Science.gov

Sample records for del complejo mycobacterium

  1. First isolation of mycobacterium avium subsp. Paratuberculosis from wild guanacos (Lama guanicoe) on Tierra del Fuego Island.

    PubMed

    Salgado, M; Herthnek, D; Bölske, G; Leiva, S; Kruze, J

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to search for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection in a free-ranging wild animal species in a region where Johnes's disease has yet to be reported and to classify Map isolates using a genomic typing method. Fecal samples were obtained from 501 wild guanacos (Lama guanicoe) from Tierra del Fuego Island, Chile, in August 2006. Samples were cultured using Herrold's egg yolk medium with and without mycobactin J. After 9 mo of incubation, suspected Map colonies showing mycobactin dependence were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based on IS900 and F57. Isolates were further tested using IS1311 PCR with restriction endonuclease analysis in order to type the guanaco Map strains. Twenty-one of 501 (4.2%) animals were fecal culture-positive for Map; identity was confirmed by real-time PCR and isolates were classified as cattle-type. Most culture-positive animals were located in four contiguous geographic areas, and the infection was most commonly found among adult animals. Prevalence was higher in females (5.9%) than males (3.1%) but the difference was not statistically significant. This represents the first isolation of Map from a free-ranging wildlife species in Chile. It expands the geographic range of paratuberculosis and the diversity of wildlife species that can become infected with Map.

  2. Predictive Value of Molecular Drug Resistance Testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in Valle del Cauca, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    García, Pamela K.; Nieto, Luisa Maria; van Soolingen, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Previous evaluations of the molecular GenoType tests have promoted their use to detect resistance to first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs in different geographical regions. However, there are known geographic variations in the mutations associated with drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and especially in South America, there is a paucity of information regarding the frequencies and types of mutations associated with resistance to first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs. We therefore evaluated the performance of the GenoType kits in this region by testing 228 M. tuberculosis isolates in Colombia, including 134 resistant and 94 pansusceptible strains. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of the GenoType MTBDRplus test ranged from 92 to 96% and 97 to 100%, respectively; the agreement index was optimal (Cohen's kappa, >0.8). The sensitivity of the GenoType MTBDRsl test ranged from 84 to 100% and the specificity from 88 to 100%. The most common mutations were katG S315T1, rpoB S531L, embB M306V, gyrA D94G, and rrs A1401G. Our results reflect the utility of the GenoType tests in Colombia; however, as some discordance still exists between the conventional and molecular approaches in resistance testing, we adhere to the recommendation that the GenoType tests serve as early guides for therapy, followed by phenotypic drug susceptibility testing for all cases. PMID:23658272

  3. Immune Responses in Cattle Inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mycobacterium kansasii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle were inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mycobacterium kansasii to compare antigen-specific immune responses to varied patterns of mycobacterial disease. Disease expression ranged from colonization with associated pathology (M. bovis), colonization without path...

  4. Simulaciones hidrodinámicas de flujos complejos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María Ibáñez Cabanell, José

    Son muchos los escenarios astrofísicos en que los procesos hidrodinámicos juegan un papel clave. En la complejidad que encierra la descripción de dichos procesos destaca el de la correcta simulación de flujos complejos donde la presencia de ondas de choque fuertes que, eventualmente, interaccionan entre ellas o también la presencia de inestabilidades (Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, etc.) suponen un verdadero desafío numérico. Los códigos hidrodinámicos basados en la solución de un problema de valores iniciales discontinuo (problema de Riemann) son, en la actualidad, los más robustos en el campo de la dinámica de fluidos computacional. En esta charla se dará un resumen de los fundamentos de dichas técnicas numéricas (esquemas de alta resolución de captura de choques) y se ilustrará su potencialidad mostrando una amplia gama de resultados en diferentes aplicaciones astrofísicas.

  5. Mycobacterium ulcerans disease.

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje; Johnson, R. Christian; Phillips, Richard; Adjei, Ohene; Fleischer, Bernhard; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark H.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Portaels, Françoise; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Asiedu, Kingsley

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans disease (Buruli ulcer) is an important health problem in several west African countries. It is prevalent in scattered foci around the world, predominantly in riverine areas with a humid, hot climate. We review the epidemiology, bacteriology, transmission, immunology, pathology, diagnosis and treatment of infections. M. ulcerans is an ubiquitous micro-organism and is harboured by fish, snails, and water insects. The mode of transmission is unknown. Lesions are most common on exposed parts of the body, particularly on the limbs. Spontaneous healing may occur. Many patients in endemic areas present late with advanced, severe lesions. BCG vaccination yields a limited, relatively short-lived, immune protection. Recommended treatment consists of surgical debridement, followed by skin grafting if necessary. Many patients have functional limitations after healing. Better understanding of disease transmission and pathogenesis is needed for improved control and prevention of Buruli ulcer. PMID:16283056

  6. Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium Phage Waterfoul

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Paige N.; Embry, Ella K.; Johnson, Christa O.; Watson, Tiara L.; Weast, Sayre K.; DeGraw, Caroline J.; Douglas, Jessica R.; Sellers, J. Michael; D’Angelo, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Waterfoul is a newly isolated temperate siphovirus of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc2155. It was identified as a member of the K5 cluster of Mycobacterium phages and has a 61,248-bp genome with 95 predicted genes. PMID:27856585

  7. Mycobacterium caprae infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Prodinger, Wolfgang M; Indra, Alexandra; Koksalan, Orhan K; Kilicaslan, Zeki; Richter, Elvira

    2014-12-01

    Mycobacterium caprae, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, causes tuberculosis (TB) in man and animals. Some features distinguish M. caprae from its epidemiological twin, Mycobacterium bovis: M. caprae is evolutionarily older, accounts for a smaller burden of zoonotic TB and is not globally distributed, but primarily restricted to European countries. M. caprae occurs only in a low proportion of human TB cases and this proportion may even decrease, if progress toward eradication of animal TB in Europe continues. So why bother, if M. caprae is not an enigma for diagnostic TB tests and if resistance against first-line drugs is a rarity with M. caprae? This 'European' pathogen of zoonotic TB asks interesting questions regarding the definition of a species. The latter, seemingly only an academic question, particularly requires and challenges the collaboration between human and veterinary medicine.

  8. Mycobacterium saopaulense sp. nov., a rapidly growing mycobacterium closely related to members of the Mycobacterium chelonae–Mycobacterium abscessus group

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Christiane Lourenço; Whipps, Christopher M.; Matsumoto, Cristianne Kayoko; Chimara, Erica; Droz, Sara; Tortoli, Enrico; de Freitas, Denise; Cnockaert, Margo; Palomino, Juan Carlos; Martin, Anandi; Vandamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Five isolates of non-pigmented, rapidly growing mycobacteria were isolated from three patients and, in an earlier study, from zebrafish. Phenotypic and molecular tests confirmed that these isolates belong to the Mycobacterium chelonae–Mycobacterium abscessus group, but they could not be confidently assigned to any known species of this group. Phenotypic analysis and biochemical tests were not helpful for distinguishing these isolates from other members of the M. chelonae–M. abscessus group. The isolates presented higher drug resistance in comparison with other members of the group, showing susceptibility only to clarithromycin. The five isolates showed a unique PCR restriction analysis pattern of the hsp65 gene, 100 % similarity in 16S rRNA gene and hsp65 sequences and 1–2 nt differences in rpoB and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of a concatenated dataset including 16S rRNA gene, hsp65, and rpoB sequences from type strains of more closely related species placed the five isolates together, as a distinct lineage from previously described species, suggesting a sister relationship to a group consisting of M. chelonae, Mycobacterium salmoniphilum, Mycobacterium franklinii and Mycobacterium immunogenum. DNA–DNA hybridization values >70 % confirmed that the five isolates belong to the same species, while values < 70 % between one of the isolates and the type strains of M. chelonae and M. abscessus confirmed that the isolates belong to a distinct species. The polyphasic characterization of these isolates, supported by DNA–DNA hybridization results, demonstrated that they share characteristics with M. chelonae–M. abscessus members, but constitute a different species, for which the name Mycobacterium saopaulense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is EPM 10906T ( = CCUG 66554T = LMG 28586T = INCQS 0733T). PMID:26358475

  9. Distribution of a Specific 500-Base-Pair Fragment in Mycobacterium bovis Isolates from Sardinian Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Sechi, Leonardo A.; Duprè, Ilaria; Leori, Guido; Fadda, Giovanni; Zanetti, Stefania

    2000-01-01

    Amplification of a specific, 500-bp fragment from Mycobacterium bovis isolates and use of the fragment to differentiate between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis was previously reported (J. G. Rodriguez, G. A. Meja, P. Del Portillo, M. E. Patarroyo, and L. A. Murillo, Microbiology 141:2131–2138, 1995). In the present study, 30 M. bovis isolates from Sardinian cattle were examined for the presence of this 500-bp fragment; 4 of the 30 isolates lacked the fragment. This result indicates that identification of M. bovis strains by amplification of the 500-bp sequence may lead to false-negative results. PMID:11015414

  10. Ectoine biosynthesis in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Ofer, Naomi; Wishkautzan, Marina; Meijler, Michael; Wang, Ying; Speer, Alexander; Niederweis, Michael; Gur, Eyal

    2012-10-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis is a commonly used mycobacterial model system. Here, we show that M. smegmatis protects itself against elevated salinity by synthesizing ectoine and hydroxyectoine and characterize the phenotype of a nonproducing mutant. This is the first analysis of M. smegmatis halotolerance and of the molecular mechanism that supports it.

  11. Mycobacterium bovis in Panama, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Fermín; Chernyaeva, Ekatherina; Mendoza, Libardo; Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Rotkevich, Mikhail; Tarté, Miroslava; Hernández, Humberto; Velazco, Bredio; de Escobar, Cecilia; de Waard, Jacobus H.

    2015-01-01

    Panama remains free of zoonotic tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis. However, DNA fingerprinting of 7 M. bovis isolates from a 2013 bovine tuberculosis outbreak indicated minimal homology with strains previously circulating in Panama. M. bovis dispersion into Panama highlights the need for enhanced genotype testing to track zoonotic infections. PMID:25988479

  12. The Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Inderlied, C B; Kemper, C A; Bermudez, L E

    1993-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) disease emerged early in the epidemic of AIDS as one of the common opportunistic infections afflicting human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. However, only over the past few years has a consensus developed about its significance to the morbidity and mortality of AIDS. M. avium was well known to mycobacteriologists decades before AIDS, and the MAC was known to cause disease, albeit uncommon, in humans and animals. The early interest in the MAC provided a basis for an explosion of studies over the past 10 years largely in response to the role of the MAC in AIDS opportunistic infection. Molecular techniques have been applied to the epidemiology of MAC disease as well as to a better understanding of the genetics of antimicrobial resistance. The interaction of the MAC with the immune system is complex, and putative MAC virulence factors appear to have a direct effect on the components of cellular immunity, including the regulation of cytokine expression and function. There now is compelling evidence that disseminated MAC disease in humans contributes to both a decrease in the quality of life and survival. Disseminated disease most commonly develops late in the course of AIDS as the CD4 cells are depleted below a critical threshold, but new therapies for prophylaxis and treatment offer considerable promise. These new therapeutic modalities are likely to be useful in the treatment of other forms of MAC disease in patients without AIDS. The laboratory diagnosis of MAC disease has focused on the detection of mycobacteria in the blood and tissues, and although the existing methods are largely adequate, there is need for improvement. Indeed, the successful treatment of MAC disease clearly will require an early and rapid detection of the MAC in clinical specimens long before the establishment of the characteristic overwhelming infection of bone marrow, liver, spleen, and other tissue. Also, a standard method of susceptibility testing

  13. Polymorphisms of twenty regulatory proteins between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis are responsible for tuberculosis in humans or animals, respectively. Both species are closely related and belong to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). M. tuberculosis is the most ancient species from which M. bovis and the other members o...

  14. Mycobacterium marseillense sp. nov., Mycobacterium timonense sp. nov. and Mycobacterium bouchedurhonense sp. nov., members of the Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, Iskandar; Cayrou, Caroline; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2009-11-01

    An rpoB sequence-based evaluation of 100 Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) clinical isolates led to the identification of five respiratory tract isolates that were potential representatives of three novel MAC species. Distinctive phenotypic features of isolates 62863 and 5356591(T) included a pseudomycelium morphology and both esterase and acid phosphatase activities. These two isolates exhibited sequence similarities of 99.8 % for the 16S rRNA gene, 86.3 and 86.1 % for 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) sequence, 96.7 and 97.8 % for rpoB and 97.6 and 97.4 % for hsp65, respectively, with the type strain of Mycobacterium chimaera, the most closely related species. Isolates 3256799 and 5351974(T) lacked alpha-mannosidase and beta-glucosidase activities. They exhibited sequence similarities of 99.6 % for the 16S rRNA gene, 90.1 and 90.4 % for ITS-1, 97.8 % for rpoB and 98.0 and 98.1 % for hsp65, respectively, with the type strain of M. chimaera, the most closely related species. Isolate 4355387(T) lacked urease and alpha-glucosidase activities, but it exhibited valine arylamidase, cystine arylamidase and acid phosphatase activities. It had sequence similarities of 99.3 % for the 16S rRNA gene, 51.8 % for ITS-1, 97.1 % for rpoB and 97.8 % for hsp65 with the type strain of Mycobacterium colombiense, the most closely related species. A phylogenetic tree based on concatenated 16S rRNA gene, ITS-1, rpoB and hsp65 sequences showed the uniqueness of these five isolates as representatives of three novel species, with bootstrap values >/=95 % in all nodes. On the basis of these phenotypic and genetic characteristics, these five isolates are proposed as representatives of three novel MAC species: Mycobacterium marseillense sp. nov., with strain 5356591(T) (=CCUG 56325(T) =CIP 109828(T) =CSUR P30(T)) as the type strain; Mycobacterium timonense sp. nov., with strain 5351974(T) (=CCUG 56329(T) =CIP 109830(T) =CSUR P32(T)) as the type strain; and Mycobacterium

  15. [Infections due to Mycobacterium simiae].

    PubMed

    García-Martos, Pedro; García-Agudo, Lidia; González-Moya, Enrique; Galán, Fátima; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacterium simiae is a slow-growing photochromogenic environmental mycobacterium, first described in 1965. Rarely associated with human infections, possibly due to its limited pathogenicity, it mainly produces lung infection in immunocompetent elderly patients with underlying lung disease, and in disseminated infections in immunosuppressed young patients with AIDS. A microbiological culture is needed to confirm the clinical suspicion, and genetic sequencing techniques are essential to correctly identify the species. Treating M. simiae infections is complicated, owing to the multiple resistance to tuberculous drugs and the lack of correlation between in vitro susceptibility data and in vivo response. Proper treatment is yet to be defined, but must include clarithromycin combined with other antimicrobials such as moxifloxacin and cotrimoxazole. It is possible that M. simiae infections are undiagnosed.

  16. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Maureen; Taylor, Judith; Woods, Paul

    2002-01-01

    A domestic shorthair cat was presented for lethargy and ataxia. Clinical findings included an abdominal mass, lumbosacral pain, ataxia. Aspirates from the liver and lymph nodes revealed intracellular, negative-staining rods. Treatment for presumptive mycobacterium infection was unsuccessful and the cat was euthanized. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium was confirmed on culture. PMID:12001504

  17. Human Infections Due to Mycobacterium lentiflavum

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, Enrico; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Erba, Maria Luigia; Levrè, Egle; Lombardi, Natalia; Mantella, Antonia; Mecocci, Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Three cases of human disease due to Mycobacterium lentiflavum are reported. In the first, the mycobacterium was responsible for chronic pulmonary disease in an elderly woman; in the second, it gave rise to cervical lymphadenitis in a child; and in the third, it caused a liver abscess in a young AIDS patient. PMID:11826009

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium colombiense

    PubMed Central

    Bouam, Amar; Robert, Catherine; Levasseur, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium colombiense is a rapidly growing mycobacterium initially isolated from the blood of an HIV-positive patient in Colombia. Its 5,854,893-bp draft genome exhibits a G+C content of 67.64%, 5,233 protein-coding genes, and 54 predicted RNA genes. PMID:28385843

  19. Taxonomic variation in the Mycobacterium fortuitum third biovariant complex: description of Mycobacterium boenickei sp. nov., Mycobacterium houstonense sp. nov., Mycobacterium neworleansense sp. nov. and Mycobacterium brisbanense sp. nov. and recognition of Mycobacterium porcinum from human clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Schinsky, Mark F; Morey, Roger E; Steigerwalt, Arnold G; Douglas, Michael P; Wilson, Rebecca W; Floyd, Margaret M; Butler, W Ray; Daneshvar, Maryam I; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Wallace, Richard J; McNeil, Michael M; Brenner, Don J; Brown, June M

    2004-09-01

    The Mycobacterium fortuitum third biovariant complex (sorbitol-negative and sorbitol-positive) contains unnamed taxa first characterized in 1991. These organisms can cause respiratory infections, a spectrum of soft tissue and skeletal infections, bacteraemia and disseminated disease. To evaluate this group of organisms, clinical reference isolates and the type strains of M. fortuitum third biovariant complex sorbitol-negative (n = 21), M. fortuitum third biovariant complex sorbitol-positive (n = 3), M. fortuitum (n = 3), Mycobacterium peregrinum (pipemidic acid-susceptible) (n = 1), Mycobacterium porcinum (n = 1), Mycobacterium senegalense (n = 2) and Mycobacterium septicum (n = 1) were characterized by using conventional phenotypic (morphological, physiological and antimicrobial susceptibilities), chemotaxonomic (HPLC and cellular fatty acids) and genotypic [RFLP of the rRNA gene (ribotyping), PCR-RFLP of a 439 bp segment of the 65 kDa hsp gene (PCR restriction analysis) and 16S rRNA gene sequence] analysis, DNA G + C content and DNA-DNA relatedness analyses. The results of these studies indicated that the strains comprised M. porcinum (n = 13), M. septicum (n = 1) and four novel closely related genetic groups within the M. fortuitum third biovariant complex: Mycobacterium boenickei sp. nov. (n = 6), Mycobacterium houstonense sp. nov. (n = 2), Mycobacterium neworleansense sp. nov. (n = 1) and Mycobacterium brisbanense sp. nov. (n = 1), with type strains ATCC 49935T (= W5998T = DSM 44677T), ATCC 49403T (= W5198T = DSM 44676T) ATCC 49404T (= W6705T = DSM 44679T) and ATCC 49938T (= W6743T = DSM 44680T), respectively.

  20. Beta-lactamases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium kansasii.

    PubMed

    Segura, C; Salvadó, M

    1997-09-01

    Re-emergence of infectious diseases caused by mycobacteria as well as the emergence of multiresistant strains of Mycobacterium has promoted the research on the use of beta-lactames in the treatment of such diseases. Mycobacteria produce beta-lactamases: M. tuberculosis produces a wide-spectrum beta-lactamase whose behaviour mimicks those of Gram-negative bacteria. M. kansasii produces also beta-lactamase which can be inhibited by clavulanic acid. An overview on beta-lactamases from both species is reported.

  1. [Frontier of mycobacterium research--host vs. mycobacterium].

    PubMed

    Okada, Masaji; Shirakawa, Taro

    2005-09-01

    During the past decade, we have observed advance in tuberculosis research including novel vaccines, innate immunity (TLR), SNIP analysis and molecular mechanism of drug resistance. Worldwide genome project enabled the whole genome sequence of host resistant against tuberculosis as well as the whole genome sequence of M. tuberculosis H37Rv. DNA technology has also provided a great impact on the development of novel vaccine against TB. In this symposium, we have invited leading researchers in the field of the frontier study of Mycobacterium research in order to provide general overview of the cutting edge of frontier research. Molecular mechanism of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis has been clarified. On the other hand, molecular mechanism of host-defence (insusceptibility of host) against M. tuberculosis has not yet elucidated. Dr. Taro Shirakawa (Kyoto University) reviewed the susceptibility genes of host in TB infection and presented candidate genes associated with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis. Dr. Naoto Keicho (International Medical Center of Japan) tried to identify host genetic factors involved in susceptibility to pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection by candidate gene approach and genome-wide approach. In Japan, Dr. Masaji Okada (National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center) has been engaged actively in the development of new tuberculosis vaccines (HVJ-liposome/Hsp65 DNA + IL-12 DNA vaccine and recombinant 72f BCG vaccine). He showed basic strategy for construction of new candidate vaccines and also showed significant efficacy on the protection of tuberculosis infection using cynomolgus monkeys, which are very similar to human tuberculosis. Dr. Hatsumi Taniguchi (University of Occupational and Environmental Health) presented that M. tuberculosis mIHF and the neighbor genes went into a dormacy-like state of M. smegmatis in J774 macrophage cells. This study might provide a weapon for elucidating the mechanism of dormacy

  2. Producción de eyecciones coronales de masa del complejo de regiones activas 11121 y 11123

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, H.; Mandrini, C. H.; Schmieder, C.; Crescitelli, M.

    The complex formed by active regions 11121 and 11123 (NOAA numbers); approximately located on the solar central meridian on 11 November 2010; was site of emergence of new magnetic dipoles; which produced the destabilization of active and quiescent filaments that were ejected as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) toward Earth. From its perspective; the events are observed by the AIA telescope aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the LASCO coronagraphs from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). For this date the twin STEREO spacecraft were approximately 180º appart; i.e. observing the complex from the corresponding solar limbs and thus with an exceptional view of the CMEs originating there. The amount of events observed from Earth's perspective and from the orthogonal provided by STEREO differs significantly. This reveals deficiencies in current space weather forecasting; by missing alarms when there are no solar observations perpendicular to the Sun-Earth line. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  3. Whole genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium suricattae.

    PubMed

    Dippenaar, Anzaan; Parsons, Sven David Charles; Sampson, Samantha Leigh; van der Merwe, Ruben Gerhard; Drewe, Julian Ashley; Abdallah, Abdallah Musa; Siame, Kabengele Keith; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas Claudius; van Helden, Paul David; Pain, Arnab; Warren, Robin Mark

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis occurs in various mammalian hosts and is caused by a range of different lineages of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). A recently described member, Mycobacterium suricattae, causes tuberculosis in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in Southern Africa and preliminary genetic analysis showed this organism to be closely related to an MTBC pathogen of rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis), the dassie bacillus. Here we make use of whole genome sequencing to describe the evolution of the genome of M. suricattae, including known and novel regions of difference, SNPs and IS6110 insertion sites. We used genome-wide phylogenetic analysis to show that M. suricattae clusters with the chimpanzee bacillus, previously isolated from a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in West Africa. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the Mycobacterium africanum lineage 6 complex, showing the evolutionary relationship of M. africanum and chimpanzee bacillus, and the closely related members M. suricattae, dassie bacillus and Mycobacterium mungi.

  4. Mycobacterium marinum infection on the hand (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This bacterial infection is caused by Mycobacterium marinum . Marinum is a relative of the organism which causes tuberculosis. This lesion is often referred to as a swimming pool granuloma. Atypical mycobacterial ...

  5. The Leprosy Agents Mycobacterium lepromatosis and Mycobacterium leprae in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiang Y.; Sizer, Kurt Clement; Velarde-Félix, Jesús S.; Frias-Castro, Luis O.; Vargas-Ocampo, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Mycobacterium leprae was the only known cause of leprosy until 2008, when a new species, named Mycobacterium lepromatosis, was found to cause diffuse lepromatous leprosy (DLL), a unique form of leprosy endemic in Mexico. Methods We sought to differentiate the leprosy agents among 120 Mexican patients with various clinical forms of leprosy and to compare their relative prevalence and disease features. Archived skin biopsy specimens from these patients were tested for both M. leprae and M. lepromatosis using polymerase chain reaction-based species-specific assays. Results Eighty-seven (72.5%) patients were confirmed for etiologic species, including 55 with M. lepromatosis, 18 with M. leprae, and 14 with both organisms. The endemic regions of each agent differed but overlapped. Patients with M. lepromatosis were younger and from more states, and their clinical diagnoses included 13 DLL, 34 lepromatous leprosy (LL), and eight other forms of leprosy. By contrast, the diagnoses of patients with M. leprae included none DLL, 15 LL and three other forms. Thus, M. lepromatosis caused DLL specifically (p=0.023). Patients with M. lepromatosis also showed more variable skin lesions and the extremities were the commonest biopsy sites. Finally, patients with dual infections manifested all clinical forms and accounted for 16.1% of all species-confirmed cases. Conclusions M. lepromatosis is another cause of leprosy and is probably more prevalent than M. leprae in Mexico. It mainly causes LL and also specifically DLL. Dual infections caused by both species may occur in endemic area. PMID:22788812

  6. Complete Genome Sequences of Field Isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium caprae

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Vicente, Joaquín; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Manrique, Marina; Tobes, Raquel; López, Vladimir; Romero, Beatriz; Domínguez, Lucas; Garrido, Joseba M.; Gortazar, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the complete genome sequences of field isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and the related mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium caprae. The genomes of three M. bovis (MB1, MB3, MB4) and one M. caprae (MB2) field isolates with different virulence, prevalence, and host distribution phenotypes were sequenced. PMID:26112781

  7. Structure of a New Glycolipid from the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare Complex

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Motoko; Ohta, Akihiro; Sasaki, Shun-ichi; Minnikin, David E.

    1999-01-01

    From the lipid fraction of a freeze-dried cell mass of a strain of the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare complex, a new glycolipid was isolated and was characterized as 5-mycoloyl-α-arabinofuranosyl (1→1′)-glycerol, mainly on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies. PMID:10094713

  8. Photoreactivation in Airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Peccia, Jordan; Hernandez, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Photoreactivation was observed in airborne Mycobacterium parafortuitum exposed concurrently to UV radiation (254 nm) and visible light. Photoreactivation rates of airborne cells increased with increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreased with increasing UV dose. Under a constant UV dose with visible light absent, the UV inactivation rate of airborne M. parafortuitum cells decreased by a factor of 4 as RH increased from 40 to 95%; however, under identical conditions with visible light present, the UV inactivation rate of airborne cells decreased only by a factor of 2. When irradiated in the absence of visible light, cellular cyclobutane thymine dimer content of UV-irradiated airborne M. parafortuitum and Serratia marcescens increased in response to RH increases. Results suggest that, unlike in waterborne bacteria, cyclobutane thymine dimers are not the most significant form of UV-induced DNA damage incurred by airborne bacteria and that the distribution of DNA photoproducts incorporated into UV-irradiated airborne cells is a function of RH. PMID:11526027

  9. Mycobacterium massilipolynesiensis” sp. nov., a rapidly-growing mycobacterium of medical interest related to Mycobacterium phlei

    PubMed Central

    Phelippeau, M.; Asmar, S.; Osman, D. Aboubaker; Sassi, M.; Robert, C.; Michelle, C.; Musso, D.; Drancourt, M.

    2017-01-01

    In French Polynesia, respiratory tract clinical isolate M26, displayed unusual phenotype and contradictory phylogenetic affiliations, suggesting a hitherto unidentified rapidly-growing Mycobacterium species. The phenotype of strain M26 was further characterized and its genome sequenced. Strain M26 genome consists in a 5,732,017-bp circular chromosome with a G + C% of 67.54%, comprising 5,500 protein-coding genes and 52 RNA genes (including two copies of the 16 S rRNA gene). One region coding for a putative prophage was also predicted. An intriguing characteristic of strain M26’s genome is the large number of genes encoding polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthases. Phylogenomic analysis showed that strain M26’s genome is closest to the Mycobacterium phlei genome with a 76.6% average nucleotide identity. Comparative genomics of 33 Mycobacterium genomes yielded 361 genes unique to M26 strain which functional annotation revealed 84.21% of unknown function and 3.88% encoding lipid transport and metabolism; while 48.87% of genes absent in M26 strain have unknown function, 9.5% are implicated in transcription and 19% are implicated in transport and metabolism. Strain M26’s unique phenotypic and genomic characteristics indicate it is representative of a new species named “Mycobacterium massilipolynesiensis”. Looking for mycobacteria in remote areas allows for the discovery of new Mycobacterium species. PMID:28074866

  10. The draft genome of Mycobacterium aurum, a potential model organism for investigating drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Jody; Maitra, Arundhati; McNerney, Ruth; Nair, Mridul; Gupta, Antima; Coll, Francesc; Pain, Arnab; Bhakta, Sanjib; Clark, Taane G

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium aurum (M. aurum) is an environmental mycobacteria that has previously been used in studies of anti-mycobacterial drugs due to its fast growth rate and low pathogenicity. The M. aurum genome has been sequenced and assembled into 46 contigs, with a total length of 6.02Mb containing 5684 annotated protein-coding genes. A phylogenetic analysis using whole genome alignments positioned M. aurum close to Mycobacterium vaccae and Mycobacterium vanbaalenii, within a clade related to fast-growing mycobacteria. Large-scale genomic rearrangements were identified by comparing the M. aurum genome to those of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. M. aurum orthologous genes implicated in resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs in M. tuberculosis were observed. The sequence identity at the DNA level varied from 68.6% for pncA (pyrazinamide drug-related) to 96.2% for rrs (streptomycin, capreomycin). We observed two homologous genes encoding the catalase-peroxidase enzyme (katG) that is associated with resistance to isoniazid. Similarly, two embB homologues were identified in the M. aurum genome. In addition to describing for the first time the genome of M. aurum, this work provides a resource to aid the use of M. aurum in studies to develop improved drugs for the pathogenic mycobacteria M. tuberculosis and M. leprae.

  11. Disseminated folliculitis by Mycobacterium fortuitum in an immunocompetent woman*

    PubMed Central

    Macente, Sara; Helbel, Cesar; Souza, Simone Felizardo Rocha; Siqueira, Vera Lúcia Dias; Padua, Rubia Andreia Falleiros; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a non-tuberculous fast-growing mycobacterium which is frequently acquired from environmental sources such as soil and water. Since it is an opportunist pathogen, it is associated with trauma, surgery or immunodeficiency. The current report describes a case of Mycobacterium fortuitum-caused disseminated lesions on the skin of an immunocompetent patient. PMID:23539012

  12. Disseminated folliculitis by Mycobacterium fortuitum in an immunocompetent woman.

    PubMed

    Macente, Sara; Helbel, Cesar; Souza, Simone Felizardo Rocha; Siqueira, Vera Lúcia Dias; Padua, Rubia Andreia Falleiros; Cardoso, Rosilene Fressatti

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a non-tuberculous fast-growing mycobacterium which is frequently acquired from environmental sources such as soil and water. Since it is an opportunist pathogen, it is associated with trauma, surgery or immunodeficiency. The current report describes a case of Mycobacterium fortuitum-caused disseminated lesions on the skin of an immunocompetent patient.

  13. Proposal to elevate Mycobacterium avium complex ITS sequevar MAC-Q to Mycobacterium vulneris sp. nov.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, J; Boeree, M J; Kösters, K; Wieland, A; Tortoli, E; Dekhuijzen, P N R; van Soolingen, D

    2009-09-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) consists of four recognized species, Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium colombiense, Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium chimaera, and a variety of other strains that may be members of undescribed taxa. We report on two isolates of a scotochromogenic, slowly growing, non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species within the M. avium complex from a lymph node and an infected wound after a dogbite of separate patients in The Netherlands. The extrapulmonary infections in immunocompetent patients suggested a high level of virulence. These isolates were characterized by a unique nucleotide sequence in the 16S rRNA gene, 99% similar to Mycobacterium colombiense, and the MAC-Q 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence. Sequence analyses of the hsp65 gene revealed 97% similarity to M. avium. The rpoB gene sequence was 98% similar to M. colombiense. Phenotypically, the scotochromogenicity, positive semi-quantitative catalase and heat-stable catalase tests, negative tellurite reductase and urease tests and susceptibility to hydroxylamine and oleic acid set these isolates apart from related species. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of cell-wall mycolic acid content revealed a unique pattern, related to that of M. avium and M. colombiense. Together, these findings supported a separate species status within the Mycobacterium avium complex. We propose elevation of scotochromogenic M. avium complex strains sharing this 16S gene and MAC-Q ITS sequence to separate species status, for which the name Mycobacterium vulneris sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NLA000700772T (=DSM 45247T=CIP 109859T).

  14. Mycobacterium haemophilum and Lymphadenitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, Lesla E.S.; Lindeboom, Jerome A.; Prins, Jan M.; Claas, Eric C. J.

    2005-01-01

    Infections associated with Mycobacterium haemophilum are underdiagnosed because specific culture methods required for its recovery are not applied routinely. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology on fine needle aspirates and biopsied specimens from 89 children with cervicofacial lymphadenitis, we assessed the importance of M. haemophilum. Application of a Mycobacterium genus–specific real-time PCR in combination with amplicon sequencing and a M. haemophilum–specific PCR resulted in the recognition of M. haemophilum as the causative agent in 16 (18%) children with cervicofacial lymphadenitis. Mycobacterium avium was the most frequently found species (56%), and M. haemophilum was the second most commonly recognized pathogen. Real-time PCR results were superior to culture because only 9 (56%) of the 16 diagnosed M. haemophilum infections were positive by culture. PMID:15705324

  15. Mycobacterium fortuitum cutaneous infection from amateur tattoo.

    PubMed

    Suvanasuthi, Saroj; Wongpraparut, Chanisada; Pattanaprichakul, Penvadee; Bunyaratavej, Sumanas

    2012-06-01

    A case of cutaneous Mycobacterium fortuitum infection after receiving an amateur tattoo is reported. A few days after tattooing, an otherwise healthy 25-year-old Thai male presented with multiple discrete erythematous papules confined to the tattoo area. He was initially treated with topical steroid and oral antihistamine without improvement. Skin biopsy was carried out, and the histopathology showed mixed cell granuloma with a foreign body reaction (tattoo color pigments). The acid-fast bacilli stain was positive. The tissue culture grew M. fortuitum two weeks later. He was treated with clarithromycin 1,000 mg/day and ciprofloxacin 1,000 mg/day for 10 months with complete response. From the clinical aspect, tattoo-associated rapidly growing mycobacterium infection might be difficult to differentiate from the pigment-based skin reactions. Skin biopsy for histopathology and tissue culture for Mycobacterium probably will be needed in arriving at the diagnosis.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis prevents inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Master, Sharon S; Rampini, Silvana K; Davis, Alexander S; Keller, Christine; Ehlers, Stefan; Springer, Burkhard; Timmins, Graham S; Sander, Peter; Deretic, Vojo

    2008-04-17

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) parasitizes host macrophages and subverts host innate and adaptive immunity. Several cytokines elicited by Mtb are mediators of mycobacterial clearance or are involved in tuberculosis pathology. Surprisingly, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), a major proinflammatory cytokine, has not been implicated in host-Mtb interactions. IL-1beta is activated by processing upon assembly of the inflammasome, a specialized inflammatory caspase-activating protein complex. Here, we show that Mtb prevents inflammasome activation and IL-1beta processing. An Mtb gene, zmp1, which encodes a putative Zn(2+) metalloprotease, is required for this process. Infection of macrophages with zmp1-deleted Mtb triggered activation of the inflammasome, resulting in increased IL-1beta secretion, enhanced maturation of Mtb containing phagosomes, improved mycobacterial clearance by macrophages, and lower bacterial burden in the lungs of aerosol-infected mice. Thus, we uncovered a previously masked role for IL-1beta in the control of Mtb and a mycobacterial system that prevents inflammasome and, therefore, IL-1beta activation.

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Success through dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Gengenbacher, Martin; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health threat, killing near to 2 million individuals around this globe, annually. The sole vaccine developed almost a century ago, provides limited protection only during childhood. After decades without the introduction of new antibiotics, several candidates are currently undergoing clinical investigation. Curing TB requires prolonged combination chemotherapy with several drugs. Moreover, monitoring the success of therapy is questionable due to the lack of reliable biomarkers. To substantially improve the situation, a detailed understanding of the crosstalk between human host and the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is vital. Principally, Mtb’s enormous success is based on three capacities: First, reprogramming of macrophages after primary infection/phagocytosis in order to prevent its own destruction; second, initiating the formation of well-organized granulomas, comprising different immune cells to create a confined environment for the host–pathogen standoff; third, the capability to shut down its own central metabolism, terminate replication and thereby transit into a stage of dormancy rendering itself extremely resistant to host defense and drug treatment. Here we review the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes, draw conclusions in a working model of mycobacterial dormancy and highlight gaps in our understanding to be addressed in future research. PMID:22320122

  18. Mycobacterium chimaera and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Stewardson, Andrew J; Stuart, Rhonda L; Cheng, Allen C; Johnson, Paul Dr

    2017-02-20

    There is an ongoing investigation into infections with non-tuberculous mycobacteria associated with contaminated heater-cooler units used in cardiac surgery. The overall risk is low, but surgical site and disseminated infections have been reported, including one possible case in Australia, mainly with surgery involving implantation of prosthetic material. Mycobacterium chimaera infection should be considered in patients who have previously undergone surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and who present with cardiac or disseminated infection or sternal wound infection unresponsive to standard antibiotic therapy. Where cases are suspected, patients should be investigated and managed in consultation with an infectious diseases physician and/or clinical microbiologist. If cases are confirmed or heater-cooler devices are found to be contaminated, details should be reported to the hospital infection control team, the jurisdictional health department, the Therapeutic Goods Administration and the Australian distributor of the affected heater-cooler unit(s). Measures to manage risk should include communicating with relevant hospital departments, ensuring that the manufacturer's updated instructions for use are followed, regular testing of machines, and reviewing the location of machines when in use.

  19. The pathology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, K

    2012-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an old enemy of the human race, with evidence of infection observed as early as 5000 years ago. Although more host-restricted than Mycobacterium bovis, which can infect all warm-blooded vertebrates, M. tuberculosis can infect, and cause morbidity and mortality in, several veterinary species as well. As M. tuberculosis is one of the earliest described bacterial pathogens, the literature describing this organism is vast and overwhelming. This review strives to distill what is currently known about this bacterium and the disease it causes for the veterinary pathologist.

  20. Whole chromosomal DNA probes for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, M C; McMillan, C; Coyle, M B

    1987-01-01

    Whole chromosomal DNA probes were used to identify clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium complex, and Mycobacterium gordonae. The probe for M. tuberculosis was prepared from Mycobacterium bovis BCG, which has been shown to be closely related to M. tuberculosis. A probe for the M. avium complex was prepared from three strains representing each of the three DNA homology groups in the M. avium complex. The probes were used in dot blot assays to identify clinical isolates of mycobacteria. The dot blot test correctly identified 57 of the 61 (93%) cultures grown on solid media, and 100% of antibiotic-treated broth-grown cells were correctly identified. Identification by dot blot required a maximum of 48 h. When the probes were tested against 63 positive BACTEC (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.) cultures of clinical specimens, 59% were correctly identified. However, of the 14 BACTEC cultures that had been treated with antibiotics before being lysed, 13 (93%) were correctly identified. PMID:3112180

  1. Misidentification of Mycobacterium leprae as Mycobacterium intracellulare by the COBAS AMPLICOR M. intracellulare Test

    PubMed Central

    Lefmann, M.; Moter, A.; Schweickert, B.; Göbel, U. B.

    2005-01-01

    Commercially available nucleic acid probe- and amplification-based systems for detection and differentiation of mycobacteria are widely used in clinical microbiology laboratories. Here we report two cases of human leprosy in which the COBAS AMPLICOR Mycobacterium intracellulare test led to false- positive results. Correct identification of Mycobacterium leprae was possible only by amplification and comparative sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. PMID:15815021

  2. Photodynamic inactivation of the models Mycobacterium phlei and Mycobacterium smegmatis in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce-Micah, R.; Gamm, U.; Hüttenberger, D.; Cullum, J.; Foth, H.-J.

    2009-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of bacterial strains presents an attractive potential alternative to antibiotic therapies. Success is dependent on the effective accumulation in bacterial cells of photochemical substances called photosensitizers, which are usually porphyrins or their derivatives. The kinetics of porphyrin synthesis after treatment with the precursor ALA and the accumulation of the Chlorin e6 and the following illumination were studied. The goal was to estimate effectivity of the destructive power of these PS in vitro in respect of the physiological states of Mycobacteria. So the present results examine the cell destruction by PDI using ALA-induced Porphyrins and Chlorin e6 accumulated in Mycobacterium phlei and Mycobacterium smegmatis, which serve as models for the important pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium bovis. We could show that both Mycobacterium after ALA and Chlorin e6 application were killed by illumination with light of about 662 nm. A reduction of about 97% could be reached by using a lightdose of 70 mW/cm2.

  3. Targeting phenotypically tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ben; Nathan, Carl

    2016-01-01

    While the immune system is credited with averting tuberculosis in billions of individuals exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the immune system is also culpable for tempering the ability of antibiotics to deliver swift and durable cure of disease. In individuals afflicted with tuberculosis, host immunity produces diverse microenvironmental niches that support suboptimal growth, or complete growth arrest, of M. tuberculosis. The physiological state of nonreplication in bacteria is associated with phenotypic drug tolerance. Many of these host microenvironments, when modeled in vitro by carbon starvation, complete nutrient starvation, stationary phase, acidic pH, reactive nitrogen intermediates, hypoxia, biofilms, and withholding streptomycin from the streptomycin-addicted strain SS18b, render M. tuberculosis profoundly tolerant to many of the antibiotics that are given to tuberculosis patients in a clinical setting. Targeting nonreplicating persisters is anticipated to reduce the duration of antibiotic treatment and rate of post-treatment relapse. Some promising drugs to treat tuberculosis, such as rifampicin and bedaquiline, only kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis in vitro at concentrations far greater than their minimal inhibitory concentrations against replicating bacilli. There is an urgent demand to identify which of the currently used antibiotics, and which of the molecules in academic and corporate screening collections, have potent bactericidal action on nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. With this goal, we review methods of high throughput screening to target nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and methods to progress candidate molecules. A classification based on structures and putative targets of molecules that have been reported to kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis revealed a rich diversity in pharmacophores. However, few of these compounds were tested under conditions that would exclude the impact of adsorbed compound acting during the recovery phase of

  4. Mycobacterium abscessus multispacer sequence typing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium abscessus group includes antibiotic-resistant, opportunistic mycobacteria that are responsible for sporadic cases and outbreaks of cutaneous, pulmonary and disseminated infections. However, because of their close genetic relationships, accurate discrimination between the various strains of these mycobacteria remains difficult. In this report, we describe the development of a multispacer sequence typing (MST) analysis for the simultaneous identification and typing of M. abscessus mycobacteria. We also compared MST with the reference multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) typing method. Results Based on the M. abscessus CIP104536T genome, eight intergenic spacers were selected, PCR amplified and sequenced in 21 M. abscessus isolates and analysed in 48 available M. abscessus genomes. MST and MLSA grouped 37 M. abscessus organisms into 12 and nine types, respectively; four formerly “M. bolletii” organisms and M. abscessus M139 into three and four types, respectively; and 27 formerly “M. massiliense” organisms grouped into nine and five types, respectively. The Hunter-Gaston index was off 0.912 for MST and of 0.903 for MLSA. The MST-derived tree was similar to that based on MLSA and rpoB gene sequencing and yielded three main clusters comprising each the type strain of the respective M. abscessus sub-species. Two isolates exhibited discordant MLSA- and rpoB gene sequence-derived position, one isolate exhibited discordant MST- and rpoB gene sequence-derived position and one isolate exhibited discordant MST- and MLSA-derived position. MST spacer n°2 sequencing alone allowed for the accurate identification of the different isolates at the sub-species level. Conclusions MST is a new sequencing-based approach for both identifying and genotyping M. abscessus mycobacteria that clearly differentiates formerly “M. massiliense” organisms from other M. abscessus subsp. bolletii organisms. PMID:23294800

  5. [In vitro sensitivity of Mycobacterium chelonae strains to various antimicrobial agents].

    PubMed

    Hernández García, A M; Arias, A; Felipe, A; Alvarez, R; Sierra, A

    1995-12-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of 32 Mycobacterium chelonae strains to 10 antimicrobial agents was determined. The sources of the different strains were: clinical samples from patients treated at the Hospital Universitario de Canarias and Hospital del Tórax (General and Chest facilities) and from environmental sources (water supply, sewage, swimming pools and the sea). The susceptibility tests were performed by a broth microdilution method (Mueller-Hinton Broth). The results showed amikacin as the most effective antimicrobial agent against M. chelonae isolates, then ofloxacin and cefoxitin. However no statistical difference was detected among them. The least effective was imipenem, followed by ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin.

  6. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms were measured. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1s-1, and the EPMs of fifteen environmental isolates ranged from -1...

  7. Novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex pathogen, M. mungi.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kathleen A; Laver, Pete N; Michel, Anita L; Williams, Mark; van Helden, Paul D; Warren, Robin M; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C

    2010-08-01

    Seven outbreaks involving increasing numbers of banded mongoose troops and high death rates have been documented. We identified a Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex pathogen, M. mungi sp. nov., as the causative agent among banded mongooses that live near humans in Chobe District, Botswana. Host spectrum and transmission dynamics remain unknown.

  8. Mycobacteriophage-drived diversification of Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium abscessus is an emerging opportunistic pathogen which diversity was acknowledged by the recent description of two subspecies accommodating M. abscessus, Mycobacterium bolletii and Mycobacterium massiliense isolates. Results Here, genome analysis found 1–8 prophage regions in 47/48 M. abscessus genomes ranging from small prophage-like elements to complete prophages. A total of 20,304 viral and phage proteins clustered into 853 orthologous groups. Phylogenomic and phylogenetic analyses based on prophage region homology found three main clusters corresponding to M. abscessus, M. bolletii and M. massiliense. Analysing 135 annotated Tape Measure Proteins found thirteen clusters and four singletons, suggesting that at least 17 mycobacteriophages had infected M. abscessus during its evolution. The evolutionary history of phages differed from that of their mycobacterial hosts. In particular, 33 phage-related proteins have been horizontally transferred within M. abscessus genomes. They comprise of an integrase, specific mycobacteriophage proteins, hypothetical proteins and DNA replication and metabolism proteins. Gene exchanges, loss and gains which occurred in M. abscessus genomes have been driven by several mycobacteriophages. Conclusions This analysis of phage-mycobacterium co-evolution suggests that mycobacteriophages are playing a key-role in the on-going diversification of M. abscessus. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Eric Bapteste, Patrick Forterre and Eugene Koonin. PMID:25224692

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the host response

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.; Cole, Stewart T.; Mizrahi, Valerie; Rubin, Eric; Nathan, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Advances reported at a recent international meeting highlight insights and controversies in the genetics of M. tuberculosis and the infected host, the nature of protective immune responses, adaptation of the bacillus to host-imposed stresses, animal models, and new techniques. PMID:15939785

  10. The Mycobacterium phlei Genome: Expectations and Surprises

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sarbashis; Pettersson, B. M. Fredrik; Behra, Phani Rama Krishna; Ramesh, Malavika; Dasgupta, Santanu; Bhattacharya, Alok; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium phlei, a nontuberculosis mycobacterial species, was first described in 1898–1899. We present the complete genome sequence for the M. phlei CCUG21000T type strain and the draft genomes for four additional strains. The genome size for all fiveis 5.3 Mb with 69.4% Guanine-Cytosine content. This is ≈0.35 Mbp smaller than the previously reported M. phlei RIVM draft genome. The size difference is attributed partly to large bacteriophage sequence fragments in the M. phlei RIVM genome. Comparative analysis revealed the following: 1) A CRISPR system similar to Type 1E (cas3) in M. phlei RIVM; 2) genes involved in polyamine metabolism and transport (potAD, potF) that are absent in other mycobacteria, and 3) strain-specific variations in the number of σ-factor genes. Moreover, M. phlei has as many as 82 mce (mammalian cell entry) homologs and many of the horizontally acquired genes in M. phlei are present in other environmental bacteria including mycobacteria that share similar habitat. Phylogenetic analysis based on 693 Mycobacterium core genes present in all complete mycobacterial genomes suggested that its closest neighbor is Mycobacterium smegmatis JS623 and Mycobacterium rhodesiae NBB3, while it is more distant to M. smegmatis mc2 155. PMID:26941228

  11. Disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera Infection After Cardiothoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Nicholas; Sampath, Rahul; Abu Saleh, Omar M; Tweet, Marysia S; Jevremovic, Dragan; Alniemi, Saba; Wengenack, Nancy L; Sampathkumar, Priya; Badley, Andrew D

    2016-09-01

    Ten case reports of disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera infections associated with cardiovascular surgery were published from Europe. We report 3 cases of disseminated M chimaera infections with histories of aortic graft and/or valvular surgery within the United States. Two of 3 patients demonstrated ocular involvement, a potentially important clinical finding.

  12. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITY OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of thirty Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) organisms isolated from clinical and environmental sources were measured in 9.15 mM KH2PO4 buffered water. The EPMs of fifteen clinical isolates ranged from -1.9 to -5.0 µm cm V-1 ...

  13. Granulomatous lobular mastitis secondary to Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed

    Kamyab, Armin

    2016-12-16

    Granulomatous lobular mastitis is a rare inflammatory disease of the breast of unknown etiology. Most present as breast masses in women of child-bearing age. A 29-year-old female presented with a swollen, firm and tender right breast, initially misdiagnosed as mastitis. Core needle biopsy revealed findings consistent with granulomatous lobular mastitis, and cultures were all negative for an infectious etiology. She was started on steroid therapy to which she initially responded well. A few weeks later she deteriorated and was found to have multiple breast abscesses. She underwent operative drainage and cultures grew Mycobacterium fortuitum. Granulomatous lobular mastitis is a rare inflammatory disease of the breast. The definitive diagnose entails a biopsy. Other causes of chronic or granulomatous mastitis should be ruled out, including atypical or rare bacteria such as Mycobacterium fortuitum. This is the first reported case of granulomatous mastitis secondary to Mycobacterium fortuitum. With pathologic confirmation of granulomatous mastitis, an infectious etiology must be ruled out. Atypical bacteria such as Mycobacterium fortuitum may not readily grow on cultures, as with our case. Medical management is appropriate, with surgical excision reserved for refractory cases or for drainage of abscesses.

  14. Granulomatous lobular mastitis secondary to Mycobacterium fortuitum

    PubMed Central

    Kamyab, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Granulomatous lobular mastitis is a rare inflammatory disease of the breast of unknown etiology. Most present as breast masses in women of child-bearing age. A 29-year-old female presented with a swollen, firm and tender right breast, initially misdiagnosed as mastitis. Core needle biopsy revealed findings consistent with granulomatous lobular mastitis, and cultures were all negative for an infectious etiology. She was started on steroid therapy to which she initially responded well. A few weeks later she deteriorated and was found to have multiple breast abscesses. She underwent operative drainage and cultures grew Mycobacterium fortuitum. Granulomatous lobular mastitis is a rare inflammatory disease of the breast. The definitive diagnose entails a biopsy. Other causes of chronic or granulomatous mastitis should be ruled out, including atypical or rare bacteria such as Mycobacterium fortuitum. This is the first reported case of granulomatous mastitis secondary to Mycobacterium fortuitum. With pathologic confirmation of granulomatous mastitis, an infectious etiology must be ruled out. Atypical bacteria such as Mycobacterium fortuitum may not readily grow on cultures, as with our case. Medical management is appropriate, with surgical excision reserved for refractory cases or for drainage of abscesses. PMID:28035314

  15. Iron-chelating compound from Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, W G; Merkal, R S

    1976-01-01

    A iron-chelating monohydroxamate was isolated from cultures of Mycobacterium avium grown on an iron-limiting medium. The hydroxyamate metabolite was characterized by chemical degradation and spectral measurements as L-alpha-asparaginyl-L-alpha-(N-hydroxy)-asparagine. PMID:185194

  16. Mycobacterium chelonei infection of a corneal graft.

    PubMed Central

    Aylward, G. W.; Stacey, A. R.; Marsh, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    We present a case of Mycobacterium chelonei infection in a corneal graft. The chronic ulceration and stromal infiltration followed a well defined course and eventually responded to topical amikacin, though a further graft was required. Previous cases of keratitis due to the M. fortuitum complex are reviewed. Images PMID:3311141

  17. Immunopathogenesis of Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerosol and intratracheal inoculation routes are commonly used for experimental biology purposes to infect cattle with virulent Mycobacterium bovis, each resulting primarily in a respiratory tract infection including lungs and lung-associated lymph nodes. Disease severity is dose and time dependent...

  18. Mycobacterium Xenopi Found Incidentally on MRI of the Cervical Spine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium Xenopi Found Incidentally on MRI of the Cervical Spine Military Medicine Radiology Corner, Vol. 175. January, 2010 Radiology Corner...Mycobacterium Xenopi Found Incidentally on MRI of the Cervical Spine Guarantor: Chris Walker1 Contributors: Chris Walker; 1 Col Les Folio...Mycobacterium xenopi in her lung. A mass was incidentally noted in the right upper apex on an MRI ordered to evaluate a subluxation seen in her cervical

  19. Bone marrow infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Satti, Luqman; Abbasi, Shahid; Sattar, Abdul; Ikram, Aamer; Manzar, Muhammad Adnan; Khalid, Malik Muhammad

    2011-08-01

    Incidence and prevalence of Mycobacterium fortuitum infection vary greatly by location and death is very rare except in disseminated disease in immunocompromised individuals. We present what we believe is the first case of bone marrow infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum in an HIV negative patient. Bone marrow examination revealed presence of numerous acid fast bacilli which were confirmed as Mycobacterium fortuitum on culture and by molecular analysis. Patient was managed successfully with amikacin and ciprofloxacin.

  20. Genotyping of Mycobacterium avium complex organisms using multispacer sequence typing.

    PubMed

    Cayrou, Caroline; Turenne, Christine; Behr, Marcel A; Drancourt, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) currently comprises eight species of environmental and animal-associated, slowly-growing mycobacteria: Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, Mycobacterium chimaera, Mycobacterium colombiense, Mycobacterium arosiense , Mycobacterium bouchedurhonense, Mycobacterium marseillense and Mycobacterium timonense. In humans, MAC organisms are responsible for opportunistic infections whose unique epidemiology remains poorly understood, in part due to the lack of a genotyping method applicable to all eight MAC species. In this study we developed multispacer sequence typing (MST), a sequencing-based method, for the genotyping of MAC organisms. An alignment of the genome sequence of M. avium subsp. hominissuis strain 104 and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain K-10 revealed 621 intergenic spacers <1000 bp. From these, 16 spacers were selected that ranged from 300 to 800 bp and contained a number of variable bases, <50 within each of the 16 spacers. Four spacers were successfully PCR-amplified and sequenced in 11 reference strains. Combining the sequence of these four spacers in 106 MAC organisms, including 83 M. avium, 11 M. intracellulare , six M. chimaera, two M. colombiense and one each of M. arosiense, M. bouchedurhonense, M. marseillense and M. timonense, yielded a total of 45 spacer types, with an index of discrimination of 0.94. Each spacer type was specific for a species and certain spacer types were specific for subspecies of M. avium. MST is a new method for genotyping of organisms belonging to any one of the eight MAC species tested in this study.

  1. Insights from the complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium marinum on the evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Stinear, Timothy P.; Seemann, Torsten; Harrison, Paul F.; Jenkin, Grant A.; Davies, John K.; Johnson, Paul D.R.; Abdellah, Zahra; Arrowsmith, Claire; Chillingworth, Tracey; Churcher, Carol; Clarke, Kay; Cronin, Ann; Davis, Paul; Goodhead, Ian; Holroyd, Nancy; Jagels, Kay; Lord, Angela; Moule, Sharon; Mungall, Karen; Norbertczak, Halina; Quail, Michael A.; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Walker, Danielle; White, Brian; Whitehead, Sally; Small, Pamela L.C.; Brosch, Roland; Ramakrishnan, Lalita; Fischbach, Michael A.; Parkhill, Julian; Cole, Stewart T.

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum, a ubiquitous pathogen of fish and amphibia, is a near relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis in humans. The genome of the M strain of M. marinum comprises a 6,636,827-bp circular chromosome with 5424 CDS, 10 prophages, and a 23-kb mercury-resistance plasmid. Prominent features are the very large number of genes (57) encoding polyketide synthases (PKSs) and nonribosomal peptide synthases (NRPSs) and the most extensive repertoire yet reported of the mycobacteria-restricted PE and PPE proteins, and related-ESX secretion systems. Some of the NRPS genes comprise a novel family and seem to have been acquired horizontally. M. marinum is used widely as a model organism to study M. tuberculosis pathogenesis, and genome comparisons confirmed the close genetic relationship between these two species, as they share 3000 orthologs with an average amino acid identity of 85%. Comparisons with the more distantly related Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis reveal how an ancestral generalist mycobacterium evolved into M. tuberculosis and M. marinum. M. tuberculosis has undergone genome downsizing and extensive lateral gene transfer to become a specialized pathogen of humans and other primates without retaining an environmental niche. M. marinum has maintained a large genome so as to retain the capacity for environmental survival while becoming a broad host range pathogen that produces disease strikingly similar to M. tuberculosis. The work described herein provides a foundation for using M. marinum to better understand the determinants of pathogenesis of tuberculosis. PMID:18403782

  2. Mycobacterium paraintracellulare sp. nov., for the genotype INT-1 of Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Hong; Won, Yu-Seop; Jeon, Che Ok; Jeong, Joseph; Lee, Seon Ho; Lim, Ji-Hun; Lee, Seung-Heon; Kim, Chang Ki; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-08-01

    Three mycobacterial strains, isolated from independent Korean patients with pulmonary infections, belonging to the Mycobacterium intracellulare genotype 1 (INT-1) were characterized using a polyphasic approach. The sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) of the INT-1 strains were identical to those of Mycobacterium intracellulare ATCC 13950T. However, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis targeting five housekeeping genes (hsp65, rpoB, argG, gnd and pgm) revealed the phylogenetic separation of these strains from M. intracellulare ATCC 13950T. DNA-DNA hybridization values of >70 % confirmed that the three isolates belong to the same species, while the values of <70 % between one of them and the type strains of M. intracellulare and Mycobacterium chimaera confirmed their belonging to a distinct species. In addition, phenotypic characteristics such as positive growth on MacConkey agar and in acidic broth culture, unique matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS profiles of lipids, and unique mycolic acids profiles further supported the taxonomic status of these strains as representatives of a novel species of the Mycobacterium avium complex named Mycobacterium paraintracellulare. The type strain is MOTT64T (=KCTC 29084T=JCM 30622T).

  3. Mycobacterium goodii: An Emerging Nosocomial Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Natalie Mariam; Klein, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium goodii, a rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterium, is an emerging pathogen in nosocomial infections. Its inherent resistance patterns make it a challenging organism to treat, and delays in identification can lead to poor outcomes. We present a case of cardiac device pocket infection with M. goodii, complicated by both antibiotic resistance and drug reactions that highlight the challenges faced by clinicians trying to eradicate these infections. We also present a brief review of the English literature surrounding this disease, including a table of all reported cases of M. goodii infections and their outcomes to act as guide for clinicians formulating treatment plans for these infections. A clear understanding of diagnostic methods and treatment caveats is essential to curing infections caused by these organisms.

  4. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection of ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Midani, S; Rathore, M H

    1999-07-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is one of the rapidly growing mycobacteria found in soil, dust, and water. It can be isolated as a normal colonizing organism, but as a pathogen this organism causes mainly skin and soft tissue infection preceded by trauma. A wide variety of infections can occur in individuals with predisposing conditions. Central nervous system infection with M fortuitum is rare, and meningitis occurs after surgery or trauma. We believe that ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt infection with this organism has not been reported in the literature. Practitioners should be aware of this rare entity and should suspect it in the presence of cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis with sterile culture, and after trauma, surgery, or manipulation of the VP shunt hardware. Mycobacterium fortuitum is resistant to most first-line and second-line antituberculous drugs, and treatment should include surgical debridement in addition to prolonged antimicrobial therapy.

  5. Mycobacterium fortuitum lipoid pneumonia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Leissinger, M K; Garber, J B; Fowlkes, N; Grooters, A M; Royal, A B; Gaunt, S D

    2015-03-01

    A 1-year old female spayed German Shepherd dog was evaluated for acute onset of dyspnea. Pyogranulomatous inflammation and green globoid structures were present on aspirates of the affected lung. Impression smears and histopathology confirmed pyogranulomatous pneumonia, with large amounts of lipid corresponding to the green structures noted cytologically, and identified poorly staining bacterial rods within lipid vacuoles. Special stains confirmed the presence of acid-fast bacterial rods, and polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing identified the organism as Mycobacterium fortuitum. M. fortuitum pneumonia is well described in humans and has previously been reported in 4 dogs and 1 cat. Lipid was a prominent cytologic and histologic feature, as is often described in humans and in the single feline case report. Additionally, this case highlights the variable cytologic appearance of lipid, as well as Mycobacterium spp, which are classically nonstaining with Wright-Giemsa.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Manipulator of Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Korb, Vanessa C.; Chuturgoon, Anil A.; Moodley, Devapregasan

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is one of the most successful pathogens in human history and remains a global health challenge. MTB has evolved a plethora of strategies to evade the immune response sufficiently to survive within the macrophage in a bacterial-immunological equilibrium, yet causes sufficient immunopathology to facilitate its transmission. This review highlights MTB as the driver of disease pathogenesis and presents evidence of the mechanisms by which MTB manipulates the protective immune response into a pathological productive infection. PMID:26927066

  7. Comparative Mycobacterium tuberculosis Spoligotype Distribution in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Alvarez, Jessica; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Rendón, Adrian; Quiñones-Falconi, Francisco; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we studied the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from patients according to their gender, age, and geographic location in Mexico. We did not observe any statistically significant differences in regard to age or gender. We found that spoligo international type 53 (SIT53) is more frequent in the northern states and that SIT119 predominates in central Mexico. PMID:24850349

  8. Macrophage infection models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Abramovitch, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonizes, survives, and grows inside macrophages. In vitro macrophage infection models, using both primary macrophages and cell lines, enable the characterization of the pathogen response to macrophage immune pressure and intracellular environmental cues. We describe methods to propagate and infect primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and J774 and THP-1 macrophage-like cell lines. We also present methods on the characterization of M. tuberculosis intracellular survival and the preparation of infected macrophages for imaging.

  9. Microaerophilic Conditions Promote Growth of Mycobacterium genavense

    PubMed Central

    Realini, L.; De Ridder, K.; Palomino, J.-C.; Hirschel, B.; Portaels, F.

    1998-01-01

    Our studies show that microaerophilic conditions promote the growth of Mycobacterium genavense in semisolid medium. The growth of M. genavense at 2.5 or 5% oxygen was superior to that obtained at 21% oxygen in BACTEC primary cultures (Middlebrook 7H12, pH 6.0, without additives). By using nondecontaminated specimens, it was possible to detect growth with very small inocula (25 bacilli/ml) of 12 different M. genavense strains (from nude mice) within 6 weeks of incubation under low oxygen tension; conversely, with 21% oxygen, no growth of 8 of 12 (66.7%) M. genavense strains was detected (growth index, <10). The same beneficial effect of 2.5 or 5% oxygen was observed in primary cultures of a decontaminated clinical specimen. Low oxygen tension (2.5 or 5%) is recommended for the primary isolation of M. genavense. Microaerophilic cultivation of other atypical mycobacteria, especially slow-growing (e.g., Mycobacterium avium) and difficult-to-grow (e.g., Mycobacterium ulcerans) species, is discussed. PMID:9705393

  10. Collagen degrading activity associated with Mycobacterium species

    PubMed Central

    Masso, F; Paez, A; Varela, E; d Diaz; Zenteno, E; Montano, L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The mechanism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis penetration into tissues is poorly understood but it is reasonable to assume that there is a contribution from proteases capable of disrupting the extracellular matrix of the pulmonary epithelium and the blood vessels. A study was undertaken to identify and characterise collagen degrading activity of M tuberculosis.
METHODS—Culture filtrate protein extract (CFPE) was obtained from reference mycobacterial strains and mycobacteria isolated from patients with tuberculosis. The collagen degrading activity of CFPE was determined according to the method of Johnson-Wint using 3H-type I collagen. The enzyme was identified by the Birkedal-Hansen and Taylor method and its molecular mass determined by SDS-PAGE and Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration chromatography using an electroelution purified enzyme.
RESULTS—CFPE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv showed collagenolytic activity that was four times higher than that of the avirulent strain H37Ra. The 75 kDa enzyme responsible was divalent cation dependent. Other mycobacterial species and those isolated from patients with tuberculosis also had collagen degrading activity.
CONCLUSIONS—Mycobacterium species possess a metalloprotease with collagen degrading activity. The highest enzymatic activity was found in the virulent reference strain H37Rv.

 PMID:10212111

  11. A Dermal Piercing Complicated by Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed

    Patel, Trisha; Scroggins-Markle, Leslie; Kelly, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Background. Dermal piercings have recently become a fashion symbol. Common complications include hypertrophic scarring, rejection, local infection, contact allergy, and traumatic tearing. We report a rare case of Mycobacterium fortuitum following a dermal piercing and discuss its medical implications and treatments. Case. A previously healthy 19-year-old woman presented complaining of erythema and edema at the site of a dermal piercing on the right fourth dorsal finger. She was treated with a 10-day course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and one course of cephalexin by her primary care physician with incomplete resolution. The patient stated that she had been swimming at a local water park daily. A punch biopsy around the dermal stud was performed, and cultures with sensitivities revealed Mycobacterium fortuitum. The patient was treated with clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin for two months receiving full resolution. Discussion. Mycobacterium fortuitum is an infrequent human pathogen. This organism is a Runyon group IV, rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria, often found in water,soil, and dust. Treatment options vary due to the size of the lesion. Small lesions are typically excised, while larger lesions require treatment for 2-6 months with antibiotics. We recommend a high level of suspicion for atypical mycobacterial infections in a piercing resistant to other therapies.

  12. In vitro activity of TP-271 against Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Nocardia species.

    PubMed

    Cynamon, Michael; Jureller, Jeff; Desai, Balaji; Ramachandran, Krithika; Sklaney, Mary; Grossman, Trudy H

    2012-07-01

    The in vitro activities of TP-271, a novel fluorocycline antimicrobial, against 22 isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus, 22 isolates of Mycobacterium fortuitum, and 19 isolates of Nocardia spp. were studied by a microtiter broth dilution method. The MIC(90)s for M. abscessus, M. fortuitum, and Nocardia spp. were 0.5 μg/ml, 0.03 μg/ml, and 8 μg/ml, respectively. TP-271 was significantly more active than the respective control drug in virtually all tests.

  13. Mycobacterium conspicuum sp. nov., a new species isolated from patients with disseminated infections.

    PubMed Central

    Springer, B; Tortoli, E; Richter, I; Grünewald, R; Rüsch-Gerdes, S; Uschmann, K; Suter, F; Collins, M D; Kroppenstedt, R M; Böttger, E C

    1995-01-01

    A new type of slowly growing, nonphotochromogenic mycobacterium was recovered from two patients with disseminated disease. The growth characteristics, acid fastness, acids were consistent with those for Mycobacterium species. The results of biochemical investigations, lipid analyses, and comparative 16S rRNA sequencing showed that these isolates represent a new slowly growing Mycobacterium species which is named Mycobacterium conspicuum. PMID:8576323

  14. Treatment of Mycobacterium intracellulare Infected Mice with Walter Reed Compound H

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-25

    including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium leprae , Staphylococcusaureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, enterococ----ci, Neissr•~n...97 SAD "Treatment of Mycobacterium intracellulare Infected Mice with Walter Reed Compound H" Final Comprehensive Report J. Kenneth McClatchy, Ph.D...REPORT & PERIOD COVERED "TREATMENT OF MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE - Final Comprehensive Report INFECTED MICE WITH WALTER REED COMPOUND H"li G

  15. Occurrence and Clinical Relevance of Mycobacterium chimaera sp. nov., Germany

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Oliver; Richter, Elvira; Göbel, Ulf B.; Petrich, Annette; Buchholz, Petra; Moter, Annette

    2008-01-01

    Retrospective molecular genetic analysis of 166 Mycobacterium intracellulare isolates showed that 143 (86%) strains could be assigned to Mycobacterium chimaera sp. nov. Of 97 patients from whom M. chimaera sp. nov. was isolated, only 3.3% exhibited mycobacterial lung disease, whereas all M. intracellulare isolates caused severe pulmonary infections. PMID:18760016

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera Type Strain Fl-0169

    PubMed Central

    Tokarev, Vasily; Kessler, Collin; McLimans, Christopher; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Wright, Justin; King, Dawn; Lamendella, Regina

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the draft genome sequence of the type strain Mycobacterium chimaera Fl-0169, a member of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). M. chimaera Fl-0169T was isolated from a patient in Italy and is highly similar to strains of M. chimaera isolated in Ireland, although Fl-0169T possesses unique virulence genes. PMID:28232435

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera Type Strain Fl-0169.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Stacy; Tokarev, Vasily; Kessler, Collin; McLimans, Christopher; Gomez-Alvarez, Vicente; Wright, Justin; King, Dawn; Lamendella, Regina

    2017-02-23

    We report here the draft genome sequence of the type strain Mycobacterium chimaera Fl-0169, a member of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). M. chimaera Fl-0169(T) was isolated from a patient in Italy and is highly similar to strains of M. chimaera isolated in Ireland, although Fl-0169(T) possesses unique virulence genes.

  18. 59 FR- Method Development for Airborne Mycobacterium Tuberculosis; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-03-07

    ... Tuberculosis; Meeting The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) of the Centers for... Airborne Mycobacterium Tuberculosis. Time and Date: 1 p.m.-5 p.m., March 29, 1994. Place: Alice Hamilton... peer review of a NIOSH project entitled ``Method Development For Airborne Mycobacterium...

  19. Occurrence and clinical relevance of Mycobacterium chimaera sp. nov., Germany.

    PubMed

    Schweickert, Birgitta; Goldenberg, Oliver; Richter, Elvira; Göbel, Ulf B; Petrich, Annette; Buchholz, Petra; Moter, Annette

    2008-09-01

    Retrospective molecular genetic analysis of 166 Mycobacterium intracellulare isolates showed that 143 (86%) strains could be assigned to Mycobacterium chimaera sp. nov. Of 97 patients from whom M. chimaera sp. nov. was isolated, only 3.3% exhibited mycobacterial lung disease, whereas all M. intracellulare isolates caused severe pulmonary infections.

  20. Update on Medicinal Plants with Potency on Mycobacterium ulcerans

    PubMed Central

    Tsouh Fokou, Patrick Valere; Nyarko, Alexander Kwadwo; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Tchokouaha Yamthe, Lauve Rachel; Ofosuhene, Mark; Boyom, Fabrice Fekam

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans disease has been a serious threat for people living in rural remote areas. Due to poverty or availability of traditional medicine these populations rely on herbal remedies. Currently, data on the anti-Mycobacterium ulcerans activity of plants, so far considered community-based knowledge, have been scientifically confirmed, concomitantly with some medicinal plants used to treat infectious diseases in general. Products derived from plants usually responsible for the biological properties may potentially control Mycobacterium ulcerans disease; numerous studies have aimed to describe the chemical composition of these plant antimicrobials. Thus, the present work provides the first compilation of medicinal plants that demonstrated inhibitory potential on Mycobacterium ulcerans. This work shows that the natural products represent potential alternatives to standard therapies for use as curative medicine for Mycobacterium ulcerans disease. PMID:26779539

  1. Lack of protection afforded by ribonucleic acid preparations from Mycobacterium tuberculosis against Mycobacterium leprae infections in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, C C; Youmans, A Y; Youmans, G P

    1977-01-01

    Mycobacterial ribonucleic acid preparations from H37Ra, an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, provide their usual marked protection against M. tuberculosis challenge; however, they provided no protection against Mycobacterium leprae challenge. Suspensions of intact H37Ra were not effective against M. leprae. Suspensions of BCG gave their usual distinct protection against M. leprae challenge. PMID:404242

  2. Culture and molecular method for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Messelhäusser, U; Kämpf, P; Hörmansdorfer, S; Wagner, B; Schalch, B; Busch, U; Höller, C; Wallner, P; Barth, G; Rampp, A

    2012-01-01

    A combined molecular and cultural method for the detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was developed and tested with artificially contaminated milk and dairy products. Results indicate that the method can be used for a reliable detection as a basis for first risk assessments.

  3. Mycobacteriosis in ostriches (Struthio camelus) due to infection with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Pamela; Jahns, Hanne; Power, Eugene; Bainbridge, John; Kenny, Kevin; Corpa, Juan M; Cassidy, Joseph P; Callanan, John J

    2013-12-01

    Avian tuberculosis rarely affects ratites compared to other bird species and is typically caused by Mycobacterium avium species. This study describes the pathological and microbiological findings in three adult ostriches with mycobacteriosis, in one of which Mycobacterium bovis was isolated from the lesions. Post mortem examinations on ostriches from two different zoological collections in Ireland revealed multifocal caseous granulomas affecting the spleen and liver in all cases, with additional involvement of intestines in two cases. In one case, granulomas were present within the pharynx, at the thoracic inlet and multifocally on the pleural surface. Acid-fast bacilli were observed in all lesions. Mycobacterium sp. of the M. avium complex was isolated from the intestinal lesions in the two cases with intestinal involvement, and M. bovis sp. oligotype SB0140 was cultured from the liver of the third ostrich. This represents the first reported case of M. bovis infection in an ostrich. Avian tuberculosis due to M. bovis is rare and to date has been reported in only parrots and experimentally inoculated birds. Mycobacterium bovis needs to be considered as a possible cause of tuberculosis in ostriches because the lesions are similar to those observed with M. avium complex infection.

  4. Noncanonical SMC protein in Mycobacterium smegmatis restricts maintenance of Mycobacterium fortuitum plasmids.

    PubMed

    Panas, Michael W; Jain, Paras; Yang, Hui; Mitra, Shimontini; Biswas, Debasis; Wattam, Alice Rebecca; Letvin, Norman L; Jacobs, William R

    2014-09-16

    Research on tuberculosis and leprosy was revolutionized by the development of a plasmid transformation system in the fast-growing surrogate, Mycobacterium smegmatis. This transformation system was made possible by the successful isolation of a M. smegmatis mutant strain mc(2)155, whose efficient plasmid transformation (ept) phenotype supported the replication of Mycobacterium fortuitum pAL5000 plasmids. In this report, we identified the EptC gene, the loss of which confers the ept phenotype. EptC shares significant amino acid sequence homology and domain structure with the MukB protein of Escherichia coli, a structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) protein. Surprisingly, M. smegmatis has three paralogs of SMC proteins: EptC and MSMEG_0370 both share homology with Gram-negative bacterial MukB; and MSMEG_2423 shares homology with Gram-positive bacterial SMCs, including the single SMC protein predicted for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. Purified EptC was shown to bind ssDNA and stabilize negative supercoils in plasmid DNA. Moreover, an EptC-mCherry fusion protein was constructed and shown to bind to DNA in live mycobacteria, and to prevent segregation of plasmid DNA to daughter cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of impaired plasmid maintenance caused by a SMC homolog, which has been canonically known to assist the segregation of genetic materials.

  5. Carbapenems and Rifampin Exhibit Synergy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium abscessus.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Amit; Makkar, Nayani; Pandey, Pooja; Parrish, Nicole; Singh, Urvashi; Lamichhane, Gyanu

    2015-10-01

    An effective regimen for treatment of tuberculosis (TB) is comprised of multiple drugs that inhibit a range of essential cellular activities in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The effectiveness of a regimen is further enhanced if constituent drugs act with synergy. Here, we report that faropenem (a penem) or biapenem, doripenem, or meropenem (carbapenems), which belong to the β-lactam class of antibiotics, and rifampin, one of the drugs that forms the backbone of TB treatment, act with synergy when combined. One of the reasons (carba)penems are seldom used for treatment of TB is the high dosage levels required, often at the therapeutic limits. The synergistic combination of rifampin and these (carba)penems indicates that (carba)penems can be administered at dosages that are therapeutically relevant. The combination of faropenem and rifampin also limits the frequency of resistant mutants, as we were unable to obtain spontaneous mutants in the presence of these two drugs. The combinations of rifampin and (carba)penems were effective not only against drug-sensitive Mycobacterium tuberculosis but also against drug-resistant clinical isolates that are otherwise resistant to rifampin. A combination of doripenem or biapenem and rifampin also exhibited synergistic activity against Mycobacterium abscessus. Although the MICs of these three drugs alone against M. abscessus are too high to be of clinical relevance, their concentrations in combinations are therapeutically relevant; therefore, they warrant further evaluation for clinical utility to treat Mycobacterium abscessus infection, especially in cystic fibrosis patients.

  6. Mycobacterium sarraceniae sp. nov. and Mycobacterium helvum sp. nov., isolated from the pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phuong M; Dahl, John L

    2016-11-01

    Several fast- to intermediate-growing, acid-fast, scotochromogenic bacteria were isolated from Sarracenia purpurea pitcher waters in Minnesota sphagnum peat bogs. Two strains (DL734T and DL739T) were among these isolates. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, the phylogenetic positions of both strains is in the genus Mycobacterium with no obvious relation to any characterized type strains of mycobacteria. Phenotypic characterization revealed that neither strain was similar to the type strains of known species of the genus Mycobacterium in the collective properties of growth, pigmentation or fatty acid composition. Strain DL734T grew at temperatures between 28 and 32 °C, was positive for 3-day arylsulfatase production, and was negative for Tween 80 hydrolysis, urease and nitrate reduction. Strain DL739T grew at temperatures between 28 and 37 °C, and was positive for Tween 80 hydrolysis, urea, nitrate reduction and 3-day arylsulfatase production. Both strains were catalase-negative while only DL739T grew with 5 % NaCl. Fatty acid methyl ester profiles were unique for each strain. DL739T showed an ability to survive at 8 °C with little to no cellular replication and is thus considered to be psychrotolerant. Therefore, strains DL734T and DL739T represent two novel species of the genus Mycobacterium with the proposed names Mycobacterium sarraceniae sp. nov. and Mycobacterium helvum sp. nov., respectively. The type strains are DL734T (=JCM 30395T=NCCB 100519T) and DL739T (=JCM 30396T=NCCB 100520T), respectively.

  7. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading species isolated from Hawaiian soils: Mycobacterium crocinum sp. nov., Mycobacterium pallens sp. nov., Mycobacterium rutilum sp. nov., Mycobacterium rufum sp. nov. and Mycobacterium aromaticivorans sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Hennessee, Christiane T; Seo, Jong-Su; Alvarez, Anne M; Li, Qing X

    2009-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread environmental contaminants. In this study, both pristine and contaminated soils were sampled as a source of PAH-degrading organisms. Nine strains isolated from these soils were identified as rapidly growing members of the genus Mycobacterium through basic phenotypic characteristics and through sequence similarity of three genes. Because the sequence similarity of the 16S rRNA gene is relatively high among members of this genus, additional conserved genes encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) and a heat-shock protein (hsp65) were sequenced. Several analyses were completed to differentiate the strains from one another and to determine their species-level taxonomy, including fatty acid methyl ester analysis, biochemical tests and substrate-utilization profiling. A phylogenetic tree incorporating sequences for all three genes was constructed with the isolates and their close described relatives. Results for biochemical tests, substrate-utilization tests and DNA sequencing were compared with those of the phylogenetically similar organisms to establish the isolated strains as representatives of novel species with characteristics unlike those of previously described species of Mycobacterium. Finally, DNA-DNA hybridization was performed between strains and their close relatives to confirm their position within novel species. Our results demonstrated that the isolates represent five novel species, which were named Mycobacterium crocinum sp. nov. (type strain czh-42(T) =ATCC BAA-1373(T) =CIP 109262(T); reference strains czh-1A =ATCC BAA-1370 =CIP 109266 and czh-3 =ATCC BAA-1371=CIP 109267), Mycobacterium pallens sp. nov. (type strain czh-8(T) =ATCC BAA-1372(T) =CIP 109268(T)), Mycobacterium rutilum sp. nov. (type strain czh-117(T) =ATCC BAA-1375(T) =CIP 109271(T); reference strains czh-107 =ATCC BAA-1374 =CIP 109270 and czh-132 =ATCC BAA-1376 =CIP 109272), Mycobacterium rufum sp. nov. (type strain JS14(T

  8. Bacteremia with an Unusual Pathogen: Mycobacterium neoaurum

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Munthir

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium neoaurum (M. neoaurum) is an infrequently encountered cause of infection in humans. It is a member of the rapidly growing mycobacteria family. It predominately afflicts those with a compromised immune status and a chronically indwelling vascular access. Isolation of this organism is challenging yet the advent of 16s ribosomal sequencing paved the way for more sensitive detection. No treatment guidelines are available and treatment largely depends on the experience of the treating physician and nature of the isolate. We report a case of M. neoaurum bacteremia in an immune competent host, with a chronically placed peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC line). PMID:27807489

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis wears what it eats.

    PubMed

    Russell, David G; VanderVen, Brian C; Lee, Wonsik; Abramovitch, Robert B; Kim, Mi-jeong; Homolka, Susanne; Niemann, Stefan; Rohde, Kyle H

    2010-07-22

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains one of the most pernicious of human pathogens. Current vaccines are ineffective, and drugs, although efficacious, require prolonged treatment with constant medical oversight. Overcoming these problems requires a greater appreciation of M. tuberculosis in the context of its host. Upon infection of either macrophages in culture or animal models, the bacterium realigns its metabolism in response to the new environments it encounters. Understanding these environments, and the stresses that they place on M. tuberculosis, should provide insights invaluable for the development of new chemo- and immunotherapeutic strategies.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis effectors interfering host apoptosis signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minqiang; Li, Wu; Xiang, Xiaohong; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis remains a serious human public health concern. The coevolution between its pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human host complicated the way to prevent and cure TB. Apoptosis plays subtle role in this interaction. The pathogen endeavors to manipulate the apoptosis via diverse effectors targeting key signaling nodes. In this paper, we summarized the effectors pathogen used to subvert the apoptosis, such as LpqH, ESAT-6/CFP-10, LAMs. The interplay between different forms of cell deaths, such as apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis, is also discussed with a focus on the modes of action of effectors, and implications for better TB control.

  11. Aquatic snails, passive hosts of Mycobacterium ulcerans.

    PubMed

    Marsollier, Laurent; Sévérin, Tchibozo; Aubry, Jacques; Merritt, Richard W; Saint André, Jean-Paul; Legras, Pierre; Manceau, Anne-Lise; Chauty, Annick; Carbonnelle, Bernard; Cole, Stewart T

    2004-10-01

    Accumulative indirect evidence of the epidemiology of Mycobacterium ulcerans infections causing chronic skin ulcers (i.e., Buruli ulcer disease) suggests that the development of this pathogen and its transmission to humans are related predominantly to aquatic environments. We report that snails could transitorily harbor M. ulcerans without offering favorable conditions for its growth and replication. A novel intermediate link in the transmission chain of M. ulcerans becomes likely with predator aquatic insects in addition to phytophage insects. Water bugs, such as Naucoris cimicoides, a potential vector of M. ulcerans, were shown to be infected specifically by this bacterium after feeding on snails experimentally exposed to M. ulcerans.

  12. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Riera, Jaume; Conesa, Xavier; Pisa, Jose; Moreno, Josefa; Siles, Eduard; Novell, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection by Mycobacterium marinum is rising, mainly due to the increasing popularity of home aquariums. The infection typically manifests as skin lesions, with septic arthritis being a rare presentation form. The disease is difficult to diagnose even when there is a high clinical suspicion, as culture in specific media may not yield positive findings. Thus, establishment of appropriate treatment is often delayed. Synovectomy, capsular thinning, and joint drainage together with prolonged, combined antibiotic therapy may be needed to cure the infection.

  13. Mycobacterium other than tubercle bacilli in various environments in Bangkok.

    PubMed

    Imwidthaya, P; Suthiravitayavaniz, K; Phongpanich, S

    1989-06-01

    This research was designed to isolate Mycobacterium other than tubercle bacilli in various environments in the Bangkok area, in 1987. The results were as follows, one hundred samples of soil yielded 1 Mycobacterium gordonae, 2 M. chelonei, 57 M. fortuitum, 1 Nocardia asteroides, one hundred samples of natural water from the Chao Phraya River and the canals of Chao Phraya River yielded 2 M. chelonei, 18 M. fortuitum, 1 N. asteroides and 1 N. brasiliensis, thirty samples of tap water yielded 3 M. gordonae. But thirty samples of water from swimming pools were negative for Mycobacterium.

  14. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Hod, T; Kushnir, R; Paitan, Y; Korzets, Z

    2008-12-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum group species is an atypical rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterium. It has been increasingly recognized as a potential pathogen mostly encountered in skin and soft tissue infections. Rarely, however, it has been associated with catheter-related infections, either central venous lines or peritoneal dialysis catheters. In this report we describe 2 patients maintained on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis who developed Mycobacterium fortuitum peritonitis and a catheter tunnel abscess, respectively. Molecular biology identification of the isolates was performed in both cases. The literature is reviewed regarding all similar cases.

  15. [Case of pneumothorax associated with pulmonary Mycobacterium fortuitum infection].

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Eri; Sekine, Akimasa; Sato, Tomohide; Baba, Tomohisa; Shinohara, Takeshi; Endo, Takahiro; Sogo, Yoko; Nishihira, Ryuichi; Komatsu, Shigeru; Matsumoto, Yutaka; Ogura, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    A 39-year-old man with dyspnea was revealed to have severe pneumothorax and received partial resection of the left upper lobe after unsuccessful drainage. Necrotizing epitheloid granuloma was found in the resected lung and Mycobacterium fortuitum was detected from the lesion. Chemotherapy with levofloxacin and clarithromycin was started one year after surgery because of the newly found nodular shadow near the lesion. The case experienced pyothorax due to pulmonary tuberculosis three years before and Mycobacterium avium pleuritis one year before this episode. Three-time mycobacterial pleural infection in three years seems to be uncommon. Furthermore this is the first report of pneumothorax associated with pulmonary Mycobacterium fortuitum infection.

  16. Mycobacterium abscessus and Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Pierre-Audigier, Catherine; Offredo, Catherine; Guillemot, Didier; Halley, Sophie; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Vincent, Véronique; Sivadon-Tardy, Valérie; Ferroni, Agnès; Berche, Patrick; Scheinmann, Pierre; Lenoir, Gérard

    2003-01-01

    We prospectively studied 298 patients with cystic fibrosis (mean age 11.3 years; range 2 months to 32 years; sex ratio, 0.47) for nontuberculous mycobacteria in respiratory samples from January 1, 1996, to December 31, 1999. Mycobacterium abscessus was by far the most prevalent nontuberculous mycobacterium: 15 patients (6 male, 9 female; mean age 11.9 years; range 2.5–22 years) had at least one positive sample for this microorganism (versus 6 patients positive for M. avium complex), including 10 with >3 positive samples (versus 3 patients for M. avium complex). The M. abscessus isolates from 14 patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis: each of the 14 patients harbored a unique strain, ruling out a common environmental reservoir or person-to-person transmission. Water samples collected in the cystic fibrosis center were negative for M. abscessus. This major mycobacterial pathogen in children and teenagers with cystic fibrosis does not appear to be acquired nosocomially. PMID:14720400

  17. Infection of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium complex in Spain.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, Ana; Rodríguez, Oscar; González-Quirós, Pablo; Merediz, Isabel; Sevilla, Iker A; Davé, Dipesh; Dalley, Deanna J; Lesellier, Sandrine; Chambers, Mark A; Bezos, Javier; Muñoz, Marta; Delahay, Richard J; Gortázar, Christian; Prieto, José M

    2011-11-01

    The prevalence, distribution and pathology related to infection with Mycobacterium bovis and other mycobacteria were determined in trapped (n=36) and road-killed (n=121) badgers in Spain from 2006 to 2010. The prevalence of M. bovis based on bacteriological culture from road-killed badgers was 8/121 (6.6%) and from trapped badgers was 0/36 (0%). Tuberculosis/M. bovis infection was evident in 15/121 (12.4%) road-killed badgers when bacteriology and histopathology were combined. Mycobacterium avium complex was isolated by culture from the tracheal aspirate of 1/36 (2.8%) trapped badgers and from tissue pools from 8/121 (6.6%) road-killed badgers.

  18. A Case of False-Positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium celatum

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rahman, Zaid; Sengupta, Ruchira; Johnson, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium celatum is a nontuberculous mycobacterium shown to cause symptoms similar to pulmonary M. tuberculosis. Certain strains have been shown to cross-react with the probes used to detect M. tuberculosis, making this a diagnostic challenge. We present a 56-year-old gentleman who developed signs and symptoms of lung infection with computed tomography scan of the chest showing right lung apex cavitation. Serial sputum samples were positive for acid-fast bacilli and nucleic acid amplification testing identified M. tuberculosis ribosomal RNA, resulting in treatment initiation. Further testing with high performance liquid chromatography showed a pattern consistent with M. celatum. This case illustrates the potential for M. celatum to mimic M. tuberculosis in both its clinical history and laboratory testing due to the identical oligonucleotide sequence contained in both. An increasing number of case reports suggest that early reliable differentiation could reduce unnecessary treatment and public health intervention associated with misdiagnosed tuberculosis. PMID:27895946

  19. Mixed Infection of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Sungmin; Wang, Sungho; Shi, Hyejin; Park, Sungrock; Lee, Sangki; Park, Kyoung Taek

    2017-01-01

    A mixed infection of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus (Mab) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in the lung is an unusual clinical manifestation and has not yet been reported. A 61-year-old woman had been treated for Mab lung disease and concomitant pneumonia, and was diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Despite both anti-PTB and anti-Mab therapy, her entire left lung was destroyed and collapsed. She underwent left pneumonectomy and received medical therapy. We were able to successfully treat her mixed infection by pneumonectomy followed by inhaled amikacin therapy. To the best of our knowledge, thus far, this is the first description of a mixed Mab and MTB lung infection. PMID:28180105

  20. Radiometric selective inhibition tests for differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis, and other mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, W M; Hawkins, J E

    1985-01-01

    In the context of a busy reference laboratory, radiometric selective inhibition tests were evaluated for rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis and of the M. tuberculosis complex from other mycobacteria. p-Nitro-alpha-acetylamino-beta-hydroxypropiophenone at 5 micrograms and hydroxylamine hydrochloride at 62.5 and 125 micrograms per ml of 7H12 medium were used to separate the M. tuberculosis complex from other mycobacteria (MOTT bacilli). Since it is important epidemiologically to distinguish M. tuberculosis from M. bovis, susceptibility to 1 microgram of thiophene-2-carboxylic acid per ml was also determined radiometrically. By using these three agents as selective inhibitors, M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, and MOTT bacilli were differentiated with a high degree of specificity by a BACTEC radiometric procedure. Results of tests performed on clinical isolates submitted on solid medium to our reference laboratory were available within 5 days. PMID:3921561

  1. Heat inactivation of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare complex organisms in meat products.

    PubMed Central

    Merkal, R S; Crawford, J A; Whipple, D L

    1979-01-01

    Wieners and sausages were prepared which contained the most heat-tolerant representative of the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare complex we were able to obtain. They also were prepared with infected tissues obtained from tuberculous swine. Processing conditions were as varied as possible. Neither incorporation of sodium nitrite in the emulsion nor presence of smoke during processing altered the heat susceptibility of the organisms. Substantial killing of the organisms occurred as wieners reached the upper processing temperatures, but hot oil or radiant heating of the "precooked" sausages allowed very short times within the killing range; hence, higher peak internal temperatures were necessary. The lethalities for these organisms of reaching and maintaining various processing temperatures are given. PMID:575610

  2. Multiplex-PCR for differentiation of Mycobacterium bovis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Spositto, F L E; Campanerut, P A Z; Ghiraldi, L D; Leite, C Q F; Hirata, M H; Hirata, R D C; Siqueira, V L D; Cardoso, R Fressatti

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a multiplex-PCR to differentiate Mycobacterium bovis from M. tuberculosis Complex (MTC) by one step amplification based on simultaneous detection of pncA 169 C > G change in M. bovis and the IS6110 present in MTC species. Our findings showed the proposed multiplex-PCR is a very useful tool for complementation in differentiating M. bovis from other cultured MTC species.

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Mycobacterium chimaera Respiratory Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Roycroft, Emma; Raftery, Philomena; Mok, Simone; Fitzgibbon, Margaret; Rogers, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium chimaera is an opportunistic human pathogen implicated in both pulmonary and cardiovascular infections. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of three strains isolated from human respiratory specimens. PMID:26634757

  4. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Mycobacterium chimaera Respiratory Isolates.

    PubMed

    Mac Aogáin, Micheál; Roycroft, Emma; Raftery, Philomena; Mok, Simone; Fitzgibbon, Margaret; Rogers, Thomas R

    2015-12-03

    Mycobacterium chimaera is an opportunistic human pathogen implicated in both pulmonary and cardiovascular infections. Here, we report the draft genome sequences of three strains isolated from human respiratory specimens.

  5. EVIDENCE FOR THE MACROPHAGE INDUCING GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUM INTRACELLULARE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The Mycobacterium avium Complex (MAC) includes the species M. avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI), and possibly others. Organisms belonging to the MAC are phylogenetically closely related, opportunistic pathogens. The macrophage inducing gene (mig) is the only well-des...

  6. Inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh soft cheese by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badr, Hesham M.

    2011-11-01

    The effectiveness of gamma irradiation on the inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in fresh soft cheese that prepared from artificially inoculated milk samples was studied. Irradiation at dose of 2 kGy was sufficient for the complete inactivation of these mycobacteria as they were not detected in the treated samples during storage at 4±1 °C for 15 days. Moreover, irradiation of cheese samples, that were prepared from un-inoculated milk, at this effective dose had no significant effects on their gross composition and contents from riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid, while significant decreases in vitamin A and thiamin were observed. In addition, irradiation of cheese samples had no significant effects on their pH and nitrogen fractions contents, except for the contents of ammonia, which showed a slight, but significant, increases due to irradiation. The analysis of cheese fats indicated that irradiation treatment induced significant increase in their oxidation parameters and contents from free fatty acids; however, the observed increases were relatively low. On the other hand, irradiation of cheese samples induced no significant alterations on their sensory properties. Thus, irradiation dose of 2 kGy can be effectively applied to ensure the safety of soft cheese with regards to these harmful mycobacteria.

  7. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection interference with Mycobacterium bovis diagnostics: natural infection cases and a pilot experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Michel, Anita L

    2008-07-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum and at least 1 unidentified species of soil mycobacteria were isolated from lymph nodes from 4 of 5 African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) that had been culled because of positive test results using the Bovigam assay. The buffalo were part of a group of 16 free-ranging buffalo captured in the far north of the Kruger National Park (South Africa) assumed to be free of bovine tuberculosis. No Mycobacterium bovis was isolated. To investigate the possible cause of the apparent false-positive diagnosis, the Mycobacterium isolates were inoculated into 4 experimental cattle and their immune responses monitored over a 13-week period, using the gamma interferon assay. The immune reactivity was predominantly directed toward avian tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) and lasted for approximately 8 weeks. During that period 3 of 4 cattle yielded positive test results on 1 or 2 occasions. The immune responsiveness was boosted when the inoculations were repeated after 15 weeks, which led to 2 subsequent positive reactions in the experimental animal that did not react previously. Including an additional stimulatory antigen, sensitin prepared from M. fortuitum in the gamma interferon assay, showed that it was able to elicit a detectable gamma interferon response in all 4 experimentally inoculated cattle when applied in parallel with bovine and avian tuberculin PPD for the stimulation of blood samples. The implications of occasional cross-reactive responses in natural cases of infection with environmental mycobacteria in the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis in African buffalo and cattle in South Africa are discussed.

  8. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection of the scalp after a skin graft.

    PubMed

    Smith, Blaine D; Liras, Ioannis N; De Cicco, Ignacio A; Aisenberg, Gabriel Marcelo

    2016-10-19

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a non-tuberculous mycobacterium found in the soil and water of most regions of the world, and it can cause disease in immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. We present a 52-year-old man who developed a scalp abscess under a free flap for cranium coverage after a motor vehicle accident. Culture of material drained from the abscess grew M. fortuitum.

  9. Amplification of a 500-Base-Pair Fragment from Cultured Isolates of Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Juan Germán; Fissanoti, Juan Carlos; Del Portillo, Patricia; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin; Romano, María Isabel; Cataldi, Angel

    1999-01-01

    The presence of a 500-bp fragment which amplifies a region from the genome of Mycobacterium bovis (J. G. Rodriguez, G. A. Meija, P. Del Portillo, M. E. Patarroyo, and L. A. Murillo, Microbiology 141:2131–2138, 1995) was evaluated by carrying out PCR on 121 M. bovis isolates. The M. bovis strains, previously characterized by culture and biochemical tests, were isolated from cattle in different regions of Argentina, Mexico, and Colombia. Four additional strains isolated from sea lions that belong to the M. tuberculosis complex were also included in the study. All of the isolates tested were PCR positive, rendering the expected 500-bp band and giving a correlation of 100% with previous microbiological characterization. Southern blot analysis revealed a common band of 1,800 bp and a polymorphic high-molecular-mass hybridization pattern. The results show that this assay may be useful for diagnosis and identification of M. bovis in cattle. PMID:10364607

  10. Mycobacterium arupense, Mycobacterium heraklionense, and a Newly Proposed Species, “Mycobacterium virginiense” sp. nov., but Not Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum, as Species of the Mycobacterium terrae Complex Causing Tenosynovitis and Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Vasireddy, Sruthi; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Wengenack, Nancy L.; Eke, Uzoamaka A.; Benwill, Jeana L.; Turenne, Christine; Wallace, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium terrae complex has been recognized as a cause of tenosynovitis, with M. terrae and Mycobacterium nonchromogenicum reported as the primary etiologic pathogens. The molecular taxonomy of the M. terrae complex causing tenosynovitis has not been established despite approximately 50 previously reported cases. We evaluated 26 isolates of the M. terrae complex associated with tenosynovitis or osteomyelitis recovered between 1984 and 2014 from 13 states, including 5 isolates reported in 1991 as M. nonchromogenicum by nonmolecular methods. The isolates belonged to three validated species, one new proposed species, and two novel related strains. The majority of isolates (20/26, or 77%) belonged to two recently described species: Mycobacterium arupense (10 isolates, or 38%) and Mycobacterium heraklionense (10 isolates, or 38%). Three isolates (12%) had 100% sequence identity to each other by 16S rRNA and 99.3 to 100% identity by rpoB gene region V sequencing and represent a previously undescribed species within the M. terrae complex. There were no isolates of M. terrae or M. nonchromogenicum, including among the five isolates reported in 1991. The 26 isolates were susceptible to clarithromycin (100%), rifabutin (100%), ethambutol (92%), and sulfamethoxazole or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (70%). The current study suggests that M. arupense, M. heraklionense, and a newly proposed species (“M. virginiense” sp. nov.; proposed type strain MO-233 [DSM 100883, CIP 110918]) within the M. terrae complex are the major causes of tenosynovitis and osteomyelitis in the United States, with little change over 20 years. Species identification within this complex requires sequencing methods. PMID:26962085

  11. Clarithromycin-ciprofloxacin-amikacin for therapy of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare bacteremia in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    de Lalla, F; Maserati, R; Scarpellini, P; Marone, P; Nicolin, R; Caccamo, F; Rigoli, R

    1992-01-01

    A combination of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin for the treatment of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare bacteremia was evaluated in 12 AIDS patients. Mycobacteremia cleared in all patients by 2 to 8 weeks of treatment, and symptoms resolved. Four patients died; all had negative blood cultures until death, and disseminated M. avium-M. intracellulare complex infection was not considered the primary cause of death. PMID:1387303

  12. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium abscessus in a prosthetic knee joint: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Xiang; Yang, Chang-Jen; Chen, Yu-Chuan; Lay, Chorng-Jang; Tsai, Chen-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) is an infrequent cause of prosthetic knee joint infections. Simultaneous infection with different NTM species in a prosthetic knee joint has not been previously reported. A case of prosthetic knee joint infection caused by Mycobacterium abscessus and M. fortuitum is described in this report. The patient was successfully treated with adequate antibiotics and surgery. The clinical features of sixteen previously reported cases of prosthetic knee joint infection caused by NTM are reviewed.

  13. Mycobacterium leprae: genes, pseudogenes and genetic diversity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy, which has afflicted human populations for millenia, results from infection with Mycobacterium leprae, an unculturable pathogen with an exceptionally long generation time. Considerable insight into the biology and drug resistance of the leprosy bacillus has been obtained from genomics. M. leprae has undergone reductive evolution and pseudogenes now occupy half of its genome. Comparative genomics of four different strains revealed remarkable conservation of the genome (99.995% identity) yet uncovered 215 polymorphic sites, mainly single nucleotide polymorphisms, and a handful of new pseudogenes. Mapping these polymorphisms in a large panel of strains defined 16 single nucleotide polymorphism-subtypes that showed strong geographical associations and helped retrace the evolution of M. leprae. PMID:21162636

  14. Virulence factors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Forrellad, Marina A.; Klepp, Laura I.; Gioffré, Andrea; Sabio y García, Julia; Morbidoni, Hector R.; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Cataldi, Angel A.; Bigi, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) consists of closely related species that cause tuberculosis in both humans and animals. This illness, still today, remains to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The mycobacteria enter the host by air, and, once in the lungs, are phagocytated by macrophages. This may lead to the rapid elimination of the bacillus or to the triggering of an active tuberculosis infection. A large number of different virulence factors have evolved in MTBC members as a response to the host immune reaction. The aim of this review is to describe the bacterial genes/proteins that are essential for the virulence of MTBC species, and that have been demonstrated in an in vivo model of infection. Knowledge of MTBC virulence factors is essential for the development of new vaccines and drugs to help manage the disease toward an increasingly more tuberculosis-free world. PMID:23076359

  15. New Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Sublineage, Brazzaville, Congo

    PubMed Central

    Malm, Sven; Linguissi, Laure S. Ghoma; Tekwu, Emmanuel M.; Vouvoungui, Jeannhey C.; Kohl, Thomas A.; Beckert, Patrick; Sidibe, Anissa; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Madzou-Laboum, Igor K.; Kwedi, Sylvie; Penlap Beng, Véronique; Frank, Matthias; Ntoumi, Francine

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of illness and death in Congo. No data are available about the population structure and transmission dynamics of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains prevalent in this central Africa country. On the basis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms detected by whole-genome sequencing, we phylogenetically characterized 74 MTBC isolates from Brazzaville, the capital of Congo. The diversity of the study population was high; most strains belonged to the Euro-American lineage, which split into Latin American Mediterranean, Uganda I, Uganda II, Haarlem, X type, and a new dominant sublineage named Congo type (n = 26). Thirty strains were grouped in 5 clusters (each within 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms), from which 23 belonged to the Congo type. High cluster rates and low genomic diversity indicate recent emergence and transmission of the Congo type, a new Euro-American sublineage of MTBC. PMID:28221129

  16. Interference of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with macrophage responses.

    PubMed

    Scherr, Nicole; Jayachandran, Rajesh; Mueller, Philipp; Pieters, Jean

    2009-06-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has become an important health and economic burden, with more than four thousand people succumbing to the disease every day. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the molecular basis of this pathogen's success in causing disease in humans, in order to develop new drugs superior to conventional drugs available at present. One reason why M. tuberculosis is such a dangerous microbe lies within its ability to survive within infected hosts, thereby efficiently circumventing host immune responses. Over the past few years, a number of mechanisms have been unravelled that are utilized by M. tuberculosis to survive within hosts and to avoid immune defence mechanisms. Several of these mechanisms have been described in this communication that may be useful for the development of novel compounds to treat tuberculosis.

  17. [Mycobacterium lentiflavum lymphadenitis: two case reports].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Del Olmo Izuzquiza, Ignacio; Monforte Cirac, María L; Bustillo Alonso, Matilde; Burgués Prades, Pedro; Guerrero Laleona, Carmelo

    2016-10-01

    Lymphadenitis is the most common clinical feature in nontuberculous mycobacterium infection in immunocompetent children. We present two case reports of M. lentiflavum lymphadenitis diagnosed in a tertiary hospital in the last 10 years. Routine tests were performed after persistent adenopathy, and a sample for culture was obtained, being positive for this microorganism. Both patients received oral antibiotics during several weeks. Case 1 needed complete excision after five months of treatment, whilst Case 2 was cured by medical therapy. M. lentiflavum is considered, among the newly described nontuberculous mycobacterial species, an emergent pathogen in our environment. It has its own microbiological and clinical characteristics, different from the rest of nontuberculous mycobacteria. Case reports are limited in the literature since the infection was described for the first time in 1997.

  18. Osteoarticular manifestations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Zychowicz, Michael E

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has affected humans for much of our existence. The incidence of global tuberculosis infection continues to rise, especially in concert with HIV coinfection. Many disease processes, such as diabetes, increase the likelihood of tuberculosis infection. Tuberculosis bacteria can infect any bone, joint, tendon, or bursa; however, the most common musculoskeletal site for infection includes the spine and weight-bearing joints of the hip and knee. Many patients who present with osteoarticular tuberculosis infection will have a gradual onset of pain at the site of infection. Many patients who develop a musculoskeletal tuberculosis infection will have no evidence of a pulmonary tuberculosis infection on x-ray film and many will have very mild symptoms with the initial infection. Healthcare providers must remember that many patients who develop tuberculosis infection do not progress to active tuberculosis disease; however, the latent infection may become active with immune compromise.

  19. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Veterinary Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Harris, N. Beth; Barletta, Raúl G.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (basonym M. paratuberculosis) is the etiologic agent of a severe gastroenteritis in ruminants known as Johne's disease. Economic losses to the cattle industry in the United States are staggering, reaching $1.5 billion annually. A potential pathogenic role in humans in the etiology of Crohn's disease is under investigation. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, and disease control measures of this important veterinary pathogen. We emphasize molecular genetic aspects including the description of markers used for strain identification, diagnostics, and phylogenetic analysis. Recent important advances in the development of animal models and genetic systems to study M. paratuberculosis virulence determinants are also discussed. We conclude with proposals for the applications of these models and recombinant technology to the development of diagnostic, control, and therapeutic measures. PMID:11432810

  20. Advances in Proteomics of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Parkash, O; Singh, B P

    2012-04-01

    Although Mycobacterium leprae was the first bacterial pathogen identified causing human disease, it remains one of the few that is non-cultivable. Understanding the biology of M. leprae is one of the primary challenges in current leprosy research. Genomics has been extremely valuable, nonetheless, functional proteins are ultimately responsible for controlling most aspects of cellular functions, which in turn could facilitate parasitizing the host. Furthermore, bacterial proteins provide targets for most of the vaccines and immunodiagnostic tools. Better understanding of the proteomics of M. leprae could also help in developing new drugs against M. leprae. During the past nearly 15 years, there have been several developments towards the identification of M. leprae proteins employing contemporary proteomics tools. In this review, we discuss the knowledge gained on the biology and pathogenesis of M. leprae from current proteomic studies.

  1. Cytokinins beyond plants: synthesis by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Samanovic, Marie I.; Darwin, K. H.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) resides mainly inside macrophages, which produce nitric oxide (NO) to combat microbial infections. Earlier studies revealed that proteasome-associated genes are required for M. tuberculosis to resist NO via a previously uncharacterized mechanism. Twelve years later, we elucidated the link between proteasome function and NO resistance in M. tuberculosis in Molecular Cell, 57 (2015), pp. 984-994. In a proteasome degradation-defective mutant, Rv1205, a homologue of the plant enzyme LONELY GUY (LOG) that is involved in the synthesis of phytohormones called cytokinins, accumulates and as a consequence results in the overproduction of cytokinins. Cytokinins break down into aldehydes that kill mycobacteria in the presence of NO. Importantly, this new discovery reveals for the first time that a mammalian bacterial pathogen produces cytokinins and leaves us with the question: why is M. tuberculosis, an exclusively human pathogen, producing cytokinins? PMID:28357289

  2. Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Yee Man Tracy; Pillinger, Toby; Luqmani, Asad; Cooper, Nichola

    2015-01-01

    Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare, potentially fatal condition that can be primary or secondary. Secondary HLH can occur in association with infections, most commonly viral infections, but has also been reported in association with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). Prompt identification of the underlying cause of HLH is important as it guides treatment decisions. Early initiation of appropriate treatment (eg, anti-TB treatment) reduces morbidity and mortality. We present a case of HLH associated with TB infection. Initial TB investigations were negative and standard combination chemoimmunotherapy for HLH resulted in a limited clinical response. On apparent relapse of HLH, further investigation revealed TB with changes on CT chest, granuloma on bone marrow and eventual positive TB culture on bronchoalveolar lavage. Subsequent treatment with quadruple anti-TB treatment resulted in rapid clinical response and disease remission. We advocate continued monitoring for TB infection in patients with HLH, and prophylaxis or full treatment for those at high risk. PMID:25870214

  3. Fatty Acyl Chains of Mycobacterium marinum Lipooligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Yoann; Alibaud, Laeticia; Carrère-Kremer, Séverine; Maes, Emmanuel; Tokarski, Caroline; Elass, Elisabeth; Kremer, Laurent; Guérardel, Yann

    2011-01-01

    We have recently established the fine structure of the glycan backbone of lipooligosaccharides (LOS-I to LOS-IV) isolated from Mycobacterium marinum, a close relative of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These studies culminated with the description of an unusual terminal N-acylated monosaccharide that confers important biological functions to LOS-IV, such as macrophage activation, that may be relevant to granuloma formation. It was, however, also suggested that the lipid moiety was required for LOSs to exert their immunomodulatory activity. Herein, using highly purified LOSs from M. marinum, we have determined through a combination of mass spectrometric and NMR techniques, the structure and localization of the fatty acids composing the lipid moiety. The occurrence of two distinct polymethyl-branched fatty acids presenting specific localizations is consistent with the presence of two highly related polyketide synthases (Pks5 and Pks5.1) in M. marinum and presumably involved in the synthesis of these fatty acyl chains. In addition, a bioinformatic search permitted us to identify a set of enzymes potentially involved in the biosynthesis or transfer of these lipids to the LOS trehalose unit. These include MMAR_2343, a member of the Pap (polyketide-associated protein) family, that acylates trehalose-based glycolipids in M. marinum. The participation of MMAR_2343 to LOS assembly was demonstrated using a M. marinum mutant carrying a transposon insertion in the MMAR_2343 gene. Disruption of MMAR_2343 resulted in a severe LOS breakdown, indicating that MMAR_2343, hereafter designated PapA4, fulfills the requirements for LOS acylation and assembly. PMID:21803773

  4. Mycobacterium yongonense sp. nov., a slow-growing non-chromogenic species closely related to Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoung-Jun; Math, Renukaradhya K; Jeon, Che Ok; Yu, Hee-Kyung; Park, Young-Gil; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2013-01-01

    A slow-growing non-chromogenic mycobacterium was isolated from a patient with pulmonary disease. Phenotypically, strain 05-1390(T) was similar to Mycobacterium intracellulare ATCC 13950(T). The 16S rRNA gene sequence (1385 bp) of strain 05-1390(T) showed a high degree of similarity to those of the M. intracellulare complex, namely Mycobacterium marseillense 5351974(T) (100 %), M. intracellulare ATCC 13950(T) (99.8 %) and Mycobacterium chimaera DSM 44623(T) (99.9 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and the hsp65 gene indicated that strain 05-1390(T) was closely related to M. intracellulare ATCC 13950(T), but that it was a distinct phylogenetic entity. Of particular interest, an analysis based on the rpoB gene (701 bp) showed that it is closely related to Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum ATCC BAA-614(T) (99.4 %), a scotochromogenic strain, rather than to the M. intracellulare-related strains. Unique MALDI-TOF MS profiles also supported the taxonomic status of this strain as a distinct species. These data support the conclusion that strain 05-1390(T) represents a novel mycobacterial species, for which the name Mycobacterium yongonense sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is 05-1390(T) ( = DSM 45126(T) = KCTC 19555(T)).

  5. Multinucleated giant cell cytokine expression in pulmonary granulomas of cattle experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenic mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex such as Mycobacterium bovis, induce a characteristic lesion known as a granulomas. Granulomas represent a specific host response to chronic antigenic stimuli, such as foreign bodies, certain bacterial components, or persistent pathoge...

  6. Isolation of the newly described species Mycobacterium celatum from AIDS patients.

    PubMed Central

    Tortoli, E; Piersimoni, C; Bacosi, D; Bartoloni, A; Betti, F; Bono, L; Burrini, C; De Sio, G; Lacchini, C; Mantella, A

    1995-01-01

    Mycobacterium celatum is a recently described species which, on the basis of conventional tests, may be misidentified as Mycobacterium xenopi or as belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex. Only genomic sequencing or high-performance liquid chromatography of cell wall mycolic acids can presently allow a correct identification of this mycobacterium. Two cases of infection due to M. celatum, in AIDS patients, are described here. The quantitative susceptibility pattern of the isolates to a wide spectrum of drugs is also reported. PMID:7699029

  7. In-vitro evaluation of Perasafe compared with 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde against Mycobacterium spp.

    PubMed

    Hernández, A; Martró, E; Matas, L; Ausina, V

    2003-05-01

    Quantitative suspension and carrier tests were used to compare the activity of Perasafe and Cidex against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Mycobacterium chelonae. The interference of an organic load, and of hard water was also considered. Both agents achieved reductions exceeding 10(5)-fold within 20 and 30 min for all the strains tested. Perasafe is thus mycobactericidal and a viable alternative to Cidex for intermediate or high-level disinfection.

  8. Mycobacterium mantenii sp. nov., a pathogenic, slowly growing, scotochromogenic species.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, Jakko; Lindeboom, Jerome A; Hartwig, Nico G; de Zwaan, Rina; Tortoli, Enrico; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; Boeree, Martin J; van Soolingen, Dick

    2009-11-01

    Slowly growing, scotochromogenic bacteria of a novel Mycobacterium species were isolated from lymph node samples in two children and pulmonary samples in two elderly patients from different regions in the Netherlands as well as from a surface water sample in Zambia. Its 16S rRNA gene, 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer (ITS), hsp65 and rpoB gene sequences are unique in comparison with other mycobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that these micro-organisms are most closely related to Mycobacterium scrofulaceum ATCC 19981(T) (8 differences; 0.6 % divergence). The hsp65 sequence shows 96 % similarity to that of Mycobacterium saskatchewanense MB54784 and the rpoB sequence shows 95 % similarity to that of Mycobacterium chimaera CIP 107892(T). The 16S-23S ITS sequence places these micro-organisms within the Mycobacterium avium complex, as a novel ITS sequevar. This is not supported by analysis of the 16S rRNA, hsp65 or rpoB gene sequences. Their scotochromogenicity, combined with mostly positive urease, positive semiquantitative catalase and negative tellurite reduction tests, set these isolates apart from related species. The mycolic acid patterns, obtained by HPLC, are similar to that of Mycobacterium scrofulaceum, though the peak heights and distribution present minor differences. We propose the name Mycobacterium mantenii sp. nov. for this novel species. The type strain, isolated from a lymph node biopsy sample, is strain 04-1474(T) (=NLA000401474(T) =CIP 109863(T) =DSM 45255(T)).

  9. Mycobacterium alsiense, a Novel, Slowly Growing Species Isolated from Two Patients with Pulmonary Disease▿

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Elvira; Tortoli, Enrico; Fischer, Arno; Hendricks, Oliver; Engel, Regina; Hillemann, Doris; Schubert, Sabine; Kristiansen, Jette E.

    2007-01-01

    A previously undescribed, slowly growing Mycobacterium species was isolated from pulmonary specimens of two patients, one from Denmark and one from Italy. The isolates showed unique 16S rRNA internal transcribed spacers and hsp65 sequences: the 16S rRNA was most closely related to Mycobacterium szulgai and Mycobacterium malmoense. PMID:17804654

  10. Evaluation of Vitek MS for rapid classification of clinical isolates belonging to Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Daniel P; Zembower, Teresa R; Qi, Chao

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of the Vitek MS system to classify clinical pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex isolates compared to multilocus sequence analysis. Vitek MS accurately identified 55% of the isolates as M. avium and 18% as M. intracellulare, but misidentified 24 (27%) Mycobacterium chimaera isolates as Mycobacterium intracellulare.

  11. Cámara CCD Directa con el Telescopio de 2.15 m del CASLEO: algunos diagnósticos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cellone, S. A.

    Se efectuaron algunas pruebas con la cámara CCD (+ Reductor Focal) instalada en el foco Cassegrain del Telescopio de 2.15 m del Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO). Las conclusiones más significativas son: Los tiempos de exposición efectivos difieren de los nominales en una fracción apreciable de segundo. En exposiciones de menos de 3 segundos, la iluminación no es pareja en todo el detector. En consecuencia, se recomiendan los pasos a seguir por los astrónomos tanto durante la observación como en la reducción de sus datos.

  12. The RD1 virulence locus of Mycobacterium tuberculosis regulates DNA transfer in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Jessica L.; Kowalski, Joseph C.; Karnati, Pavan K.; Derbyshire, Keith M.

    2004-01-01

    Conjugal DNA transfer occurs by an atypical mechanism in Mycobacterium smegmatis. The transfer system is chromosomally encoded and requires recipient recombination functions for both chromosome and plasmid transfer. Cis-acting sequences have been identified that confer mobility on nontransferable plasmids, but these are larger and have different properties to canonical oriT sites found in bacterial plasmids. To identify trans-acting factors required for mediating DNA transfer, a library of transposon insertion mutants was generated in the donor strain, and individual mutants were screened for their effect on transfer. From this screen, a collection of insertion mutants was isolated that increased conjugation frequencies relative to wild type. Remarkably, the mutations map to a 25-kb region of the M. smegmatis chromosome that is syntenous with the RD1 region of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is considered to be the primary attenuating deletion in the related vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guérin. The genes of the RD1 region encode a secretory apparatus responsible for exporting Cfp10- and Esat-6, both potent antigens and virulence factors. In crosses using two M. smegmatis donors, we show that wild-type cells can suppress the elevated transfer phenotype of mutant donors, which is consistent with the secretion of a factor that suppresses conjugation. Most importantly, the RD1 region of M. tuberculosis complements the conjugation phenotype of the RD1 mutants in M. smegmatis. Our results indicate that the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis RD1 regions are functionally equivalent and provide a unique perspective on the role of this critical secretion apparatus. PMID:15314236

  13. Comparative sequence analysis of Mycobacterium leprae and the new leprosy-causing Mycobacterium lepromatosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiang Y; Sizer, Kurt C; Thompson, Erika J; Kabanja, Juma; Li, Jun; Hu, Peter; Gómez-Valero, Laura; Silva, Francisco J

    2009-10-01

    Mycobacterium lepromatosis is a newly discovered leprosy-causing organism. Preliminary phylogenetic analysis of its 16S rRNA gene and a few other gene segments revealed significant divergence from Mycobacterium leprae, a well-known cause of leprosy, that justifies the status of M. lepromatosis as a new species. In this study we analyzed the sequences of 20 genes and pseudogenes (22,814 nucleotides). Overall, the level of matching of these sequences with M. leprae sequences was 90.9%, which substantiated the species-level difference; the levels of matching for the 16S rRNA genes and 14 protein-encoding genes were 98.0% and 93.1%, respectively, but the level of matching for five pseudogenes was only 79.1%. Five conserved protein-encoding genes were selected to construct phylogenetic trees and to calculate the numbers of synonymous substitutions (dS values) and nonsynonymous substitutions (dN values) in the two species. Robust phylogenetic trees constructed using concatenated alignment of these genes placed M. lepromatosis and M. leprae in a tight cluster with long terminal branches, implying that the divergence occurred long ago. The dS and dN values were also much higher than those for other closest pairs of mycobacteria. The dS values were 14 to 28% of the dS values for M. leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a more divergent pair of species. These results thus indicate that M. lepromatosis and M. leprae diverged approximately 10 million years ago. The M. lepromatosis pseudogenes analyzed that were also pseudogenes in M. leprae showed nearly neutral evolution, and their relative ages were similar to those of M. leprae pseudogenes, suggesting that they were pseudogenes before divergence. Taken together, the results described above indicate that M. lepromatosis and M. leprae diverged from a common ancestor after the massive gene inactivation event described previously for M. leprae.

  14. Combating highly resistant emerging pathogen Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis with novel salicylanilide esters and carbamates.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsuzsa; Krátký, Martin; Vinšová, Jarmila; Szabó, Nóra; Senoner, Zsuzsanna; Horváti, Kata; Stolaříková, Jiřina; Dávid, Sándor; Bősze, Szilvia

    2015-08-28

    In the Mycobacterium genus over one hundred species are already described and new ones are periodically reported. Species that form colonies in a week are classified as rapid growers, those requiring longer periods (up to three months) are the mostly pathogenic slow growers. More recently, new emerging species have been identified to lengthen the list, all rapid growers. Of these, Mycobacterium abscessus is also an intracellular pathogen and it is the most chemotherapy-resistant rapid-growing mycobacterium. In addition, the cases of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection are also increasing. Therefore there is an urgent need to find new active molecules against these threatening strains. Based on previous results, a series of salicylanilides, salicylanilide 5-chloropyrazinoates and carbamates was designed, synthesized and characterised. The compounds were evaluated for their in vitro activity on M. abscessus, susceptible M. tuberculosis H37Rv, multidrug-resistant (MDR) M. tuberculosis MDR A8, M. tuberculosis MDR 9449/2006 and on the extremely-resistant Praha 131 (XDR) strains. All derivatives exhibited a significant activity with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in the low micromolar range. Eight salicylanilide carbamates and two salicylanilide esters exhibited an excellent in vitro activity on M. abscessus with MICs from 0.2 to 2.1 μM, thus being more effective than ciprofloxacin and gentamicin. This finding is potentially promising, particularly, as M. abscessus is a threateningly chemotherapy-resistant species. M. tuberculosis H37Rv was inhibited with MICs from 0.2 μM, and eleven compounds have lower MICs than isoniazid. Salicylanilide esters and carbamates were found that they were effective also on MDR and XDR M. tuberculosis strains with MICs ≥1.0 μM. The in vitro cytotoxicity (IC50) was also determined on human MonoMac-6 cells, and selectivity index (SI) of the compounds was established. In general, salicylanilide

  15. Evidences for anti-mycobacterium activities of lipids and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Afzal; Singh, Sandeep Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the most widespread and deadly airborne disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The two-pronged lethal effect on the bacteria using lipids/surfactants and anti-tubercular drugs may render the miniaturization of dose owing to synergistic and tandem effect of both. The current research has been focused on screening and evaluating various lipids/surfactants possessing inherent anti-mycobacterium activity that can ferry the anti-tubercular drugs. In vitro anti-mycobacterium activity was evaluated using agar well diffusion method. Furthermore, time-concentration dependent killing and DNA/RNA content release studies were performed to correlate the findings. The exact mechanism of bacterial killing was further elucidated by electron/atomic force microscopy studies. Finally, to negate any toxicity, in vitro hemolysis and toxicity studies were performed. The study revealed that capmul MCM C-8, labrasol and acconon C-80 possessed highest in vitro anti-mycobacterium activity. Electron/atomic force microscopy results confirmed in vitro studies and verified the killing of Mycobacterium owing to the release of cytoplasmic content after cell wall fragmentation and disruption. Moreover, the least hemolysis and hundred percent survivals rate of mice using the excipients demonstrated the safety aspects of explored excipients that can ferry the anti-tubercular drugs. The present study concluded the safe, efficient and synergistic activity of the explored excipients and anti-tubercular drugs in controlling the menace of tuberculosis.

  16. Iron Acquisition in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joyce; Moolji, Jalal; Dufort, Alex; Staffa, Alfredo; Domenech, Pilar; Reed, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a host-adapted pathogen that evolved from the environmental bacterium M. avium subsp. hominissuis through gene loss and gene acquisition. Growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the laboratory is enhanced by supplementation of the media with the iron-binding siderophore mycobactin J. Here we examined the production of mycobactins by related organisms and searched for an alternative iron uptake system in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Through thin-layer chromatography and radiolabeled iron-uptake studies, we showed that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is impaired for both mycobactin synthesis and iron acquisition. Consistent with these observations, we identified several mutations, including deletions, in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genes coding for mycobactin synthesis. Using a transposon-mediated mutagenesis screen conditional on growth without myobactin, we identified a potential mycobactin-independent iron uptake system on a M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific genomic island, LSPP15. We obtained a transposon (Tn) mutant with a disruption in the LSPP15 gene MAP3776c for targeted study. The mutant manifests increased iron uptake as well as intracellular iron content, with genes downstream of the transposon insertion (MAP3775c to MAP3772c [MAP3775-2c]) upregulated as the result of a polar effect. As an independent confirmation, we observed the same iron uptake phenotypes by overexpressing MAP3775-2c in wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. These data indicate that the horizontally acquired LSPP15 genes contribute to iron acquisition by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, potentially allowing the subsequent loss of siderophore production by this pathogen. IMPORTANCE Many microbes are able to scavenge iron from their surroundings by producing iron-chelating siderophores. One exception is Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, a fastidious, slow-growing animal pathogen whose growth

  17. Comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Jiwon; Saier, Milton H.

    2012-01-01

    The co-emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacterial strains and the HIV pandemic has made tuberculosis a leading public health threat. The causative agent is Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtu), a facultative intracellular parasite. Mycobacterium leprae (Mle), a related organism that causes leprosy, is an obligate intracellular parasite. Given that different transporters are required for bacterial growth and persistence under a variety of growth conditions, we conducted comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of these two organisms. A minimal set of genes required for intracellular and extracellular life were identified. Drug efflux systems utilizing primary active transport mechanisms have been preferentially retained in Mle and still others preferentially lost. Transporters associated with environmental adaptation found in Mtu were mostly lost in Mle. These findings provide starting points for experimental studies that may elucidate the dependencies of pathogenesis on transport for these two pathogenic mycobacteria. They also lead to suggestions regarding transporters that function in intra- versus extra-cellular growth. PMID:22179038

  18. Differences in T-cell responses between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium africanum-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Tientcheu, Leopold D; Sutherland, Jayne S; de Jong, Bouke C; Kampmann, Beate; Jafali, James; Adetifa, Ifedayo M; Antonio, Martin; Dockrell, Hazel M; Ota, Martin O

    2014-05-01

    In The Gambia, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Mycobacterium africanum (Maf) are major causes of tuberculosis (TB). Maf is more likely to cause TB in immune suppressed individuals, implying differences in virulence. Despite this, few studies have assessed the underlying immunity to the two pathogens in human. In this study, we analyzed T-cell responses from 19 Maf- and 29 Mtb-infected HIV-negative patients before and after TB chemotherapy following overnight stimulation of whole blood with TB-specific antigens. Before treatment, percentages of early secreted antigenic target-6(ESAT-6)/culture filtrate protein-10(CFP-10) and purified protein derivative-specific single-TNF-α-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were significantly higher while single-IL-2-producing T cells were significantly lower in Maf- compared with Mtb-infected patients. Purified protein derivative-specific polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells frequencies were significantly higher before than after treatment, but there was no difference between the groups at both time points. Furthermore, the proportion of CD3(+) CD11b(+) T cells was similar in both groups pretreatment, but was significantly lower with higher TNF-α, IL-2, and IFN-γ production in Mtb- compared with that of Maf-infected patients posttreatment. Our data provide evidence of differences in T-cell responses to two mycobacterial strains with differing virulence, providing some insight into TB pathogenesis with different Mtb strains that could be prospectively explored as biomarkers for TB protection or susceptibility.

  19. Granulomatous Skin Lesions in Moray Eels Caused by a Novel Mycobacterium Species Related to Mycobacterium triplex

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Lawrence H.; Costa, Sylvia F.; Weiss, Louis M.; Johnson, Linda K.; Bartell, John; Davis, Raymond; Walsh, Michael; Levi, Michael

    2001-01-01

    An outbreak of granulomatous dermatitis was investigated in a captive population of moray eels. The affected eels had florid skin nodules concentrated around the head and trunk. Histopathological examination revealed extensive granulomatous inflammation within the dermis and subcutaneous fascial plane between the fat and axial musculature. Acid-fast rods were detected within the smallest lesions, which were presumably the ones that had developed earliest. Eventually, after several months of incubation at room temperature, a very slowly growing acid-fast organism was isolated. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified it as a Mycobacterium species closely related (0.59% divergence) to M. triplex, an SAV mycobacterium. Intradermal inoculation of healthy green moray eels with this organism reliably reproduced the lesion. Experimentally induced granulomatous dermatitis appeared within 2 weeks of inoculation and slowly but progressively expanded during the 2 months of the experiment. Live organisms were recovered from these lesions at all time points, fulfilling Koch's postulates for this bacterium. In a retrospective study of tissues collected between 1993 and 1999 from five spontaneous disease cases, acid-fast rods were consistently found within lesions, and a nested PCR for the rRNA gene also demonstrated the presence of mycobacteria within affected tissues. PMID:11402008

  20. Comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Youm, Jiwon; Saier, Milton H

    2012-03-01

    The co-emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacterial strains and the Human Immunodeficiency Virus pandemic has made tuberculosis a leading public health threat. The causative agent is Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtu), a facultative intracellular parasite. Mycobacterium leprae (Mle), a related organism that causes leprosy, is an obligate intracellular parasite. Given that different transporters are required for bacterial growth and persistence under a variety of growth conditions, we conducted comparative analyses of transport proteins encoded within the genomes of these two organisms. A minimal set of genes required for intracellular and extracellular life was identified. Drug efflux systems utilizing primary active transport mechanisms have been preferentially retained in Mle and still others preferentially lost. Transporters associated with environmental adaptation found in Mtu were mostly lost in Mle. These findings provide starting points for experimental studies that may elucidate the dependencies of pathogenesis on transport for these two pathogenic mycobacteria. They also lead to suggestions regarding transporters that function in intra- versus extra-cellular growth.

  1. A photoelectrocatalytic process that disinfects water contaminated with Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Brugnera, Michelle Fernanda; Miyata, Marcelo; Zocolo, Guilherme Julião; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin

    2013-11-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are resistant to conventional water treatment; indeed, they have been recovered from a wide variety of environmental sources. Here, we applied the photoelectrocatalytic technique using a Ti/TiO2-Ag photoanode to inactivate mycobacteria. For a mycobacteria population of 5 × 10(8) CFU mL(-1), we achieved 99.9 and 99.8% inactivation of Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium with rate constant of 6.2 × 10(-3) and 4.2 × 10(-3) min(-1), respectively, after 240 min. We compared the proposed method with the photolytic and photocatalytic methods. Using a mycobacteria population of 7.5 × 10(4) CFU mL(-1), the proposed Ti/TiO2-Ag photoanode elicited total mycobacteria inactivation within 3 min of treatment; the presence of Ag nanoparticles in the electrode provided 1.5 larger degradation rate constant as compared with the Ti/TiO2 anode (1.75 × 10(-2) for M. kansassi and 1.98 × 10(-2) for M. avium). We monitored the degradation of the metabolites released during cellular lysis by TOC removal, sugar release, chromatography, and mass spectrometry measurements; photoelectrocatalysis and Ti/TiO2-Ag photoanodes furnished the best results.

  2. Bilateral parotitis caused by Mycobacterium chelonae in an immunocompetent child.

    PubMed

    Shyur, Shyh Dar; Chu, Szu Hung; Wu, Yi Lei; Chang, Kuo Ming; Lee, Huei Chung

    2009-12-01

    This report is of a healthy 3-year-old boy with bilateral parotitis caused by Mycobacterium chelonae. He was treated with antibiotics, but the symptoms did not improve. The biopsy pathology report revealed chronic caseating granulomatous inflammation. After 2 weeks, Mycobacterium chelonae was identified from the biopsy specimen culture. The antibiotics were changed to amikacin and clarithromycin, according to the susceptibility test. Two weeks later, he underwent debridement surgery. Only partial excision of the infected tissue was performed because of the possibility of facial nerve injury. After another 2 weeks of treatment with amikacin and clarithromycin, parotidectomy was performed. The patient then received a 6-month course of oral clarithromycin. At the 1-year follow up, he was well and without residual mass. His immunologic examinations were all within normal limits. This is the first report of bilateral parotitis caused by Mycobacterium chelonae in an immunocompetent boy in the English-language literature.

  3. MYCOBACTERIUM GENAVENSE IN AN AFRICAN PENGUIN (SPHENISCUS DEMERSUS).

    PubMed

    Krause, Kristian J; Reavill, Drury; Weldy, Scott H; Bradway, Daniel S

    2015-12-01

    A 19-yr-old female African penguin (Spheniscus demersus) presented with labored breathing and anorexia. Radiographs revealed soft-tissue density lesions in the left lung fields and fluid in the right. The penguin died during the night. Postmortem examination demonstrated multiple granulomas in the lungs and air sacs. The right coelom was filled with opaque fluid. Histopathology of the lung, liver, kidney, and spleen identified Mycobacterium as a primary disease etiology. Large numbers of acid fast-positive, rod-shaped bacteria were recognized on tissue staining. Mycobacterium genavense was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific for the species. Further confirmation of M. genavense was accomplished using PCR with universal Mycobacterium spp. primers followed by sequencing of the amplicon obtained. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of mycobacteriosis-and specifically M. genavense -in an African penguin. This case also demonstrates the similarities of presentation between the more commonly suspected and encountered aspergillosis and mycobacteriosis.

  4. Deciphering the virulence factors of the opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium colombiense.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Perez, M N; Murcia, M I; Parra-Lopez, C; Blom, J; Tauch, A

    2016-11-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) contains clinically important nontuberculous mycobacteria worldwide and is the second largest medical complex in the Mycobacterium genus after the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. MAC comprises several species that are closely phylogenetically related but diverse regarding their host preference, course of disease, virulence and immune response. In this study we provided immunologic and virulence-related insights into the M. colombiense genome as a model of an opportunistic pathogen in the MAC. By using bioinformatic tools we found that M. colombiense has deletions in the genes involved in p-HBA/PDIM/PGL, PLC, SL-1 and HspX production, and loss of the ESX-1 locus. This information not only sheds light on our understanding the virulence mechanisms used by opportunistic MAC pathogens but also has great potential for the designing of species-specific diagnostic tools.

  5. Multiple lumps in the breast due to Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed

    Chandanwale, Shirish S; Gulati, Ishita; Baravkar, Dadaso S; Shinde, Sumedha P; Mishra, Neha

    2016-04-01

    Although breast tissue is the most resistant to tuberculosis, its incidence is increasing worldwide. High incidence of breast tuberculosis is presumed in India. The rapidly growing nontubercular mycobacteria, such as Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium chelonae, are of increasing clinical importance because infections due to these organisms are often hospital acquired. The true incidence of M. fortuitum is unknown but it has been estimated to be between 4 and 6 cases per one million people. It causes skin or soft tissue infections following trauma or surgery. Breast infection with M. fortuitum is very uncommon. The most common clinical presentation of breast tuberculosis is a painless lump. Multiple lumps are rarely reported. The culture and molecular studies are the keystone for differentiation of various mycobacterium species. We report one such case of a 25-year-old female presenting with multiple painless lumps due to M. fortuitum infection in the left breast.

  6. Disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Martinho, Anna Paula Vitirito; Franco, Marília Masello Junqueira; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Perrotti, Isabella Belletti Mutt; Mangia, Simone Henriques; Megid, Jane; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Lara, Gustavo Henrique Batista; Santos, Adolfo Carlos Barreto; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; de Carvalho Sanches, Osimar; Paes, Antonio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    An uncommon disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is described in a 12-year-old female dog presenting with fever, dyspnea, cough, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, melena, epistaxis, and emesis. The dog had a history of close contact with its owner, who died of pulmonary tuberculosis. Radiographic examination revealed diffuse radio-opaque images in both lung lobes, diffuse visible masses in abdominal organs, and hilar and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Bronchial washing samples and feces were negative for acid-fast organisms. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based species identification of bronchial washing samples, feces, and urine revealed M. tuberculosis using PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis-PRA. Because of public health concerns, which were worsened by the physical condition of the dog, euthanasia of the animal was recommended. Rough and tough colonies suggestive of M. tuberculosis were observed after microbiological culture of lung, liver, spleen, heart, and lymph node fragments in Löwenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media. The PRA analysis enabled diagnosis of M. tuberculosis strains isolated from organs. PMID:23339199

  7. Fish Tank Granuloma Caused by Mycobacterium marinum

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ting-Shu; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Leu, Hsieh-Shong; Huang, Ching-Tai; Chen, Yi-Chieh; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Chang, Pi-Yueh; Su, Lin-Hui; Kuo, An-Jing; Chia, Ju-Hsin; Lu, Chia-Chen; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mycobacterium marinum causes skin and soft tissue, bone and joint, and rare disseminated infections. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between treatment outcome and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. A total of 27 patients with M. marinum infections were enrolled. Methods Data on clinical characteristics and therapeutic methods were collected and analyzed. We also determined the minimum inhibitory concentrations of 7 antibiotics against 30 isolates from these patients. Results Twenty-seven patients received antimycobacterial agents with or without surgical debridement. Eighteen patients were cured, 8 failed to respond to treatment, and one was lost to follow-up. The duration of clarithromycin (147 vs. 28; p = 0.0297), and rifampicin (201 vs. 91; p = 0.0266) treatment in the cured patients was longer than that in the others. Surgical debridement was performed in 10 out of the 18 cured patients, and in 1 of another group (p = 0.0417). All the 30 isolates were susceptible to clarithromycin, amikacin, and linezolid; 29 (96.7%) were susceptible to ethambutol; 28 (93.3%) were susceptible to sulfamethoxazole; and 26 (86.7%) were susceptible to rifampicin. However, only 1 (3.3%) isolate was susceptible to doxycycline. Discussion Early diagnosis of the infection and appropriate antimicrobial therapy with surgical debridement are the mainstays of successful treatment. Clarithromycin and rifampin are supposed to be more effective agents. PMID:22911774

  8. Revisiting the Evolution of Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Serge; Inwald, Jackie; Gordon, Steve; Martin, Carlos; Warren, Rob; Kremer, Kristin; Cousins, Debby; Behr, Marcel A.

    2005-01-01

    Though careful consideration has been placed towards genetic characterization of tubercle bacillus isolates causing disease in humans, those causing disease predominantly among wild and domesticated mammals have received less attention. In contrast to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, whose host range is largely specific to humans, M. bovis and “M bovis-like” organisms infect a broad range of animal species beyond their most prominent host in cattle. To determine whether strains of variable genomic content are associated with distinct distributions of disease, the DNA contents of M. bovis or M. bovis-like isolates from a variety of hosts were investigated via Affymetrix GeneChip. Consistent with previous genomic analysis of the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC), large sequence polymorphisms of putative diagnostic and biological consequence were able to unambiguously distinguish interrogated isolates. The distribution of deleted regions indicates organisms genomically removed from M. bovis and also points to structured genomic variability within M. bovis. Certain genomic profiles spanned a variety of hosts but were clustered by geography, while others associated primarily with host type. In contrast to the prevailing assumption that M. bovis has broad host capacity, genomic profiles suggest that distinct MTC lineages differentially infect a variety of mammals. From this, a phylogenetic stratification of genotypes offers a predictive framework upon which to base future genetic and phenotypic studies of the MTC. PMID:16159772

  9. The cell envelope glycoconjugates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Angala, Shiva Kumar; Belardinelli, Juan Manuel; Huc-Claustre, Emilie; Wheat, William H.; Jackson, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the second most common cause of death due to a single infectious agent. The cell envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of the disease in humans, is a source of unique glycoconjugates and the most distinctive feature of the biology of this organism. It is the basis of much of Mtb pathogenesis and one of the major causes of its intrinsic resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. At the same time, the unique structures of Mtb cell envelope glycoconjugates, their antigenicity and essentiality for mycobacterial growth provide opportunities for drug, vaccine, diagnostic and biomarker development, as clearly illustrated by recent advances in all of these translational aspects. This review focuses on our current understanding of the structure and biogenesis of Mtb glycoconjugates with particular emphasis on one of most intriguing and least understood aspect of the physiology of mycobacteria: the translocation of these complex macromolecules across the different layers of the cell envelope. It further reviews the rather impressive progress made in the last ten years in the discovery and development of novel inhibitors targeting their biogenesis. PMID:24915502

  10. Mineralization of phenanthrene by a Mycobacterium sp

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, W.F.; Jones, G.E.

    1988-04-01

    A Mycobacterium sp., designated strain BG1, able to utilize the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon phenanthrene as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated from estuarine sediment following enrichment with the hydrocarbon. Unlike other phenanthrene degraders, this bacterium degraded phenanthrene via 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid without accumulating this or other aromatic intermediates, as shown by high-performance liquid chromatography. Degradation proceeded via meta cleavage of protocatechuic acid. Different nonionic surfactants (Tween compounds) solubilized the phenanthrene to different degrees and enhanced phenanthrene utilization. The order of enhancement, however, did not correlate perfectly with increased solubility, suggesting physiological as well as physicochemical effects of the surfactants. Plasmids of approximately 21, 58, and 77 megadaltons were detected in cells grown with phenanthrene but not in those which, after growth on nutrient media, lost the phenanthrene-degrading phenotype. Given that plasmid-mediated degradations of aromatic hydrocarbons generally occur via meta cleavages, it is of interest that the addition of pyruvate, a product of meta cleavage, supported rapid mineralization of phenanthrene in broth culture; succinate, a product of ortho cleavage, supported growth but completely repressed the utilization of phenanthrene. The involvement of plasmids may have given rise to the unusual degradation pattern that was observed.

  11. Mycobacterium bovis: characteristics of wildlife reservoir hosts.

    PubMed

    Palmer, M V

    2013-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the cause of tuberculosis in animals and sometimes humans. Many developed nations have long-standing programmes to eradicate tuberculosis in livestock, principally cattle. As disease prevalence in cattle decreases these efforts are sometimes impeded by passage of M. bovis from wildlife to cattle. In epidemiological terms, disease can persist in some wildlife species, creating disease reservoirs, if the basic reproduction rate (R0) and critical community size (CCS) thresholds are achieved. Recognized wildlife reservoir hosts of M. bovis include the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand, European badger (Meles meles) in Great Britain and Ireland, African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in South Africa, wild boar (Sus scrofa) in the Iberian Peninsula and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Michigan, USA. The epidemiological concepts of R0 and CCS are related to more tangible disease/pathogen characteristics such as prevalence, pathogen-induced pathology, host behaviour and ecology. An understanding of both epidemiological and disease/pathogen characteristics is necessary to identify wildlife reservoirs of M. bovis. In some cases, there is a single wildlife reservoir host involved in transmission of M. bovis to cattle. Complexity increases, however, in multihost systems where multiple potential reservoir hosts exist. Bovine tuberculosis eradication efforts require elimination of M. bovis transmission between wildlife reservoirs and cattle. For successful eradication identification of true wildlife reservoirs is critical, as disease control efforts are most effective when directed towards true reservoirs.

  12. The Biology of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Delogu, Giovanni; Sali, Michela; Fadda, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) still poses a major threat to mankind and during the last thirty years we have seen a recrudescence of the disease even in countries where TB was thought to be conquered. It is common opinion that more effective control tools such as new diagnostics, a new vaccine and new drugs are urgently needed to control the global pandemic, though the so far insufficient understanding of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) mechanism of pathogenesis is a major obstacle for the development of these control tools. In this review, we will summarize the recent advancement in the understanding of Mtb biology and on the pathogenesis of Mtb infection with emphasis on latent infection, with the change in paradigm of the last few years where the dichotomy between latent and active disease has been reconsidered in favor of a dynamic equilibrium between the host and the bacilli, encompassing a continuous spectrum of conditions that has been named TB spectrum. Implications for the diagnosis and control of disease in certain population will also be discussed. PMID:24363885

  13. Amino Acid Transport in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Yabu, Kunihiko

    1970-01-01

    The transport of d-alanine, d-glutamic acid, and d-valine in Mycobacterium smegmatis was compared quantitatively with that of their l-isomers. It appeared that the uptake of d-alanine was mediated by an active process displaying saturation kinetics characteristic of enzyme function, whereas the uptake of d-glutamic acid was accomplished by a passive process showing diffusion kinetics. Both processes were involved in the uptake of l-alanine, l-glutamic acid, d-valine, and l-valine. d-Valine competed with l-valine for entry into the cell through a single active process. d-Alanine and l-alanine also utilized the same active process, but the d-isomer could not enter the cell through the passive process. The passive process exhibited characteristics of diffusion, but was sensitive to sulfhydryl-blocking reagents and showed competition among structurally related amino acids. These last findings suggested that the passive process is a facilitated diffusion. PMID:5437732

  14. igr Genes and Mycobacterium tuberculosis cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jennifer C; Miner, Maurine D; Pandey, Amit K; Gill, Wendy P; Harik, Nada S; Sassetti, Christopher M; Sherman, David R

    2009-08-01

    Recently, cholesterol was identified as a physiologically important nutrient for Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival in chronically infected mice. However, it remained unclear precisely when cholesterol is available to the bacterium and what additional bacterial functions are required for its metabolism. Here, we show that the igr locus, which we previously found to be essential for intracellular growth and virulence of M. tuberculosis, is required for cholesterol metabolism. While igr-deficient strains grow identically to the wild type in the presence of short- and long-chain fatty acids, the growth of these bacteria is completely inhibited in the presence of cholesterol. Interestingly, this mutant is still able to respire under cholesterol-dependent growth inhibition, suggesting that the bacteria can metabolize other carbon sources during cholesterol toxicity. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that the growth-inhibitory effect of cholesterol in vitro depends on cholesterol import, as mutation of the mce4 sterol uptake system partially suppresses this effect. In addition, the Delta igr mutant growth defect during the early phase of disease is completely suppressed by mutating mce4, implicating cholesterol intoxication as the primary mechanism of attenuation. We conclude that M. tuberculosis metabolizes cholesterol throughout infection.

  15. Role of cholesterol in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Miner, Maurine D; Chang, Jennifer C; Pandey, Amit K; Sassetti, Christopher M; Sherman, David R

    2009-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) acquisition and utilization of nutrients within the host cell is poorly understood, although it has been hypothesized that host lipids probably play an important role in MTB survival. Cholesterol has recently been identified as an important lipid for mycobacterial infection. The mce4 transport system is required for cholesterol import into bacterial cells, and deletion of mce4 locus resulted in severe attenuation in a chronic mouse model of infection. However, it has remained unclear what additional bacterial functions were required for utilization of this sterol. We have found that the igr locus, which was previously found essential for intracellular growth and virulence of MTB, is required for cholesterol metabolism: igr-deficient bacteria cannot grow using cholesterol as a primary carbon source. The growth-inhibitory effect of cholesterol in vitro depends on cholesterol import, as the delta igr mutant growth defect during the early phase of disease is completely suppressed by mutating mce4, implicating cholesterol intoxication as the primary mechanism of attenuation. We conclude that M. tuberculosis metabolizes cholesterol throughout the course of infection, and that degradation of this sterol is crucial for bacterial persistence.

  16. Neurons Are Host Cells for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Philippa J.; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Lang, Dirk; Cooper, Susan; Sebesho, Boipelo; Allie, Nasiema; Keeton, Roanne; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M.; Salie, Sumayah; Labuschagné, Antoinette; Quesniaux, Valerie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Kellaway, Lauriston

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of the central nervous system is thought to be initiated once the bacilli have breached the blood brain barrier and are phagocytosed, primarily by microglial cells. In this study, the interactions of M. tuberculosis with neurons in vitro and in vivo were investigated. The data obtained demonstrate that neurons can act as host cells for M. tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis bacilli were internalized by murine neuronal cultured cells in a time-dependent manner after exposure, with superior uptake by HT22 cells compared to Neuro-2a cells (17.7% versus 9.8%). Internalization of M. tuberculosis bacilli by human SK-N-SH cultured neurons suggested the clinical relevance of the findings. Moreover, primary murine hippocampus-derived neuronal cultures could similarly internalize M. tuberculosis. Internalized M. tuberculosis bacilli represented a productive infection with retention of bacterial viability and replicative potential, increasing 2- to 4-fold within 48 h. M. tuberculosis bacillus infection of neurons was confirmed in vivo in the brains of C57BL/6 mice after intracerebral challenge. This study, therefore, demonstrates neurons as potential new target cells for M. tuberculosis within the central nervous system. PMID:24566619

  17. Neurons are host cells for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Randall, Philippa J; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Lang, Dirk; Cooper, Susan; Sebesho, Boipelo; Allie, Nasiema; Keeton, Roanne; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M; Salie, Sumayah; Labuschagné, Antoinette; Quesniaux, Valerie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Kellaway, Lauriston; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2014-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of the central nervous system is thought to be initiated once the bacilli have breached the blood brain barrier and are phagocytosed, primarily by microglial cells. In this study, the interactions of M. tuberculosis with neurons in vitro and in vivo were investigated. The data obtained demonstrate that neurons can act as host cells for M. tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis bacilli were internalized by murine neuronal cultured cells in a time-dependent manner after exposure, with superior uptake by HT22 cells compared to Neuro-2a cells (17.7% versus 9.8%). Internalization of M. tuberculosis bacilli by human SK-N-SH cultured neurons suggested the clinical relevance of the findings. Moreover, primary murine hippocampus-derived neuronal cultures could similarly internalize M. tuberculosis. Internalized M. tuberculosis bacilli represented a productive infection with retention of bacterial viability and replicative potential, increasing 2- to 4-fold within 48 h. M. tuberculosis bacillus infection of neurons was confirmed in vivo in the brains of C57BL/6 mice after intracerebral challenge. This study, therefore, demonstrates neurons as potential new target cells for M. tuberculosis within the central nervous system.

  18. [Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection following organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Haas, Charles; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2006-11-01

    In transplant recipients, immunosuppressive treatment affects cell-mediated immunity and increases the risk of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis may be transmitted by the donor organ or occur de novo, but such cases are rare. The vast majority of cases of active tuberculosis in transplant recipients result from reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The incidence varies from one region of the globe to another, from 0.5-1.0% in North America, to 0.36-5.5% in Europe and 7.0-11.8% in India. The incidence of tuberculosis among transplant recipients is much higher than in the general population. Diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, systemic lupus erythematosus, chronic liver disease and AIDS all increase the risk of post-transplant tuberculosis. Extrapulmonary and disseminated forms are frequent in this setting. The diagnosis of tuberculosis in transplant recipients is often difficult, and treatment is frequently delayed. Tuberculosis can be life-threatening in such cases. Treatment is difficult because rifampicin is a cytochrome P450 inducer (leading to reduced levels of cyclosporine), and because the hepatotoxicity of isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide is frequently increased in transplant recipients. Treatment of latent tuberculosis before transplantation markedly reduces the risk of developing active tuberculosis after transplantation.

  19. Genetic engineering of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Lamrabet, Otmane; Drancourt, Michel

    2012-09-01

    Genetic engineering has been used for decades to mutate and delete genes in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome with the translational goal of producing attenuated mutants with conserved susceptibility to antituberculous antibiotics. The development of plasmids and mycobacteriophages that can transfer DNA into the M. tuberculosis chromosome has effectively overcome M. tuberculosis slow growth rate and the capsule and mycolic acid wall, which limit DNA uptake. The use of genetic engineering techniques has shed light on many aspects of pathogenesis mechanisms, including cellular growth, mycolic acid biosynthesis, metabolism, drug resistance and virulence. Moreover, such research gave clues to the development of new vaccines or new drugs for routine clinical practice. The use of genetic engineering tools is mainly based on the underlying concept that altering or reducing the M. tuberculosis genome could decrease its virulence. A contrario, recent post-genomic analyses indicated that reduced bacterial genomes are often associated with increased bacterial virulence and that M. tuberculosis acquired genes by lateral genetic exchange during its evolution. Therefore, ancestors utilizing genetic engineering to add genes to the M. tuberculosis genome may lead to new vaccines and the availability of M. tuberculosis isolates with increased susceptibility to antituberculous antibiotics.

  20. Peptide mimotopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis carbohydrate immunodeterminants

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Cell-surface saccharides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appear to be crucial factors in tuberculosis pathogenicity and could be useful antigens in tuberculosis immunodiagnosis. In the present study, we report the successful antigenic and immunogenic mimicry of mannose-containing cell-wall compounds of M. tuberculosis by dodecamer peptides identified by phage-display technology. Using a rabbit antiserum raised against M. tuberculosis cell-surface saccharides as a target for biopanning, peptides with three different consensus sequences were identified. Phage-displayed and chemically synthesized peptides bound to the anticarbohydrate antiserum. Rabbit antibodies elicited against the peptide QEPLMGTVPIRAGGGS recognize the mannosylated M. tuberculosis cell-wall antigens arabinomannan and lipoarabinomannan, and the glycosylated recombinant protein alanine/proline-rich antigen. Furthermore, antibodies were also able to react with mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not with phosphatidylinositol dimannosides or arabinogalactan from mycobacteria. These results suggest that the immunogenic peptide mimics oligomannosidic epitopes. Interestingly, this report provides evidence that, in contrast with previously known carbohydrate mimotopes, no aromatic residues are necessary in a peptide sequence for mimicking unusual glycoconjugates synthesized by mycobacteria. The possible usefulness of the identified peptide mimotopes as surrogate reagents for immunodiagnosis and for the study of functional roles of the native non-peptide epitopes is discussed. PMID:15560754

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicates within necrotic human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Repnik, Urska; Herbst, Susanne; Collinson, Lucy M.; Griffiths, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulation of macrophage cell death is a well-documented phenomenon, but its role during bacterial replication is less characterized. In this study, we investigate the impact of plasma membrane (PM) integrity on bacterial replication in different functional populations of human primary macrophages. We discovered that IFN-γ enhanced bacterial replication in macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages more than in granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages. We show that permissiveness in the different populations of macrophages to bacterial growth is the result of a differential ability to preserve PM integrity. By combining live-cell imaging, correlative light electron microscopy, and single-cell analysis, we found that after infection, a population of macrophages became necrotic, providing a niche for M. tuberculosis replication before escaping into the extracellular milieu. Thus, in addition to bacterial dissemination, necrotic cells provide first a niche for bacterial replication. Our results are relevant to understanding the environment of M. tuberculosis replication in the host. PMID:28242744

  2. Disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Anna Paula Vitirito; Franco, Marília Masello Junqueira; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Perrotti, Isabella Belletti Mutt; Mangia, Simone Henriques; Megid, Jane; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Lara, Gustavo Henrique Batista; Santos, Adolfo Carlos Barreto; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; de Carvalho Sanches, Osimar; Paes, Antonio Carlos

    2013-03-01

    An uncommon disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is described in a 12-year-old female dog presenting with fever, dyspnea, cough, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, melena, epistaxis, and emesis. The dog had a history of close contact with its owner, who died of pulmonary tuberculosis. Radiographic examination revealed diffuse radio-opaque images in both lung lobes, diffuse visible masses in abdominal organs, and hilar and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Bronchial washing samples and feces were negative for acid-fast organisms. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based species identification of bronchial washing samples, feces, and urine revealed M. tuberculosis using PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis-PRA. Because of public health concerns, which were worsened by the physical condition of the dog, euthanasia of the animal was recommended. Rough and tough colonies suggestive of M. tuberculosis were observed after microbiological culture of lung, liver, spleen, heart, and lymph node fragments in Löwenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media. The PRA analysis enabled diagnosis of M. tuberculosis strains isolated from organs.

  3. [Ecology and transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans].

    PubMed

    Marsollier, L; Aubry, J; Saint-André, J-P; Robert, R; Legras, P; Manceau, A-L; Bourdon, S; Audrain, C; Carbonnelle, B

    2003-10-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans is an environmental pathogen concerning mainly the tropical countries; it is the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, which has become the third most important mycobacterial disease. In spite of water-linked epidemiological studies to identify the sources of M. ulcerans, the reservoir and the mode of transmission of this organism remain elusive. To determine the ecology and the mode of transmission of M. ulcerans we have set up an experimental model. This experimental model demonstrated that water bugs were able to transmit M. ulcerans by bites. In insects, the bacilli were localized exclusively within salivary glands, where it could both multiply contrary to other mycobacteria species. In another experimental study, we report that the crude extracts from aquatic plants stimulate in vitro the growth of M. ulcerans as much as the biofilm formation by M. ulcerans has been observed on aquatic plants. Given that the water bugs are essentially carnivorous, it is difficult to imagine a direct contact in the contamination of aquatic bugs and plants. It seems very likely that an intermediate host exists. In an endemic area of Daloa in Côte d'Ivoire, our observations were confirmed.

  4. Biosynthesis of Glycosyldiglycerides in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, John C.; Elbein, Alan D.

    1974-01-01

    A particulate enzyme preparation from Mycobacterium smegmatis catalyzes the transfer of [14C]galactose from uridine 5′-diphosphate (UDP)-[14C]galactose and of [14C]glucose from UDP-[14C]glucose into chloroform-soluble products. The radioactive neutral lipids were purified by passage through diethylaminoethyl-cellulose, followed by thin-layer chromatography. When UDP-glucose was used as substrate, two major radioactive lipids were obtained; one had a hexose-glucose-glycerol ratio of 1:1:1. The second product had a hexose-glycerol ratio of 2:1 and, in addition to glucose, contained lesser amounts of mannose and galactose. With UDP-galactose as substrate, two radioactive products were observed that were chromatographically indistinguishable from the [14C]glucosyl-labeled mono- and diglycosyldiglyceride. Palmitate and oleate were the predominant fatty acid constituents in these lipids and were present in equimolar amounts in all of the products examined. The products have thus been identified as monoglycosyldiglyceride and a diglycosyldiglyceride containing glucose as the major hexose along with mannose and galactose. Properties of the galactosyl and glucosyl transferases are described. Images PMID:4808895

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    PRISIC, SLADJANA; HUSSON, ROBERT N.

    2014-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs). A similar number of two-component systems are also present, indicating that these two signal transduction mechanisms are both important in the adaptation of this bacterial pathogen to its environment. The M. tuberculosis phosphoproteome includes hundreds of Ser- and Thr-phosphorylated proteins that participate in all aspects of M. tuberculosis biology, supporting a critical role for the STPKs in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. Nine of the STPKs are receptor type kinases, with an extracytoplasmic sensor domain and an intracellular kinase domain, indicating that these kinases transduce external signals. Two other STPKs are cytoplasmic and have regulatory domains that sense changes within the cell. Structural analysis of some of the STPKs has led to advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which these STPKs are activated and regulated. Functional analysis has provided insights into the effects of phosphorylation on the activity of several proteins, but for most phosphoproteins the role of phosphorylation in regulating function is unknown. Major future challenges include characterizing the functional effects of phosphorylation for this large number of phosphoproteins, identifying the cognate STPKs for these phosphoproteins, and determining the signals that the STPKs sense. Ultimately, combining these STPK-regulated processes into larger, integrated regulatory networks will provide deeper insight into M. tuberculosis adaptive mechanisms that contribute to tuberculosis pathogenesis. Finally, the STPKs offer attractive targets for inhibitor development that may lead to new therapies for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25429354

  6. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis regulatory network and hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Galagan, James E.; Minch, Kyle; Peterson, Matthew; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Azizi, Elham; Sweet, Linsday; Gomes, Antonio; Rustad, Tige; Dolganov, Gregory; Glotova, Irina; Abeel, Thomas; Mahwinney, Chris; Kennedy, Adam D.; Allard, René; Brabant, William; Krueger, Andrew; Jaini, Suma; Honda, Brent; Yu, Wen-Han; Hickey, Mark J.; Zucker, Jeremy; Garay, Christopher; Weiner, Brian; Sisk, Peter; Stolte, Christian; Winkler, Jessica K.; Van de Peer, Yves; Iazzetti, Paul; Camacho, Diogo; Dreyfuss, Jonathan; Liu, Yang; Dorhoi, Anca; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Drogaris, Paul; Lamontagne, Julie; Zhou, Yiyong; Piquenot, Julie; Park, Sang Tae; Raman, Sahadevan; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Mohney, Robert P.; Chelsky, Daniel; Moody, D. Branch; Sherman, David R.; Schoolnik, Gary K.

    2014-01-01

    We have taken the first steps towards a complete reconstruction of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis regulatory network based on ChIP-Seq and combined this reconstruction with system-wide profiling of messenger RNAs, proteins, metabolites and lipids during hypoxia and re-aeration. Adaptations to hypoxia are thought to have a prominent role in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. Using ChIP-Seq combined with expression data from the induction of the same factors, we have reconstructed a draft regulatory network based on 50 transcription factors. This network model revealed a direct interconnection between the hypoxic response, lipid catabolism, lipid anabolism and the production of cell wall lipids. As a validation of this model, in response to oxygen availability we observe substantial alterations in lipid content and changes in gene expression and metabolites in corresponding metabolic pathways. The regulatory network reveals transcription factors underlying these changes, allows us to computationally predict expression changes, and indicates that Rv0081 is a regulatory hub. PMID:23823726

  7. Mycobacterium pyrenivorans sp. nov., a novel polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon-degrading species.

    PubMed

    Derz, Kerstin; Klinner, Ulrich; Schuphan, Ingolf; Stackebrandt, Erko; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M

    2004-11-01

    The taxonomic position of a polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium, strain 17A3(T), isolated from contaminated soil was determined using a combination of phenotypic and genotypic properties. The isolate showed phenotypic properties that were diagnostic for species of the genus Mycobacterium. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis assigned 17A3(T) to the 16S rRNA gene subgroup that contains Mycobacterium aurum, Mycobacterium austroafricanum, Mycobacterium vaccae and Mycobacterium vanbaalenii, but it could clearly be distinguished from these species using a combination of physiological, chemotaxonomic markers and internal rRNA gene spacer analyses. The data showed that strain 17A3(T) (=DSM 44605(T)=NRRL B-24244(T)) merits recognition as the type strain of a novel species of the genus Mycobacterium. The name Mycobacterium pyrenivorans sp. nov. is proposed for the species because of its ability to use pyrene as a sole source of carbon and energy.

  8. Mycobacterium microti infection in two meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Palgrave, C J; Benato, L; Eatwell, K; Laurenson, I F; Smith, N H

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium microti is a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). M. microti is generally considered a pathogen of small rodents, although sporadic infections in a range of other mammals, including domestic animals and man, have been reported. While many human infections have been associated with immunosuppression, an increasing number of cases are being reported in immunocompetent patients. Two cases of M. microti infection in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) are reported. These are the first cases of mycobacterial disease to be described in meerkats outside Africa.

  9. MTBreg: The Database of Conditionally Regulated Proteins in Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kaufman, Markus; Pal, Debnath; Eisenberg, David

    Proteins up- and down- regulated in Mycobacterium tuberculosis grown under conditions mimicking infection are included in this database. It also includes information on proteins that are regulated by selected transcription factors or other regulatory proteins. The literature data provided here is complimentary to the databases provided by Michael Strong that include recent TB computational functional linkages and the Prolinks Database by Peter Bowers. The experimental condition, the experimental dataset and a literature reference will be displayed, including links to the computationally linked proteins in the Prolinks Database and the entry in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Structural Genomics Database.[Copied from information at http://www.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/Services/MTBreg/

  10. Mycobacterium setense sp. nov., a Mycobacterium fortuitum-group organism isolated from a patient with soft tissue infection and osteitis.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Brigitte; Marchandin, Hélène; Hamitouche, Kamel; Laurent, Frédéric

    2008-02-01

    A Gram-positive, rod-shaped acid-fast bacterium was isolated from a patient with a post-traumatic chronic skin abscess associated with osteitis. Morphological analysis, 16S rRNA, hsp65, sodA and rpoB gene sequence analysis, cell-wall fatty acid and mycolic acid composition analyses and biochemical tests showed that the isolate, designated ABO-M06(T), belonged to the genus Mycobacterium. Its phenotype was unique and genetic and phylogenetic findings suggest that strain ABO-M06(T) represents a novel species within the Mycobacterium fortuitum group. The name Mycobacterium setense sp. nov. is proposed for this novel species, with the type strain ABO-M06(T) (=CIP 109395(T)=DSM 45070(T)).

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Spoligotypes in Monterrey, Mexico▿

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Moreno-Torres, Elisa; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Rendon, Adrian; Blackwood, Kym; Kremer, Kristin; Rastogi, Nalin; Welsh, Oliverio; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio

    2010-01-01

    Although tuberculosis is still a public health problem in Mexico, there is little information about the genetic characteristics of the isolates. In the present study, we analyzed by spoligotyping 180 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from the urban area of Monterrey, Mexico, including drug-susceptible and drug-resistant isolates. The spoligotype patterns were compared with those in the international SITVIT2 spoligotyping database. Four isolates presented spoligotype patterns not found in the database (orphan types); the rest were distributed among 44 spoligo international types (SITs). SIT53 (clade T1) and SIT119 (clade X1) were predominant and included 43 (23.8%) and 28 (15.5%) of the isolates, respectively. In order to determine if there was a dominant spoligotype in the group of multidrug-resistant isolates, 37 of them were analyzed by IS6110-based restriction fragment length polymorphism assays, and scarce clustering of strains with more than five bands was observed. Fourteen isolates of this multidrug-resistant group presented four bands or less and were distributed in four SITs: SIT53 (n = 8), SIT92 (n = 3), SIT70 (n = 2), and SIT3038 (n = 1). When the molecular detection of mutations in the katG and rpoB genes were analyzed in these isolates with low copy numbers of IS6110, only two isolates shared the same IS6110, spoligotyping, and mutations patterns. When the distribution of the spoligotypes was analyzed by age cohort, SIT119 was predominantly found in patients 0 to 20 years old, especially in males, accounting for up to 40% of the isolates. In contrast, SIT53 was more prevalent in older females. This analysis demonstrates the variability of M. tuberculosis isolates in Monterrey and the partial dominance of SIT53 and SIT119 in that area of Mexico. PMID:19940048

  12. Genomic signal analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Paul Dan; Banica, Dorina; Tuduce, Rodica

    2007-02-01

    As previously shown the conversion of nucleotide sequences into digital signals offers the possibility to apply signal processing methods for the analysis of genomic data. Genomic Signal Analysis (GSA) has been used to analyze large scale features of DNA sequences, at the scale of whole chromosomes, including both coding and non-coding regions. The striking regularities of genomic signals reveal restrictions in the way nucleotides and pairs of nucleotides are distributed along nucleotide sequences. Structurally, a chromosome appears to be less of a "plain text", corresponding to certain semantic and grammar rules, but more of a "poem", satisfying additional symmetry restrictions that evoke the "rhythm" and "rhyme". Recurrent patterns in nucleotide sequences are reflected in simple mathematical regularities observed in genomic signals. GSA has also been used to track pathogen variability, especially concerning their resistance to drugs. Previous work has been dedicated to the study of HIV-1, Clade F and Avian Flu. The present paper applies GSA methodology to study Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT) rpoB gene variability, relevant to its resistance to antibiotics. Isolates from 50 Romanian patients have been studied both by rapid LightCycler PCR and by sequencing of a segment of 190-250 nucleotides covering the region of interest. The variability is caused by SNPs occurring at specific sites along the gene strand, as well as by inclusions. Because of the mentioned symmetry restrictions, the GS variations tend to compensate. An important result is that MT can act as a vector for HIV virus, which is able to retrotranscribe its specific genes both into human and MT genomes.

  13. Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium with monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Luh, Jeanne; Tong, Ning; Raskin, Lutgarde; Mariñas, Benito J

    2008-11-01

    Batch experiments were performed to study the inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium in the presence of monochloramine at 5-30 degrees C, pH 6-10, and 0.30-42.3 mg Cl2/ L. For each temperature and pH investigated, limiting high and low inactivation rates were observed for high and low disinfectant concentrations, respectively, within the range investigated. The rate of inactivation transitioned from high to low over a relatively narrow range of intermediate monochloramine concentrations. The observed temperature dependence of inactivation was consistent with an Arrhenius expression with activation energies of 58.0 and 71.7 kJ/mol for the high and low concentration ranges, respectively. The rate of inactivation increased with decreasing pH, consistent with trends reported for the reaction of monochloramine with protein thiols. Experiments performed at pH approximately 3.5 showed that dichloramine was a weaker disinfectant than monochloramine, and that its contribution to the overall inactivation of M. avium with combined chlorine was negligible at pH 6-10. A kinetic model incorporating disinfectant concentration, temperature, and pH effects was used to illustrate that monochloramine efficiency to inactivate M. avium in water could vary broadly from adequate (e.g., 99.9% inactivation efficiency in 32 min at 5 mg Cl2/L, pH 6, 30 degrees C) to impractical (e.g., 99.9% inactivation efficiency in 9 d at 1 mg Cl2/L, pH 9, 5 degrees C).

  14. Rapid susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium avium complex and Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from AIDS patients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhople, Arvind M.

    1994-01-01

    In ominous projections issued by both U.S. Public Health Service and the World Health Organization, the epidemic of HIV infection will continue to rise more rapidly worldwide than predicted earlier. The AIDS patients are susceptible to diseases called opportunistic infections of which tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection are most common. This has created an urgent need to uncover new drugs for the treatment of these infections. In the seventies, NASA scientists at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, had adopted a biochemical indicator, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), to detect presence of life in extraterrestrial space. We proposed to develop ATP assay technique to determine sensitivity of antibacterial compounds against MAC and M. tuberculosis.

  15. Comparison of the Pathogenicity for Mice of Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hajime; Tasaka, Hiromichi

    1969-01-01

    The pathogenicity for mice of 12 strains of Mycobacterium abscessus was compared with that for 8 strains of M. fortuitum. Both species caused lesions in kidneys and produced “spinning disease” resulting from inner ear infections. No major differences in pathogenicity of these two species were demonstrated. Strain to strain variation was marked, especially with M. abscessus. For example, 1.6 × 106 organisms of strain 11188 of M. abscessus produced death in four of five animals within 42 days, whereas strain 380 of M. abscessus failed to produce any deaths within 42 days. In the case of M. fortuitum, the greatest mortality observed was one of five animals, yet the incidence of spinning disease and kidney disease occurred earlier postinfection than in mice infected with M. abscessus. Histologically, abscess formation by a strain of M. abscessus was greater than by a strain of M. fortuitum, but this difference cannot be interpreted as a species difference. Images PMID:5370281

  16. High Throughput Phenotypic Analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis Strains' Metabolism Using Biolog Phenotype Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Bhagwati; Fielder, Mark; Jones, Gareth; Newell, William; Abu-Oun, Manal; Wheeler, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major human and animal disease of major importance worldwide. Genetically, the closely related strains within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex which cause disease are well-characterized but there is an urgent need better to understand their phenotypes. To search rapidly for metabolic differences, a working method using Biolog Phenotype MicroArray analysis was developed. Of 380 substrates surveyed, 71 permitted tetrazolium dye reduction, the readout over 7 days in the method. By looking for ≥5-fold differences in dye reduction, 12 substrates differentiated M. tuberculosis H37Rv and Mycobacterium bovis AF2122/97. H37Rv and a Beijing strain of M. tuberculosis could also be distinguished in this way, as could field strains of M. bovis; even pairs of strains within one spoligotype could be distinguished by 2 to 3 substrates. Cluster analysis gave three clear groups: H37Rv, Beijing, and all the M. bovis strains. The substrates used agreed well with prior knowledge, though an unexpected finding that AF2122/97 gave greater dye reduction than H37Rv with hexoses was investigated further, in culture flasks, revealing that hexoses and Tween 80 were synergistic for growth and used simultaneously rather than in a diauxic fashion. Potential new substrates for growth media were revealed, too, most promisingly N-acetyl glucosamine. Osmotic and pH arrays divided the mycobacteria into two groups with different salt tolerance, though in contrast to the substrate arrays the groups did not entirely correlate with taxonomic differences. More interestingly, these arrays suggested differences between the amines used by the M. tuberculosis complex and enteric bacteria in acid tolerance, with some hydrophobic amino acids being highly effective. In contrast, γ-aminobutyrate, used in the enteric bacteria, had no effect in the mycobacteria. This study proved principle that Phenotype MicroArrays can be used with slow-growing pathogenic mycobacteria and already has

  17. Insights on the Emergence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the Analysis of Mycobacterium kansasii

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joyce; McIntosh, Fiona; Radomski, Nicolas; Dewar, Ken; Simeone, Roxane; Enninga, Jost; Brosch, Roland; Rocha, Eduardo P.; Veyrier, Frédéric J.; Behr, Marcel A.

    2015-01-01

    By phylogenetic analysis, Mycobacterium kansasii is closely related to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Yet, although both organisms cause pulmonary disease, M. tuberculosis is a global health menace, whereas M. kansasii is an opportunistic pathogen. To illuminate the differences between these organisms, we have sequenced the genome of M. kansasii ATCC 12478 and its plasmid (pMK12478) and conducted side-by-side in vitro and in vivo investigations of these two organisms. The M. kansasii genome is 6,432,277 bp, more than 2 Mb longer than that of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, and the plasmid contains 144,951 bp. Pairwise comparisons reveal conserved and discordant genes and genomic regions. A notable example of genomic conservation is the virulence locus ESX-1, which is intact and functional in the low-virulence M. kansasii, potentially mediating phagosomal disruption. Differences between these organisms include a decreased predicted metabolic capacity, an increased proportion of toxin–antitoxin genes, and the acquisition of M. tuberculosis-specific genes in the pathogen since their common ancestor. Consistent with their distinct epidemiologic profiles, following infection of C57BL/6 mice, M. kansasii counts increased by less than 10-fold over 6 weeks, whereas M. tuberculosis counts increased by over 10,000-fold in just 3 weeks. Together, these data suggest that M. kansasii can serve as an image of the environmental ancestor of M. tuberculosis before its emergence as a professional pathogen, and can be used as a model organism to study the switch from an environmental opportunistic pathogen to a professional host-restricted pathogen. PMID:25716827

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Free-Roaming Wild Asian Elephant

    PubMed Central

    Shivashankar, Beechagondahalli Papanna; Umashankar, Kunigal Srinivasa; Nandini, Poojappa; Giridhar, Papanna; Byregowda, Somenahalli Munivenkatappa; Shrinivasa, Basavegowdanadoddi Marinaik

    2017-01-01

    Postmortem examination of a wild Asian elephant at Rajiv Gandhi National Park, India, revealed nodular lesions, granulomas with central caseation, and acid-fast bacilli in the lungs. PCR and nucleotide sequencing confirmed the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This study indicates that wild elephants can harbor M. tuberculosis that can become fatal. PMID:28221114

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Wild Asian Elephants, Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Zachariah, Arun; Pandiyan, Jeganathan; Madhavilatha, G.K.; Mundayoor, Sathish; Chandramohan, Bathrachalam; Sajesh, P.K.; Santhosh, Sam

    2017-01-01

    We tested 3 ild Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in southern India and confirmed infection in 3 animals with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an obligate human pathogen, by PCR and genetic sequencing. Our results indicate that tuberculosis may be spilling over from humans (reverse zoonosis) and emerging in wild elephants. PMID:28221104

  20. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  1. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  2. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  3. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  4. 21 CFR 866.3370 - Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mycobacterium tuberculosis immunofluorescent reagents. 866.3370 Section 866.3370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological...

  5. Palaeogenomics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: epidemic bursts with a degrading genome.

    PubMed

    Djelouadji, Zoheira; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2011-08-01

    Genome-scale analysis suggests that the last common ancestor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Mycobacterium leprae diverged 36 million years ago, and members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex differentiated 40,000 years ago. Analysis of palaeomicrobiological data from a 17,000-year-old sample from a bison and a 9000-year-old sample from a human being suggested that M tuberculosis preceded Mycobacterium bovis and related species. Whole-genome comparisons show that members of the M tuberculosis complex form a unique bacterial species with distinct ecotypes that are transmissible from any infected mammalian species to several others. Genomic deletions identified several M tuberculosis lineages that could be placed on a phylogeographical map, suggesting adaptation to local host populations. The degrees of transmissibility and virulence vary between M tuberculosis clones, with increased virulence mainly linked to gene loss in regulatory pathways. Such data suggest that most M tuberculosis clones have a restricted spreading capacity between the host population, allowing unpredictable bursts of highly transmissible, virulent, and successful clones, such as the east Asian (Beijing) clone. Advances in genomics have helped the development of molecular techniques for accurate identification of species and clones in the M tuberculosis complex, which is essential for tracing the source of infections.

  6. A strip array for spoligotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yiling; Zeng, Xiaohong; Li, Hui; Zheng, Rongrong; Xu, Ye; Li, Qingge

    2016-03-01

    A novel strip array was developed for a nine-spacer spoligotyping scheme of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). The new method was evaluated using 211 MTBC isolates and the results were fully concordant with the traditional spoligotyping approach. The strip array proved to be rapid and convenient for spoligotyping of MTBC.

  7. Mycobacterium lepromatosis Infections in Nuevo León, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy; Ocampo-Garza, Sonia S.; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Avanzi, Charlotte; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of infection caused by the recently described pathogen Mycobacterium lepromatosis is unknown. Here, we describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, and therapeutic outcomes of five lepromatous leprosy patients suffering from M. lepromatosis infection in Nuevo Léon, Mexico. Diagnosis was facilitated by a new highly specific PCR procedure. PMID:25809978

  8. Mycobacterium chelonae abscesses associated with biomesotherapy, Australia, 2008.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Mihaela; Dancer, Craig; Koehler, Ann P; Hobby, Michaela; Lease, Chris

    2013-01-01

    An outbreak of skin abscesses occurred in Adelaide, Australia, in association with biomesotherapy, an alternative therapy practice. Mycobacterium chelonae was identified in 8 patient and 3 environmental samples. Our findings show M. chelonae infection can be associated with alternative therapies when infection-control breaches occur. Tighter regulations of alternative therapy practices are needed.

  9. Infection with Mycobacterium microti in Animals in France

    PubMed Central

    Michelet, Lorraine; de Cruz, Krystel; Zanella, Gina; Aaziz, Rachid; Bulach, Tabatha; Karoui, Claudine; Hénault, Sylvie; Joncour, Guy

    2014-01-01

    We describe here 35 animal cases of tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium microti in France (2002–2014). Recently, molecular tools that overcome the difficulty of confirming infection by this potentially zoonotic agent have revealed an increasing number of cases, suggesting that its prevalence may have been underestimated. PMID:25540404

  10. MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM AND DRINKING WATER WHAT ARE THE CONNECTIONS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Human Mycobacterium avium infections are only known to be acquired from environmental sources such as water and soil. We compared M. avium isolates from clinical and drinking water sources using molecular tools. Methods: M. avium was isolated from water samples colle...

  11. A new antituberculosis drug that selectively kills nonmultiplying Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mitchison, Denis A

    2008-03-13

    An important report by Bryk et al. in this issue of Cell Host & Microbe describes the properties of a rhodanine prodrug active against nonmultiplying Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Considering the tolerance of nonreplicating Mtb to most currently available agents, such a drug could be a major addition to our antituberculosis arsenal and would greatly benefit control of the disease.

  12. Plasmid-encoded copper resistance and precipitation by Mycobacterium scrofulaceum.

    PubMed Central

    Erardi, F X; Failla, M L; Falkinham, J O

    1987-01-01

    A copper-tolerant Mycobacterium scrofulaceum strain was able to remove copper from culture medium by sulfate-dependent precipitation as copper sulfide. Such precipitation of copper sulfide was not observed in a derivative that lacks a 173-kilobase plasmid. In addition, the plasmid-carrying strain has a sulfate-independent copper resistance mechanism. PMID:3662522

  13. Mycobacterium avium Complex Cervical Lymphadenitis in an Immunocompetent Adult▿

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Joshua B.; Koeppe, John

    2010-01-01

    Nontuberculosis mycobacterial cervical lymphadenitis is a relatively common disease in immunocompetent children but a rare disease in immunocompetent adults. We report the diagnosis and treatment of Mycobacterium avium complex cervical lymphadenitis in an adult female. Our evaluation of immune competence, including gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) signaling, found no evidence of deficiency. PMID:20668140

  14. Sensitivity of Mycobacterium bovis to common beef processing interventions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective. Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, a relevant zoonosis that can spread to humans through inhalation or by ingestion. M. bovis multiplies slowly, so infected animals may be sent to slaughter during the early stages of the disease before diagnosis and when ...

  15. Sensitivity of Mycobacterium bovis to common beef processing interventions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis and a relevant zoonosis to humans, may be sent to slaughter before diagnosis of infection because of slow multiplication of the pathogen. Purpose. This study evaluates multiple processing interventi...

  16. Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Isolated From Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mycobacterium avium (MA) is divided into four subspecies based primarily on host-range and consists of MA subsp. avium (birds), MA subsp. silvaticum (wood pigeons), MA subsp. paratuberculosis (broad, poorly-defined host range), and the recently described MA subsp. hominissuis (hu...

  17. First identification of Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis sheep strain in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Travería, G E; Zumarraga, M; Etchechoury, I; Romano, M I; Cataldi, A; Pinedo, M F Alvarado; Pavlik, I; Pribylova, R; Romero, J R

    2013-01-01

    We here identified for the first time the presence of Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) sheep (S) strain in Argentina. IS900 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was positive. The S strain was compared with MAP cattle (C) strains by using IS1311 PCR-restriction endonuclease analysis (PCR-REA), multiplex PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis.

  18. Mycobacterium marinum Infection After Exposure to Coal Mine Water

    PubMed Central

    Huaman, Moises A.; Ribes, Julie A.; Lohr, Kristine M.; Evans, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum infection has been historically associated with exposure to aquariums, swimming pools, fish, or other marine fauna. We present a case of M marinum left wrist tenosynovitis and elbow bursitis associated with a puncture injury and exposure to coal mine water in Illinois. PMID:26835478

  19. Mycobacterium marinum Infection After Exposure to Coal Mine Water.

    PubMed

    Huaman, Moises A; Ribes, Julie A; Lohr, Kristine M; Evans, Martin E

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum infection has been historically associated with exposure to aquariums, swimming pools, fish, or other marine fauna. We present a case of M marinum left wrist tenosynovitis and elbow bursitis associated with a puncture injury and exposure to coal mine water in Illinois.

  20. Mycobacterium caprae Infection in Livestock and Wildlife, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Sabrina; Bezos, Javier; Romero, Beatriz; de Juan, Lucía; Álvarez, Julio; Castellanos, Elena; Moya, Nuria; Lozano, Francisco; Javed, M. Tariq; Sáez-Llorente, José L.; Liébana, Ernesto; Mateos, Ana; Domínguez, Lucas; Tuberculosis, Monitoring of Animal

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium caprae is a pathogen that can infect animals and humans. To better understand the epidemiology of M. caprae, we spoligotyped 791 animal isolates. Results suggest infection is widespread in Spain, affecting 6 domestic and wild animal species. The epidemiology is driven by infections in caprids, although the organism has emerged in cattle. PMID:21392452

  1. Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum in acidic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ricardo; Fernandes, João; Fernandes, Nuno; Oliveira, Fernanda; Cadete, Manuela

    2007-08-01

    Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum was found in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, in a system composed of two acidic (pH 3.0) springs with temperatures between 56 degrees C at the source and 40 degrees C at the confluence of both springs. Growth and survival assays at 56 degrees C for 60 days were performed, confirming the origin of the strain.

  2. Characterization of a novel variant of Mycobacterium chimaera.

    PubMed

    van Ingen, J; Hoefsloot, W; Buijtels, P C A M; Tortoli, E; Supply, P; Dekhuijzen, P N R; Boeree, M J; van Soolingen, D

    2012-09-01

    In this study, nonchromogenic mycobacteria were isolated from pulmonary samples of three patients in the Netherlands. All isolates had identical, unique 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S ITS sequences, which were closely related to those of Mycobacterium chimaera and Mycobacterium marseillense. The biochemical features of the isolates differed slightly from those of M. chimaera, suggesting that the isolates may represent a possible separate species within the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). However, the cell-wall mycolic acid pattern, analysed by HPLC, and the partial sequences of the hsp65 and rpoB genes were identical to those of M. chimaera. We concluded that the isolates represent a novel variant of M. chimaera. The results of this analysis have led us to question the currently used methods of species definition for members of the genus Mycobacterium, which are based largely on 16S rRNA or rpoB gene sequencing. Definitions based on a single genetic target are likely to be insufficient. Genetic divergence, especially in the MAC, yields strains that cannot be confidently assigned to a specific species based on the analysis of a single genetic target.

  3. Mycobacterium abscessus ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Montero, Jose A; Alrabaa, Sally F; Wills, Todd S

    2016-04-01

    A 30-year-old man with history of neonatal hydrocephalus requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement presented with Mycobacterium abscessus shunt infection despite no shunt manipulation over 10 years prior to presentation. Cure was not achieved until complete removal of all CNS shunt foreign body was performed despite initial adequate antimicrobial therapy.

  4. Infection with Mycobacterium microti in animals in France.

    PubMed

    Michelet, Lorraine; de Cruz, Krystel; Zanella, Gina; Aaziz, Rachid; Bulach, Tabatha; Karoui, Claudine; Hénault, Sylvie; Joncour, Guy; Boschiroli, Maria Laura

    2015-03-01

    We describe here 35 animal cases of tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium microti in France (2002-2014). Recently, molecular tools that overcome the difficulty of confirming infection by this potentially zoonotic agent have revealed an increasing number of cases, suggesting that its prevalence may have been underestimated.

  5. Real Time Measurement of Host Bioenergetics During Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0149 TITLE: Real Time Measurement of Host Bioenergetics During Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection ... Tuberculosis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Infection 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0149 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...resistant state, sometimes reactivating to cause tuberculosis (TB) decades after the primary infection , has puzzled scientists for years. This

  6. Cellular Interactions in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of host immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is complicated by a number of factors, including the protracted nature of the disease and the stealthy nature of the pathogen. Noted as one of the more fastidious mycobacteria, infection with MAP is often chara...

  7. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, immunology and pathology of livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in ruminants leads to a chronic and progressive enteric disease (Johne’s disease) that results in loss of intestinal function, poor body condition, and eventual death. Transmission is primarily through a fecal-oral route in neonates but con...

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium acapulcensis Strain CSURP1424

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, Shady; Rascovan, Nicolás; Robert, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium acapulcensis is a rapidly growing scotochromogenic acid-fast bacillus. The draft genome of M. acapulcensis CSURP1424 comprises 5,290,974 bp, exhibiting a 66.67% G+C content, 4,870 protein-coding genes, and 71 predicted RNA genes. PMID:27516522

  9. [Mycobacterium fortuitum: two patients and the same surgeon].

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Joaquín; Pascale, María Laura; Borda, Noemí; Notario, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01

    We describe two cases of surgical site infections due to Mycobacterium fortuitum after plastic surgery. Both patients were assisted by the same surgeon on differents hospitals. Both patients received combined antibiotic treatment and surgical debridement or multiple aspirative punctures. The final evolutions were satisfactory.

  10. Characterization of Mycobacterium orygis as M. tuberculosis Complex Subspecies

    PubMed Central

    Rahim, Zeaur; Mulder, Arnout; Boeree, Martin J.; Simeone, Roxane; Brosch, Roland; van Soolingen, Dick

    2012-01-01

    The oryx bacilli are Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms for which phylogenetic position and host range are unsettled. We characterized 22 isolates by molecular methods and propose elevation to subspecies status as M. orygis. M. orygis is a causative agent of tuberculosis in animals and humans from Africa and South Asia. PMID:22469053

  11. Transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Human to Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Ocepek, Matjaž; Pate, Mateja; Žolnir-Dovč, Manca; Poljak, Mario

    2005-01-01

    We describe the first transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from human to cattle confirmed by molecular typing of isolates involved in the transmission. IS6110-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis showed that the isolates from the cattle and farm worker who suffered from pulmonary tuberculosis 1 year prior to this case were the same strains. PMID:16000505

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection among Asian Elephants in Captivity

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Gary; Zimmerman, Ralph; Shashkina, Elena; Chen, Liang; Richard, Michael; Bradford, Carol M.; Dragoo, Gwen A.; Saiers, Rhonda L.; Peloquin, Charles A.; Daley, Charles L.; Planet, Paul; Narachenia, Apurva; Mathema, Barun

    2017-01-01

    Although awareness of tuberculosis among captive elephants is increasing, antituberculosis therapy for these animals is not standardized. We describe Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission between captive elephants based on whole genome analysis and report a successful combination treatment. Infection control protocols and careful monitoring of treatment of captive elephants with tuberculosis are warranted. PMID:28221115

  13. Tuberculosis in Alpacas (Lama pacos) Caused by Mycobacterium bovis▿

    PubMed Central

    García-Bocanegra, I.; Barranco, I.; Rodríguez-Gómez, I. M.; Pérez, B.; Gómez-Laguna, J.; Rodríguez, S.; Ruiz-Villamayor, E.; Perea, A.

    2010-01-01

    We report three cases of tuberculosis in alpacas from Spain caused by Mycobacterium bovis. The animals revealed two different lesional patterns. Mycobacterial culture and PCR assay yielded positive results for M. bovis. Molecular typing of the isolates identified spoligotype SB0295 and identical variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) allele sizes. PMID:20237097

  14. Mycobacterium bovis hip bursitis in a lung transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Dan, J M; Crespo, M; Silveira, F P; Kaplan, R; Aslam, S

    2016-02-01

    We present a report of extrapulmonary Mycobacterium bovis infection in a lung transplant recipient. M. bovis is acquired predominantly by zoonotic transmission, particularly from consumption of unpasteurized foods. We discuss epidemiologic exposure, especially as relates to the Mexico-US border, clinical characteristics, resistance profile, and treatment.

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Wild Asian Elephants, Southern India.

    PubMed

    Zachariah, Arun; Pandiyan, Jeganathan; Madhavilatha, G K; Mundayoor, Sathish; Chandramohan, Bathrachalam; Sajesh, P K; Santhosh, Sam; Mikota, Susan K

    2017-03-01

    We tested 3 ild Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in southern India and confirmed infection in 3 animals with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an obligate human pathogen, by PCR and genetic sequencing. Our results indicate that tuberculosis may be spilling over from humans (reverse zoonosis) and emerging in wild elephants.

  16. [A case of pulmonary multiresistant Mycobacterium bovis tuberculosis in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Ramarokoto, H; Andrianasolo, D; Rasolonavalona, T; Ramaroson, F; Razafitsiarovana, I; Vincent, V; Ratsimba, L; Rasolofo Razanamparany, V

    2003-01-01

    We report a chronic case of pulmonary tuberculosis in a Malagasy citizen from Antsohihy (West of Madagascar), who was infected with a multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium bovis strain. This is the first case reported of the isolation of such a strain in Madagascar.

  17. Absence of Mycobacterium intracellulare and Presence of Mycobacterium chimaera in Household Water and Biofilm Samples of Patients in the United States with Mycobacterium avium Complex Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Iakhiaeva, Elena; Williams, Myra D.; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Lande, Leah; Peterson, Donald D.; Sawicki, Janet; Kwait, Rebecca; Tichenor, Wellington S.; Turenne, Christine; Falkinham, Joseph O.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that respiratory isolates from pulmonary disease patients and household water/biofilm isolates of Mycobacterium avium could be matched by DNA fingerprinting. To determine if this is true for Mycobacterium intracellulare, household water sources for 36 patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease were evaluated. MAC household water isolates from three published studies that included 37 additional MAC respiratory disease patients were also evaluated. Species identification was done initially using nonsequencing methods with confirmation by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. M. intracellulare was identified by nonsequencing methods in 54 respiratory cultures and 41 household water/biofilm samples. By ITS sequencing, 49 (90.7%) respiratory isolates were M. intracellulare and 4 (7.4%) were Mycobacterium chimaera. In contrast, 30 (73%) household water samples were M. chimaera, 8 (20%) were other MAC X species (i.e., isolates positive with a MAC probe but negative with species-specific M. avium and M. intracellulare probes), and 3 (7%) were M. avium; none were M. intracellulare. In comparison, M. avium was recovered from 141 water/biofilm samples. These results indicate that M. intracellulare lung disease in the United States is acquired from environmental sources other than household water. Nonsequencing methods for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (including those of the MAC) might fail to distinguish closely related species (such as M. intracellulare and M. chimaera). This is the first report of M. chimaera recovery from household water. The study underscores the importance of taxonomy and distinguishing the many species and subspecies of the MAC. PMID:23536397

  18. Absence of Mycobacterium intracellulare and presence of Mycobacterium chimaera in household water and biofilm samples of patients in the United States with Mycobacterium avium complex respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Richard J; Iakhiaeva, Elena; Williams, Myra D; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Lande, Leah; Peterson, Donald D; Sawicki, Janet; Kwait, Rebecca; Tichenor, Wellington S; Turenne, Christine; Falkinham, Joseph O

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that respiratory isolates from pulmonary disease patients and household water/biofilm isolates of Mycobacterium avium could be matched by DNA fingerprinting. To determine if this is true for Mycobacterium intracellulare, household water sources for 36 patients with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease were evaluated. MAC household water isolates from three published studies that included 37 additional MAC respiratory disease patients were also evaluated. Species identification was done initially using nonsequencing methods with confirmation by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and/or partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. M. intracellulare was identified by nonsequencing methods in 54 respiratory cultures and 41 household water/biofilm samples. By ITS sequencing, 49 (90.7%) respiratory isolates were M. intracellulare and 4 (7.4%) were Mycobacterium chimaera. In contrast, 30 (73%) household water samples were M. chimaera, 8 (20%) were other MAC X species (i.e., isolates positive with a MAC probe but negative with species-specific M. avium and M. intracellulare probes), and 3 (7%) were M. avium; none were M. intracellulare. In comparison, M. avium was recovered from 141 water/biofilm samples. These results indicate that M. intracellulare lung disease in the United States is acquired from environmental sources other than household water. Nonsequencing methods for identification of nontuberculous mycobacteria (including those of the MAC) might fail to distinguish closely related species (such as M. intracellulare and M. chimaera). This is the first report of M. chimaera recovery from household water. The study underscores the importance of taxonomy and distinguishing the many species and subspecies of the MAC.

  19. Nanoparticulas basadas en complejos de Fe(II) con transicion de espin: sintesis, caracterizacion y aplicaciones en electronica molecular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monrabal Capilla, Maria

    Esta tesis doctoral esta organizada en 5 capitulos y esta destinada al estudio de sistemas de Fe (II) que presentan el fenomeno de la transicion de espin a escala nanometrica. El capitulo 1 contiene una introduccion general sobre materiales moleculares multifuncionales, destacando aquellos ejemplos mas importantes. Por otro lado, se explicara el fenomeno de la transicion de espin, tratando aspectos conceptuales, los antecedentes mas importantes y la situacion actual. En el capitulo 2 se describen los diferentes procesos existentes para la obtencion de diferentes tipos de nanoparticulas. Ademas, se presenta la sintesis y caracterizacion de nanoparticulas del polimero de coordinacion unidimensional [Fe(Htrz)2(trz)]BF4, obtenidas mediante el metodo de micelas inversas. Estas nanoparticulas, con una estrecha distribucion de tamanos centrada alrededor de los 11 nm, presentan una transicion de espin muy abrupta, con un ancho ciclo de histeresis termica de unos 40K. En el capitulo 3 se describe el proceso de modificacion del tamano de las nanoparticulas descritas en el capitulo anterior, llevado a cabo variando la proporcion de surfactante/H2O en el medio. Ademas, con el objetivo de modificar las propiedades magneticas de las nanoparticulas obtenidas en el capitulo 2, se lleva a cabo la sintesis de nanoparticulas de polimeros de la misma familia del [Fe(Htrz)2(trz)]BF4. En concreto se sintetizaron 3 nuevos tipos de nanoparticulas basadas en el polimero [Fe(Htrz)1-x(NH2trz)x](ClO4)2, siendo x = 0.05, 0.15 y 0.3, en cada caso. Estas nanoparticulas siguen presentando una estrecha distribucion de tamanos y una transicion de espin muy abrupta y con un ancho ciclo de histeresis. Ademas, se observa que este ciclo se desplaza a temperaturas mas proximas a la temperatura ambiente a medida que se aumenta el porcentaje de 4-amino-1, 2, 4- triazol en la muestra. Pero al mismo tiempo se produce una disminucion de la anchura de este ciclo. Por ultimo, en este capitulo se presenta la

  20. Fluorescent acid-fast microscopy for measuring phagocytosis of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum by Tetrahymena pyriformis and their intracellular growth.

    PubMed

    Strahl, E D; Gillaspy, G E; Falkinham, J O

    2001-10-01

    Fluorescent acid-fast microscopy (FAM) was used to enumerate intracellular Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and Mycobacterium scrofulaceum in the ciliated phagocytic protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis. There was a linear relationship between FAM and colony counts of M. avium cells both from cultures and within protozoa. The Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast stain could not be used to enumerate intracellular mycobacteria because uninfected protozoa contained acid-fast, bacterium-like particles. Starved, 7-day-old cultures of T. pyriformis transferred into fresh medium readily phagocytized M. avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum. Phagocytosis was rapid and reached a maximum in 30 min. M. avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum grew within T. pyriformis, increasing by factors of 4- to 40-fold after 5 days at 30 degrees C. Intracellular M. avium numbers remained constant over a 25-day period of growth (by transfer) of T. pyriformis. Intracellular M. avium cells also survived protozoan encystment and germination. The growth and viability of T. pyriformis were not affected by mycobacterial infection. The results suggest that free-living phagocytic protozoa may be natural hosts and reservoirs for M. avium, M. intracellulare, and M. scrofulaceum.

  1. Detection of Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium abscessus Group, and Mycobacterium fortuitum Complex by a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Directly from Clinical Samples Using the BD MAX System.

    PubMed

    Rocchetti, Talita T; Silbert, Suzane; Gostnell, Alicia; Kubasek, Carly; Campos Pignatari, Antonio C; Widen, Raymond

    2017-03-01

    A new multiplex PCR test was designed to detect Mycobacterium chelonae, Mycobacterium abscessus group, and Mycobacterium fortuitum complex on the BD MAX System. A total of 197 clinical samples previously submitted for mycobacterial culture were tested using the new protocol. Samples were first treated with proteinase K, and then each sample was inoculated into the BD MAX Sample Buffer Tube. Extraction and multiplex PCR were performed by the BD MAX System, using the BD MAX ExK TNA-3 extraction kit and BD TNA Master Mix, along with specific in-house designed primers and probes for each target. The limit of detection of each target, as well as specificity, was evaluated. Of 197 clinical samples included in this study, 133 were positive and 60 were negative for mycobacteria by culture, and another 4 negative samples were spiked with M. chelonae ATCC 35752. The new multiplex PCR on the BD MAX had 97% concordant results with culture for M. abscessus group detection, 99% for M. chelonae, and 100% for M. fortuitum complex. The new multiplex PCR test performed on the BD MAX System proved to be a sensitive and specific test to detect M. chelonae, M. abscessus group, and M. fortuitum complex by real-time PCR on an automated sample-in results-out platform.

  2. Tuberculosis in seals caused by a novel member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex: Mycobacterium pinnipedii sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Debby V; Bastida, Ricardo; Cataldi, Angel; Quse, Viviana; Redrobe, Sharon; Dow, Sue; Duignan, Padraig; Murray, Alan; Dupont, Christine; Ahmed, Niyaz; Collins, Des M; Butler, W Ray; Dawson, David; Rodríguez, Diego; Loureiro, Julio; Romano, Maria Isabel; Alito, A; Zumarraga, M; Bernardelli, Amelia

    2003-09-01

    A comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates from seals (pinnipeds) in Australia, Argentina, Uruguay, Great Britain and New Zealand was undertaken to determine their relationships to each other and their taxonomic position within the complex. Isolates from 30 cases of tuberculosis in six species of pinniped and seven related isolates were compared to representative and standard strains of the M. tuberculosis complex. The seal isolates could be distinguished from other members of the M. tuberculosis complex, including the recently defined 'Mycobacterium canettii' and 'Mycobacterium caprae', on the basis of host preference and phenotypic and genetic tests. Pinnipeds appear to be the natural host for this 'seal bacillus', although the organism is also pathogenic in guinea pigs, rabbits, humans, Brazilian tapir (Tapirus terrestris) and, possibly, cattle. Infection caused by the seal bacillus is predominantly associated with granulomatous lesions in the peripheral lymph nodes, lungs, pleura, spleen and peritoneum. Cases of disseminated disease have been found. As with other members of the M. tuberculosis complex, aerosols are the most likely route of transmission. The name Mycobacterium pinnipedii sp. nov. is proposed for this novel member of the M. tuberculosis complex (the type strain is 6482(T)=ATCC BAA-688(T)=NCTC 13288(T)).

  3. How does a Mycobacterium change its spots? Applying molecular tools to track diverse strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Defining genetic diversity in the wake of the release of several Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) genome sequences has become a major emphasis in the molecular biology and epidemiology of Johne’s disease research. These data can now be used to define the extent of strain diversity ...

  4. Description of Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov., a Mycobacterium fortuitum group organism isolated from a posttraumatic osteitis inflammation.

    PubMed

    Adékambi, Toïdi; Stein, Andréas; Carvajal, Joseph; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2006-04-01

    A nonpigmented rapidly growing mycobacterium was isolated from wound liquid outflow, bone tissue biopsy, and excised skin tissue from a 31-year-old woman who suffered an accidental open right tibia fracture and prolonged stay in a river. The three isolates grew in 3 days at 24 to 37 degrees C. 16S rRNA sequence analyses over 1,483 bp showed that they were identical and shared 99.7% (4-bp difference) sequence similarity with that of Mycobacterium porcinum, the most closely related species. Partial rpoB (723 bp) sequence analyses showed that the isolates shared 97.0% sequence similarity with that of M. porcinum. Further polyphasic approaches, including biochemical tests, antimicrobial susceptibility analyses, and hsp65, sodA, and recA gene sequence analysis, as well as % G+C determination and cell wall fatty acid composition analysis supported the evidence that these isolates were representative of a new species. Phylogenetic analyses showed the close relationship with M. porcinum in the Mycobacterium fortuitum group. The isolates were susceptible to most antibiotics and exhibited evidence for penicillinase activity, in contrast to M. porcinum. We propose the name Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov. for this new species associated with posttraumatic osteitis. The type strain is D16(T) (equivalent to CIP 108544(T) and CCUG 50187(T)).

  5. Description of Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov., a Mycobacterium fortuitum Group Organism Isolated from a Posttraumatic Osteitis Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Adékambi, Toïdi; Stein, Andréas; Carvajal, Joseph; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2006-01-01

    A nonpigmented rapidly growing mycobacterium was isolated from wound liquid outflow, bone tissue biopsy, and excised skin tissue from a 31-year-old woman who suffered an accidental open right tibia fracture and prolonged stay in a river. The three isolates grew in 3 days at 24 to 37°C. 16S rRNA sequence analyses over 1,483 bp showed that they were identical and shared 99.7% (4-bp difference) sequence similarity with that of Mycobacterium porcinum, the most closely related species. Partial rpoB (723 bp) sequence analyses showed that the isolates shared 97.0% sequence similarity with that of M. porcinum. Further polyphasic approaches, including biochemical tests, antimicrobial susceptibility analyses, and hsp65, sodA, and recA gene sequence analysis, as well as % G+C determination and cell wall fatty acid composition analysis supported the evidence that these isolates were representative of a new species. Phylogenetic analyses showed the close relationship with M. porcinum in the Mycobacterium fortuitum group. The isolates were susceptible to most antibiotics and exhibited evidence for penicillinase activity, in contrast to M. porcinum. We propose the name Mycobacterium conceptionense sp. nov. for this new species associated with posttraumatic osteitis. The type strain is D16T (equivalent to CIP 108544T and CCUG 50187T). PMID:16597850

  6. [Identification of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex by PCR of AIDS and disseminated mycobacteriosis].

    PubMed

    García-Elorriaga, Guadalupe; Degollado-Estrada, Edgar; Villagómez-Ruiz, Alfredo; Cortés-Torres, Nancy; Arreguín-Reséndiz, Lilián; Del Rey-Pineda, Guillermo; González-Bonilla, César

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: el objetivo de este artículo es Identificar y diferenciar el complejo MAC por PCR en pacientes con SIDA y micobacteriosis diseminada. Métodos: se llevó a cabo un estudio transversal para identificar MAC por biología molecular. Se sintetizaron dos conjuntos de iniciadores: MAV y MIN, para M. avium y M. intracellulare, respectivamente. El ADN total de células obtenidas de 29 aislados clínicos y muestras de suero de otros 24 pacientes con SIDA e infección micobacteriana diseminada fue extraído y se amplificó por PCR con los iniciadores MAV y MIN. Cada uno de los iniciadores MAV y MIN amplificó un segmento altamente específico de 1.3 kb del ADN homólogo, respectivamente. Resultados: veintinueve ADN de los aislados clínicos de MAC identificadas por Gen-Probe AccuProbes se amplificaron con los iniciadores MAV (M. avium). De las 24 muestras clínicas, 3 fueron positivas para M. avium y 6 para M. tuberculosis. Conclusiones: nuestros resultados demostraron que la técnica de PCR se puede aplicar para la diferenciación de M. avium y M. intracellulare por iniciadores específicos 16S rRNA. En pacientes con estadio avanzado de SIDA y en quienes se sospecha micobacteriosis diseminada, la presencia de anemia (incluso con cultivos negativos) fosfatasa alcalina elevada y una mediana de CD4 de 15.9/ml, se debe considerar seriamente el diagnóstico de infección por MAC; sugerimos que, de acuerdo con nuestros resultados, se justifica una estratificación más precisa de los pacientes en términos de sus recuentos de células T CD4.

  7. Characterization of a Mycobacterium intracellulare Variant Strain by Molecular Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Menendez, M. C.; Palenque, E.; Navarro, M. C.; Nuñez, M. C.; Rebollo, M. J.; Garcia, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a Mycobacterium intracellulare variant strain causing an unusual infection. Several isolates obtained from an immunocompromised patient were identified as members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) by the commercial AccuProbe system and biochemical standard identification. Further molecular approaches were undertaken for a more accurate characterization of the bacteria. Up to seven different genomic sequences were analyzed, ranging from conserved mycobacterial genes such as 16S ribosomal DNA to MAC-specific genes such as mig (macrophage-induced gene). The results obtained identify the isolates as a variant of M. intracellulare, an example of the internal variability described for members of the MAC, particularly within that species. The application of other molecular approaches is recommended for more accurate identification of bacteria described as MAC members. PMID:11724827

  8. Choreography of the Mycobacterium Replication Machinery during the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Trojanowski, Damian; Ginda, Katarzyna; Pióro, Monika; Hołówka, Joanna; Skut, Partycja; Jakimowicz, Dagmara

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has recently been demonstrated that bacterial chromosomes are highly organized, with specific positioning of the replication initiation region. Moreover, the positioning of the replication machinery (replisome) has been shown to be variable and dependent on species-specific cell cycle features. Here, we analyzed replisome positions in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a slow-growing bacterium that exhibits characteristic asymmetric polar cell extension. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy analyses revealed that the replisome is slightly off-center in mycobacterial cells, a feature that is likely correlated with the asymmetric growth of Mycobacterium cell poles. Estimates of the timing of chromosome replication in relation to the cell cycle, as well as cell division and chromosome segregation events, revealed that chromosomal origin-of-replication (oriC) regions segregate soon after the start of replication. Moreover, our data demonstrate that organization of the chromosome by ParB determines the replisome choreography. PMID:25691599

  9. Tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium bovis in a Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Mol, J P S; Carvalho, T F; Fonseca, A A; Sales, E B; Issa, M A; Rezende, L C; Hodon, M A; Tinoco, H P; Malta, M C C; Pessanha, A T; Pierezan, F; Mota, P M P C; Paixão, T A; Santos, R L

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis, associated with Mycobacterium bovis, was diagnosed post mortem in an adult female capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris), kept at the Pampulha Ecological Park, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in a large metropolitan area. On post-mortem examination, there were numerous firm white nodules scattered throughout all lobes of both lungs. Tissue samples were collected for histological and microbiological examination. Microscopically, the pulmonary nodules were multifocal to coalescing granulomas and intralesional acid-fast bacilli were evident in Ziehl-Neelsen-stained sections of the lung and spleen. Colonies with morphological features of Mycobacterium spp. were isolated from lung samples and conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with genomic DNA from the isolates was positive for M. bovis; sequencing indicated 100% identity with the region of difference 4 (RD4) of M. bovis. In addition, M. bovis DNA was detected in the lung by quantitative PCR. The finding of M. bovis in a capybara indicates a potential public health risk in a zoological collection.

  10. Adhesion of Mycobacterium smegmatis to Charged Surfaces and Diagnostics Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorse, Diane; Dhinojwala, Ali; Moore, Francisco

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) causes more than 1 million deaths annually. Smear microscopy is a primary rapid detection tool in areas where 95 % of PTB cases occur. This technique, in which the sputum of a symptomatic patient is stained and examined using a light microscope for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) shows sensitivity between 20 and 60 %. Insufficient bacterial isolation during sample preparation may be a reason for low sensitivity. We are optimizing a system to capture bacteria on the basis of electrostatic interactions to more thoroughly isolate bacteria from suspension and facilitate more accurate detection. Silica supports coated with positively-charged polyelectrolyte, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), captured approximately 4.1 times more Mycobacterium smegmatis, a model organism for MTB, than was captured on negatively-charged silica substrates. Future experimentation will employ branched polymer systems and seek to justify the use of colloidal stability theories to describe initial capture. Supported by University of Akron, Department of Polymer Science, Department of Biology; LORD Corporation.

  11. Analysis of Mycobacterium leprae gene expression using DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Akama, Takeshi; Tanigawa, Kazunari; Kawashima, Akira; Wu, Huhehasi; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2010-10-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, does not grow under in vitro condition, making molecular analysis of this bacterium difficult. For this reason, bacteriological information regarding M. leprae gene function is limited compared with other mycobacterium species. In this study, we performed DNA microarray analysis to clarify the RNA expression profile of the Thai53 strain of M. leprae grown in footpads of hypertensive nude rats (SHR/NCrj-rnu). Of 1605 M. leprae genes, 315 showed signal intensity twofold higher than the median. These genes include Acyl-CoA metabolic enzymes and drug metabolic enzymes, which might be related to the virulence of M. leprae. In addition, consecutive RNA expression profile and in silico analyses enabled identification of possible operons within the M. leprae genome. The present results will shed light on M. leprae gene function and further our understanding of the pathogenesis of leprosy.

  12. Pleural effusion in an immunocompetent woman caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed

    Fabbian, Fabio; De Giorgi, Alfredo; Pala, M; Fratti, Daniela; Contini, Carlo

    2011-09-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a non-tuberculous mycobacterium that can cause pneumonia, abscess and empyema in subjects with predisposing lung diseases. However, pleurisy with effusion is rare. Herein, we report the case of a 74-year-old immunocompetent female patient without apparent risk factors, who suffered haemorrhagic pleural effusion as the main clinical manifestation. Pleural nodules were detected by computed tomography scan, and microbiological analysis revealed M. fortuitum in the absence of other pathogens. The patient was treated with ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin, and full recovery ensued in 4 weeks. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of haemorrhagic pleural effusion in an immunocompetent patient without underlying diseases. Although non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections are rarely accompanied by pleural involvement, M. fortuitum should be considered in such cases, especially when microbiology fails to detect the usual pathogens, and when the clinical picture is unclear.

  13. Mycobacterium fortuitum Complex Skin Infection in a Healthy Adolescent.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Rebecca; Khatami, Ameneh

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum complex skin infection is described in a previously healthy adolescent girl in Sydney, Australia. Mycobacterium fortuitum typically causes superficial skin infections following trauma to the skin and in our patient may have been related to prior leg "waxing". This case highlights common causes for a delay in diagnosis: lack of clinician awareness and inadequate microbiological and histopathological investigations of tissue samples. Due to the size and number of lesions, surgical excision was felt to be a less desirable therapeutic option due to the potential risk of poor cosmetic outcome for our patient. The standard chemotherapeutic approach to M. fortuitum infections involves the use of a combination of at least two antimicrobial agents to which the isolate is susceptible. Despite in vitro susceptibility testing that suggested that the isolate from our patient was resistant to most oral anti-microbial agents, our patient was treated successfully with a 10-week course of oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and moxifloxacin.

  14. [Buruli ulcer: hypothetical modes of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans].

    PubMed

    Rodhain, François

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, has been increasingly rapidly over the past thirty years, particularly in Africa. These extensive necrotic lesions are due to mycolactone, a toxin produced by the bacterium. The mode of Mycobacterium ulcerans transmission is still controversial, and several insect species have been incriminated. Several infected mosquito species have been identified in Australia, while predatory water bugs, particularly belostomatids and naucorids, have been implicated in Africa. Indeed, the bacterium has been detected in these insects' salivary glands, and experimental transmission to mice has been demonstrated, raising the possibility of human transmission by water bug bites. Interestingly, individuals highly exposed to water bug bites tend to be less often infected, indicating that frequent bites by non infected bugs might have a protective effect. Insect-borne transmission would be a minor route of transmission compared to direct transmission via skin trauma.

  15. Mycobacterium llatzerense, a waterborne Mycobacterium, that resists phagocytosis by Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Delafont, Vincent; Samba-Louaka, Ascel; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Bouchon, Didier; Moulin, Laurent; Héchard, Yann

    2017-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are environmental bacteria increasingly associated to public health problems. In water systems, free-living amoebae (FLA) feed on bacteria by phagocytosis, but several bacteria, including many NTM, are resistant to this predation. Thus, FLA can be seen as a training ground for pathogenic bacteria. Mycobacterium llatzerense was previously described as frequently associated with FLA in a drinking water network. The present study aimed to characterize the interactions between M. llatzerense and FLA. M. llatzerense was internalised by phagocytosis and featured lipid inclusions, suggesting a subversion of host resources. Moreover, M. llatzerense survived and even multiplied in presence of A. castellanii. Using a genomic-based comparative approach, twelve genes involved in phagocytosis interference, described in M. tuberculosis, were identified in the M. llatzerense genome sequenced in this study. Transcriptomic analyses showed that ten genes were significantly upregulated during the first hours of the infection, which could partly explain M. llatzerense resistance. Additionally, M. llatzerense was shown to actively inhibit phagosome acidification. In conclusion, M. llatzerense presents a high degree of resistance to phagocytosis, likely explaining its frequent occurrence within FLA in drinking water networks. It underscores that NTM should be carefully monitored in water networks to prevent human health concerns. PMID:28393860

  16. Characterization of activity and expression of isocitrate lyase in Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Höner Zu Bentrup, K; Miczak, A; Swenson, D L; Russell, D G

    1999-12-01

    Analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that Mycobacterium avium expresses several proteins unique to an intracellular infection. One abundant protein with an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa was isolated, and the N-terminal sequence was determined. It matches a sequence in the M. tuberculosis database (Sanger) with similarity to the enzyme isocitrate lyase of both Corynebacterium glutamicum and Rhodococcus fascians. Only marginal similarity was observed between this open reading frame (ORF) (termed icl) and a second distinct ORF (named aceA) which exhibits a low similarity to other isocitrate lyases. Both ORFs can be found as distinct genes in the various mycobacterial databases recently published. Isocitrate lyase is a key enzyme in the glyoxylate cycle and is essential as an anapleurotic enzyme for growth on acetate and certain fatty acids as carbon source. In this study we express and purify Icl, as well as AceA proteins, and show that both exhibit isocitrate lyase activity. Various known inhibitors for isocitrate lyase were effective. Furthermore, we present evidence that in both M. avium and M. tuberculosis the production and activity of the isocitrate lyase is enhanced under minimal growth conditions when supplemented with acetate or palmitate.

  17. Detection of a novel catalase in extracts of Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed Central

    Wayne, L G; Diaz, G A

    1988-01-01

    A novel class of catalase, which differs from the previously described M- and T-catalases of mycobacteria, was detected in strains of Mycobacterium avium and M. intracellulare. Designated A-catalase, this enzyme resisted inactivation at 68 degrees C, was inactivated by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (aminotriazole), and exhibited no peroxidase activity. All of these properties distinguished the enzyme from T-catalase. The A-catalase exhibited a Km of 70 mM H2O2, which is between the upper and lower extremes of the ranges reported for T- and M-catalases, respectively. The A-catalase appeared to be more hydrophobic than M-catalase and did not react with antiserum to a representative sample of this class. The banding patterns of T- and M-catalases seen by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were essentially unaffected by the incorporation of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) into the PAGE system, whereas the single band of A-catalase seen by PAGE without SDS resolved into as many as five bands in the presence of SDS; these bands were all of slower mobility than the original band. The banding pattern seen with SDS appeared to be related more to counterion charge effects than to molecular size increases that could be attributed to SDS complexed to the protein. It remains to be determined whether the multiple A-catalase bands reflect different proteins or different SDS micellar complexes of a single protein. Images PMID:3346077

  18. Genetic basis for clarithromycin resistance among isolates of Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium abscessus.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, R J; Meier, A; Brown, B A; Zhang, Y; Sander, P; Onyi, G O; Böttger, E C

    1996-01-01

    Resistance to clarithromycin among isolates of Mycobacterium chelonae and M. abscessus was observed in 18 of 800 (2.3%) patients tested between 1990 and 1995. Patients whose isolates were resistant had either disseminated disease or chronic lung disease, and the resistant isolates were recovered after clarithromycin monotherapy. Sequencing of the gene coding for the 23S rRNA peptidyltransferase region revealed a point mutation involving adenine at position 2058 (38%) or adenine at position 2059 (62%) in 20 of 20 relapse isolates from the first 13 patients identified. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis or random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR, initial and relapse isolates were shown to have identical DNA patterns. M. chelonae and M. abscessus isolates were found to have only a single chromosomal copy of the rRNA operon, thus making them susceptible to single-step mutations. Thus, clarithromycin resistance in these species of rapidly growing mycobacteria relates to a point mutation in the gene coding for 23S rRNA and occurs in limited clinical situations, but was identified in almost 5% of isolates tested in 1995. PMID:8807061

  19. Current Perspectives on Mycobacterium farcinogenes and Mycobacterium senegalense, the Causal Agents of Bovine Farcy

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Mohamed E.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium farcinogenes and M. senegalense are the causal agents of bovine farcy, a chronic, progressive disease of the skin and lymphatics of zebu cattle. The disease, which is prevalent mainly in sub-Saharan Africa, was in earlier times thought to be caused by Nocardia farcinica and can be described as one of the neglected diseases in cattle. Some aspects of the disease have been investigated during the last five decades but the major development had been in the bacteriological, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic aspects. Molecular analyses confirmed that M. farcinogenes and M. senegalense fall in a subclade together with M. houstonense and M. fortuitum. This subclade is closely related to the one accommodating M. peregrinum, M. porcinum, M. septicum, M. neworleansense, and M. alvei. DNA probes were designed from 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer and could be used for the rapid diagnosis of bovine farcy. An ELISA assay has been evaluated for the serodiagnosis of the disease. The zoonotic potentials of M. farcinogenes and M. senegalense are unknown; few studies reported the isolation of M. senegalense and M. farcinogenes from human clinical sources but not from environmental sources or from other domestic or wild animals. PMID:24876989

  20. Testing of susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to isoniazid and rifampin by mycobacterium growth indicator tube method.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, S B; Hanna, B A

    1996-01-01

    We tested isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis recovered from 117 patients for their susceptibilities to isoniazid (INH) and rifampin (RIF) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's disk modification of the indirect method of proportions (MOP) test and a three-tube mycobacteria growth indicator tube (MGIT; BBL) antimycobacterial susceptibility test (AST). Sixty-seven of the M. tuberculosis isolates were recovered from Lowenstein-Jensen (BBL) subcultures, and 50 of the isolates were recovered from MGIT cultures of samples from various body sites. For the MGIT AST method, 0.5 ml of test organism suspension was inoculated into an MGIT with 0.1 micrograms of INH per ml, an MGIT with 1.0 micrograms of RIF per ml, and growth control MGIT. The tubes were incubated at 37 degrees C and were examined daily. The MGIT AST results were interpreted as follows: susceptible if the tubes containing INH or RIF did not fluoresce within 2 days of the time that the positive growth control fluoresced and resistant if the tubes containing INH or RIF did fluoresce within 2 days of the time that the positive growth control fluoresced. The mean time fluorescence for the positive growth control was 5.5 days. The two methods were in agreement for 114 of the 117 isolates from patients, while for 3 isolates there were minor discordant results. PMID:8735121

  1. Dramatic reduction of culture time of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodbane, Ramzi; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture, a critical technique for routine diagnosis of tuberculosis, takes more than two weeks. Here, step-by-step improvements in the protocol including a new medium, microaerophlic atmosphere or ascorbic-acid supplement and autofluorescence detection dramatically shortened this delay. In the best case, primary culture and rifampicin susceptibility testing were achieved in 72 hours when specimens were inoculated directly on the medium supplemented by antibiotic at the beginning of the culture.

  2. Asymmetric cell division in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its unique features.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Srinivasan; Nagaraja, Mukkayyan; Sebastian, Jees; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2014-03-01

    Recently, several reports showed that about 80 % of mid-log phase Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium marinum, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG cells divide symmetrically with 5-10 % deviation in the septum position from the median. However, the mode of cell division of the pathogenic mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, remained unclear. Therefore, in the present study, using electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy of septum- and nucleoid-stained live and fixed cells, and live cell time-lapse imaging, we show the occurrence of asymmetric cell division with unusually deviated septum/constriction in 20 % of the 15 % septating M. tuberculosis cells in the mid-log phase population. The remaining 80 % of the 15 % septating cells divided symmetrically but with 2-5 % deviation in the septum/constriction position, as reported for M. smegmatis, M. marinum, and M. bovis BCG cells. Both the long and the short portions of the asymmetrically dividing M. tuberculosis cells with unusually deviated septum contained nucleoids, thereby generating viable short and long cells from each asymmetric division. M. tuberculosis short cells were acid fast positive and, like the long cells, further readily underwent growth and division to generate micro-colony, thereby showing that they were neither mini cells, spores nor dormant forms of mycobacteria. The freshly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients' sputum samples, which are known for the prevalence of oxidative stress conditions, also contained short cells at the same proportion as that in the mid-log phase population. The probable physiological significance of the generation of the short cells through unusually deviated asymmetric cell division is discussed.

  3. Efflux inhibition with verapamil potentiates bedaquiline in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shashank; Cohen, Keira A; Winglee, Kathryn; Maiga, Mamoudou; Diarra, Bassirou; Bishai, William R

    2014-01-01

    Drug efflux is an important resistance mechanism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We found that verapamil, an efflux inhibitor, profoundly decreases the MIC of bedaquiline and clofazimine to M. tuberculosis by 8- to 16-fold. This exquisite susceptibility was noted among drug-susceptible and drug-resistant clinical isolates. Thus, efflux inhibition is an important sensitizer of bedaquiline and clofazimine, and efflux may emerge as a resistance mechanism to these drugs.

  4. Mycobacterium intracellulare infection in a capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Pezzone, Natalia; Eberhardt, Ayelen T; Fernández, Analia; Garbaccio, Sergio; Zumárraga, Martín; Gioffré, Andrea; Magni, Carolina; Beldomenico, Pablo M; Marini, M Rocío; Canal, Ana M

    2013-12-01

    This report describes the first case of Mycobacterium intracellulare infection with typical granulomatous lesions of mycobacteriosis in a capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris). The individual was a captive-bred young female, part of the control group of an experimental study on stress. Multiple granulomatous lesions were detected in a mesenteric lymph node of this young female. Mycobacterial infection was confirmed by bacteriologic culture and molecular identification methods. Clinical lesions were characterized by histopathology.

  5. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare: a rare cause of subacromial bursitis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Raj; Tuckett, John; Hide, Geoff; Dildey, Petra; Karsandas, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Septic subacromial bursitis is an uncommon disorder with only a few reported cases in the literature. The most common causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus. We report the case of a 61-year-old female with a septic subacromial bursitis where the causative organism was found to be Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). The diagnosis was only made following a biopsy, and we use this case to highlight the importance of recognising the need to consider a biopsy and aspiration in atypical situations.

  6. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis and Bloodstream Infection Due to Mycobacterium chimaera

    PubMed Central

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R.; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected. PMID:23536407

  7. Selective targeting of Mycobacterium smegmatis with trehalose-functionalized nanoparticles†

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardana, Kalana W.; Jayawardena, H. Surangi N.; Wijesundera, Samurdhi A.; De Zoysa, Thareendra; Sundhoro, Madanodaya

    2015-01-01

    Silica and iron oxide nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 6 to 40 nm were functionalized with trehalose. The trehalose-conjugated nanoparticles showed strong interactions with Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and minimal interactions with macrophage (RAW 264.7) or A549 cells. In addition, trehalose-conjugated silica nanoparticles selectively interacted with M. smegmatis on M. smegmatis-treated A549 cells, demonstrating high potential of trehalose in developing targeted therapy for treating mycobacterial infection. PMID:26121049

  8. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium from waterfowl with polycystic livers.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    An unusual gross appearance of avian tuberculosis, where fluid-filled thin-walled cysts are produced and grossly apparent in preference to granulomas, is presented. Histopathology confirmed the granulomatous nature of the lesions and the presence of intracellular acid-fast organisms. Mycobacterium avium complex was cultured from affected organs. The unusual gross presentation in these cases indicates the need to consider tuberculosis in the differential of cystic diseases of avian livers.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera Strain AH16.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Nabeeh A; Honda, Jennifer R; Davidson, Rebecca M; Epperson, L Elaine; Bankowski, Matthew J; Chan, Edward D; Strong, Michael

    2016-11-23

    Mycobacterium chimaera is a nontuberculous mycobacterial species that causes cardiovascular, pulmonary, and postsurgical infections. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of M. chimaera This genome is 6.33 Mbp, with a G+C content of 67.56%, and encodes 4,926 protein-coding genes, as well as 74 tRNAs, one ncRNA, and three rRNA genes.

  10. Prosthetic valve endocarditis and bloodstream infection due to Mycobacterium chimaera.

    PubMed

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R; Bloemberg, Guido; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-06-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected.

  11. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum: a rare offending organism.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Gilbert; Wiedeman, Jean; Boggan, James E

    2014-12-01

    Postsurgical infection is one of the greatest potential morbidities of ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery. The majority of infections can be linked to contamination with skin flora at the time of surgery, a phenomenon that has been well described. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria. The authors report a case of postoperative ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum and review the available neurosurgical literature and treatment strategies.

  12. Mycobacteriosis, Mycobacterium chelonae, in a captive yellow stingray (Urobatis jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Clarke, Elsburgh O; Dorn, Brian; Boone, Allison; Risatti, Guillermo; Gilbert-Marcheterre, Kelly; Harms, Craig A

    2013-06-01

    An adult yellow stingray (Urobatis jamaicensis) from a touch-tank exhibit developed a large abscess on the dorsal aspect of the calvarium and swollen soft tissue surrounding the left spiracle. A large amount of fluid exudate was drained from the abscess. Mycobacterium chelonae was diagnosed by cytology of the exudate and by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. The animal was euthanized and disseminated mycobacteriosis was confirmed with histology.

  13. In vitro susceptibilities of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to 10 antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, S K; Crawford, C E; Geddes, G L; Black, W A

    1988-01-01

    After preliminary in vitro screening of 10 antimicrobial agents against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the MICs of the 6 most promising agents against 27 clinical isolates were determined by agar dilution. The two quinolone compounds tested (difloxacin and A-56620) were the most active, each inhibiting 50% of the strains at concentrations of 4 micrograms/ml. M. tuberculosis strains previously shown to be resistant to isoniazid, streptomycin, rifampin, or ethambutol were as susceptible to these quinolone compounds as susceptible strains. PMID:3143305

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera Strain AH16

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Jennifer R.; Davidson, Rebecca M.; Epperson, L. Elaine; Bankowski, Matthew J.; Chan, Edward D.; Strong, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium chimaera is a nontuberculous mycobacterial species that causes cardiovascular, pulmonary, and postsurgical infections. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of M. chimaera. This genome is 6.33 Mbp, with a G+C content of 67.56%, and encodes 4,926 protein-coding genes, as well as 74 tRNAs, one ncRNA, and three rRNA genes. PMID:27881537

  15. Activity of rifapentine and its metabolite 25-O-desacetylrifapentine compared with rifampicin and rifabutin against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium africanum, Mycobacterium bovis and M. bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, N; Goh, K S; Berchel, M; Bryskier, A

    2000-10-01

    The in vitro activity of rifapentine and its metabolite, 25-O:-desacetylrifapentine, as compared with that of rifampicin and rifabutin, was determined against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium africanum, Mycobacterium bovis and M. bovis BCG. MICs were determined radiometrically and by the 1% proportional method using Middlebrook 7H11 agar. The bactericidal effect of the drugs was determined in parallel at selected concentrations. For drugsusceptible isolates of M. tuberculosis, the Bactec MICs of rifapentine and 25-O:-desacetylrifapentine were 0.03-0.06 mg/L and 0. 125-0.25 mg/L, respectively. Similar MICs were obtained for M. africanum (0.03-0.125 and 0.125-0.50 mg/L, respectively), and M. bovis (0.063-0.25 and 0.125-1.0 mg/L, respectively), but MICs were considerably lower for M. bovis BCG (0.008-0.063 mg/L for rifapentine and 0.016-0.125 mg/L for its metabolite). In general, MICs determined using 7H11 agar medium were usually one or two dilutions higher than those obtained using Bactec broth. When compared with rifampicin and rifabutin, the inhibitory activity of rifapentine for drug-susceptible isolates was roughly equal to that of rifabutin, and the inhibitory activity of 25-O:-desacetylrifapentine was comparable to that of rifampicin; however, rifapentine was somewhat more bactericidal than rifabutin at equal concentrations. Clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis with a high degree of resistance to rifampicin (MIC >/= 32 mg/L) were also highly resistant to rifabutin, rifapentine and 25-O:-desacetylrifapentine, although the MICs of rifabutin in this case were somewhat lower than the MICs of rifapentine.

  16. Mycobacterium chimaera pulmonary infection complicating cystic fibrosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium chimaera is a recently described species within the Mycobacterium avium complex. Its pathogenicity in respiratory tract infection remains disputed. It has never been isolated during cystic fibrosis respiratory tract infection. Case presentation An 11-year-old boy of Asian ethnicity who was born on Réunion Island presented to our hospital with cystic fibrosis after a decline in his respiratory function over the course of seven years. We found that the decline in his respiratory function was correlated with the persistent presence of a Mycobacterium avium complex organism further identified as M. chimaera. Conclusion Using sequencing-based methods of identification, we observed that M. chimaera organisms contributed equally to respiratory tract infections in patients with cystic fibrosis when compared with M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates. We believe that M. chimaera should be regarded as an emerging opportunistic respiratory pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis, including young children, and that its detection warrants long-lasting appropriate anti-mycobacterial treatment to eradicate it. PMID:21939536

  17. Degradation of ambient carbonyl sulfide by Mycobacterium spp. in soil.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiromi; Saito, Masahiko; Nagahata, Yoshiko; Katayama, Yoko

    2008-01-01

    The ability to degrade carbonyl sulfide (COS) was confirmed in seven bacterial strains that were isolated from soil, without the addition of COS. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that these isolates belonged to the genera Mycobacterium, Williamsia and Cupriavidus. For example, Mycobacterium sp. strain THI401, grown on PYG agar medium, was able to degrade an initial level of 30 parts per million by volume COS within 1 h, while 60 % of the initial COS was decreased by abiotic conversion in 30 h. Considering natural COS flux between soil and the atmosphere, COS degradation by these bacteria was confirmed at an ambient level of 500 parts per trillion by volume (p.p.t.v.), using sterilized soil to cultivate the bacterium. Autoclave sterilization of soil resulted in a small amount of COS emission, while Mycobacterium spp. degraded COS at a faster rate than it was emitted from the soil, and reduced the COS mixing ratio to a level that was lower than the ambient level: THI401 degraded COS from an initial level of 530 p.p.t.v. to a level of 330 p.p.t.v. in 30 h. These results provide experimental evidence of microbial activity in soil as a sink for atmospheric COS.

  18. A New 4-Nitrotoluene Degradation Pathway in a Mycobacterium Strain

    PubMed Central

    Spiess, Tilmann; Desiere, Frank; Fischer, Peter; Spain, Jim C.; Knackmuss, Hans-Joachim; Lenke, Hiltrud

    1998-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain HL 4-NT-1, isolated from a mixed soil sample from the Stuttgart area, utilized 4-nitrotoluene as the sole source of nitrogen, carbon, and energy. Under aerobic conditions, resting cells of the Mycobacterium strain metabolized 4-nitrotoluene with concomitant release of small amounts of ammonia; under anaerobic conditions, 4-nitrotoluene was completely converted to 6-amino-m-cresol. 4-Hydroxylaminotoluene was converted to 6-amino-m-cresol by cell extracts and thus could be confirmed as the initial metabolite in the degradative pathway. This enzymatic equivalent to the acid-catalyzed Bamberger rearrangement requires neither cofactors nor oxygen. In the same crucial enzymatic step, the homologous substrate hydroxylaminobenzene was rearranged to 2-aminophenol. Abiotic oxidative dimerization of 6-amino-m-cresol, observed during growth of the Mycobacterium strain, yielded a yellow dihydrophenoxazinone. Another yellow metabolite (λmax, 385 nm) was tentatively identified as 2-amino-5-methylmuconic semialdehyde, formed from 6-amino-m-cresol by meta ring cleavage. PMID:9464378

  19. [Infection due to Mycobacterium bovis in common variable immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Sánchez, Diana Andrea; Castilla-Rodríguez, Jaisel Luz; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel; Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Medina-Torres, Edgar Alejandro; Blancas-Galicia, Lizbeth; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is an heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by impaired antibody production. It shows a wide spectrum of manifestations including severe and recurrent respiratory infections (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus) and gastrointestinal (Campylobacter jejuni, rotavirus and Giardia lamblia). Viral infections caused by herpes zoster, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and hepatitis C are rare. The opportunistic agents such as CMV, Pneumocystis jirovecii, cryptococcus and atypical mycobacteria have been reported as isolated cases. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old female patient, who began six years before with weight loss of 7 kg in six months, fatigue, weakness, sweating, fever and abdominal pain. Furthermore, patient had intestinal obstruction and abdominal CT showed mesenteric lymph growth. The mesenteric lymph node biopsy revealed positives Mycobacterium PCR, Ziehl-Neelsen staining and culture for M. bovis. In the laparotomy postoperative period was complicated with nosocomial pneumonia, requiring mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy. Two years later, she developed right renal abscess that required surgical drainage, once again with a positive culture for Mycobacterium bovis. She was referred to highly specialized hospital and we documented panhypogammaglobulinemia and lymphopenia. Secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinemia were ruled out and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) was confirmed, we started IVIG replacement. Four years later she developed mixed cellularity Hodgkin's lymphoma. Until today she continues with IVIG and chemotherapy. This report of a patient with CVID and Mycobacterium bovis infection, a unusual association, shows the cellular immunity susceptibility in this immunodeficiency, additional to the humoral defect.

  20. Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium fortuitum infection following open fracture: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kwan, K; Ho, S T

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of dual nontuberculous mycobacterial infections complicating an open distal radius and ulna fracture after polytrauma in a 35-year-old man. There was persistent wound discharge after definitive fixation of this fracture, but microbiological cultures did not yield any organism. The patient underwent multiple debridement, and subsequent tissue grew Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium fortuitum. Despite appropriate chemotherapy and surgical debridement the infection persisted until radical bone excision and tissue debridement were done. This case indicates that nontuberculous mycobacterial infections should be considered when conventional microbiological assays fail to identify the infecting agent in suspected osteomyelitis following open fracture. A combination of radical debridement, including removal of infected bone, and prolonged antimicrobial therapy are required to eradicate the infection completely.

  1. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium Complexes by Real-Time PCR in Bovine Milk from Brazilian Dairy Farms.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, André Vinícius Andrade; Dos Reis, Emily Marques; Rodrigues, Rogério Oliveira; Cenci, Alexander; Cerva, Cristine; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos

    2015-05-01

    Foodborne diseases are a public health problem worldwide. The consumption of contaminated raw milk has been recognized as a major cause of transmission of bovine tuberculosis to humans. Other mycobacteria that may be present in raw milk and may cause diseases are those belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex. In this study, molecular biology tools were applied to investigate raw milk contamination with Mycobacterium spp. in family dairy farms from Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil. Furthermore, different variables related to the source of the milk, herd characteristics, and management were evaluated for their effect on milk contamination. Five hundred and two samples were analyzed, of which 354 were from the Northwest region (102 farms with samples from 93 bulk tanks and 261 animals) and 148 from the South region of the state (22 farms with samples from 23 bulk tanks and 125 animals). Among them, 10 (1.99%) and 7 (1.39%) were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (9 confirmed as Mycobacterium bovis) and M. avium complexes, respectively. There was no difference in the frequencies of positive samples between the regions or the sample sources. Of the positive samples, 4 were collected from a bulk tank (1 positive for M. avium and 3 for M. tuberculosis). Moreover, 1 sample was positive concomitantly for M. tuberculosis and M. avium complexes. On risk analysis, no variable was associated with raw milk contamination by M. tuberculosis complex species. However, washing the udders of all animals and drying them with paper towels were weakly classified as risk factors for M. avium contamination. Positive samples were obtained from both animals and bulk tanks, which emphasizes the importance of tuberculosis control programs and provides evidence that milk monitoring can be used as a control practice. Moreover, the findings of this study reinforce the need for awareness of the problems of raw milk consumption among the general population.

  2. Quantitative PCR Assay for Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii and Mycobacterium shottsii and Application to Environmental Samples and Fishes from the Chesapeake Bay▿

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, D. T.; Reece, K. S.; Xiao, J.; Rhodes, M. W.; Kator, H. I.; Latour, R. J.; Bonzek, C. F.; Hoenig, J. M.; Vogelbein, W. K.

    2010-01-01

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Chesapeake Bay are currently experiencing a very high prevalence of mycobacteriosis associated with newly described Mycobacterium species, Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii. The ecology of these mycobacteria outside the striped bass host is currently unknown. In this work, we developed quantitative real-time PCR assays for M. pseudoshottsii and M. shottsii and applied these assays to DNA extracts from Chesapeake Bay water and sediment samples, as well as to tissues from two dominant prey of striped bass, Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) and bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli). Mycobacterium pseudoshottsii was found to be ubiquitous in water samples from the main stem of the Chesapeake Bay and was also present in water and sediments from the Rappahannock River, Virginia. M. pseudoshottsii was also detected in menhaden and anchovy tissues. In contrast, M. shottsii was not detected in water, sediment, or prey fish tissues. In conjunction with its nonpigmented phenotype, which is frequently found in obligately pathogenic mycobacteria of humans, this pattern of occurrence suggests that M. shottsii may be an obligate pathogen of striped bass. PMID:20656856

  3. In situ cytokine expression in pulmonary granulomas of cattle experimentally infected by aerosolized Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium bovis is the cause of tuberculosis in most animal species, including cattle and is a serious zoonotic pathogen. In humans, M. bovis infection can result in disease clinically indistinguishable from that caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of most tuberculosis in humans. Reg...

  4. Comparative genomics of archived pyrazinamide resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates from Uganda

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine tuberculosis is a ‘neglected zoonosis’ and its contribution to the proportion of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infections in humans is unknown. A retrospective study on archived Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) isolates from a reference laboratory in Uganda was undertaken to iden...

  5. Functional Characterization of Iron Dependent Regulator (IdeR) of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we investigated an iron dependent regulator (IdeR) of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). IdeR is a transcriptional factor that plays a global iron regulatory role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) with a 19-bp recognition sequence. IdeR recognition sites within MAP ge...

  6. Draft genome sequence of a Mycobacterium avium complex isolate from a broadbill bird

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the draft genome sequences of ten Mycobacterium avium complex isolates obtained from diverse hosts. This collection includes isolates obtained from deer, pig, elephant, ruddy duck and Red-tailed hawk species. The type strain of Mycobacterium avium subspecies silvaticum (ATCC 49884) is also...

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium bovis Strain D-10-02315 Isolated from Wild Boar

    PubMed Central

    Branger, Maxime; Hauer, Amandine; Michelet, Lorraine; Karoui, Claudine; Cochard, Thierry; De Cruz, Krystel; Henault, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the etiologic agent of bovine tuberculosis, a chronic infectious disease, affecting livestock, wild animals, and sometimes humans. We report the draft genome sequence of a Mycobacterium bovis strain isolated from wild boar of spoligotype SB0120 (or BCG-like) also present in wildlife-livestock multi-host systems. PMID:27834714

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of the Mycobacterium immunogenum Type Strain CCUG 47286

    PubMed Central

    Jaén-Luchoro, Daniel; Seguí, Carolina; Aliaga-Lozano, Francisco; Salvà-Serra, Francisco; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Ramírez, Antonio; Ruiz, Mikel; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium immunogenum type strain CCUG 47286, a nontuberculous mycobacterium. The whole genome has 5,573,781 bp and covers as many as 5,484 predicted genes. This genome contributes to the task of closing the still-existing gap of genomes of rapidly growing mycobacterial type strains. PMID:27231356

  9. Web-Accessible Database of hsp65 Sequences from Mycobacterium Reference Strains▿†

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jianli; Chen, Yuansha; Lauzardo, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacteria include a large number of pathogens. Identification to species level is important for diagnoses and treatments. Here, we report the development of a Web-accessible database of the hsp65 locus sequences (http://msis.mycobacteria.info) from 149 out of 150 Mycobacterium species/subspecies. This database can serve as a reference for identifying Mycobacterium species. PMID:21450960

  10. Brown-Pigmented Mycobacterium mageritense as a Cause of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis and Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Allison R; Mattar, Caline; Kirmani, Nigar; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2015-08-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are a rare cause of endocarditis. Herein, we describe a case of Mycobacterium mageritense prosthetic valve endocarditis. This organism produced an unusual brown pigment on solid media. Cultures of valve tissue for acid-fast bacilli might be considered in some cases of apparently culture-negative prosthetic valve endocarditis.

  11. Virulence of two strains of Mycobacterium bovis in cattle following aerosol infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Over the past two decades, highly virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have emerged and spread rapidly in humans, suggesting a selective advantage based upon virulence. A similar scenario has not been described for Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle (i.e., Bovine Tuberculos...

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of a Mycobacterium africanum Clinical Isolate from Antioquia, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, U A; Solano, J S; Rodriguez, A; Robledo, J; Rouzaud, F

    2016-06-02

    Mycobacterium africanum is a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Most commonly found in West African countries, it has scarcely been described in South America. Here, we report the first genome sequence of a Colombian M. africanum clinical isolate. It is composed of 4,493,502 bp, with 4,069 genes.

  13. mmr, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Gene Conferring Resistance to Small Cationic Dyes and Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    De Rossi, Edda; Branzoni, Manuela; Cantoni, Rita; Milano, Anna; Riccardi, Giovanna; Ciferri, Orio

    1998-01-01

    The mmr gene, cloned from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, was shown to confer to Mycobacterium smegmatis resistance to tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP), erythromycin, ethidium bromide, acriflavine, safranin O, and pyronin Y. The gene appears to code for a protein containing four transmembrane domains. Studies of [3H]TPP intracellular accumulation strongly suggest that the resistance mediated by the Mmr protein involves active extrusion of TPP. PMID:9811672

  14. Mycobacterium species related to M. leprae and M. lepromatosis from cows with bovine nodular thelitis.

    PubMed

    Pin, Didier; Guérin-Faublée, Véronique; Garreau, Virginie; Breysse, Franck; Dumitrescu, Oana; Flandrois, Jean-Pierre; Lina, Gerard

    2014-12-01

    Bovine nodular thelitis is a granulomatous dermatitis associated with infection with acid-fast bacteria. To identify the mycobacterium responsible for this infection, we conducted phylogenetic investigations based on partial sequencing of 6 genes. These bacteria were identified as an undescribed Mycobacterium species that was phylogenetically related to M. leprae and M. lepromatosis.

  15. Evaluation of Subspecies-specific Proteins for the Diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map)-specific proteins (35) were identified by comparing the proteomes of Map isolates with those of the genetically similar subspecies IS901+ Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium or silvaticum. This approach identified subspecies-specific proteins in...

  16. First case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission by heart transplantation from donor to recipient.

    PubMed

    Weile, Jan; Eickmeyer, Holm; Dreier, Jens; Liebke, Michael; Fuchs, Uwe; Wittke, Johann-Wolfgang; Richter, Elvira; Gummert, Jan; Knabbe, Cornelius; Schulz, Uwe

    2013-12-01

    We report the first documented case of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission by an orthotopic heart transplantation from the donor to the recipient. Mycobacterium tuberculosis positive blood culture showed systemic prevalence of the Mycobacteria, however, prophylactic therapy was able to prevent a clinical manifestation of tuberculosis in the recipient.

  17. Histologic and Genotypic Characterization of a Novel Mycobacterium Species Found in Three Cats

    PubMed Central

    Appleyard, Greg D.; Clark, Edward G.

    2002-01-01

    Three cases of feline atypical mycobacteriosis from different geographical regions in North America were characterized by large clusters of filamentous bacteria visible on hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained tissue sections. PCR amplification demonstrated the presence of Mycobacterium-specific nucleic acid in samples of skin lesions from these cases. PCR-assisted cloning and DNA sequence analysis of a 541-bp length of the Mycobacterium 16S rRNA gene generated DNA sequences which were >95% identical, suggesting that the three isolates were closely related. Two of the sequences were 99% identical and may represent the same species. Alignment with comparable 16S rRNA gene sequences from 66 Mycobacterium species and partially characterized isolates highlighted similarities (>94%) with Mycobacterium bohemicum, Mycobacterium haemophilum, Mycobacterium ulcerans, Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium, and isolate IWGMT 90242. Parsimony analysis of sequence data suggested relatedness to M. leprae. Significant molecular genetic and pathobiological differences between these three similar isolates and other known species of mycobacteria suggested that the organisms may not have been described previously and that these cases may represent a new form of mycobacterial disease in cats. We suggest the term “Mycobacterium visibilis” to describe the organism from which the two nearly identical sequences were obtained. PMID:12089257

  18. Survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Biofilms on Livestock Watering Trough Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite the ubiquitous occurrence of Mycobacterium sp. in nature and the fact that Johne’s disease has been reported worldwide, little research has been done to assess the survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) in agricultural environments. The goal of this stu...

  19. Zoonotic aspects of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC).

    PubMed

    Biet, Franck; Boschiroli, Maria Laura; Thorel, Marie Françoise; Guilloteau, Laurence A

    2005-01-01

    Pathogens that are transmitted between the environment, wildlife, livestock and humans represent major challenges for the protection of human and domestic animal health, the economic sustainability of agriculture, and the conservation of wildlife. Among such pathogens, the genus Mycobacterium is well represented by M. bovis, the etiological agent of bovine tuberculosis, M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis (Map) the etiological agent of Johne disease, M. avium ssp. avium (Maa) and in a few common cases by other emergent environmental mycobacteria. Epidemiologic surveys performed in Europe, North America and New Zealand have demonstrated the existence and importance of environmental and wildlife reservoirs of mycobacterial infections that limit the attempts of disease control programmes. The aim of this review is to examine the zoonotic aspects of mycobacteria transmitted from the environment and wildlife. This work is focused on the species of two main groups of mycobacteria classified as important pathogens for humans and animals: first, M. bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, which belongs to the M. tuberculosis complex and has a broad host range including wildlife, captive wildlife, domestic livestock, non-human primates and humans; the second group examined, is the M. avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) which includes M. avium ssp. avium causing major health problems in AIDS patients and M. avium ssp. paratuberculosis the etiological agent of Johne disease in cattle and identified in patients with Crohn disease. MAC agents, in addition to a broad host range, are environmental mycobacteria found in numerous biotopes including the soil, water, aerosols, protozoa, deep litter and fresh tropical vegetation. This review examines the possible reservoirs of these pathogens in the environment and in wildlife, their role as sources of infection in humans and animals and their health impact on humans. The possibilities of control and management programmes for

  20. Paramecium caudatum enhances transmission and infectivity of Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium chelonae in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Tracy S.; Ferguson, Jayde A.; Watral, Virginia G.; Mutoji, K. Nadine; Ennis, Don G.; Kent, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterial infections in laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio) are common and widespread in research colonies. Mycobacteria within free living amoebae have been shown to be transmission vectors for mycobacteriosis. Paramecium caudatum are commonly used as a first food for zebrafish, and we investigated this ciliate’s potential to serve as a vector of Mycobacterium marinum and M. chelonae. The ability of live P. caudatum to transmit these mycobacteria to larval, juvenile and adult zebrafish was evaluated. Infections were defined by histologic observation of granulomas containing acid-fast bacteria in extraintestinal locations. In both experiments, fish fed paramecia containing mycobacteria became infected at a higher incidence than controls. Larvae (exposed at 4 days post hatch) fed paramecia with M. marinum exhibited an incidence of 30% (24/80) and juveniles (exposed at 21 days post hatch) showed 31% incidence (14/45). Adult fish fed a gelatin food matrix containing mycobacteria within paramecia or mycobacteria alone for 2 wk resulted in infections when examined 8 wk after exposure as follows: M. marinum OSU 214 47% (21/45), M. marinum CH 47% (9/19), M. chelonae 38% (5/13). In contrast, fish feed mycobacteria alone in this diet did not become infected, except for 2 fish (5%) in the M. marinum OSU 214 low dose group. These results demonstrate that Paramecium caudatum can act as a vector for mycobacteria. This provides a useful animal model for evaluation of natural mycobacterial infections and demonstrates the possibility of mycobacterial transmission in zebrafish facilities via contaminated paramecia cultures. PMID:24192000

  1. Mycobacterium shigaense Causes Lymph Node and Cutaneous Lesions as Immune Reconstitution Syndrome in an AIDS Patient: The Third Case Report of a Novel Strain Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Yusuke; Shimizu, Kaoru; Shigeta, Masayo; Minamiguchi, Hitoshi; Hodohara, Keiko; Andoh, Akira; Tanaka, Toshihide; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Mitarai, Satoshi; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old man complaining of progressive body weight loss was diagnosed to have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Within 2 weeks after the initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy, he developed fever, massive cervical lymphadenopathy and a protruding subcutaneous abscess. A lymph node biopsy and abscess drainage revealed non-caseous granuloma and mycobacterium. The mycobacterium belonged to Runyon II group, but it showed no matches to any previously reported species. According to sequence analyses, the strain was identified as Mycobacterium shigaense. After six months of antimycobacterial treatment, the lesions were all successfully cured. This is the third case report of the novel mycobacterium, M. shigaense, presenting in associatioin with immune reconstitution syndrome. PMID:27853087

  2. Therapy-resistant septic olecranon bursitis due to Mycobacterium gordonae

    PubMed Central

    Konrads, Christian; Rückl, Kilian; El Tabbakh, Mohammed; Rudert, Maximilian; Kircher, Stefan; Plumhoff, Piet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Septic olecranon bursitis due to atypical mycobacteria is rare. An insidious beginning can delay diagnosis and treatment. Antibacterial therapy recommendations are not well-defined for bursitis caused by atypical mycobacteria. We present a rare case of olecranon bursitis caused by Mycobacterium gordonae, reporting our experiences regarding pathogen identification and antibiotic therapy, which differs from regimes used in common septic bursitis mostly caused by staphylococcus aureus. Methods: A 35-year-old male with bursitis olecrani received open bursectomy. Microbiological culture did not reveal bacteria. Due to wound healing complications revision surgery was performed four weeks postoperatively. Finally, Mycobacterium gordonae was identified by PCR and an antibiogram could be developed. A triple antimicrobial combination therapy with Rifampicin, Clarithromycin, and Ethambutol was administered systemically for 12 months. The patient was followed-up for 24 months. Results: After the second operation with pathogen identification and antibiotic combination therapy the wound healed without any additional complications. At last follow-up 24 months after the first surgery with bursectomy and 23 months after revision surgery with debridement, the patient was still pain free with no significant clinical findings or tenderness to touch at the operation site. Elbow range of motion was full. Discussion: As septic bursitis can be caused by many different and sometimes rare and difficult to identify bacteria, intraoperative probes should be taken and histopathological and microbiological analysis should be conducted, including PCR. In a young man with olecranon bursitis due to Mycobacterium gordonae surgical treatment and an antibiotic combination therapy showed a good clinical outcome after one and two years. PMID:27892398

  3. Solvent-Augmented Mineralization of Pyrene by a Mycobacterium sp

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, I. Y.; Bartha, R.

    1996-01-01

    The biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon pollutants is constrained, in part, by their solid physical state and very low water solubility. Searching for ways to overcome these limitations, we isolated from soil a bacterium capable of growing on pyrene as a sole source of carbon and energy. Acid-fast stain, morphology, and fatty acid profile identified it as a Mycobacterium sp. In a mineral salts solution, the isolate mineralized 50% of a 250-(mu)g/ml concentration of [(sup14)C]pyrene in 2 to 3 days. Detergent below the critical micelle concentration increased the pyrene mineralization rate to 154%, but above the critical micelle concentration, the detergent severely inhibited pyrene mineralization. The water-miscible solvent polyethylene glycol was inhibitory. The hydrophobic solvents heptamethylnonane, decalin, phenyldecane, and diphenylmethane were also inhibitory at several concentrations tested, but the addition of paraffin oil, squalene, squalane, tridecylcyclohexane, and cis-9-tricosene at 0.8% (vol/vol) doubled pyrene mineralization rates by the Mycobacterium sp. without being utilized themselves. The Mycobacterium sp. was found to have high cell surface hydrophobicity and adhered to the emulsified solvent droplets that also contained the dissolved pyrene, facilitating its mass transfer to the degrading bacteria. Cells physically adhering to solvent droplets metabolized pyrene 8.5 times as fast as cells suspended in the aqueous medium. An enhanced mass transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds to microorganisms by suitable hydrophobic solvents might allow the development of solvent-augmented biodegradation techniques for use in aqueous or slurry-type bioreactors. PMID:16535350

  4. Mycobacterium-Inducible Nramp in Striped Bass (Morone saxatilis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burge, E.J.; Gauthier, David T.; Ottinger, C.A.; Van Veld, P.A.

    2004-01-01

    In mammals, the natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 gene, Nramp1, plays a major role in resistance to mycobacterial infections. Chesapeake Bay striped bass (Morone saxatilis) is currently experiencing an epizootic of mycobacteriosis that threatens the health of this ecologically and economically important species. In the present study, we characterized an Nramp gene in this species and obtained evidence that there is induction following Mycobacterium exposure. The striped bass Nramp gene (MsNramp) and a 554-amino-acid sequence contain all the signal features of the Nramp family, including a topology of 12 transmembrane domains (TM), the transport protein-specific binding-protein-dependent transport system inner membrane component signature, three N-linked glycosylation sites between TM 7 and TM 8, sites of casein kinase and protein kinase C phosphorylation in the amino and carboxy termini, and a tyrosine kinase phosphorylation site between TM 6 and TM 7. Phylogenetic analysis most closely grouped MsNramp with other teleost Nramp genes and revealed high sequence similarity with mammalian Nramp2. MsNramp expression was present in all tissues assayed by reverse transcription-PCR. Within 1 day of injection of Mycobacterium marinum, MsNramp expression was highly induced (17-fold higher) in peritoneal exudate (PE) cells compared to the expression in controls. The levels of MsNramp were three- and sixfold higher on days 3 and 15, respectively. Injection of Mycobacterium shottsii resulted in two-, five-, and threefold increases in gene expression in PE cells over the time course. This report is the first report of induction of an Nramp gene by mycobacteria in a poikilothermic vertebrate.

  5. Novel Cephalosporins Selectively Active on Nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report two series of novel cephalosporins that are bactericidal to Mycobacterium tuberculosis alone of the pathogens tested, which only kill M. tuberculosis when its replication is halted by conditions resembling those believed to pertain in the host, and whose bactericidal activity is not dependent upon or enhanced by clavulanate, a β-lactamase inhibitor. The two classes of cephalosporins bear an ester or alternatively an oxadiazole isostere at C-2 of the cephalosporin ring system, a position that is almost exclusively a carboxylic acid in clinically used agents in the class. Representatives of the series kill M. tuberculosis within macrophages without toxicity to the macrophages or other mammalian cells. PMID:27144688

  6. Zirconia based nucleic acid sensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Maumita; Sumana, Gajjala; Nagarajan, R.; Malhotra, B. D.

    2010-03-01

    Nanostructured zirconium oxide (ZrO2) film (particle size˜35 nm), electrochemically deposited onto gold(Au) surface, has been used to immobilize 21-mer oligonucleotide probe (ssDNA) specific to Mycobacterium tuberculosis by utilizing affinity between oxygen atom of phosphoric group and zirconium to fabricate DNA biosensor. This DNA-ZrO2/Au bioelectrode, characterized using x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and scanning electron microscopy techniques, can be used for early and rapid diagnosis of M. tuberculosis with detection limit of 0.065 ng/μL within 60s.

  7. In Vitro Susceptibility Testing of Bedaquiline against Mycobacterium avium Complex.

    PubMed

    Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Philley, Julie V; Griffith, David E; Thakkar, Foram; Wallace, Richard J

    2017-02-01

    We performed bedaquiline broth microdilution susceptibility testing using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines on 103 respiratory isolates of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), including multidrug-resistant isolates. Approximately 90% of isolates had bedaquiline MICs of ≤0.008 μg/ml, and 102/103 isolates had MICs of ≤0.015 μg/ml. Bedaquiline has excellent potential for use in patients with MAC infections, although for reasons of its metabolism by the cytochrome P450 system, it should not be given with rifampin.

  8. Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of fungus Phomopsis stipata

    PubMed Central

    de Prince, Karina Andrade; Sordi, Renata; Pavan, Fernando Rogério; Barreto Santos, Adolfo Carlos; Araujo, Angela R.; Leite, Sergio R.A.; Leite, Clarice Q. F.

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine the anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of the metabolites produced by the endophitic fungus Phomopsis stipata (Lib.) B. Sutton, (Diaporthaceae), cultivated in different media. The antimycobacterial activity was assessed through the Resazurin Microtiter Assay (REMA) and the cytotoxicity test performed on macrophage cell line. The extracts derived from fungi grown on Corn Medium and Potato Dextrose Broth presented the smallest values of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and low cytotoxicity, which implies a high selectivity index. This is the first report on the chemical composition and antitubercular activity of metabolites of P. stipata, as well as the influence of culture medium on these properties. PMID:24031821

  9. Zoonotic tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Cosivi, O.; Grange, J. M.; Daborn, C. J.; Raviglione, M. C.; Fujikura, T.; Cousins, D.; Robinson, R. A.; Huchzermeyer, H. F.; de Kantor, I.; Meslin, F. X.

    1998-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that human tuberculosis (TB) incidence and deaths for 1990 to 1999 will be 88 million and 30 million, respectively, with most cases in developing countries. Zoonotic TB (caused by Mycobacterium bovis) is present in animals in most developing countries where surveillance and control activities are often inadequate or unavailable; therefore, many epidemiologic and public health aspects of infection remain largely unknown. We review available information on zoonotic TB in developing countries, analyze risk factors that may play a role in the disease, review recent WHO activities, and recommend actions to assess the magnitude of the problem and control the disease in humans and animals. PMID:9452399

  10. Molecular basis of rifampin resistance in Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed Central

    Honore, N; Cole, S T

    1993-01-01

    Rifampin is currently the most potent drug used in leprosy control programs. We show that the rifampin resistance which emerged in nine patients with lepromatous leprosy, who had received rifampin monotherapy, stemmed from mutations in the rpoB gene, which encodes the beta subunit of RNA polymerase of Mycobacterium leprae. In eight cases missense mutations were found to affect a serine residue, Ser-425, while in the remaining mutant a small insertion was found close to this site. These findings will be of use for the development of a rapid screening procedure, involving the polymerase chain reaction, for monitoring the emergence of rifampin-resistant M. leprae strains. Images PMID:8460911

  11. Mycobacterium abscessus complex bacteremia due to prostatitis after prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chung-Hua; Lin, Jesun; Lin, Jen-Shiou; Chen, Yu-Min

    2016-10-01

    We present the case of a 49-year-old man, who developed Mycobacterium abscessus complex (M. abscessus complex) bacteremia and prostatitis after prostate biopsy. The patient was successfully treated with amikacin with imipenem-cilastatin with clarithromycin. Infections caused by M. abscessus complex have been increasingly described as a complication associated with many invasive procedures. Invasive procedures might have contributed to the occurrence of the M. abscessus complex. Although M. abscessus complex infection is difficult to diagnose and treat, we should pay more attention to this kind of infection, and the correct treatment strategy will be achieved by physicians.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the macrophage: maintaining a balance.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Jean

    2008-06-12

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a highly efficient pathogen, killing millions of infected people annually. The capacity of M. tuberculosis to survive and cause disease is strongly correlated to their ability to escape immune defense mechanisms. In particular, M. tuberculosis has the remarkable capacity to survive within the hostile environment of the macrophage. Understanding M. tuberculosis virulence strategies will not only define novel targets for drug development but will also help to uncover previously unknown signaling pathways related to the host's response to M. tuberculosis infection.

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in an orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus).

    PubMed

    Shin, N S; Kwon, S W; Han, D H; Bai, G H; Yoon, J; Cheon, D S; Son, Y S; Ahn, K; Chae, C; Lee, Y S

    1995-10-01

    A respiratory disorder was noted in a 5-year-old female orangutan kept in the Yongin Farmland. Radiographically, multiple radiodense foci ranging from 2 to 6 mm diameter were seen throughout the lung lobes. Grossly, the thoracic cavity revealed a firm texture and grayish-pink discoloration of the left apical lung lobe. Histopathologically, multifocal areas of granulomatous pneumonia present the right and left apical lung lobes. Both primers from IS1081 and IS6110 targeting 196 bp and 245 bp respectively were used in polymerase chain reaction, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from liver and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction.

  14. Ocular manifestation of disseminated Mycobacterium simiae infection in a cat.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, U; Arnold, P; Guscetti, F; Pfyffer, G E; Spiess, B

    2003-03-01

    Disseminated mycobacterial disease was diagnosed in an eight-year-old domestic shorthaired cat, with involvement of the skin, lungs, lymph nodes and one eye. Mycobacterium simiae was cultured from skin biopsies on solid agar and in liquid media. This organism is known to cause pulmonary, cutaneous or disseminated infection in human patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome but has never been encountered as a pathogen in companion animals. Combination treatment with rifampicin, enrofloxacin and clarithromycin resulted in complete clinical remission within six months, with no side effects. No recurrence was observed in a 22-month follow-up period.

  15. Role for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Membrane Vesicles in Iron Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Weinrick, Brian C.; Piqué, Daniel G.; Jacobs, William R.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis releases membrane vesicles packed with molecules that can modulate the immune response. Because environmental conditions often influence the production and content of bacterial vesicles, this study examined M. tuberculosis microvesicles released under iron limitation, a common condition faced by pathogens inside the host. The findings indicate that M. tuberculosis increases microvesicle production in response to iron restriction and that these microvesicles contain mycobactin, which can serve as an iron donor and supports replication of iron-starved mycobacteria. Consequently, the results revealed a role of microvesicles in iron acquisition in M. tuberculosis, which can be critical for survival in the host. PMID:24415729

  16. Oxadiazoles Have Butyrate-Specific Conditional Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Early, Julie V.; Casey, Allen; Martinez-Grau, Maria Angeles; Gonzalez Valcarcel, Isabel C.; Vieth, Michal; Ollinger, Juliane; Bailey, Mai Ann; Alling, Torey; Files, Megan; Ovechkina, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a global pathogen of huge importance which can adapt to several host niche environments in which carbon source availability is likely to vary. We developed and ran a phenotypic screen using butyrate as the sole carbon source to be more reflective of the host lung environment. We screened a library of ∼87,000 small compounds and identified compounds which demonstrated good antitubercular activity against M. tuberculosis grown with butyrate but not with glucose as the carbon source. Among the hits, we identified an oxadiazole series (six compounds) which had specific activity against M. tuberculosis but which lacked cytotoxicity against mammalian cells. PMID:27044545

  17. Mycobacterium fortuitum infections associated with laparoscopic gastric banding.

    PubMed

    Callen, Erin C; Kessler, Tiffany L

    2011-03-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum, a rapidly growing atypical mycobacteria, is commonly found in soil and water. This organism is most often known to cause skin, bone, and soft tissue infections associated with local trauma, surgical procedures, and in patients with immunodeficiency. Nosocomial infections associated with a variety of contaminated devices and equipment have also been widely documented. This report presents the first cases of M. fortuitum infection following laparoscopic gastric banding procedures. Both patients had complicated clinical courses necessitating removal of their banding devices and long-term antibiotic therapy.

  18. Chronic multifocal Mycobacterium fortuitum osteomyelitis following penetrating plantar trauma.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Andrea T; Antekeier, Shannon B

    2012-08-01

    We present the case of a 10-year-old girl with Mycobacterium fortuitum osteomyelitis following a plantar puncture wound with vegetative material. Nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) skin and soft tissue infections are well described in immunocompromised populations. However, NTM infection can also be seen in healthy hosts following direct inoculation. Magnetic resonance imaging examination demonstrated multifocal midfoot and metatarsal osteomyelitis. Surgical exploration revealed caseation necrosis and a chronic draining sinus tract. Combined surgical debridement and medical therapy resulted in clinical cure. A high index of suspicion and adequate collection and handling of surgical specimens facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of NTM skin and soft tissue infections.

  19. Mycobacterium lentiflavum as an Emerging Causative Agent of Cervical Lymphadenitis

    PubMed Central

    Piersimoni, Claudio; Goteri, Gaia; Nista, Domenico; Mariottini, Alessandro; Mazzarelli, Gianna; Bornigia, Stefano

    2004-01-01

    A lymph node excision was performed on a 45-year-old woman with left cervical swelling. The disorder which developed after the patient had undergone oral surgery for a severe periodontal disease failed to respond to antimicrobial chemotherapy. A mycobacterial strain subsequently identified by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of cell wall mycolic acids as Mycobacterium lentiflavum grew from the excised specimen. This case and previously published reports highlight the relevance of M. lentiflavum as an emerging causative agent of mycobacterial cervical lymphadenitis. PMID:15297560

  20. Mycobacterium marinum infection following contact with reptiles: vivarium granuloma.

    PubMed

    Bouricha, Mehdi; Castan, Bernard; Duchene-Parisi, Elisabeth; Drancourt, Michel

    2014-04-01

    A 19-year-old man presented with a 1.5-cm nodule on the first dorsal metacarpal ray. The patient denied having contact with fish tanks or fish, but recalled handling many reptiles without gloves in the vivarium where he worked. A culture of a skin biopsy specimen yielded Mycobacterium marinum. The clinical outcome was favourable after a 2-week course of intramuscular gentamicin (180 mg daily) combined with a 6-week course of oral clarithromycin (500 mg twice a day). Doctors should be aware that vivariums, in addition to fish tanks, can be sources of M. marinum exposure.

  1. Disseminated Mycobacterium genavense infection in a chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera).

    PubMed

    Huynh, M; Pingret, J-L; Nicolier, A

    2014-07-01

    A 1-year-old neutered male chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) was presented with emaciation and a 1-month history of progressive weight loss. The animal was bright and responsive on clinical examination, but had poor body condition. Serum biochemical analysis revealed elevated alanine amino transferase and alkaline phosphatase. Ultrasound examination was unremarkable. Thoracic radiography showed changes consistent with bullous emphysema and severe pneumonia. Antibiotic therapy was initiated, but the chinchilla died 6 weeks later. Necropsy examination revealed granulomatous lesions in the lungs and liver. Numerous acid-fast bacilli were present in the cytoplasm of macrophages. Sequencing of genetic material isolated from fixed tissue classified the pathogen as Mycobacterium genavense.

  2. Cholesterol catabolism as a therapeutic target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Hugues; Johnston, Jonathan B.; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is an intracellular pathogen that infects 10 million worldwide and kills 2 million people every year. The uptake and utilization of nutrients by Mtb within the host cell is still poorly understood, although lipids play an important role in Mtb persistence. The recent identification of a large regulon of cholesterol catabolic genes suggests that Mtb can use host sterol for infection and persistence. In this review, we report on recent progress in elucidation of the Mtb cholesterol catabolic reactions and their potential utility as targets for tuberculosis therapeutic agents. PMID:21924910

  3. Detection of Mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium Subspecies, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex by a Novel Tetraplex Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Elena; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and many other nontuberculous mycobacteria are worldwide distributed microorganisms of major medical and veterinary importance. Considering the growing epidemiologic significance of wildlife-livestock-human interrelation, developing rapid detection tools of high specificity and sensitivity is vital to assess their presence and accelerate the process of diagnosing mycobacteriosis. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a novel tetraplex real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus, M. avium subspecies, and M. tuberculosis complex in an internally monitored single assay. The method was evaluated using DNA from mycobacterial (n = 38) and nonmycobacterial (n = 28) strains, tissues spiked with different CFU amounts of three mycobacterial species (n = 57), archival clinical samples (n = 233), and strains isolated from various hosts (n = 147). The minimum detectable DNA amount per reaction was 50 fg for M. bovis BCG and M. kansasii and 5 fg for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. When spiked samples were analyzed, the method consistently detected as few as 100 to 1,000 mycobacterial CFU per gram. The sensitivity and specificity values for the panel of clinical samples were 97.5 and 100% using a verified culture-based method as the reference method. The assays performed on clinical isolates confirmed these results. This PCR was able to identify M. avium and M. tuberculosis complex in the same sample in one reaction. In conclusion, the tetraplex real-time PCR we designed represents a highly specific and sensitive tool for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in routine laboratory diagnosis with potential additional uses. PMID:25588660

  4. Detection of mycobacteria, Mycobacterium avium subspecies, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by a novel tetraplex real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Iker A; Molina, Elena; Elguezabal, Natalia; Pérez, Valentín; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón A

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Mycobacterium avium, and many other nontuberculous mycobacteria are worldwide distributed microorganisms of major medical and veterinary importance. Considering the growing epidemiologic significance of wildlife-livestock-human interrelation, developing rapid detection tools of high specificity and sensitivity is vital to assess their presence and accelerate the process of diagnosing mycobacteriosis. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a novel tetraplex real-time PCR for simultaneous detection of Mycobacterium genus, M. avium subspecies, and M. tuberculosis complex in an internally monitored single assay. The method was evaluated using DNA from mycobacterial (n = 38) and nonmycobacterial (n = 28) strains, tissues spiked with different CFU amounts of three mycobacterial species (n = 57), archival clinical samples (n = 233), and strains isolated from various hosts (n = 147). The minimum detectable DNA amount per reaction was 50 fg for M. bovis BCG and M. kansasii and 5 fg for M. avium subsp. hominissuis. When spiked samples were analyzed, the method consistently detected as few as 100 to 1,000 mycobacterial CFU per gram. The sensitivity and specificity values for the panel of clinical samples were 97.5 and 100% using a verified culture-based method as the reference method. The assays performed on clinical isolates confirmed these results. This PCR was able to identify M. avium and M. tuberculosis complex in the same sample in one reaction. In conclusion, the tetraplex real-time PCR we designed represents a highly specific and sensitive tool for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in routine laboratory diagnosis with potential additional uses.

  5. In Vitro Activity of a New Isothiazoloquinolone, ACH-702, against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Other Mycobacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Rendón, Adrian; Pucci, Michael J.; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we describe the activity of ACH-702 against clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and six different nontuberculous mycobacteria. The MIC50 and MIC90 of both susceptible and drug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains tested were 0.0625 and 0.125 μg/ml, respectively. The MIC50 and MIC90 values for Mycobacterium fortuitum isolates were 0.0625 μg/ml in both cases; Mycobacterium avium complex isolates showed MIC50 and MIC90 values of 0.25 and 4 μg/ml, respectively. PMID:20231398

  6. Isolated Mycobacterium kansasii wound infection and Osteomyelitis in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Tarek; Almahmoud, Mohamed Faher; Raslan, Khulood

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is a slow growing acid-fast non-tuberculosis mycobacterium. It most commonly causes pulmonary disease with tuberculosis-like manifestations. Mycobacterium kansasii-induced skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are very uncommon, especially in the absence of obvious risk factors. In this report, we present a rare case of M. kansasii-associated SSTI complicated by tendonitis and osteomyelitis in an immunocompetent patient. This case highlights the importance of considering non-tuberculosis mycobacteria while investigating chronic, relapsing, non-healing SSTIs and osteomyelitis. Proper pharmacotherapy, along with surgical debridement, is the optimal management to avoid relapse and the production of resistant species. PMID:28031850

  7. Disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Masquerading as Metastasis after Heavy Ion Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Masaru; Mukai, Yutaka; Ushijima, Ryo-ichi; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Umeki, Kenji; Okada, Fumito; Nureki, Shin-ichi; Mimata, Hiromitsu; Kadota, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is useful in disease monitoring of malignancies after therapy, while an FDG uptake may also be present in benign diseases. We herein demonstrate a case of disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis mimicking systemic metastasis of prostate cancer. This case highlights that clinicians should consider Mycobacterium tuberculosis in patients with prostate cancer who demonstrate multifocal FDG uptakes masquerading as metastasis, even when the chest photographs reveal a normal appearance and a sputum examination demonstrates negative results. An invasive surgical biopsy may be required and a pathological analysis would be critical in the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:27853089

  8. Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterium Induced Pseudoaneurysm of the Common Carotid Artery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae Young; Cho, Seong Ho; Kim, Hyun Su; Moon, Jeong Min; Lee, Sangho; Kim, Jong In

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old male patient presented with complaint of a pulsating neck mass. The patient had a previous history of cervical lymphadenopathy by non-tuberculous mycobacterium infection. Rapid growth of the mass on admission and contrast enhanced computed tomography of the neck resulted in a diagnosis of non-tuberculous mycobacterium induced pseudoaneurysm. The patient underwent emergency open repair of the pseudoaneurysm. Pseudoaneurysm of the common carotid artery is regularly reported, but here we report a rare case of non-tuberculous mycobacterium induced pseudoaneurysm of the common carotid artery. PMID:27965926

  9. RNase HI Is Essential for Survival of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Minias, Alina E.; Brzostek, Anna M.; Korycka- Machala, Malgorzata; Dziadek, Bozena; Minias, Piotr; Rajagopalan, Malini; Madiraju, Murty; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2015-01-01

    RNases H are involved in the removal of RNA from RNA/DNA hybrids. Type I RNases H are thought to recognize and cleave the RNA/DNA duplex when at least four ribonucleotides are present. Here we investigated the importance of RNase H type I encoding genes for model organism Mycobacterium smegmatis. By performing gene replacement through homologous recombination, we demonstrate that each of the two presumable RNase H type I encoding genes, rnhA and MSMEG4305, can be removed from M. smegmatis genome without affecting the growth rate of the mutant. Further, we demonstrate that deletion of both RNases H type I encoding genes in M. smegmatis leads to synthetic lethality. Finally, we question the possibility of existence of RNase HI related alternative mode of initiation of DNA replication in M. smegmatis, the process initially discovered in Escherichia coli. We suspect that synthetic lethality of double mutant lacking RNases H type I is caused by formation of R-loops leading to collapse of replication forks. We report Mycobacterium smegmatis as the first bacterial species, where function of RNase H type I has been found essential. PMID:25965344

  10. Antimicrobial resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: mechanistic and evolutionary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Gygli, Sebastian M; Borrell, Sonia; Trauner, Andrej; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2017-03-25

    Antibiotic-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are threatening progress in containing the global tuberculosis epidemic. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics, limiting the number of compounds available for treatment. This intrinsic resistance is due to a number of mechanisms including a thick, waxy, hydrophobic cell envelope and the presence of drug degrading and modifying enzymes. Resistance to the drugs which are active against M. tuberculosis is, in the absence of horizontally transferred resistance determinants, conferred by chromosomal mutations. These chromosomal mutations may confer drug resistance via modification or overexpression of the drug target, as well as by prevention of prodrug activation. Drug resistance mutations may have pleiotropic effects leading to a reduction in the bacterium's fitness, quantifiable e.g. by a reduction in the in vitro growth rate. Secondary so-called compensatory mutations, not involved in conferring resistance, can ameliorate the fitness cost by interacting epistatically with the resistance mutation. Although the genetic diversity of M. tuberculosis is low compared to other pathogenic bacteria, the strain genetic background has been demonstrated to influence multiple aspects in the evolution of drug resistance. The rate of resistance evolution and the fitness costs of drug resistance mutations may vary as a function of the genetic background.

  11. Dielectrophoretic characterization of antibiotic-treated Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shinnosuke; Lee, Hyun-Boo; Becker, Annie L; Weigel, Kris M; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Cangelosi, Gerard A; Chung, Jae-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has become a serious concern for proper treatment of patients. As a phenotypic method, dielectrophoresis can be useful but is yet to be attempted to evaluate Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex cells. This paper investigates the dielectrophoretic behavior of Mycobacterium bovis (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, BCG) cells that are treated with heat or antibiotics rifampin (RIF) or isoniazid (INH). The experimental parameters are designed on the basis of our sensitivity analysis. The medium conductivity (σ(m)) and the frequency (f) for a crossover frequency (f(xo1)) test are decided to detect the change of σ(m)-f(xo1) in conjunction with the drug mechanism. Statistical modeling is conducted to estimate the distributions of viable and nonviable cells from the discrete measurement of f (xo1). Finally, the parameters of the electrophysiology of BCG cells, C(envelope) and σ(cyto), are extracted through a sampling algorithm. This is the first evaluation of the dielectrophoresis (DEP) approach as a means to assess the effects of antimicrobial drugs on M. tuberculosis complex cells.

  12. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I by small-molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Godbole, Adwait Anand; Ahmed, Wareed; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Bradley, Erin K; Ekins, Sean; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2015-03-01

    We describe inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I (MttopoI), an essential mycobacterial enzyme, by two related compounds, imipramine and norclomipramine, of which imipramine is clinically used as an antidepressant. These molecules showed growth inhibition of both Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis cells. The mechanism of action of these two molecules was investigated by analyzing the individual steps of the topoisomerase I (topoI) reaction cycle. The compounds stimulated cleavage, thereby perturbing the cleavage-religation equilibrium. Consequently, these molecules inhibited the growth of the cells overexpressing topoI at a low MIC. Docking of the molecules on the MttopoI model suggested that they bind near the metal binding site of the enzyme. The DNA relaxation activity of the metal binding mutants harboring mutations in the DxDxE motif was differentially affected by the molecules, suggesting that the metal coordinating residues contribute to the interaction of the enzyme with the drug. Taken together, the results highlight the potential of these small molecules, which poison the M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis topoisomerase I, as leads for the development of improved molecules to combat mycobacterial infections. Moreover, targeting metal coordination in topoisomerases might be a general strategy to develop new lead molecules.

  13. Mycobacterium-Infected Dendritic Cells Disseminate Granulomatous Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Jeffrey S.; Rayasam, Aditya; Schreiber, Heidi A.; Fabry, Zsuzsanna; Sandor, Matyas

    2015-01-01

    The disappearance and reformation of granulomas during tuberculosis has been described using PET/CT/X-ray in both human clinical settings and animal models, but the mechanisms of granuloma reformation during active disease remains unclear. Granulomas can recruit inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) that can regulate local T-cell responses and can carry bacteria into the lymph nodes, which is crucial for generating systemic T-cell responses against mycobacteria. Here, we report that a subset of mycobacterium-infected iDCs are associated with bacteria-specific T-cells in infected tissue, outside the granuloma, and that this results in the formation of new and/or larger multi-focal lesions. Mycobacterium-infected iDCs express less CCR7 and migrate less efficiently compared to the non-infected iDCs, which may support T-cell capture in granulomatous tissue. Capture may reduce antigen availability in the lymph node, thereby decreasing systemic priming, resulting in a possible regulatory loop between systemic T-cell responses and granuloma reformation. T-cell/infected iDCs clusters outside the granuloma can be detected during the acute and chronic phase of BCG and Mtb infection. Our studies suggest a direct role for inflammatory dendritic cells in the dissemination of granulomatous inflammation. PMID:26515292

  14. Mycobacterium massiliense Induces Macrophage Extracellular Traps with Facilitating Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yina; Na, Yirang; Kim, Bum-Joon; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have been known to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), antimicrobial DNA structures capable of capturing and killing microbes. Recently, a similar phenomenon has been reported in macrophages infected with various pathogens. However, a role for macrophages extracellular traps (METs) in host defense responses against Mycobacterium massiliense (M. mass) has yet to be described. In this study, we show that M. mass, a rapid growing mycobacterium (RGM), also induces the release of METs from PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Intriguingly, this process is not dependent on NADPH oxidase activity, which regulates NET formation. Instead, M. mass-induced MET formation partially depends on calcium influx and requires phagocytosis of high bacterial load. The METs consist of a DNA backbone embedded with microbicidal proteins such as histone, MPO and elastase. Released METs entrap M. mass and prevent their dissemination, but do not have bactericidal activity. Instead, they result in enhanced bacterial growth. In this regard, METs were considered to provide interaction of M. mass with cells and an environment for bacterial aggregation, which may facilitate mycobacterial survival and growth. In conclusion, our results demonstrate METs as an innate defense response against M. mass infection, and suggest that extracellular traps play a multifaceted role in the interplay between host and bacteria. PMID:27191593

  15. Differentiating between live and dead Mycobacterium smegmatis using autofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Cynthia; Ha, Ngan P.; Pawlowski, Michal E.; Graviss, Edward A.; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2016-01-01

    While there have been research efforts to find faster and more efficient diagnostic techniques for tuberculosis (TB), it is equally important to monitor a patient’s response to treatment over time, especially with the increasing prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively-drug resistant (XDR) TB. Between sputum smear microscopy, culture, and GeneXpert, only culture can verify viability of mycobacteria. However, it may take up to six weeks to grow Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), during which time the patient may have responded to treatment or the mycobacteria are still viable because the patient has MDR or XDR TB. In both situations, treatment incurs increased patient costs and makes them more susceptible to host-drug effects such as liver damage. Coenzyme Factor 420 (F420) is a fluorescent coenzyme found naturally in mycobacteria, with an excitation peak around 420 nm and an emission peak around 470 nm. Using Mycobacterium smegmatis, we show that live and dead mycobacteria undergo different rates of photobleaching over a period of 2 min. These preliminary experiments suggest that the different photobleaching rates could be used to help monitor a patient’s response to TB treatment. In future studies, we propose to describe these experiments with Mtb as both M. smegmatis and Mtb use F420. PMID:27742463

  16. [The Mycobacterium leprae genome: from sequence analysis to therapeutic implications].

    PubMed

    Honore, N

    2002-01-01

    The genome of Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, was analyzed by rapid sequencing of cosmids and plasmids prepared from DNA isolated from one patient's strain. Results showed that the bacillus possesses a single circular chromosome that differs from other known mycobacterium chromosomes with regard to size (3.2 Mb) and G + C content (57.8%). Computer analysis demonstrated that only half of the sequence contains protein-coding genes. The other half contains pseudogenes and non-coding sequences. These findings indicate that M. leprae has undergone a major reductive evolution leaving a minimal set of functional genes for survival. Study of the coding region of the sequence provides evidence accounting for the particular pathogenic properties of M. leprae which is an obligate intracellular parasite. Disappearance of numerous enzymatic pathways in comparison with M. tuberculosis, an intracellular pathogen comparable to M. leprae, could explain the differences observed between the two organisms. Genomic analysis of the leprosy bacillus also provided insight into the molecular basis for resistance to various antibiotics and allowed identification of several potential targets for new drug treatments.

  17. Treatment of the Mycobacterium chelonae Infection after Fat Injection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji-An; Kim, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Min-Su; Lee, Keun-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    For recent years, use of autologous fat injection has increased significantly in facial contouring surgery. Along with such increase in use, complications like atypical mycoplasma infection have been also on the increasing trend. The authors report two cases of Mycobacterium chelonae infection that occurred after autologous fat injection. Patients were treated as infection that resistant to common antibiotics and results were negative to routine culture and Gram staining. Acid-fast bacillus stain, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and mycobacterial cultures were conducted for diagnosis under suspicion of atypical mycoplasma infection. Then, combination antibiotics therapy, surgical treatment, and steroid injection were performed for treatment. Both patients were diagnosed with Mycobacterium chelonae in PCR test. They were positive to mycobacterial cultures. Combination antibiotics therapy was repeated to improvement of symptom. However, they could not be free from side effects such as deformation in facial contour, scar and pigmentation even after full recovery. When chronic wound infections after autologous fat injection, we must suspect atypical or mycobacterial infection and conduct examinations for a early diagnosis and proper antibiotic therapy that is effective to the nontuberculous mycobacteria. PMID:25606492

  18. Mycobacterium-Infected Dendritic Cells Disseminate Granulomatous Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Harding, Jeffrey S; Rayasam, Aditya; Schreiber, Heidi A; Fabry, Zsuzsanna; Sandor, Matyas

    2015-10-30

    The disappearance and reformation of granulomas during tuberculosis has been described using PET/CT/X-ray in both human clinical settings and animal models, but the mechanisms of granuloma reformation during active disease remains unclear. Granulomas can recruit inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs) that can regulate local T-cell responses and can carry bacteria into the lymph nodes, which is crucial for generating systemic T-cell responses against mycobacteria. Here, we report that a subset of mycobacterium-infected iDCs are associated with bacteria-specific T-cells in infected tissue, outside the granuloma, and that this results in the formation of new and/or larger multi-focal lesions. Mycobacterium-infected iDCs express less CCR7 and migrate less efficiently compared to the non-infected iDCs, which may support T-cell capture in granulomatous tissue. Capture may reduce antigen availability in the lymph node, thereby decreasing systemic priming, resulting in a possible regulatory loop between systemic T-cell responses and granuloma reformation. T-cell/infected iDCs clusters outside the granuloma can be detected during the acute and chronic phase of BCG and Mtb infection. Our studies suggest a direct role for inflammatory dendritic cells in the dissemination of granulomatous inflammation.

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: ecology and evolution of a human bacterium.

    PubMed

    Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Sanou, Adama; Anh, Nguyen Thi Van; Godreuil, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    Some species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes human tuberculosis (TB), are the first cause of death linked to a single pathogen worldwide. In the last decades, evolutionary studies have much improved our knowledge on MTBC history and have highlighted its long co-evolution with humans. Its ability to remain latent in humans, the extraordinary proportion of asymptomatic carriers (one-third of the entire human population), the deadly epidemics and the observed increasing level of resistance to antibiotics are proof of its evolutionary success. Many MTBC molecular signatures show not only that these bacteria are a model of adaptation to humans but also that they have influenced human evolution. Owing to the unbalance between the number of asymptomatic carriers and the number of patients with active TB, some authors suggest that infection by MTBC could have a protective role against active TB disease and also against other pathologies. However, it would be inappropriate to consider these infectious pathogens as commensals or symbionts, given the level of morbidity and mortality caused by TB.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Bacteremia Among Acutely Febrile Children in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Pavlinac, Patricia B; Naulikha, Jaqueline M; John-Stewart, Grace C; Onchiri, Frankline M; Okumu, Albert O; Sitati, Ruth R; Cranmer, Lisa M; Lokken, Erica M; Singa, Benson O; Walson, Judd L

    2015-11-01

    In children, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) frequently disseminates systemically, presenting with nonspecific signs including fever. We determined prevalence of M. tuberculosis bacteremia among febrile children presenting to hospitals in Nyanza, Kenya (a region with high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and M. tuberculosis prevalence). Between March 2013 and February 2014, we enrolled children aged 6 months to 5 years presenting with fever (axillary temperature ≥ 37.5°C) and no recent antibiotic use. Blood samples were collected for bacterial and mycobacterial culture using standard methods. Among 148 children enrolled, median age was 3.1 years (interquartile range: 1.8-4.1 years); 10.3% of children were living with a household member diagnosed with M. tuberculosis in the last year. Seventeen percent of children were stunted (height-for-age z-score < -2), 18.6% wasted (weight-for-height z-score < -2), 2.7% were HIV-infected, and 14.2% were HIV-exposed uninfected. Seventeen children (11.5%) had one or more signs of tuberculosis (TB). All children had a Bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccination scar. Among 134 viable blood cultures, none (95% confidence interval: 0-2.7%) had Mycobacterium isolated. Despite exposure to household TB contacts, HIV exposure, and malnutrition, M. tuberculosis bacteremia was not detected in this pediatric febrile cohort, a finding consistent with other pediatric studies.

  1. A High-Throughput Cidality Screen for Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Parvinder; Ghosh, Anirban; Krishnamurthy, Ramya Vadageri; Bhattacharjee, Deepa Gagwani; Achar, Vijayashree; Datta, Santanu; Narayanan, Shridhar; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) aerosols is a major threat to tuberculosis (TB) researchers, even in bio-safety level-3 (BSL-3) facilities. Automation and high-throughput screens (HTS) in BSL3 facilities are essential for minimizing manual aerosol-generating interventions and facilitating TB research. In the present study, we report the development and validation of a high-throughput, 24-well ‘spot-assay’ for selecting bactericidal compounds against Mtb. The bactericidal screen concept was first validated in the fast-growing surrogate Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) and subsequently confirmed in Mtb using the following reference anti-tubercular drugs: rifampicin, isoniazid, ofloxacin and ethambutol (RIOE, acting on different targets). The potential use of the spot-assay to select bactericidal compounds from a large library was confirmed by screening on Mtb, with parallel plating by the conventional gold standard method (correlation, r2 = 0.808). An automated spot-assay further enabled an MBC90 determination on resistant and sensitive Mtb clinical isolates. The implementation of the spot-assay in kinetic screens to enumerate residual Mtb after either genetic silencing (anti-sense RNA, AS-RNA) or chemical inhibition corroborated its ability to detect cidality. This relatively simple, economical and quantitative HTS considerably minimized the bio-hazard risk and enabled the selection of novel vulnerable Mtb targets and mycobactericidal compounds. Thus, spot-assays have great potential to impact the TB drug discovery process. PMID:25693161

  2. [Strategical use of genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in tuberculosis control].

    PubMed

    David, Susana

    2008-01-01

    The tuberculosis situation in Portugal justifies the use of a strategy for the genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, particularly as Portugal is part of the global backdrop of human mobility, something which has a knock-on effect on the pandemic. Several international studies have placed spoligotyping and MIRU- VNTR typing as first line techniques for the molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as these techniques rely on simple technologies (PCR) and produce patterns which are easily translated into a direct interpretation numerical code. Spoligotyping has been accordingly proposed for all the isolates, while MIRU-VNTR typing should be applied to isolates with a common spoliotype. Other techniques, including IS6110-RFLP, should be reserved for use ill accordance with selected criteria. Previous studies in Portugal using spoligotyping have underlined the advantages of a strategy based on sampling consecutive patient isolates with no prior selection criteria. This allows characterisation of the M. tuberculosis population structure through monitoring the distribution of the genotypes geographically over time and within the various risk groups. On the other hand, the association of spoligotyping, MIRU-VNTF (typing and, possibly, other techniques, needs evaluating as part of bigger pictures, including identifying recent transmission situations, distinguishing between reinfection and relapse episodes and mapping the size and dynamics of disease transmission. The solution to the tuberculosis problem in Portugal implies structuring genotyping's role in tuberculosis prevention and control and its evaluation through concrete examples and results.

  3. Mechanisms involved in the intrinsic isoniazid resistance of Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Mdluli, K; Swanson, J; Fischer, E; Lee, R E; Barry, C E

    1998-03-01

    Isoniazid (INH), which acts by inhibiting mycolic acid biosynthesis, is very potent against the tuberculous mycobacteria. It is about 100-fold less effective against Mycobacterium avium. This difference has often been attributed to a decreased permeability of the cell wall. We measured the rate of conversion of radiolabelled INH to 4-pyridylmethanol by whole cells and cell-free extracts and estimated the permeability barrier imposed by the cell wall to INH influx in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium. There was no significant difference in the relative permeability to INH between these two species. However, the total conversion rate in M. tuberculosis was found to be four times greater. Examination of in vitro-generated mutants revealed that the major resistance mechanism for both species is loss of the catalase-peroxidase KatG. Analysis of lipid and protein biosynthetic profiles demonstrated that the molecular target of activated INH was identical for both species. M. avium, however, formed colonies at INH concentrations inhibitory for mycolic acid biosynthesis. These mycolate-deficient M. avium exhibited altered colony morphologies, modified cell wall ultrastructure and were 10-fold more sensitive to treatment with hydrophobic antibiotics, such as rifampin. These findings may significantly impact the design of new therapeutic regimens for the treatment of infections with atypical mycobacteria.

  4. Mycobacterium abscessus cording prevents phagocytosis and promotes abscess formation

    PubMed Central

    Bernut, Audrey; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Kissa, Karima; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Lutfalla, Georges; Kremer, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing Mycobacterium causing a wide spectrum of clinical syndromes. It now is recognized as a pulmonary pathogen to which cystic fibrosis patients have a particular susceptibility. The M. abscessus rough (R) variant, devoid of cell-surface glycopeptidolipids (GPLs), causes more severe clinical disease than the smooth (S) variant, but the underlying mechanisms of R-variant virulence remain obscure. Exploiting the optical transparency of zebrafish embryos, we observed that the increased virulence of the M. abscessus R variant compared with the S variant correlated with the loss of GPL production. The virulence of the R variant involved the massive production of serpentine cords, absent during S-variant infection, and the cords initiated abscess formation leading to rapid larval death. Cording occurred within the vasculature and was highly pronounced in the central nervous system (CNS). It appears that M. abscessus is transported to the CNS within macrophages. The release of M. abscessus from apoptotic macrophages initiated the formation of cords that grew too large to be phagocytized by macrophages or neutrophils. This study is a description of the crucial role of cording in the in vivo physiopathology of M. abscessus infection and emphasizes cording as a mechanism of immune evasion. PMID:24567393

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Bacteremia among Acutely Febrile Children in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Pavlinac, Patricia B.; Naulikha, Jaqueline M.; John-Stewart, Grace C.; Onchiri, Frankline M.; Okumu, Albert O.; Sitati, Ruth R.; Cranmer, Lisa M.; Lokken, Erica M.; Singa, Benson O.; Walson, Judd L.

    2015-01-01

    In children, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) frequently disseminates systemically, presenting with nonspecific signs including fever. We determined prevalence of M. tuberculosis bacteremia among febrile children presenting to hospitals in Nyanza, Kenya (a region with high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and M. tuberculosis prevalence). Between March 2013 and February 2014, we enrolled children aged 6 months to 5 years presenting with fever (axillary temperature ≥ 37.5°C) and no recent antibiotic use. Blood samples were collected for bacterial and mycobacterial culture using standard methods. Among 148 children enrolled, median age was 3.1 years (interquartile range: 1.8–4.1 years); 10.3% of children were living with a household member diagnosed with M. tuberculosis in the last year. Seventeen percent of children were stunted (height-for-age z-score < −2), 18.6% wasted (weight-for-height z-score < −2), 2.7% were HIV-infected, and 14.2% were HIV-exposed uninfected. Seventeen children (11.5%) had one or more signs of tuberculosis (TB). All children had a Bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccination scar. Among 134 viable blood cultures, none (95% confidence interval: 0–2.7%) had Mycobacterium isolated. Despite exposure to household TB contacts, HIV exposure, and malnutrition, M. tuberculosis bacteremia was not detected in this pediatric febrile cohort, a finding consistent with other pediatric studies. PMID:26324730

  6. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection arising in a new tattoo.

    PubMed

    Philips, Rebecca C; Hunter-Ellul, Lindsey A; Martin, Julie E; Wilkerson, Michael G

    2014-06-15

    We report an uncommon case of a cutaneous infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum arising in a new tattoo. A 29-year-old man presented with a several month history of a non-pruritic papular eruption within a tattoo; the papules developed 1-to-2 weeks after the tattoo procedure. He denied similar symptoms with previous tattoos. He had been treated unsuccessfully with cephalexin. Histopathologic examination revealed perifollicular chronic and granulomatous inflammation, consistent with chronic folliculitis. Acid-fast bacilli culture identified Mycobacterium fortuitum complex. The patient was treated with a 2-month course of oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (160mg/800mg twice daily) and ciprofloxacin (250 mg twice daily), with clinical improvement at follow up after three weeks of the antibiotic regimen. Rapidly growing mycobacteria have emerged as a cause of tattoo-associated cutaneous infection in recent years. Diagnosis and treatment can be difficult without clinical suspicion. M. fortuitum and other rapidly growing mycobacteria should be considered in the differential diagnosis of tattoo-associated dermatologic complications.

  7. Frequency of Mycobacterium chimaera among Belgian patients, 2015.

    PubMed

    Soetaert, Karine; Vluggen, Christelle; André, Emmanuel; Vanhoof, Raymond; Vanfleteren, Brigitte; Mathys, Vanessa

    2016-11-01

    Mycobacterium chimaera arouses an increasing public health concern, as this non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) has recently been associated with life-threatening cardiac infections. M. chimaera and Mycobacteriumintracellulare are genetically very close but recently appeared to present different epidemiological and clinical significance. Therefore, it has become important for laboratories to use adequate techniques allowing precise species identification. To date, most commercially available laboratory assays cannot distinguish them and erroneously identify M. chimaera as M. intracellulare. We performed a re-analysis of the 149 M. intracellulare strains received by the Belgian National Reference Laboratory using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, representing 25 % of all NTM collected in 2015. We found that M. chimaera represents the majority (n=94, 63 %) of the previous M. intracellulare. This study reports the large presence of M. intracellulare/chimaera among Belgian patients infected by an NTM and the predominance of the species M. chimaera among this group. This study also stresses the public health importance of M. chimaera and demonstrates the inability of commonly used laboratory techniques to correctly diagnose these infections.

  8. Mycobacterium fortuitum from lesions of slaughtered pigs in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Cadmus, S I B; Adesokan, H K; Okker, M; Jahans, K

    2010-12-01

    To ascertain the cause of tuberculous-like lesions in pigs slaughtered in a local abattoir in Ibadan (south-western Nigeria), a total of 516 pigs were inspected over a period of four months, 18 of which had gross lesions suggestive of tuberculosis at post-mortem. Mycobacterial culture and molecular typing (GenoType Mycobacterium CM [Common Mycobacteria] assay) analysis were used to identify and confirm the mycobacteria species responsible for these lesions. Results show that 2.3% (12/516) of the animals screened were infected with mycobacteria; Mycobacterium fortuitum was confirmed in 33.3% (4/12) of these cases. As far as the authors are aware, this is the first report confirming the isolation of M. fortuitum in slaughtered pigs in Nigeria. There is a need to improve on necessary preventive and control measures that will reduce potential sources of mycobacterial infections in pig-rearing herds. These infections may also have public health implications, especially to workers in the pig industry.

  9. Early Events in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques†

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Philana Ling; Pawar, Santosh; Myers, Amy; Pegu, Amarenda; Fuhrman, Carl; Reinhart, Todd A.; Capuano, Saverio V.; Klein, Edwin; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2006-01-01

    Little is known regarding the early events of infection of humans with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The cynomolgus macaque is a useful model of tuberculosis, with strong similarities to human tuberculosis. In this study, eight cynomolgus macaques were infected bronchoscopically with low-dose M. tuberculosis; clinical, immunologic, microbiologic, and pathologic events were assessed 3 to 6 weeks postinfection. Gross pathological abnormalities were observed as early as 3 weeks, including Ghon complex formation by 5 weeks postinfection. Caseous granulomas were observed in the lung as early as 4 weeks postinfection. Only caseous granulomas were observed in the lungs at these early time points, reflecting a rigorous initial response. T-cell activation (CD29 and CD69) and chemokine receptor (CXCR3 and CCR5) expression appeared localized to different anatomic sites. Activation markers were increased on cells from airways and only at modest levels on cells in peripheral blood. The priming of mycobacterium-specific T cells, characterized by the production of gamma interferon occurred slowly, with responses seen only after 4 weeks of infection. These responses were observed from T lymphocytes in blood, airways, and hilar lymph node, with responses predominantly localized to the site of infection. From these studies, we conclude that immune responses to M. tuberculosis are relatively slow in the local and peripheral compartments and that necrosis occurs surprisingly quickly during granuloma formation. PMID:16790751

  10. Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Mycobacterium haemophilum Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lindeboom, Jerome A.; Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, Lesla E. S.; van Soolingen, Dick; Prins, Jan M.; Kuijper, Eduard J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Mycobacterium haemophilum is a slowly growing acid-fast bacillus (AFB) belonging to the group of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) frequently found in environmental habitats, which can colonize and occasionally infect humans and animals. Several findings suggest that water reservoirs are a likely source of M. haemophilum infections. M. haemophilum causes mainly ulcerating skin infections and arthritis in persons who are severely immunocompromised. Disseminated and pulmonary infections occasionally occur. The second at-risk group is otherwise healthy children, who typically develop cervical and perihilar lymphadenitis. A full diagnostic regimen for the optimal detection of M. haemophilum includes acid-fast staining, culturing at two temperatures with iron-supplemented media, and molecular detection. The most preferable molecular assay is a real-time PCR targeting an M. haemophilum-specific internal transcribed spacer (ITS), but another approach is the application of a generic PCR for a mycobacterium-specific fragment with subsequent sequencing to identify M. haemophilum. No standard treatment guidelines are available, but published literature agrees that immunocompromised patients should be treated with multiple antibiotics, tailored to the disease presentation and underlying degree of immune suppression. The outcome of M. haemophilum cervicofacial lymphadenitis in immunocompetent patients favors surgical intervention rather than antibiotic treatment. PMID:21976605

  11. Infection by Mycobacterium bovis in a dog from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Vivianne Cambuí Figueiredo; Figueiredo, Salomão Cambuí de; Rosales, Cesar Alejandro Rodriguez; Porto, Camila Dias; Sequeira, Julio Lopes; Neto, José Soares Ferreira; Paes, Antônio Carlos; Salgado, Vanessa Riesz

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic disease caused by bacteria belonging to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MtbC). This disease rarely affects dogs. Canine infections are usually caused by M. tuberculosis. Mycobacterium bovis infections are rare in dogs and associated with consumption of raw milk or contaminated products. Here, we report a Boxer dog who had a M. bovis infection and was admitted to a Brazilian veterinary hospital with a presumptive diagnosis of chronic ehrlichiosis. Despite receiving treatment for chronic ehrlichiosis, it progressed to death. TB was diagnosed during post-mortem examinations using histopathological analysis. Ziehl-Neelsen staining revealed acid-fast bacilli in the kidneys, liver, mesentery, and a mass adhered to the liver. Further, PCR-restriction analysis was performed to identify mycobacteria in the samples. A restriction profile compatible with MtbC was found in the lungs. In addition, PCR-based MtbC typing deletions at different loci of chromosome 9 enabled the identification of M. bovis in the lungs. Therefore, it is very essential to perform differential diagnosis of TB in dogs with non-specific clinical signs and who do not respond to treatment, particularly those who had been in contact with TB-infected cattle or owners. Further, we highlight the use of molecular methods for the identification of bacilli, improving the diagnosis and aiding epidemiological studies.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in women with unexplained infertility

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Sabeti, Parvin; Aflatoonian, Abbas; Sheikhha, Mohammad Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genital tuberculosis (GTB) is an important cause of female infertility, especially in developing countries. The positive results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in endometrial GTB in the absence of tubal damage raise the possibility of the detection of sub-clinical or latent disease, with doubtful benefits of treatment. Objective: To evaluate the mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in endometrial biopsy samples collected from unexplained infertile women attending Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility by using PCR techniques. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 144 infertile women with unexplained infertility aged 20-35 years old and normal Histro-saplango graphy findings were enrolled. Endometrial biopsy samples from each participant were tested for mycobacterium tuberculosis detecting by PCR. In 93 patients, peritoneal fluid was also taken for culture and PCR. Results: The PCR results of endometrial specimens were negative in all cases, demonstrating that there was no GTB infection among our patients. Conclusion: Our results showed that GTB could not be considered as a major problem in women with unexplained infertility. Although, studies have indicated that PCR is a useful method in diagnosing early GTB disease in infertile women with no demonstrable evidence of tubal or endometrial involvement. PMID:27141534

  13. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with meningitis using nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Rios-Sarabia, Nora; Hernández-González, Olivia; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge; Gordillo, Guadalupe; Vázquez-Rosales, Guillermo; Muñoz-Pérez, Leopoldo; Torres, Javier; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2016-10-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the most severe form of tuberculosis. It is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis; MT) and it is very difficult to diagnose. The symptoms are similar to other infectious neurological diseases, such as neurocysticercosis, neuroborreliosis, or herpes viral infection. The aim of this study was to identify tuberculosis (TB) in cases of meningitis with clinical and laboratory evidence suggestive of TBM, and to confirm our findings with molecular tests for TB infection. We recruited patients with neurological symptoms who were examined at the neurology services of Hospitals of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) in Mexico City. A total of 144 consecutive patients with suggestive infectious meningitis were initially included; 94 cases of meningitis with clinical and laboratory evidence suggestive of TBM were included, but only 50 of these cases fulfilled the criteria for probable TBM. As the controls, we included 50 cases of meningitis with clinical and laboratory evidence suggestive of non-TBM. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected from all 100 patients (cases and controls) and tested for TB by multiplex and nested PCR analyses. Nested PCR detected 0.1 fg of M. tuberculosis DNA. TB infection was confirmed with molecular tests in 49 patients from the 50 cases suggestive of TBM and in 1 of the 50 non-TBM cases. The analysis exhibited a sensitivity of 98.0%, a specificity of 92.0%, a positive predictive value of 88.0% and a negative predictive value of 98.0%. The use CSF for the analyses proved to be effective for the rapid diagnosis of TBM using a developed system of multiplex and nested PCR analyses in patients presenting neurological symptoms.

  14. Tuberculosis patients co-infected with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in an urban area of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Marcio Roberto; Rocha, Adalgiza da Silva; da Costa, Ronaldo Rodrigues; de Alencar, Andrea Padilha; de Oliveira, Vania Maria; Fonseca, Antônio Augusto; Sales, Mariana Lázaro; Issa, Marina de Azevedo; Soares, Paulo Martins; Pereira, Omara Tereza Vianello; dos Santos, Eduardo Calazans; Mendes, Rejane Silva; Ferreira, Ângela Maria de Jesus; Mota, Pedro Moacyr Pinto Coelho; Suffys, Philip Noel; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland

    2013-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study, mycobacteria specimens from 189 tuberculosis (TB) patients living in an urban area in Brazil were characterised from 2008-2010 using phenotypic and molecular speciation methods (pncA gene and oxyR pseudogene analysis). Of these samples, 174 isolates simultaneously grew on Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) and Stonebrink (SB)-containing media and presented phenotypic and molecular profiles of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, whereas 12 had molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis based on the DNA analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin wax-embedded tissue samples (paraffin blocks). One patient produced two sputum isolates, the first of which simultaneously grew on LJ and SB media and presented phenotypic and molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis, and the second of which only grew on SB media and presented phenotypic profiles of Mycobacterium bovis. One patient provided a bronchial lavage isolate, which simultaneously grew on LJ and SB media and presented phenotypic and molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis, but had molecular profiles of M. bovis from paraffin block DNA analysis, and one sample had molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis identified from two distinct paraffin blocks. Moreover, we found a low prevalence (1.6%) of M. bovis among these isolates, which suggests that local health service procedures likely underestimate its real frequency and that it deserves more attention from public health officials. PMID:23778657

  15. In vitro synergic effect of beta-lapachone and isoniazid on the growth of Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Joas L da; Mesquita, Amanda R C; Ximenes, Eulalia A

    2009-07-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are ubiquitous and saprophytic organisms that have been implicated in a wide spectrum of diseases due to an increasing number of immunocompromised patients. The natural resistance of atypical mycobacteria to classical antituberculous drugs has encouraged research into new chemotherapeutic agents and drug combinations. The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro antimycobacterial activities of (2)-lapachone alone and in combination with isoniazid against Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium smegmatis via the Time-Kill Curve method. A 2 log10 CFU/mL reduction in the M. smegmatis culture was observed 72 h after adding (2)-lapachone at its minimum inhibitory concentration. This drug sterilised the culture in 120 h. For M. fortuitum, a reduction of 1.55 log10 CFU/mL occurred in 24 h, but regrowth was seen in contact with (2)-lapachone. Both microorganisms were resistant to isoniazid. Regrowth of M. fortuitum and M. smegmatis was observed at 48 h and 72 h, respectively. In combination, these two drugs had a bactericidal effect and sterilised both cultures in 96 h. These results are valuable because antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a major public health problem.

  16. Tuberculosis patients co-infected with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in an urban area of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marcio Roberto; Rocha, Adalgiza da Silva; da Costa, Ronaldo Rodrigues; de Alencar, Andrea Padilha; de Oliveira, Vania Maria; Fonseca Júnior, Antônio Augusto; Sales, Mariana Lázaro; Issa, Marina de Azevedo; Filho, Paulo Martins Soares; Pereira, Omara Tereza Vianello; dos Santos, Eduardo Calazans; Mendes, Rejane Silva; Ferreira, Angela Maria de Jesus; Mota, Pedro Moacyr Pinto Coelho; Suffys, Philip Noel; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland

    2013-05-01

    In this cross-sectional study, mycobacteria specimens from 189 tuberculosis (TB) patients living in an urban area in Brazil were characterised from 2008-2010 using phenotypic and molecular speciation methods (pncA gene and oxyR pseudogene analysis). Of these samples, 174 isolates simultaneously grew on Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) and Stonebrink (SB)-containing media and presented phenotypic and molecular profiles of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, whereas 12 had molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis based on the DNA analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin wax-embedded tissue samples (paraffin blocks). One patient produced two sputum isolates, the first of which simultaneously grew on LJ and SB media and presented phenotypic and molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis, and the second of which only grew on SB media and presented phenotypic profiles of Mycobacterium bovis. One patient provided a bronchial lavage isolate, which simultaneously grew on LJ and SB media and presented phenotypic and molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis, but had molecular profiles of M. bovis from paraffin block DNA analysis, and one sample had molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis identified from two distinct paraffin blocks. Moreover, we found a low prevalence (1.6%) of M. bovis among these isolates, which suggests that local health service procedures likely underestimate its real frequency and that it deserves more attention from public health officials.

  17. Isolation by genetic labeling of a new mycobacterial plasmid, pJAZ38, from Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed Central

    Gavigan, J A; Aínsa, J A; Pérez, E; Otal, I; Martín, C

    1997-01-01

    In a two-step mating experiment with recipient strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis, the Mycobacterium fortuitum cryptic plasmid pJAZ38 was isolated. Plasmid pJAZ38 was genetically labeled by cointegration formation mediated by the kanamycin-resistant mycobacterial transposon Tn611. The region responsible for replication of pJAZ38 was located and sequenced. This region showed homology with the Mycobacterium avium plasmid pLR7 and the Mycobacterium scrofulaceum plasmid pMSC262, a family of plasmids which have been found to be widespread throughout the mycobacteria. Further experiments showed pJAZ38 to be stably inherited in the absence of selection pressure and compatible with the most commonly used mycobacterial replicon, pAL5000. In contrast to pLR7 and pMSC262, pJAZ38 was able to replicate in M. smegmatis mc(2)155, making it a useful tool for mycobacterial genetics. PMID:9209023

  18. Mycobacterium kansasii causing chronic monoarticular synovitis in a patient with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Menashe, Leo; Kerr, Leslie Dubin; Hermann, George

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is a nontuberculous mycobacterium that primarily causes pulmonary disease in AIDS patients, however it has also been known, rarely, to result in skeletal infection. When skeletal infection occurs, the time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis is up to 5 years in previously reported cases. We describe a 48-year-old woman with HIV/AIDS who presented with chronic, isolated left knee pain and swelling of over two decades which had recently worsened. Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated marked subarticular erosions, synovial thickening, and bone marrow edema, which had progressed compared with prior imaging done seven years earlier. Synovial biopsy grew Mycobacterium kansasii. Following the presentation of our case, clinical and imaging findings, including the differential diagnosis, of monoarticular arthritis caused by Mycobacterium kansasii are reviewed and discussed. PMID:26629306

  19. First case of Mycobacterium heckeshornense cavitary lung disease in the Latin America and Caribbean region

    PubMed Central

    Coitinho, C.; Greif, G.; van Ingen, J.; Laserra, P.; Robello, C.; Rivas, C.

    2015-01-01

    A case of cavitary pulmonary disease caused by Mycobacterium heckeshornense in Uruguay is described. This is the first case reported in the Latin America and Caribbean region, showing that this species is a worldwide opportunistic human pathogen. PMID:26909156

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Carbendazim-Degrading Mycobacterium sp. Strain djl-10

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qiaoyun; Yang, Wei; Wang, Xinfeng

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium sp. strain djl-10, an efficient degrader of carbendazim, was isolated from a carbendazim manufacturing wastewater treatment system. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of djl-10, which consists of a chromosome and three plasmids. PMID:28232422

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of vitamin B12-related metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Young, Douglas B.; Comas, Iñaki; de Carvalho, Luiz P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of genome sequences from clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with phylogenetically-related pathogens Mycobacterium marinum, Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium leprae reveals diversity amongst genes associated with vitamin B12-related metabolism. Diversity is generated by gene deletion events, differential acquisition of genes by horizontal transfer, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with predicted impact on protein function and transcriptional regulation. Differences in the B12 synthesis pathway, methionine biosynthesis, fatty acid catabolism, and DNA repair and replication are consistent with adaptations to different environmental niches and pathogenic lifestyles. While there is no evidence of further gene acquisition during expansion of the M. tuberculosis complex, the emergence of other forms of genetic diversity provides insights into continuing host-pathogen co-evolution and has the potential to identify novel targets for disease intervention. PMID:25988174

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the Mycobacterium bovis genome resolve phylogenetic relationships

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium bovis isolates carry restricted allelic variation yet exhibit a range of disease phenotypes and host preferences. Conventional genotyping methods target small hyper-variable regions of their genome and provide anonymous biallelic information insufficient to develop phylogeny. To resolv...

  3. No holes barred: Invasion of the intestinal mucosa by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The infection biology of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) has recently crystalized with added details surrounding intestinal invasion. The involvement of pathogen-derived effector proteins such as the major membrane protein, oxidoreductase and fibronectin attachment proteins hav...

  4. Composition and potency characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis purified protein derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) purified protein derivatives (PPDs) are immunologic reagents prepared from cultured filtrates of the type strain ATCC 19698. Traditional production consists of floating culture incubation at 37oC, organism inactivation by autoclaving, coarse filtrat...

  5. Comparative Genomic Analysis Reveals a Possible Novel Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterium Species with High Pathogenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Siew Woh; Dutta, Avirup; Wong, Guat Jah; Wee, Wei Yee; Ang, Mia Yang; Siow, Cheuk Chuen

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria have been reported to cause a wide range of human diseases. We present the first whole-genome study of a Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterium, Mycobacterium sp. UM_CSW (referred to hereafter as UM_CSW), isolated from a patient diagnosed with bronchiectasis. Our data suggest that this clinical isolate is likely a novel mycobacterial species, supported by clear evidence from molecular phylogenetic, comparative genomic, ANI and AAI analyses. UM_CSW is closely related to the Mycobacterium avium complex. While it has characteristic features of an environmental bacterium, it also shows a high pathogenic potential with the presence of a wide variety of putative genes related to bacterial virulence and shares very similar pathogenomic profiles with the known pathogenic mycobacterial species. Thus, we conclude that this possible novel Mycobacterium species should be tightly monitored for its possible causative role in human infections. PMID:27035710

  6. Pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a horse: zoonotic concerns and limitations of antemortem testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A case of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in a horse. Clinical evaluation performed prior to euthanasia did not suggest tuberculosis, but postmortem examination provided pathological and bacteriological evidence of disease. In the lungs, multiple tuberculoid...

  7. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  8. GENETIC FINGERPRINTING OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) ORGANISMS ISOLATED FROM HOSPITAL PATIENTS AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A particularly pathogenic group of mycobacteria belong to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), which includes M. avium and M. intracellulare. MAC organisms cause disease in children, the elderly, and immuno-compromised individuals. A critical step in preventing MAC infections...

  9. AMPLIFIED FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM ANALYSIS OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX ISOLATES RECOVERED FROM SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine-scale genotyping methods are necessary in order to identify possible sources of human exposure to opportunistic pathogens belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). In this study, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was evaluated for fingerprintin...

  10. Chronic Mycobacterium marinum Infection Acts as a Tumor Promoter in Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An accumulating body of research indicates there is an increased cancer risk associated with chronic infections. The genus Mycobacterium contains a number of species, including M tuberculosis, which mount chronic infections and have been implicated in higher cancer risk. Several ...

  11. Immunogenicity of Proteome-determined Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific Proteins in Sheep with Paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis causes paratuberculosis, a chronic granulomatous enteritis. Detecting animals with paratuberculosis infections is difficult because the currently available tools have low sensitivity and lack specificity being prone to spurious positive test results ca...

  12. Mycobacterium kansasii causing chronic monoarticular synovitis in a patient with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Menashe, Leo; Kerr, Leslie Dubin; Hermann, George

    2015-09-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is a nontuberculous mycobacterium that primarily causes pulmonary disease in AIDS patients, however it has also been known, rarely, to result in skeletal infection. When skeletal infection occurs, the time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis is up to 5 years in previously reported cases. We describe a 48-year-old woman with HIV/AIDS who presented with chronic, isolated left knee pain and swelling of over two decades which had recently worsened. Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated marked subarticular erosions, synovial thickening, and bone marrow edema, which had progressed compared with prior imaging done seven years earlier. Synovial biopsy grew Mycobacterium kansasii. Following the presentation of our case, clinical and imaging findings, including the differential diagnosis, of monoarticular arthritis caused by Mycobacterium kansasii are reviewed and discussed.

  13. Infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare in AIDS: endoscopic duodenal appearance mimicking Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Iglesias, J L; Yañez, J; Durana, J; Arnal, F

    1988-09-01

    We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who presented with diarrhea, weight loss and abdominal lymph node enlargement. A diagnosis of infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare with a clinical picture similar to Whipple's disease was established. The endoscopic study of the duodenum revealed multiple yellow nodules that became confluent in the second portion, entirely replacing the normal mucosa. These endoscopic findings have not been described previously in intestinal infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare.

  14. Osteomyelitis and skin ulcers caused by Mycobacterium szulgai in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Tappe, Dennis; Langmann, Peter; Zilly, Michael; Klinker, Hartwig; Schmausser, Bernd; Frosch, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium szulgai is a ubiquitious non-tuberculous mycobacterium causing infection in immunocompetent and immunocompromized patients. Clinically mimicking pulmonary tuberculosis in most cases described, rarely other manifestations occur. Here we report the case of an AIDS patient with osteomyelitis of the hand and toe, accompanied by multiple cutaneous ulcers of the chest and forearm. The case highlights the unusual combination of osteomyelitis and skin ulcers without pulmonary infection and describes the likely cutaneous route of infection in a patient who keeps tropical fish.

  15. Real-Time Measurement of Host Bioenergetics During Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0149 TITLE: “Real-Time Measurement of Host Bioenergetics During Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection ...Mycobacteria Meeting. Birmingham, Alabama. January 24-26, 2014. Energy and redox homeostasis during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection . Adrie JC Steyn. 4... Infections . June 26- 29, 2014. Saltsjöbaden, Sweden. Metabolomic discovery of a redox and bioenergetic hierarchy in M. tuberculosis and in human TB. Adrie

  16. Mycobacterium fortuitum empyema associated with an indwelling pleural catheter: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Blair, Paul; Moshgriz, Mahdi; Siegel, Marc

    2017-03-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rapidly growing mycobacterium (RGM) that is an uncommon cause of healthcare-associated infections. The most common infections caused by M. fortuitum include skin, soft tissue, and catheter-related infections. Although occasionally cultured from sputum samples, M. fortuitum is a rare cause of pulmonary disease. We report a case of M. fortuitum empyema associated with an infected pleural catheter and review M. fortuitum pulmonary infections.

  17. Genetic heterogeneity within Mycobacterium fortuitum complex species: genotypic criteria for identification.

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, P; Kiekenbeck, M; Meissner, D; Wolters, J; Böttger, E C

    1992-01-01

    A 1.5-kb segment of the DNA that encodes 16S rRNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and 880 nucleotide positions were determined from each of the described biovariants of Mycobacterium fortuitum. Signature sequences which allow rapid identification of M. fortuitum strains at the biovariant level are described. Our data demonstrate a close phylogenetic relationship between Mycobacterium senegalense and M. fortuitum and indicate that the described biovariants of M. fortuitum represent genetically distinct taxa. PMID:1280641

  18. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, Crohn's disease and the Doomsday scenario

    PubMed Central

    Hermon-Taylor, John

    2009-01-01

    Johne's disease is chronic inflammation of the intestine caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis. Infection and disease are mainly in domestic livestock but can affect many species including primates. Johne's is a new disease which emerged at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries and principally involved Europe and North America. It has since spread to former low incidence regions to become a global problem. Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammation of the intestine in humans which emerged in Europe and North America mid 20th century and increased to become a major healthcare problem. It has now spread to former low incidence regions. Infected animals shed Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in milk and into the environment. Human populations are widely exposed. Outcomes maybe influenced by microbial phenotype. Exposure to extracellular forms of these pathogens may confer some natural protection; exposure to intracellular forms which have passaged through milk macrophages or environmental protists may pose a greater threat to humans particularly individuals with an inherited or acquired susceptibility. Hot spots of human disease such as in Winnipeg which sits on rock at the junction of two rivers may result from local exposure to high levels of waterborne pathogens brought down from farmland. When appropriate methods are used most people with Crohn's disease are found to be infected. There are no data which demonstrate that these pathogens are harmless to humans. An overwhelming balance of probability and Public health risk favours the conclusion that Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis is also pathogenic for people. A two tier co-operative pathogenic mechanism is proposed in Crohn's disease. Intracellular infection with the primary pathogen widely distributed throughout the gut causes an immune dysregulation and a specific chronic enteric neuropathy with loss of mucosal integrity. Segments of gross inflammatory disease

  19. [A case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion, distinguished from pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yosuke; Kurosawa, Takayuki; Hosaka, Kiminori

    2014-09-01

    A case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion is very rare. We report a case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion, distinguished from pulmonary tuberculosis. A 44-year-old man presented to a clinic with a productive cough, sputum, and loss of appetite for several months. Chest X-ray and chest computed tomography (CT) showed right pleural effusion, centrilobular nodules and infiltrative shadows with cavities in the bilateral lung fields. The direct smear examination showed positive acid-fast bacilli (Gaffky 5). He was referred to our hospital for suspected recurrent pulmonary tuberculosis. We started anti-tuberculosis drugs because pulmonary tuberculosis complicated with pleurisy was first suspected from the findings of high ADA level (78.6 IU/l) of the effusion and positive result of interferon-gamma release assay (QuantiFERON TB-2G). But Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium complex was not identified by the polymerase chain reaction method and the culture of the sputum was negative. At a later date, Mycobacterium kansasii was detected by sputum culture. The patient was diagnosed as pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection and treatment with anti-tuberculosis drugs including RFP resulted in a good clinical response. This case was a rare case of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection with pleural effusion, distinguished from pulmonary tuberculosis.

  20. Use of immunochromatographic assay for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from liquid culture

    PubMed Central

    Považan, Anika; Vukelić, Anka; Savković, Tijana; Kurucin, Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    A new, simple immunochromatographic assay for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in liquid cultures has been developed. The principle of the assay is binding of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex specific antigen to the monoclonal antibody conjugated on the test strip. The aim of this study is evaluation of the performance of immunochromatographic assay in identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in primary positive liquid cultures of BacT/Alert automated system. A total of 159 primary positive liquid cultures were tested using the immunochromatographic assay (BD MGIT TBc ID) and the conventional subculture, followed by identification using biochemical tests. Of 159 positive liquid cultures, using the conventional method, Mycobacterium tuberculos is was identified in 119 (74.8%), nontuberculous mycobacteria were found in 4 (2.5%), 14 (8.8%) cultures were contaminated and 22 (13.8%) cultures were found to be negative. Using the immunochromatographic assay, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was detected in 118 (74.2%) liquid cultures, and 41 (25.8%) tests were negative. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the test were 98.3%; 97.5%; 99.15%; 95.12%, respectively. The value of kappa test was 0.950, and McNemar test was 1.00. The immunochromatographic assay is a simple and rapid test which represents a suitable alternative to the conventional subculture method for the primary identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in liquid cultures of BacT/Alert automated system. PMID:22364301

  1. 5-Arylaminouracil Derivatives: New Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Matyugina, Elena; Novikov, Mikhail; Babkov, Denis; Ozerov, Alexander; Chernousova, Larisa; Andreevskaya, Sofia; Smirnova, Tatiana; Karpenko, Inna; Chizhov, Alexander; Murthu, Pravin; Lutz, Stefan; Kochetkov, Sergei; Seley-Radtke, Katherine L; Khandazhinskaya, Anastasia L

    2015-12-01

    Three series of 5-arylaminouracil derivatives, including 5-(phenylamino)uracils, 1-(4'-hydroxy-2'-cyclopenten-1'-yl)-5-(phenylamino)uracils, and 1,3-di-(4'-hydroxy-2'-cyclopenten-1'-yl)-5-(phenylamino)uracils, were synthesized and screened for potential antimicrobial activity. Most of compounds had a negative effect on the growth of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain, with 100% inhibition observed at concentrations between 5 and 40 μg/mL. Of those, 1-(4'-hydroxy-2'-cyclopenten-1'-yl)-3-(4‴-hydroxy-2‴-cyclopenten-1‴-yl)-5-(4″-butyloxyphenylamino)uracil proved to be the most active among tested compounds against the M. tuberculosis multidrug-resistant strain MS-115 (MIC90 5 μg/mL). In addition, the thymidylate kinase of M. tuberculosis was evaluated as a possible enzymatic target.

  2. Mycobacterium fortuitum Cruz from the tropical fish Hyphessobrycon innesi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, A.J.; Brancato, F.P.

    1959-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum, a rapid-growing, acid-fast bacillus, isolated from a cold abscess of human origin was described by Cruz (1938). Gordon and Smith (1955), in a taxonomic study embracing a group of acid-fast bacteria capable of relatively rapid growth on ordinary media, classified a number of cultures in their collection as M. fortuitum Cruz. In this group were strains isolated from human beings, cattle, soil, and cold-blooded animals including marine fishes. The present study was undertaken to determine the identity of a rapid-growing, acid-fast bacillus isolated at the New York Aquarium from lesions present in a population of freshwater tropical fishes commonly known as the Neon Tetra (Hyphessobrycon innesi). The symptomatology and pathology of this disease have been described by Nigrelli (1953).

  3. Mycolic Acid Index Susceptibility Method for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Viader-Salvadó, José M.; Garza-González, Elvira; Valdez-Leal, Ramón; de los Angeles del Bosque-Moncayo, M.; Tijerina-Menchaca, Rolando; Guerrero-Olazarán, Martha

    2001-01-01

    A rapid drug susceptibility test to measure the susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to isoniazid (INH) and rifampin (RIF) using clinical isolates and a newly defined mycolic acid index (MAI) was evaluated. A total of 200 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis were tested for susceptibility or resistance to INH and RIF by the MAI susceptibility and indirect-proportion methods. Overall, there was agreement between the two methods for 398 (99.5%) of the 400 total tests. Specifically, the sensitivity of the MAI susceptibility method for INH and RIF was 97.6 and 100%, respectively. The specificity and positive predictive value were 100% for both drugs, and the negative predictive value for INH and RIF was 98.3 and 100%, respectively. In conclusion, the MAI susceptibility method described here can be used for rapid drug susceptibility testing of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates within 5 days after clinical isolates are incubated in the presence or absence of an antituberculosis drug. PMID:11427584

  4. Disseminated Mycobacterium haemophilum infection in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Brix, Silke R; Iking-Konert, Christof; Stahl, Rolf A K; Wenzel, Ulrich

    2016-10-31

    Opportunistic infections are a major concern in renal and transplant medicine. We present the case of a renal transplant recipient with a generalised Mycobacterium haemophilum infection after an increase in immunosuppressive therapy and treatment with a tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitor. Infection involved skin and soft tissue, joints and bones, as well as the renal transplant with an interstitial nephritis. Rapid diagnosis using PCR and DNA sequencing allowed early appropriate treatment. Triple antibiotic therapy and reduction in immunosuppression resulted in a slow but sustained recovery. Immunosuppression causes severe opportunistic infections. TNF-α inhibitors are very effective and well tolerated but have an increased susceptibility to infections with mycobacteria. Mycobacterial infections represent a significant clinical risk to transplant recipients because of their aggressive clinical course and the need for complex toxic antibiotic treatments. In these patients, M. haemophilum is a cause of skin infections.

  5. Chlorine, Chloramine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Ozone Susceptibility of Mycobacterium avium

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Robert H.; Falkinham, Joseph O.; Norton, Cheryl D.; LeChevallier, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    Environmental and patient isolates of Mycobacterium avium were resistant to chlorine, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone. For chlorine, the product of the disinfectant concentration (in parts per million) and the time (in minutes) to 99.9% inactivation for five M. avium strains ranged from 51 to 204. Chlorine susceptibility of cells was the same in washed cultures containing aggregates and in reduced aggregate fractions lacking aggregates. Cells of the more slowly growing strains were more resistant to chlorine than were cells of the more rapidly growing strains. Water-grown cells were 10-fold more resistant than medium-grown cells. Disinfectant resistance may be one factor promoting the persistence of M. avium in drinking water. PMID:10742264

  6. Development of Rifapentine Susceptibility Tests for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Heifets, L.; Sanchez, T.; Vanderkolk, J.; Pham, V.

    1999-01-01

    Two methods for testing the susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to rifapentine have been developed: the agar proportion method and the radiometric BACTEC technique. A critical concentration of 0.5 μg of rifapentine per ml is proposed for both methods since it provides a reliable means of distinguishing between susceptible and resistant M. tuberculosis isolates. It is recommended that two quality control M. tuberculosis strains be used at the introduction of these tests in a clinical laboratory: one that is pansusceptible (H37Rv) and one that is resistant to rifapentine. The resistant strain can be obtained from the American Type Culture Collection, where it is deposited under the number ATCC 700457. PMID:9869560

  7. Mycobacterium bovis in Swine: Spoligotyping of Isolates from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Barandiaran, Soledad; Martínez Vivot, Marcela; Moras, Eduardo Vicente; Cataldi, Angel Adrián; Zumárraga, Martín José

    2011-01-01

    A total of 143 Mycobacterium bovis isolates of pigs, from the most productive swine area in Argentina, were typed by spoligotyping. Twenty-two different spoligotypes were identified, and 133 (93%) isolates were grouped into 12 clusters. One of them, designed SB0140, was the most frequent because it held 83 (58%) isolates. This spoligotype also grouped 362 (43%) out of 841 isolates from previously typed cattle and, thus, constitutes the most frequent in our country. In addition, 135 (94%) isolates revealed spoligotypes identical to those of cattle, showing an epidemiological link. On the other hand, there were seven novel spoligotypes, six of which were also unique since they had only one isolate each. This study aimed to identify the spoligotypes of M. bovis isolated from pigs to contribute to a better understanding of the distribution of bovine tuberculosis in the main productive area of Argentina. PMID:21547236

  8. Cutaneous Mycobacterium chelonae infection distal to the arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Van Ende, Charlotte; Wilmes, Dunja; Lecouvet, Frédéric E; Labriola, Laura; Cuvelier, René; Van Ingelgem, Grégory; Jadoul, Michel

    2016-10-01

    A few single cases of Mycobacterium chelonae skin infection have been reported in haemodialysis patients. We report three additional cases that share peculiar clinical characteristics, pointing to diagnostic clues. All three cases presented as erythematous nodules developing distally to a proximal arteriovenous fistula (AVF). This presentation was identical to that of two published cases. A survey of all Belgian haemodialysis units during the period 2007-11 yields an estimated incidence of ∼0.9/10 000 patient-years. Although the source of M. chelonae remains unclear, this specific clinical presentation should be added to the listing of potential complications of an AVF and should be recognized, as it is fully treatable if diagnosed by culture and tissue biopsy.

  9. Cutaneous Mycobacterium chelonae infection distal to the arteriovenous fistula

    PubMed Central

    Van Ende, Charlotte; Wilmes, Dunja; Lecouvet, Frédéric E.; Labriola, Laura; Cuvelier, René; Van Ingelgem, Grégory; Jadoul, Michel

    2016-01-01

    A few single cases of Mycobacterium chelonae skin infection have been reported in haemodialysis patients. We report three additional cases that share peculiar clinical characteristics, pointing to diagnostic clues. All three cases presented as erythematous nodules developing distally to a proximal arteriovenous fistula (AVF). This presentation was identical to that of two published cases. A survey of all Belgian haemodialysis units during the period 2007–11 yields an estimated incidence of ∼0.9/10 000 patient-years. Although the source of M. chelonae remains unclear, this specific clinical presentation should be added to the listing of potential complications of an AVF and should be recognized, as it is fully treatable if diagnosed by culture and tissue biopsy. PMID:27679721

  10. Surviving the macrophage: tools and tricks employed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Rajesh; BoseDasgupta, Somdeb; Pieters, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has evolved to withstand one of the most inhospitable cells within the human body, namely the macrophage, a cell that is normally geared toward the destruction of any invading microbe. How M. tuberculosis achieves this is still incompletely understood; however, a number of mechanisms are now known that provide advantages to M. tuberculosis for its survival and proliferation inside the macrophage. While some of these mechanisms are mediated by factors released by M. tuberculosis, others rely on host components that are being hijacked to benefit survival of M. tuberculosis within the macrophage as well to avoid the generation of an effective immune response. Here, we describe several of these mechanisms, also pointing out the potential usage of this knowledge toward the development of novel strategies to treat tuberculosis. Furthermore, we attempt to put the 'macrophage niche' into context with other intracellular pathogens and discuss some of the generalities as well as specializations that M. tuberculosis employs to survive.

  11. A deletion hampering appropriate typing of Mycobacterium africanum.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Estefanía; Herrera, Diana Maricela; Herranz, Marta; Santantón, Sheila; Martínez-Lirola, Miguel; Tudó, Griselda; Gonzalez, Juliá; Bouza, Emilio; Pérez-Lago, Laura; García-de-Viedma, Darío

    2017-03-01

    Molecular epidemiology analysis of tuberculosis transmission is based mostly on the application of MIRU-VNTR. In certain isolates a complete 24-loci genotype is not obtained and these incompletely genotyped isolates can not be used in the definition of clusters. In a population-based molecular epidemiology study performed in Almería, Southeast Spain, a context with a high proportion of immigrants, we found that an 88-bp deletion in isolates of Mycobacterium africanum Lineage 5 hampers MIRU-VNTR analysis. A more extensive analysis revealed that this deletion was shared by all the Lineage 5 isolates in certain countries of origin of immigrants, such as Equatorial Guinea, and is likely present in several other African countries and also in the USA. A procedure is proposed to enable epidemiological analysis of these isolates.

  12. Detection of Autofluorescent Mycobacterium Chelonae in Living Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Whipps, Christopher M.; Moss, Larry G.; Sisk, Dana M.; Murray, Katrina N.; Tobin, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium chelonae is widespread in aquatic environments and can cause mycobacteriosis with low virulence in zebrafish. The risk of infection in zebrafish is exacerbated in closed-recirculating aquatic systems where rapidly growing mycobacteria can live on biofilms, as well as in zebrafish tissues. We have discovered a method of identifying and visualizing M. chelonae infections in living zebrafish using endogenous autofluorescence. Infected larvae are easily identified and can be excluded from experimental results. Because infection may reduce fertility in zebrafish, the visualization of active infection in contaminated eggs of transparent casper females simplifies screening. Transparent fish are also particularly useful as sentinels that can be examined periodically for the presence of autofluorescence, which can then be tested directly for M. chelonae. PMID:24451037

  13. Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG as an HIV Vaccine Vector

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Rosamund; Chege, Gerald; Shephard, Enid; Stutz, Helen; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 has resulted in a devastating AIDS pandemic. An effective HIV/AIDS vaccine that can be used to either, prevent HIV infection, control infection or prevent progression of the disease to AIDS is needed. In this review we discuss the use of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the tuberculosis vaccine, as a vaccine vector for an HIV vaccine. Numerous features make BCG an attractive vehicle to deliver HIV antigens. It has a good safety profile, elicits long-lasting cellular immune responses and in addition manufacturing costs are affordable, a necessary consideration for developing countries. In this review we discuss the numerous factors that influence generation of a genetically stable recombinant BCG vaccine for HIV. PMID:20353397

  14. Streptomyces as host for recombinant production of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins.

    PubMed

    Vallin, Carlos; Ramos, Astrid; Pimienta, Elsa; Rodríguez, Caridad; Hernández, Tairí; Hernández, Ivones; Del Sol, Ricardo; Rosabal, Grisel; Van Mellaert, Lieve; Anné, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    The 45/47 kDa APA protein (Rv1860) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was produced by Streptomyces lividans. The recombinant protein could be recovered from the culture medium of an S. lividans clone containing the apa gene under control of the promoter and signal sequence of the Streptomyces coelicolor agarase gene. The recombinant protein production was further scaled-up using fermentation conditions. The APA protein was subsequently purified from the culture supernatant by means of immunochromatography. About 80 mg of recombinant protein were obtained per liter of culture media. In vivo tests with the APA protein purified from S. lividans TK24/pRGAPA1 revealed that the recombinant protein was antigenic and could induce high titers of specific antibodies in the mouse biological model. Results obtained concerning heterologous production of APA, its immunogenic and antigenic capacity, demonstrated the potential of S. lividans as a valuable host for the production of recombinant proteins from M. tuberculosis.

  15. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with meningitis due to Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of persistent fever, headache and fatigue for several weeks. On admission, she was diagnosed as having meningitis due to Mycobacterium intracellulare (M. intracellulare) detected in her cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by polymerase chain reaction. Even though anti-tuberculous therapy improved her CSF findings, her condition was not restored. Brain MRI showed multifocal and asymmetrical increases in T2 signals involving white matter and cortical gray-white junction of cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum and brainstem. Based on the progression of clinical symptoms and radiological features, we diagnosed her illness as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) associated with meningitis due to M. intracellulare. Steroid therapy dramatically improved her condition. This is the first report of ADEM following meningitis due to M. intracellulare in a non-immunocompromized host.

  16. Structural enzymology of sulphur metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Robert; Schneider, Gunter

    2010-05-21

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis poses a serious threat to human health and has led to world-wide efforts focusing on the development of novel vaccines and antibiotics against this pathogen. Sulphur metabolism in this organism has been linked to essential processes such as virulence and redox defence. The cysteine biosynthetic pathway is up-regulated in models of persistent M. tuberculosis infections and provides potential targets for novel anti-mycobacterial agents, directed specifically toward the pathogen in its persistent phase. Functional and structural characterization of enzymes from sulfur metabolism establishes a necessary framework for the design of strong binding inhibitors that might be developed into new drugs. This review summarizes recent progress in the elucidation of the structural enzymology of the sulphate reduction and cysteine biosynthesis pathways.

  17. Intramacrophage growth of Mycobacterium avium during infection of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Frehel, C; de Chastellier, C; Offredo, C; Berche, P

    1991-01-01

    Growth of the virulent Mycobacterium avium strain TMC 724 in host tissues during persistent infection of mice was studied. Following intravenous infection of C57BL/6 mice, the kinetics of bacterial growth was biphasic in the spleen and liver, with a significant reduction of the multiplication rate after day 21 to 28 of infection. An electron-microscopic study of the liver and spleen of infected mice showed that the bacteria were strictly intracellular. They were observed within inflammatory macrophages populating granulomas disseminated in host tissues. The bacteria were confined to the phagosome compartment, and they were encapsulated. Phagosome-lysosome fusions were encountered, but the bacteria showed no visible signs of degradation and continued to multiply. These results are the first in vivo evidence that virulent M. avium multiplies exclusively intracellularly and that encapsulated bacteria resist the microbicidal mechanisms of macrophages inside the phagosomal compartment. Images PMID:2037382

  18. Role of sulfhydryls in in vitro growth of Mycobacterium lepraemurium.

    PubMed Central

    Dhople, A M; Hanks, J H

    1981-01-01

    In an attempt to evaluate various factors that influence the growth of Mycobacterium lepraemurium in NC-5 medium, the effects of sulfur and --SH compounds were investigated. Cysteine could be replaced by equimolar concentrations of other --SH compounds containing carboxyl group, and at lower concentrations by nonpolar sulfhydryl compounds. The oxidized form of sulfhydryls, as well as certain organic and inorganic reducing agents, did not support growth. The results suggest that the function of sulfhydryl compounds is to maintain low reducing potential in the medium and also to participate in metabolic or biosynthetic pathways or both. A combination of dithiothreitol and thioglycolate gave better results than when these compounds were incorporated individually in the medium. This suggests the protective action of dithiothreitol in preventing oxidation of monothiols. PMID:7011997

  19. Mycobacterium abscessus Lung Disease in a Patient with Kartagener Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Song, Won Jun; Jun, Ji Eun; Ryu, Duck Hyun; Lee, Ji Eun; Jeong, Ho Jung; Jeong, Suk Hyeon; Kang, Hyung Koo; Kim, Jung Soo; Lee, Hyun; Chon, Hae Ri; Jeon, Kyeongman; Kim, Dohun; Kim, Jhingook; Koh, Won-Jung

    2014-09-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is characterized by the congenital impairment of mucociliary clearance. When accompanied by situs inversus, chronic sinusitis and bronchiectasis, PCD is known as Kartagener syndrome. The main consequence of impaired ciliary function is a reduced mucus clearance from the lungs, and susceptibility to chronic respiratory infections due to opportunistic pathogens, including nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). There has been no report of NTM lung disease combined with Kartagener syndrome in Korea. Here, we report an adult patient with Kartagener syndrome complicated with Mycobacterium abscessus lung disease. A 37-year-old female presented to our hospital with chronic cough and sputum. She was ultimately diagnosed with M. abscessus lung disease and Kartagener syndrome. M. abscessus was repeatedly isolated from sputum specimens collected from the patient, despite prolonged antibiotic treatment. The patient's condition improved and negative sputum culture conversion was achieved after sequential bilateral pulmonary resection.

  20. Dissection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens using recombinant DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R A; Bloom, B R; Grosskinsky, C M; Ivanyi, J; Thomas, D; Davis, R W

    1985-01-01

    A recombinant DNA strategy has been used systematically to survey the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome for sequences that encode specific antigens detected by monoclonal antibodies. M. tuberculosis genomic DNA fragments with randomly generated endpoints were used to construct a large lambda gt11 recombinant DNA expression library. Sufficient numbers of recombinants were produced to contain inserts whose endpoints occur at nearly every base pair in the pathogen genome. Protein antigens specified by linear segments of pathogen DNA and produced by the recombinant phage of Escherichia coli were screened with monoclonal antibody probes. This approach was coupled with an improved detection method for gene isolation using antibodies to clonally isolate DNA sequences that specify polypeptide components of M. tuberculosis. The methodology described here, which is applicable to other pathogens, offers possibilities for the development of more sensitive and specific immunodiagnostic and seroepidemiological tests for tuberculosis and, ultimately, for the development of more effective vaccines. Images PMID:2581251

  1. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis as a cause of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    McNees, Adrienne L; Markesich, Diane; Zayyani, Najah R; Graham, David Y

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown cause, affecting approximately 1.4 million North American people. Due to the similarities between Crohn's disease and Johne's disease, a chronic enteritis in ruminant animals caused by Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) infection, MAP has long been considered to be a potential cause of Crohn's disease. MAP is an obligate intracellular pathogen that cannot replicate outside of animal hosts. MAP is widespread in dairy cattle and because of environmental contamination and resistance to pasteurization and chlorination, humans are frequently exposed through contamination of food and water. MAP can be cultured from the peripheral mononuclear cells from 50-100% of patients with Crohn's disease, and less frequently from healthy individuals. Association does not prove causation. We discuss the current data regarding MAP as a potential cause of Crohn's disease and outline what data will be required to firmly prove or disprove the hypothesis.

  2. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis on Dairy Farms.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingling; Katani, Robab; Schilling, Megan; Kapur, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiological agent of severe chronic intestinal inflammatory disease in ruminants, termed Johne's disease, and can infect many other animal species, including humans. MAP has a long incubation period prior to manifestation of clinical signs including diarrhea, weight loss, and loss of production. MAP has a high prevalence in dairy herds and results in considerable adverse impacts on animal health and productivity throughout the world. Recent investigations have leveraged the characterization of the MAP genome for the development of powerful new molecular techniques for MAP strain differentiation. These approaches are providing key insights into the epidemiology and transmission of MAP on and between dairy herds. We summarize the state of the art for MAP diagnostics and strain differentiation and our current knowledge of mechanisms of within- and between-herd transmission of MAP, along with future needs for the development of rational MAP infection control programs.

  3. Turning the respiratory flexibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis against itself

    PubMed Central

    Lamprecht, Dirk A.; Finin, Peter M.; Rahman, Md. Aejazur; Cumming, Bridgette M.; Russell, Shannon L.; Jonnala, Surendranadha R.; Adamson, John H.; Steyn, Adrie J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) electron transport chain (ETC) has received significant attention as a drug target, however its vulnerability may be affected by its flexibility in response to disruption. Here we determine the effect of the ETC inhibitors bedaquiline, Q203 and clofazimine on the Mtb ETC, and the value of the ETC as a drug target, by measuring Mtb's respiration using extracellular flux technology. We find that Mtb's ETC rapidly reroutes around inhibition by these drugs and increases total respiration to maintain ATP levels. Rerouting is possible because Mtb rapidly switches between terminal oxidases, and, unlike eukaryotes, is not susceptible to back pressure. Increased ETC activity potentiates clofazimine's production of reactive oxygen species, causing rapid killing in vitro and in a macrophage model. Our results indicate that combination therapy targeting the ETC can be exploited to enhance killing of Mtb. PMID:27506290

  4. The efficacy of the heat killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Doig, C; Seagar, A L; Watt, B; Forbes, K J

    2002-01-01

    There is concern that current procedures for the heat inactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may not be adequate. This raises serious safety issues for laboratory staff performing molecular investigations such as IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing. This paper confirms that the protocol of van Embden et al, as performed routinely in this laboratory, is safe and effective for the heat inactivation of M tuberculosis. This procedure involves complete immersion of a tube containing a suspension of one loopfull of growth in a water bath at 80°C for 20 minutes. Seventy four isolates were included in this investigation. Despite prolonged incubation for 20 weeks, none of the heat killed M tuberculosis suspensions produced visible colonies or gave a positive growth signal from liquid culture. This method did not affect the integrity of the DNA for subsequent molecular investigations. PMID:12354807

  5. Novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolate from a wild chimpanzee.

    PubMed

    Coscolla, Mireia; Lewin, Astrid; Metzger, Sonja; Maetz-Rennsing, Kerstin; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Nitsche, Andreas; Dabrowski, Pjotr Wojtek; Radonic, Aleksandar; Niemann, Stefan; Parkhill, Julian; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Feldman, Julia; Comas, Iñaki; Boesch, Christophe; Gagneux, Sebastien; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2013-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by gram-positive bacteria known as the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). MTBC include several human-associated lineages and several variants adapted to domestic and, more rarely, wild animal species. We report an M. tuberculosis strain isolated from a wild chimpanzee in Côte d'Ivoire that was shown by comparative genomic and phylogenomic analyses to belong to a new lineage of MTBC, closer to the human-associated lineage 6 (also known as M. africanum West Africa 2) than to the other classical animal-associated MTBC strains. These results show that the general view of the genetic diversity of MTBC is limited and support the possibility that other MTBC variants exist, particularly in wild mammals in Africa. Exploring this diversity is crucial to the understanding of the biology and evolutionary history of this widespread infectious disease.

  6. MYCOBACTERIUM ABSCESSUS PNEUMONIA IN AN ATLANTIC BOTTLENOSE DOLPHIN (TURSIOPS TRUNCATUS)

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Leigh Ann; Stamper, M. Andrew; Whitaker, Brent R.; Hadfield, Catherine A.; Simons, Brian; Mankowski, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus pneumonia was diagnosed antemortem in a 23-yr-old male Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). Clinical signs included lethargy, hyporexia, coughing, and bloody respiratory discharge. Diagnostic findings included neutrophilic leukocytosis, anemia, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and repeated forceful exhaled breath (sputum) cytology, with acute inflammatory cells and acid-fast positive beaded rods. The bacteria were initially identified free in the sputum sample and subsequently were seen within neutrophils. A culture was positive for a rapidly growing, white, colony-forming organism confirmed as M. abscessus by polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. Clinical signs initially resolved with multidrug therapy. Concurrent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection complicated clinical management and contributed to terminal decline. The dolphin was euthanized 5 mo after initial diagnosis. Necropsy results demonstrated acid-fast positive bacteria in lung tissue and supported the diagnosis of M. abscessus pneumonia. Acid-fast stains and mycobacteria cultures should be considered when evaluating ill dolphins. PMID:23272373

  7. Sequence Analysis of the Direct Repeat Region in Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Caimi, Karina; Romano, Maria I.; Alito, Alicia; Zumarraga, Martin; Bigi, Fabiana; Cataldi, Angel

    2001-01-01

    Spoligotyping is a major tool for molecular typing of Mycobacterium bovis. This technique is based on the polymorphism of spacers that separate direct repeats (DRs) in the M. tuberculosis complex DR region. Numerous M. bovis strains show a lack of several spacers which appears as a gap in the spoligotyping pattern. To determine whether these gaps contain alternative spacers not included in the spoligotyping membrane, PCRs using primers that hybridize to the spacers adjacent to the gaps were performed. Comparing the sizes of products obtained by PCR with those deduced from spoligotyping patterns, fragments were selected and sequenced to look for alternative spacers. Upon analysis of the sequences, five alternative spacers were detected, although deletions of spacers are mainly responsible for the observed gaps. The alternative spacers, which are more frequent in M. bovis than in M. tuberculosis, may contribute to increased M. bovis differentiation. PMID:11230428

  8. Clonal complexity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis can hamper diagnostic procedures.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Lago, Laura; Herranz, Marta; Navarro, Yurena; Ruiz Serrano, María Jesús; Miralles, Pilar; Bouza, Emilio; García-de-Viedma, Darío

    2017-02-15

    Clonal complexity is increasingly accepted in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, including mixed infections by ≥2 strains, which usually occur in settings with a high burden of tuberculosis and/or a high risk of overexposure to infected patients. Mixed infections can hamper diagnostic procedures: obtaining an accurate antibiogram is difficult when the susceptibility patterns of the strains differ. Here, we show how mixed infections can also prove challenging for other diagnostic procedures, even outside settings where mixed infections are traditionally expected. We show how an unnoticed mixed infection in an HIV-positive patient diagnosed in Madrid, Spain, with differences in the representativeness of the coinfecting strains in different sputum samples, markedly complicated the resolution of a laboratory cross-contamination false-positivity alert.

  9. An elucidation of neutrophil functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Morris, Devin; Nguyen, Thien; Kim, John; Kassissa, Christine; Khurasany, Melissa; Luong, Jennifer; Kasko, Sarah; Pandya, Shalin; Chu, Michael; Chi, Po-Ting; Ly, Judy; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the functions of neutrophils in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, with particular reference to glutathione (GSH). We examined the effects of GSH in improving the ability of neutrophils to control intracellular M. tb infection. Our findings indicate that increasing the intracellular levels of GSH with a liposomal formulation of GSH (L-GSH) resulted in reduction in the levels of free radicals and increased acidification of M. tb containing phagosomes leading to the inhibition in the growth of M. tb. This inhibitory mechanism is dependent on the presence of TNF-α and IL-6. Our studies demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism adapted by the neutrophils to control M. tb infection.

  10. An Elucidation of Neutrophil Functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Devin; Nguyen, Thien; Kim, John; Kassissa, Christine; Khurasany, Melissa; Luong, Jennifer; Kasko, Sarah; Pandya, Shalin; Chu, Michael; Chi, Po-Ting; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the functions of neutrophils in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, with particular reference to glutathione (GSH). We examined the effects of GSH in improving the ability of neutrophils to control intracellular M. tb infection. Our findings indicate that increasing the intracellular levels of GSH with a liposomal formulation of GSH (L-GSH) resulted in reduction in the levels of free radicals and increased acidification of M. tb containing phagosomes leading to the inhibition in the growth of M. tb. This inhibitory mechanism is dependent on the presence of TNF-α and IL-6. Our studies demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism adapted by the neutrophils to control M. tb infection. PMID:24312131

  11. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis as a cause of Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    McNees, Adrienne L.; Markesich, Diane; Zayyani, Najah R.; Graham, David Y.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown cause, affecting approximately 1.4 million North American people. Due to the similarities between Crohn's disease and Johne’s disease, a chronic enteritis in ruminant animals caused by Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP) infection, MAP has long been considered to be a potential cause of Crohn's disease. MAP is an obligate intracellular pathogen that cannot replicate outside of animal hosts. MAP is widespread in dairy cattle and because of environmental contamination and resistance to pasteurization and chlorination, humans are frequently exposed through contamination of food and water. MAP can be cultured from the peripheral mononuclear cells from 50 to 100% of patients with Crohn's disease, and less frequently from healthy individuals. Association does not prove causation. We discuss the current data regarding MAP as a potential cause of Crohn's disease and outline what data will be required to firmly prove or disprove the hypothesis. PMID:26474349

  12. Genome-wide comparison of medieval and modern Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Schuenemann, Verena J; Singh, Pushpendra; Mendum, Thomas A; Krause-Kyora, Ben; Jäger, Günter; Bos, Kirsten I; Herbig, Alexander; Economou, Christos; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Nebel, Almut; Boldsen, Jesper L; Kjellström, Anna; Wu, Huihai; Stewart, Graham R; Taylor, G Michael; Bauer, Peter; Lee, Oona Y-C; Wu, Houdini H T; Minnikin, David E; Besra, Gurdyal S; Tucker, Katie; Roffey, Simon; Sow, Samba O; Cole, Stewart T; Nieselt, Kay; Krause, Johannes

    2013-07-12

    Leprosy was endemic in Europe until the Middle Ages. Using DNA array capture, we have obtained genome sequences of Mycobacterium leprae from skeletons of five medieval leprosy cases from the United Kingdom, Sweden, and Denmark. In one case, the DNA was so well preserved that full de novo assembly of the ancient bacterial genome could be achieved through shotgun sequencing alone. The ancient M. leprae sequences were compared with those of 11 modern strains, representing diverse genotypes and geographic origins. The comparisons revealed remarkable genomic conservation during the past 1000 years, a European origin for leprosy in the Americas, and the presence of an M. leprae genotype in medieval Europe now commonly associated with the Middle East. The exceptional preservation of M. leprae biomarkers, both DNA and mycolic acids, in ancient skeletons has major implications for palaeomicrobiology and human pathogen evolution.

  13. Eosinophilic cystitis and cholangitis - systemic disease triggered by mycobacterium tuberculosis?

    PubMed

    Buda, Piotr; Grenda, Ryszard; Wieteska-Klimczak, Anna; Gietka, Piotr; Skobejko-Włodarska, Lidia; Felberg, Karina; Książyk, Janusz

    Eosinophilic cystitis (EC) is a rare inflammatory disorder of the urinary tract characterized by infiltration of bladder with eosinophils. The cause remains unclear, immunological mechanisms have been implicated in pathogenesis. Potential etiological factors include: tumors, allergy, parasitic infections, trauma. The disease may have a variable course, from a mild self-limiting, through common symptoms like: dysuria, hematuria, abdominal pain, tumor, to severe renal failure, with eosinophilic infiltration of the other organs and systemic complications. Treatment depending on disease severity and etiology is pharmacological and/or surgical. Here we report a case of a previously healthy 16-year old girl with inflammatory tumor in the liver hilum infiltrating extrahepatic biliary tract who developed three months later haematuria with acute dysuric signs and renal failure. Based on histopathological findings diagnosis of eosinophilic cystitis was established. Tests for Mycobacterium tuberculosis were positive. To our knowledge, EC association with cholangitis and tuberculosis have never been reported before.

  14. Mycobacterium bovis meningitis in young Nigerian-born male.

    PubMed

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Lillebaek, Troels; Nielsen, Ming-Yuan; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2014-10-01

    In Denmark, tuberculous meningitis is rare. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement with Mycobacterium bovis is even rarer and has only been seen three times since 1992. We present a case of M. bovis meningitis in a previously healthy young Nigerian-born male, who had been exposed to unpasteurized dairy products in Nigeria but had no known contact with larger mammals. Before the development of meningitis, the patient had several contacts with the health system due to fever and non-specific symptoms. Finally, upon hospital admission, the patient was diagnosed with M. tuberculosis complex meningitis and treated empirically. After 13 days he was discharged without neurological sequelae. Later, the culture revealed M. bovis and treatment was adjusted accordingly.

  15. The transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in high burden settings.

    PubMed

    Yates, Tom A; Khan, Palwasha Y; Knight, Gwenan M; Taylor, Jonathon G; McHugh, Timothy D; Lipman, Marc; White, Richard G; Cohen, Ted; Cobelens, Frank G; Wood, Robin; Moore, David A J; Abubakar, Ibrahim

    2016-02-01

    Unacceptable levels of Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission are noted in high burden settings and a renewed focus on reducing person-to-person transmission in these communities is needed. We review recent developments in the understanding of airborne transmission. We outline approaches to measure transmission in populations and trials and describe the Wells-Riley equation, which is used to estimate transmission risk in indoor spaces. Present research priorities include the identification of effective strategies for tuberculosis infection control, improved understanding of where transmission occurs and the transmissibility of drug-resistant strains, and estimates of the effect of HIV and antiretroviral therapy on transmission dynamics. When research is planned and interventions are designed to interrupt transmission, resource constraints that are common in high burden settings-including shortages of health-care workers-must be considered.

  16. Interaction of antimicrobial peptide with mycolyl transferase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Devjani I; Gohil, Tejas P

    2016-03-01

    It is estimated that about 40% of the Indian population are infected with tuberculosis (TB) and that ∼3,000,000 people die as a result of TB annually. TB is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In 2011, the World Health Organization declared India as having the highest TB burden worldwide. An important criteria for pathogenicity is the presence of mycolic acid linked to the protective outer membrane of bacteria. Mycolyl transferase catalyzes the transfer of mycolic acid and promotes cell wall synthesis. This is also considered as a novel target for drug-mediated intervention strategies. Here, we have attempted to understand the interaction between the antimicrobial peptide (AMP), dermcidin, and mycolyl transferase in M. tuberculosis using a computational approach. The present study was undertaken in order to elucidate the capability of AMPs to treat this bacteria, which is less sensitive to available antibiotics, and to design a novel method for new therapies.

  17. Immunoinformatics study on highly expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes during infection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Thi, Le Thuy; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Calero, Romel; Camacho, Frank; Reyes, Fatima; Hossain, Md Murad; Gonzalez, Gustavo Sierra; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Acosta, Armando

    2014-09-01

    The most important targets for vaccine development are the proteins that are highly expressed by the microorganisms during infection in-vivo. A number of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) proteins are also reported to be expressed in-vivo at different phases of infection. In the present study, we analyzed multiple published databases of gene expression profiles of Mtb in-vivo at different phases of infection in animals and humans and selected 38 proteins that are highly expressed in the active, latent and reactivation phases. We predicted T- and B-cell epitopes from the selected proteins using HLAPred for T-cell epitope prediction and BCEPred combined with ABCPred for B-cell epitope prediction. For each selected proteins, regions containing both T- and B-cell epitopes were identified which might be considered as important candidates for vaccine design against tuberculosis.

  18. CD8 T cells and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Philana Ling; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis is primarily a respiratory disease that is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis can persist and replicate in macrophages in vivo, usually in organized cellular structures called granulomas. There is substantial evidence for the importance of CD4 T cells in control of tuberculosis, but the evidence for a requirement for CD8 T cells in this infection has not been proven in humans. However, animal model data support a non-redundant role for CD8 T cells in control of M. tuberculosis infection. In humans, infection with this pathogen leads to generation of specific CD8 T cell responses. These responses include classical (MHC Class I restricted) and non-classical CD8 T cells. Here, we discuss the potential roles of CD8 T cells in defense against tuberculosis, and our current understanding of the wide range of CD8 T cell types seen in M. tuberculosis infection.

  19. Disinfecting endoscopes: how not to transmit Mycobacterium tuberculosis by bronchoscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Leers, W D

    1980-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis was cultured from the bronchial washings of two patients who underwent bronchoscopy consecutively with the same bronchoscope. Active pulmonary tuberculosis was later confirmed in the first patient, whereas the second patient had clinical and serologic evidence of infection with respiratory syncytial virus. The bronchoscope had been cleaned with an iodophor disinfectant, which had not destroyed the tubercle bacilli. The agent recommended for chemical disinfection of fibreoptic bronchoscopes is 2% glutaraldehyde solution; the instrument should be immersed in it for 10 to 30 minutes. Five hours' exposure to ethylene oxide is recommended for sterilization of instruments. These procedures must be preceded by adequate mechanical cleaning. Then transmission of pathogenic organisms during endoscopy, which can result in nosocomial disease, misdiagnosis or inappropriate treatment, will be avoided. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:6790150

  20. Manipulation of the Mononuclear Phagocyte System by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there has been an emerging appreciation about the role of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) to control and eradicate pathogens. Likewise, there have been significant advances in dissecting the mechanisms involved in the microbial subversion of MPS cells, mainly affecting their differentiation and effector functions. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a chronic bacterial pathogen that represents an enigma to the field because of its remarkable ability to thrive in humans. One reason is that M. tuberculosis renders a defective MPS compartment, which is perhaps the most ingenious strategy for survival in the host given the prominence of these cells to modulate microenvironments, their function as sentinels and orchestrators of the immune response, and their pathogenic role as reservoirs for microbial persistence. In this article, the principal strategies used by M. tuberculosis to subvert the MPS compartment are presented along with emerging concepts. PMID:25147188

  1. Selective Mycobacterium tuberculosis Shikimate Kinase Inhibitors as Potential Antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Sara; Simithy, Johayra; Goodwin, Douglas C; Calderón, Angela I

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the persistence of tuberculosis (TB) as well as the emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) forms of the disease, the development of new antitubercular drugs is crucial. Developing inhibitors of shikimate kinase (SK) in the shikimate pathway will provide a selective target for antitubercular agents. Many studies have used in silico technology to identify compounds that are anticipated to interact with and inhibit SK. To a much more limited extent, SK inhibition has been evaluated by in vitro methods with purified enzyme. Currently, there are no data on in vivo activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate kinase (MtSK) inhibitors available in the literature. In this review, we present a summary of the progress of SK inhibitor discovery and evaluation with particular attention toward development of new antitubercular agents. PMID:25861218

  2. Advances in Mycobacterium tuberculosis therapeutics discovery utlizing structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Nicholas; Owens, Cedric P.; Contreras, Heidi; Goulding, Celia W.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health threat and is exacerbated both by the emergence of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and its synergy with HIV infection. The waning effectiveness of current treatment regimens necessitates the development of new or repurposed anti-TB therapeutics for improved combination therapies against the disease. Exploiting atomic resolution structural information of proteins in complex with their substrates and/or inhibitors can facilitate structure-based rational drug design. Since our last review in 2009, there has been a wealth of new M. tuberculosis protein structural information. Once again, we have compiled the most promising structures with regards to potential anti-TB drug development and present them in this updated review. PMID:23167715

  3. A Focused Screen Identifies Antifolates with Activity on Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anuradha; Colmenarejo, Gonzalo; Pérez, Esther; Gonzalez, Ruben R.; Torres, Pedro; Calvo, David; Gómez, Ruben M.; Ortega, Fátima; Jiménez, Elena; Gabarro, Raquel C.; Rullás, Joaquín; Ballell, Lluis

    2015-01-01

    Antifolates are widely used to treat several diseases but are not currently used in the first-line treatment of tuberculosis, despite evidence that some of these molecules can target Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) bacilli in vitro. To identify new antifolate candidates for animal-model efficacy studies of tuberculosis, we paired knowledge and tools developed in academia with the infrastructure and chemistry resources of a large pharmaceutical company. Together we curated a focused library of 2508 potential antifolates, which were then tested for activity against live Mtb. We identified 210 primary hits, confirmed the on-target activity of potent compounds, and now report the identification and characterization of 5 hit compounds, representative of 5 different chemical scaffolds. These antifolates have potent activity against Mtb and represent good starting points for improvement that could lead to in vivo efficacy studies. PMID:26771003

  4. Mycobacterium bovis in Argentina: isolates from cats typified by spoligotyping.

    PubMed

    Zumárraga, M J; Vivot, M Martínez; Marticorena, D; Bernardelli, A; Fasán, R; Iachini, R; Cataldi, A A

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, 19 Mycobacterium bovis isolates from different cats were typified by spoligotyping. We detected nine spoligotypes. There was only one cluster, which grouped 11 of the isolates (57.9%), showing the main spoligotype from cattle from Argentina. The rest of the spoligotypes presented only one isolate each. Five of them were not found in cattle, and were unique and exclusive of cats. The isolates studied show that tuberculosis of bovine origin in cats constitutes a potential public health problem in Buenos Aires region. The identification of genotypes from non-natural hosts could contribute to understand the spread of bovine tuberculosis. This is the first report showing genetic profiles of M. bovis isolates in felines from Argentina.

  5. Transcontinental spread of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Long, R; Nobert, E; Chomyc, S; van Embden, J; McNamee, C; Duran, R R; Talbot, J; Fanning, A

    1999-06-01

    Globally, the proportion of all cases of tuberculosis (TB) caused by drug-resistant strains is increasing. We report the case of a Canadian citizen who acquired a highly drug-resistant strain of Mycobacterium bovis while visiting a relative with AIDS-related tuberculosis in Spain. The origin of the strain was traced using spoligotyping, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based fingerprint technology, and the European DNA database. The level of primary drug resistance-all five first-line drugs and 19 of 21 second-line drugs-in this case was unprecedented in Canada. Isolation of this strain from a Canadian citizen represents the first report of its appearance in this hemisphere. The infection was contained and combined medical-surgical treatment delivered.

  6. Mycobacterium icosiumassiliensis sp. nov., a New Member in the Mycobacterium terrae Complex Isolated from Surface Water in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Djouadi, Lydia N; Levasseur, Anthony; Khalil, Jacques Bou; Blanc-Taileur, Caroline; Asmar, Shady; Ghiloubi, Wassila; Natèche, Farida; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-08-01

    An acid-fast, rapidly growing, rod-shaped microorganism designated 8WA6 was isolated from a lake in Algiers, Algeria. The lake water was characterized by a temperature of 18 °C, a pH of 7.82, a copper concentration of 8.6 µg/L, and a cadmium concentration of 0.6 µg/L. First-line molecular identification confirmed the 8WA6 isolate to be a member of the Mycobacterium terrae complex, sharing 99.4 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with M. arupense AR-30097, 98.2 % partial hsp65 gene sequence similarity with M. terrae 28K766, and 97.1 % partial rpoB gene sequence similarity with Mycobacterium sp. FI-05396. Its 4.89-Mb genome exhibits a 66.8 GC % and an average nucleotide identity of 64.5 % with M. tuberculosis, 70.5 % with M. arupense, and 75 % with M. asiaticum. In the M. terrae complex, Mycobacterium 8WA6 was unique in exhibiting growth at 42 °C, negative reaction for nitrate reduction, urease activity and Tween 80 hydrolysis, and a positive reaction for α-glucosidase and β-glucosidase. Its protein profile determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry revealed a unique spectrum similar to M. arupense and M. terrae, exhibiting eleven specific peaks at 3787.791, 4578.019, 6349.630, 6855.638, 7202.310, 8149.608, 8775.257, 10,224.588, 10,484.116, 12,226.379, and 12,636.871 m/z. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for antibiotics, determined by microdilution, indicated a broad spectrum resistance, except for rifabutin (MIC, 0.5 g/L) and cefoxitin (MIC, 16 g/L). We concluded that the 8WA6 isolate is a representative isolate of a previously undescribed species in the M. terrae complex, which was named M. icosiumassiliensis sp. nov. with strain 8WA6 (Collection de Souches de l'Unité des Rickettsies, CSUR P1561, Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen, DSM 100711) as the type strain.

  7. EmbA is an essential arabinosyltransferase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Anita G.; Goude, Renan; Shi, Libin; Zhang, Jian; Chatterjee, Delphi; Parish, Tanya

    2008-01-01

    The Emb proteins (EmbA, EmbB, EmbC) are mycobacterial arabinosyltransferases involved in the biogenesis of the mycobacterial cell wall. EmbA and EmbB are predicted to work in unison as a heterodimer. EmbA and EmbB are involved in the formation of the crucial terminal hexaarabinoside motif [Araβ(1→2)Araα(1→5)] [Araβ(1→2)Araα(1→3)]Araα(1→5)Araα1→(Ara6) in the cell wall polysaccharide arabinogalactan. Studies conducted in Mycobacterium smegmatis revealed that mutants with disruptions in embA or embB are viable, although the growth rate was affected. In contrast, we demonstrate here that embA is an essential gene in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, since a deletion of the chromosomal gene could only be achieved when a second functional copy was provided on an integrated vector. Complementation of an embA mutant of M. smegmatis by M. tuberculosis embA confirmed that it encodes a functional arabinosyltransferase. We identified a promoter for M. tuberculosis embA located immediately upstream of the gene, indicating that it is expressed independently from the upstream gene, embC. Promoter activity from PembA(Mtb) was sevenfold lower when assayed in M. smegmatis compared to M. tuberculosis, indicating that the latter is not a good host for genetic analysis of M. tuberculosis embA expression. PembA(Mtb) activity remained constant throughout growth phases and after stress treatment, although it was reduced during hypoxia-induced non-replicating persistence. Ethambutol exposure had no effect on PembA(Mtb) activity. These data demonstrate that M. tuberculosis embA encodes a functional arabinosyltransferase which is constitutively expressed and plays a critical role in M. tuberculosis. PMID:18174142

  8. EmbA is an essential arabinosyltransferase in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Anita G; Goude, Renan; Shi, Libin; Zhang, Jian; Chatterjee, Delphi; Parish, Tanya

    2008-01-01

    The Emb proteins (EmbA, EmbB, EmbC) are mycobacterial arabinosyltransferases involved in the biogenesis of the mycobacterial cell wall. EmbA and EmbB are predicted to work in unison as a heterodimer. EmbA and EmbB are involved in the formation of the crucial terminal hexaarabinoside motif [Arabeta(1-->2)Araalpha(1-->5)] [Arabeta(1-->2)Araalpha(1-->3)]Araalpha(1-->5)Araalpha1-->(Ara(6)) in the cell wall polysaccharide arabinogalactan. Studies conducted in Mycobacterium smegmatis revealed that mutants with disruptions in embA or embB are viable, although the growth rate was affected. In contrast, we demonstrate here that embA is an essential gene in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, since a deletion of the chromosomal gene could only be achieved when a second functional copy was provided on an integrated vector. Complementation of an embA mutant of M. smegmatis by M. tuberculosis embA confirmed that it encodes a functional arabinosyltransferase. We identified a promoter for M. tuberculosis embA located immediately upstream of the gene, indicating that it is expressed independently from the upstream gene, embC. Promoter activity from P(embA)((Mtb)) was sevenfold lower when assayed in M. smegmatis compared to M. tuberculosis, indicating that the latter is not a good host for genetic analysis of M. tuberculosis embA expression. P(embA)((Mtb)) activity remained constant throughout growth phases and after stress treatment, although it was reduced during hypoxia-induced non-replicating persistence. Ethambutol exposure had no effect on P(embA)((Mtb)) activity. These data demonstrate that M. tuberculosis embA encodes a functional arabinosyltransferase which is constitutively expressed and plays a critical role in M. tuberculosis.

  9. Allelic exchange in Mycobacterium tuberculosis with long linear recombination substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, V; Pavelka, M S; Bardarov, S S; Martin, J; Weisbrod, T R; McAdam, R A; Bloom, B R; Jacobs, W R

    1996-01-01

    Genetic studies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been greatly hampered by the inability to introduce specific chromosomal mutations. Whereas the ability to perform allelic exchanges has provided a useful method of gene disruption in other organisms, in the clinically important species of mycobacteria, such as M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis, similar approaches have thus far been unsuccessful. In this communication, we report the development of a shuttle mutagenesis strategy that involves the use of long linear recombination substrates to reproducibly obtain recombinants by allelic exchange in M. tuberculosis. Long linear recombination substrates, approximately 40 to 50 kb in length, were generated by constructing libraries in the excisable cosmid vector pYUB328. The cosmid vector could be readily excised from the recombinant cosmids by digestion with PacI, a restriction endonuclease for which there exist few, if any, sites in mycobacterial genomes. A cosmid containing the mycobacterial leuD gene was isolated, and a selectable marker conferring resistance to kanamycin was inserted into the leuD gene in the recombinant cosmid by interplasmid recombination in Escherichia coli. A long linear recombination substrate containing the insertionally mutated leuD gene was generated by PacI digestion. Electroporation of this recombination substrate containing the insertionally mutated leuD allele resulted in the generation of leucine auxotrophic mutants by homologous recombination in 6% of the kanamycin-resistant transformants for both the Erdman and H37Rv strains of M. tuberculosis. The ability to perform allelic exchanges provides an important approach for investigating the biology of this pathogen as well as developing new live-cell M. tuberculosis-based vaccines. PMID:8550428

  10. The rpoB gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, L P; Crawford, J T; Shinnick, T M

    1994-01-01

    A portion of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase (rpoB) was amplified by PCR using degenerate oligonucleotides and used as a hybridization probe to isolate plasmid clones carrying the entire rpoB gene of M. tuberculosis H37Rv, a virulent, rifampin-susceptible strain. Sequence analysis of a 5,084-bp SacI genomic DNA fragment revealed a 3,534-bp open reading frame encoding an 1,178-amino-acid protein with 57% identity with the Escherichia coli beta subunit. This SacI fragment also carried a portion of the rpoC gene located 43 bp downstream from the 3' end of the rpoB open reading frame; this organization is similar to that of the rpoBC operon of E. coli. The M. tuberculosis rpoB gene was cloned into the shuttle plasmid pMV261 and electroporated into the LR223 strain of Mycobacterium smegmatis, which is highly resistant to rifampin (MIC > 200 micrograms/ml). The resulting transformants were relatively rifampin susceptible (MIC = 50 micrograms/ml). Using PCR mutagenesis techniques, we introduced a specific rpoB point mutation (associated with clinical strains of rifampin-resistant M. tuberculosis) into the cloned M. tuberculosis rpoB gene and expressed this altered gene in the LR222 strain of M. smegmatis, which is susceptible to rifampin (MIC = 25 micrograms/ml). The resulting transformants were rifampin resistant (MIC = 200 micrograms/ml). The mutagenesis and expression strategy of the cloned M. tuberculosis rpoB gene that we have employed in this study will allow us to determine the rpoB mutations that are responsible for rifampin resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:8031050

  11. Building a better bacillus: the emergence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joyce; Behr, Marcel A.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium is comprised of more than 150 species that reside in a wide variety of habitats. Most mycobacteria are environmental organisms that are either not associated with disease or are opportunistic pathogens that cause non-transmissible disease in immunocompromised individuals. In contrast, a small number of species, such as the tubercle bacillus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, are host-adapted pathogens for which there is no known environmental reservoir. In recent years, gene disruption studies using the host-adapted pathogen have uncovered a number of “virulence factors,” yet genomic data indicate that many of these elements are present in non-pathogenic mycobacteria. This suggests that much of the genetic make-up that enables virulence in the host-adapted pathogen is already present in environmental members of the genus. In addition to these generic factors, we hypothesize that molecules elaborated exclusively by professional pathogens may be particularly implicated in the ability of M. tuberculosis to infect, persist, and cause transmissible pathology in its host species, Homo sapiens. One approach to identify these molecules is to employ comparative analysis of mycobacterial genomes, to define evolutionary events such as horizontal gene transfer (HGT) that contributed M. tuberculosis-specific genetic elements. Independent studies have now revealed the presence of HGT genes in the M. tuberculosis genome and their role in the pathogenesis of disease is the subject of ongoing investigations. Here we review these studies, focusing on the hypothesized role played by HGT loci in the emergence of M. tuberculosis from a related environmental species into a highly specialized human-adapted pathogen. PMID:24765091

  12. Bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities of benzoxazinorifamycin KRM-1648 against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium in human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Mor, N; Simon, B; Heifets, L

    1996-01-01

    Inhibitory and bactericidal activities of KRM-1648 were determined against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium residing in human monocyte-derived macrophages and extracellular M. tuberculosis and M. avium. MICs and MBCs of KRM-1648 against intracellular and extracellular bacteria were substantially lower than those of rifampin. The MICs and MBCs of either drug against the intracellular bacteria were only twofold lower than or equal to the values found for extracellular bacteria. The prolonged effect of KRM-1648 found in this study is probably associated with high ratios of intracellular accumulation, which were 50- to 100-fold higher than that found for rifampin. Further studies on intracellular distribution of KRM-1648 and on the sites of actual interaction between the drug and bacteria residing in macrophages are necessary, as well as evaluation of combined effects of KRM-1648 with other drugs in long-term macrophage culture experiments. PMID:8726023

  13. Sobre las soluciones acotadas del problema instantáneo de dos cuerpos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altavista, C.

    La demostración se basa en el hecho de que las integrales del problema de los N-cuerpos admiten componentes en el campo complejo según las raíces n-ésimas de la unidad. Definida la matriz unitaria correspondiente, la fórmula de Cayley permite transformar la matriz unitaria en una matriz hermitiana. Utilizando como parámetros los cosenos direccionales de un sistema de coordenadas orbitales referidos a un sistema de referencia fijo, puede construirse, utilizando el operador hermitiano antes definido, una forma cuadrática cuyas raíces mínima y máxima definen las cotas respectivas de los movimientos de los mencionados cosenos direccionales.

  14. Cloning and expression of the trehalose-phosphate phosphatase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: comparison to the enzyme from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Edavana, Vineetha Koroth; Pastuszak, Irena; Carroll, J D; Thampi, Prajitha; Abraham, Edathera C; Elbein, Alan D

    2004-06-15

    Two open reading frames in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, Rv3372 and Rv2006, have about 25% sequence identity at the amino acid level to the trehalose-phosphate phosphatase (TPP) purified from Mycobacterium smegmatis. However, the protein produced from the cloned Rv3372 gene has a molecular weight of about 45kDa whereas the trehalose-P phosphatase purified from M. smegmatis has a molecular weight of about 27kDa. We expressed the Rv3372 protein in Escherichia coli and show here that it is a trehalose-P phosphatase with very similar properties to the M. smegmatis TPP, i.e., complete specificity for trehalose-phosphate as the substrate, an almost absolute requirement for Mg(2+), and a pH optimum of 7-7.5. On the other hand, in contrast to the M. smegmatis enzyme, the Rv3372 protein was much less stable to heat and much less sensitive to inhibition by diumycin and moenomycin. In fact, both of these antibiotics stimulate enzyme activity at low concentrations and only inhibit the activity at higher antibiotic concentrations. Antibody prepared against the 27kDa TPP does not cross react with the 45kDa TPP nor does antibody against the 45kDa TPP cross react with the 27kDa TPP. Nevertheless, studies of secondary structure by circular dichroism indicate that the two enzymes are quite similar in structure. The product of the other gene, Rv2006, is a 159kDa protein with no detectable phosphatase activity. Thus, its function is currently unknown.

  15. Mycobacterium leprae RecA is structurally analogous but functionally distinct from Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA protein.

    PubMed

    Patil, K Neelakanteshwar; Singh, Pawan; Harsha, Sri; Muniyappa, K

    2011-12-01

    Mycobacterium leprae is closely related to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, yet causes a very different illness. Detailed genomic comparison between these two species of mycobacteria reveals that the decaying M. leprae genome contains less than half of the M. tuberculosis functional genes. The reduction of genome size and accumulation of pseudogenes in the M. leprae genome is thought to result from multiple recombination events between related repetitive sequences, which provided the impetus to investigate the recombination-like activities of RecA protein. In this study, we have cloned, over-expressed and purified M. leprae RecA and compared its activities with that of M. tuberculosis RecA. Both proteins, despite being 91% identical at the amino acid level, exhibit strikingly different binding profiles for single-stranded DNA with varying GC contents, in the ability to catalyze the formation of D-loops and to promote DNA strand exchange. The kinetics and the extent of single-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase and coprotease activities were nearly equivalent between these two recombinases. However, the degree of inhibition exerted by a range of ATP:ADP ratios was greater on strand exchange promoted by M. leprae RecA compared to its M. tuberculosis counterpart. Taken together, our results provide insights into the mechanistic aspects of homologous recombination and coprotease activity promoted by M. lepare RecA, and further suggests that it differs from the M. tuberculosis counterpart. These results are consistent with an emerging concept of DNA-sequence influenced structural differences in RecA nucleoprotein filaments and how these differences reflect on the multiple activities associated with RecA protein.

  16. Serologic tests for detecting antibodies against Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa).

    PubMed

    Boadella, Mariana; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Greenwald, Reena; Esfandiari, Javan; Jaroso, Raquel; Carta, Tania; Garrido, Joseba M; Vicente, Joaquín; de la Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian

    2011-01-01

    New tools to detect exposure of free-range Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa scrofa) to pathogenic mycobacteria would be valuable for improved disease surveillance and wildlife management. Two hundred sera from wild boar of known Mycobacterium bovis infection status were used to evaluate test suitability for the detection of antibodies against M. bovis and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (or cross-reacting members of the M. avium complex). Two traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were evaluated using M. bovis purified protein derivative (bPPD) and paratuberculosis protoplasmatic antigen 3 (PPA3) as antigens, respectively, and a new point-of-care test format for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) that uses the innovative dual-path platform (DPP TB) test. The effect of individual factors (sex, age, lesions) on the diagnostic performance of the serologic tests was also determined. Although the DPP had a sensitivity of 89.6% and a specificity of 90.4%, for bPPD, the sensitivity was 79.2% and the specificity 100%. Both tests had a kappa agreement of 0.80. Sixty-five of 68 (95.6%) wild boar sera with antibodies against the PPA3 antigen corresponded to known M. bovis-infected wild boar. Significant differences were not observed in the bPPD and DPP readings among lesion categories or between age classes. A slight sex-related difference in sensitivity toward males in the DPP was found, but it was not detected in the bPPD enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results support the use of antibody-based diagnostic tests for both large-scale and individual bTB testing of Eurasian wild boar and suggest that wild boar cannot be used as sentinels for infections caused by M. avium complex members.

  17. Effects of ortho-phthalaldehyde, glutaraldehyde and chlorhexidine diacetate on Mycobacterium chelonae and Mycobacterium abscessus strains with modified permeability.

    PubMed

    Fraud, S; Hann, A C; Maillard, J-Y; Russell, A D

    2003-03-01

    The mechanisms of the mycobactericidal action of ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA), glutaraldehyde (GTA) and chlorhexidine diacetate (CHA) were investigated using mycobacterial spheroplasts of two reference strains, Mycobacterium chelonae NCTC 946, Mycobacterium abscessus NCTC 10882 and two GTA-resistant strains, M. chelonae Epping and M. chelonae Harefield. Transmission electron microscopy of the spheroplasts revealed an altered cell wall structure compared with the parent cells. Structural alterations resulting from the spheroplasting process were in part correlated to a loss of lipid content. Low concentrations of CHA induced protein coagulation in M. chelonae NCTC 946 spheroplasts, which also exhibited the highest loss of free non-polar lipids. Higher concentrations of CHA were required to produce similar results to the other spheroplasts investigated in which there was a less substantial decrease in lipid content. OPA (0.5% w/v) readily penetrated the residual cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, producing significant protein coagulation in M. chelonae NCTC 946. GTA (0.5% v/v) induced a similar effect but to a lesser extent. Pre-treatment of the spheroplasts with OPA and GTA and their subsequent suspension in water demonstrated that GTA was a more potent cross-linking agent. This protective effect of GTA results from extensive cross-linking of amino and/or sulphydryl side-chain groups of proteins. The rapid mycobactericidal effect of OPA probably arises from its more efficient penetration across biological membranes. Mycobacterial spheroplasts represented a useful cellular model with an altered cell wall permeability. This study also showed the importance of the mycobacterial cell wall in conferring intrinsic resistance to CHA.

  18. T-cell mRNA Expression in Response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination and Mycobacterium bovis Infection of White-tailed deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding immune responses of white-tailed deer (WTD) to infection with Mycobacterium bovis provides insight into mechanisms of pathogen control and may provide clues to development of effective vaccine strategies. WTD were vaccinated with either BCG strain Pasteur or BCG Danish. Both vaccinates...

  19. Vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis BCG Strains Danish and Pasteur in White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) Experimentally Challenged with Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wildlife reservoirs of Mycobacterium bovis represent serious obstacles to the eradication of tuberculosis in domestic livestock. The cause for many faltering eradication programs is the presence of wildlife reservoirs of M. bovis. One approach in dealing with this wildlife reservoir is to vaccinate ...

  20. Fecal volatile organic compound profiles from white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) as indicators of Mycobacterium bovis exposure or Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) serve as a reservoir for bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, and can be a source of infection in cattle. Vaccination with M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is being considered for management of bovine tuberculosis in deer. Presently, no...

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Mycobacterium immunogenum Strains Obtained from a Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Simulator

    PubMed Central

    Revetta, Randy P.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequences of six Mycobacterium immunogenum strains isolated from a chloraminated drinking water distribution system simulator subjected to changes in operational parameters. M. immunogenum, a rapidly growing mycobacterium previously reported to be the cause of hypersensitivity pneumonitis from contaminated metalworking fluid aerosols, is becoming a public health concern. PMID:26744376

  2. Cloning and sequence analysis of a class A beta-lactamase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra.

    PubMed Central

    Hackbarth, C J; Unsal, I; Chambers, H F

    1997-01-01

    A cosmid library from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra was introduced into Mycobacterium smegmatis, and eight recombinant clones with increased resistance to cefoxitin were identified. Isoelectric focusing detected an M. tuberculosis-derived beta-lactamase in one of these recombinant clones. A sequence analysis identified it as a class A beta-lactamase whose expression correlated with the increased resistance phenotype. PMID:9145897

  3. Assessing the effectiveness of low-pressure ultraviolet light for inactivating Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) micro-organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: To assess low-pressure ultraviolet light (LP-UV) inactivation kinetics of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) strains in a water matrix using collimated beam apparatus. Methods and Results: Strains of M. avium (n = 3) and Mycobacterium intracellulare (n = 2) were exposed t...

  4. Pulmonary Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination Confers Dose-Dependent Superior Protection Compared to That of Subcutaneous Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Aguilo, Nacho; Toledo, Ana Maria; Lopez-Roman, Eva Maria; Perez-Herran, Esther; Gormley, Eamonn; Rullas-Trincado, Joaquin; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, the Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine is one of the most widely used vaccines. However, it appears to be ineffective in preventing pulmonary tuberculosis. Here, we show that pulmonary BCG vaccination of mice with a broad dose range provides superior protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge compared to that of subcutaneous vaccination. PMID:24501340

  5. Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle and white-tailed deer: Translational research of relevance to human tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a premier example of a disease complex with pathogens primarily affecting humans (i.e., Mycobacterium tuberculosis) or livestock and wildlife (i.e., Mycobacterium bovis) and with a long history of inclusive collaborations between physicians and veterinarians. Advances with the s...

  6. Isolation of a Mycobacterium microti-like organism from a rock hyrax (Procavia capensis) in a Canadian zoo.

    PubMed

    Lutze-Wallace, Cyril; Turcotte, Claude; Glover, Gordon; Cousins, Debby; Bell, John; Berlie-Surujballi, Gloria; Barbeau, Yvon; Randall, Geoff

    2006-10-01

    A Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organism was isolated from a zoo resident rock hyrax (Procavia capensis) imported into Canada from South Africa. The strain was identified biochemically as Mycobacterium microti. The spoligotype pattern obtained for this isolate was found to be rare. This represents the first report of isolation and spoligotyping of M. microti in North America.

  7. Mycobacterium microti Llama-Type Infection Presenting as Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patient

    PubMed Central

    Horstkotte, Matthias A.; Sobottka, Ingo; Schewe, Carl K.; Schäfer, Peter; Laufs, Rainer; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Niemann, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    A rare case of Mycobacterium microti infection in a human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient is described. Because of unusual morphological and cultural features, the pathogen was analyzed by spoligotyping and identified as the Mycobacterium microti llama type. Although culture of M. microti is difficult, drug susceptibility testing could be performed, which correlated with the clinical outcome. PMID:11136815

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis pili (MTP), a putative biomarker for a tuberculosis diagnostic test.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Natasha; Ramsugit, Saiyur; Pillay, Manormoney

    2014-05-01

    Novel biomarkers are urgently needed for point of care TB diagnostics. In this study, we investigated the potential of the pilin subunit protein encoded by the mtp gene as a diagnostic biomarker. BLAST analysis of the mtp gene on published genome databases, and amplicon sequencing were performed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex (MTBC) strains and other organisms. The protein secondary structure of the amino acid sequences of non-tuberculous Mycobacteria that partially aligned with the mtp sequence was analysed with PredictProtein software. The mtp gene and corresponding amino acid sequence of MTBC were 100% homologous with H37Rv, in contrast to the partial alignment of the non-tuberculous Mycobacteria. The mtp gene was present in all 91 clinical isolates of MTBC. Except for 2 strains with point mutations, the sequence was 100% conserved among the clinical strains. The mtp gene could not be amplified in all non-tuberculous Mycobacteria and respiratory organisms. The predicted MTP protein structure of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium abscessus differed significantly from that of the M. tuberculosis, which was similar to Mycobacterium marinum. The absence of the mtp gene in non-tuberculous Mycobacteria and other respiratory bacteria suggests that its encoded product, the pilin subunit protein of M. tuberculosis may be a suitable marker for a point of care TB test.

  9. Mycobacterium shottsii sp. nov., a slowly growing species isolated from Chesapeake Bay striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; Kotob, S.; van Berkum, P.; Kaattari, I.; Vogelbein, W.; Quinn, F.; Floyd, M.M.; Butler, W.R.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Slowly growing, non-pigmented mycobacteria were isolated from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) during an epizootic of mycobacteriosis in the Chesapeake Bay. Growth characteristics, acid-fastness and results of 16S rRNA gene sequencing were consistent with those of the genus Mycobacterium. A unique profile of biochemical reactions was observed among the 21 isolates. A single cluster of eight peaks identified by analysis of mycolic acids (HPLC) resembled those of reference patterns but differed in peak elution times from profiles of reference species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. One isolate (M175T) was placed within the slowly growing mycobacteria by analysis of aligned 16S rRNA gene sequences and was proximate in phylogeny to Mycobacterium ulcerans and Mycobacterium marinum. However, distinct nucleotide differences were detected in the 16S rRNA gene sequence among M175T, M. ulcerans and M. marinum (99.2% similarity). Isolate M175T could be differentiated from other slowly growing, non-pigmented mycobacteria by its inability to grow at 37??C, production of niacin and urease, absence of nitrate reductase and resistance to isoniazid (1 ??g ml-1), thiacetazone and thiophene-2-carboxylic hydrazide. Based upon these genetic and phenotypic differences, isolate M175T (= ATCC 700981T = NCTC 13215T) is proposed as the type strain of a novel species, Mycobacterium shottsii sp. nov.

  10. Murine Mycobacterium marinum Infection as a Model for Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lienard, Julia; Carlsson, Fredric

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacteria are a major human health problem globally. Regarding tuberculosis the situation is worsened by the poor efficacy of current vaccine regimens and by emergence of drug-resistant strains (Manjelievskaia J et al, Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 110: 110, 2016; Pereira et al., Lancet Infect Dis 12:300-306, 2012; http://www.who.int/tb/publications/global_report/en/) undermining both disease-prevention and available treatments. Thus, increased basic understanding of mycobacterial-and particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis-virulence strategies and pathogenesis is of great importance. To this end several in vivo infection models are available (Guirado and Schlesinger, Front Immunol 4:98, 2013; Leung et al., Eur J Immunol 43:2246-2254, 2013; Patel et al., J Lab Physicians 3:75-79, 2011; van Leeuwen et al., Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med 5:a018580, 2015). While these models all have their merits they also exhibit limitations, and none perfectly mimics all aspects of human tuberculosis. Thus, there is a need for multiple models that may complement each other, ultimately allowing us to gain true insight into the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections.Here, we describe a recently developed mouse model of Mycobacterium marinum infection that allows kinetic and quantitative studies of disease progression in live animals [8]. Notably, this model exhibits features of human tuberculosis not replicated in M. tuberculosis infected mice, and may provide an important complement to the field. For example, granulomas in the M. marinum model develop central caseating necrosis (Carlsson et al., PLoS Pathog 6:e1000895, 2010), a hallmark of granulomas in human tuberculosis normally not replicated in murine M. tuberculosis infection. Moreover, while tuberculosis is heterogeneous and presents with a continuum of active and latent disease, M. tuberculosis infected mice essentially lack this dynamic range and do not replicate latency (Guirado and Schlesinger, Front Immunol 4:98, 2013

  11. MenA is a promising drug target for developing novel lead molecules to combat Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kurosu, Michio; Crick, Dean C

    2009-03-01

    Potent inhibitors of MenA (1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphtoate prenyltrasferase) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis are identified, and are also effective in inhibiting growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis at low concentrations. The MenA inhibitors possess common chemical structural features of (alkylamino)oalkoxyphenyl)(phenyl)methanones. Significantly, the MenA inhibitors can be synthesized in a few steps with high overall yields. The representative MenA inhibitors are highly effective in killing nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis that is evaluated by using the Wayne low oxygen model. In addition, a series of drug resistant Mycobacterium spp. are sensitive to the MenA inhibitors. The results are expected to be of significance in terms of discovering new lead compounds that can be developed into new drugs to combat unmet diseases caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  12. MenA Is a Promising Drug Target for Developing Novel Lead Molecules to Combat Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kurosu, Michio; Crick, Dean C.

    2017-01-01

    Potent inhibitors of MenA (1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphtoate prenyltrasferase) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis are identified, and are also effective in inhibiting growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis at low concentrations. The MenA inhibitors possess common chemical structural features of ((alkylamino)alkoxyphenyl)(phenyl)methanones. Significantly, the MenA inhibitors can be synthesized in a few steps with high overall yields. The representative MenA inhibitors are highly effective in killing nonreplicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis that is evaluated by using the Wayne low oxygen model. In addition, a series of drug resistant Mycobacterium spp. are sensitive to the MenA inhibitors. The results are expected to be of significance in terms of discovering new lead compounds that can be developed into new drugs to combat unmet diseases caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:19275719

  13. Use of MALDI-TOF MS for Identification of Nontuberculous Mycobacterium Species Isolated from Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mediavilla-Gradolph, María Concepción; De Toro-Peinado, Inmaculada; Bermúdez-Ruiz, María Pilar; García-Martínez, María de los Ángeles; Ortega-Torres, María; Montiel Quezel-Guerraz, Natalia; Palop-Borrás, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results obtained for identification by MALDI-TOF of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) isolated in clinical samples with those obtained by GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS (common mycobacteria/additional species). A total of 66 Mycobacterium isolates from various clinical specimens (mainly respiratory) were tested in this study. They were identified using MALDI-TOF Bruker from strains isolated in Lowenstein, following the recommended protocol of heat inactivation and extraction, and were simultaneously analyzed through hybridization by GenoType Mycobacterium from liquid culture MGIT. Our results showed that identification by MALDI-TOF was correct in 98.4% (65/66) of NTM isolated in our clinical practice (M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. abscessus, M. chelonae, M. fortuitum, M. mucogenicum, M. kansasii, and M. scrofulaceum). MALDI-TOF was found to be an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective system for identification of mycobacteria species. PMID:26106617

  14. Identification of metabolites from the degradation of fluoranthene by Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, I; Freeman, J P; Evans, F E; Cerniglia, C E

    1993-01-01

    Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1, previously shown to extensively mineralize high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in pure culture and in sediments, degrades fluoranthene to 9-fluorenone-1-carboxylic acid. In this study, 10 other fluoranthene metabolites were isolated from ethyl acetate extracts of the culture medium by thin-layer and high-performance liquid chromatographic methods. On the basis of comparisons with authentic compounds by UV spectrophotometry and thin-layer chromatography as well as gas chromatography-mass spectral and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses, the metabolites were identified as 8-hydroxy-7-methoxyfluoranthene, 9-hydroxyfluorene, 9-fluorenone, 1-acenaphthenone, 9-hydroxy-1-fluorenecarboxylic acid, phthalic acid, 2-carboxybenzaldehyde, benzoic acid, phenylacetic acid, and adipic acid. Authentic 9-hydroxyfluorene and 9-fluorenone were metabolized by Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1. A pathway for the catabolism of fluoranthene by Mycobacterium sp. strain PYR-1 is proposed. PMID:8481006

  15. Animal-adapted members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex endemic to the southern African subregion.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Charlene; Van Helden, Paul; Miller, Michele; Parsons, Sven

    2016-04-26

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) cause tuberculosis (TB) in both animals and humans. In this article, three animal-adapted MTC strains that are endemic to the southern African subregion - that is, Mycobacterium suricattae, Mycobacterium mungi, and the dassie bacillus - are reviewed with a focus on clinical and pathological presentations, geographic distribution, genotyping methods, diagnostic tools and evolution. Moreover, factors influencing the transmission and establishment of TB pathogens in novel host populations, including ecological, immunological and genetic factors of both the host and pathogen, are discussed. The risks associated with these infections are currently unknown and further studies will be required for greater understanding of this disease in the context of the southern African ecosystem.

  16. Proteasomal control of cytokinin synthesis protects Mycobacterium tuberculosis against nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Samanovic, Marie I.; Tu, Shengjiang; Novák, Ondřej; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; McAllister, Fiona E.; Aravind, L.; Gygi, Steven P.; Hubbard, Stevan R.; Strnad, Miroslav; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Summary One of several roles of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome is to defend against host-produced nitric oxide (NO), a free radical that can damage numerous biological macromolecules. Mutations that inactivate proteasomal degradation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis result in bacteria that are hypersensitive to NO and attenuated for growth in vivo, but it was not known why. To elucidate the link between proteasome function, NO-resistance, and pathogenesis, we screened for suppressors of NO hypersensitivity in a mycobacterial proteasome ATPase mutant and identified mutations in Rv1205. We determined that Rv1205 encodes a pupylated proteasome substrate. Rv1205 is a homologue of the plant enzyme LONELY GUY, which catalyzes the production of hormones called cytokinins. Remarkably, we report for the first time that an obligate human pathogen secretes several cytokinins. Finally, we determined that the Rv1205-dependent accumulation of cytokinin breakdown products is likely responsible for the sensitization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasome-associated mutants to NO. PMID:25728768

  17. Mycolic Acid Analysis by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography for Identification of Mycobacterium Species

    PubMed Central

    Butler, W. Ray; Guthertz, Linda S.

    2001-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiologic agent of tuberculosis and can be accurately detected by laboratories using commercial genetic tests. Nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM) causing other mycobacterioses can be difficult to identify. The identification processes are confounded by an increasing diversity of newly characterized NTM species. The ubiquitous nature of NTM, combined with their potential to be opportunistic pathogens in immunocompromised as well as nonimmunodeficient patients, further complicates the problem of their identification. Since clinical case management varies depending on the etiologic agent, laboratories must identify the species in a timely manner. However, only a few identification methods can detect the species diversity within the Mycobacterium genus. Over the last decade, high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the mycolic acids has become an accepted method for identification of mycobacteria. In this review, we assess its development and usefulness as an identification technique for Mycobacterium species. PMID:11585782

  18. [Advances in the research of an animal model of wound due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Jia, Chiyu

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis ranks as the second deadly infectious disease worldwide. The incidence of tuberculosis is high in China. Refractory wound caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection ranks high in misdiagnosis, and it is accompanied by a protracted course, and its pathogenic mechanism is still not so clear. In order to study its pathogenic mechanism, it is necessary to reproduce an appropriate animal model. Up to now the study of the refractory wound caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is just beginning, and there is still no unimpeachable model for study. This review describes two models which may reproduce a wound similar to the wound caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, so that they could be used to study the pathogenesis and characteristics of a tuberculosis wound in an animal.

  19. [Case of urinary mycobacterium fortuitum in a patient with urinary tract tuberculosis posttreatment].

    PubMed

    Maehana, Takeshi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Hirobe, Megumi; Taguchi, Keisuke

    2008-11-01

    A 70-year-old male who complained of urinary frequency and a feeling of incomplete emptying was admitted to our hospital. Imaging findings showed dilation of the left renal pelvis and ureter. He was diagnosed as having urinary tuberculosis because a positive urinary Mycobacterium tuberculosis result was obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). He was treated with a combination of the antituberculosis agents isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol for six months. The symptoms and pyuria disappeared and M. tuberculosis was negative by PCR; however, Mycobacterium fortuitum was isolated by culture. Due to asymptomatic urinary tract infection by the multidrug resistant M. fortuitum, he was followed up with observation. Currently, he remains unchanged with regard to symptoms and imaging examination. M. fortuitum is a nontubercular mycobacterium, and clinical relevance between urinary tract infection and M. fortuitum has rarely emerged. However, we should be aware that nontubercular mycobacteria such as M. fortuitum can infect the urinary tract, especially in immunocompromised patients.

  20. Clofazimine Prevents the Regrowth of Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium avium Type Strains Exposed to Amikacin and Clarithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Beatriz E.; Meletiadis, Joseph; Wattenberg, Melanie; de Jong, Arjan; van Soolingen, Dick; Mouton, Johan W.

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug therapy is a standard practice when treating infections by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), but few treatment options exist. We conducted this study to define the drug-drug interaction between clofazimine and both amikacin and clarithromycin and its contribution to NTM treatment. Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium avium type strains were used. Time-kill assays for clofazimine alone and combined with amikacin or clarithromycin were performed at concentrations of 0.25× to 2× MIC. Pharmacodynamic interactions were assessed by response surface model of Bliss independence (RSBI) and isobolographic analysis of Loewe additivity (ISLA), calculating the percentage of statistically significant Bliss interactions and interaction indices (I), respectively. Monte Carlo simulations with predicted human lung concentrations were used to calculate target attainment rates for combination and monotherapy regimens. Clofazimine alone was bacteriostatic for both NTM. Clofazimine-amikacin was synergistic against M. abscessus (I = 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29 to 0.55) and M. avium (I = 0.027; 95% CI, 0.007 to 0.048). Based on RSBI analysis, synergistic interactions of 28.4 to 29.0% and 23.2 to 56.7% were observed at 1× to 2× MIC and 0.25× to 2× MIC for M. abscessus and M. avium, respectively. Clofazimine-clarithromycin was also synergistic against M. abscessus (I = 0.53; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.72) and M. avium (I = 0.16; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.35), RSBI analysis showed 23.5% and 23.3 to 53.3% at 2× MIC and 0.25× to 0.5× MIC for M. abscessus and M. avium, respectively. Clofazimine prevented the regrowth observed with amikacin or clarithromycin alone. Target attainment rates of combination regimens were >60% higher than those of monotherapy regimens for M. abscessus and M. avium. The combination of clofazimine with amikacin or clarithromycin was synergistic in vitro. This suggests a potential role for clofazimine in treatment regimens that warrants further

  1. How B cells shape the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Paul J; Chan, John

    2009-03-01

    Extensive work illustrating the importance of cellular immune mechanisms for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has largely relegated B-cell biology to an afterthought within the tuberculosis (TB) field. However, recent studies have illustrated that B lymphocytes, through a variety of interactions with the cellular immune response, play previously underappreciated roles in shaping host defense against non-viral intracellular pathogens, including M. tuberculosis. Work in our laboratory has recently shown that, by considering these lymphocytes more broadly within their variety of interactions with cellular immunity, B cells have a significant impact on the outcome of airborne challenge with M. tuberculosis as well as the resultant inflammatory response. In this review, we advocate for a revised view of TB immunology in which roles of cellular and humoral immunity are not mutually exclusive. In the context of our current understanding of host defense against non-viral intracellular infections, we review recent data supporting a more significant role of B cells during M. tuberculosis infection than previously thought.

  2. Pathology of Mycobacterium bovis infection in wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Drewe, J A; Foote, A K; Sutcliffe, R L; Pearce, G P

    2009-01-01

    Pathological lesions associated with Mycobacterium bovis infection (bovine tuberculosis; bTB) in free-living meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in the Kalahari Desert of South Africa are described. The pathology of bTB in meerkats was determined through detailed post-mortem examinations of 57 animals (52 meerkats showing clinical signs of bTB, and five not showing signs of disease). Lymph nodes and tissue lesions thought to be associated with bTB were cultured for mycobacteria. All 52 bTB-infected meerkats showed gross or microscopical granulomatous lesions, but M. bovis was cultured from only 42% (22/52) of these animals. The majority (96%, 50/52) of diseased meerkats had lesions in multiple sites, the pattern of which suggested haematogenous spread of M. bovis infection in this species. The histological characteristics of the tuberculous lesions, together with the gross pathology and the wide range of body systems affected, indicate that infection in meerkats is acquired principally via the respiratory and oral routes, whereas excretion is most likely via the respiratory tract and suppurating skin wounds. Urine and faeces appear to be unlikely sources of infection. The findings of this study provide information on the transmission, pathogenesis and epidemiology of bTB in meerkats that is likely to be relevant to the understanding of M. bovis infection in other social mammal species such as the European badger (Meles meles).

  3. Gene Transfer in Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Shuttle Phasmids to Enlightenment

    PubMed Central

    JACOBS, WILLIAM R.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases have plagued humankind throughout history and have posed serious public health problems. Yet vaccines have eradicated smallpox and antibiotics have drastically decreased the mortality rate of many infectious agents. These remarkable successes in the control of infections came from knowing the causative agents of the diseases, followed by serendipitous discoveries of attenuated viruses and antibiotics. The discovery of DNA as genetic material and the understanding of how this information translates into specific phenotypes have changed the paradigm for developing new vaccines, drugs, and diagnostic tests. Knowledge of the mechanisms of immunity and mechanisms of action of drugs has led to new vaccines and new antimicrobial agents. The key to the acquisition of the knowledge of these mechanisms has been identifying the elemental causes (i.e., genes and their products) that mediate immunity and drug resistance. The identification of these genes is made possible by being able to transfer the genes or mutated forms of the genes into causative agents or surrogate hosts. Such an approach was limited in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the difficulty of transferring genes or alleles into M. tuberculosis or a suitable surrogate mycobacterial host. The construction of shuttle phasmids—chimeric molecules that replicate in Escherichia coli as plasmids and in mycobacteria as mycobacteriophages—was instrumental in developing gene transfer systems for M. tuberculosis. This review will discuss M. tuberculosis genetic systems and their impact on tuberculosis research. “I had to know my enemy in order to prevail against him.”Nelson Mandela PMID:26105819

  4. Importance of porins for biocide efficacy against Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Elrike; Schmidt, Stefan; Niederweis, Michael; Steinhauer, Katrin

    2011-05-01

    Mycobacteria are among the microorganisms least susceptible to biocides but cause devastating diseases, such as tuberculosis, and increasingly opportunistic infections. The exceptional resistance of mycobacteria to toxic solutes is due to an unusual outer membrane, which acts as an efficient permeability barrier, in synergy with other resistance mechanisms. Porins are channel-forming proteins in the outer membrane of mycobacteria. In this study we used the alamarBlue assay to show that the deletion of Msp porins in isogenic mutants increased the resistance of Mycobacterium smegmatis to isothiazolinones (methylchloroisothiazolinone [MCI]/methylisothiazolinone [MI] and octylisothiazolinone [2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one; OIT]), formaldehyde-releasing biocides {hexahydrotriazine [1,3,5-tris (2-hydroxyethyl)-hexahydrotriazine; HHT] and methylenbisoxazolidine [N,N'-methylene-bis-5-(methyloxazolidine); MBO]}, and the lipophilic biocides polyhexamethylene biguanide and octenidine dihydrochloride 2- to 16-fold. Furthermore, the susceptibility of the porin triple mutant against a complex disinfectant was decreased 8-fold compared to wild-type (wt) M. smegmatis. Efficacy testing in the quantitative suspension test EN 14348 revealed 100-fold improved survival of the porin mutant in the presence of this biocide. These findings underline the importance of porins for the susceptibility of M. smegmatis to biocides.

  5. Pyrosequencing assay for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms to the species level is important for diagnostic, therapeutic and epidemiologic perspectives. Indeed, isolates are routinely identified as belonging to the M. tuberculosis complex without further discrimination in agreement with the high genomic similarity of the M. tuberculosis complex members and the resulting complex available identification tools. Findings We herein develop a pyrosequencing assay analyzing polymorphisms within glpK, pykA and gyrB genes to identify members of the M. tuberculosis complex at the species level. The assay was evaluated with 22 M. tuberculosis, 21 M. bovis, 3 M. caprae, 3 M. microti, 2 M. bovis BCG, 2 M. pinnipedii, 1 M. canettii and 1 M. africanum type I isolates. The resulted pyrograms were consistent with conventional DNA sequencing data and successfully identified all isolates. Additionally, 127 clinical M. tuberculosis complex isolates were analyzed and were unambiguously identified as M. tuberculosis. Conclusion We proposed a pyrosequencing-based scheme for the rapid identification of M. tuberculosis complex isolates at the species level. The assay is robust, specific, rapid and can be easily introduced in the routine activity. PMID:22011383

  6. Enumeration of Mycobacterium leprae Using Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Truman, Richard W.; Andrews, P. Kyle; Robbins, Naoko Y.; Adams, Linda B.; Krahenbuhl, James L.; Gillis, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae is not cultivable in axenic media, and direct microscopic enumeration of the bacilli is complex, labor intensive, and suffers from limited sensitivity and specificity. We have developed a real-time PCR assay for quantifying M. leprae DNA in biological samples. Primers were identified to amplify a shared region of the multicopy repeat sequence (RLEP) specific to M. leprae and tested for sensitivity and specificity in the TaqMan format. The assay was specific for M. leprae and able to detect 10 fg of purified M. leprae DNA, or approximately 300 bacteria in infected tissues. We used the RLEP TaqMan PCR to assess the short and long-term growth results of M. leprae in foot pad tissues obtained from conventional mice, a gene knock-out mouse strain, athymic nude mice, as well as from reticuloendothelial tissues of M. leprae–infected nine-banded armadillos. We found excellent correlative results between estimates from RLEP TaqMan PCR and direct microscopic counting (combined r = 0.98). The RLEP TaqMan PCR permitted rapid analysis of batch samples with high reproducibility and is especially valuable for detection of low numbers of bacilli. Molecular enumeration is a rapid, objective and highly reproducible means to estimate the numbers of M. leprae in tissues, and application of the technique can facilitate work with this agent in many laboratories. PMID:18982056

  7. Clinical Features of Spontaneous Partial Healing During Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Estelle; Chauty, Annick; Kempf, Marie; Le Corre, Yannick; Delneste, Yves; Croue, Anne; Marsollier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Background. Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing skin disease leading to extensive cutaneous and subcutaneous destruction and functional limitations. Spontaneous healing in the absence of medical treatment occurs in rare cases, but this has not been well described in the literature. Methods. In a retrospective case study in an area of Benin where this disease is highly endemic, we selected 26 Buruli ulcer patients presenting features of spontaneous healing from a cohort of 545 Buruli ulcer patients treated between 2010 and 2013. Results. The 26 patients studied had a median age of 13.5 years and were predominantly male (1.4:1). Three groups of patients were defined on the basis of their spontaneous healing characteristics. The first group (12 patients) consisted of patients with an ulcer of more than 1 year′s duration showing signs of healing. The second (13 patients) group contained patients with an active Buruli ulcer lesion some distance away from a first lesion that had healed spontaneously. Finally, the third group contained a single patient displaying complete healing of lesions from a nodule, without treatment and with no relapse. Conclusions. We defined several features of spontaneous healing in Buruli ulcer patients and highlighted the difficulties associated with diagnosis and medical management. Delays in consultation contributed to the high proportion of patients with permanent sequelae and a risk of squamous cell carcinoma. Early detection and antibiotic treatment are the best ways to reduce impairments. PMID:26925431

  8. Evaluation of Fluoromycobacteriophages for Detecting Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Rondón, Liliana; Piuri, Mariana; Jacobs, William R.; de Waard, Jacobus; Hatfull, Graham F.; Takiff, Howard E.

    2011-01-01

    We tested a new method for detecting drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that uses a TM4 mycobacteriophage phAE87::hsp60-EGFP (EGFP-phage) engineered to contain the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After promising results in preliminary studies, the EGFP-phage was used to detect isoniazid (INH), rifampin (RIF), and streptomycin (STR) resistance in 155 strains of M. tuberculosis, and the results were compared to the resazurin microplate technique, with the proportion method serving as the reference standard. The resazurin technique yielded sensitivities of 94% for INH and RIF and 98% for STR and specificities of 97% for INH, 95% for RIF, and 98% for STR. The sensitivity of EGFP-phage was 94% for all three antibiotics, with specificities of 90% for INH, 93% for RIF, and 95% for STR. The EGFP-phage results were available in 2 days for RIF and STR and in 3 days for INH, with an estimated cost of ∼2$ to test the three antibiotics. Using a more stringent criterion for resistance improved the specificity of the EGFP-phage for INH and RIF without affecting the sensitivity. In preliminary studies, the EGFP-phage could also effectively detect resistance to the fluoroquinolones. The EGFP-phage method has the potential to be a valuable rapid and economic screen for detecting drug-resistant tuberculosis if the procedure can be simplified, if it can be adapted to clinical material, and if its sensitivity can be improved. PMID:21346042

  9. Macrophage polarization drives granuloma outcome during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Marino, Simeone; Cilfone, Nicholas A; Mattila, Joshua T; Linderman, Jennifer J; Flynn, JoAnne L; Kirschner, Denise E

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), induces formation of granulomas, structures in which immune cells and bacteria colocalize. Macrophages are among the most abundant cell types in granulomas and have been shown to serve as both critical bactericidal cells and targets for M. tuberculosis infection and proliferation throughout the course of infection. Very little is known about how these processes are regulated, what controls macrophage microenvironment-specific polarization and plasticity, or why some granulomas control bacteria and others permit bacterial dissemination. We take a computational-biology approach to investigate mechanisms that drive macrophage polarization, function, and bacterial control in granulomas. We define a "macrophage polarization ratio" as a metric to understand how cytokine signaling translates into polarization of single macrophages in a granuloma, which in turn modulates cellular functions, including antimicrobial activity and cytokine production. Ultimately, we extend this macrophage ratio to the tissue scale and define a "granuloma polarization ratio" describing mean polarization measures for entire granulomas. Here we coupled experimental data from nonhuman primate TB granulomas to our computational model, and we predict two novel and testable hypotheses regarding macrophage profiles in TB outcomes. First, the temporal dynamics of granuloma polarization ratios are predictive of granuloma outcome. Second, stable necrotic granulomas with low CFU counts and limited inflammation are characterized by short NF-κB signal activation intervals. These results suggest that the dynamics of NF-κB signaling is a viable therapeutic target to promote M1 polarization early during infection and to improve outcome.

  10. Identification of immunoreactive proteins of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Piras, Cristian; Soggiu, Alessio; Bonizzi, Luigi; Greco, Viviana; Ricchi, Matteo; Arrigoni, Norma; Bassols, Anna; Urbani, Andrea; Roncada, Paola

    2015-02-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the cause of a chronic enteritis of ruminants (bovine paratuberculosis (PTB)--Johne's disease) that is associated with enormous worldwide economic losses for the animal production. Diagnosis is based on observation of clinical signs, the detection of antibodies in milk or serum, or evaluation of bacterial culture from feces. The limit of these methods is that they are not able to detect the disease in the subclinical stage and are applicable only when the disease is already advanced. For this reason, the main purpose of this study is to use the MAP proteome to detect novel immunoreactive proteins that may be helpful for PTB diagnoses. 2DE and 2D immunoblotting of MAP proteins were performed using sera of control cattle and PTB-infected cattle in order to highlight the specific immunoreactive proteins. Among the assigned identifiers to immunoreactive spots it was found that most of them correspond to surface-located proteins while three of them have never been described before as antigens. The identification of these proteins improves scientific knowledge that could be useful for PTB diagnoses. The sequence of the identified protein can be used for the synthesis of immunoreactive peptides that could be screened for their immunoreaction against bovine sera infected with MAP. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange consortium with identifier PXD001159 and DOI 10.6019/PXD001159.

  11. Lymphatic endothelial cells are a replicative niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Thomas R.; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Russell, Matthew R.G.; Borel, Sophie; Diedrich, Collin R.; Rohde, Manfred; Wainwright, Helen; Collinson, Lucy M.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2016-01-01

    In extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the most common site of infection is within the lymphatic system, and there is growing recognition that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are involved in immune function. Here, we identified LECs, which line the lymphatic vessels, as a niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph nodes of patients with tuberculosis. In cultured primary human LECs (hLECs), we determined that M. tuberculosis replicates both in the cytosol and within autophagosomes, but the bacteria failed to replicate when the virulence locus RD1 was deleted. Activation by IFN-γ induced a cell-autonomous response in hLECs via autophagy and NO production that restricted M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, depending on the activation status of LECs, autophagy can both promote and restrict replication. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for hLECs and autophagy in tuberculosis pathogenesis and suggest that hLECs are a potential niche for M. tuberculosis that allows establishment of persistent infection in lymph nodes. PMID:26901813

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pyrazinamide Resistance Determinants: a Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Cabibbe, Andrea M.; Feuerriegel, Silke; Casali, Nicola; Drobniewski, Francis; Rodionova, Yulia; Bakonyte, Daiva; Stakenas, Petras; Pimkina, Edita; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa; Degano, Massimo; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Hoffner, Sven; Mansjö, Mikael; Werngren, Jim; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Niemann, Stefan; Cirillo, Daniela M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pyrazinamide (PZA) is a prodrug that is converted to pyrazinoic acid by the enzyme pyrazinamidase, encoded by the pncA gene in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Molecular identification of mutations in pncA offers the potential for rapid detection of pyrazinamide resistance (PZAr). However, the genetic variants are highly variable and scattered over the full length of pncA, complicating the development of a molecular test. We performed a large multicenter study assessing pncA sequence variations in 1,950 clinical isolates, including 1,142 multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains and 483 fully susceptible strains. The results of pncA sequencing were correlated with phenotype, enzymatic activity, and structural and phylogenetic data. We identified 280 genetic variants which were divided into four classes: (i) very high confidence resistance mutations that were found only in PZAr strains (85%), (ii) high-confidence resistance mutations found in more than 70% of PZAr strains, (iii) mutations with an unclear role found in less than 70% of PZAr strains, and (iv) mutations not associated with phenotypic resistance (10%). Any future molecular diagnostic assay should be able to target and identify at least the very high and high-confidence genetic variant markers of PZAr; the diagnostic accuracy of such an assay would be in the range of 89.5 to 98.8%. PMID:25336456

  13. Selective adsorption of Mycobacterium Phlei on pyrite and sphalerite.

    PubMed

    Jia, C Y; Wei, D Z; Li, P J; Li, X J; Tai, P D; Liu, W; Gong, Z Q

    2011-04-01

    The adsorption of Mycobacterium Phlei cells on the surfaces of pyrite and sphalerite was studied as functions of time and pH. The results indicated that a higher amount of cells adsorbing onto pyrite compared with that onto sphalerite under neutral and alkaline conditions, and it was also observed from photographs of scanning electron micrograph. To gain a better insight into the mechanisms of differential adsorption, the functional groups on cell surfaces and the chemical states of each element on mineral surfaces before and after interaction with bacterial cells were investigated. The results showed that many groups presented on cells surface, such as C-O-H, C-O-C, C=O, C-N, N-H and P=O. The change in state of each element on pyrite and sphalerite surfaces after interaction with bacterial cells revealed that there were chemical reactions between metal ions and S on mineral surface and atoms like N, O, P, etc. on cell surface, and the shifts in binding energy of each element on pyrite surface is larger than that of sphalerite. Possible mechanisms for selective adsorption of bacterial cells onto pyrite and sphalerite were discussed in the latter part of this paper.

  14. SInCRe—structural interactome computational resource for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Metri, Rahul; Hariharaputran, Sridhar; Ramakrishnan, Gayatri; Anand, Praveen; Raghavender, Upadhyayula S.; Ochoa-Montaño, Bernardo; Higueruelo, Alicia P.; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan; Chandra, Nagasuma R.; Blundell, Tom L.; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an integrated database for Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (Mtb) that collates information on protein sequences, domain assignments, functional annotation and 3D structural information along with protein–protein and protein–small molecule interactions. SInCRe (Structural Interactome Computational Resource) is developed out of CamBan (Cambridge and Bangalore) collaboration. The motivation for development of this database is to provide an integrated platform to allow easily access and interpretation of data and results obtained by all the groups in CamBan in the field of Mtb informatics. In-house algorithms and databases developed independently by various academic groups in CamBan are used to generate Mtb-specific datasets and are integrated in this database to provide a structural dimension to studies on tuberculosis. The SInCRe database readily provides information on identification of functional domains, genome-scale modelling of structures of Mtb proteins and characterization of the small-molecule binding sites within Mtb. The resource also provides structure-based function annotation, information on small-molecule binders including FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drugs, protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and natural compounds that bind to pathogen proteins potentially and result in weakening or elimination of host–pathogen protein–protein interactions. Together they provide prerequisites for identification of off-target binding. Database URL: http://proline.biochem.iisc.ernet.in/sincre PMID:26130660

  15. Tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium africanum, United States, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aditya; Bloss, Emily; Heilig, Charles M; Click, Eleanor S

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium africanum is endemic to West Africa and causes tuberculosis (TB). We reviewed reported cases of TB in the United States during 2004-2013 that had lineage assigned by genotype (spoligotype and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit variable number tandem repeats). M. africanum caused 315 (0.4%) of 73,290 TB cases with lineage assigned by genotype. TB caused by M. africanum was associated more with persons from West Africa (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 253.8, 95% CI 59.9-1,076.1) and US-born black persons (aOR 5.7, 95% CI 1.2-25.9) than with US-born white persons. TB caused by M. africanum did not show differences in clinical characteristics when compared with TB caused by M. tuberculosis. Clustered cases defined as >2 cases in a county with identical 24-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit genotypes, were less likely for M. africanum (aOR 0.1, 95% CI 0.1-0.4), which suggests that M. africanum is not commonly transmitted in the United States.

  16. Structural Insights on the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Proteasomal ATPase Mpa

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.; Li, H; Lin, G; Tang, C; Li, D; Nathan, C; Heran Darwin, K

    2009-01-01

    Proteasome-mediated protein turnover in all domains of life is an energy-dependent process that requires ATPase activity. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) was recently shown to possess a ubiquitin-like proteasome pathway that plays an essential role in Mtb resistance to killing by products of host macrophages. Here we report our structural and biochemical investigation of Mpa, the presumptive Mtb proteasomal ATPase. We demonstrate that Mpa binds to the Mtb proteasome in the presence of ATPS, providing the physical evidence that Mpa is the proteasomal ATPase. X-ray crystallographic determination of the conserved interdomain showed a five stranded double {beta} barrel structure containing a Greek key motif. Structure and mutational analysis indicate a major role of the interdomain for Mpa hexamerization. Our mutational and functional studies further suggest that the central channel in the Mpa hexamer is involved in protein substrate translocation and degradation. These studies provide insights into how a bacterial proteasomal ATPase interacts with and facilitates protein degradation by the proteasome.

  17. Ultrastructure of Mycobacterium marinum granuloma in striped bass Morone saxatilis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gauthier, David T.; Vogelbein, W.K.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    An emerging epizootic of mycobacteriosis currently threatens striped bass Morone saxatilis populations in Chesapeake Bay, USA. Several species of mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium marinum, species resembling M. avium, M. gordonae, M. peregrinum, M. scrofulaceum and M. terrae, and the new species M. shottsii have been isolated from diseased and healthy bass. In this study, we describe the ultrastructure of developing M. marinum granulomas in experimentally infected bass over a period of 45 wk. The primary host response to injected mycobacteria was formation of large macrophage aggregations containing phagocytosed bacilli, M. marinum were always contained within phagosomes. Close association of lysosomes with mycobacterial phagosomes, as well as the presence of electron-opaque material within phagosomes, suggested phagolysosomal fusion. Development of granulomas involved epithelioid transformation of macrophages, followed by appearance of central necrosis. Desmosomes were present between mature epithelioid cells. The necrotic core region of M. marinum granulomas was separated from overlying epithelioid cells by several layers of flattened, electron-opaque spindle-shaped cells. These cells appeared to be formed by compression of epithelioid cells and, aside from a flattened nucleus, did not possess recognizable organelles. Following the development of well-defined, paucibacillary granulomas, secondary disease was observed. Recrudescence was marked by bacterial replication followed by disruption of granuloma architecture, including loss of epithelioid and spindle cell layers. In advanced recrudescent lesions, normal tissue was replaced by macrophages, fibroblasts, and other inflammatory leukocytes. Large numbers of mycobacteria were observed, both intracellular and suspended in cellular debris.

  18. Bovine Tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) in Wildlife in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Aranaz, Alicia; de Juan, Lucía; Montero, Natalia; Sánchez, Celia; Galka, Margarita; Delso, Consuelo; Álvarez, Julio; Romero, Beatriz; Bezos, Javier; Vela, Ana I.; Briones, Victor; Mateos, Ana; Domínguez, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis infection in wildlife and feral species is a potential source of infection for livestock and a threat to protected and endangered species. The aim of this study was to identify Spanish wild animal species infected with M. bovis through bacteriological culture and spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping) of isolates for epidemiological purposes. This study included samples from red deer (Cervus elaphus), fallow deer (Dama dama), wild boar (Sus scrofa), Iberian lynx (Lynx pardina), hare (Lepus europaeus), and cattle (Bos taurus). They were collected in several geographical areas that were selected for their unique ecological value and/or known relationships between wildlife and livestock. In the areas included in this survey, M. bovis strains with the same spoligotyping pattern were found infecting several wild species and livestock, which indicates an epidemiological link. A locally predominant spoligotype was found in these areas. Better understanding of the transmission and distribution of disease in these populations will permit more precise targeting of control measures. PMID:15184440

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein promotes neutrophil activation.

    PubMed

    Neufert, C; Pai, R K; Noss, E H; Berger, M; Boom, W H; Harding, C V

    2001-08-01

    Certain microbial substances, e.g., LPS, can activate neutrophils or prime them to enhance their response to other activating agents, e.g., fMLP. We investigated the role of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) 19-kDa lipoprotein in activation of human neutrophils. MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein initiated phenotypic changes characteristic of neutrophil activation, including down-regulation of CD62 ligand (L-selectin) and up-regulation of CD35 (CR1) and CD11b/CD18 (CR3, Mac-1). In addition, exposure of neutrophils to MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein enhanced the subsequent oxidative burst in response to fMLP as assessed by oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (determined by flow cytometry). LPS also produced these effects with similar kinetics, but an oligodeoxynucleotide containing a CpG motif failed to induce any priming or activation response. Although the effects of LPS required the presence of serum, neutrophil activation by MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein occurred independently of serum factors, suggesting the involvement of different receptors and signaling mechanisms for LPS and MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein. Thus, MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein serves as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern that promotes neutrophil priming and activation.

  20. Modeling Innate Immune Response to Early Mycobacterium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Rafael V.; Kleijn, Jetty; Meijer, Annemarie H.

    2012-01-01

    In the study of complex patterns in biology, mathematical and computational models are emerging as important tools. In addition to experimental approaches, these modeling tools have recently been applied to address open questions regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, including the immune response to mycobacterial infection and tuberculous granuloma formation. We present an approach in which a computational model represents the interaction of the Mycobacterium infection with the innate immune system in zebrafish at a high level of abstraction. We use the Petri Net formalism to model the interaction between the key host elements involved in granuloma formation and infection dissemination. We define a qualitative model for the understanding and description of causal relations in this dynamic process. Complex processes involving cell-cell or cell-bacteria communication can be modeled at smaller scales and incorporated hierarchically into this main model; these are to be included in later elaborations. With the infection mechanism being defined on a higher level, lower-level processes influencing the host-pathogen interaction can be identified, modeled, and tested both quantitatively and qualitatively. This systems biology framework incorporates modeling to generate and test hypotheses, to perform virtual experiments, and to make experimentally verifiable predictions. Thereby it supports the unraveling of the mechanisms of tuberculosis infection. PMID:23365620

  1. Guillain-Barré syndrome associated with Mycobacterium bovis lymphadenitis.

    PubMed

    Vergnon-Miszczycha, Delphine; Suy, Florence; Robert, Florence; Carricajo, Anne; Fresard, Anne; Cazorla, Céline; Guglielminotti, Claire; Lucht, Frédéric; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an autoimmune disease that can be triggered by different infectious agents. Here we report the case of a 26-year-old Algerian woman who developed GBS associated with a Mycobacterium bovis cervical lymphadenitis. Following intravenous immunoglobulin therapy, the patient's neurologic state returned to normal after 3 months. The lymphadenitis responded more slowly to the antituberculous treatment and an excision of necrotic cervical lymph nodes had to be performed four times. Antibiotics were administered for 16 months: ethambutol was stopped after 2 months, and rifampicin and isoniazid pursued for 14 months. An extensive etiological investigation showed that, in this case, the only likely infectious trigger GBS was the concomitant M. bovis infection. To our knowledge, this is the first report of GBS triggered by M. bovis. We performed a literature review revealing that the association between tuberculosis and Guillain-Barré syndrome is very rare (only seven cases previously reported) but is not coincidental. Physicians should be aware that tuberculosis can be a cause of GBS.

  2. [Pyrazinamide monoresistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Manisa region, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Ozkütük, Nuri; Ecemiş, Talat; Sürücüoğlu, Süheyla

    2008-10-01

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is a primary antituberculous drug. BACTEC 460TB is the recommended reference method for the detection of PZA resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This method is more expensive than the conventional susceptibility methods and therefore, it is recommended that each laboratory should establish their own protocol for the inclusion of PZA in the panel of primary drugs tested. One of the most important factors that help this decision is the prevalence of PZA resistance, particularly PZA monoresistance in the related community. The aim of the present study was to determine the extent of PZA monoresistance in M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC) isolates in our region. In this study, PZA susceptibility testing of 109 MTBC strains (susceptible to isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and streptomycin) isolated from Manisa province in the Aegean region of Turkey was performed by using the BACTEC 460TB radiometric system (Becton Dickinson, MD). Two (1.8%) of the 109 isolates which were susceptible to all primary drugs revealed monoresistance against PZA. One of the PZA-monoresistant isolates has been identified as M. bovis and the other as M. tuberculosis by molecular method (Genotype MTBC, Hain Lifescience, Germany). The results of our study indicated that since the rate of PZA monoresistance was low, susceptibility testing of a panel of primary drugs without PZA may be an economical alternative in our region.

  3. A vitamin B12 transporter in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, Krishnamoorthy; Venclovas, Česlovas; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Sacchettini, James C.; McKinney, John D.; Mizrahi, Valerie; Warner, Digby F.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B12-dependent enzymes function in core biochemical pathways in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an obligate pathogen whose metabolism in vivo is poorly understood. Although M. tuberculosis can access vitamin B12 in vitro, it is uncertain whether the organism is able to scavenge B12 during host infection. This question is crucial to predictions of metabolic function, but its resolution is complicated by the absence in the M. tuberculosis genome of a direct homologue of BtuFCD, the only bacterial B12 transport system described to date. We applied genome-wide transposon mutagenesis to identify M. tuberculosis mutants defective in their ability to use exogenous B12. A small proportion of these mapped to Rv1314c, identifying the putative PduO-type ATP : co(I)rrinoid adenosyltransferase as essential for B12 assimilation. Most notably, however, insertions in Rv1819c dominated the mutant pool, revealing an unexpected function in B12 acquisition for an ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type protein previously investigated as the mycobacterial BacA homologue. Moreover, targeted deletion of Rv1819c eliminated the ability of M. tuberculosis to transport B12 and related corrinoids in vitro. Our results establish an alternative to the canonical BtuCD-type system for B12 uptake in M. tuberculosis, and elucidate a role in B12 metabolism for an ABC protein implicated in chronic mycobacterial infection. PMID:23407640

  4. Enhanced Specialized Transduction Using Recombineering in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tufariello, JoAnn M.; Malek, Adel A.; Vilchèze, Catherine; Cole, Laura E.; Ratner, Hannah K.; González, Pablo A.; Jain, Paras; Hatfull, Graham F.; Larsen, Michelle H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic engineering has contributed greatly to our understanding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis biology and has facilitated antimycobacterial and vaccine development. However, methods to generate M. tuberculosis deletion mutants remain labor-intensive and relatively inefficient. Here, methods are described that significantly enhance the efficiency (greater than 100-fold) of recovering deletion mutants by the expression of mycobacteriophage recombineering functions during the course of infection with specialized transducing phages delivering allelic exchange substrates. This system has been successfully applied to the CDC1551 strain of M. tuberculosis, as well as to a ΔrecD mutant generated in the CDC1551 parental strain. The latter studies were undertaken as there were precedents in both the Escherichia coli literature and mycobacterial literature for enhancement of homologous recombination in strains lacking RecD. In combination, these measures yielded a dramatic increase in the recovery of deletion mutants and are expected to facilitate construction of a comprehensive library of mutants with every nonessential gene of M. tuberculosis deleted. The findings also open up the potential for sophisticated genetic screens, such as synthetic lethal analyses, which have so far not been feasible for the slow-growing mycobacteria. PMID:24865558

  5. Development of vaccines to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Johne's disease or paratuberculosis is a chronic debilitating disease in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The disease causes significant economic losses in livestock industries worldwide. There are no effective control measures to eradicate the disease because there are no appropriate diagnostic methods to detect subclinically infected animals. Therefore, it is very difficult to control the disease using only test and cull strategies. Vaccination against paratuberculosis has been considered as an alternative strategy to control the disease when combined with management interventions. Understanding host-pathogen interactions is extremely important to development of vaccines. It has long been known that Th1-mediated cellular immune responses are play a crucial role in protection against MAP infection. However, recent studies suggested that innate immune responses are more closely related to protective effects than adaptive immunity. Based on this understanding, several attempts have been made to develop vaccines against paratuberculosis. A variety of ideas for designing novel vaccines have emerged, and the tests of the efficacy of these vaccines are conducted constantly. However, no effective vaccines are commercially available. In this study, studies of the development of vaccines for MAP were reviewed and summarized. PMID:27489800

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs in Mozambique*, **

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Germano Manuel; Folgosa, Elena; Nquobile, Ndlovu; Gitta, Sheba; Cadir, Nureisha

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the drug resistance profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mozambique. METHODS: We analyzed secondary data from the National Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Maputo, Mozambique, and from the Beira Regional Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Beira, Mozambique. The data were based on culture-positive samples submitted to first-line drug susceptibility testing (DST) between January and December of 2011. We attempted to determine whether the frequency of DST positivity was associated with patient type or provenance. RESULTS: During the study period, 641 strains were isolated in culture and submitted to DST. We found that 374 (58.3%) were resistant to at least one antituberculosis drug and 280 (43.7%) were resistant to multiple antituberculosis drugs. Of the 280 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases, 184 (65.7%) were in previously treated patients, most of whom were from southern Mozambique. Two (0.71%) of the cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis were confirmed to be cases of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis was most common in males, particularly those in the 21-40 year age bracket. CONCLUSIONS: M. tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs is high in Mozambique, especially in previously treated patients. The frequency of M. tuberculosis strains that were resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin in combination was found to be high, particularly in samples from previously treated patients. PMID:24831398

  7. Native New Zealand plants with inhibitory activity towards Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants have long been investigated as a source of antibiotics and other bioactives for the treatment of human disease. New Zealand contains a diverse and unique flora, however, few of its endemic plants have been used to treat tuberculosis. One plant, Laurelia novae-zelandiae, was reportedly used by indigenous Maori for the treatment of tubercular lesions. Methods Laurelia novae-zelandiae and 44 other native plants were tested for direct anti-bacterial activity. Plants were extracted with different solvents and extracts screened for inhibition of the surrogate species, Mycobacterium smegmatis. Active plant samples were then tested for bacteriostatic activity towards M. tuberculosis and other clinically-important species. Results Extracts of six native plants were active against M. smegmatis. Many of these were also inhibitory towards M. tuberculosis including Laurelia novae-zelandiae (Pukatea). M. excelsa (Pohutukawa) was the only plant extract tested that was active against Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions Our data provide support for the traditional use of Pukatea in treating tuberculosis. In addition, our analyses indicate that other native plant species possess antibiotic activity. PMID:20537175

  8. Importance of Porins for Biocide Efficacy against Mycobacterium smegmatis▿

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, Elrike; Schmidt, Stefan; Niederweis, Michael; Steinhauer, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacteria are among the microorganisms least susceptible to biocides but cause devastating diseases, such as tuberculosis, and increasingly opportunistic infections. The exceptional resistance of mycobacteria to toxic solutes is due to an unusual outer membrane, which acts as an efficient permeability barrier, in synergy with other resistance mechanisms. Porins are channel-forming proteins in the outer membrane of mycobacteria. In this study we used the alamarBlue assay to show that the deletion of Msp porins in isogenic mutants increased the resistance of Mycobacterium smegmatis to isothiazolinones (methylchloroisothiazolinone [MCI]/methylisothiazolinone [MI] and octylisothiazolinone [2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one; OIT]), formaldehyde-releasing biocides {hexahydrotriazine [1,3,5-tris (2-hydroxyethyl)-hexahydrotriazine; HHT] and methylenbisoxazolidine [N,N′-methylene-bis-5-(methyloxazolidine); MBO]}, and the lipophilic biocides polyhexamethylene biguanide and octenidine dihydrochloride 2- to 16-fold. Furthermore, the susceptibility of the porin triple mutant against a complex disinfectant was decreased 8-fold compared to wild-type (wt) M. smegmatis. Efficacy testing in the quantitative suspension test EN 14348 revealed 100-fold improved survival of the porin mutant in the presence of this biocide. These findings underline the importance of porins for the susceptibility of M. smegmatis to biocides. PMID:21398489

  9. Machine learning and docking models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Kéri, György; Orfi, Lászlo; Pato, János; Bhat, Rajeshwari Subray; Verma, Rinkee; Bradley, Erin K; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2017-03-01

    There is a shortage of compounds that are directed towards new targets apart from those targeted by the FDA approved drugs used against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Topoisomerase I (Mttopo I) is an essential mycobacterial enzyme and a promising target in this regard. However, it suffers from a shortage of known inhibitors. We have previously used computational approaches such as homology modeling and docking to propose 38 FDA approved drugs for testing and identified several active molecules. To follow on from this, we now describe the in vitro testing of a library of 639 compounds. These data were used to create machine learning models for Mttopo I which were further validated. The combined Mttopo I Bayesian model had a 5 fold cross validation receiver operator characteristic of 0.74 and sensitivity, specificity and concordance values above 0.76 and was used to select commercially available compounds for testing in vitro. The recently described crystal structure of Mttopo I was also compared with the previously described homology model and then used to dock the Mttopo I actives norclomipramine and imipramine. In summary, we describe our efforts to identify small molecule inhibitors of Mttopo I using a combination of machine learning modeling and docking studies in conjunction with screening of the selected molecules for enzyme inhibition. We demonstrate the experimental inhibition of Mttopo I by small molecule inhibitors and show that the enzyme can be readily targeted for lead molecule development.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Interferes with HIV Vaccination in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ignatowicz, Lech; Mazurek, Jolanta; Leepiyasakulchai, Chaniya; Sköld, Markus; Hinkula, Jorma; Källenius, Gunilla; Pawlowski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has emerged as the most prominent bacterial disease found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals worldwide. Due to high prevalence of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections, the future HIV vaccine in areas highly endemic for TB will often be administrated to individuals with an ongoing Mtb infection. The impact of concurrent Mtb infection on the immunogenicity of a HIV vaccine candidate, MultiHIV DNA/protein, was investigated in mice. We found that, depending on the vaccination route, mice infected with Mtb before the administration of the HIV vaccine showed impairment in both the magnitude and the quality of antibody and T cell responses to the vaccine components p24Gag and gp160Env. Mice infected with Mtb prior to intranasal HIV vaccination exhibited reduced p24Gag-specific serum IgG and IgA, and suppressed gp160Env-specific serum IgG as compared to respective titers in uninfected HIV-vaccinated controls. Importantly, in Mtb-infected mice that were HIV-vaccinated by the intramuscular route the virus neutralizing activity in serum was significantly decreased, relative to uninfected counterparts. In addition mice concurrently infected with Mtb had fewer p24Gag-specific IFN-γ-expressing T cells and multifunctional T cells in their spleens. These results suggest that Mtb infection might interfere with the outcome of prospective HIV vaccination in humans. PMID:22848444

  11. Isoxyl Activation Is Required for Bacteriostatic Activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Korduláková, Jana; Janin, Yves L.; Liav, Avraham; Barilone, Nathalie; Dos Vultos, Tiago; Rauzier, Jean; Brennan, Patrick J.; Gicquel, Brigitte; Jackson, Mary

    2007-01-01

    Isoxyl (ISO), a thiourea derivative that was successfully used for the clinical treatment of tuberculosis during the 1960s, is an inhibitor of the synthesis of oleic and mycolic acids in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Its effect on oleic acid synthesis has been shown to be attributable to its inhibitory activity on the stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase DesA3, but its enzymatic target(s) in the mycolic acid pathway remains to be identified. With the goal of elucidating the mode of action of ISO, we have isolated a number of spontaneous ISO-resistant mutants of M. tuberculosis and undertaken their genotypic characterization. We report here the characterization of a subset of these strains carrying mutations in the monooxygenase gene ethA. Through complementation studies, we demonstrate for the first time that the EthA-mediated oxidation of ISO is absolutely required for this prodrug to inhibit its lethal enzymatic target(s) in M. tuberculosis. An analysis of the metabolites resulting from the in vitro transformation of ISO by purified EthA revealed the occurrence of a formimidamide allowing the formulation of an activation pathway in which the oxidation of ISO catalyzed by EthA is followed by chemical transformations involving extrusion or elimination and, finally, hydrolysis. PMID:17785510

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis chorismate mutase: A potential target for TB.

    PubMed

    Khanapur, Manjulatha; Alvala, Mallika; Prabhakar, Maddela; Shiva Kumar, K; Edwin, R K; Sri Saranya, P S V K; Patel, Raj Kumar; Bulusu, Gopalakrishnan; Misra, P; Pal, Manojit

    2017-03-15

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis chorismate mutase (MtbCM) catalyzes the rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate in the shikimate biosynthetic pathway to form the essential amino acids, phenylalanine and tyrosine. Two genes encoding chorismate mutase have been identified in Mtb. The secretory form,∗MtbCM (encoded by Rv1885c) is assumed to play a key role in pathogenesis of tuberculosis. Also, the inhibition of MtbCM may hinder the supply of nutrients to the organism. Indeed, the existence of chorismate mutase (CM) in bacteria, fungi and higher plants but not in human and low sequence homology among known CM makes it an interesting target for the discovery of anti-tubercular agents. The present article mainly focuses on the recent developments in the structure, function and inhibition of MtbCM. The understanding of various aspects of MtbCM as presented in the current article may facilitate the design and subsequent chemical synthesis of new inhibitors against ∗MtbCM, that could lead to the discovery and development of novel and potent anti-tubercular agents in future.

  13. Demonstrating a Multi-drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Amplification Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2014-01-01

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice. PMID:24796567

  14. Control of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in agricultural species.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, D J; Benedictus, G

    2001-04-01

    Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease is a chronic intestinal disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, which continues to spread in agricultural species. Control of paratuberculosis is challenging and should not be underestimated. Due to the long incubation period of the infection, disease is largely subclinical in domesticated livestock. Hence, direct effects on animal productivity and welfare are often masked and may appear insufficient to justify large investments in control programmes by individual farmers, livestock industries or governments. Furthermore, in some countries the main effects of the disease are indirect, resulting from the impact of market discrimination against herds and flocks known to be infected, or from the control measures enforced to reduce transmission. In such circumstances, producers may be unwilling to co-operate with surveillance that may detect infection in herds or flocks. As control programmes are rarely successful in eliminating the infection from a herd or flock in the short term without an aggressive and costly programme, financial and community support assists producers to deal with the challenge. Successful prevention and control depends on animal health authorities and livestock industries acquiring a good understanding of the nature and epidemiology of infection, and of the application of tools for diagnosis and control. Building support for control programmes under the leadership of the affected livestock industries is critical, as programmes are unlikely to be successful without ongoing political will, supported by funding for research, surveillance and control.

  15. Bystander Macrophage Apoptosis after Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Deirdre M.; ten Bokum, Annemieke M. C.; O'Leary, Seonadh M.; O'Sullivan, Mary P.; Keane, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Human macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis may undergo apoptosis. Macrophage apoptosis contributes to the innate immune response against M. tuberculosis by containing and limiting the growth of mycobacteria and also by depriving the bacillus of its niche cell. Apoptosis of infected macrophages is well documented; however, bystander apoptosis of uninfected macrophages has not been described in the setting of M. tuberculosis. We observed that uninfected human macrophages underwent significant bystander apoptosis 48 and 96 h after they came into contact with macrophages infected with avirulent M. tuberculosis. The bystander apoptosis was significantly greater than the background apoptosis observed in uninfected control cells cultured for the same length of time. There was no evidence of the involvement of tumor necrosis factor alpha, Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, transforming growth factor β, Toll-like receptor 2, or MyD88 in contact-mediated bystander apoptosis. This newly described phenomenon may further limit the spread of M. tuberculosis by eliminating the niche cells on which the bacillus relies. PMID:17954721

  16. Gamma Interferon Release Assays for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Denkinger, Claudia M.; Kik, Sandra V.; Rangaka, Molebogeng X.; Zwerling, Alice; Oxlade, Olivia; Metcalfe, John Z.; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Dowdy, David W.; Dheda, Keertan; Banaei, Niaz

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) can substantially reduce the risk of developing active disease. However, there is no diagnostic gold standard for LTBI. Two tests are available for identification of LTBI: the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assay (IGRA). Evidence suggests that both TST and IGRA are acceptable but imperfect tests. They represent indirect markers of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exposure and indicate a cellular immune response to M. tuberculosis. Neither test can accurately differentiate between LTBI and active TB, distinguish reactivation from reinfection, or resolve the various stages within the spectrum of M. tuberculosis infection. Both TST and IGRA have reduced sensitivity in immunocompromised patients and have low predictive value for progression to active TB. To maximize the positive predictive value of existing tests, LTBI screening should be reserved for those who are at sufficiently high risk of progressing to disease. Such high-risk individuals may be identifiable by using multivariable risk prediction models that incorporate test results with risk factors and using serial testing to resolve underlying phenotypes. In the longer term, basic research is necessary to identify highly predictive biomarkers. PMID:24396134

  17. Macrophage polarization: convergence point targeted by mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Villarino, Geanncarlo; Vérollet, Christel; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    In the arms race of host-microbe co-evolution, macrophages (Mɸs) have been endowed with strategies to neutralize pathogenic challenge while preserving host integrity. During steady-states conditions, Mɸs perform multiple house-keeping functions governed by their differentiation state, tissue distribution, and signals from the microenvironment. In response to pathogenic challenge and host mediators, however, Mɸs undergo different programs of activation rendering them either pro-inflammatory and microbicidal (M1), or immunosuppressants and tissue repairers (M2). An excessive or prolonged polarization of either program may be detrimental to the host due to potential tissue injury or contribution to pathogenesis. Conversely, intracellular microbes that cause chronic diseases such as tuberculosis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome exemplify strategies for survival in the host. Indeed, both Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) are successful intracellular microbes that thrive in Mɸs. Given these microbes not only co-circulate throughout the developing world but each has contributed to prevalence and mortality caused by the other, substantial insights into microbe physiology and host defenses then rest in the attempt to fully understand their influence on Mɸ polarization. This review addresses the role of Mɸ polarization in the immune response to, and pathogenesis of, Mtb and HIV.

  18. RP105 facilitates macrophage activation by Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Antje; Kobayashi, Toshihiko; Pierini, Lynda M; Banaei, Niaz; Ernst, Joel D; Miyake, Kensuke; Ehrt, Sabine

    2009-01-22

    RP105, phylogenetically related to Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, is reported to facilitate B cell activation by the TLR4-agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS)--but to limit LPS-induced cytokine production by antigen-presenting cells. Here, we show that the role of RP105 extends beyond LPS recognition and that RP105 positively regulates macrophage responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) lipoproteins. Mtb-infected RP105(-/-) mice exhibited impaired proinflammatory cytokine responses associated with enhanced bacterial burden and increased lung pathology. The Mtb 19 kDa lipoprotein induced release of tumor necrosis factor in a manner dependent on both TLR2 and RP105, and macrophage activation by Mtb lacking mature lipoproteins was not RP105 dependent. Thus, mycobacterial lipoproteins are RP105 agonists. RP105 physically interacted with TLR2, and both RP105 and TLR2 were required for optimal macrophage activation by Mtb. Our data identify RP105 as an accessory molecule for TLR2, forming part of the receptor complex for innate immune recognition of mycobacterial lipoproteins.

  19. Peptides specific for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection: diagnostic potential.

    PubMed

    Casey, J L; Sanalla, A M; Tamvakis, D; Thalmann, C; Carroll, E L; Parisi, K; Coley, A M; Stewart, D J; Vaughan, J A; Michalski, W P; Luke, R; Foley, M

    2011-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD). Current serological diagnostic tests for JD are limited by their sensitivity when used in sub-clinical stages of the disease. Our objective was to identify peptides that mimic diagnostically important Map epitopes that might be incorporated into a new-generation JD diagnostic. Four peptides were isolated from a phage-displayed random peptide library by screening on antibodies derived from Map-infected goats. The peptides were recognised by antibodies from Map-infected goats but not by antibodies from uninfected goats. The peptides elicited immune responses in rabbits, which reacted strongly with bona fide Map antigens proving the peptides were true epitope mimics. To assess the diagnostic value a panel of goat sera was screened for reactivity's with peptides. The peptides were recognised by antibodies from a proportion of goats infected with Map compared with control animals with a diagnostic specificity of 100% and the sensitivity ranged from 50 to 75%. Combinations of any two peptides improved sensitivity 62.5-87.5% and 100% sensitivity was achieved with three of the four peptides in combination. These data suggest peptides representing diagnostically important Map epitopes could be incorporated into a sensitive diagnostic test.

  20. The solution structure of acyl carrier protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hing C; Liu, Gaohua; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Rock, Charles O; Zheng, Jie

    2002-05-03

    Acyl carrier protein (ACP) performs the essential function of shuttling the intermediates between the enzymes that constitute the type II fatty acid synthase system. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is unique in producing extremely long mycolic acids, and tubercular ACP, AcpM, is also unique in possessing a longer carboxyl terminus than other ACPs. We determined the solution structure of AcpM using protein NMR spectroscopy to define the similarities and differences between AcpM and the typical structures. The amino-terminal region of the structure is well defined and consists of four helices arranged in a right-handed bundle held together by interhelical hydrophobic interactions similar to the structures of other bacterial ACPs. The unique carboxyl-terminal extension from helix IV has a "melted down" feature, and the end of the molecule is a random coil. A comparison of the apo- and holo-forms of AcpM revealed that the 4'-phosphopantetheine group oscillates between two states; in one it is bound to a hydrophobic groove on the surface of AcpM, and in another it is solvent-exposed. The similarity between AcpM and other ACPs reveals the conserved structural motif that is recognized by all type II enzymes. However, the function of the coil domain extending from helix IV to the carboxyl terminus remains enigmatic, but its structural characteristics suggest that it may interact with the very long chain intermediates in mycolic acid biosynthesis or control specific protein-protein interactions.

  1. Indoleamides are active against drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Shichun; Guo, Haidan; Onajole, Oluseye K.; Pieroni, Marco; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Chen, Gang; Tipparaju, Suresh K.; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Bishai, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Responsible for nearly two million deaths each year, the infectious disease tuberculosis remains a serious global health challenge. The emergence of multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis confounds control efforts, and new drugs with novel molecular targets are desperately needed. Here we describe lead compounds, the indoleamides, with potent activity against both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis by targeting the mycolic acid transporter MmpL3. We identify a single mutation in mmpL3 which confers high resistance to the indoleamide class while remaining susceptible to currently used first- and second-line tuberculosis drugs, indicating a lack of cross-resistance. Importantly, an indoleamide derivative exhibits dose-dependent anti-mycobacterial activity when orally administered to M. tuberculosis-infected mice. The bioavailability of the indoleamides, combined with their ability to kill tubercle bacilli, indicates great potential for translational developments of this structure class for the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:24352433

  2. Pathogen roid rage: cholesterol utilization by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wipperman, Matthew F; Sampson, Nicole S; Thomas, Suzanne T

    2014-01-01

    The ability of science and medicine to control the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires an understanding of the complex host environment within which it resides. Pathological and biological evidence overwhelmingly demonstrate how the mammalian steroid cholesterol is present throughout the course of infection. Better understanding Mtb requires a more complete understanding of how it utilizes molecules like cholesterol in this environment to sustain the infection of the host. Cholesterol uptake, catabolism and broader utilization are important for maintenance of the pathogen in the host and it has been experimentally validated to contribute to virulence and pathogenesis. Cholesterol is catabolized by at least three distinct sub-pathways, two for the ring system and one for the side chain, yielding dozens of steroid intermediates with varying biochemical properties. Our ability to control this worldwide infectious agent requires a greater knowledge of how Mtb uses cholesterol to its advantage throughout the course of infection. Herein, the current state of knowledge of cholesterol metabolism by Mtb is reviewed from a biochemical perspective with a focus on the metabolic genes and pathways responsible for cholesterol steroid catabolism.

  3. Molecular Biology of Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tasha; Wolff, Kerstin A.; Nguyen, Liem

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has become a curable disease thanks to the discovery of antibiotics. However, it has remained one of the most difficult infections to treat. Most current TB regimens consist of six to nine months of daily doses of four drugs that are highly toxic to patients. The purpose of these lengthy treatments is to completely eradicate Mycobacterium tuberculosis, notorious for its ability to resist most antibacterial agents, thereby preventing the formation of drug resistant mutants. On the contrary, the prolonged therapies have led to poor patient adherence. This, together with a severe limit of drug choices, has resulted in the emergence of strains that are increasingly resistant to the few available antibiotics. Here we review our current understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the profound drug resistance of M. tuberculosis. This knowledge is essential for the development of more effective antibiotics that not only are potent against drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains but also help shorten the current treatment courses required for drug susceptible TB. PMID:23179675

  4. Anaerobic incubation conditions enhance pyrazinamide activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wade, Mary Margaret; Zhang, Ying

    2004-08-01

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is an unconventional front line tuberculosis drug characterized by high in vivo sterilizing activity, but poor in vitro activity. This disparity in PZA activity may reflect differences between the in vivo tissue environment and in vitro culture conditions. This study examined the effect of anaerobic conditions, which exist in granulomatous lesions in vivo, on PZA activity in vitro. Low oxygen enhanced the activity of PZA against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with anaerobic conditions resulting in greater enhancement than microaerobic conditions. ATPase and respiratory chain enzyme inhibitors enhanced PZA activity under normal atmospheric conditions, but not under anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, the inhibitors did not enhance isoniazid or rifampicin activity. Nitrate as an alternative electron acceptor antagonized PZA activity under anaerobic conditions. These findings provide further support for a proposed mechanism of action of PZA in which the active form of PZA (pyrazinoic acid) depletes the membrane energy reserve. They also provide another explanation for the higher sterilizing activity of PZA within in vivo lesions with low oxygen than under in vitro drug susceptibility testing conditions with ambient oxygen.

  5. Pyrazinamide inhibits trans-translation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Xuelian; Jiang, Xin; Yuan, Haiming; Lee, Jong Seok; Barry, Clifton E; Wang, Honghai; Zhang, Wenhong; Zhang, Ying

    2011-09-16

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is a first-line tuberculosis drug that plays a unique role in shortening the duration of tuberculosis chemotherapy. PZA is hydrolyzed intracellularly to pyrazinoic acid (POA) by pyrazinamidase (PZase, encoded by pncA), an enzyme frequently lost in PZA-resistant strains, but the target of POA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has remained elusive. Here, we identify a previously unknown target of POA as the ribosomal protein S1 (RpsA), a vital protein involved in protein translation and the ribosome-sparing process of trans-translation. Three PZA-resistant clinical isolates without pncA mutation harbored RpsA mutations. RpsA overexpression conferred increased PZA resistance, and we confirmed that POA bound to RpsA (but not a clinically identified ΔAla mutant) and subsequently inhibited trans-translation rather than canonical translation. Trans-translation is essential for freeing scarce ribosomes in nonreplicating organisms, and its inhibition may explain the ability of PZA to eradicate persisting organisms.

  6. Demonstrating a multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis amplification microarray.

    PubMed

    Linger, Yvonne; Kukhtin, Alexander; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander; Qu, Peter; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Cooney, Christopher G; Chandler, Darrell P

    2014-04-25

    Simplifying microarray workflow is a necessary first step for creating MDR-TB microarray-based diagnostics that can be routinely used in lower-resource environments. An amplification microarray combines asymmetric PCR amplification, target size selection, target labeling, and microarray hybridization within a single solution and into a single microfluidic chamber. A batch processing method is demonstrated with a 9-plex asymmetric master mix and low-density gel element microarray for genotyping multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The protocol described here can be completed in 6 hr and provide correct genotyping with at least 1,000 cell equivalents of genomic DNA. Incorporating on-chip wash steps is feasible, which will result in an entirely closed amplicon method and system. The extent of multiplexing with an amplification microarray is ultimately constrained by the number of primer pairs that can be combined into a single master mix and still achieve desired sensitivity and specificity performance metrics, rather than the number of probes that are immobilized on the array. Likewise, the total analysis time can be shortened or lengthened depending on the specific intended use, research question, and desired limits of detection. Nevertheless, the general approach significantly streamlines microarray workflow for the end user by reducing the number of manually intensive and time-consuming processing steps, and provides a simplified biochemical and microfluidic path for translating microarray-based diagnostics into routine clinical practice.

  7. Interactions between Mycobacterium xenopi, amoeba and human cells.

    PubMed

    Drancourt, M; Adékambi, T; Raoult, D

    2007-02-01

    Outbreaks due to Mycobacterium xenopi have been linked with contaminated water. M. xenopi has been shown to interact with the biofilm formed in water distribution systems and to be hosted by free-living Acanthamoeba. The present study investigated the interaction between M. xenopi and A. polyphaga amoeba, and between M. xenopi and human fibroblast HEL cells. Examination using the light microscopy together with electronic and confocal microscopy demonstrated that M. xenopi was located within the amoeba and in HEL cells. The Light Cycler measurement of the M. xenopi:A. polyphaga DNA ratio and the M. xenopi:HEL cell DNA ratio demonstrated intra-amoebal and intracellular growth of M. xenopi with doubling-times of five-days and 10 days, respectively. Intra-amoebal M. xenopi survived protozoan encystment and germination. These data demonstrate that M. xenopi is a facultative intra-amoebal and intracellular pathogen. Testing intra-amoebal M. xenopi might be necessary to properly evaluate decontamination procedures for hospital water supply systems in order to achieve eradication.

  8. Rv3168 phosphotransferase activity mediates kanamycin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Woo; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2013-11-28

    Tuberculosis is a worldwide epidemic disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with an estimated one-third of the human population currently affected. Treatment of this disease with aminoglycoside antibiotics has become less effective owing to antibiotic resistance. Recent determination of the crystal structure of the M. tuberculosis Rv3168 protein suggests a structure similar to that of Enterococcus faecalis APH(3')-IIIa, and that this protein may be an aminoglycoside phosphotransferase. To determine whether Rv3168 confers antibiotic resistance against kanamycin, we performed dose-response antibiotic resistance experiments using kanamycin. Expression of the Rv3168 protein in Escherichia coli conferred antibiotic resistance against 100 μM kanamycin, a concentration that effected cell growth arrest in the parental E. coli strain and an E. coli strain expressing the Rv3168(D249A) mutant, in which the catalytic Asp249 residue was mutated to alanine. Furthermore, we detected phosphotransferase activity of Rv3168 against kanamycin as a substrate. Moreover, docking simulation of kanamycin into the Rv3168 structure suggests that kanamycin fits well into the substrate binding pocket of the protein, and that the phosphorylation-hydroxyl-group of kanamycin was located at a position similar to that in E. faecalis APH(3')-IIIa. On the basis of these results, we suggest that the Rv3168 mediates kanamycin resistance in M. tuberculosis, likely through phosphotransferase targeting of kanamycin.

  9. Rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Folgueira, L; Delgado, R; Palenque, E; Aguado, J M; Noriega, A R

    1996-01-01

    A method based on DNA amplification and hybridization has been used for the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in blood samples from 38 hospitalized patients (15 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and 23 HIV negative) in whom localized or disseminated forms of tuberculosis were suspected. In 32 of these patients, the diagnosis of tuberculosis was eventually confirmed by conventional bacteriological or histological procedures. M. tuberculosis DNA was detected with the PCR technique in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 9 of 11 (82%) HIV-infected patients and in 7 of 21 (33%) HIV-negative patients (P < 0.01), while M. tuberculosis blood cultures were positive in 1 of 8 (12.5%) and 1 of 18 (5.5%) patients, respectively. PCR was positive in all cases with disseminated disease in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients and also in the HIV-positive patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Seven samples from patients with documented illness other than tuberculosis and 12 specimens from healthy volunteers, including seven volunteers with a recent positive purified protein derivative test, were used as controls and had a negative PCR. These results suggest that detection of M. tuberculosis DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells may be a useful tool for rapid diagnosis of disseminated and extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis, especially in an HIV-positive population. PMID:8904404

  10. Statewide survey of laboratories performing Mycobacterium tuberculosis testing in Minnesota.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, W A; Besser-Wiek, J M; Osterholm, M T; MacDonald, K L

    1996-01-01

    Rapid and accurate laboratory detection and identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, particularly multidrug-resistant strains, is critical to both public health control measures and patient management. The authors surveyed microbiology laboratories to evaluate whether their methods met national guidelines. As needed, laboratories received individualized recommendations for improvement. The laboratories were resurveyed a year later to assess changes in methods. Current guidelines recommend fluorochrome acid-fast smears, broth cultures, identification by nucleic acid probe or BACTEC-NAP, and BACTEC primary susceptibility panels, which should include pyrazinamide. Of 27 laboratories performing acid-fast smears, 15 used fluorochrome methods. Six of 16 laboratories performing mycobacterial cultures used broth media. Of six laboratories performing species identification, five used nucleic acid probes or BACTEC-NAP. Of five laboratories evaluating drug sensitivity, two used BACTEC and two included pyrazinamide in their protocols. Overall, 24 (89%) laboratories needed improvements; a year later, 16 (67%) of those had altered their methods or made definite plans to do so. Survey results suggest that health departments can facilitate improvements in laboratory testing for pathogens of public health importance. PMID:8606914

  11. Immunological consequences of strain variation within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Tientcheu, Leopold D.; Ndengane, Mthawelenga; Andoseh, Genevieve; Kampmann, Beate; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    In 2015, there were an estimated 10.4 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) globally, making it one of the leading causes of death due to an infectious disease. TB is caused by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), with human disease resulting from infection by M. tuberculosis sensu stricto and M. africanum. Recent progress in genotyping techniques, in particular the increasing availability of whole genome sequence data, has revealed previously under appreciated levels of genetic diversity within the MTBC. Several studies have shown that this genetic diversity may translate into differences in TB transmission, clinical manifestations of disease, and host immune responses. This suggests the existence of MTBC genotype‐dependent host–pathogen interactions which may influence the outcome of infection and progression of disease. In this review, we highlight the studies demonstrating differences in innate and adaptive immunological outcomes consequent on MTBC genetic diversity, and discuss how these differences in immune response might influence the development of TB vaccines, diagnostics and new therapies. PMID:28150302

  12. Chemokine response in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, E R; Cooper, A M; Orme, I M

    1995-01-01

    We show here that infection of murine macrophages with various strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the rapid in vitro expression of genes encoding chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein 2, which recruit neutrophils to sites of infection, and macrophage-recruiting chemokines 10-kDa, interferon-inducible protein (IP-10) and macrophage chemotactic protein 1. Three strains of M. tuberculosis, Erdman and the clinical isolates CSU 22 and CSU 46, induced similar levels of secretion of macrophage chemotactic protein 1 from infected macrophage monolayers; however, the Erdman strain failed to induce levels of secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha similar to those induced by either CSU 22 or CSU 46. Using a low-dose aerosol infection model, we also found that while the Erdman strain induced negligible increases in chemokine mRNA levels in the lungs, infection with either CSU 22 or CSU 46 resulted in greater levels of mRNA production for all four chemokines tested. The growth of these strains in the lungs was, however, equally well contained by acquired host immunity. These data allow us to hypothesize that the chemokine response in the lungs probably does not control the protective granulomatous response and that perhaps other T-cell- or macrophage-associated cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha or interleukin 12 may be involved in this process. PMID:7558294

  13. Soluble TNFRp75 regulates host protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Roanne; Allie, Nasiema; Dambuza, Ivy; Abel, Brian; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Sebesho, Boipelo; Randall, Philippa; Burger, Patricia; Fick, Elizabeth; Quesniaux, Valerie F J; Ryffel, Bernhard; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2014-04-01

    Development of host protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is critically dependent on the inflammatory cytokine TNF. TNF signals through 2 receptors, TNFRp55 and TNFRp75; however, the role of TNFRp75-dependent signaling in immune regulation is poorly defined. Here we found that mice lacking TNFRp75 exhibit greater control of M. tuberculosis infection compared with WT mice. TNFRp75-/- mice developed effective bactericidal granulomas and demonstrated increased pulmonary recruitment of activated DCs. Moreover, IL-12p40-dependent migration of DCs to lung draining LNs of infected TNFRp75-/- mice was substantially higher than that observed in WT M. tuberculosis-infected animals and was associated with enhanced frequencies of activated M. tuberculosis-specific IFN-γ-expressing CD4+ T cells. In WT mice, TNFRp75 shedding correlated with markedly reduced bioactive TNF levels and IL-12p40 expression. Neutralization of TNFRp75 in M. tuberculosis-infected WT BM-derived DCs (BMDCs) increased production of bioactive TNF and IL-12p40 to a level equivalent to that produced by TNFRp75-/- BMDCs. Addition of exogenous TNFRp75 to TNFRp75-/- BMDCs infected with M. tuberculosis decreased IL-12p40 synthesis, demonstrating that TNFRp75 shedding regulates DC activation. These data indicate that TNFRp75 shedding downmodulates protective immune function and reduces host resistance and survival; therefore, targeting TNFRp75 may be beneficial for improving disease outcome.

  14. Characterization of Mycobacterium Abscessus Subtypes in Shanghai of China

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Liulin; Li, Bing; Chu, Haiqing; Huang, Dongdong; Zhang, Zhemin; Zhang, Jingbo; Gui, Tao; Xu, Liyun; Zhao, Lan; Sun, Xiwen; Xiao, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate the epidemic characteristics of Mycobacterium abscessus in Shanghai. Fifty-five strains from 55 M. abscessus pulmonary disease patients were isolated. Drug sensitivity was measured by a broth microdilution method. Subtypes of M. abscessus were identified by DNA sequencing. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST), mining spanning tree (MST), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were used to analyze sequence types (ST) and clonal complexes (CC). Clinical manifestations were assessed by CT imaging. We identified 42 A isolates, 11 M, and 2 B-subtypes. A and M were highly sensitive to tigecycline and amikacin (97.6–100%). The A-type easily developed drug resistance against clarithromycin. Both types were highly resistance to sulfonamides, moxifloxacin, doxycycline, imipenem, and tobramycin. MLST analysis identified 41 STs including 32 new STs. The MST algorithm distributed 55 isolates into 12 separate CC. The PFGE analysis exhibited 53 distinct restriction patterns and the M-type was closely clustered according to their ST and CC numbers. CT imaging showed that tree-in-bud and patch shadow were commonly observed in M-type, whereas pulmonary cavities were often found in A-type infection patients (P < 0.001). ST1 in A and ST23 in M-type were the main epidemic strains in Shanghai. The M-type appeared to be prone to epidemic nosocomial transmission. PMID:26817866

  15. Mycobacterium microti Infection (Vole Tuberculosis) in Wild Rodent Populations

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Rachel; Begon, Michael; Bennett, Malcolm; Ergon, Torbjørn; Graham, Isla M.; de Haas, Petra E. W.; Hart, C. A.; Koedam, Marianne; Kremer, Kristin; Lambin, Xavier; Roholl, Paul; Soolingen, Dick van

    2002-01-01

    Mycobacterium microti (vole tuberculosis) infections in small wild mammals were first described more than 60 years ago in several populations in Great Britain. Few studies of vole tuberculosis have been undertaken since then, and little is known about the relationship between M. microti isolates originating from different populations or at different times or of the prevalence of this infection in wild rodent populations, despite human cases of M. microti infections being increasingly reported. In this study, field voles (Microtus agrestis), bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus), and wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) were found to be infected, with up to 8% having external tuberculous signs, in wild populations in Northumberland and Cheshire, England. Spoligotyping applied directly to the clinical material simultaneously detected and typed M. microti bacteria in skin lesions, lymph glands, and internal abcesses. IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism typing of cultured bacteria was used to compare these isolates with previously isolated strains from both animals and humans. This demonstrated that although the current rodent isolates were distinct from those isolated from voles in the 1930s in Great Britain, they had a high degree of similarity to these strains and were distinct from the M. microti isolates from humans, a pig, and a ferret from The Netherlands. Thus, M. microti infection seems to be widespread in wild rodent populations, but more studies are needed to understand how M. microti might be transmitted from animals to humans and to determine better the zoonotic risk posed. PMID:12202566

  16. Preliminary observations on Mycobacterium spp. in dairy cattle in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Proaño-Perez, Freddy; Rigouts, Leen; Brandt, Jef; Dorny, Pierre; Ron, Jorge; Chavez, Maria-Augusta; Rodriguez, Richar; Fissette, Krista; Van Aerde, Anita; Portaels, Françoise; Benitez-Ortiz, Washington

    2006-08-01

    This study evaluated bovine tuberculosis in Mejia canton, a major dairy cattle production region in Ecuador. Randomly selected cattle (1,012 from 59 farms) classified according to herd size were tested by the single tuberculin test (STT). Sixty days later, positive reactors were tested again by the comparative tuberculin test (CTT). In addition, tissue samples from two STT-CTT-positive reactors detected on a farm were obtained in a local slaughterhouse and analyzed bacteriologically. A total of 4.24% of the cattle were positive in the STT and 3.85% were positive in the CTT, with the highest number (7.95%) in large herds versus 3.4% in medium herds and 0.3% in small herds. Mycobacterium bovis was isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes and lungs of one animal. A 16S ribosomal RNA-based polymerase chain reaction confirmed culture results and differentiated mycobacteria other than M. tuberculosis. This study confirms the zoonotic importance of tuberculosis in Ecuadorian dairy cattle with herd size likely to be a crucial parameter in the prevalence of the disease. The implementation of a national control program is necessary and should be based on the detection of positive cattle by STT in combination with CTT.

  17. Computed Tomography Findings of Pulmonary Mycobacterium simiae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Baghizadeh, Ayeh; Farnia, Poopak

    2017-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) pulmonary infections can be quite similar to tuberculosis, both clinically and radiologically. However, the treatment protocol is not similar. Mycobacterium simiae is a rare cause of NTM pulmonary infection. Herein, we aimed to evaluate and compare the computed tomography (CT) scan findings of M. simiae infection in lungs. For this reason, thirty-four patients (n = 34) with M. simiae lung infection were retrospectively evaluated. Diagnosis was confirmed by American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines and CT scans were reviewed in both lung and mediastinal windows. The average age of patients was 63 ± 14.54 years and 52.9% were male. The majority of patients had cough (91.2%) and sputum production (76.5%). Clinically, 41.2% of patients had previous history of TB (14/34), 38.2% had cardiac diseases (13/34), and 35.3% had diabetes mellitus (12/34). The most common CT findings in our study were nodular lesions (100%) and bronchiectasis (85.29%). Regarding the severity, grade I bronchiectasis was the most prevalent. Other prominent findings were tree-in-bud sign (88.2%), consolidation (52.94%), and lobar fibrosis and volume loss (67.6%). There was no significant zonal distribution of findings. In conclusion, nodular lesions and bronchiectasis are the most frequent features in CT scan of M. simiae pulmonary infection. PMID:28127232

  18. Inhaled therapies, azithromycin and Mycobacterium abscessus in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Catherinot, Emilie; Roux, Anne-Laure; Vibet, Marie-Anne; Bellis, Gil; Lemonnier, Lydie; Le Roux, Evelyne; Bernède-Bauduin, Claire; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Guillemot, Didier; Gaillard, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are at particularly high risk of developing lung disease caused by Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MABSC). Over the last 10 years, changes in CF treatment, with increasing use of inhaled therapies and low-dose azithromycin, have been accompanied by an increase in the prevalence of MABSC infections in CF patients. There is therefore some concern about the role of new CF treatments in the emergence of MABSC infections. We addressed this issue by means of a case-control study including 30 MABSC-positive cases and 60 nontuberculous mycobacteria-negative CF controls matched for age, sex and centre. We also compared practices at the CF centres with the highest prevalence of MABSC with those at the other centres. No positive association was found between MABSC lung disease and the use of inhaled therapies or low-dose azithromycin in the 4 years preceding MABSC isolation. These treatments were not significantly more frequently used at the CF centres with the highest MABSC prevalence rates. In conclusion, there is no evidence for a link between M. abscessus complex lung disease and inhaled therapies or low-dose azithromycin in patients with CF.

  19. Structural and functional characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis triosephosphate isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, Sean E.; Capodagli, Glenn C.; Deaton, Michelle K.; Pegan, Scott D.

    2012-04-18

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major infectious disease that accounts for over 1.7 million deaths every year. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, enters the human host by the inhalation of infectious aerosols. Additionally, one third of the world's population is likely to be infected with latent TB. The incidence of TB is on the rise owing in part to the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains. As a result, there is a growing need to focus on novel M. tuberculosis enzyme targets. M. tuberculosis triosephosphate isomerase (MtTPI) is an essential enzyme for gluconeogenetic pathways, making it a potential target for future therapeutics. In order to determine its structure, the X-ray crystal structure of MtTPI has been determined, as well as that of MtTPI bound with a reaction-intermediate analog. As a result, two forms of the active site were revealed. In conjunction with the kinetic parameters obtained for the MtTPI-facilitated conversion of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (D-GAP), this provides a greater structural and biochemical understanding of this enzyme. Additionally, isothermal titration calorimetry was used to determine the binding constant for a reaction-intermediate analog bound to the active site of MtTPI.

  20. Amperometric immunosensor for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Morgan; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Hyun-Boo; Inoue, Shinnosuke; Becker, Annie L.; Weigel, Kris M.; Cangelosi, Gerard A.; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Chung, Jae-Hyun

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has been a major public health problem, which can be better controlled by using accurate and rapid diagnosis in low-resource settings. A simple, portable, and sensitive detection method is required for point-of-care (POC) settings. This paper studies an amperometric biosensor using a microtip immunoassay for a rapid and low-cost detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in sputum. MTB in sputum is specifically captured on the functionalized microtip surface and detected by electric current. According to the numerical study, the current signal on the microtip surface is linearly changed with increasing immersion depth. Using a reference microtip, the immersion depth is compensated for a sensing microtip. On the microtip surface, target bacteria are concentrated and organized by a coffee-ring effect, which amplifies the electric current. To enhance the signal-to-noise ratio, both the sample processing and rinsing steps are presented with the use of deionized water as a medium for the amperometric measurement. When applied to cultured MTB cells spiked into human sputum, the detection limit was 100 CFU mL-1, comparable to a more labor-intensive fluorescence detection method reported previously.