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Sample records for deinococcus radiodurans chromosome

  1. Reassembly of shattered chromosomes in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Zahradka, Ksenija; Slade, Dea; Bailone, Adriana; Sommer, Suzanne; Averbeck, Dietrich; Petranovic, Mirjana; Lindner, Ariel B; Radman, Miroslav

    2006-10-05

    Dehydration or desiccation is one of the most frequent and severe challenges to living cells. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is the best known extremophile among the few organisms that can survive extremely high exposures to desiccation and ionizing radiation, which shatter its genome into hundreds of short DNA fragments. Remarkably, these fragments are readily reassembled into a functional 3.28-megabase genome. Here we describe the relevant two-stage DNA repair process, which involves a previously unknown molecular mechanism for fragment reassembly called 'extended synthesis-dependent strand annealing' (ESDSA), followed and completed by crossovers. At least two genome copies and random DNA breakage are requirements for effective ESDSA. In ESDSA, chromosomal fragments with overlapping homologies are used both as primers and as templates for massive synthesis of complementary single strands, as occurs in a single-round multiplex polymerase chain reaction. This synthesis depends on DNA polymerase I and incorporates more nucleotides than does normal replication in intact cells. Newly synthesized complementary single-stranded extensions become 'sticky ends' that anneal with high precision, joining together contiguous DNA fragments into long, linear, double-stranded intermediates. These intermediates require RecA-dependent crossovers to mature into circular chromosomes that comprise double-stranded patchworks of numerous DNA blocks synthesized before radiation, connected by DNA blocks synthesized after radiation.

  2. A highly conserved repeated chromosomal sequence in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans SARK

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, E.; Gutman, P.D.; Hanlong Yao; Minton, K.W. )

    1991-03-01

    A DNA fragment containing a portion of a DNA damage-inducible gene from Deinococcus radiodurans SARK hybridized to numerous fragments of SARK genomic DNA because of a highly conserved repetitive chromosomal element. The element is of variable length, ranging from 150 to 192 bp, depending on the absence or presence of one or two 21-bp sequences located internally. A putative translational start site of the damage-inducible gene is within the reiterated element. The element contains dyad symmetries that suggest modes of transcriptional and/or translational control.

  3. Thioredoxin System from Deinococcus radiodurans

    SciTech Connect

    Obiero, Josiah; Pittet, Vanessa; Bonderoff, Sara A.; Sanders, David A.R.

    2010-05-03

    This paper describes the cloning, purification, and characterization of thioredoxin (Trx) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and the structure determination of TrxR from the ionizing radiation-tolerant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1. The genes from D. radiodurans encoding Trx and TrxR were amplified by PCR, inserted into a pET expression vector, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The overexpressed proteins were purified by metal affinity chromatography, and their activity was demonstrated using well-established assays of insulin precipitation (for Trx), 5,5{prime}-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) reduction, and insulin reduction (for TrxR). In addition, the crystal structure of oxidized TrxR was determined at 1.9-{angstrom} resolution. The overall structure was found to be very similar to that of E. coli TrxR and homodimeric with both NADPH- and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding domains containing variants of the canonical nucleotide binding fold, the Rossmann fold. The K{sub m} (5.7 {micro}M) of D. radiodurans TrxR for D. radiodurans Trx was determined and is about twofold higher than that of the E. coli thioredoxin system. However, D. radiodurans TrxR has a much lower affinity for E. coli Trx (K{sub m}, 44.4 {micro}M). Subtle differences in the surface charge and shape of the Trx binding site on TrxR may account for the differences in recognition. Because it has been suggested that TrxR from D. radiodurans may have dual cofactor specificity (can utilize both NADH and NADPH), D. radiodurans TrxR was tested for its ability to utilize NADH as well. Our results show that D. radiodurans TrxR can utilize only NADPH for activity.

  4. ParA encoded on chromosome II of Deinococcus radiodurans binds to nucleoid and inhibits cell division in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Charaka, Vijaya Kumar; Mehta, Kruti P; Misra, H S

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial genome segregation and cell division has been studied mostly in bacteria harbouring single circular chromosome and low-copy plasmids. Deinococcus radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacterium, harbours multipartite genome system. Chromosome I encodes majority of the functions required for normal growth while other replicons encode mostly the proteins involved in secondary functions. Here, we report the characterization of putative P-loop ATPase (ParA2) encoded on chromosome II of D. radiodurans. Recombinant ParA2 was found to be a DNA-binding ATPase. E. coli cells expressing ParA2 showed cell division inhibition and mislocalization of FtsZ-YFP and those expressing ParA2-CFP showed multiple CFP foci formation on the nucleoid. Although, in trans expression of ParA2 failed to complement SlmA loss per se, it could induce unequal cell division in slmAminCDE double mutant. These results suggested that ParA2 is a nucleoid-binding protein, which could inhibits cell division in E. coli by affecting the correct localization of FtsZ and thereby cytokinesis. Helping slmAminCDE mutant to produce minicells, a phenotype associated with mutations in the 'Min' proteins, further indicated the possibility of ParA2 regulating cell division by bringing nucleoid compaction at the vicinity of septum growth.

  5. An alternative pathway of recombination of chromosomal fragments precedes recA-dependent recombination in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Daly, M J; Minton, K W

    1996-08-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans R1 and other members of this genus are able to repair and survive extreme DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation and many other DNA-damaging agents. The ability of R1 to repair completely > 100 double-strand breaks in its chromosome without lethality or mutagenesis is recA dependent. However, during the first 1.5 h after irradiation, recA+ and recA cells show similar increases in the average size of chromosomal fragments. In recA+ cells, DNA continues to enlarge to wild-type size within 29 h. However, in recA cells, no DNA repair is observed following the first 1.5 h postirradiation. This recA-independent effect was studied further, using two slightly different Escherichia coli plasmids forming adjacent duplication insertions in the chromosome, providing repetitive sequences suitable for circularization by non-recA-dependent pathways following irradiation. After exposure to 1.75 Mrad (17,500 Gy), circular derivatives of the integration units were detected in both recA+ and recA cells. These DNA circles were formed in the first 1.5 h postirradiation, several hours before the onset of detectable recA-dependent homologous recombination. By comparison, D. radiodurans strains containing the same E. coli plasmids as nonrepetitive direct insertions did not form circular derivatives of the integration units before or after irradiation in recA+ or recA cells. The circular derivatives of the tandemly integrated plasmids were formed before the onset of recA-dependent repair and have structures consistent with the hypothesis that DNA repair occurring immediately postirradiation is by a recA-independent single-strand annealing reaction and may be a preparatory step for further DNA repair in wild-type D. radiodurans.

  6. Genome sequence of the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    PubMed

    White, O; Eisen, J A; Heidelberg, J F; Hickey, E K; Peterson, J D; Dodson, R J; Haft, D H; Gwinn, M L; Nelson, W C; Richardson, D L; Moffat, K S; Qin, H; Jiang, L; Pamphile, W; Crosby, M; Shen, M; Vamathevan, J J; Lam, P; McDonald, L; Utterback, T; Zalewski, C; Makarova, K S; Aravind, L; Daly, M J; Minton, K W; Fleischmann, R D; Ketchum, K A; Nelson, K E; Salzberg, S; Smith, H O; Venter, J C; Fraser, C M

    1999-11-19

    The complete genome sequence of the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1 is composed of two chromosomes (2,648,638 and 412,348 base pairs), a megaplasmid (177,466 base pairs), and a small plasmid (45,704 base pairs), yielding a total genome of 3,284, 156 base pairs. Multiple components distributed on the chromosomes and megaplasmid that contribute to the ability of D. radiodurans to survive under conditions of starvation, oxidative stress, and high amounts of DNA damage were identified. Deinococcus radiodurans represents an organism in which all systems for DNA repair, DNA damage export, desiccation and starvation recovery, and genetic redundancy are present in one cell.

  7. PprA Protein Is Involved in Chromosome Segregation via Its Physical and Functional Interaction with DNA Gyrase in Irradiated Deinococcus radiodurans Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Devigne, Alice; Guérin, Philippe; Lisboa, Johnny; Quevillon-Cheruel, Sophie; Armengaud, Jean; Sommer, Suzanne; Bouthier de la Tour, Claire

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, was previously shown to be required for cell survival and accurate chromosome segregation after exposure to ionizing radiation. Here, we used an in vivo approach to determine, by shotgun proteomics, putative PprA partners coimmunoprecipitating with PprA when cells were exposed to gamma rays. Among them, we found the two subunits of DNA gyrase and, thus, chose to focus our work on characterizing the activities of the deinococcal DNA gyrase in the presence or absence of PprA. Loss of PprA rendered cells hypersensitive to novobiocin, an inhibitor of the B subunit of DNA gyrase. We showed that treatment of bacteria with novobiocin resulted in induction of the radiation desiccation response (RDR) regulon and in defects in chromosome segregation that were aggravated by the absence of PprA. In vitro, the deinococcal DNA gyrase, like other bacterial DNA gyrases, possesses DNA negative supercoiling and decatenation activities. These two activities are inhibited in vitro by novobiocin and nalidixic acid, whereas PprA specifically stimulates the decatenation activity of DNA gyrase. Together, these results suggest that PprA plays a major role in chromosome decatenation via its interaction with the deinococcal DNA gyrase when D. radiodurans cells are recovering from exposure to ionizing radiation. IMPORTANCE D. radiodurans is one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known. This bacterium is able to cope with high levels of DNA lesions generated by exposure to extreme doses of ionizing radiation and to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Here, we identified partners of PprA, a radiation-induced Deinococcus-specific protein, previously shown to be required for radioresistance. Our study leads to three main findings: (i) PprA interacts with DNA gyrase after irradiation, (ii) treatment of cells with novobiocin results in defects in chromosome segregation

  8. [Biosorption of Radionuclide Uranium by Deinococcus radiodurans].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Dong, Fa-qin; Dai, Qun-wei; Liu, Ming-xue; Nie, Xiao-qin; Zhang, Dong; Ma, Jia-lin; Zhou, Xian

    2015-04-01

    As a biological adsorbent, Living Deinococcus radiodurans was used for removing radionuclide uranium in the aqueous solution. The effect factors on biosorption of radionuclide uranium were researched in the present paper, including solution pH values and initial uranium concentration. Meanwhile, the biosorption mechanism was researched by the method of FTIR and SEM/EDS. The results show that the optimum conditions for biosorption are as follows: pH = 5, co = 100 mg · L(-1) and the maximum biosorption capacity is up to 240 mgU · g(-1). According to the SEM results and EDXS analysis, it is indicated that the cell surface is attached by lots of sheet uranium crystals, and the main biosorpiton way of uranium is the ion exchange or surface complexation. Comparing FTIR spectra and FTIR fitting spectra before and after biosorption, we can find that the whole spectra has a certain change, particularly active groups (such as amide groups of the protein, hydroxy, carboxyl and phosphate group) are involved in the biosorption process. Then, there is a new peak at 906 cm(-1) and it is a stretching vibration peak of UO2(2+). Obviously, it is possible that as an anti radiation microorganism, Deinococcus radiodurans could be used for removing radionuclide uranium in radiation environment.

  9. Duplication insertion of drug resistance determinants in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.D.; Lennon, E.; McNeil, L.B.; Minton, K.W.

    1988-05-01

    Escherichia coli drug resistance plasmids were introduced into Deinococcus radiodurans by cloning D. radiodurans DNA into the plasmids prior to transformation. The plasmids were integrated into the chromosome of the transformants and flanked by a direct repeat of the cloned D. radiodurans segment. The plasmid and one copy of the flanking chromosomal segment constituted a unit (amplification unit) which was found repeated in tandem at the site of chromosomal integration. Up to 50 copies of the amplification unit were present per chromosome, accounting for approximately 10% of the genomic DNA. Circular forms of the amplification unit were also present in D. radiodurans transformants. These circles were introduced into E. coli, where they replicated as plasmids. The drug resistance determinants which have been introduced into D. radiodurans in this fashion are cat (from Tn9) and aphA (from Tn903). Transformation of D. radiodurans to drug resistance was efficient when the donor DNA was from D. radiodurans of E. coli, but was greatly reduced when the donor DNA was linearized with restriction enzymes prior to transformation. In the course of the study, a plasmid, pS16, was discovered in D. radiodurans R1, establishing that all Deinococcus strains so far examined contain plasmids.

  10. Dynamics of Deinococcus radiodurans under Controlled Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Sidhartha S.; Joshi, Hiren M.; Sabareesh, K. P. V.; Tata, B. V. R.; Rao, T. S.

    2006-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is a potent radiation resistant bacterium with immense potential in nuclear waste treatment. In this investigation, the translational and rotational dynamics of dilute suspensions of D. radiodurans cultured under controlled growth conditions was studied by the polarized and depolarized dynamic light-scattering (DLS) techniques. Additionally, confocal laser scanning microscopy was used for characterizing the cultured samples and also for identification of D. radiodurans dimer, tetramer, and multimer morphologies. The data obtained showed translational diffusion coefficients (DT) of 1.2 × 10−9, 1.97 × 10−9, and 2.12 × 10−9 cm2 /s, corresponding to an average size of 3.61, 2.22, and 2.06 μm, respectively, for live multimer, tetramer, and dimer forms of D. radiodurans. Depolarized DLS experiments showed very slow rotational diffusion coefficients (DR) of 0.182/s for dimer and 0.098/s for tetramer morphologies. No measurable rotational diffusion was observed for multimer form. Polarized DLS measurements on live D. radiodurans confirmed that the bacterium is nonmotile in nature. The dynamics of the dead dimer and tetramer D. radiodurans were also studied using polarized and depolarized DLS experiments and compared with the dynamics of live species. The dead cells were slightly smaller in size when compared to the live cells. However, no additional information could be obtained for dead cells from the polarized and depolarized dynamic light-scattering studies. PMID:16829564

  11. Small-Molecule Antioxidant Proteome-Shields in Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Michael J.; Kiang, Juliann G.; Fukumoto, Risaku; Lee, Duck-Yeon; Wehr, Nancy B.; Viteri, Gabriela A.; Berlett, Barbara S.; Levine, Rodney L.

    2010-01-01

    For Deinococcus radiodurans and other bacteria which are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation, ultraviolet radiation, and desiccation, a mechanistic link exists between resistance, manganese accumulation, and protein protection. We show that ultrafiltered, protein-free preparations of D. radiodurans cell extracts prevent protein oxidation at massive doses of ionizing radiation. In contrast, ultrafiltrates from ionizing radiation-sensitive bacteria were not protective. The D. radiodurans ultrafiltrate was enriched in Mn, phosphate, nucleosides and bases, and peptides. When reconstituted in vitro at concentrations approximating those in the D. radiodurans cytosol, peptides interacted synergistically with Mn2+ and orthophosphate, and preserved the activity of large, multimeric enzymes exposed to 50,000 Gy, conditions which obliterated DNA. When applied ex vivo, the D. radiodurans ultrafiltrate protected Escherichia coli cells and human Jurkat T cells from extreme cellular insults caused by ionizing radiation. By establishing that Mn2+-metabolite complexes of D. radiodurans specifically protect proteins against indirect damage caused by gamma-rays delivered in vast doses, our findings provide the basis for a new approach to radioprotection and insight into how surplus Mn budgets in cells combat reactive oxygen species. PMID:20838443

  12. Fast Neutron Irradiation of the Highly Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus Radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Diane Louise

    Fast neutron dose survival curves were generated for the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which is renowned for its unusually high resistance to gamma, x-ray, and ultraviolet radiation, but for which fast neutron response was unknown. The fast neutrons were produced by the University of Massachusetts Lowell 5.5-MV, type CN Van de Graaff accelerator through the ^7Li(p,n)^7 Be reaction by bombarding a thick metallic lithium target with a 4-MeV proton beam. The bacteria were uniformly distributed on 150-mm agar plates and were exposed to the fast neutron beam under conditions of charged particle equilibrium. The plates were subdivided into concentric rings of increasing diameter from the center to the periphery of the plate, within which the average neutron dose was calculated as the product of the precisely known neutron fluence at the average radius of the ring and the neutron energy dependent kerma factor. The neutron fluence and dose ranged from approximately 3 times 1013 n cm^ {-2} to 1 times 1012 n cm^ {-2}, and 200 kilorad to 5 kilorad, respectively, from the center to the periphery of the plate. Percent survival for Deinococcus radiodurans as a function of fast neutron dose was derived from the ability of the irradiated cells to produce visible colonies within each ring compared to that of a nonirradiated control population. The bacterium Escherichia coli B/r (CSH) was irradiated under identical conditions for comparative purposes. The survival response of Deinococcus radiodurans as a result of cumulative fast neutron exposures was also investigated. The quantification of the ability of Deinococcus radiodurans to survive cellular insult from secondary charged particles, which are produced by fast neutron interactions in biological materials, will provide valuable information about damage and repair mechanisms under extreme cellular stress, and may provide new insight into the origin of this bacterium's unprecedented radiation resistance.

  13. Gene fusions with lacZ by duplication insertion in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    SciTech Connect

    Lennon, E.; Minton, K.W. )

    1990-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is the most-studied species of a eubacterial family characterized by extreme resistance to DNA damage. We have focused on developing molecular biological techniques to investigate the genetics of this organism. We report construction of lacZ gene fusions by a method involving both in vitro splicing and the natural transformation of D. radiodurans. Numerous fusion strains were identified by expression of beta-galactosidase. Among these fusion strains, several were inducible by exposure to the DNA-damaging agent mitomycin C, and four of the inducible fusion constructs were cloned in Escherichia coli. Hybridization studies indicate that one of the damage-inducible genes contains a sequence reiterated throughout the D. radiodurans chromosome. Survival measurements show that two of the fusion strains have increased sensitivity to mitomycin C, suggesting that the fusions within these strains inactivate repair functions.

  14. ATCG nucleotide fluctuation of Deinococcus radiodurans radiation genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Todd; Subramaniam, R.; Sullivan, R.; Cheung, E.; Schneider, C.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Flamholz, A.; Lieberman, D. H.; Cheung, T. D.

    2007-09-01

    The radiation resistance-repair genes in Deinococcus radiodurans (DR) and E-coli were analyzed in terms of the A, T, C, G nucleotide fluctuations. The studied genes were Rec-A, Rec-Q, and the unique DR PprA gene. In an ATCG sequence, each base was assigned a number equal to its atomic number. The resulting numerical sequence was the basis of the statistical analysis. Fractal analysis using the Higuchi method gave a fractal dimension increase of the Deinococcus radiodurans genes as compared to E-coli, which is comparable to the enhancement observed in the human HAR1 region (HAR1F gene) over that of the chimpanzee. Near neighbor fluctuation was also studied via the Black-Scholes model where the increment sequence was treated as a random walk series. The Deinococcus radiodurans radiation gene standard deviations were consistently higher than that of the E-coli deviations, and agree with the fractal analysis results. The sequence stacking interaction was studied using the published nucleotide-pair melting free energy values and Deinococcus radiodurans radiation genes were shown to possess larger negative free energies. The high sensitivity of the fractal dimension as a biomarker was tested with correlation analysis of the gamma ray dose versus fractal dimension, and the R square values were found to be above 0.9 (N=5). When compared with other nucleotide sequences such as the rRNA sequences, HAR1 and its chimpanzee counterpart, the higher fluctuation (correlated randomness) and larger negative free energy of a DR radiation gene suggested that a radiation resistance-repair sequence exhibited higher complexity. As the HAR1 nucleotide sequence complexity and its transcription activity of co-expressing cortex protein reelin supported a positive selection event in humans, a similar inference of positive selection of coding genes could be drawn for Deinococcus radiodurans when compared to E-coli. The origin of such a positive selection would be consistent with that of a

  15. Biology of Extreme Radiation Resistance: The Way of Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Krisko, Anita; Radman, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is a champion of extreme radiation resistance that is accounted for by a highly efficient protection against proteome, but not genome, damage. A well-protected functional proteome ensures cell recovery from extensive radiation damage to other cellular constituents by molecular repair and turnover processes, including an efficient repair of disintegrated DNA. Therefore, cell death correlates with radiation-induced protein damage, rather than DNA damage, in both robust and standard species. From the reviewed biology of resistance to radiation and other sources of oxidative damage, we conclude that the impact of protein damage on the maintenance of life has been largely underestimated in biology and medicine. PMID:23818498

  16. Biological decolorization of malachite green by Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    PubMed

    Lv, Guo-Ying; Cheng, Jian-Hui; Chen, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Zuo-Fa; Fan, Lei-Fa

    2013-09-01

    Cultures of Deinococcus radiodurans R1 were observed to decolorize malachite green (MG) dye. The effects of various factors on decolorization efficiency were investigated. The optimal decolorization temperature and pH ranges were 25-50°C and 6.0-8.0, respectively. With increasing initial MG concentration, the decolorization efficiency decreased, and the kinetic parameters, R(MG,max) and K(m) were 416.7 mg-MG/g-cell/h and 1033.7 mg/L, respectively. The D. radiodurans R1 cells were capable of tolerating and rapidly degrading high concentrations of the dye. When MG concentration was 200 mg/L, decolorization efficiency was up to 97.2% within 30 min. The intermediate products of MG biodegradation were 4-(dimethylamino)phenol and 4-(dimethylamino)benzophenone, as identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. Toxicity tests indicated that D. radiodurans R1 did not detoxify an MG solution completely, but clearly reduced its toxicity. This study demonstrated that this strain was an efficient degrader compared to other microorganisms.

  17. Fatty acids are precursors of alkylamines in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R; Huang, Y

    1992-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans contains novel phospholipids of which the structures of three have been previously described. These three lipids contain both fatty acids and alkylamines. Both the fatty acid and alkylamine constituents were found to be composed of a mixture of species, of which C15, C16, and C17 saturated and monounsaturated alkyl chains predominated. Alkylamines contained a relatively higher proportion of saturated species. Progression of bacterial growth through the mid-log to stationary phases was accompanied by an increase in the proportions of C15 and C17 alkyl chains in both fatty acid and alkylamine constituents. Radiolabeled palmitic acid was found to be rapidly incorporated into both fatty acid and alkylamine components of phosphatidylglyceroylalkylamine, which is the precursor of the more-complex phosphoglycolipids found in major amounts in D. radiodurans. After culturing D. radiodurans in the presence of a mixture of palmitic acids labeled with 14C and 3H in the 1 and 9,10 positions, respectively, the same 14C/3H ratio was recovered in both fatty acid and alkylamine constituents, strongly suggesting that alkylamines are derived from intact fatty acids rather than by a de novo pathway. The results identify a novel product of fatty acid metabolism which has not to date been observed in any other organism. Images PMID:1429439

  18. Growth of Deinococcus Radiodurans in Oils as Sole Source of Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmaso, G. Z. L.; Paulino-Lima, I. G.; Leite, S. G. F.; Leitão, A. C.; Lage, C.

    2010-04-01

    Growth of deinococcus radiodurans was analysed in (i) gasoline, diesel oil with (ii) or without (iii) additives, (iv) sergipano oil and (v) arabic light oil. High microbial abundance was confirmed for many of them.

  19. The single-stranded DNA-binding protein of Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Eggington, Julie Malia; Haruta, Nami; Wood, Elizabeth Anne; Cox, Michael Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Background Deinococcus radiodurans R1 is one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known and is able to repair an unusually large amount of DNA damage without induced mutation. Single-stranded DNA-binding (SSB) protein is an essential protein in all organisms and is involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair. The published genomic sequence from Deinococcus radiodurans includes a putative single-stranded DNA-binding protein gene (ssb; DR0100) requiring a translational frameshift for synthesis of a complete SSB protein. The apparently tripartite gene has inspired considerable speculation in the literature about potentially novel frameshifting or RNA editing mechanisms. Immediately upstream of the ssb gene is another gene (DR0099) given an ssb-like annotation, but left unexplored. Results A segment of the Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 genome encompassing the ssb gene has been re-sequenced, and two errors involving omitted guanine nucleotides have been documented. The corrected sequence incorporates both of the open reading frames designated DR0099 and DR0100 into one contiguous ssb open reading frame (ORF). The corrected gene requires no translational frameshifts and contains two predicted oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) folds. The protein has been purified and its sequence is closely related to the Thermus thermophilus and Thermus aquaticus SSB proteins. Like the Thermus SSB proteins, the SSBDr functions as a homodimer. The Deinococcus radiodurans SSB homodimer stimulates Deinococcus radiodurans RecA protein and Escherichia coli RecA protein-promoted DNA three-strand exchange reactions with at least the same efficiency as the Escherichia coli SSB homotetramer. Conclusions The correct Deinococcus radiodurans ssb gene is a contiguous open reading frame that codes for the largest bacterial SSB monomer identified to date. The Deinococcus radiodurans SSB protein includes two OB folds per monomer and functions as a homodimer. The Deinococcus

  20. Deciphering peculiar protein-protein interacting modules in Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Mezhoud, Karim; Sghaier, Haïtham; Barkallah, Insaf

    2009-01-01

    Interactomes of proteins under positive selection from ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria (IRRB) might be a part of the answer to the question as to how IRRB, particularly Deinococcus radiodurans R1 (Deira), resist ionizing radiation. Here, using the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP) and the Protein Structural Interactome (PSI)-base server for PSI map, we have predicted novel interactions of orthologs of the 58 proteins under positive selection in Deira and other IRRB, but which are absent in IRSB. Among these, 18 domains and their interactomes have been identified in DNA checkpoint and repair; kinases pathways; energy and nucleotide metabolisms were the important biological processes that were found to be involved. This finding provides new clues to the cellular pathways that can to be important for ionizing-radiation resistance in Deira. PMID:19356244

  1. DNA adenine hypomethylation leads to metabolic rewiring in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Shaiwale, Nayana S; Basu, Bhakti; Deobagkar, Deepti D; Deobagkar, Dileep N; Apte, Shree K

    2015-08-03

    The protein encoded by DR_0643 gene from Deinococcus radiodurans was shown to be an active N-6 adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase (Dam). Deletion of corresponding protein reduced adenine methylation in the genome by 60% and resulted in slow-growth phenotype. Proteomic changes induced by DNA adenine hypomethylation were mapped by two-dimensional protein electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. As compared to wild type D. radiodurans cells, at least 54 proteins were differentially expressed in Δdam mutant. Among these, 39 metabolic enzymes were differentially expressed in Δdam mutant. The most prominent change was DNA adenine hypomethylation induced de-repression of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, E1 component (aceE) gene resulting in 10 fold increase in the abundance of corresponding protein. The observed differential expression profile of metabolic enzymes included increased abundance of enzymes involved in fatty acid and amino acid degradation to replenish acetyl Co-A and TCA cycle intermediates and diversion of phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate into amino acid biosynthesis, a metabolic rewiring attempt by Δdam mutant to restore energy generation via glycolysis-TCA cycle axis. This is the first report of DNA adenine hypomethylation mediated rewiring of metabolic pathways in prokaryotes.

  2. Impact of low-temperature plasmas on Deinococcus radiodurans and biomolecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogul, Rakesh; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Chan, Suzanne L.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Khare, Bishun N.; Meyyappan, M.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of cold plasma on Deinococcus radiodurans, plasmid DNA, and model proteins were assessed using microbiological, spectrometric, and biochemical techniques. In low power O(2) plasma (approximately 25 W, approximately 45 mTorr, 90 min), D. radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacterium, showed a 99.999% reduction in bioburden. In higher power O(2) plasma (100 W and 500 mTorr), the reduction rate increased about 10-fold and observation by atomic force microscopy showed significant damage to the cell. Damage to cellular lipids, proteins, and chromosome was indicated by losses of infrared spectroscopic peaks at 2930, 1651, 1538, and 1245 cm(-1), respectively. In vitro experiments show that O(2) plasmas induce DNA strand scissions and cross-linking as well as reduction of enzyme activity. The observed degradation and removal of biomolecules was power-dependent. Exposures to 200 W at 500 mTorr removed biomolecules to below detection limits in 60 s. Emission spectroscopy indicated that D. radiodurans cells were volatilized into CO(2), CO, N(2), and H(2)O, confirming that these plasmas were removing complex biological matter from surfaces. A CO(2) plasma was not as effective as the O(2) plasma, indicating the importance of plasma composition and the dominant role of chemical degradation. Together, these findings have implications for NASA planetary protection schemes and for the contamination of Mars.

  3. Impact of low-temperature plasmas on Deinococcus radiodurans and biomolecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogul, Rakesh; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Chan, Suzanne L.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Khare, Bishun N.; Meyyappan, M.; Trent, Jonathan D.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of cold plasma on Deinococcus radiodurans, plasmid DNA, and model proteins were assessed using microbiological, spectrometric, and biochemical techniques. In low power O(2) plasma (approximately 25 W, approximately 45 mTorr, 90 min), D. radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacterium, showed a 99.999% reduction in bioburden. In higher power O(2) plasma (100 W and 500 mTorr), the reduction rate increased about 10-fold and observation by atomic force microscopy showed significant damage to the cell. Damage to cellular lipids, proteins, and chromosome was indicated by losses of infrared spectroscopic peaks at 2930, 1651, 1538, and 1245 cm(-1), respectively. In vitro experiments show that O(2) plasmas induce DNA strand scissions and cross-linking as well as reduction of enzyme activity. The observed degradation and removal of biomolecules was power-dependent. Exposures to 200 W at 500 mTorr removed biomolecules to below detection limits in 60 s. Emission spectroscopy indicated that D. radiodurans cells were volatilized into CO(2), CO, N(2), and H(2)O, confirming that these plasmas were removing complex biological matter from surfaces. A CO(2) plasma was not as effective as the O(2) plasma, indicating the importance of plasma composition and the dominant role of chemical degradation. Together, these findings have implications for NASA planetary protection schemes and for the contamination of Mars.

  4. Impact of low-temperature plasmas on Deinococcus radiodurans and biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Mogul, Rakesh; Bol'shakov, Alexander A; Chan, Suzanne L; Stevens, Ramsey M; Khare, Bishun N; Meyyappan, M; Trent, Jonathan D

    2003-01-01

    The effects of cold plasma on Deinococcus radiodurans, plasmid DNA, and model proteins were assessed using microbiological, spectrometric, and biochemical techniques. In low power O(2) plasma (approximately 25 W, approximately 45 mTorr, 90 min), D. radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacterium, showed a 99.999% reduction in bioburden. In higher power O(2) plasma (100 W and 500 mTorr), the reduction rate increased about 10-fold and observation by atomic force microscopy showed significant damage to the cell. Damage to cellular lipids, proteins, and chromosome was indicated by losses of infrared spectroscopic peaks at 2930, 1651, 1538, and 1245 cm(-1), respectively. In vitro experiments show that O(2) plasmas induce DNA strand scissions and cross-linking as well as reduction of enzyme activity. The observed degradation and removal of biomolecules was power-dependent. Exposures to 200 W at 500 mTorr removed biomolecules to below detection limits in 60 s. Emission spectroscopy indicated that D. radiodurans cells were volatilized into CO(2), CO, N(2), and H(2)O, confirming that these plasmas were removing complex biological matter from surfaces. A CO(2) plasma was not as effective as the O(2) plasma, indicating the importance of plasma composition and the dominant role of chemical degradation. Together, these findings have implications for NASA planetary protection schemes and for the contamination of Mars.

  5. Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 contains N6-methyladenine in its genome

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Bhaskar Jyoti; Sabnis, Ketaki; Deobagkar, Deepti D.; Deobagkar, Dileep N.; E-mail: dndeo@unipune.ernet.in

    2005-09-23

    Methylation of DNA is known to be involved in DNA repair mechanisms in bacteria. Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 on exposure to high radiation undergoes significant DNA damage, which is repaired without mutations. However, the presence of modified nucleotides has not been reported in its genome. We report here the detection of N6-methyladenine in the genome of D. radiodurans strain R1 using immunochemical techniques. This N6-methyladenine is not a part of GATC restriction-modification system. D. radiodurans cell extract also exhibited a DNA adenine methyltransferase activity which was reduced in the early post-irradiation recovery phase.

  6. Design and Construction of Deinococcus Radiodurans for Biodegradation of Organic Toxins at Radioactive DOE Waste Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Daly; Lawrence P. Wackett; James K. Fredrickson

    2001-04-22

    Seventy million cubic meters of ground and three trillion liters of groundwater have been contaminated by leaking radioactive waste generated in the United States during the Cold War. A cleanup technology is being developed based on the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans that is being engineered to express bioremediating functions. Research aimed at developing D. radiodurans for organic toxin degradation in highly radioactive waste sites containing radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organic compounds was started by this group.Work funded by the existing grant has already contributed to eleven papers on the fundamental biology of D. radiodurans and its design for bioremediation of highly radioactive waste environments

  7. Identifying the Proteins that Mediate the Ionizing Radiation Resistance of Deinococcus Radiodurans R1

    SciTech Connect

    Battista, John R

    2010-02-22

    The primary objectives of this proposal was to define the subset of proteins required for the ionizing radiation (IR) resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans R1, characterize the activities of those proteins, and apply what was learned to problems of interest to the Department of Energy.

  8. In-vivo Atomic Force Microscopy of Surface Proteins within Deinococcus Radiodurans

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, Tedd Edward; Pinhero, Patrick Joseph

    2001-04-01

    We present in vivo images of the outer cell wall of the bacteria Deinococcus radiodurans using noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM). High-resolution imaging shows a hexagonal-packed lattice. This lattice is consistent with previous observations of a hexagonally packed intermediate layer from extracted cell wall material. The ordered hexagonal structures were primarily observed at the interfaces between adjoining bacteria, while rougher, "orange-peel-like" structures were observed in other regions. It is possible that the bacteria were in a dormant state during imaging as the desiccation tolerance of D. radiodurans is well documented. The only previous observations of the HPI layer of D. radiodurans have been performed on chemically extracted S-layers applied to flat substrates. Our report is the first in vivo observation of these structures in D. radiodurans without invasive sample preparation. Additionally, this is the first known report of in vivo observation of bacterial S-layers by AFM.

  9. Modulating Radiation Resistance: Novel Protection Paradigms Based on Defenses against Ionizing Radiation in the Extremophile Deinococcus radiodurans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-10

    cellular damge caused by ionizing radiation and ultraviolet light. Deinococcus radiodurans; Lactobacillus plantarurn; cyanobacteria ; radiation...6 3. K. S. Makarova and MICHAEL J. DALY (2010) Comparative genomics of stress response systems in Deinococcus bacteria. Bacterial Stress Responses...In Press) Abstract | The prospect of comparative genomics resolving the seemingly paradoxical mechanism of extreme radiation resistance in

  10. Accumulation of Mn(II) in Deinococcus radiodurans Facilitates Gamma-Radiation Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Michael J.; Gaidamakova, E; Matrosova, V; Vasilenko, A; Zhai, M; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Hess, M; Omelchenko, M V.; Kostandarithes, Heather M.; Makarova, S; Wackett, L. P.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Ghosal, D

    2004-11-05

    Deinococcus radiodurans is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation. How this bacterium can grow under chronic gamma-radiation (50 Gy/hour) or recover from acute doses greater than 10 kGy is unknown. We show that D. radiodurans accumulates very high intracellular manganese and low iron levels compared to radiation sensitive bacteria, and resistance exhibits a concentration-dependent response to Mn(II). Among the most radiation-resistant bacterial groups reported, Deinococcus, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus and cyanobacteria spp. accumulate Mn(II). In contrast, Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas putida have high Fe but low intracellular Mn concentrations and are very sensitive. We propose that Mn(II) accumulation facilitates recovery from radiation injury.

  11. Effects of heavy ions on inactivation and DNA double strand breaks in Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, H; Schafer, M; Schmitz, C; Bucker, H

    1994-10-01

    Inactivation and double strand break (dsb) induction after heavy ion irradiation were studied in stationary phase cells of the highly radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans R1. There is evidence that the radiation sensitivity of this bacterium is nearly independent on energy in the range of up to 15 MeV/u for lighter ions (Ar). The responses to dsb induction for charged particles show direct relationship between increasing radiation dose and residual intact DNA.

  12. RecBC enzyme overproduction affects UV and gamma radiation survival of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Nivedita P; Kamble, Vidya A; Misra, Hari S

    2008-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans recovering from the effect of acute dose of gamma (gamma) radiation shows a biphasic mechanism of DNA double strands breaks repair that involves an efficient homologous recombination. However, it shows higher sensitivity to near-UV (NUV) than Escherichia coli and lacks RecBC, a DNA strand break (DSB) repair enzyme in some bacteria. Recombinant Deinococcus expressing the recBC genes of E. coli showed nearly three-fold improvements in near-UV tolerance and nearly 2 log cycle reductions in wild type gamma radiation resistance. RecBC over expression effect on radiation response of D. radiodurans was independent of indigenous RecD. Loss of gamma radiation tolerance was attributed to the enhanced rate of in vivo degradation of radiation damaged DNA and delayed kinetics of DSB repair during post-irradiation recovery. RecBC expressing cells of Deinococcus showed wild type response to Far-UV. These results suggest that the overproduction of RecBC competes with the indigenous mechanism of gamma radiation damaged DNA repair while it supports near-UV tolerance in D. radiodurans.

  13. The three catalases in Deinococcus radiodurans: Only two show catalase activity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sun-Wook; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Heon-Man; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-01-15

    Deinococcus radiodurans, which is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress, is known to have three catalases (DR1998, DRA0146, and DRA0259). In this study, to investigate the role of each catalase, we constructed catalase mutants (Δdr1998, ΔdrA0146, and ΔdrA0259) of D. radiodurans. Of the three mutants, Δdr1998 exhibited the greatest decrease in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) resistance and the highest increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels following H2O2 treatments, whereas ΔdrA0146 showed no change in its H2O2 resistance or ROS level. Catalase activity was not attenuated in ΔdrA0146, and none of the three bands detected in an in-gel catalase activity assay disappeared in ΔdrA0146. The purified His-tagged recombinant DRA0146 did not show catalase activity. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis of the deinococcal catalases revealed that the DR1998-type catalase is common in the genus Deinococcus, but the DRA0146-type catalase was found in only 4 of 23 Deinococcus species. Taken together, these results indicate that DR1998 plays a critical role in the anti-oxidative system of D. radiodurans by detoxifying H2O2, but DRA0146 does not have catalase activity and is not involved in the resistance to H2O2 stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification and evaluation of the role of the manganese efflux protein in Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Deinococcus radiodurans accumulates high levels of manganese ions, and this is believed to be correlated with the radiation resistance ability of this microorganism. However, the maintenance of manganese ion homeostasis in D. radiodurans remains to be investigated. Results In this study, we identified the manganese efflux protein (MntE) in D. radiodurans. The null mutant of mntE was more sensitive than the wild-type strain to manganese ions, and the growth of the mntE mutant was delayed in manganese-supplemented media. Furthermore, there was a substantial increase in the in vivo concentration of manganese ions. Consistent with these characteristics, the mntE mutant was more resistant to H2O2, ultraviolet rays, and γ-radiation. The intracellular protein oxidation (carbonylation) level of the mutant strain was remarkably lower than that of the wild-type strain. Conclusions Our results indicated that dr1236 is indeed a mntE homologue and is indispensable for maintaining manganese homeostasis in D. radiodurans. The data also provide additional evidence for the involvement of intracellular manganese ions in the radiation resistance of D. radiodurans. PMID:21156049

  15. Characteristics of dr1790 disruptant and its functional analysis in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianhui; Wang, Hu; Xu, Xin; Wang, Liangyan; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans (DR) is an extremophile that is well known for its resistance to radiation, oxidants and desiccation. The gene dr1790 of D. radiodurans was predicted to encode a yellow-related protein. The primary objective of the present study was to characterize the biological function of the DR1790 protein, which is a member of the ancient yellow/major royal jelly (MRJ) protein family, in prokaryotes. Fluorescence labeling demonstrated that the yellow-related protein encoded by dr1790 is a membrane protein. The deletion of the dr1790 gene decreased the cell growth rate and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and radiation and increased the membrane permeability of D. radiodurans. Transcript profiling by microarray and RT-PCR analyses of the dr1790 deletion mutant suggested that some genes that are involved in protein secretion and transport were strongly suppressed, while other genes that are involved in protein quality control, such as chaperones and proteases, were induced. In addition, the expression of genes with predicted functions that are involved in antioxidant systems, electron transport, and energy metabolism was significantly altered through the disruption of dr1790. Moreover, the results of proteomic analyses using 2-DE and MS also demonstrated that DR1790 contributed to D. radiodurans survival. Taken together, these results indicate that the DR1790 protein from the ancient yellow protein family plays a pleiotropic role in the survival of prokaryotic cells and contributes to the extraordinary resistance of D. radiodurans against oxidative and radiation stresses.

  16. Extremely high intracellular concentration of glucose-6-phosphate and NAD(H) in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Takumi; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2017-03-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is highly resistant to ionizing radiation and UV radiation, and oxidative stress caused by such radiations. NADP(H) seems to be important for this resistance (Slade and Radman, Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 75:133-191; Slade, Radman, Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 75:133-191, 2011), but the mechanism underlying the generation of NADP(H) or NAD(H) in D. radiodurans has not fully been addressed. Intracellular concentrations of NAD(+), NADH, NADP(+), and NADPH in D. radiodurans are also not determined yet. We found that cell extracts of D. radiodurans catalyzed reduction of NAD(P)(+) in vitro, indicating that D. radiodurans cells contain both enzymes and a high concentration of substrates for this activity. The enzyme and the substrate were attributed to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate of which intracellular concentration was extremely high. Unexpectedly, the intracellular concentration of NAD(H) was also much greater than that of NADP(H), suggesting some significant roles of NADH. These unusual features of this bacterium would shed light on a new aspect of physiology of this bacterium.

  17. Functional analysis of gamma-carotene ketolase involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zongtao; Shen, Shaochuan; Tian, Bing; Wang, Hu; Xu, Zhenjian; Wang, Liangyan; Hua, Yuejin

    2009-11-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 synthesizes a unique ketocarotenoid product named deinoxanthin. The detailed steps involved in the biosynthesis of deinoxanthin remain unresolved. A carotene ketolase homologue encoded by dr0093 was inactivated by gene mutation to verify its function in the native host D. radiodurans. Analysis of the carotenoids in the resultant mutant R1DeltacrtO demonstrated that dr0093 encodes gamma-carotene ketolase (CrtO) catalysing the introduction of one keto group into the C-4 position of gamma-carotene derivatives to form ketolated carotenoids. The mutant R1DeltacrtO became more sensitive to H(2)O(2) treatment than the wild-type strain R1, indicating that the C-4 keto group is important for the antioxidant activity of carotenoids in D. radiodurans. Carotenoid extracts from mutant R1DeltacrtO exhibited lower 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity than those from the wild-type strain R1. The enhanced antioxidant ability of ketocarotenoids in D. radiodurans might be attributed to its extended conjugated double bonds and relative stability by the C-4 keto group substitution.

  18. Characterization of monofunctional catalase KatA from radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Issei; Tamura, Takashi; Sghaier, Haitham; Narumi, Issay; Yamaguchi, Shotaro; Umeda, Koichi; Inagaki, Kenji

    2006-04-01

    Catalase plays a key role in protecting cells against toxic reactive oxygen species. Here we report on the cloning, purification and characterization of a catalase (KatA, DR1998) from the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The size of purified D. radiodurans KatA monomer was 65 kDa while gel filtration revealed that the size of the enzyme was 240 kDa, suggesting that KatA formed a homotetramer in solution. Purified KatA displayed a final specific activity of 68,800 U/mg of protein. The catalase activity of KatA was inhibited by sodium azide, sodium cyanide and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. The absorption spectrum of KatA exhibited a Soret band at 408 nm. The position of the spectral peak remained unchanged following reduction of KatA with dithionite. No peroxidase activity was found for KatA. These results demonstrate that D. radiodurans KatA is a typical monofunctional heme-containing catalase. The stability of KatA with respect to H2O2 stress was superior to that of commercially available Aspergillus niger and bovine liver catalases. The relative abundance of KatA in cells in addition to the H2O2 resistance property may play a role in the survival strategy of D. radiodurans against oxidative damage.

  19. Insight into the Strong Antioxidant Activity of Deinoxanthin, a Unique Carotenoid in Deinococcus Radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hong-Fang

    2010-01-01

    Deinoxanthin (DX) is a unique carotenoid synthesized by Deinococcus radiodurans, one of the most radioresistant organisms known. In comparison with other carotenoids, DX was proven to exhibit significantly stronger reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging activity, which plays an important role in the radioresistance of D. radiodurans. In this work, to gain deeper insights into the strong antioxidant activity of DX, the parameters characterizing ROS-scavenging potential were calculated by means of quantum chemical calculations. It was found that DX possesses lower lowest triplet excitation energy for its unique structure than other carotenoids, such as β-carotene and zeaxanthin, which endows DX strong potential in the energy transfer-based ROS-scavenging process. Moreover, the H-atom donating potential of DX is similar to zeaxanthin according to the theoretical homolytic O-H bond dissociation enthalpy. Thus, the large number of conjugated double bonds should be crucial for its strong antioxidant activity. PMID:21151452

  20. Insight into the strong antioxidant activity of deinoxanthin, a unique carotenoid in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-Fang

    2010-11-10

    Deinoxanthin (DX) is a unique carotenoid synthesized by Deinococcus radiodurans, one of the most radioresistant organisms known. In comparison with other carotenoids, DX was proven to exhibit significantly stronger reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging activity, which plays an important role in the radioresistance of D. radiodurans. In this work, to gain deeper insights into the strong antioxidant activity of DX, the parameters characterizing ROS-scavenging potential were calculated by means of quantum chemical calculations. It was found that DX possesses lower lowest triplet excitation energy for its unique structure than other carotenoids, such as β-carotene and zeaxanthin, which endows DX strong potential in the energy transfer-based ROS-scavenging process. Moreover, the H-atom donating potential of DX is similar to zeaxanthin according to the theoretical homolytic O-H bond dissociation enthalpy. Thus, the large number of conjugated double bonds should be crucial for its strong antioxidant activity.

  1. Engineering of Deinococcus radiodurans R1 for bioprecipitation of uranium from dilute nuclear waste.

    PubMed

    Appukuttan, Deepti; Rao, Amara Sambasiva; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2006-12-01

    Genetic engineering of radiation-resistant organisms to recover radionuclides/heavy metals from radioactive wastes is an attractive proposition. We have constructed a Deinococcus radiodurans strain harboring phoN, a gene encoding a nonspecific acid phosphatase, obtained from a local isolate of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. The recombinant strain expressed an approximately 27-kDa active PhoN protein and efficiently precipitated over 90% of the uranium from a 0.8 mM uranyl nitrate solution in 6 h. The engineered strain retained uranium bioprecipitation ability even after exposure to 6 kGy of 60Co gamma rays. The PhoN-expressing D. radiodurans offers an effective and eco-friendly in situ approach to biorecovery of uranium from dilute nuclear waste.

  2. Engineering of Deinococcus radiodurans R1 for Bioprecipitation of Uranium from Dilute Nuclear Waste▿

    PubMed Central

    Appukuttan, Deepti; Rao, Amara Sambasiva; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Genetic engineering of radiation-resistant organisms to recover radionuclides/heavy metals from radioactive wastes is an attractive proposition. We have constructed a Deinococcus radiodurans strain harboring phoN, a gene encoding a nonspecific acid phosphatase, obtained from a local isolate of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. The recombinant strain expressed an ∼27-kDa active PhoN protein and efficiently precipitated over 90% of the uranium from a 0.8 mM uranyl nitrate solution in 6 h. The engineered strain retained uranium bioprecipitation ability even after exposure to 6 kGy of 60Co gamma rays. The PhoN-expressing D. radiodurans offers an effective and eco-friendly in situ approach to biorecovery of uranium from dilute nuclear waste. PMID:17056698

  3. The three catalases in Deinococcus radiodurans: Only two show catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Sun-Wook; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Heon-Man; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-01-15

    Deinococcus radiodurans, which is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation and oxidative stress, is known to have three catalases (DR1998, DRA0146, and DRA0259). In this study, to investigate the role of each catalase, we constructed catalase mutants (Δdr1998, ΔdrA0146, and ΔdrA0259) of D. radiodurans. Of the three mutants, Δdr1998 exhibited the greatest decrease in hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) resistance and the highest increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels following H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatments, whereas ΔdrA0146 showed no change in its H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resistance or ROS level. Catalase activity was not attenuated in ΔdrA0146, and none of the three bands detected in an in-gel catalase activity assay disappeared in ΔdrA0146. The purified His-tagged recombinant DRA0146 did not show catalase activity. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis of the deinococcal catalases revealed that the DR1998-type catalase is common in the genus Deinococcus, but the DRA0146-type catalase was found in only 4 of 23 Deinococcus species. Taken together, these results indicate that DR1998 plays a critical role in the anti-oxidative system of D. radiodurans by detoxifying H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, but DRA0146 does not have catalase activity and is not involved in the resistance to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress. - Highlights: • The dr1998 mutant strain lost 90% of its total catalase activity. • Increased ROS levels and decreased H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resistance were observed in dr1998 mutants. • Lack of drA0146 did not affect any oxidative stress-related phenotypes. • The purified DRA0146 did not show catalase activity.

  4. CYP287A1 is a carotenoid 2-β-hydroxylase required for deinoxanthin biosynthesis in Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengfu; Zhang, Wei; Su, Shiyou; Chen, Ming; Lu, Wei; Lin, Min; Molnár, István; Xu, Yuquan

    2015-12-01

    The carotenoid deinoxanthin is a crucial resistance factor against various stresses in the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. Disruption of the gene dr2473 encoding the cytochrome P450 CYP287A1 led to the accumulation of 2-deoxydeinoxanthin in D. radiodurans, demonstrating that CYP287A1 is a novel β-carotene 2-hydroxylase. The dr2473 knockout mutant was shown to be more sensitive to UV radiation and oxidative stress than the wild-type strain D. radiodurans R1, indicating that the C2 alcohol of deinoxanthin is important for antioxidant activity.

  5. AMT Tag Approach to Proteomic Characterization of Deinococcus Radiodurans and Shewanella Oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, Mary S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Anderson, David J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Hixson, Kim K.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Tolic, Nikola; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-09-01

    Biology is transitioning from a largely qualitative, mostly descriptive science to a quantitative and ultimately predictive science. Advances in high throughput DNA sequencing have made increasing numbers of genome sequences available and enabled a “systems” level analysis of complex biological organisms. The ability to quantitatively measure the array of proteins, also termed the proteome, in prokaryotic cells and communities of cells is key to understanding microbial systems. This chapter focuses on the utility of the AMT tag mass spectrometric approach used to characterize the proteomes of two microbes, Deinococcus radiodurans and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

  6. [Substrate specificity of carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase from Deinococcus radiodurans].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zongtao; Tian, Bing; Shen, Shaochuan; Hu, Yuejin

    2010-10-01

    To examine the substrate specificity of carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase (DR2250) from Deinococcus radiodurans, we amplified the dr2250 gene by using PCR methods. The PCR products were digested by Hind III-BamH I and ligated into the vector pUC19, yielding recombinant vector pUC-CRTD. We analyzed the carotenoids of E. coli transformants containing pACCRT-EBI(Eu) and (or) pRK-CRTC and (or) pUC-CRTD. Our results demonstrated that DR2250 had substrate specificity on the carotenoids with hydroxyl group at C1 (1').

  7. A tamB homolog is involved in maintenance of cell envelope integrity and stress resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jiangliu; Li, Tao; Dai, Shang; Weng, Yulan; Li, Jiulong; Li, Qinghao; Xu, Hong; Hua, Yuejin; Tian, Bing

    2017-01-01

    The translocation and assembly module (TAM) in bacteria consists of TamA and TamB that form a complex to control the transport and secretion of outer membrane proteins. Herein, we demonstrated that the DR_1462-DR_1461-DR_1460 gene loci on chromosome 1 of Deinococcus radiodurans, which lacks tamA homologs, is a tamB homolog (DR_146T) with two tamB motifs and a DUF490 motif. Mutation of DR_146T resulted in cell envelope peeling and a decrease in resistance to shear stress and osmotic pressure, as well as an increase in oxidative stress resistance, consistent with the phenotype of a surface layer (S-layer) protein SlpA (DR_2577) mutant, demonstrating the involvement of DR_146T in maintenance of cell envelope integrity. The 123 kDa SlpA was absent and only its fragments were present in the cell envelope of DR_146T mutant, suggesting that DR_146T might be involved in maintenance of the S-layer. A mutant lacking the DUF490 motif displayed only a slight alteration in phenotype compared with the wild type, suggesting DUF490 is less important than tamB motif for the function of DR_146T. These findings enhance our understanding of the properties of the multilayered envelope in extremophilic D. radiodurans, as well as the diversity and functions of TAMs in bacteria. PMID:28383523

  8. Efficient bioremediation of radioactive iodine using biogenic gold nanomaterial-containing radiation-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi Hee; Jeong, Sun-Wook; Shim, Ha Eun; Yun, Seong-Jae; Mushtaq, Sajid; Choi, Dae Seong; Jang, Beom-Su; Yang, Jung Eun; Choi, Yong Jun; Jeon, Jongho

    2017-04-04

    We herein report a new bioremediation method using a radiation-resistant bacterium. Biogenic gold nanomaterial-containing Deinococcus radiodurans R1 showed excellent capability for the removal of radioactive iodine (>99%) in several aqueous solutions. These observations demonstrated that our remediation system would be efficiently applied to the treatment of radioactive wastes.

  9. Background Mutational Features of the Radiation-Resistant Bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Long, Hongan; Kucukyildirim, Sibel; Sung, Way; Williams, Emily; Lee, Heewook; Ackerman, Matthew; Doak, Thomas G; Tang, Haixu; Lynch, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Deinococcus bacteria are extremely resistant to radiation, oxidation, and desiccation. Resilience to these factors has been suggested to be due to enhanced damage prevention and repair mechanisms, as well as highly efficient antioxidant protection systems. Here, using mutation-accumulation experiments, we find that the GC-rich Deinococcus radiodurans has an overall background genomic mutation rate similar to that of E. coli, but differs in mutation spectrum, with the A/T to G/C mutation rate (based on a total count of 88 A:T → G:C transitions and 82 A:T → C:G transversions) per site per generation higher than that in the other direction (based on a total count of 157 G:C → A:T transitions and 33 G:C → T:A transversions). We propose that this unique spectrum is shaped mainly by the abundant uracil DNA glycosylases reducing G:C → A:T transitions, adenine methylation elevating A:T → C:G transversions, and absence of cytosine methylation decreasing G:C → A:T transitions. As opposed to the greater than 100× elevation of the mutation rate in MMR(-) (DNA Mismatch Repair deficient) strains of most other organisms, MMR(-) D. radiodurans only exhibits a 4-fold elevation, raising the possibility that other DNA repair mechanisms compensate for a relatively low-efficiency DNA MMR pathway. As D. radiodurans has plentiful insertion sequence (IS) elements in the genome and the activities of IS elements are rarely directly explored, we also estimated the insertion (transposition) rate of the IS elements to be 2.50 × 10(-3) per genome per generation in the wild-type strain; knocking out MMR did not elevate the IS element insertion rate in this organism.

  10. Protein damage and death by radiation in Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Krisko, Anita; Radman, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is among a small number of bacterial species that are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation, UV light, toxic chemicals, and desiccation. We measured proteome oxidation (i.e., protein carbonylation, PC) in D. radiodurans as well as in standard and evolved resistant strains of Escherichia coli exposed to ionizing radiation or UVC light and found a consistent correlation with cell killing. The unique quantitative relationship between incurred PC and cell death holds over the entire range of killing for all tested bacteria and for both lethal agents, meaning that both bacterial species are equally sensitive to PC. We show that the extraordinary robustness of D. radiodurans depends on efficient proteome protection (but not DNA protection) against constitutive and radiation-induced PC consisting of low molecular weight cytosolic compounds. Remarkably, experimental evolution of resistance to ionizing radiation in E. coli coevolves with protection against PC. The decline in biosynthetic efficacy of the cellular proteome, as measured by the loss of reproduction of undamaged bacteriophage λ in irradiated standard and evolved ionizing radiation-resistant E. coli, correlates with radiation-induced oxidative damage to host cells and their sensitivity to ionizing radiation. This correlation suggests that cell death by radiation is caused primarily by oxidative damage with consequential loss of maintenance activities including DNA repair. PMID:20660760

  11. Protein damage and death by radiation in Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Krisko, Anita; Radman, Miroslav

    2010-08-10

    Deinococcus radiodurans is among a small number of bacterial species that are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation, UV light, toxic chemicals, and desiccation. We measured proteome oxidation (i.e., protein carbonylation, PC) in D. radiodurans as well as in standard and evolved resistant strains of Escherichia coli exposed to ionizing radiation or UVC light and found a consistent correlation with cell killing. The unique quantitative relationship between incurred PC and cell death holds over the entire range of killing for all tested bacteria and for both lethal agents, meaning that both bacterial species are equally sensitive to PC. We show that the extraordinary robustness of D. radiodurans depends on efficient proteome protection (but not DNA protection) against constitutive and radiation-induced PC consisting of low molecular weight cytosolic compounds. Remarkably, experimental evolution of resistance to ionizing radiation in E. coli coevolves with protection against PC. The decline in biosynthetic efficacy of the cellular proteome, as measured by the loss of reproduction of undamaged bacteriophage lambda in irradiated standard and evolved ionizing radiation-resistant E. coli, correlates with radiation-induced oxidative damage to host cells and their sensitivity to ionizing radiation. This correlation suggests that cell death by radiation is caused primarily by oxidative damage with consequential loss of maintenance activities including DNA repair.

  12. Bioremediation of endocrine disruptor di-n-butyl phthalate ester by Deinococcus radiodurans and Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chien-Sen; Chen, Lung-Chieh; Chen, Bing-Sheng; Lin, Sin-Hsien

    2010-01-01

    Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) is a group of phthalate esters (PAEs) that are widely used in cosmetics, perfumes, and plasticizers. Due to its high production and application figures, DBP is commonly found in wastewater, sewage sludge, and aquatic environments. It has been classified as suspected endocrine disruptors by most countries. In this study, we isolated two DBP degradable strains from activated sludge. The strains were identified with their 16S rRNA as Deinococcus radiodurans and Pseudomonas stutzeri. We constructed the optimal condition of DBP degradation by using different kinds of incubation factors such as temperature, initial pH, yeast extract and surfactants. The optimal conditions of DBP degradation for these two strains are: 30 degrees C, pH 7.5 and static culture. Besides, addition of 0.23 mM of Triton X-100 could enhance the DBP degradation for D. radiodurans. In the end, we amended these two strains into the origin activated sludge and analyzed the whole microbial community structure of mixed cultures by PCR-DGGE technique. The result showed that only D. radiodurans could survive in the activated sludge after 7d of incubation. Based on this work, we hope that these findings could provide some useful information for applying the bioremediation of DBP in our environment.

  13. Phosphorylation of Deinococcus radiodurans RecA Regulates Its Activity and May Contribute to Radioresistance*

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra S.; Bihani, Subhash C.; Waldor, Matthew K.; Misra, Hari S.

    2016-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans has a remarkable capacity to survive exposure to extreme levels of radiation that cause hundreds of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). DSB repair in this bacterium depends on its recombinase A protein (DrRecA). DrRecA plays a pivotal role in both extended synthesis-dependent strand annealing and slow crossover events of DSB repair during the organism's recovery from DNA damage. The mechanisms that control DrRecA activity during the D. radiodurans response to γ radiation exposure are unknown. Here, we show that DrRecA undergoes phosphorylation at Tyr-77 and Thr-318 by a DNA damage-responsive serine threonine/tyrosine protein kinase (RqkA). Phosphorylation modifies the activity of DrRecA in several ways, including increasing its affinity for dsDNA and its preference for dATP over ATP. Strand exchange reactions catalyzed by phosphorylated versus unphosphorylated DrRecA also differ. In silico analysis of DrRecA structure support the idea that phosphorylation can modulate crucial functions of this protein. Collectively, our findings suggest that phosphorylation of DrRecA enables the recombinase to selectively use abundant dsDNA substrate present during post-irradiation recovery for efficient DSB repair, thereby promoting the extraordinary radioresistance of D. radiodurans. PMID:27255712

  14. Harnessing a radiation inducible promoter of Deinococcus radiodurans for enhanced precipitation of uranium.

    PubMed

    Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2014-11-10

    Bioremediation is an attractive option for the treatment of radioactive waste. We provide a proof of principle for augmentation of uranium bioprecipitation using the radiation inducible promoter, Pssb from Deinococcus radiodurans. Recombinant cells of D. radiodurans carrying acid phosphatase gene, phoN under the regulation of Pssb when exposed to 7 kGy gamma radiation at two different dose rates of 56.8 Gy/min and 4 Gy/min, showed 8-9 fold increase in acid phosphatase activity. Highest whole cell PhoN activity was obtained after 2h in post irradiation recovery following 8 kGy of high dose rate radiation. Such cells showed faster removal of high concentrations of uranium than recombinant cells expressing PhoN under a radiation non-inducible deinococcal promoter, PgroESL and could precipitate uranium even after continuous exposure to 0.6 Gy/min gamma radiation for 10 days. Radiation induced recombinant D. radiodurans cells when lyophilized retained high levels of PhoN activity and precipitated uranium efficiently. These results highlight the importance of using a suitable promoter for removal of radionuclides from solution.

  15. Roles of DNA repair and membrane integrity in heat resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Bauermeister, Anja; Hahn, Claudia; Rettberg, Petra; Reitz, Günther; Moeller, Ralf

    2012-11-01

    To study the effects of heat shock on Deinococcus radiodurans and the role of DNA repair in high temperature resistance, different strains of D. radiodurans (wild type, recA, irrE, and pprA) were treated with temperatures ranging from 40 to 100 °C under wet and dry conditions. The mutant strains were more sensitive to wet heat of ≥60 °C and dry heat of ≥80 °C than the wild type. Both wild-type and DNA repair-deficient strains were much more resistant to high temperatures when exposed in the dried state as opposed to cells in suspension. Molecular staining techniques with the wild-type strain revealed that cells in the dried state were able to retain membrane integrity after drying and subsequent heat exposure, while heat-exposed cells in suspension showed significant loss of membrane integrity and respiration activity. The results suggest that the repair of DNA damage (e.g., DNA double-strand breaks by RecA and PprA) is essential after treatment with wet heat at temperatures >60 °C and dry heat >80 °C, and the ability of D. radiodurans to stabilize its plasma membrane during dehydration might represent one aspect in the protection of dried cells from heat-induced membrane damage.

  16. Irradiation-Induced Deinococcus radiodurans Genome Fragmentation Triggers Transposition of a Single Resident Insertion Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Cécile; Ton-Hoang, Bao; Coste, Geneviève; Bailone, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Stress-induced transposition is an attractive notion since it is potentially important in creating diversity to facilitate adaptation of the host to severe environmental conditions. One common major stress is radiation-induced DNA damage. Deinococcus radiodurans has an exceptional ability to withstand the lethal effects of DNA–damaging agents (ionizing radiation, UV light, and desiccation). High radiation levels result in genome fragmentation and reassembly in a process which generates significant amounts of single-stranded DNA. This capacity of D. radiodurans to withstand irradiation raises important questions concerning its response to radiation-induced mutagenic lesions. A recent study analyzed the mutational profile in the thyA gene following irradiation. The majority of thyA mutants resulted from transposition of one particular Insertion Sequence (IS), ISDra2, of the many different ISs in the D. radiodurans genome. ISDra2 is a member of a newly recognised class of ISs, the IS200/IS605 family of insertion sequences. PMID:20090938

  17. Metabolic engineering of deinococcus radiodurans based on computational analysis and functional genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Jeremy, S.

    2005-02-02

    The objective of our work is to develop novel computational tools to analyze the Deinococcus radiodurans DNA repair pathways and the influence of the metabolic flux distribution on DNA repair. These tools will be applied to provide insights for metabolic engineering of strains capable of growing under nutrient poor conditions similar to those found in mixed contaminant sites of interest to the DOE. Over the entire grant period we accomplished all our specific aims and were also able to pursue new directions of research. Below, I will list the major accomplishments over the previous 3 years. (1) Performed Monte Carlo Simulations of RecA Mediated Pairing of Homologous DNA Molecules. (2) Developed a statistical approach to study the gene expression data from D. radiodurans. We have been studying the data from John Batista's. (3) Developed an expression profiling technology to generate very accurate and precise expression data. We followed up on results from John Batista's group using this approach. (4) Developed and put online a database for metabolic reconstructions. (5) We have developed and applied new Monte Carlo algorithms that are optimized for studying biological systems. (6) We developed a flux balance model for the D. radiodurans metabolic network

  18. Comparative genomics of Thermus thermophilus and Deinococcus radiodurans: divergent routes of adaptation to thermophily and radiation resistance

    PubMed Central

    Omelchenko, Marina V; Wolf, Yuri I; Gaidamakova, Elena K; Matrosova, Vera Y; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Daly, Michael J; Koonin, Eugene V; Makarova, Kira S

    2005-01-01

    Background Thermus thermophilus and Deinococcus radiodurans belong to a distinct bacterial clade but have remarkably different phenotypes. T. thermophilus is a thermophile, which is relatively sensitive to ionizing radiation and desiccation, whereas D. radiodurans is a mesophile, which is highly radiation- and desiccation-resistant. Here we present an in-depth comparison of the genomes of these two related but differently adapted bacteria. Results By reconstructing the evolution of Thermus and Deinococcus after the divergence from their common ancestor, we demonstrate a high level of post-divergence gene flux in both lineages. Various aspects of the adaptation to high temperature in Thermus can be attributed to horizontal gene transfer from archaea and thermophilic bacteria; many of the horizontally transferred genes are located on the single megaplasmid of Thermus. In addition, the Thermus lineage has lost a set of genes that are still present in Deinococcus and many other mesophilic bacteria but are not common among thermophiles. By contrast, Deinococcus seems to have acquired numerous genes related to stress response systems from various bacteria. A comparison of the distribution of orthologous genes among the four partitions of the Deinococcus genome and the two partitions of the Thermus genome reveals homology between the Thermus megaplasmid (pTT27) and Deinococcus megaplasmid (DR177). Conclusion After the radiation from their common ancestor, the Thermus and Deinococcus lineages have taken divergent paths toward their distinct lifestyles. In addition to extensive gene loss, Thermus seems to have acquired numerous genes from thermophiles, which likely was the decisive contribution to its thermophilic adaptation. By contrast, Deinococcus lost few genes but seems to have acquired many bacterial genes that apparently enhanced its ability to survive different kinds of environmental stresses. Notwithstanding the accumulation of horizontally transferred genes, we

  19. Characterization of the Minimal Replicon of a Cryptic Deinococcus radiodurans SARK Plasmid and Development of Versatile Escherichia coli-D. radiodurans Shuttle Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Meima, Rob; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2000-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 12-kb fragment of the cryptic Deinococcus radiodurans SARK plasmid pUE10 was determined, in order to direct the development of small, versatile cloning systems for Deinococcus. Annotation of the sequence revealed 12 possible open reading frames. Among these are the repU and resU genes, the predicted products of which share similarity with replication proteins and site-specific resolvases, respectively. The products of both genes were demonstrated using an overexpression system in Escherichia coli. RepU was found to be required for replication, and ResU was found to be required for stable maintenance of pUE10 derivatives. Gel shift analysis using purified His-tagged RepU identified putative binding sites and suggested that RepU may be involved in both replication initiation and autoregulation of repU expression. In addition, a gene encoding a possible antirestriction protein was found, which was shown to be required for high transformation frequencies. The arrangement of the replication region and putative replication genes for this plasmid from D. radiodurans strain SARK is similar to that for plasmids found in Thermus but not to that for the 45.7-kb plasmid found in D. radiodurans strain R1. The minimal region required for autonomous replication in D. radiodurans was determined by sequential deletion of segments from the 12-kb fragment. The resulting minimal replicon, which consists of approximately 2.6 kb, was used for the construction of a shuttle vector for E. coli and D. radiodurans. This vector, pRAD1, is a convenient general-purpose cloning vector. In addition, pRAD1 was used to generate a promoter probe vector, and a plasmid containing lacZ and a Deinococcus promoter was shown to efficiently express LacZ. PMID:10966401

  20. DqsIR quorum sensing-mediated gene regulation of the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans in response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Dai, Shang; Tian, Bing; Li, Tao; Yu, Jiangliu; Liu, Chengzhi; Wang, Liangyan; Xu, Hong; Zhao, Ye; Hua, Yuejin

    2016-05-01

    Here, we show that AHLs can be employed by Deinococcus radiodurans, which belongs to the unique phylum Deinococcus-Thermus and is known for its cellular resistance to environmental stresses. An AHL-mediated quorum-sensing system (DqsI/DqsR) was identified in D. radiodurans. We found that under non-stress conditions, the AHL level was "shielded" by quorum quenching enzymes, whereas AHLs accumulated when D. radiodurans was exposed to oxidative stress. Upon exposure to H2 O2 , AHL synthetic enzymes (DqsI) were immediately induced, while the expression of quorum-quenching enzymes began to increase approximately 30 min after exposure to H2 O2 , as shown by time-course analyses of gene expression. Both dqsI mutant (DMDqsI) and dqsR mutant (MDqsR) were more sensitive to oxidative stress compared with the wild-type strain. Exogenous AHLs (5 μM) could completely restore the survival fraction of DMDqsI under oxidative stress. RNA-seq analysis showed that a number of genes involved in stress-response, cellular cleansing, and DNA repair had altered transcriptional levels in MDqsR. The DqsR, acting as a regulator of quorum sensing, controls gene expression along with AHLs. Hence, the DqsIR-mediated quorum sensing that mediates gene regulation is an adaptive strategy for D. radiodurans in response to oxidative stresses and is conserved in the extremophilic Deinococcus bacteria. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Biochemical and Functional Characterization of the NurA-HerA Complex from Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kaiying; Chen, Xuanyi; Xu, Guangzhi; Wang, Liangyan; Xu, Hong; Yang, Su

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In archaea, the NurA nuclease and HerA ATPase/helicase, together with the Mre11-Rad50 complex, function in 3′ single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) end processing during homologous recombination (HR). However, bacterial homologs of NurA and HerA have not been characterized. From Deinococcus radiodurans, we identified the manganese-dependent 5′-to-3′ ssDNA/double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) exonuclease/endonuclease NurA (DrNurA) and the ATPase HerA (DrHerA). These two proteins stimulated each other's activity through direct protein-protein interactions. The N-terminal HAS domain of DrHerA was the key domain for this interaction. Several critical residues of DrNurA and DrHerA were verified by site-directed mutational analysis. Temperature-dependent activity assays confirmed that the two proteins had mesophilic features, with optimum activity temperatures 10°C to 15°C higher than their optimum growth temperatures. Knocking out either nurA or herA affected cell proliferation by shortening the growth phase, especially for growth at a high temperature (37°C). In addition, both mutant strains displayed almost 10-fold-reduced intermolecular recombination efficiency, indicating that DrNurA and DrHerA might be involved in homologous recombination in vivo. However, single- and double-gene deletions did not show significantly decreased radioresistance. Our results confirmed that the biochemical activities of bacterial NurA and HerA proteins were conserved with archaea. Our phenotypical results suggested that these proteins might have different functions in bacteria. IMPORTANCE Deinococcus radiodurans NurA (DrNurA) was identified as a manganese-dependent 5′-to-3′ ssDNA/dsDNA exonuclease/endonuclease, and Deinococcus radiodurans HerA (DrHerA) was identified as an ATPase. Physical interactions between DrNurA and DrHerA explained mutual stimulation of their activities. The N-terminal HAS domain on DrHerA was identified as the interaction domain. Several essential functional

  2. Deinococcus radiodurans Engineered for Complete Toluene Degradation Facilitates Cr(VI) Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Brim, Hassan; Osborne, Jeffrey P.; Kostandarithis, Heather M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Wackett, L. P.; Daly, Michael J.

    2006-08-01

    Toluene and other fuel hydrocarbons are commonly found in association with radionuclides at numerous US Department of Energy sites, frequently occurring together with Cr(VI) and other heavy metals. In this study, the extremely radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, which naturally reduces Cr(VI) to the less mobile and less toxic Cr(III), was engineered for complete toluene degradation by cloned expression of tod and xyl genes of Pseudomonas putida. The recombinant Tod/Xyl strain showed incorporation of carbon from 14C-labelled toluene into cellular macromolecules and carbon dioxide, in the absence or presence of chronic ionizing radiation. The engineered bacteria were able to oxidize toluene under both minimal and complex nutrient conditions, and recombinant cells reduced Cr(VI) in sediment microcosms. As such, the Tod/Xyl strain could provide a model for examining the reduction of metals coupled to organic contaminant oxidation in aerobic radionuclide-contaminated sediments.

  3. Laboratory simulation of interplanetary ultraviolet radiation (broad spectrum) and its effects on Deinococcus radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulino-Lima, Ivan Gláucio; Pilling, Sérgio; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo; de Brito, Arnaldo Naves; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalves; Leitão, Alvaro Costa; Lage, Claudia de Alencar Santos

    2010-08-01

    The radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans was exposed to a simulated interplanetary UV radiation at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). Bacterial samples were irradiated on different substrates to investigate the influence of surface relief on cell survival. The effects of cell multi-layers were also investigated. The ratio of viable microorganisms remained virtually the same (average 2%) for integrated doses from 1.2 to 12 kJ m -2, corresponding to 16 h of irradiation at most. The asymptotic profiles of the curves, clearly connected to a shielding effect provided by multi-layering cells on a cavitary substrate (carbon tape), means that the inactivation rate may not change significantly along extended periods of exposure to radiation. Such high survival rates reinforce the possibility of an interplanetary transfer of viable microbes.

  4. Characterization of a Mn-dependent fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Mei; Liu, Jong-Kang; Shouri, Mohammad Reza; Wong, Tit-Yee

    2006-02-01

    The key enzyme of the glycolytic pathway of Deinococcus radiodurans, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, could be induced independently by glucose and Mn. The enzyme exhibited the characteristics of the metal-dependent Class II aldolases. Unlike most Class II aldolases, the deinococcal aldolase preferred Mn, not Zn, as a cofactor. The fbaA gene encoding the deinococcal aldolase was cloned and the protein overproduced in various Escherichia coli expression hosts. However, the overexpressed deinococcal enzyme aggregated and formed inclusion bodies. Dissolving these inclusion bodies by urea and subsequent purification by nickel affinity chromatography, resulted in a protein fraction that exhibited aldolase activity only in the presence of Mn. This active aldolase fraction exhibited masses of about 70 kDa and 35 kDa by gel filtration and by SDS gel electrophoresis, respectively, suggesting that the active aldolase was a dimer.

  5. Global analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans proteome by using accurate mass tags

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Mary S.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Anderson, David J.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Battista, John R.; Daly, Michael J.; Fredrickson, Jim; Hixson, Kim K.; Kostandarithes, Heather; Masselon, Christophe; Markillie, Lye Meng; Moore, Ronald J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Shen, Yufeng; Stritmatter, Eric; Tolić, Nikola; Udseth, Harold R.; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2002-01-01

    Understanding biological systems and the roles of their constituents is facilitated by the ability to make quantitative, sensitive, and comprehensive measurements of how their proteome changes, e.g., in response to environmental perturbations. To this end, we have developed a high-throughput methodology to characterize an organism's dynamic proteome based on the combination of global enzymatic digestion, high-resolution liquid chromatographic separations, and analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The peptides produced serve as accurate mass tags for the proteins and have been used to identify with high confidence >61% of the predicted proteome for the ionizing radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. This fraction represents the broadest proteome coverage for any organism to date and includes 715 proteins previously annotated as either hypothetical or conserved hypothetical. PMID:12177431

  6. Crystal structure of Deinococcus radiodurans RecQ helicase catalytic core domain: the interdomain flexibility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chia; Huang, Chi-Hung; Yang, Chia Shin; Way, Tzong-Der; Chang, Ming-Chung; Chen, Yeh

    2014-01-01

    RecQ DNA helicases are key enzymes in the maintenance of genome integrity, and they have functions in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. In contrast to most RecQs, RecQ from Deinococcus radiodurans (DrRecQ) possesses an unusual domain architecture that is crucial for its remarkable ability to repair DNA. Here, we determined the crystal structures of the DrRecQ helicase catalytic core and its ADP-bound form, revealing interdomain flexibility in its first RecA-like and winged-helix (WH) domains. Additionally, the WH domain of DrRecQ is positioned in a different orientation from that of the E. coli RecQ (EcRecQ). These results suggest that the orientation of the protein during DNA-binding is significantly different when comparing DrRecQ and EcRecQ.

  7. New features of the cell wall of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Farci, Domenica; Bowler, Matthew W; Kirkpatrick, Joanna; McSweeney, Sean; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2014-07-01

    We have analyzed the cell wall of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. Unexpectedly, the bacterial envelope appears to be organized in different complexes of high molecular weight. Each complex is composed of several proteins, most of which are coded by genes of unknown function and the majority are constituents of the inner/outer membrane system. One of the most abundant complexes is constituted by the gene DR_0774. This protein is a type of secretin which is a known subunit of the homo-oligomeric channel that represents the main bulk of the type IV piliation family. Finally, a minor component of the pink envelope consists of several inner-membrane proteins. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. Global Analysis of Deinococcus Radiodurans Proteome by Csing Accurate Mass Tags

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Anderson, David J.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Battista, John R.; Daly, Michael J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Hixson, Kim K.; Kostandarithes, Heather M.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Moore, Ronald J.; Romine, Margaret F.; Shen, Yufeng; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Tolic, Nikola; Udseth, Harold R.; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2002-08-20

    The ability to understand biological systems and their constituents would be greatly facilitated by the ability to make quantitative, sensitive, and comprehensive measurements of how their proteome changes e.g. in response to environmental perturbations. To this end we have developed new instrumentation and a high throughput methodology to characterize an organism's dynamic proteome based upon the combination of global enzymatic digestion, high-resolution liquid chromatographic separations and analysis by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Using accurate mass tags, 61% of the predicted proteome of the ionizing radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans was characterized with high confidence. This represents the broadest proteome coverage for any organism to date, and includes 715 proteins previously annotated as either hypothetical or conserved hypothetical.

  9. The role of Deinococcus radiodurans RecFOR proteins in homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Katsuya; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Ishaque, Abu M; Ohba, Hirofumi; Yamada, Mitsugu; Tejima, Kouhei; Onodera, Takefumi; Narumi, Issay

    2012-04-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits extraordinary resistance to the lethal effect of DNA-damaging agents, a characteristic attributed to its highly proficient DNA repair capacity. Although the D. radiodurans genome is clearly devoid of recBC and addAB counterparts as RecA mediators, the genome possesses all genes associated with the RecFOR pathway. In an effort to gain insights into the role of D. radiodurans RecFOR proteins in homologous recombination, we generated recF, recO and recR disruptant strains and characterized the disruption effects. All the disruptant strains exhibited delayed growth relative to the wild-type, indicating that the RecF, RecO and RecR proteins play an important role in cell growth under normal growth conditions. A slight reduction in transformation efficiency was observed in the recF and recO disruptant strains compared to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, disruption of recR resulted in severe reduction of the transformation efficiency. On the other hand, the recF disruptant strain was the most sensitive phenotype to γ rays, UV irradiation and mitomycin C among the three disruptants. In the recF disruptant strain, the intracellular level of the LexA1 protein did not decrease following γ irradiation, suggesting that a large amount of the RecA protein remains inactive despite being induced. These results demonstrate that the RecF protein plays a crucial role in the homologous recombination repair process by facilitating RecA activation in D. radiodurans. Thus, the RecF and RecR proteins are involved in the RecA activation and the stability of incoming DNA, respectively, during RecA-mediated homologous recombination processes that initiated the ESDSA pathway in D. radiodurans. Possible mechanisms that involve the RecFOR complex in homologous intermolecular recombination and homologous recombination repair processes are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Imposed Environmental Stresses Facilitate Cell-Free Nanoparticle Formation by Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Angela; Contreras, Lydia M; Keitz, Benjamin K

    2017-09-15

    The biological synthesis of metal nanoparticles has been examined in a wide range of organisms, due to increased interest in green synthesis and environmental remediation applications involving heavy metal ion contamination. Deinococcus radiodurans is particularly attractive for environmental remediation involving metal reduction, due to its high levels of resistance to radiation and other environmental stresses. However, few studies have thoroughly examined the relationships between environmental stresses and the resulting effects on nanoparticle biosynthesis. In this work, we demonstrate cell-free nanoparticle production and study the effects of metal stressor concentrations and identity, temperature, pH, and oxygenation on the production of extracellular silver nanoparticles by D. radiodurans R1. We also report the synthesis of bimetallic silver and gold nanoparticles following the addition of a metal stressor (silver or gold), highlighting how production of these particles is enabled through the application of environmental stresses. Additionally, we found that both the morphology and size of monometallic and bimetallic nanoparticles were dependent on the environmental stresses imposed on the cells. The nanoparticles produced by D. radiodurans exhibited antimicrobial activity comparable to that of pure silver nanoparticles and displayed catalytic activity comparable to that of pure gold nanoparticles. Overall, we demonstrate that biosynthesized nanoparticle properties can be partially controlled through the tuning of applied environmental stresses, and we provide insight into how their application may affect nanoparticle production in D. radiodurans during bioremediation.IMPORTANCE Biosynthetic production of nanoparticles has recently gained prominence as a solution to rising concerns regarding increased bacterial resistance to antibiotics and a desire for environmentally friendly methods of bioremediation and chemical synthesis. To date, a range of organisms

  11. Depletion of reduction potential and key energy generation metabolic enzymes underlies tellurite toxicity in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Anaganti, Narasimha; Basu, Bhakti; Gupta, Alka; Joseph, Daisy; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress resistant Deinococcus radiodurans surprisingly exhibited moderate sensitivity to tellurite induced oxidative stress (LD50 = 40 μM tellurite, 40 min exposure). The organism reduced 70% of 40 μM potassium tellurite within 5 h. Tellurite exposure significantly modulated cellular redox status. The level of ROS and protein carbonyl contents increased while the cellular reduction potential substantially decreased following tellurite exposure. Cellular thiols levels initially increased (within 30 min) of tellurite exposure but decreased at later time points. At proteome level, tellurite resistance proteins (TerB and TerD), tellurite reducing enzymes (pyruvate dehydrogense subunits E1 and E3), ROS detoxification enzymes (superoxide dismutase and thioredoxin reductase), and protein folding chaperones (DnaK, EF-Ts, and PPIase) displayed increased abundance in tellurite-stressed cells. However, remarkably decreased levels of key metabolic enzymes (aconitase, transketolase, 3-hydroxy acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein alpha, and beta) involved in carbon and energy metabolism were observed upon tellurite stress. The results demonstrate that depletion of reduction potential in intensive tellurite reduction with impaired energy metabolism lead to tellurite toxicity in D. radiodurans. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Enhanced stress resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans cells in the dried state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauermeister, Anja; Moeller, Ralf; Reitz, Guenther; Billi, Daniela; Rettberg, Petra

    Liquid water is often regarded as a pre-requisite for life as we know it. However, some organisms can survive prolonged periods in a desiccated state and seem to resist other environmental stres-sors even better when water is absent. We tested this observation in Deinococcus radiodurans, a non-sporeforming soil bacterium well-known for its outstanding resistance to DNA damaging stressors, including high doses of UV and ionizing radiation, oxidants, and desiccation. Due to its polyextremophilic characteristics it has been regarded as a model organism in astrobiological research. To determine if the cellular changes imposed by the removal of water have an effect on the stress resistance of D. radiodurans, we compared the survival capacity of dried cells with that of hydrated cells after exposure to mono-and polychromatic UV radiation, -radiation, and heat shock (85C). In all cases, resistance was enhanced in dried cells. It is suggested that these effects are mainly due to a reduced oxidative stress in dried cells, as the metabolism is shut down and radical diffusion is very limited. Hence, desiccating conditions as encountered in space vacuum or on arid planets such as Mars may be beneficial instead of detrimental to the survival of some polyextremophilic microbes. Ongoing experiments aim to evaluate damage at a subcellular level in dried and hydrated cells after exposure to irradiation or heat shock.

  13. Identification and functional analysis of a phytoene desaturase gene from the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhenjian; Tian, Bing; Sun, Zongtao; Lin, Jun; Hua, Yuejin

    2007-05-01

    The phytoene-related desaturases are the key enzymes in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. The gene encoding phytoene desaturase in the deinoxanthin synthesis pathway of Deinococcus radiodurans was identified and characterized. Two putative phytoene desaturase homologues (DR0861 and DR0810) were identified by analysis of conserved amino acid regions, and the former displayed the highest identity (68 %) with phytoene desaturase of the cyanobacterium Gloeobacter violaceus. DR0861 gene knockout and dinucleotide-binding motif deletion resulted in the arrest of lycopene synthesis and the accumulation of phytoene. The colourless DR0861 knockout mutant became more sensitive to acute ionizing radiation and oxygen stress. Complementation of the mutant with a heterologous or homologous gene restored its pigment and resistance. The desaturase activity of DR0861 (crtI) was further confirmed by the assay of enzyme activity in vitro and heterologous expression in Escherichia coli containing crtE and crtB genes (responsible for phytoene synthesis) from Erwinia uredovora. In addition, the amount of lycopene synthesis in E. coli resulting from the expression of crtI from D. radiodurans was determined, and this had significant dose-dependent effects on the survival rate of E. coli exposed to hydrogen peroxide and ionizing radiation.

  14. Carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase is involved in carotenoid biosynthesis in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing; Sun, Zongtao; Xu, Zhenjian; Shen, Shaochuan; Wang, Hu; Hua, Yuejin

    2008-12-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 synthesizes deinoxanthin, a unique carotenoid product, which contributes to cell resistance following various stresses. The biosynthetic pathway of deinoxanthin is unclear, although several enzymes are presumed to be involved. The gene (dr2250) predicted by gene homologue analysis to encode carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase (CrtD) was deleted to investigate its function. A mutant deficient in the gene homologue of crtLm (dr0801) was also constructed to verify the catalytic function of the gene product in the native host. Carotenoid analysis of the resultant mutants verified that DR2250 encodes carotenoid 3',4'-desaturase, which catalyses the C-3',4'-desaturation of the monocyclic precursor of deinoxanthin but not acyclic carotenoids. Mutation of the gene homologue of crtLm (dr0801) resulted in accumulation of lycopene, confirming that it encodes the lycopene cyclase in the native host. The lack of CrtD decreased the antioxidant capacity of the mutant deficient in dr2250 compared with the wild-type, indicating that the C-3',4'-desaturation step contributes to the antioxidant capacity of deinoxanthin in D. radiodurans.

  15. In Situ Determination of Manganese(II) Speciation in Deinococcus radiodurans by High Magnetic Field EPR

    PubMed Central

    Tabares, Leandro C.; Un, Sun

    2013-01-01

    High magnetic field high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance techniques were used to measure in situ Mn(II) speciation in Deinococcus radiodurans, a radiation-resistant bacteria capable of accumulating high concentrations of Mn(II). It was possible to identify and quantify the evolution of Mn(II) species in intact cells at various stages of growth. Aside from water, 95-GHz high field electron nuclear double resonance showed that the Mn(II) ions are bound to histidines and phosphate groups, mostly from fructose-1,6-bisphosphate but also inorganic phosphates and nucleotides. During stationary growth phase, 285-GHz continuous wave EPR measurements showed that histidine is the most common ligand to Mn(II) and that significant amounts of cellular Mn(II) in D. radiodurans are bound to peptides and proteins. As much as 40% of the total Mn(II) was in manganese superoxide dismutase, and it is this protein and not smaller manganese complexes, as has been suggested recently, that is probably the primary defense against superoxide. PMID:23303180

  16. Three HRDC domains differentially modulate Deinococcus radiodurans RecQ DNA helicase biochemical activity.

    PubMed

    Killoran, Michael P; Keck, James L

    2006-05-05

    RecQ helicases are key genome maintenance enzymes that function in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. In contrast to nearly every other identified RecQ family member, the RecQ helicase from the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans encodes three "Helicase and RNase D C-terminal" (HRDC) domains at its C terminus. HRDC domains have been implicated in structure-specific nucleic acid binding with roles in targeting RecQ proteins to particular DNA structures; however, only RecQ proteins with single HRDC domains have been examined to date. We demonstrate that the HRDC domains can be proteolytically removed from the D. radiodurans RecQ (DrRecQ) C terminus, consistent with each forming a structural domain. Using this observation as a guide, we produced a panel of recombinant DrRecQ variants lacking combinations of its HRDC domains to investigate their biochemical functions. The N-terminal-most HRDC domain is shown to be critical for high affinity DNA binding and for efficient unwinding of DNA in some contexts. In contrast, the more C-terminal HRDC domains attenuate the DNA binding affinity and DNA-dependent ATP hydrolysis rate of the enzyme and play more complex roles in structure-specific DNA unwinding. Our results indicate that the multiple DrRecQ HRDC domains have evolved to encode DNA binding and regulatory functions in the enzyme.

  17. Simulation of the environmental climate conditions on martian surface and its effect on Deinococcus radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Vega, U. Pogoda; Rettberg, P.; Reitz, G.

    The resistance of terrestrial microorganisms under the thermo-physical conditions of Mars (diurnal temperature variations, UV climate, atmospheric pressure and gas composition) at mid-latitudes was studied for the understanding and assessment of potential life processes on Mars. In order to accomplish a targeted search for life on other planets, e.g. Mars, it is necessary to know the limiting physical and chemical parameters of terrestrial life. Therefore the polyextremophile bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans was chosen as test organism for these investigations. For the simulation studies at the Planetary and Space Simulation Facilities (PSI) at DLR, Cologne, Germany, conditions that are present during the southern summer at latitude of 60° on Mars were applied. We could simulate several environmental parameters of Mars in one single experiment: vacuum/low pressure, anoxic atmosphere and diurnal cycles in temperature and relative humidity, energy-rich ultraviolet (UV) radiation as well as shielding by different martian soil analogue materials. These parameters have been applied both single and in different combinations in laboratory experiments. Astonishingly the diurnal Mars-like cycles in temperature and relative humidity affected the viability of D. radiodurans cells quite severely. But the martian UV climate turned out to be the most deleterious factor, though D. radiodurans is red-pigmented due to carotenoids incorporated in its cell wall, which have been assigned not only a possible role as free radical scavenger but also as a UV-protectant. An additional UV-protection was accomplished by mixing the bacteria with nano-sized hematite.

  18. Genome of the Extremely Radiation-Resistant Bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans Viewed from the Perspective of Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Kira S.; Aravind, L.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Tatusov, Roman L.; Minton, Kenneth W.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans shows remarkable resistance to a range of damage caused by ionizing radiation, desiccation, UV radiation, oxidizing agents, and electrophilic mutagens. D. radiodurans is best known for its extreme resistance to ionizing radiation; not only can it grow continuously in the presence of chronic radiation (6 kilorads/h), but also it can survive acute exposures to gamma radiation exceeding 1,500 kilorads without dying or undergoing induced mutation. These characteristics were the impetus for sequencing the genome of D. radiodurans and the ongoing development of its use for bioremediation of radioactive wastes. Although it is known that these multiple resistance phenotypes stem from efficient DNA repair processes, the mechanisms underlying these extraordinary repair capabilities remain poorly understood. In this work we present an extensive comparative sequence analysis of the Deinococcus genome. Deinococcus is the first representative with a completely sequenced genome from a distinct bacterial lineage of extremophiles, the Thermus-Deinococcus group. Phylogenetic tree analysis, combined with the identification of several synapomorphies between Thermus and Deinococcus, supports the hypothesis that it is an ancient group with no clear affinities to any of the other known bacterial lineages. Distinctive features of the Deinococcus genome as well as features shared with other free-living bacteria were revealed by comparison of its proteome to the collection of clusters of orthologous groups of proteins. Analysis of paralogs in Deinococcus has revealed several unique protein families. In addition, specific expansions of several other families including phosphatases, proteases, acyltransferases, and Nudix family pyrophosphohydrolases were detected. Genes that potentially affect DNA repair and recombination and stress responses were investigated in detail. Some proteins appear to have been horizontally transferred from eukaryotes and are

  19. The effects of space travel to Deinococcus radiodurans and the carotenoid Deinoxanthin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettberg, Petra; De Vera, Jean-Pierre; Bohmeier, Maria; Leuko, Stefan; Boettger, Ute; Hanke, Franziska

    Carotenoids are common, vital components of many organisms. They (1) protect chlorophyll from oxidative damage; (2) create harmless products from toxic singlet oxygen; (3) assist light absorption in chloroplasts as they collect energy in the spectrum where chlorophyll cannot; (4) transport harvested light energy to retinal based proton pumps; and (5) provide structure via the polyene chain to plastid membranes (Winters et al. 2013). More than 600 carotenoids have been isolated from natural sources and there is a rising interest in the use of carotenoids as possible biomarkers for life on other planets. It is therefore of great interest to investigate if the harboring organisms and the associated carotenoids are able to cope with simulated and real space conditions. These questions are addressed by the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) experiment Biology and Mars experiment (BIOMEX). BIOMEX is an interdisciplinary and international space research project and the prime objective is to measure to what extent biomarkers are resistant to and able to maintain their stability under space and Mars-like conditions. Part of the research focusses on the extreme radiation resistant Deinococcus radiodurans and the effect and influence of Deinoxanthin to fitness and survival following exposure to space conditions. Furthermore, the resistance of crude extracted Deinoxanthin to space conditions is of great interest and was tested. As part of environmental verification tests (EVT’s), D. radiodurans and D. radiodurans ΔcrtB (a mutant not able to produce Deinoxanthin) were exposed to several space relevant environmental factors. Interestingly, both strains showed similar survival abilities. To investigate if the carotenoid within the cell took damage, samples were investigated by RAMAN spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy is a non-destructive technique, the feasibility of this method which is able to detect carotenoids is well known and has been proposed to be onboard the ExoMars mission

  20. Evaluation of the antioxidant effects of carotenoids from Deinococcus radiodurans through targeted mutagenesis, chemiluminescence, and DNA damage analyses.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing; Xu, Zhenjian; Sun, Zongtao; Lin, Jun; Hua, Yuejin

    2007-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is highly resistant to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The antioxidant effect of carotenoids in D. radiodurans was investigated by using a targeted mutation of the phytoene synthase gene to block the carotenoid synthesis pathway and by evaluating the survival of cells under environmental stresses. The colorless mutant R1DeltacrtB of D. radiodurans failed to synthesize carotenoids, and was more sensitive to ionizing radiation, hydrogen peroxide, and desiccation than the wild type, suggesting that carotenoids in D. radiodurans help in combating environmental stresses. Chemiluminescence analyses showed that deinoxanthin, a major product in the carotenoid synthesis pathway, had significantly stronger scavenging ability on H2O2 and singlet oxygen than two carotenes (lycopene and beta-carotene) and two xanthophylls (zeaxanthin and lutein). Deinoxanthin also exhibited protective effect on DNA. Our findings suggest that the stronger antioxidant effect of deinoxanthin contribute to the resistance of D. radiodurans. The higher antioxidant effect of deinoxanthin may be attributed to its distinct chemical structure which has an extended conjugated double bonds and the presence of a hydroxyl group at C-1' position, compared with other tested carotenoids.

  1. Proteome dynamics during post-desiccation recovery reveal convergence of desiccation and gamma radiation stress response pathways in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Ujaoney, Aman Kumar; Padwal, Mahesh Kumar; Basu, Bhakti

    2017-09-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is inherently resistant to both ionizing radiation and desiccation. Fifteen months of desiccation was found to be the LD50 dose for D. radiodurans. Desiccated cells of D. radiodurans entered 6h of growth arrest during post-desiccation recovery (PDR). Proteome dynamics during PDR were mapped by resolving cellular proteins by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry. At least 41 proteins, represented by 51 spots on proteome profiles, were differentially expressed throughout PDR. High upregulation in expression was observed for DNA repair proteins involved in single strand annealing (DdrA and DdrB), nucleotide excision repair (UvrA and UvrB), homologous recombination (RecA) and other vital proteins that contribute to DNA replication, recombination and repair (Ssb, GyrA and GyrB). Expression of CRP/FNR family transcriptional regulator (Crp) remained high throughout PDR. Other pathways such as cellular detoxification, protein homeostasis and metabolism displayed both, moderately induced and repressed proteins. Functional relevance of proteomic modulations to surviving desiccation stress is discussed in detail. Comparison of our data with the published literature revealed convergence of radiation and desiccation stress responses of D. radiodurans. This is the first report that substantiates the hypothesis that the radiation stress resistance of D. radiodurans is incidental to its desiccation stress resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Low-Temperature Ionizing Radiation Resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans and Antarctic Dry Valley Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartnell, Lewis R.; Hunter, Stephanie J.; Lovell, Keith V.; Coates, Andrew J.; Ward, John M.

    2010-09-01

    The high flux of cosmic rays onto the unshielded surface of Mars poses a significant hazard to the survival of martian microbial life. Here, we determined the survival responses of several bacterial strains to ionizing radiation exposure while frozen at a low temperature characteristic of the martian near-subsurface. Novel psychrotolerant bacterial strains were isolated from the Antarctic Dry Valleys, an environmental analogue of the martian surface, and identified by 16S rRNA gene phylogeny as representatives of Brevundimonas, Rhodococcus, and Pseudomonas genera. These isolates, in addition to the known radioresistant extremophile Deinococcus radiodurans, were exposed to gamma rays while frozen on dry ice (-79°C). We found D. radiodurans to exhibit far greater radiation resistance when irradiated at -79°C than was observed in similar studies performed at higher temperatures. This greater radiation resistance has important implications for the estimation of potential survival times of microorganisms near the martian surface. Furthermore, the most radiation resistant of these Dry Valley isolates, Brevundimonas sp. MV.7, was found to show 99% 16S rRNA gene similarity to contaminant bacteria discovered in clean rooms at both Kennedy and Johnson Space Centers and so is of prime concern to efforts in the planetary protection of Mars from our lander probes. Results from this experimental irradiation, combined with previous radiation modeling, indicate that Brevundimonas sp. MV.7 emplaced only 30 cm deep in martian dust could survive the cosmic radiation for up to 100,000 years before suffering 106 population reduction.

  3. Low-temperature ionizing radiation resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans and Antarctic Dry Valley bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R; Hunter, Stephanie J; Lovell, Keith V; Coates, Andrew J; Ward, John M

    2010-09-01

    The high flux of cosmic rays onto the unshielded surface of Mars poses a significant hazard to the survival of martian microbial life. Here, we determined the survival responses of several bacterial strains to ionizing radiation exposure while frozen at a low temperature characteristic of the martian near-subsurface. Novel psychrotolerant bacterial strains were isolated from the Antarctic Dry Valleys, an environmental analogue of the martian surface, and identified by 16S rRNA gene phylogeny as representatives of Brevundimonas, Rhodococcus, and Pseudomonas genera. These isolates, in addition to the known radioresistant extremophile Deinococcus radiodurans, were exposed to gamma rays while frozen on dry ice (-79°C). We found D. radiodurans to exhibit far greater radiation resistance when irradiated at -79°C than was observed in similar studies performed at higher temperatures. This greater radiation resistance has important implications for the estimation of potential survival times of microorganisms near the martian surface. Furthermore, the most radiation resistant of these Dry Valley isolates, Brevundimonas sp. MV.7, was found to show 99% 16S rRNA gene similarity to contaminant bacteria discovered in clean rooms at both Kennedy and Johnson Space Centers and so is of prime concern to efforts in the planetary protection of Mars from our lander probes. Results from this experimental irradiation, combined with previous radiation modeling, indicate that Brevundimonas sp. MV.7 emplaced only 30 cm deep in martian dust could survive the cosmic radiation for up to 100,000 years before suffering 10⁶ population reduction.

  4. Characterization of RecA424 and RecA670 proteins from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kitayama, Shigeru; Yanagisawa, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    RecA protein is considered to be the most important participant in the radiation resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans. However, it is still unclear how RecA contributes to the resistance. In this study, we identified a new recA mutation (recA424) in the DNA-repair deficient mutant strain KI696, the phenotype of which is remarkably different from mutant strain rec30 carrying recA670. The properties of the gene products from the recA mutants were compared. recA424 could not complement the deficiency in Escherichia coli RecA, as found for recA670. In vitro, neither RecA424 nor RecA670 could promote DNA strand exchange under conditions in which wild-type RecA promoted the reaction, indicating that both RecA424 and Rec670 are defective in recombination activity. RecA424 promoted the autocleavage reaction of LexA in vitro, whereas RecA670 did not. The intracellular LexA level in KI696 was decreased following gamma-irradiation. However, the LexA level in strain rec30 was constant irrespective of irradiation. These results indicate that RecA424 retains co-protease activity, whereas RecA670 does not. While strain rec30 is extremely radiation sensitive, strain KI696 is only slightly sensitive. Together, these observations suggest that the co-protease activity rather than the recombination activity of RecA contributes to radiation resistance in D. radiodurans.

  5. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, J K; Kostandarithes, H M; Li, S W; Plymale, A E; Daly, M J

    2000-05-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO(2) and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH(2)DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml(-1)) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms.

  6. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Kostandarithes, H.M.; Li, S.W.; Plymake, A.E.; Daly, M.J.

    2000-05-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO{sub 2} and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH{sub 2}DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml{sup {minus}1}) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms.

  7. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    PubMed Central

    Fredrickson, J. K.; Kostandarithes, H. M.; Li, S. W.; Plymale, A. E.; Daly, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO2 and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH2DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml−1) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms. PMID:10788374

  8. Responses of Mn2+ speciation in Deinococcus radiodurans and Escherichia coli to γ-radiation by advanced paramagnetic resonance methods

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ajay; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Bennett, Brian; Daly, Michael J.; Hoffman, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    The remarkable ability of bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans to survive extreme doses of γ-rays (12,000 Gy), 20 times greater than Escherichia coli, is undiminished by loss of Mn-dependent superoxide dismutase (SodA). D. radiodurans radiation resistance is attributed to the accumulation of low-molecular-weight (LMW) “antioxidant” Mn2+–metabolite complexes that protect essential enzymes from oxidative damage. However, in vivo information about such complexes within D. radiodurans cells is lacking, and the idea that they can supplant reactive-oxygen-species (ROS)–scavenging enzymes remains controversial. In this report, measurements by advanced paramagnetic resonance techniques [electron-spin-echo (ESE)-EPR/electron nuclear double resonance/ESE envelope modulation (ESEEM)] reveal differential details of the in vivo Mn2+ speciation in D. radiodurans and E. coli cells and their responses to 10 kGy γ-irradiation. The Mn2+ of D. radiodurans exists predominantly as LMW complexes with nitrogenous metabolites and orthophosphate, with negligible EPR signal from Mn2+ of SodA. Thus, the extreme radiation resistance of D. radiodurans cells cannot be attributed to SodA. Correspondingly, 10 kGy irradiation causes no change in D. radiodurans Mn2+ speciation, despite the paucity of holo-SodA. In contrast, the EPR signal of E. coli is dominated by signals from low-symmetry enzyme sites such as that of SodA, with a minority pool of LMW Mn2+ complexes that show negligible coordination by nitrogenous metabolites. Nonetheless, irradiation of E. coli majorly changes LMW Mn2+ speciation, with extensive binding of nitrogenous ligands created by irradiation. We infer that E. coli is highly susceptible to radiation-induced ROS because it lacks an adequate supply of LMW Mn antioxidants. PMID:23536297

  9. Responses of Mn2+ speciation in Deinococcus radiodurans and Escherichia coli to γ-radiation by advanced paramagnetic resonance methods.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ajay; Gaidamakova, Elena K; Matrosova, Vera Y; Bennett, Brian; Daly, Michael J; Hoffman, Brian M

    2013-04-09

    The remarkable ability of bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans to survive extreme doses of γ-rays (12,000 Gy), 20 times greater than Escherichia coli, is undiminished by loss of Mn-dependent superoxide dismutase (SodA). D. radiodurans radiation resistance is attributed to the accumulation of low-molecular-weight (LMW) "antioxidant" Mn(2+)-metabolite complexes that protect essential enzymes from oxidative damage. However, in vivo information about such complexes within D. radiodurans cells is lacking, and the idea that they can supplant reactive-oxygen-species (ROS)-scavenging enzymes remains controversial. In this report, measurements by advanced paramagnetic resonance techniques [electron-spin-echo (ESE)-EPR/electron nuclear double resonance/ESE envelope modulation (ESEEM)] reveal differential details of the in vivo Mn(2+) speciation in D. radiodurans and E. coli cells and their responses to 10 kGy γ-irradiation. The Mn(2+) of D. radiodurans exists predominantly as LMW complexes with nitrogenous metabolites and orthophosphate, with negligible EPR signal from Mn(2+) of SodA. Thus, the extreme radiation resistance of D. radiodurans cells cannot be attributed to SodA. Correspondingly, 10 kGy irradiation causes no change in D. radiodurans Mn(2+) speciation, despite the paucity of holo-SodA. In contrast, the EPR signal of E. coli is dominated by signals from low-symmetry enzyme sites such as that of SodA, with a minority pool of LMW Mn(2+) complexes that show negligible coordination by nitrogenous metabolites. Nonetheless, irradiation of E. coli majorly changes LMW Mn(2+) speciation, with extensive binding of nitrogenous ligands created by irradiation. We infer that E. coli is highly susceptible to radiation-induced ROS because it lacks an adequate supply of LMW Mn antioxidants.

  10. A PerR-like protein involved in response to oxidative stress in the extreme bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chengzhi; Wang, Liangyan; Li, Tao; Lin, Lin; Dai, Shang; Tian, Bing Hua, Yuejin

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We report a novel PerR-like protein of Fur family in D. radiodurans that is not annotated in the current database. • drperR responses to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and functions as a negative regulator of katE and dps. • We provided implications on how to utilize sequenced genome data and the importance of genome data mining. • This study adds knowledge to complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans. - Abstract: Response and defense systems against reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the remarkable resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans to oxidative stress induced by oxidants or radiation. However, mechanisms involved in ROS response and defense systems of D. radiodurans are not well understood. Fur family proteins are important in ROS response. Only a single Fur homolog is predicted by sequence similarity in the current D. radiodurans genome database. Our bioinformatics analysis demonstrated an additional guanine nucleotide in the genome of D. radiodurans that is not in the database, leading to the discovery of another Fur homolog DrPerR. Gene disruption mutant of DrPerR showed enhanced resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and increased catalase activity in cell extracts. Real-time PCR results indicated that DrPerR functions as a repressor of the catalase gene katE. Meanwhile, derepression of dps (DNA-binding proteins from starved cells) gene under H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress by DrPerR point to its regulatory role in metal ions hemostasis. Thus, DrPerR might function as a Fur homolog protein which is involved in ROS response and defense. These results help clarify the complicated regulatory network that responds to ROS stress in D. radiodurans.

  11. Simulation of the Martian UV radiation climate and its effect on Deinococcus radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogoda de La Vega, U.; Rettberg, P.

    The question of putative life on Mars has been the topic of several studies Early works had to rely on the physical data that have been gained during the 1970s with the help of the Viking missions More recently several Mars-related missions have provided numerous and more precise data to establish a realistic simulation of the Martian climate Our focus is directed at the diurnal temperature variations and the atmospheric pressure and composition the so called thermo-physical conditions which are typical for the Martian mid- and low latitudes The resistance of terrestrial microorganisms under the thermo-physical conditions on Mars was studied for the understanding and assessment of potential life processes on Mars In order to accomplish a targeted search for life on other planets e g Mars it is necessary to know the limiting physical and chemical parameters of terrestrial life Therefore the polyextremophile bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans was chosen as test organism for these investigations For the simulation studies at the Planetary and Space Simulation Facilities PSI at DLR Cologne Germany conditions that are present during the southern summer at latitude of 60 r on Mars were applied We could simulate several environmental parameters of Mars vacuum low pressure anoxic atmosphere and diurnal cycles in temperature energy-rich UV radiation as well as shielding by different Martian soil analogue materials These parameters have been applied both single and in different combinations in laboratory experiments

  12. Deinococcus radiodurans pprI expression enhances the radioresistance of eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ling; Yue, Ling; Shi, Yi; Ren, Lili; Chen, Tingting; Li, Na; Zhang, Shuyu; Yang, Wei; Yang, Zhanshan

    2016-01-01

    PprI accelerates radiation-induced DNA damage repair via regulating the expression of DNA repair genes and enhances antioxidative enzyme activity in Deinococcus radiodurans after radiation. The main aim of our study was to determine whether the expression of pprI gene could fulfil its DNA repair function in eukaryotes and enhance the radioresistance of eukaryotic organism or not. In this study, we constructed pEGFP-c1-pprI eukaryotic expression vector and established a human lung epithelial cell line BEAS-2B with stable integration of pprI gene. We found that pprIexpression enhanced radioresistance of BEAS-2B cells, decreased γ-H2AX foci formation and apoptosis in irradiated BEAS-2B cells and alleviated radiation induced G2/M arrest of BEAS-2B cells. Moreover, we transferred pEGFP-c1-pprI vector into muscle of BALB/c mice by in vivo electroporation and studied the protective effect of prokaryotic pprI gene in irradiated mice. We found that pprI expression alleviated acute radiation induced hematopoietic system, lung, small intestine and testis damage and increased survival rate of irradiated mice via regulating Rad51 expression in different organs. These findings suggest that prokaryotic pprI gene expression in mammalian cells could enhance radioresistance in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26992215

  13. The structure of amylosucrase from Deinococcus radiodurans has an unusual open active-site topology.

    PubMed

    Skov, Lars K; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Remaud-Simeon, Magali; Ernst, Heidi A; Gajhede, Michael; Mirza, Osman

    2013-09-01

    Amylosucrases (ASes) catalyze the formation of an α-1,4-glucosidic linkage by transferring a glucosyl unit from sucrose onto an acceptor α-1,4-glucan. To date, several ligand-bound crystal structures of wild-type and mutant ASes from Neisseria polysaccharea and Deinococcus geothermalis have been solved. These structures all display a very similar overall conformation with a deep pocket leading to the site for transglucosylation, subsite -1. This has led to speculation on how sucrose enters the active site during glucan elongation. In contrast to previous studies, the AS structure from D. radiodurans presented here has a completely empty -1 subsite. This structure is strikingly different from other AS structures, as an active-site-lining loop comprising residues Leu214-Asn225 is found in a previously unobserved conformation. In addition, a large loop harbouring the conserved active-site residues Asp133 and Tyr136 is disordered. The result of the changed loop conformations is that the active-site topology is radically changed, leaving subsite -1 exposed and partially dismantled. This structure provides novel insights into the dynamics of ASes and comprises the first structural support for an elongation mechanism that involves considerable conformational changes to modulate accessibility to the sucrose-binding site and thereby allows successive cycles of glucosyl-moiety transfer to a growing glucan chain.

  14. Survival of Deinococcus radiodurans against laboratory-simulated solar wind charged particles.

    PubMed

    Paulino-Lima, Ivan Gláucio; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo; Galante, Douglas; Cockell, Charles; Olsson-Francis, Karen; Brucato, John Robert; Baratta, Giuseppe Antonio; Strazzulla, Giovanni; Merrigan, Tony; McCullough, Robert; Mason, Nigel; Lage, Claudia

    2011-11-01

    In this experimental study, cells of the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans were exposed to several different sources of radiation chosen to replicate the charged particles found in the solar wind. Naked cells or cells mixed with dust grains (basalt or sandstone) differing in elemental composition were exposed to electrons, protons, and ions to determine the probability of cell survival after irradiation. Doses necessary to reduce the viability of cell population to 10% (LD(10)) were determined under different experimental conditions. The results of this study indicate that low-energy particle radiation (2-4 keV), typically present in the slow component of the solar wind, had no effect on dehydrated cells, even if exposed at fluences only reached in more than 1000 years at Sun-Earth distance (1 AU). Higher-energy ions (200 keV) found in solar flares would inactivate 90% of exposed cells after several events in less than 1 year at 1 AU. When mixed with dust grains, LD(10) increases about 10-fold. These results show that, compared to the highly deleterious effects of UV radiation, solar wind charged particles are relatively benign, and organisms protected under grains from UV radiation would also be protected from the charged particles considered in this study.

  15. Conformational change of the hexagonally packed intermediate layer of Deinococcus radiodurans monitored by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, D J; Baumeister, W; Engel, A

    1996-01-01

    Both surfaces of the hexagonally packed intermediate (HPI) layer of Deinococcus radiodurans were imaged in buffer solution by atomic force microscopy. When adsorbed to freshly cleaved mica, the hydrophilic outer surface of the HPI layer was attached to the substrate and the hydrophobic inner surface was exposed to the stylus. The height of a single HPI layer was 7.0 nm, while overlapping edges of adjacent single layers adsorbed to mica had a height of 14.7 nm. However, double-layered stacks with inner surfaces facing each other exhibited a height of 17.4 nm. These stacks exposed the outer surface to the stylus. The different heights of overlapping layers and stacks are attributed to differences in the interaction between inner and outer surfaces. At high resolution, the inner surface revealed a protruding core with a central pore connected by six emanating arms. The pores exhibited two conformations, one with and the other without a central plug. Individual pores were observed to switch from one state to the other. PMID:8655475

  16. Crystal structure and DNA-binding analysis of RecO from Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Leiros, Ingar; Timmins, Joanna; Hall, David R; McSweeney, Sean

    2005-01-01

    The RecFOR pathway has been shown to be essential for DNA repair through the process of homologous recombination in bacteria and, recently, to be important in the recovery of stalled replication forks following UV irradiation. RecO, along with RecR, RecF, RecQ and RecJ, is a principal actor in this fundamental DNA repair pathway. Here we present the three-dimensional structure of a member of the RecO family. The crystal structure of Deinococcus radiodurans RecO (drRecO) reveals possible binding sites for DNA and for the RecO-binding proteins within its three discrete structural regions: an N-terminal oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, a helical bundle and a zinc-finger motif. Furthermore, drRecO was found to form a stable complex with RecR and to bind both single- and double-stranded DNA. Mutational analysis confirmed the existence of multiple DNA-binding sites within the protein. PMID:15719017

  17. Design of Deinococcus radiodurans thioredoxin reductase with altered thioredoxin specificity using computational alanine mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Obiero, Josiah; Sanders, David A R

    2011-06-01

    In this study, the X-ray crystal structure of the complex between Escherichia coli thioredoxin reductase (EC TrxR) and its substrate thioredoxin (Trx) was used as a guide to design a Deinococcus radiodurans TrxR (DR TrxR) mutant with altered Trx specificity. Previous studies have shown that TrxRs have higher affinity for cognate Trxs (same species) than that for Trxs from different species. Computational alanine scanning mutagenesis and visual inspection of the EC TrxR-Trx interface suggested that only four residues (F81, R130, F141, and F142) account for the majority of the EC TrxR-Trx interface stability. Individual replacement of equivalent residues in DR TrxR (M84, K137, F148, and F149) with alanine resulted in drastic changes in binding affinity, confirming that the four residues account for most of TrxR-Trx interface stability. When M84 and K137 were changed to match equivalent EC TrxR residues (K137R and M84F), the DR TrxR substrate specificity was altered from its own Trx to that of EC Trx. The results suggest that a small subset of the TrxR-Trx interface residues is responsible for the majority of Trx binding affinity and species-specific recognition.

  18. Inactivation of two homologues of proteins presumed to be involved in the desiccation tolerance of plants sensitizes Deinococcus radiodurans R1 to desiccation.

    PubMed

    Battista, J R; Park, M J; McLemore, A E

    2001-09-01

    Mutational inactivation of the genes designated DR1172 and DRB0118 in Deinococcus radiodurans R1 greatly sensitizes this species to desiccation, but not to ionizing radiation. These genes encode proteins that share features with the desiccation-induced LEA76 proteins of many plants and the PCC13-62 protein of Craterostigma plantagineum, suggesting that D. radiodurans may serve as a useful model for the study of desiccation tolerance in higher organisms. Copyright 2001 Elsevier Science (USA).

  19. Identification of New Genes Contributing to the Extreme Radioresistance of Deinococcus radiodurans Using a Tn5-Based Transposon Mutant Library

    PubMed Central

    Passot, Fanny; Dutertre, Murielle; Porteron, Martine; Confalonieri, Fabrice; Sommer, Suzanne; Pasternak, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Here, we have developed an extremely efficient in vivo Tn5-based mutagenesis procedure to construct a Deinococcus radiodurans insertion mutant library subsequently screened for sensitivity to genotoxic agents such as γ and UV radiations or mitomycin C. The genes inactivated in radiosensitive mutants belong to various functional categories, including DNA repair functions, stress responses, signal transduction, membrane transport, several metabolic pathways, and genes of unknown function. Interestingly, preliminary characterization of previously undescribed radiosensitive mutants suggests the contribution of cyclic di-AMP signaling in the recovery of D. radiodurans cells from genotoxic stresses, probably by modulating several pathways involved in the overall cell response. Our analyses also point out a new transcriptional regulator belonging to the GntR family, encoded by DR0265, and a predicted RNase belonging to the newly described Y family, both contributing to the extreme radioresistance of D. radiodurans. Altogether, this work has revealed new cell responses involved either directly or indirectly in repair of various cell damage and confirmed that D. radiodurans extreme radiation resistance is determined by a multiplicity of pathways acting as a complex network. PMID:25884619

  20. Comparative survival analysis of Deinococcus radiodurans and the haloarchaea Natrialba magadii and Haloferax volcanii exposed to vacuum ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Abrevaya, Ximena C; Paulino-Lima, Ivan G; Galante, Douglas; Rodrigues, Fabio; Mauas, Pablo J D; Cortón, Eduardo; Lage, Claudia de Alencar Santos

    2011-12-01

    The haloarchaea Natrialba magadii and Haloferax volcanii, as well as the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, were exposed to vacuum UV (VUV) radiation at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory. Cell monolayers (containing 10(5) to 10(6) cells per sample) were prepared over polycarbonate filters and irradiated under high vacuum (10(-5) Pa) with polychromatic synchrotron radiation. N. magadii was remarkably resistant to high vacuum with a survival fraction of (3.77±0.76)×10(-2), which was larger than that of D. radiodurans (1.13±0.23)×10(-2). The survival fraction of the haloarchaea H. volcanii, of (3.60±1.80)×10(-4), was much smaller. Radiation resistance profiles were similar between the haloarchaea and D. radiodurans for fluences up to 150 J m(-2). For fluences larger than 150 J m(-2), there was a significant decrease in the survival of haloarchaea, and in particular H. volcanii did not survive. Survival for D. radiodurans was 1% after exposure to the higher VUV fluence (1350 J m(-2)), while N. magadii had a survival lower than 0.1%. Such survival fractions are discussed regarding the possibility of interplanetary transfer of viable microorganisms and the possible existence of microbial life in extraterrestrial salty environments such as the planet Mars and Jupiter's moon Europa. This is the first work to report survival of haloarchaea under simulated interplanetary conditions.

  1. Effect of N+ Beam Exposure on Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Activities and Induction of Mn-SOD in Deinococcus Radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dao-jun; Chen, Ruo-lei; Shao, Chun-lin; Wu, Li-jun; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2000-10-01

    Though bacteria of the radiation-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans have a high resistance to the lethal and mutagenic effects of many DNA-damaging agents, the mechanisms involved in the response of these bacteria to oxidative stress are poorly understood. In this report, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities produced by these bacteria were measured, and the change of SOD and CAT activities by 20 keV N+ beam exposure was examined. Their activities were increased by N+ beam exposure from 8×1014 ions/cm2 to 6×1015 ions/cm2. The treatment of H2O2 and [CHCl3 +CH3CH2OH] and the measurement of absorption spectrum showed that the increase in SOD activity was resulted from inducible activities of Mn-SOD in D. radiodurans AS1.633 by N+ beam exposure. These results suggested that this bacteria possess inducible defense mechanisms against the deleterious effects of oxidization.

  2. Purification and characterization of DR_2577 (SlpA) a major S-layer protein from Deinococcus radiodurans

    SciTech Connect

    Farci, Domenica; Bowler, Matthew W.; Esposito, Francesca; McSweeney, Sean; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2015-06-03

    The protein DR_2577 is a major Surface layer component of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In the present study DR_2577 has been purified and its oligomeric profile characterized by means of size exclusion chromatography and gel electrophoresis. DR_2577 was found to be organized into three hierarchical orders characterized by monomers, stable dimers formed by the occurrence of disulfide bonds, and hexamers resulting from a combination of dimers. Finally, the structural implications of these findings are discussed providing new elements for a more integrated model of this S-layer.

  3. Purification and characterization of DR_2577 (SlpA) a major S-layer protein from Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Farci, Domenica; Bowler, Matthew W.; Esposito, Francesca; McSweeney, Sean; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The protein DR_2577 is a major Surface layer component of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In the present study DR_2577 has been purified and its oligomeric profile characterized by means of size exclusion chromatography and gel electrophoresis. DR_2577 was found to be organized into three hierarchical orders characterized by monomers, stable dimers formed by the occurrence of disulfide bonds, and hexamers resulting from a combination of dimers. The structural implications of these findings are discussed providing new elements for a more integrated model of this S-layer. PMID:26074883

  4. Purification and characterization of DR_2577 (SlpA) a major S-layer protein from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Farci, Domenica; Bowler, Matthew W; Esposito, Francesca; McSweeney, Sean; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The protein DR_2577 is a major Surface layer component of the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In the present study DR_2577 has been purified and its oligomeric profile characterized by means of size exclusion chromatography and gel electrophoresis. DR_2577 was found to be organized into three hierarchical orders characterized by monomers, stable dimers formed by the occurrence of disulfide bonds, and hexamers resulting from a combination of dimers. The structural implications of these findings are discussed providing new elements for a more integrated model of this S-layer.

  5. The DnaE polymerase from Deinococcus radiodurans features RecA-dependent DNA polymerase activity

    PubMed Central

    Randi, Lorenzo; Perrone, Alessandro; Maturi, Mirko; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Camerani, Michela; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    We report in the present study on the catalytic properties of the Deinococcus radiodurans DNA polymerase III α subunit (αDr). The αDr enzyme was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, both in soluble form and as inclusion bodies. When purified from soluble protein extracts, αDr was found to be tightly associated with E. coli RNA polymerase, from which αDr could not be dissociated. On the contrary, when refolded from inclusion bodies, αDr was devoid of E. coli RNA polymerase and was purified to homogeneity. When assayed with different DNA substrates, αDr featured slower DNA extension rates when compared with the corresponding enzyme from E. coli (E. coli DNA Pol III, αEc), unless under high ionic strength conditions or in the presence of manganese. Further assays were performed using a ssDNA and a dsDNA, whose recombination yields a DNA substrate. Surprisingly, αDr was found to be incapable of recombination-dependent DNA polymerase activity, whereas αEc was competent in this action. However, in the presence of the RecA recombinase, αDr was able to efficiently extend the DNA substrate produced by recombination. Upon comparing the rates of RecA-dependent and RecA-independent DNA polymerase activities, we detected a significant activation of αDr by the recombinase. Conversely, the activity of αEc was found maximal under non-recombination conditions. Overall, our observations indicate a sharp contrast between the catalytic actions of αDr and αEc, with αDr more performing under recombination conditions, and αEc preferring DNA substrates whose extension does not require recombination events. PMID:27789781

  6. Bioprecipitation of uranium from alkaline waste solutions using recombinant Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sayali; Ballal, Anand; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2013-11-15

    Bioremediation of uranium (U) from alkaline waste solutions remains inadequately explored. We engineered the phoK gene (encoding a novel alkaline phosphatase, PhoK) from Sphingomonas sp. for overexpression in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The recombinant strain thus obtained (Deino-PhoK) exhibited remarkably high alkaline phosphatase activity as evidenced by zymographic and enzyme activity assays. Deino-PhoK cells could efficiently precipitate uranium over a wide range of input U concentrations. At low uranyl concentrations (1 mM), the strain precipitated >90% of uranium within 2h while a high loading capacity of around 10.7 g U/g of dry weight of cells was achieved at 10 mM U concentration. Uranium bioprecipitation by Deino-PhoK cells was not affected in the presence of Cs and Sr, commonly present in intermediate and low level liquid radioactive waste, or after exposure to very high doses of ionizing radiation. Transmission electron micrographs revealed the extracellular nature of bioprecipitated U, while X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analysis identified the precipitated uranyl phosphate species as chernikovite. When immobilized into calcium alginate beads, Deino-PhoK cells efficiently removed uranium, which remained trapped in beads, thus accomplishing physical separation of precipitated uranyl phosphate from solutions. The data demonstrate superior ability of Deino-PhoK, over earlier reported strains, in removal of uranium from alkaline solutions and its potential use in bioremediation of nuclear and other waste. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Structural and functional characterization of two unusual endonuclease III enzymes from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Sarre, Aili; Ökvist, Mats; Klar, Tobias; Hall, David R; Smalås, Arne O; McSweeney, Sean; Timmins, Joanna; Moe, Elin

    2015-08-01

    While most bacteria possess a single gene encoding the bifunctional DNA glycosylase Endonuclease III (EndoIII) in their genomes, Deinococcus radiodurans possesses three: DR2438 (DrEndoIII1), DR0289 (DrEndoIII2) and DR0982 (DrEndoIII3). Here we have determined the crystal structures of DrEndoIII1 and an N-terminally truncated form of DrEndoIII3 (DrEndoIII3Δ76). We have also generated a homology model of DrEndoIII2 and measured activity of the three enzymes. All three structures consist of two all α-helical domains, one of which exhibits a [4Fe-4S] cluster and the other a HhH-motif, separated by a DNA binding cleft, similar to previously determined structures of endonuclease III from Escherichia coli and Geobacillus stearothermophilus. However, both DrEndoIII1 and DrEndoIII3 possess an extended HhH motif with extra helical features and an altered electrostatic surface potential. In addition, the DNA binding cleft of DrEndoIII3 seems to be less accessible for DNA interactions, while in DrEndoIII1 it seems to be more open. Analysis of the enzyme activities shows that DrEndoIII2 is most similar to the previously studied enzymes, while DrEndoIII1 seems to be more distant with a weaker activity towards substrate DNA containing either thymine glycol or an abasic site. DrEndoIII3 is the most distantly related enzyme and displays no detectable activity towards these substrates even though the suggested catalytic residues are conserved. Based on a comparative structural analysis, we suggest that the altered surface potential, shape of the substrate-binding pockets and specific amino acid substitutions close to the active site and in the DNA interacting loops may underlie the unexpected differences in activity.

  8. Kinetics of DNA unwinding by the RecD2 helicase from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Shadrick, William R; Julin, Douglas A

    2010-06-04

    RecD2 from Deinococcus radiodurans is a superfamily 1 DNA helicase that is homologous to the Escherichia coli RecD protein but functions outside the context of RecBCD enzyme. We report here on the kinetics of DNA unwinding by RecD2 under single and multiple turnover conditions. There is little unwinding of 20-bp substrates by preformed RecD2-dsDNA complexes when excess ssDNA is present to trap enzyme molecules not bound to the substrate. A shorter 12-bp substrate is unwound rapidly under single turnover conditions. The 12-bp unwinding reaction could be simulated with a mechanism in which the DNA is unwound in two kinetic steps with rate constant of k(unw) = 5.5 s(-1) and a dissociation step from partially unwound DNA of k(off) = 1.9 s(-1). These results indicate a kinetic step size of about 3-4 bp, unwinding rate of about 15-20 bp/s, and low processivity (p = 0.74). The reaction time courses with 20-bp substrates, determined under multiple turnover conditions, could be simulated with a four-step mechanism and rate constant values very similar to those for the 12-bp substrate. The results indicate that the faster unwinding of a DNA substrate with a forked end versus only a 5'-terminal single-stranded extension can be accounted for by a difference in the rate of enzyme binding to the DNA substrates. Analysis of reactions done with different RecD2 concentrations indicates that the enzyme forms an inactive dimer or other oligomer at high enzyme concentrations. RecD2 oligomers can be detected by glutaraldehyde cross-linking but not by size exclusion chromatography.

  9. Predicted highly expressed and putative alien genes of Deinococcus radiodurans and implications for resistance to ionizing radiation damage

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Samuel; Mrázek, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Predicted highly expressed (PHX) and putative alien genes determined by codon usages are characterized in the genome of Deinococcus radiodurans (strain R1). Deinococcus radiodurans (DEIRA) can survive very high doses of ionizing radiation that are lethal to virtually all other organisms. It has been argued that DEIRA is endowed with enhanced repair systems that provide protection and stability. However, predicted expression levels of DNA repair proteins with the exception of RecA tend to be low and do not distinguish DEIRA from other prokaryotes. In this paper, the capability of DEIRA to resist extreme doses of ionizing and UV radiation is attributed to an unusually high number of PHX chaperone/degradation, protease, and detoxification genes. Explicitly, compared with all current complete prokaryotic genomes, DEIRA contains the greatest number of PHX detoxification and protease proteins. Other sources of environmental protection against severe conditions of UV radiation, desiccation, and thermal effects for DEIRA are the several S-layer (surface structure) PHX proteins. The top PHX gene of DEIRA is the multifunctional tricarboxylic acid (TCA) gene aconitase, which, apart from its role in respiration, also alerts the cell to oxidative damage. PMID:11296249

  10. Deinococcus radiodurans RecA nucleoprotein filaments characterized at the single-molecule level with optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Pobegalov, Georgii; Cherevatenko, Galina; Alekseev, Aleksandr; Sabantsev, Anton; Kovaleva, Oksana; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Morozova, Natalia; Baitin, Dmitrii; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail

    2015-10-23

    Deinococcus radiodurans can survive extreme doses of ionizing radiation due to the very efficient DNA repair mechanisms that are able to cope even with hundreds of double-strand breaks. RecA, the critical protein of homologous recombination in bacteria, is one of the key components of the DNA-repair system. Repair of double-strand breaks requires RecA binding to DNA and assembly of the RecA nucleoprotein helical filaments. The Escherichia coli RecA protein (EcRecA) and its interactions with DNA have been extensively studied using various approaches including single-molecule techniques, while the D. radiodurans RecA (DrRecA) remains much less characterized. However, DrRecA shows some remarkable differences from E. coli homolog. Here we combine microfluidics and single-molecule DNA manipulation with optical tweezers to follow the binding of DrRecA to long double-stranded DNA molecules and probe the mechanical properties of DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments at physiological pH. Our data provide a direct comparison of DrRecA and EcRecA binding to double-stranded DNA under identical conditions. We report a significantly faster filaments assembly as well as lower values of persistence length and contour length for DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments compared to EcRecA. Our results support the existing model of DrRecA forming more frequent and less continuous filaments relative to those of EcRecA. - Highlights: • We investigate Deinococcus radiodurans RecA interactions with long double-stranded DNA at the single-molecule level. • At physiological pH D. radiodurans RecA forms nucleoprotein filaments significantly faster relative to Escherichia coli RecA. • D. radiodurans RecA-dsDNA nucleoprotein filaments are more flexible and slightly shorter compared to those of E. coli RecA.

  11. Characterization of the role of DR0171 in transcriptional response to radiation in the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huiming; Xia, Wenrong; Chen, Huan; Yin, Longfei; Zhao, Xiaojun; Xu, Guangzhi; Hua, Yuejin

    2011-10-01

    The extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans encodes a number of function-unknown genes, and some of them involve in the radioresistance. The radiation-inducible gene dr0171 has a recA-like expression pattern in the postirradiation recovery and was also supposed to encode a transcriptional regulator to contribute to the radioresistance. Here, we found that the EGFP-tagged DR0171 proteins gathered in the nucleoid regions after radiation. Further, we constructed a null mutant of dr0171 and found that the incapacitation of the dr0171 led to a significant decline in resistance to γ-rays, UV radiation, and hydrogen peroxide and delayed genomic DNA reconstruction after radiation, indicating that this gene is involved in the postirradiation recovery. The microarray assays showed that the disruption of dr0171 does not lead to a significant change in the transcriptional profile of D. radiodurans under normal conditions, except after the stress of 6 kGy γ radiation was applied. The transcript level of at least 153 genes decreased over twofold in the irradiated dr0171 mutant compared with those in the irradiated wild-type strain, indicating that DR0171 only functions after radiation damage. Taken together, the data presented here indicate that DR0171 serves as a regulator of the transcriptional response to radiation damage in D. radiodurans.

  12. Synthesis and extracellular accumulation of silver nanoparticles by employing radiation-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans, their characterization, and determination of bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Rasika R; Shaiwale, Nayana S; Deobagkar, Dileep N; Deobagkar, Deepti D

    2015-01-01

    There has been rapid progress in exploring microorganisms for green synthesis of nanoparticles since microbes show extraordinary diversity in terms of species richness and niche localization. Microorganisms are easy to culture using relatively inexpensive and simple nutrients under varied conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, etc. In this work, Deinococcus radiodurans that possesses the ability to withstand extremely high radiation and desiccation stress has been employed for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). D. radiodurans was able to accumulate AgNPs in medium under various conditions, and process optimization was carried out with respect to time, temperature, pH, and concentration of silver salt. AgNPs were characterized using UV/vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The microbially synthesized AgNPs exhibited good antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms and anti-biofouling activity. Their ability to inhibit growth and proliferation of cancer cell line was also examined, and it could be seen that AgNPs synthesized using D. radiodurans exhibited excellent anticancer activity. PMID:25673991

  13. Synthesis and extracellular accumulation of silver nanoparticles by employing radiation-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans, their characterization, and determination of bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Rasika R; Shaiwale, Nayana S; Deobagkar, Dileep N; Deobagkar, Deepti D

    2015-01-01

    There has been rapid progress in exploring microorganisms for green synthesis of nanoparticles since microbes show extraordinary diversity in terms of species richness and niche localization. Microorganisms are easy to culture using relatively inexpensive and simple nutrients under varied conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, etc. In this work, Deinococcus radiodurans that possesses the ability to withstand extremely high radiation and desiccation stress has been employed for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). D. radiodurans was able to accumulate AgNPs in medium under various conditions, and process optimization was carried out with respect to time, temperature, pH, and concentration of silver salt. AgNPs were characterized using UV/vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The microbially synthesized AgNPs exhibited good antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms and anti-biofouling activity. Their ability to inhibit growth and proliferation of cancer cell line was also examined, and it could be seen that AgNPs synthesized using D. radiodurans exhibited excellent anticancer activity.

  14. Pyrroloquinoline quinone and a quinoprotein kinase support γ-radiation resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans and regulate gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra Singh; Desai, Shruti Sumeet; Misra, Hari Sharan

    2013-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its extraordinary resistance to various DNA damaging agents including γ-radiation and desiccation. The pqqE:cat and Δdr2518 mutants making these cells devoid of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) and a PQQ inducible Ser/Thr protein kinase, respectively, became sensitive to γ-radiation. Transcriptome analysis of these mutants showed differential expression of the genes including those play roles in oxidative stress tolerance and (DSB) repair in D. radiodurans and in genome maintenance and stress response in other bacteria. Escherichia coli cells expressing DR2518 and PQQ showed improved resistance to γ-radiation, which increased further when both DR2518 and PQQ were present together. Although, profiles of genes getting affected in these mutants were different, there were still a few common genes showing similar expression trends in both the mutants and some others as reported earlier in oxyR and pprI mutant of this bacterium. These results suggested that PQQ and DR2518 have independent roles in γ-radiation resistance of D. radiodurans but their co-existence improves radioresistance further, possibly by regulating differential expression of the genes important for bacterial response to oxidative stress and DNA damage. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by the extreme bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans and an evaluation of their antibacterial properties

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiulong; Li, Qinghao; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Tian, Bing; Li, Tao; Yu, Jiangliu; Dai, Shang; Weng, Yulan; Hua, Yuejin

    2016-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an extreme bacterium known for its high resistance to stresses including radiation and oxidants. The ability of D. radiodurans to reduce Au(III) and biosynthesize gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was investigated in aqueous solution by ultraviolet and visible (UV/Vis) absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). D. radiodurans efficiently synthesized AuNPs from 1 mM Au(III) solution in 8 h. The AuNPs were of spherical, triangular and irregular shapes with an average size of 43.75 nm and a polydispersity index of 0.23 as measured by DLS. AuNPs were distributed in the cell envelope, across the cytosol and in the extracellular space. XRD analysis confirmed the crystallite nature of the AuNPs from the cell supernatant. Data from the FTIR and XPS showed that upon binding to proteins or compounds through interactions with carboxyl, amine, phospho and hydroxyl groups, Au(III) may be reduced to Au(I), and further reduced to Au(0) with the capping groups to stabilize the AuNPs. Biosynthesis of AuNPs was optimized with respect to the initial concentration of gold salt, bacterial growth period, solution pH and temperature. The purified AuNPs exhibited significant antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria by damaging their cytoplasmic membrane. Therefore, the extreme bacterium D. radiodurans can be used as a novel bacterial candidate for efficient biosynthesis of AuNPs, which exhibited potential in biomedical application as an antibacterial agent. PMID:27877039

  16. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by the extreme bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans and an evaluation of their antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiulong; Li, Qinghao; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Tian, Bing; Li, Tao; Yu, Jiangliu; Dai, Shang; Weng, Yulan; Hua, Yuejin

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an extreme bacterium known for its high resistance to stresses including radiation and oxidants. The ability of D. radiodurans to reduce Au(III) and biosynthesize gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was investigated in aqueous solution by ultraviolet and visible (UV/Vis) absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). D. radiodurans efficiently synthesized AuNPs from 1 mM Au(III) solution in 8 h. The AuNPs were of spherical, triangular and irregular shapes with an average size of 43.75 nm and a polydispersity index of 0.23 as measured by DLS. AuNPs were distributed in the cell envelope, across the cytosol and in the extracellular space. XRD analysis confirmed the crystallite nature of the AuNPs from the cell supernatant. Data from the FTIR and XPS showed that upon binding to proteins or compounds through interactions with carboxyl, amine, phospho and hydroxyl groups, Au(III) may be reduced to Au(I), and further reduced to Au(0) with the capping groups to stabilize the AuNPs. Biosynthesis of AuNPs was optimized with respect to the initial concentration of gold salt, bacterial growth period, solution pH and temperature. The purified AuNPs exhibited significant antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria by damaging their cytoplasmic membrane. Therefore, the extreme bacterium D. radiodurans can be used as a novel bacterial candidate for efficient biosynthesis of AuNPs, which exhibited potential in biomedical application as an antibacterial agent.

  17. Effects of Low-Temperature Plasma-Sterilization on Mars Analog Soil Samples Mixed with Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Schirmack, Janosch; Fiebrandt, Marcel; Stapelmann, Katharina; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    We used Ar plasma-sterilization at a temperature below 80 °C to examine its effects on the viability of microorganisms when intermixed with tested soil. Due to a relatively low temperature, this method is not thought to affect the properties of a soil, particularly its organic component, to a significant degree. The method has previously been shown to work well on spacecraft parts. The selected microorganism for this test was Deinococcus radiodurans R1, which is known for its remarkable resistance to radiation effects. Our results showed a reduction in microbial counts after applying a low temperature plasma, but not to a degree suitable for a sterilization of the soil. Even an increase of the treatment duration from 1.5 to 45 min did not achieve satisfying results, but only resulted in in a mean cell reduction rate of 75% compared to the untreated control samples. PMID:27240407

  18. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the RecQ helicase catalytic core from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chia; Huang, Chi-Hung; Yang, Chia-Shin; Chang, Chi-Huang; Kuan, Shu-Min; Chan, Nei-Li; Chen, Yeh

    2012-10-01

    The RecQ proteins are a highly conserved group of DNA helicases which play crucial roles in the maintenance of genome stability. DrRecQ from the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is a special member of the RecQ family because it contains three Helicase-and-RNase-D-C-terminal (HRDC) domains at the C-terminus. The helicase catalytic core is essential for ATPase and DNA-unwinding activities. In this work, the helicase catalytic core of DrRecQ was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Crystals were obtained using the sitting-drop vapour diffusion method and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 84.75, b = 95.61, c = 183.83 Å.

  19. Endogenous nitric oxide regulates the recovery of the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans from exposure to UV light

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bhumit A.; Moreau, Magali; Widom, Joanne; Chen, Huan; Yin, Longfei; Hua, Yuejin; Crane, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans (Dr) withstands desiccation, reactive oxygen species, and doses of radiation that would be lethal to most organisms. Deletion of a gene encoding a homolog of mammalian nitric oxide synthase (NOS) severely compromises the recovery of Dr from ultraviolet (UV) radiation damage. The Δnos defect can be complemented with recombinant NOS, rescued by exogenous nitric oxide (NO) and mimicked in the wild-type strain with an NO scavenging compound. UV radiation induces both upregulation of the nos gene and cellular NO production on similar time scales. Growth recovery does not depend on NO being present during UV irradiation, but rather can be manifested by NO addition hours after exposure. Surprisingly, nos deletion does not increase sensitivity to oxidative damage, and hydrogen peroxide does not induce nos expression. However, NOS-derived NO upregulates transcription of obgE, a gene involved in bacterial growth proliferation and stress response. Overexpression of the ObgE GTPase in the Δnos background substantially alleviates the growth defect after radiation damage. Thus, NO acts as a signal for the transcriptional regulation of growth in D. radiodurans. PMID:19841256

  20. Deinococcus radiodurans can interfere with quorum sensing by producing an AHL-acylase and an AHL-lactonase.

    PubMed

    Koch, Gudrun; Nadal-Jimenez, Pol; Cool, Robbert H; Quax, Wim J

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial communication via the secretion of small diffusible compounds allows microorganisms to regulate gene expression in a coordinated manner. As many virulence traits are regulated in this fashion, disruption of chemical communication has been proposed as novel antimicrobial therapy. Quorum-quenching enzymes have been a promising discovery in this field as they interfere with the communication of Gram-negative bacteria. AHL-lactonases and AHL-acylases have been described in a variety of bacterial strains; however, usually only one of these two groups of enzymes has been described in a single species. We report here the presence of a member of each group of enzymes in the extremophile bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. Co-occurrence of both enzymes in a single species increases the chance of inactivating foreign AHL signals under different conditions. We demonstrate that both enzymes are able to degrade the quorum-sensing molecules of various pathogens subsequently affecting virulence gene expression. These studies add the quorum-quenching enzymes of D. radiodurans to the list of potent quorum-quenchers and highlight the idea that quorum quenching could have evolved in some bacteria as a strategy to gain a competitive advantage by altering gene expression in other species.

  1. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina; Gaidamakova, Elena; Matrosova, Vera; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam L; Mavromatis, K; Pitluck, Samual; Richardson, P M; Detter, J. Chris; Brettin, Tom; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M; Wolf, Yuri; Sorokin, Alexei; Gerasimova, Anna; Gelfand, Mikhail; Fredrickson, James K; Koonin, Eugene; Daly, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at its optimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  2. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-24

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at itsoptimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  3. Extracellular dGMP enhances Deinococcus radiodurans tolerance to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingfeng; Sun, Hongxing; Feng, Qiong; Lu, Huiming; Zhao, Ye; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Xin; Jiao, Jiandong; Wang, Liangyan; Hua, Yuejin

    2013-01-01

    Free extracellular DNA provides nutrition to bacteria and promotes bacterial evolution by inducing excessive mutagenesis of the genome. To understand the influence of extracellular DNA fragments on D. radiodurans, we investigated cell growth and survival after extracellular DNA or dNMPs treatment. The results showed that the extracellular DNA fragments inhibited the growth of D. radiodurans. Interestingly, dGMP, a DNA component, enhanced D. radiodurans tolerance to H(2)O(2) and gamma-radiation significantly. Further experiments indicated that extracellular dGMP stimulated the activity of one catalase (KatA, DR1998), and induced gene transcription including the extracellular nuclease (drb0067). When this only extracellular nuclease gene (drb0067) in D. radiodurans was deleted, the mutant strain showed more sensitive to H(2)O(2) and gamma-radiation than the wild type strain. These results suggest that DRB0067 plays an important role in oxidative stress resistance. Taken together, we proposed a new anti-oxidation mechanism in D. radiodurans. This mechanism acts to increase expression levels of DRB0067 which then secretes active nuclease to degrade extracellular DNA fragments. The extracellular nuclease has a two-fold benefit, creating more free dNTPs for further cell protection and the removal of extracellular DNA fragments.

  4. The essential histone-like protein HU plays a major role in Deinococcus radiodurans nucleoid compaction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hong Ha; de la Tour, Claire Bouthier; Toueille, Magali; Vannier, Françoise; Sommer, Suzanne; Servant, Pascale

    2009-07-01

    The nucleoid of radioresistant bacteria, including D. radiodurans, adopts a highly condensed structure that remains unaltered after exposure to high doses of irradiation. This structure may contribute to radioresistance by preventing the dispersion of DNA fragments generated by irradiation. In this report, we focused our study on the role of HU protein, a nucleoid-associated protein referred to as a histone-like protein, in the nucleoid compaction of D. radiodurans. We demonstrate, using a new system allowing conditional gene expression, that HU is essential for viability in D. radiodurans. Using a tagged HU protein and immunofluorescence microscopy, we show that HU protein localizes all over the nucleoid and that when HU is expressed from a thermosensitive plasmid, its progressive depletion at the non-permissive temperature generates decondensation of DNA before fractionation of the nucleoid into several entities and subsequent cell lysis. We also tested the effect of the absence of Dps, a protein also involved in nucleoid structure. In contrast to the drastic effect of HU depletion, no change in nucleoid morphology and cell viability was observed in dps mutants compared with the wild-type, reinforcing the major role of HU in nucleoid organization and DNA compaction in D. radiodurans.

  5. Identification and Characterization of uvrA, a DNA Repair Gene of Deinococcus radiodurans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    and Murray, 1978; Baumeister and Kubler , 1978; Thompson and Murray, 1981; Schleifer and Kandler, 1972), cell membrane components (Knivett et aI...radiodurans, bUl no other species of the genus, possesses an HPJ layer, arranged in a hexagonal array (Brooks and Fox, 1980; Baumeister and Kubler , 1978

  6. Final Report for Grant No. DE-FG02-98ER62583 ''Functional Analysis of the Genome Sequence of Deinococcus radiodurans''

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Daly, Ph.D.

    2003-10-15

    Extremophiles are nearly always defined with singular characteristics that allow existence within a singular extreme environment. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans qualifies as a polyextremeophile, showing remarkable resistance to a range of damage caused by ionizing radiation, dessication, ultraviolet radiation, oxidizing agents, and electrophilic mutagens. D. radiodurans is most famous for its extreme resistance to ionizing radiation; it not only can grow continuously in the presence of chronic radiation (6,000 rad per hour), but it can survive acute exposures to gamma radiation that exceed 1,500,000 rads without lethality or induced mutation. These characteristics were the impetus for sequencing its genome. We completed an extensive comparative sequence analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans (strain R1) genome. Deinococcus is the first representative with a completely sequenced genome from a bacterial branch of extremophiles - the Thermus/Deinococcus group. Phylogenetic tree analysis, combined with the identification of several synapomorphies between Thermus and Deinococcus, support that it is a very ancient branch localized in the vicinity of the bacterial tree root. Distinctive features of the Deinoccoccus genome as well as features shared with other free-living bacteria were revealed by comparison of its proteome to a collection of Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs). Analysis of paralogs in Deinococcus has revealed some unique protein families. In addition, specific expansions of several protein families including phosphatases, proteases, acyl transferases and MutT pyrophosphohydrolases, were detected. Genes that potentially affect DNA repair and recombination were investigated in detail. Some proteins appear to have been horizontally transferred from eukaryotes, and are not present in other bacteria. For example, three proteins homologous to plant desiccation-resistance proteins were identified and these are particularly interesting

  7. PprM, a Cold Shock Domain-Containing Protein from Deinococcus radiodurans, Confers Oxidative Stress Tolerance to Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun-Ha; Singh, Harinder; Appukuttan, Deepti; Jeong, Sunwook; Choi, Yong Jun; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Narumi, Issay; Lim, Sangyong

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a representative microorganism that is frequently used for industrial biotechnology; thus its cellular robustness should be enhanced for the widespread application of E. coli in biotechnology. Stress response genes from the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans have been used to enhance the stress tolerance of E. coli. In the present study, we introduced the cold shock domain-containing protein PprM from D. radiodurans into E. coli and observed that the tolerance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was significantly increased in recombinant strains (Ec-PprM). The overexpression of PprM in E. coli elevated the expression of some OxyR-dependent genes, which play important roles in oxidative stress tolerance. Particularly, mntH (manganese transporter) was activated by 9-fold in Ec-PprM, even in the absence of H2O2 stress, which induced a more than 2-fold increase in the Mn/Fe ratio compared with wild type. The reduced production of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (·OH) and low protein carbonylation levels (a marker of oxidative damage) in Ec-PprM indicate that the increase in the Mn/Fe ratio contributes to the protection of cells from H2O2 stress. PprM also conferred H2O2 tolerance to E. coli in the absence of OxyR. We confirmed that the H2O2 tolerance of oxyR mutants reflected the activation of the ycgZ-ymgABC operon, whose expression is activated by H2O2 in an OxyR-independent manner. Thus, the results of the present study showed that PprM could be exploited to improve the robustness of E. coli. PMID:28119668

  8. PprM, a Cold Shock Domain-Containing Protein from Deinococcus radiodurans, Confers Oxidative Stress Tolerance to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Ha; Singh, Harinder; Appukuttan, Deepti; Jeong, Sunwook; Choi, Yong Jun; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Narumi, Issay; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a representative microorganism that is frequently used for industrial biotechnology; thus its cellular robustness should be enhanced for the widespread application of E. coli in biotechnology. Stress response genes from the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans have been used to enhance the stress tolerance of E. coli. In the present study, we introduced the cold shock domain-containing protein PprM from D. radiodurans into E. coli and observed that the tolerance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was significantly increased in recombinant strains (Ec-PprM). The overexpression of PprM in E. coli elevated the expression of some OxyR-dependent genes, which play important roles in oxidative stress tolerance. Particularly, mntH (manganese transporter) was activated by 9-fold in Ec-PprM, even in the absence of H2O2 stress, which induced a more than 2-fold increase in the Mn/Fe ratio compared with wild type. The reduced production of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (·OH) and low protein carbonylation levels (a marker of oxidative damage) in Ec-PprM indicate that the increase in the Mn/Fe ratio contributes to the protection of cells from H2O2 stress. PprM also conferred H2O2 tolerance to E. coli in the absence of OxyR. We confirmed that the H2O2 tolerance of oxyR mutants reflected the activation of the ycgZ-ymgABC operon, whose expression is activated by H2O2 in an OxyR-independent manner. Thus, the results of the present study showed that PprM could be exploited to improve the robustness of E. coli.

  9. Deinococcus radiodurans RecA nucleoprotein filaments characterized at the single-molecule level with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Pobegalov, Georgii; Cherevatenko, Galina; Alekseev, Aleksandr; Sabantsev, Anton; Kovaleva, Oksana; Vedyaykin, Alexey; Morozova, Natalia; Baitin, Dmitrii; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail

    2015-10-23

    Deinococcus radiodurans can survive extreme doses of ionizing radiation due to the very efficient DNA repair mechanisms that are able to cope even with hundreds of double-strand breaks. RecA, the critical protein of homologous recombination in bacteria, is one of the key components of the DNA-repair system. Repair of double-strand breaks requires RecA binding to DNA and assembly of the RecA nucleoprotein helical filaments. The Escherichia coli RecA protein (EcRecA) and its interactions with DNA have been extensively studied using various approaches including single-molecule techniques, while the D. radiodurans RecA (DrRecA) remains much less characterized. However, DrRecA shows some remarkable differences from E. coli homolog. Here we combine microfluidics and single-molecule DNA manipulation with optical tweezers to follow the binding of DrRecA to long double-stranded DNA molecules and probe the mechanical properties of DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments at physiological pH. Our data provide a direct comparison of DrRecA and EcRecA binding to double-stranded DNA under identical conditions. We report a significantly faster filaments assembly as well as lower values of persistence length and contour length for DrRecA nucleoprotein filaments compared to EcRecA. Our results support the existing model of DrRecA forming more frequent and less continuous filaments relative to those of EcRecA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. SAXS Structural Studies of Dps from Deinococcus radiodurans Highlights the Conformation of the Mobile N-Terminal Extensions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sandra P; Cuypers, Maxime G; Round, Adam; Finet, Stephanie; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Mitchell, Edward P; Romão, Célia V

    2017-03-10

    The radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans contains two DNA-binding proteins from starved cells (Dps): Dps1 (DR2263) and Dps2 (DRB0092). These are suggested to play a role in DNA interaction and manganese and iron storage. The proteins assemble as a conserved dodecameric structure with structurally uncharacterised N-terminal extensions. In the case of DrDps1, these extensions have been proposed to be involved in DNA interactions, while in DrDps2, their function has yet to be established. The reported data reveal the relative position of the N-terminal extensions to the dodecameric sphere in solution for both Dps. The low-resolution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) results show that the N-terminal extensions protrude from the spherical shell of both proteins. The SAXS envelope of a truncated form of DrDps1 without the N-terminal extensions appears as a dodecameric sphere, contrasting strongly with the protrusions observed in the full-length models. The effect of iron incorporation into DrDps2 was investigated by static and stopped-flow SAXS measurements, revealing dynamic structural changes upon iron binding and core formation, as reflected by a quick alteration of its radius of gyration. The truncated and full-length versions of DrDps were also compared on the basis of their interaction with DNA to analyse functional roles of the N-terminal extensions. DrDps1 N-terminal protrusions appear to be directly involved with DNA, whilst those from DrDps2 are indirectly associated with DNA binding. Furthermore, detection of DrDps2 in the D. radiodurans membrane fraction suggests that the N-terminus of the protein interacts with the membrane.

  11. Expression of PprI from Deinococcus radiodurans Improves Lactic Acid Production and Stress Tolerance in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiangrong; Tian, Bing; Dai, Shang; Li, Tao; Guo, Linna; Tan, Zhongfang; Jiao, Zhen; Jin, Qingsheng; Wang, Yanping; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    PprI is a general switch protein that regulates the expression of certain proteins involved in pathways of cellular resistance in the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In this study, we transformed pprI into Lactococcus lactis strain MG1363 using the lactococcal shuttle vector pMG36e and investigated its effects on the tolerance and lactic acid production of L. lactis while under stress. PprI was stably expressed in L. lactis as confirmed by western blot assays. L. lactis expressing PprI exhibited significantly improved resistance to oxidative stress and high osmotic pressure. This enhanced cellular tolerance to stressors might be due to the regulation of resistance-related genes (e.g., recA, recO, sodA, and nah) by pprI. Moreover, transformed L. lactis demonstrated increased lactic acid production, attributed to enhanced lactate dehydrogenase activity. These results suggest that pprI can improve the tolerance of L. lactis to environmental stresses, and this transformed bacterial strain is a promising candidate for industrial applications of lactic acid production. PMID:26562776

  12. Expression of PprI from Deinococcus radiodurans Improves Lactic Acid Production and Stress Tolerance in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiangrong; Tian, Bing; Dai, Shang; Li, Tao; Guo, Linna; Tan, Zhongfang; Jiao, Zhen; Jin, Qingsheng; Wang, Yanping; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    PprI is a general switch protein that regulates the expression of certain proteins involved in pathways of cellular resistance in the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In this study, we transformed pprI into Lactococcus lactis strain MG1363 using the lactococcal shuttle vector pMG36e and investigated its effects on the tolerance and lactic acid production of L. lactis while under stress. PprI was stably expressed in L. lactis as confirmed by western blot assays. L. lactis expressing PprI exhibited significantly improved resistance to oxidative stress and high osmotic pressure. This enhanced cellular tolerance to stressors might be due to the regulation of resistance-related genes (e.g., recA, recO, sodA, and nah) by pprI. Moreover, transformed L. lactis demonstrated increased lactic acid production, attributed to enhanced lactate dehydrogenase activity. These results suggest that pprI can improve the tolerance of L. lactis to environmental stresses, and this transformed bacterial strain is a promising candidate for industrial applications of lactic acid production.

  13. The DNA excision repair system of the highly radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is facilitated by the pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-M; Liu, J-K; Wong, T-Y

    2003-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is highly resistant to radiation and mutagenic chemicals. Mutants defective in the putative glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (zwf-) and the aldolase gene (fda-) were generated by homologous recombination. These mutants were used to test the cells' resistance to agents that cause dimer formation and DNA strand breaks. The zwf - mutants were more sensitive to agents that induce DNA excision repair, such as UV irradiation and H2O2, but were as resistant to DNA strand break-causing agents such as methylmethanesulphonic acid (MMS) and mitomycin C (MMC) as the wild-type cells. Analysis of the cytoplasmic fraction of zwf- cells showed that the concentrations of inosine monophosphate (IMP) and uridine monophosphate (UMP) were only 30% of those found in the wild-type cells. The fda- mutants were slightly more resistant to UV light and H2O2. Results suggested that the deinococcal pentose phosphate pathway augmented the DNA excision repair system by providing cells with adequate metabolites for the DNA mismatch repair.

  14. "Final Report for Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER62492 "Engineering Deinococcus radiodurans for Metal Remediation in Radioactive Mixed Waste Sites"

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Daly, Ph.D.

    2005-03-17

    The groundwater and sediments of numerous U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) field sites are contaminated with mixtures of heavy metals (e.g., Hg, Cr, Pd) and radionuclides (e.g., U, Tc), as well as the fuel hydrocarbons benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX); chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as trichloroethylene (TCE); and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The remediation of such mixed wastes constitutes an immediate and complex waste management challenge for DOE, particularly in light of the costliness and limited efficacy of current physical and chemical strategies for treating mixed wastes. In situ bioremediation via natural microbial processes (e.g., metal reduction) remains a potent, potentially cost-effective approach to the reductive immobilization or detoxification of environmental contaminants. Seventy million cubic meters of soil and three trillion liters of groundwater have been contaminated by leaking radioactive waste generated in the United States during the Cold War. A cleanup technology is being developed based on the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. Our recent isolation and characterization of D. radiodurans from a variety of DOE environments, including highly radioactive sediments beneath one of the leaking tanks (SX-108) at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington state, underscores the potential for this species to survive in such extreme environments. Research aimed at developing D. radiodurans for metal remediation in radioactive waste sites was started by this group in September 1997 with support from DOE NABIR grant DE-FG02-97ER62492. Our grant was renewed for the period 2000-2003, which includes work on the thermophilic radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus geothermalis. Work funded by the existing grant contributed to 18 papers in the period 1997-2004 on the fundamental biology of D. radiodurans and its design for bioremediation of radioactive waste environments. Our progress since September

  15. DR2539 is a novel DtxR-like regulator of Mn/Fe ion homeostasis and antioxidant enzyme in Deinococcus radiodurans

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huan; Wu, Rongrong; Xu, Guangzhi; Fang, Xu; Qiu, Xiaoli; Guo, Hongyin; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2010-05-28

    Transcriptional regulators of the diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) family control the expression of genes involved in the uptake of iron and manganese, which is not only necessitous nutrients but also was suggested to be essential for intracellular redox cycling of microorganisms. We identified a unique DtxR homologue (DR2539) with special characteristics from Deinococcus radiodurans, which is known for its extreme resistance to radiation and oxidants. The dr2539 mutant showed higher resistance to hydrogen peroxide than the wild-type strain R1. Intracellular catalase activity assay and semiquantitative PCR analysis demonstrated that this DtxR is a negative regulator of catalase (katE). Furthermore, quantitative real-time PCR, global transcription profile and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis showed that the DtxR is involved in the regulation of antioxidant system by maintaining the intracellular Mn/Fe ion homeostasis of D. radiodurans. However, unlike the other DtxR homologues, the DtxR of D. radiodurans acts as a negative regulator of a Mn transporter gene (dr2283) and as a positive regulator of Fe-dependent transporter genes (dr1219, drb0125) in D. radiodurans.

  16. The Deinococcus radiodurans DR1245 Protein, a DdrB Partner Homologous to YbjN Proteins and Reminiscent of Type III Secretion System Chaperones

    SciTech Connect

    Norais, Cédric; Servant, Pascale; Bouthier-de-la-Tour, Claire; Coureux, Pierre-Damien; Ithurbide, Solenne; Vannier, Françoise; Guerin, Philippe P.; Dulberger, Charles L.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Keck, James L.; Armengaud, Jean; Cox, Michael M.; Sommer, Suzanne

    2013-02-18

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. A small subset of Deinococcus genus-specific genes were shown to be up-regulated upon exposure to ionizing radiation and to play a role in genome reconstitution. These genes include an SSB-like protein called DdrB. Here, we identified a novel protein encoded by the dr1245gene as an interacting partner of DdrB. A strain devoid of the DR1245 protein is impaired in growth, exhibiting a generation time approximately threefold that of the wild type strain while radioresistance is not affected. We determined the three-dimensional structure of DR1245, revealing a relationship with type III secretion system chaperones and YbjN family proteins. Thus, DR1245 may display some chaperone activity towards DdrB and possibly other substrates.

  17. The Deinococcus radiodurans DR1245 Protein, a DdrB Partner Homologous to YbjN Proteins and Reminiscent of Type III Secretion System Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Bouthier-de-la-Tour, Claire; Coureux, Pierre-Damien; Ithurbide, Solenne; Vannier, Françoise; Guerin, Philippe P.; Dulberger, Charles L.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Keck, James L.; Armengaud, Jean; Cox, Michael M.; Sommer, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extreme resistance to ionizing radiation. A small subset of Deinococcus genus-specific genes were shown to be up-regulated upon exposure to ionizing radiation and to play a role in genome reconstitution. These genes include an SSB-like protein called DdrB. Here, we identified a novel protein encoded by the dr1245 gene as an interacting partner of DdrB. A strain devoid of the DR1245 protein is impaired in growth, exhibiting a generation time approximately threefold that of the wild type strain while radioresistance is not affected. We determined the three-dimensional structure of DR1245, revealing a relationship with type III secretion system chaperones and YbjN family proteins. Thus, DR1245 may display some chaperone activity towards DdrB and possibly other substrates. PMID:23441204

  18. Structures of trehalose synthase from Deinococcus radiodurans reveal that a closed conformation is involved in catalysis of the intramolecular isomerization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yung Lin; Chow, Sih Yao; Lin, Yi Ting; Hsieh, Yu Chiao; Lee, Guan Chiun; Liaw, Shwu Huey

    2014-12-01

    Trehalose synthase catalyzes the simple conversion of the inexpensive maltose into trehalose with a side reaction of hydrolysis. Here, the crystal structures of the wild type and the N253A mutant of Deinococcus radiodurans trehalose synthase (DrTS) in complex with the inhibitor Tris are reported. DrTS consists of a catalytic (β/α)8 barrel, subdomain B, a C-terminal β domain and two TS-unique subdomains (S7 and S8). The C-terminal domain and S8 contribute the majority of the dimeric interface. DrTS shares high structural homology with sucrose hydrolase, amylosucrase and sucrose isomerase in complex with sucrose, in particular a virtually identical active-site architecture and a similar substrate-induced rotation of subdomain B. The inhibitor Tris was bound and mimics a sugar at the -1 subsite. A maltose was modelled into the active site, and subsequent mutational analysis suggested that Tyr213, Glu320 and Glu324 are essential within the +1 subsite for the TS activity. In addition, the interaction networks between subdomains B and S7 seal the active-site entrance. Disruption of such networks through the replacement of Arg148 and Asn253 with alanine resulted in a decrease in isomerase activity by 8-9-fold and an increased hydrolase activity by 1.5-1.8-fold. The N253A structure showed a small pore created for water entry. Therefore, our DrTS-Tris may represent a substrate-induced closed conformation that will facilitate intramolecular isomerization and minimize disaccharide hydrolysis.

  19. THE ROLE OF IRON IN Deinococcus radiodurans ENGINEERED FOR GROWTH ON TOLUENE AND THE ROLE OF MANGANESE IN THE EXTREME RADIATION RESISTANCE PHENOTYPE

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan Brim; Elena K. Gaidamakova; Vera Y. Matrosova; Min Zhai; Amudhan Venkateswaran; Marina Omelchenko; Kira S. Makarova; Lawrence P. Wackett; James K. Fredrickson; Michael J. Daly

    2004-03-17

    Toluene and other fuel hydrocarbons are commonly found in association with radionuclides at numerous Department of Energy (DOE) sites, frequently occurring together with Cr(VI) and other heavy metals. In this study, the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans was engineered for complete toluene mineralization by cloned expression of tod and xyl genes of Pseudomonas putida. The recombinant Tod/Xyl strain showed significant incorporation of carbon from the toluene aromatic ring into cellular macromolecules and carbon dioxide, in the absence or presence of chronic radiation. We have shown that intracellular iron concentrations in wild-type D. radiodurans in minimal medium are exceptionally low and not sufficient to support growth on toluene using Fe-dependent oxygenases cloned from P. putida. Introducing the fur mutation into D. radiodurans increased intracellular Fe levels, and imparted on the engineered strain the ability to grow on meta-toluate as the sole carbon and energy source. The organism's native Cr(VI) reduction capabilities were facilitated by toluene when present as the sole carbon and energy source in natural sediment analogues of DOE contaminated environments. The engineered bacteria were able to oxidize toluene under both minimal and complex nutrient conditions, which is important since both conditions have environmental equivalents in the context of bioremediation processes. As such, the Tod/Xyl strain is providing a model for understanding the role of Fe and reduction of metals coupled to organic contaminant oxidation in aerobic radionuclide contaminated sediments. We have shown that D. radiodurans contains high intracellular manganese levels, and that Mn restriction sensitizes cells to irradiation. We propose that the unusually high Mn/Fe ratio of D. radiodurans facilitates survival by quenching oxidative stress during recovery.

  20. Final Report for Grant No. DE-FG02-01ER63220 "The Dynamics of Cellular Stress Responses in Deinococcus radiodurans"

    SciTech Connect

    PI: Michael J. Daly, Ph.D., Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences; Co-Investigators: James K. Fredrickson, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Richard D. Smith, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Eugene Koonin, Ph.D., National Center for Biotechnology Information; Jizhong Zhou, Ph.D. , Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Mary S. Lipton, Ph.D., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2006-03-06

    Bacteria belonging to the family Deinococcaceae are some of the most ionizing radiation (IR) resistant organisms yet discovered. Deinococcus radiodurans is obligate aerobic, capable of growth under chronic IR (60 Gy/hour) and relatively resistant to many DNA damaging conditions including exposure to desiccation, ultraviolet radiation and hydrogen peroxide. The genes and cellular pathways underlying the survival strategies of D. radiodurans have been under investigation for fifty years. In the last decade, D. radiodurans was subjected to whole-genome sequencing, annotation and comparative analysis, whole-transcriptome and whole-proteome analyses, and numerous DNA repair studies. Collectively, published reports support that the key to survival of D. radiodurans resides in its ability to repair DNA, but the mechanisms responsible remain poorly defined. Unexpectedly, many novel genes implicated in recovery from IR by transcriptome and proteome profiling have had little effect on survival when disrupted, and there is reason to ask if something is missing from classical models of radiation resistance. The prevailing dogma of radiation toxicity has been that the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of radiation are principally the result of DNA damage that occurs during IR. However, in light of available whole genome sequences, one broad observation that is difficult to reconcile with this view is that many organisms that encode a compliment of DNA repair and protection functions are killed at radiation doses that cause little DNA damage. This indicates that there are cellular targets involved in recovery that are more vulnerable to IR damage than DNA. It has been reported that D. radiodurans and other resistant organisms accumulate very high intracellular concentrations of Mn(II), and restricting the amount of Mn(II) during recovery from IR substantially reduced survival of D. radiodurans. At high intracellular concentrations, Mn(II) is known to act as a true catalyst of the

  1. PprM is necessary for up-regulation of katE1, encoding the major catalase of Deinococcus radiodurans, under unstressed culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sun-Wook; Seo, Ho Seong; Kim, Min-Kyu; Choi, Jong-Il; Lim, Heon-Man; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is a poly-extremophilic organism, capable of tolerating a wide variety of different stresses, such as gamma/ultraviolet radiation, desiccation, and oxidative stress. PprM, a cold shock protein homolog, is involved in the radiation resistance of D. radiodurans, but its role in the oxidative stress response has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the effect of pprM mutation on catalase gene expression. pprM disruption decreased the mRNA and protein levels of KatE1, which is the major catalase in D. radiodurans, under normal culture conditions. A pprM mutant strain (pprM MT) exhibited decreased catalase activity, and its resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) decreased accordingly compared with that of the wild-type strain. We confirmed that RecG helicase negatively regulates katE1 under normal culture conditions. Among katE1 transcriptional regulators, the positive regulator drRRA was not altered in pprM (-), while the negative regulators perR, dtxR, and recG were activated more than 2.5-fold in pprM MT. These findings suggest that PprM is necessary for KatE1 production under normal culture conditions by down-regulation of katE1 negative regulators.

  2. DrwH, a novel WHy domain-containing hydrophobic LEA5C protein from Deinococcus radiodurans, protects enzymatic activity under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shijie; Wang, Jin; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Yingying; Guo, Cui; Zhang, Liwen; Han, Jiahui; Wu, Xiaoli; Xue, Dong; Gomaa, Ahmed E; Feng, Shuai; Zhang, Heng; Chen, Yun; Ping, Shuzhen; Chen, Ming; Zhang, Wei; Li, Liang; Zhou, Zhengfu; Zuo, Kaijing; Li, Xufeng; Yang, Yi; Lin, Min

    2017-08-24

    Water stress and hypersensitive response (WHy) domain is typically found as a component of atypical late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins closely associated with resistance to multiple stresses in numerous organisms. Several putative LEA proteins have been identified in Deinococcus bacteria; however their precise function remains unclear. This work reports the characterization of a Deinococcus-specific gene encoding a novel WHy domain-containing hydrophobic LEA5C protein (named DrwH) in D. radiodurans R1. The expression of the drwH gene was induced by oxidative and salinity stresses. Inactivation of this gene resulted in increased sensitivity to oxidative and salinity stresses as well as reduced activities of antioxidant enzymes. The WHy domain of the DrwH protein differs structurally from that of a previously studied bacterial LEA5C protein, dWHy1, identified as a gene product from an Antarctic desert soil metagenome library. Further analysis indicated that in E. coli, the function of DrwH is related to oxidative stress tolerance, whereas dWHy1 is associated with freezing-thawing stress tolerance. Under oxidative stress induced by H2O2, DrwH protected the enzymatic activities of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). These findings provide new insight into the evolutionary and survival strategies of Deinococcus bacteria under extreme environmental conditions.

  3. Structure-Based and Random Mutagenesis Approaches Increase the Organophosphate-Degrading Activity of a Phosphotriesterase Homologue from Deinococcus radiodurans

    SciTech Connect

    Hawwa, Renda; Larsen, Sonia D.; Ratia, Kiira; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2010-11-09

    An enzyme from the amidohydrolase family from Deinococcus radiodurans (Dr-OPH) with homology to phosphotriesterase has been shown to exhibit activity against both organophosphate (OP) and lactone compounds. We have characterized the physical properties of Dr-OPH and have found it to be a highly thermostable enzyme, remaining active after 3 h of incubation at 60 C and withstanding incubation at temperatures up to 70 C. In addition, it can withstand concentrations of at least 200 mg/mL. These properties make Dr-OPH a promising candidate for development in commercial applications. However, compared to the most widely studied OP-degrading enzyme, that from Pseudomonas diminuta, Dr-OPH has low hydrolytic activity against certain OP substrates. Therefore, we sought to improve the OP-degrading activity of Dr-OPH, specifically toward the pesticides ethyl and methyl paraoxon, using structure-based and random approaches. Site-directed mutagenesis, random mutagenesis, and site-saturation mutagenesis were utilized to increase the OP-degrading activity of Dr-OPH. Out of a screen of more than 30,000 potential mutants, a total of 26 mutant enzymes were purified and characterized kinetically. Crystal structures of w.t. Dr-OPH, of Dr-OPH in complex with a product analog, and of 7 mutant enzymes were determined to resolutions between 1.7 and 2.4 {angstrom}. Information from these structures directed the design and production of 4 additional mutants for analysis. In total, our mutagenesis efforts improved the catalytic activity of Dr-OPH toward ethyl and methyl paraoxon by 126- and 322-fold and raised the specificity for these two substrates by 557- and 183-fold, respectively. Our work highlights the importance of an iterative approach to mutagenesis, proving that large rate enhancements are achieved when mutations are made in already active mutants. In addition, the relationship between the kinetic parameters and the introduced mutations has allowed us to hypothesize on those

  4. Engineering Deinococcus geothermailis for Bioremediation of High-Temperature Radioactive Waste Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Brim, Hassan; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Kostandarithes, Heather M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Daly, Michael J.

    2003-08-01

    Deinococcus geothermalis is an extremely radiation-resistant thermophilic bacterium closely related to the mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans, which is being engineered for in situ bioremediation of radioactive wastes.

  5. The S-layer Protein DR_2577 Binds Deinoxanthin and under Desiccation Conditions Protects against UV-Radiation in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Farci, Domenica; Slavov, Chavdar; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans has the puzzling ability to withstand over a broad range of extreme conditions including high doses of ultraviolet radiation and deep desiccation. This bacterium is surrounded by a surface layer (S-layer) built of a regular repetition of several proteins, assembled to form a paracrystalline structure. Here we report that the deletion of a main constituent of this S-layer, the gene DR_2577, causes a decrease in the UVC resistance, especially in desiccated cells. Moreover, we show that the DR_2577 protein binds the carotenoid deinoxanthin, a strong protective antioxidant specific of this bacterium. A further spectroscopical characterization of the deinoxanthin-DR_2577 complex revealed features which could suggest a protective role of DR_2577. We propose that, especially under desiccation, the S-layer shields the bacterium from incident ultraviolet light and could behave as a first lane of defense against UV radiation.

  6. The S-layer Protein DR_2577 Binds Deinoxanthin and under Desiccation Conditions Protects against UV-Radiation in Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Farci, Domenica; Slavov, Chavdar; Tramontano, Enzo; Piano, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans has the puzzling ability to withstand over a broad range of extreme conditions including high doses of ultraviolet radiation and deep desiccation. This bacterium is surrounded by a surface layer (S-layer) built of a regular repetition of several proteins, assembled to form a paracrystalline structure. Here we report that the deletion of a main constituent of this S-layer, the gene DR_2577, causes a decrease in the UVC resistance, especially in desiccated cells. Moreover, we show that the DR_2577 protein binds the carotenoid deinoxanthin, a strong protective antioxidant specific of this bacterium. A further spectroscopical characterization of the deinoxanthin-DR_2577 complex revealed features which could suggest a protective role of DR_2577. We propose that, especially under desiccation, the S-layer shields the bacterium from incident ultraviolet light and could behave as a first lane of defense against UV radiation. PMID:26909071

  7. Microbial survival rates of Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans under low temperature, low pressure, and UV-Irradiation conditions, and their relevance to possible Martian life.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Benjamin; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2006-04-01

    Viability rates were determined for microbial populations of Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans under the environmental stresses of low temperature (-35 degrees C), low-pressure conditions (83.3 kPa), and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (37 W/m(2)). During the stress tests the organisms were suspended in saltwater soil and freshwater soil media, at variable burial depths, and in seawater. Microbial populations of both organisms were most susceptible to dehydration stress associated with low-pressure conditions, and to UV irradiation. However, suspension in a liquid water medium and burial at larger depths (5 cm) improved survival rates markedly. Our results indicate that planetary surfaces that possess little to no atmosphere and have low water availability do not constitute a favorable environment for terrestrial microorganisms.

  8. Roles of PprA, IrrE, and RecA in the resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans to germicidal and environmentally relevant UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Bauermeister, Anja; Bentchikou, Esma; Moeller, Ralf; Rettberg, Petra

    2009-12-01

    To study the role of different DNA repair genes in the resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans to mono- and polychromatic UV radiation, wild-type strain and knockout mutants in RecA, PprA, and IrrE of D. radiodurans were irradiated with UV-C (254 nm), UV-(A + B) (280-400 nm) and UV-A (315-400 nm) radiation, and survival was monitored. The strain deficient in recA was highly sensitive to UV-C radiation compared to the wild-type, but showed no loss of resistance against irradiation with UV-(A + B) and UV-A, while pprA and irrE-deficient strains exhibited elevated sensitivity to UV-A and UV-(A + B) radiation. These results suggest that the repair of DNA double-strand breaks is essential after treatment with highly energetic UV-C radiation, whereas protection from oxidative stress may play a greater role in resistance to environmentally relevant UV radiation.

  9. Engineered Deinococcus radiodurans R1 with NiCoT genes for bioremoval of trace cobalt from spent decontamination solutions of nuclear power reactors.

    PubMed

    Gogada, Raghu; Singh, Surya Satyanarayana; Lunavat, Shanti Kumari; Pamarthi, Maruthi Mohan; Rodrigue, Agnes; Vadivelu, Balaji; Phanithi, Prakash-Babu; Gopala, Venkateswaran; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to engineer bacteria for the removal of Co in contaminated effluents. Radioactive cobalt ((60)Co) is known as a major contributor for person-sievert budgetary because of its long half-life and high γ-energy values. Some bacterial Ni/Co transporter (NiCoT) genes were described to have preferential uptake for cobalt. In this study, the NiCoT genes nxiA and nvoA from Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009 (RP) and Novosphingobium aromaticivorans F-199 (NA), respectively, were cloned under the control of the groESL promoter. These genes were expressed in Deinococcus radiodurans in reason of its high resistance to radiation as compared to other bacterial strains. Using qualitative real time-PCR, we showed that the expression of NiCoT-RP and NiCoT-NA is induced by cobalt and nickel. The functional expression of these genes in bioengineered D. radiodurans R1 strains resulted in >60 % removal of (60)Co (≥5.1 nM) within 90 min from simulated spent decontamination solution containing 8.5 nM of Co, even in the presence of >10 mM of Fe, Cr, and Ni. D. radiodurans R1 (DR-RP and DR-NA) showed superior survival to recombinant E. coli (ARY023) expressing NiCoT-RP and NA and efficiency in Co remediation up to 6.4 kGy. Thus, the present study reports a remarkable reduction in biomass requirements (2 kg) compared to previous studies using wild-type bacteria (50 kg) or ion-exchanger resins (8000 kg) for treatment of ~10(5)-l spent decontamination solutions (SDS).

  10. Molecular analysis of the Deinococcus radiodurans recA locus and identification of a mutation site in a DNA repair-deficient mutant, rec30.

    PubMed

    Narumi, I; Satoh, K; Kikuchi, M; Funayama, T; Kitayama, S; Yanagisawa, T; Watanabe, H; Yamamoto, K

    1999-12-07

    Deinococcus radiodurans strain rec30, which is a DNA damage repair-deficient mutant, has been estimated to be defective in the deinococcal recA gene. To identify the mutation site of strain rec30 and obtain information about the region flanking the gene, a 4.4-kb fragment carrying the wild-type recA gene was sequenced. It was revealed that the recA locus forms a polycistronic operon with the preceding cistrons (orf105a and orf105b). Predicted amino acid sequences of orf105a and orf105b showed substantial similarity to the competence-damage inducible protein (cinA gene product) from Streptococcus pneumoniae and the 2'-5' RNA ligase from Escherichia coli, respectively. By analyzing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragments derived from the genomic DNA of strain rec30, the mutation site in the strain was identified as a single G:C to A:T transition which causes an amino acid substitution at position 224 (Gly to Ser) of the deinococcal RecA protein. Furthermore, we succeeded in expressing both the wild-type and mutant recA genes of D. radiodurans in E. coli without any obvious toxicity or death. The gamma-ray resistance of an E. coli recA1 strain was fully restored by the expression of the wild-type recA gene of D. radiodurans that was cloned in an E. coli vector plasmid. This result is consistent with evidence that RecA proteins from many bacterial species can functionally complement E. coli recA mutants. In contrast with the wild-type gene, the mutant recA gene derived from strain rec30 did not complement E. coli recA1, suggesting that the mutant RecA protein lacks functional activity for recombinational repair.

  11. Characterization of a DNA damage-inducible membrane protein kinase from Deinococcus radiodurans and its role in bacterial radioresistance and DNA strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra S; Misra, Hari S

    2010-09-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans mutant lacking pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ) synthesis shows sensitivity to γ-rays and impairment of DNA double strand break repair. The genome of this bacterium encodes five putative proteins having multiple PQQ binding motifs. The deletion mutants of corresponding genes were generated, and their response to DNA damage was monitored. Only the Δdr2518 mutant exhibited higher sensitivity to DNA damage. Survival of these cells decreased by 3-log cycle both at 6 kGy γ-rays and 1200 Jm(-2) UV (254 nm) radiation, and 2.5-log cycle upon 14 days desiccation at 5% humidity. The Δdr2518 mutant showed complete inhibition of DSB repair until 24 h PIR and disappearance of a few phosphoproteins. The Δdr2518pqqE:cat double mutant showed γ-ray sensitivity similar to Δdr2518 indicating functional interaction of these genes in D. radiodurans. DR2518 contains a eukaryotic type Ser/Thr kinase domain and structural topology suggesting stress responsive transmembrane protein. Its autokinase activity in solution was stimulated by nearly threefold with PQQ and twofold with linear DNA, but not with circular plasmid DNA. More than 15-fold increase in dr2518 transcription and several-fold enhanced in vivo phosphorylation of DR2518 were observed in response to γ irradiation. These results suggest that DR2518 as a DNA damage-responsive protein kinase plays an important role in radiation resistance and DNA strand break repair in D. radiodurans. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Knockout of crtB or crtI gene blocks the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in Deinococcus radiodurans R1 and influences its resistance to oxidative DNA-damaging agents due to change of free radicals scavenging ability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yang, Qiao; Luo, Xuesong; Fang, Chengxiang; Zhang, Qiuju; Tang, Yali

    2007-10-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans R1, a red-pigmented strain of the extremely radioresistant genus Deinococcus, contains a major carotenoid namely deinoxanthin. The high resistance of this organism against the lethal actions of DNA-damaging agents including ionizing radiation and ultraviolet light (UV) has been widely reported. However, the possible antioxidant role of carotenoids in this strain has not been completely elucidated. In this study, we constructed two colorless mutants by knockout of crtB and crtI genes, respectively. Comparative analysis of the two colorless mutants and the wild type showed that the two colorless mutants were more sensitive to ionizing radiation, UV, and hydrogen peroxide, but not to mitomycin-C (MMC). With electron spin resonance (ESR) and spin trapping techniques, we observed that hydroxyl radical signals occurred in the suspensions of UV irradiated Deinococcus radiodurans cells and the intensity of signals was influenced by carotenoids levels. We further showed that the carotenoid extract from the wild type could obviously scavenge superoxide anions generated by the irradiated riboflavin/EDTA system. These results suggest that carotenoids in D. radiodurans R1 function as free radical scavengers to protect this organism against the deleterious effects of oxidative DNA-damaging agents.

  13. DR1769, a Protein with N-Terminal Beta Propeller Repeats and a Low-Complexity Hydrophilic Tail, Plays a Role in Desiccation Tolerance of Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra S.

    2013-01-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes five putative quinoproteins. Among these, the Δdr2518 and Δdr1769 mutants became sensitive to gamma radiation. DR2518 with beta propeller repeats in the C-terminal domain was characterized as a radiation-responsive serine/threonine protein kinase in this bacterium. DR1769 contains beta propeller repeats at the N terminus, while its C-terminal domain is a proline-rich disordered structure and constitutes a low-complexity hydrophilic region with aliphatic-proline dipeptide motifs. The Δdr1769 mutant showed nearly a 3-log cycle sensitivity to desiccation at 5% humidity compared to that of the wild type. Interestingly, the gamma radiation and mitomycin C (MMC) resistance in mutant cells also dropped by ∼1-log cycle at 10 kGy and ∼1.5-fold, respectively, compared to those in wild-type cells. But there was no effect of UV (254 nm) exposure up to 800 J · m−2. These cells showed defective DNA double-strand break repair, and the average size of the nucleoid in desiccated wild-type and Δdr1769 cells was reduced by approximately 2-fold compared to that of respective controls. However, the nucleoid in wild-type cells returned to a size almost similar to that of the untreated control, which did not happen in mutant cells, at least up to 24 h postdesiccation. These results suggest that DR1769 plays an important role in desiccation and radiation resistance of D. radiodurans, possibly by protecting genome integrity under extreme conditions. PMID:23794625

  14. DR1769, a protein with N-terminal beta propeller repeats and a low-complexity hydrophilic tail, plays a role in desiccation tolerance of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra S; Misra, Hari S

    2013-09-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes five putative quinoproteins. Among these, the Δdr2518 and Δdr1769 mutants became sensitive to gamma radiation. DR2518 with beta propeller repeats in the C-terminal domain was characterized as a radiation-responsive serine/threonine protein kinase in this bacterium. DR1769 contains beta propeller repeats at the N terminus, while its C-terminal domain is a proline-rich disordered structure and constitutes a low-complexity hydrophilic region with aliphatic-proline dipeptide motifs. The Δdr1769 mutant showed nearly a 3-log cycle sensitivity to desiccation at 5% humidity compared to that of the wild type. Interestingly, the gamma radiation and mitomycin C (MMC) resistance in mutant cells also dropped by ∼1-log cycle at 10 kGy and ∼1.5-fold, respectively, compared to those in wild-type cells. But there was no effect of UV (254 nm) exposure up to 800 J · m(-2). These cells showed defective DNA double-strand break repair, and the average size of the nucleoid in desiccated wild-type and Δdr1769 cells was reduced by approximately 2-fold compared to that of respective controls. However, the nucleoid in wild-type cells returned to a size almost similar to that of the untreated control, which did not happen in mutant cells, at least up to 24 h postdesiccation. These results suggest that DR1769 plays an important role in desiccation and radiation resistance of D. radiodurans, possibly by protecting genome integrity under extreme conditions.

  15. Functional and structural characterization of DR_0079 from Deinococcus radiodurans, a novel Nudix hydrolase with a preference for cytosine (deoxy) ribonucleoside 5'-di- and triphosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Litvinova, Olga; Robinson, Howard; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2008-06-24

    The Deinococcus radiodurans Nudix hydrolase DR0079 was assayed for activity towards a wide variety of substrates and observed to have a marked specificity for cytosine ribonucleoside 5’-diphosphate (CDP) and cytosine ribonucleoside 5’-triphosphate (CTP) with a slight preference for CDP. The next most specific substrates, with a relative activity of <50%, were the corresponding deoxyribose nucleosides, dCDP and dCTP. Enzyme hydrolase activity at the site of the phosphodiester bond was corroborated using 31P NMR spectroscopy to follow the phosphorus resonances for two substrates, CDP and IDP, and the hydrolysis products, NMP and Pi. Optimum activity for CDP was determined to be at pH 9.0 – 9.5. The optimal divalent cation for CDP hydrolysis at this pH was Mg2+ followed by Mn2+ (~47%) and Co2+(~27%). The biochemical data is discussed with reference to the crystal structure for the D. radiodurans DR0079 that was determined in the apo-metal form at 1.9 Å resolution. The protein in the crystal structure contains nine β-strands, three α-helices, and two 3-10 helices that are organized into three subdomains; an N-terminal β-sheet, a central Nudix core, and a C-terminal helixturn- helix motif. As observed for all known structures of Nudix hydrolases, the α-helix of the ‘Nudix box’ is one of two helices that sandwich a ‘four-strand’ mixed β-sheet. Using 15N-labelled DR0079, NMR chemical shift mapping experiments were performed with the paramagnetic divalent cation Co2+ and the non-hydrolyzable substrate thymidine- 5’-O-(α,β-methylenediphosphate (TMP-CP). The results of the chemical shift perturbation experiments were mapped onto the crystal structure of DR0079 and a model for substrate binding proposed.

  16. A Novel C-Terminal Domain of RecJ is Critical for Interaction with HerA in Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kaiying; Zhao, Ye; Chen, Xuanyi; Li, Tao; Wang, Liangyan; Xu, Hong; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) generates error-free repair products, which plays an important role in double strand break repair and replication fork rescue processes. DNA end resection, the critical step in HR, is usually performed by a series of nuclease/helicase. RecJ was identified as a 5′-3′ exonuclease involved in bacterial DNA end resection. Typical RecJ possesses a conserved DHH domain, a DHHA1 domain, and an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold. However, RecJs from Deinococcus-Thermus phylum, such as Deinococcus radiodurans RecJ (DrRecJ), possess an extra C-terminal domain (CTD), of which the function has not been characterized. Here, we showed that a CTD-deletion of DrRecJ (DrRecJΔC) could not restore drrecJ mutant growth and mitomycin C (MMC)-sensitive phenotypes, indicating that this domain is essential for DrRecJ in vivo. DrRecJΔC displayed reduced DNA nuclease activity and DNA binding ability. Direct interaction was identified between DrRecJ-CTD and DrHerA, which stimulates DrRecJ nuclease activity by enhancing its DNA binding affinity. Moreover, DrNurA nuclease, another partner of DrHerA, inhibited the stimulation of DrHerA on DrRecJ nuclease activity by interaction with DrHerA. Opposing growth and MMC-resistance phenotypes between the recJ and nurA mutants were observed. A novel modulation mechanism among DrRecJ, DrHerA, and DrNurA was also suggested. PMID:26648913

  17. Untargeted metabolite profiling reveals that nitric oxide bioynthesis is an endogenous modulator of carotenoid biosynthesis in Deinococcus radiodurans and is required for extreme ionizing radiation resistance.

    PubMed

    Hansler, Alex; Chen, Qiuying; Ma, Yuliang; Gross, Steven S

    2016-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans (Drad) is the most radioresistant organism known. Although mechanisms that underlie the extreme radioresistance of Drad are incompletely defined, resistance to UV irradiation-induced killing was found to be greatly attenuated in an NO synthase (NOS) knockout strain of Drad (Δnos). We now show that endogenous NO production is also critical for protection of Drad against γ-irradiation (3000 Gy), a result of accelerated growth recovery, not protection against killing. NO-donor treatment rescued radiosensitization in Δnos Drad but did not influence radiosensitivity in wild type Drad. To discover molecular mechanisms by which endogenous NO confers radioresistance, metabolite profiling studies were performed. Untargeted LC-MS-based metabolite profiling in Drad quantified relative abundances of 1425 molecules and levels of 294 of these were altered by >5-fold (p < 0.01). Unexpectedly, these studies identified a dramatic perturbation in carotenoid biosynthetic intermediates in Δnos Drad, including a reciprocal switch in the pathway end-products from deoxydeinoxanthin to deinoxanthin. NO supplementation rescued these nos deletion-associated changes in carotenoid biosynthesis, and fully-restored radioresistance to wildtype levels. Because carotenoids were shown to be important contributors to radioprotection in Drad, our findings suggest that endogenously-produced NO serves to maintain a spectrum of carotenoids critical for Drad's ability to withstand radiation insult.

  18. Untargeted Metabolite Profiling Reveals that Nitric Oxide Bioynthesis is an Endogenous Modulator of Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Deinococcus radiodurans and is Required for Extreme Ionizing Radiation Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hansler, Alex; Chen, Qiuying; Ma, Yuliang; Gross, Steven S.

    2015-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans (Drad) is the most radioresistant organism known. Although mechanisms that underlie the extreme radioresistance of Drad are incompletely defined, resistance to UV irradiation-induced killing was found to be greatly attenuated in an NO synthase (NOS) knockout strain of Drad (Δnos). We now show that endogenous NO production is also critical for protection of Drad against γ-irradiation (3000 Gy), a result of accelerated growth recovery, not protection against killing. NO-donor treatment rescued radiosensitization in Δnos Drad but did not influence radiosensitivity in wild type Drad. To discover molecular mechanisms by which endogenous NO confers radioresistance, metabolite profiling studies were performed. Untargeted LC-MS-based metabolite profiling in Drad quantified relative abundances of 1,425 molecules and levels of 294 of these were altered by >5-fold (p< 0.01). Unexpectedly, these studies identified a dramatic perturbation in carotenoid biosynthetic intermediates in Δnos Drad, including a reciprocal switch in the pathway end-products from deoxydeinoxanthin to deinoxanthin. NO supplementation rescued these nos deletion-associated changes in carotenoid biosynthesis, and fully-restored radioresistance to wildtype levels. Because carotenoids were shown to be important contributors to radioprotection in Drad, our findings suggest that endogenously-produced NO serves to maintain a spectrum of carotenoids critical for Drad’s ability to withstand radiation insult. PMID:26550929

  19. Cytosolic expression of synthetic phytochelatin and bacterial metallothionein genes in Deinococcus radiodurans R1 for enhanced tolerance and bioaccumulation of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Ruchi; Archana, G

    2014-06-01

    Due to its exemplary resistance to ionising radiation, oxidative stress, desiccation and several DNA damaging agents, Deinococcus radiodurans R1 (DR1) is considered as one of the most appropriate candidates for the bioremediation of the nuclear waste sites. However, the high sensitivity of this bacterium to heavy metals, which are usually preponderant at nuclear waste dump sites, precludes its application for bioremediation. This study deals with the expression two metal binding peptides in DR1 as an attractive strategy for developing metal tolerance in this bacterium. A synthetic gene (EC20) encoding a phytochelatin analogue with twenty repeating units of glutamate and cysteine was constructed by overlap extension and expressed in DR1. The cyanobacterial metallothionein (MT) gene, smtA was cloned for intracellular expression in DR1. Both the genes were expressed under the native groESL promoter. DR1 strain carrying the recombinant EC20 demonstrated 2.5-fold higher tolerance to Cd(2+) and accumulated 1.21-fold greater Cd(2+) as opposed to the control while the heterologous expression of MT SmtA in DR1 imparted the transformant superior tolerance to Cd(2+) amassing 2.5-fold greater Cd(2+) than DR1 expressing EC20.

  20. Analysis of Deinococcus radiodurans's transcriptional response to ionizing radiation and desiccation reveals novel proteins that contribute to extreme radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masashi; Earl, Ashlee M; Howell, Heather A; Park, Mie-Jung; Eisen, Jonathan A; Peterson, Scott N; Battista, John R

    2004-09-01

    During the first hour after a sublethal dose of ionizing radiation, 72 genes were upregulated threefold or higher in D. radiodurans R1. Thirty-three of these loci were also among a set of 73 genes expressed in R1 cultures recovering from desiccation. The five transcripts most highly induced in response to each stress are the same and encode proteins of unknown function. The genes (ddrA, ddrB, ddrC, ddrD, and pprA) corresponding to these transcripts were deleted, both alone and in all possible two-way combinations. Characterization of the mutant strains defines three epistasis groups that reflect different cellular responses to ionizing radiation-induced damage. The ddrA and ddrB gene products have complementary activities and inactivating both loci generates a strain that is more sensitive to ionizing radiation than strains in which either single gene has been deleted. These proteins appear to mediate efficient RecA-independent processes connected to ionizing radiation resistance. The pprA gene product is not necessary for homologous recombination during natural transformation, but nevertheless may participate in a RecA-dependent process during recovery from radiation damage. These characterizations clearly demonstrate that novel mechanisms significantly contribute to the ionizing radiation resistance in D. radiodurans.

  1. Design and construction of deinococcus radiodurans for biodegradation of organic toxins at radioactive DOE waste sites. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, M.J.; Wackett, L.P.; Minton, K.W.

    1998-06-01

    'A 1992 survey of DOE waste sites indicates that about 32% of soils and 45% of groundwaters at these sites contain radionuclides and metals plus an organic toxin class. The most commonly reported combinations of these hazardous compounds being radionuclides and metals (e.g., U, Pu, Cs, Pb, Cr, As) plus chlorinated hydrocarbons (e.g., trichloroethylene), fuel hydrocarbons (e.g., toluene), or polychlorinated biphenyls (e.g., Arochlor 1248). These wastes are some of the most hazardous pollutants and pose an increasing risk to human health as they leach into the environment. The objective of this research is to develop novel organisms, that are highly resistant to radiation and the toxic effects of metals and radionuclides, for in-situ bioremediation of organic toxins. Few organisms exist that are able to remediate such environmental organic pollutants, and among those that can, the bacteria belonging to the genus Pseudomonas are the most characterized. Unfortunately, these bacteria are very radiation sensitive. For example, Pseudomonas spp. is even more sensitive than Escherichia coli and, thus, is not suitable as a bioremediation host in environments subjected to radiation. By contrast, D. radiodurans, a natural soil bacterium, is the most radiation resistant organism yet discovered; it is several thousand times more resistant to ionizing radiation than Pseudomonas. The sophisticated gene transfer and expression systems the authors have developed for D. radiodurans over the last eight years make this organism an ideal candidate for high-level expression of genes that degrade organic toxins, in radioactive environments. The authors ultimate aim is to develop organisms and approaches that will be useful for remediating the large variety of toxic organic compounds found in DOE waste sites that are too radioactive to support other bioremediation organisms. This report summarizes work after the first 6 months of a 3-year project.'

  2. The members of M20D peptidase subfamily from Burkholderia cepacia, Deinococcus radiodurans and Staphylococcus aureus (HmrA) are carboxydipeptidases, primarily specific for Met-X dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Jamdar, Sahayog N; Are, Venkata N; Navamani, Mallikarjunan; Kumar, Saurabh; Nagar, Vandan; Makde, Ravindra D

    2015-12-01

    Three members of peptidase family M20D from Burkholderia cepacia (BcepM20D; Uniprot accession no. A0A0F7GQ23), Deinococcus radiodurans R1 (DradM20D; Uniprot accession no. Q9RTP6) and Staphylococcus aureus (HmrA; Uniprot accession no. Q99Q45) were characterized in terms of their preference for various substrates. The results thus reveal that all the enzymes including HmrA lack endopeptidase as well as aminopeptidase activities and possess strong carboxypeptidase activity. Further, the amidohydrolase activity exerted on other substrates like N-Acetyl-Amino acids, N-Carbobenzoxyl-Amino acids and Indole acetic acid (IAA)-Amino acids is due to the ability of these enzymes to accommodate different types of chemical groups other than the amino acid at the S1 pocket. Further, data on peptide hydrolysis strongly suggests that all the three enzymes are primarily carboxydipeptidases exhibiting highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km 5-36 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) for Met-X substrates, where -X could be Ala/Gly/Ser/Tyr/Phe/Leu depending on the source organism. The supportive evidence for the substrate specificities was also provided with the molecular docking studies carried out using structure of SACOL0085 and homology modelled structure of BcepM20D. The preference for different substrates, their binding at active site of the enzyme and possible role of these enzymes in recycling of methionine are discussed in this study.

  3. Laboratory-Evolved Mutants of an Exogenous Global Regulator, IrrE from Deinococcus radiodurans, Enhance Stress Tolerances of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tingjian; Wang, Jianqing; Yang, Rong; Li, Jicong; Lin, Min; Lin, Zhanglin

    2011-01-01

    Background The tolerance of cells toward different stresses is very important for industrial strains of microbes, but difficult to improve by the manipulation of single genes. Traditional methods for enhancing cellular tolerances are inefficient and time-consuming. Recently, approaches employing global transcriptional or translational engineering methods have been increasingly explored. We found that an exogenous global regulator, irrE from an extremely radiation-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans, has the potential to act as a global regulator in Escherichia coli, and that laboratory-evolution might be applied to alter this regulator to elicit different phenotypes for E. coli. Methodology/Principal Findings To extend the methodology for strain improvement and to obtain higher tolerances toward different stresses, we here describe an approach of engineering irrE gene in E. coli. An irrE library was constructed by randomly mutating the gene, and this library was then selected for tolerance to ethanol, butanol and acetate stresses. Several mutants showing significant tolerances were obtained and characterized. The tolerances of E. coli cells containing these mutants were enhanced 2 to 50-fold, based on cell growth tests using different concentrations of alcohols or acetate, and enhanced 10 to 100-fold based on ethanol or butanol shock experiments. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays showed that intracellular ROS levels were sharply reduced for cells containing the irrE mutants. Sequence analysis of the mutants revealed that the mutations distribute cross all three domains of the protein. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first time that an exogenous global regulator has been artificially evolved to suit its new host. The successes suggest the possibility of improving tolerances of industrial strains by introducing and engineering exogenous global regulators, such as those from extremophiles. This new approach can be applied alone or

  4. Gene cloning and protein expression of γ-glutamyltranspeptidases from Thermus thermophilus and Deinococcus radiodurans: comparison of molecular and structural properties with mesophilic counterparts.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Immacolata; Di Salle, Anna; Merlino, Antonello; Rossi, Mosè; La Cara, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase (γ-GT) is an ubiquitous enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of γ-glutamyl bonds in glutathione and glutamine and the transfer of the released γ-glutamyl group to amino acids or short peptides. γ-GTs from extremophiles, bacteria adapted to live in hostile environments, were selected as model systems to study the molecular underpinnings of their adaptation to extreme conditions and to find out special properties of potential biotechnological interest. Here, we report the cloning, expression and purification of two members of γ-GT family from two different extremophilic species, Thermus thermophilus (TtGT) and Deinococcus radiodurans (DrGT); the first is an aerobic eubacterium, growing at high temperatures (50-82°C), the second is a polyextremophile, as it tolerates radiations, cold, dehydration, vacuum, and acid. TtGT and DrGT were both synthesized as precursor proteins of 59-60 kDa, undergoing an intramolecular auto-cleavage to yield two subunits of 40 and 19-20 kDa, respectively. However, like the γ-GT from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, but differently from the other characterized bacterial and eukaryotic γ-GTs, the two new extremophilic enzymes displayed γ-glutamyl hydrolase, but not transpeptidase activity in the 37-50°C temperature range, pH 8.0. The comparison of sequences and structural models of these two proteins with experimental-determined structures of other known mesophilic γ-GTs suggests that the extremophilic members of this protein family have found a common strategy to adapt to different hostile environments. Moreover, a phylogenetic analysis suggests that γ-GTs displaying only γ-glutamyl hydrolase activity could represent the progenitors of the bacterial and eukaryotic counterparts.

  5. FrnE, a Cadmium-Inducible Protein in Deinococcus radiodurans, Is Characterized as a Disulfide Isomerase Chaperone In Vitro and for Its Role in Oxidative Stress Tolerance In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Nivedita P.; Joe, Min-Ho; Misra, H. S.; Lim, Sang-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans R1 exposed to a lethal dose of cadmium shows differential expression of a large number of genes, including frnE (drfrnE) and some of those involved in DNA repair and oxidative stress tolerance. The drfrnE::nptII mutant of D. radiodurans showed growth similar to that of the wild type, but its tolerance to 10 mM cadmium and 10 mM diamide decreased by ∼15- and ∼3-fold, respectively. These cells also showed nearly 6 times less resistance to gamma radiation at 12 kGy and ∼2-fold-higher sensitivity to 40 mM hydrogen peroxide than the wild type. In trans expression of drFrnE increased cytotoxicity of dithiothreitol (DTT) in the dsbA mutant of Escherichia coli. Recombinant drFrnE showed disulfide isomerase activity and could maintain insulin in its reduced form in the presence of DTT. While an equimolar ratio of wild-type protein could protect malate dehydrogenase completely from thermal denaturation at 42°C, the C22S mutant of drFrnE provided reduced protection to malate dehydrogenase from thermal inactivation. These results suggested that drFrnE is a protein disulfide isomerase in vitro and has a role in oxidative stress tolerance of D. radiodurans possibly by protecting the damaged cellular proteins from inactivation. PMID:23603741

  6. The Site-Directed A184S Mutation in the HTH Domain of the Global Regulator IrrE Enhances Deinococcus radiodurans R1 Tolerance to UV Radiation and MMC Shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Zhou, Zhengfu; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Zhen; Song, Yuan; Lu, Wei; Lin, Min; Chen, Ming

    2015-12-28

    IrrE is a highly conserved global regulator in the Deinococcus genus and contributes to survival from high doses of UV radiation, ionizing radiation, and desiccation. Drad-IrrE and Dgob-IrrE from Deinococcus radiodurans and Deinococcus gobiensis I-0 each share 66% sequence identity. However, Dgob-IrrE showed a stronger protection phenotype against UV radiation than Drad- IrrE in the D. radiodurans irrE-deletion mutant (ΔirrE), which may be due to amino acid residues differences around the DNA-binding HTH domain. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate a Drad-IrrE A184S single mutant, which has been characterized and compared with the ΔirrE mutant complemented strain with Drad-irrE, designated ΔirrE-E. The effects of the A184S mutation following UV radiation and mitomycin C (MMC) shock were determined. The A184S mutant displayed significantly increased resistance to UV radiation and MMC shock. The corresponding A184 site in Dgob-IrrE was inversely mutated, generating the S131A mutant, which exhibited a loss of resistance against UV radiation, MMC shock, and desiccation. qPCR analysis revealed that critical genes in the DNA repair system, such as recA, pprA, uvrA, and ddrB, were remarkably induced after UV radiation and MMC shock in the ΔirrE-IE and A184S mutants. These data suggested that A184S improves the ability against UV radiation and MMC shock, providing new insights into the modification of IrrE. We speculated that the serine residue may determine the efficiency of DNA binding, leading to the increased expression of IrrE-dependent genes important for protection against DNA damage.

  7. Genome-wide search for ionizing radiation responsive elements in Deinococcus radiodurans reveals regulatory role of the DNA gyrase subunit A 5' UTR in the Radiation and Desiccation Response (RDR).

    PubMed

    Villa, Jordan K; Amador, Paul; Janovsky, Justin; Bhuyan, Arijit; Saldanha, Roland; Lamkin, Thomas J; Contreras, Lydia M

    2017-04-14

    Tight regulation of gene expression is important for Deinococcus radiodurans survival, a model bacterium of extreme stress resistance. Few studies have examined the use of regulatory RNAs as a possible contributing mechanism to ionizing radiation (IR) resistance, despite their proffered efficient and dynamic gene expression regulation under IR stress. This work presents a transcriptome-based approach for identification of stress-responsive regulatory 5' UTR elements in D. radiodurans R1 that can be broadly applied to other bacteria. Using this platform and an in vivo fluorescence screen, we uncovered the presence of a radiation-responsive regulatory motif in the 5' UTR of DNA gyrase subunit A Additional screens under H2O2-induced oxidative stress revealed the specificity of the response of this element to IR stress. Further examination of the sequence revealed a regulatory motif of the Radiation and Desiccation Response (RDR) in the 5' UTR that is necessary for D. radiodurans recovery from high doses of IR. Furthermore, we suggest that it is the preservation of predicted RNA structure, in addition to DNA sequence consensus, of the motif that permits this important regulatory ability.IMPORTANCEDeinococcus radiodurans is an extremely stress resistant bacterium capable of tolerating up to 3,000 times more ionizing radiation than human cells. As an integral part of the stress response mechanism of this organism, we suspect that it maintains stringent control of gene expression. However, understanding of its regulatory pathways remains incomplete to date. Untranslated RNA elements have been demonstrated to play crucial roles in gene regulation throughout bacteria. In this work, we focus on searching for and characterizing responsive RNA elements under radiation stress and propose that multiple levels of gene regulation simultaneously work to enable this organism to efficiently recover from exposure to ionizing radiation. The model we propose serves as a generic template

  8. Functional and Structural Characterization of DR_0079 from Deinococcus radiodurans, a Novel Nudix Hydrolase with a Preference for Cytosine (Deoxy)ribonucleoside 5 -Di- and Triphophates

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko,G.; Litvinova, O.; Robinson, H.; Yakunin, A.; Kennedy, M.

    2008-01-01

    The genome of the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans encodes 21 Nudix hydrolases, of which only two have been characterized in detail. Here we report the activity and crystal structure for DR{_}0079, the first Nudix hydrolase observed to have a marked preference for cytosine ribonucleoside 5'-diphosphate (CDP) and cytosine ribonucleoside 5'-triphosphate (CTP). After CDP and CTP, the next most preferred substrates for DR{_}0079, with a relative activity of <50%, were the corresponding deoxyribose nucleotides, dCDP and dCTP. Hydrolase activity at the site of the phosphodiester bond was corroborated using 31P NMR spectroscopy to follow the phosphorus resonances for three substrates, CDP, IDP, and CTP, and their hydrolysis products, CMP + Pi, IMP + Pi, and CMP + PPi, respectively. Nucleophilic substitution at the {beta}-phosphorus of CDP and CTP was established, using 31P NMR spectroscopy, by the appearance of an upfield-shifted Pi resonance and line-broadened PPi resonance, respectively, when the hydrolysis was performed in 40% H218O-enriched water. The optimal activity for CDP was at pH 9.0-9.5 with the reaction requiring divalent metal cation (Mg2+ > Mn2+ > Co2+). The biochemical data are discussed with reference to the crystal structure for DR{_}0079 that was determined in the metal-free form at 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The protein contains nine {beta}-strands, three a-helices, and two 310-helices organized into three subdomains: an N-terminal {beta}-sheet, a central Nudix core, and a C-terminal helix-turn-helix motif. As observed for all known structures of Nudix hydrolases, the a-helix of the 'Nudix box' is one of two helices that sandwich a 'four-strand' mixed {beta}-sheet. To identify residues potentially involved in metal and substrate binding, NMR chemical shift mapping experiments were performed on 15N-labeled DR{_}0079 with the paramagnetic divalent cation Co2+ and the nonhydrolyzable substrate thymidine 5'-O-({alpha}, {beta

  9. Functional Annotation and Three-Dimensional Structure of Dr0930 from Deinococcus radiodurans, a Close Relative of Phosphotriesterase in the Amidohydrolase Superfamily

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Kolb, P; Fedorov, A; Meier, M; Fedorov, L; Nguyen, T; Sterner, R; Almo, S; Shoichet, B; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    Dr0930, a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily in Deinococcus radiodurans, was cloned, expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The enzyme crystallized in the space group P3121, and the structure was determined to a resolution of 2.1 Angstroms. The protein folds as a (e/a)7e-barrel, and a binuclear metal center is found at the C-terminal end of the e-barrel. The purified protein contains a mixture of zinc and iron and is intensely purple at high concentrations. The purple color was determined to be due to a charge transfer complex between iron in the e-metal position and Tyr-97. Mutation of Tyr-97 to phenylalanine or complexation of the metal center with manganese abolished the absorbance in the visible region of the spectrum. Computational docking was used to predict potential substrates for this previously unannotated protein. The enzyme was found to catalyze the hydrolysis of d- and ?-lactones with an alkyl substitution at the carbon adjacent to the ring oxygen. The best substrate was d-nonanoic lactone with a kcat/Km of 1.6 x 106 M-1 s-1. Dr0930 was also found to catalyze the very slow hydrolysis of paraoxon with values of kcat and kcat/Km of 0.07 min-1 and 0.8 M-1 s-1, respectively. The amino acid sequence identity to the phosphotriesterase (PTE) from Pseudomonas diminuta is 30%. The eight substrate specificity loops were transplanted from PTE to Dr0930, but no phosphotriesterase activity could be detected in the chimeric PTE-Dr0930 hybrid. Mutation of Phe-26 and Cys-72 in Dr0930 to residues found in the active site of PTE enhanced the kinetic constants for the hydrolysis of paraoxon. The F26G/C72I mutant catalyzed the hydrolysis of paraoxon with a kcat of 1.14 min-1, an increase of 16-fold over the wild-type enzyme. These results support previous proposals that phosphotriesterase activity evolved from an ancestral parent enzyme possessing lactonase activity.

  10. RecA proteins from Deinococcus geothermalis and Deinococcus murrayi--cloning, purification and biochemical characterisation.

    PubMed

    Wanarska, Marta; Krawczyk, Beata; Hildebrandt, Piotr; Kur, Józef

    2011-04-22

    Escherichia coli RecA plays a crucial role in recombinational processes, the induction of SOS responses and mutagenic lesion bypasses. It has also been demonstrated that RecA protein is indispensable when it comes to the reassembly of shattered chromosomes in γ-irradiated Deinococcus radiodurans, one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known. Moreover, some functional differences between E. coli and D. radiodurans RecA proteins have also been shown. In this study, recA genes from Deinococcus geothermalis and Deinococcus murrayi, bacteria that are slightly thermophilic and extremely γ-radiation resistant, were isolated, cloned and expressed in E. coli. After production and purification, the biochemical properties of DgeRecA and DmuRecA proteins were determined. Both proteins continued to exist in the solutions as heterogenous populations of oligomeric forms. The DNA binding by DgeRecA and DmuRecA proteins is stimulated by Mg2+ ions. Furthermore, both proteins bind more readily to ssDNA when ssDNA and dsDNA are in the same reaction mixture. Both proteins are slightly thermostable and were completely inactivated in 10 s at 80°C. Both proteins hydrolyze ATP and dATP in the presence of ssDNA or complementary ssDNA and dsDNA, but not in the absence of DNA or in the presence of dsDNA only, and dATP was hydrolyzed more rapidly than ATP. They were also able to promote DNA strand exchange reactions by a pathway common for other RecA proteins. However, we did not obtain DNA strand exchange products when reactions were performed on an inverse pathway, characteristic for RecA of D. radiodurans. The characterization of DgeRecA and DmuRecA proteins made in this study indicates that the unique properties of D. radiodurans RecA are probably not common among RecA proteins from Deinococcus sp.

  11. RecA Proteins from Deinococcus geothermalis and Deinococcus murrayi - Cloning, Purification and Biochemical Characterisation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli RecA plays a crucial role in recombinational processes, the induction of SOS responses and mutagenic lesion bypasses. It has also been demonstrated that RecA protein is indispensable when it comes to the reassembly of shattered chromosomes in γ-irradiated Deinococcus radiodurans, one of the most radiation-resistant organisms known. Moreover, some functional differences between E. coli and D. radiodurans RecA proteins have also been shown. Results In this study, recA genes from Deinococcus geothermalis and Deinococcus murrayi, bacteria that are slightly thermophilic and extremely γ-radiation resistant, were isolated, cloned and expressed in E. coli. After production and purification, the biochemical properties of DgeRecA and DmuRecA proteins were determined. Both proteins continued to exist in the solutions as heterogenous populations of oligomeric forms. The DNA binding by DgeRecA and DmuRecA proteins is stimulated by Mg2+ ions. Furthermore, both proteins bind more readily to ssDNA when ssDNA and dsDNA are in the same reaction mixture. Both proteins are slightly thermostable and were completely inactivated in 10 s at 80°C. Both proteins hydrolyze ATP and dATP in the presence of ssDNA or complementary ssDNA and dsDNA, but not in the absence of DNA or in the presence of dsDNA only, and dATP was hydrolyzed more rapidly than ATP. They were also able to promote DNA strand exchange reactions by a pathway common for other RecA proteins. However, we did not obtain DNA strand exchange products when reactions were performed on an inverse pathway, characteristic for RecA of D. radiodurans. Conclusions The characterization of DgeRecA and DmuRecA proteins made in this study indicates that the unique properties of D. radiodurans RecA are probably not common among RecA proteins from Deinococcus sp. PMID:21513512

  12. Complete genome sequence of Deinococcus maricopensis type strain (LB-34T)

    SciTech Connect

    Pukall, Rudiger; Zeytun, Ahmet; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla L.; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Nolan, Matt; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Pati, Amrita; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Deinococcus maricopensis (Rainey and da Costa 2005) is a member of the genus Deinococcus, which is comprised of 44 validly named species and is located within the deeply branching bacterial phylum Deinococcus Thermus. Strain LB-34T was isolated from a soil sample from the Sonoran Desert in Arizona. Various species of the genus Deinococcus are characterized by extreme radiation resistance, with D. maricopensis being resistant in excess of 10 kGy. Even though the genomes of three Deinococcus species, D. radiodurans, D. geothermalis and D. deserti, have already been published, no special physiological characteristic is currently known that is unique to this group. It is therefore of special interest to analyze the genomes of additional species of the genus Deinococcus to better understand how these species adapted to gamma- or UV ionizing-radiation. The 3,498,530 bp long genome of D. maricopensis with its 3,301 protein-coding and 66 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  13. Carotenoid biosynthesis in extremophilic Deinococcus-Thermus bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2010-11-01

    Bacteria from the phylum Deinococcus-Thermus are known for their resistance to extreme stresses including radiation, oxidation, desiccation and high temperature. Cultured Deinococcus-Thermus bacteria are usually red or yellow pigmented because of their ability to synthesize carotenoids. Unique carotenoids found in these bacteria include deinoxanthin from Deinococcus radiodurans and thermozeaxanthins from Thermus thermophilus. Investigations of carotenogenesis will help to understand cellular stress resistance of Deinococcus-Thermus bacteria. Here, we discuss the recent progress toward identifying carotenoids, carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes and pathways in some species of Deinococcus-Thermus extremophiles. In addition, we also discuss the roles of carotenoids in these extreme bacteria.

  14. Crystal structures of complexes of the branched-chain aminotransferase from Deinococcus radiodurans with α-ketoisocaproate and L-glutamate suggest the radiation resistance of this enzyme for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chung-De; Lin, Chih-Hao; Chuankhayan, Phimonphan; Huang, Yen-Chieh; Hsieh, Yin-Cheng; Huang, Tien-Feng; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Liu, Ming-Yih; Chang, Wen-Chang; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2012-11-01

    Branched-chain aminotransferases (BCAT), which utilize pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor, reversibly catalyze the transfer of the α-amino groups of three of the most hydrophobic branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), leucine, isoleucine, and valine, to α-ketoglutarate to form the respective branched-chain α-keto acids and glutamate. The BCAT from Deinococcus radiodurans (DrBCAT), an extremophile, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli for structure and functional studies. The crystal structures of the native DrBCAT with PLP and its complexes with L-glutamate and α-ketoisocaproate (KIC), respectively, have been determined. The DrBCAT monomer, comprising 358 amino acids, contains large and small domains connected with an interdomain loop. The cofactor PLP is located at the bottom of the active site pocket between two domains and near the dimer interface. The substrate (L-glutamate or KIC) is bound with key residues through interactions of the hydrogen bond and the salt bridge near PLP inside the active site pocket. Mutations of some interaction residues, such as Tyr71, Arg145, and Lys202, result in loss of the specific activity of the enzymes. In the interdomain loop, a dynamic loop (Gly173 to Gly179) clearly exhibits open and close conformations in structures of DrBCAT without and with substrates, respectively. DrBCAT shows the highest specific activity both in nature and under ionizing radiation, but with lower thermal stability above 60 °C, than either BCAT from Escherichia coli (eBCAT) or from Thermus thermophilus (HB8BCAT). The dimeric molecular packing and the distribution of cysteine residues at the active site and the molecular surface might explain the resistance to radiation but small thermal stability of DrBCAT.

  15. Deinococcus antarcticus sp. nov., isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ning; Li, Hui-Rong; Yuan, Meng; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Yu, Yong

    2015-02-01

    A pink-pigmented, non-motile, coccoid bacterial strain, designated G3-6-20(T), was isolated from a soil sample collected in the Grove Mountains, East Antarctica. This strain was resistant to UV irradiation (810 J m(-2)) and slightly more sensitive to desiccation as compared with Deinococcus radiodurans. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate indicated that the organism belongs to the genus Deinococcus. Highest sequence similarities were with Deinococcus ficus CC-FR2-10(T) (93.5 %), Deinococcus xinjiangensis X-82(T) (92.8 %), Deinococcus indicus Wt/1a(T) (92.5 %), Deinococcus daejeonensis MJ27(T) (92.3 %), Deinococcus wulumuqiensis R-12(T) (92.3 %), Deinococcus aquaticus PB314(T) (92.2 %) and Deinococcus radiodurans DSM 20539(T) (92.2 %). Major fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c, summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c), anteiso-C15 : 0 and C16 : 0. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain G3-6-20(T) was 63.1 mol%. Menaquinone 8 (MK-8) was the predominant respiratory quinone. Based on its phylogenetic position, and chemotaxonomic and phenotypic characteristics, strain G3-6-20(T) represents a novel species of the genus Deinococcus, for which the name Deinococcus antarcticus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is G3-6-20(T) ( = DSM 27864(T) = CCTCC AB 2013263(T)).

  16. Microbial genome program report: Optical approaches for physical mapping and sequence assembly of the Deinococcus radiodurans chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David C.

    1999-11-23

    Maps of genomic or cloned DNA are frequently constructed by analyzing the cleavage patterns produced by restriction enzymes. Restriction enzymes are remarkable reagents that faithfully cleave only at specific sequences of between 4 and 8 nucleotides, which vary according to the specific enzymes. Restriction enzymes are reliable, numerous, and easily obtainable and presently, there are approximately 250 different sequences represented among thousands of enzymes. Restriction maps characterize gene structure and even entire genomes. Furthermore, such maps provide a useful scaffold for the alignment and verification of sequence data. Restriction maps generated by computer and predicted from the sequence are aligned with the actual restriction map. Restriction enzyme action has traditionally been assayed by gel electrophoresis. This technique separates cleaved molecules on the basis of their nobilities under the influence of an applied electrical field, within a gel separation matrix (small fragments have a greater mobility than large ones). Although gel electrophoresis distinguishes different sized DNA fragments (known as a fingerprint), the original order of these fragments remains unknown. The subsequent task of determining the order of such fragments is a labor intensive task, especially when making restriction maps of whole genomes, and therefore despite its obvious utility to genome analysis, it is not widely used.

  17. Proximity of Radiation Desiccation Response Motif to the core promoter is essential for basal repression as well as gamma radiation-induced gyrB gene expression in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Anaganti, Narasimha; Basu, Bhakti; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2017-03-02

    The radioresistant D. radiodurans regulates its DNA damage regulon (DDR) through interaction between a 17bp palindromic cis-regulatory element called the Radiation Desiccation Response Motif (RDRM), the DdrO repressor and a protease IrrE. The role of RDRM in regulation of DDR was dissected by constructing RDRM sequence-, position- or deletion-variants of Deinococcal gyrB gene (DR0906) promoter and by RDRM insertion in the non-RDRM groESL gene (DR0606) promoter, and monitoring the effect of such modifications on the basal as well as gamma radiation inducible promoter activity by quantifying fluorescence of a GFP reporter. RDRM sequence-variants revealed that the conservation of sequence at the 5th and 13th position and the ends of RDRM is essential for basal repression by interaction with DdrO. RDRM position-variants showed that the sequence acts as a negative regulatory element only when located around transcription start site (TSS) and within the span of RNA polymerase (RNAP) binding region. RDRM deletion-variants indicated that the 5' sequence of RDRM possibly possesses an enhancer-like element responsible for higher expression yields upon repressor clearance post-irradiation. The results suggest that RDRM plays both a negative as well as a positive role of in the regulation of DDR in D. radiodurans.

  18. Oxidative Stress Resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans†

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Dea; Radman, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Deinococcus radiodurans is a robust bacterium best known for its capacity to repair massive DNA damage efficiently and accurately. It is extremely resistant to many DNA-damaging agents, including ionizing radiation and UV radiation (100 to 295 nm), desiccation, and mitomycin C, which induce oxidative damage not only to DNA but also to all cellular macromolecules via the production of reactive oxygen species. The extreme resilience of D. radiodurans to oxidative stress is imparted synergistically by an efficient protection of proteins against oxidative stress and an efficient DNA repair mechanism, enhanced by functional redundancies in both systems. D. radiodurans assets for the prevention of and recovery from oxidative stress are extensively reviewed here. Radiation- and desiccation-resistant bacteria such as D. radiodurans have substantially lower protein oxidation levels than do sensitive bacteria but have similar yields of DNA double-strand breaks. These findings challenge the concept of DNA as the primary target of radiation toxicity while advancing protein damage, and the protection of proteins against oxidative damage, as a new paradigm of radiation toxicity and survival. The protection of DNA repair and other proteins against oxidative damage is imparted by enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant defense systems dominated by divalent manganese complexes. Given that oxidative stress caused by the accumulation of reactive oxygen species is associated with aging and cancer, a comprehensive outlook on D. radiodurans strategies of combating oxidative stress may open new avenues for antiaging and anticancer treatments. The study of the antioxidation protection in D. radiodurans is therefore of considerable potential interest for medicine and public health. PMID:21372322

  19. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-23

    Progress is briefly summarized in these areas: ionizing radiation resistance in bacteria; a hypothesis regarding ionizing radiation resistance emerging for bacterial cells; transcriptome analysis of irradiated D. radiodurans and Shewanella oneidensis; the role of metal reduction in Mn-dependnet Deinococcal species; and engineered Deinococcus strains as models for bioremediation. Key findings are also reported regarding protein oxidation as a possible key to bacterial desiccation resistance, and the whole-genome sequence of the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis.

  20. X-ray Radiation Induces Deprotonation of the Bilin Chromophore in Crystalline D. Radiodurans Phytochrome

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Feifei; Burgie, E. Sethe; Yu, Tao; Heroux, Annie; Schatz, George C.; Vierstra, Richard D.; Orville, Allen M.

    2015-02-04

    We report that in the red light-absorbing (Pr) state, the bilin chromophore of the Deinococcus radiodurans proteobacterial phytochrome (DrBphP) is hypersensitive to X-ray photons used in typical synchrotron X-ray protein crystallography experiments. This causes the otherwise fully protonated chromophore to deprotonate without additional major structural changes. Furthermore, these results have major implications for our understanding of the structural and chemical characteristics of the resting and intermediate states of phytochromes and other photoreceptor proteins.

  1. Engineering Deinococcus geothermalis for Bioremediation of High-Temperature Radioactive Waste Environments

    PubMed Central

    Brim, Hassan; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Kostandarithes, Heather M.; Fredrickson, James K.; Daly, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    Deinococcus geothermalis is an extremely radiation-resistant thermophilic bacterium closely related to the mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans, which is being engineered for in situ bioremediation of radioactive wastes. We report that D. geothermalis is transformable with plasmids designed for D. radiodurans and have generated a Hg(II)-resistant D. geothermalis strain capable of reducing Hg(II) at elevated temperatures and in the presence of 50 Gy/h. Additionally, D. geothermalis is capable of reducing Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid, U(VI), and Cr(VI). These characteristics support the prospective development of this thermophilic radiophile for bioremediation of radioactive mixed waste environments with temperatures as high as 55°C. PMID:12902245

  2. Small-Molecule Antioxidant Proteome-Shields in Deinococcus Radiodurans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    induced oxidation [1,2]. For example, 90% of Shewanella oneidensis cells, which are hypersensitive to c-ray-induced protein oxidation, are killed by...medium supplemented with 0.03% glutamine, 4.5 g/l glucose, 25 mM HEPES, 10% fetal bovine serum, penicillin (50 mg/ml) and streptomycin (50 mg/ml

  3. A New Perspective on Radiation Resistance Based on Deinococcus radiodurans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    hydrothermal vent field in Papua New Guinea. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69, 644–648 (2003). 78. Pavlov, A. K., Kalinin, V. L., Konstantinov, A. N., Shelegedin...organisms decreases the cellular concentration of ROS formed during irradiation. This in turn pre‑ vents IR‑induced protein oxidation, which leaves

  4. Firm but Slippery Attachment of Deinococcus geothermalis

    PubMed Central

    Kolari, M.; Schmidt, U.; Kuismanen, E.; Salkinoja-Salonen, M. S.

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms impair the operation of many industrial processes. Deinococcus geothermalis is efficient primary biofilm former in paper machine water, functioning as an adhesion platform for secondary biofilm bacteria. It produces thick biofilms on various abiotic surfaces, but the mechanism of attachment is not known. High-resolution field-emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed peritrichous adhesion threads mediating the attachment of D. geothermalis E50051 to stainless steel and glass surfaces and cell-to-cell attachment, irrespective of the growth medium. Extensive slime matrix was absent from the D. geothermalis E50051 biofilms. AFM of the attached cells revealed regions on the cell surface with different topography, viscoelasticity, and adhesiveness, possibly representing different surface layers that were patchily exposed. We used oscillating probe techniques to keep the tip-biofilm interactions as small as possible. In spite of this, AFM imaging of living D. geothermalis E50051 biofilms in water resulted in repositioning but not in detachment of the surface-attached cells. The irreversibly attached cells did not detach when pushed with a glass capillary but escaped the mechanical force by sliding along the surface. Air drying eliminated the flexibility of attachment, but it resumed after reimmersion in water. Biofilms were evaluated for their strength of attachment. D. geothermalis E50051 persisted 1 h of washing with 0.2% NaOH or 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate, in contrast to biofilms of Burkholderia cepacia F28L1 or the well-characterized biofilm former Staphylococcus epidermidis O-47. Deinococcus radiodurans strain DSM 20539T also formed tenacious biofilms. This paper shows that D. geothermalis has firm but laterally slippery attachment not reported before for a nonmotile species. PMID:11948162

  5. Comparative proteomics reveals key proteins recruited at the nucleoid of Deinococcus after irradiation-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    de la Tour, Claire Bouthier; Passot, Fanny Marie; Toueille, Magali; Mirabella, Boris; Guérin, Philippe; Blanchard, Laurence; Servant, Pascale; de Groot, Arjan; Sommer, Suzanne; Armengaud, Jean

    2013-12-01

    The nucleoids of radiation-resistant Deinococcus species show a high degree of compaction maintained after ionizing irradiation. We identified proteins recruited after irradiation in nucleoids of Deinococcus radiodurans and Deinococcus deserti by means of comparative proteomics. Proteins in nucleoid-enriched fractions from unirradiated and irradiated Deinococcus were identified and semiquantified by shotgun proteomics. The ssDNA-binding protein SSB, DNA gyrase subunits GyrA and GyrB, DNA topoisomerase I, RecA recombinase, UvrA excinuclease, RecQ helicase, DdrA, DdrB, and DdrD proteins were found in significantly higher amounts in irradiated nucleoids of both Deinococcus species. We observed, by immunofluorescence microscopy, the subcellular localization of these proteins in D. radiodurans, showing for the first time the recruitment of the DdrD protein into the D. radiodurans nucleoid. We specifically followed the kinetics of recruitment of RecA, DdrA, and DdrD to the nucleoid after irradiation. Remarkably, RecA proteins formed irregular filament-like structures 1 h after irradiation, before being redistributed throughout the cells by 3 h post-irradiation. Comparable dynamics of DdrD localization were observed, suggesting a possible functional interaction between RecA and DdrD. Several proteins involved in nucleotide synthesis were also seen in higher quantities in the nucleoids of irradiated cells, indicative of the existence of a mechanism for orchestrating the presence of proteins involved in DNA metabolism in nucleoids in response to massive DNA damage. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD00196 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000196). © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Deinococcus radioresistens sp. nov., a UV and gamma radiation-resistant bacterium isolated from mountain soil.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Lee, Jae-Jin; Lim, Sang-Yong; Joe, Min-Ho; Im, Seong-Hun; Kim, Myung Kyum

    2015-02-01

    Two Gram-negative, non-motile, short rod-shaped bacterial strains, designated as 8A(T) and 28A, were isolated from Mount Deogyusan, Jeonbuk Province, South Korea. The isolates were analyzed by a polyphasic approach, revealing variations in their phenotypic characters but high DNA-DNA hybridisation values reciprocally, confirming that they belong to the same species. Both the isolates also showed a high resistance to UV compared with Deinococcus radiodurans, and a gamma-radiation resistance similar to other members of the genus Deinococcus. Phylogenetic analysis with the 16S rRNA gene sequences of closely related species indicated their similarities were below 97 %. Chemotaxonomic data showed the most abundant fatty acids to be C16:1ω7c and C16:0. The strains can be distinguished from closely related species by the production of esterase (C4) and α-galactosidase, and by their ability to assimilate L-alanine, L-histidine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Based on the phenotypic, phylogenetic, and chemotaxonomic data, the isolates represent a novel species of the genus Deinococcus, for which the name Deinococcus radioresistens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 8A(T) (KEMB 9004-109(T) = JCM 19777(T)), and a second strain is 28A (KEMB 9004-113 = JCM 19778).

  7. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Daly, Michael J.

    2006-06-01

    Until recently, there have been no clear physiologic predictors of a cell's ability to recover from ionizing radiation (IR), desiccation, and other DOE-relevant oxidative stress conditions. In general, the most resistant bacteria have been Gram-positive (e.g., Deinococcus, Arthrobacter, Lactobacillus & Enterococcus spp.) and the most sensitive have been Gram-negative (e.g., Pseudomonas, Shewanella & Neisseria spp.). However, there are several reported exceptions to this paradigm, the Gram-negative cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis is extremely resistant to IR, whereas the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus is sensitive. We have identified biomolecular signatures for radiation sensitivity and resistance which are independent of phylogeny, where very high and very low intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios correlated with very high and very low resistances, respectively; and restricting Mn(II) in the famously resistant Deinococcus radiodurans sensitized this eubacterium to IR (http://cfyn.ifas.ufl.edu/radiation.pdf).

  8. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Michael J.

    2006-05-01

    Ionizing Radiation (IR) Resistance in Bacteria. Until recently, there have been no clear physiologic predictors of a cell's ability to recover from ionizing radiation (IR) and other DOE-relevant oxidative stress conditions. In general, the most resistant bacteria have been Gram-positive (e.g., Deinococcus, Arthrobacter, Lactobacillus & Enterococcus spp.) and the most sensitive have been Gram-negative (e.g., Pseudomonas, Shewanella & Neisseria spp.). However, there are several reported exceptions to this paradigm, the Gram-negative cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis is extremely resistant to IR, whereas the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus is sensitive. We have identified biomolecular signatures for radiation sensitivity and resistance which are independent of phylogeny, where very high and very low intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios correlated with very high and very low resistances, respectively; and restricting Mn(II) in the famously resistant Deinococcus radiodurans sensitized this eubacterium to IR.

  9. DNA recognition and the precleavage state during single-stranded DNA transposition in D. radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Alison Burgess; James, Jeffrey A; Barabas, Orsolya; Pasternak, Cécile; Ton-Hoang, Bao; Chandler, Michael; Sommer, Suzanne; Dyda, Fred

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial insertion sequences (ISs) from the IS200/IS605 family encode the smallest known DNA transposases and mobilize through single-stranded DNA transposition. Transposition by one particular family member, ISDra2 from Deinococcus radiodurans, is dramatically stimulated upon massive γ irradiation. We have determined the crystal structures of four ISDra2 transposase/IS end complexes; combined with in vivo activity assays and fluorescence anisotropy binding measurements, these have revealed the molecular basis of strand discrimination and transposase action. The structures also show that previously established structural rules of target site recognition that allow different specific sequences to be targeted are only partially conserved among family members. Furthermore, we have captured a fully assembled active site including the scissile phosphate bound by a divalent metal ion cofactor (Cd2+) that supports DNA cleavage. Finally, the observed active site rearrangements when the transposase binds a metal ion in which it is inactive provide a clear rationale for metal ion specificity. PMID:20890269

  10. Raman Spectroscopy of Deinococcus Radiodurans and β-Carotene on a Mineral Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooijschuur, J. H.; Davies, G. R.; Ariese, F.

    2014-06-01

    “Is there life on other planets?” is one of the key questions in space exploration. Resonance Raman (RRS), Time Resolved Raman (TRRS) and Spatially Offset Raman (SORS) are Raman spectroscopic tools to find microorganisms hidden in minerals.

  11. Mechanism for accurate, protein-assisted DNA annealing by Deinococcus radiodurans DdrB

    PubMed Central

    Sugiman-Marangos, Seiji N.; Weiss, Yoni M.; Junop, Murray S.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate pairing of DNA strands is essential for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). How cells achieve accurate annealing when large regions of single-strand DNA are unpaired has remained unclear despite many efforts focused on understanding proteins, which mediate this process. Here we report the crystal structure of a single-strand annealing protein [DdrB (DNA damage response B)] in complex with a partially annealed DNA intermediate to 2.2 Å. This structure and supporting biochemical data reveal a mechanism for accurate annealing involving DdrB-mediated proofreading of strand complementarity. DdrB promotes high-fidelity annealing by constraining specific bases from unauthorized association and only releases annealed duplex when bound strands are fully complementary. To our knowledge, this mechanism provides the first understanding for how cells achieve accurate, protein-assisted strand annealing under biological conditions that would otherwise favor misannealing. PMID:27044084

  12. Catalase and superoxide dismutase double staining zymogram technique for Deinococcus and Kocuria species exposed to multiple stresses.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Manish R; Yadav, Radhika; Desai, Anjana

    2009-12-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase expression is associated with oxidative stress. Existing techniques for the individual staining of SOD and catalase have been described in the past. The objective of this study was to achieve a simple and rapid technique for the double staining of bacterial SOD and catalase on the same polyacrylamide gel. SOD detection was carried out using nitro-blue tetrazolium (NBT) dye reduction followed by ferricyanide precipitation for negative staining of the catalase enzyme on the same gel. The staining procedure resulted in pale blue SOD bands while catalase appeared as yellow bands against a greenish blue background on the same gel. This technique was used to detect changes in the polymorphic forms of these enzymes in Deinococcus radiodurans R1 and Kocuria sp. C2 subjected to stresses like UV and gamma radiation and desiccation.

  13. Chromosome

    MedlinePlus

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  14. High Resolution Structure of Deinococcus Bacteriophytochrome Yields New Insights into Phytochrome Architecture and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Jeremiah R.; Zhang, Junrui; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Vierstra, Richard D.; Forest, Katrina T.

    2010-03-08

    Phytochromes are red/far red light photochromic photoreceptors that direct many photosensory behaviors in the bacterial, fungal, and plant kingdoms. They consist of an N-terminal domain that covalently binds a bilin chromophore and a C-terminal region that transmits the light signal, often through a histidine kinase relay. Using x-ray crystallography, we recently solved the first three-dimensional structure of a phytochrome, using the chromophore-binding domain of Deinococcus radiodurans bacterial phytochrome assembled with its chromophore, biliverdin IX{alpha}. Now, by engineering the crystallization interface, we have achieved a significantly higher resolution model. This 1.45 {angstrom} resolution structure helps identify an extensive buried surface between crystal symmetry mates that may promote dimerization in vivo. It also reveals that upon ligation of the C3{sup 2} carbon of biliverdin to Cys{sup 24}, the chromophore A-ring assumes a chiral center at C2, thus becoming 2(R),3(E)-phytochromobilin, a chemistry more similar to that proposed for the attached chromophores of cyanobacterial and plant phytochromes than previously appreciated. The evolution of bacterial phytochromes to those found in cyanobacteria and higher plants must have involved greater fitness using more reduced bilins, such as phycocyanobilin, combined with a switch of the attachment site from a cysteine near the N terminus to one conserved within the cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenyl cyclase/FhlA domain. From analysis of site-directed mutants in the D. radiodurans phytochrome, we show that this bilin preference was partially driven by the change in binding site, which ultimately may have helped photosynthetic organisms optimize shade detection. Collectively, these three-dimensional structural results better clarify bilin/protein interactions and help explain how higher plant phytochromes evolved from prokaryotic progenitors.

  15. The possible interplanetary transfer of microbes: assessing the viability of Deinococcus spp. under the ISS Environmental conditions for performing exposure experiments of microbes in the Tanpopo mission.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yuko; Yang, Yinjie; Kawashiri, Narutoshi; Shiraishi, Keisuke; Takasu, Masako; Narumi, Issay; Satoh, Katsuya; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Kazumichi; Tanigawa, Yoshiaki; Momoki, Yoh-Hei; Tanabe, Maiko; Sugino, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Yuta; Shimizu, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Kensei; Yokobori, Shin-Ichi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the possible interplanetary transfer of life, numerous exposure experiments have been carried out on various microbes in space since the 1960s. In the Tanpopo mission, we have proposed to carry out experiments on capture and space exposure of microbes at the Exposure Facility of the Japanese Experimental Module of the International Space Station (ISS). Microbial candidates for the exposure experiments in space include Deinococcus spp.: Deinococcus radiodurans, D. aerius and D. aetherius. In this paper, we have examined the survivability of Deinococcus spp. under the environmental conditions in ISS in orbit (i.e., long exposure to heavy-ion beams, temperature cycles, vacuum and UV irradiation). A One-year dose of heavy-ion beam irradiation did not affect the viability of Deinococcus spp. within the detection limit. Vacuum (10(-1) Pa) also had little effect on the cell viability. Experiments to test the effects of changes in temperature from 80 °C to -80 °C in 90 min (± 80 °C/90 min cycle) or from 60 °C to -60 °C in 90 min (± 60 °C/90 min cycle) on cell viability revealed that the survival rate decreased severely by the ± 80 °C/90 min temperature cycle. Exposure of various thicknesses of deinococcal cell aggregates to UV radiation (172 nm and 254 nm, respectively) revealed that a few hundred micrometer thick aggregate of deinococcal cells would be able to withstand the solar UV radiation on ISS for 1 year. We concluded that aggregated deinococcal cells will survive the yearlong exposure experiments. We propose that microbial cells can aggregate as an ark for the interplanetary transfer of microbes, and we named it 'massapanspermia'.

  16. Characterization and safety evaluation of a Deinococcus member as feed additive for hens.

    PubMed

    Wu, Szu-Yin; Li, I-Chen; Lin, Yi-Chin; Chen, Chin-Chu

    2016-04-01

    As previous studies mainly focus on understanding the mechanisms of radioresistance in Deinococcus bacteria, the present study aimed at characterizing and verifying the safety use of the GKB-Aid 1995 strain, a member of the radiation-resistant bacterial genus Deinococcus, as an ingredient in feed supplements. Using Vitek 2 system and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, GKB-Aid 1995 most resembles Deinococcus grandis. The Ames test, in vitro chromosomal test, in vivo micronucleus test and acute toxicity test were performed subsequently for its safety evaluation. As there is a possibility that the pigment of GKB-Aid 1995 can pass from feed to eggs intended for human consumption, an acute toxicity test was also carried out in pigmented egg yolk. The results confirmed that GKB-Aid 1995 was non-genotoxic in three genotoxicity experiments, and the LD50 of GKB-Aid 1995 and the pigmented egg yolk in ICR mice was greater than 10 and 12 g kg(-1) body weight, respectively. Overall, these data indicate that GKB-Aid 1995 is a non-toxic substance with no genotoxicity and is therefore safe to be used as a feed supplement or feed additive. This study suggests there is potential in developing GKB-Aid 1995 as an animal feed additive intended to enhance yolk coloration to meet the demand of consumers.

  17. Modulating Radiation Resistance: Novel Protection Paradigms Based on Defenses against Ionizing Radiation in the Extrempohile Deinococcus radiodurans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    diverse areas, including bioremediation , long-term enzyme storage, towards pre-exposure and post-exposure interventions against ionizing radiation...implications of the highest order, including bioremediation of high-level radioactive waste sites, and metabolic interventions at the cellular level...ability to grow luxuriantly under high-level chronic γ-radiation. This holds the prospect of bioremediation (cleanup) of radioactive waste sites with

  18. MDP: A Deinococcus Mn2+-Decapeptide Complex Protects Mice from Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Paridhi; Gayen, Manoshi; Smith, Joan T; Gaidamakova, Elena K; Matrosova, Vera Y; Grichenko, Olga; Knollmann-Ritschel, Barbara; Daly, Michael J; Kiang, Juliann G; Maheshwari, Radha K

    2016-01-01

    The radioprotective capacity of a rationally-designed Mn2+-decapeptide complex (MDP), based on Mn antioxidants in the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, was investigated in a mouse model of radiation injury. MDP was previously reported to be extraordinarily radioprotective of proteins in the setting of vaccine development. The peptide-component (DEHGTAVMLK) of MDP applied here was selected from a group of synthetic peptides screened in vitro for their ability to protect cultured human cells and purified enzymes from extreme damage caused by ionizing radiation (IR). We show that the peptides accumulated in Jurkat T-cells and protected them from 100 Gy. MDP preserved the activity of T4 DNA ligase exposed to 60,000 Gy. In vivo, MDP was nontoxic and protected B6D2F1/J (female) mice from acute radiation syndrome. All irradiated mice treated with MDP survived exposure to 9.5 Gy (LD70/30) in comparison to the untreated mice, which displayed 63% lethality after 30 days. Our results show that MDP provides early protection of white blood cells, and attenuates IR-induced damage to bone marrow and hematopoietic stem cells via G-CSF and GM-CSF modulation. Moreover, MDP mediated the immunomodulation of several cytokine concentrations in serum including G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-10 during early recovery. Our results present the necessary prelude for future efforts towards clinical application of MDP as a promising IR countermeasure. Further investigation of MDP as a pre-exposure prophylactic and post-exposure therapeutic in radiotherapy and radiation emergencies is warranted.

  19. MDP: A Deinococcus Mn2+-Decapeptide Complex Protects Mice from Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joan T.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Grichenko, Olga; Knollmann-Ritschel, Barbara; Daly, Michael J.; Kiang, Juliann G.

    2016-01-01

    The radioprotective capacity of a rationally-designed Mn2+-decapeptide complex (MDP), based on Mn antioxidants in the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, was investigated in a mouse model of radiation injury. MDP was previously reported to be extraordinarily radioprotective of proteins in the setting of vaccine development. The peptide-component (DEHGTAVMLK) of MDP applied here was selected from a group of synthetic peptides screened in vitro for their ability to protect cultured human cells and purified enzymes from extreme damage caused by ionizing radiation (IR). We show that the peptides accumulated in Jurkat T-cells and protected them from 100 Gy. MDP preserved the activity of T4 DNA ligase exposed to 60,000 Gy. In vivo, MDP was nontoxic and protected B6D2F1/J (female) mice from acute radiation syndrome. All irradiated mice treated with MDP survived exposure to 9.5 Gy (LD70/30) in comparison to the untreated mice, which displayed 63% lethality after 30 days. Our results show that MDP provides early protection of white blood cells, and attenuates IR-induced damage to bone marrow and hematopoietic stem cells via G-CSF and GM-CSF modulation. Moreover, MDP mediated the immunomodulation of several cytokine concentrations in serum including G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-10 during early recovery. Our results present the necessary prelude for future efforts towards clinical application of MDP as a promising IR countermeasure. Further investigation of MDP as a pre-exposure prophylactic and post-exposure therapeutic in radiotherapy and radiation emergencies is warranted. PMID:27500529

  20. Deinococcus aetherius sp. nov., isolated from the stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yinjie; Itoh, Takashi; Yokobori, Shin-Ichi; Shimada, Haruo; Itahashi, Shiho; Satoh, Katsuya; Ohba, Hirofumi; Narumi, Issay; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2010-04-01

    A pink-red pigmented, non-motile, coccoid bacterial strain, ST0316(T), was isolated from dust samples collected from the stratosphere in Japan. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that it belonged to the genus Deinococcus. DNA G+C content (69.8 mol%), desiccation tolerance, and resistance to gamma-rays [D(10) (dose required to reduce the bacterial population by 10-fold) >8 kGy] and UV radiation (D(10) 1000 J m(-2)) supported the affiliation of strain ST0316(T) to the genus Deinococcus. The major peptidoglycan amino acids were d-glutamic acid, glycine, d-alanine, l-alanine and ornithine. Predominant fatty acids were C(16 : 1)omega7c, C(16 : 0), C(17 : 0) and iso-C(17 : 0). Strain ST0316(T) diverged from recognized species of the genus Deinococcus, showing less than 93.0 % similarity values to its closest relatives Deinococcus apachensis, D. aerius, D. geothermalis and D. murrayi. Strain ST0316(T) also differed from the type strains of closely related species in its polar lipid profile, nitrate reduction and carbon-source assimilation tests. Therefore, we propose a new species of the genus Deinococcus, Deinococcus aetherius sp. nov. (type strain, ST0316(T) =JCM 11751(T) =DSM 21230(T)).

  1. Preserving immunogenicity of lethally irradiated viral and bacterial vaccine epitopes using a radio- protective Mn2+-Peptide complex from Deinococcus.

    PubMed

    Gaidamakova, Elena K; Myles, Ian A; McDaniel, Dennis P; Fowler, Cedar J; Valdez, Patricia A; Naik, Shruti; Gayen, Manoshi; Gupta, Paridhi; Sharma, Anuj; Glass, Pamela J; Maheshwari, Radha K; Datta, Sandip K; Daly, Michael J

    2012-07-19

    Although pathogen inactivation by γ-radiation is an attractive approach for whole-organism vaccine development, radiation doses required to ensure sterility also destroy immunogenic protein epitopes needed to mount protective immune responses. We demonstrate the use of a reconstituted manganous peptide complex from the radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans to protect protein epitopes from radiation-induced damage and uncouple it from genome damage and organism killing. The Mn(2+) complex preserved antigenic structures in aqueous preparations of bacteriophage lambda, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, and Staphylococcus aureus during supralethal irradiation (25-40 kGy). An irradiated vaccine elicited both antibody and Th17 responses, and induced B and T cell-dependent protection against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in mice. Structural integrity of viruses and bacteria are shown to be preserved at radiation doses far above those which abolish infectivity. This approach could expedite vaccine production for emerging and established pathogens for which no protective vaccines exist. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Deinococcus aquaticus sp. nov., isolated from fresh water, and Deinococcus caeni sp. nov., isolated from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Im, Wan-Taek; Jung, Hae-Min; Ten, Leonid N; Kim, Myung Kyum; Bora, Nagamani; Goodfellow, Michael; Lim, Sangyong; Jung, Jinwoo; Lee, Sung-Taik

    2008-10-01

    The taxonomic positions of two environmental isolates from South Korea were established using a combination of genotypic and phenotypic data. The organisms, designated PB314(T) and Ho-08(T), were Gram-negative, rod-shaped and non-spore-forming and had chemotaxonomic properties consistent with their classification in the genus Deinococcus 16S rRNA gene tree, the highest sequence similarities being shown to the type strains of Deinococcus grandis (96.3-96.7 %) and Deinococcus indicus (96.3-96.4 %). The isolates shared relatively high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (98.1 %) but had a DNA-DNA relatedness value of only 22 %. Chemotaxonomic data revealed that both strains possess quinone system MK-8 as the predominant compound, C(16 : 1)omega7c and C(16 : 0) as major fatty acids and ornithine as a diamino acid in the peptidoglycan structure, corroborating our assignment of the strains to the genus Deinococcus. The results of phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, DNA-DNA relatedness values and physiological and biochemical tests clearly demonstrated that the two strains represent distinct species. On the basis of these data, two novel species, Deinococcus aquaticus sp. nov. (type strain PB314(T) =KCTC 12552(T) =NBRC 101311(T)) and Deinococcus caeni sp. nov. (type strain Ho-08(T) =KCTC 12553(T) =NBRC 101312(T)), are proposed.

  3. Reclassification of Deinococcus xibeiensis Wang et al. 2010 as a heterotypic synonym of Deinococcus wulumuqiensis Wang et al. 2010.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sunhee; Farrance, Christine E; Russell, Anne; Yi, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Two species of the genus Deinococcus, namely Deinococcus wulumuqiensis Wang et al. 2010 and Deinococcus xibeiensis Wang et al. 2010, were simultaneously proposed and described in the same publication. However, the identical 16S rRNA gene sequence of the two type strains strongly raised the probability of their relatedness at the species level. Thus, the genomic relatedness of the two species of the genus Deinococcus was investigated here to clarify their taxonomic status. The high (99.9 %) average nucleotide identity (ANI) between the genome sequences of the two type strains suggested that the two species are synonymous. Additional phenotypic data including enzymic activities and substrate-utilization profiles showed no pronounced differences between the type strains of the two species. Data from this study demonstrated that the two taxa constitute a single species. According to Rule 42 of the Bacteriological Code, we propose that D. xibeiensis Wang et al. 2010 should be reclassified as a subjective heterotypic synonym of D. wulumuqiensis Wang et al. 2010.

  4. Deinococcus metallilatus sp. nov. and Deinococcus carri sp. nov., isolated from a car air-conditioning system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Uk; Lee, Hyosun; Lee, Ji-Hyeong; Ahn, Jae-Hyung; Lim, Sangyong; Jeong, Sunwook; Park, So Yoon; Seong, Chi Nam; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2015-09-01

    Two bacterial strains, designated MA1002(T) and MA1003(T), were isolated from the air-conditioning system of a car. Cells of both strains were Gram-reaction-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming coccoids, catalase- and oxidase-positive and UV-radiation resistant. The major fatty acids of strain MA1002(T) were iso-C17 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0 and those of strain MA1003(T) were iso-C16 : 0 and iso-C16 : 1 H. The polar lipid profile of MA1002(T) contained phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified phosphoglycolipids, an unidentified phospholipid, an unidentified aminophospholipid, an unidentified aminolipid and an unidentified lipid. MA1003(T) had three unidentified phosphoglycolipids, six unidentified phospholipids, two unidentified glycolipids and two unidentified polar lipids as the polar lipids. The G+C contents of the genomic DNA of MA1002(T) and MA1003(T) were 70.5 and 76.0 mol%, respectively. MK-8 was the predominant respiratory quinone for both strains. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain MA1002(T) was phylogenetically related to Deinococcus apachensis DSM 19763(T), D. geothermalis DSM 11300(T), D. aerius TR0125(T) and D. aetherius ST0316(T) (92.9, 92.6, 92.0 and 91.9% sequence similarity, respectively), and MA1003(T) showed the highest sequence similarity to Deinococcus hopiensis KR-140(T) (92.9%) and D. xinjiangensis X-82(T) (91.4%). The results of genotypic and phenotypic characterizations showed that both strains could be distinguished from phylogenetically related species, and that the strains represented novel species within the genus Deinococcus, for which we propose the names Deinococcus metallilatus sp. nov. (type strain MA1002(T) = KACC 17964(T) = NBRC 110141(T)) and Deinococcus carri sp. nov. (type strain is MA1003(T) = KACC 17965(T) = NBRC 110142(T)).

  5. Genome Sequence of a Gamma- and UV-Ray-Resistant Strain, Deinococcus wulumuqiensis R12.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xian; Jiang, Ling; Zhang, Zhidong; Shi, Yuhu; Huang, He

    2013-05-09

    Deinococcus wulumuqiensis R12, isolated from radiation-polluted soil, is a red-pigmented strain of the extremely radioresistant genus Deinococcus. It contains a major carotenoid, namely, deinoxanthin. Here, we present a 3.39-Mb assembly of its genome sequence, which might provide various kinds of useful information related to Deinococcus, such as about the key enzymes of its radioresistance mechanism and carotenoid biosynthetic pathways.

  6. Genome Sequence of a Gamma- and UV-Ray-Resistant Strain, Deinococcus wulumuqiensis R12

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xian; Jiang, Ling; Zhang, Zhidong; Shi, Yuhu

    2013-01-01

    Deinococcus wulumuqiensis R12, isolated from radiation-polluted soil, is a red-pigmented strain of the extremely radioresistant genus Deinococcus. It contains a major carotenoid, namely, deinoxanthin. Here, we present a 3.39-Mb assembly of its genome sequence, which might provide various kinds of useful information related to Deinococcus, such as about the key enzymes of its radioresistance mechanism and carotenoid biosynthetic pathways. PMID:23661483

  7. Deinococcus sedimenti sp. nov. isolated from river sediment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Jin; Lee, Yeon-Hee; Park, Su-Jin; Lim, Sangyong; Jeong, Sun-Wook; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Park, Sangkyu; Choi, Hyo-Won; Kim, Myung Kyum; Jung, Hee-Young

    2016-12-01

    A novel Gram-positive, oval-shaped, non-motile bacterium designated strain 16F1L(T) was isolated from sediment collected from the Han River in Seoul, Republic of Korea. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence (1,448 bp), this strain was identified as a member of the genus Deinococcus that belongs to the class Deinococci. Similarities in the 16S rRNA gene sequence were shown with Deinococcus daejeonensis MJ27(T) (99.0%), D. grandis DSM 3963(T) (98.1%), D. radiotolerans C1(T) (97.5%), and D. caeni Ho-08(T) (97.2%). Strain 16F1L(T) was classified as a different genomic species from closely related Deinococcus members, based on less than 70% DNA-DNA relatedness. Genomic DNA G+C content of strain 16F1L(T) was 67.2 mol%. Strain 16F1L(T) was found to grow at temperatures of 10-37°C (optimum 25°C) and pH 7-8 (optimum pH 7) on R2A medium, and was catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. Strain 16F1L(T) showed resistance to gamma radiation (D10 > 2 kGy). In addition, this strain had the following chemotaxonomic characteristics: the major fatty acids were C15:1 ω6c and C16:1 ω7c; the polar lipid profile contained phosphoglycolipids, unknown aminophospholipids, an unknown aminoglycolipid, unknown aminolipids, an unknown glycolipid, an unknown phospholipid, and an unknown polar lipid; the major quinone was MK-8. Phylogenetic, genotypic, phenotypic, and chemotaxonomic characteristics indicated that strain 16F1L(T) represents a novel species within the genus Deinococcus, for which the name Deinococcus sedimenti sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 16F1L(T) (=KCTC 33796(T) =JCM 31405(T)).

  8. Evaluation of the role of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant systems in the radiation resistance of Deinococcus.

    PubMed

    Shashidhar, Ravindranath; Kumar, Sanjukta A; Misra, Hari S; Bandekar, Jayant R

    2010-03-01

    Antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant metabolites appear to have different roles in the oxidative stress resistance responses of radiation-resistant bacteria belonging to the Deinococcus-Thermus group. Twelve distinct strains belonging to 7 Deinococcus species were characterized for their responses to hydrogen peroxide, ciprofloxacin, and ionizing radiation. The levels of catalase and peroxidase activities in these strains showed a positive correlation with resistance to hydrogen peroxide and ciprofloxacin. However, the levels of these enzymes and carotenoids did not appear to contribute significantly to radiation resistance. Our findings support the idea that enzymatic defense systems are not sufficient to account for the extreme radiation resistance of Deinococcus species. Consistent with previously published reports, the Deinococcus strains had high intracellular manganese/iron ratios. No significant correlation was found between intracellular manganese/iron ratios and radiation resistance within different Deinococcus species, suggesting that other components are involved in conferring radiation resistance.

  9. Partial Complementation of the UV Sensitivity of Deinococcus Radiodurans Excision Repair Mutants by the Cloned denv Gene of Bacteriophage T4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-19

    partially characterized as incising UV irradiated DNA at the same frequency as the PD-glycosylase from Micrococcus luteus (Evans and Moseley, 1985...the dimer-glycosylase of Micrococcus luteus . Excision repair in E. coli is governed by the uvr A, uvr B and uvr C genes. Mutations in any one of... Micrococcus luteus are very similar: they specifically recognize only dimers, and not 6-4 photoproducts or chemical adducts, and have been shown in vitro

  10. Exploration of Deinococcus-Thermus molecular diversity by novel group-specific PCR primers

    PubMed Central

    Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas; Bachar, Dipankar; Christen, Richard; Alain, Karine; Chapon, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    The deeply branching Deinococcus-Thermus lineage is recognized as one of the most extremophilic phylum of bacteria. In previous studies, the presence of Deinococcus-related bacteria in the hot arid Tunisian desert of Tataouine was demonstrated through combined molecular and culture-based approaches. Similarly, Thermus-related bacteria have been detected in Tunisian geothermal springs. The present work was conducted to explore the molecular diversity within the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum in these extreme environments. A set of specific primers was designed in silico on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, validated for the specific detection of reference strains, and used for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of metagenomic DNA retrieved from the Tataouine desert sand and Tunisian hot spring water samples. These analyses have revealed the presence of previously undescribed Deinococcus-Thermus bacterial sequences within these extreme environments. The primers designed in this study thus represent a powerful tool for the rapid detection of Deinococcus-Thermus in environmental samples and could also be applicable to clarify the biogeography of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum. PMID:23996915

  11. Deinococcus as new chassis for industrial biotechnology: biology, physiology and tools.

    PubMed

    Gerber, E; Bernard, R; Castang, S; Chabot, N; Coze, F; Dreux-Zigha, A; Hauser, E; Hivin, P; Joseph, P; Lazarelli, C; Letellier, G; Olive, J; Leonetti, J-P

    2015-07-01

    Deinococcus spp are among the most radiation-resistant micro-organisms that have been discovered. They show remarkable resistance to a range of damage caused by ionizing radiation, desiccation, UV radiation and oxidizing agents. Traditionally, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been the two platforms of choice for engineering micro-organisms for biotechnological applications, because they are well understood and easy to work with. However, in recent years, researchers have begun using Deinococcus spp in biotechnologies and bioremediation due to their specific ability to grow and express novel engineered functions. More recently, the sequencing of several Deinococcus spp and comparative genomic analysis have provided new insight into the potential of this genus. Features such as the accumulation of genes encoding cell cleaning systems that eliminate organic and inorganic cell toxic components are widespread among Deinococcus spp. Other features such as the ability to degrade and metabolize sugars and polymeric sugars make Deinococcus spp. an attractive alternative for use in industrial biotechnology. © 2015 The Authors published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Deinococcus metalli sp. nov., isolated from an abandoned lead-zinc mine.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guang-Da; Wang, Yong-Hong; Li, Yan-Xuan; Zhu, Hong-Hui

    2015-10-01

    An aerobic, non-motile and Gram-staining-positive bacterial strain (1PNM-19T) was isolated from a lead-zinc ore in an abandoned mine and was investigated in a taxonomic study using a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain 1PNM-19T was affiliated to the genus Deinococcus and most closely related to Deinococcus aquatilis DSM 23025T and Deinococcus ficus DSM 19119T. The major respiratory quinone was determined to be menaquinone 8 (MK-8) and the major fatty acids contained summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) and C16 : 0. A complex polar lipid profile consisted of different unidentified glycolipids and polar lipids, two unidentified aminolipids, an unidentified phosphoglycolipid, phospholipid and aminophospholipid. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain 1PNM-19T was 71.7 ± 0.1 mol%. Based on data from this taxonomic study, strain 1PNM-19T represents a novel species of the genus Deinococcus, for which the name Deinococcus metalli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 1PNM-19T ( = GIMCC 1.654T = CCTCC AB 2014198T = DSM 27521T).

  13. Complete genome sequence of Deinococcus soli N5(T), a gamma-radiation- resistant bacterium isolated from rice field in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Joo, Eun Sun; Kim, Eun Bit; Jeon, Seon Hwa; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj

    2015-10-10

    A Gram-negative, non-motile and short-rod shaped and gamma-radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus soli N5(T), isolated from a rice field soil in South Korea. The complete genome of D. soli N5(T) consists of a chromosome (3,236,984bp). The key enzymes for the central DNA repair mechanisms were present in the genome. The enzyme coding genes has been identified which is involving in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. The gene cluster in the genome sequence suggest that the D. soli N5(T) use (NER) pathways for efficient removal of pyrimidine dimers that are the most abundant type of UV- induced damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Biofilms and planktonic cells of Deinococcus geothermalis in extreme environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Guenther; Rabbow, Elke; Rettberg, Petra; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Wingender, Jost; Froesler, Jan

    In addition to the several extreme environments on Earth, Space can be considered as just another exceptional environment with a unique mixture of stress factors comprising UV radiation, vacuum, desiccation, temperature, ionizing radiation and microgravity. Life that processes in these environments can depend on the life forms and their state of living. The question is whether there are different strategies for individual microorganisms compared to communities of the same organisms to cope with the different factors of their surroundings. Comparative studies of the survi-val of these communities called biofilms and planktonic cell samples of Deinococcus geothermalis stand at the focal point of the presented investigations. A biofilm is a structured community of microorganisms that live encapsulated in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances on a surface. Microorganisms living in a biofilm usually have significantly different properties to cooperate than individually living microorganisms of the same species. An advantage of the biofilm is increased resistance to various chemical and physical effects, while the dense extracellular matrix and the outer layer of the cells protect the interior of the microbial consortium. The space experiment BOSS (Biofilm organisms surfing Space) as part the ESA experimental unit EXPOSE R-2 with a planned launch date in July 2014 will be subsequently mounted on the Russian Svesda module outside the ISS. An international team of scientists coordinated by Dr. P. Rettberg will investigate the hypothesis whether microorganisms organized as biofilm outmatch the same microorganisms exposed individually in the long-term survival of the harsh environmental conditions as they occur in space and on Mars. Another protective function in the samples could be dust par-ticles for instance Mars regolith simulant contained inside the biofilms or mixed with the planktonic cells, as additional shelter especially against the extraterrestrial UV

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Deinococcus sp. Strain RL Isolated from Sediments of a Hot Water Spring

    PubMed Central

    Mahato, Nitish Kumar; Tripathi, Charu; Verma, Helianthous; Singh, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Deinococcus sp. strain RL, a moderately thermophilic bacterium, was isolated from sediments of a hot water spring in Manikaran, India. Here, we report the draft genome (2.79 Mbp) of this strain, which contains 62 contigs and 2,614 coding DNA sequences, with an average G+C content of 69.4%. PMID:25035332

  16. Genome Sequence of Deinococcus marmoris PAMC 26562 Isolated from Antarctic Lichen

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghee; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Kim, Byung Kwon; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deinococcus marmoris strain PAMC 26562 was isolated from Usnea sp., a lichen collected from King George Island, Antarctica. We report here the draft genome sequence of strain PAMC 26562, which has xanthorhodopsin and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase genes in addition to major metabolic pathways presented in deinococcal genomes. PMID:28336585

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Deinococcus xibeiensis R13, a New Carotenoid-Producing Strain

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yaochi; Xu, Xian; Song, Ping; Jiang, Ling; Zhang, Zhidong

    2013-01-01

    Deinococcus xibeiensis strain R13, isolated from radiation-contaminated soils, synthesizes a unique ketocarotenoid, deinoxanthin. Here, we present a 3.49-Mb assembly of its genome sequence, which can help us find the key genes of the deinoxanthin biosynthesis pathways and modify genes obtaining a high yield of the new carotenoid. PMID:24309735

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Deinococcus xibeiensis R13, a New Carotenoid-Producing Strain.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yaochi; Xu, Xian; Song, Ping; Jiang, Ling; Zhang, Zhidong; Huang, He

    2013-12-05

    Deinococcus xibeiensis strain R13, isolated from radiation-contaminated soils, synthesizes a unique ketocarotenoid, deinoxanthin. Here, we present a 3.49-Mb assembly of its genome sequence, which can help us find the key genes of the deinoxanthin biosynthesis pathways and modify genes obtaining a high yield of the new carotenoid.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus Bacterium Meiothermus ruber Strain A

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Ward, David M.; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-03-26

    The draft genome sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus group bacterium Meiothermus ruber strain A, isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture obtained from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY), comprises 2,968,099 bp in 170 contigs. It is predicted to contain 2,895 protein-coding genes, 44 tRNA-coding genes, and 2 rRNA operons.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Deinococcus phoenicis, a Novel Strain Isolated during the Phoenix Lander Spacecraft Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Stepanov, Victor G.; Vaishampayan, Parag; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2014-01-01

    Deinococcus phoenicis strain 1P10MET is a radiation- and desiccation-resistant bacterium isolated from a cleanroom facility where the Phoenix Lander spacecraft was assembled. In order to facilitate investigations of the nature of the extreme resistance of D. phoenicis to bactericidal factors, a draft genome sequence of D. phoenicis was determined. PMID:24762934

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus Bacterium Meiothermus ruber Strain A

    DOE PAGES

    Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; ...

    2015-03-26

    The draft genome sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus group bacterium Meiothermus ruber strain A, isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture obtained from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY), comprises 2,968,099 bp in 170 contigs. It is predicted to contain 2,895 protein-coding genes, 44 tRNA-coding genes, and 2 rRNA operons.

  2. Identification of distinctive molecular traits that are characteristic of the phylum "Deinococcus-Thermus" and distinguish its main constituent groups.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jonathan; Adeolu, Mobolaji; Khadka, Bijendra; Gupta, Radhey S

    2016-10-01

    The phylum "Deinococcus-Thermus" contains two heavily researched groups of extremophilic bacteria: the highly radioresistant order Deinococcales and the thermophilic order Thermales. Very few characteristics are known that are uniquely shared by members of the phylum "Deinococcus-Thermus". Comprehensive phylogenetic and comparative analyses of >65 "Deinococcus-Thermus" genomes reported here have identified numerous molecular signatures in the forms of conserved signature insertions/deletions (CSIs) and conserved signature proteins (CSPs), which provide distinguishing characteristics of the phylum "Deinococcus-Thermus" and its main groups. We have identified 58 unique CSIs and 155 unique CSPs that delineate different phylogenetic groups within the phylum. Of these identified traits, 24 CSIs and 29 CSPs are characteristic of the phylum "Deinococcus-Thermus" and they provide novel and reliable means to circumscribe/describe this phylum. An additional 3 CSIs and 3 CSPs are characteristic of the order Deinococcales, and 6 CSIs and 51 CSPs are characteristic of the order Thermales. The remaining 25 CSIs and 72 CSPs identified in this study are distinctive traits of genus level groups within the phylum "Deinococcus-Thermus". The molecular characteristics identified in this work provide novel and independent support for the common ancestry of the members of the phylum "Deinococcus-Thermus" and provide a new means to distinguish the main constituent clades of the phylum. Additionally, the CSIs and CSPs identified in this work may play a role in the unique extremophilic adaptations of the members of this phylum and further functional analyses of these characteristics could provide novel biochemical insights into the unique adaptations found within the phylum "Deinococcus-Thermus".

  3. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  4. Four proteins synthesized in response to deoxyribonucleic acid damage in Micrococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, M T

    1980-01-01

    Four proteins, alpha beta, gamma, and delta, preferentially synthesized in ultraviolet light-treated cells of Micrococcus radiodurans, were characterized in terms of their molecular weights and isoelectric points. Within the sublethal-dose range, the differential rate of synthesis for these proteins increased linearly with the inducing UV dose. The degree of induction reached 100-fold, and the most abundant protein beta, amounted to approximately 2% of the total newly synthesized protein after irradiation. Damage caused by ionizing radiation or by treatment with mitomycin C also provoked the synthesis of the four proteins. The proportions between the individual proteins, however, varied strikingly with the damaging agent. In contrast to treatments which introduced damage in the cellular deoxyribonucleic acid, the mere arrest of deoxyribonucleic acid replication, caused by nalidixic acid or by starvation for thymine, failed to elicit the synthesis of either protein. Repair of deoxyribonucleic acid damage requires that a number of versatile and efficient processes by employed. It is proposed that the induced proteins participate in deoxyribonucleic acid repair in M. radiodurans. Mechanisms are discussed which would allow a differentiated cellular response to damages of sufficiently distinctive nature. Images PMID:7354007

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus Bacterium Meiothermus ruber Strain A

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Vera; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Burhans, Richard; Gay, Scott E.; Schuster, Stephan C.; Ward, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the Deinococcus-Thermus group bacterium Meiothermus ruber strain A, isolated from a cyanobacterial enrichment culture obtained from Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park, WY), comprises 2,968,099 bp in 170 contigs. It is predicted to contain 2,895 protein-coding genes, 44 tRNA-coding genes, and 2 rRNA operons. PMID:25814606

  6. Deinococcus yunweiensis sp. nov., a gamma- and UV-radiation-resistant bacterium from China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Qin; Sun, Cheng-Hang; Li, Wen-Jun; Yu, Li-Yan; Zhou, Jian-Qin; Zhang, Yue-Qin; Xu, Li-Hua; Jiang, Cheng-Lin

    2007-02-01

    A Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, non-motile, rod-shaped, red-pigmented strain, designated YIM 007T, was found as a contaminant on an agar plate in the laboratory of Yunnan Institute of Microbiology, China. The optimum growth pH and temperature for the isolate were 7.0-7.5 and 30 degrees C, respectively. The predominant respiratory quinone was MK-8. The polar lipid profile consisted mainly of various unknown phosphoglycolipids and glycolipids. The major cellular fatty acids were C(16 : 1)omega7c, C(16 : 0), C(17 : 0) and C(17 : 1)omega8c. l-Ornithine was detected in its peptidoglycan. The DNA G+C content was 64.1 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain YIM 007(T) showed 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity levels of 86.8-92.1 % to the other described Deinococcus species. Based on the high 16S rRNA gene sequence divergence and phenotypic differences, it is proposed that the unknown strain should be classified as a novel species in the genus Deinococcus with the name Deinococcus yunweiensis sp. nov. The type strain is YIM 007T (=KCTC 3962T=DSM 17005T).

  7. Complete genome sequence of the orange-red pigmented, radioresistant Deinococcus proteolyticus type strain (MRPT)

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, A; Zeytun, Ahmet; Yasawong, Montri; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, K; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, N; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Pukall, Rudiger; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla L.

    2012-01-01

    Deinococcus proteolyticus (ex Kobatake et al. 1973) Brook and Murray 1981 is one of currently 47 species in the genus Deinococcus within the family Deinococcaceae. Strain MRPTT was isolated from faeces of Lama glama; it shares with various other species of the genus the extreme radiation resistance, with D. proteolyticus being resistant up to 1.5 Mrad of gamma radiation. Strain MRPT{sup T} is of further interest for its carotenoid pigment. The genome presented here is only the fifth completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Deinococcus (and the forth type strain) to be published, and will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of how members of this genus adapted to high gamma- or UV ionizing-radiation. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,886,836 bp long genome with its four large plasmids of 97 kbp, 132 kbp, 196 kbp and 315 kbp harbours 2,741 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  8. Marker chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Marker chromosomes are a morphologically heterogeneous group of structurally abnormal chromosomes that pose a significant challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Phenotypes associated with marker chromosomes are highly variable and range from normal to severely abnormal. Clinical outcomes are very difficult to predict when marker chromosomes are detected prenatally. In this review, we outline the classification, etiology, cytogenetic characterization, and clinical consequences of marker chromosomes, as well as practical approaches to prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  9. Deinococcus depolymerans sp. nov., a gamma- and UV-radiation-resistant bacterium, isolated from a naturally radioactive site.

    PubMed

    Asker, Dalal; Awad, Tarek S; McLandsborough, Lynne; Beppu, Teruhiko; Ueda, Kenji

    2011-06-01

    Four gamma- and UV-radiation-resistant bacterial strains, designated TDMA-24(T), TDMA-24-2, TDMA-24-3 and TDMA-24-4, were isolated from a fresh-water sample collected at Misasa, Tottori, Japan. Cells of these strains were Gram-reaction-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped and formed red colonies. The genomic DNA G+C contents ranged from 70.5 to 70.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the novel isolates belong to the genus Deinococcus, the highest sequence similarities being with Deinococcus aquaticus PB314(T) (98%) and Deinococcus caeni Ho-08(T) (97 %). The polar lipid profile of strain TDMA-24(T) comprised three unidentified phosphoglycolipids, five unidentified glycolipids and seven unidentified polar lipids. MK-8 was the predominant respiratory quinone. Major fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0), C(15 : 1)ω6c, C(15 : 0), C(16 : 0) and summed feature 3 (iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH and/or C(16 : 1)ω7c). On the basis of their phylogenetic positions and chemotaxonomic and phenotypic characteristics, the novel isolates represent a novel species of the genus Deinococcus, for which the name Deinococcus depolymerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TDMA-24(T) ( = JCM 14369(T)  = NBRC 102115(T)  = CCUG 53609(T)).

  10. Deinococcus budaensis sp. nov., a mesophilic species isolated from a biofilm sample of a hydrothermal spring cave.

    PubMed

    Makk, Judit; Tóth, Erika M; Anda, Dóra; Pál, Sára; Schumann, Peter; Kovács, Attila L; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit; Márialigeti, Károly; Borsodi, Andrea K

    2016-12-01

    Following the exposure of a biofilm sample from a hydrothermal spring cave (Gellért Hill, Budapest, Hungary) to gamma radiation, a strain designated FeSTC15-38T was isolated and studied by polyphasic taxonomic methods. The spherical-shaped cells stained Gram-negative, and were aerobic and non-motile. The pH range for growth was pH 6.0-9.0, with an optimum at pH 7.0. The temperature range for growth was 20-37 °C, with an optimum at 28 °C. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate indicated that the organism belongs to the genus Deinococcus. The highest sequence similarities appeared with Deinococcus hopiensis KR-140T (94.1 %), Deinococcus aquaticus PB314T (93.3 %) and Deinococcus aerophilus 5516T-11T (92.7 %). The DNA G+C content of the novel strain was 68.2 mol%. The predominant fatty acids (>10 %) were iso-C16 : 0 and C16 : 1ω7c, and the cell-wall peptidoglycan type was A3β l-Orn-Gly2-3, corroborating the assignment of the strain to the genus Deinococcus. Strain FeSTC15-38T contained MK-8 as the major menaquinone and several unidentified phospholipids, glycolipids and phosphoglycolipids. Resistance to gamma radiation (D10) of strain FeSTC15-38T was <3.0 kGy. According to phenotypic and genotypic data, strain FeSTC15-38T represents a novel species for which the name Deinococcus budaensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is FeSTC15-38T (=NCAIM B.02630T=DSM 101791T).

  11. Influence of repeated lyophilization on the survival of Deinococcus proteolyticus, Micrococcus luteus and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rýznar, L; Drásil, V

    1991-01-01

    Repeated lyophilization of Deinococcus proteolyticus, Micrococcus luteus and Escherichia coli cells results in a successive decrease of their survival. The survival curve is exponential with E. coli and M. luteus, and sigmoidal with a broad shoulder with D. proteolyticus both after repeated lyophilization and after UV- or gamma-irradiation. When cells were subjected to gamma-irradiation after a 20-fold freeze-drying, the corresponding survival curve became exponential without the shoulder. Hence we assume that irradiation and repeated lyophilization afflict the same cellular structures and/or functions.

  12. Deinococcus soli sp. nov., a gamma- and uv-radiation-resistant bacterium from north-west China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Qin, Bao-Fu; Wang, Yang; Fang, Cheng-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    An ionizing- and UV-radiation-resistant bacterial strain, designated ZLM-202T, was isolated from an arid soil sample collected from Xinjiang Province, north-west China. The soil sample was irradiated before serial dilution plating was performed using twofold-diluted marine agar. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain ZLM-202T was a member of the genus Deinococcus, exhibiting sequence similarities of 86.3-92.2% to the type strains of recognized Deinococcus species. Strain-ZLM-202 was strictly aerobic and showed optimum growth at 30-37 degrees C and pH 7.0. The major respiratory menaquinone was MK-8. The major fatty acids were 16:1 omega7c, 16:0, 15:1 omega6c, 15:0 iso and 16:1 omega5c. L-ornithine was detected in its peptidoglycan. The polar lipid profile consisted mainly of various unknown phosphoglycolipids, aminophospholipids, glycolipids and phospholipids. The DNA G + C content was 65.5 mol. %. The strain was shown to be extremely resistant to gamma radiation (> 10 kGy) and UV light (> 600 J m(-2)). On the basis of the phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic data, strain ZLM-202T represents a novel species of the genus Deinococcus, for which the name Deinococcus soli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ZLM-202T (= CCTCC AB 208223T = KCTC 13419T).

  13. Complete genome sequence of the orange-red pigmented, radioresistant Deinococcus proteolyticus type strain (MRP(T)).

    PubMed

    Copeland, Alex; Zeytun, Ahmet; Yassawong, Montri; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Hammon, Nancy; Deshpande, Shweta; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A; Pitluck, Sam; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Pukall, Rüdiger; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2012-05-25

    Deinococcus proteolyticus (ex Kobatake et al. 1973) Brook and Murray 1981 is one of currently 47 species in the genus Deinococcus within the family Deinococcaceae. Strain MRP(T) was isolated from feces of Lama glama and possesses extreme radiation resistance, a trait is shares with various other species of the genus Deinococcus, with D. proteolyticus being resistant up to 1.5 Mrad of gamma radiation. Strain MRP(T) is of further interest for its carotenoid pigment. The genome presented here is only the fifth completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Deinococcus (and the forth type strain) to be published, and will hopefully contribute to a better understanding of how members of this genus adapted to high gamma- or UV ionizing-radiation. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 2,886,836 bp long genome with its four large plasmids of lengths 97 kbp, 132 kbp, 196 kbp and 315 kbp harbors 2,741 protein-coding and 58 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  14. Chromosomal Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists have shown that a genetic element on one chromosome may direct gene activity on another. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers report that a multitasking master-control region appears to over-see both a set of its own genes and a related gene on a nearby chromosome. The findings reinforce the growing importance of location…

  15. Chromosomal Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Scientists have shown that a genetic element on one chromosome may direct gene activity on another. Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) researchers report that a multitasking master-control region appears to over-see both a set of its own genes and a related gene on a nearby chromosome. The findings reinforce the growing importance of location…

  16. Modeling Chromosomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  17. Modeling Chromosomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  18. Two new restriction endonucleases DraII and DraIII from Deinococcus radiophilus.

    PubMed Central

    Grosskopf, R; Wolf, W; Kessler, C

    1985-01-01

    In addition to recently characterized DraI (1), two new Type II restriction endonucleases, DraII and DraIII, with novel site-specificities were isolated and purified from Deinococcus radiophilus ATCC 27603. DraII and DraIII recognize the hepta- and nonanucleotide sequences (sequence in text) The cleavage sites within both strands are indicated by arrows. The recognition sequences were established by mapping of the cleavage sites on pBR322 (DraII) and fd109 RF DNA (DraIII). The sequence specifities were confirmed by computer-assisted restriction analyses of the generated fragment patterns of the sequenced DNA's of the bacteriophages lambda, phi X174 RF, M13mp8 RF and fd109 RF, the viruses Adeno2 and SV40, and the plasmids pBR322 and pBR328. The cleavage positions within the recognition sequences were determined by sequencing experiments. Images PMID:2987827

  19. Chromosome Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... division. There are two kinds of cell division, mitosis and meiosis. Mitosis results in two cells that are duplicates of ... 23 paired sets of chromosomes in nonreproductive cells. Mitosis: Cell division resulting in cells that have paired ...

  20. CHROMOSOME MICROMANIPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Nicklas, R. Bruce; Koch, Carol A.

    1969-01-01

    Kinetochore reorientation is the critical process ensuring normal chromosome distribution. Reorientation has been studied in living grasshopper spermatocytes, in which bivalents with both chromosomes oriented to the same pole (unipolar orientation) occur but are unstable: sooner or later one chromosome reorients, the stable, bipolar orientation results, and normal anaphase segregation to opposite poles follows. One possible source of stability in bipolar orientations is the normal spindle forces toward opposite poles, which slightly stretch the bivalent. This tension is lacking in unipolar orientations because all the chromosomal spindle fibers and spindle forces are directed toward one pole. The possible role of tension has been tested directly by micromanipulation of bivalents in unipolar orientation to artificially create the missing tension. Without exception, such bivalents never reorient before the tension is released; a total time "under tension" of over 5 hr has been accumulated in experiments on eight bivalents in eight cells. In control experiments these same bivalents reoriented from a unipolar orientation within 16 min, on the average, in the absence of tension. Controlled reorientation and chromosome segregation can be explained from the results of these and related experiments. PMID:5824068

  1. Chromosome Territories

    PubMed Central

    Cremer, Thomas; Cremer, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome territories (CTs) constitute a major feature of nuclear architecture. In a brief statement, the possible contribution of nuclear architecture studies to the field of epigenomics is considered, followed by a historical account of the CT concept and the final compelling experimental evidence of a territorial organization of chromosomes in all eukaryotes studied to date. Present knowledge of nonrandom CT arrangements, of the internal CT architecture, and of structural interactions with other CTs is provided as well as the dynamics of CT arrangements during cell cycle and postmitotic terminal differentiation. The article concludes with a discussion of open questions and new experimental strategies to answer them. PMID:20300217

  2. Chromosome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed.

  3. Acceptor Specificity of Amylosucrase from Deinococcus radiopugnans and Its Application for Synthesis of Rutin Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myo-Deok; Jung, Dong-Hyun; Seo, Dong-Ho; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Seo, Ean-Jeong; Baek, Nam-In; Yoo, Sang-Ho; Park, Cheon-Seok

    2016-11-28

    The transglycosylation activity of amylosucrase (ASase) has received significant attention owing to its use of an inexpensive donor, sucrose, and broad acceptor specificity, including glycone and aglycone compounds. The transglycosylation reaction of recombinant ASase from Deinococcus radiopugnans (DRpAS) was investigated using various phenolic compounds, and quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (rutin) was found to be the most suitable acceptor molecule used by DRpAS. Two amino acid residues in DRpAS variants (DRpAS Q299K and DRpAS Q299R), assumed to be involved in acceptor binding, were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. Intriguingly, DRpAS Q299K and DRpAS Q299R produced 10-fold and 4-fold higher levels of rutin transglycosylation product than did the wild-type (WT) DRpAS, respectively. According to in silico molecular docking analysis, the lysine residue at position 299 in the mutants enables rutin to more easily position inside the active pocket of the mutant enzyme than in that of the WT, due to conformational changes in loop 4.

  4. Architecture of Deinococcus geothermalis biofilms on glass and steel: a lectin study.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Minna; Neu, Thomas R; Raulio, Mari; Kolari, Marko; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja S

    2008-07-01

    Deinococcus geothermalis is resistant to chemical and physical stressors and forms tenuous biofilms in paper industry. The architecture of its biofilms growing on glass and on stainless acid proof steel was studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescent lectins and nanobeads as in situ probes. Hydrophobic nanobeads adhered to the biofilms but did not penetrate to biofilm interior. In contrast, the biofilms were readily permeable towards many different lectins. A skeletal network of glycoconjugates, reactive with Dolichos biflorus and Maclura pomifera lectins, was prominent in the space inside the biofilm colony core but absent on the exterior. Cells in the core space of the biofilm were interconnected by a network of adhesion structures, reactive with Amaranthus caudatus lectin but with none of the 65 other tested lectins. The glycoconjugates connecting the individual cells to steel reacted with Phaseolus vulgaris lectin whereas those connecting to glass mainly reacted with A. caudatus lectin. Envelopes of all cells in the D. geothermalis biofilm reacted with several other lectins, with many different specificities. We conclude that numerous different glycoconjugates are involved in the adhesion and biofilm formation of D. geothermalis, possibly contributing its unique survival capacity when exposed to dehydration, biocidal chemicals and other extreme conditions.

  5. Quantitative contributions of bacteria and of Deinococcus geothermalis to deposits and slimes in paper industry.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Minna; Kanto Oqvist, Charlotta; Ekman, Jaakko; Kosonen, Mirva; Jokela, Sanna; Kolari, Marko; Korhonen, Päivi; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2008-12-01

    Deinococcus geothermalis has frequently been isolated from pink colored deposits of paper industry processes. Laboratory studies have shown that D. geothermalis is capable of forming on nonliving surfaces patchy biofilms that are resistant to adverse agents such as extreme pH, desiccation, solubilising detergents and biocides. This study was done to quantitatively assess the role of D. geothermalis as a biofouler in paper industry. Colored deposits were collected from 24 European and North American paper and board machines and the densities of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes and those of the red slime producers D. geothermalis and Meiothermus spp. were measured by QPCR (quantitative real time PCR). D. geothermalis was found at nine machines, usually from splash area deposits, but its contribution was minor, 0.001-1%, to the total bacterial burden of 8.3 to log 10.5 log units per gram wet-weight of the deposits. When D. geothermalis was found in a measurable quantity, Meiothermus spp. also was found, often in bulk quantity (7-100% of the total bacteria). The data are in line with the properties of D. geothermalis known from laboratory biofilm studies, indicating this species is a pioneer coloniser of machine surfaces and may help other bacteria to adhere and grown into biofilms, rather than competing with them.

  6. Chromosome Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Perceptive Scientific Instruments, Inc., provides the foundation for the Powergene line of chromosome analysis and molecular genetic instrumentation. This product employs image processing technology from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and image enhancement techniques from Johnson Space Center. Originally developed to send pictures back to earth from space probes, digital imaging techniques have been developed and refined for use in a variety of medical applications, including diagnosis of disease.

  7. Specificity of root microbiomes in native-grown Nicotiana attenuata and plant responses to UVB increase Deinococcus colonization.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, Rakesh; Oh, Youngjoo; Kumar, Ramesh; Weinhold, Arne; Luu, Van Thi; Groten, Karin; Baldwin, Ian T

    2017-05-01

    Plants recruit microbial communities from the soil in which they germinate. Our understanding of the recruitment process and the factors affecting it is still limited for most microbial taxa. We analysed several factors potentially affecting root microbiome structure - the importance of geographic location of natural populations, the microbiome of native seeds as putative source of colonization and the effect of a plant's response to UVB exposure on root colonization of highly abundant species. The microbiome of Nicotiana attenuata seeds was determined by a culture-dependent and culture-independent approach, and the root microbiome of natural N. attenuata populations from five different locations was analysed using 454-pyrosequencing. To specifically address the influence of UVB light on root colonization by Deinococcus, a genus abundant and consistently present in N. attenuata roots, transgenic lines impaired in UVB perception (irUVR8) and response (irCHAL) were investigated in a microcosm experiment with/without UVB supplementation using a synthetic bacterial community. The seed microbiome analysis indicated that N. attenuata seeds are sterile. Alpha and beta diversities of native root bacterial communities differed significantly between soil and root, while location had only a significant effect on the fungal but not the bacterial root communities. With UVB supplementation, root colonization of Deinococcus increased in wild type, but decreased in irUVR8 and irCHAL plants compared to nontreated plants. Our results suggest that N. attenuata recruits a core root microbiome exclusively from soil, with fungal root colonization being less selective than bacterial colonization. Root colonization by Deinococcus depends on the plant's response to UVB. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Characterizing the Catalytic Potential of Deinococcus, Arthrobacter and other Robust Bacteria in Contaminated Subsurface Environments of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Michael J.

    2005-06-01

    Natural selection in highly radioactive waste sites may yield bacteria with favorable bioremediating characteristics. However, until recently the microbial ecology of such environments has remained unexplored because of the high costs and technical complexities associated with extracting and characterizing samples from such sites. We have examined the bacterial ecology within radioactive sediments from a high-level nuclear waste plume in the vadose zone on the DOE?s Hanford Site in south-central Washington state (Fredrickson et al, 2004). Manganese-dependent, radiation resistant bacteria have been isolated from this contaminated site including the highly Mn-dependent Deinococcus and Arthrobacter spp.

  9. Chromosome structure and function

    SciTech Connect

    Risley, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents topics in chromosome structure and function. Topics covered include: the structure of interphase chromatin; chromatin structure, gene expression and differentiation; organization of mitotic chromosomes; organization of meiotic chromosomes and synaptonimal complexes; the lampbrush chromsome of animal oocytes; dosage compensation in mammals: x chromosome inactivation; and polytene chromosomes.

  10. Physiology of Resistant Deinococcus geothermalis Bacterium Aerobically Cultivated in Low-Manganese Medium

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Minna; Bernhardt, Jörg; Neubauer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This dynamic proteome study describes the physiology of growth and survival of Deinococcus geothermalis, in conditions simulating paper machine waters being aerobic, warm, and low in carbon and manganese. The industrial environment of this species differs from its natural habitats, geothermal springs and deep ocean subsurfaces, by being highly exposed to oxygen. Quantitative proteome analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and bioinformatic tools showed expression change for 165 proteins, from which 47 were assigned to a function. We propose that D. geothermalis grew and survived in aerobic conditions by channeling central carbon metabolism to pathways where mainly NADPH rather than NADH was retrieved from the carbon source. A major part of the carbon substrate was converted into succinate, which was not a fermentation product but likely served combating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Transition from growth to nongrowth resulted in downregulation of the oxidative phosphorylation observed as reduced expression of V-type ATPase responsible for ATP synthesis in D. geothermalis. The battle against oxidative stress was seen as upregulation of superoxide dismutase (Mn dependent) and catalase, as well as several protein repair enzymes, including FeS cluster assembly proteins of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein system, peptidylprolyl isomerase, and chaperones. Addition of soluble Mn reinitiated respiration and proliferation with concomitant acidification, indicating that aerobic metabolism was restricted by access to manganese. We conclude that D. geothermalis prefers to combat ROS using manganese-dependent enzymes, but when manganese is not available central carbon metabolism is used to produce ROS neutralizing metabolites at the expense of high utilization of carbon substrate. PMID:22228732

  11. Physiology of resistant Deinococcus geothermalis bacterium aerobically cultivated in low-manganese medium.

    PubMed

    Liedert, Christina; Peltola, Minna; Bernhardt, Jörg; Neubauer, Peter; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2012-03-01

    This dynamic proteome study describes the physiology of growth and survival of Deinococcus geothermalis, in conditions simulating paper machine waters being aerobic, warm, and low in carbon and manganese. The industrial environment of this species differs from its natural habitats, geothermal springs and deep ocean subsurfaces, by being highly exposed to oxygen. Quantitative proteome analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and bioinformatic tools showed expression change for 165 proteins, from which 47 were assigned to a function. We propose that D. geothermalis grew and survived in aerobic conditions by channeling central carbon metabolism to pathways where mainly NADPH rather than NADH was retrieved from the carbon source. A major part of the carbon substrate was converted into succinate, which was not a fermentation product but likely served combating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Transition from growth to nongrowth resulted in downregulation of the oxidative phosphorylation observed as reduced expression of V-type ATPase responsible for ATP synthesis in D. geothermalis. The battle against oxidative stress was seen as upregulation of superoxide dismutase (Mn dependent) and catalase, as well as several protein repair enzymes, including FeS cluster assembly proteins of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein system, peptidylprolyl isomerase, and chaperones. Addition of soluble Mn reinitiated respiration and proliferation with concomitant acidification, indicating that aerobic metabolism was restricted by access to manganese. We conclude that D. geothermalis prefers to combat ROS using manganese-dependent enzymes, but when manganese is not available central carbon metabolism is used to produce ROS neutralizing metabolites at the expense of high utilization of carbon substrate.

  12. Structural Investigation of the Thermostability and Product Specificity of Amylosucrase from the Bacterium Deinococcus geothermalis

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, Frédéric; Barbe, Sophie; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Potocki-Véronèse, Gabrielle; Guieysse, David; Guillet, Valérie; Monsan, Pierre; Mourey, Lionel; Remaud-Siméon, Magali; André, Isabelle; Tranier, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Amylosucrases are sucrose-utilizing α-transglucosidases that naturally catalyze the synthesis of α-glucans, linked exclusively through α1,4-linkages. Side products and in particular sucrose isomers such as turanose and trehalulose are also produced by these enzymes. Here, we report the first structural and biophysical characterization of the most thermostable amylosucrase identified so far, the amylosucrase from Deinoccocus geothermalis (DgAS). The three-dimensional structure revealed a homodimeric quaternary organization, never reported before for other amylosucrases. A sequence signature of dimerization was identified from the analysis of the dimer interface and sequence alignments. By rigidifying the DgAS structure, the quaternary organization is likely to participate in the enhanced thermal stability of the protein. Amylosucrase specificity with respect to sucrose isomer formation (turanose or trehalulose) was also investigated. We report the first structures of the amylosucrases from Deinococcus geothermalis and Neisseria polysaccharea in complex with turanose. In the amylosucrase from N. polysaccharea (NpAS), key residues were found to force the fructosyl moiety to bind in an open state with the O3′ ideally positioned to explain the preferential formation of turanose by NpAS. Such residues are either not present or not similarly placed in DgAS. As a consequence, DgAS binds the furanoid tautomers of fructose through a weak network of interactions to enable turanose formation. Such topology at subsite +1 is likely favoring other possible fructose binding modes in agreement with the higher amount of trehalulose formed by DgAS. Our findings help to understand the inter-relationships between amylosucrase structure, flexibility, function, and stability and provide new insight for amylosucrase design. PMID:22210773

  13. Survival of Deinococcus geothermalis in Biofilms under Desiccation and Simulated Space and Martian Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frösler, Jan; Panitz, Corinna; Wingender, Jost; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Rettberg, Petra

    2017-05-01

    Biofilm formation represents a successful survival strategy for bacteria. In biofilms, cells are embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). As they are often more stress-tolerant than single cells, biofilm cells might survive the conditions present in space and on Mars. To investigate this topic, the bacterium Deinococcus geothermalis was chosen as a model organism due to its tolerance toward desiccation and radiation. Biofilms cultivated on membranes and, for comparison, planktonically grown cells deposited on membranes were air-dried and exposed to individual stressors that included prolonged desiccation, extreme temperatures, vacuum, simulated martian atmosphere, and UV irradiation, and they were exposed to combinations of stressors that simulate space (desiccation + vacuum + UV) or martian (desiccation + Mars atmosphere + UV) conditions. The effect of sulfatic Mars regolith simulant on cell viability during stress was investigated separately. The EPS produced by the biofilm cells contained mainly polysaccharides and proteins. To detect viable but nonculturable (VBNC) cells, cultivation-independent viability indicators (membrane integrity, ATP, 16S rRNA) were determined in addition to colony counts. Desiccation for 2 months resulted in a decrease of culturability with minor changes of membrane integrity in biofilm cells and major loss of membrane integrity in planktonic bacteria. Temperatures between -25°C and +60°C, vacuum, and Mars atmosphere affected neither culturability nor membrane integrity in both phenotypes. Monochromatic (254 nm; ≥1 kJ m-2) and polychromatic (200-400 nm; >5.5 MJ m-2 for planktonic cells and >270 MJ m-2 for biofilms) UV irradiation significantly reduced the culturability of D. geothermalis but did not affect cultivation-independent viability markers, indicating the induction of a VBNC state in UV-irradiated cells. In conclusion, a substantial proportion of the D. geothermalis population remained viable under

  14. The structure of DdrB from Deinococcus: a new fold for single-stranded DNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sugiman-Marangos, Seiji; Junop, Murray S.

    2010-01-01

    Deinococcus spp. are renowned for their amazing ability to recover rapidly from severe genomic fragmentation as a result of exposure to extreme levels of ionizing radiation or desiccation. Despite having been originally characterized over 50 years ago, the mechanism underlying this remarkable repair process is still poorly understood. Here, we report the 2.8 Å structure of DdrB, a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein unique to Deinococcus spp. that is crucial for recovery following DNA damage. DdrB forms a pentameric ring capable of binding single-stranded but not double-stranded DNA. Unexpectedly, the crystal structure reveals that DdrB comprises a novel fold that is structurally and topologically distinct from all other single-stranded binding (SSB) proteins characterized to date. The need for a unique ssDNA binding function in response to severe damage, suggests a distinct role for DdrB which may encompass not only standard SSB protein function in protection of ssDNA, but also more specialized roles in protein recruitment or DNA architecture maintenance. Possible mechanisms of DdrB action in damage recovery are discussed. PMID:20129942

  15. Relationships between chromosome structure and chromosomal aberrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eidelman, Yuri; Andreev, Sergey

    An interphase nucleus of human lymphocyte was simulated by the novel Monte Carlo tech-nique. The main features of interphase chromosome structure and packaging were taken into account: different levels of chromatin organisation; nonrandom localisation of chromosomes within a nucleus; chromosome loci dynamics. All chromosomes in a nucleus were modelled as polymer globules. A dynamic pattern of intra/interchromosomal contacts was simulated. The detailed information about chromosomal contacts, such as distribution of intrachromoso-mal contacts over the length of each chromosome and dependence of contact probability on genomic separation between chromosome loci, were calculated and compared to the new exper-imental data obtained by the Hi-C technique. Types and frequencies of simple and complex radiation-induced chromosomal exchange aberrations (CA) induced by X-rays were predicted with taking formation and decay of chromosomal contacts into account. Distance dependence of exchange formation probability was calculated directly. mFISH data for human lymphocytes were analysed. The calculated frequencies of simple CA agreed with the experimental data. Complex CA were underestimated despite the dense packaging of chromosome territories within a nucleus. Possible influence of chromosome-nucleus structural organisation on the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations is discussed.

  16. Survival of Deinococcus geothermalis in Biofilms under Desiccation and Simulated Space and Martian Conditions.

    PubMed

    Frösler, Jan; Panitz, Corinna; Wingender, Jost; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Rettberg, Petra

    2017-05-01

    Biofilm formation represents a successful survival strategy for bacteria. In biofilms, cells are embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). As they are often more stress-tolerant than single cells, biofilm cells might survive the conditions present in space and on Mars. To investigate this topic, the bacterium Deinococcus geothermalis was chosen as a model organism due to its tolerance toward desiccation and radiation. Biofilms cultivated on membranes and, for comparison, planktonically grown cells deposited on membranes were air-dried and exposed to individual stressors that included prolonged desiccation, extreme temperatures, vacuum, simulated martian atmosphere, and UV irradiation, and they were exposed to combinations of stressors that simulate space (desiccation + vacuum + UV) or martian (desiccation + Mars atmosphere + UV) conditions. The effect of sulfatic Mars regolith simulant on cell viability during stress was investigated separately. The EPS produced by the biofilm cells contained mainly polysaccharides and proteins. To detect viable but nonculturable (VBNC) cells, cultivation-independent viability indicators (membrane integrity, ATP, 16S rRNA) were determined in addition to colony counts. Desiccation for 2 months resulted in a decrease of culturability with minor changes of membrane integrity in biofilm cells and major loss of membrane integrity in planktonic bacteria. Temperatures between -25°C and +60°C, vacuum, and Mars atmosphere affected neither culturability nor membrane integrity in both phenotypes. Monochromatic (254 nm; ≥1 kJ m(-2)) and polychromatic (200-400 nm; >5.5 MJ m(-2) for planktonic cells and >270 MJ m(-2) for biofilms) UV irradiation significantly reduced the culturability of D. geothermalis but did not affect cultivation-independent viability markers, indicating the induction of a VBNC state in UV-irradiated cells. In conclusion, a substantial proportion of the D. geothermalis

  17. Human chromosome 8.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, S

    1988-01-01

    The role of human chromosome 8 in genetic disease together with the current status of the genetic linkage map for this chromosome is reviewed. Both hereditary genetic disease attributed to mutant alleles at gene loci on chromosome 8 and neoplastic disease owing to somatic mutation, particularly chromosomal translocations, are discussed. PMID:3070042

  18. Mitotic chromosome structure

    SciTech Connect

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    2012-07-15

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  19. Crystal Structure of Deinococcus Phytochrome in the Photoactivated State Reveals a Cascade of Structural Rearrangements during Photoconversion.

    PubMed

    Burgie, E Sethe; Zhang, Junrui; Vierstra, Richard D

    2016-03-01

    Phytochromes are photochromic photoreceptors responsible for a myriad of red/far-red light-dependent processes in plants and microorganisms. Interconversion is initially driven by photoreversible isomerization of bilin, but how this alteration directs the photostate-dependent changes within the protein to actuate signaling is poorly understood. Here, we describe the structure of the Deinococcus phytochrome photosensory module in its near complete far-red light-absorbing Pfr state. In addition to confirming the 180° rotation of the D-pyrrole ring, the dimeric structure clearly identifies downstream rearrangements that trigger large-scale conformational differences between the dark-adapted and photoactivated states. Mutational analyses verified the importance of residues surrounding the bilin in Pfr stabilization, and protease sensitivity assays corroborated photostate alterations that propagate along the dimeric interface. Collectively, these data support a cooperative "toggle" model for phytochrome photoconversion and advance our understanding of the allosteric connection between the photosensory and output modules.

  20. The Deinococcus-Thermus phylum and the effect of rRNA composition on phylogenetic tree construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisburg, W. G.; Giovannoni, S. J.; Woese, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    Through comparative analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA sequences, it can be shown that two seemingly dissimilar types of eubacteria Deinococcus and the ubiquitous hot spring organism Thermus are distantly but specifically related to one another. This confirms an earlier report based upon 16S rRNA oligonucleotide cataloging studies (Hensel et al., 1986). Their two lineages form a distinctive grouping within the eubacteria that deserved the taxonomic status of a phylum. The (partial) sequence of T. aquaticus rRNA appears relatively close to those of other thermophilic eubacteria. e.g. Thermotoga maritima and Thermomicrobium roseum. However, this closeness does not reflect a true evolutionary closeness; rather it is due to a "thermophilic convergence", the result of unusually high G+C composition in the rRNAs of thermophilic bacteria. Unless such compositional biases are taken into account, the branching order and root of phylogenetic trees can be incorrectly inferred.

  1. The Deinococcus-Thermus phylum and the effect of rRNA composition on phylogenetic tree construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisburg, W. G.; Giovannoni, S. J.; Woese, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    Through comparative analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA sequences, it can be shown that two seemingly dissimilar types of eubacteria Deinococcus and the ubiquitous hot spring organism Thermus are distantly but specifically related to one another. This confirms an earlier report based upon 16S rRNA oligonucleotide cataloging studies (Hensel et al., 1986). Their two lineages form a distinctive grouping within the eubacteria that deserved the taxonomic status of a phylum. The (partial) sequence of T. aquaticus rRNA appears relatively close to those of other thermophilic eubacteria. e.g. Thermotoga maritima and Thermomicrobium roseum. However, this closeness does not reflect a true evolutionary closeness; rather it is due to a "thermophilic convergence", the result of unusually high G+C composition in the rRNAs of thermophilic bacteria. Unless such compositional biases are taken into account, the branching order and root of phylogenetic trees can be incorrectly inferred.

  2. The Deinococcus-Thermus phylum and the effect of rRNA composition on phylogenetic tree construction.

    PubMed

    Weisburg, W G; Giovannoni, S J; Woese, C R

    1989-01-01

    Through comparative analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA sequences, it can be shown that two seemingly dissimilar types of eubacteria Deinococcus and the ubiquitous hot spring organism Thermus are distantly but specifically related to one another. This confirms an earlier report based upon 16S rRNA oligonucleotide cataloging studies (Hensel et al., 1986). Their two lineages form a distinctive grouping within the eubacteria that deserved the taxonomic status of a phylum. The (partial) sequence of T. aquaticus rRNA appears relatively close to those of other thermophilic eubacteria. e.g. Thermotoga maritima and Thermomicrobium roseum. However, this closeness does not reflect a true evolutionary closeness; rather it is due to a "thermophilic convergence", the result of unusually high G+C composition in the rRNAs of thermophilic bacteria. Unless such compositional biases are taken into account, the branching order and root of phylogenetic trees can be incorrectly inferred.

  3. B Chromosomes - A Matter of Chromosome Drive.

    PubMed

    Houben, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    B chromosomes are supernumerary chromosomes which are often preferentially inherited, deviating from usual Mendelian segregation. The balance between the so-called chromosome drive and the negative effects that the presence of Bs applies on the fitness of their host determines the frequency of Bs in a particular population. Drive is the key for understanding most B chromosomes. Drive occurs in many ways at pre-meiotic, meiotic or post-meiotic divisions, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. The cellular mechanism of drive is reviewed based on the findings obtained for the B chromosomes of rye, maize and other species. How novel analytical tools will expand our ability to uncover the biology of B chromosome drive is discussed.

  4. RNA sequencing and proteogenomics reveal the importance of leaderless mRNAs in the radiation-tolerant bacterium Deinococcus deserti.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Arjan; Roche, David; Fernandez, Bernard; Ludanyi, Monika; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Pignol, David; Vallenet, David; Armengaud, Jean; Blanchard, Laurence

    2014-04-01

    Deinococcus deserti is a desiccation- and radiation-tolerant desert bacterium. Differential RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed to explore the specificities of its transcriptome. Strikingly, for 1,174 (60%) mRNAs, the transcription start site was found exactly at (916 cases, 47%) or very close to the translation initiation codon AUG or GUG. Such proportion of leaderless mRNAs, which may resemble ancestral mRNAs, is unprecedented for a bacterial species. Proteomics showed that leaderless mRNAs are efficiently translated in D. deserti. Interestingly, we also found 173 additional transcripts with a 5'-AUG or 5'-GUG that would make them competent for ribosome binding and translation into novel small polypeptides. Fourteen of these are predicted to be leader peptides involved in transcription attenuation. Another 30 correlated with new gene predictions and/or showed conservation with annotated and nonannotated genes in other Deinococcus species, and five of these novel polypeptides were indeed detected by mass spectrometry. The data also allowed reannotation of the start codon position of 257 genes, including several DNA repair genes. Moreover, several novel highly radiation-induced genes were found, and their potential roles are discussed. On the basis of our RNA-seq and proteogenomics data, we propose that translation of many of the novel leaderless transcripts, which may have resulted from single-nucleotide changes and maintained by selective pressure, provides a new explanation for the generation of a cellular pool of small peptides important for protection of proteins against oxidation and thus for radiation/desiccation tolerance and adaptation to harsh environmental conditions.

  5. B-chromosome evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, J P; Sharbel, T F; Beukeboom, L W

    2000-01-01

    B chromosomes are extra chromosomes to the standard complement that occur in many organisms. They can originate in a number of ways including derivation from autosomes and sex chromosomes in intra- and interspecies crosses. Their subsequent molecular evolution resembles that of univalent sex chromosomes, which involves gene silencing, heterochromatinization and the accumulation of repetitive DNA and transposons. B-chromosome frequencies in populations result from a balance between their transmission rates and their effects on host fitness. Their long-term evolution is considered to be the outcome of selection on the host genome to eliminate B chromosomes or suppress their effects and on the B chromosome's ability to escape through the generation of new variants. Because B chromosomes interact with the standard chromosomes, they can play an important role in genome evolution and may be useful for studying molecular evolutionary processes. PMID:10724453

  6. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other “precarious” features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction. PMID:24633873

  7. Chromosome Disorder Outreach

    MedlinePlus

    ... Visit our Photo Gallery Education, Advocacy, Information & Support Chromosome Disorder Outreach, Inc is a non-profit organization. ... Inc. All Rights Reserved You are donating to : Chromosome Disorder Outreach, Inc, a 501c non-profit organization. ...

  8. Human X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 21, describes in detail the human X chromosome. X chromatin (or Barr body) formation, inactivation and reactivation of the X chromosome, X;Y translocations, and sex reversal are discussed. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Chromosomal Disorders and Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on chromosomal aberrations in autism, especially possible gene markers. It notes that Chromosome 15 and numerical and structural abnormalities of the sex chromosomes have been most frequently reported as related to the genesis of autism. (Author/DB)

  10. Chromosomal Disorders and Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillberg, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on chromosomal aberrations in autism, especially possible gene markers. It notes that Chromosome 15 and numerical and structural abnormalities of the sex chromosomes have been most frequently reported as related to the genesis of autism. (Author/DB)

  11. Chromosomal development of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 30, describes the chromosomal development of cancer. It has been established through cytological research that the number of chromosomes in cancer cells often deviates greatly from the usual number in healthy cells of the host organism. This chapter includes discussions on chromosome studies in ascites tumors, stemline and tumor development, mitotic aberrations in cancer, and selection and tumor progression. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Abnormal human sex chromosome constitutions

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 22, discusses abnormal human sex chromosome constitution. Aneuploidy of X chromosomes with a female phenotype, sex chromosome aneuploidy with a male phenotype, and various abnormalities in X chromosome behavior are described. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  13. The human Y chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, P; Darling, S; Wolfe, J

    1985-01-01

    Despite its central role in sex determination, genetic analysis of the Y chromosome has been slow. This poor progress has been due to the paucity of available genetic markers. Whereas the X chromosome is known to include at least 100 functional genetic loci, only three or four loci have been ascribed to the Y chromosome and even the existence of several of these loci is controversial. Other factors limiting genetic analysis are the small size of the Y chromosome, which makes cytogenetic definition difficult, and the absence of extensive recombination. Based on cytogenetic observation and speculation, a working model of the Y chromosome has been proposed. In this classical model the Y chromosome is defined into subregions; an X-Y homologous meiotic pairing region encompassing most of the Y chromosome short arm and, perhaps, including a pseudoautosomal region of sex chromosome exchange; a pericentric region containing the sex determining gene or genes; and a long arm heterochromatic genetically inert region. The classical model has been supported by studies on the MIC2 loci, which encode a cell surface antigen defined by the monoclonal antibody 12E7. The X linked locus MIC2X, which escapes X inactivation, maps to the tip of the X chromosome short arm and the homologous locus MIC2Y maps to the Y chromosome short arm; in both cases, these loci are within the proposed meiotic pairing region. MIC2Y is the first biochemically defined, expressed locus to be found on the human Y chromosome. The proposed simplicity of the classical model has been challenged by recent molecular analysis of the Y chromosome. Using cloned probes, several groups have shown that a major part of the Y chromosome short arm is unlikely to be homologous to the X chromosome short arm. A substantial block of sequences of the short arm are homologous to sequences of the X chromosome long arm but well outside the pairing region. In addition, the short arm contains sequences shared with the Y chromosome

  14. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  15. Chromosome instability syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 11, discusses chromosome instability syndromes. The focus is on the most extensively studied genotypic chromosomal aberrations which include Bloom syndrome, Fanconi anemia, ataxia telangiectasia, and xeroderma pigmentosum. The great interest in these syndromes is out of proportion to their rare occurrence; however, studies of genotypic chromosome breakage have been inspired by the hope of throwing light on chromosome structure and behavior. A table is given which relates chromosomal aberrations in Bloom syndrome which may cause or promote cancer. 34 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Engineering of plant chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Mette, Michael Florian; Houben, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Engineered minimal chromosomes with sufficient mitotic and meiotic stability have an enormous potential as vectors for stacking multiple genes required for complex traits in plant biotechnology. Proof of principle for essential steps in chromosome engineering such as truncation of chromosomes by T-DNA-mediated telomere seeding and de novo formation of centromeres by cenH3 fusion protein tethering has been recently obtained. In order to generate robust protocols for application in plant biotechnology, these steps need to be combined and supplemented with additional methods such as site-specific recombination for the directed transfer of multiple genes of interest on the minichromosomes. At the same time, the development of these methods allows new insight into basic aspects of plant chromosome functions such as how centromeres assure proper distribution of chromosomes to daughter cells or how telomeres serve to cap the chromosome ends to prevent shortening of ends over DNA replication cycles and chromosome end fusion.

  17. Chromosomes, conflict, and epigenetics: chromosomal speciation revisited.

    PubMed

    Brown, Judith D; O'Neill, Rachel J

    2010-01-01

    Since Darwin first noted that the process of speciation was indeed the "mystery of mysteries," scientists have tried to develop testable models for the development of reproductive incompatibilities-the first step in the formation of a new species. Early theorists proposed that chromosome rearrangements were implicated in the process of reproductive isolation; however, the chromosomal speciation model has recently been questioned. In addition, recent data from hybrid model systems indicates that simple epistatic interactions, the Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities, are more complex. In fact, incompatibilities are quite broad, including interactions among heterochromatin, small RNAs, and distinct, epigenetically defined genomic regions such as the centromere. In this review, we will examine both classical and current models of chromosomal speciation and describe the "evolving" theory of genetic conflict, epigenetics, and chromosomal speciation.

  18. Analysis of plant meiotic chromosomes by chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Lysak, Martin A; Mandáková, Terezie

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) refers to visualization of large chromosome regions, entire chromosome arms, or entire chromosomes via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For CP in plants, contigs of chromosome-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from the target species or from a closely related species (comparative chromosome painting, CCP) are typically applied as painting probes. Extended pachytene chromosomes provide the highest resolution of CP in plants. CP enables identification and tracing of particular chromosome regions and/or entire chromosomes throughout all meiotic stages as well as corresponding chromosome territories in premeiotic interphase nuclei. Meiotic pairing and structural chromosome rearrangements (typically inversions and translocations) can be identified by CP. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols of CP and CCP in plant species including chromosome preparation, BAC DNA labeling, and multicolor FISH.

  19. Destruction of Deinococcus geothermalis biofilm by photocatalytic ALD and sol-gel TiO2 surfaces.

    PubMed

    Raulio, Mari; Pore, Viljami; Areva, Sami; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku; Lindén, Mika; Rosenholm, Jarl B; Lounatmaa, Kari; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2006-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to explore possibilities of photocatalytic TiO2 coating for reducing biofilms on non-living surfaces. The model organism, Deinococcus geothermalis, known to initiate growth of durable, colored biofilms on machine surfaces in the paper industry, was allowed to form biofilms on stainless steel, glass and TiO2 film coated glass or titanium. Field emission electron microscopy revealed that the cells in the biofilm formed at 45 degrees C under vigorous shaking were connected to the surface by means of numerous adhesion threads of 0.1-0.3 microm in length. Adjacent cells were connected to one another by threads of 0.5-1 microm in length. An ultrastructural analysis gave no indication for the involvement of amorphous extracellular materials (e.g., slime) in the biofilm. When biofilms on photocatalytic TiO2 surfaces, submerged in water, were exposed to 20 W h m(-2) of 360 nm light, both kinds of adhesion threads were completely destroyed and the D. geothermalis cells were extensively removed (from >10(7) down to below 10(6) cells cm(-2)). TiO2 films prepared by the sol-gel technique were slightly more effective than those prepared by the ALD technique. Doping of the TiO2 with sulfur did not enhance its biofilm-destroying capacity. The results show that photocatalytic TiO2 surfaces have potential as a self-cleaning technology for warm water using industries.

  20. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analysis of the Radioresistant Bacterium Deinococcus gobiensis: Insights into the Extreme Environmental Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Lu, Wei; Wang, Jin; Yang, Mingkun; Zhao, Peng; Tang, Ran; Li, Xinna; Hao, Yanhua; Zhou, Zhengfu; Zhan, Yuhua; Yu, Haiying; Teng, Chao; Yan, Yongliang; Ping, Shuzhen; Wang, Yingdian; Lin, Min

    2012-01-01

    The desert is an excellent model for studying evolution under extreme environments. We present here the complete genome and ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced transcriptome of Deinococcus gobiensis I-0, which was isolated from the cold Gobi desert and shows higher tolerance to gamma radiation and UV light than all other known microorganisms. Nearly half of the genes in the genome encode proteins of unknown function, suggesting that the extreme resistance phenotype may be attributed to unknown genes and pathways. D. gobiensis also contains a surprisingly large number of horizontally acquired genes and predicted mobile elements of different classes, which is indicative of adaptation to extreme environments through genomic plasticity. High-resolution RNA-Seq transcriptome analyses indicated that 30 regulatory proteins, including several well-known regulators and uncharacterized protein kinases, and 13 noncoding RNAs were induced immediately after UV irradiation. Particularly interesting is the UV irradiation induction of the phrB and recB genes involved in photoreactivation and recombinational repair, respectively. These proteins likely include key players in the immediate global transcriptional response to UV irradiation. Our results help to explain the exceptional ability of D. gobiensis to withstand environmental extremes of the Gobi desert, and highlight the metabolic features of this organism that have biotechnological potential. PMID:22470573

  1. The first evidence of deinoxanthin from Deinococcus sp. Y35 with strong algicidal effect on the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Huajun; Guan, Chengwei; Chen, Zhangran; Zheng, Wei; Xu, Hong; Tian, Yun; Yu, Zhiming; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-06-15

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) could be deemed hazardous materials in aquatic environment. Alexandrium tamarense is a toxic HAB causing alga, which causes serious economic losses and health problems. In this study, the bacterium Deinococcus xianganensis Y35 produced a new algicide, showing a high algicidal effect on A. tamarense. The algicidal compound was identified as deinoxanthin, a red pigment, based on high resolution mass spectrometry and NMR after the active compound was isolated and purified. Deinoxanthin exhibited an obvious inhibitory effect on algal growth, and showed algicidal activity against A. tamarense with an EC50 of 5.636 μg/mL with 12h treatment time. Based on the unique structure and characteristics of deinoxanthin, the content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased after 0.5h exposure, the structure of organelles including chloroplasts and mitochondria were seriously damaged. All these results firstly confirmed that deinoxanthin as the efficient and eco-environmental algicidal compound has potential to be used for controlling harmful algal blooms through overproduction of ROS.

  2. The death mechanism of the harmful algal bloom species Alexandrium tamarense induced by algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Huajun; Cai, Guanjing; Chen, Zhangran; Fu, Lijun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause a variety of deleterious effects on aquatic ecosystems, especially the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense, which poses a serious threat to marine economic and human health based on releasing paralytic shellfish poison into the environment. The algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35 which can induce growth inhibition on A. tamarense was used to investigate the functional mechanism. The growth status, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, photosynthetic system and the nuclear system of algal cells were determined under algicidal activity. A culture of strain Y35 not only induced overproduction of ROS in algal cells within only 0.5 h of treatment, also decrease the total protein content as well as the response of the antioxidant enzyme. Meanwhile, lipid peroxidation was induced and cell membrane integrity was lost. Photosynthetic pigments including chlorophyll a and carotenoid decreased along with the photosynthetic efficiency being significantly inhibited. At the same time, photosynthesis-related gene expression showed down-regulation. More than, the destruction of cell nuclear structure and inhibition of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) related gene expression were confirmed. The potential functional mechanism of the algicidal bacterium on A. tamarense was investigated and provided a novel viewpoint which could be used in HABs control. PMID:26441921

  3. Large-scale structure of RecA protein from Deinococcus radiodurance and its complexes in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelov, D. V.; Lebedev, D. V.; Suslov, A. V.; Shalguev, V. I.; Kuklin, A. I.; Islamov, A. Kh; Lauter, H.; Lanzov, V. A.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2008-03-01

    Different conformational states of the filaments formed by RecA protein from a radiation resistant strain Deinococcus radiodurance (RecADr) in solution were investigated using small angle neutron scattering. Scattering by the protein self-polymer was consistent with a long helix model, with the pitch of the helix being lower than that in the crystal structure. Compared to those of RecA proteins from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, helical filaments of RecA from D. radiodurance exhibited a lower helical pitch and lower stability at low Mg2+ concentrations or under conditions of elevated ionic strength in the absence of ATP (adenosine triphosphate). Formation of an active filament upon binding of ATPγS and either single- or double-stranded DNA brought about a significant increase in the helix pitch and a moderate decrease in the cross-sectional gyration radius, but resulted in little change in the number of monomers per helix turn. The helix pitch value of the RecADr presynaptic complex was conservative and close to that found for other RecA proteins and their analogs.

  4. The death mechanism of the harmful algal bloom species Alexandrium tamarense induced by algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Huajun; Cai, Guanjing; Chen, Zhangran; Fu, Lijun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause a variety of deleterious effects on aquatic ecosystems, especially the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense, which poses a serious threat to marine economic and human health based on releasing paralytic shellfish poison into the environment. The algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35 which can induce growth inhibition on A. tamarense was used to investigate the functional mechanism. The growth status, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, photosynthetic system and the nuclear system of algal cells were determined under algicidal activity. A culture of strain Y35 not only induced overproduction of ROS in algal cells within only 0.5 h of treatment, also decrease the total protein content as well as the response of the antioxidant enzyme. Meanwhile, lipid peroxidation was induced and cell membrane integrity was lost. Photosynthetic pigments including chlorophyll a and carotenoid decreased along with the photosynthetic efficiency being significantly inhibited. At the same time, photosynthesis-related gene expression showed down-regulation. More than, the destruction of cell nuclear structure and inhibition of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) related gene expression were confirmed. The potential functional mechanism of the algicidal bacterium on A. tamarense was investigated and provided a novel viewpoint which could be used in HABs control.

  5. Chromosomal differentiation of cells

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 16, discusses the chromosomal differentiation of cells. The chromosomes of differentiated cells have been much less studies than those of meristematic or germline cells, probably because such cells do not usually divide spontaneously. However, in many cases they can be induced to undergo mitosis. 26 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Sexually antagonistic chromosomal cuckoos

    PubMed Central

    Rice, William R.; Gavrilets, Sergey; Friberg, Urban

    2009-01-01

    The two kinds of sex chromosomes in the heterogametic parent are transmitted to offspring with different sexes, causing opposite-sex siblings to be completely unrelated for genes located on these chromosomes. Just as the nest-parasitic cuckoo chick is selected to harm its unrelated nest-mates in order to garner more shared resources, sibling competition causes the sex chromosomes to be selected to harm siblings that do not carry them. Here we quantify and contrast this selection on the X and Y, or Z and W, sex chromosomes. We also develop a hypothesis for how this selection can contribute to the decay of the non-recombining sex chromosome. PMID:19364719

  7. Engineered chromosomes in transgenics.

    PubMed

    Blazso, Peter; Sinko, Ildiko; Katona, Robert L

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer or simply transgenic technology has evolved much since 1980. Gene delivery strategies, systems, and equipments have become more and more precise and efficient. It has also been shown that even chromosomes can be used besides traditional plasmid and viral vectors for zygote or embryonic stem cell transformation. Artificial chromosomes and their loadable variants have brought their advantages over traditional genetic information carriers into the field of transgenesis. Engineered chromosomes are appealing vectors for gene transfer since they have large transgene carrying capacity, they are non-integrating, and stably expressing in eukaryotic cells. Embryonic stem cell lines can be established that carry engineered chromosomes and ultimately used in transgenic mouse chimera creation. The demonstrated protocol describes all the steps necessary for the successful production of transgenic mouse chimeras with engineered chromosome bearer embryonic stem cells.

  8. Capturing Chromosome Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Job; Rippe, Karsten; Dekker, Martijn; Kleckner, Nancy

    2002-02-01

    We describe an approach to detect the frequency of interaction between any two genomic loci. Generation of a matrix of interaction frequencies between sites on the same or different chromosomes reveals their relative spatial disposition and provides information about the physical properties of the chromatin fiber. This methodology can be applied to the spatial organization of entire genomes in organisms from bacteria to human. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we could confirm known qualitative features of chromosome organization within the nucleus and dynamic changes in that organization during meiosis. We also analyzed yeast chromosome III at the G1 stage of the cell cycle. We found that chromatin is highly flexible throughout. Furthermore, functionally distinct AT- and GC-rich domains were found to exhibit different conformations, and a population-average 3D model of chromosome III could be determined. Chromosome III emerges as a contorted ring.

  9. XYY chromosome anomaly and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, M; MacBeth, R; Varma, S L

    1998-02-07

    Sex chromosome anomalies have been associated with psychoses, and most of the evidence is linked to the presence of an additional X chromosome. We report a patient with XYY chromosome anomaly who developed schizophrenia.

  10. Quantitative Characterization of the Growth of Deinococcus geothermalis DSM-11302: Effect of Inoculum Size, Growth Medium and Culture Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bornot, Julie; Molina-Jouve, Carole; Uribelarrea, Jean-Louis; Gorret, Nathalie

    2015-08-20

    Due to their remarkable resistance to extreme conditions, Deinococcaceae strains are of great interest to biotechnological prospects. However, the physiology of the extremophile strain Deinococcus geothermalis has scarcely been studied and is not well understood. The physiological behaviour was then studied in well-controlled conditions in flask and bioreactor cultures. The growth of D. geothermalis type strains was compared. Among the strains tested, the strain from the German Collection of Microorganisms (Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen DSM) DSM-11302 was found to give the highest biomass concentration and growth rate: in a complex medium with glucose, the growth rate reached 0.75 h(-1) at 45 °C. Yeast extract concentration in the medium had significant constitutive and catalytic effects. Furthermore, the results showed that the physiological descriptors were not affected by the inoculum preparation steps. A batch culture of D. geothermalis DSM-11302 on defined medium was carried out: cells grew exponentially with a maximal growth rate of 0.28 h(-1) and D. geothermalis DSM-11302 biomass reached 1.4 g·L(-1) in 20 h. Then, 1.4 gDryCellWeight of biomass (X) was obtained from 5.6 g glucose (Glc) consumed as carbon source, corresponding to a yield of 0.3 CmolX·CmolGlc(-1); cell specific oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production rates reached 216 and 226 mmol.CmolX(-1)·h(-1), respectively, and the respiratory quotient (QR) value varied from 1.1 to 1.7. This is the first time that kinetic parameters and yields are reported for D. geothermalis DSM-11302 grown on a mineral medium in well-controlled batch culture.

  11. Quantitative Characterization of the Growth of Deinococcus geothermalis DSM-11302: Effect of Inoculum Size, Growth Medium and Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bornot, Julie; Molina-Jouve, Carole; Uribelarrea, Jean-Louis; Gorret, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Due to their remarkable resistance to extreme conditions, Deinococcaceae strains are of great interest to biotechnological prospects. However, the physiology of the extremophile strain Deinococcus geothermalis has scarcely been studied and is not well understood. The physiological behaviour was then studied in well-controlled conditions in flask and bioreactor cultures. The growth of D. geothermalis type strains was compared. Among the strains tested, the strain from the German Collection of Microorganisms (Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen DSM) DSM-11302 was found to give the highest biomass concentration and growth rate: in a complex medium with glucose, the growth rate reached 0.75 h−1 at 45 °C. Yeast extract concentration in the medium had significant constitutive and catalytic effects. Furthermore, the results showed that the physiological descriptors were not affected by the inoculum preparation steps. A batch culture of D. geothermalis DSM-11302 on defined medium was carried out: cells grew exponentially with a maximal growth rate of 0.28 h−1 and D. geothermalis DSM-11302 biomass reached 1.4 g·L−1 in 20 h. Then, 1.4 gDryCellWeight of biomass (X) was obtained from 5.6 g glucose (Glc) consumed as carbon source, corresponding to a yield of 0.3 CmolX·CmolGlc−1; cell specific oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production rates reached 216 and 226 mmol.CmolX−1·h−1, respectively, and the respiratory quotient (QR) value varied from 1.1 to 1.7. This is the first time that kinetic parameters and yields are reported for D. geothermalis DSM-11302 grown on a mineral medium in well-controlled batch culture. PMID:27682099

  12. UV photobiochemistry under space conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dose, K.; Bieger-Dose, A.; Dillmann, R.; Gill, M.; Kerz, O.; Klein, A.; Stridde, C.

    The response of spores of Bacillus subtilis, cells of Deinococcus radiodurans and conidia of Aspergillus ochraceus to actual and simulated space conditions (UV in combination with long-term exposure to extremely dry conditions, including vacuum) has been studied: The following effects have been analyzed: decrease of viability, occurrence of DNA double strand breaks, formation of DNA-protein cross-links and DNA-DNA cross-links. All organisms show an increased sensitivity to UV light in extreme dryness (dry argon or vacuum) compared to an irradiation in aqueous suspension. The UV irradiation leads in all cases to a variety of DNA lesions. Very conspicuous is the occurrence of double strand breaks. Most of these double strand breaks are produced by incomplete repair of other lesions, especially base damages. The increase in DNA lesions can be correlated to the loss in viability. The specific response of the chromosomal DNA to UV irradiation in extreme dryness, however, varies from species to species and depends on the state of dehydration. The formation of DNA double strand breaks and DNA-protein cross-links prevails in the case of B. subtilis spores. In cells of Deinococcus radiodurans DNA-DNA cross-links often predominate, in conidia of Aspergillus ochraceus double strand breaks. The results obtained by direct exposure to space conditions (EURECA mission and D2 mission) largely agree with the laboratory data.

  13. Human chromosome 22.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, J C; Aurias, A; Julier, C; Prieur, M; Szajnert, M F

    1987-01-01

    The acrocentric chromosome 22, one of the shortest human chromosomes, carries about 52 000 kb of DNA. The short arm is made up essentially of heterochromatin and, as in other acrocentric chromosomes, it contains ribosomal RNA genes. Ten identified genes have been assigned to the long arm, of which four have already been cloned and documented (the cluster of lambda immunoglobulin genes, myoglobin, the proto-oncogene c-sis, bcr). In addition, about 10 anonymous DNA segments have been cloned from chromosome 22 specific DNA libraries. About a dozen diseases, including at least four different malignancies, are related to an inherited or acquired pathology of chromosome 22. They have been characterised at the phenotypic or chromosome level or both. In chronic myelogenous leukaemia, with the Ph1 chromosome, and Burkitt's lymphoma, with the t(8;22) variant translocation, the molecular pathology is being studied at the DNA level, bridging for the first time the gap between cytogenetics and molecular genetics. PMID:3550088

  14. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  15. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  16. Recombination and chromosome segregation.

    PubMed Central

    Sherratt, David J; Søballe, Britta; Barre, François-Xavier; Filipe, Sergio; Lau, Ivy; Massey, Thomas; Yates, James

    2004-01-01

    The duplication of DNA and faithful segregation of newly replicated chromosomes at cell division is frequently dependent on recombinational processes. The rebuilding of broken or stalled replication forks is universally dependent on homologous recombination proteins. In bacteria with circular chromosomes, crossing over by homologous recombination can generate dimeric chromosomes, which cannot be segregated to daughter cells unless they are converted to monomers before cell division by the conserved Xer site-specific recombination system. Dimer resolution also requires FtsK, a division septum-located protein, which coordinates chromosome segregation with cell division, and uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to activate the dimer resolution reaction. FtsK can also translocate DNA, facilitate synapsis of sister chromosomes and minimize entanglement and catenation of newly replicated sister chromosomes. The visualization of the replication/recombination-associated proteins, RecQ and RarA, and specific genes within living Escherichia coli cells, reveals further aspects of the processes that link replication with recombination, chromosome segregation and cell division, and provides new insight into how these may be coordinated. PMID:15065657

  17. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  18. Chromosome Segregation Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nicklas, R. Bruce

    1974-01-01

    Most aspects of chromosome distribution to the daughter cells in meiosis and mitosis are now understood, at the cellular level. The most striking evidence that the proposed explanation is valid is that it correctly predicts the outcome of experiments on living cells in which the experimenter (1) can determine the distribution of any chosen chromosome to a chosen daughter cell, (2) can induce a mal-orientation, and (3) can stabilize a mal-orientation, causing non-disjunction of a chosen bivalent. Recent reviews of chromosome distribution mechanisms are also considered, in an attempt to clarify the remaining unsolved problems. PMID:4442702

  19. THE HUMAN CHROMOSOME

    PubMed Central

    Abuelo, J. G.; Moore, Dorothy E.

    1969-01-01

    Human lymphocytes were grown in short-term tissue culture and were arrested in metaphase with Colcemid. Their chromosomes were prepared by the Langmuir trough-critical point drying technique and were examined under the electron microscope. In addition, some chromosomes were digested with trypsin, Pronase, or DNase. The chromosomes consist entirely of tightly packed, 240 ± 50-A chromatin fibers. Trypsin and Pronase treatments induce relaxation of fiber packing and reveal certain underlying fiber arrangements. Furthermore, trypsin treatment demonstrates that the chromatin fiber has a 25–50 A trypsin-resistant core surrounded by a trypsin-sensitive sheath. DNase digestion suggests that this core contains DNA. PMID:5775795

  20. Models of chromosome structure.

    PubMed

    Nicodemi, Mario; Pombo, Ana

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control chromosome folding in the nucleus of eukaryotes and their contribution to gene regulation is a key open issue in molecular biology. Microscopy and chromatin-capture techniques have shown that chromatin has a complex organization, which dynamically changes across organisms and cell types. The need to make sense of such a fascinating complexity has prompted the development of quantitative models from physics, to find the principles of chromosome folding, its origin and function. Here, we concisely review recent advances in chromosome modeling, focusing on a recently proposed framework, the Strings & Binders Switch (SBS) model, which recapitulates key features of chromosome organization in space and time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chromosome doubling method

    DOEpatents

    Kato, Akio

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for chromosome doubling in plants. The technique overcomes the low yields of doubled progeny associated with the use of prior techniques for doubling chromosomes in plants such as grasses. The technique can be used in large scale applications and has been demonstrated to be highly effective in maize. Following treatment in accordance with the invention, plants remain amenable to self fertilization, thereby allowing the efficient isolation of doubled progeny plants.

  2. [Sex chromosomes and meiosis].

    PubMed

    Guichaoua, M-R; Geoffroy-Siraudin, C; Tassistro, V; Ghalamoun-Slaimi, R; Perrin, J; Metzler-Guillemain, C

    2009-01-01

    Sex chromosome behaviour fundamentally differs between male and female meiosis. In oocyte, X chromosomes synapse giving a XX bivalent which is not recognizable in their morphology and behaviour from autosomal bivalents. In human male, X and Y chromosomes differ from one another in their morphology and their genetic content, leading to a limited pairing and preventing genetic recombination, excepted in homologous region PAR1. During pachytene stage of the first meiotic prophase, X and Y chromosomes undergo a progressive condensation and form a transcriptionally silenced peripheral XY body. The condensation of the XY bivalent during pachytene stage led us to describe four pachytene substages and to localize the pachytene checkpoint between substages 2 and 3. We also defined the pachytene index (PI=P1+P2/P1+P2+P3+P4) which is always less than 0.50 in normal meiosis. XY body undergoes decondensation at diplotene stage, but transcriptional inactivation of the two sex chromosomes or Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI) persists through to the end of spermatogenesis. Sex chromosome inactivation involves several proteins, some of them were now identified. Two isoforms of the HP1 protein, HP1beta and HP1gamma, are involved in the facultative heterochromatinization of the XY body, but the initiation of this process involves the phosphorylation of the protein H2AX by the kinase ATR whose recruitment depends on BRCA1. Extensive researches on the inactivation of the sex chromosomes during male meiosis will allow to a better understanding of some male infertilities.

  3. Epilepsy and chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many chromosomal abnormalities are associated with Central Nervous System (CNS) malformations and other neurological alterations, among which seizures and epilepsy. Some of these show a peculiar epileptic and EEG pattern. We describe some epileptic syndromes frequently reported in chromosomal disorders. Methods Detailed clinical assessment, electrophysiological studies, survey of the literature. Results In some of these congenital syndromes the clinical presentation and EEG anomalies seems to be quite typical, in others the manifestations appear aspecific and no strictly linked with the chromosomal imbalance. The onset of seizures is often during the neonatal period of the infancy. Conclusions A better characterization of the electro clinical patterns associated with specific chromosomal aberrations could give us a valuable key in the identification of epilepsy susceptibility of some chromosomal loci, using the new advances in molecular cytogenetics techniques - such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), subtelomeric analysis and CGH (comparative genomic hybridization) microarray. However further studies are needed to understand the mechanism of epilepsy associated with chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:20438626

  4. Visualization of chromosome condensation in plants with large chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Maria A; Chaban, Inna A; Sheval, Eugene V

    2017-09-12

    Most data concerning chromosome organization have been acquired from studies of a small number of model organisms, the majority of which are mammals. In plants with large genomes, the chromosomes are significantly larger than the animal chromosomes that have been studied to date, and it is possible that chromosome condensation in such plants was modified during evolution. Here, we analyzed chromosome condensation and decondensation processes in order to find structural mechanisms that allowed for an increase in chromosome size. We found that anaphase and telophase chromosomes of plants with large chromosomes (average 2C DNA content exceeded 0.8 pg per chromosome) contained chromatin-free cavities in their axial regions in contrast to well-characterized animal chromosomes, which have high chromatin density in the axial regions. Similar to animal chromosomes, two intermediates of chromatin folding were visible inside condensing (during prophase) and decondensing (during telophase) chromosomes of Nigella damascena: approximately 150 nm chromonemata and approximately 300 nm fibers. The spatial folding of the latter fibers occurs in a fundamentally different way than in animal chromosomes, which leads to the formation of chromosomes with axial chromatin-free cavities. Different compaction topology, but not the number of compaction levels, allowed for the evolution of increased chromosome size in plants.

  5. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kawamura, Ryo; Marko, John F.

    2011-02-01

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed.

  6. Philadelphia chromosome duplication as a ring-shaped chromosome.

    PubMed

    Borjas-Gutierrez, Cesar; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The gain of a second copy of the Philadelphia chromosome is one of the main secondary chromosomal changes related to the clonal evolution of cells with t(9;22) in chronic myelogenous leukemia. This gain causes the acquisition of another copy of the BCR/ABL1 fusion gene. Isochromosomes of the der(22) chromosome or double minute chromosomes are well known to lead an increased copy number of BCR/ABL1 gene. There is no antecedent of Philadelphia chromosome duplication as a ring chromosome. A recent published report contains evidence that strongly suggests that the Philadelphia chromosome was duplicated as a ring chromosome, observation that was overlooked by the authors. The instability inherent to the ring chromosome increases the risk of emergence of clones containing more and more BCR/ABL1 gene copies, which would produce increased fitness for clonal selection, resulting in worsening of the patient's prognosis.

  7. "Chromosome": a knowledge-based system for the chromosome classification.

    PubMed

    Ramstein, G; Bernadet, M

    1993-01-01

    Chromosome, a knowledge-based analysis system has been designed for the classification of human chromosomes. Its aim is to perform an optimal classification by driving a tool box containing the procedures of image processing, pattern recognition and classification. This paper presents the general architecture of Chromosome, based on a multiagent system generator. The image processing tool box is described from the met aphasic enhancement to the fine classification. Emphasis is then put on the knowledge base intended for the chromosome recognition. The global classification process is also presented, showing how Chromosome proceeds to classify a given chromosome. Finally, we discuss further extensions of the system for the karyotype building.

  8. Chromosome 18 replaced by two ring chromosomes of chromosome 18 origin.

    PubMed

    Miller, K; Pabst, B; Ritter, H; Nürnberg, P; Siebert, R; Schmidtke, J; Arslan-Kirchner, M

    2003-04-01

    We here describe the first example of the replacement of an autosome by two ring chromosomes originating from the missing chromosome, presented in a patient with a single chromosome 18 and two additional ring chromosomes. Detailed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis revealed the chromosome 18 origin of both ring chromosomes and characterized the small and the large ring chromosome as derivatives of the short and long arm of chromosome 18, respectively. The loss of subtelomeric regions of the short and the long arm of chromosome 18 in the ring chromosomes was confirmed by FISH studies. Molecular studies showed the exclusive presence of the paternal alleles for microsatellite markers located distal to the short and long arm loci D18S843 and D18S474, respectively. This indicates the maternal origin of both rings and provides evidence for substantial deletions of the distal parts of both arms of chromosome 18 in the ring chromosomes. The dysmorphic features of the patient can be explained by these deletions in both chromosome arms, as the clinical findings partly overlap with observations in 18p- and 18q-syndrome and are similar to some cases of ring chromosome 18. Centromere misdivision is suggested as one mechanism involved in the formation of the ring chromosomes.

  9. Sex Chromosome Drive

    PubMed Central

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R.; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome drivers are selfish elements that subvert Mendel's first law of segregation and therefore are overrepresented among the products of meiosis. The sex-biased progeny produced then fuels an extended genetic conflict between the driver and the rest of the genome. Many examples of sex chromosome drive are known, but the occurrence of this phenomenon is probably largely underestimated because of the difficulty to detect it. Remarkably, nearly all sex chromosome drivers are found in two clades, Rodentia and Diptera. Although very little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of drive, epigenetic processes such as chromatin regulation could be involved in many instances. Yet, its evolutionary consequences are far-reaching, from the evolution of mating systems and sex determination to the emergence of new species. PMID:25524548

  10. Meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Turner, James M A

    2007-05-01

    X chromosome inactivation is most commonly studied in the context of female mammalian development, where it performs an essential role in dosage compensation. However, another form of X-inactivation takes place in the male, during spermatogenesis, as germ cells enter meiosis. This second form of X-inactivation, called meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) has emerged as a novel paradigm for studying the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. New studies have revealed that MSCI is a special example of a more general mechanism called meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC), which silences chromosomes that fail to pair with their homologous partners and, in doing so, may protect against aneuploidy in subsequent generations. Furthermore, failure in MSCI is emerging as an important etiological factor in meiotic sterility.

  11. Vibrios Commonly Possess Two Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazuhisa; Iida, Tetsuya; Kita-Tsukamoto, Kumiko; Honda, Takeshi

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of the two-chromosome configuration was investigated in 34 species of vibrios and closely related species. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of undigested genomic DNA suggested that vibrios commonly have two chromosomes. The size of the large chromosome is predominantly within a narrow range (3.0 to 3.3 Mb), whereas the size of the small chromosome varies considerably among the vibrios (0.8 to 2.4 Mb). This fact suggests that the structure of the small chromosome is more flexible than that of the large chromosome during the evolution of vibrios. PMID:15629946

  12. Chromosomes and clinical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Robert James McKinlay

    2016-07-01

    Chromosome abnormalities may cast light on the nature of mechanisms whereby normal anatomy evolves, and abnormal anatomy arises. Correlating genotype to phenotype is an exercise in which the geneticist and the anatomist can collaborate. The increasing power of the new genetic methodologies is enabling an increasing precision in the delineation of chromosome imbalances, even to the nucleotide level; but the classical skills of careful observation and recording remain as crucial as they always have been. Clin. Anat. 29:540-546, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Chromosomal rearrangements in cattle and pigs revealed by chromosome microdissection and chromosome painting

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Alain; Ducos, Alain; Yerle, Martine

    2003-01-01

    A pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 in a boar, as well as a case of (2q-;5p+) translocation mosaicism in a bull were analysed by chromosome painting using probes generated by conventional microdissection. For the porcine inversion, probes specific for p arms and q arms were produced and hybridised simultaneously on metaphases of a heterozygote carrier. In the case of the bovine translocation, two whole chromosome probes (chromosome 5, and derived chromosome 5) were elaborated and hybridised independently on chromosomal preparations of the bull who was a carrier of the mosaic translocation. The impossibility of differentiating chromosomes 2 and der(2) from other chromosomes of the metaphases did not allow the production of painting probes for these chromosomes. For all experiments, the quality of painting was comparable to that usually observed with probes obtained from flow-sorted chromosomes. The results obtained allowed confirmation of the interpretations proposed with G-banding karyotype analyses. In the bovine case, however, the reciprocity of the translocation could not be proven. The results presented in this paper show the usefulness of the microdissection technique for characterising chromosomal rearrangements in species for which commercial probes are not available. They also confirmed that the main limiting factor of the technique is the quality of the chromosomal preparations, which does not allow the identification of target chromosomes or chromosome fragments in all cases. PMID:14604515

  14. Characterization of chromosomal architecture in Arabidopsis by chromosome conformation capture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The packaging of long chromatin fibers in the nucleus poses a major challenge, as it must fulfill both physical and functional requirements. Until recently, insights into the chromosomal architecture of plants were mainly provided by cytogenetic studies. Complementary to these analyses, chromosome conformation capture technologies promise to refine and improve our view on chromosomal architecture and to provide a more generalized description of nuclear organization. Results Employing circular chromosome conformation capture, this study describes chromosomal architecture in Arabidopsis nuclei from a genome-wide perspective. Surprisingly, the linear organization of chromosomes is reflected in the genome-wide interactome. In addition, we study the interplay of the interactome and epigenetic marks and report that the heterochromatic knob on the short arm of chromosome 4 maintains a pericentromere-like interaction profile and interactome despite its euchromatic surrounding. Conclusion Despite the extreme condensation that is necessary to pack the chromosomes into the nucleus, the Arabidopsis genome appears to be packed in a predictive manner, according to the following criteria: heterochromatin and euchromatin represent two distinct interactomes; interactions between chromosomes correlate with the linear position on the chromosome arm; and distal chromosome regions have a higher potential to interact with other chromosomes. PMID:24267747

  15. The sequences of heat shock protein 40 (DnaJ) homologs provide evidence for a close evolutionary relationship between the Deinococcus-thermus group and cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bustard, K; Gupta, R S

    1997-08-01

    The genes encoding for heat shock protein 40 (Hsp40 or DnaJ) homologs were cloned and sequenced from the archaebacterium Halobacterium cutirubrum and the eubacterium Deinococcus proteolyticus to add to sequences from the gene banks. These genes were identified downstream of the Hsp70 (or DnaK) genes in genomic fragments spanning this region and, as in other prokaryotic species, Hsp70-Hsp40 genes are likely part of the same operon. The Hsp40 homolog from D. proteolyticus was found to be lacking a central 204 base pair region present in H. cutirubrum that encodes for the four cysteine-rich domains of the repeat consensus sequence CxxCxGxG (where x is any amino acid), present in most Hsp40 homologs. The available sequences from various archaebacteria, eubacteria, and eukaryotes show that the same deletion is also present in the homologs from Thermus aquaticus and two cyanobacteria, but in no other species tested. This unique deletion and the clustering of homologs from the Deinococcus-Thermus group and cyanobacterial species in the Hsp40 phylogenetic trees suggest a close evolutionary relationship between these groups as was also shown recently for Hsp70 sequences (R.S. Gupta et al., J Bacteriol 179:345-357, 1997). Sequence comparisons indicate that the Hsp40 homologs are not as conserved as the Hsp70 sequences. Phylogenetic analysis provides no reliable information concerning evolutionary relationship between prokaryotes and eukaryotes and their usefulness in this regard is limited. However, in phylogenetic trees based on Hsp40 sequences, the two archaebacterial homologs showed a polyphyletic branching within Gram-positive bacteria, similar to that seen with Hsp70 sequences.

  16. The Y Chromosome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  17. The Y Chromosome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  18. Why Chromosome Palindromes?

    PubMed Central

    Betrán, Esther; Demuth, Jeffery P.; Williford, Anna

    2012-01-01

    We look at sex-limited chromosome (Y or W) evolution with particular emphasis on the importance of palindromes. Y chromosome palindromes consist of inverted duplicates that allow for local recombination in an otherwise nonrecombining chromosome. Since palindromes enable intrachromosomal gene conversion that can help eliminate deleterious mutations, they are often highlighted as mechanisms to protect against Y degeneration. However, the adaptive significance of recombination resides in its ability to decouple the evolutionary fates of linked mutations, leading to both a decrease in degeneration rate and an increase in adaptation rate. Our paper emphasizes the latter, that palindromes may exist to accelerate adaptation by increasing the potential targets and fixation rates of incoming beneficial mutations. This hypothesis helps reconcile two enigmatic features of the “palindromes as protectors” view: (1) genes that are not located in palindromes have been retained under purifying selection for tens of millions of years, and (2) under models that only consider deleterious mutations, gene conversion benefits duplicate gene maintenance but not initial fixation. We conclude by looking at ways to test the hypothesis that palindromes enhance the rate of adaptive evolution of Y-linked genes and whether this effect can be extended to palindromes on other chromosomes. PMID:22844637

  19. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-08-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available.

  20. Chromosome Variations And Human Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soudek, D.

    1974-01-01

    Article focused on the science of cytogenetics, which studied the transmission of the units of heredity called chromosomes, and considered the advantage of proper diagnosis of genetic diseases, treated on the chromosomal level. (Author/RK)

  1. [Dicentric Y chromosome].

    PubMed

    Abdelmoula, N Bouayed; Amouri, A

    2005-01-01

    Dicentric Y chromosomes are the most common Y structural abnormalities and their influence on gonadal and somatic development is extremely variable. Here, we report the third comprehensive review of the literature concerning dicentric Y chromosomes reported since 1994. We find 78 new cases for which molecular studies (PCR or FISH) have been widely applied to investigate SRY (68% of cases), GBY, ZFY, RFS4Y, GCY and different genes at AZF region. For dic(Yq), all cases (n = 20) were mosaic for 45,X and 4 of them were also mosaic for a 46,XY cell line. When breakpoints were available (15/20 cases), they were in Yp11. 50% of cases were phenotypic female and 20% phenotypic male while 20% of cases were reported with gonadal dysgenesis. Gonadal histology was defined in 8 cases but only in one case, gonadal tissu was genetically investigated because of gonadoblastoma. For dic(Yp) (n = 55), mosaicism concerned only 45,X cell line and was found in 50 cases while the remainder five cases were homogeneous. When breakpoints were available, it was at Yq11 in 50 cases and at Yq12 in two cases. 54% of cases were phenotypic female, 26% were phenotypic male and 18% were associated with genitalia ambiguous. SRY was analyzed in 33 cases, sequenced in 9 cases and was muted in only one case. Gonads were histologically explored in 34 cases and genetically investigated in 8 cases. Gonadoblastoma was found in only two cases. Through this review, it seems that phenotype-genotype correlations are still not possible and that homogeneous studies of dic(Y) in more patients using molecular tools for structural characterization of the rearranged Y chromosome and assessment of mosaicism in many organs are necessary to clarify the basis of the phenotypic heterogeneity of dicentric Y chromosomes and then to help phenotypic prediction of such chromosome rearrangement.

  2. Chromosomal breakpoints characterization of two supernumerary ring chromosomes 20.

    PubMed

    Guediche, N; Brisset, S; Benichou, J-J; Guérin, N; Mabboux, P; Maurin, M-L; Bas, C; Laroudie, M; Picone, O; Goldszmidt, D; Prévot, S; Labrune, P; Tachdjian, G

    2010-02-01

    The occurrence of an additional ring chromosome 20 is a rare chromosome abnormality, and no common phenotype has been yet described. We report on two new patients presenting with a supernumerary ring chromosome 20 both prenatally diagnosed. The first presented with intrauterine growth retardation and some craniofacial dysmorphism, and the second case had a normal phenotype except for obesity. Conventional cytogenetic studies showed for each patient a small supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, these SMCs corresponded to ring chromosomes 20 including a part of short and long arms of chromosome 20. Detailed molecular cytogenetic characterization showed different breakpoints (20p11.23 and 20q11.23 for Patient 1 and 20p11.21 and 20q11.21 for Patient 2) and sizes of the two ring chromosomes 20 (13.6 Mb for case 1 and 4.8 Mb for case 2). Review of the 13 case reports of an extra r(20) ascertained postnatally (8 cases) and prenatally (5 cases) showed varying degrees of phenotypic abnormalities. We document a detailed molecular cytogenetic chromosomal breakpoints characterization of two cases of supernumerary ring chromosomes 20. These results emphasize the need to characterize precisely chromosomal breakpoints of supernumerary ring chromosomes 20 in order to establish genotype-phenotype correlation. This report may be helpful for prediction of natural history and outcome, particularly in prenatal diagnosis. Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. [Chromosomal organization of the genomes of small-chromosome plants].

    PubMed

    Muravenko, O V; Zelenin, A V

    2009-11-01

    An effective approach to study the chromosome organization in genomes of plants with small chromosomes and/or with low-informative C-banding patterns was developed in the course of investigation of the karyotypes of cotton plant, camomile, flax, and pea. To increase the resolving power of chromosome analysis, methods were worked out for revealing early replication patterns on chromosomes and for artificial impairment of mitotic chromosome condensation with the use of a DNA intercalator, 9-aminoacridine (9-AMA). To estimate polymorphism of the patterns of C-banding of small chromosomes on preparations obtained with the use of 9-AMA, it is necessary to choose a length interval that must not exceed three average sizes of metaphase chromosomes without the intercalator. The use of 9-AMA increases the resolution of differential C- and OR-banding and the precision of physical chromosome mapping by the FISH method. Of particular importance in studying small chromosomes is optimization of the computer-aided methods used to obtain and process chromosome images. The complex approach developed for analysis of the chromosome organization in plant genomes was used to study the karyotypes of 24 species of the genus Linum L. It permitted their chromosomes to be identified for the first time, and, in addition, B chromosomes were discovered and studied in the karyotypes of the species of the section Syllinum. By similarity of the karyotypes, the studied flax species were distributed in eight groups in agreement with the clusterization of these species according to the results of RAPD analysis performed in parallel. Systematic positions and phylogenetic relationships of the studied flax species were verified. Out results can serve as an important argument in favour of the proposal to develop a special program for sequencing the genome of cultivated flax (L. usitatissimum L.), which is a major representative of small-chromosome species.

  4. Degeneration of a Nonrecombining Chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, William R.

    1994-01-01

    Comparative studies suggest that sex chromosomes begin as ordinary autosomes that happen to carry a major sex determining locus. Over evolutionary time the Y chromosome is selected to stop recombining with the X chromosome, perhaps in response to accumulation of alleles beneficial to the heterogametic but harmful to the homogametic sex. Population genetic theory predicts that a nonrecombining Y chromosome should degenerate. Here this prediction is tested by application of specific selection pressures to Drosophila melanogaster populations. Results demonstrate the decay of a nonrecombining, nascent Y chromosome and the capacity for recombination to ameliorate such decay.

  5. The chromosome cycle of prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Summary In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, chromosomal DNA undergoes replication, condensation-decondensation and segregation, sequentially, in some fixed order. Other conditions, like sister-chromatid cohesion (SCC), may span several chromosomal events. One set of these chromosomal transactions within a single cell cycle constitutes the “chromosome cycle”. For many years it was generally assumed that the prokaryotic chromosome cycle follows major phases of the eukaryotic one: -replication-condensation-segregation-(cell division)-decondensation-, with SCC of unspecified length. Eventually it became evident that, in contrast to the strictly consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes, all stages of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle run concurrently. Thus, prokaryotes practice “progressive” chromosome segregation separated from replication by a brief SCC, and all three transactions move along the chromosome at the same fast rate. In other words, in addition to replication forks, there are “segregation forks” in prokaryotic chromosomes. Moreover, the bulk of prokaryotic DNA outside the replication-segregation transition stays compacted. I consider possible origins of this concurrent replication-segregation and outline the “nucleoid administration” system that organizes the dynamic part of the prokaryotic chromosome cycle. PMID:23962352

  6. Chromosome 19 International Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. . Medical Center); Ropers, H.H. . Dept. of Human Genetics); Carrano, A.J. )

    1993-01-04

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 19 was hosted on January 25 and 26, 1992, by the Department of Human Genetics, University Hospital Nijmegen, The Netherlands, at the 'Meerdal Conference Center'. The workshop was supported by a grant from the European Community obtained through HUGO, the Dutch Research Organization (NWO) and the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA). Travel support for American participants was provided by the Department of Energy. The goals of this workshop were to produce genetic, physical and integrated maps of chromosome 19, to identify inconsistencies and gaps, and to discuss and exchange resources and techniques available for the completion of these maps. The second day of the meeting was largely devoted to region or disease specific efforts. In particular, the meeting served as a platform for assessing and discussing the recent progress made into the molecular elucidation of myotonic dystrophy.

  7. Automated Chromosome Breakage Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    An automated karyotyping machine was built at JPL in 1972. It does computerized karyotyping, but it has some hardware limitations. The image processing hardware that was available at a reasonable price in 1972 was marginal, at best, for this job. In the meantime, NASA has developed an interest in longer term spaceflights and an interest in using chromosome breakage studies as a dosimeter for radiation or perhaps other damage that might occur to the tissues. This uses circulating lymphocytes as a physiological dosimeter looking for chromosome breakage on long-term spaceflights. For that reason, we have reactivated the automated karyotyping work at JPL. An update on that work, and a description of where it appears to be headed is presented.

  8. Automated Chromosome Breakage Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    An automated karyotyping machine was built at JPL in 1972. It does computerized karyotyping, but it has some hardware limitations. The image processing hardware that was available at a reasonable price in 1972 was marginal, at best, for this job. In the meantime, NASA has developed an interest in longer term spaceflights and an interest in using chromosome breakage studies as a dosimeter for radiation or perhaps other damage that might occur to the tissues. This uses circulating lymphocytes as a physiological dosimeter looking for chromosome breakage on long-term spaceflights. For that reason, we have reactivated the automated karyotyping work at JPL. An update on that work, and a description of where it appears to be headed is presented.

  9. SOME CHROMOSOME NUMBERS OF DRAPARNALDIA.

    PubMed

    Carroll, J W; Deason, T R

    1969-03-01

    The variability exhibited by Draparnaldia both in nature and in the laboratory makes it difficult to identify the species. The natural variability of Draparnaldia was amplified by the environmental conditions and the media used in this study. With the hope that chromosome studies would aid in taxonomic characterization by providing additional differentiating criteria, special attention was devoted to adapting techniques which could be used to determine chromosome numbers of Draparnaldia isolates. The chromosome numbers reported herein are as follows: (1) Draparnaldia glomerata, Isolate #1, isolated from Davis Falls, Montevallo, Alabama, was found to have a chromosome number of 13. (2) Draparnaldia Isolate #2, an unidentified species obtained from Anniston, Alabama, was found to have a chromosome number of 13. (3) Draparnaldia acuta, Isolate #3 from Northwood Lake, Northport, Alabama, exhibited 26 chromosomes. (4) Draparnaldia plumosa strain 423 (Indiana Culture Collection), 418/a (Cambridge) was observed to have a chromosome number of 13.

  10. The X chromosome in space.

    PubMed

    Jégu, Teddy; Aeby, Eric; Lee, Jeannie T

    2017-06-01

    Extensive 3D folding is required to package a genome into the tiny nuclear space, and this packaging must be compatible with proper gene expression. Thus, in the well-hierarchized nucleus, chromosomes occupy discrete territories and adopt specific 3D organizational structures that facilitate interactions between regulatory elements for gene expression. The mammalian X chromosome exemplifies this structure-function relationship. Recent studies have shown that, upon X-chromosome inactivation, active and inactive X chromosomes localize to different subnuclear positions and adopt distinct chromosomal architectures that reflect their activity states. Here, we review the roles of long non-coding RNAs, chromosomal organizational structures and the subnuclear localization of chromosomes as they relate to X-linked gene expression.

  11. Chromosomal evolution in Rodentia.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, S A; Perelman, P L; Trifonov, V A; Graphodatsky, A S

    2012-01-01

    Rodentia is the most species-rich mammalian order and includes several important laboratory model species. The amount of new information on karyotypic and phylogenetic relations within and among rodent taxa is rapidly increasing, but a synthesis of these data is currently lacking. Here, we have integrated information drawn from conventional banding studies, recent comparative painting investigations and molecular phylogenetic reconstructions of different rodent taxa. This permitted a revision of several ancestral karyotypic reconstructions, and a more accurate depiction of rodent chromosomal evolution.

  12. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  13. Interpreting Chromosome Aberration Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Dan; Reeder, Christopher; Loucas, Bradford; Hlatky, Lynn; Chen, Allen; Cornforth, Michael; Sachs, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage cells by breaking both strands of DNA in multiple locations, essentially cutting chromosomes into pieces. The cell has enzymatic mechanisms to repair such breaks; however, these mechanisms are imperfect and, in an exchange process, may produce a large-scale rearrangement of the genome, called a chromosome aberration. Chromosome aberrations are important in killing cells, during carcinogenesis, in characterizing repair/misrepair pathways, in retrospective radiation biodosimetry, and in a number of other ways. DNA staining techniques such as mFISH ( multicolor fluorescent in situ hybridization) provide a means for analyzing aberration spectra by examining observed final patterns. Unfortunately, an mFISH observed final pattern often does not uniquely determine the underlying exchange process. Further, resolution limitations in the painting protocol sometimes lead to apparently incomplete final patterns. We here describe an algorithm for systematically finding exchange processes consistent with any observed final pattern. This algorithm uses aberration multigraphs, a mathematical formalism that links the various aspects of aberration formation. By applying a measure to the space of consistent multigraphs, we will show how to generate model-specific distributions of aberration processes from mFISH experimental data. The approach is implemented by software freely available over the internet. As a sample application, we apply these algorithms to an aberration data set, obtaining a distribution of exchange cycle sizes, which serves to measure aberration complexity. Estimating complexity, in turn, helps indicate how damaging the aberrations are and may facilitate identification of radiation type in retrospective biodosimetry.

  14. Construction of human chromosome 21-specific yeast artificial chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, M.K.; Shero, J.H.; Hieter, P.A.; Antonarakis, S.E. ); Cheung, Meichi; Kan, Yuetwai )

    1989-12-01

    Chromosome 21-specific yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) have been constructed by a method that performs all steps in agarose, allowing size selection by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and the use of nanogram to microgram quantities of DNA. The DNA sources used were hybrid cell line WAV-17, containing chromosome 21 as the only human chromosome and flow-sorted chromosome 21. The transformation efficiency of ligation products was similar to that obtained in aqueous transformations and yielded YACs with sizes ranging from 100 kilobases (kb) to > 1 megabase when polyamines were included in the transformation procedure. Twenty-five YACs containing human DNA have been obtained from a mouse-human hybrid, ranging in size from 200 to > 1000 kb, with an average size of 410 kb. Ten of these YACs were localized to subregions of chromosome 21 by hybridization of RNA probes to a panel of somatic cell hybrid DNA. Twenty-one human YACs, ranging in size from 100 to 500 kb, with an average size of 150 kb, were obtained from {approx} 50 ng of flow-sorted chromosome 21 DNA. Three were localized to subregions of chromosome 21. YACs will aid the construction of a physical map of human chromosome 21 and the study of disorders associated with chromosome 21 such as Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome.

  15. B Chromosomes – A Matter of Chromosome Drive

    PubMed Central

    Houben, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    B chromosomes are supernumerary chromosomes which are often preferentially inherited, deviating from usual Mendelian segregation. The balance between the so-called chromosome drive and the negative effects that the presence of Bs applies on the fitness of their host determines the frequency of Bs in a particular population. Drive is the key for understanding most B chromosomes. Drive occurs in many ways at pre-meiotic, meiotic or post-meiotic divisions, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. The cellular mechanism of drive is reviewed based on the findings obtained for the B chromosomes of rye, maize and other species. How novel analytical tools will expand our ability to uncover the biology of B chromosome drive is discussed. PMID:28261259

  16. Polymer Models of Interphase Chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua; Kondev, Jané; Bressen, Debra; Haber, James

    2006-03-01

    Experiments during interphase, the growth phase of the cell cycle in eukaryotic cells, have shown that parts of chromosomes are tethered to the nuclear periphery[1]. Using a simple polymer model of interphase chromosomes that includes tethering, we compute the probability distribution for the distance between two marked points on the chromosome. These calculations are inspired by recent experiments with two or more fluorescent markers placed along the chromosome[2]. We demonstrate how experiments of this kind, in conjunction with simpe polymer models, can be used to systematically dissect the spatial organization of interphase chromosomes in the nucleus of living cells. This comparison of theory with experiments has lead to the conclusion that the structure of chromosome III in yeast is consistent with a 10nm-fiber model of chromatin. [1]Wallace F. Marshall. Current Biology, 12, 2002. [2] Kerstin Bystricky, Patrick Heun, Lutz Gehlen, Jörg Langowski and Susan M. Gasser. PNAS, 101(47) 2004

  17. Chromosomal evolution in Rodentia

    PubMed Central

    Romanenko, S A; Perelman, P L; Trifonov, V A; Graphodatsky, A S

    2012-01-01

    Rodentia is the most species-rich mammalian order and includes several important laboratory model species. The amount of new information on karyotypic and phylogenetic relations within and among rodent taxa is rapidly increasing, but a synthesis of these data is currently lacking. Here, we have integrated information drawn from conventional banding studies, recent comparative painting investigations and molecular phylogenetic reconstructions of different rodent taxa. This permitted a revision of several ancestral karyotypic reconstructions, and a more accurate depiction of rodent chromosomal evolution. PMID:22086076

  18. Chromosome dynamics in multichromosome bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jha, Jyoti K; Baek, Jong Hwan; Venkova-Canova, Tatiana; Chattoraj, Dhruba K

    2012-07-01

    On the basis of limited information, bacteria were once assumed to have no more than one chromosome. In the era of genomics, it has become clear that some, like eukaryotes, have more than one chromosome. Multichromosome bacteria provide opportunities to investigate how split genomes emerged, whether the individual chromosomes communicate to coordinate their replication and segregation, and what selective advantages split genomes might provide. Our current knowledge of these topics comes mostly from studies in Vibrio cholerae, which has two chromosomes, chr1 and chr2. Chr1 carries out most of the house-keeping functions and is considered the main chromosome, whereas chr2 appears to have originated from a plasmid and has acquired genes of mostly unknown origin and function. Nevertheless, unlike plasmids, chr2 replicates once and only once per cell cycle, like a bona fide chromosome. The two chromosomes replicate and segregate using separate programs, unlike eukaryotic chromosomes. They terminate replication synchronously, suggesting that there might be communication between them. Replication of the chromosomes is affected by segregation genes but in a chromosome specific fashion, a new development in the field of DNA replication control. The split genome allows genome duplication to complete in less time and with fewer replication forks, which could be beneficial for genome maintenance during rapid growth, which is the norm for V. cholerae in broth cultures and in the human host. In the latter, the expression of chr2 genes increases preferentially. Studies of chromosome maintenance in multichromosomal bacteria, although in their infancy, are already broadening our view of chromosome biology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chromatin in time and space. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Histone acetylation in insect chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Allfrey, V G; Pogo, B G; Littau, V C; Gershey, E L; Mirsky, A E

    1968-01-19

    Acetylation of histones takes place along the salivary gland chromosomes of Chironomus thummi when RNA synthesis is active. It can be observed but not measured quantitatively by autoradiography of chromosome squashes. The "fixatives" commonly used in preparing squashes of insect chromosomes preferentially extract the highly acetylated "arginine-rich" histone fractions; the use of such fixatives may explain the reported absence of histone acetylation in Drosophila melanogaster.

  20. Spatial organization of bacterial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xindan; Rudner, David Z

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are organized in stereotypical patterns that are faithfully and robustly regenerated in daughter cells. Two distinct spatial patterns were described almost a decade ago in our most tractable model organisms. In recent years, analysis of chromosome organization in a larger and more diverse set of bacteria and a deeper characterization of chromosome dynamics in the original model systems have provided a broader and more complete picture of both chromosome organization and the activities that generate the observed spatial patterns. Here, we summarize these different patterns highlighting similarities and differences and discuss the protein factors that help establish and maintain them.

  1. Individual chromosomes as viscoelastic copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almagro, S.; Dimitrov, S.; Hirano, T.; Vallade, M.; Riveline, D.

    2003-09-01

    We report elastic measurements of individual chromosomes observed in vitro. Free fluctuations of shapes show that a chromosome can be seen as a copolymer, exhibiting rigid regions alternating with semi-flexible regions. We characterize this behavior and compare it with known biopolymers. We further show that the inner part of a chromosome exhibits viscoelasticity, as extracted by the loading rate dependence of the stretch modulus. Taken together, these data suggest an organization for the chromosome as a copolymer composed of an inner rigid core exhibiting viscoelasticity surrounded by an elastic soft envelope.

  2. The XXXXY Chromosome Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Zaleski, Witold A.; Houston, C. Stuart; Pozsonyi, J.; Ying, K. L.

    1966-01-01

    The majority of abnormal sex chromosome complexes in the male have been considered to be variants of Klinefelter's syndrome but an exception should probably be made in the case of the XXXXY individual who has distinctive phenotypic features. Clinical, radiological and cytological data on three new cases of XXXXY syndrome are presented and 30 cases from the literature are reviewed. In many cases the published clinical and radiological data were supplemented and re-evaluated. Mental retardation, usually severe, was present in all cases. Typical facies was observed in many; clinodactyly of the fifth finger was seen in nearly all. Radiological examination revealed abnormalities in the elbows and wrists in all the 19 personally evaluated cases, and other skeletal anomalies were very frequent. Cryptorchism is very common and absence of Leydig's cells may differentiate the XXXXY chromosome anomaly from polysomic variants of Klinefelter's syndrome. The relationship of this syndrome to Klinefelter's syndrome and to Down's syndrome is discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15 PMID:4222822

  3. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Homolka, David; Ivanek, Robert; Capkova, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiri

    2007-10-01

    Heterozygosity for certain mouse and human chromosomal rearrangements is characterized by the incomplete meiotic synapsis of rearranged chromosomes, by their colocalization with the XY body in primary spermatocytes, and by male-limited sterility. Previously, we argued that such X-autosomal associations could interfere with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation. Recently, supporting evidence has reported modifications of histones in rearranged chromosomes by a process called the meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC). Here, we report on the transcriptional down-regulation of genes within the unsynapsed region of the rearranged mouse chromosome 17, and on the subsequent disturbance of X chromosome inactivation. The partial transcriptional suppression of genes in the unsynapsed chromatin was most prominent prior to the mid-pachytene stage of primary spermatocytes. Later, during the mid-late pachytene, the rearranged autosomes colocalized with the XY body, and the X chromosome failed to undergo proper transcriptional silencing. Our findings provide direct evidence on the MSUC acting at the mRNA level, and implicate that autosomal asynapsis in meiosis may cause male sterility by interfering with meiotic sex chromosome inactivation.

  4. Distance between homologous chromosomes results from chromosome positioning constraints.

    PubMed

    Heride, Claire; Ricoul, Michelle; Kiêu, Kien; von Hase, Johann; Guillemot, Vincent; Cremer, Christoph; Dubrana, Karine; Sabatier, Laure

    2010-12-01

    The organization of chromosomes is important for various biological processes and is involved in the formation of rearrangements often observed in cancer. In mammals, chromosomes are organized in territories that are radially positioned in the nucleus. However, it remains unclear whether chromosomes are organized relative to each other. Here, we examine the nuclear arrangement of 10 chromosomes in human epithelial cancer cells by three-dimensional FISH analysis. We show that their radial position correlates with the ratio of their gene density to chromosome size. We also observe that inter-homologue distances are generally larger than inter-heterologue distances. Using numerical simulations taking radial position constraints into account, we demonstrate that, for some chromosomes, radial position is enough to justify the inter-homologue distance, whereas for others additional constraints are involved. Among these constraints, we propose that nucleolar organizer regions participate in the internal positioning of the acrocentric chromosome HSA21, possibly through interactions with nucleoli. Maintaining distance between homologous chromosomes in human cells could participate in regulating genome stability and gene expression, both mechanisms that are key players in tumorigenesis.

  5. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  6. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  7. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Haering, Christian H.; Jessberger, Rolf

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  8. Organization of the bacterial chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Krawiec, S; Riley, M

    1990-01-01

    Recent progress in studies on the bacterial chromosome is summarized. Although the greatest amount of information comes from studies on Escherichia coli, reports on studies of many other bacteria are also included. A compilation of the sizes of chromosomal DNAs as determined by pulsed-field electrophoresis is given, as well as a discussion of factors that affect gene dosage, including redundancy of chromosomes on the one hand and inactivation of chromosomes on the other hand. The distinction between a large plasmid and a second chromosome is discussed. Recent information on repeated sequences and chromosomal rearrangements is presented. The growing understanding of limitations on the rearrangements that can be tolerated by bacteria and those that cannot is summarized, and the sensitive region flanking the terminator loci is described. Sources and types of genetic variation in bacteria are listed, from simple single nucleotide mutations to intragenic and intergenic recombinations. A model depicting the dynamics of the evolution and genetic activity of the bacterial chromosome is described which entails acquisition by recombination of clonal segments within the chromosome. The model is consistent with the existence of only a few genetic types of E. coli worldwide. Finally, there is a summary of recent reports on lateral genetic exchange across great taxonomic distances, yet another source of genetic variation and innovation. PMID:2087223

  9. Visualization of early chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    Kireeva, Natashe; Lakonishok, Margot; Kireev, Igor; Hirano, Tatsuya; Belmont, Andrew S.

    2004-01-01

    Current models of mitotic chromosome structure are based largely on the examination of maximally condensed metaphase chromosomes. Here, we test these models by correlating the distribution of two scaffold components with the appearance of prophase chromosome folding intermediates. We confirm an axial distribution of topoisomerase IIα and the condensin subunit, structural maintenance of chromosomes 2 (SMC2), in unextracted metaphase chromosomes, with SMC2 localizing to a 150–200-nm-diameter central core. In contrast to predictions of radial loop/scaffold models, this axial distribution does not appear until late prophase, after formation of uniformly condensed middle prophase chromosomes. Instead, SMC2 associates throughout early and middle prophase chromatids, frequently forming foci over the chromosome exterior. Early prophase condensation occurs through folding of large-scale chromatin fibers into condensed masses. These resolve into linear, 200–300-nm-diameter middle prophase chromatids that double in diameter by late prophase. We propose a unified model of chromosome structure in which hierarchical levels of chromatin folding are stabilized late in mitosis by an axial “glue.” PMID:15353545

  10. Advances in plant chromosome genomics.

    PubMed

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Vrána, Jan; Cápal, Petr; Kubaláková, Marie; Burešová, Veronika; Simková, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) is revolutionizing genomics and is providing novel insights into genome organization, evolution and function. The number of plant genomes targeted for sequencing is rising. For the moment, however, the acquisition of full genome sequences in large genome species remains difficult, largely because the short reads produced by NGS platforms are inadequate to cope with repeat-rich DNA, which forms a large part of these genomes. The problem of sequence redundancy is compounded in polyploids, which dominate the plant kingdom. An approach to overcoming some of these difficulties is to reduce the full nuclear genome to its individual chromosomes using flow-sorting. The DNA acquired in this way has proven to be suitable for many applications, including PCR-based physical mapping, in situ hybridization, forming DNA arrays, the development of DNA markers, the construction of BAC libraries and positional cloning. Coupling chromosome sorting with NGS offers opportunities for the study of genome organization at the single chromosomal level, for comparative analyses between related species and for the validation of whole genome assemblies. Apart from the primary aim of reducing the complexity of the template, taking a chromosome-based approach enables independent teams to work in parallel, each tasked with the analysis of a different chromosome(s). Given that the number of plant species tractable for chromosome sorting is increasing, the likelihood is that chromosome genomics - the marriage of cytology and genomics - will make a significant contribution to the field of plant genetics.

  11. Integrating maps of chromosome 21.

    PubMed

    Patterson, D

    1992-06-01

    The past year has seen major progress in the construction of various types of maps of human chromosome 21. Perhaps more significantly, the chromosome 21 research community is making very significant progress on integration of these maps through the use of common resources and increased collaboration and communication.

  12. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation

    PubMed Central

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung BK; Laub, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly one millimeter long, or approximately 1000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length-scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation. PMID:26566111

  13. Bacterial chromosome organization and segregation.

    PubMed

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana; Le, Tung B K; Laub, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    If fully stretched out, a typical bacterial chromosome would be nearly 1 mm long, approximately 1,000 times the length of a cell. Not only must cells massively compact their genetic material, but they must also organize their DNA in a manner that is compatible with a range of cellular processes, including DNA replication, DNA repair, homologous recombination, and horizontal gene transfer. Recent work, driven in part by technological advances, has begun to reveal the general principles of chromosome organization in bacteria. Here, drawing on studies of many different organisms, we review the emerging picture of how bacterial chromosomes are structured at multiple length scales, highlighting the functions of various DNA-binding proteins and the impact of physical forces. Additionally, we discuss the spatial dynamics of chromosomes, particularly during their segregation to daughter cells. Although there has been tremendous progress, we also highlight gaps that remain in understanding chromosome organization and segregation.

  14. Chromosome choreography: the meiotic ballet.

    PubMed

    Page, Scott L; Hawley, R Scott

    2003-08-08

    The separation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis in eukaryotes is the physical basis of Mendelian inheritance. The core of the meiotic process is a specialized nuclear division (meiosis I) in which homologs pair with each other, recombine, and then segregate from each other. The processes of chromosome alignment and pairing allow for homolog recognition. Reciprocal meiotic recombination ensures meiotic chromosome segregation by converting sister chromatid cohesion into mechanisms that hold homologous chromosomes together. Finally, the ability of sister kinetochores to orient to a single pole at metaphase I allows the separation of homologs to two different daughter cells. Failures to properly accomplish this elegant chromosome dance result in aneuploidy, a major cause of miscarriage and birth defects in human beings.

  15. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A.; Morris, M. A.

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 20 syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions ring chromosome 20 syndrome ring chromosome 20 syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Ring chromosome 20 syndrome is a condition that affects the ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions Y chromosome infertility Y chromosome infertility Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Y chromosome infertility is a condition that affects the production of ...

  18. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes of

  19. CHROMOSOMAL MAPPING IN STRAINS OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS , CHROMOSOMES), (*CHROMOSOMES, MAPPING), NITROSO COMPOUNDS, GUANIDINES, GENETICS, MUTATIONS, DRUGS, TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY), TEST METHODS, DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACIDS, INHIBITION, RESISTANCE(BIOLOGY).

  20. Genetic Engineering of a Radiation-Resistant Bacterium for Biodegradation of Mixed Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2002-06-10

    The mixture of toxic chemicals, heavy metals, halogenated solvents and radionuclides in many DOE waste materials presents a challenging problem for separating the different species and disposing of individual contaminants. One approach for dealing with mixed wastes is to genetically engineer the radiation-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans to survive in and detoxify DOE's mixed waste streams, and to develop process parameters for treating mixed wastes with such constructed strains. The goal for this project is to develop a suite of genetic tools for Deinococcus radiodurans and to use these tools to construct and test stable strains for detoxification of haloorganics in mixed wastes.

  1. Genetic Engineering of a Radiation-Resistant Bacterium for Biodegradation of Mixed Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2001-06-11

    The mixture of toxic chemicals, heavy metals, halogenated solvents and radionuclides in many DOE waste materials presents a challenging problem for separating the different species and disposing of individual contaminants. One approach for dealing with mixed wastes is to genetically engineer the radiation-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans to survive in and detoxify DOE's mixed waste streams, and to develop process parameters for treating mixed wastes with such constructed strains. The goal for this project is to develop a suite of genetic tools for Deinococcus radiodurans and to use these tools to construct and test stable strains for detoxification of haloorganics in mixed wastes.

  2. Protein Oxidation Implicated as the Primary Determinant of Bacterial Radioresistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    homologous end joining of D. radiodurans chromosomal DSB fragments following IR is not observed [28]; and the products of interchromosomal recombination in...radiodurans resistance [12,27]; Mn-SOD is not needed for survival of D. radiodurans following acute irradiation or growth under 50 Gy/h [1,11]; non

  3. Reference-assisted chromosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaebum; Larkin, Denis M; Cai, Qingle; Asan; Zhang, Yongfen; Ge, Ri-Li; Auvil, Loretta; Capitanu, Boris; Zhang, Guojie; Lewin, Harris A; Ma, Jian

    2013-01-29

    One of the most difficult problems in modern genomics is the assembly of full-length chromosomes using next generation sequencing (NGS) data. To address this problem, we developed "reference-assisted chromosome assembly" (RACA), an algorithm to reliably order and orient sequence scaffolds generated by NGS and assemblers into longer chromosomal fragments using comparative genome information and paired-end reads. Evaluation of results using simulated and real genome assemblies indicates that our approach can substantially improve genomes generated by a wide variety of de novo assemblers if a good reference assembly of a closely related species and outgroup genomes are available. We used RACA to reconstruct 60 Tibetan antelope (Pantholops hodgsonii) chromosome fragments from 1,434 SOAPdenovo sequence scaffolds, of which 16 chromosome fragments were homologous to complete cattle chromosomes. Experimental validation by PCR showed that predictions made by RACA are highly accurate. Our results indicate that RACA will significantly facilitate the study of chromosome evolution and genome rearrangements for the large number of genomes being sequenced by NGS that do not have a genetic or physical map.

  4. Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences

    DOEpatents

    Moyzis, Robert K.; Meyne, Julianne

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  5. X Chromosome Evolution in Cetartiodactyla

    PubMed Central

    Proskuryakova, Anastasia A.; Kulemzina, Anastasia I.; Makunin, Alexey I.; Kukekova, Anna V.; Lynn Johnson, Jennifer; Lemskaya, Natalya A.; Beklemisheva, Violetta R.; Roelke-Parker, Melody E.; Bellizzi, June; Ryder, Oliver A.; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Graphodatsky, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    The phenomenon of a remarkable conservation of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals has been first described by Susumu Ohno in 1964. A notable exception is the cetartiodactyl X chromosome, which varies widely in morphology and G-banding pattern between species. It is hypothesized that this sex chromosome has undergone multiple rearrangements that changed the centromere position and the order of syntenic segments over the last 80 million years of Cetartiodactyla speciation. To investigate its evolution we have selected 26 evolutionarily conserved bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from the cattle CHORI-240 library evenly distributed along the cattle X chromosome. High-resolution BAC maps of the X chromosome on a representative range of cetartiodactyl species from different branches: pig (Suidae), alpaca (Camelidae), gray whale (Cetacea), hippopotamus (Hippopotamidae), Java mouse-deer (Tragulidae), pronghorn (Antilocapridae), Siberian musk deer (Moschidae), and giraffe (Giraffidae) were obtained by fluorescent in situ hybridization. To trace the X chromosome evolution during fast radiation in specious families, we performed mapping in several cervids (moose, Siberian roe deer, fallow deer, and Pere David’s deer) and bovid (muskox, goat, sheep, sable antelope, and cattle) species. We have identified three major conserved synteny blocks and rearrangements in different cetartiodactyl lineages and found that the recently described phenomenon of the evolutionary new centromere emergence has taken place in the X chromosome evolution of Cetartiodactyla at least five times. We propose the structure of the putative ancestral cetartiodactyl X chromosome by reconstructing the order of syntenic segments and centromere position for key groups. PMID:28858207

  6. Analysis of chromosome 21 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones

    SciTech Connect

    Tassone, F. A. Gemelli School of Medicine, Rome ); Cheng, S.; Gardiner, K. )

    1992-12-01

    Chromosome 21 contains genes relevant to several important diseases. Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones, because they span >100 kbp, will provide attractive material for initiating searches for such genes. Twenty-two YAC clones, each of which maps to a region of potential relevance either to aspects of the Down syndrome phenotype or to one of the other chromosome 21-associated genetic diseases, have been analyzed in detail. Clones total [approximately]6,000 kb and derive from all parts of the long arm. Rare restriction-site maps have been constructed for each clone and have been used to determine regional variations in clonability, methylation frequency, CpG island density, and CpG island frequency versus gene density. This information will be useful for the isolation and mapping of new genes to chromosome 21 and for walking in YAC libraries. 48 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Integrative selection of human chromosome-specific yeast artificial chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan, W.J.; Reeves, R.G. )

    1991-09-01

    Human specific integrative selection vectors (ISVs) were designed to optimize integration of a yeast-selectable marker specifically into yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) derived from human but not mouse DNA. ISVs were transformed into a YAC genomic library constructed from DNA of a human-mouse somatic cell hybrid containing chromosome 21 (HSA21) as the only human chromosome. One percent of the yeast in the original library contained HSA21-derived YACs; between 45% and 54% of the yeast recovered after transformation with ISV vectors contained human YACs. Integrative selection provides a rapid means of obtaining a highly enriched population of human chromosome-specific YACs by eliminating the labor-intensive steps of isolating and screening primary transformants. The procedure is biased toward the selection of YACs that contain a large number of targets for homologous recombination; thus, libraries constructed by this procedure will be composed primarily of the largest YACs in the population.

  8. Analysis of chromosome 21 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones.

    PubMed Central

    Tassone, F; Cheng, S; Gardiner, K

    1992-01-01

    Chromosome 21 contains genes relevant to several important diseases. Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones, because they span > 100 kbp, will provide attractive material for initiating searches for such genes. Twenty-two YAC clones, each of which maps to a region of potential relevance either to aspects of the Down syndrome phenotype or to one of the other chromosome 21-associated genetic diseases, have been analyzed in detail. Clones total approximately 6,000 kb and derive from all parts of the long arm. Rare restriction-site maps have been constructed for each clone and have been used to determine regional variations in clonability, methylation frequency, CpG island density, and CpG island frequency versus gene density. This information will be useful for the isolation and mapping of new genes to chromosome 21 and for walking in YAC libraries. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 PMID:1463009

  9. Gametocidal chromosomes enhancing chromosome aberration in common wheat induced by 5-azacytidine.

    PubMed

    Su, W-Y; Cong, W-W; Shu, Y-J; Wang, D; Xu, G-H; Guo, C-H

    2013-07-08

    The gametocidal (Gc) chromosome from Aegilops spp induces chromosome mutation, which is introduced into common wheat as a tool of chromosome manipulation for genetic improvement. The Gc chromosome functions similar to a restriction-modification system in bacteria, in which DNA methylation is an important regulator. We treated root tips of wheat carrying Gc chromosomes with the hypomethylation agent 5-azacytidine; chromosome breakage and micronuclei were observed in these root tips. The frequency of aberrations differed in wheat containing different Gc chromosomes, suggesting different functions inducing chromosome breakage. Gc chromosome 3C caused the greatest degree of chromosome aberration, while Gc chromosome 3C(SAT) and 2C caused only slight chromosome aberration. Gc chromosome 3C induced different degrees of chromosome aberration in wheat varieties Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring and Norin 26, demonstrating an inhibition function in common wheat.

  10. Bacterial Chromosome Organization and Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Esteban; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial chromosomes are generally ∼1000 times longer than the cells in which they reside, and concurrent replication, segregation, and transcription/translation of this crowded mass of DNA poses a challenging organizational problem. Recent advances in cell-imaging technology with subdiffraction resolution have revealed that the bacterial nucleoid is reliably oriented and highly organized within the cell. Such organization is transmitted from one generation to the next by progressive segregation of daughter chromosomes and anchoring of DNA to the cell envelope. Active segregation by a mitotic machinery appears to be common; however, the mode of chromosome segregation varies significantly from species to species. PMID:20182613

  11. Chromosome Segregation in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, R.; Jha, J; Chattoraj, DK

    2014-01-01

    The study of chromosome segregation is currently one of the most exciting research frontiers in cell biology. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of the chromosome segregation process in Vibrio cholerae, based primarily on findings from fluorescence microscopy experiments. This bacterium is of special interest because of its eukaryotic feature of having a divided genome, a feature shared with 10% of known bacteria. We also discuss how the segregation mechanisms of V. cholerae compare with those in other bacteria, and highlight some of the remaining questions regarding the process of bacterial chromosome segregation. PMID:25732338

  12. [Chromosome analysis and genetic testing].

    PubMed

    Isobe, Yasushi; Miura, Ikuo

    2014-03-01

    Chromosomal and genetic tests are essential to establish correct diagnoses of the lymphoma. When the tissue examination is planned, these should be done simultaneously with the morphological and immunophenotypic evaluations. Chromosome analyses can identify the genomic alterations of tumor cells. Some chromosome abnormalities define disease subtypes. For example, recurrent 14q32 translocations involving the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus support the diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma, and their translocation partners identify the types. In contrast, genetic testings are performed to confirm the presence of certain abnormalities including gene rearrangements, mutations, amplifications and deletions in each case. These results provide us detailed information for diagnosis, prognosis, and choice of therapy.

  13. Repetitive telomeric sequences in chromosomal translocations involving chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, J.; Dallaire, L.; Fetni, R.

    1994-09-01

    Telomeres perform key functions in maintaining chromosome integrity. In some structural rearrangements the structure and polymorphism in human telomeres may play a significant role. However, of all the telomeric and subtelomeric sequences, only the terminal TTAGGG repeats are believed essential for telomere function. During the course of a study on the role of telomere structure and polymorphism in chromosomal rearrangements observed in families referred for prenatal diagnosis, we studied three cases in which chromosome 21 was involved. Repetitive TTAGGG sequences for all human chromosomes were used as probes (Oncor). Case 1, a de novo cryptic translocation (2;21) was initially identified as monosomy 21 in a child with psychomotor delay and mild dysmorphism. Using a cosmid probe specific for region 21q22.3 and whole chromosome 21 specific painting probe, the long arm of 21 was found on the short arm of chromosome 2 with an interstitial telomere at the breakpoint junction. All the cells were monosomic for 21pter{yields}q21. Case 2 is a familial (19;21) translocation. GTG-banding and FISH with a satellite probe showed no apparent loss of material at the end of either 19q or 21q, with an interstitial telomere at the fusion site of the two intact chromosomes. In case 3, a four generation reciprocal (20;21) translocation, there was no interstitial telomere. The persistence of an interstitial telomere is a relatively rare event which can now be observed with in situ hybridization. Its study may lead to a better understanding of the dynamics of translocations and of chromosome imbalance.

  14. Numerous Transitions of Sex Chromosomes in Diptera

    PubMed Central

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot), but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes). Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa. PMID:25879221

  15. Numerous transitions of sex chromosomes in Diptera.

    PubMed

    Vicoso, Beatriz; Bachtrog, Doris

    2015-04-01

    Many species groups, including mammals and many insects, determine sex using heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Diptera flies, which include the model Drosophila melanogaster, generally have XY sex chromosomes and a conserved karyotype consisting of six chromosomal arms (five large rods and a small dot), but superficially similar karyotypes may conceal the true extent of sex chromosome variation. Here, we use whole-genome analysis in 37 fly species belonging to 22 different families of Diptera and uncover tremendous hidden diversity in sex chromosome karyotypes among flies. We identify over a dozen different sex chromosome configurations, and the small dot chromosome is repeatedly used as the sex chromosome, which presumably reflects the ancestral karyotype of higher Diptera. However, we identify species with undifferentiated sex chromosomes, others in which a different chromosome replaced the dot as a sex chromosome or in which up to three chromosomal elements became incorporated into the sex chromosomes, and others yet with female heterogamety (ZW sex chromosomes). Transcriptome analysis shows that dosage compensation has evolved multiple times in flies, consistently through up-regulation of the single X in males. However, X chromosomes generally show a deficiency of genes with male-biased expression, possibly reflecting sex-specific selective pressures. These species thus provide a rich resource to study sex chromosome biology in a comparative manner and show that similar selective forces have shaped the unique evolution of sex chromosomes in diverse fly taxa.

  16. Chromosome Aberrations in Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Kerry A.; Durante, M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    A review of currently available data on in vivo induced chromosome damage in the blood lymphocytes of astronauts proves that, after protracted exposure of a few months or more to space radiation, cytogenetic biodosimetry analyses of blood collected within a week or two of return from space provides a reliable estimate of equivalent radiation dose and risk. Recent studies indicate that biodosimetry estimates from single spaceflights lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry and biophysical models, but very large uncertainties are associated with single individual measurements and the total sample population remains low. Retrospective doses may be more difficult to estimate because of the fairly rapid time-dependent loss of "stable" aberrations in blood lymphocytes. Also, biodosimetry estimates from individuals who participate in multiple missions, or very long (interplanetary) missions, may be complicated by an adaptive response to space radiation and/or changes in lymphocyte survival and repopulation. A discussion of published data is presented and specific issues related to space radiation biodosimetry protocols are discussed.

  17. Chromosome 5 workshop.

    PubMed

    Crowe, R R; Vieland, V

    1998-01-01

    In schizophrenia, evidence consistent with linkage in the 5q23.3-q31.1 region emerged from three independent samples. In addition, a moderately retarded woman with schizophrenia with an interstitial deletion overlapping this region was reported at the workshop. A second region of interest for schizophrenia is the 5p14.1-p13.1 region, where lod scores as high as 4.37 were found in one pedigree. Chromosome 5p15 gave a non-parametric linkage (NPL) score of 2.18 (p < 0.02) in one study. Several genome scans have not found evidence of excess allele sharing in these regions, although in most cases the genome scans did not include the markers that had resulted in provisional evidence of linkage. A large pedigree of bipolar illness has shown provisional evidence of linkage at, or near, the dopamine transporter locus at 5p15.3; the maximum lod score obtained was 2.72 at D5S417. In other regions, a genome scan of bipolar disorder gave NPL scores of 2.98 at D5S812 and 3.76 at D5S423. The third disorder of interest is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) because two studies have reported an association with the 480 bp allele at the dopamine transporter locus. A poster presented at the Congress reported a failure to replicate the association in a sample with considerable power to detect the effect size previously reported.

  18. Chromosome abnormalities in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Vassilopoulos, D

    1976-01-01

    The current status of research into chromosomal abnormalities in neurological diseases is reviewed. The only possible association between chromosome aberration and neurological disorder is found in ataxia telangiectasia and in tumours of the nervous system. In the remaining diseases reviewed, no specific association was confirmed. This was expected to some extent, since the majority of these diseases (spinal muscular atrophies, muscular dystrophies, etc.) are due to single gene defects.

  19. Methods for chromosome-specific staining

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1995-01-01

    Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining are provided. Compositions comprise heterogenous mixtures of labeled nucleic acid fragments having substantially complementary base sequences to unique sequence regions of the chromosomal DNA for which their associated staining reagent is specific. Methods include methods for making the chromosome-specific staining compositions of the invention, and methods for applying the staining compositions to chromosomes.

  20. Origin and domestication of papaya Yh chromosome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sex in papaya is controlled by a pair of nascent sex chromosomes. Females are XX, and two slightly different Y chromosomes distinguish males (XY) and hermaphrodites (XYh). The hermaphrodite-specific region of the Yh chromosome (HSY) and its X chromosome counterpart were sequenced and analyzed previo...

  1. B chromosomes and sex in animals.

    PubMed

    Camacho, J P M; Schmid, M; Cabrero, J

    2011-01-01

    Supernumerary (B) chromosomes are dispensable elements found in many eukaryote genomes in addition to standard (A) chromosomes. In many respects, B chromosomes resemble sex chromosomes, so that a common ancestry for them has frequently been suggested. For instance, B chromosomes in grasshoppers, and other insects, show a pycnotic cycle of condensation-decondensation during meiosis remarkably similar to that of the X chromosome. In some cases, B chromosome size is even very similar to that of the X chromosome. These resemblances have led to suggest the X as the B ancestor in many cases. In addition, sex chromosome origin from B chromosomes has also been suggested. In this article, we review the existing evidence for both evolutionary pathways, as well as sex differences for B frequency at adult and embryo progeny levels, B chromosome effects or B chromosome transmission. In addition, we review cases found in the literature showing sex-ratio distortion associated with B chromosome presence, the most extreme case being the paternal sex ratio (PSR) chromosomes in some Hymenoptera. We finally analyse the possibility of B chromosome regularisation within the host genome and, as a consequence of it, whether B chromosomes can become regular members of the host genome.

  2. Microelasticity of Single Mitotic Chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Michael; Eroglu, Sertac; Chatenay, Didier; Marko, John F.; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2000-03-01

    The force-extension behavior of mitotic chromosomes from the newt TVI tumor cell line was studied using micropipette manipulation and force measuring techniques. Reversible, linear elastic response was observed for extensions up to 5 times the native length; the force required to double chromosome length was 1 nanonewton (nN). For further elongations, the linear response teminates at a force plateau of 15 nN and at an extension of 20x. Beyond this extension, the chromosome breaks at elongations between 20x and 70x. These results will be compared to the similar behavior of mitotic chromosomes from explanted newt cells (Poirier, Eroglu, Chatenay and Marko, Mol. Biol. Cell, in press). Also, the effect of biochemical modifications on the elasticity was studied. Ethidium Bromide, which binds to DNA, induces up to a 10 times increase in the Young's modulus. Anti-XCAP-E, which binds to a putative chromosome folding protein, induces up to a 2 times increase in the Young's modulus. Preliminary results on the dynamical relaxation of chromosomes will also be presented. Support of this research through a Biomedical Engineering Research Grant from The Whitaker Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Chromosome evolution in Neotropical butterflies.

    PubMed

    Saura, Anssi; Von Schoultz, Barbara; Saura, Anja O; Brown, Keith S

    2013-06-01

    We list the chromosome numbers for 65 species of Neotropical Hesperiidae and 104 species or subspecies of Pieridae. In Hesperiidae the tribe Pyrrhopygini have a modal n = 28, Eudaminae and Pyrgini a modal n = 31, while Hesperiinae have n = around 29. Among Pieridae, Coliadinae have a strong modal n = 31 and among Pierinae Anthocharidini are almost fixed for n = 15 while Pierini vary with n = 26 as the most common chromosome number. Dismorphiinae show wide variation. We discuss these results in the context of chromosome numbers of over 1400 Neotropical butterfly species and subspecies derived from about 3000 populations published here and in earlier papers of a series. The overall results show that many Neotropical groups are characterized by karyotype instability with several derived modal numbers or none at all, while almost all taxa of Lepidoptera studied from the other parts of the world have one of n = 29-31 as modal numbers. Possibly chromosome number changes become fixed in the course of speciation driven by biotic interactions. Population subdivision and structuring facilitate karyotype change. Factors that stabilize chromosome numbers include hybridization among species sharing the same number, migration, sexual selection and possibly the distribution of chromosomes within the nucleus. © 2013 The Authors.

  4. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Role of premature stop codons in bacterial evolution.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tit-Yee; Fernandes, Sanjit; Sankhon, Naby; Leong, Patrick P; Kuo, Jimmy; Liu, Jong-Kang

    2008-10-01

    When the stop codons TGA, TAA, and TAG are found in the second and third reading frames of a protein-encoding gene, they are considered premature stop codons (PSC). Deinococcus radiodurans disproportionately favored TGA more than the other two triplets as a PSC. The TGA triplet was also found more often in noncoding regions and as a stop codon, though the bias was less pronounced. We investigated this phenomenon in 72 bacterial species with widely differing chromosomal GC contents. Although TGA and TAG were compositionally similar, we found a great variation in use of TGA but a very limited range of use of TAG. The frequency of use of TGA in the gene sequences generally increased with the GC content of the chromosome, while the frequency of use of TAG, like that of TAA, was inversely proportional to the GC content of the chromosome. The patterns of use of TAA, TGA and TAG as real stop codons were less biased and less influenced by the GC content of the chromosome. Bacteria with higher chromosomal GC contents often contained fewer PSC trimers in their genes. Phylogenetically related bacteria often exhibited similar PSC ratios. In addition, metabolically versatile bacteria have significantly fewer PSC trimers in their genes. The bias toward TGA but against TAG as a PSC could not be explained either by the preferential usage of specific codons or by the GC contents of individual chromosomes. We proposed that the quantity and the quality of the PSC in the genome might be important in bacterial evolution.

  6. Flow karyotyping and sorting of human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J.W.; Lucas, J.; Peters, D.; Pinkel, D.; Trask, B.; van den Engh, G.; Van Dilla, M.A.

    1986-07-16

    Flow cytometry and sorting are becoming increasingly useful as tools for chromosome classfication and for the detection of numerical and structural chromosome aberrations. Chromosomes of a single type can be purified with these tools to facilitate gene mapping or production of chromosome specific recombinant DNA libraries. For analysis of chromosomes with flow cytometry, the chromosomes are extracted from mitotic cells, stained with one or more fluorescent dyes and classified one-by-one according to their dye content(s). Thus, the flow approach is fundamentally different than conventional karyotyping where chromosomes are classified within the context of a metaphase spread. Flow sorting allows purification of chromosomes that can be distinguished flow cytometrically. The authors describe the basic principles of flow cytometric chromosome classification i.e. flow karyotyping, and chromosome sorting and describe several applications. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Problems with the current deinococcal hypothesis: an alternative theory.

    PubMed

    Sghaier, Haïtham; Narumi, Issay; Satoh, Katsuya; Ohba, Hirofumi; Mitomo, Hiroshi

    2007-08-01

    All theories related to the evolution of Deinococcus radiodurans have a common denominator: the strong positive correlation between ionizing-radiation resistance and desiccation tolerance. Currently, the widespread hypothesis is that D. radiodurans' ionizing-radiation resistance is a consequence of this organism's adaptation to desiccation (desiccation adaptation hypothesis). Here, we draw attention to major discrepancy that has emerged between the "desiccation adaptation hypothesis" and recent findings in computational biology, experimental research, and terrestrial subsurface surveys. We explain why the alternative hypothesis, suggesting that D. radiodurans' desiccation tolerance could be a consequence of this organism's adaptation to ionizing radiation (radiation adaptation hypothesis), should be considered on equal basis with the "desiccation adaptation hypothesis".

  8. Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ

    DOEpatents

    Christian, Allen T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Tucker, James D.

    2002-01-01

    Amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ to increase the amount of DNA associated with a chromosome or chromosome region is described. The amplification of chromosomal DNA in situ provides for the synthesis of Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) painting probes from single dissected chromosome fragments, the production of cDNA libraries from low copy mRNAs and improved in Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) procedures.

  9. Human chromosomes: Structure, behavior, and effects

    SciTech Connect

    Therman, E.; Susman, M.

    1993-12-31

    The book `Human Chromosomes: Structure, Behavior, and Effects` covers the most important topics regarding human chromosomes and current research in cytogenetics. Attention is given both to structure and function of autosomes and sex chromosomes, as well as definitions and causes of chromosomal aberrations. This often involves discussion about various aspects of the cell cycle (both mitosis and meiosis). Methods and techniques involved in researching and mapping human chromosomes are also discussed.

  10. Chromosome I controls chromosome II replication in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jong Hwan; Chattoraj, Dhruba K

    2014-02-01

    Control of chromosome replication involves a common set of regulators in eukaryotes, whereas bacteria with divided genomes use chromosome-specific regulators. How bacterial chromosomes might communicate for replication is not known. In Vibrio cholerae, which has two chromosomes (chrI and chrII), replication initiation is controlled by DnaA in chrI and by RctB in chrII. DnaA has binding sites at the chrI origin of replication as well as outside the origin. RctB likewise binds at the chrII origin and, as shown here, to external sites. The binding to the external sites in chrII inhibits chrII replication. A new kind of site was found in chrI that enhances chrII replication. Consistent with its enhancing activity, the chrI site increased RctB binding to those chrII origin sites that stimulate replication and decreased binding to other sites that inhibit replication. The differential effect on binding suggests that the new site remodels RctB. The chaperone-like activity of the site is supported by the finding that it could relieve the dependence of chrII replication on chaperone proteins DnaJ and DnaK. The presence of a site in chrI that specifically controls chrII replication suggests a mechanism for communication between the two chromosomes for replication.

  11. The map of chromosome 20.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, N E

    1988-01-01

    The number of gene assignments to human chromosome 20 has increased slowly until recently. Only seven genes and one fragile site were confirmed assignments to chromosome 20 at the Ninth Human Gene Mapping Workshop in September 1987 (HGM9). One fragile site, 13 additional genes, and 10 DNA sequences that identify restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), however, were provisionally added to the map at HGM9. Five mutated genes on chromosome 20 have a relation to disease: a mutation in the adenosine deaminase gene results in a deficiency of the enzyme and severe combined immune deficiency; mutations in the gene for the growth hormone releasing factor result in some forms of dwarfism; mutations in the closely linked genes for the hormones arginine vasopressin and oxytocin and their neurophysins are probably responsible for some diabetes insipidus; and mutations in the gene that regulates both alpha-neuraminidase and beta-galactosidase activities determine galactosialidosis. The gene for the prion protein is on chromosome 20; it is related to the infectious agent of kuru, Creutzfeld-Jacob disease, and Gertsmann-Straussler syndrome, although the nature of the relationship is not completely understood. Two genes that code for tyrosine kinases are on the chromosome, SRC1 the proto-oncogene and a gene (HCK) coding for haemopoietic kinase (an src-like kinase), but no direct relation to cancer has been shown for either of these kinases. The significance of non-random loss of chromosome 20 in the malignant diseases non-lymphocytic leukaemia and polycythaemia vera is not understood. Twenty-four additional loci are assigned to the chromosome: five genes that code for binding proteins, one for a light chain of ferritin, genes for three enzymes (inosine triphosphatase, s-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase, and sterol delta 24-reductase), one for each of a secretory protein and an opiate neuropeptide, a cell surface antigen, two fragile sites, and 10 DNA sequences (one

  12. Heteromorphic variants of chromosome 9

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterochromatic variants of pericentromere of chromosome 9 are reported and discussed since decades concerning their detailed structure and clinical meaning. However, detailed studies are scarce. Thus, here we provide the largest ever done molecular cytogenetic research based on >300 chromosome 9 heteromorphism carriers. Results In this study, 334 carriers of heterochromatic variants of chromosome 9 were included, being 192 patients from Western Europe and the remainder from Easter-European origin. A 3-color-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe-set directed against for 9p12 to 9q13~21.1 (9het-mix) and 8 different locus-specific probes were applied for their characterization. The 9het-mix enables the characterization of 21 of the yet known 24 chromosome 9 heteromorphic patterns. In this study, 17 different variants were detected including five yet unreported; the most frequent were pericentric inversions (49.4%) followed by 9qh-variants (23.9%), variants of 9ph (11.4%), cenh (8.2%), and dicentric- (3.8%) and duplication-variants (3.3%). For reasons of simplicity, a new short nomenclature for the yet reported 24 heteromorphic patterns of chromosome 9 is suggested. Six breakpoints involved in four of the 24 variants could be narrowed down using locus-specific probes. Conclusions Based on this largest study ever done in carriers of chromosome 9 heteromorphisms, three of the 24 detailed variants were more frequently observed in Western than in Eastern Europe. Besides, there is no clear evidence that infertility is linked to any of the 24 chromosome 9 heteromorphic variants. PMID:23547710

  13. Chromosome therapy. Correction of large chromosomal aberrations by inducing ring chromosomes in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehyun; Bershteyn, Marina; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The fusion of the short (p) and long (q) arms of a chromosome is referred to as a "ring chromosome." Ring chromosome disorders occur in approximately 1 in 50,000-100,000 patients. Ring chromosomes can result in birth defects, mental disabilities, and growth retardation if additional genes are deleted during the formation of the ring. Due to the severity of these large-scale aberrations affecting multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have so far been proposed. Our recent study (Bershteyn et al.) using patient-derived fibroblast lines containing ring chromosomes, found that cellular reprogramming of these fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) resulted in the cell-autonomous correction of the ring chromosomal aberration via compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD). These observations have important implications for studying the mechanism of chromosomal number control and may lead to the development of effective therapies for other, more common, chromosomal aberrations.

  14. Chromosome photoinactivation, a new method for high speed chromosome sorting

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.C.; Park, M.; Han, K.T.; Cram, L.S. )

    1993-01-01

    A new optical high-speed chromosome sorting concept is under development which relies on chromosome inactivation rather than droplet sorting to meet the demands of large volume sorting for cloning into large insert vectors. Inactivation can be achieved by photosensitizing and cross-linking metaphase chromosomes. By eliminating the need to create droplets, sorting rates 50 to 100 times faster than the sorting rates of commercial sorters will be achieved. Preliminary experiments using 8-methoxy psoralen in combination with UV doses of about 20 kJ/m2 have shown that: (1) DNA is cross-linked and remains double stranded even under denaturing conditions, (2) the ability of psoralen treated plasmid DNA to transect E. coli XL1-Blue cells is totally blocked following UV exposure, and (3) an average of one interstrand cross-link per 6 kb is produced with these UV doses.

  15. Spatial ordering of chromosomes enhances the fidelity of chromosome partitioning in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Jain, Isha H; Vijayan, Vikram; O'Shea, Erin K

    2012-08-21

    Many cyanobacteria have been shown to harbor multiple chromosome copies per cell, yet little is known about the organization, replication, and segregation of these chromosomes. Here, we visualize individual chromosomes in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus via time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. We find that chromosomes are equally spaced along the long axis of the cell and are interspersed with another regularly spaced subcellular compartment, the carboxysome. This remarkable organization of the cytoplasm along with accurate midcell septum placement allows for near-optimal segregation of chromosomes to daughter cells. Disruption of either chromosome ordering or midcell septum placement significantly increases the chromosome partitioning error. We find that chromosome replication is both asynchronous and independent of the position of the chromosome in the cell and that spatial organization is preserved after replication. Our findings on chromosome organization, replication, and segregation in S. elongatus provide a basis for understanding chromosome dynamics in bacteria with multiple chromosomes.

  16. Spatial ordering of chromosomes enhances the fidelity of chromosome partitioning in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Isha H.; Vijayan, Vikram; O’Shea, Erin K.

    2012-01-01

    Many cyanobacteria have been shown to harbor multiple chromosome copies per cell, yet little is known about the organization, replication, and segregation of these chromosomes. Here, we visualize individual chromosomes in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus via time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. We find that chromosomes are equally spaced along the long axis of the cell and are interspersed with another regularly spaced subcellular compartment, the carboxysome. This remarkable organization of the cytoplasm along with accurate midcell septum placement allows for near-optimal segregation of chromosomes to daughter cells. Disruption of either chromosome ordering or midcell septum placement significantly increases the chromosome partitioning error. We find that chromosome replication is both asynchronous and independent of the position of the chromosome in the cell and that spatial organization is preserved after replication. Our findings on chromosome organization, replication, and segregation in S. elongatus provide a basis for understanding chromosome dynamics in bacteria with multiple chromosomes. PMID:22869746

  17. Chromosome 7 and Haematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Cotter, F E; Johnson, E

    1997-01-01

    Abnormalities of chromosome 7 are the most common clonal chromosomal changes observed in myelodysplasia (MDS) and the second most frequent in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) [1-5]. These changes may consist of long arm deletion (7q-) or total loss of the whole chromosome (monosomy 7) from bone marrow cells [1, 4, 6-24] and was first reported in association with myeloid disease in 1964 with the report of 3 cases of refractory anaemia, granulocytic hyperplasia [25]. The association between chromosome 7 alterations, MDS and AML in children and adults is clear, however, a rare association with lymphoid malignancies has also been recently reported. The abnormalities may occur in de novo MDS/AML, secondary cases following exposure to drugs, radiotherapy and toxins and in addition in a range of constitutional disorders including Fanconi's anaemia, congenital neutropenia and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The broad spread of conditions in which this consistent genetic change can occur leads one to speculate that there is an underlying instability in chromosome 7 and that genes on this chromosome play a role in the development of malignancy. The loss of DNA associated with malignant progression suggests the presence of a tumour suppressor gene (or genes) [26, 27]. Patients with monosomy 7 usually present as classical MDS with abnormal erythroid, megakaryocyte and myeloid differentiation [7, 28]. From a mechanistic perspective, increased cell proliferation and apoptosis is a common feature possibly induced by the failure of normal haematopoietic maturation. In all groups the presence of chromosome 7 abnormalities defines a poor prognostic group [29]. The majority of patients with MDS transform to a form of acute leukaemia resistant to therapy, including bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Although fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has accelerated the study of these disorders at the cytogenetic and molecular levels, [4, 30, 31, 32, 33] no gene has been clearly

  18. Mechanisms for Complex Chromosomal Insertions

    PubMed Central

    Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Yuan, Bo; Cooper, Mitchell L.; Magriñá, Maria A.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Lalani, Seema R.; Patel, Ankita; Song, Rodger H.; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Carvalho, Claudia M. B.; Lupski, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal insertions are genomic rearrangements with a chromosome segment inserted into a non-homologous chromosome or a non-adjacent locus on the same chromosome or the other homologue, constituting ~2% of nonrecurrent copy-number gains. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their formation. We identified 16 individuals with complex insertions among 56,000 individuals tested at Baylor Genetics using clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Custom high-density aCGH was performed on 10 individuals with available DNA, and breakpoint junctions were fine-mapped at nucleotide resolution by long-range PCR and DNA sequencing in 6 individuals to glean insights into potential mechanisms of formation. We observed microhomologies and templated insertions at the breakpoint junctions, resembling the breakpoint junction signatures found in complex genomic rearrangements generated by replication-based mechanism(s) with iterative template switches. In addition, we analyzed 5 families with apparently balanced insertion in one parent detected by FISH analysis and found that 3 parents had additional small copy-number variants (CNVs) at one or both sides of the inserting fragments as well as at the inserted sites. We propose that replicative repair can result in interchromosomal complex insertions generated through chromothripsis-like chromoanasynthesis involving two or three chromosomes, and cause a significant fraction of apparently balanced insertions harboring small flanking CNVs. PMID:27880765

  19. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  20. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Zamariola, Linda; Tiang, Choon Lin; De Storme, Nico; Pawlowski, Wojtek; Geelen, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved. PMID:24987397

  1. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  2. Mechanisms for Complex Chromosomal Insertions.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shen; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Yuan, Bo; Cooper, Mitchell L; Magriñá, Maria A; Bacino, Carlos A; Lalani, Seema R; Breman, Amy M; Smith, Janice L; Patel, Ankita; Song, Rodger H; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Carvalho, Claudia M B; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lupski, James R

    2016-11-01

    Chromosomal insertions are genomic rearrangements with a chromosome segment inserted into a non-homologous chromosome or a non-adjacent locus on the same chromosome or the other homologue, constituting ~2% of nonrecurrent copy-number gains. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their formation. We identified 16 individuals with complex insertions among 56,000 individuals tested at Baylor Genetics using clinical array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Custom high-density aCGH was performed on 10 individuals with available DNA, and breakpoint junctions were fine-mapped at nucleotide resolution by long-range PCR and DNA sequencing in 6 individuals to glean insights into potential mechanisms of formation. We observed microhomologies and templated insertions at the breakpoint junctions, resembling the breakpoint junction signatures found in complex genomic rearrangements generated by replication-based mechanism(s) with iterative template switches. In addition, we analyzed 5 families with apparently balanced insertion in one parent detected by FISH analysis and found that 3 parents had additional small copy-number variants (CNVs) at one or both sides of the inserting fragments as well as at the inserted sites. We propose that replicative repair can result in interchromosomal complex insertions generated through chromothripsis-like chromoanasynthesis involving two or three chromosomes, and cause a significant fraction of apparently balanced insertions harboring small flanking CNVs.

  3. The chromosomes of the Filariae

    PubMed Central

    Post, Rory

    2005-01-01

    An understanding of the nature of the chromosomes of the filariae is expected to greatly assist the future interpretation of genome data. Filarial development is not eutelic, and there does not seem to be a fixed number of cell divisions in the way that there is in Caenorhabditis. It is not clear whether the chromosomes of the filariae have localized centromeres or whether they are holocentric. Sex determination is by a chromosomal "balance" X0 system in most filariae, but in some Onchocercidae there has been a chromosomal fusion to create a neo-XY system. It is presumed that the molecular basis of sex determination in filariae is similar to Caenorhabditis. The ancestral karyotype of the filariae is probably 5A+X0, but in some Onchocercidae this has been reduced to 4A+XY, and in O. volvulus and O. gibsoni it has been further reduced to 3A+XY. Onchocerca volvulus and O. gibsoni both have supernumary (B-) chromosomes and in O. volvulus there is a single active nucleolus organising region near the middle of the long autosome. PMID:16266430

  4. Structure and function of eukaryotic chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hennig, W.

    1987-01-01

    Contents: Introduction; Polytene Chromosomel Giant Chromosomes in Ciliates; The sp-I Genes in the Balbiani Rings of Chironomus Salivary Glands; The White Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster; The Genetic and Molecular Organization of the Dense Cluster of Functionally Related Vital Genes in the DOPA Decarboxylase Region of the Drosophila melanogaster Genome; Heat Shock Puffs and Response to Environmental Stress; The Y Chromosomal Lampbrush Loops of Drosophila; Contributions of Electron Microscopic Spreading Preparations (''Miller Spreads'') to the Analysis of Chromosome Structure; Replication of DNA in Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Gene Amplification in Dipteran Chromosomes; The Significance of Plant Transposable Elements in Biologically Relevant Processes; Arrangement of Chromosomes in Interphase Cell Nuclei; Heterochromatin and the Phenomenon of Chromosome Banding; Multiple Nonhistone Protein-DNA Complexes in Chromatin Regulate the Cell- and Stage-Specific Activity of an Eukaryotic Gene; Genetics of Sex Determination in Eukaryotes; Application of Basic Chromosome Research in Biotechnology and Medicine. This book presents an overview of various aspects of chromosome research.

  5. Richter's syndrome with identification of marker chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, P H; McEwan, C M; Hamer, J W; Beard, M E

    1980-07-01

    A case is presented of a man with Richter's syndrome with diffuse histiocytic lymphoma following a ten-year history of untreated chronic lymphatic leukemia. He did not respond to therapy. The lymphoma cells had 61 chromosomes with aneuploidy of 13 chromosomes and 11 structurally altered chromosomes. Only chromosomes 8, 9, 12, 14, and 18 were diploid and without abnormality. Significantly, part of chromsome 1q was duplicated as in the partial trisomy of 1q reported to characterize a number of hematologic neoplasms. A large marker chromosome with subterminal centromere was a tandem duplication of chromosome 4q.

  6. STUDIES ON THE ISOLATION OF METAPHASE CHROMOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    ChoraŻy, M.; Bendich, A.; Borenfreund, E.; Hutchison, D. J.

    1963-01-01

    A method for the isolation of metaphase chromosomes from mouse L1210 leukemia cells has been developed. Cells, arrested at metaphase with colchicine, were exposed to hypotonic solution and the pH was then adjusted to 5.6 to stabilize the chromosomes. The metaphase figures were subsequently disrupted and the chromosomes isolated by a series of differential centrifugations in sucrose. The isolated chromosomes were well preserved, as judged by morphological criteria. The effect of various enzymes and chemical agents on the isolated chromosomes was studied. Chymotrypsin, trypsin, and deoxyribonuclease caused a marked disintegration of the chromosomes, whereas treatment with pepsin and ribonuclease induced no significant morphological alterations. PMID:14069802

  7. Using Chromosomes to Teach Evolution: Chromosomal Rearrangements in Speciation Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Uses diagrams to aid in discussing how the English map of the human chromosomes, published by Offner in 1993, can be used to illustrate some important questions in evolution, as well as give students a glimpse into some of the mechanisms underlying evolutionary change. (ZWH)

  8. Ring chromosomes in dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans are composed of interspersed sequences from chromosomes 17 and 22.

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, R.; Lux, M. L.; Huang, S. F.; Naber, S. P.; Corson, J. M.; Fletcher, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    Ring chromosomes are found in most dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSPs), and recent reports demonstrate that portions of the DFSP ring chromosomes derive from chromosome 17. In this study we characterized ring chromosomes in three DFSPs using a combined approach of karyotyping, chromosome painting, and comparative genomic hybridization. Chromosome painting demonstrated that the ring chromosomes in each DFSP were composed of discontinuous, interwoven sequences from chromosomes 17 and 22. Amplification of chromosomes 17 and 22 sequences was confirmed in each of these cases by comparative genomic hybridization, and over-representation of chromosomes 17 and 22 sequences was also demonstrated by comparative genomic hybridization in 1 of 2 cytogenetically unremarkable DFSPs. We conclude that amplification of chromosomes 17 and 22 sequences, in ring form, is a characteristic aberration in DFSP. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7495279

  9. Multiscale image enhancement of chromosome banding patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Castleman, Kenneth R.

    1996-10-01

    Visual examination of chromosome banding patterns is an important means of chromosome analysis. Cytogeneticists compare their patient's chromosome image against the prototype normal/abnormal human chromosome banding patterns. Automated chromosome analysis instruments facilitate this by digitally enhancing the chromosome images. Currently available systems employing traditional highpass/bandpass filtering and/or histogram equalization are approximately equivalent to photomicroscopy in their ability to support the detection of band pattern alterations. Improvements in chromosome image display quality, particularly in the detail of the banding pattern, would significantly increase the cost-effectiveness of these systems. In this paper we present our work on the use of multiscale transform and derivative filtering for image enhancement of chromosome banding patterns. A steerable pyramid representation of the chromosome image is generated by a multiscale transform. The derivative filters are designed to detect the bands of a chromosome, and the steerable pyramid transform is chosen based on its desirable properties of shift and rotation invariance. By processing the transform coefficients that correspond to the bands of the chromosome in the pyramid representation, contrast enhancement of the chromosome bands can be achieved with designed flexibility in scale, orientation and location. Compared with existing chromosome image enhancement techniques, this new approach offers the advantage of selective chromosome banding pattern enhancement that allows designated detail analysis. Experimental results indicate improved enhancement capabilities and promise more effective visual aid to comparison of chromosomes to the prototypes and to each other. This will increase the ability of automated chromosome analysis instruments to assist the evaluation of chromosome abnormalities in clinical samples.

  10. Chromosomal destabilization during gene amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, J C; Wahl, G M

    1990-01-01

    Acentric extrachromosomal elements, such as submicroscopic autonomously replicating circular molecules (episomes) and double minute chromosomes, are common early, and in some cases initial, intermediates of gene amplification in many drug-resistant and tumor cell lines. In order to gain a more complete understanding of the amplification process, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which such extrachromosomal elements are generated and we traced the fate of these amplification intermediates over time. The model system consists of a Chinese hamster cell line (L46) created by gene transfer in which the initial amplification product was shown previously to be an unstable extrachromosomal element containing an inverted duplication spanning more than 160 kilobases (J. C. Ruiz and G. M. Wahl, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:4302-4313, 1988). In this study, we show that these molecules were formed by a process involving chromosomal deletion. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed at multiple time points on cells with amplified sequences. These studies reveal that the extrachromosomal molecules rapidly integrate into chromosomes, often near or at telomeres, and once integrated, the amplified sequences are themselves unstable. These data provide a molecular and cytogenetic chronology for gene amplification in this model system; an early event involves deletion to generate extrachromosomal elements, and subsequent integration of these elements precipitates a cascade of chromosome instability. Images PMID:2188107

  11. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Harton, Gary L; Tempest, Helen G

    2012-01-01

    Infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family. Despite this, the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered. Nevertheless, more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified. This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically: chromosomal aneuploidy, structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions. Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans. Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin, but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts. Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm. Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed, as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases. Clinical recommendations where possible will be made, as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility. PMID:22120929

  12. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Harton, Gary L; Tempest, Helen G

    2012-01-01

    Infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family. Despite this, the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered. Nevertheless, more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified. This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically: chromosomal aneuploidy, structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions. Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans. Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin, but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts. Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm. Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed, as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases. Clinical recommendations where possible will be made, as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility.

  13. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  14. Genomic signals for whole chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Paul D.

    2003-06-01

    The paper presents some new results in the analysis of genomic information at the scale of whole chromosomes or whole genomes based on the conversion into genomic signals. Mainly, the phase analysis -- phase, cumulated phase and unwrapped phase, and the sequence path analysis are presented. The unwrapped phase displays an almost linear variation along whole chromosomes. The property holds for all the investigated genomes, being shared by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, while the magnitude and sign of the unwrapped phase slope is specific for each taxon and chromosome. Such a behavior proves a rule similar to Chargaff's rule, but reveals a statistical regularity of the succession of the nucleotides -- a second order statistics, not only of the distribution of nucleotides -- a first order statistics. The cumulated phase of the genomic signal of certain prokaryotes also shows interesting specific behavior. The comparison between the behavior of the cumulated phase and of the unwrapped phae across the putative origins and termini of the replichores suggests an interesting model for the structure of chromosomes.

  15. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  16. Chromosome replication in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed Central

    Zusman, D R; Krotoski, D M; Cumsky, M

    1978-01-01

    The rates of DNA synthesis during the cell-division cycle were measured in Myxococcus xanthus growing in three different media permitting a twofold variation in doubling time. In all three media, simple DNA cycles were observed. Synthesis of DNA occurred during 85% of the cell-division cycle, independent of generation time, from 5 to 11 h. Cells were observed to contain one bacterial nucleoid at birth that later divided synchronously midway through the cell cycle. Nucleoid segregation appeared to begin before chromosome replication was completed. The DNA content of exponential-phase bacteria was determined to be about 20 +/- 3 X 10(-9) microgram per cell; newborn bacteria contained about 14 +/- 2 X 10(-9) microgram of DNA per cell. Exponential-phase bacteria showed about a 50% increase in DNA in the presence of chloramphenicol (50 microgram/ml). The number of randomly segregating chromosomes present in exponential-phase bacteria was determined by following the fate of prelabeled DNA during outgrowth in nonradioactive media. The results are consistent with a model in which cells are born with exactly one complete unreplicated chromosome. The molecular weight of such a chromosome is about 8.4 +/- 1.2 X 10(9). PMID:412830

  17. Chromosomal abnormalities and mental illness.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, D J; Blackwood, D H R; Porteous, D J; Pickard, B S; Muir, W J

    2003-03-01

    Linkage studies of mental illness have provided suggestive evidence of susceptibility loci over many broad chromosomal regions. Pinpointing causative gene mutations by conventional linkage strategies alone is problematic. The breakpoints of chromosomal abnormalities occurring in patients with mental illness may be more direct pointers to the relevant gene locus. Publications that describe patients where chromosomal abnormalities co-exist with mental illness are reviewed along with supporting evidence that this may amount to an association. Chromosomal abnormalities are considered to be of possible significance if (a) the abnormality is rare and there are independent reports of its coexistence with psychiatric illness, or (b) there is colocalisation of the abnormality with a region of suggestive linkage findings, or (c) there is an apparent cosegregation of the abnormality with psychiatric illness within the individual's family. Breakpoints have been described within many of the loci suggested by linkage studies and these findings support the hypothesis that shared susceptibility factors for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may exist. If these abnormalities directly disrupt coding regions, then combining molecular genetic breakpoint cloning with bioinformatic sequence analysis may be a method of rapidly identifying candidate genes. Full karyotyping of individuals with psychotic illness especially where this coexists with mild learning disability, dysmorphism or a strong family history of mental disorder is encouraged.

  18. Chromosome synteny in cucumis species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucumber, Cucumis sativus L. (2n = 2x = 14) and melon, C. melo L. (2n = 2x = 24) are two important vegetable species in the genus Cucumis (family Cucurbitaceae). Two inter-fertile botanical varieties with 14 chromosomes, the cultivated C. sativus var. sativus L. and the wild C. sativus var. hardwick...

  19. Chromosome Territory Modeller and Viewer.

    PubMed

    Tkacz, Magdalena A; Chromiński, Kornel; Idziak-Helmcke, Dominika; Robaszkiewicz, Ewa; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents ChroTeMo, a tool for chromosome territory modelling, accompanied by ChroTeVi-a chromosome territory visualisation software that uses the data obtained by ChroTeMo. These tools have been developed in order to complement the molecular cytogenetic research of interphase nucleus structure in a model grass Brachypodium distachyon. Although the modelling tool has been initially created for one particular species, it has universal application. The proposed version of ChroTeMo allows for generating a model of chromosome territory distribution in any given plant or animal species after setting the initial, species-specific parameters. ChroTeMo has been developed as a fully probabilistic modeller. Due to this feature, the comparison between the experimental data on the structure of a nucleus and the results obtained from ChroTeMo can indicate whether the distribution of chromosomes inside a nucleus is also fully probabilistic or is subjected to certain non-random patterns. The presented tools have been written in Python, so they are multiplatform, portable and easy to read. Moreover, if necessary they can be further developed by users writing their portions of code. The source code, documentation, and wiki, as well as the issue tracker and the list of related articles that use ChroTeMo and ChroTeVi, are accessible in a public repository at Github under GPL 3.0 license.

  20. Chromosome Territory Modeller and Viewer

    PubMed Central

    Idziak-Helmcke, Dominika; Robaszkiewicz, Ewa; Hasterok, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents ChroTeMo, a tool for chromosome territory modelling, accompanied by ChroTeVi–a chromosome territory visualisation software that uses the data obtained by ChroTeMo. These tools have been developed in order to complement the molecular cytogenetic research of interphase nucleus structure in a model grass Brachypodium distachyon. Although the modelling tool has been initially created for one particular species, it has universal application. The proposed version of ChroTeMo allows for generating a model of chromosome territory distribution in any given plant or animal species after setting the initial, species-specific parameters. ChroTeMo has been developed as a fully probabilistic modeller. Due to this feature, the comparison between the experimental data on the structure of a nucleus and the results obtained from ChroTeMo can indicate whether the distribution of chromosomes inside a nucleus is also fully probabilistic or is subjected to certain non-random patterns. The presented tools have been written in Python, so they are multiplatform, portable and easy to read. Moreover, if necessary they can be further developed by users writing their portions of code. The source code, documentation, and wiki, as well as the issue tracker and the list of related articles that use ChroTeMo and ChroTeVi, are accessible in a public repository at Github under GPL 3.0 license. PMID:27505434

  1. Chromosomes of the liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Gab-Man; Im, Kyung-il; Huh, Sun

    2000-01-01

    A karyological study was carried out in order to compared the chromosome numbers, chromosome morphologies and karyotypes of the oriental liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis (Trematoda: Opisthorchiidae), collected from Korea and China. Chromosome preparations were made by means of air-drying method. The chromosome number was 2n=56 in both Korean and Chinese flukes, and chromosomes were divided into two groups based on this size; consisting of 8 pairs of large and 20 pairs of small chromosomes. However, the karyotypes showed some differences between Korean and Chinese flukes. The karyotype of liver flukes from Korea consisted of three metacentric pairs, one meta-/submetacentric pair, 16 submetacentric pairs and eight subtelocentric pairs of chromosomes. On the other hand, liver flukes from China consisted of two metacentric pairs, two meta-/submetacentric pairs, 16 submetacentric pairs and eight subtelocentric pairs of chromosomes. PMID:11002660

  2. Detection Of Amplified Or Deleted Chromosomal Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Stokke, Trond , Pinkel, Daniel , Gray, Joe W.

    1997-05-27

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  3. Detection of amplified or deleted chromosomal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Stokke, Trond; Pinkel, Daniel; Gray, Joe W.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20.

  4. Detection of amplified or deleted chromosomal regions

    DOEpatents

    Stokke, T.; Pinkel, D.; Gray, J.W.

    1995-12-05

    The present invention relates to in situ hybridization methods for the identification of new chromosomal abnormalities associated with various diseases. In particular, it provides probes which are specific to a region of amplification in chromosome 20. 3 figs.

  5. Mathematical glimpse on the Y chromosome degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, M. P.

    2006-04-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerate and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Non-recombination of XY pairs has been pointed out as the key factor for the degeneration of the Y chromosome. The aim here is to show that there is a mathematical asymmetry in sex chromosomes which leads to the degeneration of Y chromosomes even in the absence of XX and XY recombination. A model for sex-chromosome evolution in a stationary regime is proposed. The consequences of their asymmetry are analyzed and lead us to a couple of conclusions. First, Y chromosome degeneration shows up sqrt{2} more often than X chromosome degeneration. Second, if nature prohibits female mortalities from beeing exactly 50%, then Y chromosome degeneration is inevitable.

  6. An Automated System for Chromosome Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Melnyk, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a complete system to produce karyotypes and chromosome measurement data from human blood samples, and to provide a basis for statistical analysis of quantitative chromosome measurement data are described.

  7. Multicolor Spectral Karyotyping of Human Chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrock, E.; Du Manoir, S.; Veldman, T.; Schoell, B.; Wienberg, J.; Ferguson-Smith, M. A.; Ning, Y.; Ledbetter, D. H.; Bar-Am, I.; Soenksen, D.; Garini, Y.; Ried, T.

    1996-07-01

    The simultaneous and unequivocal discernment of all human chromosomes in different colors would be of significant clinical and biologic importance. Whole-genome scanning by spectral karyotyping allowed instantaneous visualization of defined emission spectra for each human chromosome after fluorescence in situ hybridization. By means of computer separation (classification) of spectra, spectrally overlapping chromosome-specific DNA probes could be resolved, and all human chromosomes were simultaneously identified.

  8. Methods for chromosome-specific staining

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Pinkel, D.

    1995-09-05

    Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining are provided. Compositions comprise heterogeneous mixtures of labeled nucleic acid fragments having substantially complementary base sequences to unique sequence regions of the chromosomal DNA for which their associated staining reagent is specific. Methods include ways for making the chromosome-specific staining compositions of the invention, and methods for applying the staining compositions to chromosomes. 3 figs.

  9. Chromosome protein framework from proteome analysis of isolated human metaphase chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Kiichi; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2007-01-01

    We have presented a structural model of the chromosome based on its constituent proteins. Development of a method of mass isolation for intact human metaphase chromosomes and proteome analysis by mass spectrometry of the isolated chromosomal proteins enabled us to develop a four-layer structural model of human metaphase chromosomes. The model consists of four layers, each with different chromosomal protein sets, i.e., chromosome coating proteins (CCPs), chromosome peripheral proteins (CPPs), chromosome structural proteins (CSPs), and chromosome fibrous proteins (CFPs). More than 200 identified proteins have been classified and assigned to the four layers with each layer occupying a distinct region of the chromosome. CCPs are localized at the most outer regions of the chromosomes and they attach to the regions tentatively and occasionally. CCPs include mostly mitochondrial and cytoplasmic proteins, e.g., 70 kDa heat shock protein 9B and Hsp60. CPPs are also localized at the peripheral regions of the chromosomes, but as the essential part of the chromosomes. CPPs include nucleolin, lamin A/C, fibrillarin, etc. CSPs are the primary chromosomal structure proteins, and include topoisomerase IIalpha, condensin subunits, histones, etc. CFPs have a fibrous nature, e.g., beta-actin, vimentin, myosin II, tublin, etc. A data set of these proteins, which we developed, contains essential chromosome proteins with classified information based on this four-layer model and presents useful leads for further studies on chromosomal structure and function.

  10. Evolution of sex chromosomes ZW of Schistosoma mansoni inferred from chromosome paint and BAC mapping analyses.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hirohisa; Hirai, Yuriko; LoVerde, Philip T

    2012-12-01

    Chromosomes of schistosome parasites among digenetic flukes have a unique evolution because they exhibit the sex chromosomes ZW, which are not found in the other groups of flukes that are hermaphrodites. We conducted molecular cytogenetic analyses for investigating the sex chromosome evolution using chromosome paint analysis and BAC clones mapping. To carry this out, we developed a technique for making paint probes of genomic DNA from a single scraped chromosome segment using a chromosome microdissection system, and a FISH mapping technique for BAC clones. Paint probes clearly identified each of the 8 pairs of chromosomes by a different fluorochrome color. Combination analysis of chromosome paint analysis with Z/W probes and chromosome mapping with 93 BAC clones revealed that the W chromosome of Schistosoma mansoni has evolved by at least four inversion events and heterochromatinization. Nine of 93 BAC clones hybridized with both the Z and W chromosomes, but the locations were different between Z and W chromosomes. The homologous regions were estimated to have moved from the original Z chromosome to the differentiated W chromosome by three inversions events that occurred before W heterohcromatinization. An inversion that was observed in the heterochromatic region of the W chromosome likely occurred after W heterochromatinization. These inversions and heterochromatinization are hypothesized to be the key factors that promoted the evolution of the W chromosome of S. mansoni. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. CHROMOSOMAL LOCATION AND GENE PAUCITY IN THE MALE SPECIFIC REGION ON PAPAYA Y CHROMOSOME

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sex chromosomes in flowering plants evolved recently and many of them remain homomorphic, including those in papaya. We investigated the chromosomal location of papaya’s small male specific region of the hermaphrodite Y (Yh) chromosome (MSY) and its genomic features. We conducted chromosome fluoresc...

  12. The house fly Y Chromosome is young and minimally differentiated from its ancient X Chromosome partner.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Richard P; Gonzales, Christopher A; Luu, Hoang

    2017-08-01

    Canonical ancient sex chromosome pairs consist of a gene rich X (or Z) Chromosome and a male-limited (or female-limited) Y (or W) Chromosome that is gene poor. In contrast to highly differentiated sex chromosomes, nascent sex chromosome pairs are homomorphic or very similar in sequence content. Nascent sex chromosomes can arise if an existing sex chromosome fuses to an autosome or an autosome acquires a new sex-determining locus/allele. Sex chromosomes often differ between closely related species and can even be polymorphic within species, suggesting that nascent sex chromosomes arise frequently over the course of evolution. Previously documented sex chromosome transitions involve changes to both members of the sex chromosome pair (X and Y, or Z and W). The house fly has sex chromosomes that resemble the ancestral fly karyotype that originated ∼100 million yr ago; therefore, the house fly is expected to have X and Y Chromosomes with different gene content. We tested this hypothesis using whole-genome sequencing and transcriptomic data, and we discovered little evidence for genetic differentiation between the X and Y in house fly. We propose that the house fly has retained the ancient X Chromosome, but the ancestral Y was replaced by an X Chromosome carrying a new male determining gene. Our proposed hypothesis provides a mechanism for how one member of a sex chromosome pair can experience evolutionary turnover while the other member remains unaffected. © 2017 Meisel et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  13. Morphology and structure of polytene chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhimulev, I.F.

    1996-12-31

    The morphology and structure of polytene chromosomes is the subject of this detailed volume of Advances in Genetics. Polytene chromosomes are the only interphase chromosomes that appear throughout as individual structures, and therefore offer the kind of detail of the molecular biology that geneticists need. 2869 refs., 123 figs., 27 tabs.

  14. Study of chromosomal alterations in bovine leukosis.

    PubMed

    Predescu, E; Athanasiu, P; Nastac, E; Hozoc, M

    1977-01-01

    The results of a cytogenetic study of the "CT 384" cell line obtained from bovine leukemic lymph nodes are presented. Multiple chromosomal alterations were found in the 265 metaphases examined: numeric anomalies (aneuploidy and polyploidy), morphologic aberrations (dicentric, annular, giant, filamentous chromosomes) and chromosomal lesions (arm breaks).

  15. Supernumerary chromosomes in mosaic Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thong, M K; Manonmani, V; Norlasiah, I S

    1996-12-01

    The finding of a supernumerary or marker chromosome in a karyotype poses difficulty in genetic counselling. The true incidence and significance of this chromosomal aberration is unknown in Malaysia. We report two patients who presented with supernumerary chromosomes in mosaic Turner syndrome.

  16. Spacecraft Sterilization Using Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Moogega; Vaze, Nachiket; Anderson, Shawn; Fridman, Gregory; Vasilets, Victor N.; Gutsol, Alexander; Tsapin, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    As a solution to chemically and thermally destructive sterilization methods currently used for spacecraft, non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas are used to treat surfaces inoculated with Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans. Evidence of significant morphological changes and reduction in viability due to plasma exposure will be presented, including a 4-log reduction of B. subtilis after 2 minutes of dielectric barrier discharge treatment.

  17. Spacecraft Sterilization Using Non-Equilibrium Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Moogega; Vaze, Nachiket; Anderson, Shawn; Fridman, Gregory; Vasilets, Victor N.; Gutsol, Alexander; Tsapin, Alexander; Fridman, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    As a solution to chemically and thermally destructive sterilization methods currently used for spacecraft, non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas are used to treat surfaces inoculated with Bacillus subtilis and Deinococcus radiodurans. Evidence of significant morphological changes and reduction in viability due to plasma exposure will be presented, including a 4-log reduction of B. subtilis after 2 minutes of dielectric barrier discharge treatment.

  18. Complexity of genetic sequences modified by horizontal gene transfer and degraded-DNA uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremberger, George; Dehipawala, S.; Nguyen, A.; Cheung, E.; Sullivan, R.; Holden, T.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2015-09-01

    Horizontal gene transfer has been a major vehicle for efficient transfer of genetic materials among living species and could be one of the sources for noncoding DNA incorporation into a genome. Our previous study of lnc- RNA sequence complexity in terms of fractal dimension and information entropy shows a tight regulation among the studied genes in numerous diseases. The role of sequence complexity in horizontal transferred genes was investigated with Mealybug in symbiotic relation with a 139K genome microbe and Deinococcus radiodurans as examples. The fractal dimension and entropy showed correlation R-sq of 0.82 (N = 6) for the studied Deinococcus radiodurans sequences. For comparison the Deinococcus radiodurans oxidative stress tolerant catalase and superoxide dismutase genes under extracellular dGMP growth condition showed R-sq ~ 0.42 (N = 6); and the studied arsenate reductase horizontal transferred genes for toxicity survival in several microorganisms showed no correlation. Simulation results showed that R-sq < 0.4 would be improbable at less than one percent chance, suggestive of additional selection pressure when compared to the R-sq ~ 0.29 (N = 21) in the studied transferred genes in Mealybug. The mild correlation of R-sq ~ 0.5 for fractal dimension versus transcription level in the studied Deinococcus radiodurans sequences upon extracellular dGMP growth condition would suggest that lower fractal dimension with less electron density fluctuation favors higher transcription level.

  19. A Plain English Map of the Human Chromosomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Presents a chromosome map for 19 known chromosomes in human genetics. Describes the characteristics attributed to the genetic codes for each of the chromosomes and discusses the teaching applications of the chromosome map. (MDH)

  20. A Plain English Map of the Human Chromosomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Presents a chromosome map for 19 known chromosomes in human genetics. Describes the characteristics attributed to the genetic codes for each of the chromosomes and discusses the teaching applications of the chromosome map. (MDH)

  1. Dual Detection of Chromosomes and Microtubules by the Chromosomal Passenger Complex Drives Spindle Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Boo Shan; Tan, Lei; Kapoor, Tarun M.; Funabiki, Hironori

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Chromosome-dependent spindle assembly requires the chromosomal recruitment and activation of Aurora B, the kinase subunit of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC). It remains unclear how the chromosome-activated kinase spatially transmits signals to organize the micron scale spindle. Here we reveal that the CPC must detect two structures, chromosomes and microtubules, to support spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. While Aurora B is enriched on chromosomes in metaphase, we establish that a fraction of Aurora B is targeted to the metaphase spindle and phosphorylates microtubule-bound substrates. We demonstrate that chromosomally activated Aurora B must be targeted to microtubules to drive spindle assembly. Moreover, although the CPC-microtubule interaction can activate Aurora B, which further promotes microtubule assembly, this positive feedback is not initiated without chromosomes. We propose that the dual detection of chromosomes and microtubules by the CPC is a critical step in assembling spindles around and only around chromosomes. PMID:20627073

  2. Dual detection of chromosomes and microtubules by the chromosomal passenger complex drives spindle assembly.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Boo Shan; Tan, Lei; Kapoor, Tarun M; Funabiki, Hironori

    2010-06-15

    Chromosome-dependent spindle assembly requires the chromosomal recruitment and activation of Aurora B, the kinase subunit of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC). It remains unclear how the chromosome-activated kinase spatially transmits signals to organize the micron-scale spindle. Here we reveal that the CPC must detect two structures, chromosomes and microtubules, to support spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. While Aurora B is enriched on chromosomes in metaphase, we establish that a fraction of Aurora B is targeted to the metaphase spindle and phosphorylates microtubule-bound substrates. We demonstrate that chromosomally activated Aurora B must be targeted to microtubules to drive spindle assembly. Moreover, although the CPC-microtubule interaction can activate Aurora B, which further promotes microtubule assembly, this positive feedback is not initiated without chromosomes. We propose that the dual detection of chromosomes and microtubules by the CPC is a critical step in assembling spindles around and only around chromosomes.

  3. Micromanipulation studies of chromosome movement. II. Birefringent chromosomal fibers and the mechanical attachment of chromosomes to the spindle

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    The degree of mechanical coupling of chromosomes to the spindles of Nephrotoma and Trimeratropis primary spermatocytes varies with the stage of meiosis and the birefringent retardation of the chromosomal fibers. In early prometaphase, before birefringent chromosomal fibers have formed, a bivalent can be displaced toward a spindle pole by a single, continuous pull with a microneedle. Resistance to poleward displacement increases with increased development of the chromosomal fibers, reaching a maximum at metaphase. At this stage kinetochores cannot be displaced greater than 1 micrometer toward either spindle pole, even by a force which is sufficient to displace the entire spindle within the cell. The abolition of birefringence with either colcemid or vinblastine results in the loss of chromosome-spindle attachment. In the absence of birefringent fibers a chromosome can be displaced anywhere within the cell. The photochemical inactivation of colcemid by irradiation with 366-nm light results in the reformation of birefringent chromosomal fibers and the concomitant re-establishment of chromosome attachment to the spindle. These results support the hypothesis that the birefringent chromosomal fibers anchor the chromosomes to the spindle and transmit the force for anaphase chromosome movement. PMID:479316

  4. Y-chromosome polymorphism: Possible largest Y chromosome in man?

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, D.S.K.; Al-Awadi, S.A.; Bastaki, L.

    1994-09-01

    The role of variations (inversions/deletion or duplication) in the heterochromatin in gonadal development and function, reproductive fitness, and malignant disease has been extensively studied. However, the causal-relationship of large Y (Yqh+) and repeated fetal loss has not been established unequivocally. An Arab couple (?Bedouin origin) with a history of repeated abortions were investigated. Karyotype analysis of the husband showed a very large Y chromosome, confirmed by GTG-, QFQ- and CBG-banding techniques. C-banding showed discontinuous distribution of the heterochromatin blocks separated by pale bands. The origin of the large heterochromatin segment could be due to tandem duplication of the Yq region or translocation (Yq:Yq). No other relatives (males) of the propositus have been available for investigation. Polymorphism of the Y chromosome could be attributed to evolutionary changes from an ancestral type, either by deletion or duplication of the heterochromatin segment. More detailed studies on isolated, aboriginal/tribal human populations will enable us to better understand the significance of the Y chromosome polymorphism.

  5. Mapping strategies: Chromosome 16 workshop. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The following topics from a workshop on chromosome 16 are briefly discussed: genetic map of chromosome 16; chromosome breakpoint map of chromosome 16; integrated physical/genetic map of chromosome 16; pulsed field map of the 16p13.2--p13.3 region (3 sheets); and a report of the HGM10 chromosome 16 committee.

  6. Mechanisms of X Chromosome Dosage Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Sevinç

    2015-01-01

    In many animals, males have one X and females have two X chromosomes. The difference in X chromosome dosage between the two sexes is compensated by mechanisms that regulate X chromosome transcription. Recent advances in genomic techniques have provided new insights into the molecular mechanisms of X chromosome dosage compensation. In this review, I summarize our current understanding of dosage imbalance in general, and then review the molecular mechanisms of X chromosome dosage compensation with an emphasis on the parallels and differences between the three well-studied model systems, M. musculus, D. melanogaster and C. elegans. PMID:25628761

  7. Automated clinical system for chromosome analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, K. R.; Friedan, H. J.; Johnson, E. T.; Rennie, P. A.; Wall, R. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An automatic chromosome analysis system is provided wherein a suitably prepared slide with chromosome spreads thereon is placed on the stage of an automated microscope. The automated microscope stage is computer operated to move the slide to enable detection of chromosome spreads on the slide. The X and Y location of each chromosome spread that is detected is stored. The computer measures the chromosomes in a spread, classifies them by group or by type and also prepares a digital karyotype image. The computer system can also prepare a patient report summarizing the result of the analysis and listing suspected abnormalities.

  8. Automatic segmentation of overlapping and touching chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zhiqiang; Chen, Xiaohua; Zhang, Renli; Yu, Chang

    2001-09-01

    This paper describes a technique to segment overlapping and touching chromosomes of human metaphase cells. Automated chromosome classification has been an important pattern recognition problem for decades, numerous attempts were made in the past to characterize chromosome band patterns. But successful separation between touching and overlapping chromosomes is vital for correct classification. Since chromosomes are non-rigid objects, common methods for separation between touching chromosomes are not usable. We proposed a method using shape concave and convex information, topology analysis information, and band pale paths for segmentation of touching and overlapping chromosomes. To detect shape concave and convex information, we should first pre-segment the chromosomes and get the edge of overlapping and touching chromosomes. After filtering the original image using edge-preserving filter, we adopt the Otsu's segmentation method and extract the boundary of chromosomes. Hence the boundary can be used for segment the overlapping and touching chromosomes by detecting the concave and convex information based on boundary information. Most of the traditional boundary-based algorithms detect corners based on two steps: the first step is to acquire the smoothed version of curvature at every point along the contour, and the second step is to detect the positions where curvature maximal occur and threshold the curvature as corner points. Recently wavelet transform has been adopted into corner detection algorithms. Since the metaphase overlapping chromosomes has multi-scale corners, we adopt a multi-scale corner detection method based on Hua's method for corner detection. For touching chromosomes, it is convenient to split them using pale paths. Starting from concave corner points, a search algorithm is represented. The searching algorithm traces three pixels into the object in the direction of the normal vector in order to avoid stopping at the initial boundary until it

  9. Method for obtaining chromosome painting probes

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, Joe N.

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided for determining a clastogenic signature of a sample of chromosomes by quantifying a frequency of a first type of chromosome aberration present in the sample; quantifying a frequency of a second, different type of chromosome aberration present in the sample; and comparing the frequency of the first type of chromosome aberration to the frequency of the second type of chromosome aberration. A method is also provided for using that clastogenic signature to identify a clastogenic agent or dosage to which the cells were exposed.

  10. Polymer models of chromosome (re)organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirny, Leonid

    Chromosome Conformation Capture technique (Hi-C) provides comprehensive information about frequencies of spatial interactions between genomic loci. Inferring 3D organization of chromosomes from these data is a challenging biophysical problem. We develop a top-down approach to biophysical modeling of chromosomes. Starting with a minimal set of biologically motivated interactions we build ensembles of polymer conformations that can reproduce major features observed in Hi-C experiments. I will present our work on modeling organization of human metaphase and interphase chromosomes. Our works suggests that active processes of loop extrusion can be a universal mechanism responsible for formation of domains in interphase and chromosome compaction in metaphase.

  11. Sex chromosome abnormalities and psychiatric diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinzhu; Yang, Jian; Li, Yuhong; Ma, Xin; Li, Rena

    2017-01-01

    Excesses of sex chromosome abnormalities in patients with psychiatric diseases have recently been observed. It remains unclear whether sex chromosome abnormalities are related to sex differences in some psychiatric diseases. While studies showed evidence of susceptibility loci over many sex chromosomal regions related to various mental diseases, others demonstrated that the sex chromosome aneuploidies may be the key to exploring the pathogenesis of psychiatric disease. In this review, we will outline the current evidence on the interaction of sex chromosome abnormalities with schizophrenia, autism, ADHD and mood disorders. PMID:27992373

  12. Novel insights into mitotic chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    Piskadlo, Ewa; Oliveira, Raquel A.

    2016-01-01

    The fidelity of mitosis is essential for life, and successful completion of this process relies on drastic changes in chromosome organization at the onset of nuclear division. The mechanisms that govern chromosome compaction at every cell division cycle are still far from full comprehension, yet recent studies provide novel insights into this problem, challenging classical views on mitotic chromosome assembly. Here, we briefly introduce various models for chromosome assembly and known factors involved in the condensation process (e.g. condensin complexes and topoisomerase II). We will then focus on a few selected studies that have recently brought novel insights into the mysterious way chromosomes are condensed during nuclear division. PMID:27508072

  13. The Chromosomes of Birds during Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Pigozzi, María I

    2016-01-01

    The cytological analysis of meiotic chromosomes is an exceptional tool to approach complex processes such as synapsis and recombination during the division. Chromosome studies of meiosis have been especially valuable in birds, where naturally occurring mutants or experimental knock-out animals are not available to fully investigate the basic mechanisms of major meiotic events. This review highlights the main contributions of synaptonemal complex and lampbrush chromosome research to the current knowledge of avian meiosis, with special emphasis on the organization of chromosomes during prophase I, the impact of chromosome rearrangements during meiosis, and distinctive features of the ZW pair.

  14. Chromosome congression explained by nanoscale electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, L John; Shain, Daniel H

    2014-02-24

    Nanoscale electrostatic microtubule disassembly forces between positively charged molecules in kinetochores and negative charges on plus ends of microtubules have been implicated in poleward chromosome motions and may also contribute to antipoleward chromosome movements. We propose that chromosome congression can be understood in terms of antipoleward nanoscale electrostatic microtubule assembly forces between negatively charged microtubule plus ends and like-charged chromosome arms, acting in conjunction with poleward microtubule disassembly forces. Several other aspects of post-attachment prometaphase chromosome motions, as well as metaphase oscillations, are consistently explained within this framework.

  15. Extensive Diversity of Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacteria Recovered from Sonoran Desert Soil and Description of Nine New Species of the Genus Deinococcus Obtained from a Single Soil Sample†

    PubMed Central

    Rainey, Fred A.; Ray, Keren; Ferreira, Margarida; Gatz, Bridget Z.; Nobre, M. Fernanda; Bagaley, Danielle; Rash, Brian A.; Park, Mie-Jung; Earl, Ashlee M.; Shank, Nicole C.; Small, Alanna M.; Henk, Margaret C.; Battista, John R.; Kämpfer, Peter; da Costa, Milton S.

    2005-01-01

    The ionizing-radiation-resistant fractions of two soil bacterial communities were investigated by exposing an arid soil from the Sonoran Desert and a nonarid soil from a Louisiana forest to various doses of ionizing radiation using a 60Co source. The numbers of surviving bacteria decreased as the dose of gamma radiation to which the soils were exposed increased. Bacterial isolates surviving doses of 30 kGy were recovered from the Sonoran Desert soil, while no isolates were recovered from the nonarid forest soil after exposure to doses greater than 13 kGy. The phylogenetic diversities of the surviving culturable bacteria were compared for the two soils using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. In addition to a bacterial population that was more resistant to higher doses of ionizing radiation, the diversity of the isolates was greater in the arid soil. The taxonomic diversity of the isolates recovered was found to decrease as the level of ionizing-radiation exposure increased. Bacterial isolates of the genera Deinococcus, Geodermatophilus, and Hymenobacter were still recovered from the arid soil after exposure to doses of 17 to 30 kGy. The recovery of large numbers of extremely ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria from an arid soil and not from a nonarid soil provides further ecological support for the hypothesis that the ionizing-radiation resistance phenotype is a consequence of the evolution of other DNA repair systems that protect cells against commonly encountered environmental stressors, such as desiccation. The diverse group of bacterial strains isolated from the arid soil sample included 60 Deinococcus strains, the characterization of which revealed nine novel species of this genus. PMID:16151108

  16. Extensive diversity of ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria recovered from Sonoran Desert soil and description of nine new species of the genus Deinococcus obtained from a single soil sample.

    PubMed

    Rainey, Fred A; Ray, Keren; Ferreira, Margarida; Gatz, Bridget Z; Nobre, M Fernanda; Bagaley, Danielle; Rash, Brian A; Park, Mie-Jung; Earl, Ashlee M; Shank, Nicole C; Small, Alanna M; Henk, Margaret C; Battista, John R; Kämpfer, Peter; da Costa, Milton S

    2005-09-01

    The ionizing-radiation-resistant fractions of two soil bacterial communities were investigated by exposing an arid soil from the Sonoran Desert and a nonarid soil from a Louisiana forest to various doses of ionizing radiation using a (60)Co source. The numbers of surviving bacteria decreased as the dose of gamma radiation to which the soils were exposed increased. Bacterial isolates surviving doses of 30 kGy were recovered from the Sonoran Desert soil, while no isolates were recovered from the nonarid forest soil after exposure to doses greater than 13 kGy. The phylogenetic diversities of the surviving culturable bacteria were compared for the two soils using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. In addition to a bacterial population that was more resistant to higher doses of ionizing radiation, the diversity of the isolates was greater in the arid soil. The taxonomic diversity of the isolates recovered was found to decrease as the level of ionizing-radiation exposure increased. Bacterial isolates of the genera Deinococcus, Geodermatophilus, and Hymenobacter were still recovered from the arid soil after exposure to doses of 17 to 30 kGy. The recovery of large numbers of extremely ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria from an arid soil and not from a nonarid soil provides further ecological support for the hypothesis that the ionizing-radiation resistance phenotype is a consequence of the evolution of other DNA repair systems that protect cells against commonly encountered environmental stressors, such as desiccation. The diverse group of bacterial strains isolated from the arid soil sample included 60 Deinococcus strains, the characterization of which revealed nine novel species of this genus.

  17. Chromosome painting of Z and W sex chromosomes in Characidium (Characiformes, Crenuchidae).

    PubMed

    Pazian, Marlon F; Shimabukuro-Dias, Cristiane Kioko; Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2013-03-01

    Some species of the genus Characidium have heteromorphic ZZ/ZW sex chromosomes with a totally heterochromatic W chromosome. Methods for chromosome microdissection associated with chromosome painting have become important tools for cytogenetic studies in Neotropical fish. In Characidium cf. fasciatum, the Z chromosome contains a pericentromeric heterochromatin block, whereas the W chromosome is completely heterochromatic. Therefore, a probe was produced from the W chromosome through microdissection and degenerate oligonucleotide-primed polymerase chain reaction amplification. FISH was performed using the W probe on the chromosomes of specimens of this species. This revealed expressive marks in the pericentromeric region of the Z chromosome as well as a completely painted W chromosome. When applying the same probe on chromosome preparations of C. cf. gomesi and Characidium sp., a pattern similar to C. cf. fasciatum was found, while C. cf. zebra, C. cf. lagosantense and Crenuchus spilurus species showed no hybridization signals. Structural changes in the chromosomes of an ancestral sexual system in the group that includes the species C. cf. gomesi, C. cf. fasciatum and Characidium sp., could have contributed to the process of speciation and could represent a causal mechanism of chromosomal diversification in this group. The heterochromatinization process possibly began in homomorphic and homologous chromosomes of an ancestral form, and this process could have given rise to the current patterns found in the species with sex chromosome heteromorphism.

  18. The Hypermethylated Regions in Avian Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Michael; Steinlein, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Chromosomal locations and amounts of 5-methylcytosine-rich chromosome regions were detected in the karyotypes of 13 bird species by indirect immunofluorescence using a monoclonal anti-5-methylcytosine antibody. These species belong to 7 orders and 10 families of modern (Neognathae) and primitive (Palaeognathae) birds and are characterized by macro- and microchromosomes as well as ZW sex chromosomes. In all 13 species, the hypermethylated chromosome segments are confined to constitutive heterochromatin. The chromosomal locations of hypermethylated DNA regions in the karyotypes are constant and species-specific. There is no general rule with regard to the distribution of these hypermethylated chromosome regions in the genomes of birds. In most instances, hypermethylated segments are located in the centromeric regions of chromosomes, but in the sex chromosomes, these can also be found in telomeric and interstitial postitions. In most of the species studied, the centromeric heterochromatin in many, if not all, of the microchromosomes is hypermethylated. However, in one species, the only detectable hypermethylated heterochromatic regions are located in one pair of macroautosomes and in the Z sex chromosome, but none of the microchromosomes contains visible quantities of 5-methylcytosine. The analysis of 5-methylcytosine-rich chromosome regions can be very helpful for the comparative cytogenetics of closely related species or subspecies. It also reflects the dynamic evolutionary process operating in the highly repetitive DNA of eukaryotic chromosomes. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Lampbrush chromosomes enable study of cohesin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Austin, Christopher; Novikova, Natalya; Guacci, Vincent; Bellini, Michel

    2009-01-01

    The lampbrush chromosomes present in the nuclei of amphibian oocytes offer unique biological approaches for study of the mechanisms that regulate chromatin structure with high spatial resolution. We discuss fundamental aspects of the remarkable organization and plasticity exhibited by lampbrush chromosomes. We then utilize lampbrush chromosomes to characterize the chromosomal distribution and dynamics of cohesin, the four-protein complex (RAD21/MCD1/SCC1, SMC1, SMC3, SCC3/SA2) responsible for sister chromatid cohesion. We find that endogenous SMC3 and newly expressed hRAD21 co-localize on chromosomal axes, sites where sister chromatids are tightly paired. We present evidence suggesting that hRAD21 recruitment to lampbrush chromosomes is modulated by chromosomal SMC1 and SMC3. Notably, using a technique for de novo chromosome assembly, we demonstrate that both SMC3 and hRAD21 are recruited to single, unreplicated lampbrush chromatids. Finally, we used our novel method of analyzing the oocyte nucleus under oil combined with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, to provide direct evidence that cohesin is highly dynamic at discrete, condensed chromosomal regions. Collectively, these data demonstrate that lampbrush chromosomes provide a unique and powerful tool for combining biochemical and cytological analyses for dissection of complex chromosomal processes.

  20. [Chromosome abnormalities in human cancer].

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Gómez, F

    1995-01-01

    Recent investigation on the presence of chromosome abnormalities in neoplasias has allowed outstanding advances in the knowledge of malignant transformation mechanisms and important applications in the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of leukaemias, lymphomas and solid tumors. The purpose of the present paper is to discuss the most relevant cytogenetic aberrations, some of them described at the Unidad de Investigación Médica en Genética Humana, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, and to correlate these abnormalities with recent achievements in the knowledge of oncogenes, suppressor genes or antioncogenes, their chromosome localization, and their mutations in human neoplasia; as well as their perspectives in prevention and treatment of cancer that such findings permit to anticipate.

  1. [Chromosome recombination in rice meiosis].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Luo, Wei-Xiong; Li, Ming; Luo, Qiong

    2011-06-01

    Meiosis is a highly conservative process, which plays important role in the life cycles of all sexually reproductive organisms, while the pairing, synapsis, and recombination are the key events in this process and have become the hotspots in meiosis studies. At present, we cannot observe the process of cross and recombination of chromosomes directly in plant meiosis, and generally conclude the process by analysis the genetic population. In the present study, we analyzed 32 DH lines using graphical genotypes, and found 4 chromosomes out of 32 DH lines had regional heterozygosis, which was further confirmed using STS markers. We suggested that it may cause by repair incompletion or mis-repair of chromsome. These results provid some directly evidence for explaining the mechanism of plant meiosis.

  2. International workshop of chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Pericak-Vance, M.A. . Div. of Neurology); Carrano, A.J. )

    1991-09-16

    This document summarizes the workshop on physical and genetic mapping of chromosome 19. The first session discussed the major disease loci found on the chromosome. The second session concentrated on reference families, markers and linkage maps. The third session concentrated on radiation hybrid mapping, somatic cell hybrid panels, macro restriction maps and YACs, followed by cDNA and long range physical maps. The fourth session concentrated on compiling consensus genetic and physical maps as well as discussing regions of conflict. The final session dealt with the LLNL cosmid contig database and comparative mapping of homologous regions of the human and mouse genomes, and ended with a discussion of resource sharing. 18 refs., 2 figs. (MHB)

  3. Chromosome chains and platypus sex: kinky connections.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Terry

    2005-07-01

    Mammal sex determination depends on an XY chromosome system, a gene for testis development and a means of activating the X chromosome. The duckbill platypus challenges these dogmas.(1,2) Gutzner et al.(1) find no recognizable SRY sequence and question whether the mammalian X was even the original sex chromosome in the platypus. Instead they suggest that the original platypus sex chromosomes were derived from the ZW chromosome system of birds and reptiles. Unraveling the puzzles of sex determination and dosage compensation in the platypus has been complicated by the fact that it has a surplus of sex chromosomes. Rather than a single X and Y chromosome, the male platypus has five Xs and five Ys.

  4. Conservation of sex chromosomes in lacertid lizards.

    PubMed

    Rovatsos, Michail; Vukić, Jasna; Altmanová, Marie; Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Moravec, Jiří; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2016-07-01

    Sex chromosomes are believed to be stable in endotherms, but young and evolutionary unstable in most ectothermic vertebrates. Within lacertids, the widely radiated lizard group, sex chromosomes have been reported to vary in morphology and heterochromatinization, which may suggest turnovers during the evolution of the group. We compared the partial gene content of the Z-specific part of sex chromosomes across major lineages of lacertids and discovered a strong evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes. We can conclude that the common ancestor of lacertids, living around 70 million years ago (Mya), already had the same highly differentiated sex chromosomes. Molecular data demonstrating an evolutionary conservation of sex chromosomes have also been documented for iguanas and caenophidian snakes. It seems that differences in the evolutionary conservation of sex chromosomes in vertebrates do not reflect the distinction between endotherms and ectotherms, but rather between amniotes and anamniotes, or generally, the differences in the life history of particular lineages.

  5. Microtubule detyrosination guides chromosomes during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Barisic, Marin; Silva e Sousa, Ricardo; Tripathy, Suvranta K.; Magiera, Maria M.; Zaytsev, Anatoly V.; Pereira, Ana L.; Janke, Carsten; Grishchuk, Ekaterina L.; Maiato, Helder

    2015-01-01

    Before chromosomes segregate into daughter cells they align at the mitotic spindle equator, a process known as chromosome congression. CENP-E/Kinesin-7 is a microtubule plus-end-directed kinetochore motor required for congression of pole-proximal chromosomes. Because the plus-ends of many astral microtubules in the spindle point to the cell cortex, it remains unknown how CENP-E guides pole-proximal chromosomes specifically towards the equator. Here we found that congression of pole-proximal chromosomes depended on specific post-translational detyrosination of spindle microtubules that point to the equator. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that CENP-E-dependent transport was strongly enhanced on detyrosinated microtubules. Blocking tubulin tyrosination in cells caused ubiquitous detyrosination of spindle microtubules and CENP-E transported chromosomes away from spindle poles in random directions. Thus, CENP-E-driven chromosome congression is guided by microtubule detyrosination. PMID:25908662

  6. Transient Microgeographic Clines during B Chromosome Invasion.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Juan Pedro M; Shaw, Michael W; Cabrero, Josefa; Bakkali, Mohammed; Ruíz-Estévez, Mercedes; Ruíz-Ruano, Francisco J; Martín-Blázquez, Rubén; López-León, María Dolores

    2015-11-01

    The near-neutral model of B chromosome evolution predicts that the invasion of a new population should last some tens of generations, but the details on how it proceeds in real populations are mostly unknown. Trying to fill this gap, we analyze here a natural population of the grasshopper Eyprepocnemis plorans at three time points during the last 35 years. Our results show that B chromosome frequency increased significantly during this period and that a cline observed in 1992 had disappeared in 2012 once B chromosome frequency reached an upper limit at all sites sampled. This indicates that, during B chromosome invasion, transient clines for B chromosome frequency are formed at the invasion front on a microgeographic scale. Computer simulation experiments showed that the pattern of change observed for genotypic frequencies is consistent with the existence of B chromosome drive through females and selection against individuals with a high number of B chromosomes.

  7. Chromosome X aneuploidy in Brazilian schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Leopoldo Silva; Khayat, André Salim; de Lima, Patrícia Danielle Lima; Lima, Eleonidas Moura; Pinto, Giovanny Rebouças; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez

    2010-01-01

    The identification of cytogenetic abnormalities in schizophrenic patients may provide clues to the genes involved in this disease. For this reason, a chromosomal analysis of samples from 62 schizophrenics and 70 controls was performed with trypsin-Giemsa banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization of the X chromosome. A clonal pericentric inversion on chromosome 9 was detected in one male patient, and we also discovered mosaicism associated with X chromosome aneuploidy in female patients, primarily detected in schizophrenic and normal female controls over 40 years old. When compared with age-matched female controls, the frequency of X chromosome loss was not significantly different between schizophrenics and controls, except for the 40- to 49-year-old age group. Our findings suggest that the X chromosome loss seen in schizophrenic patients is inherent to the normal cellular aging process. However, our data also suggest that X chromosome gain may be correlated with schizophrenia in this Brazilian population.

  8. Environmental pollution, chromosomes, and health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    In mid-May, 1980, President Carter declared a state of emergency at the Love Canal area, near Niagara Falls, New York. The reason for this was for the U.S. to underwrite the relocation costs ($3-5 million) of some 2500 residents who, according to a report by the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) may have suffered damaged chromosomes. These injuries were apparently caused by contact with toxic wastes that had been dumped in the area in the years prior to development for housing.That the toxic compounds exist in the Love Canal and Niagara Falls subsurface zones, including public water supplies, appears to be established fact. That the residents of the Love Canal area suffered chromosomal damage may be established fact as well. Whether or not these two findings can be linked to ill health of the residents is another matter. Recently, the EPA report has been described as having ‘close to zero scientific significance,’ and has been ‘discredited’(Science, 208, 123a, 1980). The reasons for this disparity go beyond differences of opinion, beyond possible inadequacies of the EPA study, and even beyond problems that probably will arise from future studies, including those now in the planning stages. The problem is that even if victims have easily recognizable injuries from toxic substances (injury that apparently has not occurred to Love Canal residents), medical science usually cannot show a causal relationship. Even chromosomal damage is, at best, difficult to interpret. In ideal studies of significant populations and control groups, the association of toxic chemical to chromosome damage and to cancer and birth defects is indirect and, up to now, has been shown to have little or no significance to an individual member of the exposed population.

  9. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The chromosome painting is an efficient tool for chromosome research. However, plant chromosome painting is relatively underdeveloped. In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and chromosomes of...

  10. Chromosome segregation and aneuploidy. I

    SciTech Connect

    Vig, B.K.

    1993-12-31

    Of all genetic afflictions of man, aneuploidy ranks as the most prevalent. Among liveborn babies aneuploidy exist to the extent of about 0.3%, to about 0.5% among stillborns and a dramatic 25% among miscarriages. The burden is too heavy to be taken lightly. Whereas cytogeneticists are capable of tracing the origin of the extra or missing chromosome to the contributing parent, it is not certain what factors are responsible for this {open_quote}epidemic{close_quote} affecting the human genome. The matter is complicated by the observation that, to the best of our knowledge, all chromosomes do not malsegregate with equal frequency. Chromosome number 16, for example, is the most prevalent among abortuses - one-third of all aneuploid miscarriages are due to trisomy 16 - yet it never appears in aneuploid constitution among the liveborn. Some chromsomes, number 1, for example, appear only rarely, if at all. In the latter case painstaking efforts have to be made to karyotype very early stages of embryonic development, as early as the 8-cell stage. Even though no convincing data are yet available, it is conceivable that the product of most aneuploid zygotes is lost before implantation.

  11. Mechanisms of Chromosome Congression during Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Maiato, Helder; Gomes, Ana Margarida; Sousa, Filipe; Barisic, Marin

    2017-01-01

    Chromosome congression during prometaphase culminates with the establishment of a metaphase plate, a hallmark of mitosis in metazoans. Classical views resulting from more than 100 years of research on this topic have attempted to explain chromosome congression based on the balance between opposing pulling and/or pushing forces that reach an equilibrium near the spindle equator. However, in mammalian cells, chromosome bi-orientation and force balance at kinetochores are not required for chromosome congression, whereas the mechanisms of chromosome congression are not necessarily involved in the maintenance of chromosome alignment after congression. Thus, chromosome congression and maintenance of alignment are determined by different principles. Moreover, it is now clear that not all chromosomes use the same mechanism for congressing to the spindle equator. Those chromosomes that are favorably positioned between both poles when the nuclear envelope breaks down use the so-called “direct congression” pathway in which chromosomes align after bi-orientation and the establishment of end-on kinetochore-microtubule attachments. This favors the balanced action of kinetochore pulling forces and polar ejection forces along chromosome arms that drive chromosome oscillatory movements during and after congression. The other pathway, which we call “peripheral congression”, is independent of end-on kinetochore microtubule-attachments and relies on the dominant and coordinated action of the kinetochore motors Dynein and Centromere Protein E (CENP-E) that mediate the lateral transport of peripheral chromosomes along microtubules, first towards the poles and subsequently towards the equator. How the opposite polarities of kinetochore motors are regulated in space and time to drive congression of peripheral chromosomes only now starts to be understood. This appears to be regulated by position-dependent phosphorylation of both Dynein and CENP-E and by spindle microtubule

  12. Mechanisms of Chromosome Congression during Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Maiato, Helder; Gomes, Ana Margarida; Sousa, Filipe; Barisic, Marin

    2017-02-17

    Chromosome congression during prometaphase culminates with the establishment of a metaphase plate, a hallmark of mitosis in metazoans. Classical views resulting from more than 100 years of research on this topic have attempted to explain chromosome congression based on the balance between opposing pulling and/or pushing forces that reach an equilibrium near the spindle equator. However, in mammalian cells, chromosome bi-orientation and force balance at kinetochores are not required for chromosome congression, whereas the mechanisms of chromosome congression are not necessarily involved in the maintenance of chromosome alignment after congression. Thus, chromosome congression and maintenance of alignment are determined by different principles. Moreover, it is now clear that not all chromosomes use the same mechanism for congressing to the spindle equator. Those chromosomes that are favorably positioned between both poles when the nuclear envelope breaks down use the so-called "direct congression" pathway in which chromosomes align after bi-orientation and the establishment of end-on kinetochore-microtubule attachments. This favors the balanced action of kinetochore pulling forces and polar ejection forces along chromosome arms that drive chromosome oscillatory movements during and after congression. The other pathway, which we call "peripheral congression", is independent of end-on kinetochore microtubule-attachments and relies on the dominant and coordinated action of the kinetochore motors Dynein and Centromere Protein E (CENP-E) that mediate the lateral transport of peripheral chromosomes along microtubules, first towards the poles and subsequently towards the equator. How the opposite polarities of kinetochore motors are regulated in space and time to drive congression of peripheral chromosomes only now starts to be understood. This appears to be regulated by position-dependent phosphorylation of both Dynein and CENP-E and by spindle microtubule diversity by

  13. Chromosomal variants in klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Frühmesser, A; Kotzot, D

    2011-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) describes the phenotype of the most common sex chromosome abnormality in humans and occurs in one of every 600 newborn males. The typical symptoms are a tall stature, narrow shoulders, broad hips, sparse body hair, gynecomastia, small testes, absent spermatogenesis, normal to moderately reduced Leydig cell function, increased secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone, androgen deficiency, and normal to slightly decreased verbal intelligence. Apart from that, amongst others, osteoporosis, varicose veins, thromboembolic disease, or diabetes mellitus are observed. Some of the typical features can be very weakly pronounced so that the affected men often receive the diagnosis only at the adulthood by their infertility. With a frequency of 4%, KS is described to be the most common genetic reason for male infertility. The most widespread karyotype in affected patients is 47,XXY. Apart from that, various other karyotypes have been described, including 46,XX in males, 47,XXY in females, 47,XX,der(Y), 47,X,der(X),Y, or other numeric sex chromosome abnormalities (48,XXXY, 48,XXYY, and 49,XXXXY). The focus of this review was to abstract the different phenotypes, which come about by the various karyotypes and to compare them to those with a 'normal' KS karyotype. For that the patients have been divided into 6 different groups: Klinefelter patients with an additional isochromosome Xq, with additional rearrangements on 1 of the 2 X chromosomes or accordingly on the Y chromosome, as well as XX males and true hermaphrodites, 47,XXY females and Klinefelter patients with other numeric sex chromosome abnormalities. In the latter, an almost linear increase in height and developmental delay was observed. Men with an additional isochromosome Xq show infertility and other minor features of 'normal' KS but not an increased height. Aside from the infertility, in male patients with other der(X) as well as der(Y) rearrangements and in XXY women no specific phenotype

  14. Human and porcine correspondence of chromosome segments using bidirectional chromosome painting

    SciTech Connect

    Goureau, A. |; Riquet, J.; Milan, D.

    1996-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the correspondence between human and porcine chromosome fragments using whole chromosome painting probes from both species in heterologous hybridization experiments (bidirectional heterologous chromosome painting). Bidirectional experiments allow the determination of segment-to-segment homologies between the chromosomes of these two species. Chromosome-specific painting probes from both species were, except one, obtained by DOP-PCR or PARM-PCR amplification of flow-sorted chromosomes. The probes labeled 95% of the total length of the porcine chromsomes with human painting probes and 60% of the human chromosomes in the reverse experiments. Syntenic relationships of chromosomal segments of the karyotype of both species were determined. There was close agreement between comparative gene mapping data and the identified homologous segments; this comparison enabled orientation of the segments. We demonstrate that bidirectional heterologous chromosome painting is a highly efficient way of generating comparative cytogenetic maps. 43 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Reciprocal translocation between Y chromosome long arm euchromatin and the short arm of chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Brigitte; Glaubitz, Ralf; Schalk, Thomas; Schneider, Ulrich; Schulze, Wolfgang; Miller, Konstantin

    2002-01-01

    A case with an apparently balanced reciprocal translocation between the long arm of the Y chromosome and the short arm of chromosome 1 t(Y;1)(q11.2;p34.3) is described. The translocation was found in a phenotypically normal male ascertained by infertility and presenting for intra-cytoplasmatic sperm injection treatment. Histological examination of testicular biopsies revealed spermatogenic failure. Chromosome painting with probes for chromosome 1 and for the euchromatic part of the Y chromsome confirmed the translocation of euchromatic Y chromosomal material onto the short arm of chromosome 1 and of a substantial part of the short arm of chromosome 1 onto the Y chromosome. Among the Y/autosome translocations, the rearrangements involving long arm euchromatin of the Y chromosome are relatively rare and mostly associated with infertility. Microdeletion screening at the azoospermia locus revealed no deletions, suggesting another mechanism causing infertility in this translocation carrier.

  16. Whole chromosome painting of B chromosomes of the red-eye tetra Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae (Teleostei, Characidae)

    PubMed Central

    Scudeler, Patricia Elda Sobrinho; Diniz, Débora; Wasko, Adriane Pinto; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract B chromosomes are dispensable genomic elements found in different groups of animals and plants. In the present study, a whole chromosome probe was generated from a specific heterochromatic B chromosome occurring in cells of the characidae fish Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae (Steindachner, 1907). The chromosome painting probes were used in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments for the assessment of metaphase chromosomes obtained from individuals from three populations of Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae. The results revealed that DNA sequences were shared between a specific B chromosome and many chromosomes of the A complement in all populations analyzed, suggesting a possible intra-specific origin of these B chromosomes. However, no hybridization signals were observed in other B chromosomes found in the same individuals, implying a possible independent origin of B chromosome variants in this species. FISH experiments using 18S rDNA probes revealed the presence of non-active ribosomal genes in some B chromosomes and in some chromosomes of the A complement, suggesting that at least two types of B chromosomes had an independent origin. The role of heterochromatic segments and ribosomal sequences in the origin of B chromosomes were discussed. PMID:26753081

  17. Comparative analysis of sex chromosomes in Leporinus species (Teleostei, Characiformes) using chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Parise-Maltempi, Patrícia Pasquali; da Silva, Edson Lourenço; Rens, Willem; Dearden, Frances; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Trifonov, Vladimir; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A

    2013-07-03

    The Leporinus genus, belonging to the Anostomidae family, is an interesting model for studies of sex chromosome evolution in fish, particularly because of the presence of heteromorphic sex chromosomes only in some species of the genus. In this study we used W chromosome-derived probes in a series of cross species chromosome painting experiments to try to understand events of sex chromosome evolution in this family. W chromosome painting probes from Leporinus elongatus, L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens were hybridized to each others chromosomes. The results showed signals along their W chromosomes and the use of L. elongatus W probe against L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens also showed signals over the Z chromosome. No signals were observed when the later aforementioned probe was used in hybridization procedures against other four Anostomidae species without sex chromosomes. Our results demonstrate a common origin of sex chromosomes in L. elongatus, L. macrocephalus and L. obtusidens but suggest that the L. elongatus chromosome system is at a different evolutionary stage. The absence of signals in the species without differentiated sex chromosomes does not exclude the possibility of cryptic sex chromosomes, but they must contain other Leporinus W sequences than those described here.

  18. Whole chromosome painting of B chromosomes of the red-eye tetra Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae (Teleostei, Characidae).

    PubMed

    Scudeler, Patricia Elda Sobrinho; Diniz, Débora; Wasko, Adriane Pinto; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2015-01-01

    B chromosomes are dispensable genomic elements found in different groups of animals and plants. In the present study, a whole chromosome probe was generated from a specific heterochromatic B chromosome occurring in cells of the characidae fish Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae (Steindachner, 1907). The chromosome painting probes were used in fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments for the assessment of metaphase chromosomes obtained from individuals from three populations of Moenkhausia sanctaefilomenae. The results revealed that DNA sequences were shared between a specific B chromosome and many chromosomes of the A complement in all populations analyzed, suggesting a possible intra-specific origin of these B chromosomes. However, no hybridization signals were observed in other B chromosomes found in the same individuals, implying a possible independent origin of B chromosome variants in this species. FISH experiments using 18S rDNA probes revealed the presence of non-active ribosomal genes in some B chromosomes and in some chromosomes of the A complement, suggesting that at least two types of B chromosomes had an independent origin. The role of heterochromatic segments and ribosomal sequences in the origin of B chromosomes were discussed.

  19. Chromosomal divergence and evolutionary inferences in Rhodniini based on the chromosomal location of ribosomal genes

    PubMed Central

    Pita, Sebastián; Panzera, Francisco; Ferrandis, Inés; Galvão, Cleber; Gómez-Palacio, Andrés; Panzera, Yanina

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridisation to determine the chromosomal location of 45S rDNA clusters in 10 species of the tribe Rhodniini (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae). The results showed striking inter and intraspecific variability, with the location of the rDNA clusters restricted to sex chromosomes with two patterns: either on one (X chromosome) or both sex chromosomes (X and Y chromosomes). This variation occurs within a genus that has an unchanging diploid chromosome number (2n = 22, including 20 autosomes and 2 sex chromosomes) and a similar chromosome size and genomic DNA content, reflecting a genome dynamic not revealed by these chromosome traits. The rDNA variation in closely related species and the intraspecific polymorphism in Rhodnius ecuadoriensis suggested that the chromosomal position of rDNA clusters might be a useful marker to identify recently diverged species or populations. We discuss the ancestral position of ribosomal genes in the tribe Rhodniini and the possible mechanisms involved in the variation of the rDNA clusters, including the loss of rDNA loci on the Y chromosome, transposition and ectopic pairing. The last two processes involve chromosomal exchanges between both sex chromosomes, in contrast to the widely accepted idea that the achiasmatic sex chromosomes of Heteroptera do not interchange sequences. PMID:23778665

  20. Single origin of sex chromosomes and multiple origins of B chromosomes in fish genus Characidium.

    PubMed

    Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; Serrano, Érica Alves; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Camacho, Juan Pedro M; da Costa Silva, Guilherme José; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Oliveira, Cláudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome painting with DNA probes obtained from supernumerary (B) and sex chromosomes in three species of fish genus Characidium (C. gomesi, C. pterostictum and C. oiticicai) showed a close resemblance in repetitive DNA content between B and sex chromosomes in C. gomesi and C. pterostictum. This suggests an intraspecific origin for B chromosomes in these two species, probably deriving from sex chromosomes. In C. oiticicai, however, a DNA probe obtained from its B chromosome hybridized with the B but not with the A chromosomes, suggesting that the B chromosome in this species could have arisen interspecifically, although this hypothesis needs further investigation. A molecular phylogenetic analysis performed on nine Characidium species, with two mtDNA genes, showed that the presence of heteromorphic sex chromosomes in these species is a derived condition, and that their origin could have been unique, a conclusion also supported by interspecific chromosome painting with a CgW probe derived from the W chromosome in C. gomesi. Summing up, our results indicate that whereas heteromorphic sex chromosomes in the genus Characidium appear to have had a common and unique origin, B chromosomes may have had independent origins in different species. Our results also show that molecular phylogenetic analysis is an excellent complement for cytogenetic studies by unveiling the direction of evolutionary chromosome changes.

  1. Single Origin of Sex Chromosomes and Multiple Origins of B Chromosomes in Fish Genus Characidium

    PubMed Central

    Pansonato-Alves, José Carlos; Serrano, Érica Alves; Utsunomia, Ricardo; Camacho, Juan Pedro M.; da Costa Silva, Guilherme José; Vicari, Marcelo Ricardo; Artoni, Roberto Ferreira; Oliveira, Cláudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome painting with DNA probes obtained from supernumerary (B) and sex chromosomes in three species of fish genus Characidium (C. gomesi, C. pterostictum and C. oiticicai) showed a close resemblance in repetitive DNA content between B and sex chromosomes in C. gomesi and C. pterostictum. This suggests an intraspecific origin for B chromosomes in these two species, probably deriving from sex chromosomes. In C. oiticicai, however, a DNA probe obtained from its B chromosome hybridized with the B but not with the A chromosomes, suggesting that the B chromosome in this species could have arisen interspecifically, although this hypothesis needs further investigation. A molecular phylogenetic analysis performed on nine Characidium species, with two mtDNA genes, showed that the presence of heteromorphic sex chromosomes in these species is a derived condition, and that their origin could have been unique, a conclusion also supported by interspecific chromosome painting with a CgW probe derived from the W chromosome in C. gomesi. Summing up, our results indicate that whereas heteromorphic sex chromosomes in the genus Characidium appear to have had a common and unique origin, B chromosomes may have had independent origins in different species. Our results also show that molecular phylogenetic analysis is an excellent complement for cytogenetic studies by unveiling the direction of evolutionary chromosome changes. PMID:25226580

  2. [Spectral karyotyping of seven prenatally detected marker chromosomes and complex chromosome aberrations].

    PubMed

    Song, Hua-lei; Chen, Bao-jiang; Fang, Qun; Xie, Ying-jun; Lin, Shao-bin; Wu, Jian-zhu

    2012-08-01

    To perform spectral karyotyping (SKY), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and conventional karyotyping on prenatally detected marker chromosomes and complex chromosomal aberrations. Five marker chromosomes and 2 complex chromosome aberrations diagnosed by G banding were collected. SKY was performed to verify the composition of marker chromosomes. FISH was used to confirm the diagnosis when necessary. In certain cases, C or N banding technique was employed to verify the composition of chromosomes. Results of ultrasonography and pregnancy outcome were reviewed. Among the 5 marker chromosomes, 2 were large and 3 were medium in size, 4 were de novo and one was inherited from the father. By SKY analysis, 2 marker chromosomes have originated from non-acrocentric chromosomes (4 and 9), whilst the other two have originated from acrocentric chromosomes (21 and 22). The remainder was derived from X chromosome. The SKY results were confirmed by FISH in 3 cases. Four cases have chosen to terminate the pregnancy after genetic counseling. A fetus with inherited paternal marker chromosome was delivered at term, and showed normal development during the first year of life. As for the other 2 cases with complex chromosome aberrations, by SKY examination, one had duplication in chromosome 8 and the other had chromosome rearrangements derived from translocation between chromosomes 2 and 6. In the latter case the fetus was delivered at term but showed developmental retardation at 6 months. SKY in combination with FISH can facilitate identification of the origins of marker chromosomes as well as complex chromosomal aberrations. With combined information from ultrasonography, SKY and FISH, effective counseling may be offered to the patients.

  3. Biological dosimetry by interphase chromosome painting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    Both fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase spreads with whole-chromosome probes and premature chromosome condensation in interphase nuclei have been used in the past to estimate the radiation dose to lymphocytes. We combined these techniques to evaluate the feasibility of using painted interphase chromosomes for biodosimetry. Human peripheral lymphocytes were exposed to gamma rays and fused to mitotic Chinese hamster cells either immediately after irradiation or after 8 h incubation at 37 degrees C. Interphase or metaphase human chromosomes were hybridized with a composite probe specific for human chromosomes 3 and 4. The dose-response curve for fragment induction immediately after irradiation was linear; these results reflected breakage frequency in the total genome in terms of DNA content per chromosome. At 8 h after irradiation, the dose-response curve for chromosome interchanges, the prevalent aberration in interphase chromosomes, was linear-quadratic and similar to that observed for metaphase chromosomes. These results suggest that painting prematurely condensed chromosomes can be useful for biological dosimetry when blood samples are available shortly after the exposure, or when interphase cells are to be scored instead of mitotic cells.

  4. Micromechanical study of mitotic chromosome structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marko, John

    2011-03-01

    Our group has developed micromanipulation techniques for study of the highly compacted mitotic form of chromosome found in eukaryote cells during cell division. Each metaphase chromosome contains two duplicate centimeter-long DNA molecules, folded up by proteins into cylindrical structures several microns in length. Native chromosomes display linear and reversible stretching behavior over a wide range of extensions (up to 5x native length for amphibian chromosomes), described by a Young modulus of about 300 Pa. Studies using DNA-cutting and protein-cutting enzymes have revealed that metaphase chromosomes behave as a network of chromatin fibers held together by protein-based isolated crosslinks. Our results are not consistent with the more classical model of loops of chromatin attached to a protein-based structural organizer or ``scaffold". In short, our experiments indicate that metaphase chromosomes can be considered to be ``gels" of chromatin; the stretching modulus of a whole chromosome is consistent with stretching of the chromatin fibers contained within it. Experiments using topoisomerases suggest that topological constraints may play an appreciable role in confining chromatin in the metaphase chromosome. Finally, recent experiments on human chromosomes will be reviewed, including results of experiments where chromosome-folding proteins are specifically depleted using siRNA methods. Supported by NSF-MCB-1022117, DMR-0715099, PHY-0852130, DMR-0520513, NCI 1U54CA143869-01 (NU-PS-OC), and the American Heart Association.

  5. The importance of having two X chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Arthur P.; Reue, Karen; Eghbali, Mansoureh; Vilain, Eric; Chen, Xuqi; Ghahramani, Negar; Itoh, Yuichiro; Li, Jingyuan; Link, Jenny C.; Ngun, Tuck; Williams-Burris, Shayna M.

    2016-01-01

    Historically, it was thought that the number of X chromosomes plays little role in causing sex differences in traits. Recently, selected mouse models have been used increasingly to compare mice with the same type of gonad but with one versus two copies of the X chromosome. Study of these models demonstrates that mice with one X chromosome can be strikingly different from those with two X chromosomes, when the differences are not attributable to confounding group differences in gonadal hormones. The number of X chromosomes affects adiposity and metabolic disease, cardiovascular ischaemia/reperfusion injury and behaviour. The effects of X chromosome number are likely the result of inherent differences in expression of X genes that escape inactivation, and are therefore expressed from both X chromosomes in XX mice, resulting in a higher level of expression when two X chromosomes are present. The effects of X chromosome number contribute to sex differences in disease phenotypes, and may explain some features of X chromosome aneuploidies such as in Turner and Klinefelter syndromes. PMID:26833834

  6. Biological dosimetry by interphase chromosome painting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; George, K.; Yang, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    Both fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase spreads with whole-chromosome probes and premature chromosome condensation in interphase nuclei have been used in the past to estimate the radiation dose to lymphocytes. We combined these techniques to evaluate the feasibility of using painted interphase chromosomes for biodosimetry. Human peripheral lymphocytes were exposed to gamma rays and fused to mitotic Chinese hamster cells either immediately after irradiation or after 8 h incubation at 37 degrees C. Interphase or metaphase human chromosomes were hybridized with a composite probe specific for human chromosomes 3 and 4. The dose-response curve for fragment induction immediately after irradiation was linear; these results reflected breakage frequency in the total genome in terms of DNA content per chromosome. At 8 h after irradiation, the dose-response curve for chromosome interchanges, the prevalent aberration in interphase chromosomes, was linear-quadratic and similar to that observed for metaphase chromosomes. These results suggest that painting prematurely condensed chromosomes can be useful for biological dosimetry when blood samples are available shortly after the exposure, or when interphase cells are to be scored instead of mitotic cells.

  7. The importance of having two X chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Arthur P; Reue, Karen; Eghbali, Mansoureh; Vilain, Eric; Chen, Xuqi; Ghahramani, Negar; Itoh, Yuichiro; Li, Jingyuan; Link, Jenny C; Ngun, Tuck; Williams-Burris, Shayna M

    2016-02-19

    Historically, it was thought that the number of X chromosomes plays little role in causing sex differences in traits. Recently, selected mouse models have been used increasingly to compare mice with the same type of gonad but with one versus two copies of the X chromosome. Study of these models demonstrates that mice with one X chromosome can be strikingly different from those with two X chromosomes, when the differences are not attributable to confounding group differences in gonadal hormones. The number of X chromosomes affects adiposity and metabolic disease, cardiovascular ischaemia/reperfusion injury and behaviour. The effects of X chromosome number are likely the result of inherent differences in expression of X genes that escape inactivation, and are therefore expressed from both X chromosomes in XX mice, resulting in a higher level of expression when two X chromosomes are present. The effects of X chromosome number contribute to sex differences in disease phenotypes, and may explain some features of X chromosome aneuploidies such as in Turner and Klinefelter syndromes.

  8. Nucleolar organizing chromosomes ofRicinus.

    PubMed

    Paris, H S; Shifriss, O; Jelenkovic, G

    1980-03-01

    Pachytene chromosome morphology was compared in nine races ofRicinus communis L. (2n = 20), using pollen mother cells (PMCs) and light microscopy. Of the ten bivalents, only the two possessing nucleolar organizing regions (NORs), chromosomes 2 and 7, exhibit structural variations among the races. The NORs are located in the short arms of these two chromosomes. Most of the observed structural variations affect these short arms, which are similar morphologically and consist largely of heterochromatic segments. The PMCs contain a single nucleolus and this is associated with the NOR of each of the two chromosomes at a particular frequency in each race. In eight races, a nucleolar constriction (NC) is present in either chromosome 2 or chromosome 7. In these races, the nucleolus is associated with the chromosome possessing an NC at a frequency of 100% and with the chromosome lacking an NC at a frequency ranging between 5.6 and 100%, depending upon the race. No microscopically visible NC is present in the ninth race. In this race, the nucleolus is associated with both chromosomes 2 and 7 at a frequency of 100%. The association of the nucleolus with a chromosome possessing an NC is at the NC and with a chromosome lacking an NC is at the terminal heterochromatic segment of the short arm. Several interpretations are offered to account for the variations in frequency of association between the nucleolus and each of the nucleolar organizing chromosomes. It is suggested that the two non-linked NORs have evolved through some intragenomic changes rather than polyploidy, that this species is highly intolerant to structural variations other than those occurring in or near the NORs, and that structural variations in the nucleolar organizing chromosomes are not associated with racial variations in plant phenotype.

  9. Small marker chromosomes in man: origin from pericentric heterochromatin of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16.

    PubMed Central

    Callen, D F; Ringenbergs, M L; Fowler, J C; Freemantle, C J; Haan, E A

    1990-01-01

    Three patients with different marker chromosomes were screened by in situ hybridisation using biotinylated probes to chromosome specific pericentric repeats to determine the chromosomal origin of the marker. Each marker had a different origin, with one from each of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16. This is the first time that autosomal marker chromosomes consisting of a small ring have been shown to be derived from the pericentric heterochromatin of metacentric and submetacentric chromosomes. Evidence suggests that such markers are not associated with any significant risk of phenotypic abnormalities, but additional cases need to be studied. Images PMID:2325088

  10. Structure of the eukaryotic chromosome and the karyotype

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The second chapter of `Human Chromosomes: Structure, Behavior, and Effects` provides information on the structure of the eukaryotic chromosome (chromosomes or higher organisms) and the karyotype. Chromosome size, shape, and number are discussed, as are banding techniques. Euploid and aneuploid changes in chromosomes (changes in the number of sets of chromosomes or the number of individual chromosomes) are also discussed. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Deciphering evolutionary strata on plant sex chromosomes and fungal mating-type chromosomes through compositional segmentation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ravi S; Azad, Rajeev K

    2016-03-01

    Sex chromosomes have evolved from a pair of homologous autosomes which differentiated into sex determination systems, such as XY or ZW system, as a consequence of successive recombination suppression between the gametologous chromosomes. Identifying the regions of recombination suppression, namely, the "evolutionary strata", is central to understanding the history and dynamics of sex chromosome evolution. Evolution of sex chromosomes as a consequence of serial recombination suppressions is well-studied for mammals and birds, but not for plants, although 48 dioecious plants have already been reported. Only two plants Silene latifolia and papaya have been studied until now for the presence of evolutionary strata on their X chromosomes, made possible by the sequencing of sex-linked genes on both the X and Y chromosomes, which is a requirement of all current methods that determine stratum structure based on the comparison of gametologous sex chromosomes. To circumvent this limitation and detect strata even if only the sequence of sex chromosome in the homogametic sex (i.e. X or Z chromosome) is available, we have developed an integrated segmentation and clustering method. In application to gene sequences on the papaya X chromosome and protein-coding sequences on the S. latifolia X chromosome, our method could decipher all known evolutionary strata, as reported by previous studies. Our method, after validating on known strata on the papaya and S. latifolia X chromosome, was applied to the chromosome 19 of Populus trichocarpa, an incipient sex chromosome, deciphering two, yet unknown, evolutionary strata. In addition, we applied this approach to the recently sequenced sex chromosome V of the brown alga Ectocarpus sp. that has a haploid sex determination system (UV system) recovering the sex determining and pseudoautosomal regions, and then to the mating-type chromosomes of an anther-smut fungus Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae predicting five strata in the non

  12. Scaling Chromosomes for an Evolutionary Karyotype: A Chromosomal Tradeoff between Size and Number across Woody Species

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Guolu; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the expected scaling relationships between chromosome size and number across woody species and to clarify the importance of the scaling for the maintenance of chromosome diversity by analyzing the scaling at the inter- & intra-chromosomal level. To achieve for the goals, chromosome trait data were extracted for 191 woody species (including 56 evergreen species and 135 deciduous species) from the available literature. Cross-species analyses revealed a tradeoff among chromosomes between chromosome size and number, demonstrating there is selective mechanism crossing chromosomes among woody species. And the explanations for the result were presented from intra- to inter-chromosome contexts that the scaling may be compromises among scale symmetry, mechanical requirements, and resource allocation across chromosomes. Therein, a 3/4 scaling pattern was observed between total chromosomes and m-chromosomes within nucleus which may imply total chromosomes may evolve from more to less. In addition, the primary evolutionary trend of karyotype and the role of m-chromosomes in the process of karyotype evolution were also discussed. PMID:26657837

  13. Chromosome-specific segmentation revealed by structural analysis of individually isolated chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Kitada, Kunio; Taima, Akira; Ogasawara, Kiyomoto; Metsugi, Shouichi; Aikawa, Satoko

    2011-04-01

    Analysis of structural rearrangements at the individual chromosomal level is still technologically challenging. Here we optimized a chromosome isolation method using fluorescent marker-assisted laser-capture and laser-beam microdissection and applied it to structural analysis of two aberrant chromosomes found in a lung cancer cell line. A high-density array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) analysis of DNA samples prepared from each of the chromosomes revealed that these two chromosomes contained 296 and 263 segments, respectively, ranging from 1.5 kb to 784.3 kb in size, derived from different portions of chromosome 8. Among these segments, 242 were common in both aberrant chromosomes, but 75 were found to be chromosome-specific. Sequences of 263 junction sites connecting the ends of segments were determined using a PCR/Sanger-sequencing procedure. Overlapping microhomologies were found at 169 junction sites. Junction partners came from various portions of chromosome 8 and no biased pattern in the positional distribution of junction partners was detected. These structural characteristics suggested the occurrence of random fragmentation of the entire chromosome 8 followed by random rejoining of these fragments. Based on that, we proposed a model to explain how these aberrant chromosomes are formed. Through these structural analyses, it was demonstrated that the optimized chromosome isolation method described here can provide high-quality chromosomal DNA for high resolution array-CGH analysis and probably for massively parallel sequencing analysis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Microdissection and chromosome painting of X and B chromosomes in Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Teruel, María; Cabrero, Josefa; Montiel, Eugenia E; Acosta, Manuel J; Sánchez, Antonio; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2009-01-01

    Acquisition of knowledge of the nature and DNA content of B chromosomes has been triggered by a collection of molecular techniques, one of which, microdissection, has provided interesting results in a number of B chromosome systems. Here we provide the first data on the molecular composition of B chromosomes in Locusta migratoria, after microdissection of the B and X chromosomes, DNA amplification by one (B) or two (X) different methods, and chromosome painting. The results showed that B chromosomes share at least two types of repetitive DNA sequences with the A chromosomes, suggesting that Bs in this species most likely arose intraspecifically. One of these repetitive DNAs is located on the heterochromatic distal half of the B chromosome and in the pericentromeric regions of about half of the A chromosomes, including the X. The other type of repetitive DNA is located interspersedly over the non-centromeric euchromatic regions of all A chromosomes and in an interstitial part of the proximal euchromatic half of the B chromosome. Chromosome painting, however, did not provide results sufficiently reliable to determine, in this species, which A chromosome gave rise to the B; this might be done by detailed analysis of the microdissected DNA sequences.

  15. Scaling Chromosomes for an Evolutionary Karyotype: A Chromosomal Tradeoff between Size and Number across Woody Species.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guolu; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the expected scaling relationships between chromosome size and number across woody species and to clarify the importance of the scaling for the maintenance of chromosome diversity by analyzing the scaling at the inter- & intra-chromosomal level. To achieve for the goals, chromosome trait data were extracted for 191 woody species (including 56 evergreen species and 135 deciduous species) from the available literature. Cross-species analyses revealed a tradeoff among chromosomes between chromosome size and number, demonstrating there is selective mechanism crossing chromosomes among woody species. And the explanations for the result were presented from intra- to inter-chromosome contexts that the scaling may be compromises among scale symmetry, mechanical requirements, and resource allocation across chromosomes. Therein, a 3/4 scaling pattern was observed between total chromosomes and m-chromosomes within nucleus which may imply total chromosomes may evolve from more to less. In addition, the primary evolutionary trend of karyotype and the role of m-chromosomes in the process of karyotype evolution were also discussed.

  16. Inherited partial duplication of chromosome No. 15

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Atsuko; Towner, Joseph W.; Ebbin, Allan J.; Kahlstrom, Emily J.; Wilson, Miriam G.

    1974-01-01

    A boy with unusual facial appearance and mental retardation was found to have duplication for the distal half of the long arm of chromosome No. 15 and possibly deficiency for the distal end of the long arm of No. 21. The chromosome abnormality was inherited from his mother, who had a translocation involving chromosomes Nos. 15 and 21. Giemsa-banding localized the break point in chromosome No. 15 just distal to the intense band at the midportion of the long arm. The break point in chromosome No. 21 appeared to be at the distal end of the long arm. The difficulty encountered in cytogenetic analysis of the propositus with conventional staining, the importance of chromosome analysis of the parents, and the application of differential staining techniques are also presented. Images PMID:4139262

  17. Actin-mediated motion of meiotic chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Koszul, R.; Kim, K. P.; Prentiss, M.; Kleckner, N.; Kameoka, S.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Chromosome movement is prominent during meiosis. Here, using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, we elucidate the basis for dynamic mid-prophase chromosome movement in budding yeast. Diverse finding reveal a process in which, at the pachytene stage, individual telomere/nuclear envelope (NE) ensembles attach passively to, and then move in concert with, nucleus-hugging actin cables that are continuous with the global cytoskeletal actin network. Other chromosomes move in concert with lead chromosome(s). The same process, in modulated form, explains the zygotene "bouquet" configuration in which, immediately preceding pachytene, chromosome ends colocalize dynamically in a restricted region of the NE. Mechanical properties of the system and biological roles of mid-prophase movement for meiosis, including recombination, are discussed. PMID:18585353

  18. Building bridges within the bacterial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Song, Dan; Loparo, Joseph J

    2015-03-01

    All organisms must dramatically compact their genomes to accommodate DNA within the cell. Bacteria use a set of DNA-binding proteins with low sequence specificity called nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) to assist in chromosome condensation and organization. By bending or bridging DNA, NAPs also facilitate chromosome segregation and regulate gene expression. Over the past decade, emerging single-molecule and chromosome conformation capture techniques have investigated the molecular mechanisms by which NAPs remodel and organize the bacterial chromosome. In this review we describe how such approaches reveal the biochemical mechanisms of three NAPs that are believed to facilitate DNA bridging: histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS), ParB, and structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC). These three proteins form qualitatively different DNA bridges, leading to varied effects on transcription and chromosome segregation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chromosomal polymorphism in mammals: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Dobigny, Gauthier; Britton-Davidian, Janice; Robinson, Terence J

    2017-02-01

    Although chromosome rearrangements (CRs) are central to studies of genome evolution, our understanding of the evolutionary consequences of the early stages of karyotypic differentiation (i.e. polymorphism), especially the non-meiotic impacts, is surprisingly limited. We review the available data on chromosomal polymorphisms in mammals so as to identify taxa that hold promise for developing a more comprehensive understanding of chromosomal change. In doing so, we address several key questions: (i) to what extent are mammalian karyotypes polymorphic, and what types of rearrangements are principally involved? (ii) Are some mammalian lineages more prone to chromosomal polymorphism than others? More specifically, do (karyotypically) polymorphic mammalian species belong to lineages that are also characterized by past, extensive karyotype repatterning? (iii) How long can chromosomal polymorphisms persist in mammals? We discuss the evolutionary implications of these questions and propose several research avenues that may shed light on the role of chromosome change in the diversification of mammalian populations and species.

  20. Sexual maldevelopment and sex reversal, chromosomal causes.

    PubMed

    Magenis, R Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The SRY gene on the Y chromosome is the testis determining factor (TDF). It is therefore the initial male determining factor. However, phenotypic sex determination includes a cascade of genes located on autosomes as well as sex chromosomes. Aberrations of these genes may cause sexual maldevelopment or sex reversal. Abnormalities may include single gene mutations and gene loss or gain-changes may involve only sex organs or may be part of syndromes. These changes may also arise as chromosome abnormalities involving contiguous genes. Eight cases with chromosomal abnormalities involving different causative mechanisms are described herein. The most common cause is nondisjunction, including loss or gain of sex chromosomes. Less common causes are mispairing and crossing over in meiosis, chromosome breaks with repair, nonhomologous pairing due to low copy repeats and crossing over, and translocation (familial or de novo) with segregation. Cases include: [see: text].