanol species show a dramatic change in the slope of intensity variation at ˜873 K, indicating that most of silanols is hydrogen-bonded to water rather than to other silanols. The fraction of hydrogen-bonded proton species is also much smaller in 14 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles than in 7 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles mainly due to the presences of larger fractions of water and hydrogen-bonded silanol species. 29Si NMR results show that with increasing dehydration temperature, the fraction of Q4 species apparently increases at the expense of Q2 and Q3 species. The fractions of Q2 and Q3 structures in 7 nm amorphous silica nanoparticles are

  14. Effects of dehydration and rehydration on thermoregulatory sweating in goats.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M A

    1989-01-01

    1. Measurement of rectal temperature (Tr), sweat rate, respiratory frequency (f) and respiratory evaporation (Eresp) were made in one Nubian and four Alpine-Toggenberg goats while they stood for 90 min in a climate chamber at 40 degrees C ambient temperature (Ta). The animals were studied when they were hydrated, when they had been dehydrated by 48 h water deprivation, and when they were rehydrated by voluntary drinking of water or saline or by intraruminal water administration. Plasma osmolality (Posm), plasma protein concentration (PP) and haematocrit (Hct) were measured before every experiment and before and after voluntary drinking. 2. Hydrated animals increased evaporation by panting and sweating during heat exposure and Tr rose about 1 degree C. The rate of sweating was as high or higher than Eresp. Dehydrated animals had lower sweat rates and higher Tr than hydrated animals, but f and Eresp were the same in hydrated and dehydrated animals. 3. When dehydrated goats were allowed to drink after 60 min of heat exposure, sweating began abruptly within 3 min of the start of drinking in every animal whether water or saline was drunk. Sweat rate returned to hydrated levels or higher before any change occurred in Posm, PP or Hct. Respiratory frequency was higher after drinking than in dehydrated animals which were not allowed to drink. 4. When water was administered by rumen tube after 60 min of heat exposure, sweating in the Nubian occurred with a short latency, similar to the onset after drinking. In the other four animals, sweating onset occurred on average at 13 min 42 s after intraruminal water administration. 5. It is concluded that sweating is a significant avenue of evaporative heat loss in these goats when they are hydrated and exposed to high Ta. Sweat rate is markedly reduced after water deprivation but returns to hydrated levels within 3 min after the start of drinking. The rapid recovery of sweating after voluntary drinking is not initiated by changes in

  15. Gunion - Nevada`s most innovative geothermal food dehydration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Trexler, D.T.; Taylan, G.; Stewart, M.B.; Baker, S.

    1995-12-31

    The Gunion (garlic and onion) dehydration plant, owned and operated by Integrated Ingredients, a Division of Burns Philp Food, Incorporated, uses geothermal fluids at a temperature of 306{degrees}F to dehydrate 50 to 70-thousand pounds per day of garlic and onions. The geothermal fluids are provided by Empire Farms, who has the rights for development of the resource and is the lease holder of fee land known as the Kosmos Lease. The San Emidio KGRA is located in northern Washoe County, 90 miles north-northeast of Reno, Nevada and 20 miles south of Gerlach, Nevada. Geothermal fluids exit the plant at 242{degrees}F and are piped to an injection well located 3,000 feet south-southwest of the plant. The plant location was selected not only for the geothermal resource, but also for the area`s low relative humidity. Currently, 1100-1200 gpm of geothermal fluids, at an inlet temperature of 302{degrees}F, are sufficient to provide the dryer line with ample BTU`s. Three geothermal wells drilled to depths ranging from 493 to 1817 feet produce fluids ranging in temperature from 266 to 306{degrees}F. One well can easily provide the heat required by the dryer line and will be capable of providing heat for a planned three-fold expansion of the facility. The remaining two wells are used as backup, or may be used for other applications such as soil sterilization. The fluid exiting the plant at 242{degrees}F may be cascaded and used for greenhouses and soil warming in the future. Geothermal heat is also used to dehumidify onions placed in the cold storage facility. The dehydration process takes 5-6 hours to dry the product to a 4.5% moisture content. The dried product is then milled to various sizes from powder to granules. The dehydration plant operates 24 hours/day 7 days a week. Currently 80 people are employed full-time at the plant. The dehydrated onion and garlic are used in condiments, soups, sauces and salad dressing.

  16. Analysis of Dehydration and Strength in Elite Badminton Players

    PubMed Central

    Abián-Vicén, Javier; Del Coso, Juan; González-Millán, Cristina; Salinero, Juan José; Abián, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Background The negative effects of dehydration on aerobic activities are well established. However, it is unknown how dehydration affects intermittent sports performance. The purpose of this study was to identify the level of dehydration in elite badminton players and its relation to muscle strength and power production. Methodology Seventy matches from the National Spanish badminton championship were analyzed (46 men’s singles and 24 women’s singles). Before and after each match, jump height and power production were determined during a countermovement jump on a force platform. Participants’ body weight and a urine sample were also obtained before and after each match. The amount of liquid that the players drank during the match was also calculated by weighing their individual drinking bottles. Results and Discussion Sweat rate during the game was 1.14±0.46 l/h in men and 1.02±0.64 l/h in women. The players rehydrated at a rate of 1.10±0.55 l/h and 1.01±0.44 l/h in the male and female groups respectively. Thus, the dehydration attained during the game was only 0.37±0.50% in men and 0.32±0.83% in women. No differences were found in any of the parameters analyzed during the vertical jump (men: from 31.82±5.29 to 32.90±4.49 W/kg; p>0.05, women: from 26.36±4.73 to 27.25±4.44 W/kg; p>0.05). Post-exercise urine samples revealed proteinuria (60.9% of cases in men and 66.7% in women), leukocyturia (men = 43.5% and women = 50.0%) and erythrocyturia (men = 50.0% and women = 21.7%). Conclusions Despite a moderate sweat rate, badminton players adequately hydrated during a game and thus the dehydration attained was low. The badminton match did not cause muscle fatigue but it significantly increased the prevalence of proteinuria, leukocyturia and erythrocyturia. PMID:22666396

  17. Enzyme-catalyzed, gas-phase reactions.

    PubMed

    Barzana, E; Klibanov, A M; Karel, M

    1987-06-01

    Dehydrated preparations of alcohol oxidase adsorbed on DEAE-cellulose vigorously catalyze a gas-phase oxidation of ethanol vapors with molecular oxygen. The gas-phase reaction is strongly dependent on the water activity of the system. The enzymatic activity is severely inhibited by the product hydrogen peroxide. This inhibition can be alleviated, however, by an addition of catalase or peroxidase to the dry preparation. Such dehydrated, bienzymic catalysts afford a complete and selective conversion of the substrate to acetaldehyde. Dry alcohol oxidase is much more thermostable than in aqueous solution. The results of this work suggest that dehydrated enzymes have potential applications in the analysis of gaseous compounds and in the development of novel gas-solid bioreactors.

  18. Characterization and Thermal Dehydration Kinetics of Highly Crystalline Mcallisterite, Synthesized at Low Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Senberber, Fatma Tugce

    2014-01-01

    The hydrothermal synthesis of a mcallisterite (Mg2(B6O7(OH)6)2·9(H2O)) mineral at low temperatures was characterized. For this purpose, several reaction temperatures (0–70°C) and reaction times (30–240 min) were studied. Synthesized minerals were subjected to X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and Raman spectroscopies and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Additionally, experimental analyses of boron trioxide (B2O3) content and reaction yields were performed. Furthermore, thermal gravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) were used for the determination of thermal dehydration kinetics. According to the XRD results, mcallisterite, which has a powder diffraction file (pdf) number of “01-070-1902,” was formed under certain reaction parameters. Pure crystalline mcallisterite had diagnostic FT-IR and Raman vibration peaks and according to the SEM analysis, for the minerals which were synthesized at 60°C and 30 min of reaction time, particle size was between 398.30 and 700.06 nm. Its B2O3 content and reaction yield were 50.80 ± 1.12% and 85.80 ± 0.61%, respectively. Finally, average activation energies (conversion values (α) that were selected between 0.1 and 0.6) were calculated as 100.40 kJ/mol and 98.31 kJ/mol according to Ozawa and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) methods, respectively. PMID:24719585

  19. Controlling condensation and frost growth with chemical micropatterns

    PubMed Central

    Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Hansen, Ryan R.; Murphy, Kevin R.; Nath, Saurabh; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, C. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In-plane frost growth on chilled hydrophobic surfaces is an inter-droplet phenomenon, where frozen droplets harvest water from neighboring supercooled liquid droplets to grow ice bridges that propagate across the surface in a chain reaction. To date, no surface has been able to passively prevent the in-plane growth of ice bridges across the population of supercooled condensate. Here, we demonstrate that when the separation between adjacent nucleation sites for supercooled condensate is properly controlled with chemical micropatterns prior to freezing, inter-droplet ice bridging can be slowed and even halted entirely. Since the edge-to-edge separation between adjacent supercooled droplets decreases with growth time, deliberately triggering an early freezing event to minimize the size of nascent condensation was also necessary. These findings reveal that inter-droplet frost growth can be passively suppressed by designing surfaces to spatially control nucleation sites and by temporally controlling the onset of freezing events. PMID:26796663

  20. Controlling condensation and frost growth with chemical micropatterns

    DOE PAGES

    Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Hansen, Ryan R.; Murphy, Kevin R.; ...

    2016-01-22

    Frost growth on chilled hydrophobic surfaces is an inter-droplet phenomenon, where frozen droplets harvest water from supercooled liquid droplets to grow ice bridges that propagate across the surface in a chain reaction. To date, no surface has been able to passively prevent the in-plane growth of frost across the population of supercooled condensate. Here, we demonstrate that when the nucleation sites for supercooled condensate are properly controlled with chemical micropatterns, the speed of frost growth can be slowed and even halted entirely. This stoppage of frost growth is attributed to the large interdroplet separation between condensate upon the onset ofmore » freezing, which was controlled by the pitch of the chemical patterns and by deliberately triggering an early freezing event. Lastly, these findings reveal that frost growth can be passively suppressed by designing surfaces to spatially control nucleation sites and/or temporally control the onset of freezing events.« less

  1. Controlling condensation and frost growth with chemical micropatterns

    SciTech Connect

    Boreyko, Jonathan B.; Hansen, Ryan R.; Murphy, Kevin R.; Nath, Saurabh; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, C. Patrick

    2016-01-22

    Frost growth on chilled hydrophobic surfaces is an inter-droplet phenomenon, where frozen droplets harvest water from supercooled liquid droplets to grow ice bridges that propagate across the surface in a chain reaction. To date, no surface has been able to passively prevent the in-plane growth of frost across the population of supercooled condensate. Here, we demonstrate that when the nucleation sites for supercooled condensate are properly controlled with chemical micropatterns, the speed of frost growth can be slowed and even halted entirely. This stoppage of frost growth is attributed to the large interdroplet separation between condensate upon the onset of freezing, which was controlled by the pitch of the chemical patterns and by deliberately triggering an early freezing event. Lastly, these findings reveal that frost growth can be passively suppressed by designing surfaces to spatially control nucleation sites and/or temporally control the onset of freezing events.

  2. Advances in shell side condensation for refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Ralph L.

    The design of shell and tube condensers used in air conditioning and refrigeration applications is discussed. The geometry of interest involves condensation on the shell side of a horizontal tube bundle. Enhanced heat transfer geometries are typically used for condensation on the shell side. The heat transfer is removed by water on the tube side, which typically have tube side enhancement. Single tube and row effect condensation data are presented. Thermal design methods for sizing of the condenser are outlined.

  3. Chemical dehydration of specimens with 2,2-dimethoxypropane (DMP) for paraffin processing of animal tissues: practical and economic advantages over dehydration in ethanol.

    PubMed

    Conway, K; Kiernan, J A

    1999-01-01

    Chemical dehydration can be accomplished using 2,2-dimethoxypropane (DMP). In the presence of an acid catalyst, this liquid reacts with water generating methanol and acetone as products. Although DMP is more expensive per milliliter than ethanol and other solvents used for dehydration, it is an economical alternative because a much smaller volume is needed. Slow penetration of DMP was previously thought to restrict its use to tiny specimens, but we now show that pieces of tissue as thick as 2 cm are dehydrated by overnight immersion in acidified DMP. We also show that dehydration in acidified DMP does not impair the staining of RNA or other basophilic components of animal tissues. The temperature and concentrations of methanol and H+ in the chemical dehydrating agent are too low to produce histochemically detectable methylation or nucleic acid extraction.

  4. Ligation of the hairpin ribozyme in cis induced by freezing and dehydration

    PubMed Central

    KAZAKOV, SERGEI A.; BALATSKAYA, SVETLANA V.; JOHNSTON, BRIAN H.

    2006-01-01

    Although reducing the temperature slows most chemical reactions, freezing can stimulate some reactions by mechanisms that are only partially understood. Here we show that freezing stimulates the self-ligation (circularization) of linear forms of the hairpin ribozyme (HPR) containing 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate and 5′-OH termini. Divalent metal ions (M2+) are not required, but monovalent cations and anions at millimolar concentrations can have various effects on this reaction depending on the specific ion. Under optimal conditions, the observed rate of M2+-independent self-ligation reaches a peak (0.04 min−1) at −10°C with a yield of −60% after 1 h. In contrast, no ligation occurs either at above 0°C or in solutions that remain unfrozen when supercooled to subzero temperatures. Under freezing conditions, the cleavage–ligation equilibrium strongly favors ligation. Besides freezing, evaporation of the aqueous solvent as well as the presence of ethanol at levels of 40% or above can also induce M2+-independent HPR ligation at 25°C. We argue that partial RNA dehydration, which is a common feature of freezing, evaporation, and the presence of ethanol, is a key factor supporting HPR ligation activity at both above- and below-freezing temperatures. In the context of the RNA world hypothesis, freezing-induced ligation is an attractive mechanism by which complex RNAs could have evolved under conditions in which RNA was relatively protected against degradation. PMID:16495237

  5. Bose-Einstein condensate strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2015-02-01

    We consider the possible existence of gravitationally bound general relativistic strings consisting of Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) matter which is described, in the Newtonian limit, by the zero temperature time-dependent nonlinear Schrödinger equation (the Gross-Pitaevskii equation), with repulsive interparticle interactions. In the Madelung representation of the wave function, the quantum dynamics of the condensate can be formulated in terms of the classical continuity equation and the hydrodynamic Euler equations. In the case of a condensate with quartic nonlinearity, the condensates can be described as a gas with two pressure terms, the interaction pressure, which is proportional to the square of the matter density, and the quantum pressure, which is without any classical analogue, though, when the number of particles in the system is high enough, the latter may be neglected. Assuming cylindrical symmetry, we analyze the physical properties of the BEC strings in both the interaction pressure and quantum pressure dominated limits, by numerically integrating the gravitational field equations. In this way we obtain a large class of stable stringlike astrophysical objects, whose basic parameters (mass density and radius) depend sensitively on the mass and scattering length of the condensate particle, as well as on the quantum pressure of the Bose-Einstein gas.

  6. Polariton condensates at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet, Thierry; Brimont, Christelle

    2016-10-01

    We review the recent developments of the polariton physics in microcavities featuring the exciton-photon strong coupling at room temperature, and leading to the achievement of room-temperature polariton condensates. Such cavities embed active layers with robust excitons that present a large binding energy and a large oscillator strength, i.e. wide bandgap inorganic or organic semiconductors, or organic molecules. These various systems are compared, in terms of figures of merit and of common features related to their strong oscillator strength. The various demonstrations of polariton laser are compared, as well as their condensation phase diagrams. The room-temperature operation indeed allows a detailed investigation of the thermodynamic and out-of-equilibrium regimes of the condensation process. The crucial role of the spatial dynamics of the condensate formation is discussed, as well as the debated issue of the mechanism of stimulated relaxation from the reservoir to the condensate under non-resonant excitation. Finally the prospects of polariton devices are presented.

  7. Self-condensation of activated dinucleotides on polynucleotide templates with alternating sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    Substantial quantities of the alternating polymers poly(U-G) and poly(C-A) have been prepared and used as templates for the self-condensation of ImpApC, ImpCpA, ImpGpU and ImpUpG. It is found that the condensation of ImpGpu and ImpUpG on poly(C-A) is efficient, the condensation of ImpCpA on poly(U-G) is moderately efficient, while the condensation of ImpApC on poly(U-C) proceeds poorly. In many cases, the product is predominantly 3'-5'-linked. These reactions demonstrate unequivocally, for the first time, that template-directed reactions occur in double-helical structures. Furthermore, they describe for the first time a pair of reactions in which each of two complementary polymers facilitates the synthesis of the other. The prebiotic significance of these findings is discussed.

  8. MICROWAVE-ACCELERATED MULTICOMPONENT REACTIONS UNDER SOLVENT-FREE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of microwave-accelerated solventless synthetic protocols in multicomponent (MCC) reactions will be exemplified by several condensation and cyclization reactions including the rapid one-pot assembly of valuable heterocyclic compounds from in situ generated intermed...

  9. Temperature- and pH-dependent aqueous-phase kinetics of the reactions of glyoxal and methylglyoxal with atmospheric amines and ammonium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedehi, Nahzaneen; Takano, Hiromi; Blasic, Vanessa A.; Sullivan, Kristin A.; De Haan, David O.

    2013-10-01

    Reactions of glyoxal (Glx) and methylglyoxal (MG) with primary amines and ammonium salts may produce brown carbon and N-containing oligomers in aqueous aerosol. 1H NMR monitoring of reactant losses and product appearance in bulk aqueous reactions were used to derive rate constants and quantify competing reaction pathways as a function of pH and temperature. Glx + ammonium sulfate (AS) and amine reactions generate products containing C-N bonds, with rates depending directly on pH: rate = (70 ± 60) M-1 s-1fAld [Glx]totfAm [Am]tot, where fAld is the fraction of aldehyde with a dehydrated aldehyde functional group, and fAm is the fraction of amine or ammonia that is deprotonated at a given pH. MG + amine reactions generate mostly aldol condensation products and exhibit less pH dependence: rate = 10[(0.36 ± 0.06) × pH - (3.6 ± 0.3)] M-1 s-1fAld [MG]tot [Am]tot. Aldehyde + AS reactions are less temperature-dependent (Ea = 18 ± 8 kJ mol-1) than corresponding amine reactions (Ea = 50 ± 11 kJ mol-1). Using aerosol concentrations of [OH] = 10-12 M, [amine]tot = [AS] = 0.1 M, fGlx = 0.046 and fMG = 0.09, we estimate that OH radical reactions are normally the major aerosol-phase sink for both dicarbonyl compounds. However, reactions with AS and amines together can account for up to 12 and 45% of daytime aerosol-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal reactivity, respectively, in marine aerosol at pH 5.5. Reactions with AS and amines become less important in acidic or non-marine aerosol, but may still be significant atmospheric sources of brown carbon, imidazoles, and nitrogen-containing oligomers.

  10. Dehydration of highly concentrated solutions of fructose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in a cheap and sustainable choline chloride/carbon dioxide system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Barrault, Joël; De Oliveira Vigier, Karine; Jérôme, François

    2012-07-01

    Fête DES sciences: The dehydration of fructose and inulin to HMF is conveniently performed in a cheap and sustainable choline chloride/CO(2) deep eutectic solvent (DES) system. The medium is capable of converting high contents of fructose (>100 wt %) without affecting the yield of HMF (up to 72 %). The purity of the recovered HMF is >98%, and the reaction medium can be recycled.

  11. Chemistry at and near the surface of liquid sulfuric acid: A kinetic, thermodynamic, and mechanistic analysis of heterogeneous reactions of acetone

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.L.; Schindler, L.R.; Roberts, J.T.

    1999-08-26

    The interactions of gas-phase acetone with liquid sulfuric acid solutions are described. The solutions were prepared as 0.05--0.10 {micro}m thick films deposited on single-crystal metal substrates. Experiments were carried out over broad ranges of acid composition (70 {minus} >96 wt % H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), temperature (180--220 K), and acetone pressure (10{sup {minus}7}{minus}10{sup {minus}3} Pa). Two types of measurements are reported: the time-dependent acetone uptake probability, and the infrared spectra of absorbed acetone and its reaction products. From the infrared measurements, a reaction scheme is identified in which gas-phase acetone is taken up by sulfuric acid to form protonated acetone. In solutions containing more than 70 wt % H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, protonated acetone undergoes a self-condensation/dehydration reaction to form mesityl oxide. In films that contain 85 wt % or more H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, a second reaction sequence occurs, ultimately resulting in the formation of tremethylbenzene. The uptake probability measurements are consistent with the infrared data. In 70 wt % H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the acetone uptake probability rapidly decreases from an initial value near unity to a steady-state value of zero, due to the formation of a saturated acetone + sulfuric acid solution. The Henry`s law solubility constants of acetone in 70 wt % H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} were obtained from the integrated uptake measurements. The temperature dependence of the measurements implies that the standard-state enthalpy and entropy changes of acetone solution in 70 wt % sulfuric acid are {minus}66 kJ mol{sup {minus}1} and {minus}249 J mol{sup {minus}1} K{sup {minus}1}, respectively. In the more concentrated films, the steady-state uptake probability is never measured to be zero, since absorbed acetone goes on to form the condensation/dehydration products. A two-step kinetic scheme is proposed to account for the reactions of acetone in sulfuric acid. By fitting the data to the model

  12. Combined analysis of mRNA and miRNA identifies dehydration and salinity responsive key molecular players in citrus roots

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Rangjin; Zhang, Jin; Ma, Yanyan; Pan, Xiaoting; Dong, Cuicui; Pang, Shaoping; He, Shaolan; Deng, Lie; Yi, Shilai; Zheng, Yongqiang; Lv, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Citrus is one of the most economically important fruit crops around world. Drought and salinity stresses adversely affected its productivity and fruit quality. However, the genetic regulatory networks and signaling pathways involved in drought and salinity remain to be elucidated. With RNA-seq and sRNA-seq, an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression profiling and their regulatory networks were conducted using citrus roots subjected to dehydration and salt treatment. Differentially expressed (DE) mRNA and miRNA profiles were obtained according to fold change analysis and the relationships between miRNAs and target mRNAs were found to be coherent and incoherent in the regulatory networks. GO enrichment analysis revealed that some crucial biological processes related to signal transduction (e.g. ‘MAPK cascade’), hormone-mediated signaling pathways (e.g. abscisic acid- activated signaling pathway’), reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolic process (e.g. ‘hydrogen peroxide catabolic process’) and transcription factors (e.g., ‘MYB, ZFP and bZIP’) were involved in dehydration and/or salt treatment. The molecular players in response to dehydration and salt treatment were partially overlapping. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis further confirmed the results from RNA-seq and sRNA-seq analysis. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms how citrus roots respond to dehydration and salt treatment. PMID:28165059

  13. Combined analysis of mRNA and miRNA identifies dehydration and salinity responsive key molecular players in citrus roots.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rangjin; Zhang, Jin; Ma, Yanyan; Pan, Xiaoting; Dong, Cuicui; Pang, Shaoping; He, Shaolan; Deng, Lie; Yi, Shilai; Zheng, Yongqiang; Lv, Qiang

    2017-02-06

    Citrus is one of the most economically important fruit crops around world. Drought and salinity stresses adversely affected its productivity and fruit quality. However, the genetic regulatory networks and signaling pathways involved in drought and salinity remain to be elucidated. With RNA-seq and sRNA-seq, an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression profiling and their regulatory networks were conducted using citrus roots subjected to dehydration and salt treatment. Differentially expressed (DE) mRNA and miRNA profiles were obtained according to fold change analysis and the relationships between miRNAs and target mRNAs were found to be coherent and incoherent in the regulatory networks. GO enrichment analysis revealed that some crucial biological processes related to signal transduction (e.g. 'MAPK cascade'), hormone-mediated signaling pathways (e.g. abscisic acid- activated signaling pathway'), reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolic process (e.g. 'hydrogen peroxide catabolic process') and transcription factors (e.g., 'MYB, ZFP and bZIP') were involved in dehydration and/or salt treatment. The molecular players in response to dehydration and salt treatment were partially overlapping. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis further confirmed the results from RNA-seq and sRNA-seq analysis. This study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms how citrus roots respond to dehydration and salt treatment.

  14. Fate of catechols in coal gasification condensate waters

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrich, K.E.

    1986-02-01

    Even after the wastewater has been subjected to rigorous cleaning, many chemicals still remain. In order to remove these compounds, they must be identified. Catechol is a compound which appears in the condensate water and, because its concentration changes, its fate is somewhat uncertain. In recent experiments modeling the condensate water conditions, catechol solutions were aerated in the presence of ammonia. Upon acidification of the solutions, a polymer precipitates. This polymer was compared to the black compound isolated from the condensate water by spectral and elemental analyses. The structures of the two polymers were reasonably similar. The kinetics of oxidation, as determined by the uptake of oxygen, indicates that the reaction was first order in catechol and oxygen. The rate was significantly enhanced by an increase in pH. Assuming that catechol is the only subunit of the polymers isolated from the different condensate waters, calculations would indicate that the initial catechol concentration varies from 440 to 1700 ppM. An attempt is being made to account for all of the carbon that appears in the water from the gasification process. Presently, only 60% to 70% of the carbon-containing products have been identified. Part of the remaining total organic carbon can be accounted for by the catechol polymer. Studying the fate of catechol in the coal gasification condensate water will help to develop an environmentally and financially feasible treatment of the wastewater. 4 refs.

  15. Spacecraft Crew Cabin Condensation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrillo, Laurie Y.; Rickman, Steven L.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2013-01-01

    A report discusses a new technique to prevent condensation on the cabin walls of manned spacecraft exposed to the cold environment of space, as such condensation could lead to free water in the cabin. This could facilitate the growth of mold and bacteria, and could lead to oxidation and weakening of the cabin wall. This condensation control technique employs a passive method that uses spacecraft waste heat as the primary wallheating mechanism. A network of heat pipes is bonded to the crew cabin pressure vessel, as well as the pipes to each other, in order to provide for efficient heat transfer to the cabin walls and from one heat pipe to another. When properly sized, the heat-pipe network can maintain the crew cabin walls at a nearly uniform temperature. It can also accept and distribute spacecraft waste heat to maintain the pressure vessel above dew point.

  16. Condensed Astatine: Monatomic and Metallic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N. W.

    2013-09-01

    The condensed matter properties of the nominal terminating element of the halogen group with atomic number 85, astatine, are as yet unknown. In the intervening more than 70 years since its discovery significant advances have been made in substrate cooling and the other techniques necessary for the production of the element to the point where we might now enquire about the key properties astatine might have if it attained a condensed phase. This subject is addressed here using density functional theory and structural selection methods, with an accounting for relativistic physics that is essential. Condensed astatine is predicted to be quite different in fascinating ways from iodine, being already at 1 atm a metal, and monatomic at that, and possibly a superconductor (as is dense iodine).

  17. Condensed astatine: monatomic and metallic.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N W

    2013-09-13

    The condensed matter properties of the nominal terminating element of the halogen group with atomic number 85, astatine, are as yet unknown. In the intervening more than 70 years since its discovery significant advances have been made in substrate cooling and the other techniques necessary for the production of the element to the point where we might now enquire about the key properties astatine might have if it attained a condensed phase. This subject is addressed here using density functional theory and structural selection methods, with an accounting for relativistic physics that is essential. Condensed astatine is predicted to be quite different in fascinating ways from iodine, being already at 1 atm a metal, and monatomic at that, and possibly a superconductor (as is dense iodine).

  18. Neuroamine condensations in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Collins, M A

    1980-01-01

    Non-enzymatic products of neuroamines and endogenous carbonyl compounds are apparent "normal" products in human metabolism, and their levels become increased during pathological conditions. DA condensation products--salsolinol, its O-methylated derivative, and methylated derivatives of 1-carboxyl-THP--are found normally in human urine, and the last TIQ is in human brain. Potential beta-carboline condensation products also occur in (aging) human lens tissue. Chronic drinking in alcoholics causes significant increases in urinary salsolinol and O-methyl-salsolinol, presumably due to the increased AcH which is made available. L-DOPA therapy (in Parkinson's disease) elevates urinary and tissue levels of the carboxylated THP derivatives, as well as of salsolinol and THP itself; hyperphenylalaninemia during PKU also increases tissue levels of a DA/phenylpyruvate-derived TIQ and an imine condensate of phenylethylamine and vitamin B6. These unusual products may interfere with neural dynamic processes, and produce cytotoxic metabolites.

  19. Introduction. Cosmology meets condensed matter.

    PubMed

    Kibble, T W B; Pickett, G R

    2008-08-28

    At first sight, low-temperature condensed-matter physics and early Universe cosmology seem worlds apart. Yet, in the last few years a remarkable synergy has developed between the two. It has emerged that, in terms of their mathematical description, there are surprisingly close parallels between them. This interplay has been the subject of a very successful European Science Foundation (ESF) programme entitled COSLAB ('Cosmology in the Laboratory') that ran from 2001 to 2006, itself built on an earlier ESF network called TOPDEF ('Topological Defects: Non-equilibrium Field Theory in Particle Physics, Condensed Matter and Cosmology'). The articles presented in this issue of Philosophical Transactions A are based on talks given at the Royal Society Discussion Meeting 'Cosmology meets condensed matter', held on 28 and 29 January 2008. Many of the speakers had participated earlier in the COSLAB programme, but the strength of the field is illustrated by the presence also of quite a few new participants.

  20. Deep-level magma dehydration and ascent rates at Mt. Etna (Sicily, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienti, P.; Perinelli, C.; Putirka, K.

    2012-04-01

    Magma ascent velocity, v (dH/dt; H = depth, t = time),can be determined from ascent rate (dP/dt), and rate of cooling (dT/dt): v= 1/(rgpg) (dP/dT)(dT/dt) where r is magma density, P is pressure, T is temperature and g is the acceleration of gravity. This equation for v provides a key to investigating the relationships between initial ascent rate of magma and the depths of magma dehydration, and v can be calculated using pressure and temperature (P - PH2O - T) estimates from mineral-liquid thermobarometry, and cooling rates inferred from Crystal Size Distribution (CSD) theory. For recent Mt. Etna lava flows, both dP/dT and dT/dt have been well characterized based, respectively, on clinopyroxene thermobarometry, and clinopyroxene CSDs (the latter yields dT/dt = 2x10-6 °C/s). Deep-level (>20 km) magma ascent rates range from practically 0 (where clinopyroxene P - T estimates form a cluster, and so dP/dT ≈ 0), to about 10 m/hr for flows that yield very steep P - T trajectories. Many lava flows at Mt. Etna yield P - T paths that follow a hydrous (about 3% water) clinopyroxene saturation surface, which closely approximates water contents obtained from melt inclusions. Independent assessments of deep level water content yield ascent rates of ~1 m/hr, in agreement with the slowest rates derived for magma effusion or vapor-driven ascent (~0.001 to >0.2 m/s, or 3.6 to 720 m/hr). Changes in P - T slopes, as obtained by pyroxene thermobarometry, indicate an upward acceleration of magma, which may be due to the onset of deep-level magma dehydration linked to the non-ideal behavior of water and CO2 mixtures that induce a deep-level maximum of water loss at P ≈ 0.4 MPa at T ≈ 1200 ° C for a CO2 content >1000ppm. Melt inclusion data on CO2 and H2O contents are successfully reproduced and interpreted in a context of magma dehydration induced by a CO2 flux possibly deriving by decarbonation reaction of the carbonate fraction of the Capo D'Orlando flysch.

  1. Condensation of anhydrides or dicarboxylic acids with compounds containing active methylene groups. Part 19: Condensation of phthalic and substituted phthalic anhydrides with benzoylacetic ester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rotberg, Y. T.; Oshkaya, V. P.

    1985-01-01

    Phthalylbenzoylacetic ester and its nitro and halogen derivatives were prepared through condensation of phthalic anhydride, nitrophthalic anhydride, and phthalic halide anhydride with benzoylacetic ester in a solution of acetic anhydride and triethylamine. The condensation of hemipinic acid anhydride proceeds similarly, but under more drastic conditions. Derivatives of indan-1,3-dione are also formed, with a small yield, in the reaction of nitrophthalic anhydrides with benzoylacetic ester in the presence of increased quantities of triethylamine.

  2. Scrutinizing the pion condensed phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignano, Stefano; Lepori, Luca; Mammarella, Andrea; Mannarelli, Massimo; Pagliaroli, Giulia

    2017-02-01

    When the isospin chemical potential exceeds the pion mass, charged pions condense in the zero-momentum state forming a superfluid. Chiral perturbation theory provides a very powerful tool for studying this phase. However, the formalism that is usually employed in this context does not clarify various aspects of the condensation mechanism and makes the identification of the soft modes problematic. We re-examine the pion condensed phase using different approaches within the chiral perturbation theory framework. As a first step, we perform a low-density expansion of the chiral Lagrangian valid close to the onset of the Bose-Einstein condensation. We obtain an effective theory that can be mapped to a Gross-Pitaevskii Lagrangian in which, remarkably, all the coefficients depend on the isospin chemical potential. The low-density expansion becomes unreliable deep in the pion condensed phase. For this reason, we develop an alternative field expansion deriving a low-energy Lagrangian analog to that of quantum magnets. By integrating out the "radial" fluctuations we obtain a soft Lagrangian in terms of the Nambu-Goldstone bosons arising from the breaking of the pion number symmetry. Finally, we test the robustness of the second-order transition between the normal and the pion condensed phase when next-to-leading-order chiral corrections are included. We determine the range of parameters for turning the second-order phase transition into a first-order one, finding that the currently accepted values of these corrections are unlikely to change the order of the phase transition.

  3. Fluid flow during slab unbending and dehydration: Implications for intermediate-depth seismicity, slab weakening and deep water recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenda, Manuele; Gerya, Taras V.; Mancktelow, Neil S.; Moresi, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Subducting oceanic plates carry a considerable amount of water from the surface down to mantle depths and contribute significantly to the global water cycle. A part of these volatiles stored in the slab is expelled at intermediate depths (70-300 km) where dehydration reactions occur. However, despite the fact that water considerably affects many physical properties of rocks, not much is known about the fluid flow path and the interaction with the rocks through which volatiles flow in the slab interior during its dehydration. We performed thermomechanical models (coupled with a petrological database and with incompressible aqueous fluid flow) of a dynamically subducting and dehydrating oceanic plate. Results show that, during slab dehydration, unbending stresses drive part of the released fluids into the cold core of the plate toward a level of strong tectonic under-pressure and neutral (slab-normal) pressure gradients. Fluids progressively accumulate and percolate updip along such a layer forming, together with the upper hydrated layer near the top of the slab, a Double Hydrated Zone (DHZ) where intermediate-depth seismicity could be triggered. The location and predicted mechanics of the DHZ would be consistent with seismological observations regarding Double Seismic Zones (DSZs) found in most subduction zones and suggests that hydrofracturing could be the trigger mechanism for observed intermediate-depth seismicity. In the light of our results, the lower plane of the DSZ is more likely to reflect a layer of upward percolating fluid than a level of mantle dehydration. In our models, a 20-30 km thick DSZ forms in relatively old oceanic plates without requiring an extremely deep slab hydration prior to subduction. The redistribution of fluids into the slab interior during slab unbending also has important implications for slab weakening and the deep water cycle. We estimate that, over the whole of Earth's history, a volume of water equivalent to around one to two

  4. On the onset of surface condensation: formation and transition mechanisms of condensation mode

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Qiang; Sun, Jie; Wang, Qian; Wang, Wen; Wang, Hua Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to investigate the onset of surface condensation. On surfaces with different wettability, we snapshot different condensation modes (no-condensation, dropwise condensation and filmwise condensation) and quantitatively analyze their characteristics by temporal profiles of surface clusters. Two different types of formation of nanoscale droplets are identified, i.e. the formations with and without film-like condensate. We exhibit the effect of surface tensions on the formations of nanoscale droplets and film. We reveal the formation mechanisms of different condensation modes at nanoscale based on our simulation results and classical nucleation theory, which supplements the ‘classical hypotheses’ of the onset of dropwise condensation. We also reveal the transition mechanism between different condensation modes based on the competition between surface tensions and reveal that dropwise condensation represents the transition states from no-condensation to filmwise condensation. PMID:27481071

  5. On the onset of surface condensation: formation and transition mechanisms of condensation mode.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Qiang; Sun, Jie; Wang, Qian; Wang, Wen; Wang, Hua Sheng

    2016-08-02

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to investigate the onset of surface condensation. On surfaces with different wettability, we snapshot different condensation modes (no-condensation, dropwise condensation and filmwise condensation) and quantitatively analyze their characteristics by temporal profiles of surface clusters. Two different types of formation of nanoscale droplets are identified, i.e. the formations with and without film-like condensate. We exhibit the effect of surface tensions on the formations of nanoscale droplets and film. We reveal the formation mechanisms of different condensation modes at nanoscale based on our simulation results and classical nucleation theory, which supplements the 'classical hypotheses' of the onset of dropwise condensation. We also reveal the transition mechanism between different condensation modes based on the competition between surface tensions and reveal that dropwise condensation represents the transition states from no-condensation to filmwise condensation.

  6. Oxidation, Reduction, and Condensation of Alcohols over (MO3)3 (M=Mo, W) Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zongtang; Li, Zhenjun; Kelley, Matthew S.; Kay, Bruce D.; Li, Shenggang; Hennigan, Jamie M.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Dixon, David A.

    2014-10-02

    The reactions of deuterated methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-propanol, 2-butanol and t-butanol over cyclic (MO3)3 (M = Mo, W) clusters were studied experimentally with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and theoretically with coupled cluster CCSD(T) theory and density functional theory. The reactions of two alcohols per M3O9 cluster are required to provide agreement with experiment for D2O release, dehydrogenation and dehydration. The reaction begins with the elimination of water by proton transfers and forms an intermediate dialkoxy species which can undergo further reaction. Dehydration proceeds by a β hydrogen transfer to a terminal M=O. Dehydrogenation takes place via an α hydrogen transfer to an adjacent MoVI = O atom or a WVI metal center with redox involved for M = Mo and no redox for M = W. The two channels have comparable activation energies. H/D exchange to produce alcohols can take place after olefin is released or via the dialkoxy species depending on the alcohol and the cluster. The Lewis acidity of the metal center with WVI being larger than MoVI results in the increased reactivity of W3O9 over Mo3O9 for dehydrogenation and dehydration.

  7. Condensed Matter Physics - Biology Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, G.

    The field of condensed matter physics had its genesis this century and it has had a remarkable evolution. A closer look at its growth reveals a hidden aim in the collective consciousness of the field - a part of the development this century is a kind of warm up exercise to understand the nature of living condensed matter, namely the field of biology, by a growing new breed of scientists in the coming century. Through some examples the vitality of this interaction will be pointed out.

  8. Tripol condensate polishing - operational experience

    SciTech Connect

    Swainsbury, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper gives a brief outline of the Mission Energy Management Australia Company who operate and maintain the Loy Yang B Power Station in the Latrobe Valley, Victoria, Australia. Details of the plant configuration, the water/steam circuit and cycle chemistry are discussed. The arrangement of the TRIPOL Condensate Polishing Plant and it`s operational modes are examined. Results of the first twelve months operation of the TRIPOL plant are detailed. Levels of crud removal during early commissioning phases employing the pre-filter are presented. Typical parameters achieved during a simulated condenser leak and an operational run beyond the ammonia break point are also documented.

  9. Andreev Reflection in Bosonic Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, I.; Sols, F.

    2009-05-08

    We study the bosonic analog of Andreev reflection at a normal-superfluid interface where the superfluid is a boson condensate. We model the normal region as a zone where nonlinear effects can be neglected. Against the background of a decaying condensate, we identify a novel contribution to the current of reflected atoms. The group velocity of this Andreev reflected component differs from that of the normally reflected one. For a three-dimensional planar or two-dimensional linear interface Andreev reflection is neither specular nor conjugate.

  10. Characterization of dehydration-induced luminescence of kaolinite.

    PubMed

    Lahav, N; Coyne, L; Lawless, J G

    1985-01-01

    Dehydration-induced luminescence (DIL), the emission of light from a clay paste upon dehydration, was characterized experimentally for a colloidal kaolinite. The relationship between total photon count of the emitted light and film thickness is linear up to a thickness of 30 micrometers. The photon emission was obtained over a critical range of water contents (25-60%) of the oven-dry clay, and the kinetics of photon emission was presumed to be closely associated with the kinetics of film dehydration. Whether drying proceeded throughout the bulk or via a moving front was undetermined, but in either mode it was preceded by the formation of a thin dry film at the interface with the atmosphere. Grinding of the kaolinite for several minutes by mortar and pestle before paste preparations resulted in an overall increase of photon emission compared to unground kaolinite and in the formation of more than one emission peak, as well as a prolongation of the light emission. This effect on the kinetics of light emittance was observed for about two months after the application of the mechanical stress and suggests a means of detecting the mechanical stress history of a clay. An estimate was made of the spectral characteristics of the emitted light using optical filters and by incorporating tryptophan and salicylic acid into the kaolinite paste where they acted as fluorescent probes. The latter technique shifted the frequency of the light emitted by the kaolinite from the ultraviolet to the visible range where it was less effectively reabsorbed. The first method showed that the wavelengths of 97% of the emitted light was <460 nm and that 75% of the light had wavelengths < 410 nm. The second method showed that the total intensity of DIL increased in the presence of fluorescence molecules, suggesting that the emittance was in the ultraviolet range.

  11. Deformation-induced dehydration structures in the Nankai accretionary prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Famin, V.; Byrne, T.; Lewis, J. C.; Kanagawa, K.; Behrmann, J.; Iodp 314/315/316 Scientists, E.

    2008-12-01

    This study investigates the chemical changes caused by deformation in the hanging wall of a major, probably seismogenic thrust fault in the Kumano forearc basin, Nankai Trough. In cores from IODP Expedition 315 (site C0001), the clay sediments display numerous deformation structures including tilted beddings, decimeter scale faults and shear zones with normal or thrust offsets, and clusters of parallel curviplanar veins interpreted as earthquake-induced dewatering structures. Curviplanar veins are often observed to merge into small oblique shear zones with millimeter offsets, or to branch on larger shear zones with a ~30° angle. This suggests that some shear zones may form by the coalescence of veins. Curviplanar veins and shear zones appear darker than the surrounding clay at the macroscopic observation scale, and brighter and therefore denser under CT-scan imaging. At the micro-scale, clay has a preferred crystallographic orientation in the deformation structures and no preferred orientation outside. Electron probe micro-analysis reveals that the dark material has a higher sum of major elements (65-80 wt%), i.e. a lower volatile content (assumed to be mostly water) than the host sediment (50-60 wt%). All the major elements are equally enriched in proportion to the volatile depletion. Mass balance calculation indicates that a 20-30 wt% water loss is required to account for chemical change in the deformation microstructures. The water loss may be due to clay dehydration or to pore collapse. Shear zones are equally dehydrated as the curviplanar veins from the mass balance standpoint. In 1 m3 of sediment, a deformed volume of 1 % should produce about 6.2 L of water. Given the low permeability of the sediment, dehydration may increase the pore pressure and enhance further deformation. Deformation localization would be self-sustained by fluid overpressure, suggesting that dewatering veins may evolve into larger deformation structures after an earthquake.

  12. Coupled deformation and dehydration processes in smectite-rich sediments constrained by laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huepers, Andre; Kopf, Achim J.

    2013-04-01

    Subduction zones play a central role in the geological activity of the earth which is expressed as devastating events such as earthquakes, tsunamis and explosive volcanism. Many processes that lead to such catastrophic behavior are driven by fluids, which in turn affect the rock mechanical behavior. The kinetic reaction of hydrous smectite to illite is widely accepted as a fluid source in subduction zone forearcs that also affects the mechanical state of subduction zone sediments. The released fluids are characterized by low-chlorinity and high volatile content. Also, previous workers demonstrated in uniaxial deformation tests that smectite partially dehydrates with increasing effective stress. To shed light on this process we performed uniaxial deformation experiments on smectite-rich samples from the Nankai and Costa Rica subduction zones. Experiments were conducted at temperatures of up to 100°C under constant rate of strain and effective stresses of up to ~100MPa. Fluids expelled during the experiments were analyzed for major and minor element content. The fluids are characterized by fluid-freshening and increasing volatile content that starts at ~1.3MPa effective stress. During the course of the experiments the smectite interlayer water content decreases from 27 wt-% to 20 wt-%. The released interlayer water comprises up to 17% of the total fluid volume released from the consolidating sediment. The onset of fluid freshening is characterized by a change in deformation behavior of the samples. The porosity decrease with increasing effective stress is smaller at effective stresses greater 1.3MPa. We propose that dehydration of the low permeable smectite leads to excess pore pressures in the sample, which causes a load transfer from the solid phase to the pore fluid.

  13. Crystallization of a protein using dehydration without a precipitant

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Miriam L.; Baker, Edward N.; Lott, J. Shaun

    2005-01-01

    Hypoxic response protein I (HRPI) is a protein of unknown biochemical function whose expression is very strongly upregulated in response to oxygen depletion in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Crystals have been grown from a solution of full-length HRPI by the unusual method of dehydration without the use of precipitants. The crystals produced diffract to a maximum resolution of 2.1 Å and belong to space group P41212 (or P43212), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.18, c = 37.34 Å. PMID:16511097

  14. Effects of dehydration on organ metabolism in the frog Pseudacris crucifer: hyperglycemic responses to dehydration mimic freezing-induced cryoprotectant production.

    PubMed

    Churchill, T A; Storey, K B

    1994-01-01

    The metabolic effects of evaporative water loss at 5 degrees C were assessed for both fall- and spring-collected spring peepers Pseudacris crucifer. Frogs readily endured the loss of 50% of total body water. During dehydration organ water content was defined with no change in water content in skeletal muscle, gut, and kidney of 50% dehydrated frogs and reduced water content in liver, brain and heart. Dehydration stimulated a rapid and massive increase in liver glucose production. In fall-collected frogs liver glucose rose by 120-fold to 2690 +/- 400 nmol.mg protein-1 or 220 mumol.g ww-1 in 50% dehydrated frogs and glucose in other organs increased by 2.6- to 60-fold. Spring-collected frogs showed the same qualitative response to dehydration although absolute glucose levels were lower, rising maximally by 8.4-fold in liver. Glucose synthesis was supported by glycogenolysis in liver and changes in the levels of glycolytic intermediates in liver indicated that an inhibitory block at the phosphofructokinase locus during desiccation helped to divert hexose phosphates into the production of glucose. Liver energy status (ATP, total adenylates, energy charge) was maintained even after the loss of 35% of total body water but at 50% dehydration all parameters showed a sharp decline; for example, energy charge fell from about 0.85 to 0.42. Severe dehydration also led to an accumulation of lactate in four organs, probably hypoxia-induced due to impaired circulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Effects of dehydration on immune functions after a judo practice session.

    PubMed

    Chishaki, Takeharu; Umeda, Takashi; Takahashi, Ippei; Matsuzaka, Masashi; Iwane, Kaori; Matsumoto, Hidehiko; Ishibashi, Goshi; Ueno, Yuichi; Kashiwa, Naohiro; Nakaji, Shigeyuki

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of dehydration after a judo practice session on player muscle and immune functions. Subjects included 25 female university judoists. Investigations were performed before and after 2.5 h of regular judo practice. Body composition, serum enzymes (myogenic enzymes, immunoglobulins and complements), neutrophils counts, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production capability, and phagocytic activity (PA) were measured. Subjects were divided into two groups according to level of dehydration after practice (mild dehydration and severe dehydration groups) and results were compared. Creatine kinase was found to increase significantly after practice. In addition, neutrophil count also increased significantly after practice in both groups. The changing ratios of IgA, IgG and C3 observed in the mild dehydration group were significantly higher than those in the severe dehydration group. In the severe dehydration group, post-practice PA/neutrophil had decreased significantly. Significant positive correlations were found between severity of dehydration and changing ratios of IgA, IgG, IgM, C3, C4 and ROS production capabilities, whereas no significant association was seen with PA and/or serum SOD activity. These results suggest that dehydration resulted in immunosuppression, including decreased neutrophil function.

  16. Visualization of early chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    Kireeva, Natashe; Lakonishok, Margot; Kireev, Igor; Hirano, Tatsuya; Belmont, Andrew S.

    2004-01-01

    Current models of mitotic chromosome structure are based largely on the examination of maximally condensed metaphase chromosomes. Here, we test these models by correlating the distribution of two scaffold components with the appearance of prophase chromosome folding intermediates. We confirm an axial distribution of topoisomerase IIα and the condensin subunit, structural maintenance of chromosomes 2 (SMC2), in unextracted metaphase chromosomes, with SMC2 localizing to a 150–200-nm-diameter central core. In contrast to predictions of radial loop/scaffold models, this axial distribution does not appear until late prophase, after formation of uniformly condensed middle prophase chromosomes. Instead, SMC2 associates throughout early and middle prophase chromatids, frequently forming foci over the chromosome exterior. Early prophase condensation occurs through folding of large-scale chromatin fibers into condensed masses. These resolve into linear, 200–300-nm-diameter middle prophase chromatids that double in diameter by late prophase. We propose a unified model of chromosome structure in which hierarchical levels of chromatin folding are stabilized late in mitosis by an axial “glue.” PMID:15353545

  17. Magnetofermionic condensate in two dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Kulik, L. V.; Zhuravlev, A. S.; Dickmann, S.; Gorbunov, A. V.; Timofeev, V. B.; Kukushkin, I. V.; Schmult, S.

    2016-01-01

    Coherent condensate states of particles obeying either Bose or Fermi statistics are in the focus of interest in modern physics. Here we report on condensation of collective excitations with Bose statistics, cyclotron magnetoexcitons, in a high-mobility two-dimensional electron system in a magnetic field. At low temperatures, the dense non-equilibrium ensemble of long-lived triplet magnetoexcitons exhibits both a drastic reduction in the viscosity and a steep enhancement in the response to the external electromagnetic field. The observed effects are related to formation of a super-absorbing state interacting coherently with the electromagnetic field. Simultaneously, the electrons below the Fermi level form a super-emitting state. The effects are explicable from the viewpoint of a coherent condensate phase in a non-equilibrium system of two-dimensional fermions with a fully quantized energy spectrum. The condensation occurs in the space of vectors of magnetic translations, a property providing a completely new landscape for future physical investigations. PMID:27848969

  18. Linker DNA destabilizes condensed chromatin.

    PubMed

    Green, G R; Ferlita, R R; Walkenhorst, W F; Poccia, D L

    2001-01-01

    The contribution of the linker region to maintenance of condensed chromatin was examined in two model systems, namely sea urchin sperm nuclei and chicken red blood cell nuclei. Linkerless nuclei, prepared by extensive digestion with micrococcal nuclease, were compared with Native nuclei using several assays, including microscopic appearance, nuclear turbidity, salt stability, and trypsin resistance. Chromatin in the Linkerless nuclei was highly condensed, resembling pyknotic chromatin in apoptotic cells. Linkerless nuclei were more stable in low ionic strength buffers and more resistant to trypsin than Native nuclei. Analysis of histones from the trypsinized nuclei by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that specific histone H1, H2B, and H3 tail regions stabilized linker DNA in condensed nuclei. Thermal denaturation of soluble chromatin preparations from differentially trypsinized sperm nuclei demonstrated that the N-terminal regions of histones Sp H1, Sp H2B, and H3 bind tightly to linker DNA, causing it to denature at a high temperature. We conclude that linker DNA exerts a disruptive force on condensed chromatin structure which is counteracted by binding of specific histone tail regions to the linker DNA. The inherent instability of the linker region may be significant in all eukaryotic chromatins and may promote gene activation in living cells.

  19. Magnetofermionic condensate in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Kulik, L V; Zhuravlev, A S; Dickmann, S; Gorbunov, A V; Timofeev, V B; Kukushkin, I V; Schmult, S

    2016-11-16

    Coherent condensate states of particles obeying either Bose or Fermi statistics are in the focus of interest in modern physics. Here we report on condensation of collective excitations with Bose statistics, cyclotron magnetoexcitons, in a high-mobility two-dimensional electron system in a magnetic field. At low temperatures, the dense non-equilibrium ensemble of long-lived triplet magnetoexcitons exhibits both a drastic reduction in the viscosity and a steep enhancement in the response to the external electromagnetic field. The observed effects are related to formation of a super-absorbing state interacting coherently with the electromagnetic field. Simultaneously, the electrons below the Fermi level form a super-emitting state. The effects are explicable from the viewpoint of a coherent condensate phase in a non-equilibrium system of two-dimensional fermions with a fully quantized energy spectrum. The condensation occurs in the space of vectors of magnetic translations, a property providing a completely new landscape for future physical investigations.

  20. Approaching Bose-Einstein Condensation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Loris

    2011-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is discussed at the level of an advanced course of statistical thermodynamics, clarifying some formal and physical aspects that are usually not covered by the standard pedagogical literature. The non-conventional approach adopted starts by showing that the continuum limit, in certain cases, cancels out the crucial…

  1. Magnetofermionic condensate in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulik, L. V.; Zhuravlev, A. S.; Dickmann, S.; Gorbunov, A. V.; Timofeev, V. B.; Kukushkin, I. V.; Schmult, S.

    2016-11-01

    Coherent condensate states of particles obeying either Bose or Fermi statistics are in the focus of interest in modern physics. Here we report on condensation of collective excitations with Bose statistics, cyclotron magnetoexcitons, in a high-mobility two-dimensional electron system in a magnetic field. At low temperatures, the dense non-equilibrium ensemble of long-lived triplet magnetoexcitons exhibits both a drastic reduction in the viscosity and a steep enhancement in the response to the external electromagnetic field. The observed effects are related to formation of a super-absorbing state interacting coherently with the electromagnetic field. Simultaneously, the electrons below the Fermi level form a super-emitting state. The effects are explicable from the viewpoint of a coherent condensate phase in a non-equilibrium system of two-dimensional fermions with a fully quantized energy spectrum. The condensation occurs in the space of vectors of magnetic translations, a property providing a completely new landscape for future physical investigations.

  2. Severe hypercalcaemia and colon ischaemia: dehydration as an unusual cause?

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Liliana Gil; Ferreira, Nuno Ribeiro; Cardiga, Rosa; Póvoa, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcaemia is an emergency with severe consequences. Dehydration can be an uncommon cause of hypercalcaemia, as seen in this case. A 63-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism and osteoporosis, was admitted to the emergency room with abdominal distension and vomiting for 24 h. Initial evaluation was Hg 18.5 g/dL, Htc 56.2%, creatinine 2 mg/dL, metabolic acidaemia, lactate 8.3 mmol/L, anion gap 19, total Ca2+ 17.7 mg/dL and PO4+ 6.6 mg/dL. CT revealed colonic distension without obstruction or ischaemia. Renal replacement therapy and pamidronate were initiated. The patient's clinical condition deteriorated with septic shock in the context of toxic megacolon and she underwent an emergency subtotal colectomy (10 kg). Hypercalcaemia was corrected in 24 h with aggressive fluid replacement (8 L NaCl 0.9% first 12 h), with a reduction of total Ca2+ to 8.2 mg/dL. Other causes of hypercalcaemia were excluded. ‘Hypercalcaemic crisis’ secondary to severe acute dehydration is not mentioned in the literature. PMID:25809432

  3. Dehydration of isopropanol by pervaporation using aromatic polyetherimide membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.Y.M.; Feng, X. )

    1993-08-01

    Aromatic polyetherimide membranes were prepared by the phase inversion method and tested for the pervaporation separation of water from isopropanol with emphasis on the breaking of azcotropic composition and the dehydration of high concentrations of isopropanol. It was found that the membrane selectivity was enhanced by partial evaporation of the solvent in the cast polymer films prior to the gelation step during membrane formation. The membrane performance was shown to be dependent on the feed concentration and the operating temperature. At a feed temperature of 25[degree]C and a permeate pressure of 133 Pa, separation factors of 173 and 384 were achieved for the dehydration of isopropanol solutions at 0.68 (azeotropic composition) and 0.96 mole fractions isopropanol, respectively, with reasonably high permeation rates. The utility of the membranes for the proposed separation was demonstrated; however, these membranes were not prepared under optimized conditions and thus a continuous study is required to rationalize the effects of membrane preparation parameters on membrane performance. 20 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Twin formation in hematite during dehydration of goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Genki; Kunisada, Yuji; Nomura, Takahiro; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Akiyama, Tomohiro

    2016-11-01

    Twin formation in hematite during dehydration was investigated using X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). When synthetic goethite was heated at different temperatures between 100 and 800 °C, a phase transformation occurred at temperatures above 250 °C. The electron diffraction patterns showed that the single-crystalline goethite with a growth direction of [001]G was transformed into hematite with a growth direction of [100]H. Two non-equivalent structures emerged in hematite after dehydration, with twin boundaries at the interface between the two variants. As the temperature was increased, crystal growth occurred. At 800 °C, the majority of the twin boundaries disappeared; however, some hematite particles remained in the twinned variant. The electron diffraction patterns and high-resolution TEM observations indicated that the twin boundaries consisted of crystallographically equivalent prismatic (100) (010), and (1bar{1}0) planes. According to the total energy calculations based on spin-polarized density functional theory, the twin boundary of prismatic (100) screw had small interfacial energy (0.24 J/m2). Owing to this low interfacial energy, the prismatic (100) screw interface remained after higher-temperature treatment at 800 °C.

  5. Enzyme dehydration using Microglassification™ preserves the protein's structure and function.

    PubMed

    Aniket; Gaul, David A; Bitterfield, Deborah L; Su, Jonathan T; Li, Victoria M; Singh, Ishita; Morton, Jackson; Needham, David

    2015-02-01

    Controlled enzyme dehydration using a new processing technique of Microglassification™ has been investigated. Aqueous solution microdroplets of lysozyme, α-chymotrypsin, catalase, and horseradish peroxidase were dehydrated in n-pentanol, n-octanol, n-decanol, triacetin, or butyl lactate, and changes in their structure and function were analyzed upon rehydration. Water solubility and microdroplet dissolution rate in each solvent decreased in the order: butyl lactate > n-pentanol > triacetin > n-octanol > n-decanol. Enzymes Microglassified™ in n-pentanol retained higher activity (93%-98%) than n-octanol (78%-85%) or n-decanol (75%-89%), whereas those Microglassified™ in triacetin (36%-75%) and butyl lactate (48%-79%) retained markedly lower activity. FTIR spectroscopy analyses showed α-helix to β-sheet transformation for all enzymes upon Microglassification™, reflecting a loss of bound water in the dried state; however, the enzymes reverted to native-like conformation upon rehydration. Accelerated stressed-storage tests using Microglassified™ lysozyme showed a significant (p < 0.01) decrease in enzymatic activity from 46,560 ± 2736 to 31,060 ± 4327 units/mg after 3 months of incubation; however, it was comparable to the activity of the lyophilized formulation throughout the test period. These results establish Microglassification™ as a viable technique for enzyme preservation without affecting its structure or function.

  6. Structural and functional insights into asymmetric enzymatic dehydration of alkenols.

    PubMed

    Nestl, Bettina M; Geinitz, Christopher; Popa, Stephanie; Rizek, Sari; Haselbeck, Robert J; Stephen, Rosary; Noble, Michael A; Fischer, Max-Philipp; Ralph, Erik C; Hau, Hoi Ting; Man, Henry; Omar, Muhiadin; Turkenburg, Johan P; van Dien, Stephen; Culler, Stephanie J; Grogan, Gideon; Hauer, Bernhard

    2017-03-01

    The asymmetric dehydration of alcohols is an important process for the direct synthesis of alkenes. We report the structure and substrate specificity of the bifunctional linalool dehydratase isomerase (LinD) from the bacterium Castellaniella defragrans that catalyzes in nature the hydration of β-myrcene to linalool and the subsequent isomerization to geraniol. Enzymatic kinetic resolutions of truncated and elongated aromatic and aliphatic tertiary alcohols (C5-C15) that contain a specific signature motif demonstrate the broad substrate specificity of LinD. The three-dimensional structure of LinD from Castellaniella defragrans revealed a pentamer with active sites at the protomer interfaces. Furthermore, the structure of LinD in complex with the product geraniol provides initial mechanistic insights into this bifunctional enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed active site amino acid residues essential for its dehydration and isomerization activity. These structural and mechanistic insights facilitate the development of hydrating catalysts, enriching the toolbox for novel bond-forming biocatalysis.

  7. Dehydration-induced amorphous phases of calcium carbonate.

    PubMed

    Saharay, Moumita; Yazaydin, A Ozgur; Kirkpatrick, R James

    2013-03-28

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a critical transient phase in the inorganic precipitation of CaCO3 and in biomineralization. The calcium carbonate crystallization pathway is thought to involve dehydration of more hydrated ACC to less hydrated ACC followed by the formation of anhydrous ACC. We present here computational studies of the transition of a hydrated ACC with a H2O/CaCO3 ratio of 1.0 to anhydrous ACC. During dehydration, ACC undergoes reorganization to a more ordered structure with a significant increase in density. The computed density of anhydrous ACC is similar to that of calcite, the stable crystalline phase. Compared to the crystalline CaCO3 phases, calcite, vaterite, and aragonite, the computed local structure of anhydrous ACC is most-similar to those of calcite and vaterite, but the overall structure is not well described by either. The strong hydrogen bond interaction between the carbonate ions and water molecules plays a crucial role in stabilizing the less hydrated ACC compositions compared to the more hydrated ones, leading to a progressively increasing hydration energy with decreasing water content.

  8. Dehydration induced loss of photosynthesis in Arabidopsis leaves during senescence is accompanied by the reversible enhancement in the activity of cell wall β-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Patro, Lichita; Mohapatra, Pranab Kishor; Biswal, Udaya Chand; Biswal, Basanti

    2014-08-01

    The physiology of loss of photosynthetic production of sugar and the consequent cellular sugar reprogramming during senescence of leaves experiencing environmental stress largely remains unclear. We have shown that leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana causes a significant reduction in the rate of oxygen evolution and net photosynthetic rate (Pn). The decline in photosynthesis is further aggravated by dehydration. During dehydration, primary photochemical reaction of thylakoids and net photosynthesis decrease in parallel with the increase in water deficit. Senescence induced loss in photosynthesis is accompanied by a significant increase in the activity of cell wall hydrolyzing enzyme such as β-glucosidase associated with cell wall catabolism. The activity of this enzyme is further enhanced when the senescing leaves experience dehydration stress. It is possible that both senescence and stress separately or in combination result in the loss in photosynthesis which could be a signal for an enhancement in the activity of β-glucosidase that breaks down cell wall polysaccharides to sugar to sustain respiration for metabolic activities of plants experiencing stress. Thus dehydration response of cell wall hydrolases of senescing leaves is considered as plants' strategy to have cell wall polysaccharides as an alternative energy source for completion of energy requiring senescence process, stress survival and maintenance of recovery potential of energy deficit cells in the background of loss in photosynthesis. Withdrawal of stress (rehydration) distinctly exhibits recovery of photosynthesis and suppression of enzyme activity. Retention of the signaling for sugar reprogramming through breakdown of cell wall polysaccharides in the senescing leaves exposed to severe drought stress suggests that senescing leaves like mature ones possess potential for stress recovery. The precise mechanism of stress adaptation of senescing leaves is yet to be known. A significant

  9. Inactivation mechanism of glycerol dehydration by diol dehydratase from combined quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations.

    PubMed

    Doitomi, Kazuki; Kamachi, Takashi; Toraya, Tetsuo; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2012-11-13

    Inactivation of diol dehydratase during the glycerol dehydration reaction is studied on the basis of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations. Glycerol is not a chiral compound but contains a prochiral carbon atom. Once it is bound to the active site, the enzyme adopts two binding conformations. One is predominantly responsible for the product-forming reaction (G(R) conformation), and the other primarily contributes to inactivation (G(S) conformation). Reactant radical is converted into a product and byproduct in the product-forming reaction and inactivation, respectively. The OH group migrates from C2 to C1 in the product-forming reaction, whereas the transfer of a hydrogen from the 3-OH group of glycerol to C1 takes place during the inactivation. The activation barrier of the hydrogen transfer does not depend on the substrate-binding conformation. On the other hand, the activation barrier of OH group migration is sensitive to conformation and is 4.5 kcal/mol lower in the G(R) conformation than in the G(S) conformation. In the OH group migration, Glu170 plays a critical role in stabilizing the reactant radical in the G(S) conformation. Moreover, the hydrogen bonding interaction between Ser301 and the 3-OH group of glycerol lowers the activation barrier in G(R)-TS2. As a result, the difference in energy between the hydrogen transfer and the OH group migration is reduced in the G(S) conformation, which shows that the inactivation is favored in the G(S) conformation.

  10. Wettability modified nanoporous ceramic membrane for simultaneous residual heat and condensate recovery.

    PubMed

    Hu, H W; Tang, G H; Niu, D

    2016-06-07

    Recovery of both latent heat and condensate from boiler flue gas is significant for improving boiler efficiency and water conservation. The condensation experiments are carried out to investigate the simultaneous heat and mass transfer across the nanoporous ceramic membranes (NPCMs) which are treated to be hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces using the semicontinuous supercritical reactions. The effects of typical parameters including coolant flow rate, vapor/nitrogen gas mixture temperature, water vapor volume fraction and transmembrane pressure on heat and mass transfer performance are studied. The experimental results show that the hydrophilic NPCM exhibits higher performances of condensation heat transfer and condensate recovery. However, the hydrophobic modification results in remarkable degradation of heat and condensate recovery from the mixture. Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to establish a hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore/water liquid system, and the infiltration characteristics of the single hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore is revealed.

  11. Wettability modified nanoporous ceramic membrane for simultaneous residual heat and condensate recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, H. W.; Tang, G. H.; Niu, D.

    2016-06-01

    Recovery of both latent heat and condensate from boiler flue gas is significant for improving boiler efficiency and water conservation. The condensation experiments are carried out to investigate the simultaneous heat and mass transfer across the nanoporous ceramic membranes (NPCMs) which are treated to be hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces using the semicontinuous supercritical reactions. The effects of typical parameters including coolant flow rate, vapor/nitrogen gas mixture temperature, water vapor volume fraction and transmembrane pressure on heat and mass transfer performance are studied. The experimental results show that the hydrophilic NPCM exhibits higher performances of condensation heat transfer and condensate recovery. However, the hydrophobic modification results in remarkable degradation of heat and condensate recovery from the mixture. Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to establish a hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore/water liquid system, and the infiltration characteristics of the single hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore is revealed.

  12. Wettability modified nanoporous ceramic membrane for simultaneous residual heat and condensate recovery

    PubMed Central

    Hu, H. W.; Tang, G. H.; Niu, D.

    2016-01-01

    Recovery of both latent heat and condensate from boiler flue gas is significant for improving boiler efficiency and water conservation. The condensation experiments are carried out to investigate the simultaneous heat and mass transfer across the nanoporous ceramic membranes (NPCMs) which are treated to be hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces using the semicontinuous supercritical reactions. The effects of typical parameters including coolant flow rate, vapor/nitrogen gas mixture temperature, water vapor volume fraction and transmembrane pressure on heat and mass transfer performance are studied. The experimental results show that the hydrophilic NPCM exhibits higher performances of condensation heat transfer and condensate recovery. However, the hydrophobic modification results in remarkable degradation of heat and condensate recovery from the mixture. Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to establish a hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore/water liquid system, and the infiltration characteristics of the single hydrophilic/hydrophobic nanopore is revealed. PMID:27270997

  13. Influence of iodine on the treatment of spacecraft humidity condensate to produce potable water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symons, James M.; Muckle, Susan V.

    1990-01-01

    Several compounds in the ersatz humidity condensate do react with iodine to form iodine-substituted organic compounds (TOI), most notably phenol, acetaldehyde, ethanol, and sodium formate. Iodination of the ersatz humidity condensate produced 3.0 to 3.5 mg/L of TOI within 24 hours. The TOI that was produced by the passage of the ersatz humidity condensate through the first iodinated resin (IR) in the adsorption system was removed by the granular activated carbon that followed. TOI detected in the final effluent was formed by the reaction of the non-adsorbable condensate compounds with the final IR in the treatment series. The activated carbon bed series in the adsorption system performed poorly in its removal of TOC. The rapid breakthrough of TOC was not surprising, as the ersatz humidity condensate contained several highly soluble organic compounds, alcohols and organic acids.

  14. Selective synthesis of alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones by dibutyltin dimethoxide-catalyzed condensation of aldehydes with alkenyl trichloroacetates.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Akira; Goudu, Riku; Arai, Takayoshi

    2004-11-11

    Various alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones were stereoselectively synthesized in high yields up to 94% by a condensation reaction between alkenyl trichloroacetates and aldehydes using dibutyltin dimethoxide as a catalyst in the presence of methanol. This process is superior to the classical Claisen-Schmidt condensation with respect to mildness of the base catalyst and product selectivity.

  15. Dehydration experiments on natural omphacites: qualitative and quantitative characterization by various spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch-Müller, M.; Abs-Wurmbach, I.; Rhede, D.; Kahlenberg, V.; Matsyuk, S.

    2007-11-01

    increase in Fe3+. That dehydration is correlated with oxidation of Fe2+ is indirectly confirmed by annealing of one sample in a gas mixing furnace at 700°C under reducing conditions keeping almost constant OH- content and giving no indication of Fe2+-oxidation. Obtained data indicate that in samples with a relatively high concentration of Fe2+ at M2 and low-water concentrations, i.e., at a ratio of Fe2+ M2/H > 10 dehydration occurs by iron oxidation of Fe2+ exclusively at the M2 site following the reaction: {left[ {{text{Fe}}^{{{text{2 + [ M2]}}}}{text{OH}}^{ - } } right]} = {left[ {{text{Fe}}^{{{text{3 + [ M2]}}}} {text{O}}^{{{text{2}} - }} } right]} + {text{1/2}}{text{H}}_{{text{2}}} \\uparrow . In samples having relatively low concentration of Fe2+ at M2 but high-water concentrations, i.e., ratio of Fe2+ M2/H < 5.0 dehydration occurs through oxidation of Fe2+ at M1.

  16. Internally drained condenser for spacecraft thermal management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A.; Drew, Brian C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained to date in a program to develop a high heat flux condenser for use in two-phase spacecraft thermal management loops. The objective is to obtain a several fold increase in condensation heat transfer coefficient over those which can be achieved with shear-controlled or capillary-wick condensers. The internally drained condenser relies on shaped fins to develop a capillary pressure gradient over the surface of the fins and drive the condensate toward narrow drainage grooves separating the fins. The condensate then flows through a drainage network embedded in the condenser walls. Heat transfer coefficients of up to 8 W/sq cm C were measured in steam, providing a heat transfer enhancement ratio greater than a factor of 8. In the paper the proof-of-concept experiments are described and simplified models to predict the performance of the internally drained condenser are presented.

  17. Witness of fluid-flow organization during high-pressure antigorite dehydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; Garrido, Carlos J.; Gómez-Pugnaire, María. Teresa

    2010-05-01

    The link between devolatilization reactions and fluid flow is crucial to unravel important geodynamic processes in subduction zones as deformation and element transfer is extremely controlled by the presence of water. At high confining pressure, significant fluid pressure gradients are expected in a reacting rock being dehydrated, because of its rather limited permeability [1]. Compactation-driven fluid flow seems to be an intrinsic mechanism occurring at devolatilization of viscolastic rocks. Nevertheless, and despite the important implications of this coupled deformation/fluid-migration mechanism for fluid transport, a conclusive confirmation of these processes by petrological and textural evidences in metamorphic terrains has been hampered by the scarcity of devolatilization fronts in the geological record. Evidences of high-pressure antigorite dehydration found at Cerro del Almirez (Betic Cordillera, Spain) [2] represent a noteworthy exception. Here, the transition between the hydrous protolith (antigorite serpentinite) and the prograde product assemblage (olivine + orthopyroxene + chlorite, chlorite harzburgite) is extremely well preserved and can be surveyed in detail. The maximum stability of the antigorite has been experimentally determined at ~680°C at 1.6-1.9 GPa [3]. Antigorite dehydration is accompanied by release of high amounts of high-pressure water-rich fluids (~ 9 wt.% fluid). Distinctive layers (up to 1 m thick) of transitional lithologies occur in between atg-serpentinite and chl-harburgite all along the devolatilization front, consisting of (1) chlorite-antigorite olivine-serpentinite, which gradually changes to (2) chlorite-antigorite-olivine-orthopyroxene serpentinite. These transitional lithologies are more massive and darker in color than atg-serpentinite and largely consist of coarse sized grains of antigorite and chlorite (250-500 μm). Antigorite in these assemblages is characterized by microstructural disorder features, which are

  18. Film condensation in a horizontal rectangular duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Qing; Suryanarayana, N. V.

    1992-01-01

    Condensation heat transfer in an annular flow regime with and without interfacial waves was experimentally investigated. The study included measurements of heat transfer rate with condensation of vapor flowing inside a horizontal rectangular duct and experiments on the initiation of interfacial waves in condensation, and adiabatic air-liquid flow. An analytical model for the condensation was developed to predict condensate film thickness and heat transfer coefficients. Some conclusions drawn from the study are that the condensate film thickness was very thin (less than 0.6 mm). The average heat transfer coefficient increased with increasing the inlet vapor velocity. The local heat transfer coefficient decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface, with the largest change at the leading edge of the test section. The interfacial shear stress, which consisted of the momentum shear stress and the adiabatic shear stress, appeared to have a significant effect on the heat transfer coefficients. In the experiment, the condensate flow along the condensing surface experienced a smooth flow, a two-dimensional wavy flow, and a three-dimensional wavy flow. In the condensation experiment, the local wave length decreased with the axial distance of the condensing surface and the average wave length decreased with increasing inlet vapor velocity, while the wave speed increased with increasing vapor velocity. The heat transfer measurements are reliable. And, the ultrasonic technique was effective for measuring the condensate film thickness when the surface was smooth or had waves of small amplitude.

  19. Proceedings: 2000 Workshop on Condensate Polishing

    SciTech Connect

    2001-06-01

    Condensate polishing maintains control of impurities in the nuclear power plant and allows the unit to operate more reliably. This report presents proceedings of EPRI's 2000 Workshop on Condensate Polishing, where 30 papers were presented on current issues and utility experience involving condensate polishing at both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) plants.

  20. Exciton-polaritons condensate in a microwire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamoun, O.; Jaziri, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, polariton condensation has been claimed in microwires. Numerical solutions of the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation that describes the behavior of the condensate in a trap and exciton-polariton interaction, have been obtained. In this work we study theoretically exciton-polariton one dimensional condensation in several quantized states.

  1. Modelling couplings between reaction, fluid flow and deformation: Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yury Y.; Connolly, James A. D.

    2016-04-01

    Mineral assemblages out of equilibrium are commonly found in metamorphic rocks testifying of the critical role of kinetics for metamorphic reactions. As experimentally determined reaction rates in fluid-saturated systems generally indicate complete reaction in less than several years, i.e. several orders of magnitude faster than field-based estimates, metamorphic reaction kinetics are generally thought to be controlled by transport rather than by processes at the mineral surface. However, some geological processes like earthquakes or slow-slip events have shorter characteristic timescales, and transport processes can be intimately related to mineral surface processes. Therefore, it is important to take into account the kinetics of mineral surface processes for modelling fluid/rock interactions. Here, a model coupling reaction, fluid flow and deformation was improved by introducing a delay in the achievement of equilibrium. The classical formalism for dissolution/precipitation reactions was used to consider the influence of the distance from equilibrium and of temperature on the reaction rate, and a dependence on porosity was introduced to model evolution of reacting surface area during reaction. The fitting of experimental data for three reactions typically occurring in metamorphic systems (serpentine dehydration, muscovite dehydration and calcite decarbonation) indicates a systematic faster kinetics close from equilibrium on the dehydration side than on the hydration side. This effect is amplified through the porosity term in the reaction rate since porosity is formed during dehydration. Numerical modelling indicates that this difference in reaction rate close from equilibrium plays a key role in microtextures formation. The developed model can be used in a wide variety of geological systems where couplings between reaction, deformation and fluid flow have to be considered.

  2. Condensed matter analogues of cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibble, Tom; Srivastava, Ajit

    2013-10-01

    It is always exciting when developments in one branch of physics turn out to have relevance in a quite different branch. It would be hard to find two branches farther apart in terms of energy scales than early-universe cosmology and low-temperature condensed matter physics. Nevertheless ideas about the formation of topological defects during rapid phase transitions that originated in the context of the very early universe have proved remarkably fruitful when applied to a variety of condensed matter systems. The mathematical frameworks for describing these systems can be very similar. This interconnection has led to a deeper understanding of the phenomena in condensed matter systems utilizing ideas from cosmology. At the same time, one can view these condensed matter analogues as providing, at least in a limited sense, experimental access to the phenomena of the early universe for which no direct probe is possible. As this special issue well illustrates, this remains a dynamic and exciting field. The basic idea is that when a system goes through a rapid symmetry-breaking phase transition from a symmetric phase into one with spontaneously broken symmetry, the order parameter may make different choices in different regions, creating domains that when they meet can trap defects. The scale of those domains, and hence the density of defects, is constrained by the rate at which the system goes through the transition and the speed with which order parameter information propagates. This is what has come to be known as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The resultant scaling laws have now been tested in a considerable variety of different systems. The earliest experiments illustrating the analogy between cosmology and condensed matter were in liquid crystals, in particular on the isotropic-to-nematic transition, primarily because it is very easy to induce the phase transition (typically at room temperature) and to image precisely what is going on. This field remains one of the

  3. Skeletal muscle volume following dehydration induced by exercise in heat

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Intracellular skeletal muscle water is redistributed into the extracellular compartment during periods of dehydration, suggesting an associated decline in muscle volume. The purpose of this study was to evaluate skeletal muscle volume in active (knee extensors (KE)) and less active (biceps/triceps brachii, deltoid) musculature following dehydration induced by exercise in heat. Methods Twelve participants (seven men, five women) cycled in the heat under two conditions: (1) dehydration (DHYD) resulting in 3% and 5% losses of estimated total body water (ETBW), which was assessed by changes in body mass, and (2) fluid replacement (FR) where 3% and 5% losses of ETBW were counteracted by intermittent (20 to 30 min) fluid ingestion via a carbohydrate-electrolyte beverage. During both conditions, serum osmolality and skeletal muscle volume (assessed by magnetic resonance imaging) were measured at baseline and at the 3% and 5% ETBW loss measurement points. Results In DHYD, serum osmolality increased at 3% (p = 0.005) and 5% (p < 0.001) ETBW losses, while FR decreased serum osmolality at the 5% loss of ETBW time point (p = 0.009). In DHYD, KE muscle volume declined from 1,464 ± 446 ml to 1,406 ± 425 ml (3.9%, p < 0.001) at 3% ETBW loss and to 1,378 ± 421 ml (5.9%, p < 0.001) at 5% ETBW loss. The largest decline in KE volume in DYHD occurred in the mid-belly (31 ml, p = 0.001) and proximal (24 ml, p = 0.001) regions of the grouped vasti muscles. There were no changes in volume for the biceps/triceps (p = 0.35) or deltoid (p = 0.92) during DHYD. FR prevented the loss of KE muscle volume at 3% (1,430 ± 435 ml, p = 0.074) and 5% (1,431 ± 439 ml, p = 0.156) ETBW loss time points compared to baseline (1,445 ± 436 ml). Conclusions Following exercise in the heat, the actively contracting muscles lost volume, while replacing lost fluids intermittently during exercise in heat prevented this decline

  4. Addition polymers from 1,4,5,8-tetrahydro-1,4;5,8-diepoxyanthracene and Bis-dienes. 2: Evidence for thermal dehydration occurring in the cure process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Olshavsky, Michael A.; Meador, Michael A.; Ahn, Myong-Ku

    1988-01-01

    Diels-Alder cycloaddition copolymers from 1,4,5,8-tetrahydro-1,4;5,8-diepoxyanthracene and anthracene end-capped polyimide oligomers appear, by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), to undergo dehydration at elevated temperatures. This would produce thermally stable pentiptycene units along the polymer backbone, and render the polymers incapable of unzipping through a retro-Diels-Alder pathway. High resolution solid 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of one formulation of the polymer system before and after heating at elevated temperatures, shows this to indeed be the case. NMR spectra of solid samples of the polymer before and after heating correlated well with those of the parent pentiptycene model compound before and after acid-catalyzed dehydration. Isothermal gravimetric analyses and viscosities of the polymer before and after heat treatment support dehydration as a mechanism for the cure reaction.

  5. Polymer Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, E.; Chacón-Acosta, G.

    2013-05-01

    In this work we analyze a non-interacting one-dimensional polymer Bose-Einstein condensate in a harmonic trap within the semiclassical approximation. We use an effective Hamiltonian coming from the polymer quantization that arises in loop quantum gravity. We calculate the number of particles in order to obtain the critical temperature. The Bose-Einstein functions are replaced by series, whose high order terms are related to powers of the polymer length. It is shown that the condensation temperature presents a shift respect to the standard case, for small values of the polymer scale. In typical experimental conditions, it is possible to establish a bound for λ2 up to ≲10-16 m2. To improve this bound we should decrease the frequency of the trap and also decrease the number of particles.

  6. HIGH PERMEABILITY MEMBRANES FOR THE DEHYDRATION OF LOW WATER CONTENT ETHANOL BY PERVAPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Energy efficient dehydration of low water content ethanol is a challenge for the sustainable production of fuel-grade ethanol. Pervaporative membrane dehydration using a recently developed hydrophilic polymer membrane formulation consisting of a cross-linked mixture of poly(allyl...

  7. Quality of frozen fruit bars manufactured through infrared pre-dehydration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, frozen restructured whole apple and strawberry bars were manufactured by partial dehydration, using infrared (IR) heating, followed by restructuring and freezing. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of IR partial dehydration on the quality of restructured f...

  8. Exercise-induced hemolysis in xerocytosis. Erythrocyte dehydration and shear sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Platt, O S; Lux, S E; Nathan, D G

    1981-01-01

    A patient with xerocytosis was found to have swimming-induced intravascular hemolysis and shortening of erythrocyte life-span. In a microviscometer, xerocytes were more susceptible than normal erythrocytes to hemolysis by shear stress. Fractionation of normal and abnormal cells on discontinuous Stractan density gradients revealed that increasingly dehydrated cells were increasingly more shear sensitive. This sensitivity was partially corrected by rehydrating xerocytic erythrocytes by means of the cation-ionophore nystatin in a high potassium buffer. Conversely, normal erythrocytes were rendered shear sensitive by dehydrating them with nystatin in a low potassium buffer. This effect of dehydration was entirely reversible if normal cells were dehydrated for less than 4 h but was only partially reversed after more prolonged dehydration. It is likely that dehydration of erythrocytes results in shear sensitivity primarily because of concentration of cell contents and reduced cellular deformability. With prolonged dehydration, secondary membrane changes may potentiate the primary effect. This increased shear sensitivity of dehydrated cells may explain atraumatic exercise-induced hemolysis in xerocytosis as cardiac output is shifted to vessels of exercising muscles with small diameters and high shear rates. PMID:7276163

  9. 21 CFR 573.400 - Ethoxyquin in certain dehydrated forage crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and vitamin E in the forage crops. (c) It is added to the dehydrated forage crops in an oil mixture containing only suitable animal or suitable vegetable oil, prior to grinding and mixing. (d) The maximum... vegetable oils are to be used in the oil mix. (f) The label of any dehydrated forage crops treated with...

  10. 21 CFR 573.400 - Ethoxyquin in certain dehydrated forage crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and vitamin E in the forage crops. (c) It is added to the dehydrated forage crops in an oil mixture containing only suitable animal or suitable vegetable oil, prior to grinding and mixing. (d) The maximum... vegetable oils are to be used in the oil mix. (f) The label of any dehydrated forage crops treated with...

  11. 21 CFR 573.400 - Ethoxyquin in certain dehydrated forage crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and vitamin E in the forage crops. (c) It is added to the dehydrated forage crops in an oil mixture containing only suitable animal or suitable vegetable oil, prior to grinding and mixing. (d) The maximum... vegetable oils are to be used in the oil mix. (f) The label of any dehydrated forage crops treated with...

  12. 21 CFR 573.400 - Ethoxyquin in certain dehydrated forage crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and vitamin E in the forage crops. (c) It is added to the dehydrated forage crops in an oil mixture containing only suitable animal or suitable vegetable oil, prior to grinding and mixing. (d) The maximum... vegetable oils are to be used in the oil mix. (f) The label of any dehydrated forage crops treated with...

  13. Dehydration of 2-Methyl-1-Cyclohexanol: New Findings from a Popular Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesen, J. Brent; Schretzman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The mineral acid-catalyzed dehydration of 2-methyl-1-cyclohexanol has been a popular laboratory exercise in second-year organic chemistry for several decades. The dehydration experiment is often performed by organic chemistry students to illustrate Zaitsev's rule. However, sensitive analytical techniques reveal that the results do not entirely…

  14. Simultaneous Infrared Dry-Blanching and Dehydration of apple slices Controlled by Intermittent Heating Mode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infrared heating controlled by intermittent heating mode was found to be able to achieve simultaneous dry-blanching and dehydration of apple slices with a desirable quality. In order to better understand the performance of intermittent heating for simultaneous dry-blanching and dehydration (SIDBD),...

  15. Reactions of silver atoms and clusters in Ag-NaA zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waşowicz, Tomasz; Michalik, Jacek

    The agglomeration of silver in hydrated and dehydrated Ag-NaA zeolites gamma irradiated at 77 K has been studied by ESR. The agglomeration process is radiation-induced in hydrated samples whereas in dehydrated ones is initiated by thermal autoreduction. In the result different silver clusters are stabilized at room temperature, Ag 2+3…Ag + becomes stabilized in hydrated zeolites and Ag n+ 6 in dehydrated ones. Silver hexamers have been reacted with various molecular adsorbates. The reaction rate depends on molecular size and nucleophilic character of adsorbate. In the presence of water and small alcohols silver hexamers are transformed to the elongated tetramers.

  16. N-cyanoimidazole and diimidazole imine: water-soluble condensing agents for the formation of the phosphodiester bond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J. P.; Huang, C. H.; Hagan, W. J. Jr

    1989-01-01

    The reaction of BrCN with imidazole results in the formation of N-cyanoimidazole and diimidazole imine. These compounds were shown to be useful condensing agents for the formation of the phosphodiester bound in aqueous solution.

  17. Efficient and economical access to substituted benzothiazoles: copper-catalyzed coupling of 2-haloanilides with metal sulfides and subsequent condensation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dawei; Xie, Siwei; Xue, Peng; Zhang, Xiaojing; Dong, Jinhua; Jiang, Yongwen

    2009-01-01

    Don't tell azole: The first metal-catalyzed direct coupling of metal sulfides with aryl halides and subsequent intramolecular condensation provided substituted benzothiazoles (see scheme). A wide range of functional groups are tolerated under the reaction conditions.

  18. Extreme-UV lithography condenser

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Sweeney, Donald W.; Shafer, David; McGuire, James

    2001-01-01

    Condenser system for use with a ringfield camera in projection lithography where the condenser includes a series of segments of a parent aspheric mirror having one foci at a quasi-point source of radiation and the other foci at the radius of a ringfield have all but one or all of their beams translated and rotated by sets of mirrors such that all of the beams pass through the real entrance pupil of a ringfield camera about one of the beams and fall onto the ringfield radius as a coincident image as an arc of the ringfield. The condenser has a set of correcting mirrors with one of the correcting mirrors of each set, or a mirror that is common to said sets of mirrors, from which the radiation emanates, is a concave mirror that is positioned to shape a beam segment having a chord angle of about 25 to 85 degrees into a second beam segment having a chord angle of about 0 to 60 degrees.

  19. Condensation on Slippery Asymmetric Bumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    Controlling dropwise condensation by designing surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and be shed as quickly as possible is fundamental to water harvesting systems, thermal power generation, distillation towers, etc. However, cutting-edge approaches based on micro/nanoscale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants that synergistically couples both aspects of condensation and outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle's bump geometry in promoting condensation, we show how to maximize vapor diffusion flux at the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing curvature and shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope analogous to cactus spines couples rapid drop growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free energy profile that drives the drop down the slope. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher plant-inspired coating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion. We further observe an unprecedented six-fold higher exponent in growth rate and much faster shedding time compared to other surfaces. We envision that our fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be applied to a wide range of phase change applications.

  20. Condensation on Slippery Asymmetric Bumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; Kim, Philseok; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2016-11-01

    Controlling dropwise condensation by designing surfaces that enable droplets to grow rapidly and be shed as quickly as possible is fundamental to water harvesting systems, thermal power generation, distillation towers, etc. However, cutting-edge approaches based on micro/nanoscale textures suffer from intrinsic trade-offs that make it difficult to optimize both growth and transport at once. Here we present a conceptually different design approach based on principles derived from Namib desert beetles, cacti, and pitcher plants that synergistically couples both aspects of condensation and outperforms other synthetic surfaces. Inspired by an unconventional interpretation of the role of the beetle's bump geometry in promoting condensation, we show how to maximize vapor diffusion flux at the apex of convex millimetric bumps by optimizing curvature and shape. Integrating this apex geometry with a widening slope analogous to cactus spines couples rapid drop growth with fast directional transport, by creating a free energy profile that drives the drop down the slope. This coupling is further enhanced by a slippery, pitcher plant-inspired coating that facilitates feedback between coalescence-driven growth and capillary-driven motion. We further observe an unprecedented six-fold higher exponent in growth rate and much faster shedding time compared to other surfaces. We envision that our fundamental understanding and rational design strategy can be applied to a wide range of phase change applications.