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  1. Endometrial ablation

    MedlinePlus

    Hysteroscopy-endometrial ablation; Laser thermal ablation; Endometrial ablation-radiofrequency; Endometrial ablation-thermal balloon ablation; Rollerball ablation; Hydrothermal ablation; Novasure ablation

  2. Endometrial polyps

    MedlinePlus

    Uterine polyps ... one knows exactly why some women get endometrial polyps. They tend to grow when there is more ... the hormone estrogen in the body. Most endometrial polyps are not cancerous. About 5% can be cancerous ...

  3. [Endometrial imaging].

    PubMed

    Lemercier, E; Genevois, A; Dacher, J N; Benozio, M; Descargues, G; Marpeau, L

    2000-12-01

    The diagnostic value of endovaginal sonography in benign or malignant endometrial pathology is high, increased by sonohysterography. Sonohysterography is useful in the diagnosis of endometrial thickness and to determine further investigations. MRI is accurate in the uterine adenomyosis diagnosis and is the imaging modality of choice for the preoperative endometrial cancer staging. PMID:11173754

  4. Thalidomide in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Endometrial Adenoacanthoma; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma

  5. Endometrial Ablation

    MedlinePlus

    ... a thin layer of the lining of the uterus and stops the menstrual flow in many women. ... medical conditions, including the following: • Disorders of the uterus or endometrium • Endometrial hyperplasia • Cancer of the uterus • ...

  6. Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Member Login Join Pay Dues Follow us: Women's Health Care Physicians Contact Us My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate ... and is best made in consultation with your health care team. What happens after treatment for endometrial cancer? ...

  7. Megestrol Acetate or Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System in Treating Patients With Atypical Endometrial Hyperplasia or Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-09

    Atypical Endometrial Hyperplasia; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVB Endometrial Carcinoma

  8. What Is Endometrial Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... endometrial adenocarcinomas. These types tend to be more aggressive than most endometrial cancers. They tend to grow ... forming glands. Grade 3 cancers tend to be aggressive and have a poorer outlook than lower-grade ...

  9. Copanlisib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-25

    Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Metastatic Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  10. Trebananib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-10

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma, Variant With Squamous Differentiation; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrioid Stromal Sarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  11. Trametinib With or Without GSK2141795 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  12. Endometrial pneumatosis (emphysematous endometritis).

    PubMed

    Chua, Yee Jia; Meharry, Suzanne; Harding, Steven; Stewart, Colin J R

    2014-09-01

    Endometrial pneumatosis, also referred to as pneumopolycystic or emphysematous endometritis, is a rare condition reported only twice previously in the literature and only once as an isolated finding. We report a case of endometrial pneumatosis in a 43-yr-old patient who underwent hysterectomy and bilateral salpingectomy for treatment of a symptomatic uterine leiomyoma. No predisposing factors towards pneumatosis were identified and in particular there was no evidence of immune impairment, diabetes mellitus, uterine infection, or prior surgical intervention. Endometrial pneumatosis remains an enigmatic condition of uncertain etiology but it appears to be self-limited with no known pathologic sequelae. PMID:25083968

  13. Hormones and endometrial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Areege; Tempest, Nicola; Parkes, Christina; Alnafakh, Rafah; Makrydima, Sofia; Adishesh, Meera; Hapangama, Dharani K

    2016-02-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the commonest gynaecological cancer in the Western World with an alarmingly increasing incidence related to longevity and obesity. Ovarian hormones regulate normal human endometrial cell proliferation, regeneration and function therefore are implicated in endometrial carcinogenesis directly or via influencing other hormones and metabolic pathways. Although the role of unopposed oestrogen in the pathogenesis of EC has received considerable attention, the emerging role of other hormones in this process, such as androgens and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) is less well recognised. This review aims to consolidate the current knowledge of the involvement of the three main endogenous ovarian hormones (oestrogens, progesterone and androgens) as well as the other hormones in endometrial carcinogenesis, to identify important avenues for future research. PMID:26966933

  14. Endometrial Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women with a condition called polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) have abnormal hormone levels, such as higher androgen ( ... increase a woman's chance of getting endometrial cancer. PCOS is also a leading cause of infertility in ...

  15. General Information About Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Endometrial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Endometrial Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  16. Brivanib Alaninate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  17. Cancer Statistics: Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 60,050 % of All New Cancer Cases 3.6% Estimated Deaths in 2016 10,470 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 635,437 women living with endometrial cancer in ...

  18. Endometrial metastasis of colorectal cancer with coincident endometrial adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Colling, Richard; Lopes, Tito; Das, Nagiindra; Mathew, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis to the uterine corpus is uncommon and secondary colorectal tumours of the endometrium are rare. We describe a uterine tumour with components of both primary endometrial and metastatic colorectal carcinomata. In this case, a 72-year-old obese woman presented with a 2-week history of postmenopausal bleeding per vaginum and weight loss. She had an abdominoperineal resection 3 years previously for a Dukes stage B rectal carcinoma. A transvaginal ultrasonography showed a thickened endometrium. Histology immunophenotyping showed a CK7+, CK20+, CA125− and CEA+ colorectal metastasis (a profile consistent with her previous cancer) associated with a primary CK7+, CK20−, CA125+ and CEA− endometroid endometrial adenocarcinoma. We conclude this represents endometrial metastasis of colorectal carcinoma with coincident primary endometrial adenocarcinoma. We speculate as to whether the endometrial carcinoma arose de novo or was induced by the colorectal metastasis, or whether the primary endometrial tumour provided a fertile site for the colorectal metastasis. PMID:22791861

  19. Radiation Therapy With or Without Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma, Variant With Squamous Differentiation; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  20. A Trial for Patients With Advanced/Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-11-13

    Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Site; Urogenital Neoplasms; Genital Neoplasms, Female; Uterine Neoplasms; Endometrial Neoplasms; Cancer of Endometrium; Endometrial Cancer; Cancer of the Endometrium; Endometrium Cancer; Neoplasms, Endometrial

  1. Endometrial haemostasis and menstruation.

    PubMed

    Davies, Joanna; Kadir, Rezan A

    2012-12-01

    Under normal physiological circumstances menstruation is a highly regulated, complex process that is under strict hormonal control. During normal menstruation, progesterone withdrawal initiates menstruation. The cessation of menstrual bleeding is achieved by endometrial haemostasis via platelet aggregation, fibrin deposition and thrombus formation. Local endocrine, immunological and haemostatic factors interact at a molecular level to control endometrial haemostasis. Tissue factor and thrombin play a key role locally in the cessation of menstrual bleeding through instigation of the coagulation factors. On the other hand, fibrinolysis prevents clot organisation within the uterine cavity while plasminogen activator inhibitors (PAI) and thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitors control plasminogen activators and plasmin activity. Abnormalities of uterine bleeding can result from imbalance of the haemostatic factors. The most common abnormality of uterine bleeding is heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB). Modern research has shown that an undiagnosed bleeding disorder, in particular von Willebrand disease (VWD) and platelet function disorders, can be an underlying cause of HMB. This has led to a change in the approach to the management of HMB. While full haemostatic assessment is not required for all women presenting with HMB, menstrual score and bleeding score can help to discriminate women who are more likely to have a bleeding disorder and benefit from laboratory haemostatic evaluation. Haemostatic agents (tranexamic acid and DDAVP) enhance systemic and endometrial haemostasis and are effective in reducing menstrual blood loss in women with or without bleeding disorders. Further research is required to enhance our understanding of the complex interactions of haemostatic factors in general, and specifically within the endometrium. This will lead to the development of more targeted interventions for the management of abnormal uterine bleeding in the future.

  2. DNA methylation in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Freudenheim, Jo L

    2010-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most commonly diagnosed gynecological cancer, and it has been shown to be a complex disease driven by abnormal genetic and epigenetic alterations, as well as environmental factors. Epigenetic changes resulting in aberrant gene expression are dynamic and modifiable features of many cancer types. A significant epigenetic change is aberrant DNA methylation. In this review, we review evidence on the role of aberrant DNA methylation, examining changes in relation to endometrial carcinogenesis, and report on recent advances in the understanding of the contribution of aberrant DNA methylation to endometrial cancer with the emphasis on the role of dietary/lifestyle and environmental factors, as well as opportunities and challenges of DNA methylation in endometrial cancer management and prevention. PMID:20543579

  3. Drugs Approved for Endometrial Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for endometrial cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. Photodynamic therapy toward selective endometrial ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadir, Yona; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Berns, Michael W.

    1993-05-01

    Potential applications of photodynamic therapy for endometrial disease are discussed. Experimental models that may lead to diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis as well as selective endometrial ablation are summarized.

  5. 21 CFR 884.1100 - Endometrial brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endometrial brush. 884.1100 Section 884.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... Endometrial brush. (a) Identification. An endometrial brush is a device designed to remove samples of...

  6. 21 CFR 884.1060 - Endometrial aspirator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endometrial aspirator. 884.1060 Section 884.1060 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... § 884.1060 Endometrial aspirator. (a) Identification. An endometrial aspirator is a device designed...

  7. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy, Cisplatin, and Bevacizumab Followed by Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients Who Have Undergone Surgery for Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-09

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma

  8. Adjuvant therapy for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon, Maria C.; Ammakkanavar, Natraj R.

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is a common gynecologic malignancy typically diagnosed at early stage and cured with surgery alone. Adjuvant therapy is tailored according to the risk of recurrence, estimated based on the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage and other histological factors. The objective of this manuscript is to review the evidence guiding adjuvant therapy for early stage and locally advanced uterine cancer. For patients with early stage disease, minimizing toxicity, while preserving outstanding cure rates remains the major goal. For patients with locally advanced endometrial cancer optimal combined regimens are being defined. Risk stratification based on molecular traits is under development and may aid refine the current risk prediction model and permit personalized approaches for women with endometrial cancer. PMID:24761218

  9. What's New in Endometrial Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for endometrial cancer What`s new in endometrial cancer research and treatment? Molecular pathology ... that caused the endometrial cells to become cancerous. New treatments New drugs, combinations of drugs and targeted ...

  10. 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian Past Issues / Spring 2007 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian NCI estimates that endometrial, ...

  11. Adjuvant progestagens for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Hirsch, Pierre PL; Bryant, Andrew; Keep, Sarah L; Kitchener, Henry C; Lilford, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is the most common genital tract carcinoma among women in developed countries, with most women presenting with stage 1 disease. Adjuvant progestagen therapy has been advocated following primary surgery to reduce the risk of recurrence of disease. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant progestagen therapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Specilaised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) Issue 2, 2009. MEDLINE and EMBASE up to April 2009. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of progestagen therapy in women who have had surgery for endometrial cancer. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Risk ratios (RRs) comparing survival in women who did and did not receive progestagen were pooled in random effects meta-analyses.. Main results Seven trials assessing 4556 women were identified. Three trials included women with stage one disease only, whereas four included women with more advanced disease. Meta-analysis of four trials showed that there was no significant difference in the risk of death at five years between adjuvant progestagen therapy and no further treatment (RR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.18). This conclusion is also robust to single trial analyses at 4 and 7 years and in one trial across all points in time using a hazard ratio (HR). There was also no significant difference between progestagen therapy and control in terms of the risk of death from endometrial cancer, cardiovascular disease and intercurrent disease. Relapse of disease appeared to be reduced by progestagen therapy in one trial (HR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.97 and 5 year RR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.96), but there was no evidence of a difference in disease recurrence in another trial at 7 years (RR = 1.34, 95% CI 0.79 to 2.27). Authors’ conclusions There

  12. Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Gene Tests May Improve Therapy for Endometrial Cancer By analyzing genes in hundreds of endometrial tumors, scientists identified details ...

  13. Novel genetic targets in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Daphne W.

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, ~74,000 women die from endometrial cancer each year. Understanding the somatic genomic alterations that drive endometrial tumorigenesis may provide new opportunities to identify targeted therapies for specific subsets of patients. Since 2012, the use of next generation sequencing to decode the mutational landscape of endometrial tumors has not only confirmed prior knowledge of established genetic targets for serous and endometrioid endometrial carcinomas, but has also uncovered novel significantly mutated genes, referred to herein as novel genetic targets, which represent candidate cancer genes in these tumors. This editorial summarizes the novel genetic targets that have been identified in serous and endometrioid ECs, according to their unifying functional characteristics. An expert opinion section comments on remaining knowledge gaps that will undoubtedly be filled in future genomic studies of endometrial cancer. PMID:24750045

  14. Evaluation of endometrial cancer epidemiology in Romania.

    PubMed

    Bohîlțea, R E; Furtunescu, F; Dosius, M; Cîrstoiu, M; Radoi, V; Baroș, A; Bohîlțea, L C

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer represents the most frequent gynecological malignant affection in the developed countries, in which the incidence of cervical cancer has significantly decreased due to the rigorous application of screening methods and prophylaxis. According to its frequency, endometrial cancer is situated on the fourth place in the category of women's genital-mammary malignant diseases, after breast, cervical and ovarian cancer in Romania. The incidence and mortality rates due to endometrial cancer have registered an increasing trend worldwide and also in Romania, a significant decrease of the age of appearance for the entire endometrial pathology sphere being noticed. At the national level, the maximum incidence is situated between 60 and 64 years old, the mortality rate of the women under 65 years old being high in Romania. The study evaluates endometrial cancer, from an epidemiologic point of view, at the national level compared to the international statistic data.

  15. The utility of endometrial thickness measurement in asymptomatic postmenopausal women with endometrial fluid.

    PubMed

    Seckin, B; Ozgu-Erdinc, A S; Dogan, M; Turker, M; Cicek, M N

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical usefulness of sonographic endometrium thickness measurement in asymptomatic postmenopausal women with endometrial fluid collection. Fifty-two asymptomatic postmenopausal women with endometrial fluid, who underwent endometrial sampling were evaluated. Histopathological findings revealed that 25 (48.1%) women had insufficient tissue, 20 (38.4%) had atrophic endometrium and 7 (13.5%) had endometrial polyps. No case of malignancy was found. There was no statistically significant difference between the various histopathological categories (insufficient tissue, atrophic endometrium and polyp) with regard to the mean single-layer endometrial thickness (1.54 ± 0.87, 2.04 ± 1.76 and 1.79 ± 0.69 mm, respectively, p = 0.436). Out of 44 patients with endometrial thickness of less than 3 mm, 38 (86.4%) had atrophic changes or insufficient tissue and 6 (13.6%) had endometrial polyps. In conclusion, if the endometrial thickness is 3 mm or less, endometrial sampling is not necessary in asymptomatic postmenopausal women with endometrial fluid.

  16. [Biometric research in the cytomorphological diagnosis of endometrial lesions].

    PubMed

    Novik, V I; Agroskin, L S; Papaian, G V; Solov'eva, L V

    1990-01-01

    Morphometrical and optical density (including DNA content) parametres of nuclei of the endometrial epithelial cells in smears of endometrial aspirates obtained from 57 women without endometrial disorders with hyperplastic, precancer conditions and endometrial cancer have been measured by using television image analyzer IBAS-2. Biometrical data have demonstrated a good correlation with cytomorphological diagnostic criteria and in 85.7% they have facilitated discrimination of the normal and hyperplastic epithelium from precancer and high differentiated endometrial cancer. PMID:2318130

  17. Endometrial receptivity array: Clinical application.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Nalini

    2015-01-01

    Human implantation is a complex process requiring synchrony between a healthy embryo and a functionally competent or receptive endometrium. Diagnosis of endometrial receptivity (ER) has posed a challenge and so far most available tests have been subjective and lack accuracy and a predictive value. Microarray technology has allowed identification of the transcriptomic signature of the window of receptivity window of implantation (WOI). This technology has led to the development of a molecular diagnostic tool, the ER array (ERA) for diagnosis of ER. Use of this test in patients with recurrent implantation failure (RIF) has shown that the WOI is displaced in a quarter of these patients and use of a personalized embryo transfer (pET) on the day designated by ERA improves reproductive performance. Our results in the Indian population revealed an endometrial factor in 27.5% RIF patients, which was significantly greater than the non-RIF group 15% (P = 0.04). After pET, the overall ongoing pregnancy rate was 42.4% and implantation rate was 33%, which was at par with our in-vitro fertilization results over 1-year. We also performed ERA in patients with persistently thin endometrium, and it was reassuring to find that the endometrium in 75% of these patients was receptive despite being 6 mm or less. A pregnancy rate of 66.7% was achieved in this group. Though larger studies are required to validate these results ERA has become a useful tool in our diagnostic armamentarium for ER. PMID:26538853

  18. Breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms and endometrial cancer risk: a Collaborative Endometrial Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Shahana; O’Mara, Tracy A.; Ferguson, Kaltin; Lambrechts, Diether; Garcia-Dios, Diego A.; Vergote, Ignace; Amant, Frederic; Howarth, Kimberley; Gorman, Maggie; Hodgson, Shirley; Tomlinson, Ian; Yang, Hannah P.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise A.; Chanock, Stephen; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Hall, Per; Liu, Jianjun; Shah, Mitul; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Strom, Brian L.; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2011-01-01

    Recent large--scale association studies, both of genome-wide and candidate gene design, have revealed several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which are significantly associated with risk of developing breast cancer. As both breast and endometrial cancers are considered to be hormonally driven and share multiple risk factors, we investigated whether breast cancer risk alleles are also associated with endometrial cancer risk. We genotyped nine breast cancer risk SNPs in up to 4188 endometrial cases and 11 928 controls, from between three and seven Caucasian populations. None of the tested SNPs showed significant evidence of association with risk of endometrial cancer. PMID:21965274

  19. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  20. 21 CFR 884.1185 - Endometrial washer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... with negative pressure. This device is used to study endometrial cytology (cells). (b) Classification... a recent cesarean section, and (iii) Warning: Do not attach to a wall or any external suction,...

  1. 21 CFR 884.1185 - Endometrial washer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... with negative pressure. This device is used to study endometrial cytology (cells). (b) Classification... a recent cesarean section, and (iii) Warning: Do not attach to a wall or any external suction,...

  2. 21 CFR 884.1185 - Endometrial washer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... with negative pressure. This device is used to study endometrial cytology (cells). (b) Classification... a recent cesarean section, and (iii) Warning: Do not attach to a wall or any external suction,...

  3. 21 CFR 884.1185 - Endometrial washer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... with negative pressure. This device is used to study endometrial cytology (cells). (b) Classification... a recent cesarean section, and (iii) Warning: Do not attach to a wall or any external suction,...

  4. 21 CFR 884.1185 - Endometrial washer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with negative pressure. This device is used to study endometrial cytology (cells). (b) Classification... for Standardization's ISO 10993 ‘Biological Evaluation of Medical Devices—Part I: Evaluation...

  5. Intraperitoneal Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  6. Dasatinib, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-22

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  7. From endometrial receptivity to infertility.

    PubMed

    Tabibzadeh, S; Shea, W; Lessey, B A; Broome, J

    1999-01-01

    Implantation of the blastocyst in endometrium requires establishment of a coordinated molecular dialogue between the embryo and the endometrium. Factors instrumental in the preparation of a receptive endometrium are derived from the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. These factors modulate the expression of genes that drive the endometrium throughout the characteristic menstrual cycles. During each menstrual cycle, a series of coordinated, architectural, morphological, cytochemical, and molecular changes ultimately lead to the preparation of a receptive endometrium during the putative "receptive period" or "implantation window." It is during this critical period that a proper dialogue can be established between an intrusive blastocyst and a receptive endometrium. If, for any reason, this dialogue is not established or is perturbed, the embryo is aborted. The natural fate of the receptive endometrium, in the absence of implantation, is development of a second set of changes that ultimately lead to menstruation. The identity of the molecular repertoire that makes endometrium receptive to implantation and/or lead to menstruation is being revealed and broadly includes cytokines, heat shock factors, adhesion molecules and matrix metalloproteases. We identified a novel gene of the transforming growth factor-beta, superfamily of molecules, the so-called endometrial bleeding--associated factor or ebaf, whose expression is confined to the late secretory and menstrual phases. Various forms of female infertility were associated with dysregulated expression of ebaf during the implantation window. The findings show an occult molecular defect of endometrial receptivity that seems to be due to dysregulated and premature expression of a member of the premenstrual molecular repertoire. The dysregulated expression of ebaf may assist in the identification, prognostication, and monitoring of treatment of infertile women.

  8. Study establishes basis for genomic classification of endometrial cancers

    Cancer.gov

    A comprehensive genomic analysis of nearly 400 endometrial tumors suggests that certain molecular characteristics – such as the frequency of mutations – could complement current pathology methods and help distinguish between principal types of endometrial

  9. [Pten gene expression in the endometrial mucosa].

    PubMed

    Bakiewicz, Anna; Goździk, Jarosław; Sporny, Stanisław

    2006-04-01

    The opinions about the causes of the endometrial carcinoma have changed since 1995, due to molecular biology progress. The findings concerning the recently discovered suppressor PTEN gene localized on the chromosome 10 -10q23.3, the product of which is a specific phosphatase are especially valuable. The loss of the gene function is directly linked with the genesis and progression of endometrial carcinoma, as well as cancers of other tissues and organs, including thyroid, breast, ovary, prostate or skin. Immunohistochemical studies with the use of the 6H2.1 antibody directed against the protein coded by the PTEN gene indicate that the protein cannot be found in more than half of the patients with endometrial carcinoma and its precursor--EIN. Mutations of the PTEN gene have also been detected in many young women with normal microscopic structure of the endometrial mucosa. Thus, a test for the absence of the PTEN gene product in the endometrial cells may be used for precise identification of early stages of carcinogenesis.

  10. Fenretinide: A Novel Treatment for Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Navdha; Malpani, Saurabh; Dyson, Matthew; Ono, Masanori; Coon, John S.; Kim, Julie J.; Schink, Julian C.; Bulun, Serdar E.; Pavone, Mary Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to progestin treatment is a major hurdle in the treatment of advanced and reoccurring endometrial cancer. Fenretinide is a synthetic retinoid that has been evaluated in clinical trials as a cancer therapeutic and chemo-preventive agent. Fenretinide has been established to be cytotoxic to many kinds of cancer cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that fenretinide decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in Ishikawa cells, which are an endometrial cancer cell line, in dose dependent manner in-vitro. This effect was found to be independent of retinoic acid nuclear receptor signaling pathway. Further, we have shown that this induction of apoptosis by fenretinide may be caused by increased retinol uptake via STRA6. Silencing of STRA6 was shown to decrease apoptosis which was inhibited by knockdown of STRA6 expression in Ishikawa cells. Results of an in-vivo study demonstrated that intraperitoneal injections of fenretinide in endometrial cancer tumors (created using Ishikawa cells) in mice inhibited tumor growth effectively. Immunohistochemistry of mice tumors showed a decrease in Ki67 expression and an increase in cleaved caspase-3 staining after fenretinide treatment when compared to vehicle treated mice. Collectively, our results are the first to establish the efficacy of fenretinide as an antitumor agent for endometrial cancer both in-vitro and in-vivo, providing a valuable rationale for initiating more preclinical studies and clinical trials using fenretinide for the treatment of endometrial cancer. PMID:25340777

  11. Uterine endometrial polyp with severe hemorrhage and cystic endometrial hyperplasia-pyometra complex in a dog.

    PubMed

    Gumber, Sanjeev; Springer, Nora; Wakamatsu, Nobuko

    2010-05-01

    The current report describes an unusual presentation of uterine endometrial polyp with severe hemorrhage and cystic endometrial hyperplasia-pyometra complex in a 9.5-year-old female Doberman Pinscher. The dog presented with a 2-day history of bloody discharge from the vulva and an enlarged abdomen. The postmortem examination revealed a markedly distended right uterine horn with a large pedunculated mass (17 cm x 9 cm x 4 cm) and blood. Based on the histological findings, the diagnosis of uterine endometrial polyp was made. PMID:20453227

  12. Endometrial Stromal Nodule: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Fdili Alaoui, F. Z.; Chaara, H.; Bouguern, H.; Melhouf, M. A.; Fatemi, H.; Belmlih, A.; Amarti, A.

    2011-01-01

    Endometrial stromal nodule (ESN) is the least common of the endometrial stromal tumors. They are rare neoplasms which are diagnosed in most instances by light microscopy. Although such nodules are benign, hysterectomy has been considered the treatment of choice to determine the margins of the tumor required for diagnosis and to differentiate it from invasive stromal sarcoma Whose prognosis is totally different. We report a case of a 45 years old woman, with presurgical diagnosis of adnexal mass or uterine tumor. She underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy. Pathologic examination revealed an endometrial stromal nodule. Through this observation, we insist on the fact that the ESNs are rare and benign entities which must be differentiated from the other invasive malignant stromal tumors; this can change the final prognosis. PMID:21423543

  13. Endometrial stromal nodule: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Fdili Alaoui, F Z; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Melhouf, M A; Fatemi, H; Belmlih, A; Amarti, A

    2011-01-01

    Endometrial stromal nodule (ESN) is the least common of the endometrial stromal tumors. They are rare neoplasms which are diagnosed in most instances by light microscopy. Although such nodules are benign, hysterectomy has been considered the treatment of choice to determine the margins of the tumor required for diagnosis and to differentiate it from invasive stromal sarcoma Whose prognosis is totally different. We report a case of a 45 years old woman, with presurgical diagnosis of adnexal mass or uterine tumor. She underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy. Pathologic examination revealed an endometrial stromal nodule. Through this observation, we insist on the fact that the ESNs are rare and benign entities which must be differentiated from the other invasive malignant stromal tumors; this can change the final prognosis. PMID:21423543

  14. Morphometric evaluation of endometrial blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Makhija, Divya; Mathai, Alka Mary; Naik, Ramadas; Kumar, Suneet; Rai, Sharada; Pai, Muktha R; Baliga, Poornima

    2008-01-01

    Five hundred endometrial specimens were studied to document the changes in blood vessels in various phases of menstrual cycle, menstrual disturbances and in unexplained infertility. Sixty-three cases were taken as control and 437 cases as study group which included cases of dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB), endometrial polyps, fibroids, adenomyosis, infertility and atrophic endometrium. Using light microscopy, the vascular morphology was studied. The blood vessels were concentrated more in basal layer in the proliferative phase and in functional layer in the secretory phase. Cases of complex hyperplasia and pill endometrium had significantly higher vessel concentration. Congestion and dilatation of blood vessels were significantly higher in cases of DUB. The present study showed a positive correlation between endometrial angiogenesis and menstrual disorders. The alteration in blood vessel morphology has significant role in prognosis and in various anti-angiogenic therapies.

  15. Metformin for endometrial hyperplasia: a Cochrane protocol

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Naomi S; Oliver, Thomas R W; Shiwani, Hunain; Saner, Juliane R F; Mulvaney, Caroline A; Atiomo, William

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Endometrial hyperplasia is a precancerous lesion of the endometrium, commonly presenting with uterine bleeding. If managed expectantly, it frequently progresses to endometrial carcinoma, rates of which are increasing dramatically worldwide. However, the established treatment for endometrial hyperplasia (progestogens) involves multiple side effects and leaves the risk of recurrence. Metformin is the most commonly used oral hypoglycaemic agent in type 2 diabetes mellitus. It has also been linked to the reversal of endometrial hyperplasia and may therefore contribute to decreasing the prevalence of endometrial carcinoma without the fertility and side effect consequences of current therapies. However, the efficacy and safety of metformin being used for this therapeutic target is unclear and, therefore, this systematic review will aim to determine this. Methods and analysis We will search the following trials and databases with no language restrictions: Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Specialised Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE; EMBASE; EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; PubMed; Google Scholar; ClinicalTrials.gov; the WHO International Trials Registry Platform portal; OpenGrey and the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS). We will include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of use of metformin compared with a placebo or no treatment, conventional medical treatment (eg, progestogens) or any other active intervention. Two review authors will independently assess the trial eligibility, risk of bias and extract appropriate data points. Trial authors will be contacted for additional data. The primary review outcome is the regression of endometrial hyperplasia histology towards normal histology. Secondary outcomes include hysterectomy rate; abnormal uterine bleeding; quality of life scores and adverse reactions to treatments. Ethics and dissemination

  16. p53 suppresses type II endometrial carcinomas in mice and governs endometrial tumour aggressiveness in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Peter J; Ikenberg, Kristian; Fuchs, Thomas J; Rechsteiner, Markus; Georgiev, Strahil; Fankhauser, Niklaus; Noske, Aurelia; Roessle, Matthias; Caduff, Rosmarie; Dellas, Athanassios; Fink, Daniel; Moch, Holger; Krek, Wilhelm; Frew, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    Type II endometrial carcinomas are a highly aggressive group of tumour subtypes that are frequently associated with inactivation of the TP53 tumour suppressor gene. We show that mice with endometrium-specific deletion of Trp53 initially exhibited histological changes that are identical to known precursor lesions of type II endometrial carcinomas in humans and later developed carcinomas representing all type II subtypes. The mTORC1 signalling pathway was frequently activated in these precursor lesions and tumours, suggesting a genetic cooperation between this pathway and Trp53 deficiency in tumour initiation. Consistent with this idea, analyses of 521 human endometrial carcinomas identified frequent mTORC1 pathway activation in type I as well as type II endometrial carcinoma subtypes. mTORC1 pathway activation and p53 expression or mutation status each independently predicted poor patient survival. We suggest that molecular alterations in p53 and the mTORC1 pathway play different roles in the initiation of the different endometrial cancer subtypes, but that combined p53 inactivation and mTORC1 pathway activation are unifying pathogenic features among histologically diverse subtypes of late stage aggressive endometrial tumours. PMID:22678923

  17. ZEB1 Expression in Endometrial Biopsy Predicts Lymph Node Metastases in Patient with Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Gang; Wang, Xiangming; Cao, Xiaozhi; Shen, Lijuan; Zhu, Jiansheng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to analyze the expression of zinc-finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1) in endometrial biopsy and its correlation with preoperative characteristics, including lymph node metastases in patient with endometrial cancer. Methods. Using quantitative RT-PCR, ZEB1 expressions in endometrial biopsy from 452 patients were measured. The relationship between ZEB1 expression and preoperative characteristics was analyzed. Results. ZEB1 expressions were significantly associated with subtype, grade, myometrial invasion, and lymph node metastases. Lymph node metastases could be identified with a sensitivity of 57.8% at specificity of 74.1% by ZEB1 expression in endometrial biopsy. Based on combination of preoperative characteristics and ZEB1 expression, lymph node metastases could be identified with a sensitivity of 62.1% at specificity of 96.2% prior to hysterectomy. Conclusion. ZEB1 expression in endometrial biopsy could help physicians to better predict the lymph node metastasis in patients with endometrial cancer prior to hysterectomy. PMID:25544793

  18. Effects of adipocyte-secreted factors on decidualized endometrial cells: modulation of endometrial receptivity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gamundi-Segura, Silvia; Serna, Jose; Oehninger, Sergio; Horcajadas, Jose A; Arbones-Mainar, Jose M

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is defined as an excessive accumulation of adipose tissue that may lead to health complications. Mounting evidence indicates that obesity has a negative impact on fertility. Yet, the link between adipose tissue biology and infertility remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the communication between the adipose tissue and the reproductive system and the importance of this cross talk for the development of a receptive endometrium. To that end, we generated an in vitro model with endometrial and adipocyte cell lines. Sexual hormones, progesterone and estradiol, were used to decidualize endometrial cells and sensitize adipocytes. Decidualization produced a simultaneous increase of adipokine receptors in endometrial cells paralleling changes in their receptivity status. Furthermore, sensitization of 3T3-L1 adipocytes increased mRNA levels of leptin and resistin and decreased the expression of adiponectin and chemerin levels. This was accompanied by increased isoproterenol-induced lipolysis and reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Lastly, conditioned culture medium of those sensitized adipocytes was used to feed endometrial cells. This treatment resulted in (i) upregulation of genes previously identified as positive regulators of endometrial receptivity, such as leukemia inhibitory factor and glutathione peroxidase 3, and (ii) downregulation of interleukin-15 and mucin1, both genes negatively related with endometrial receptivity. Our results indicate that the endocrine communication between adipose tissue and the reproductive system is bidirectional and stress the importance of the adipose tissue to modulate the reproductive fitness.

  19. Endometrial thickness and risk of breast and endometrial carcinomas in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Ashley S.; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Modugno, Francesmary; Black, Amanda; Hill, Lyndon M.; Martin, Jerry; Sit, Anita S.; Sherman, Mark E.; Brinton, Louise A.

    2013-01-01

    Postmenopausal women with higher circulating estrogen levels are at increased risk of developing breast and endometrial carcinomas. In the endometrium, excess estrogen relative to progesterone produces a net proliferative stimulus, which may result in endometrial thickening. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that endometrial thickness is a biological marker of excess estrogen stimulation that is associated with risk of breast and endometrial carcinomas. Endometrial thickness was measured in 1,272 postmenopausal women, aged 55–74, who underwent transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) screening as part of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. Serial endometrial thickness measurements were available for a subset of women at one (n=1,018), two (n=869) and three years (n=641) after baseline. We evaluated associations between endometrial thickness and breast (n=91) and endometrial (n=14) carcinoma by estimating relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using Cox proportional hazards regression with age as the time metric. Models incorporating baseline endometrial thickness and as a time-varying covariate using all measurements were examined. Median follow-up among study participants was 12.5 years (range: 0.3–13.8 years). Compared to baseline endometrial thickness of 1.0 – 2.99 mm, women with baseline endometrial thickness greater than or equal to 5.0 mm had an increased risk of breast (RR: 2.00, 95% CI 1.15, 3.48) and endometrial (RR: 5.02, 95% CI 0.96, 26.36) carcinomas in models adjusted for menopausal hormone use and BMI. Our data suggest that increased endometrial thickness as assessed by TVU was associated with increased risk of breast and endometrial carcinomas. PMID:23907658

  20. Laparoscopic surgery for endometrial cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Hauspy, Jan; Jiménez, Waldo; Rosen, Barry; Gotlieb, Walter H; Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael; Plante, Marie

    2010-06-01

    Uterine cancer is the fourth most common cancer in Canadian women, with an estimated 4200 new cases and 790 disease-related deaths in 2008. We investigated the domains that are important for further implementation of minimally invasive surgery for the management of endometrial cancer by performing a literature review to assess the available data on overall and disease-free survival in laparoscopic versus open surgery. We also investigated the influence of patient- related factors, surgical factors, quality of life, and cost implications. Among the 23 articles reviewed, five were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), four were prospective reviews, and 14 were retrospective reviews. The RCTs showed no difference in overall and disease-free survival for patients with endometrial cancer who had undergone laparoscopic hysterectomy compared with open surgery. Morbid obesity is a limiting factor for the feasibility of complete laparoscopic staging. Laparoscopy seems to decrease complications and decrease blood loss. It also shortens hospital stay, with improved short-term quality of life and cosmesis, while yielding similar lymph node counts. Overall, laparoscopy is cost-effective, because the increased operation cost of laparoscopy is offset by the shorter hospital stay and faster return to work. On the basis of currently available data, patients with endometrial cancer should be offered minimally invasive surgery as part of their treatment for endometrial cancer whenever possible.

  1. Endometrial study in patients with postmenopausal metrorrhagia

    PubMed Central

    de Merlo, Gaspar González; Mirasol, Esteban González; García, María Teresa Gómez; Parra, Carmen Ángel; Goy, Enrique Iglesias

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to devise a strategy to diagnose malign endometrial pathologies (adenocarcinoma or atypical hyperplasia) that minimizes the number of invasive tests done (hysteroscopy, aspiration biopsy or curettage) with no loss of its detection efficiency. Material and methods We retrospectively studied the clinical histories of 779 postmenopausal women at the University Hospital Complex of Albacete, for whom an endometrial study had been done (hysteroscopy, aspiration biopsy or curettage) with a 1-year follow-up between 1 March 2006 and 31 March 2008. Results There were 77 cases of a malignant pathology (66 adenocarcinomas and 11 hyperplasias with atypia); 96.1% had metrorrhagia, and there were only 3 cases of asymptomatic patients (all 3 presented endometrial thickness of > 5 mm: 10, 12 and 15 mm). The sensitivity and specificity of the transvaginal ultrasound, with a 5 mm cut-off point to diagnose a malignant pathology, were 98.4% and 30.1%, respectively; 89.1% and 99.6%, respectively, for aspiration biopsy; 83.9% and 99.1%, respectively, for hysteroscopy without biopsy; and both were 100% for biopsy. Statistical significance was considered at p < 0.05 and confidence intervals were calculated at 95%. Conclusions In postmenopausal women with metrorrhagia, the first action to take is to do a transvaginal ultrasound, followed by en endometrial study, but only if the endometrium is irregular or endometrial thickness is ≥ 5 mm; in asymptomatic women, the cut-off point should be set at 10 mm. The immediate method of choice is an ambulatory biopsy. PMID:27279854

  2. CD82 expression alters with human endometrial cycles and affects the uterine endometrial receptivity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaowei; Liu, Shuai; Wang, Xiaoqi; Yan, Qiu

    2012-03-01

    Embryo implantation is a process that requires both temporal and spatial synchronization of the uterine endometrium and the embryo, and the endometrium becomes receptive to the embryo during the window of implantation. Although the expression patterns of many implantation-related molecules change dynamically during this process, the impact of CD82 on endometrial receptivity has not been elucidated. By immunohistochemical staining, we found that CD82 levels rose from the proliferative phase to the secretory phase in human endometrium. Specifically, the highest level appeared in mid- and late-secretory phases. Consistently, RL95-2 cells, representative of high-receptive endometrial epithelium, expressed higher levels of CD82 than did HEC-1A cells, which are representative of low-receptive endometrial epithelium, as detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot and immunofluorescence. Furthermore, progesterone up-regulated the expression of CD82 in both epithelial cell lines. Down-regulation of CD82 in RL95-2 cells by either CD82 siRNA transfection or treatment with a CD82 antibody significantly decreased the adhesion of human embryonic JAR cells to RL95-2 cell monolayers (P < 0.01) and inhibited the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). In contrast, up-regulation of CD82 in HEC-1A cells by CD82 cDNA transfection promoted embryonic JAR cell adhesion to HEC-1A monolayers (P < 0.05) and activated the phosphorylation of FAK. In conclusion, the expression of CD82 increases in endometrial tissues during the window of embryo implantation, CD82 expression affects endometrial receptivity of the uterine epithelial cells in vitro, and the FAK signaling pathway may be involved in this phenomenon. The correlation between CD82 and endometrial receptivity suggests that CD82 may serve as a potential marker of endometrial function. PMID:22393164

  3. Endometrial adenocarcinoma in a 13-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Mee; Shin, So Jin; Bae, Jin Gon; Kwon, Kun Young; Rhee, Jeong Ho

    2016-03-01

    Endometrial cancer is the third most common gynecologic cancer in the Korea and occurs mainly in menopausal women. Although it can develop in young premenopausal women cancer as well, an attack in the adolescent girl is very rare. A 13-year-old girl visited gynecology department with the complaint of abnormal uterine bleeding. An endometrial biopsy revealed FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) grade II endometrial adenocarcinoma. In the treatment of endometrial cancer, conservative management should be considered if the patient is nulliparous or wants the fertility preservation. Therefore, we decided to perform a hormonal therapy and a follow-up endometrial biopsy after progestin administration for eight months revealed no residual tumor. We report a case of endometrial cancer occurred in a 13-year-old girl with a brief review of the literature.

  4. Endometrial adenocarcinoma in a 13-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Mee; Shin, So Jin; Bae, Jin Gon; Kwon, Kun Young

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the third most common gynecologic cancer in the Korea and occurs mainly in menopausal women. Although it can develop in young premenopausal women cancer as well, an attack in the adolescent girl is very rare. A 13-year-old girl visited gynecology department with the complaint of abnormal uterine bleeding. An endometrial biopsy revealed FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) grade II endometrial adenocarcinoma. In the treatment of endometrial cancer, conservative management should be considered if the patient is nulliparous or wants the fertility preservation. Therefore, we decided to perform a hormonal therapy and a follow-up endometrial biopsy after progestin administration for eight months revealed no residual tumor. We report a case of endometrial cancer occurred in a 13-year-old girl with a brief review of the literature. PMID:27004208

  5. Detection of endometrial lesions by degree of linear polarization maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Fazleabas, Asgerally; Walsh, Joseph T.

    2010-02-01

    Endometriosis is one of the most common causes of chronic pelvic pain and infertility and is characterized by the presence of endometrial glands and stroma outside of the uterine cavity. A novel laparoscopic polarization imaging system was designed to detect endometriosis by imaging endometrial lesions. Linearly polarized light with varying incident polarization angles illuminated endometrial lesions. Degree of linear polarization image maps of endometrial lesions were constructed by using remitted polarized light. The image maps were compared with regular laparoscopy image. The degree of linear polarization map contributed to the detection of endometriosis by revealing structures inside the lesion. The utilization of rotating incident polarization angle (IPA) for the linearly polarized light provides extended understanding of endometrial lesions. The developed polarization system with varying IPA and the collected image maps could provide improved characterization of endometrial lesions via higher visibility of the structure of the lesions and thereby improve diagnosis of endometriosis.

  6. Endometrial adenocarcinoma in a 13-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Mee; Shin, So Jin; Bae, Jin Gon; Kwon, Kun Young; Rhee, Jeong Ho

    2016-03-01

    Endometrial cancer is the third most common gynecologic cancer in the Korea and occurs mainly in menopausal women. Although it can develop in young premenopausal women cancer as well, an attack in the adolescent girl is very rare. A 13-year-old girl visited gynecology department with the complaint of abnormal uterine bleeding. An endometrial biopsy revealed FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) grade II endometrial adenocarcinoma. In the treatment of endometrial cancer, conservative management should be considered if the patient is nulliparous or wants the fertility preservation. Therefore, we decided to perform a hormonal therapy and a follow-up endometrial biopsy after progestin administration for eight months revealed no residual tumor. We report a case of endometrial cancer occurred in a 13-year-old girl with a brief review of the literature. PMID:27004208

  7. My approach to the interpretation of endometrial biopsies and curettings

    PubMed Central

    McCluggage, W G

    2006-01-01

    A major proportion of the workload in many histopathology laboratories is accounted for by endometrial biopsies, either curettage specimens or outpatient biopsy specimens. The increasing use of pipelle and other methods of biopsy not necessitating general anaesthesia has resulted in greater numbers of specimens with scant tissue, resulting in problems in assessing adequacy and in interpreting artefactual changes, some of which appear more common with outpatient biopsies. In this review, the criteria for adequacy and common artefacts in endometrial biopsies, as well as the interpretation of endometrial biopsies in general, are discussed, concentrating on areas that cause problems for pathologists. An adequate clinical history, including knowledge of the age, menstrual history and menopausal status, and information on the use of exogenous hormones and tamoxifen, is necessary for the pathologist to critically evaluate endometrial biopsies. Topics such as endometritis, endometrial polyps, changes that are induced by hormones and tamoxifen within the endometrium, endometrial metaplasias and hyperplasias, atypical polypoid adenomyoma, adenofibroma, adenosarcoma, histological types of endometrial carcinoma and grading of endometrial carcinomas are discussed with regard to endometrial biopsy specimens rather than hysterectomy specimens. The value of ancillary techniques, especially immunohistochemistry, is discussed where appropriate. PMID:16873562

  8. [Molecular based targets and endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, St; Ananiev, J; Ivanova, K; Velev, V; Todorova, M; Gulubova, M

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the rate of spread of endometrial carcinoma, especially in the postmenopausal period. Along with routine diagnostic methods, giving information on the location and progression of the disease, there are some morphological methods determining very accurately the correlations in the development of this type of cancer and his prognosis. Moreover--in recent years, the accumulated information about the molecular profile of this type of cancer made it possible to implement a number of new drugs against the so-called molecular therapy -'targets' in the neoplastic process. Significant proportion of cases show response rates, it is more hope in the development of more successful formulas and target -based therapy. In this review, we present and discuss the role of certain molecular markers as potential indicators of prognosis and development, as well as determining the target treatment of endometrial carcinoma.

  9. microRNAs and Endometrial Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Chill, Henry H; Dior, Uri P; Kogan, Liron; Revel, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Embryo implantation requires a reciprocal interaction between the blastocyst and endometrium and is associated with complex regulatory mechanisms. Since their discovery, microRNAs became prominent candidates providing missing links for many biological pathways. In recent years, microRNAs were implicated as one of the important players in regulation of various biological and physiological endometrial related processes. This chapter aims to present recent knowledge pertaining to the diverse aspects of microRNAs in the embryo-endometrial relationship. We will focus on the role of microRNAs in decidualization and their part in natural and stimulated cycles. Next, we will present recent studies deliberating the role of microRNAs in recurrent pregnancy loss and in the important phenomenon of recurrent implantation failure. Lastly, demonstrating an important aspect of embryo implantation and invasion, we will outline few microRNA related shared pathways of implantation and carcinogenesis. PMID:26662990

  10. [Molecular based targets and endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Stoyanov, St; Ananiev, J; Ivanova, K; Velev, V; Todorova, M; Gulubova, M

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the rate of spread of endometrial carcinoma, especially in the postmenopausal period. Along with routine diagnostic methods, giving information on the location and progression of the disease, there are some morphological methods determining very accurately the correlations in the development of this type of cancer and his prognosis. Moreover--in recent years, the accumulated information about the molecular profile of this type of cancer made it possible to implement a number of new drugs against the so-called molecular therapy -'targets' in the neoplastic process. Significant proportion of cases show response rates, it is more hope in the development of more successful formulas and target -based therapy. In this review, we present and discuss the role of certain molecular markers as potential indicators of prognosis and development, as well as determining the target treatment of endometrial carcinoma. PMID:25909140

  11. Endometrial cancer: Not your grandmother's cancer.

    PubMed

    McAlpine, Jessica N; Temkin, Sarah M; Mackay, Helen J

    2016-09-15

    Worldwide, the incidence of endometrial carcinoma (EC) is rapidly increasing, and the highest disease burden is reported in North America and Western Europe. Although the prognosis remains good for patients with are diagnosed with early stage EC, for those with recurrent or metastatic disease, the options are few, and the median overall survival is short. It is imperative to gain a greater understanding of all aspects of EC, limit its effect on scarce health care resources and, more importantly, prevent this cancer from significantly impacting future generations of women. An exciting new era of endometrial cancer research and clinical management has begun that incorporates biologically and clinically relevant genomic and clinicopathologic parameters. Continued collaborative research efforts and funding are essential if we are to advance our understanding of this disease and improve clinical outcomes. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2016;122:2787-2798. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:27308732

  12. Endometrial cancer: rising incidence, detection and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kistner, R W; Krantz, K E; Lebherz, T B; Lewis, G L; Reagan, J W; Smith, J; Tobin, J J; Wied, G L

    1973-02-01

    This editorial consists of summaries of the discussions on incidence, pathogenesis, prognosis and patient follow-up, and transcripts of the discussions on detection and treatment of endometrial carcinoma, from a symposium held in Carefree, Arizona. 75% of the cancers occur in postmenopausal women; average age is 52 years, but is decreasing. Endometrial carcinoma rose from 20.3 to 46.3% of all uterine cancers in Cleveland University Hospitals from 1941-1970. Older patients are often diabetic, overweight, nulliparous, with anovulatory or familial history; young women frequently resemble mild Stein-Levinthal syndrome. Clinically, 20% of patients are assymptomatic, others may have softer or larger uterus, larger ovaries, irregular postmenopausal bleeding, or lengthy onset of menopause. The Gravlee jet wash is indicated for high risk patients and those about to take estrogen. Endometrial carcinoma first affects epithelium, then endometrial stroma, then upper myometrium, lower myometrium, then other organs, perhaps via lymphatics, vagina, tubes, but ascites is uncommon. Generally, U.S. physicians use intrauterine radium followed by surgery, British use surgery first, and Swedish use radiation only. Cases must be treated individually, e.g. surgery only for minimal cancer, radium and surgery for more serious cases, and preoperative external radiation also for advanced disease. Although radiation lessens chance of implantation during surgical trauma, insertion of intrauterine radium enhances spread of tumor cells. Injectable progestins sometimes control metastatic disease, although they require 8 weeks to act. Progestins may help those with late recurrence, squamous metaplasia, or who are under 50 years of age. Estrogens are rarely effective. Prognois for terminal patients often includes subjective improvement, bowel obstruction, lung complications, hemorrhage. Radiation side effects and menopausal symptoms are often problems for cured patients. In young cured patients the

  13. Integrated genomic characterization of endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kandoth, Cyriac; Schultz, Nikolaus; Cherniack, Andrew D; Akbani, Rehan; Liu, Yuexin; Shen, Hui; Robertson, A Gordon; Pashtan, Itai; Shen, Ronglai; Benz, Christopher C; Yau, Christina; Laird, Peter W; Ding, Li; Zhang, Wei; Mills, Gordon B; Kucherlapati, Raju; Mardis, Elaine R; Levine, Douglas A

    2013-05-01

    We performed an integrated genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic characterization of 373 endometrial carcinomas using array- and sequencing-based technologies. Uterine serous tumours and ∼25% of high-grade endometrioid tumours had extensive copy number alterations, few DNA methylation changes, low oestrogen receptor/progesterone receptor levels, and frequent TP53 mutations. Most endometrioid tumours had few copy number alterations or TP53 mutations, but frequent mutations in PTEN, CTNNB1, PIK3CA, ARID1A and KRAS and novel mutations in the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex gene ARID5B. A subset of endometrioid tumours that we identified had a markedly increased transversion mutation frequency and newly identified hotspot mutations in POLE. Our results classified endometrial cancers into four categories: POLE ultramutated, microsatellite instability hypermutated, copy-number low, and copy-number high. Uterine serous carcinomas share genomic features with ovarian serous and basal-like breast carcinomas. We demonstrated that the genomic features of endometrial carcinomas permit a reclassification that may affect post-surgical adjuvant treatment for women with aggressive tumours.

  14. The epidemiology of endometrial and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Daniel W

    2012-02-01

    This review highlights similarities in the epidemiology of endometrial and ovarian cancer, including highly correlated incidence rates and similar risk factor profiles. Factors that decrease risk for both cancers include a late menarche, early age at first birth, giving birth and breastfeeding, and use of oral contraceptives. Short or irregular cycles and late menopause are associated with increased risk for both. Other risk factors that appear to operate in a similar direction include decreased risk associated with IUD use or a tubal ligation, and increased risk associated with obesity, lack of exercise, and use of talc powders in genital hygiene. Estrogen excess is proposed as the underlying mechanism for most endometrial cancers, whereas incessant ovulation has been suggested as the explanation for ovarian cancer. However, an increased number of estimated ovulatory cycles correlates directly with risk for both endometrial and ovarian cancer, suggesting that reproductive tissue turnover with an accumulation of PTEN or p53 mutations represents a possible common mechanism. An immune-based explanation involving mucin proteins represents another common mechanism that could explain additional risk factors. Maintenance of ideal weight, breastfeeding children, use of oral contraceptives, and avoidance of talc powders in genital hygiene are measures that could lower the risk for both types of cancer. Careful selection of patients for prophylactic oophorectomy for those women who are coming to hysterectomy for benign disease is an additional measure to consider for ovarian cancer.

  15. Endometrial Adenocarcinoma Presenting in a Premenopausal Patient with Tuberous Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, J. S.; Chambers, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Endometrial adenocarcinoma is very uncommon in women under 40 years of age. Case: A 39-year-old woman with tuberous sclerosis and severe intellectual disability presented with irregular bleeding unresponsive to oral contraceptive therapy. She was subsequently found to have a deeply invasive endometrial adenocarcinoma. Conclusion:…

  16. Systemic therapy for endometrial stromal sarcomas: current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Serkies, Krystyna; Pawłowska, Ewa; Jassem, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Uterine endometrial stromal sarcomas including true low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (LG-ESS) and high-grade (HG-ESS) or undifferentiated endometrial sarcoma (UES) constitute a group of rare, aggressive malignancies. Most LG-ESSs express steroid receptors. Surgery is the principal primary therapy for endometrial stromal sarcomas and should be considered in all cases. These malignancies are relatively radio- and chemoresistant. Chemotherapy is used in recurrent and advanced HG-ESS and UES. Currently, the combination of gemcitabine and docetaxel is considered the most effective regimen, but at the expense of substantial toxicity. In steroid receptor positive advanced LG-ESS hormonal therapy, mainly with progestins, allows in some patients for a long-term survival. Aromatase inhibitors seem to be equally effective as first- and subsequent-line of treatment, and are well tolerated. The role of molecular-targeted therapies in endometrial stromal sarcomas remains to be established. PMID:27629136

  17. Effect of normal endometrial stroma on growth and differentiation in Ishikawa endometrial adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Julia T; Lessey, Bruce A; Seppälä, Markku; Kaufman, David G

    2002-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is characterized by alterations in the stromal cells and the supporting extracellular matrix in addition to the intrinsic alterations of the malignant epithelial cells. We have developed a cell culture model that demonstrates the role of stromal cells in the regulation of proliferation, hormone responsiveness, and differentiation of an endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line (Ishikawa). Conditioned medium (CM) was collected from normal primary human endometrial stromal cells grown on plastic or within the basement membrane extract, Matrigel. The CM produced by stromal cells cultured in contact with Matrigel markedly inhibited Ishikawa cell proliferation compared with CM from stromal cells cultured on plastic. Ishikawa cell proliferation varied with steroid hormone treatment in the presence of CM from stromal cells embedded in Matrigel. When the Ishikawa cells were placed in coculture in contact with stromal cells in Matrigel, production of a differentiated epithelial secretory product, glycodelin, was induced. Gene expression of stromal cell hormone receptors, growth factors, and integrins was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR in the presence of Matrigel to determine the potential factors involved in stromal regulatory function. These combined studies imply that the phenotype of the Ishikawa cells can be induced to differentiate to more closely resemble normal endometrial epithelium by reintroduction of stromal factors and appropriate extracellular matrix. Additionally, the study shows that basement membrane proteins influence the regulatory function of stromal cells as they mediate epithelial cell growth.

  18. Clear cell adenocarcinoma present exclusively within endometrial polyp: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Mitsuaki; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Okabe, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial polyp is a common benign lesion that protrudes into the endometrial surface. The incidence of carcinoma within endometrial polyp is thought to be low, however, postmenopausal women with endometrial polyps are at an increased risk. Endometrial clear cell adenocarcinoma is a distinct and relatively rare subtype of endometrial carcinoma, and recent studies have proposed putative precursor lesions of clear cell adenocarcinoma, namely clear cell endometrial glandular dysplasia (EmGD) and clear cell endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma (EIC). Herein, we describe two cases of clear cell adenocarcinoma present exclusively within endometrial polyp and discuss the association of its precursor. Two postmenopausal Japanese females, 66-year-old (Case 1) and 54-year-old (Case 2) presented with abnormal genital bleeding. Cytological examination of both cases revealed adenocarcinoma, thus, hysterectomy was performed. Histopathological studies demonstrated clear cell adenocarcinoma within exclusively endometrial polyp in both cases. The peculiar finding in Case 1 was presence of atypical glandular cells with large round to oval nuclei and clear cytoplasm within the atrophic endometrial glands in the surrounding endometrial tissue, which corresponded to clear cell EIC. A recent study showed that 33% of uteri had at least one focus of clear cell EmGD in endometrial polyps. Accordingly, clear cell adenocarcinoma and clear cell EmGD can occur in association with endometrial polyps more frequently than previously thought. Therefore, detailed histopathological examination is important in diagnosis of endometrial polyps, especially in the postmenopausal women, moreover cytological examination is a useful tool in the postmenopausal women with endometrial polyps.

  19. NAC1, a potential stem cell pluripotency factor expression in normal endometrium, endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masako; Nakayama, Kentaro; Yeasmin, Shamima; Katagiri, Atsuko; Iida, Kouji; Nakayama, Naomi; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of NAC1 in the development of endometrial cancer. NAC1 expression and localization were assessed with immunohistochemistry in the normal cyclic human endometrium, hyperplastic endometrium, and endometrial cancer. Expression of NAC1 in the glandular cells was significantly higher in the early and mid proliferative phases than in the other menstrual phases, endometrial hyperplasia, and endometrial carcinoma. NAC1 expression was down-regulated during endometrial carcinogenesis. There were significant correlations between positive NAC1 expression and pathological grade (P=0.037). No significant associations were found between NAC1 expression and the other clinicopathological characteristics including patient age, FIGO staging, depth of myometrial invasion, pelvic lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular space invasion, menopause, or body mass index. NAC1 gene knockdown inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in Ishikawa, HHUA, and JHEM2 cell lines, all of which overexpressed NAC1. Ectopic overexpression of the NAC1 gene stimulated cell proliferation in the HEC1B, and JHEM1 endometrial cancer cell lines, which have lower endogenous NAC1 expression. Endometrial carcinomas with NAC1 overexpression are clinically aggressive, high-grade carcinomas. Therefore, detection of NAC1 overexpression in endometrial cancers may identify patients who will benefit from NAC1 targeted therapy.

  20. Expression of retinoic acid receptors in human endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kojiro; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Tamura, Mitsutoshi; Niikura, Hitoshi; Takano, Tadao; Yoshinaga, Kohsuke; Nagase, Satoru; Suzuki, Takashi; Ito, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyo; Hayashi, Shin-ichi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2008-02-01

    The retinoids (vitamin A and its biologically active derivatives) are essential for the health and survival of the individual. Several studies have reported a strong rationale for the use of retinoids in cancer treatment and chemoprevention. It has been discovered that expression of retinoic acid receptor (RAR) beta is frequently silenced in epithelial carcinogenesis, which has led to the hypothesis that RAR beta could act as a tumor suppressor. However, the status of RAR beta in human endometrial carcinoma has not been examined. In the present study, we initially studied the effects of retinoic acid on cell proliferation and the expression of RAR alpha, RAR beta, and RAR gamma using AM580 (a RAR-specific agonist) in the Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell line. We also examined the expression of RAR in human eutopic endometrium (30 cases), endometrial hyperplasia (28 cases), and endometrial carcinoma (103 cases) using immunohistochemistry. Finally, we correlated these findings with the clinicopathological parameters. In vitro, cell growth was inhibited and RAR beta and RAR gamma mRNA was significantly induced by AM580, compared with vehicle controls, whereas RAR alpha mRNA was significantly attenuated by AM580, compared with vehicle. RAR beta was detected predominantly in endometrial hyperplasia, compared with endometrial carcinoma. No statistically significant correlation was obtained between the expression of any other RAR subtypes and clinicopathological parameters in human endometrial carcinoma. The results of our study demonstrate that AM580 inhibits cell growth and induces RAR beta mRNA expression in the Ishikawa cell line, and the expression level of RAR beta in endometrial carcinoma is significantly lower than that in endometrial hyperplasia. AM580 might therefore be considered as a potential treatment for endometrial carcinoma.

  1. Isolated humeral recurrence in endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Devdas, Santosh Kumar; Digumarti, Leela; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Patro, Kunha Charan; Nutakki, Ramakoteswararao

    2016-01-01

    Isolated skeletal metastasis in endometrial carcinoma at recurrence is very rare. We report a 52-year-old woman diagnosed to have FIGO Stage 1b, Grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma, presenting with isolated distal humerus metastasis, 2 years after surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for primary disease. Imaging, bone scintigraphy, and cytology confirmed the diagnosis of poorly differentiated metastatic adenocarcinoma. She was treated with local radiotherapy followed by six cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy along with zoledronic acid, monthly. She is symptom-free after the treatment and at a first follow-up visit after 3 months.

  2. Endometrial carcinoma in a young dog.

    PubMed

    Payne-Johnson, C E; Kelly, D F; Davies, P T

    1986-07-01

    A 2-years-old nulliparous cross-bred bitch had persistent vulval discharge following treatments that included a combined ethinyloestradiol/methyltestosterone preparation and megoestrol acetate. The uterus, removed at ovarohysterectomy, contained a large polypoid intraluminal mass with the histological features of endometrial carcinoma. The bitch has remained well for thirty-one months after surgery. The possibility is considered that the lesion is drug-related but no firm conclusion can be drawn about the precise nature and pathogenesis of this unusual lesion.

  3. Isolated humeral recurrence in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Devdas, Santosh Kumar; Digumarti, Leela; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Patro, Kunha Charan; Nutakki, Ramakoteswararao

    2016-01-01

    Isolated skeletal metastasis in endometrial carcinoma at recurrence is very rare. We report a 52-year-old woman diagnosed to have FIGO Stage 1b, Grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma, presenting with isolated distal humerus metastasis, 2 years after surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for primary disease. Imaging, bone scintigraphy, and cytology confirmed the diagnosis of poorly differentiated metastatic adenocarcinoma. She was treated with local radiotherapy followed by six cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy along with zoledronic acid, monthly. She is symptom-free after the treatment and at a first follow-up visit after 3 months. PMID:27688615

  4. Isolated humeral recurrence in endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Devdas, Santosh Kumar; Digumarti, Leela; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Patro, Kunha Charan; Nutakki, Ramakoteswararao

    2016-01-01

    Isolated skeletal metastasis in endometrial carcinoma at recurrence is very rare. We report a 52-year-old woman diagnosed to have FIGO Stage 1b, Grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma, presenting with isolated distal humerus metastasis, 2 years after surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy for primary disease. Imaging, bone scintigraphy, and cytology confirmed the diagnosis of poorly differentiated metastatic adenocarcinoma. She was treated with local radiotherapy followed by six cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy along with zoledronic acid, monthly. She is symptom-free after the treatment and at a first follow-up visit after 3 months. PMID:27688615

  5. Endometrial cancer and antidepressants: A nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiao-Fan; Chan, Hsiang-Lin; Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Liang, Hsin-Yi; Chiu, Wei-Che; Huang, Kuo-You; Lee, Yena; McIntyre, Roger S; Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung

    2016-07-01

    To our knowledge, the association between antidepressant exposure and endometrial cancer has not been previously explored. Herein, we aim to investigate the association between antidepressant prescription, including novel antidepressants, and the risk for endometrial cancer in a population-based study.Data for the analysis were derived from National Health Insurance Research Database. We identified 8392 cases with a diagnosis of endometrial cancer and 82,432 matched controls. A conditional logistic regression model was used, with adjusting for potentially confounding variables (e.g., comorbid psychiatric diseases, comorbid physical diseases, and other medications). Risk for endometrial cancer in the population-based study sample was categorized by, and assessed as a function of, antidepressant prescription and cumulative dosage.We report no association between endometrial cancer incidence and antidepressant prescription, including those prescribed either selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.15) or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (adjusted OR = 1.14; 95% CI, 0.76-1.71). We also did not identify an association between higher cumulative doses of antidepressant prescription and endometrial cancer.There was no association between antidepressant prescription and endometrial cancer. PMID:27442640

  6. Regression of latent endometrial precancers by progestin infiltrated intrauterine device.

    PubMed

    Ørbo, Anne; Rise, Cecil E; Mutter, George L

    2006-06-01

    PTEN tumor suppressor inactivation is the earliest step in endometrial carcinogenesis, occurring in morphologically unremarkable endometrial glands in half of normal women. We test the hypothesis that sex hormones positively or negatively select for these "latent precancers" by examining their emergence, persistence, and regression rates under differing hormonal conditions. Perimenopausal and postmenopausal women had an intake endometrial biopsy and underwent hormonal therapy with progestin-impregnated intrauterine device (IUD; n = 21), cyclic oral progestins (n = 28), or surveillance only (n = 22) with follow-up biopsies. For comparison, premenopausal naturally cycling endometrial biopsies were studied as single time points in 87 patients and multiple surveillance time points in 34 patients. Biopsies in which any PTEN protein-null glands were found by immunohistochemistry were scored as containing a latent endometrial precancer. All groups had a similar proportion of latent precancers at intake but differed after therapy. Emergence rates were highest (21%) for the naturally cycling premenopausal group compared with just 9% for untreated perimenopausal women. The IUD group had the highest rate of regression, with a 62% pretherapy and 5% post-therapy rate of latent precancers. This contrasted to nonsignificant changes for the oral progestin and untreated control groups. Delivery of high doses of progestins locally to the endometrium by IUD leads to ablation of preexisting PTEN-inactivated endometrial latent precancers and is a possible mechanism for reduction of long-term endometrial cancer risk known to occur in response to this hormone.

  7. Regression of latent endometrial precancers by progestin infiltrated intrauterine device

    PubMed Central

    Ørbo, Anne; Rise, Cecil E.; Mutter, George L.

    2008-01-01

    PTEN tumor suppressor inactivation is the earliest step in endometrial carcinogenesis, occurring in morphologically unremarkable endometrial glands in half of normal women. We test the hypothesis that sex hormones positively or negatively select for these “latent precancers” by examining their emergence, persistence, and regression rates under differing hormonal conditions. Peri and postmenopausal women had an intake endometrial biopsy and underwent hormonal therapy with progestin-impregnated intrauterine device (“IUD”, n=21), cyclic oral progestins (n=28), or surveillance only (n=22), with followup biopsies. For comparison, premenopausal naturally cycling endometrial biopsies were studied as single timepoints in 87 patients, and multiple surveillance timepoints in 34. Biopsies in which any PTEN protein null glands were found by immunohistochemistry were scored as containing a latent endometrial precancer. All groups had a similar proportion of latent precancers at intake, but differed after therapy. Emergence rates were highest (21%) for the naturally cycling premenopausal group, in comparison to just 9% for untreated perimenopausal women. The IUD group had the highest rate of regression, with a 62% pre and 5% post therapy rate of latent precancers. This contrasted to non-significant changes for the oral progestin and untreated control groups. Delivery of high doses of progestins locally to the endometrium by IUD leads to ablation of pre-existing PTEN-inactivated endometrial latent precancers, and is a possible mechanism for reduction of long term endometrial cancer risk known to occur in response to this hormone. PMID:16740697

  8. [Environmental and genetic risk factors for endometrial carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Sénéchal, Claire; Cottereau, Edouard; de Pauw, Antoine; Elan, Camille; Dagousset, Isabelle; Fourchotte, Virginie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lae, Marick; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Buecher, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    In France, endometrial cancer is at the first rank of gynecological cancers for cancer incidence, before ovarian and cervical cancers. In fact, the number of incident cases has been estimated to 7275 for the year 2012; the number of death due to endometrial cancer to 2025. This cancer is hormone-dependent and endogenous (reproductive factors) or exogenous (oral combined contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy) causes of exposition to estrogens are the major environmental risk factors for both types of endometrial cancers: type I or well-differentiated endometrioid adenocarcinomas; and type II including all other histological types: papillary serous adenocarcinomas, clear cell adenocarcinomas and carcinosarcomas, also known as malignant mixed Mullerian tumor, MMMT. Obesity, diabetes mellitus and adjuvant treatment of breast cancer with tamoxifen are also associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer. Genetic factors may also be implicated in the pathogenesis of endometrial cancer either as "minor genetic factors" (susceptibility factors), which remain largely unknown and are responsible for the increased observed risk in relatives of women affected with endometrial cancer; or as major genetic factors responsible for hereditary forms and namely for Lynch syndrome whose genetic transmission is of autosomic dominant type. The appropriate recognition of Lynch syndrome is of critical importance because affected patients and their relatives should benefit from specific care. The aims of this review is to describe major environmental and genetic risk factors for endometrial cancer with specific attention to most recent advances in this field and to describe recommendations for care of at-risk women.

  9. Therapeutic options for management of endometrial hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial hyperplasia (EH) comprises a spectrum of changes in the endometrium ranging from a slightly disordered pattern that exaggerates the alterations seen in the late proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle to irregular, hyperchromatic lesions that are similar to endometrioid adenocarcinoma. Generally, EH is caused by continuous exposure of estrogen unopposed by progesterone, polycystic ovary syndrome, tamoxifen, or hormone replacement therapy. Since it can progress, or often occur coincidentally with endometrial carcinoma, EH is of clinical importance, and the reversion of hyperplasia to normal endometrium represents the key conservative treatment for prevention of the development of adenocarcinoma. Presently, cyclic progestin or hysterectomy constitutes the major treatment option for EH without or with atypia, respectively. However, clinical trials of hormonal therapies and definitive standard treatments remain to be established for the management of EH. Moreover, therapeutic options for EH patients who wish to preserve fertility are challenging and require nonsurgical management. Therefore, future studies should focus on evaluation of new treatment strategies and novel compounds that could simultaneously target pathways involved in the pathogenesis of estradiol-induced EH. Novel therapeutic agents precisely targeting the inhibition of estrogen receptor, growth factor receptors, and signal transduction pathways are likely to constitute an optimal approach for treatment of EH. PMID:26463434

  10. Ethanol labeling: detection of early fluid absorption in endometrial resection.

    PubMed

    Duffy, S; Cruise, M; Reilly, C; Reid, P C; Sharp, F

    1992-02-01

    A study is presented of ethanol labeling of irrigation fluid in endometrial resection. The introduction of ethanol labeling and intraoperative breath ethanol analysis provided an inexpensive and potentially useful means of detecting early fluid absorption during uterine surgery. The breath ethanol analyzer used was a hand-held meter; the irrigant solution was 5% dextrose with 1% ethanol. Simultaneous breath and venous samples were taken from women undergoing endometrial resection. An increase in breath ethanol was positively correlated with fluid absorption, blood ethanol, and serum glucose. This technique may prove valuable in preventing fluid overload during endometrial resection.

  11. Endometrial stem/progenitor cells: the first 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Gargett, Caroline E.; Schwab, Kjiana E.; Deane, James A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The existence of stem/progenitor cells in the endometrium was postulated many years ago, but the first functional evidence was only published in 2004. The identification of rare epithelial and stromal populations of clonogenic cells in human endometrium has opened an active area of research on endometrial stem/progenitor cells in the subsequent 10 years. METHODS The published literature was searched using the PubMed database with the search terms ‘endometrial stem cells and menstrual blood stem cells' until December 2014. RESULTS Endometrial epithelial stem/progenitor cells have been identified as clonogenic cells in human and as label-retaining or CD44+ cells in mouse endometrium, but their characterization has been modest. In contrast, endometrial mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been well characterized and show similar properties to bone marrow MSCs. Specific markers for their enrichment have been identified, CD146+PDGFRβ+ (platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta) and SUSD2+ (sushi domain containing-2), which detected their perivascular location and likely pericyte identity in endometrial basalis and functionalis vessels. Transcriptomics and secretomics of SUSD2+ cells confirm their perivascular phenotype. Stromal fibroblasts cultured from endometrial tissue or menstrual blood also have some MSC characteristics and demonstrate broad multilineage differentiation potential for mesodermal, endodermal and ectodermal lineages, indicating their plasticity. Side population (SP) cells are a mixed population, although predominantly vascular cells, which exhibit adult stem cell properties, including tissue reconstitution. There is some evidence that bone marrow cells contribute a small population of endometrial epithelial and stromal cells. The discovery of specific markers for endometrial stem/progenitor cells has enabled the examination of their role in endometrial proliferative disorders, including endometriosis, adenomyosis and Asherman

  12. Adenovirus mediated homozygous endometrial epithelial Pten deletion results in aggressive endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ayesha; Ellenson, Lora Hedrick

    2011-07-01

    Pten is the most frequently mutated gene in uterine endometriod carcinoma (UEC) and its precursor complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH). Because the mutation frequency is similar in CAH and UEC, Pten mutations are thought to occur relatively early in endometrial tumorigenesis. Previous work from our laboratory using the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model has demonstrated somatic inactivation of the wild type allele of Pten in both CAH and UEC. In the present study, we injected adenoviruses expressing Cre into the uterine lumen of adult Pten floxed mice in an attempt to somatically delete both alleles of Pten specifically in the endometrium. Our results demonstrate that biallelic inactivation of Pten results in an increased incidence of carcinoma as compared to the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model. In addition, the carcinomas were more aggressive with extension beyond the uterus into adjacent tissues and were associated with decreased expression of nuclear ER{alpha} as compared to associated CAH. Primary cultures of epithelial and stromal cells were prepared from uteri of Pten floxed mice and Pten was deleted in vitro using Cre expressing adenovirus. Pten deletion was evident in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the treatment of the primary cultures with estrogen had different effects on Akt activation as well as Cyclin D3 expression in the two purified components. This study demonstrates that somatic biallelic inactivation of Pten in endometrial epithelium in vivo results in an increased incidence and aggressiveness of endometrial carcinoma compared to mice carrying a germline deletion of one allele and provides an important in vivo and in vitro model system for understanding the genetic underpinnings of endometrial carcinoma.

  13. Endometrial and acute myeloid leukemia cancer genomes characterized

    Cancer.gov

    Two studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program reveal details about the genomic landscapes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and endometrial cancer. Both provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of these cancers with the potential to i

  14. Monitoring of human endometrial function by radiommunoassay of PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Sh. G.

    1984-12-18

    The present invention relates to a novel method for the quantitative determination of PEP (progestagen-associated endometrial protein) in a body fluid by radioimmunoassay. The technique is useful in monitoring the function of the human endometrium.

  15. miR-200 Regulates Endometrial Development During Early Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Patricia T; Mainigi, Monica A; Word, R Ann; Kraus, W Lee; Mendelson, Carole R

    2016-09-01

    For successful embryo implantation, endometrial stromal cells must undergo functional and morphological changes, referred to as decidualization. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate implantation and decidualization are not well defined. Here we demonstrate that the estradiol- and progesterone-regulated microRNA (miR)-200 family was markedly down-regulated in mouse endometrial stromal cells prior to implantation, whereas zinc finger E-box binding homeobox-1 and -2 and other known and predicted targets were up-regulated. Conversely, miR-200 was up-regulated during in vitro decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells. Knockdown of miR-200 negatively affected decidualization and prevented the mesenchymal-epithelial transition-like changes that accompanied decidual differentiation. Notably, superovulation of mice and humans altered miR-200 expression. Our findings suggest that hormonal alterations that accompany superovulation may negatively impact endometrial development and decidualization by causing aberrant miR-200 expression. PMID:27533790

  16. Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium (E2C2)

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium studies the etiology of this common cancer and build on resources from existing studies by combining data across studies in order to advance the understanding of the etiology of this disease.

  17. DNA Methylation Machinery in the Endometrium and Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Caplakova, Veronika; Babusikova, Eva; Blahovcova, Eva; Balharek, Tomas; Zelieskova, Maria; Hatok, Jozef

    2016-09-01

    During the normal menstrual cycle, endometrial tissue undergoes many biochemical and morphological changes which are under the control of steroid hormone levels. DNA methylation plays a key role in gene expression regulation and influences functional changes in endometrial tissue. Eliminating senescent cells from the functional layer of the endometrium is mediated by apoptotic cell death, which helps maintain cellular homeostasis. Aberrant DNA methylation changes result in deregulation of important apoptotic proteins during endometrial carcinogenesis and thus apoptosis resistance development. Evading apoptosis is still a major problem in the successful treatment of endometrial cancer patients with advanced disease. Despite intensive study of the cancer epigenome, there is missing information about disrupted apoptotic gene regulation in DNA methylation levels. Therefore, it is necessary to spread our knowledge in the field of epigenetics to help us differentiate normal and cancer tissues and detect the early stages of cancer disease. PMID:27630276

  18. RNF43 is frequently mutated in colorectal and endometrial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Giannakis, Marios; Hodis, Eran; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Yamauchi, Mai; Rosenbluh, Joseph; Cibulskis, Kristian; Saksena, Gordon; Lawrence, Michael S.; Qian, ZhiRong; Nishihara, Reiko; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Hahn, William C.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Getz, Gad; Ogino, Shuji; Fuchs, Charles S.; Garraway, Levi A.

    2014-01-01

    We report somatic mutations of RNF43 in over 18% of colorectal adenocarcinomas and endometrial carcinomas. RNF43 encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase that negatively regulates Wnt signaling. Truncating mutations of RNF43 are more prevalent in microsatellite-unstable tumors and show mutual exclusivity with inactivating APC mutations in colorectal adenocarcinomas. These results indicate that RNF43 is one of the most commonly mutated genes in colorectal and endometrial cancers. PMID:25344691

  19. Inverse Relationship between Progesterone Receptor and Myc in Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Donghai; Meng, Xiangbing; Thiel, Kristina W.; Leslie, Kimberly K.; Yang, Shujie

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer, the most common gynecologic malignancy, is a hormonally-regulated disease. Response to progestin therapy positively correlates with hormone receptor expression, in particular progesterone receptor (PR). However, many advanced tumors lose PR expression. We recently reported that the efficacy of progestin therapy can be significantly enhanced by combining progestin with epigenetic modulators, which we term “molecularly enhanced progestin therapy.” What remained unclear was the mechanism of action and if estrogen receptor α (ERα), the principle inducer of PR, is necessary to restore functional expression of PR via molecularly enhanced progestin therapy. Therefore, we modeled advanced endometrial tumors that have lost both ERα and PR expression by generating ERα-null endometrial cancer cell lines. CRISPR-Cas9 technology was used to delete ERα at the genomic level. Our data demonstrate that treatment with a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) was sufficient to restore functional PR expression, even in cells devoid of ERα. Our studies also revealed that HDACi treatment results in marked downregulation of the oncogene Myc. We established that PR is a negative transcriptional regulator of Myc in endometrial cancer in the presence or absence of ERα, which is in contrast to studies in breast cancer cells. First, estrogen stimulation augmented PR expression and decreased Myc in endometrial cancer cell lines. Second, progesterone increased PR activity yet blunted Myc mRNA and protein expression. Finally, overexpression of PR by adenoviral transduction in ERα-null endometrial cancer cells significantly decreased expression of Myc and Myc-regulated genes. Analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database of endometrial tumors identified an inverse correlation between PR and Myc mRNA levels, with a corresponding inverse correlation between PR and Myc downstream transcriptional targets SRD5A1, CDK2 and CCNB1. Together, these data reveal a

  20. Efficacy of microwave ablation for the treatment of endometrial carcinoma: A report of 3 cases

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, KOHEI; NAKAYAMA, KENTARO; ISHIKAWA, MASAKO; KATAGIRI, HIROSHI; ISHIBASHI, TOMOKA; SATO, EMI; AMANO, CHIKA; KYO, SATORU

    2016-01-01

    Microwave endometrial ablation (MEA) is effective for the emergency control of uterine hemorrhage. However, to the best of our knowledge, there has been only a single report of life-threatening hemorrhage induced by endometrial carcinoma that was treated with MEA. The present report evaluates the efficacy of MEA as an emergency therapeutic option for the control of bleeding due to advanced endometrial carcinoma and minimally-invasive, early-stage endometrial carcinoma in 3 patients. MEA was able to effectively control massive uterine bleeding due to endometrial carcinoma in 2 patients with advanced disease and was curative in a patient with minimally-invasive endometrial carcinoma. Given its safety, simplicity and effectiveness, MEA may be utilized for the emergency treatment of uterine bleeding in advanced endometrial carcinoma, and may be used as a curative treatment in early-stage endometrial carcinoma. PMID:27123057

  1. What Should You Ask Your Health Care Team About Endometrial Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... endometrial cancer survivor What should you ask your health care team about endometrial cancer? As you cope with ... only ones who can give you information. Other health care professionals, such as nurses and social workers, can ...

  2. Progesterone receptor gene variants and risk of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    O'Mara, Tracy A.; Fahey, Paul; Ferguson, Kaltin; Marquart, Louise; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Amant, Frederic; Hall, Per; Liu, Jianjun; Czene, Kamila; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Ahmed, Shahana; Dunning, Alison M.; Gregory, Catherine S.; Shah, Mitul; Webb, Penelope M.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged excessive estrogen exposure unopposed by progesterone is widely accepted to be a risk factor for endometrial cancer development. The physiological function of progesterone is dependent upon the presence of its receptor [progesterone receptor (PGR)] and several studies have reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PGR gene to be associated with endometrial cancer risk. We sought to confirm the associations with endometrial cancer risk previously reported for four different PGR polymorphisms. A maximum of 2888 endometrial cancer cases and 4483 female control subjects from up to three studies were genotyped for four PGR polymorphisms (rs1042838, rs10895068, rs11224561 and rs471767). Logistic regression with adjustment for age, study, ethnicity and body mass index was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and P-values. Of the four SNPs investigated, only rs11224561 in the 3′ region of the PGR gene was found to be significantly associated with endometrial cancer risk. The A allele of the rs11224561 SNP was associated with increased risk of endometrial cancer (OR per allele 1.31; 95% CI 1.12–1.53, P = 0.001, adjusted for age and study), an effect of the same magnitude and direction as reported previously. We have validated the endometrial cancer risk association with a tagSNP in the 3′ untranslated region of PGR previously reported in an Asian population. Replication studies will be required to refine the risk estimate and to establish if this, or a correlated SNP, is the underlying causative variant. PMID:21148628

  3. Endometrial beta3 Integrin profile reflects endometrial receptivity defects in women with unexplained recurrent pregnancy loss

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) is still unknown in 50% of the cases. Herein we measure the expression of beta3 integrin subunit, a well-known implantation marker, in women with or without RPL and correlate it with the histological dating of the endometrial tissue. Methods LH-timed endometrial biopsies were obtained from cases (RPL; n = 21, age 33.9+/-4.7) and healthy controls (n = 29; age 29.8+/-4.1) during the mid-secretory phase (post ovulatory day: 8 to 10). Endometrial samples were timed histologically according to Noyes’ criteria and underwent immunohistochemical staining for beta3 integrin expression. For statistical analysis the semi-quantitative HSCORE was assessed. Type I (beta3 negative in an out-of-phase endometrium) and Type II defect (beta3 negative in an in-phase endometrium) were also analysed. Statistical analysis was done with Student t-test, Mann Whitney U test, ANCOVA and chi square for trend. Significance was set as P < 0.05. Results The mean (SD) age in controls was lower compared to cases [(29.8 (4.1) vs. 33.9 (4.7) – P = 0.001; Student t-test)]. The median (range) expression of beta3 integrin in controls and cases was 1.94 (0 to 3.5) vs. 0.82 (0 to 3.6), respectively (P = 0.001; Mann Whitney U test). Significance was still significant after adjusting for age (P = 0.03;ANCOVA). The normal positive staining > =0.7 of beta3 integrin subunit and in-phase endometrium was seen in 24 out of 29 (82.8%) controls, but in only 6 out of 21 (28.6%) of cases with RPL; Type I and II defects were seen in 10.3 and 6.9% of controls, while present in 52.4 and 19.1% of cases, respectively (P = 0.0005; chi-square). Conclusions Women with unexplained RPL had significantly reduced integrin expression compared to controls. Our findings underline the need for further molecular analysis of endometrial tissue in affected women. PMID:24950982

  4. Body Mass Index Genetic Risk Score and Endometrial Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Jennifer; Setiawan, Veronica W.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Schumacher, Fredrick; Yu, Herbert; Delahanty, Ryan; Bernstein, Leslie; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Chu; Cook, Linda S.; Friedenreich, Christine; Garcia-Closas, Monserrat; Haiman, Christopher A.; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Olson, Sara H.; Risch, Harvey A.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ursin, Giske; Yang, Hannah P.; Kraft, Peter; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common variants that predispose individuals to a higher body mass index (BMI), an independent risk factor for endometrial cancer. Composite genotype risk scores (GRS) based on the joint effect of published BMI risk loci were used to explore whether endometrial cancer shares a genetic background with obesity. Genotype and risk factor data were available on 3,376 endometrial cancer case and 3,867 control participants of European ancestry from the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium GWAS. A BMI GRS was calculated by summing the number of BMI risk alleles at 97 independent loci. For exploratory analyses, additional GRSs were based on subsets of risk loci within putative etiologic BMI pathways. The BMI GRS was statistically significantly associated with endometrial cancer risk (P = 0.002). For every 10 BMI risk alleles a woman had a 13% increased endometrial cancer risk (95% CI: 4%, 22%). However, after adjusting for BMI, the BMI GRS was no longer associated with risk (per 10 BMI risk alleles OR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.07; P = 0.78). Heterogeneity by BMI did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.06), and no effect modification was noted by age, GWAS Stage, study design or between studies (P≥0.58). In exploratory analyses, the GRS defined by variants at loci containing monogenic obesity syndrome genes was associated with reduced endometrial cancer risk independent of BMI (per BMI risk allele OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88, 0.96; P = 2.1 x 10−5). Possessing a large number of BMI risk alleles does not increase endometrial cancer risk above that conferred by excess body weight among women of European descent. Thus, the GRS based on all current established BMI loci does not provide added value independent of BMI. Future studies are required to validate the unexpected observed relation between monogenic obesity syndrome genetic variants and endometrial cancer risk. PMID:26606540

  5. A Risk-Scoring Model for the Prediction of Endometrial Cancer among Symptomatic Postmenopausal Women with Endometrial Thickness > 4 mm

    PubMed Central

    Mfuta, Kabala; Setti, Tiziano; Cerami, Lillo Bruno; Bergamini, Ezio; Boselli, Fausto

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To develop and test a risk-scoring model for the prediction of endometrial cancer among symptomatic postmenopausal women at risk of intrauterine malignancy. Methods. We prospectively studied 624 postmenopausal women with vaginal bleeding and endometrial thickness > 4 mm undergoing diagnostic hysteroscopy. Patient characteristics and endometrial assessment of women with or without endometrial cancer were compared. Then, a risk-scoring model, including the best predictors of endometrial cancer, was tested. Univariate, multivariate, and ROC curve analysis were performed. Finally, a split-sampling internal validation was also performed. Results. The best predictors of endometrial cancer were recurrent vaginal bleeding (odds ratio (OR) = 2.96), the presence of hypertension (OR = 2.01) endometrial thickness > 8 mm (OR = 1.31), and age > 65 years (OR = 1.11). These variables were used to create a risk-scoring model (RHEA risk-model) for the prediction of intrauterine malignancy, with an area under the curve of 0.878 (95% CI 0.842 to 0.908; P < 0.0001). At the best cut-off value (score ≥ 4), sensitivity and specificity were 87.5% and 80.1%, respectively. Conclusion. Among symptomatic postmenopausal women with endometrial thickness > 4 mm, a risk-scoring model including patient characteristics and endometrial thickness showed a moderate diagnostic accuracy in discriminating women with or without endometrial cancer. Based on this model, a decision algorithm was developed for the management of such a population. PMID:24991535

  6. Oral Bisphosphonate Use and Risk of Postmenopausal Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Newcomb, Polly A.; Passarelli, Michael N.; Phipps, Amanda I.; Anderson, Garnet L.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Ho, Gloria Y.F.; O'Sullivan, Mary Jo; Chlebowski, Rowan T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Bisphosphonates are common medications used for the treatment of osteoporosis and are also used to reduce metastases to bone in patients with cancer. Several studies, including the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), have found that use of bisphosphonates is associated with reduced risk of developing breast cancer, but less is known about associations with other common malignancies. This study was aimed at examining the effects of bisphosphonates on the risk of endometrial cancer. Methods We evaluated the relationship between use of oral bisphosphonates and endometrial cancer risk in a cohort of 89,918 postmenopausal women participating in the WHI. A detailed health interview was conducted at baseline, and bisphosphonate use was ascertained from an inventory of regularly used medications at baseline and over follow-up. All women had an intact uterus at the time of study entry. Results During a median follow-up of 12.5 years, 1,123 women were diagnosed with incident invasive endometrial cancer. Ever use of bisphosphonates was associated with reduced endometrial cancer risk (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.64 to 1.00; P = .05), with no interactions observed with age, body mass index, or indication for use. Conclusion In this large prospective cohort of postmenopausal women, bisphosphonate use was associated with a statistically significant reduction in endometrial cancer risk. PMID:25713431

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ulianich, Luca; Insabato, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is a common gynecologic malignancy often diagnosed at early stage. In spite of a huge advance in our understanding of EC biology, therapeutic modalities do not have significantly changed over the past 40 years. A restricted number of genes have been reported to be mutated in EC, mediating cell proliferation and invasiveness. However, besides these alterations, few other groups and ourselves recently identified the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and GRP78 increase following endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as mechanisms favoring growth and invasion of EC cells. Here, a concise update on currently available data in the field is presented, analyzing the crosstalk between the UPR and the main signaling pathways regulating EC cell proliferation and survival. It is evident that this is a rapidly expanding and promising issue. However, more data are very likely to yield a better understanding on the mechanisms through which EC cells can survive the low oxygen and glucose tumor microenvironment. In this perspective, the UPR and, particularly, GRP78 might constitute a novel target for the treatment of EC in combination with traditional adjuvant therapy. PMID:25593927

  8. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III, IV, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  9. Age at Last Birth in Relation to Risk of Endometrial Cancer: Pooled Analysis in the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Pike, Malcolm C.; Karageorgi, Stalo; Deming, Sandra L.; Anderson, Kristin; Bernstein, Leslie; Brinton, Louise A.; Cai, Hui; Cerhan, James R.; Cozen, Wendy; Chen, Chu; Doherty, Jennifer; Freudenheim, Jo L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Lacey, James V.; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Lurie, Galina; Mack, Thomas; Matsuno, Rayna K.; McCann, Susan; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Olson, Sara H.; Rastogi, Radhai; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Risch, Harvey; Robien, Kim; Schairer, Catherine; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Strom, Brian L.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Ursin, Giske; Webb, Penelope M.; Weiss, Noel S.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yang, Hannah P.; Yu, Herbert; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2012-01-01

    Childbearing at an older age has been associated with a lower risk of endometrial cancer, but whether the association is independent of the number of births or other factors remains unclear. Individual-level data from 4 cohort and 13 case-control studies in the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium were pooled. A total of 8,671 cases of endometrial cancer and 16,562 controls were included in the analysis. After adjustment for known risk factors, endometrial cancer risk declined with increasing age at last birth (Ptrend < 0.0001). The pooled odds ratio per 5-year increase in age at last birth was 0.87 (95% confidence interval: 0.85, 0.90). Women who last gave birth at 40 years of age or older had a 44% decreased risk compared with women who had their last birth under the age of 25 years (95% confidence interval: 47, 66). The protective association was similar across the different age-at-diagnosis groups and for the 2 major tumor histologic subtypes (type I and type II). No effect modification was observed by body mass index, parity, or exogenous hormone use. In this large pooled analysis, late age at last birth was independently associated with a reduced risk of endometrial cancer, and the reduced risk persisted for many years. PMID:22831825

  10. Pathophysiology and management of endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Y. S.; Gambone, J. C.; Berek, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is currently the commonest pelvic malignancy affecting American women, most of whom share the same pathophysiologic basis, that is, unopposed estrogenic stimulation. The initial result of hyperestrogenism is the development of endometrial hyperplasia, which is reversible in most cases by appropriate hormonal therapy. Persistent stimulation eventually leads to atypical hyperplasia with nuclear atypia and invasive carcinoma. Because there is no cost-effective screening method for the detection of endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma, it is essential to survey the high-risk population with appropriate diagnostic techniques. After diagnosis, therapy should be individualized based on pathologic findings (cell type and histologic grade) and extent of disease (International Federation of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians stage, depth of myometrial invasion, and pelvic and para-aortic lymph node status). Recent studies suggest that sex hormone receptors and nuclear DNA ploidy patterns provide useful prognostic information independent of histologic grade. Images PMID:2202159

  11. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO Consensus Conference on Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Creutzberg, Carien; Amant, Frederic; Bosse, Tjalling; González-Martín, Antonio; Ledermann, Jonathan; Marth, Christian; Nout, Remi; Querleu, Denis; Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Sessa, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The first joint European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11–13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared three clinically-relevant questions about endometrial cancer relating to the following four areas: prevention and screening, surgery, adjuvant treatment and advanced and recurrent disease. All relevant scientific literature, as identified by the experts, was reviewed in advance. During the consensus conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question and a consensus was reached. Results of this consensus conference, together with a summary of evidence supporting each recommendation, are detailed in this article. All participants have approved this final article. PMID:26645990

  12. The Equine Endometrial Cup Reaction: A Fetomaternal Signal of Significance

    PubMed Central

    Antczak, D. F.; de Mestre, Amanda M.; Wilsher, Sandra; Allen, W. R.

    2015-01-01

    A remarkable feature of equine pregnancy is the development of the invasive trophoblast of the chorionic girdle and its formation of the gonadotrophin-secreting endometrial cup cells in early gestation. The details of this process have been revealed only slowly over the past century, since the first description of the endometrial cups in 1912. This centennial presents an opportunity to review the characteristics of the cells and molecules involved in this early, critical phase of placentation in the mare. The invasiveness of the chorionic girdle trophoblast appears to represent an atavistic attribute more commonly associated with the hemochorial placentae of primates and rodents but not with the more recently derived epitheliochorial placentae of the odd-toed ungulates. The nature of and raison d’etre for the strong fetal signals transmitted to the mare by the endometrial cup reaction, and her responses to these messages, are the subject of the present review. PMID:25387026

  13. Role of epigenomics in ovarian and endometrial cancers.

    PubMed

    Balch, Curtis; Matei, Daniela E; Huang, Tim H-M; Nephew, Kenneth P

    2010-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy and while constituting only 3% of all female cancers, it causes 14,600 deaths in the USA annually. Endometrial cancer, the most diagnosed and second-most fatal gynecologic cancer, afflicts over 40,000 US women annually, causing an estimated 7780 deaths in 2009. In both advanced ovarian and endometrial carcinomas, the majority of initially therapy-responsive tumors eventually evolve to a fully drug-resistant phenotype. In addition to genetic mutations, epigenetic anomalies are frequent in both gynecologic malignancies, including aberrant DNA methylation, atypical histone modifications and dysregulated expression of distinct microRNAs, resulting in altered gene-expression patterns favoring cell survival. In this article, we summarize the most recent hypotheses regarding the role of epigenetics in ovarian and endometrial cancers, including a possible role in tumor 'stemness' and also evaluate the possible therapeutic benefits of reversal of these oncogenic chromatin aberrations.

  14. Progesterone Receptor Action in Leiomyoma and Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J. Julie; Sefton, Elizabeth C.; Bulun, Serdar E.

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone is a key hormone in the regulation of uterine function. In the normal physiological context, progesterone is primarily involved in remodeling of the endometrium and maintaining a quiescent myometrium. When pathologies of the uterus develop, specifically, endometrial cancer and uterine leiomyoma, response to progesterone is usually altered. Progesterone acts through mainly two isoforms of the progesterone receptor (PR), PRA and PRB which have been reported to exhibit different transcriptional activities. Studies examining the expression and function of the PRs in the normal endometrium and myometrium as well as in endometrial cancer and uterine leiomyoma are summarized here. The clinical use of progestins and the transcriptional activity of the PR on genes specific to endometrial cancer and leiomyoma are described. An increased understanding of the differential expression of PRs and response to progesterone in these two diseases is critical in order to develop more efficient and targeted therapies. PMID:20374701

  15. Endometrial abnormality in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shang, Kewei; Jia, Xiao; Qiao, Jie; Kang, Jihong; Guan, Youfei

    2012-07-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy associated with infertility and metabolic disorder in women of reproductive age. Although the clinical and biochemical features are heterogeneous with individuals, the most widely accepted clinical characteristics of PCOS are oligo- or anovulation combined with hyperandrogenism. With the higher rate of implantation failure after induction of ovulation or higher risk of spontaneous miscarriage after pregnancy, the reduced fertility is apparently attributed not only to anovulation but also to endometrial dysfunction in patients with PCOS. Here we review the features of the endometrial abnormalities in women with PCOS. The ability to improve the endometrial functions is of potential therapeutic targets to increase reproductive outcome of women with PCOS.

  16. New endometrial ablation techniques for treatment of menorrhagia.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Linda D

    2004-01-01

    Endometrial ablation is an excellent alternative to hysterectomy in women with menorrhagia and small intramural fibroids. Preoperative evaluation, which includes office hysteroscopy or saline infusion sonography, is critical to patient management and choice of procedure. A vast array of endometrial ablation technology is available currently that includes balloon therapy, cryosurgery hot circulating saline, bipolar impedance technology, and microwave: (1) ThermaChoice UTB System (Gynecare, Inc., Somerville, NJ, USA), (2) Uterine Balloon Therapy (UBT) System, HerOption Uterine Cryoblation Therapy System (American Medical Systems, Inc., Minnetonka, MN, USA), (3) Hydro ThermAblator HTA System (BEI Medical/Boston Scientific, Natick, MA), (4) NovaSure System (Novacept, Palo Alto, CA, USA), and (5) Microsulis Microwave Endometrial Ablation (MEA) System (Microsulis Medical Ltd., Pompano Beach, FL, USA). Each method is described herein, and Summary of Safety and Effectiveness Data (SSED) data for each product are reviewed.

  17. Endometrial polyp in an African wild dog (Lycaon pictus).

    PubMed

    Cho, H S; Park, N Y

    2006-11-01

    An 8-year-old female African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) from a zoo in Gyeonggi province, Republic of Korea presented with a 3.0 x 2.0 x 2.5 cm in size, smooth-surfaced, solitary pedunculated mass protruding into the uterine lumen. Microscopically, the mass was covered with epithelium, contained endometrial gland tissue, and was dilated in the vascularised stroma. Within the mass, there was extensive diffuse haemorrhage with several blood vessels apparently plugged with fibrin. At the base of the mass, the spaces lined with epithelium near the attachment of the stalk were interpreted to be glandular structures. There were segments of cuboidal epithelium found on the surface of the mass, which was similar to the lining the uterus. A diagnosis of an endometrial polyp was made based on the gross and histology findings. This is the first case report of a spontaneous endometrial polyp in an African wild dog.

  18. Cyclooxygenase-2 and p53 expressions in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yong-Tark; Kang, Sokbom; Kang, Dae-Hee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Park, In-Ae; Bang, Yung-Jue; Kim, Jae Weon; Park, Noh-Hyun; Kang, Soon-Beom; Lee, Hyo-Pyo; Song, Yong-Sang

    2004-09-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been known to be related with various types of carcinoma, but we have insufficient knowledge about the association between COX-2 and endometrial cancer. Many have reported a close relationship between p53 expression and a poor prognosis in endometrial cancer, but it is unclear whether p53 is an independent prognostic factor. To clarify these uncertainties, we examined the expressions of COX-2 and p53 in endometrial cancer tissues. The study was carried on 152 endometrial cancer patients who had operation at Seoul National University Hospital. Paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were sectioned and immunostained using monoclonal anti-COX-2 and anti-p53 antibodies. Twenty-seven (17.8%) specimens stained as COX-2 positive. COX-2 positivity was more frequently observed in postmenopausal patients than in premenopausal patients (8.8% versus 25.0%; P = 0.009). However, COX-2 positivity did not show a statistically significant association with any other clinicopathologic characteristic (parity, body mass index, histotype, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, grade, lymph node metastasis, deep myometrial invasion, or p53 overexpression). Thirty-one (20.4%) specimens showed p53 overexpression and this was significantly correlated with an advanced stage (P = 0.001), poor differentiation (P < 0.001), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.012), and deep myometrial invasion (P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that advanced stage was an independent prognostic factor of survival, but p53 overexpression was not. COX-2 may be associated with endometrial cancer carcinogenesis during the postmenopausal period but not with tumor aggressiveness and p53 overexpression. The p53 overexpression was found to be strongly associated with endometrial cancer aggressiveness.

  19. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration as a marker of endometrial cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Lie, Geoffrey; Morley, Thomas; Chowdhury, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    An 84-year-old woman developed a cerebellar syndrome having undergone a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for endometrial cancer 1 year previously. She was found to be anti-Yo antibody positive and was diagnosed with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). A subsequent positron emission tomography scan and lymph node biopsy identified recurrence of her endometrial cancer. This case illustrates how PCD can be an indicator of cancer recurrence, underlines the significance of PCD as a prompt to search for underlying malignancy, and highlights the difficulties PCD poses to the clinician in terms of diagnosis and management.

  20. [Endometrial ossification: a report of four cases and literature review].

    PubMed

    Nevarez Bernal, Roberto; Vilchis Nava, Pablo; Kably Ambe, Alberto

    2007-03-01

    Endometrial ossification is a rare endometrial pathology. Its predisposing factors include history of uterine curettage to metabolic abnormalities. It usually presents in patients with secondary infertility and history of first trimester pregnancy loss, accompanied by severe dysmenorrhea and dyspareunia. The diagnosis is suspected by OB-GYN history and USG findings, therapeutic strategies range from D&C to hysterectomy, we propose diagnosis and management by hysteroscopy in order to preserve future fertility and minimize uterine damage. A review of four cases during 1985-2004 from a large assisted reproduction center in Mexico City is presented.

  1. Life-style and metformin for the prevention of endometrial pathology in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Campagnoli, Carlo; Abbà, Chiara; Ambroggio, Simona; Brucato, Tiziana; Pasanisi, Patrizia

    2013-02-01

    In western women, the endometrium is frequently exposed, even after menopause, to the endogenous hormonal stimulation. Such a stimulation increases the risk of pathologic conditions such as endometrial hyperplasia and type I (endometrioid) endometrial adenocarcinoma. Metabolic syndrome, obesity, insulin resistance and type II diabetes promote the endometrial stimulation, and are recognized risk factors for endometrial cancer. Furthermore, chronic hyperinsulinemia linked both to obesity and metabolic syndrome influences endometrial proliferation through direct and indirect actions. Intentional weight loss, calorie restriction and physical activity are associated with a reduced risk of the endometrial pathology. Biological mechanisms include reduction in insulin and sex steroid hormone levels. In addition to life-style modifications, the antidiabetic metformin may be proposed as preventive agent. Metformin reduces the metabolic syndrome, lowers insulin and testosterone levels in postmenopausal women, and it is a potent inhibitor of endometrial cancer cell proliferation.

  2. Evaluation of Metachronous Breast and Endometrial Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Grzankowski, Kassondra S.; Szender, J. Brian; Spring-Robinson, Chandra L.; Lele, Shashikant B.; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Frederick, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The time interval between diagnoses of breast cancer (BC) and endometrial cancer (EC) is not well established in women with metachronous primary tumors. We sought to examine this interval and identify associations with treatment-related and clinicopathologic factors. Methods We identified 141 patients who developed both cancers during 1966 to 2013. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1, BC first, and group 2, EC first. Subanalysis performed of group 1 (59 patients) stratified around adjuvant tamoxifen use: pre-1990 BC diagnosis and post. Results Fifty-nine and 82 patients were in groups 1 and 2, respectively. The mean time interval was comparable (76 vs 74 months, P = 0.861). Subanalysis divided group 1 into pre- (n = 27) and post- (n = 32) 1990 and resulted in different mean time intervals between diagnosis of metachronous cancers (106 vs 50 months, respectively [P = 0.042]). Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for EC were longer in the pre group (PFS, 51 vs 26 months [P = 0.169]; OS, 59 vs 27 months [P = 0.190]). Median PFS and OS for BC were also longer in this group (PFS, 147 vs 109 months [P = 0.005]; OS, 166 vs 114 months [P < 0.001]). Conclusions Our data indicate the mean time interval between the diagnosis of EC and BC was approximately 6 years. Disease-specific EC survival was worse for patients with a previous diagnosis of BC. Stratification around implementation of tamoxifen use shows comparable grade and stage but different time interval and survival, suggesting resulting effects from adjuvant therapy for BC. These results are useful in counseling women at risk. PMID:27648713

  3. Metformin Use and Endometrial Cancer Survival

    PubMed Central

    Nevadunsky, Nicole S.; Van Arsdale, Anne; Strickler, Howard D.; Moadel, Alyson; Kaur, Gurpreet; Frimer, Marina; Conroy, Erin; Goldberg, Gary L.; Einstein, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes are risk factors for the development of uterine cancer. Although greater progression free survival among diabetic patients with ovarian and breast cancer using metformin have been reported, no studies have assessed the association of metformin use with survival in women with endometrial cancer (EC). Methods We conducted a single-institution retrospective cohort study of all patients treated for uterine cancer from January 1999 through December 2009. Demographic, medical, social, and survival data were abstracted from medical records and the national death registry. Overall survival (OS) was estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Cox models were utilized for multivariate analysis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Of 985 patients, 114 (12%) had diabetes and were treated with metformin, 136 (14%) were diabetic but did not use metformin, and 735 (74%) had not been diagnosed with diabetes. Greater OS was observed in diabetics with non-endometrioid EC who used metformin than in diabetic cases not using metformin and non-endometrioid EC cases without diabetes (log rank test (p=0.02)). This association remained significant (hazard ratio = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.30–0.97, p<0.04) after adjusting for age, clinical stage, grade, chemotherapy treatment, radiation treatment and presence of hyperlipidemia in multivariate analysis. No association between metformin use and OS in diabetics with endometrioid histology was observed. Conclusion Diabetic EC patients with non-endometrioid tumors who used metformin had lower risk of death than women with EC who did not use metformin. These data suggest that metformin might be useful as adjuvant therapy for non-endometrioid EC. PMID:24189334

  4. Endometrial pathology in postmenopausal tamoxifen treatment: comparison between gynaecologically symptomatic and asymptomatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, I; Perel, E; Flex, D; Tepper, R; Altaras, M M; Cordoba, M; Beyth, Y

    1999-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate whether endometrial pathology is more likely to be diagnosed in gynaecologically symptomatic rather than in gynaecologically asymptomatic postmenopausal breast cancer patients with tamoxifen treatment; and to evaluate the possible influence of various clinical factors on the incidence of endometrial pathology. METHODS: Endometrial histological findings, transvaginal ultrasonographic endometrial thickness, demographic characteristics, health habits, and risk factors for endometrial cancer were compared between 14 gynaecologically symptomatic (group I) and 224 gynaecologically asymptomatic (group II) postmenopausal breast cancer patients with tamoxifen treatment. RESULTS: Overall, 28.6% of the study population had endometrial pathology. The incidence of overall positive endometrial histological findings was significantly higher in group I than in group II (92.9% v 24.6%, p < 0.0001). Atrophic endometrium was more common in group II than in group I (75.3% v 7.1%, p < 0.0001). Most other endometrial pathology was significantly more common in group I than in group II (endometrial hyperplasia, 35.7% v 5.6%, p < 0.0001; endometrial polyps, 35.7% v 13.4%, p < 0.0111; endometrial carcinoma, 21.5% v 0.9%, p < 0.0001). Endometrial pathology appeared considerably later in the gynaecologically asymptomatic patients than in gynaecologically symptomatic patients (p = 0.0002). Vaginal bleeding or spotting occurred exclusively in group I. The incidence of endometrial pathology in the entire study population was consistent with that reported elsewhere, and higher than that reported for healthy postmenopausal women. CONCLUSIONS: Endometrial pathology is more likely to be diagnosed in gynaecologically symptomatic postmenopausal breast cancer patients with tamoxifen treatment, and after a shorter duration of time, than in gynaecologically asymptomatic patients. PMID:10474520

  5. Intrauterine devices and endometrial cancer risk: a pooled analysis of the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Ashley S.; Gaudet, Mia M.; La Vecchia, Carlo; Nagle, Christina M.; Ou Shu, Xiao; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Olov Adami, Hans; Beresford, Shirley; Bernstein, Leslie; Chen, Chu; Cook, Linda S.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Hill, Dierdre; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; Lacey, James V.; Levi, Fabio; Liang, Xiaolin; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony; McCann, Susan E.; Negri, Eva; Olson, Sara H.; Palmer, Julie R.; Patel, Alpa V.; Petruzella, Stacey; Prescott, Jennifer; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosenberg, Lynn; Sherman, Mark E.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Webb, Penelope M.; Wise, Lauren A.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Wanghong; Yang, Hannah P.; Yu, Herbert; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Brinton, Louise A.

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs), long-acting and reversible contraceptives, induce a number of immunological and biochemical changes in the uterine environment that could affect endometrial cancer (EC) risk. We addressed this relationship through a pooled analysis of data collected in the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium. We combined individual-level data from 4 cohort and 14 case-control studies, in total 8,801 EC cases and 15,357 controls. Using multivariable logistic regression, we estimated pooled odds ratios (pooled-ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for EC risk associated with ever use, type of device, ages at first and last use, duration of use, and time since last use, stratified by study and adjusted for confounders. Ever use of IUDs was inversely related to EC risk (pooled-OR=0.81, 95% CI=0.74–0.90). Compared with never use, reduced risk of EC was observed for inert IUDs (pooled-OR=0.69, 95% CI=0.58–0.82), older age at first use (≥35 years pooled-OR=0.53, 95% CI=0.43–0.67), older age at last use (≥45 years pooled-OR=0.60, 95% CI=0.50–0.72), longer duration of use (≥10 years pooled-OR=0.61, 95% CI=0.52–0.71), and recent use (within 1 year of study entry pooled-OR=0.39, 95% CI=0.30–0.49). Future studies are needed to assess the respective roles of detection biases and biologic effects related to foreign body responses in the endometrium, heavier bleeding (and increased clearance of carcinogenic cells), and localized hormonal changes. PMID:25242594

  6. Ethmoid metastasis of endometrial carcinoma causing mucocoele of maxillary antrum.

    PubMed

    Scott, A; Raine, M; Stansbie, J M

    1998-03-01

    We report a case of an antral mucocoele secondary to the obstruction of its ostium by metastatic endometrial carcinoma. This is the first report of such a cause for a mucocoele, and for a metastasis from such a tumour in the head and neck.

  7. Predictors of limph node metastasis in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    IGNAT, FLORIN LAURENTIU; IRIMIE, ALEXANDRU; COSTIN, NICOLAE; ACHIMAS-CADARIU, PATRICIU; LISENCU, IOAN COSMIN

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in developed countries. The adequate surgical staging proposed by FIGO (International Federation for Gynaecology and Obstetrics) advocates lymphadenectomy; however, it does not establish the indications, the type and the extent of lymphadenectomy, thus generating multiple controversies. Methods Retrospective, analytical study of patients treated surgically for endometrial adenocarcinoma in the Oncological Institute ”Prof. Dr. Ion Chiricuţă” Cluj-Napoca (IOCN) between January 2008 and December 2012 – 709 cases eligible for the study. Results 206 pelvic and/or paraaortic lymphadenectomies were performed, the average number of excised lymph nodes being 15.6. Overall in 4.4% of patients the lymph nodes were affected by metastases. The presence of each risk factor analysed was statistically significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (p<0.05). Age above 55 years was statistically significantly associated (p<0.05) with the presence of negative prognostic factors in the study. Conclusions The analysed histopathological and clinical prognostic factors were statistically significantly associated with lymphatic dissemination in endometrial cancer. We recommend treating endometrial cancer in tertiary centres by surgeons or gynaecologists-oncologists with experience in extensive peritoneal and retroperitoneal surgery. PMID:26527979

  8. JAZF1/SUZ12 gene fusion in endometrial stromal sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Hrzenjak, Andelko

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial stromal sarcomas (ESSs) belong to the rarest uterine malignancies (prevalence category <1-9/1,000,000). According to the new 2014 World Health Organisation (WHO) classification, they are separated into four categories; benign endometrial stromal nodules (ESNs), low grade endometrial stromal sarcomas (LG-ESSs), high-grade endometrial stromal sarcomas (HG-ESSs) and undifferentiated uterine sarcomas (UUSs). Due to heterogeneous histopathologic appearance these tumors still represent diagnostic challenge, even for experienced pathologists. ESSs are genetically very heterogeneous and several chromosomal translocations and gene fusions have so far been identified in these malignancies. To date the JAZF1/SUZ12 gene fusion is by far the most frequent and seems to be the cytogenetic hallmark of ESN and LG-ESS. Based on present literature data this gene fusion is present in approximately 75% of ESN, 50% of LG-ESS and 15% of HG-ESS cases. The frequency of JAZF1/SUZ12 appearance varies between classic ESS and different morphologic variants. This gene fusion is suggested to become a specific diagnostic tool, especially in difficult borderline cases. In combination with the recently described YWHAE/FAM22 gene fusion the JAZF1/SUZ12 fusion could be used to differentiate between LG-ESS and HG-ESS. The purpose of this review is to summarize literature data published in last two and a half decades about this gene fusion, as a contribution to our understanding of ESS genetics and pathogenesis. PMID:26879382

  9. Small non-coding RNA deregulation in endometrial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ravo, Maria; Cordella, Angela; Rinaldi, Antonio; Bruno, Giuseppina; Alexandrova, Elena; Saggese, Pasquale; Nassa, Giovanni; Giurato, Giorgio; Tarallo, Roberta; Marchese, Giovanna; Rizzo, Francesca; Stellato, Claudia; Biancardi, Rossella; Troisi, Jacopo; Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Zullo, Fulvio; Weisz, Alessandro; Guida, Maurizio

    2015-03-10

    Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) represent a heterogeneous group of <200nt-long transcripts comprising microRNAs, PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and small-nucleolar-RNAs (snoRNAs) involved in physiological and pathological processes such as carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Aberrant sncRNA expression in cancer has been associated with specific clinical phenotypes, grading, staging, metastases development and resistance to therapy.Aim of the present work is to study the role of sncRNAs in endometrial carcinogenesis. Changes in sncRNA expression were identified by high-throughput genomic analysis of paired normal, hyperplastic and cancerous endometrial tissues obtained by endometrial biopsies (n = 10). Using smallRNA sequencing and microarrays we identified significant differences in sncRNA expression pattern between normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic endometrium. This led to the definition of a sncRNA signature (129 microRNAs, 2 of which not previously described, 10 piRNAs and 3 snoRNAs) of neoplastic transformation. Functional bioinformatics analysis identified as downstream targets multiple signaling pathways potentially involved in the hyperplastic and neoplastic tissue responses, including Wnt/β-catenin, and ERK/MAPK and TGF-β-Signaling.Considering the regulatory role of sncRNAs, this newly identified sncRNA signature is likely to reflect the events leading to endometrial cancer, which can be exploited to dissect the carcinogenic process including novel biomarkers for early and non-invasive diagnosis of these tumors. PMID:25686835

  10. Small non-coding RNA deregulation in endometrial carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ravo, Maria; Cordella, Angela; Rinaldi, Antonio; Bruno, Giuseppina; Alexandrova, Elena; Saggese, Pasquale; Nassa, Giovanni; Giurato, Giorgio; Tarallo, Roberta; Marchese, Giovanna; Rizzo, Francesca; Stellato, Claudia; Biancardi, Rossella; Troisi, Jacopo; Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Zullo, Fulvio; Weisz, Alessandro; Guida, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) represent a heterogeneous group of <200nt-long transcripts comprising microRNAs, PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and small-nucleolar-RNAs (snoRNAs) involved in physiological and pathological processes such as carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Aberrant sncRNA expression in cancer has been associated with specific clinical phenotypes, grading, staging, metastases development and resistance to therapy. Aim of the present work is to study the role of sncRNAs in endometrial carcinogenesis. Changes in sncRNA expression were identified by high-throughput genomic analysis of paired normal, hyperplastic and cancerous endometrial tissues obtained by endometrial biopsies (n = 10). Using smallRNA sequencing and microarrays we identified significant differences in sncRNA expression pattern between normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic endometrium. This led to the definition of a sncRNA signature (129 microRNAs, 2 of which not previously described, 10 piRNAs and 3 snoRNAs) of neoplastic transformation. Functional bioinformatics analysis identified as downstream targets multiple signaling pathways potentially involved in the hyperplastic and neoplastic tissue responses, including Wnt/β-catenin, and ERK/MAPK and TGF-β-Signaling. Considering the regulatory role of sncRNAs, this newly identified sncRNA signature is likely to reflect the events leading to endometrial cancer, which can be exploited to dissect the carcinogenic process including novel biomarkers for early and non-invasive diagnosis of these tumors. PMID:25686835

  11. Primary pulmonary carcinoid tumor with metastasis to endometrial polyp

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Mazdak; Kolev, Valentin; Costin, Dan; Mizrachi, Howard H.; Chuang, Linus; Warner, Richard R.P.; Gretz, Herbert F.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION A carcinoid tumor occurring in the endometrium has been documented in the literature, but there is no report in regard to carcinoid tumor metastasis to endometrium. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a case of a malignant carcinoid metastasis to an endometrial polyp. Patient underwent hysteroscopy, and polypectomy. The pathology demonstrated an endometrial polyp containing a 4 mm x 5 mm nodule of metastatic carcinoid tumor, consistent with metastasis from patient's known pulmonary carcinoid. The tumor was morphologically similar to the tumors of the right lung, with similar immune-profile. DISCUSSION This patient presented with a suspicious pelvic ultrasound. Due to her age, the first priority was to exclude uterine cancer. The endometrial polyp, which was found, had a small focus of metastatic carcinoid tumor. To the best of our knowledge, this finding has not been previously recorded in the literature. Our patient also had a history of metastatic carcinoid tumor to breast. This finding is also very uncommon. CONCLUSION This is the first case in the literature described a malignant carcinoid metastasis to an endometrial polyp. PMID:23127865

  12. Shadow cell differentiation from squamoid morule in endometrial adenoacanthoma.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshitsugu

    2015-01-01

    Shadow cell differentiation (SCD), commonly found in cutaneous pilomatricoma (PMX), has been said to be extremely rare in extracutaneous tumors and its morphogenesis has not been clarified yet. In the present study, 25 cases of endometrial adenoacanthoma were examined with special reference to SCD and with immunohistochemistry for beta-catenin and CD10. Shadow cell nests (SCNs) were observed in 2 out of 5 cases of adenocarcinoma with squamoid morules and all of 4 cases of adenocarcinoma with squamous differentiation and morules, but not in any cases of adenocarcinoma with squamous differentiation. SCNs were just adjacent to morules with or without a mutual transition. Immunohistochemical examination revealed nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin and expression of CD10 in the squamoid morules around SCNs. These results indicate that SCNs are derived from squamoid morules in endometrial adenoacanthoma, and established a link between matrical basaloid cells in PMX and squamoid morules in endometrial adenoacanthoma, as common original tissues, showing nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin and expression of CD10, of SCNs. It seems that SCD is not so uncommon as previously estimated in endometrial adenoacanthoma.

  13. Synchronous Endometrial and Ovarian Carcinomas: Evidence of Clonality.

    PubMed

    Anglesio, Michael S; Wang, Yi Kan; Maassen, Madlen; Horlings, Hugo M; Bashashati, Ali; Senz, Janine; Mackenzie, Robertson; Grewal, Diljot S; Li-Chang, Hector; Karnezis, Anthony N; Sheffield, Brandon S; McConechy, Melissa K; Kommoss, Friedrich; Taran, Florin A; Staebler, Annette; Shah, Sohrab P; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Brucker, Sara; Gilks, C Blake; Kommoss, Stefan; Huntsman, David G

    2016-06-01

    Many women with ovarian endometrioid carcinoma present with concurrent endometrial carcinoma. Organ-confined and low-grade synchronous endometrial and ovarian tumors (SEOs) clinically behave as independent primary tumors rather than a single advanced-stage carcinoma. We used 18 SEOs to investigate the ancestral relationship between the endometrial and ovarian components. Based on both targeted and exome sequencing, 17 of 18 patient cases of simultaneous cancer of the endometrium and ovary from our series showed evidence of a clonal relationship, ie, primary tumor and metastasis. Eleven patient cases fulfilled clinicopathological criteria that would lead to classification as independent endometrial and ovarian primary carcinomas, including being of FIGO stage T1a/1A, with organ-restricted growth and without surface involvement; 10 of 11 of these cases showed evidence of clonality. Our observations suggest that the disseminating cells amongst SEOs are restricted to physically accessible and microenvironment-compatible sites yet remain indolent, without the capacity for further dissemination. PMID:26832771

  14. Common mitochondrial polymorphisms as risk factor for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Klemba, Aleksandra; Semczuk, Andrzej; Plak, Katarzyna; Marzec, Barbara; Krawczyk, Tomasz; Kofler, Barbara; Golik, Pawel; Bartnik, Ewa

    2009-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed gynaecological cancer in developed countries. Although the molecular genetics of this disease has been in the focus of many research laboratories for the last 20 years, relevant prognostic and diagnostic markers are still missing. At the same time mitochondrial DNA mutations have been reported in many types of cancer during the last two decades. It is therefore very likely that the mitochondrial genotype is one of the cancer susceptibility factors. To investigate the presence of mtDNA somatic mutations and distribution of inherited polymorphisms in endometrial adenocarcinoma patients we analyzed the D-loop sequence of cancer samples and their corresponding normal tissues and moreover performed mitochondrial haplogroup analysis. We detected 2 somatic mutation and increased incidence of mtDNA polymorphisms, in particular 16223C (80% patients, p = 0.005), 16126C (23%, p = 0.025) and 207A (19%, p = 0.027). Subsequent statistical analysis revealed that endometrial carcinoma population haplogroup distribution differs from the Polish population and that haplogroup H (with its defining polymorphism - C7028T) is strongly underrepresented (p = 0.003), therefore might be a cancer-protective factor. Our report supports the notion that mtDNA polymorphisms establish a specific genetic background for endometrial adenocarcinoma development and that mtDNA analysis may result in the development of new molecular tool for cancer detection. PMID:19863780

  15. Influence of VEGFR and LHCGR on endometrial adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kölbl, Alexandra C.; Birk, Amelie E.; Kuhn, Christina; Jeschke, Udo; Andergassen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial adenocarcinoma is a common gynecological malignancy that is usually treated by surgical resection followed by radiation. However, the frequency of remote metastasis is high. The present study aimed to investigate whether patients with endometrial adenocarcinoma exhibited a positive response to treatment with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue or inhibitors of neoangiogenesis, which are applied for the treatment of other malignancies. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed using 203 paraffin-embedded tissue samples of endometrial adenocarcinomas from patients who had undergone surgery at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Germany. The tissues were incubated with antibodies against luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), and evaluated by bright field microscopy. The staining was categorized according to the Immune-Reactive-Score (IRS). The IRS scores were then statistically associated with various tumor traits, including tumor size, lymph node status, metastasis, grade, expression of steroid hormone receptors and patient survival. There was a significant association between VEGFR2 expression and tumor grading and estrogen receptor-α (ERα). For LHCGR, a correlation was observed with ERα and progesterone receptor (PR). No correlations were identified between VEGFR2 or LHCGR expression and the other examined tumor traits or patient survival. The associations between VEGFR2 and ERα, and between LHCGR and ERα or PR, may be explained by the interaction of these signal transduction molecules in the regulation of cellular growth and differentiation. These mechanisms also have an important role in the formation of remote metastases, which is the main cause for tumor-associated mortality. The results of the present study suggested that patients with endometrial adenocarcinoma may benefit from treatment with inhibitors

  16. Influence of VEGFR and LHCGR on endometrial adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kölbl, Alexandra C.; Birk, Amelie E.; Kuhn, Christina; Jeschke, Udo; Andergassen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial adenocarcinoma is a common gynecological malignancy that is usually treated by surgical resection followed by radiation. However, the frequency of remote metastasis is high. The present study aimed to investigate whether patients with endometrial adenocarcinoma exhibited a positive response to treatment with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue or inhibitors of neoangiogenesis, which are applied for the treatment of other malignancies. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed using 203 paraffin-embedded tissue samples of endometrial adenocarcinomas from patients who had undergone surgery at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Germany. The tissues were incubated with antibodies against luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), and evaluated by bright field microscopy. The staining was categorized according to the Immune-Reactive-Score (IRS). The IRS scores were then statistically associated with various tumor traits, including tumor size, lymph node status, metastasis, grade, expression of steroid hormone receptors and patient survival. There was a significant association between VEGFR2 expression and tumor grading and estrogen receptor-α (ERα). For LHCGR, a correlation was observed with ERα and progesterone receptor (PR). No correlations were identified between VEGFR2 or LHCGR expression and the other examined tumor traits or patient survival. The associations between VEGFR2 and ERα, and between LHCGR and ERα or PR, may be explained by the interaction of these signal transduction molecules in the regulation of cellular growth and differentiation. These mechanisms also have an important role in the formation of remote metastases, which is the main cause for tumor-associated mortality. The results of the present study suggested that patients with endometrial adenocarcinoma may benefit from treatment with inhibitors

  17. Squamous morules are functionally inert elements of premalignant endometrial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Chieh; Lomo, Lesley; Baak, Jan P A; Eng, Charis; Ince, Tan A; Crum, Christopher P; Mutter, George L

    2009-02-01

    Squamous morules are a common component of premalignant glandular lesions that are followed by glandular, rather than squamous, carcinomas. We tested the hypothesis that the appearance of glands associated with morules predicts cancer risk, and undertook molecular testing to determine the clonal and hormonal response properties of admixed squamous and glandular elements. A total of 66 patients with squamous morules in an index endometrial biopsy had follow-up clinical data (average follow-up: interval 31 months, 2.5 biopsies) showing development of carcinoma in 11% (7/66) of cases. The histological appearance of morule-associated glands in the index biopsy was significantly associated with this clinical outcome, with the majority (71%, 5/7) of cancer occurrences following an overtly premalignant lesion (endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia) with squamous morules. Eight endometrial intraepithelial neoplasias with squamous morules were examined by immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptors and mitotic activity (Ki-67 antigen percent stained). Glandular components had abundant estrogen and progesterone receptors, and high levels of mitotic activity in all cases. In sharp contrast, all squamous morules were devoid of sex hormone receptors and had undetectable or extremely low-proliferation rates. When mutated, the same specific PTEN mutation was detected in squamous and glandular elements, indicating that both are of common lineage. The clinical and laboratory data are consistent with a model of morule biology in which squamous morules are a hormonally incompetent subpopulation of endometrial glandular lesions. Isolated morules might result from artifactual displacement from their native glandular context, or selective hormonally induced regression of the glandular but not squamous components over time. Subsequent cancer risk, as promoted by estrogens, is greatest when the glandular component has the appearance of endometrial intraepithelial

  18. Squamous Morules Are Functionally Inert Elements of Premalignant Endometrial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Chieh; Lomo, Lesley; Baak, Jan P. A.; Eng, Charis; Ince, Tan A.; Crum, Christopher P.; Mutter, George L.

    2008-01-01

    Squamous morules are a common component of premalignant glandular lesions that are followed by glandular, rather than squamous, carcinomas. We tested the hypothesis that the appearance of glands associated with morules predicts cancer risk, and undertook molecular testing to determine the clonal and hormonal response properties of admixed squamous and glandular elements. 66 patients with squamous morules in an index endometrial biopsy had followup clinical data (average followup: interval 31 months, 2.5 biopsies) showing development of carcinoma in 11% (7/66) of cases. The histological appearance of morule-associated glands in the index biopsy was significantly associated with this clinical outcome, with the majority (71%, 5/7) of cancer occurrences following an overtly premalignant lesion (Endometrial Intraepithelial Neoplasia) with squamous morules. Eight endometrial intraepithelial neoplasias with squamous morules were examined by immunohistochemistry for estrogen and progesterone receptors and mitotic activity (Ki-67 antigen percent stained). Glandular components had abundant estrogen and progesterone receptors, and high levels of mitotic activity in all cases. In sharp contrast, all squamous morules were devoid of sex hormone receptors and had undetectable or extremely low proliferation rates. When mutated, the same specific PTEN mutation was detected in squamous and glandular elements, indicating that both are of common lineage. The clinical and laboratory data are consistent with a model of morule biology in which squamous morules are a hormonally incompetent subpopulation of endometrial glandular lesions. Isolated morules might result from artifactual displacement from their native glandular context, or selective hormonally induced regression of the glandular but not squamous components over time. Subsequent cancer risk, as promoted by estrogens, is greatest when the glandular component has the appearance of endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia. Even

  19. Soy Intake Is Associated With Lower Endometrial Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Chen, Jin-Liang; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yong; Zeng, Huan; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epidemiologic studies reporting the effect of soy intake on endometrial cancer risk conveyed conflicting results. We systematically reviewed the literature to investigate whether there was an inverse relation between dietary soy intake and endometrial cancer risk. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and 4 main Chinese literature databases were searched from their inception to August 25, 2015 for both case–control studies and cohort studies that assessed the effect of soy intake on endometrial cancer risk. Study-specific most-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) or relative risks (RRs) were combined by using fixed-effects or random-effects model to calculate pooled risk estimates (REs). A total of 10 epidemiologic studies were included in this meta-analysis, including 8 case–control studies and 2 prospective cohort studies. Dietary soy intake was inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk with an overall RE of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.72, 0.91). In subgroup analyses, a statistically significant protective effect of soy intake was found for unfermented soy food (RE: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.67, 0.97), postmenopausal women (RE: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.61, 0.95), and Asian (RE: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.95) and non-Asian population (RE: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.71, 0.96). Current evidence indicates that soy food intake is associated with lower endometrial cancer risk. Further larger cohort studies are warranted to fully clarify such an association. PMID:26683956

  20. Ultrasound in assisted reproduction: a call to fill the endometrial gap.

    PubMed

    Hershko-Klement, Anat; Tepper, Ronnie

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound offers essential details and an overall view of the anatomic features of the reproductive organs, as well as physiologic assessment. There is still a great gap, however, in our understanding and interpretation of endometrial sonographic findings. Endometrial thickness, growth, and sonographic patterns have been repeatedly tested and compared with pregnancy rates in IVF cycles, yielding conflicting results. Generally, the data accrued so far suggest refraining from clinical decisions based solely on endometrial thickness. The three-layer ultrasound pattern reflects normal follicular/proliferative dynamics, and its presence in the pre-hCG period was reported to carry a better outcome: Significantly higher clinical pregnancy rates were found in patients with this pattern on the day of hCG administration among IVF cohorts. Subendometrial contractility (endometrial "waves") offers a tool that can be used in cases of repeated implantation failure in patients reporting cramps around the planned time of embryo transfer, or as a reassuring modality to assess uterine quiescence during preparations for embryo transfer. We support the creation of an integrated endometrial score incorporating conservative endometrial measurements, endometrial-myometrial junction studies, and endometrial contractility, as well as new concepts that remain to be tested, such as endometrial surface area. Such scores may enable us to improve the effectiveness of endometrial ultrasound imaging in the clinical setting. PMID:27140291

  1. Effect of Endometrial Injury on Secretion of Endometrial Cytokines and IVF Outcomes in Women with Unexplained Subfertility

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu; Han, Junyan; Jia, Chanwei; Ma, Yanmin; Lan, Yonglian; Li, Ying; Wang, Shuyu

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the effect of endometrial injury (EI) on in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes in women with unexplained subfertility and explore the relationship between EI and endometrial inflammatory cytokines, 66 women with unexplained subfertility undergoing IVF treatment were recruited. 38 patients in the EI group underwent EI in the mid-luteal phase of the cycle and 28 patients in the non-EI (NEI) group. According to the pregnancy outcome, the NEI and EI groups were divided into NEI-nonpregnant (NEI-NP), NEI-pregnant (NEI-P), EI-NP, and EI-P. All patients underwent aspiration of endometrial secretions immediately before embryo transfer. The concentrations of ten mediators were measured using Milliplex Magnetic Bead assay. The clinical pregnancy was significantly higher in the EI than in the NEI group. The concentrations of interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-8, IL-12 (p70), IL-13, interferon- (IFN-) γ, monocyte chemotactic protein- (MCP-) 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were significantly higher in the EI than the NEI group. The expression of IFN-γ and VEGF in the EI-P was significantly increased compared to the EI-NP group. These findings suggest that, in women with unexplained subfertility, endometrial injury might be a potential method to improve clinical pregnancy rates by promoting the expression of IFN-γ and VEGF. PMID:26586929

  2. Effect of Endometrial Injury on Secretion of Endometrial Cytokines and IVF Outcomes in Women with Unexplained Subfertility.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu; Han, Junyan; Jia, Chanwei; Ma, Yanmin; Lan, Yonglian; Li, Ying; Wang, Shuyu

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the effect of endometrial injury (EI) on in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes in women with unexplained subfertility and explore the relationship between EI and endometrial inflammatory cytokines, 66 women with unexplained subfertility undergoing IVF treatment were recruited. 38 patients in the EI group underwent EI in the mid-luteal phase of the cycle and 28 patients in the non-EI (NEI) group. According to the pregnancy outcome, the NEI and EI groups were divided into NEI-nonpregnant (NEI-NP), NEI-pregnant (NEI-P), EI-NP, and EI-P. All patients underwent aspiration of endometrial secretions immediately before embryo transfer. The concentrations of ten mediators were measured using Milliplex Magnetic Bead assay. The clinical pregnancy was significantly higher in the EI than in the NEI group. The concentrations of interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-8, IL-12 (p70), IL-13, interferon- (IFN-) γ, monocyte chemotactic protein- (MCP-) 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were significantly higher in the EI than the NEI group. The expression of IFN-γ and VEGF in the EI-P was significantly increased compared to the EI-NP group. These findings suggest that, in women with unexplained subfertility, endometrial injury might be a potential method to improve clinical pregnancy rates by promoting the expression of IFN-γ and VEGF.

  3. The incidence rates of endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer: a four-year population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the incidence rates of endometrial hyperplasia (EH) and endometrial cancer (EC) in the Republic of Korea using national insurance claim data generated from 2009 to 2012. Materials and Methods Data that were generated from 2009 to 2012 were sourced from the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service-National Inpatients Sample database. The data from women who were assigned diagnosis codes representing EH or EC within 1 month of being assigned codes that corresponded to procedures that included endometrial biopsies and several types of gynecologic surgeries to obtain endometrial pathology samples, were selected for analysis. Results Data from 2,477,424 women were entered into the database between 2009 and 2012, and the data from 1,868 women with EH and 868 women with EC were extracted for analysis. The mean ages of the patients were 44.1 ± 0.4 years for those with EH and 52.7 ± 0.6 years for those with EC. The EH and EC incidence rates were 37 per 100,000 woman-years and 8 per 100,000 woman-years, respectively. The EH and EC incidence rates peaked when the women were in their late forties and fifties, respectively. Conclusions The EH and EC incidence rates determined in this study were somewhat lower than those determined from previous studies. Further studies are required that adjust the data for race, menopausal hormone therapy, and obesity.

  4. The incidence rates of endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer: a four-year population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to determine the incidence rates of endometrial hyperplasia (EH) and endometrial cancer (EC) in the Republic of Korea using national insurance claim data generated from 2009 to 2012. Materials and Methods Data that were generated from 2009 to 2012 were sourced from the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service-National Inpatients Sample database. The data from women who were assigned diagnosis codes representing EH or EC within 1 month of being assigned codes that corresponded to procedures that included endometrial biopsies and several types of gynecologic surgeries to obtain endometrial pathology samples, were selected for analysis. Results Data from 2,477,424 women were entered into the database between 2009 and 2012, and the data from 1,868 women with EH and 868 women with EC were extracted for analysis. The mean ages of the patients were 44.1 ± 0.4 years for those with EH and 52.7 ± 0.6 years for those with EC. The EH and EC incidence rates were 37 per 100,000 woman-years and 8 per 100,000 woman-years, respectively. The EH and EC incidence rates peaked when the women were in their late forties and fifties, respectively. Conclusions The EH and EC incidence rates determined in this study were somewhat lower than those determined from previous studies. Further studies are required that adjust the data for race, menopausal hormone therapy, and obesity. PMID:27635340

  5. Effect of Endometrial Injury on Secretion of Endometrial Cytokines and IVF Outcomes in Women with Unexplained Subfertility.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu; Han, Junyan; Jia, Chanwei; Ma, Yanmin; Lan, Yonglian; Li, Ying; Wang, Shuyu

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the effect of endometrial injury (EI) on in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes in women with unexplained subfertility and explore the relationship between EI and endometrial inflammatory cytokines, 66 women with unexplained subfertility undergoing IVF treatment were recruited. 38 patients in the EI group underwent EI in the mid-luteal phase of the cycle and 28 patients in the non-EI (NEI) group. According to the pregnancy outcome, the NEI and EI groups were divided into NEI-nonpregnant (NEI-NP), NEI-pregnant (NEI-P), EI-NP, and EI-P. All patients underwent aspiration of endometrial secretions immediately before embryo transfer. The concentrations of ten mediators were measured using Milliplex Magnetic Bead assay. The clinical pregnancy was significantly higher in the EI than in the NEI group. The concentrations of interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-8, IL-12 (p70), IL-13, interferon- (IFN-) γ, monocyte chemotactic protein- (MCP-) 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were significantly higher in the EI than the NEI group. The expression of IFN-γ and VEGF in the EI-P was significantly increased compared to the EI-NP group. These findings suggest that, in women with unexplained subfertility, endometrial injury might be a potential method to improve clinical pregnancy rates by promoting the expression of IFN-γ and VEGF. PMID:26586929

  6. The accuracy of endometrial sampling in women with postmenopausal bleeding: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    van Hanegem, Nehalennia; Prins, Marileen M C; Bongers, Marlies Y; Opmeer, Brent C; Sahota, Daljit Singh; Mol, Ben Willem J; Timmermans, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Postmenopausal bleeding (PMB) can be the first sign of endometrial cancer. In case of thickened endometrium, endometrial sampling is often used in these women. In this systematic review, we studied the accuracy of endometrial sampling for the diagnoses of endometrial cancer, atypical hyperplasia and endometrial disease (endometrial pathology, including benign polyps). We systematically searched the literature for studies comparing the results of endometrial sampling in women with postmenopausal bleeding with two different reference standards: blind dilatation and curettage (D&C) and hysteroscopy with histology. We assessed the quality of the detected studies by the QUADAS-2 tool. For each included study, we calculated the fraction of women in whom endometrial sampling failed. Furthermore, we extracted numbers of cases of endometrial cancer, atypical hyperplasia and endometrial disease that were identified or missed by endometrial sampling. We detected 12 studies reporting on 1029 women with postmenopausal bleeding: five studies with dilatation and curettage (D&C) and seven studies with hysteroscopy as a reference test. The weighted sensitivity of endometrial sampling with D&C as a reference for the diagnosis of endometrial cancer was 100% (range 100-100%) and 92% (71-100) for the diagnosis of atypical hyperplasia. Only one study reported sensitivity for endometrial disease, which was 76%. When hysteroscopy was used as a reference, weighted sensitivities of endometrial sampling were 90% (range 50-100), 82% (range 56-94) and 39% (21-69) for the diagnosis of endometrial cancer, atypical hyperplasia and endometrial disease, respectively. For all diagnosis studied and the reference test used, specificity was 98-100%. The weighted failure rate of endometrial sampling was 11% (range 1-53%), while insufficient samples were found in 31% (range 7-76%). In these women with insufficient or failed samples, an endometrial (pre) cancer was found in 7% (range 0-18%). In women with

  7. Methylated DNA collected by tampons--a new tool to detect endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Fiegl, Heidi; Gattringer, Conny; Widschwendter, Andreas; Schneitter, Alois; Ramoni, Angela; Sarlay, Daniela; Gaugg, Inge; Goebel, Georg; Müller, Hannes M; Mueller-Holzner, Elisabeth; Marth, Christian; Widschwendter, Martin

    2004-05-01

    This proof of principle study aimed to define a new and simple strategy for detection of endometrial cancer using epigenetic markers. We investigated DNA isolated from vaginal secretion collected from tampon for aberrant methylation of five genes (CDH13, HSPA2, MLH1, RASSF1A, and SOCS2) using MethyLight in 15 patients with endometrial cancer and 109 patients without endometrial cancer. All endometrial cancer patients revealed three or more methylated genes, whereas 91% (99 of 109) of the patients without endometrial cancer had no or fewer than three genes methylated in their vaginal secretion. The methods developed in this study provide the basis for a prospective clinical trial to screen asymptomatic women who are at high risk for endometrial cancer.

  8. Surgical Management of Endometrial Polyps in Infertile Women: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Nigel; Petrini, Allison C.; Lekovich, Jovana P.; Elias, Rony T.; Spandorfer, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial polyps are benign localized lesions of the endometrium, which are commonly seen in women of reproductive age. Observational studies have suggested a detrimental effect of endometrial polyps on fertility. The natural course of endometrial polyps remains unclear. Expectant management of small and asymptomatic polyps is reasonable in many cases. However, surgical resection of endometrial polyps is recommended in infertile patients prior to treatment in order to increase natural conception or assisted reproductive pregnancy rates. There is mixed evidence regarding the resection of newly diagnosed endometrial polyps during ovarian stimulation to improve the outcomes of fresh in vitro fertilization cycles. Hysteroscopy polypectomy remains the gold standard for surgical treatment. Evidence regarding the cost and efficacy of different methods for hysteroscopic resection of endometrial polyps in the office and outpatient surgical settings has begun to emerge. PMID:26301260

  9. A critical assessment on the role of sentinel node mapping in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ditto, Antonino; Martinelli, Fabio; Signorelli, Mauro; Perotto, Stefania; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in the developed countries. Although the high incidence of this occurrence no consensus, about the role of retroperitoneal staging, still exists. Growing evidence support the safety and efficacy of sentinel lymph node mapping. This technique is emerging as a new standard for endometrial cancer staging procedures. In the present paper, we discuss the role of sentinel lymph node mapping in endometrial cancer, highlighting the most controversies features. PMID:26508591

  10. Is the pineal gland involved in the pathogenesis of endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R; Anastasiadis, P G; Anninos, P A; Tsagas, N

    1992-01-01

    The pathogenesis of endometrial carcinoma, which is the most common malignant neoplasm of the female genital tract, is unknown. It is believed that a prolonged period of increased estrogenic exposure unopposed by progesterone may underlie the malignant transformation of the endometrial cells. In the following communication, we propose that deficient melatonin functions may be an additional endocrine factor implicated in the pathogenesis of endometrial carcinoma. This hypothesis is based on the observations that: (a) melatonin has antiestrogenic properties; (b) melatonin stimulates progesterone production which opposes the action of estrogens; (c) an increased rate of endometrial hyperplasia, a premalignant condition, has been noted during the winter, a time of year associated with diminished melatonin secretion; (d) an increased incidence of anovulatory cycles, which is a risk factor for endometrial carcinoma, occurs in the winter; (e) melatonin secretion decreases sharply during the menopause, a period associated with an increased risk of endometrial carcinoma; (f) obesity, which is a major risk factor for endometrial carcinoma, is associated with impaired circadian melatonin secretion; (g) diabetes mellitus, which is an additional risk factor for endometrial carcinoma, is associated with decreased melatonin secretion and an increased rate of pineal calcification; and (h) the prevalence of endometrial carcinoma is lower in the black population compared to the white population. Similarly, the incidence of pineal calcification, which reflects the secretory activity of the gland, is significantly lower in the African and American black populations as compared to the white population.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1342018

  11. Is the pineal gland involved in the pathogenesis of endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R; Anastasiadis, P G; Anninos, P A; Tsagas, N

    1992-01-01

    The pathogenesis of endometrial carcinoma, which is the most common malignant neoplasm of the female genital tract, is unknown. It is believed that a prolonged period of increased estrogenic exposure unopposed by progesterone may underlie the malignant transformation of the endometrial cells. In the following communication, we propose that deficient melatonin functions may be an additional endocrine factor implicated in the pathogenesis of endometrial carcinoma. This hypothesis is based on the observations that: (a) melatonin has antiestrogenic properties; (b) melatonin stimulates progesterone production which opposes the action of estrogens; (c) an increased rate of endometrial hyperplasia, a premalignant condition, has been noted during the winter, a time of year associated with diminished melatonin secretion; (d) an increased incidence of anovulatory cycles, which is a risk factor for endometrial carcinoma, occurs in the winter; (e) melatonin secretion decreases sharply during the menopause, a period associated with an increased risk of endometrial carcinoma; (f) obesity, which is a major risk factor for endometrial carcinoma, is associated with impaired circadian melatonin secretion; (g) diabetes mellitus, which is an additional risk factor for endometrial carcinoma, is associated with decreased melatonin secretion and an increased rate of pineal calcification; and (h) the prevalence of endometrial carcinoma is lower in the black population compared to the white population. Similarly, the incidence of pineal calcification, which reflects the secretory activity of the gland, is significantly lower in the African and American black populations as compared to the white population.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Endometrial or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-02

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma

  13. Evaluation of the anti-tumor effects of lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor galloflavin in endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaoyun; Sheng, Xiugui; Jones, Hannah M; Jackson, Amanda L; Kilgore, Joshua; Stine, Jessica E; Schointuch, Monica N; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L

    2015-01-29

    High rates of aerobic glycolysis represent a key mechanism by which endometrial cancer cells consume glucose as its primary energy source. The up-regulated glycolytic pathway is a common therapeutic target whose inhibition has implications for anti-tumor activity in cancer cells. The present study was aimed at evaluating the potential of a novel lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) inhibitor, Galloflavin, as a therapeutic agent for endometrial cancer. Our results revealed that Galloflavin effectively inhibited cell growth in endometrial cancer cell lines and primary cultures of human endometrial cancer through its involvement in multiple signaling pathways that regulate metabolism, cell cycle, apoptosis, cell stress and metastasis.

  14. Current Issues in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stubert, J.; Gerber, B.

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is the most common carcinoma of the female genital tract. Its most important clinical sign is postmenopausal bleeding. An endometrial biopsy is essential for diagnosis. Treatment decisions are governed by tumour risk assessment and patient comorbidity, which is often present. Pelvic and paraaortic lymph node dissection is unnecessary in low risk cases (definition: pT1 a, G1/2) and adjuvant radiotherapy and systemic treatments are usually avoidable. Treatment of high-risk patients (G3 and/or pT1b) and palliative cases is difficult and not well standardised. New molecular-based subtype classification may help treatment decision making in future. PMID:26941450

  15. Ultrastructural aspects of endometrial surface in Kartagener's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marchini, M; Losa, G A; Nava, S; Di Nola, G; Fedele, L

    1992-02-01

    The endometrium of an infertile patient with Kartagener's syndrome showed initial secretory phase characteristics at SEM, whereas TEM analysis demonstrated several alterations in the central and peripheral microtubular distribution in 87% of the cilia examined. Such aspects seemed appropriate for a normal implantation, but the ciliary immotility or dyskinesia could cause an altered flow of the endometrial secretions and compromise the upstream movement of the spermatozoa.

  16. Xanthogranulomatous Endometritis: An Unusual Pathological Entity Mimicking Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Makkar, M; Gill, MK; Singh, DP

    2013-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous endometritis is an unusual pathological entity mimicking endometrial carcinoma. This shows sheets of foamy histiocytes alongwith other inflammatory cells. We, hereby, report a case of 45 year multigravida female with irregular menstrual history, clinically diagnosed as carcinoma and histopathologically turned out as xanthogranulomatous endometritis. So, this condition should always be dealt with caution, and pathologists and clinicians should be aware of it. PMID:24349850

  17. Menstrual physiology: implications for endometrial pathology and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Maybin, Jacqueline A.; Critchley, Hilary O.D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Each month the endometrium becomes inflamed, and the luminal portion is shed during menstruation. The subsequent repair is remarkable, allowing implantation to occur if fertilization takes place. Aberrations in menstrual physiology can lead to common gynaecological conditions, such as heavy or prolonged bleeding. Increased knowledge of the processes involved in menstrual physiology may also have translational benefits at other tissue sites. METHODS Pubmed and Cochrane databases were searched for all original and review articles published in English until April 2015. Search terms included ‘endometrium’, ‘menstruation’, ‘endometrial repair’, ‘endometrial regeneration’ ‘angiogenesis’, ‘inflammation’ and ‘heavy menstrual bleeding’ or ‘menorrhagia’. RESULTS Menstruation occurs naturally in very few species. Human menstruation is thought to occur as a consequence of preimplantation decidualization, conferring embryo selectivity and the ability to adapt to optimize function. We highlight how current and future study of endometrial inflammation, vascular changes and repair/regeneration will allow us to identify new therapeutic targets for common gynaecological disorders. In addition, we describe how increased knowledge of this endometrial physiology will have many translational applications at other tissue sites. We highlight the clinical applications of what we know, the key questions that remain and the scientific and medical possibilities for the future. CONCLUSIONS The study of menstruation, in both normal and abnormal scenarios, is essential for the production of novel, acceptable medical treatments for common gynaecological complaints. Furthermore, collaboration and communication with specialists in other fields could significantly advance the therapeutic potential of this dynamic tissue. PMID:26253932

  18. Xanthogranulomatous Endometritis: A Challenging Imitator of Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Doğan-Ekici, A. Işın; Usubütün, Alp; Küçükali, Türkan; Ayhan, Ali

    2007-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous inflammation is a distinguished histopathological entity affecting several organs, predominantly the kidney and gallbladder. So far, only a small number of cases of xanthogranulomatous inflammation occurring in female genital tract have been described, most frequently affecting the endometrium and histologically characterized by replacement of endometrium by xanthogranulomatous inflammation composed of abundant foamy histiocytes, siderophages, giant cells, fibrosis, calcification and accompanying polymorphonuclear leucocytes, plasma cells and lymphocytes of polyclonal origin. We present a case of a 69-year-old female complained of post menopausal bleeding and weight loss. Clinical preliminary diagnoses were endometrial carcinoma or hyperplasia and ultrasound was supposed to be endometrial malignancy, hyperplasia or pyometra by radiologist. Histopathological examination of uterus revealed xanthogranulomatous endometritis. Since xanthogranulomatous endometritis may mimic endometrial malignancy clinically and pathologically as a result of the replacement of the endometrium and occasionally invasion of the myometrium by friable yellowish tissue composed of histiocytes, knowledge of this unusual inflammatory disease is needed for both clinicians and pathologists. PMID:17710239

  19. Endometrial echotexture variables in postpartum cows with subclinical endometritis.

    PubMed

    Polat, B; Cengiz, M; Cannazik, O; Colak, A; Oruc, E; Altun, S; Salar, S; Bastan, A

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate endometrial echotexture changes on ultrasonographic digital images during subclinical endometritis using a computer-assisted image analysis program. Endometrial samples were collected from 140 Brown Swiss cows (days in milk = 35 ± 3) using a cytobrush method and classified as having a non-inflamed uterus (n = 66) and uterus with acute (n = 42), subacute (n = 21), and chronic (n = 11) inflammations. The mean cellular infiltration density was 0%, 31 ± 5%, 37 ± 6%, and 16 ± 8% for cows with non-inflamed uterus and cows with acute, subacute, and chronic uterine inflammations (P < 0.0001). As the cell infiltration density increased, both cervical diameter and mean gray level did not change. There were a liner decrease in homogeneity and a linear increase in contrast in response to increased cellular infiltration density. The sensitivity and specificity were 79.73% and 46.97% for the homogeneity value and 59.46% and 69.70% for the contrast value, respectively. In conclusion, monitoring endometrial echotexture alterations, especially homogeneity and contrast, changed depending on the cellular density and inflammation status and may be potential diagnostic markers for subclinical endometritis in cows. PMID:25721562

  20. Pseudo-placentational endometrial cysts in a bitch.

    PubMed

    Bartel, C; Schönkypl, S; Walter, I

    2010-02-01

    Cystic alterations of the canine endometrium compromise reproduction and fertility of the bitch and may lead to life-threatening diseases, such as pyometra. Even without clinical evidence, reduction of the uterine lumen by cysts implicates disturbances during migration, nidation and development of the embryo. Several studies point to the high variability of morphology of uterine endometrial cysts but they lack detailed analyses of alterations. In the present study, immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the expression of steroid hormone receptors (oestrogen, progesterone), proliferation activity, inflammation and infection in the cystic affected tissue regions in contrast to the normal endometrium. Oestrogen receptor expression showed a high density of receptors throughout the surface epithelial cells, crypt epithelial cells, glandular epithelial cells and stromal cells of the normal endometrium as well as the cystic affected regions. Proliferation in the cysts was verified in the middle and basal cells of the crypts. Neither in the endometrium nor in the cysts inflammatory processes or evidence of infection could be detected. Furthermore, lectin histochemistry and electron microscopic methods showed that lectin binding patterns and cell morphology of internal epithelial lining and surface epithelium of the cysts can be used to characterize and distinguish different types of cystic alterations. Analogies between epithelial cells of the glandular chambers of the canine placenta and the cystic cellular morphology, steroid hormone receptor distribution as well as lectin binding patterns of the endometrial cysts, as observed in this study, suggest to introduce the term 'pseudo-placentational endometrial cysts'. PMID:19891664

  1. Unusual inflammation in gynecologic pathology associated with defective endometrial receptivity.

    PubMed

    Kitaya, Kotaro; Yasuo, Tadahiro; Tada, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Terumi; Iwaki, Yuri; Karita, Masako; Funabiki, Miyako; Taguchi, Sagiri; Spillers, Dustin; Nakamura, Yoshitaka; Yamada, Hisao

    2014-09-01

    Human cycling endometrium displays a series of periodic transitions unique to this mucosal tissue, which includes rapid proliferation, secretory transformation, physiological angiogenesis, interstitial edema, and menstrual shedding. Among these properties of the endometrium are the inflammatory changes that occur dynamically across the menstrual cycle. Immunocompetent cell composition and inflammatory gene expression pattern in the human endometrium drastically fluctuate from the proliferative phase to the secretory phase, particularly at the time of ovulation. These local immune responses are fine-tuned by the direct or indirect action of two representative ovarian steroids, estradiol and progesterone, and are essential for successful blastocyst implantation. Meanwhile, studies have been accumulating the evidence that such physiological endometrial inflammatory status is altered in the presence of certain gynecologic pathologies. Given that blastocysts are semi-allografts for maternal tissue, even subtle alterations in endometrial immunity potentially have a negative impact on implantation process. In this article, we aimed to review and discuss the physiological and pathological mucosal inflammatory conditions that can affect endometrial receptivity. PMID:24771248

  2. Does dilation and curettage versus expectant management for spontaneous abortion in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization affect subsequent endometrial development?

    PubMed

    Moon, Kimberly S; Richter, Kevin S; Levy, Michael J; Widra, Eric A

    2009-11-01

    In in vitro fertilization patients, treatment of spontaneous abortion with dilation and curettage (D&C) versus expectant management has no long-term effect on subsequent endometrial development, as measured by change in endometrial thickness. A transient reduction in endometrial thickness was found within the first 6 months after D&C, which is a novel finding, but it is likely to have little or no effect on pregnancy rates given the small absolute effect on endometrial thickness.

  3. Does dilation and curettage versus expectant management for spontaneous abortion in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization affect subsequent endometrial development?

    PubMed

    Moon, Kimberly S; Richter, Kevin S; Levy, Michael J; Widra, Eric A

    2009-11-01

    In in vitro fertilization patients, treatment of spontaneous abortion with dilation and curettage (D&C) versus expectant management has no long-term effect on subsequent endometrial development, as measured by change in endometrial thickness. A transient reduction in endometrial thickness was found within the first 6 months after D&C, which is a novel finding, but it is likely to have little or no effect on pregnancy rates given the small absolute effect on endometrial thickness. PMID:19560759

  4. Relationships between Serum Luteinizing Hormone Level, Endometrial Thickness and Body Mass Index in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Patients with and without Endometrial Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ramezanali, Fariba; Khalili, Gholamreza; Arabipoor, Arezoo; Bagheri Lankarani, Narges; Moini, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Background The endometrial hyperplasia measured by ultrasound in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) women is strongly related to pathologic endometrial thickness, but there is no consensus on the relation between serum luteinizing hormone (LH) and either of these factors: pathologic endometrial hyperplasia and body mass index (BMI). Materials and Methods In this observational cross-sectional study, three hundred fifty infertile PCOS women were involved in this research. An endometrial biopsy was taken by using a pipelle instrument, regardless of menstrual cycle’s day and all samples were reported by the same pathologist. Basal serum LH level was compared between two subgroups (hyperplasia and non-hyperplasia). The intended population was divided into three groups according to BMI and basal serum LH, later on the comparison was made in three groups. Chi-square test was applied to compare nominal variables between groups. Mann-Whitney U, and one way ANOVA tests were used to compare means on the basis of the result of normality test. Results The frequency of endometrial hyperplasia was 2.6%. Endometrial thickness in the patients with endometrial hyperplasia was significantly higher than that of a normal endometrium (10.78 ± 3.70 vs. 7.90 ± 2.86 respectively, P=0.020). There was no relation between endometrial hyperplasia and serum LH (P=0.600). The ANOVA test showed serum LH levels were not the same among three BMI groups (P=0.007). Post hoc test was also performed. It showed that the LH level in normal BMI group was significantly higher than those of other groups (P=0.005 and P=0.004), but there was no statistical difference between overweight and obese groups (P=0.8). We found no relationship between BMI and endometrial thickness in PCOS patients (P=0.6). Conclusion Sonographic endometrial stripe thickness is predictive for endometrial hyperplasia in PCOS women. We could not find out any relationship between serum LH level and BMI with endometrial thickness in

  5. Genetic strain and reproductive status affect endometrial fatty acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Meier, S; Peterson, A J; Mitchell, M D; Littlejohn, M; Walker, C G; Roche, J R

    2009-08-01

    Poor reproductive performance limits cow longevity in seasonal, pasture-based dairy systems. Few differences in ovarian dynamics have been reported in different strains of Holstein-Friesian cows, implying that the uterine environment may be a key component determining reproductive success. To test the hypothesis that the uterine environment differs among genetic strains of the Holstein-Friesian cow, endometrial fatty acids (FA) were analyzed from New Zealand (NZ), and North American (NA) Holstein-Friesian cows. The effect of reproductive status was also investigated, with cows from both Holstein-Friesian strains slaughtered on either d 17 of the estrous cycle (termed cyclic) or d 17 of pregnancy (after embryo transfer; termed pregnant). Endometrial tissues were collected from 22 cows (NZ pregnant, n = 6; NZ cyclic, n = 4; NA pregnant, n = 6; NA cyclic, n = 6), and FA composition was analyzed. Daily plasma progesterone concentrations, milk production, milk FA composition, body weight, and body condition score were determined. Milk yield (4% fat-corrected milk) was similar for the NZ (28.5 kg/d) and NA (29.3 kg/d; SE 2.07 kg/d) cows, but NZ cows had a greater mean milk fat percentage. Mean plasma progesterone concentrations were significantly greater in NZ cows. Plasma progesterone concentrations were similar in the pregnant and cyclic groups. Mean length of the trophoblast recovered from the pregnant cows (NZ: 20.8 +/- 2.84 cm; NA: 27.9 +/- 10.23 cm) was not affected by genetic strain. Endometrial tissues from NZ cows contained greater concentrations of C17:0, C20:3n-3, and total polyunsaturated FA. The endometria from pregnant cows contained greater concentrations of C17:0, C20:2, and C20:3n-6, and less C20:1, C20:2, C20:5n-3. The observed changes in endometrial FA between Holstein-Friesian cows of different genetic origins or reproductive states may reflect differences in endometrial function and may affect reproductive function.

  6. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors modulate proliferation and angiogenesis in human endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nickkho-Amiry, Mahshid; McVey, Rhona; Holland, Cathrine

    2012-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) and retinoid X receptors (RXR) are implicated in the development of several obesity-related cancers. Little is known of either the expression or function of PPARs and RXRs in endometrial cancer although this increasingly common disease is highly associated with both obesity and insulin resistance. We investigated the expression of PPAR and RXR subtypes in human endometrial cancers and normal endometrium with immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry and subsequently showed PPAR/RXR binding preferences by coimmunoprecipitation. To determine the functions of PPARs within the endometrium, we investigated proliferation, apoptosis, PTEN expression, and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in endometrial cell lines after reducing the expression of PPARα and PPARγ with antisense RNA. The functional effects of PPAR ligands were also investigated in vitro. We identified differential expression of PPAR and RXR subtypes in endometrial cancers and discovered that PPARγ expression correlated with expression of PTEN. PPARα activation influences endometrial cell growth and VEGF secretion. PPARγ activation reduces proliferation of endometrial cells via regulation of PTEN and appears to reduce VEGF secretion. We conclude that the PPAR/RXR pathway contribute to endometrial carcinogenesis by control of PTEN expression and modulation of VEGF secretion. We propose that PPAR ligands should be considered for clinical investigation in early phase studies of women with endometrial cancer.

  7. Stromal deletion of the APC tumor suppressor in mice triggers development of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanwar, Pradeep S.; Zhang, LiHua; Roberts, Drucilla J.; Teixeira, Jose M.

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of the stromal microenvironment to the progression of endometrial cancer (EC) has not been well explored. We have conditionally expressed a mutant allele of adenomatous polyposis coli (APCcKO) in murine uterine stroma cells to study its effect on uterine development and function. In addition to metrorrhagia, the mice develop complex atypical endometrial gland hyperplasia that progresses to endometrial carcinoma in situ and endometrial adenocarcinoma as evidenced by myometrial invasion. Stromal cells subjacent to the carcinoma cells express αSMA with fewer cells expressing PDGFR-α compared to normal stromal cells suggesting that the mutant stromal cells have acquired a more myofibroblastic phenotype, which have been described as cancer-associated fibroblasts and have been shown to induce carcinogenesis in other organ systems. Analyses of human EC specimens showed substantial αSMA expression in the stroma compared with normal endometrial stroma cells. We also show that APCcKO mutant uteri and human EC have decreased stromal levels of TGFβ and BMP activities and that the mutant uteri failed to respond to exogenous estradiol stimulation. The mutant stroma cells also had higher levels of VEGF and SDF signaling components and diminished expression of ERα and PR which is common in advanced stages of human EC and is an indicator of poor prognosis. Our results indicate that de novo mutation or loss of heterozygosity in stromal APC is sufficient to induce endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial carcinogenesis by mechanisms that are consistent with unopposed estrogen signaling in the endometrial epithelium. PMID:21363919

  8. The value of hysteroscopic biopsy in the diagnosis of endometrial polyps.

    PubMed

    Spadoto-Dias, Daniel; Bueloni-Dias, Flávia Neves; Elias, Leonardo Vieira; Leite, Nilton José; Modotti, Waldir Pereira; Lasmar, Ricardo Bassil; Dias, Rogério

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the combination of hysteroscopy with endometrial biopsy is more accurate in differentiating endometrial polyps from endometrial hyperplasia and cancer. However, blind biopsy not always confirms hysteroscopic findings due to high rates of inadequate or insufficient material. The objective of this clinical, prospective, and comparative study was to establish a correlation between the histological results of office-based endometrial biopsies (hysteroscopically guided and blind) with the surgical polypectomy specimens. We evaluated 82 patients with hysteroscopic diagnosis of endometrial polyp, who randomly underwent hysteroscopically guided biopsy or blind biopsy, referred for surgical resection. A total of 36 women (43.9%) underwent hysteroscopically guided biopsy and 46 women (56.1%) underwent blind biopsy. The sensitivity of hysteroscopically guided biopsy for the diagnosis of endometrial polyps ranged between 35.3 and 36.8%, when carried out at the apex and base of the lesion, compared with 29.2% for blind biopsy. Specificity was 33.3, 50, and 60%, respectively, for each biopsy. The positive predictive values were 75, 77.8, and 87.5%, and negative predictive values were 8.3, 14.3, and 8.1% respectively, compared with surgical polypectomy specimens. The office-based endometrial biopsies had low diagnostic accuracy for endometrial polyps compared with surgical polypectomy specimens. PMID:27638896

  9. Use of Outpatient Endometrial Biopsy in a Population with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, Joshua S.

    2008-01-01

    Background: To demonstrate the feasibility of outpatient endometrial sampling to evaluate abnormal uterine bleeding in a population of women with intellectual disability. Method: Retrospective chart review was completed of all endometrial biopsies performed on women attending a dedicated gynaecology clinic for women with intellectual disability…

  10. Diagnostic utility of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-beta immunoreactivity in endometrial carcinomas: lack of specificity for endometrial clear cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fadare, Oluwole; Liang, Sharon X

    2012-12-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-beta (HNF1β) has recently emerged as a relatively sensitive and specific marker for ovarian clear cell carcinoma. The purpose of this study is to assess the diagnostic utility of this marker for endometrial clear cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on 75 endometrial tissues using a goat polyclonal antibody raised against a peptide mapping at the C-terminus of human HNF1β protein. The 75 cases included 15 clear cell carcinomas, 20 endometrioid carcinomas, 15 endometrial serous carcinomas/uterine papillary serous carcinomas, 20 cases of normal endometrium, 2 cases of clear cell metaplasia, and 3 cases of Arias Stella reaction. Staining interpretations were based on a semiquantitative scoring system, a 0 to 12+ continuous numerical scale that was derived by multiplying the extent of staining (0 to 4+ scale) by the intensity of staining (0 to 3+ scale) for each case. HNF1β expression was found to be present in a wide spectrum of tissues. Twenty-seven (54%) of the 50 carcinomas displayed at least focal nuclear HNF1β expression, including 11 (73%) of 15, 9 (60%) of 15, and 7 (35%) of 20 clear cell, serous, and endometrioid carcinomas, respectively. The average nuclear staining scores for clear cell carcinomas, endometrioid carcinomas, and serous carcinomas were 5.2, 1.4, and 4.1, respectively. Clear cell carcinomas and endometrioid carcinomas displayed statistically significant differences regarding their nuclear staining scores (P = 0.0027), but clear cell carcinomas and endometrial serous carcinomas did not (P = 0.45). The calculated sensitivity of any nuclear HNF1β expression in classifying a carcinoma as being of the clear cell histotype was 73%, whereas the specificity was 54%. Nineteen of 20 normal endometrium samples displayed at least focal nuclear expression of HNF1β, and this expression was often diffuse. The 5 cases of benign histologic mimics of clear cell carcinomas (Arias Stella reaction and clear

  11. Comparison of Risk Factors and survival of Type 1 and Type II Endometrial Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Tahira Y.; Chishti, Uzma; Aziz, Aliya B.; Sheikh, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare risk factors and progression free survival of type 1 & 2 endometrial cancers. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 149 patients with early stage endometrial carcinoma treated between 1997 and 2012 in Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi was performed. Results: A total of 149 patients were analyzed. Type I tumors accounted for 92% of cases in the study while 8% were type II tumors. The mean age, BMI, parity, co-morbidities (hypertension & Diabetes), family history and history of polycystic disease were comparable in both groups. Overall better survival (113 Vs 24 months) was observed for type I endometrial cancer. Conclusion: Both types of endometrial cancer may share common etiologic factors. Despite the limitation of small numbers in one group this study confirms better survival in type 1 endometrial cancer. PMID:27648033

  12. MMAC/PTEN gene expression in endometrial cancer: RT-PCR studies.

    PubMed

    Sobczuk, Anna; Smolarz, Beata; Romanowicz-Makowska, Hanna; Pertyński, Tomasz

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the MMAC/PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) gene are documented in cancers of the breast, prostate, ovary, colon, melanoma, glioblastoma, lymphoma and endometrium. In the present work MMAC/PTEN gene expression in women with endometrial adenocarcinoma (n=70) in RNA samples obtained from cancer tissue were investigated. Control DNA was obtained from 68 normal endometrial tissue. The MMAC/PTEN expression was determined by RT-PCR analysis. The expression of MMAC/PTEN gene in endometrial adenocarcinoma cases was significantly reduced compared to the expression in the normal samples (P < 0.05). Furthermore the significant difference (P < 0.05) was observed between the expression of MMAC/PTEN in stage III versus lower stages of endometrial cancer. The results support the hypothesis that the MMAC/PTEN gene expression may be associated with the incidence of endometrial cancer.

  13. Two methods for establishing primary human endometrial stromal cells from hysterectomy specimens.

    PubMed

    Jividen, Kasey; Movassagh, Mercedeh Javanbakht; Jazaeri, Amir; Li, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to establish in vitro cell culture systems. These systems are designed to model a vast number of in vivo processes. Cell culture systems arising from human endometrial samples are no exception. Applications range from normal cyclic physiological processes to endometrial pathologies such as gynecological cancers, infectious diseases, and reproductive deficiencies. Here, we provide two methods for establishing primary endometrial stromal cells from surgically resected endometrial hysterectomy specimens. The first method is referred to as "the scraping method" and incorporates mechanical scraping using surgical or razor blades whereas the second method is termed "the trypsin method." This latter method uses the enzymatic activity of trypsin to promote the separation of cells and primary cell outgrowth. We illustrate step-by-step methodology through digital images and microscopy. We also provide examples for validating endometrial stromal cell lines via quantitative real time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) and immunofluorescence (IF). PMID:24894444

  14. Human Endometrial Side Population Cells Exhibit Genotypic, Phenotypic and Functional Features of Somatic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cervelló, Irene; Gil-Sanchis, Claudia; Mas, Aymara; Delgado-Rosas, Francisco; Martínez-Conejero, José Antonio; Galán, Amparo; Martínez-Romero, Alicia; Martínez, Sebastian; Navarro, Ismael; Ferro, Jaime; Horcajadas, José Antonio; Esteban, Francisco José; O'Connor, José Enrique; Pellicer, Antonio; Simón, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    During reproductive life, the human endometrium undergoes around 480 cycles of growth, breakdown and regeneration should pregnancy not be achieved. This outstanding regenerative capacity is the basis for women's cycling and its dysfunction may be involved in the etiology of pathological disorders. Therefore, the human endometrial tissue must rely on a remarkable endometrial somatic stem cells (SSC) population. Here we explore the hypothesis that human endometrial side population (SP) cells correspond to somatic stem cells. We isolated, identified and characterized the SP corresponding to the stromal and epithelial compartments using endometrial SP genes signature, immunophenotyping and characteristic telomerase pattern. We analyzed the clonogenic activity of SP cells under hypoxic conditions and the differentiation capacity in vitro to adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. Finally, we demonstrated the functional capability of endometrial SP to develop human endometrium after subcutaneous injection in NOD-SCID mice. Briefly, SP cells of human endometrium from epithelial and stromal compartments display genotypic, phenotypic and functional features of SSC. PMID:20585575

  15. Comparison of Risk Factors and survival of Type 1 and Type II Endometrial Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Tahira Y.; Chishti, Uzma; Aziz, Aliya B.; Sheikh, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare risk factors and progression free survival of type 1 & 2 endometrial cancers. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 149 patients with early stage endometrial carcinoma treated between 1997 and 2012 in Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi was performed. Results: A total of 149 patients were analyzed. Type I tumors accounted for 92% of cases in the study while 8% were type II tumors. The mean age, BMI, parity, co-morbidities (hypertension & Diabetes), family history and history of polycystic disease were comparable in both groups. Overall better survival (113 Vs 24 months) was observed for type I endometrial cancer. Conclusion: Both types of endometrial cancer may share common etiologic factors. Despite the limitation of small numbers in one group this study confirms better survival in type 1 endometrial cancer.

  16. Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab or Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Temsirolimus or Ixabepilone, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III, Stage IV, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-27

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  17. Body Mass Index Is Positively Associated with Endometrial Cancer in Chinese Women, Especially Prior to Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yifei; Dai, Xujing; Chen, Limei; Lee, Arier C; Tong, Mancy; Wise, Michelle; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Obesity is a well-known risk factor for developing endometrial cancer. However, the incidence and survival rate of endometrial cancer are associated with ethnicity and geographical area. In addition, whether menopausal status is associated with developing endometrial cancer in obese women and whether obesity is associated with subtypes of endometrial cancer have not been fully investigated. Here, we investigated the effect of BMI on developing endometrial cancer in Chinese women taking into account menopausal status and cancer subtypes. Methods: Data on 1,127 women with endometrial cancer including body mass index (BMI), age at diagnosis, parity, menopausal status and cancer subtype were collected from the largest obstetrics & gynaecology hospital in China and analysed. Results: After adjusting for age and parity, the odds for developing endometrial cancer in overweight or obese perimenopausal women was significantly higher than that in women with normal weight (OR=2.6 with 95%CI:1.9-3.5, and OR=3.5 with 95%CI: 2.2-5.4, respectively). The odds of developing endometrial cancer in overweight postmenopausal women were significantly higher than that in women who were normal weight (OR=2.4 with 95%CI: 1.8-3.1), however this was not the case for obese postmenopausal women. We further found that BMI, menopausal status, age and parity were not associated with subtypes of endometrial cancer. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that obesity is positively associated with the incidence of developing endometrial cancer in Chinese women, with more significant effects in perimenopausal women. PMID:27326261

  18. Methylation Analysis of DNA Mismatch Repair Genes Using DNA Derived from the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Endometrial Cancer: Epimutation in Endometrial Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Takashi; Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Adachi, Masataka; Iijima, Moito; Kunitomi, Haruko; Nakamura, Kanako; Iida, Miho; Nogami, Yuya; Umene, Kiyoko; Masuda, Kenta; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Yamagami, Wataru; Hirasawa, Akira; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2016-10-14

    Germline mutation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes is a cause of Lynch syndrome. Methylation of MutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and MutS homolog 2 (MSH2) has been detected in peripheral blood cells of patients with colorectal cancer. This methylation is referred to as epimutation. Methylation of these genes has not been studied in an unselected series of endometrial cancer cases. Therefore, we examined methylation of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 promoter regions of peripheral blood cells in 206 patients with endometrial cancer using a methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). Germline mutation of MMR genes, microsatellite instability (MSI), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were also analyzed in each case with epimutation. MLH1 epimutation was detected in a single patient out of a total of 206 (0.49%)-1 out of 58 (1.72%) with an onset age of less than 50 years. The patient with MLH1 epimutation showed high level MSI (MSI-H), loss of MLH1 expression and had developed endometrial cancer at 46 years old, complicated with colorectal cancer. No case had epimutation of MSH2 or MSH6. The MLH1 epimutation detected in a patient with endometrial cancer may be a cause of endometrial carcinogenesis. This result indicates that it is important to check epimutation in patients with endometrial cancer without a germline mutation of MMR genes.

  19. Methylation Analysis of DNA Mismatch Repair Genes Using DNA Derived from the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Endometrial Cancer: Epimutation in Endometrial Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Takashi; Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Adachi, Masataka; Iijima, Moito; Kunitomi, Haruko; Nakamura, Kanako; Iida, Miho; Nogami, Yuya; Umene, Kiyoko; Masuda, Kenta; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Yamagami, Wataru; Hirasawa, Akira; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutation of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes is a cause of Lynch syndrome. Methylation of MutL homolog 1 (MLH1) and MutS homolog 2 (MSH2) has been detected in peripheral blood cells of patients with colorectal cancer. This methylation is referred to as epimutation. Methylation of these genes has not been studied in an unselected series of endometrial cancer cases. Therefore, we examined methylation of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 promoter regions of peripheral blood cells in 206 patients with endometrial cancer using a methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP). Germline mutation of MMR genes, microsatellite instability (MSI), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were also analyzed in each case with epimutation. MLH1 epimutation was detected in a single patient out of a total of 206 (0.49%)—1 out of 58 (1.72%) with an onset age of less than 50 years. The patient with MLH1 epimutation showed high level MSI (MSI-H), loss of MLH1 expression and had developed endometrial cancer at 46 years old, complicated with colorectal cancer. No case had epimutation of MSH2 or MSH6. The MLH1 epimutation detected in a patient with endometrial cancer may be a cause of endometrial carcinogenesis. This result indicates that it is important to check epimutation in patients with endometrial cancer without a germline mutation of MMR genes. PMID:27754426

  20. Lifetime physical activity and risk of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    John, Esther M.; Koo, Jocelyn; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.

    2010-01-01

    Background The role of moderate physical activity and life patterns of activity in reducing endometrial cancer risk remains uncertain. Methods We assessed lifetime histories of activity from recreation, transportation, chores, and occupation and other risk factors in a population-based case-control study of endometrial cancer conducted in the San Francisco Bay area. The analysis was based on 472 newly diagnosed cases ascertained by the regional cancer registry and 443 controls identified by random-digit dialing who completed an in-person interview. Results Reduced risks associated with greater lifetime physical activity (highest vs. lowest tertile) were found for both total activity (odds ratio (OR) = 0.61 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.43–0.87, ptrend = 0.01) and activity of moderate intensity (OR=0.44, 95% CI=0.30–0.64, ptrend < 0.0001). Compared to women with low lifetime physical activity (below median), those with greater activity throughout life had the highest reduction in risk (OR=0.62, 95% CI=0.44–0.88). Inverse associations were stronger in obese and overweight women, but differences were not statistically significantly different from those in normal weight women. Conclusion These findings suggest that physical activity in adulthood, even of moderate intensity, may be effective in lowering the risk of endometrial cancer, particularly among those at highest risk for this disease. Impact The results emphasize the importance of evaluating lifetime histories of physical activity from multiple sources, including both recreational and non-recreational activities of various intensities, in order to fully understand the relation between physical activity and disease risk. PMID:20406960

  1. Transvaginal ultrasound examination of myometrial infiltration by endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Miklos, P; Klacko, M; Babala, P; Masak, L; Ondrus, D; Waczulikova, I

    2014-01-01

    The depth of myometrial infiltration by endometrial cancer is an important prognostic factor. The examination of the depth of infiltration classifies the patients in the low- and high-risk groups, which influences the therapeutic approach. Transvaginal ultrasonography represents a first-choice diagnostic test for the assessment of the depth of myometrial infiltration as the time consumption and financial demands of magnetic resonance imaging need to be taken into account. In comparison with the MRI, the diagnostic accuracy of the transvaginal ultrasound depends more on the individual experience and professional potential of the examining physician. This fact can contribute to the heterogeneity of published results of transvaginal ultrasound on the determination of infiltration depth. Having in mind the aim to verify these indicators in our local conditions and environment, we decided to prospectively study 150 endometrial cancer patients who were examined with the transvaginal ultrasound in the period 1/2009 - 10/ 2011. Correlated firstly with the preoperative and then secondly with the definitive histopathological examination was the depth-of-infiltration-related data that had been taken from the ultrasound findings. The output being monitored was the exclusion or confirmation of the invasion exceeding half the thickness of myometrium. In our study, the diagnostic accuracy of the method reached 82.67 %, while the other indicators were as follows: sensitivity 92.31 %, specificity 79.28 %, positive predictive value (PPV) 61.02 %, negative predictive value (NPV) 96.7 %, the likelihood ratio of a positive test 4.455 and the likelihood ratio of a negative test 0.097. The results of the depth of myometrial infiltration examination and their comparison with the data from similarly oriented clinical studies entitle us to include this examination in the set of standard preoperative methods used for the examination of patients with endometrial cancer (Tab. 3, Fig. 5, Ref

  2. Odds ratio analysis in women with endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Żak, Ewa; Pięta, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite the progress in diagnosis and treatment of malignant tumours, the effects of treatment are insufficient. Reduction of the risk of cervical, ovarian, and endometrial cancer is possible by introducing preventative actions. Aim of the study The aim of the thesis is the analysis of selected risk factors that may affect the increase or decrease in the odds ratio of developing endometrial cancer. Material and methods The study was conducted among patients of the Gynaecology and Obstetrics Hospital of Poznań University of Medical Sciences in the years 2011-2013. The research included a total of 548 female respondents aged between 40 and 84 years. Women responded to questions assessing elements of lifestyle such as consumption of alcohol, smoking, and eating certain groups of foods. Results The respondents consuming fruits and vegetables several times a week have a reduced risk of odds ratio and the OR is 0.85; 95% CI: 0.18-4.09, compared to the women who rarely consume vegetables and fruits. Consumption of whole-wheat bread several times a week reduces the risk of developing the cancer, OR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.14-2.47, compared to women not consuming wholegrain bread at all. Respondents who consumed red meat, such as veal, pork, and lamb in the amount of 101-200 g per day have an increased risk of developing the disease: OR = 2.16; 95% CI: 1.09-4.28, compared to women not consuming red meat at all. Conclusions A diet rich in fruit and vegetables, onions, garlic, whole grains, and beans should be introduced in order to reduce the risk of endometrial cancer. The consumption of red meat and white pasta should be reduced or even eliminated. PMID:27095953

  3. Photoaffinity labeling of the progesterone receptor from human endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, C.L.; Satyaswaroop, P.G.

    1985-11-01

    A nude mouse model for the growth of human endometrial carcinoma and hormonal modulation of the progesterone receptor (PR) was established previously. This study describes the effect of 17 beta-estradiol and tamoxifen (TAM) on growth rate and PR concentration in a hormonally responsive human endometrial tumor (EnCa 101) grown in this experimental system and presents the first characterization of human endometrial carcinoma PR. EnCa 101 was transplanted subcutaneously into ovariectomized, BALB/c, nu/nu athymic mice and grown under 17 beta-estradiol-stimulated, TAM-stimulated, and control conditions. Both 17 beta-estradiol and TAM increased the growth rate of EnCa 101 in nude mice, and a parallel increase in the cytosol PR concentration was observed. PR was partially purified by phosphocellulose and DEAE cellulose chromatography, and the DEAE eluate was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and photoaffinity labeling with (17 alpha-methyl-TH)promegestone ((TH)R5020). Two PR-negative tumors (EnCa K and EnCa V) were also examined in parallel. Photolabeling and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of EnCa 101 grown in the presence of 17 beta-estradiol or TAM revealed incorporation of (3H)R5020 into proteins of molecular weight approximately 116,000 and 85,000. Labeled proteins of molecular weight 66,000, 45,000, and 35,000 were also observed. No incorporation of (TH)R5020 was observed in EnCa 101 grown in the absence of estrogen, nor was any observed in EnCa K or EnCa V.

  4. Endometrial decidualization: a rare cause of acute appendicitis during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Skyle J.; Kaur, Anupinder; Wullschleger, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    Appendicular endometriosis is a rare and poorly understood pathology that affects women in their reproductive years. In the gravid woman, ectopic endometrial tissue undergoes decidualization. This physiological process can result in acute appendicitis in exceptional cases. Here we describe a patient in her second trimester of pregnancy who presented with right iliac fossa pain and clinical, laboratory and imaging findings consistent with acute appendicitis. A laparoscopic appendectomy was performed with intraoperative findings suspicious for malignancy. Histological analysis made the surprising diagnosis of decidualized endometriosis causing luminal constriction resulting in acute appendicitis. We also detail the challenging diagnostic and management issues faced by clinicians in such cases. PMID:27106612

  5. Fludeoxyglucose F 18 PET Scan, CT Scan, and Ferumoxtran-10 MRI Scan Before Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Finding Lymph Node Metastasis in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer or High-Risk Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-19

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  6. Endometrial and cervical cancer: incidence and mortality among women in the Lodz region

    PubMed Central

    Leśniczak, Beata; Krasomski, Grzegorz; Oszukowski, Przemysław; Woźniak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Introduction By the early 21st century the most common cancer of female genitals in Poland was cervical cancer. Now endometrial cancer ranks first. The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence and mortality of endometrial and cervical cancer among women in the Lodz region. Material and methods Data on the incidence and mortality of endometrial and cervical cancer among inhabitants of the Lodz region were obtained from the National Cancer Registry and Bulletin of Cancer Cases in the Lodz region. The analysis covered ten consecutive years beginning in 2001. Results The number of new cases reported in 2010 exceeded that observed in 2001 by 181. The standardized incidence rate of endometrial cancer increased by 6.3, while the standardized incidence rate of cervical cancer decreased by 1.4. Conclusions In the years 2001-2010, the incidence of endometrial cancer increased by 88.3% and that of cervical cancer decreased by 6.5% among inhabitants of the Lodz region. In the years 2001-2010, mortality of endometrial cancer increased by 24.5% and that of cervical cancer decreased by 12.6%. In 2010, the highest crude incidence rates in the Lodz region of both endometrial and cervical cancer at 39.1 were recorded in the district town of Piotrków. PMID:26528109

  7. Joint Effect of Genotypic and Phenotypic Features of Reproductive Factors on Endometrial Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhanwei; Risch, Harvey; Lu, Lingeng; Irwin, Melinda L.; Mayne, Susan; Schwartz, Peter; Rutherford, Thomas; De Vivo, Immaculata; Yu, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged estrogen exposure is believed to be the major cause of endometrial cancer. As possible markers of estrogen exposure, various menstrual and reproductive features, e.g., ages at menarche and menopause, are found to be associated with endometrial cancer risk. In order to assess their combined effects on endometrial cancer, we created the total number of menstrual cycles (TNMC) that a woman experienced during her life or up to the time of study and two genetic risk scores, GRS1 for age at menarche and GRS2 for age at menopause. Comparing 482 endometrial cancer patients with 571 population controls, we found TNMC was associated with endometrial cancer risk and that the association remained statistically significant after adjustment for obesity and other potential confounders. Risk increased by about 2.5% for every additional 10 menstrual-cycles. The study also showed that high GRS1 was associated with increased risk. This relationship, however, was attenuated after adjustment for obesity. Our study further indicated women with high TNMC and GRS1 had twice the risk of endometrial cancer compared to those low in both indices. Our results provided additional support to the involvement of estrogen exposure in endometrial cancer risk with regard to genetic background and lifestyle features. PMID:26498156

  8. Genetic imbalances in precursor lesions of endometrial cancer detected by comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Kiechle, M; Hinrichs, M; Jacobsen, A; Lüttges, J; Pfisterer, J; Kommoss, F; Arnold, N

    2000-06-01

    Endometrial hyperplasia is regarded as a precursor lesion of endometrioid adenocarcinomas of the endometrium. The genetic events involved in the multistep process from normal endometrial glandular tissue to invasive endometrial carcinomas are primarily unknown. We chose endometrial hyperplasia as a model for identifying chromosomal aberrations occurring during carcinogenesis. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed on 47 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens of endometrial hyperplasia using the microdissection technique to increase the number of tumor cells in the samples and reduce contamination from normal cells. CGH analysis revealed that 24 out of 47 (51%) samples had detectable chromosomal imbalances, whereas 23 (49%) were in a genetically balanced state. The incidence of aberrant CGH profiles tended to parallel dysplasia grade, ranging from 22% aberrant profiles in simple hyperplasia to 67% in complex hyperplasia with atypia. The most frequent imbalances were 1p, 16p, and 20q underrepresentations and 4q overrepresentations. Copy number changes in 1p were more frequent in atypical complex hyperplasia than in complex lesions without atypical cells or simple lesions (42% versus 20% and 0%). Our results show that endometrial hyperplasia reveals recurrent chromosomal imbalances which tend to increase with the presence of atypical cells. The most frequent aberrations in endometrial cancer, 1q and 8q overrepresentations, are not present or are rare in its precursor lesions. This analysis provides evidence that tumorigenesis proceeds through the accumulation of a series of genetic alterations and suggests a stepwise mode of tumorigenesis. PMID:10854205

  9. Regulation of inflammatory and angiogenesis mediators in a functional model of decidualized endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Bourdiec, Amélie; Ahmad, Syed-Furquan; Lachhab, Asmaa; Akoum, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms involving the expression of interleukin (IL) 1 family members in the process of preparing the endometrium to receive an embryo remain unclear. In this study, decidualization differentially skewed the balance of IL1 family receptor expression in a pattern that increases endometrial stromal cell receptivity to IL1, IL18 and IL33. Additionally, endometrial cells showed increased expression of homeobox HOXA10 and HOXA11 and LIFR, which are known to be involved in endometrial embryo receptivity. Further analyses of decidual endometrial cells revealed a significant increase in the release of potent proinflammatory, remodelling and angiogenic factors implicated in the embryo invasion process, such as VEGF (P = 0.0305), MMP9 (P = 0.0003), TIMP3 (P = 0.0001), RANTES (P = 0.0020), MCP1 (P = 0.0001) and MIF (P = 0.0068). No significant changes in endogenous IL1B secretion were observed. Decreased secretion of IL18 and decidualization increased secretion of IL33. These findings reveal a significant modulation of endometrial cell receptivity to IL1 family members during endometrial stromal cell decidualization, and suggest that the involvement of IL1 family members is important in physiological processes of endometrial receptivity, including adaptive immunology. This may be relevant to establishing a favourable uterine microenvironment for embryo implantation. PMID:26602943

  10. Cyto-histologic evaluation of the endometrium in climacteric women at risk for endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    de Aloysio, D; Rocca, G; Miliffi, L

    1986-08-31

    The authors evaluated the diagnostic effectiveness of a triple specimen technique (cyto-histologic) performed by the Perma device. The incidence of endometrial hyperplasia (according to Dallenbach-Hellweg's classification) was estimated in 254 climacteric women selected from outpatients who come spontaneously to the Menopause Clinic of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department (Bologna University). The selection criterion was the evidence of risk factors for endometrial carcinoma, climacteric bleedings (obesity, late menopause, high blood pressure, diabetes), or endometriotropic estrogen therapy in the postmenopause. Results showed that the cyto-histologic sampling is most useful for diagnosing endometrial hyperplasia and early carcinoma (diagnostic effectiveness: 89.0-93.8%). Also, endometrial hyperplasia was found to have a significant incidence in the group we examined. This incidence was highest in women with climacteric bleedings, secondly in women using high-dose estrogens, and thirdly in women with risk factors for endometrial carcinoma. When evaluating the different kinds of endometrial hyperplasia, we never found adenomatous hyperplasia in women on estrogen therapy. Affinity between histologic and cytologic classes was around 50% in endometrial hyperplasia and 100% in early carcinoma. This emphasizes that both samplings are needed to perform an accurate diagnosis.

  11. Factors Influencing the Recurrence Potential of Benign Endometrial Polyps after Hysteroscopic Polypectomy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jehn-Hsiahn; Chen, Chin-Der; Chen, Shee-Uan; Yang, Yu-Shih; Chen, Mei-Jou

    2015-01-01

    Background An endometrial polyp is a frequently encountered gynecologic disease with abnormal uterine bleeding and infertility being the two common presenting problems, and hysteroscopic polypectomy is an effective method to remove them. The postoperative polyp recurrence might result in reappearance of abnormal uterine bleeding or infertility, whereas factors influencing the postoperative recurrence potential have limited data. Methods This case-series report included 168 premenopausal women who suffered from endometrial polyps and underwent hysteroscopic polypectomy. All of them were awaiting a future pregnancy. Office hysteroscopy was done before and after hysteroscopic polypectomy, in which preoperative hysteroscopy examined the number, type, and location of endometrial polyps, and postoperative hysteroscopy checked the polyp recurrence. Surgical indications, either infertility or the presentation of abnormal uterine bleeding, and follow-up duration were recorded. Results Seventy-three out of 168 (43%) women had polyp recurrence after hysteroscopic polypectomy. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that more endometrial polyps (P = 0.015) and longer duration of follow-up (P = 0.004) were significantly associated with an increased risk of postoperative polyp recurrence. The type of endometrial polyps was not correlated with polyp recurrence potential, whereas pedunculated type endometrial polyps were closely related to the presentation of abnormal uterine bleeding (P = 0.001). Conclusions A higher number of endometrial polyps and longer follow-up duration are associated with a greater potential of polyp recurrence after hysteroscopic polypectomy. PMID:26660149

  12. Malignant and premalignant changes in the endometrium of women with an ultrasound diagnosis of endometrial polyp.

    PubMed

    Gambadauro, P; Martínez-Maestre, M Á; Schneider, J; Torrejón, R

    2014-10-01

    The association between polyps and endometrial cancer is under debate. The main objectives of this study were to study the frequency and the characteristics of malignant and premalignant endometrial changes in women with endometrial polyp at ultrasound. The study population consisted of 1,390 consecutive patients that were referred to office hysteroscopy because of the ultrasonographic diagnosis of endometrial polyps. A total of 16 cases of endometrial neoplasia were diagnosed (1.15%). The frequencies of atypia and cancer in our population were 0.14% and 1.01%, respectively. All patients, except one, were postmenopausal (93.8%). All had undergone the initial ultrasonographic assessment because of symptoms (bleeding in the 93.8%). The neoplasia was not confined to the polyp in 75% of the cases. Nine cases had a lower risk disease (56.25%; atypical hyperplasia or endometrial cancer stage IA-G1,2), while seven had a higher risk cancer (43.75%; ≥ stage IA-G3). Patients with a higher risk disease were found to be significantly younger, and their polyps were smaller, albeit non-significantly. In spite of the common practice to refer all women with an ultrasound diagnosis of polyp to hysteroscopy, our data show how the prevalence of endometrial neoplasia in these patients is low (1.15%). Moreover, the malignancy is not confined to a polyp in most of the cases.

  13. Association of leukocyte telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes with endometrial cancer risk in Caucasian Americans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhui; Zhang, Liren; Zhao, Lina; Wu, Xifeng; Gu, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Telomeres are the protective structure at the ends of each chromosome and play an important role in maintaining genomic integrity. Interindividual variation of telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes has been associated with the risks of developing many human diseases including several cancers. The association between leukocyte telomere length (LTL) and endometrial cancer risk is still inconsistent. Using a case-control study of endometrial cancer patients (n = 139) and control subjects (n = 139) in a Caucasian population, we assessed the association of relative LTL with the risk of endometrial cancer. We calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals using multivariate logistic regression. We also determined the joint effects of LTL with established risk factors of endometrial cancer. The normalized LTL was significantly longer in endometrial cancer cases (median, 0.93; range, 0.19-1.62) than in controls (median, 0.70; range, 0.03-2.14) (P < 0.001). When individuals were dichotomized into long and short groups based on the median LTL value in the controls, individuals with long LTL had a significantly increased risk of endometrial cancer (adjusted OR, 3.84; 95%CI, 2.16-6.85; P < 0.001) compared to those with short LTL. When individuals were categorized into three groups or four groups according to tertile or quartile LTL value in the controls, there was a significant dose-response association between LTL and the risk of endometrial cancer (P < 0.001). Joint effects between LTL and smoking status, body mass index and a history of hypertension or diabetes in elevating endometrial cancer risk were observed. Long telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes is associated with a significantly increased risk of endometrial cancer.

  14. The impact of low-volume uterine lavage on endometrial biopsy classification.

    PubMed

    Linton, J K; Sertich, P L

    2016-09-01

    In the mare, the low-volume uterine lavage technique allows for bacterial sampling of the entire uterine lumen and is usually performed after obtaining the traditional double-guarded endometrial swab for aerobic culture and cytology and before procurement of an endometrial biopsy sample during a breeding soundness examination. The purpose of this study was to explore the potential effects of the low-volume lavage on the endometrial biopsy classification and polymorphonuclear cell (PMNs) infiltration in the context of a breeding soundness examination. Fourteen light horse mares of mixed breed, age 7 to 21 years, with known reproductive history, were included in the study, matched by age and reproductive history, and then divided into treatment and control groups. Transrectal palpation and ultrasonography, endometrial swabbing, and the first endometrial biopsy were performed in all mares. Low-volume uterine lavage was performed in the treatment group but not the control group. After either the lavage or a 15-minute rest, a second endometrial biopsy was obtained from both the control and treatment groups. Endometrial swabs and effluent from the low-volume lavages were submitted for aerobic culture and sensitivity. Biopsy samples were fixed in Bouin's solution for 24 hours, processed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and then viewed under bright light microscopy. Additional staining with anti-neutrophil elastase antibody (ab68672) was performed for indirect immunohistochemistry. All samples were interpreted by a blinded observer. When the first (pre-uterine lavage) and second (post-uterine lavage) biopsies were compared using a mixed-effects logistic regression, there was no difference in endometrial biopsy classification (P = 0.74), presence of PMNs in blood vessels (P = 0.728), or infiltration of PMNs in the tissue (P = 0.934) between the treatment and control groups. In this study, the low-volume uterine lavage did not affect the endometrial biopsy

  15. Evidence of a Causal Association Between Insulinemia and Endometrial Cancer: A Mendelian Randomization Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nead, Kevin T.; Sharp, Stephen J.; Thompson, Deborah J.; Painter, Jodie N.; Savage, David B.; Semple, Robert K.; Barker, Adam; Perry, John R. B.; Attia, John; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Holliday, Elizabeth; Lotta, Luca A.; O’Mara, Tracy; McEvoy, Mark; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Scott, Rodney J.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Insulinemia and type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been associated with endometrial cancer risk in numerous observational studies. However, the causality of these associations is uncertain. Here we use a Mendelian randomization (MR) approach to assess whether insulinemia and T2D are causally associated with endometrial cancer. Methods: We used single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with T2D (49 variants), fasting glucose (36 variants), fasting insulin (18 variants), early insulin secretion (17 variants), and body mass index (BMI) (32 variants) as instrumental variables in MR analyses. We calculated MR estimates for each risk factor with endometrial cancer using an inverse-variance weighted method with SNP-endometrial cancer associations from 1287 case patients and 8273 control participants. Results: Genetically predicted higher fasting insulin levels were associated with greater risk of endometrial cancer (odds ratio [OR] per standard deviation = 2.34, 95% confidence internal [CI] = 1.06 to 5.14, P = .03). Consistently, genetically predicted higher 30-minute postchallenge insulin levels were also associated with endometrial cancer risk (OR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.76, P = .003). We observed no associations between genetic risk of type 2 diabetes (OR = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.79 to 1.04, P = .16) or higher fasting glucose (OR = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.67 to 1.50, P = .99) and endometrial cancer. In contrast, endometrial cancer risk was higher in individuals with genetically predicted higher BMI (OR = 3.86, 95% CI = 2.24 to 6.64, P = 1.2x10-6). Conclusion: This study provides evidence to support a causal association of higher insulin levels, independently of BMI, with endometrial cancer risk. PMID:26134033

  16. Role of Liquid-based Cytology and Cell Block in the Diagnosis of Endometrial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Wen, Jia; Xu, Pi-Li; Chen, Rui; Yang, Xi; Zhou, Lian-Er; Jiang, Ping; Wan, An-Xia; Liao, Qin-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background: Liquid-based cytology (LBC) offers an alternative method to biopsy in screening endometrial cancer. Cell block (CB), prepared by collecting residual cytological specimen, represents a novel method to supplement the diagnosis of endometrial cytology. This study aimed to compare the specimen adequacy and diagnostic accuracy of LBC and CB in the diagnosis of endometrial lesions. Methods: A total of 198 women with high risks of endometrial carcinoma (EC) from May 2014 to April 2015 were enrolled in this study. The cytological specimens were collected by the endometrial sampler (SAP-1) followed by histopathologic evaluation of dilatation and curettage or biopsy guided by hysteroscopy. The residual cytological specimens were processed into paraffin-embedded CB after LBC preparation. Diagnostic accuracies of LBC and CB for detecting endometrial lesions were correlated with histological diagnoses. Chi-square test was used to compare the specimen adequacies of LBC and CB. Results: The specimen inadequate rate of CB was significantly higher than that of LBC (22.2% versus 7.1%, P < 0.01). There were 144 cases with adequate specimens for LBC and CB preparation. Among them, 29 cases were atypical endometrial hyperplasia (11 cases) or carcinoma (18 cases) confirmed by histology evaluation. Taking atypical hyperplasia and carcinoma as positive, the diagnostic accuracy of CB was 95.1% while it was 93.8% in LBC. When combined LBC with CB, the diagnostic accuracy was improved to 95.8%, with a sensitivity of 89.7% and specificity of 97.4%. Conclusions: CB is a feasible and reproducible adjuvant method for screening endometrial lesions. A combination of CB and LBC can improve the diagnostic accuracy of endometrial lesions. PMID:27270542

  17. Presence of HHV-6A in Endometrial Epithelial Cells from Women with Primary Unexplained Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotti, Daria; Lo Monte, Giuseppe; Caselli, Elisabetta; Bolzani, Silvia; Rotola, Antonella; Di Luca, Dario; Rizzo, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the roles of human herpesvirus (HHV)-6 primary unexplained infertile women, a prospective randomized study was conducted on a cohort of primary unexplained infertile women and a cohort of control women, with at least one successful pregnancy. HHV-6 DNA was analyzed and the percentage and immune-phenotype of resident endometrial Natural Killer (NK) cells, as the first line of defense towards viral infections, was evaluated in endometrial biopsies. Cytokine levels in uterine flushing samples were analyzed. HHV-6A DNA was found in 43% of endometrial biopsies from primary unexplained infertile women, but not in control women. On the contrary, HHV-6B DNA was absent in endometrial biopsies, but present in PBMCs of both cohorts. Endometrial NK cells presented a different distribution in infertile women with HHV6-A infection compared with infertile women without HHV6-A infection. Notably, we observed a lower percentage of endometrial specific CD56brightCD16- NK cells. We observed an enhanced HHV-6A-specific endometrial NK cell response in HHV-6A positive infertile women, with a marked increase in the number of endometrial NK cells activating towards HHV-6A infected cells. The analysis of uterine flushing samples showed an increase in IL-10 levels and a decrease of IFN-gamma concentrations in infertile women with HHV6-A infection. Our study indicates, for the first time, that HHV-6A infection might be an important factor in female unexplained infertility development, with a possible role in modifying endometrial NK cells immune profile and ability to sustain a successful pregnancy. PMID:27367597

  18. Immunohistochemical characterisation of molecular subtypes in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Łapińska-Szumczyk, Sylwia M; Supernat, Anna M; Majewska, Hanna I; Gulczyński, Jacek; Biernat, Wojciech; Wydra, Dariusz; Żaczek, Anna J

    2015-01-01

    Four molecular subtypes have lately been established in endometrial cancer basing on estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2 status: ER+/PR+/HER2+, ER+/PR+/HER2-, ER-/PR-/HER2+ and ER-/PR-/HER2-. The subtypes have shown diversity in terms of prognosis, clinicopathological and molecular characteristics, with ER+/PR+/HER2- and ER-/PR-/HER2+ group exhibiting exceptionally benign and aggressive behavior, respectively. We have further characterized the subtypes in the context of pathways known to drive endometrial carcinogenesis: phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway (ERBB/PI3K pathway), TP53 system, and the mismatch repair (MMR) mechanism. Analysis of tumor heterogeneity was also included. ER+/PR+/HER2+ was characterized by active ERBB/PI3K pathway occurring in 58% of cases. Subtype ER-/PR-/HER2+ was characterized by the most frequent TP53 mutations (83% of cases). Triple negative phenotype utterly lacked active ERBB/PI3K pathway. Analyzed major pathways rarely correlated with clinicopathologial data but mutated TP53 and retained MMR did correlate with shorter overall survival (both P<0.01). The presence of tumor heterogeneity was most frequent in ER-/PR-/HER2+ subtype (53% of all cases). The presented results further emphasize that the molecular subtype distinction, along with MMR and TP53 status, could be a useful diagnostic tool in guiding individualized therapy. PMID:26885170

  19. Endometrial ablation using SideFire laser fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Royice B.

    1996-05-01

    The first successful report using the neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) Laser to control hypermenorrhea was reported in 1981. Variations on the treatment technique have been attempted to improve the amenorrhea rate. Reports using the Nd:YAG laser with the blanching or non-touch technique seem to result in a better outcome and higher rate of total amenorrhea than using the dragging technique. Due to the report of improved rates of amenorrhea when using the blanching technique and the Nd:YAG laser, a fiber was developed to direct the laser energy at right angles to the axis of the fiber, therefore allowing a total treatment of the entire uterus in a perpendicular fashion. The theoretic benefit of this would be a more complete and predictable destruction of the endometrial lining, avoiding fluid overload by coagulating and sealing of the vessels and lymphatic. After a follow-up of 12 to 36 months, 56 of the 60 patients (93%) who underwent complete endometrial ablation with the SideFireTM technique had excellent results. Total absolute amenorrhea resulted in 50 patients (83%). Contrary to earlier reports, using the rollerball electrode, this procedure technique resulted in no decrease in results in younger patients. In conclusion, this seems to be a reasonable alternative which offers improved results when compared to previously available methods using electrosurgery or the Nd:YAG laser without the use of the SideFireTM device.

  20. Implantation in assisted reproduction: a look at endometrial receptivity.

    PubMed

    Fatemi, H M; Popovic-Todorovic, B

    2013-11-01

    Implantation failure in assisted reproduction is thought to be mainly due to impaired uterine receptivity. With normal uterine anatomy, changes in endocrine profile during ovarian stimulation and medical conditions of the mother (i.e. thrombophilia and abnormal immunological response) could result in a non-receptive endometrium. High oestradiol concentrations during ovarian stimulation lead to premature progesterone elevation, causing endometrial advancement and hampering implantation, which can be overcome by a freeze-all approach and embryo transfer in natural cycles or by milder stimulation protocols. Patients with recurrent implantation failure (RIF) should be tested for inherited and acquired thrombophilias. Each patient should be individually assessed and counselled regarding therapy with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). Empirical treatment with LMWH, aspirin or corticosteroids is not effective for women with RIF who have negative thrombophilic tests. If thrombophilic tests are normal, patients should be tested for immunological causes. If human leukocyte antigen dissimilarity is proven, treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin might be beneficial. Preliminary observational studies using intralipid infusion in the presence of increased natural killer cytotoxic activity are interesting but the proposed rationale is controversial and randomized controlled trials are needed. Hysteroscopy and/or endometrial scratching in the cycle preceding ovarian stimulation should become standard for patients with RIF.

  1. Endometrial regenerative cells: a novel stem cell population.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiaolong; Ichim, Thomas E; Zhong, Jie; Rogers, Andrea; Yin, Zhenglian; Jackson, James; Wang, Hao; Ge, Wei; Bogin, Vladimir; Chan, Kyle W; Thébaud, Bernard; Riordan, Neil H

    2007-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a critical component of the proliferative endometrial phase of the menstrual cycle. Thus, we hypothesized that a stem cell-like population exist and can be isolated from menstrual blood. Mononuclear cells collected from the menstrual blood contained a subpopulation of adherent cells which could be maintained in tissue culture for >68 doublings and retained expression of the markers CD9, CD29, CD41a, CD44, CD59, CD73, CD90 and CD105, without karyotypic abnormalities. Proliferative rate of the cells was significantly higher than control umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells, with doubling occurring every 19.4 hours. These cells, which we termed "Endometrial Regenerative Cells" (ERC) were capable of differentiating into 9 lineages: cardiomyocytic, respiratory epithelial, neurocytic, myocytic, endothelial, pancreatic, hepatic, adipocytic, and osteogenic. Additionally, ERC produced MMP3, MMP10, GM-CSF, angiopoietin-2 and PDGF-BB at 10-100,000 fold higher levels than two control cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cell lines. Given the ease of extraction and pluripotency of this cell population, we propose ERC as a novel alternative to current stem cells sources. PMID:18005405

  2. ECGene: A Literature‐Based Knowledgebase of Endometrial Cancer Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yining; O'Mara, Tracy A

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endometrial cancer (EC) ranks as the sixth common cancer for women worldwide. To better distinguish cancer subtypes and identify effective early diagnostic biomarkers, we need improved understanding of the biological mechanisms associated with EC dysregulated genes. Although there is a wealth of clinical and molecular information relevant to EC in the literature, there has been no systematic summary of EC‐implicated genes. In this study, we developed a literature‐based database ECGene (Endometrial Cancer Gene database) with comprehensive annotations. ECGene features manual curation of 414 genes from thousands of publications, results from eight EC gene expression datasets, precomputation of coexpressed long noncoding RNAs, and an EC‐implicated gene interactome. In the current release, we generated and comprehensively annotated a list of 458 EC‐implicated genes. We found the top‐ranked EC‐implicated genes are frequently mutated in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) tumor samples. Furthermore, systematic analysis of coexpressed lncRNAs provided insight into the important roles of lncRNA in EC development. ECGene has a user‐friendly Web interface and is freely available at http://ecgene.bioinfo‐minzhao.org/. As the first literature‐based online resource for EC, ECGene serves as a useful gateway for researchers to explore EC genetics. PMID:26699919

  3. Enolase-1 is a therapeutic target in endometrial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Luyun; Wang, Lijing; Chen, YiYu; Fu, Qiaofen; Liu, Yan; Hua, Shengni; Fan, Yue; Liu, Yiyi; Deng, Xiaojie; Luo, Rongcheng; Mei, Zhong; Jiang, Qinping; Liu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    ENO1 plays a paradoxical role in driving the pathogenesis of tumors. However, the clinical significance of ENO1 expression remains unclear and its function and modulatory mechanisms have never been reported in endometrial carcinoma (EC). In this study, ENO1 silencing significantly reduced cell glycolysis, proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro, as well as tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo by modulating p85 suppression. This in turn mediated inactivation of PI3K/AKT signaling and its downstream signals including glycolysis, cell cycle progression, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated genes. These effects on glycolysis and cell growth were not observed after ENO1 suppression in normal human endometrial epithelial cells (HEEC). Knocking down ENO1 could significantly enhance the sensitivity of EC cells to cisplatin (DDP) and markedly inhibited the growth of EC xenografts in vivo. In clinical samples, EC tissues exhibited higher expression levels of ENO1 mRNA and protein compared with normal endometrium tissues. Patients with higher ENO1 expression had a markedly shorter overall survival than patients with low ENO1 expression. We conclude that ENO1 favors carcinogenesis, representing a potential target for gene-based therapy. PMID:25951350

  4. Single-cell transcriptome analysis of endometrial tissue

    PubMed Central

    Krjutškov, K.; Katayama, S.; Saare, M.; Vera-Rodriguez, M.; Lubenets, D.; Samuel, K.; Laisk-Podar, T.; Teder, H.; Einarsdottir, E.; Salumets, A.; Kere, J.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION How can we study the full transcriptome of endometrial stromal and epithelial cells at the single-cell level? SUMMARY ANSWER By compiling and developing novel analytical tools for biopsy, tissue cryopreservation and disaggregation, single-cell sorting, library preparation, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and statistical data analysis. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Although single-cell transcriptome analyses from various biopsied tissues have been published recently, corresponding protocols for human endometrium have not been described. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The frozen-thawed endometrial biopsies were fluorescence-activated cell sorted (FACS) to distinguish CD13-positive stromal and CD9-positive epithelial cells and single-cell transcriptome analysis performed from biopsied tissues without culturing the cells. We studied gene transcription, applying a modern and efficient RNA-seq protocol. In parallel, endometrial stromal cells were cultured and global expression profiles were compared with uncultured cells. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS For method validation, we used two endometrial biopsies, one from mid-secretory phase (Day 21, LH+8) and another from late-secretory phase (Day 25). The samples underwent single-cell FACS sorting, single-cell RNA-seq library preparation and Illumina sequencing. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Here we present a complete pipeline for single-cell gene-expression studies, from clinical sampling to statistical data analysis. Tissue manipulation, starting from disaggregation and cell-type-specific labelling and ending with single-cell automated sorting, is managed within 90 min at low temperature to minimize changes in the gene expression profile. The single living stromal and epithelial cells were sorted using CD13- and CD9-specific antibodies, respectively. Of the 8622 detected genes, 2661 were more active in cultured stromal cells than in biopsy cells. In the comparison of biopsy versus cultured cells, 5603

  5. Endometrial biopsy in the infertility investigation. The experience at two institutions.

    PubMed

    Wild, R A; Sanfilippo, J S; Toledo, A A

    1986-10-01

    The combined experience at two institutions was reviewed to evaluate endometrial biopsy and the prognosis for pregnancies affected by endometrial sampling during the cycle of conception. In the evaluation of 1,084 patients, 1,174 biopsies were performed. Twenty-seven endometrial biopsies were done during the cycle of conception, with spontaneous abortion occurring in six cases (22.2%). Multiple diagnoses were made (including luteal phase defects, endometritis and polyps), and interruption of pregnancy occurred. Several cases illustrate disturbing complications. Methods of minimizing pregnancy interruption and patient discomfort are available.

  6. Distinction of endometrial stromal sarcomas from 'hemangiopericytomatous' tumors using a panel of immunohistochemical stains.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Rohit; Shia, Jinru; Hummer, Amanda J; Thaler, Howard T; Tornos, Carmen; Soslow, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Endometrial stromal sarcomas are low-grade malignant tumors that may pose a diagnostic challenge, especially when they are present in an extrauterine site. Owing to the presence of an arborizing vasculature and cells with an undifferentiated appearance, endometrial stromal sarcomas can be confused with several soft-tissue neoplasms. We studied 17 endometrial stromal sarcomas, eight hemangiopericytomas, 14 solitary fibrous tumors, and 16 synovial sarcomas immunohistochemically, detecting the following antigens: CD10, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, bcl-2, CD34, smooth muscle antigen, epithelial membrane antigen and cytokeratin (AE1/AE3). Most endometrial stromal sarcomas stained positively for CD10 (16/17), estrogen receptor (17/17), progesterone receptor (15/17), and bcl-2 (17/17). Staining with antismooth muscle antigen was seen in 11 of 17 cases of endometrial stromal sarcoma, with more intense staining seen in areas showing smooth muscle differentiation. Staining with AE1/3 was seen in four of 17 endometrial stromal sarcomas, with two of the positive cases containing epithelioid cells. None of the endometrial stromal sarcomas expressed epithelial membrane antigen or CD34. More than half of the hemangiopericytomas (4/8) and solitary fibrous tumors (9/14) cases demonstrated CD10 expression either focally or in a patchy cytoplasmic and membranous pattern. Hemangiopericytomas, solitary fibrous tumors, and synovial sarcomas did not express estrogen receptor. Four of eight hemangiopericytomas and seven of 14 solitary fibrous tumors also showed patchy progesterone receptor expression. CD34 expression was identified in six of eight hemangiopericytomas and 13 of 14 solitary fibrous tumors, but we did not find expression of CD34 in synovial sarcoma. Differences between endometrial stromal sarcoma and other soft-tissue tumors were detected for all of the immunohistochemical markers (P<0.05), except anti-bcl-2 and AE1/3. Antibodies against CD10 mark a substantial

  7. Endometrial adenocarcinoma: an analysis of treatment and outcome.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Louise M; Swindell, Richard; Webber-Rookes, Daniel; Hannon, R; Hunter, Robin D; Livsey, Jac; Davidson, Susan E

    2008-11-01

    This study aims to review the survival and morbidity in patients treated for endometrial cancer, at a single centre and analyses the effects of co-morbidity on these outcomes. Case notes of all patients referred to the Christie Hospital with endometrial carcinoma from January 1, 1993 to December 31, 1995 (n=499) were reviewed. Twenty patients presented with recurrence and were not included in this analysis. Three hundred and seventy-five patients had previously undergone a total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingoophorectomy (+/- pelvic lymphadenectomy). Of these, 175 received adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (XRT) only, 49 received XRT and brachytherapy, 30 received brachytherapy alone and 121 patients had no further therapy. One hundred and four patients were referred for primary treatment. Radical radiotherapy was administered to 63 patients who were unfit for surgery, with 10 of these receiving XRT + brachytherapy and 53 receiving brachytherapy alone. Thirteen patients received palliative XRT and 28 supportive care only. The overall 5-year survival for those treated radically was 73.3%. There was no significant survival difference between patients who underwent surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy, in whatever form (p=0.115). Patients who did not undergo surgery did less well as a group, although there was no significant survival difference between those treated with combination therapy or brachytherapy alone (p=0.33). Survival was significantly associated with FIGO stage, tumour grade, age (especially those >75 years) and co-morbidity (ACE-27 score). Late morbidity occurred in 46 patients, with severe toxicity affecting 12 (3.8%). Toxicity was associated with ACE-27 score (p=0.0019), treatment dose and modality, with 50% (n=6) of severe toxicity seen in patients receiving adjuvant XRT + ICT. These data demonstrate that survival in patients with endometrial carcinoma treated radically remains good, with the stage and grade of tumour being significant

  8. Restraint stress delays endometrial adaptive remodeling during mouse embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanhui; Dong, Yulan; Wang, Zixu; Cao, Jing; Chen, Yaoxing

    2015-01-01

    In mice, previously, we showed that restraint stress reduces the number of embryo implantation sites in the endometrium. Here, we hypothesized that the uterine microenvironment is altered by restraint stress and consequently is suboptimal for embryo implantation. On embryonic day 1 (E1), 60 of 154 pregnant CD1 mice underwent restraint stress (4 h), repeated daily to E3, E5 or E7 (n = 10 mice per group). Restraint stress decreased food intake and suppressed body weight gain on E3, E5 and E7. Restraint stress decreased the actual and relative weight (percent body weight) of uterus and ovary on E5 (by 14.9%, p = 0.03; 16.1%, p = 0.004) and E7 (by 16.8%, p = 0.03; 20.0%, p = 0.01). Morphologically, restraint stress decreased relative endometrial area (by 8.94-18.8%, p = 0.003-0.021) and uterine gland area (by 30.6%, p < 0.01 on E3 and 44.5%, p < 0.01 on E5). Immunohistochemistry showed that restraint stress decreased microvessel density (by 12.9-70.5%, p < 0.01) and vascular endothelial growth factor expression (by 14.6-45.9%, p = 0.007-0.02). Restraint stress decreased by 32.4-39.8% (p = 0.002-0.01) the mean optical density ratio for proliferating cell nuclear antigen/terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay showed a dose-dependent decrease in proliferative activity of endometrial stromal cells (from 52 of 154 pregnant E5 control mice) incubated with H2O2 (100-1000 μM) in vitro. These findings supported the hypothesis that restraint stress negatively influences endometrial adaptive remodeling via an oxidative stress pathway, which resulted in fewer implantation sites.

  9. Endometrial adult/progenitor stem cells: pathogenetic theory and new antiangiogenic approach for endometriosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Pittatore, G; Moggio, A; Benedetto, C; Bussolati, B; Revelli, A

    2014-03-01

    The cyclical arrival of endometrial cells into the abdominal cavity through retrograde flux at menstruation represents the etiopathogenetic basis of endometriosis. The endometrium has peculiar regenerative properties linked to the presence of adult stem cells similar to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Once in the abdominal cavity, these MSCs could proliferate, invade, and differentiate into endometrial cells, finally generating ectopic implants. As only differentiated endometrial cells, and not endometrial MSCs, possess steroid hormone receptors, MSCs could be responsible for the high rate of persistence/recurrence of the disease after hypoestrogenism-inducing therapies. Even angiogenesis promoted by MSCs could play an important role, as survival and proliferation of endometriotic tissue depend on the formation of new blood vessels. Inhibition of angiogenesis represents, in fact, a new, promising therapeutic approach for the disease. Further, medications directly targeting endometriosis MSCs could be effective, alone or in association with hormonal treatments, in increasing the success of medical treatment.

  10. Global Endometrial Ablation in the Presence of Essure® Microinserts

    PubMed Central

    Aldape, Diana; Chudnoff, Scott G; Levie, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) affects 30% of women at some time during their reproductive years and is one of the most common reasons a woman sees a gynecologist. Many women are turning to endometrial ablation to manage their AUB. This article reviews the data relating to the available endometrial ablation techniques performed with hysteroscopic sterilization, and focuses on data from patients who had Essure® (Conceptus, San Carlos, CA) coils placed prior to performance of endometrial ablation. Reviewed specifically are data regarding safety and efficacy of these two procedures when combined. Data submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration for the three devices currently approved are reviewed, as well as all published case series. Articles included were selected based on a PubMed search for endometrial ablation (also using the brand names of the different techniques currently available), hysteroscopic sterilization, and Essure. PMID:24358407

  11. Let7a inhibits the growth of endometrial carcinoma cells by targeting Aurora-B.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Qi, Meiyan; Ma, Chengbin; Lao, Guoying; Liu, Yu; Liu, Yan; Liu, Yingzi

    2013-08-19

    MicroRNAs negatively regulate target gene expression at the post-transcriptional level during carcinogenesis. Recent advances revealed that the expression levels of several miRNAs are up- or down-regulated in endometrial carcinoma (EC). Here we identify dysregulated miRNAs in EC and we elucidate the essential role of let-7a. The expression of 86 miRNAs in EC was found to be different from adjacent normal endometrial tissues. Moreover, miR-let-7 members are down-regulated in EC and let-7 miRNAs are highly associated with endometrial cancer. A functional investigation revealed that let-7a suppressed proliferation of HeLa cells by targeting Aurora-B. Let-7a also antagonizes Aurora-B functions in promoting carcinoma cell proliferation by down-regulating Aurora-B protein level. Let-7a could be applied for gene therapy against endometrial carcinogenesis. PMID:23769985

  12. Participation of WNT and β-Catenin in Physiological and Pathological Endometrial Changes: Association with Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kiewisz, Jolanta; Wasniewski, Tomasz; Kmiec, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    WNT proteins are involved in embryonic development, sex determination, stem cell recruitment, angiogenesis, and cancer. They take part in morphological changes in the endometrium during development, regulate processes of endometrial proliferation and differentiation. This review presents current knowledge about implication of WNT proteins and β-catenin in physiological endometrial functions as well as their involvement in uterine carcinogenesis. Influence of WNT proteins on the formation of blood vessel, taking place both under healthy and pathological conditions, is also considered. Participation of WNT proteins, β-catenin, and inhibitors and inducers of WNT signaling in the process of endometrial angiogenesis is largely unknown. Thus, confirmation of their local and systemic participation in the process of endometrial angiogenesis may in the long term help to establish new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in conditions associated with the pathology of the female reproductive system. PMID:26366420

  13. Circulating adiponectin levels and risk of endometrial cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    LI, ZHI-JUN; YANG, XUE-LING; YAO, YAN; HAN, WEI-QING; LI, BO

    2016-01-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have presented conflicting results regarding associations between circulating adiponectin (APN) levels and the risk of endometrial cancer. Thus a meta-analysis was performed to investigate the association between these factors. Multiple electronic sources, including PubMed, SpringerLink and Google Scholar databases were searched to identify relevant studies for the present meta-analysis. All of the selected studies examined the correlation between circulating APN levels and endometrial cancer. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated and pooled using meta-analysis methods. Overall, 18 case-control studies met the inclusion criteria. A total of 5,692 participants and 2,337 cases of endometrial cancer were included in this meta-analysis. The SMD of the pooled analysis (95% CI) were −1.96 (−2.60, −1.31), P=0.000. When the cancer grades were compared, the APN values were not significantly different between the grades of endometrial cancer [G1 vs. G3, 1.02 (−0.68, 2.72), P>0.05; G1 vs. G2, 0.34 (−0.86, 1.54), P>0.05]. However, there was a significant association between high APN levels and postmenopausal endometrial cancer cases with an SMD (95% CI) of −2.27 (−4.36, −0.18) and P<0.05, however, no association was observed in premenopausal endometrial cancer cases with an SMD (95% CI) of −1.52 (−3.49, 0.45) and P>0.05. The low circulating APN level increases the risk of endometrial cancer, whereas the high APN level decreases this risk in postmenopausal women. Circulating APN as simple biomarkers may be a promising tool for the prevention, early diagnosis and disease monitoring of endometrial cancer. PMID:27284314

  14. Project for the National Program of Early Diagnosis of Endometrial Cancer Part II

    PubMed Central

    Bohîlțea, RE; Ancăr, V; Rădoi, V; Furtunescu, F; Bohîlțea, LC

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Endometrial cancer recorded a peak incidence in ages 60-64 years in Romania. Since 2013, an increased trend of endometrial cancer occurrence has been registered in urban areas as compared with rural ones. Unfortunately, most of the cancer cases are diagnosed too late, in an advanced stage of the disease, resulting into diminished lifetime expectancy. The first part of the article concentrated on issues such as: the description of the study, results, and discussions regarding the study, definitions and terms, risk factors specific for endometrial carcinomas, presentation of the activities of the Program, etc. Objective: Drafting a national program that will serve as an early diagnosis method of endometrial cancer. This second part of the study continues with the presentation of the activities of the Program, analyzes the human resources and materials needed to implement the Program, presents the strategies and the indicators specific for the implementation of the project. Methods and Results: A standardization of the diagnostic steps was proposed and the focus was on 4 key elements for the early diagnosis of endometrial cancer: The first steps were approached in the first part of the study and the second part of the study investigated the proper monitoring of precursor endometrial lesions or cancer associated endometrial lesions and screening high risk populations (Lynch syndrome, Cowden syndrome). Discussion: Improving medical practice based on diagnostic algorithms and programs improves and increases the lifetime expectancy, due to the fact that endometrial cancer is early diagnosed and treated before it causes serious health problems or even death. Abbreviations: ASCCP = American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, CT = Computerized Tomography, HNPCC = Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (Lynch syndrome), IHC = Immunohistochemistry, MSI = Microsatellites instability, MSI-H/ MSI-L = high (positive test)/ low (negative test

  15. Obesity, inflammatory markers, and endometrial cancer risk: a prospective case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Dossus, Laure; Rinaldi, Sabina; Becker, Susen; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Stegger, Jakob; Overvad, Kim; Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie; Jimenez-Corona, Aida; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Rohrmann, Sabine; Teucher, Birgit; Boeing, Heiner; Schütze, Madlen; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Benetou, Vassiliki; Lagiou, Pagona; Palli, Domenico; Berrino, Franco; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Redondo, Maria-Luisa; Travier, Noémie; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Altzibar, Jone M; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Peeters, Petra H M; Hallmans, Goran; Lundin, Eva; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas; Allen, Naomi; Key, Tim J; Slimani, Nadia; Hainaut, Pierre; Romaguera, Dora; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    Obesity, a major risk factor for endometrial cancer, is a low-grade inflammatory state characterized by elevated concentrations of cytokines and acute phase reactants. The current study had two aims: first to investigate the associations of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL6), and IL1 receptor antagonist (IL1Ra) with endometrial cancer risk and second to examine to which extent these markers can influence the association between obesity and endometrial cancer. We conducted a case–control study, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, which comprised 305 incident cases of endometrial cancer and 574 matched controls. CRP, IL6, and IL1Ra were measured in prospectively collected blood specimens by immunoassays. Data were analyzed using conditional logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided, and P values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. We observed a significant increase in risk of endometrial cancer with elevated levels of CRP (odds ratio (OR) for top versus bottom quartile: 1.58, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03–2.41, Ptrend=0.02), IL6 (OR for top versus bottom quartile: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.08–2.54, Ptrend=0.008), and IL1Ra (OR for top versus bottom quartile: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.22–2.73, Ptrend=0.004). After adjustment for body mass index (BMI), the estimates were strongly reduced and became non-significant. The association between BMI and endometrial cancer was also substantially attenuated (∼10–20%) after adjustment for inflammatory markers, even when the effects of C-peptide or estrone had already been taken into account. We provided epidemiological evidence that chronic inflammation might mediate the association between obesity and endometrial cancer and that endometrial carcinogenesis could be promoted by an inflammatory milieu. PMID:20843938

  16. Female Hormonal Factors and the Risk of Endometrial Cancer in Lynch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dashti, Seyedeh Ghazaleh; Chau, Rowena; Ouakrim, Driss Ait; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P.; Winship, Ingrid M.; Arnold, Julie; Ahnen, Dennis J.; Haile, Robert W.; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steven; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Newcomb, Polly A.; Potter, John D.; Baron, John A.; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Win, Aung Ko

    2015-01-01

    Importance Apart from hysterectomy, there is no consensus recommendation for reducing endometrial cancer risk for women with a mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation (Lynch syndrome). Objective To investigate the association between hormonal factors and endometrial cancer risk in Lynch syndrome. Design, Setting, and Participants A retrospective cohort study including 1,128 women with a MMR gene mutation identified from the Colon Cancer Family Registry was conducted. Data were analyzed using a weighted cohort approach. Participants were recruited between 1997 and 2012, from centers across the United States, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. Exposures Age at menarche, first and last live birth, and menopause, number of live births, hormonal contraceptive use, and postmenopausal hormone use. Main Outcome and Measures Self-reported diagnosis of endometrial cancer. Results Endometrial cancer was diagnosed in 133 women (incidence per 100 person-years, 0.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24 to 0.34). A lower risk of endometrial cancer was associated with later age at menarche (hazard ratio [HR] per year, 0.85 [95%CI, 0.73 to 0.99]; P=.04), parity (parous vs nulliparous: HR, 0.21 [95%CI, 0.10 to 0.42]; P<.001), and hormonal contraceptive use (≥1 year vs <1 year: HR, 0.39 [95%CI, 0.23 to 0.64]; P<.001). There was no statistically significant association between endometrial cancer and age at first and last live birth, age at menopause, and postmenopausal hormone use. Conclusions and Relevance For women with a MMR gene mutation, some endogenous and exogenous hormonal factors were associated with a lower risk of endometrial cancer. These directions and strengths of associations were similar to those for the general population. If replicated, these findings suggest that women with a MMR gene mutation may be counseled like the general population in regard to hormonal influences on endometrial cancer risk. PMID:26151267

  17. Expression of placental protein 14 by the new endometrial cancer cell line MFE-280 in vitro and by endometrial carcinomas in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, R; Loos, S; Nia, A H; Kunzmann, R; Schulz, K D

    1998-01-01

    MFE-280 endometrial cancer cells express PP14 (placental protein 14) in vitro. PP14 is normally found in the secretory endometrium and in placental tissue. MFE-280 cells, which are tumorigenic in nude mice, were derived from a recurrent, poorly differentiated endometrial carcinoma. The cells were initially grown in suspension culture and later transferred to monolayer cultures. Karyotyping revealed near-diploidy with a complex heterogeneous aberration pattern. MFE-280 cells were positive for the cytokeratins 7, 8, 18 and 19 as well as for vimentin. The expression of PP14 in MFE-280 cells was demonstrated by immunochemistry and reverse transcriptase--polymerase chain reaction. PP14-mRNA was also detected in one out of five endometrial cancer specimen. In tumor tissue the expression of PP14 was not dependent on progestins.

  18. Cytokines and the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian-endometrial axis.

    PubMed

    Tabibzadeh, S

    1994-05-01

    Recently, the demarcating boundaries that allowed separation of the fields of reproductive biology, endocrinology, immunology and neurobiology have faded. The missing link that now ties these disciplines together is the understanding that the language by which cells communicate within these diverse systems is unanimous. This language is the network of products collectively called cytokines. The effect of these factors spans from the hypothalamus to the endometrium and is undoubtedly involved in the maintenance of the delicate balance within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal-endometrial axis. Orchestrated networks of these cytokines also seem to be linked to the steroid hormone signals, an essential feature for maintenance of normal menstrual cycles. Evidence in favour of these emerging concepts is discussed. Major emphasis is placed on interferons, interleukins, tumour necrosis factor, transforming growth factors and colony-stimulating factors.

  19. Endometrial adenocarcinoma, adjuvant radiotherapy tailored to prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, J H; Hoekstra, C J; van Putten, W L; Tjokrowardojo, A J; Koper, P C

    1990-02-01

    The optimal adjuvant radiotherapy for surgically treated endometrial cancer has not yet been defined. We report on 389 patients treated between 1970 and 1985 with adjuvant radiotherapy. The treatment was tailored to the known prognostic factors: myometrial invasion and grade of differentiation of the tumor. Ten-year overall survival was 67%, 10-year relapse-free survival 77%; 23% relapse, of which 21% distant and 6% locoregional relapse. In a multivariate analysis, stage (pT), grade, and myometrial invasion were prognostic factors. The number of locoregional failures was very small (n = 23). This small number, the fact that radiation treatment was tailored to prognostic factors, and the absence of a nontreated control group precluded an analysis of the effect of the adjuvant irradiation. Large randomized studies with a control (no treatment) arm should be performed to determine the value of adjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:2303362

  20. [Chemotherapy of metastatic endometrial carcinoma. Review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Pierga, J Y; Dieras, V; Paraiso, D; Pouillart, P

    1995-12-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is one of the most common gynaecological cancers in Western countries. About 75% of the patients present limited disease, confined to the uterus that can be cured by surgery. However, one third of the patients will need systemic treatment because of metastatic or relapsing disease. Hormonotherapy response rates are less than 20%. In monochemotherapy, the higher response rates are constantly observed with doxorubicin or cisplatinum (25-35%). Most commonly used combination are CAP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, cisplatinum) or AP (doxorubicin, cisplatinum), giving 35 to 60% of objective responses. Recent results of large randomized trials have demonstrated marginal, if any, effect of cyclophosphamide and superiority of doxorubicin-cisplatinum combination compared to doxorubicin alone for response and survival. Chemotherapy as hormonotherapy remains palliative. Median response duration is 4 to 6 months and median overall survival duration is 7 to 10 months. Currently, hormonotherapy-chemotherapy combination have not been proved to be more effective than chemotherapy alone.

  1. [Myxoid mesenchymal tumors of uterus: endometrial stromal and smooth muscle tumors, myxoid variant].

    PubMed

    Chesnais, Anne-Laure; Watkin, Emmanuel; Beurton, Daniel; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan

    2011-06-01

    Four myxoid variant of uterine mesenchymal tumors are reported. One was a low grade stromal sarcoma with infiltrative margins and the others were well circumscribed tumors corresponding to an endometrial stromal nodule and two leiomyomas. They were hypocellular neoplasms composed of stellated cells with an abundant Alcian Blue positive myxoid matrix. The myxoid nature of the neoplasms obscured their cellular nature and made the distinction between smooth muscle and endometrial stromal tumors difficult. Endometrial stromal tumors, showed very focal areas of small basophilic cells, characteristic of endometrial stroma. The diagnosis was based on the presence of a spiral arteriolar network, a CD10 positivity as well as the absence of h-caldesmon and desmin expression. The two myxoid leiomyomas showed more spindle cells and a desmin expression while h-caldesmon was negative and CD10 focally positive in both cases. Myxoid variant of endometrial stromal tumors does not necessarily exhibit the typical morphology of endometrial stroma. They may demonstrate morphological features of smooth muscle tumors in the uterus. Also, myxoid changes in uterin smooth muscle tumors may modify the classical immunoreactivity of smooth muscle markers in these tumors and make it difficult to distinguish between benign and malignant neoplasms. An immunohistochemical panel of antibodies including CD10, h-caldesmon and desmin may help in establishing the correct diagnosis.

  2. Surgical Management of Early Endometrial Cancer: An Update and Proposal of a Therapeutic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Francesca; Balbi, Giancarlo; Di Martino, Luca; Grauso, Flavio; Salzillo, Maria Elena; Messalli, Enrico Michelino

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years technical improvements have produced a dramatic shift from traditional open surgery towards a minimally invasive approach for the management of early endometrial cancer. Advancement in minimally invasive surgical approaches has allowed extensive staging procedures to be performed with significantly reduced patient morbidity. Debate is ongoing regarding the choice of a minimally invasive approach that has the most effective benefit for the patients, the surgeon, and the healthcare system as a whole. Surgical treatment of women with presumed early endometrial cancer should take into account the features of endometrial disease and the general surgical risk of the patient. Women with endometrial cancer are often aged, obese, and with cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities that increase the risk of peri-operative complications, so it is important to tailor the extent and the radicalness of surgery in order to decrease morbidity and mortality potentially derivable from unnecessary procedures. In this regard women with negative nodes derive no benefit from unnecessary lymphadenectomy, but may develop short- and long-term morbidity related to this procedure. Preoperative and intraoperative techniques could be critical tools for tailoring the extent and the radicalness of surgery in the management of women with presumed early endometrial cancer. In this review we will discuss updates in surgical management of early endometrial cancer and also the role of preoperative and intraoperative evaluation of lymph node status in influencing surgical options, with the aim of proposing a management algorithm based on the literature and our experience. PMID:25063051

  3. Diagnosis of Endometrial-Factor Infertility: Current Approaches and New Avenues for Research

    PubMed Central

    Katzorke, N.; Vilella, F.; Ruiz, M.; Krüssel, J.-S.; Simón, C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, research to improve success rates in reproductive medicine has focused predominantly on the understanding and optimization of embryo quality. However, the emergence of personalized medicine in ovulation induction and embryology has shifted the focus to assessing the individual status of the endometrium. The endometrium is considered receptive during an individually defined period, the window of implantation (WOI), when the mother permits a blastocyst to attach and implant. This individual receptivity status can now be objectively diagnosed using the endometrial receptivity array (ERA) developed in 2011. The ERA, together with a computational algorithm, detects the unique transcriptomic signature of endometrial receptivity by analyzing 238 differentially expressed genes and reliably predicting the WOI. We and others have illustrated the utility of this personalized diagnostic approach to discriminate between individual physiological variation in endometrial receptivity and unknown endometrial pathology, deemed as causal in recurrent implantation failure (RIF). An international randomized controlled trial (“The ERA as a diagnostic guide for personalized embryo transfer.” ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01954758) is underway to determine the clinical value of this endometrial diagnostic intervention in the work-up for reproductive care. In this review, we analyse the current clinical practice in the diagnosis of the endometrial factor together with new avenues of research. PMID:27365540

  4. Genetic alterations in endometrial cancer by targeted next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ya-Sian; Huang, Hsien-Da; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2016-02-01

    Many genetic factors play important roles in the development of endometrial cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate genetic alterations in the Taiwanese population with endometrial cancer. DNA was extracted from 10 cases of fresh-frozen endometrial cancer tissue. The exomes of cancer-related genes were captured using the NimbleGen Comprehensive Cancer Panel (578 cancer-related genes) and sequenced using the Illumina Genomic Sequencing Platform. Our results revealed 120 variants in 99 genes, 21 of which were included in the Oncomine Cancer Research Panel used in the National Cancer Institute Match Trial. The 21 genes comprised 8 tumor suppressor candidates (ATM, MSH2, PIK3R1, PTCH1, PTEN, TET2, TP53, and TSC1) and 13 oncogene candidates (ALK, BCL9, CTNNB1, ERBB2, FGFR2, FLT3, HNF1A, KIT, MTOR, PDGFRA, PPP2R1A, PTPN11, and SF3B1). We identified a high frequency of mutations in PTEN (50%) and genes involved in the endometrial cancer-related molecular pathway, which involves the IL-7 signaling pathway (PIK3R1, n=1; AKT2, n=1; FOXO1, n=1). We report the mutational landscape of endometrial cancer in the Taiwanese population. We believe that this study will shed new light on fundamental aspects for understanding the molecular pathogenesis of endometrial cancer and may aid in the development of new targeted therapies. PMID:26626801

  5. Intracrine Androgens Enhance Decidualization and Modulate Expression of Human Endometrial Receptivity Genes.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Douglas A; Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Cousins, Fiona L; Critchley, Hilary O D; Saunders, Philippa T K

    2016-01-01

    The endometrium is a complex, steroid-dependent tissue that undergoes dynamic cyclical remodelling. Transformation of stromal fibroblasts (ESC) into specialised secretory cells (decidualization) is fundamental to the establishment of a receptive endometrial microenvironment which can support and maintain pregnancy. Androgen receptors (AR) are present in ESC; in other tissues local metabolism of ovarian and adrenal-derived androgens regulate AR-dependent gene expression. We hypothesised that altered expression/activity of androgen biosynthetic enzymes would regulate tissue availability of bioactive androgens and the process of decidualization. Primary human ESC were treated in vitro for 1-8 days with progesterone and cAMP (decidualized) in the presence or absence of the AR antagonist flutamide. Time and treatment-dependent changes in genes essential for a) intra-tissue biosynthesis of androgens (5α-reductase/SRD5A1, aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3/AKR1C3), b) establishment of endometrial decidualization (IGFBP1, prolactin) and c) endometrial receptivity (SPP1, MAOA, EDNRB) were measured. Decidualization of ESC resulted in significant time-dependent changes in expression of AKR1C3 and SRD5A1 and secretion of T/DHT. Addition of flutamide significantly reduced secretion of IGFBP1 and prolactin and altered the expression of endometrial receptivity markers. Intracrine biosynthesis of endometrial androgens during decidualization may play a key role in endometrial receptivity and offer a novel target for fertility treatment. PMID:26817618

  6. Subsequent endometrial carcinoma with adjuvant tamoxifen treatment in Japanese breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, N; Hachisuga, T; Saito, T; Kawarabayashi, T

    2001-01-01

    This study aimed to detail the clinicopathologic features of endometrial carcinomas that developed in Japanese patients receiving adjuvant tamoxifen treatment for breast cancer patients. Ten endometrial carcinomas in tamoxifen-treated breast cancer patients were collected from two medical centers. The endometrial carcinomas included two stage Ia, four stage Ib, two stage Ic and two stage IIIc. Three tumors were Grade 1, six were Grade 2, and one was Grade 3. The tumor was limited to the endometrium in two cases. Myometrial invasion was limited to the inner half of the myometrium in five cases and involved the outer half in three. A mild degree of lymphovascular space invasion was identified in five cases. Deep cervical invasion was recognized in one case. The cell types comprised nine endometrioid adenocarcinomas and one serous carcinoma. Five of eight postmenopausal endometrial carcinomas were associated with polypoid endometrial lesions composed of cystically dilated atrophic and proliferative glands widely separated by fibrotic stroma. Two patients with retroperitoneal lymph node metastases died of endometrial cancer. One patient developed a contralateral breast cancer during tamoxifen treatment. No patient died of breast cancer. We did not demonstrate a higher frequency of either high-grade tumors or unfavorable histologic subtypes in tamoxifen-treated Japanese breast cancer patients.

  7. Ovarian and endometrial endometrioid carcinomas have distinct CTNNB1 and PTEN mutation profiles.

    PubMed

    McConechy, Melissa K; Ding, Jiarui; Senz, Janine; Yang, Winnie; Melnyk, Nataliya; Tone, Alicia A; Prentice, Leah M; Wiegand, Kimberly C; McAlpine, Jessica N; Shah, Sohrab P; Lee, Cheng-Han; Goodfellow, Paul J; Gilks, C Blake; Huntsman, David G

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian endometrioid carcinomas and endometrial endometrioid carcinomas share many histological and molecular alterations. These similarities are likely due to a common endometrial epithelial precursor cell of origin, with most ovarian endometrioid carcinomas arising from endometriosis. To directly compare the mutation profiles of two morphologically similar tumor types, endometrial endometrioid carcinomas (n=307) and ovarian endometrioid carcinomas (n=33), we performed select exon capture sequencing on a panel of genes: ARID1A, PTEN, PIK3CA, KRAS, CTNNB1, PPP2R1A, TP53. We found that PTEN mutations are more frequent in low-grade endometrial endometrioid carcinomas (67%) compared with low-grade ovarian endometrioid carcinomas (17%) (P<0.0001). By contrast, CTNNB1 mutations are significantly different in low-grade ovarian endometrioid carcinomas (53%) compared with low-grade endometrial endometrioid carcinomas (28%) (P<0.0057). This difference in CTNNB1 mutation frequency may be reflective of the distinct microenvironments; the epithelial cells lining an endometriotic cyst within the ovary are exposed to a highly oxidative environment that promotes tumorigenesis. Understanding the distinct mutation patterns found in the PI3K and Wnt pathways of ovarian and endometrial endometrioid carcinomas may provide future opportunities for stratifying patients for targeted therapeutics.

  8. The potential role of elastography in differentiating between endometrial polyps and submucosal fibroids: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial polyps and submucosal fibroids are common causes of abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) and less commonly infertility. The prevalence of such intrauterine lesions increases with age during the reproductive years, and usually decreases after menopause. The first-line imaging examination in the diagnosis of endometrial polyps as well as submucosal fibroidsis ultrasound, but its accuracy is not obvious. Elastography is an ultrasound-based imaging modality that is used to assess the stiffness of examined tissues. Considering the fact that endometrial polyps derive from soft endometrial tissue and submucosal fibroids are made of hard muscle tissue, elastography seems a perfect tool to differentiate between such lesions. I present two groups of patients with AUB and intrauterine lesions suspected on ultrasound. In the first group of patients, elastography showed that the stiffness of the lesion was similar to the endometrium and softer than the myometrium. During hysteroscopies endometrial polyps were removed. In the second group of patients, elastography showed that the stiffness of the lesion was similar to the myometrium and harder than the endometrium. During hysteroscopies submucosal fibroids were removed. In both groups, the diagnosis was confirmed by the pathological examination in all cases. It was demonstrated that with the use of elastography it is possible to assess the stiffness of intrauterine lesions, which may be useful in differentiating between endometrial polyps and submucosal fibroids. PMID:26327901

  9. The potential role of elastography in differentiating between endometrial polyps and submucosal fibroids: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Sławomir

    2015-06-01

    Endometrial polyps and submucosal fibroids are common causes of abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) and less commonly infertility. The prevalence of such intrauterine lesions increases with age during the reproductive years, and usually decreases after menopause. The first-line imaging examination in the diagnosis of endometrial polyps as well as submucosal fibroidsis ultrasound, but its accuracy is not obvious. Elastography is an ultrasound-based imaging modality that is used to assess the stiffness of examined tissues. Considering the fact that endometrial polyps derive from soft endometrial tissue and submucosal fibroids are made of hard muscle tissue, elastography seems a perfect tool to differentiate between such lesions. I present two groups of patients with AUB and intrauterine lesions suspected on ultrasound. In the first group of patients, elastography showed that the stiffness of the lesion was similar to the endometrium and softer than the myometrium. During hysteroscopies endometrial polyps were removed. In the second group of patients, elastography showed that the stiffness of the lesion was similar to the myometrium and harder than the endometrium. During hysteroscopies submucosal fibroids were removed. In both groups, the diagnosis was confirmed by the pathological examination in all cases. It was demonstrated that with the use of elastography it is possible to assess the stiffness of intrauterine lesions, which may be useful in differentiating between endometrial polyps and submucosal fibroids. PMID:26327901

  10. Surgical management of early endometrial cancer: an update and proposal of a therapeutic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Francesca; Balbi, Giancarlo; Di Martino, Luca; Grauso, Flavio; Salzillo, Maria Elena; Messalli, Enrico Michelino

    2014-07-26

    In the last few years technical improvements have produced a dramatic shift from traditional open surgery towards a minimally invasive approach for the management of early endometrial cancer. Advancement in minimally invasive surgical approaches has allowed extensive staging procedures to be performed with significantly reduced patient morbidity. Debate is ongoing regarding the choice of a minimally invasive approach that has the most effective benefit for the patients, the surgeon, and the healthcare system as a whole. Surgical treatment of women with presumed early endometrial cancer should take into account the features of endometrial disease and the general surgical risk of the patient. Women with endometrial cancer are often aged, obese, and with cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities that increase the risk of peri-operative complications, so it is important to tailor the extent and the radicalness of surgery in order to decrease morbidity and mortality potentially derivable from unnecessary procedures. In this regard women with negative nodes derive no benefit from unnecessary lymphadenectomy, but may develop short- and long-term morbidity related to this procedure. Preoperative and intraoperative techniques could be critical tools for tailoring the extent and the radicalness of surgery in the management of women with presumed early endometrial cancer. In this review we will discuss updates in surgical management of early endometrial cancer and also the role of preoperative and intraoperative evaluation of lymph node status in influencing surgical options, with the aim of proposing a management algorithm based on the literature and our experience.

  11. Immunohistochemical expression of glypican 3 in endometrial carcinoma and correlation with prognostic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Sarah A; Raboh, Nermine M Abd

    2015-01-01

    Background: Carcinogenesis is associated with several critical regulatory molecules which are involved in different signaling pathways such as the WNT signaling pathways. Among which the β-catenin dependent pathway has been associated with human endometrial cancer. Genetic and biochemical studies have demonstrated that glypicans can regulate several signaling pathways including those triggered by Wnts. Glypican 3 is one of six mammalian members of the glypican family of proteoglycans. Overexpression of glypican 3 has been reported in some types of cancers but only few data are available about its expression in endometrial carcinoma and its role in endometrial carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine the immunohistochemical expression of glypican 3 in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (EEC) and serous endometrial carcinoma (SEC), and to correlate its expression with prognostic factors of endometrial carcinoma. Materials and methods: Immunohistochemical expression of glypican 3 was studied in fifty two EEC and nineteen SEC cases. Results: Glypican 3 expression showed a significant difference between EEC and SEC (P = 0.027) and it was significantly correlated with tumor grade, stage and myometrial invasion (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Glypican 3 expression can be used as an adjunct in the differentiation between EEC and SEC. Glypican 3 is associated with poor prognostic parameters in both EEC and SEC, and it can be a promising molecule for targeted immunotherapy in positive cases. PMID:26722522

  12. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen as a tumour marker in patients with endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hashiguchi, Y.; Kasai, M.; Fukuda, T.; Ichimura, T.; Yasui, T.; Sumi, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background No potential tumour markers have been validated for prognosis in endometrial cancer. However, carcinoembryonic antigen (cea) is one of the most widely used tumour markers in various types of cancer. Although cea expression in endometrial cancer has been investigated, its prognostic value remains controversial, and no studies have investigated serum cea levels in large case series. In the present study, we investigated diagnostic and prognostic applications of serum cea for endometrial cancer. Methods This prospective study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. Between January 2006 and December 2012, serum cea was measured prospectively in 215 patients with endometrial cancer and was subsequently measured during treatment and at scheduled follow-up examinations in patients with elevated baseline serum cea. Results During the study period, 215 patients (142 stage i, 19 stage ii, 32 stage iii, 22 stage iv) were treated for endometrial cancer. By the time of last follow-up, 52 had relapsed (24.2%), and the median follow-up duration was 45 months (range: 1–95 months). Elevated serum cea was identified in 25 patients (11.6%) and was associated with histologic type (p = 0.04), histologic grade (p = 0.03), and myometrial invasion depth (p = 0.01). Elevated serum cea was not related to clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, age, menopausal status, or body mass index. Relapse of disease was related to elevated serum cea (p = 0.006). Conclusions Serum cea is a potential prognostic indicator for endometrial cancer. PMID:27803603

  13. Inflammation influences steroid hormone receptors targeted by progestins in endometrial stromal cells from women with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Grandi, Giovanni; Mueller, Michael D; Papadia, Andrea; Kocbek, Vida; Bersinger, Nick A; Petraglia, Felice; Cagnacci, Angelo; McKinnon, Brett

    2016-09-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent disease characterised by the growth of endometrial epithelial and stromal cells outside the uterus creating a chronic inflammatory environment that further contributes to disease progression. The first choice treatment for endometriosis is currently progestin mediated hormone modulation. In addition to their progestogenic activity however, progestins also have the potential to bind to other nuclear receptors influencing their local activity on endometriotic cells. This local activity will be dependent on the steroid hormone receptor expression that occurs in endometrial cells in a chronic inflammatory environment. We therefore aimed to quantify receptors targeted by progestins in endometrial stromal cells after exposure to inflammation. Using primary endometrial stromal cells isolated from women with endometriosis we examined the mRNA and protein expression of the progesterone receptors A and B, membrane progesterone receptors 1 and 2, androgen receptors, mineralocorticoid receptors and glucocorticoid receptors after exposure to the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β). The results indicate that both cytokines reduced the expression of progesterone receptors and increased the expression of the glucocorticoid receptors in the endometrial stromal cells. The change in expression of progestin targets in endometrial stromal cells in an inflammatory environment could contribute to the progesterone resistance observed in endometriotic cells and ultimately influence the design of hormonal therapies aimed at treating this disease. PMID:27371899

  14. Metastatic endometrial endometrioid carcinoma with clear cell changes to the breast: a case report.

    PubMed

    Farghaly, Hanan

    2013-02-01

    Metastasis to breast from extramammary tissue is rare, and endometrial cancer has rarely been reported to metastasize to the breast. An extensive search in the medical literature reveals only 2 cases. They can be easily mistaken for primary breast carcinoma both clinically and radiologically, even with known history of endometrial carcinoma. This report presents a case of a 64-year-old woman who had endometrial carcinoma treated with total hysterectomy and adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy. Three years after the diagnosis, she had evidence of a solitary breast metastasis. To our knowledge, this is the third described case of endometrial cancer metastatic to the breast and the first in which the endometrial carcinoma demonstrates significant clear cell changes. This report is a reminder that although rare, endometrial carcinoma has the potential to metastasize to breast and illustrates how metastatic lesions in the breast can masquerade clinically as a primary carcinoma. Furthermore, essential guidelines necessary to distinguish primary from metastatic lesions in the breast are presented.

  15. Role of MicroRNAs in carcinogenesis that potential for biomarker of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Widodo; Djati, Muhammad Sasmito; Rifa'i, Muhaimin

    2016-01-01

    The non-invasive diagnostic tool for early detection of endometrial cancer still limited. The etiology of this disease is believed to be associated with disharmony hormone production. One predominant factor that regulate hormone production is microRNA (miRNAs). Some studies reported that miRNAs play a significant role in the process carcinogenesis. We have identified 12 of miRNAs that potentially have a role in controlling endometrial carcinogenesis pathways. Further analysis suggested that these miRNA targeted genes that regulate the early development of endometrial cancer. These genes cluster into several functional groups involving a process of angiogenesis, apoptosis, cell cycle, cell proliferation and p53 pathways. Some of the genes are PTEN, GSK3b, and TP53, which are a tumor suppressor that control the process of growth arrest, DNA Repair, and Apoptosis. Upregulation of the miRNA may obstruct the cell ability to control the cell cycle. This study was found three miRNA that plays a role in the development of endometrial cancer. The hsa-miR-495 and hsa-miR-152 were repressed in endometrial cancer compared to normal tissue. The microRNA regulate genes that control proliferation and cell survival. Moreover, hsa-miR-181d was upregulated to control expression a tumor suppressor gene, PTEN to protect the cancer cell from apoptosis. Further investigation to validate the function of the miRNA is a warrant for developing biomarkers of endometrial carcinoma. PMID:27006767

  16. Selected physical activities and the risk of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Levi, F.; La Vecchia, C.; Negri, E.; Franceschi, S.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between various indicators of physical activity and endometrial cancer risk was analysed using data of a case-control study conducted in 1988-1991 in Switzerland and Italy on 274 histologically confirmed cases and 572 controls admitted to hospital for acute, non neoplastic, non hormone-related diseases. Using a self-rated assessment of total physical activity, there was a systematic tendency for the cases to report more frequently 'low' or 'very low' physical activity. The relative risks were similar for 'very high' or 'moderately high' physical activity, but increased in the two lowest levels, with point estimates, in various decades of age, between 1.3 and 2.3 for 'moderately low' and over 2.5 for 'very low' physical activity. Although the association was apparently stronger at older ages, all the trends in risk were significant. Allowance for major identified potential distorting factors, including body mass index and a measure of total energy intake, could explain only in part the association, and the inverse trends in risk remained statistically significant. When selected types of physical activity were analysed, no association was observed with climbing stairs or walking, but the risk estimates for the lowest level of activity was over 4 for housework, and between 1.5 and 1.9 for sport and leisure and occupational activity. Thus, the present findings suggest that a moderate or high physical activity is an indicator of reduced endometrial cancer risk, although this observation still requires epidemiologic confirmation and clearer definition from a pathogenic point of view. PMID:8471444

  17. Renin–angiotensin system gene polymorphisms and endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Delforce, Sarah J; Wang, Yu; Ashton, Katie A; Proietto, Anthony; Otton, Geoffrey; Blackwell, C Caroline; Scott, Rodney J; Lumbers, Eugenie R

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common gynaecological malignancy and its incidence is increasing. Dysregulation of the endometrial renin–angiotensin system (RAS) could predispose to EC; therefore, we studied the prevalence of RAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Australian women with EC. SNPs assessed were AGT M235T (rs699); AGTR1 A1166C (rs5186); ACE A240T and T93C (rs4291, rs4292) and ATP6AP2 (rs2968915). They were identified using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. The C allele of the AGTR1 SNP (rs5186) was more prevalent in women with EC (odds ratio (OR) 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.2–2.3), P=0.002). The CC genotype of this SNP is associated with upregulation of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1). The G allele of AGT rs699, which is associated with higher angiotensinogen (AGT) levels, was less prevalent in women with EC (OR 0.54, 95% CI (0.39–0.74), P<0.001) compared with controls. AGT and AGT formed by removal of angiotensin I (des(Ang I)AGT) are both anti-angiogenic. In women with EC who had had hormone replacement therapy (HRT), the prevalence of the AGTR1 SNP (rs5186) and the ACE SNPs (rs4291 and rs4292) was greater than in women who had no record of HRT; SNP rs4291 is associated with increased plasma ACE activity. These data suggest there is an interaction between genotype, oestrogen replacement therapy and EC. In conclusion, the prevalence of two SNPs that enhance RAS activity was different in women with EC compared with healthy controls. These genetic factors may interact with obesity and hyperoestrogenism, predisposing ageing, obese women to EC. PMID:27068935

  18. Renin-angiotensin system gene polymorphisms and endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Pringle, Kirsty G; Delforce, Sarah J; Wang, Yu; Ashton, Katie A; Proietto, Anthony; Otton, Geoffrey; Blackwell, C Caroline; Scott, Rodney J; Lumbers, Eugenie R

    2016-05-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common gynaecological malignancy and its incidence is increasing. Dysregulation of the endometrial renin-angiotensin system (RAS) could predispose to EC; therefore, we studied the prevalence of RAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Australian women with EC. SNPs assessed were AGT M235T (rs699); AGTR1 A1166C (rs5186); ACE A240T and T93C (rs4291, rs4292) and ATP6AP2 (rs2968915). They were identified using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. The C allele of the AGTR1 SNP (rs5186) was more prevalent in women with EC (odds ratio (OR) 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.2-2.3), P=0.002). The CC genotype of this SNP is associated with upregulation of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1). The G allele of AGT rs699, which is associated with higher angiotensinogen (AGT) levels, was less prevalent in women with EC (OR 0.54, 95% CI (0.39-0.74), P<0.001) compared with controls. AGT and AGT formed by removal of angiotensin I (des(Ang I)AGT) are both anti-angiogenic. In women with EC who had had hormone replacement therapy (HRT), the prevalence of the AGTR1 SNP (rs5186) and the ACE SNPs (rs4291 and rs4292) was greater than in women who had no record of HRT; SNP rs4291 is associated with increased plasma ACE activity. These data suggest there is an interaction between genotype, oestrogen replacement therapy and EC. In conclusion, the prevalence of two SNPs that enhance RAS activity was different in women with EC compared with healthy controls. These genetic factors may interact with obesity and hyperoestrogenism, predisposing ageing, obese women to EC.

  19. Fibulin-5 localisation in human endometrial cancer shifts from epithelial to stromal with increasing tumour grade, and silencing promotes endometrial epithelial cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    WINSHIP, AMY LOUISE; RAINCZUK, KATE; TON, AMANDA; DIMITRIADIS, EVA

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynaecological malignancy. While endocrine, genetic and inflammatory factors are thought to contribute to its pathogenesis, its precise etiology and molecular regulators remain poorly understood. Fibulin-5 is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that inhibits cell growth and invasion in several cancer cell types and is downregulated in a number of types of human cancer. However, it is unknown whether fibulin-5 plays a role in endometrial tumourigenesis. In the current report, the expression and localisation of fibulin-5 in type I endometrioid human endometrial cancers of grades (G) 1–3 was investigated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Fibulin-5 mRNA was found to be significantly reduced in whole tumour tissues from women across G1-3 compared with benign endometrium (P<0.0001). Consistently, fibulin-5 protein was also reduced in the tumour epithelial compartment across increasing tumour grades. By contrast, increased protein localisation to the tumour stroma was observed with increasing grade. Knockdown by small interfering RNA in Ishikawa endometrial epithelial cancer cells expressing fibulin-5 stimulated cell adhesion and proliferation in vitro. Fibulin-5 mRNA expression in Ishikawa cells was induced by transforming growth factor-β and fibulin-5 in turn activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), suggesting that it may act via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In summary, the present study identified fibulin-5 as a downregulated ECM gene in human endometrial cancer and observed a shift from epithelial to stromal protein localisation with increasing tumour grade in women. These data suggest that loss of fibulin-5 function may promote endometrial cancer progression by enhancing epithelial cell adhesion and proliferation. PMID:27347195

  20. Does Cytological Laboratory Holds the Responsibility for the Low Sensitivity of the PAP Test in Detecting Endometrial Cancer?

    PubMed

    Milicić, Valerija; Matić, Tereza Solocki; Martinek, Vjenceslav; Tomasković, Igor; Ramljak, Vesna

    2015-09-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecological cancer but there is no economically justified screening method. Although we can detect endometrial cells in the sample using PAP test, many studies show low sensitivity and positive predictive value of PAP test for the diagnosis of endometrial cancer. The goal of this research was to determine significance of PAP test for the diagnostics of endometrial carcinoma. Sensitivity and specificity were analyzed with statistical parameters. VCE (vaginal, cervical, endocervical) smears of patients with histologically proven endometrial carcinoma were re-examined in order to determine the proportion of false negative results for endometrial cancer cells in the VCE samples. Study group consisted of all consecutive patients with PAP test performed at the Department of Clinical Cytology of the University Hospital Center Osijek from 2002 until the end of 2014. There was one inclusion criteria: subsequent hysterectomy or curettage within the six month after the PAP test, regardless of histological finding. From a total of 263 patients with previous PAP test and histologically proven endometrial cancer, endometrial cancer was cytologicaly diagnosed in 24.7% (including suspicious and positive findings), while 66.2% patients had normal cytological findings. The diagnostic value of PAP test in detection of endometrial cancer was statistically revealed with 25% sensitivity and 99% specificity. To determine false negative rate VCE samples were reviewed for patients with histologically proven endometrial cancer and negative VCE findings. There were a total of five negative results. In one case revision did not changed the original negative diagnosis, but benign endometrial cells, a lot of blood and inadequate cytohormonal status were found. In three out of four reviewed samples there were missed cells of endometrial adenocarcinoma. Review of remaining VCE sample upgraded the diagnosis from negative to suspicious for endometrial cancer

  1. Endometrial stem cells repair injured endometrium and induce angiogenesis via AKT and ERK pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanling; Lin, Xiaona; Dai, Yongdong; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Zhu, Haiyan; Jiang, Yinshen; Zhang, Songying

    2016-11-01

    Intrauterine adhesions are common acquired endometrial syndromes secondary to endometrial injury, with limited effective therapies. Recently, several studies have reported that bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) could repair injured endometrium in animal experiments. However, the role of stem cells in endometrial injury repair and its therapeutic mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we established mouse endometrial injury model and examined the benefit of human endometrial mesenchymal stem cells derived from menstrual blood (MenSCs) in restoration of injured endometrium. Injured endometrium exhibited significantly accelerated restoration at Day 7 after MenSCs transplantation, with increased endometrial thickness and microvessel density. Moreover, the fertility of mice with injured endometrium was improved, with higher conception rate (53.57% vs 14.29%, P = 0.014) and larger embryo number (3.1 ± 0.6 vs 0.9 ± 0.7, P = 0.030) in MenSCs group than control group, while no difference was found in undamaged horns between two groups. Conditioned medium from MenSCs (MenSCs-CM) could decrease H2O2-induced apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and promote proliferation, migration and angiogenesis. Angiogenesis effect of MenSCs-CM was also confirmed in Matrigel plug assay in mice. Furthermore, we discovered that MenSCs-CM could activate AKT and ERK pathways and induce the overexpression of eNOS, VEGFA, VEGFR1, VEGFR2 and TIE2 in HUVECs, which are critical in MenSCs-CM-induced angiogenesis. Angiogenesis induced by MenSCs-CM could be reversed by inhibitors of AKT and/or ERK. Taken together, we concluded that MenSCs could restore injured endometrium and improve the fertility of the endometrial injury mice, which was partially attributed to angiogenesis induced by MenSCs. PMID:27486270

  2. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor signaling by metformin in endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    XIE, YA; WANG, JING-LU; JI, MEI; YUAN, ZHONG-FU; PENG, ZHENG; ZHANG, YI; WEN, JIAN-GUO; SHI, HUI-RONG

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, diabetes and insulin resistance are marked risk factors that promote the development of type I endometrial cancer. Previous studies have demonstrated that insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and IGF-2 promote cell proliferation in endometrial cancer cells, while metformin reverses this effect and inhibits cell proliferation. However, the effects of metformin on the regulation of the IGF signaling pathway are unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulation of IGF signaling by metformin in endometrial cancer cells, and to determine the effects of metformin combined with IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) inhibitor on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cell proliferation was assessed following exposure of Ishikawa and HEC-1B endometrial cancer cell lines to metformin and/or the IGF-1R inhibitor, PPP. Apoptosis was assessed by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. Metformin was observed to downregulate IGF-1R and upregulate IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) mRNA and protein expression, while compound C, an adenosine monophosphate protein kinase inhibitor, reversed this effect. Metformin administered with PPP inhibited endometrial cancer cell proliferation to a greater degree than treatment with either agent alone. At high concentrations (1 or 2 mM), metformin induced apoptosis in endometrial cancer cells. Metformin combined with IGF-1R axis inhibitors may act synergistically to kill tumor cells, as metformin was shown to delay and prevent IGF-1R feedback. In conclusion, this study supported the results of animal studies and subclinical studies, demonstrating the feasibility of metformin combined with IGF-1R axis inhibitors in the treatment of endometrial cancer. PMID:25289085

  3. In situ androgen and estrogen biosynthesis in endometrial cancer: focus on androgen actions and intratumoral production.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kiyoshi; Miki, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takashi; McNamara, Keely May; Sasano, Hironobu

    2016-07-01

    In situ estrogen biosynthesis is considered to play pivotal roles in the development and progression of human endometrial carcinoma. However, the biological roles of androgen have remained virtually unknown. Various epidemiological studies have revealed that elevated serum androgen levels are generally associated with an increased risk of developing endometrial carcinoma; however, studies directly examining androgens in carcinoma tissues are relatively rare and reviews summarizing this information are scarce. Therefore, we summarized recent studies on androgens in endometrial carcinoma, especially focusing androgen actions and in situ androgen biosynthesis. Among the enzymes required for local biosynthesis of androgen, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 5 (conversion from androstenedione to testosterone) and 5α-reductase (reduction of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT)) are the principal enzymes involved in the formation of biologically most potent androgen, DHT. Both enzymes and androgen receptor were expressed in endometrial carcinoma tissues, and in situ production of DHT has been reported to exist in endometrial carcinoma tissues. However, testosterone is not only a precursor of DHT production, but also a precursor of estradiol synthesis, as a substrate of the aromatase enzyme. Therefore, aromatase could be another key enzyme serving as a negative regulator for in situ production of DHT by reducing amounts of the precursor. In an in vitro study, DHT was reported to exert antiproliferative effects on endometrial carcinoma cells. Intracrine mechanisms of androgens, the downstream signals of AR, which are directly related to anticancer progression, and the clinical significance of DHT-AR pathway in the patients with endometrial carcinoma have, however, not been fully elucidated. PMID:27287451

  4. Endometrial inflammation and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins induced by Mycoplasma bovis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengyao; Wang, Guoqing; Lv, Tingting; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Xie, Guanghong; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng; Cao, Rongfeng

    2014-03-15

    Mycoplasma bovis infection can cause endometrial inflammation leading to infertility and involuntary culling in dairy cows. Because extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins affect the adherence of mycoplasma to eukaryotic cell surface, they may play a role in the pathogenesis of the bacteria. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the endometrial inflammatory response and ECM protein expression induced by M bovis. Endometrial concentrations of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and mRNA and protein expression of collagen IV (CL-IV), fibronectin (FN), and laminin (LN) were evaluated 10, 20, and 30 days after M bovis intrauterine infusion in breed cows 18 days postpartum. The presence of the bacteria in the uterus was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Endometrial TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 concentrations in the treatment group were greater (P < 0.05) than in the positive and negative control groups 20 and 30 days after infusion. Endometrial CL-IV, FN, and LN mRNA and protein expression increased (P < 0.01) 20 days after infusion in all groups. However, the increase was more pronounced in the treatment group and reactive expressions were greater (P < 0.05) than in the positive and negative control groups 10, 20, and 30 days after infusion. In conclusion, M bovis triggered endometrial inflammatory response and increased CL-IV, FN, and LN mRNA and protein expression. The abnormal expression of ECM these proteins may promote the pathogenic effects of M bovis that lead to endometrial tissue damage and infertility.

  5. Association between Body Mass Index and Physical Function among Endometrial Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Justin C.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to quantify the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and physical function among endometrial cancer survivors. Understanding this relationship would help healthcare providers target efforts to refer obese endometrial cancer survivors to weight loss and exercise interventions. Methods We conducted a survey of 213 endometrial cancer survivors who received cancer care at an academic l health system between 2006 and 2010. Physical function subscale was quantified using physical functional component score from the SF-12 questionnaire. We compared physical function of endometrial cancer survivors to population-based age-standardized normative values. Results Among the 213 patients, 16% were normal weight (BMI ≤25 kg/m2), and 52% were obese (≥30 kg/m2). Higher BMI categories were associated with lower physical function (Ptrend = 0.003), as a continuous variable each 5kg/m2 higher BMI, physical function score was lower by 0.15 points (β = -0.15; P = 0.045). Compared to population-based age-standardized normative values, patients <75yrs reported lower physical function, whereas patients ≥75yrs reported better physical function. BMI was the only covariate associated with differences in physical function between survivors and age-standardized normative values (P = 0.039). Conclusions Among endometrial cancer survivors, higher BMI is associated with lower physical function. Younger endometrial cancer survivors report lower physical function compared to age-standardized normative values. Healthcare providers should be aware that younger, obese endometrial cancer survivors may particularly benefit from interventions such as exercise and weight loss to increase or preserve physical function. PMID:27529546

  6. Endometrial oxytocin receptor and uterine prostaglandin secretion in mares during the oestrous cycle and early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Starbuck, G R; Stout, T A; Lamming, G E; Allen, W R; Flint, A P

    1998-07-01

    Circulating concentrations of 13,14-dihydro-15-ketoprostaglandin F2 alpha (PGFM) were measured before and after administration of oxytocin and after endometrial biopsy, with or without uterine flushing performed per vaginam, on days 10, 14 and 18 after ovulation in nine pregnant and nine cyclic mares. Concentrations of oxytocin receptor were measured in endometrial biopsy samples. Neither pregnancy status nor time after ovulation affected basal PGFM concentrations. PGFM concentrations were increased after oxytocin administration on each of the days studied in cyclic mares; on day 14 the mean response was 4.5 times higher than the mean response on days 10 and 18. In contrast, during pregnancy, responses to oxytocin administration occurred only on days 10 and 18. Marked increases in PGFM concentrations in response to endometrial biopsy occurred only on day 14 in cyclic mares and on day 18 in pregnant mares. Mean concentrations of oxytocin receptor were between 200 and 300 fmol mg-1 protein on day 10 in both pregnant and cyclic mares; in cyclic mares oxytocin receptor concentrations were increased approximately threefold on day 14 compared with days 10 and 18, but no such increase was evident during pregnancy. Total amounts of PGFM secreted after oxytocin treatment correlated with endometrial oxytocin receptor concentrations in cyclic (P < 0.001) but not in pregnant (P > 0.5) mares, and the same was true for PGFM release induced by endometrial biopsy (cyclic: P = 0.0025; pregnant: P > 0.5). The data support the hypothesis that endometrial concentrations of oxytocin receptor determine uterine prostaglandin F2 alpha secretion in cyclic mares and that endometrial oxytocin receptor concentrations are reduced in early pregnancy by a product of the conceptus. The increase in response of the pregnant uterus to oxytocin treatment or biopsy-flushing between days 14 and 18 was not due to an increase in the concentration of oxytocin receptors but presumably reflected increased

  7. Endometrial changes from short-term therapy with CDB-4124, a selective progesterone receptor modulator.

    PubMed

    Ioffe, Olga B; Zaino, Richard J; Mutter, George L

    2009-03-01

    Selective progesterone receptor modulators are a class of drugs with progesterone antagonist activity that may confer therapeutic benefit for reproductive disorders in premenopausal women. Endometrial structure, which is dynamically controlled by circulating sex hormones, is likely to be perturbed by progesterone receptor modulators through their progesterone antagonist properties. We examined endometrial histology in 58 premenopausal women treated with the progesterone receptor modulator CDB-4124 (also known as Proellex) for endometriosis or uterine leiomyomata in two clinical trials. Endometrial biopsies obtained after 3 or 6 months with doses of 12.5, 25, or 50 mg daily oral CDB-4124 were reviewed independently by three pathologists. Consensus diagnoses using the World Health Organization hyperplasia scoring system, comments on specific histologic features, and clinical annotation were collected and analyzed. The majority of the endometrial biopsies (103 of 174 biopsies) contained histologic changes that are not seen during normal menstrual cycles. The histology of CDB-4124-treated patients was generally inactive or atrophic, and less frequently, proliferative or secretory, superimposed upon which were novel changes including formation of cystically dilated glands, and secretory changes coexisting with mitoses and apoptotic bodies. With increasing treatment dose and duration, the cysts became predominant and their lining inactive or atrophic. Cystic glands in the CDB-4124-treated subjects correlated with increased endometrial thickness by ultrasound. None of the CDB-4124-treated patients developed endometrial carcinoma or hyperplasia while on therapy. CDB-4124 therapy for 3-6 months produces histologic changes that are sufficiently novel that they might easily be misinterpreted by pathologists, particularly as disordered proliferative or hyperplastic endometrium. Knowledge of the constellation of endometrial changes associated with this agent and other

  8. Joint loss of PAX2 and PTEN expression in endometrial precancers and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Monte, Nicolas M.; Webster, Kaitlyn A.; Neuberg, Donna; Dressler, Gregory R.; Mutter, George L.

    2010-01-01

    Latent endometrial carcinoma precancers are normal appearing endometrial glands with sporadic loss of tumor suppressor gene function such as PTEN. Progression to carcinoma is inefficient and requires additional genetic damage that creates a histologic precursor lesion called endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (EIN). In this study, we examined loss of PAX2 expression, a gene required for embryonic uterine development, during endometrial carcinogenesis. Normal proliferative, EIN, and malignant (endometrial adenocarcinoma) endometrial tissues were immunostained for PTEN and PAX2. Proliferative samples with loss of protein in at least one gland were scored as latent precancers. EIN and cancer lesions were scored by the majority pattern. Overall prevalence and topography of joint PAX2-PTEN expression loss was examined. The prevalence of PAX2 protein loss in the sequence of normal to precancer to cancer was 36%, 71%, and 77% respectively, and for PTEN 49%, 44%, and 68%. Normal endometrial prevalence of PAX2 or PTEN deficient latent precancers was unaffected by biopsy indication, but increased significantly with age. Coincident loss of PAX2 and PTEN expression in an individual normal endometrium was seen in 21% of patients, but usually involved different glands. Coincident loss was more common in precancers (31%) and carcinoma (55%), in which case both markers were protein null in an overlapping clonal distribution. PAX2 and PTEN protein loss occur independently and accumulate with increasing age in latent precancers of normal premenopausal endometrium. Loss of function of both genes in an overlapping distribution characterizes clinical emergence of a premalignant lesion which is carried forward to carcinoma. PMID:20631067

  9. Retinoic acid inhibits endometrial cancer cell growth via multiple genomic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cheng, You-Hong; Utsunomiya, Hiroki; Pavone, Mary Ellen; Yin, Ping; Bulun, Serdar E

    2011-04-01

    Previous studies have indicated that retinoic acid (RA) may be therapeutic for endometrial cancer. However, the downstream target genes and pathways triggered by ligand-activated RA receptor α (RARα) in endometrial cancer cells are largely unknown. In this study, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting assays were used to assess the roles of RA and the RA agonist (AM580) in the growth of endometrial cancer cells. Illumina-based microarray expression profiling of endometrial Ishikawa cells incubated with and without AM580 for 1, 3, and 6 h was performed. We found that both RA and AM580 markedly inhibited endometrial cancer cell proliferation, while knockdown of RARα could block AM580 inhibition. Knockdown of RARα significantly increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen and BCL2 protein levels. Incubation of Ishikawa cells with or without AM580 followed by microarray expression profiling showed that 12 768 genes out of 47 296 gene probes were differentially expressed with significant P values. We found that 90 genes were the most regulated genes with the most significant P value (P<0.0001) using F-test. We selected four highly regulated genes with diverse functions, namely G0S2, TNFAIP2, SMAD3, and NRIP1. Real-time PCR verified that AM580 highly regulated these genes, whereas chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR assay demonstrated that ligand-activated RARα interacted with the promoter of these genes in intact endometrial cancer cells. AM580 also significantly altered 18 pathways including those related to cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In conclusion, AM580 treatment of Ishikawa cells causes the differential expression of a number of RARα target genes and activation of signaling pathways. These pathways could, therefore, mediate the carcinogenesis of human endometrial cancer.

  10. EF5 in Finding Oxygen in Tumor Cells of Patients Who Are Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Cervical, Endometrial, or Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  11. The progesterone antagonist onapristone retards the advanced endometrial transformation after gonadotropin stimulation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Krusche, C A; Herrler, A; Classen-Linke, I; Beier, H M

    2000-01-01

    Ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins (GN) during human in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF/ET) therapy alters the ovarian steroid output, especially that of progesterone. As a consequence, endometrial transformation is advanced, and embryo implantation is hampered. This study used the rabbit model to determine if the application of the progesterone antagonist (PA) onapristone (ONA) could retard endometrial development after GN-stimulation. Rabbits were GN-stimulated twice daily with 5 IU FSH and 5 IU LH on 3 consecutive days with a) hMG (n = 10) or b) with a mixture of recombinant FSH and LH (n = 10). The animals were then mated, and hCG was injected i.v. to ensure ovulation. This day is designated as day 0 post coitum (d 0 p.c.). On day 2 p.c., five animals of each group were treated with 20 mg ONA/kg body weight and five with vehicle for control. On d 5 p.c. endometrial transformation was analyzed by morphology, uteroglobin (Ugl)-mRNA expression, and proliferation. Embryos were flushed from the uteri. Their number and morphology was evaluated. The endometrium of GN-stimulated control animals demonstrated very long endometrial glands and narrow stromal septa. Ugl-mRNA expression was restricted to the cells at the bottom of the gland. 17.0 +/- 4.6% (mean +/- SD) of glandular cells and 6.0 +/- 5.3% of luminal epithelial cells proliferated. In ONA-treated animals, endometrial glands were significantly shorter, and the pattern of arborization was less pronounced. Endometrial gland cells and luminal epithelial cells expressed Ugl-mRNA. Furthermore, glandular and luminal cells proliferated with high intensity (38.6 +/- 6.8% and 36.4 +/- 9.3%, respectively). These results indicate that the status of endometrial differentiation was retarded after ONA-treatment. Nevertheless, the embryos of these ONA-treated animals were well developed. In conclusion, after GN-stimulation, ONA treatment retarded the advanced endometrial transformation in rabbits. Therefore

  12. Metformin impairs growth of endometrial cancer cells via cell cycle arrest and concomitant autophagy and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective therapies for early endometrial cancer usually involve surgical excision and consequent infertility Therefore, new treatment approaches that preserve fertility should be developed. Metformin, a well-tolerated anti-diabetic drug, can inhibit cancer cell growth. However, the mechanism of metformin action is not well understood. Here we investigate the roles of autophagy and apoptosis in the anti-cancer effects of metformin on endometrial cancer cells. Methods Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells were treated with metformin. WST-8 assays, colony formation assays, flow cytometry, caspase luminescence measurement, immunofluorescence, and western blots were used to assess the effects of metformin on cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and autophagy. Results Metformin-treated cells exhibited significantly lower viability and proliferation and significantly more cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2/M than control cells. These cells also exhibited significantly more apoptosis via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. In addition, metformin treatment induced autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy, either by Beclin1 knockdown or by 3-methyladenine-mediated inhibition of caspase-3/7, suppressed the anti-proliferative effects of metformin on endometrial cancer cells. These findings indicate that the anti-proliferative effects and apoptosis caused by metformin are partially or completely dependent on autophagy. Conclusions We showed that metformin suppresses endometrial cancer cell growth via cell cycle arrest and concomitant autophagy and apoptosis. PMID:24966801

  13. Giant Endometrial Polyp in a Postmenopausal Woman without Hormone/Drug Use and Vaginal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Betül; Doğan, Selen; Karaveli, Fatma Şeyda; Şimşek, Tayup; Erdoğan, Gülgün; Candaner, Işıl

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine and discuss the causes of a giant endometrial polyp in a postmenopausal woman without hormone/drug use and to submit interesting clinical presentation. Here we report a seventy-year-old female patient who was admitted to our hospital with lower back pain. There were no other complaints from her. Physical examination was normal. For further examination, computed tomography was performed and a heterogeneous mass, with a diameter of 10 × 9 centimeters, was detected in the uterine cavity. Hysterectomy because of suspected endometrial cancer was performed. Histopathological examination showed us a giant endometrial polyp with edematous and focal fibrotic stroma, large thick walled blood vessels between normal sized and cystically dilated endometrial glands. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a giant endometrial polyp which is unrelated to use of drugs such as tamoxifen and raloxifene; however, based on the history of the patient it may be associated with long-term consumption of thyme, which is a kind of phytoestrogen. PMID:25093134

  14. Role of endometrial cancer abnormal MMR protein in screening Lynch-syndrome families

    PubMed Central

    Long, Qiongxian; Peng, Yong; Tang, Zhirong; Wu, Cailiang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify patients with endometrial cancer with potential Lynch-related DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression defects and to explore the role of these defects in screening for LS. Methods: Endometrial cancers from 173 patients recruited to the Nanchong Central Hospital were tested for MMR (MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, and MSH6) protein expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results: In the 173 tumor tissue samples, the expression loss rates of MSH6, MSH2, PMS2 and MLH1 protein were 16.18% (28/173), 12.14% (21/173), 7.51% (13/173) and 5.78% (10/173), respectively. The total loss rate of MMR protein was 29.89% (27/87). There were 19 patients with a family history of cancer, of which 18 patients demonstrated loss of expression of MMR protein. In the 22 abnormal MMR patients without family history, five families were found to have Lynch-associated cancer (colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer, stomach cancer) after follow-up for two years. Conclusion: MMR proteins play an important role in the progress of endometrial cancer. The routine testing of MMR proteins in endometrial cancer can contribute to the screening of LS families, especially small families. PMID:25400828

  15. Prognostic and Clinical Significance of miRNA-205 in Endometrioid Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilczynski, Milosz; Wojciechowski, Michal; Malinowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is one of the most common malignancies of the reproductive female tract, with endometrioid endometrial cancer being the most frequent type. Despite the relatively favourable prognosis in cases of endometrial cancer, there is a necessity to evaluate clinical and prognostic utility of new molecular markers. MiRNAs are small, non-coding RNA molecules that take part in RNA silencing and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Altered expression of miRNAs may be associated with cancer initiation, progression and metastatic capabilities. MiRNA-205 seems to be one of the key regulators of gene expression in endometrial cancer. In this study, we investigated clinical and prognostic role of miRNA-205 in endometrioid endometrial cancer. After total RNA extraction from 100 archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues, real-time quantitative RT-PCR was used to define miRNA-205 expression levels. The aim of the study was to evaluate miRNA-205 expression levels in regard to patients’ clinical and histopathological features, such as: survival rate, recurrence rate, staging, myometrial invasion, grading and lymph nodes involvement. Higher levels of miRNA-205 expression were observed in tumours with less than half of myometrial invasion and non-advanced cancers. Kaplan-Maier analysis revealed that higher levels of miRNA-205 were associated with better overall survival (p = 0,034). These results indicate potential clinical utility of miRNA-205 as a prognostic marker. PMID:27737015

  16. Incidental endometrial adenocarcinoma in early pregnancy: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hannuna, Karen Yael; Yael, Hannuna Karen; Putignani, Lorenza; Lorenza, Putignani; Silvestri, Evelina; Evelina, Silvestri; Pisa, Roberto; Roberto, Pisa; Angioli, Roberto; Roberto, Angioli; Signore, Fabrizio; Fabrizio, Signore

    2009-12-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common neoplasia of the female reproductive system, with the highest incidence among uterine malignancies, and is rarely associated with pregnancy. Thirty-five cases of pregnancy-associated endometrial cancer have been reported in literature, of which ours represents the 20th case diagnosed during the first trimester. A 39-year-old woman, gravida 4, para 2, was diagnosed with a focal, well- to moderately differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IA and grades G1 and G2) after dilatation and curettage (D&C) for a spontaneous abortion. The patient underwent progestational therapy and follow-up hysteroscopies and D&C to preserve fertility; she is alive and well 18 months after diagnosis. Recurrence of endometrial cancer coexisting with early pregnancy has not been reported in the literature. Conservative therapy for early endometrial cancer, diagnosed at the time of pregnancy, may be an option. Routine histologic examination after D&C performed for spontaneous abortion seems advisable.

  17. Comparative image analysis of conventional and thin-layer preparations in endometrial cytology.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Manabu; Kobayashi, Tadao K; Nishimura, Yukari; Machida, Daisuke; Toyonaga, Masumi; Tsunoda, Shinpei; Ohbu, Makoto

    2013-06-01

    We evaluated the differences in cytologic findings between conventional and thin-layer preparations in endometrial cytology to introduce the thin-layer method into routine cytology. Eighty patients who had undergone endometrial cytology and biopsy on the same day were selected and we compared the cytological findings between conventional- and thin-layer preparations (TLP) in endometrial cytology. The numbers of neutrophils and cell clusters in the thin-layer method were lower than those in the conventional smear (CSS) method. The average number of neutrophils in endometrioid adenocarcinoma was significantly higher than that in normal morphology endometrium and endometrial hyperplasia. Regarding the shape of the cell clusters, ball-like patterns and round-edged cell clusters were not identified in CSS. The average number of clusters in CSS was significantly greater than that using the TLP. The average of the nuclear area in CSS was significantly larger than that using the TLP, indicating that the nuclear areas in CSS were more uneven than that using the TLP. In the future, it is expected that liquid-based cytology will be applied to the cytological diagnosis of a variety of lesions. The influence on cells due to fixation is considerable in liquid-based preparations. Therefore, if we strive to pick up the differences between CSS and TLP of endometrial samples, the diagnostic accuracy of the latter could be improved.

  18. Costs and benefits of routine follow-up after curative treatment for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Agboola, O O; Grunfeld, E; Coyle, D; Perry, G A

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the costs of routine outpatient follow-up after curative treatment of endometrial cancer, and to determine whether this leads to early detection of recurrence or survival. The impact of specific disease characteristics on survival is examined. DESIGN: Retrospective chart review, and calculation of costs. SETTING: Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre-Civic Division (ORCC-C). PATIENTS: All 432 patients referred to the ORCC-C with endometrial cancer between 1982 and 1991 who received treatment with curative intent and who continued with routine follow-up. RESULTS: Cancer recurred in 50 patients (11.57%). There was no statistically significant difference in overall survival between patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic recurrences, or between those with recurrences detected during routine follow-up visits or in the interval between routine visits. Of 4830 Papanicolaou (Pap) smears performed routinely, cancer was detected in 6 cases. The mean cost of the routine follow-up procedures for each patient with a recurrence was $19,200. CONCLUSION: Intensive follow-up of women with endometrial cancer does not result in improved survival. A prospective randomized study is warranted to evaluate other potential benefits of follow-up, such as improved quality of life or decreased morbidity. There is no economic or clinical justification for the routine use of the Pap smear in the follow-up of patients with endometrial cancer. The potential benefits of routine follow-up in endometrial cancer and other types of cancer with favourable prognoses warrant critical evaluation. PMID:9327795

  19. Is endometrial receptivity transcriptomics affected in women with endometriosis? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Velasco, Juan A; Fassbender, Amelie; Ruiz-Alonso, Maria; Blesa, David; D'Hooghe, Thomas; Simon, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    Endometrial receptivity is still questioned today in women with endometriosis. The aim of this study was to assess the endometrial receptivity gene signature in patients with different stages of endometriosis by investigating transcriptomic modifications of their endometrium using the endometrial receptivity array (ERA) test. A prospective, interventional multicentre pilot trial was designed and implemented in two university-affiliated infertility units from Belgium and Spain. Gene expression microarray was used to diagnose the receptivity status by quantifying the expression of 238 specific genes directly related to human endometrial receptivity. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed no clustering of samples based on endometriosis stages. Two subgroups of samples clustered together corresponding on the day of the cycle in which the biopsy was taken (day 18 versus days 19-20). None of the 238 genes present in the ERA array were significantly over- or under- expressed in any of different stages of the disease compared with controls. Minimal differences were found when looking at the functional profile, suggesting that the possible effect from a clinical point of view may be meaningless. Endometrial receptivity gene signature during the implantation window does not vary significantly among patients with endometriosis even considering different stages compared with healthy women. PMID:26385059

  20. CYP19A1 fine-mapping and Mendelian randomization: estradiol is causal for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Deborah J; O'Mara, Tracy A; Glubb, Dylan M; Painter, Jodie N; Cheng, Timothy; Folkerd, Elizabeth; Doody, Deborah; Dennis, Joe; Webb, Penelope M; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Maranian, Mel J; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Zhao, Hui; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Amant, Frederic; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Dowdy, Sean C; Winham, Stacey J; Salvesen, Helga B; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S; Werner, Henrica M J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Tham, Emma; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Scott, Rodney J; McEvoy, Mark; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Nyholt, Dale R; Henders, Anjali K; Hopper, John L; Traficante, Nadia; Ruebner, Matthias; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Lambrechts, Diether; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Bojesen, Stig E; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Dowsett, Mitch; Easton, Douglas F; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2016-02-01

    Candidate gene studies have reported CYP19A1 variants to be associated with endometrial cancer and with estradiol (E2) concentrations. We analyzed 2937 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6608 endometrial cancer cases and 37 925 controls and report the first genome wide-significant association between endometrial cancer and a CYP19A1 SNP (rs727479 in intron 2, P=4.8×10(-11)). SNP rs727479 was also among those most strongly associated with circulating E2 concentrations in 2767 post-menopausal controls (P=7.4×10(-8)). The observed endometrial cancer odds ratio per rs727479 A-allele (1.15, CI=1.11-1.21) is compatible with that predicted by the observed effect on E2 concentrations (1.09, CI=1.03-1.21), consistent with the hypothesis that endometrial cancer risk is driven by E2. From 28 candidate-causal SNPs, 12 co-located with three putative gene-regulatory elements and their risk alleles associated with higher CYP19A1 expression in bioinformatical analyses. For both phenotypes, the associations with rs727479 were stronger among women with a higher BMI (Pinteraction=0.034 and 0.066 respectively), suggesting a biologically plausible gene-environment interaction. PMID:26574572

  1. Annexin A2 Acts as an Adhesion Molecule on the Endometrial Epithelium during Implantation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kai-Fai; Chiu, Philip C. N.; Pang, Ronald T. K.; Ng, Ernest H. Y.; Yeung, William S. B.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the function of Annexin A2 (Axna2) in mouse embryo implantation in vivo, experimental manipulation of Axna2 activities was performed in mouse endometrial tissue in vivo and in vitro. Histological examination of endometrial tissues was performed throughout the reproduction cycle and after steroid treatment. Embryo implantation was determined after blockage of the Axna2 activities by siRNA or anti-Axna2 antibody. The expression of Axna2 immunoreactivies in the endometrial luminal epithelium changed cyclically in the estrus cycle and was upregulated by estrogen. After nidatory estrogen surge, there was a concentration of Axna2 immunoreactivities at the interface between the implanting embryo and the luminal epithelium. The phenomenon was likely to be induced by the implanting embryos as no such concentration of signal was observed in the inter-implantation sites and in pseudopregnancy. Knockdown of Axna2 by siRNA reduced attachment of mouse blastocysts onto endometrial tissues in vitro. Consistently, the number of implantation sites was significantly reduced after infusion of anti-Axna2 antibody into the uterine cavity. Steroids and embryos modulate the expression of Axna2 in the endometrial epithelium. Axna2 may function as an adhesion molecule during embryo implantation in mice. PMID:26444699

  2. Annexin A2 Acts as an Adhesion Molecule on the Endometrial Epithelium during Implantation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Ye, Tian-Min; Lee, Kai-Fai; Chiu, Philip C N; Pang, Ronald T K; Ng, Ernest H Y; Yeung, William S B

    2015-01-01

    To determine the function of Annexin A2 (Axna2) in mouse embryo implantation in vivo, experimental manipulation of Axna2 activities was performed in mouse endometrial tissue in vivo and in vitro. Histological examination of endometrial tissues was performed throughout the reproduction cycle and after steroid treatment. Embryo implantation was determined after blockage of the Axna2 activities by siRNA or anti-Axna2 antibody. The expression of Axna2 immunoreactivies in the endometrial luminal epithelium changed cyclically in the estrus cycle and was upregulated by estrogen. After nidatory estrogen surge, there was a concentration of Axna2 immunoreactivities at the interface between the implanting embryo and the luminal epithelium. The phenomenon was likely to be induced by the implanting embryos as no such concentration of signal was observed in the inter-implantation sites and in pseudopregnancy. Knockdown of Axna2 by siRNA reduced attachment of mouse blastocysts onto endometrial tissues in vitro. Consistently, the number of implantation sites was significantly reduced after infusion of anti-Axna2 antibody into the uterine cavity. Steroids and embryos modulate the expression of Axna2 in the endometrial epithelium. Axna2 may function as an adhesion molecule during embryo implantation in mice.

  3. NMU signaling promotes endometrial cancer cell progression by modulating adhesion signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ting-Yu; Wu, Fang-Ju; Chang, Chia-Lin; Li, Zhongyou; Luo, Ching-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Neuromedin U (NMU) was originally named based on its strong uterine contractile activity, but little is known regarding its signaling/functions in utero. We identified that NMU and one of its receptors, NMUR2, are not only present in normal uterine endometrium but also co-expressed in endometrial cancer tissues, where the NMU level is correlated with the malignant grades and survival of patients. Cell-based assays further confirmed that NMU signaling can promote cell motility and proliferation of endometrial cancer cells derived from grade II tumors. Activation of NMU pathway in these endometrial cancer cells is required in order to sustain expression of various adhesion molecules, such as CD44 and integrin alpha1, as well as production of their corresponding extracellular matrix ligands, hyaluronan and collagen IV; it also increased the activity of SRC and its downstream proteins RHOA and RAC1. Thus, it is concluded that NMU pathway positively controls the adhesion signaling-SRC-Rho GTPase axis in the tested endometrial cancer cells and that changes in cell motility and proliferation can occur when there is manipulation of NMU signaling in these cells either in vitro or in vivo. Intriguingly, this novel mechanism also explains how NMU signaling promotes the EGFR-driven and TGFβ receptor-driven mesenchymal transitions. Through the above axis, NMU signaling not only can promote malignancy of the tested endometrial cancer cells directly, but also helps these cells to become more sensitive to niche growth factors in their microenvironment. PMID:26849234

  4. The wedelolactone derivative inhibits estrogen receptor-mediated breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer cells growth.

    PubMed

    Xu, Defeng; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Cheng, Max A; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Chawnshang; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen and estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated signaling pathways play important roles in the etiology and progression of human breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Attenuating ER activities by natural products and their derivatives is a relatively practical strategy to control and reduce breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risk. Here, we found 3-butoxy-1,8,9-trihydroxy-6H-benzofuro[3,2-c]benzopyran-6-one (BTB), a new derivative of wedelolactone, could effectively inhibit the 17-estradiol (E2)-induced ER transactivation and suppress the growth of breast cancer as well as endometrial and ovarian cancer cells. Our results indicate that 2.5 μM BTB effectively suppresses ER-positive, but not ER-negative, breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that BTB can modulate ER transactivation and suppress the expression of E2-mediated ER target genes (Cyclin D1, E2F1, and TERT) in the ER-positive MCF-7, Ishikawa, and SKOV-3 cells. Importantly, this BTB mediated inhibition of ER activity is selective since BTB does not suppress the activities of other nuclear receptors, including glucocorticoid receptor and progesterone receptor, suggesting that BTB functions as a selective ER signaling inhibitor with the potential to treat breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers.

  5. Reproducibility of histological cell type in high-grade endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Han, Guangming; Sidhu, Davinder; Duggan, Máire A; Arseneau, Jocelyne; Cesari, Matthew; Clement, Philip B; Ewanowich, Carol A; Kalloger, Steve E; Köbel, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Subclassification of endometrial carcinoma according to histological type shows variable interobserver agreement. The aim of this study was to assess specifically the interobserver agreement of histological type in high-grade endometrial carcinomas, recorded by gynecological pathologists from five academic centers across Canada. In a secondary aim, the agreement of consensus diagnosis with immunohistochemical marker combinations was assessed including six routine (TP53, CDKN2A (p16), ER, PGR, Ki67, and VIM) and six experimental immunohistochemical markers (PTEN, ARID1A, CTNNB1, IGF2BP3, HNF1B, and TFF3). The paired interobserver agreement ranged from κ 0.50 to 0.63 (median 0.58) and the intraobserver agreement from κ 0.49 to 0.67 (median 0.61). Consensus about histological type based on morphological assessment was reached in 72% of high-grade endometrial carcinomas. A seven-marker immunohistochemical panel differentiated FIGO grade 3 endometrioid from serous carcinoma with a 100% concordance rate compared with the consensus diagnosis. More practically, a three-marker panel including TP53, ER, and CDKN2A (p16) can aid in the differential diagnosis of FIGO grade 3 endometrioid from endometrial serous carcinoma. Our study demonstrates that the inter- and intraobserver reproducibility of histological type based on morphology alone are mostly moderate. Ancillary techniques such as immunohistochemical marker panels are likely needed to improve diagnostic reproducibility of histological types within high-grade endometrial carcinomas.

  6. CYP19A1 fine-mapping and Mendelian randomization: estradiol is causal for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Deborah J; O'Mara, Tracy A; Glubb, Dylan M; Painter, Jodie N; Cheng, Timothy; Folkerd, Elizabeth; Doody, Deborah; Dennis, Joe; Webb, Penelope M; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Maranian, Mel J; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Zhao, Hui; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Amant, Frederic; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Dowdy, Sean C; Winham, Stacey J; Salvesen, Helga B; Trovik, Jone; Njolstad, Tormund S; Werner, Henrica M J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Tham, Emma; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Scott, Rodney J; McEvoy, Mark; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Nyholt, Dale R; Henders, Anjali K; Hopper, John L; Traficante, Nadia; Ruebner, Matthias; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Lambrechts, Diether; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Bojesen, Stig E; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Dowsett, Mitch; Easton, Douglas F; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2016-01-01

    Candidate gene studies have reported CYP19A1 variants to be associated with endometrial cancer and with estradiol (E2) concentrations. We analyzed 2937 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6608 endometrial cancer cases and 37 925 controls and report the first genome wide-significant association between endometrial cancer and a CYP19A1 SNP (rs727479 in intron 2, P=4.8×10−11). SNP rs727479 was also among those most strongly associated with circulating E2 concentrations in 2767 post-menopausal controls (P=7.4×10−8). The observed endometrial cancer odds ratio per rs727479 A-allele (1.15, CI=1.11–1.21) is compatible with that predicted by the observed effect on E2 concentrations (1.09, CI=1.03–1.21), consistent with the hypothesis that endometrial cancer risk is driven by E2. From 28 candidate-causal SNPs, 12 co-located with three putative gene-regulatory elements and their risk alleles associated with higher CYP19A1 expression in bioinformatical analyses. For both phenotypes, the associations with rs727479 were stronger among women with a higher BMI (Pinteraction=0.034 and 0.066 respectively), suggesting a biologically plausible gene-environment interaction. PMID:26574572

  7. Oxidative stress biomarkers in endometrial secretions: A comparison between successful and unsuccessful in vitro fertilization cycles.

    PubMed

    Rahiminejad, Mohammad Ehsan; Moaddab, Amirhossein; Ganji, Maziar; Eskandari, Nika; Yepez, Mayel; Rabiee, Soghra; Wise, Meredith; Ruano, Rodrigo; Ranjbar, Akram

    2016-08-01

    A potential role of oxidative stress has been implicated in the outcome of various steps of assisted reproductive technology (ART). In a prospective cohort study, a total of 100 patients undergoing IVF/ICSI procedure due to male factor infertility were recruited based on the inclusion criteria. In all patients, 1-2ml of endometrial secretions was aspirated prior to embryo transfer. The oxidative stress markers in endometrial secretions, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) activities, lipid peroxidation (LPO), total thiol groups (TTG), and total antioxidant power (TAP) were investigated and compared among study groups including term pregnancy, failed IVF cycle, and miscarriage. P<0.05 was considered statistically different. Of the 100 patients, 28 cases (28%) resulted in ongoing pregnancy (biochemical pregnancy followed by clinical pregnancy), 11 cases (11%) resulted in miscarriage, and 61 cases (61%), resulted in failed IVF cycle. SOD, LPO, CAT, and TAP levels in the endometrial secretions of the three groups were statistically different (P-value <0.01, <0.001, <0.001, and <0.001, respectively). TTG levels in endometrial secretion of three groups were not statistically different (P-value=0.837). Our results indicated that higher levels of antioxidants such as SOD, CAT, or TAP, and lower levels of oxidative stress markers such as LPO in the endometrial secretions were associated with successful IVF outcome. PMID:27232354

  8. Effects of interferon-tau and steroids on cytochrome P450 activity in bovine endometrial epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the current study was to examine cyclooxygenase (COX), cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) and 2C (CYP2C) activity in bovine endometrial cell cultures following exposure to oxytocin (OT), interferon-t (IFN), estradiol (E2) and/or progesterone (P4). Bovine endometrial epithelial cells were tr...

  9. Identification of HSPA8 as a candidate biomarker for endometrial carcinoma by using iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Nianchun; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Shufen; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Although there are advances in diagnostic, predictive, and therapeutic strategies, discovering protein biomarker for early detection is required for improving the survival rate of the patients with endometrial carcinoma. In this study, we identify proteins that are differentially expressed between the Stage I endometrial carcinoma and the normal pericarcinous tissues by using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis. Totally, we screened 1,266 proteins. Among them, 103 proteins were significantly overexpressed, and 30 were significantly downexpressed in endometrial carcinoma. Using the bioinformatics analysis, we identified a list of proteins that might be closely associated with endometrial carcinoma, including CCT7, HSPA8, PCBP2, LONP1, PFN1, and EEF2. We validated the gene overexpression of these molecules in the endometrial carcinoma tissues and found that HSPA8 was most significantly upregulated. We further validated the overexpression of HSPA8 by using immunoblot analysis. Then, HSPA8 siRNA was transferred into the endometrial cancer cells RL-95-2 and HEC-1B. The depletion of HSPA8 siRNAs significantly reduced cell proliferation, promoted cell apoptosis, and suppressed cell growth in both cell lines. Taken together, HSPA8 plays a vital role in the development of endometrial carcinoma. HSPA8 is a candidate biomarker for early diagnosis and therapy of Stage I endometrial carcinoma. PMID:27110132

  10. Human S100A10 plays a crucial role in the acquisition of the endometrial receptivity phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, Laurence; Drissennek, Loubna; Antoine, Yannick; Tiers, Laurent; Hirtz, Christophe; Lehmann, Sylvain; Perrochia, Hélène; Bissonnette, François; Kadoch, Isaac-Jacques; Haouzi, Delphine; Hamamah, Samir

    2016-05-01

    In assisted reproduction, about 30% of embryo implantation failures are related to inadequate endometrial receptivity. To identify molecules involved in endometrial receptivity acquisition, we investigated, using a SELDI-TOF approach, the protein expression profile of early-secretory and mid-secretory endometrium samples. Among the proteins upregulated in mid-secretory endometrium, we investigated the function of S100A10 in endometrial receptivity and implantation process. S100A10 was expressed in epithelial and stromal cells of the endometrium of fertile patients during the implantation windows. Conversely, it was downregulated in the mid-secretory endometrium of infertile patients diagnosed as non-receptive. Transcriptome analysis of human endometrial epithelial and stromal cells where S100A10 was silenced by shRNA revealed the deregulation of 37 and 256 genes, respectively, related to components of the extracellular matrix and intercellular connections. Functional annotations of these deregulated genes highlighted alterations of the leukocyte extravasation signaling and angiogenesis pathways that play a crucial role during implantation. S100A10 silencing also affected the migration of primary endometrial epithelial and stromal cells, decidualization and secretory transformation of primary endometrial stromal cells and epithelial cells respectively, and promoted apoptosis in serum-starved endometrial epithelial cells. Our findings identify S100A10 as a player in endometrial receptivity acquisition. PMID:26760977

  11. Robotically assisted peritoneal mesometrial resection (PMMR) in endometrial cancer supported by ICG labeling of the compartmental lymphatic system.

    PubMed

    Kimmig, Rainer; Aktas, Bahriye; Buderath, Paul; Heubner, Martin

    2016-04-01

    •Peritoneal mesometrial resection is a compartment based radical hysterectomy in endometrial cancer•ICG staining of the lymph-vessel system facilitates identification of compartment borders•Fluorescence based HD-video documentation supports education in surgery of endometrial cancer. PMID:27331131

  12. Endometrial carcinoma in breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. Two case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lanza, A; Alba, E; Re, A; Tessarolo, M; Leo, L; Bellino, R; Lauricella, A; Wierdis, T

    1994-01-01

    Recent reports suggest an increased incidence of endometrial cancer in breast cancer patients under long-term adjuvant tamoxifen (TAM) treatment. The Authors describe two cases of endometrial adenocarcinoma among 80 post-menopausal patients affected with breast cancer and treated with TAM. PMID:7875160

  13. The role of adjuvant radiation in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Diavolitsis, Virginia; Boyle, John; Singh, Diljeet K; Small, William

    2009-04-15

    Endometrial cancer treatment ideally begins with a staging procedure including abdominopelvic washing, total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and lymph node evaluation. Recommendations for postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy are determined by recurrence risk. Patients who have undergone staging and have early stage I disease and an absence of high-risk features for recurrence generally are treated with surgery alone. Intermediate-risk patients--those with high-risk stage I disease and some stage II patients--may benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy. Several randomized trials show that radiation therapy improves locoregional control among intermediate-risk patients. The optimal type of radiation therapy, whether vaginal brachytherapy or whole-pelvic radiation therapy, remains undetermined, though treatment decision can be guided by risk factors not encompassed by the current staging system. Patients with high-risk stage II disease and stage III disease generally receive external-beam radiotherapy, often in combination with chemotherapy. Chemotherapy alone in advanced-stage patients is a consideration, given the results of the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG)-122 trial.

  14. [Obesity, a main risk factor for endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Mendoza, Carlos Manuel; Velasco-Navarro, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: la obesidad es un factor de riesgo reconocido para el cáncer de endometrio, y en México ambas entidades se han incrementado. En nuestro medio hay información que indica escasa trascendencia de la obesidad para este carcinoma, lo que parece contradictorio. Se realizó este estudio con el objetivo de encontrar la prevalencia de la obesidad en mujeres con cáncer de endometrio. Métodos: estudio de casos y controles, realizado en un hospital general de la Ciudad de México. Se evaluó obesidad (índice de masa corporal de 30 kg/m(2)), diabetes mellitus e hipertensión arterial sistémica. Resultados: fueron 66 mujeres, 22 con cáncer endometrial y 44 controles. En los casos, la obesidad ocurrió en el 77 % (razón de momios [RM] 8.1, intervalo de confianza [IC] al 95 % 2.46-26.6), la diabetes mellitus en el 41 % (RM 4.3, IC 1.31-14.7) y la hipertensión arterial sistémica ocurrió en el 41 % (RM 2.3, IC 0.78-7.1). Conclusiones: los resultados de este estudio preliminar muestran que en esta población la obesidad es el factor de riesgo más frecuente.

  15. A strategy for the control of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gusberg, S. B.

    1975-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies can provide us with etiological clues and help us recognize high risk factors. The definition of high risk factors, especially in the perimenopausal years can lead to prophylactic measures that may aid in the control of endometrial cancer. Recognition of the high risk patient in the perimenopausal years by aspiration curettage of ambulatory women may offer a significant strategy of surveillance. The advent of modern steroid metabolic technology promises to help us clarify the problems of hormone sensitivity of this tumor so that we may properly translate these data into therapeutic action. Virulence scales can help the choice of treatment for invasive carcinoma so that patients with tumors of low virulence do not suffer from an excess of complications nor those with tumors of high virulence an excess of failure to control. In this manner we can define the role of radiotherapy and surgery, elect combined treatment when indicated and select radical surgery as indicated. There is evidence to suggest that the developmental concept of this tumor may lead to its control in a manner similar to that occurring with cervix cancer. PMID:1166055

  16. Long Non-Coding RNAs in Endometrial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Smolle, Maria A; Bullock, Marc D; Ling, Hui; Pichler, Martin; Haybaeck, Johannes

    2015-11-04

    Endometrial carcinoma (EC), the second most common form of gynaecological malignancy, can be divided into two distinct sub-types: Type I tumours arise from hyperplastic endometrium and typically effect women around the time of menopause, whereas type II tumours arise in postmenopausal women from atrophic endometrium. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a novel class of non-protein coding molecules that have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of many types of cancer including gynaecological tumours. Although they play critical physiological roles in cellular metabolism, their expression and function are deregulated in EC compared with paired normal tissue, indicating that they may also participate in tumour initiation and progression. For instance, the lncRNA MALAT-1 is down-regulated in EC samples compared to normal or hyperplastic endometrium, whereas the lncRNA OVAL is down-regulated in type II disease but up-regulated in type I disease. Other notatble lncRNAs such as HOTAIR, H19 and SRA become up-regulated with increasing EC tumour grade and other features associated with poor prognosis. In the current review, we will examine the growing body of evidence linking deregulated lncRNAs with specific biological functions of tumour cells in EC, we will highlight associations between lncRNAs and the molecular pathways implicated in EC tumourigenesis and we will identify critical knowledge gaps that remain to be addressed.

  17. Endometrial carcinoma: stage I. A retrospective analysis of 262 patients.

    PubMed

    De Palo, G; Kenda, R; Andreola, S; Luciani, L; Musumeci, R; Rilke, F

    1982-08-01

    From 1969 to 1977, 420 patients with endometrial carcinoma were observed and treated at the National Tumor Institute of Milan. Total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were performed in 351. After careful clinical and pathologic review, 262 patients were classified as having stage I disease. Further treatment included post-operative radium therapy to the vaginal vault. There were 247 cases with adenocarcinoma, 10 with adenoacanthoma, and 5 with adenosquamous or clear cell carcinoma. Of 257 cases with adenocarcinoma or adenoacanthoma, 63 were grade 1, 161 grade 2, and 33 grade 3. Of the total series, only 41 cases had disease limited to the mucosal surface. The 5-year actuarial survival was 91.4% and the recurrence-free survival was 93.4%. The case material was evaluated according to the risk factors, and results were 1) premenopausal patients had a better prognosis (100% recurrence-free survival versus 92.8% for postmenopausal women, P = .003); 2) length of the uterine cavity was not a significant prognostic factor; 3) myometrial invasion alone was not prognostic but correlated with grade of tumor; 4) the grade of the tumor was an important determinant of recurrence (grade 1 98% recurrence-free survival, grade 2 95%, grade 3 79%). With the described therapy, vaginal recurrences were absent. The recurrences were distant in 20% and local with or without distant metastases in 80%.

  18. The role of adjuvant radiation in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Diavolitsis, Virginia; Boyle, John; Singh, Diljeet K; Small, William

    2009-04-15

    Endometrial cancer treatment ideally begins with a staging procedure including abdominopelvic washing, total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and lymph node evaluation. Recommendations for postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy are determined by recurrence risk. Patients who have undergone staging and have early stage I disease and an absence of high-risk features for recurrence generally are treated with surgery alone. Intermediate-risk patients--those with high-risk stage I disease and some stage II patients--may benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy. Several randomized trials show that radiation therapy improves locoregional control among intermediate-risk patients. The optimal type of radiation therapy, whether vaginal brachytherapy or whole-pelvic radiation therapy, remains undetermined, though treatment decision can be guided by risk factors not encompassed by the current staging system. Patients with high-risk stage II disease and stage III disease generally receive external-beam radiotherapy, often in combination with chemotherapy. Chemotherapy alone in advanced-stage patients is a consideration, given the results of the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG)-122 trial. PMID:19476264

  19. Long Non-Coding RNAs in Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Smolle, Maria A.; Bullock, Marc D.; Ling, Hui; Pichler, Martin; Haybaeck, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma (EC), the second most common form of gynaecological malignancy, can be divided into two distinct sub-types: Type I tumours arise from hyperplastic endometrium and typically effect women around the time of menopause, whereas type II tumours arise in postmenopausal women from atrophic endometrium. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a novel class of non-protein coding molecules that have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of many types of cancer including gynaecological tumours. Although they play critical physiological roles in cellular metabolism, their expression and function are deregulated in EC compared with paired normal tissue, indicating that they may also participate in tumour initiation and progression. For instance, the lncRNA MALAT-1 is down-regulated in EC samples compared to normal or hyperplastic endometrium, whereas the lncRNA OVAL is down-regulated in type II disease but up-regulated in type I disease. Other notatble lncRNAs such as HOTAIR, H19 and SRA become up-regulated with increasing EC tumour grade and other features associated with poor prognosis. In the current review, we will examine the growing body of evidence linking deregulated lncRNAs with specific biological functions of tumour cells in EC, we will highlight associations between lncRNAs and the molecular pathways implicated in EC tumourigenesis and we will identify critical knowledge gaps that remain to be addressed. PMID:26556343

  20. Cadmium chloride alters mRNA levels of angiogenesis related genes in primary human endometrial endothelial cells grown in vitro.

    PubMed

    Helmestam, Malin; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli; Olovsson, Matts

    2010-11-01

    Cadmium, is known to cause adverse reproductive effects, and classified as an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC). Human endometrial endothelial cells (HEEC) have a key role in the regulation of endometrial angiogenesis. These cells are known to express estrogen receptors, a feature that makes them potential targets for EDCs such as cadmium. We have designed a co-culture system, in which HEEC were grown in the same cell culture medium as endometrial stromal cells but in separate, communicating chambers. With quantitative PCR, we investigated changes in mRNA expression of genes associated with angiogenesis, sex steroids and endothelial cell specific functions. We found that cadmium altered the mRNA expression of the two important angiogenic molecules VEGF-A and PLGF. Cadmium might thus affect endometrial angiogenesis and as a consequence cause endometrial dysfunction with an increased risk for fertility problems. PMID:20580663

  1. Preventing endometrial cancer risk in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) women: could metformin help?

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Mohamad Nasir; Khan, Gulafshana; Ariffin, Rina; Abu, Jafaru; Chapman, Caroline; Deen, Suha; Nunns, David; Barrett, David A; Seedhouse, Claire; Atiomo, William

    2014-01-01

    Current data indicate that there is a significant risk of endometrial cancer (EC) in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), although further research needed to clarify the exact molecular mechanisms. Endometrial hyperplasia is a premalignant condition that usually heralds EC and it shares identical risk factors with EC. Metabolic syndrome with a triad of obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and diabetes, which is commonly observed in PCOS appears to be a key mechanism in EC pathogenesis. Measures to improve insulin resistance could therefore play a role in reducing the risk of EC in women with PCOS. Metformin is an insulin sensitising agent which is safe, widely available and currently licensed for type-2 diabetes. It has been clearly shown in both animal and human studies that metformin is of value in reversing endometrial hyperplasia. Metformin may therefore prevent EC in PCOS. This article reviews the use of metformin in reducing EC risk in PCOS and makes a case for future research on this topic. PMID:24183733

  2. AMF/PGI-mediated tumorigenesis through MAPK-ERK signaling in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiran; Jia, Yuanhui; Che, Qi; Zhou, Qian; Wang, Kai; Wan, Xiao-Ping

    2015-09-22

    Autocrine motility factor (AMF), which is also known as phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), enhances tumor cell growth and motility. In this study, we found that AMF and its receptor were both highly expressed in Endometrial Carcinoma (EC) tissues compared to normal tissues. Levels of AMF were increased in serum of endometrial cancer patients. Downregulation of AMF by shRNA inhibited invasion, migration and proliferation as well as growth in a three-dimensional culture. AMF cytokine function, but not enzymatic activity of PGI, regulated tumorigenic activities of AMF. The MAPK-ERK1/2 pathway contributed to AMF-induced effects in EC cells. In agreement, Mek inhibitor decreased AMF-induced invasion, migration and proliferation of EC cells. In addition, in two mouse tumor metastasis models (EC cells delivered through left ventricle or intraperitoneally) AMF-silenced EC cells showed decreased tumor proliferative and metastatic capacities. We suggest that AMF/PGI is a potential therapeutic target in endometrial carcinoma.

  3. Does thyroid-stimulating hormone influence the prognosis of patients with endometrial cancer? A multicentre trial

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, V; Hofstetter, G; Polterauer, S; Reinthaller, A; Grimm, C; Schwameis, R; Taucher, S; Wagener, A; Marth, C; Concin, N

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thyroid function has been suggested to interfere with tumour biology and prognosis in different cancers. The present study was performed to investigate the impact of pre-therapeutic serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels on the prognosis of patients with endometrial cancer. Methods: Pre-therapeutic serum TSH was investigated in 199 patients with endometrial cancer. After stratification in TSH risk groups, univariate and multivariable survival analyses were performed. Results: Elevated TSH was independently associated with poor disease-specific survival in univariate/multivariable survival analyses (P=0.01 and P=0.03, respectively). Conclusion: Thyroid-stimulating hormone may serve as a novel and independent prognostic parameter for disease-specific survival in patients with endometrial cancer. PMID:23764750

  4. Female infertility: role of vaginal hormonal cytology, endometrial biopsy and endocrinological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Afroz, Nishat; Singh, Mamta; Verma, Manju; Bansal, Vandana

    2006-03-01

    Female infertility can be categorised into those who fail to ovulate (anovulatory infertility) because of some defect at hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis and those who are ovulatory (ovulatory infertility), but are infertile because of some lesion present in genital tract. The role of vaginal hormonal cytology, endometrial biopsy and endocrinological evaluation in the detection of ovulation and various ovulatory dysfunction was studied in 42 infertile female patients. On the basis of cytological findings, of the 42 patients, 14 were found to be ovulatory, 26 anovulatory (which include 5 cases of atrophic changes) and 2 inconsistent due to inflammatory changes. Endometrial biopsy showed evidence of ovulation in 15, anovulation in 27 cases. Hormonal evaluation indicated some sort of endocrinological disorders in 15 patients, which may underlie anovulatory infertility in these patients, while results were within normal range in the rest 27 patients. Results of vaginal cytology and endometrial biopsy showed correlation in respect to ovulation in 93.33% of the cases.

  5. Radionuclide liver and bone scanning in the evaluation of patients with endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Christie, J.H.; Garcia, J.F.; Baldwin, M.H.; Wicks, J.D.; Bartow, S.A.

    1981-12-01

    Staging bone scans or skeletal surveys were obtained of 97 patients with endometrial carcinoma. Of the 77 patients with Stage I or II disease, no metastases were identified at staging. Three patients in the entire series demonstrated bony metastases; all of these metastases were detectable by radionuclide bone scan and radiographic bone survey. Eighty-nine patients were examined with radionuclide liver/spleen scanning at the time of staging. Four of the 89 initial scans were interpreted as demonstrating hepatocellular disease, and all four patients had abnormal liver function studies. Only one patient demonstrated a possible hepatic metastasis at initial diagnosis. This patient also had abnormal liver function studies. Based on these results, bone surveys and radionuclide bone scans are not indicated as screening procedures in endometrial carcinoma. It is suggested that screening for liver metastases in patients with endometrial carcinoma is not warranted in patients with normal liver function studies.

  6. Methods for endometrial preparation in frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycles

    PubMed Central

    Kalem, Ziya; Kalem, Müberra Namlı; Gürgan, Timur

    2016-01-01

    Frozen-thawed (FT) embryo transfer is a procedure used for the storage and transfer of excess embryos obtained during in vitro fertilization– intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles. In recent years, improvements in laboratory conditions and limitations on the number of embryos to be transferred have led to a progressive increase in FT embryo transfer cycles. However, the best solution for endometrial preparation in these cycles is still a matter of debate. In this study, we aimed to review the current methods of endometrial preparation in FT embryo transfer cycles. In light of the current literature, it is hard to determine which method is the best for endometrial preparation. It is therefore necessary to conduct randomized controlled studies in a prospective design, which will also evaluate the above-mentioned factors.

  7. Endometrioid endometrial carcinoma indirectly caused by pituitary prolactinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Kimihiro; Niwa, Yuri; Mizutani, Teruyuki; Shimizu, Ken; Hayashi, Kazumasa; Chaya, Jyunya; Kato, Noriko; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 44-year-old nulliparous woman who experienced irregular menstrual cycles for about 10 years and developed both pituitary prolactinoma and endometrioid endometrial carcinoma. In premenopausal women, hyperprolactinemia causes hypogonadism by inhibiting secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone and thus suppressing luteinizing hormone levels, which can cause menstrual disorders ranging from amenorrhea, oligomenorrhea and chronic anovulatory cycle to short luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. A chronic anovulatory menstrual cycle is the most common cause of long-term exposure of the endometrium to endogenous estrogen without adequate opposition from progestins, which can lead to endometrioid endometrial carcinoma. In this case, pituitary prolactinoma may have caused the chronic anovulatory cycle and indirectly led to the endometrioid endometrial carcinoma. In patients for whom the cause of irregular menstruation and chronic anovulatory cycle is suspected to be hyperprolactinemia, explorations of both the hypophysis and endometrium are essential.

  8. Cystic endometrial hyperplasia and pyometra in three captive African hunting dogs (Lycaon pictus).

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Gwen; Adkesson, Michael J; Langan, Jennifer N; Haskins, Samantha; Landolfi, Jamie

    2012-03-01

    Pyometra and cystic endometrial hyperplasia are common in domestic canids and are suspected to develop as a consequence of elevated progesterone levels. Reports of uterine pathology in exotic canids are limited, with some speculating of association with contraception. This report describes pyometra, cystic endometrial hyperplasia, and ovariohysterectomy in three African hunting dogs (Lycaon pictus). Ovarian corpora lutea were detected in two of the dogs, suggesting endogenous progesterone production. One dog had a uterine adenocarcinoma and two had ovarian granulosa cell tumors. Clinical signs included anorexia, lethargy, vulvar discharge, polyuria, polydipsia, and abdominal distention. Diagnosis was based on clinical signs, physical examination, bloodwork, radiography, and ultrasonography, with confirmation through histopathologic evaluation of tissues. Cystic endometrial hyperplasia, pyometra, and uterine neoplasia have rarely been diagnosed in exotic canids; however, they should be considered as differential diagnoses in intact bitches that present with suspected reproductive disease. PMID:22448515

  9. The genomic landscape and evolution of endometrial carcinoma progression and abdominopelvic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Gibson, William J; Hoivik, Erling A; Halle, Mari K; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Cherniack, Andrew D; Berg, Anna; Holst, Frederik; Zack, Travis I; Werner, Henrica M J; Staby, Kjersti M; Rosenberg, Mara; Stefansson, Ingunn M; Kusonmano, Kanthida; Chevalier, Aaron; Mauland, Karen K; Trovik, Jone; Krakstad, Camilla; Giannakis, Marios; Hodis, Eran; Woie, Kathrine; Bjorge, Line; Vintermyr, Olav K; Wala, Jeremiah A; Lawrence, Michael S; Getz, Gad; Carter, Scott L; Beroukhim, Rameen; Salvesen, Helga B

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have detailed the genomic landscape of primary endometrial cancers, but the evolution of these cancers into metastases has not been characterized. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 98 tumor biopsies including complex atypical hyperplasias, primary tumors and paired abdominopelvic metastases to survey the evolutionary landscape of endometrial cancer. We expanded and reanalyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data, identifying new recurrent alterations in primary tumors, including mutations in the estrogen receptor cofactor gene NRIP1 in 12% of patients. We found that likely driver events were present in both primary and metastatic tissue samples, with notable exceptions such as ARID1A mutations. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the sampled metastases typically arose from a common ancestral subclone that was not detected in the primary tumor biopsy. These data demonstrate extensive genetic heterogeneity in endometrial cancers and relative homogeneity across metastatic sites.

  10. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO consensus conference on endometrial cancer: Diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Creutzberg, Carien; Amant, Frederic; Bosse, Tjalling; González-Martín, Antonio; Ledermann, Jonathan; Marth, Christian; Nout, Remi; Querleu, Denis; Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Sessa, Cristiana

    2015-12-01

    The first joint European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11-13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared three clinically-relevant questions about endometrial cancer relating to the following four areas: Prevention and screening, surgery, adjuvant treatment and advanced and recurrent disease. All relevant scientific literature, as identified by the experts, was reviewed in advance. During the consensus conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question and a consensus was reached. Results of this consensus conference, together with a summary of evidence supporting each recommendation, are detailed in this article. All participants have approved this final article.

  11. Potential Pathophysiological Mechanisms of the Beneficial Role of Endometrial Injury in In Vitro Fertilization Outcome.

    PubMed

    Siristatidis, Charalampos; Vrachnis, Nikos; Vogiatzi, Paraskevi; Chrelias, Charalampos; Retamar, Andrea Quinteiro; Bettocchi, Stefano; Glujovsky, Demián

    2014-03-01

    Successful embryo implantation is a complex process that involves multiple biological mechanisms and reciprocal interactions between the embryo and the proliferated endometrium. In this review, we provide an informative contribution on the pathways underlying the beneficial nature of endometrial injury toward improving implantation rates of embryos conceived and through in vitro fertilization. The evidence published to date are in favor of inducing local endometrial injury in the preceding cycle of ovarian stimulation to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with unexplained and recurrent implantation failure. Endometrial injury triggers a series of biological responses but the findings suggest that no particular pathway is solely adequate to explain the association between trauma and improved pregnancy rates rather than a cluster of events in response to trauma which benefits embryo implantation in ways both known and unknown to the scientific community. PMID:24604231

  12. Endoglin (CD105) coordinates the process of endometrial receptivity for embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Chadchan, Sangappa Basanna; Kumar, Vijay; Maurya, Vineet Kumar; Soni, Upendra Kumar; Jha, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-04-15

    Endoglin is a TGF-β receptor that is expressed in uterine endothelial and stromal cells in addition to trophoblast expression. However, the functional importance of endoglin in the embryo implantation process is not clear. We observed endoglin expression in the endometrium throughout the stages of its receptivity; however, its expression was enhanced during the receptive stage. Endoglin expression was predominant in epithelial cells of the lumen and glands, but showed a milder expression in stromal cells. Endoglin expression was initially observed in the primary decidual zone and later extended to the secondary decidua zone. Knockdown of endoglin via siRNA reduced the implantation sites along with the blastocyst numbers. Mouse blastocyst with endoglin-silenced endometrial epithelial cells (human and mouse origin) showed poor trophoblast outgrowth, which suggests an essential role for endoglin during endometrial receptivity. In conclusion, our findings reveal the association of endoglin with endometrial receptivity, which is important for embryo attachment. PMID:26802878

  13. Methods for endometrial preparation in frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycles.

    PubMed

    Kalem, Ziya; Kalem, Müberra Namlı; Gürgan, Timur

    2016-01-01

    Frozen-thawed (FT) embryo transfer is a procedure used for the storage and transfer of excess embryos obtained during in vitro fertilization- intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles. In recent years, improvements in laboratory conditions and limitations on the number of embryos to be transferred have led to a progressive increase in FT embryo transfer cycles. However, the best solution for endometrial preparation in these cycles is still a matter of debate. In this study, we aimed to review the current methods of endometrial preparation in FT embryo transfer cycles. In light of the current literature, it is hard to determine which method is the best for endometrial preparation. It is therefore necessary to conduct randomized controlled studies in a prospective design, which will also evaluate the above-mentioned factors. PMID:27651727

  14. Methods for endometrial preparation in frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycles

    PubMed Central

    Kalem, Ziya; Kalem, Müberra Namlı; Gürgan, Timur

    2016-01-01

    Frozen-thawed (FT) embryo transfer is a procedure used for the storage and transfer of excess embryos obtained during in vitro fertilization– intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles. In recent years, improvements in laboratory conditions and limitations on the number of embryos to be transferred have led to a progressive increase in FT embryo transfer cycles. However, the best solution for endometrial preparation in these cycles is still a matter of debate. In this study, we aimed to review the current methods of endometrial preparation in FT embryo transfer cycles. In light of the current literature, it is hard to determine which method is the best for endometrial preparation. It is therefore necessary to conduct randomized controlled studies in a prospective design, which will also evaluate the above-mentioned factors. PMID:27651727

  15. A Pyrosequencing Assay for the Quantitative Methylation Analysis of GALR1 in Endometrial Samples: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Kottaridi, Christine; Koureas, Nikolaos; Margari, Niki; Terzakis, Emmanouil; Bilirakis, Evripidis; Pappas, Asimakis; Chrelias, Charalampos; Spathis, Aris; Aga, Evangelia; Pouliakis, Abraham; Panayiotides, Ioannis; Karakitsos, Petros

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract while aberrant DNA methylation seems to play a critical role in endometrial carcinogenesis. Galanin's expression has been involved in many cancers. We developed a new pyrosequencing assay that quantifies DNA methylation of galanin's receptor-1 (GALR1). In this study, the preliminary results indicate that pyrosequencing methylation analysis of GALR1 promoter can be a useful ancillary marker to cytology as the histological status can successfully predict. This marker has the potential to lead towards better management of women with endometrial lesions and eventually reduce unnecessary interventions. In addition it can provide early warning for women with negative cytological result. PMID:26504828

  16. Endometrial Osseous Metaplasia—A Rare Presentation of Polymenorrhagia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yogesh Kumar; Hakim, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial ossification is a rare entity in which bones are found in the uterus. Exact aetiopathogenesis is not known but the most accepted theory is metaplasia of stromal cells into osteoblast cells result in the formation of bones. The possibility of malignant mixed mullerian tumour should be in the mind of clinician and pathologist while making diagnosis. We hereby report an extremely rare case, which is among very few reported cases in the world, in which endometrial ossification presented in a perimenopausal female with polymenorrhagia. A 41-year-old multiparous patient presented with irregular bleeding per vaginum for the past two years. She was found to be a case of endometrial calcification with osseous metaplasia with presence of bones varying from 7mm – 1.5 cms size in the uterine cavity. She was successfully managed by total abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:26023606

  17. Association of MDM2 SNP309 and TP53 Arg72Pro polymorphisms with risk of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    YONEDA, TOMOKO; KUBOYAMA, AYUMI; KATO, KIYOKO; OHGAMI, TATSUHIRO; OKAMOTO, KANAKO; SAITO, TOSHIAKI; WAKE, NORIO

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of endometrial cancer, a common gynecological malignancy, is increasing in Japan. We have previously shown that the ER/MDM2/p53/p21 pathway plays an important role in endometrial carcinogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of germline single nucleotide polymorphisms in murine double minute 2 (MDM2) SNP309, TP53 Arg72Pro, ESR1 PvuII and XbaI, and p21 codon 31 on endometrial cancer risk. We evaluated these polymorphisms in DNA samples from 125 endometrial cancer cases and 200 controls using polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism. The association of each genetic polymorphism with endometrial cancer was examined by the odds ratio and 95% confidence interval, which were obtained using logistic regression analysis. The SNP309 GG genotype non-significantly increased the risk of endometrial cancer. The 95% confidence interval for the GG genotype vs. the TT genotype of MDM2 SNP309 was 1.76 (0.93–3.30). Endometrial cancer was not associated with tested SNP genotypes for TP53, ESR1 and p21. The combination of SNP309 GG + TG and TP53 codon 72 Arg/Arg significantly increased endometrial cancer risk. The adjusted OR was 2.53 (95% confidence interval, 1.03–6.21) and P for the interaction was 0.04. This result was supported by in vitro data showing that endometrial cancer cell lines with the SNP309 G allele failed to show growth inhibition by treatment with RITA, which reduces p53-MDM2 binding. The presence of the SNP309 G allele and TP53 codon 72 Arg/Arg genotype is associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer in Japanese women. PMID:23624782

  18. Frequent PIK3CA Mutations in Colorectal and Endometrial Cancer with Double Somatic Mismatch Repair Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Stacey A.; Turner, Emily H.; Beightol, Mallory B.; Jacobson, Angela; Gooley, Ted A.; Salipante, Stephen J.; Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Smith, Christina; Scroggins, Sheena; Tait, Jonathan F.; Grady, William M.; Lin, Edward H.; Cohn, David E.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Arnold, Mark W.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Pearlman, Rachel; Hampel, Heather; Pritchard, Colin C.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Double somatic mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes have recently been described in colorectal and endometrial cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI) not attributable to MLH1 hypermethylation or germline mutation. We sought to define the molecular phenotype of this newly recognized tumor subtype. Methods From two prospective Lynch syndrome screening studies, we identified patients with colorectal and endometrial tumors harboring ≥2 somatic MMR mutations, but normal germline MMR testing (“double somatic”). We determined the frequencies of tumor PIK3CA, BRAF, KRAS, NRAS, and PTEN mutations by targeted next-generation sequencing and used logistic-regression models to compare them to: Lynch syndrome, MLH1 hypermethylated, and microsatellite stable (MSS) tumors. We validated our findings using independent datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Results Among colorectal cancer cases, we found that 14/21 (67%) of double somatic cases had PIK3CA mutations vs. 4/18 (22%) Lynch syndrome, 2/10 (20%) MLH1 hypermethylated, and 12/78 (15%) MSS tumors; p<0.0001. PIK3CA mutations were detected in 100% of 13 double somatic endometrial cancers (p=0.04). BRAF mutations were absent in double somatic and Lynch syndrome colorectal tumors. We found highly similar results in a validation cohort from TCGA (113 colorectal, 178 endometrial cancer), with 100% of double somatic cases harboring a PIK3CA mutation (p<0.0001). Conclusions PIK3CA mutations are present in double somatic mutated colorectal and endometrial cancers at substantially higher frequencies than other MSI subgroups. PIK3CA mutation status may better define an emerging molecular entity in colorectal and endometrial cancers, with the potential to inform screening and therapeutic decision making. PMID:27302833

  19. A prospective study of dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kathryn M.; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Rosner, Bernard A.; Willett, Walter C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acrylamide is a probable human carcinogen formed during cooking of many common foods. Epidemiological studies of acrylamide and breast cancer risk have been null; however, positive associations with ovarian and endometrial cancers have been reported. We studied acrylamide intake and risk of breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers in a prospective cohort study. Methods We assessed acrylamide intake among 88,672 women in the Nurses’ Health Study using food frequency questionnaires administered every four years. Between 1980 and 2006 we identified 6301 cases of invasive breast cancer, 484 cases of invasive endometrial adenocarcinoma, and 416 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer. We used Cox proportional hazards models to study the association between acrylamide and cancer risk. Results We found no association between acrylamide intake and breast cancer overall or according to estrogen and progesterone receptor status. We found an increased risk of endometrial cancer among high acrylamide consumers (adjusted relative risk [RR] for highest versus lowest quintile=1.41, 95% CI: 1.01–1.97, p-value for trend=0.03). We observed a non-significant suggestion of increased risk for ovarian cancer overall (RR 1.25, CI: 0.88–1.77, p-trend=0.12), with a significantly increased risk for serous tumors (RR 1.58, CI: 0.99–2.52, p-trend=0.04). Associations did not differ by smoking status. Conclusions We observed no association between acrylamide and breast cancer. Risk of endometrial cancer and possibly ovarian cancer was greater among high acrylamide consumers. Impact This is the second prospective study to report positive associations with endometrial and ovarian cancers. These associations should be further evaluated to inform public health policy. PMID:20693310

  20. Selective CB2 up-regulation in women affected by endometrial inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Iuvone, Teresa; De Filippis, Daniele; Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; D'Amico, Alessandra; Simonetti, Sara; Sparice, Stefania; Esposito, Giuseppe; Bifulco, Giuseppe; Insabato, Luigi; Nappi, Carmine; Guida, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Endometritis is defined as an inflammation of the endometrial mucosa of the uterus. In endometritis large amounts of toxic mediators, including nitric oxide (NO) are released by inflammatory cells. As a consequence of nitric oxide-dependent injury, the cells respond by triggering protective mechanisms, by changing the endo-cannabinoid system (ECS) which comprises both CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands. The aim of our study was to seek out evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in inflammatory endometrial tissue as well as for their potential role in endometrial inflammation. Our results showed a selective up-regulation of both transcription and expression of CB2 receptors in biopsies from women affected by endometrial inflammation compared to healthy women. The experiments with the nitric oxide-donor S-Nitroso-L-Glutathione (GSNO) suggest that such a selective up-regulation may be related to the nitric oxide release occurring during endometrial inflammation. In addition, we demonstrated an increase in chymase expression, a marker of mast cells, in biopsies of women affected by endometritis. Therefore our results support the hypothesis that the up-regulation of CB2 occurs mainly on mast cells and that it might tend to sensitize these cells to the anti-inflammatory effect exerted by endogenous cannabinoids by binding their receptor and thus preventing the mast cell degranulation and the release of pro-inflammatory mediators. In conclusion, we believe that the selective CB2 up-regulation might play a role as a novel prognostic factor in endometrial inflammation. PMID:18419603

  1. Imatinib sensitizes endometrial cancer cells to cisplatin by targeting CD117-positive growth-competent cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiuzhi; Kyo, Satoru; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mizumoto, Yasunari; Maida, Yoshiko; Bono, Yukiko; Takakura, Masahiro; Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    The use of molecular target therapy has not been established for endometrial cancer. The present study investigated the potential therapeutic strategy of targeting CD117-positive cancer cells as a novel molecular target therapy. FACS-sorted CD117(+) cells isolated from endometrial cancer cell lines (Ishikawa or MFE280 cells) exhibited higher proliferative capacity in vitro and colony forming activity on soft agar, and decreased sensitivity to cisplatin, compared to CD117(-) cells. Immunohistochemical analyses with surgical specimens of endometrial cancers showed that high CD117 expression was tightly linked to advanced FIGO stages, myometrial invasion and histological grade, and was significantly associated with poor overall survival and relapse-free survival (Kaplan-Meier analysis; p<0.001, log-rank test). The Cox-regression hazard model identified high CD117 expression to be an independent prognostic factor for survival (p<0.05). In vitro assay confirmed that stem cell factor (SCF), a ligand of CD117, was produced specifically in CD117(+) cells of endometrial cancer, and the colony-forming activity were abrogated by adding anti-SCF antibody, indicating an SCF-dependent growth property. Imatinib was confirmed to selectively target CD117(+) cells in vitro, and synergistically enhanced the anti-tumor effect of low dose cisplatin in vivo, which showed only modest effects when used as a single use. These findings suggest that CD117 can be a marker of aggressive behavior of cells as well as an independent prognostic marker in endometrial cancer. Targeting of the SCF/CD117 axis by imatinib sensitized endometrial cancer cells to cisplatin, proposing a novel therapeutic strategy for this tumor type. PMID:24333732

  2. A polymorphic repeat in the IGF1 promoter influences the risk of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Katherine A; Avery-Kiejda, Kelly A; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Attia, John; Bowden, Nikola A

    2016-01-01

    Due to the lack of high-throughput genetic assays for tandem repeats, there is a paucity of knowledge about the role they may play in disease. A polymorphic CA repeat in the promoter region of the insulin-like growth factor 1 gene (IGF1 has been studied extensively over the past 10 years for association with the risk of developing breast cancer, among other cancers, with variable results. The aim of this study was to determine if this CA repeat is associated with the risk of developing breast cancer and endometrial cancer. Using a case–control design, we analysed the length of this CA repeat in a series of breast cancer and endometrial cancer cases and compared this with a control population. Our results showed an association when both alleles were considered in breast and endometrial cancers (P=0.029 and 0.011, respectively), but this did not pass our corrected threshold for significance due to multiple testing. When the allele lengths were analysed categorically against the most common allele length of 19 CA repeats, an association was observed with the risk of endometrial cancer due to a reduction in the number of long alleles (P=0.013). This was confirmed in an analysis of the long alleles separately for endometrial cancer risk (P=0.0012). Our study found no association between the length of this polymorphic CA repeat and breast cancer risk. The significant association observed between the CA repeat length and the risk of developing endometrial cancer has not been previously reported. PMID:27090263

  3. Diagnostic value of transcervical endometrial biopsies in domestic dogs compared with full-thickness uterine sections.

    PubMed

    Christensen, B W; Schlafer, D H; Agnew, D W; Wang, C; Kozlowski, C; Asa, C S

    2012-12-01

    Transcervical endometrial biopsy is a useful tool for obtaining information about uterine health in some species. The clinical application of information gained from histopathological interpretations of endometrial biopsies in the bitch has not been validated. We hypothesized that transcervical endometrial biopsy samples would be as diagnostic as full-thickness uterine sections in identifying cystic endometrial hyperplasia (CEH), inflammation and periglandular fibrosis. Endometrial biopsies were obtained from 20 female adult dogs. Vaginal swabs, gross appearance of the vulva and vaginal tract, and serum progesterone values were used to determine the stage of the oestrous cycle at the time of sampling. The uteri were removed between 1 and 6 days after the biopsy procedure, and full-thickness sections were collected from each uterine horn and ovary and processed for histopathology. Two pathologists, blinded to the origin of each sample, compared full-thickness sections from the excised uteri to the biopsy samples collected via the transcervical technique. Pathologic features noted included: CEH, inflammation and periglandular fibrosis. Pathological diagnoses obtained from the biopsy sections were compared with those obtained from the full-thickness sections, as well as comparing diagnoses between the two pathologists, using McNemar's test. Of the 59 total biopsy samples obtained, 54 were considered diagnostic. All stages of the canine oestrous cycle were represented (anoestrus, proestrus, oestrus and dioestrus). Pyometra was not noted in any of the transcervical biopsy sections, but was noted in many of the full-thickness sections collected from dogs in dioestrus, suggesting either that biopsy is not a sensitive indicator of pyometra or that the procedure may induce pyometra in dioestrous dogs. Transcervical endometrial biopsy showed similar sensitivity as full-thickness sections in detecting CEH, inflammation and fibrosis. No differences in describing lesions were

  4. The effect of stem cell factor on proliferation of human endometrial CD146+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Fayazi, Mehri; Salehnia, Mojdeh; Ziaei, Saeideh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stem cell factor (SCF) is a transcriptional factor which plays crucial roles in normal proliferation, differentiation and survival in a range of stem cells. Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine the proliferation effect of different concentrations of SCF on expansion of human endometrial CD146+ cells. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, total populations of isolated human endometrial suspensions after fourth passage were isolated by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) into CD146+ cells. Human endometrial CD146+ cells were karyotyped and tested for the effect of SCF on proliferation of CD146+ cells, then different concentrations of 0, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 ng/ml was carried out and mitogens-stimulated endometrial CD146+ cells proliferation was assessed by MTT assay. Results: Chromosomal analysis showed a normal metaphase spread and 46XX karyotype. The proliferation rate of endometrial CD146+ cells in the presence of 0, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 ng/ml SCF were 0.945±0.094, 0.962±0.151, 0.988±0.028, 1.679±0.012 and 1.129±0.145 respectively. There was a significant increase in stem/ stromal cell proliferation following in vitro treatment by 50 ng/ml than other concentrations of SCF (p=0.01). Conclusion: The present study suggests that SCF could have effect on the proliferation and cell survival of human endometrial CD146+ cells and it has important implications for medical sciences and cell therapies. PMID:27525327

  5. FOXP1 forkhead transcription factor is associated with the pathogenesis of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Mizunuma, Makito; Yokoyama, Yoshihito; Futagami, Masayuki; Horie, Kayo; Watanabe, Jun; Mizunuma, Hideki

    2016-05-01

    Endometrial cancers are mostly estrogen-dependent. FOXP1 is a P subfamily of forkhead box (FOX), and known as an estrogen-responsive transcription factor. The aims of this study were to examine histological location of FOXP1 in normal and malignant endometrium, and to investigate a possible association between FOXP1 and other factors considered to be involved in pathogenesis of endometrial cancer. The levels of FOXP1, estrogen receptor (ER)α, and ERβ expression were examined immunohistochemically in normal and malignant endometrium obtained from 75 women (8 normal, 8 atypical endometrial hyperplasia, and 59 endometrial cancers from grade 1 to 3). The effects of estrogen on ERα, FOXP1, KRAS, and PTEN expression were analyzed in telomerase-immortalized human endometrial stromal cells (T HESCs) by Western blotting. Western blotting was also used to examine the effect of FOXP1 plasmid DNA or siRNA transfection on KRAS and PTEN expression in Ishikawa cells (well differentiated endometrioid adenocarcinoma), HEC-50B cells (poorly differentiated endometrioid adenocarcinoma), and T HESCs, respectively. FOXP1 was expressed in normal and malignant endometrium, but the rate of expression was different depending upon menstrual cycle and pathological grade of malignancy. FOXP1 expression in nucleus and cytoplasm of grade 3 endometrioid cancers was significantly lower than that of grade 1 and 2 ones. Estradiol increased levels of FOXP1 and KRAS expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in T HESCs cells, and FOXP1 transfection or knockdown led to increase or decrease of KRAS expression but not PTEN. KRAS expression level was significantly related to FOXP1 and ERα levels in cancer tissues. Estradiol did not affect KRAS expression in T HESCs cells transfected with FOXP1 siRNA. These results suggest that FOXP1 is involved in estrogen dependent endometrial cancers through KRAS pathway. PMID:27441287

  6. Silencing of ghrelin receptor expression inhibits endometrial cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fung, Jenny N T; Jeffery, Penny L; Lee, John D; Seim, Inge; Roche, Deborah; Obermair, Andreas; Chopin, Lisa K; Chen, Chen

    2013-07-15

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide hormone produced predominantly in the stomach but also in a range of normal cell types and tumors, where it has endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine roles. Previously, we have demonstrated that ghrelin has proliferative and antiapoptotic effects in endometrial cancer cell lines, suggesting a potential role in promoting tumor growth. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ghrelin receptor, GHSR, and gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and characterized ghrelin and GHSR1a protein expression in human endometrial tumors. GHSR gene silencing was achieved in the Ishikawa and KLE endometrial cancer cell lines, using a lentiviral short-hairpin RNA targeting GHSR. The effects of GHSR1a knockdown were further analyzed in vivo using the Ishikawa cell line in a NOD/SCID xenograft model. Cell proliferation was reduced in cultured GHSR1a knockdown Ishikawa and KLE cells compared with scrambled controls in the absence of exogenously applied ghrelin and in response to exogenous ghrelin (1,000 nM). The tumor volumes were reduced significantly in GHSR1a knockdown Ishikawa mouse xenograft tumors compared with scrambled control tumours. Using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that ghrelin and GHSR1a are expressed in benign and cancerous glands in human endometrial tissue specimens, although there was no correlation between the intensity of staining and cancer grade. These data indicate that downregulation of GHSR expression significantly inhibits endometrial cancer cell line and mouse xenograft tumour growth. This is the first preclinical evidence that downregulation of GHSR may be therapeutic in endometrial cancer.

  7. A polymorphic repeat in the IGF1 promoter influences the risk of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Katherine A; Avery-Kiejda, Kelly A; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Attia, John; Bowden, Nikola A; Scott, Rodney J

    2016-05-01

    Due to the lack of high-throughput genetic assays for tandem repeats, there is a paucity of knowledge about the role they may play in disease. A polymorphic CA repeat in the promoter region of the insulin-like growth factor 1 gene (IGF1 has been studied extensively over the past 10 years for association with the risk of developing breast cancer, among other cancers, with variable results. The aim of this study was to determine if this CA repeat is associated with the risk of developing breast cancer and endometrial cancer. Using a case-control design, we analysed the length of this CA repeat in a series of breast cancer and endometrial cancer cases and compared this with a control population. Our results showed an association when both alleles were considered in breast and endometrial cancers (P=0.029 and 0.011, respectively), but this did not pass our corrected threshold for significance due to multiple testing. When the allele lengths were analysed categorically against the most common allele length of 19 CA repeats, an association was observed with the risk of endometrial cancer due to a reduction in the number of long alleles (P=0.013). This was confirmed in an analysis of the long alleles separately for endometrial cancer risk (P=0.0012). Our study found no association between the length of this polymorphic CA repeat and breast cancer risk. The significant association observed between the CA repeat length and the risk of developing endometrial cancer has not been previously reported. PMID:27090263

  8. Childhood body mass index and height and risk of histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aarestrup, J; Gamborg, M; Ulrich, L G; Sørensen, T I A; Baker, J L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endometrial cancer risk factors include adult obesity and taller stature, but the influence of size earlier in life is incompletely understood. We examined whether childhood body mass index (BMI; kg m−2) and height were associated with histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer. Methods: From the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, 155 505 girls born 1930–1989 with measured weights and heights from 7 to 13 years were linked to health registers. BMI and height were transformed to age-specific z-scores. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by Cox regressions. Results: A total of 1020 endometrial cancers were recorded. BMI was non-linearly associated with all endometrial cancers, oestrogen-dependent cancers and the subtype of endometrioid adenocarcinomas; associations were statistically significant and positive above a z-score=0 and non-significant below zero. Compared with a 7-year-old girl with a BMI z-score=0, an equally tall girl who was 3.6 kg heavier (BMI z-score=1.5) had a hazard ratio=1.53 (95% confidence interval: 1.29–1.82) for endometrioid adenocarcinoma. BMI was not associated with non-oestrogen-dependent cancers, except at the oldest childhood ages. Height at all ages was statistically significant and positively associated with all endometrial cancers, except non-oestrogen-dependent cancers. At 7 years, per ~5.2 cm (1 z-score), the risk of endometrioid adenocarcinoma was 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.09–1.28). Among non-users of unopposed oestrogens, associations between BMI and endometrioid adenocarcinoma strengthened, but no effects on height associations were observed. Conclusions: Endometrial carcinogenesis is linked to early-life body size, suggesting that childhood BMI and height may be useful indicators for the risk of later development of endometrial cancer and might aid in the early prevention of obesity-related endometrial cancers. PMID:27121254

  9. Project for the National Program of Early Diagnosis of Endometrial Cancer Part I

    PubMed Central

    Bohîlțea, RE; Ancăr, V; Cirstoiu, MM; Rădoi, V; Bohîlțea, LC; Furtunescu, F

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Endometrial cancer recorded a peak incidence in ages 60-64 years in Romania, reaching in 2013 the average value of 8.06/ 100,000 women, and 15.97/ 100,000 women within the highest risk age range, having in recent years an increasing trend, being higher in urban than in rural population. Annually, approximately 800 new cases are registered in our country. The estimated lifetime risk of a woman to develop endometrial cancer is of about 1,03%. Based on an abnormal uterine bleeding, 35% of the endometrial cancers are diagnosed in an advanced stage of the disease, with significantly diminished lifetime expectancy. Objective: Drafting a national program for the early diagnosis of endometrial cancer. Methods and Results: We proposed a standardization of the diagnostic steps and focused on 4 key elements for the early diagnosis of endometrial cancer: investigation of abnormal uterine bleeding occurring in pre/ post-menopausal women, investigating features/ anomalies of cervical cytology examination, diagnosis, treatment and proper monitoring of precursor endometrial lesions or cancer associated endometrial lesions and screening high risk populations (Lynch syndrome, Cowden syndrome). Discussion: Improving medical practice based on diagnostic algorithms addresses the four risk groups, by improving information system reporting and record keeping. Improving addressability cases by increasing the health education of the population will increase the rate of diagnosis of endometrial cancer in the early stages of the disease. Abbreviations: ACOG = American Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, ASCCP = American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, PATT = Partial Activated Thromboplastin Time, BRCA = Breast Cancer Gene, CT = Computerized Tomography, IFGO = International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics, HLG = Hemoleucogram, HNPCC = Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (Lynch syndrome), IHC = Immunohistochemistry, BMI = Body Mass Index, INR

  10. Spontaneous Ruptured Uterus in an Adolescent With Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome and Endometrial Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Baquing, Mary Anne; Brotherton, Joy

    2015-01-01

    Uterine diverticula and rudimentary horns are rare forms of uterine anomalies that occur during embryogenesis. They can communicate with the endometrial cavity and may have the potential to develop pathology. This case report presents an obese, anovulatory adolescent with polycystic ovarian syndrome who was admitted with acute abdominal pain and found to have radiological findings that were concerning for a ruptured mass contiguous with the uterine cavity, which was likely a uterine horn or diverticulum. Further evaluation revealed simple hyperplasia without atypia on endometrial sampling, supporting the surgical resection and subsequent medical management of this young patient.

  11. Recurrent Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma: Treatment with a Progestin and Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Agonist

    PubMed Central

    duPont, Nefertiti Chianti; DiSaia, Philip John

    2010-01-01

    Endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) formerly classified as low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma is a rare uterine malignancy with a good prognosis despite a tendency to recur. Primary surgical management for ESS includes total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Patients with ESS have long disease-free survival rates when treated with primary surgical therapy, but nearly fifty percent of these patients will recur. We present the case of a patient with recurrent ESS who had an excellent response to combined therapy with megestrol and leuprolide. PMID:20613993

  12. Unilateral uterine torsion secondary to an inflammatory endometrial polyp in the bitch.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Ba; Laksito, Ma; Long, F; Yates, Gd

    2011-10-01

    A 9-year-old bitch was presented because of lethargy and abdominal distension. Abdominal ultrasound revealed an enlarged, fluid-filled uterus and associated mass. Subsequent exploratory laparotomy revealed unilateral uterine torsion involving the mass. Recovery following ovariohysterectomy was uneventful and the histopathological diagnosis was of a benign endometrial inflammatory polyp. Reports of uterine torsion in the English-language literature are reviewed to identify factors associated with the incidence of uterine torsion. The aetiology of the cystic endometrial hyperplasia/pyometra complex and its possible role in the development of inflammatory polypoid lesions in the bitch is also discussed. PMID:21933164

  13. Role of the clinical pathology laboratory in the evaluation of endometrial carcinomas for Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Bojana; Broaddus, Russell R

    2014-05-01

    Molecular diagnostic testing of endometrial carcinomas in the pathology laboratory has recently emerged as a key component of the clinical evaluation of Lynch syndrome in many centers. Testing modalities involve immunohistochemical and PCR-based analyses. This article outlines the routine application of these analyses, provides a practical guide for troubleshooting some of the common technical issues related to their performance, and reviews common pitfalls in their interpretation. Discrepancies between tissue testing and genetic testing results are discussed in the context of the current understanding of endometrial cancer biology. The merits of universal versus targeted tissue testing based on clinical patient history and histological tumor appearance are also addressed.

  14. Prospective multicenter randomized intermediate biomarker study of oral contraceptive versus depo-provera for prevention of endometrial cancer in women with Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lu, Karen H; Loose, David S; Yates, Melinda S; Nogueras-Gonzalez, Graciela M; Munsell, Mark F; Chen, Lee-May; Lynch, Henry; Cornelison, Terri; Boyd-Rogers, Stephanie; Rubin, Mary; Daniels, Molly S; Conrad, Peggy; Milbourne, Andrea; Gershenson, David M; Broaddus, Russell R

    2013-08-01

    Women with Lynch syndrome have a 40% to 60% lifetime risk for developing endometrial cancer, a cancer associated with estrogen imbalance. The molecular basis for endometrial-specific tumorigenesis is unclear. Progestins inhibit estrogen-driven proliferation, and epidemiologic studies have shown that progestin-containing oral contraceptives (OCP) reduce the risk of endometrial cancer by 50% in women at general population risk. It is unknown whether they are effective in women with Lynch syndrome. Asymptomatic women ages 25 to 50 with Lynch syndrome were randomized to receive the progestin compounds Depo-Provera (depo-MPA) or OCP for three months. An endometrial biopsy and transvaginal ultrasound were conducted before and after treatment. Endometrial proliferation was evaluated as the primary endpoint. Histology and a panel of surrogate endpoint biomarkers were evaluated for each endometrial biopsy as secondary endpoints. A total of 51 women were enrolled, and 46 completed treatment. Two of the 51 women had complex hyperplasia with atypia at the baseline endometrial biopsy and were excluded from the study. Overall, both depo-MPA and OCP induced a dramatic decrease in endometrial epithelial proliferation and microscopic changes in the endometrium characteristic of progestin action. Transvaginal ultrasound measurement of endometrial stripe was not a useful measure of endometrial response or baseline hyperplasia. These results show that women with Lynch syndrome do show an endometrial response to short-term exogenous progestins, suggesting that OCP and depo-MPA may be reasonable chemopreventive agents in this high-risk patient population.

  15. [Overweight, obesity, diabetes, and hypertension in endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Chávez, Tania L N; Vilar-Compte, Diana; de Nicola-Delfín, Luigina; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: en mujeres posmenopáusicas, el exceso de grasa ha sido asociado con un incremento del riesgo de padecer cáncer de endometrio. El objetivo del estudio fue conocer la frecuencia de sobrepeso, obesidad, diabetes e hipertensión en pacientes con cáncer de endometrio. Métodos: se obtuvieron datos demográficos, clínicos, de laboratorio e histopatológicos de los expedientes electrónicos de las pacientes con diagnóstico de cáncer de endometrio en el periodo comprendido de enero del 2009 a julio del 2011. Posteriormente, se efectuó un análisis descriptivo de la información. Resultados: se incluyó un total de 274 expedientes. El promedio de edad de las pacientes fue de 54 años. El 50.4 % eran posmenopáusicas. En el momento del diagnóstico, 112 casos (48.6 %) se encontraban en etapa clínica I. Del total de pacientes, 104 (37.9 %) presentaron diabetes mellitus, 122 (44.5 %) hipertensión arterial, 194 (72.6 %) sobrepeso u obesidad, y se registraron 24 casos con síndrome metabólico. Conclusiones: para este diagnóstico, los resultados muestran un mayor número de casos de sobrepeso y obesidad en comparación con otros países. Es necesario que se hagan más estudios para evaluar la relación del exceso de grasa como factor de riesgo para el cáncer de endometrio.

  16. Endometrial responses to embryonic signals in the primate

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Prajna; Fazleabas, Asgerally T.

    2016-01-01

    The delicate interaction between an embryo and the uterus to initiate implantation and maintain pregnancy is one of the most elegant and fascinating interactions in human biology. Understanding the molecular events of embryo-maternal interaction is of interest to reproductive biologists, clinicians and couples affected by infertility. We have established the baboon as the non-human primate model for studying embryo implantation. Infusion of chorionic gonadotropin (CG), the major embryonic signal of primates, into the uterine cavity of normal cycling baboons during the window of receptivity induces a myriad of morphological, biochemical and molecular changes in the estrogen and progesterone primed endometrium. The luminal epithelium responds by forming plaques, the overall secretory function of the glandular epithelium increases and the stromal response is characterized by induction of α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA). Cross talk between ovarian and embryonic hormones is evidenced by the fact that these responses are inhibited upon treatment with a progesterone receptor antagonist. CG signals principally through the seven transmembrane LH/CG G-protein coupled receptor, and activates a mitogen activated protein kinase pathway in the endometrial epithelium that is unique and independent of all the classical signaling pathways. In the stromal compartment, CG both rescues stromal fibroblasts from their apoptotic demise and also differentiates them into the decidualized phenotype. We propose that stromal cell survival and differentiation is mediated by a critical modulator of cell fate, Notch-1. Thus, CG is an important embryonic signal which modulates communication between the embryo and the endometrium and induces changes that are critical to successful implantation. PMID:19876822

  17. Genomic landscape of endometrial stromal sarcoma of uterus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Jin; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Min Sung; Baek, In-Pyo; Rhee, Jae-Keun; Lee, Sung Hak; Hur, Soo Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2015-10-20

    Although recurrent gene fusions such as JAZF1-JJAZ1 are considered driver events for endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) development, other genomic alterations remain largely unknown. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing, transcriptome sequencing and copy number profiling for five ESSs (three low-grade ESS (LG-ESS) and two undifferentiated uterine sarcomas (UUSs)). All three LG-ESSs exhibited either one of JAZF1-SUZ12, JAZF1-PHF1 and MEAF6-PHF1 fusions, whereas the two UUSs did not. All ESSs except one LG-ESS exhibited copy number alterations (CNAs), many of which encompassed cancer-related genes. In UUSs, five CNAs encompassing cancer-related genes (EZR, CDH1, RB1, TP53 and PRKAR1A) accompanied their expressional changes, suggesting that they might stimulate UUS development. We found 81 non-silent mutations (35 from LG-ESSs and 46 from UUSs) that included 15 putative cancer genes catalogued in cancer-related databases, including PPARG and IRF4 mutations. However, they were non-recurrent and did not include any well-known mutations, indicating that point mutations may not be a major driver for ESS development. Our data show that gene fusions and CNAs are the principal drivers for LG-ESS and USS, respectively, but both may require additional genomic alterations including point mutations. These differences may explain the different biologic behaviors between LG-ESS and UUS. Our findings suggest that ESS development requires point mutations and CNAs as well as the gene fusions. PMID:26429873

  18. The important application of thioridazine in the endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qiong; Sun, Xiao; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yudong; Wang, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endometrial cancer (ECa) is one of the serious healthy burden for female worldwide. The treatments of ECa focus on the application of endocrine therapy and aberrant signaling proteins expression recently years. Medroxyprogesterone acrtate (MPA) plays crucial role in the endocrine therapy for ECa patients. However, the outcomes are still not ideal in the advanced stage tumor, especially in the progesterone-resistant ECa. Thioridazine (THIO) is an anti-psychotic agent, which has been reported to suppress the development of several human cancers. In this study, we aimed at to explore the clinical significant of THIO in the treatment of ECa. Methods: Two ECa cell lines (ISK and KLE) were enrolled in this study, and were grouped into fore groups based on the treatment with different agents. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to analyze the viability of ECa cell lines. The apoptosis of ECa cells was examined by using the flow cytometer. To investigate the expression of important proteins, we applied the quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) method and western blot analysis. Results: The viability of ECa cells was downregulated, and the apoptosis of ECa cells was upregulated after treating with the THIO plus MPA. The expression of progesterone receptor B (PRB) and dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) were increased, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and p-AKT were decreased in the THIO+MPA group. All these results suggested that the THIO could promote MPA to inhibit the growth of cells in ECa, especially in the progesterone-resistant ECa. Conclusion: Taken together, all the data in the present study suggested that the THIO plus MPA might act as the suppressor of tumor growth in ECa by inhibiting the PI3K/AKT signal transduction pathway, which was mediated by PRB, DRD2 and EGFR. PMID:27398159

  19. Genomic landscape of endometrial stromal sarcoma of uterus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Sung; Baek, In-Pyo; Rhee, Jae-Keun; Lee, Sung Hak; Hur, Soo Young; Kim, Tae-Min; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2015-01-01

    Although recurrent gene fusions such as JAZF1-JJAZ1 are considered driver events for endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) development, other genomic alterations remain largely unknown. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing, transcriptome sequencing and copy number profiling for five ESSs (three low-grade ESS (LG-ESS) and two undifferentiated uterine sarcomas (UUSs)). All three LG-ESSs exhibited either one of JAZF1-SUZ12, JAZF1-PHF1 and MEAF6-PHF1 fusions, whereas the two UUSs did not. All ESSs except one LG-ESS exhibited copy number alterations (CNAs), many of which encompassed cancer-related genes. In UUSs, five CNAs encompassing cancer-related genes (EZR, CDH1, RB1, TP53 and PRKAR1A) accompanied their expressional changes, suggesting that they might stimulate UUS development. We found 81 non-silent mutations (35 from LG-ESSs and 46 from UUSs) that included 15 putative cancer genes catalogued in cancer-related databases, including PPARG and IRF4 mutations. However, they were non-recurrent and did not include any well-known mutations, indicating that point mutations may not be a major driver for ESS development. Our data show that gene fusions and CNAs are the principal drivers for LG-ESS and USS, respectively, but both may require additional genomic alterations including point mutations. These differences may explain the different biologic behaviors between LG-ESS and UUS. Our findings suggest that ESS development requires point mutations and CNAs as well as the gene fusions. PMID:26429873

  20. Intravaginal brachytherapy alone for intermediate-risk endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alektiar, Kaled M. . E-mail: alektiak@mskcc.org; Venkatraman, Ennapadam; Chi, Dennis S.; Barakat, Richard R.

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: Despite the results of the Gynecologic Oncology Group trial No. 99 (GOG no. 99), some unanswered questions still remain about the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for intermediate-risk endometrial cancer. First, can intravaginal brachytherapy (IVRT) alone substitute for external beam RT but without added morbidity? Second, is the high-risk (HR) definition from GOG no. 99 a useful tool to predict pelvic recurrence specifically? The purpose of this study was to try to answer these questions in a group of patients with Stage IB-IIB endometrial carcinoma treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) IVRT alone. Methods and Materials: Between November 1987 and December 2002, 382 patients with Stage IB-IIB endometrial carcinoma were treated with simple hysterectomy followed by HDR-IVRT alone at our institution. Comprehensive surgical staging (CSS), defined as pelvic washings and pelvic/paraaortic lymph node sampling, was performed in 20% of patients. The mean age was 60 years (range, 29-92 years). Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) was present in 14% of patients. The median HDR-IVRT dose was 21 Gy (range, 6-21 Gy), given in three fractions. Complications were assessed in terms of late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (Grade 3 or worse) toxicity of the GI tract, genitourinary GU tract, and vagina. Results: With a median follow-up of 48 months, the 5-year vaginal/pelvic control rate was 95% (95% confidence interval [CI], 93-98%). On multivariate analysis, a poor vaginal/pelvic control rate correlated with age {>=}60 years old (relative risk [RR], 3, 95% CI, 1-12; p = 0.01), International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Grade 3 (RR, 9, 95% CI, 2-35; p = 0.03), and LVI (RR, 4, 95% CI, 1-13; p = 0.051). The depth of myometrial invasion and CSS, however, were not significant. With regard to pelvic control specifically, the presence of GOG no. 99 HR features did not affect the pelvic control rate. The 5-year rate for HR patients was 96% (95% CI, 90-100%) vs. 96% (95

  1. Investigation of the Roles of Cyclooxygenase-2 and Galectin-3 Expression in the Pathogenesis of Premenopausal Endometrial Polyps

    PubMed Central

    Kasap, Esin; Karaarslan, Serap; Gur, Esra Bahar; Genc, Mine; Sahin, Nur; Güclü, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The pathogenesis and etiology of endometrial polyps has not been elucidated. In this study, we aimed to examine the pathogenic mechanisms of endometrial polyp development using immunohistochemistry. We evaluated the expression of galectin-3 and cyclooxgenase-2 (COX-2) during the menstrual cycle in premenopausal women with endometrial polyps or normal endometrium. Methods Thirty-one patients with endometrial polyps and 50 healthy control patients were included in this study. The levels of expression of COX-2 and galectin-3 were studied by immunohistochemistry. Results: The percentage of COX-2–positive cells and the intensity of COX-2 staining in the endometrium did not vary during the menstrual cycle either in the control group or in patients with endometrial polyps. However, expression of galectin-3 was significantly lower in endometrial polyps and during the proliferative phase of the endometrium compared with the secretory phase. Conclusions: Our data suggests that the pathogenesis of endometrial polyps does not involve expression of COX-2 or galectin-3. PMID:27086598

  2. Dynamic monitoring of menopause hormone therapy and defining the cut-off value of endometrial thickness during uterine bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Qiu; Yang, Jun; Zhao, Qiaoling; Li, Fen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-dose tibolone therapy on ovarian area, uterine volume and endometrial thickness, and define the cut-off value of endometrial thickness for curettage during uterine bleeding. We followed 619 postmenopausal women, aged 40-60 years, for two years. There were 301 subjects in the low-dose tibolone treatment group and 318 subjects in the control group. The ovarian area, uterine volume and endometrial thickness in all participants were measured by transvaginal ultrasound prior to, one and two years post enrollment, respectively. Endometrial specimens were collected from all subjects with abnormal uterine bleeding during the follow-up period. We found that the uterine volume in the treatment group was greater than that in the control group, and the difference was significant (P<0.05), but there were no significant differences in ovarian area and endometrial thickness between the two groups (P>0.05). When the cut-off value for endometrial thickness was 7.35 mm, the sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79.07%, respectively, and 85.71% and 93.02% when 7.55 mm was set as the cut-off during tibolone therapy. The results indicate that low-dose tibolone therapy may postpone uterine atrophy and the cut-off value of endometrial thickness may be appropriately adjusted for curettage. PMID:27533929

  3. Decreased expression of messenger RNAs encoding endothelin receptors and neutral endopeptidase 24.11 in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Pekonen, F.; Nyman, T.; Ammälä, M.; Rutanen, E. M.

    1995-01-01

    In this study, we used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to compare the expression of mRNAs encoding endothelin-1 (ET-1), endothelin receptors type A (ETA-R) and type B (ETB-R) and ET-1-degrading enzyme neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP) in 15 endometrial cancer tissues and 13 normal endometrial tissues. The relative levels of ET-1 mRNA in endometrial cancer tissues did not differ from those in normal endometrium. Both ETA-R and ETB-R mRNA levels were significantly lower in endometrial cancer tissue than in normal endometrium (P < 0.001). The complete lack of NEP mRNA in endometrial cancer tissues was in marked contrast to results from normal endometrium (P < 0.001). In conclusion, differential expression of mRNAs encoding ET-R and NEP in normal endometrium and endometrial cancer suggests that ET action is altered in endometrial cancer compared with normal endometrium. Images Figure 2 PMID:7819049

  4. A polymerase chain reaction assay for non-random X chromosome inactivation identifies monoclonal endometrial cancers and precancers.

    PubMed

    Mutter, G L; Chaponot, M L; Fletcher, J A

    1995-02-01

    We hypothesize that endometrial carcinoma and their precursors share a monoclonal growth pattern and tested this thesis with archival paraffin-embedded tissues using a polymerase chain reaction-based assay for non-random X chromosome inactivation. Of the 10 well-differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma cases with heterozygous markers (HUMARA, X-linked androgen receptor gene), 9 had skewed X inactivation consistent with a monoclonal process, and one contained a structurally altered HUMARA gene. X inactivation skewing similar to that of the tumor was seen in matched control polyclonal tissues of 4 (of 9) cases, caused by the small number of endometrial stem cells at the time of embryonic X inactivation. When the polymerase chain reaction assay was applied to four potential endometrial precancers (atypical endometrial hyperplasia) and matched control tissues, two were inconclusive, and two were found to be monoclonal. We conclude that 1) it is essential to include polyclonal control tissues in X inactivation analyses to determine whether skewing is a specific indicator of monoclonality; and 2) endometrial adenocarcinomas and some putative precancers, atypical endometrial hyperplasia, are monoclonal.

  5. Ligand-Activated Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor β/δ Modulates Human Endometrial Cancer Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    MA, JJ; Monsivais, D; Dyson, MT; Coon, JS; Malpani, S; Ono, M; Zhao, H; Xin, H; Pavone, ME; Kim, JJ; Chakravarti, D; Bulun, SE

    2013-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the fourth most common malignancy among women and is a major cause of morbidity- contributing to approximately 8,200 annual deaths in the United States. Despite advances to the understanding of endometrial cancer, novel interventions for the disease are necessary given that many tumors become refractory to therapy. As a strategy to identify novel therapies for endometrial carcinoma, in this study we examined the contribution of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor β/δ (PPARβ/δ) to endometrial cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. We found that when activated with the highly selective PPARβ/δ agonists, GW0742 and GW501516, PPARβ/δ inhibited the proliferation and markedly induced the apoptosis of three endometrial cancer cell lines. The specificity of the PPARβ/δ-induced effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis was demonstrated using PPARβ/δ-selective antagonists and PPARβ/δ siRNA in combination with PPARβ/δ-selective agonists. Furthermore, we showed that PPARβ/δ activation increased PTEN expression, which led to AKT and GSK3β dephosphorylation, and increased β-catenin phosphorylation associated with its degradation. Overall, our data suggest that the anti-tumorigenic effect of PPARβ/δ activation in endometrial cancer is mediated through the negative regulation of the AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin pathway. These findings warrant further investigation of PPARβ/δ as a therapeutic target in endometrial cancer. PMID:23943160

  6. Dietary insulin index and insulin load in relation to endometrial cancer risk in the Nurses’ Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Jennifer; Bao, Ying; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Hankinson, Susan E.; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2014-01-01

    Background While unopposed estrogen exposure is considered the main driver of endometrial carcinogenesis, factors associated with states of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are independently associated with endometrial cancer risk. We used dietary insulin load and insulin index scores to represent the estimated insulin demand of overall diets and assessed their association with endometrial cancer risk in the prospective Nurses’ Health Study. Methods We estimated incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for risk of invasive endometrial cancer using Cox proportional hazards models. Between the baseline dietary questionnaire (1980) and 2010, we identified a total of 798 incident invasive epithelial endometrial adenocarcinomas over 1,417,167 person-years of follow-up. Results Dietary insulin scores were not associated with overall risk of endometrial cancer. Comparing women in the highest to the lowest quintile, the multivariable-adjusted RRs of endometrial cancer were 1.07 (95% CI: 0.84, 1.35) for cumulative average dietary insulin load and 1.03 (95% CI: 0.82, 1.31) for cumulative average dietary insulin index. Findings did not vary substantially by alcohol consumption, total dietary fiber intake, or BMI and/or physical activity (Pheterogeneity ≥ 0.10). Conclusions Intake of a diet predicted to stimulate a high postprandial insulin response was not associated with endometrial cancer risk in this large prospective study. Considering the complex interplay of diet, lifestyle and genetic factors contributing to the hyperinsulinemic state, dietary measures alone may not sufficiently capture absolute long-term insulin exposure. Impact This study is the first to investigate dietary insulin scores in relation to endometrial cancer risk. PMID:24859872

  7. Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and the risk of type I and type II endometrial cancer among postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Inoue-Choi, Maki; Robien, Kim; Mariani, Andrea; Cerhan, James R.; Anderson, Kristin E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake has been associated with an increased risk of obesity and type II diabetes. However, its association with endometrial cancer is unclear. Methods: We evaluated dietary intake of SSB, fruit juice, sugar-free beverages, sweets/baked goods, starch, and sugars among 23,039 postmenopausal women in the Iowa Women’s Health Study. Incident estrogen-dependent type I and estrogen-independent type II endometrial cancers were identified via linkage with the SEER Registry. Risks of type I and type II endometrial cancers were separately compared by energy-adjusted dietary intake in Cox proportional hazards regression models. Results: From 1986 to 2010, 506 type I and 89 type II incident endometrial cancers were identified. An increased risk of type I endometrial cancer was observed with increasing SSB intake after adjustment for BMI and other cofounders (ptrend=0.0005). Compared to non-drinkers of SSB, the risk was 78% higher (95% CI=1.32-2.40) among women in the highest quintile of SSB intake. The observed association was not modified by BMI, physical activity, history of diabetes, or cigarette smoking. Higher risk of type I endometrial cancer was also observed with higher intake of sugars. None of the dietary items included in the analysis was associated with type II endometrial cancer risk. Conclusion: Higher intake of SSB and sugars were associated with an increased risk of type I, but not type II, endometrial cancer. Impact: SSB intake may be a risk factor for type I endometrial cancer regardless of other lifestyle factors. PMID:24273064

  8. Adherence to Vaginal Dilation Following High Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Lois C.; Abdallah, Rita; Schluchter, Mark; Panneerselvam, Ashok; Kunos, Charles A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: We report demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors associated with adherence to vaginal dilation and describe the sexual and marital or nonmarital dyadic functioning of women following high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated women aged 18 years or older in whom early-stage endometrial (IAgr3-IIB) cancers were treated by HDR intravaginal brachytherapy within the past 3.5 years. Women with or without a sexual partner were eligible. Patients completed questionnaires by mail or by telephone assessing demographic and clinical variables, adherence to vaginal dilation, dyadic satisfaction, sexual functioning, and health beliefs. Results: Seventy-eight of 89 (88%) eligible women with early-stage endometrial cancer treated with HDR brachytherapy completed questionnaires. Only 33% of patients were adherers, based on reporting having used a dilator more than two times per week in the first month following radiation. Nonadherers who reported a perceived change in vaginal dimension following radiation reported that their vaginas were subjectively smaller after brachytherapy (p = 0.013). Adherers reported more worry about their sex lives or lack thereof than nonadherers (p = 0.047). Patients reported considerable sexual dysfunction following completion of HDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: Adherence to recommendations for vaginal dilator use following HDR brachytherapy for endometrial cancer is poor. Interventions designed to educate women about dilator use benefit may increase adherence. Although sexual functioning was compromised, it is likely that this existed before having cancer for many women in our study.

  9. Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With High-Risk Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-11

    Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  10. What Is New in Endometrial Cancer?: Best Articles From the Past Year.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jason D

    2016-10-01

    This month we focus on current research in endometrial cancer. Dr. Wright discusses four recent publications, which are concluded with a "bottom line" that is the take-home message. The complete reference for each can be found in on this page, along with direct links to the abstracts.

  11. Evaluation of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) boost in the management of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Demiral, S; Beyzadeoglu, M; Uysal, B; Oysul, K; Kahya, Y Elcim; Sager, O; Dincoglan, F; Gamsiz, H; Dirican, B; Surenkok, S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) boost with multileaf collimator technique after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in patients with endometrial cancer. Consecutive patients with endometrial cancer treated using LINAC-based SBRT boost after pelvic RT were enrolled in the study. All patients had undergone surgery including total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy ± pelvic/paraortic lymphadenectomy before RT. Prescribed external pelvic RT dose was 45 Gray (Gy) in 1.8 Gy daily fractions. All patients were treated with SBRT boost after pelvic RT. The prescribed SBRT boost dose to the upper two thirds of the vagina including the vaginal vault was 18 Gy delivered in 3 fractions with 1-week intervals. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3 (CTCAE v3).Between April 2010 and May 2011, 18 patients with stage I-III endometrial cancer were treated with LINAC-based SBRT boost after pelvic RT. At a median follow-up of 24 (8-26) months with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and gynecological examination, local control rate of the study group was 100 % with negligible acute and late toxicity.LINAC-based SBRT boost to the vaginal cuff is a feasible gynecological cancer treatment modality with excellent local control and minimal toxicity that may replace traditional brachytherapy boost in the management of endometrial cancer. PMID:23374003

  12. Augmentation of arginase Ⅱ expression in the human endometrial epithelium in the secretory phase.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Makiko; Harada, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Tomonori; Iwahara, Yuki; Kubota, Toshiro

    2012-01-01

    L-arginine is the common substrate for arginase and nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Arginase converts L-arginine to urea and L-ornithine. L-Ornithine is the principal precursor for the production of polyamines and L-proline, which are required for cell proliferation and collagen synthesis. Endothelial NOS is expressed in the human endometrial glandular epithelium, but the expression and physiological roles of arginase in the human endometrium are not clear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and distribution patterns of arginases Ⅰ (A-Ⅰ) and Ⅱ (A-Ⅱ) in the human endometrium by using immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR), and western blotting. A-Ⅰ and A-Ⅱ were detected by immunohistochemistry in human endometrial epithelial cells during the proliferative and secretory phases of the menstrual cycle. RT-PCR showed that A-Ⅰ and A-Ⅱ mRNA were expressed in human endometrial tissue. Western blotting analysis results showed the expression of A-Ⅱ protein. Immunohistochemistry and western blotting results showed that expression levels of A-Ⅱ were significantly higher in the secretory phase than in the proliferative phase. Increased A-Ⅱ levels in the secretory phase may be responsible for endometrial growth by increasing polyamines and proline products. PMID:23897115

  13. Five endometrial cancer risk loci identified through genome-wide association analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Timothy H T; Thompson, Deborah J; O'Mara, Tracy A; Painter, Jodie N; Glubb, Dylan M; Flach, Susanne; Lewis, Annabelle; French, Juliet D; Freeman-Mills, Luke; Church, David; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Webb, Penelope M; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Nyholt, Dale R; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Shah, Mitul; Dennis, Joe; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Amant, Frederic; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Zhao, Hui; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Dowdy, Sean C; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Njølstad, Tormund S; Salvesen, Helga B; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica M J; Ashton, Katie; Otton, Geoffrey; Proietto, Tony; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Tham, Emma; Li, Mulin Jun; Yip, Shun H; Wang, Junwen; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Palles, Claire; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Cunningham, Julie M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Edwards, Stacey L; Easton, Douglas F; Tomlinson, Ian; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of three endometrial cancer genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and two follow-up phases totaling 7,737 endometrial cancer cases and 37,144 controls of European ancestry. Genome-wide imputation and meta-analysis identified five new risk loci of genome-wide significance at likely regulatory regions on chromosomes 13q22.1 (rs11841589, near KLF5), 6q22.31 (rs13328298, in LOC643623 and near HEY2 and NCOA7), 8q24.21 (rs4733613, telomeric to MYC), 15q15.1 (rs937213, in EIF2AK4, near BMF) and 14q32.33 (rs2498796, in AKT1, near SIVA1). We also found a second independent 8q24.21 signal (rs17232730). Functional studies of the 13q22.1 locus showed that rs9600103 (pairwise r(2) = 0.98 with rs11841589) is located in a region of active chromatin that interacts with the KLF5 promoter region. The rs9600103[T] allele that is protective in endometrial cancer suppressed gene expression in vitro, suggesting that regulation of the expression of KLF5, a gene linked to uterine development, is implicated in tumorigenesis. These findings provide enhanced insight into the genetic and biological basis of endometrial cancer. PMID:27135401

  14. Dietary inflammatory index and endometrial cancer risk in an Italian case-control study.

    PubMed

    Shivappa, Nitin; Hébert, James R; Zucchetto, Antonella; Montella, Maurizio; Serraino, Diego; La Vecchia, Carlo; Rossi, Marta

    2016-01-14

    The relation between inflammation deriving from diet and endometrial cancer risk has not yet been investigated. In this study, we explored the association between the dietary inflammatory index (DII) and endometrial cancer risk in an Italian case-control study. Cases comprised 454 patients with incident, histologically confirmed carcinoma of the endometrium, and controls comprised 908 subjects admitted to the same network of hospitals as cases for a wide spectrum of acute, non-neoplastic conditions. DII scores were computed on the basis of dietary intake assessed using a reproducible and valid seventy-eight-item FFQ. OR were calculated through logistic regression models conditioned on age and study centre and adjusted for recognised confounding factors, including total energy intake. Women with the most pro-inflammatory diet had a higher risk for endometrial cancer compared with women with the most anti-inflammatory diet (OR(Quartile) 4 v. 1 1·46; 95% CI 1·02, 2·11; P(trend)=0·04). A pro-inflammatory diet may increase the risk for endometrial cancer.

  15. Tissue-Engineered Endometrial Model for the Study of Cell–Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    James, Christopher O.; Sidell, Neil; Taylor, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial stromal and epithelial cell cross talk is known to influence many of the dynamic changes that occur during the menstrual cycle. We modified our previous model and embedded telomerase-immortalized human endometrial stromal cells and Ishikawa adenocarcinoma epithelial cells in a collagen–Matrigel hydrogel to create a tissue-engineered model of the endometrium. Comparisons of single and cocultured cells examined communication between endometrial stromal and epithelial cells, which were cultured with 0 or 10 nmol/L 17β estradiol; conditioned medium was used to look at the production of paracrine factors. Using this model, we were able to identify the changes in interleukin 6 (IL-6) and active matrix metalloproteinase 2, which appear to be due to paracrine signaling and differences in transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) that do not appear to be due to paracrine signaling. Moreover, IL-6, TGF-β1, and DNA content were also affected by the presence of estradiol in many of the tissues. These results indicate that paracrine and endocrine signaling are involved in human endometrial responses and support the use of coculture models to further investigate cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions. PMID:25031317

  16. Uterine sarcoma Part II-Uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma: The TAG systematic review.

    PubMed

    Horng, Huann-Cheng; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Wang, Peng-Hui; Chen, Yi-Jen; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Ng, Heung-Tat

    2016-08-01

    Endometrial stromal tumors are rare uterine tumors (<1%). Four main categories include endometrial stromal nodule, low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (LG-ESS), high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (HG-ESS), and uterine undifferentiated sarcoma (UUS). This review is a series of articles discussing the uterine sarcomas. LG-ESS, a hormone-dependent tumor harboring chromosomal rearrangement, is an indolent tumor with a favorable prognosis, but characterized by late recurrences even in patients with Stage I disease, suggesting the requirement of a long-term follow-up. Patients with HG-ESS, based on the identification of YWHAE-NUTM2A/B (YWHAE-FAM22A/B) gene fusion, typically present with advanced stage diseases and frequently have recurrences, usually within a few years after initial surgery. UUS is, a high-grade sarcoma, extremely rare, lacking a specific line of differentiation, which is a diagnosis of exclusion (the wastebasket category, which fails to fulfill the morphological and immunohistochemical criteria of translocation-positive ESS). Surgery is the main strategy in the management of uterine sarcoma. Due to rarity, complex biological characteristics, and unknown etiology and risk factors of uterine sarcomas, the role of adjuvant therapy is not clear. Only LG-ESS might respond to progestins or aromatase inhibitors. PMID:27590366

  17. EXPRESSION OF AHR AND ARNT MRNA IN CULTURED HUMAN ENDOMETRIAL EXPLANTS EXPOSED TO TCDD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Expression of AhR and ARNT mRNA in cultured human endometrial explants exposed to TCDD.

    Pitt JA, Feng L, Abbott BD, Schmid J, Batt RE, Costich TG, Koury ST, Bofinger DP.

    Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

    Endom...

  18. The effect of endometrial injury on first cycle IVF/ICSI outcome: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mahran, Ahmad; Ibrahim, Mahmoud; Bahaa, Haitham

    2016-01-01

    Background: Implantation remains a limiting step in IVF/ICSI. Endometrial injury isa promising procedure aiming at improving the implantation and pregnancy rates after IVF/ICSI. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of endometrial injury induced in precedingcycle on IVF/ICSI outcome. Materials and Methods: Four hundred patients undergoing their first IVF/ICSI cycle in two IVF units in Minia, Egypt were randomly selected to undergo either endometrial injury in luteal phase of preceding cycle (intervention group) or no treatment (control group). Primary outcome wasthe implantation and live birth ratesWhile the secondary outcome was clinical pregnancy, miscarriage, multiple pregnancy rates, pain and bleeding during and after procedure. Results: Implantation and live birth rates were significantly higher in intervention compared with control group (22.4% vs. 18.7%, p=0.02 and 67% vs. 28%, p=0.03), respectively. There was also a significant reduction in miscarriage rate in intervention group (4.8% vs. 19.7%, respectively, p<0.001). Conclusion: Endometrial injury in preceding cycle improves the implantation rate and live birth rate and reduces the miscarriage rate per clinical pregnancy in patients undergoing their first IVF/ICSI cycle. PMID:27294218

  19. Ultrastructural and histochemical markers of endometrial secretion induction in habitual miscarriage.

    PubMed

    Ilizarova, N A; Marinkin, I O; Ageeva, T A; Bgatova, N P; Kuleshov, V M; Aidagulova, S V

    2009-10-01

    Biphasic hormone therapy at the stage of pre-gestation treatment of patients with habitual miscarriages stimulates the expression of progesterone receptors in the endometrium during the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle with full-value ultrastructural rearrangement of the endometrial glandular components in comparison with the patients receiving metabolic therapy alone. PMID:20396766

  20. Biopsy-induced inflammatory conditions improve endometrial receptivity: the mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Gnainsky, Y; Granot, I; Aldo, P; Barash, A; Or, Y; Mor, G; Dekel, N

    2015-01-01

    A decade ago, we first reported that endometrial biopsy significantly improves the success of pregnancy in IVF patients with recurrent implantation failure, an observation that was later confirmed by others. Recently, we have demonstrated that this treatment elevated the levels of endometrial pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased the abundance of macrophages (Mac) and dendritic cells (DCs). We therefore hypothesised that the biopsy-related successful pregnancy is secondary to an inflammatory response, and aimed at deciphering its mechanism of action. Supporting our hypothesis, we found that the pro-inflammatory TNFα stimulated primary endometrial stromal cells to express cytokines that attracted monocytes and induced their differentiation into DCs. These monocyte-derived DCs stimulated endometrial epithelial cells to express the adhesive molecule SPP1 (osteopontin (OPN)) and its receptors ITGB3 and CD44, whereas MUC16, which interferes with adhesion, was downregulated. Other implantation-associated genes, such as CHST2, CCL4 (MIP1B) and GROA, were upregulated by monocyte-derived Mac. These findings suggest that uterine receptivity is mediated by the expression of molecules associated with inflammation. Such an inflammatory milieu is not generated in some IVF patients with recurrent implantation failure in the absence of local injury provoked by the biopsy treatment. PMID:25349438

  1. Body mass index, conversion rate and complications among patients undergoing robotic surgery for endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Mary J; Dorzin, Esther; Nguyen, Loan; Anderson, Elizabeth; Bunn, W Douglas

    2015-12-01

    A retrospective cohort study was performed to evaluate the relationship of BMI to conversion rate in patients undergoing robotic surgery for endometrial cancer. Secondary outcomes were operative times, number of lymph nodes retrieved, and complications. Women with endometrial cancer scheduled for robotic surgery from September 2008 to September 2012 were included. Women were divided into three groups based on BMI, and conversion rates to laparotomy were compared. Descriptive and comparative analyses were performed among non-obese, obese, and morbidly obese women who completed robotic surgery. 298 women were scheduled for robotic surgery for endometrial carcinoma: 87 non-obese (BMI 19-29, μ 25.23), 110 obese (BMI 30-39, μ 34.21), and 101 morbidly obese (BMI 40-71, μ 47.38). Conversion to laparotomy occurred in 18 patients (6%), with no difference in conversion rate between BMI categories. Direct comparison between converted and completed robotic patients showed no significant differences in preoperative characteristics, except that patients who required conversion had a higher number of previous abdominal surgeries. Patients completing robotic surgery underwent node dissections at similar rates in all three BMI categories. Operating room time, but not surgical time, was increased in morbidly obese patients. There were no significant differences in complications, performance of lymphadenectomy, or lymph node yields between BMI categories. Increase in BMI was not associated with an increase in rate of conversion to laparotomy or complication rate in patients undergoing robotic surgery for endometrial carcinoma. Node dissections were pathologically equivalent between BMI categories.

  2. Endometrial polyps smaller than 1.5 cm do not affect ICSI outcome.

    PubMed

    Isikoglu, M; Berkkanoglu, M; Senturk, Z; Coetzee, K; Ozgur, K

    2006-02-01

    This study aimed to determine whether the presence of endometrial polyps discovered during ovarian stimulation affects the outcomes of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles. This retrospective descriptive study was conducted in a private assisted reproductive technology unit. Medical records of ICSI cycles performed between January 2003 and December 2004 were reviewed. Patients were divided into three groups: patients with endometrial polyps discovered during ovarian stimulation (group 1, n=15), patients who underwent hysteroscopic polyp resection prior to their ICSI cycle (group 2, n=40) and patients without polyps (group 3, n=956). Main outcome measures were clinical pregnancy rates and implantation rates. Age of the patients, age of the husbands, body mass index, total amount of gonadotrophins used, length of stimulation, peak oestradiol concentrations, peak endometrial thickness and number of embryos replaced were not significantly different between the groups, nor were the pregnancy and implantation rates. Only one patient (12.5%) from the first group experienced miscarriage within 12 weeks of pregnancy. In conclusion, endometrial polyps discovered during ovarian stimulation do not negatively affect pregnancy and implantation outcomes in ICSI cycles.

  3. LKB1 loss promotes endometrial cancer progression via CCL2-dependent macrophage recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Christopher G.; Nakada, Yuji; Saatcioglu, Hatice D.; Aloisio, Gina M.; Cuevas, Ileana; Zhang, Song; Miller, David S.; Lea, Jayanthi S.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Amelio, Antonio L.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Castrillon, Diego H.

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy and the fourth most common malignancy in women. For most patients in whom the disease is confined to the uterus, treatment results in successful remission; however, there are no curative treatments for tumors that have progressed beyond the uterus. The serine/threonine kinase LKB1 has been identified as a potent suppressor of uterine cancer, but the biological modes of action of LKB1 in this context remain incompletely understood. Here, we have shown that LKB1 suppresses tumor progression by altering gene expression in the tumor microenvironment. We determined that LKB1 inactivation results in abnormal, cell-autonomous production of the inflammatory cytokine chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) within tumors, which leads to increased recruitment of macrophages with prominent tumor-promoting activities. Inactivation of Ccl2 in an Lkb1-driven mouse model of endometrial cancer slowed tumor progression and increased survival. In human primary endometrial cancers, loss of LKB1 protein was strongly associated with increased CCL2 expression by tumor cells as well as increased macrophage density in the tumor microenvironment. These data demonstrate that CCL2 is a potent effector of LKB1 loss in endometrial cancer, creating potential avenues for therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26413869

  4. Parity and endometrial cancer risk: a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi-Jun; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Tu, Chao; Zhu, Jingjing; Qian, Ke-Qing; Feng, Tong-Bao; Li, Changwei; Wu, Lang; Ma, Xiao-Xin

    2015-09-16

    The association between parity and endometrial cancer risk is inconsistent from observational studies. We aimed to quantitatively assess the relationship by summarizing all relevant epidemiological studies. PubMed (MEDLINE), Embase and Scopus were searched up to February 2015 for eligible case-control studies and prospective studies. Random-effects model was used to pool risk estimations. Ten prospective studies, 35 case-control studies and 1 pooled analysis of 10 cohort and 14 case-control studies including 69681 patients were identified. Pooled analysis revealed that there was a significant inverse association between parity and risk of endometrial cancer (relative risk (RR) for parous versus nulliparous: 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.65-0.74; I(2) = 76.9%). By evaluating the number of parity, we identified that parity number of 1, 2 or 3 versus nulliparous demonstrated significant negative association (RR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.64-0.84, I(2) = 88.3%; RR = 0.62, 95% CI 0.53-0.74, I(2) = 92.1%; and RR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.65-0.70, I(2) = 20.0% respectively). The dose-response analysis suggested a nonlinear relationship between the number of parity and endometrial cancer risk. The RR decreased when the number of parity increased. This meta-analysis suggests that parity may be associated with a decreased risk of endometrial cancer. Further studies are warranted to replicate our findings.

  5. Identifying aggressive forms of endometrioid-type endometrial cancer: new insights into molecular subtyping

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuexin; Broaddus, Russell R.; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Summary Clinical heterogeneity represents a great challenge for cancer therapeutics. Molecular classification of patients into different subtypes based on genetic or epigenetic characteristics has the potential to revolutionize the clinical care and mechanistic understanding of a wide spectrum of cancers, including endometrial carcinoma, the most common gynecological cancer affecting women. PMID:25494844

  6. Foxa2 Is Essential for Mouse Endometrial Gland Development and Fertility1

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jae-Wook; Kwak, Inseok; Lee, Kevin Y.; Kim, Tae Hoon; Large, Michael J.; Stewart, Colin L.; Kaestner, Klaus H.; Lydon, John P.; DeMayo, Francesco J.

    2010-01-01

    During embryonic development, Foxa2 is required for the formation of the node and notochord, and ablation of this gene results in defects in gastrulation, neural tube patterning, and gut morphogenesis. Foxa2 has been shown to be expressed specifically in the glandular epithelium of the murine uterus. To study the uterine function of Foxa2, this gene was conditionally ablated in the mouse uterus by crossing mice with floxed Foxa2 alleles, Foxa2loxP/loxP, with the Pgrcre mouse model. Pgrcre/+ Foxa2loxP/loxP mice showed significantly reduced fertility. Analysis of the uterus on Day 5.5 of pregnancy showed disrupted blastocyst implantation. Pgrcre/+ Foxa2loxP/loxP mice also showed a severe impairment of the uterus to respond to the artificial induction of the decidual response. Morphological examination of the uteri of these mice showed a severe reduction in the number of endometrial glands. The loss of endometrial glands resulted in the reduction of leukemia inhibitory factor (Lif) expression. The lack of a decidual response could be partially rescued by an intrauterine injection of LIF before the initiation of the decidual response. This analysis demonstrates that Foxa2 regulates endometrial gland development and that mice with a loss of endometrial glands cannot support implantation in part due to the loss of LIF, which is a requisite for fertility in the mouse. PMID:20484741

  7. Exercise Programme in Endometrial Cancer; Protocol of the Feasibility and Acceptability Survivorship Trial (EPEC-FAST)

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Anke; Lopes, Alberto; Das, Nagindra; Bekkers, Ruud; Massuger, Leon; Galaal, Khadra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obesity has been associated with impaired quality of life and poorer outcomes in endometrial cancer survivors. Lifestyle interventions promoting exercise and weight reduction have been proposed for survivorship care. However, studies evaluating exercise programmes for endometrial cancer survivors are lacking. Purpose The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of an individualised exercise intervention for endometrial cancer survivors to improve quality of life. Methods and analysis This is a feasibility study in which women will undergo a 10-week exercise programme with a personal trainer. The study population comprises women with confirmed diagnosis of endometrial cancer, who have completed surgical treatment with curative intent, and are aged 18 years or older. The study will take place at the Royal Cornwall Hospital Trust, UK. Feasibility will be evaluated in terms of recruitment, adherence and compliance to the programme. Secondary outcomes are quality of life, psychological distress, fatigue, pain and complication rates. In addition, the acceptability of the programme will be assessed. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained through the Exeter NRES Committee. The study results will be used to optimise the intervention content, and may serve as the foundation for a larger definitive trial. Results will be disseminated through peer-review journals, congresses, relevant clinical groups and presented on the Trust's website. Trial registration number: NCT02367950; pre-results. PMID:26674498

  8. Consumption of sugary foods and drinks and risk of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    King, Melony G; Chandran, Urmila; Olson, Sara H; Demissie, Kitaw; Lu, Shou-En; Parekh, Niyati; Bandera, Elisa V

    2013-07-01

    Consumption of foods high in sugar promotes insulin production, which has been linked to endometrial carcinogenesis. We evaluated the impact of dietary intake of sugary foods and beverages, as well as added sugar and total sugar on endometrial cancer risk in a population-based case-control study, including 424 cases and 398 controls. Participants completed an interview and food frequency questionnaire, and provided self-recorded waist and hip measurements. Women in the highest quartile of added sugar intake had significantly increased endometrial cancer risk (OR = 1.84, 95% CI 1.16-2.92). Among women with waist-to-hip ratio ≥0.85, risk was significantly higher for the highest versus lowest tertile of added sugar intakes (OR = 2.50, 95% CI 1.38-4.52). The association with added sugar also became stronger when analyses were restricted to never users of hormone replacement therapy (OR = 2.03; 95% CI 1.27-3.26, for highest versus lowest tertile). There was little evidence of effect modification by body mass index or physical activity. Given the high prevalence of intake of sugary foods and drinks in Western populations, additional research is warranted to confirm our findings on endometrial cancer.

  9. Isolated abdominal wound recurrence of an endometrial adenocarcinoma confined to a polyp

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, J.F.; Hatch, K.D.; Orr, J.W. Jr.; Shingleton, H.M.

    1986-11-01

    An unusual case of Stage IB moderately well-differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma that was confined to a polyp and recurred only in the abdominal wound is presented. Eighteen months following complete excision, local electron beam therapy, and the institution of hormonal therapy, the patient is alive and without other evidence of recurrence. The mechanisms of metastasis in this case are discussed.

  10. [Endometrial adenocarcinoma and clear cell carcinoma in a young woman with polycystic ovarian syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Niu, Jing; Liu, Nan; Liu, Guo-Bing

    2016-05-01

    A 26-year-old unmarried woman with irregular menstruation for 4 years was admitted for an intrauterine space-occupying mass. Pathological examination before surgery showed moderately to poorly differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent laparoscopically assisted epifascial panhysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Pathological examination of the surgical specimens reported moderately to poorly differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma and stage II clear cell carcinoma. The patient then received chemotherapy and remained alive without evidence of recurrence. Young women with polycystic ovarian syndrome are at high risk of developing endometrial carcinoma, but concurrent clear cell carcinoma is rare. Careful evaluation before and after treatment are essential to improve the patients prognosis. PMID:27222196

  11. Reduced connexin 43 in eutopic endometrium and cultured endometrial stromal cells from subjects with endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jie; Boicea, Anisoara; Barrett, Kara L.; James, Christopher O.; Bagchi, Indrani C.; Bagchi, Milan K.; Nezhat, Ceana; Sidell, Neil; Taylor, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that reduced fecundity associated with endometriosis reflects a failure of embryonic receptivity. Microdomains composed of endometrial gap junctions, which facilitate cell–cell communication, may be implicated. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of connexin (Cx) 43 block human endometrial cell differentiation in vitro and conditional uterine deletion of Cx43 alleles cause implantation failure in mice. The aim of this study was to determine whether women with endometriosis have reduced eutopic endometrial Cx43. Cx26 acted as a control. Endometrial biopsies were collected from age, race and cycle phase-matched women without (15 controls) or with histologically confirmed endometriosis (15 cases). Immunohistochemistry confirmed a predominant localization of Cx43 in the endometrial stroma, whereas Cx26 was confined to the epithelium. Cx43 immunostaining was reduced in eutopic biopsies of endometriosis subjects and western blotting of tissue lysates confirmed lower Cx43 levels in endometriosis cases, with Cx43/β-actin ratios =3.4 ± 1.5 in control and =1.2 ± 0.3 in endometriosis biopsies (P < 0.01). When endometrial stromal cells (ESC) were isolated from endometriosis cases, Cx43 levels and scrape loading-dye transfer were reduced by ∼45% compared with ESC from controls. In vitro decidualization of ESC derived from endometriosis versus control subjects resulted in lesser epithelioid transformation and a significantly reduced up-regulation of Cx43 protein (1.2 ± 0.2- versus 1.7 ± 0.4-fold, P < 0.01). No changes in Cx26 were observed. While basal steady-state levels of Cx43 mRNA did not differ with respect to controls, ESC from endometriosis cases failed to manifest a response to hormone treatment in vitro. In summary, eutopic endometrial Cx43 concentrations in endometriosis cases were <50% those of controls in vivo and in vitro, functional gap junctions were reduced and hormone-induced Cx43 mRNA levels were blunted. PMID:24270393

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies a possible susceptibility locus for endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jirong; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Lose, Felicity; Thompson, Deborah; Tomlinson, Ian; Yu, Herbert; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Lambrechts, Diether; Dörk, Thilo; Dubrowinskaja, Natalia; Goodman, Marc T.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Scott, Rodney J.; Delahanty, Ryan; Zheng, Ying; O’Mara, Tracy; Healey, Catherine S.; Hodgson, Shirley; Risch, Harvey; Yang, Hannah P.; Amant, Frederic; Turmanov, Nurzhan; Schwake, Anita; Lurie, Galina; Trovik, Jone; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ashton, Katie; Ji, Bu-Tian; Bao, Ping-Ping; Howarth, Kimberly; Lu, Lingeng; Lissowska, Jolanta; Coenegrachts, Lieve; Kaydarova, Dylyara; Dürst, Matthias; Thompson, Pamela J.; Krakstad, Camilla; Ekici, Arif B.; Otton, Geoffrey; Shi, Jiajun; Zhang, Ben; Gorman, Maggie; Brinton, Louise; Coosemans, An; Matsuno, Rayna K.; Halle, Mari K.; Hein, Alexander; Proietto, Anthony; Cai, Hui; Lu, Wei; Dunning, Alison; Easton, Douglas; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Qiuyin; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 100 genetic loci for various cancers. However, only one is for endometrial cancer. METHODS We conducted a three-stage GWAS including 8,492 endometrial cancer cases and 16,596 controls. After analyzing 585,963 SNPs in 832 cases and 2,682 controls (Stage 1) from the Shanghai Endometrial Cancer Genetics Study, we selected the top 106 SNPs for in silico replication among 1,265 cases and 5,190 controls from the Australian/British Endometrial Cancer GWAS (Stage 2). Nine SNPs showed results consistent in direction with Stage 1 with P<0.1. These 9 SNPs were investigated among 459 cases and 558 controls (Stage 3a) and 6 SNPs showed a direction of association consistent with Stages 1 and 2. These 6 SNPs, plus 2 additional SNPs selected based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) and P values in Stage 2, were investigated among 5,936 cases and 8,166 controls from an additional 11 studies (Stage 3b). RESULTS SNP rs1202524, near the CAPN9 gene on chromosome 1q42.2, showed a consistent association with endometrial cancer risk across all three stages, with odds ratios (OR) of 1.09 (95% CI: 1.03–1.16) for the A/G genotype and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.05–1.30) for the G/G genotype (P=1.6 × 10−4 in combined analyses of all samples). The association was stronger when limited to the endometrioid subtype, with ORs (95% CI) of 1.11 (1.04–1.18) and 1.21 (1.08–1.35), respectively (P=2.4 × 10−5). CONCLUSIONS Chromosome 1q42.2 may host an endometrial cancer susceptibility locus. IMPACT This study identified a potential genetic locus for endometrial cancer risk. PMID:22426144

  13. Prognostic Significance of POLE Proofreading Mutations in Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Church, David N.; Stelloo, Ellen; Nout, Remi A.; Valtcheva, Nadejda; Depreeuw, Jeroen; ter Haar, Natalja; Noske, Aurelia; Amant, Frederic; Wild, Peter J.; Lambrechts, Diether; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Jobsen, Jan J.; Smit, Vincent T. H. B. M.; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Bosse, Tjalling

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current risk stratification in endometrial cancer (EC) results in frequent over- and underuse of adjuvant therapy, and may be improved by novel biomarkers. We examined whether POLE proofreading mutations, recently reported in about 7% of ECs, predict prognosis. Methods: We performed targeted POLE sequencing in ECs from the PORTEC-1 and -2 trials (n = 788), and analyzed clinical outcome according to POLE status. We combined these results with those from three additional series (n = 628) by meta-analysis to generate multivariable-adjusted, pooled hazard ratios (HRs) for recurrence-free survival (RFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) of POLE-mutant ECs. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: POLE mutations were detected in 48 of 788 (6.1%) ECs from PORTEC-1 and-2 and were associated with high tumor grade (P < .001). Women with POLE-mutant ECs had fewer recurrences (6.2% vs 14.1%) and EC deaths (2.3% vs 9.7%), though, in the total PORTEC cohort, differences in RFS and CSS were not statistically significant (multivariable-adjusted HR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.13 to 1.37, P = .15; HR = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.03 to 1.44, P = .11 respectively). However, of 109 grade 3 tumors, 0 of 15 POLE-mutant ECs recurred, compared with 29 of 94 (30.9%) POLE wild-type cancers; reflected in statistically significantly greater RFS (multivariable-adjusted HR = 0.11, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.84, P = .03). In the additional series, there were no EC-related events in any of 33 POLE-mutant ECs, resulting in a multivariable-adjusted, pooled HR of 0.33 for RFS (95% CI = 0.12 to 0.91, P = .03) and 0.26 for CSS (95% CI = 0.06 to 1.08, P = .06). Conclusion: POLE proofreading mutations predict favorable EC prognosis, independently of other clinicopathological variables, with the greatest effect seen in high-grade tumors. This novel biomarker may help to reduce overtreatment in EC. PMID:25505230

  14. Buformin exhibits anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects in endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kilgore, Joshua; Jackson, Amanda L; Clark, Leslie H; Guo, Hui; Zhang, Lu; Jones, Hannah M; Gilliam, Timothy P; Gehrig, Paola A; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Biguanides are anti-diabetic drugs that are thought to have anti-tumorigenic effects. Most pre-clinical studies have focused on metformin for cancer treatment and prevention; however, buformin may be potentially more potent than metformin. Given this, our goal was to evaluate the effects of buformin on cell growth, adhesion and invasion in endometrial cancer cell lines. Methods: The ECC-1 and Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines were used. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle analysis was performed by FITC Annexin V assay and propidium iodide staining, respectively. Adhesion was analyzed using the laminin adhesion assay. Invasion was assessed using the transwell invasion assay. The effects of buformin on the AMPK/mTOR pathway were determined by Western immunoblotting. Results: Buformin and metformin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in both endometrial cancer cell lines. IC50s were 1.4-1.6 mM for metformin and 8-150 μM for buformin. Buformin induced cell cycle G1 phase arrest in the ECC-1 cells and G2 phase arrest in the Ishikawa cells. For both ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells, treatment with buformin resulted in induction of apoptosis, reduction in adhesion and invasion, activation of AMPK and inhibition of phosphorylated-S6. Buformin potentiated the anti-proliferative effects of paclitaxel in both cell lines. Conclusion: Buformin has significant anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic effects in endometrial cancer cells through modulation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway. IC50 values were lower for buformin than metformin, suggesting that buformin may be more potent for endometrial cancer treatment and worthy of further investigation. PMID:27398153

  15. Association of thymidylate synthase gene with endometrial cancer risk in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wang-Hong; Long, Ji-Rong; Zheng, Wei; Ruan, Zhi-Xian; Cai, Qiuyin; Cheng, Jia-Rong; Zhao, Gen-Ming; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2009-01-01

    We comprehensively evaluated genetic variants in the thymidylate synthase (TYMS) gene in association with endometrial cancer risk in a population-based case-control study of 1,199 incident endometrial cancer cases and 1,212 age frequency-matched population controls. Exposure information was obtained via in-person interview and DNA samples (blood or buccal cell) were collected. Genotyping of 11 haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPs) for the TYMS gene plus the 5kb flanking regions was performed for 1,028 cases and 1,003 controls by using the Affymetrix MegAllele Targeted Genotyping System. Of eleven htSNPs identified, seven that are located in flanking regions of the TYMS gene are also in the ENOSF1 (rTS) gene. The SNP rs3819102, located in the 3′ flanking region of the TYMS gene and in an intron of the ENOSF1 gene, was associated with risk of endometrial cancer. The odds ratio (OR) for the CC genotype was 1.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) =1.0–2.2) compared to the TT genotype. Haplotype TTG in block 2 of the TYMS gene, which includes SNPs rs10502289, rs2298583, and rs2298581 (located in introns of the ENOSF1 gene), was associated with a marginally significant decrease in risk of endometrial cancer under the dominant model (OR=0.8, 95%CI=0.6–1.0). This study suggests that genetic polymorphisms in the TYMS or ENOSF1 genes may play a role in the development of endometrial cancer among Chinese women. PMID:19190136

  16. Proteomics of endometrial fluid after dexamethasone treatment in mares susceptible to endometritis.

    PubMed

    Arlas, T R; Wolf, C A; Petrucci, B P L; Estanislau, J F; Gregory, R M; Jobim, M I M; Mattos, R C

    2015-09-01

    Corticotherapy is a common treatment in mares susceptible to endometritis. Isoflupredone improves pregnancy rates and affects the protein profile of endometrial fluid in comparison to untreated mares. Dexamethasone decreases postbreeding fluid accumulation and uterine edema; however, its effects on the protein profile of the endometrial fluid have not yet been studied. The aim of the present study was to verify the effect of dexamethasone on the protein profile of endometrial fluid, in the presence or absence of infection, from mares susceptible to persistent postbreeding endometritis. Nine susceptible mares aged between 7 and 18 years were used. After checking for signs of estrus, mares were subjected to four treatments: C: mares received no treatment and served as control; D: mares received 40-mg dexamethasone at breeding, with collection of samples after 6 hours; I-6 and I-24: intrauterine infusion of 1 × 10(9)Streptococcus zooepidemicus/mL and samples collected after 6 and 24 hours; I/D-6 and I/D-24: intrauterine infusion of 1 × 10(9)S zooepidemicus/mL and 40-mg dexamethasone, collecting the sample after 6 and 24 hours. All mares were subjected to all treatments. Samples were collected and subjected to two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry for the identification of relevant protein spots. Corticotherapy altered the protein profile of the endometrial fluid of susceptible mares, characterized by an increase and/or decrease in the optical density of inflammatory acute-phase proteins. We conclude that the use of dexamethasone in mares with and without infection alters the protein profile of endometrial fluid of susceptible mares. PMID:25998273

  17. Study of the Impact of Uterine Artery Embolization (UAE) on Endometrial Microvessel Density (MVD) and Angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Guosheng; Xiang Xianhong; Guo Wenbo; Zhang Bing; Chen Wei; Yang Jianyong

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo investigate the influence of uterine artery embolization (UAE) on endometrial microvessel density (MVD) and angiogenesis.MethodsSixty female guinea pigs were divided into two groups, the control group (n = 15) and the UAE treatment group (n = 45). In the UAE group, tris-acryl gelatin microspheres were used to generate embolization. Animals were further divided into three subgroups, A1, A2, and A3 (n = 15 for each subgroup), with uterine specimens collected at 7-15, 16-30, and 31-45 days after UAE, respectively. Immunostaining for factor VIII and CD105 was performed to identify total endometrial MVD (MVD{sub FVIII}) and CD105-positive angiogenesis (MVD{sub CD105}) at the indicated time points after UAE.ResultsQuantitative analysis revealed that MVD{sub FVIII} significantly decreased in the A1 (11.40 {+-} 2.76, p < 0.05) and A2 (15.37 {+-} 3.06, p < 0.05) groups compared to the control group (19.40 {+-} 2.50), and was restored to normal in the A3 group (18.77 {+-} 2.69). UAE caused a temporal up-regulation of MVD{sub CD105}-positive angiogenesis in the A1 group (9.33 {+-} 2.37, p < 0.05) and the A2 group (11.63 {+-} 1.56, p < 0.05) compared to the control group (7.12 {+-} 1.67), and the MVD{sub CD105} value returned to normal in the A3 group (8.07 {+-} 1.97).ConclusionUAE caused a temporal decrease in endometrial MVD that reversed over time as a result of the increase of CD105-positive angiogenesis. Although the UAE-induced reduction of endometrial MVD was reversible, its long-term effect on endometrial receptivity still needs further study.

  18. Antitumor effects and molecular mechanisms of ponatinib on endometrial cancer cells harboring activating FGFR2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hee; Kwak, Yeonui; Kim, Nam Doo; Sim, Taebo

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant mutational activation of FGFR2 is associated with endometrial cancers (ECs). AP24534 (ponatinib) currently undergoing clinical trials has been known to be an orally available multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Our biochemical kinase assay showed that AP24534 is potent against wild-type FGFR1-4 and 5 mutant FGFRs (V561M-FGFR1, N549H-FGFR2, K650E-FGFR3, G697C-FGFR3, N535K-FGFR4) and possesses the strongest kinase-inhibitory activity on N549H-FGFR2 (IC50 of 0.5 nM) among all FGFRs tested. We therefore investigated the effects of AP24534 on endometrial cancer cells harboring activating FGFR2 mutations and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. AP24534 significantly inhibited the proliferation of endometrial cancer cells bearing activating FGFR2 mutations (N549K, K310R/N549K, S252W) and mainly induced G1/S cell cycle arrest leading to apoptosis. AP24534 also diminished the kinase activity of immunoprecipitated FGFR2 derived from MFE-296 and MFE-280 cells and reduced the phosphorylation of FGFR2 and FRS2 on MFE-296 and AN3CA cells. AP24534 caused substantial reductions in ERK phosphorylation, PLCγ signaling and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs bearing FGFR2 activating mutations. Akt signaling pathway was also deactivated by AP24534. AP24534 causes the chemotherapeutic effect through mainly the blockade of ERK, PLCγ and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs. Moreover, AP24534 inhibited migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells with FGFR2 mutations. In addition, AP24534 significantly blocked anchorage-independent growth of endometrial cancer cells. We, for the first time, report the molecular mechanisms by which AP24534 exerts antitumor effects on ECs with FGFR2 activating mutations, which would provide mechanistic insight into ongoing clinical investigations of AP24534 for ECs.

  19. Histopathology-like categories based on endometrial imprint cytology in dysfunctional uterine bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Baxi, Seema N.; Panchal, Nirav S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cytology of the endometrium is an underused technique in diagnostic pathology. It has been used in the past for endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma. Only few studies have used cytology in the diagnosis of dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB). Endometrial imprint cytology has been rarely used except for application of immunocytochemistry in diagnosis of endometrial carcinoma. Aim: The present study was conducted to evaluate whether it is possible to assign histopathology-like diagnosis by imprint cytology and also to evaluate its usefulness in the assessment of patients of dysfunctional uterine bleeding of low clinical suspicion. Materials and Methods: Imprint smears were made from 93 curettage materials during a study of DUB. Blinded analysis of imprint smears was performed by using McKenzie's criteria and some criteria devised for the requirements of this study. Results of cytology were correlated with histopathology. Statistical analysis was carried out by GraphpadInStat Demo. Results: Majority of the patterns classifiable in histopathology could also be classified in this study on imprint cytology. The overall sensitivity and specificity of cytology in the detection of endometrial patterns in DUB patients were 91.23% and 83.87%, respectively, although the sensitivities and specificities differ according to the phase of endometrium. Conclusion: Histopathology-like categories can be assigned on imprint smears in the diagnosis of DUB. Endometrial imprint cytology can be helpful in centers where histopathology laboratories are not available and even in well-established institutes. It is possible to improve the sensitivity and specificity with better imprinting techniques. PMID:26229245

  20. Type I and II Endometrial Cancers: Have They Different Risk Factors?

    PubMed Central

    Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Yang, Hannah P.; Pike, Malcolm C.; McCann, Susan E.; Yu, Herbert; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Wolk, Alicja; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Weiss, Noel S.; Webb, Penelope M.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; van de Vijver, Koen; Thompson, Pamela J.; Strom, Brian L.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Soslow, Robert A.; Shu, Xiao-ou; Schairer, Catherine; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Rohan, Thomas E.; Robien, Kim; Risch, Harvey A.; Ricceri, Fulvio; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Rastogi, Radhai; Prescott, Jennifer; Polidoro, Silvia; Park, Yikyung; Olson, Sara H.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Miller, Anthony B.; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Matsuno, Rayna K.; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Lurie, Galina; Lu, Lingeng; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liang, Xiaolin; Lacey, James V.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Håkansson, Niclas; Goodman, Marc T.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Freudenheim, Jo L.; Doherty, Jennifer; De Vivo, Immaculata; Courneya, Kerry S.; Cook, Linda S.; Chen, Chu; Cerhan, James R.; Cai, Hui; Brinton, Louise A.; Bernstein, Leslie; Anderson, Kristin E.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Schouten, Leo J.; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Endometrial cancers have long been divided into estrogen-dependent type I and the less common clinically aggressive estrogen-independent type II. Little is known about risk factors for type II tumors because most studies lack sufficient cases to study these much less common tumors separately. We examined whether so-called classical endometrial cancer risk factors also influence the risk of type II tumors. Patients and Methods Individual-level data from 10 cohort and 14 case-control studies from the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium were pooled. A total of 14,069 endometrial cancer cases and 35,312 controls were included. We classified endometrioid (n = 7,246), adenocarcinoma not otherwise specified (n = 4,830), and adenocarcinoma with squamous differentiation (n = 777) as type I tumors and serous (n = 508) and mixed cell (n = 346) as type II tumors. Results Parity, oral contraceptive use, cigarette smoking, age at menarche, and diabetes were associated with type I and type II tumors to similar extents. Body mass index, however, had a greater effect on type I tumors than on type II tumors: odds ratio (OR) per 2 kg/m2 increase was 1.20 (95% CI, 1.19 to 1.21) for type I and 1.12 (95% CI, 1.09 to 1.14) for type II tumors (Pheterogeneity < .0001). Risk factor patterns for high-grade endometrioid tumors and type II tumors were similar. Conclusion The results of this pooled analysis suggest that the two endometrial cancer types share many common etiologic factors. The etiology of type II tumors may, therefore, not be completely estrogen independent, as previously believed. PMID:23733771

  1. Genetic polymorphisms in obesity-related genes and endometrial cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoli; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Long, Ji-Rong; Cai, Hui; Cai, Qiuyin; Cheng, Jiarong; Wen, Wanqing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with circulating levels of adiponectin and leptin and endometrial cancer risk. Little is known about whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes that encode adiponectin (ADIPOQ), leptin (LEP), adiponectin receptor 1 (ADIPOR1), adiponectin receptor 2 (ADIPOR2), and leptin receptor (LEPR) are associated with endometrial cancer. Methods We selected 87 tagging SNPs to capture common genetic variants in these five genes. These SNPs were evaluated in 1,028 endometrial cancer cases and 1,932 community controls recruited from Chinese women. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results Three of the 10 SNPs evaluated in the ADIPOQ gene were significantly associated with reduced cancer risk. The OR for women homozygous for the minor allele (A/A) for rs3774262 was 0.68 (95% CI: 0.48-0.97) compared with women homozygous for the major allele (G/G). Similar results were found for SNPs rs1063539 and rs12629945 in ADIPOQ, which were in linkage disequilibrium with rs3774262. These associations became non-significant after Bonferroni correction was applied. Controls with the minor allele A at rs3774262 had lower weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, and BMI than controls with the major allele G (all P<0.05). Women homozygous for the minor allele (T/T) of rs2071045 in the LEP gene also had significantly lower risk (OR=0.70 (0.54-0.90)) than women homozygous for the major allele (C/C). No other SNPs in the LEP, ADIPOR1, ADIPOR2, or LEPR genes were found to be associated with cancer risk. Conclusions Although a chance finding cannot be ruled out, the consistency of findings for gene-endometrial cancer risk and gene-obesity measurements suggests that genetic polymorphisms in the ADIPOQ genes may play a role in endometrial cancer development. PMID:22038736

  2. Therapeutic role of systematic lymphadenectomy in early-stage endometrial cancer: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    LI, MEI-YI; HU, XIAO-XIA; ZHONG, JIAN-HONG; CHEN, LU-LU; LIN, YONG-XIU

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current review was to examine whether systematic lymphadenectomy is safe and effective for treating early-stage endometrial cancer. PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were systematically searched during April 2014 to identify studies comparing the use of systematic lymphadenectomy and no systematic lymphadenectomy in parallel for the treatment of early-stage endometrial cancer. A total of 13 eligible studies involving 51,155 patients were included in this review. The median overall survival (OS) rate at 5 years following lymphadenectomy was 90% (range, 73.1–98.3%) for patients undergoing the systematic procedure and 88.2% (range, 68–98.4%) for patients not undergoing the systematic procedure. For the two types of lymphadenectomy, OS has tended to improve over the last 20 years. The combined rate of disease-free and progression-free survival was higher in patients who underwent systematic lymphadenectomy, and the recurrence rate was lower. In particular, systematic lymphadenectomy was associated with markedly higher OS than the non-systematic procedure for patients with intermediate- and high-risk endometrial cancer when ≥11 lymph nodes were removed. Systematic lymphadenectomy demonstrates clinical benefit in patients with early-stage endometrial cancer and should thus be a standard treatment option. In conclusion, systematic lymphadenectomy leads to higher OS than no systematic lymphadenectomy in intermediate- and high-risk patients with early-stage endometrial cancer, particularly when the procedure removes ≥11 lymph nodes. PMID:27313706

  3. Molecular Analysis of Mixed Endometrial Carcinomas Shows Clonality in Most Cases.

    PubMed

    Köbel, Martin; Meng, Bo; Hoang, Lien N; Almadani, Noorah; Li, Xiaodong; Soslow, Robert A; Gilks, C Blake; Lee, Cheng-Han

    2016-02-01

    Mixed endometrial carcinoma refers to a tumor that comprises 2 or more distinct histotypes. We studied 18 mixed-type endometrial carcinomas-11 mixed serous and low-grade endometrioid carcinomas (SC/EC), 5 mixed clear cell and low-grade ECs (CCC/EC), and 2 mixed CCC and SCs (CCC/SC), using targeted next-generation sequencing and immunohistochemistry to compare the molecular profiles of the different histotypes present in each case. In 16 of 18 cases there was molecular evidence that both components shared a clonal origin. Eight cases (6 EC/SC, 1 EC/CCC, and 1 SC/CCC) showed an SC molecular profile that was the same in both components. Five cases (3 CCC/EC and 2 SC/EC) showed a shared endometrioid molecular profile and identical mismatch-repair protein deficiency in both components. A single SC/EC case harbored the same POLE exonuclease domain mutation in both components. One SC/CCC and 1 EC/CCC case showed both shared and unique molecular features in the 2 histotype components, suggesting early molecular divergence from a common clonal origin. In 2 cases, there were no shared molecular features, and these appear to be biologically unrelated synchronous tumors. Overall, these results show that the different histologic components in mixed endometrial carcinomas typically share the same molecular aberrations. Mixed endometrial carcinomas most commonly occur through morphologic mimicry, whereby tumors with serous-type molecular profile show morphologic features of EC or CCC, or through underlying deficiency in DNA nucleotide repair, with resulting rapid accrual of mutations and intratumoral phenotypic heterogeneity. Less commonly, mixed endometrial carcinomas are the result of early molecular divergence from a common progenitor clone or are synchronous biologically unrelated tumors (collision tumors).

  4. The influence of hormone therapies on type I and II endometrial cancer: A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Mørch, Lina S; Kjaer, Susanne K; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Lidegaard, Øjvind

    2016-03-15

    The influence of hormone therapy (HT) on risk for endometrial cancer is still casting which type of HT the clinicians recommend. It is unrevealed if HT has a differential influence on Type I versus Type II endometrial tumors, and little is known about the influence of, e.g., different routes of administration and about the influence of tibolone. We followed all Danish women aged 50-79 years without previous cancer or hysterectomy (n = 914,595) during 1995-2009. From the National Prescription Register, we computed HT exposures as time-dependent covariates. Incident endometrial cancers (n = 6,202) were identified from the National Cancer Registry: 4,972 Type I tumors and 500 Type II tumors. Incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (Cls) were estimated by Poisson regression. Compared with women never on HT, the RR of endometrial cancer was increased with conjugated estrogen: 4.27 (1.92-9.52), nonconjugated estrogen: 2.00 (1.87-2.13), long cycle combined therapy: 2.89 (2.27-3.67), cyclic combined therapy: 2.06 (1.88-2.27), tibolone 3.56 (2.94-4.32), transdermal estrogen: 2.77 (2.12-3.62) and vaginal estrogen: 1.96 (1.77-2.17), but not with continuous combined therapy: 1.02 (0.87-1.20). In contrast, the risk of Type II tumors appeared decreased with continuous combined therapy: 0.45 (0.20-1.01), and estrogen therapy implied a nonsignificantly altered risk of 1.43 (0.85-2.41). Our findings support that continuous combined therapy is risk free for Type I tumors, while all other hormone therapies increase risk. In contrast, Type II endometrial cancer was less convincingly associated with hormone use, and continuous combined therapy appeared to decrease the risk.

  5. Coexistence of adenomyosis and endometrioid endometrial cancer: Role in surgical guidance and prognosis estimation

    PubMed Central

    GIZZO, SALVATORE; PATRELLI, TITO SILVIO; DALL'ASTA, ANDREA; DI GANGI, STEFANIA; GIORDANO, GIOVANNA; MIGLIAVACCA, COSTANZA; MONICA, MICHELA; MERISIO, CARLA; NARDELLI, GIOVANNI BATTISTA; QUARANTA, MICHELA; NOVENTA, MARCO; BERRETTA, ROBERTO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to diagnose the concomitant presence of adenomyosis (AM) in endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC) in order to evaluate its value as an oncological prognostic marker. A retrospective analysis of 289 patients diagnosed with EEC who underwent total hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and pelvic-lymphadenectomy was conducted. The total cohort included 37 patients in Group A (those with concomitant AM and EEC) and 252 patients in Group B (those affected only by EEC). The following factors were evaluated: Presence or absence of AM, tumor grade, depth of myometrial invasion, tumor size, lymphovascular space involvement, lymph node status, peritoneal cytology, concomitant detection of endometrial atypical-hyperplasia or polypoid endometrial features and tumor stage according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) classification. Uterine examination of different sections of uterine cervix, corpus, myomas and cervical or endometrial polyps was performed. The diagnosis of AM was confirmed when the distance between the lower border of the endometrium and the foci of the endometrial glands and stroma was >2.5 mm. Parametric and nonparametric statistical tests were performed when possible; continuous variables were analyzed using a Student's t-test, and categorical variables were analyzed by the χ2 test or Fisher's exact test. The association between FIGO stage and group was determined to be significant: 83.8% of Group A patients were categorized as FIGO stage I, vs. 68.7% of Group B patients. In addition, Group A was associated with lower grades in FIGO stage, myometrial invasion, lymphovascular space involvement, lymph node involvement and tumor size. The findings suggest that the intraoperative evaluation of the presence of AM in patients with EEC may aid surgeons in estimating oncological risk and in selecting the most appropriate surgical treatment. PMID:26893721

  6. Infiltrating Macrophages Induce ERα Expression through an IL17A-mediated Epigenetic Mechanism to Sensitize Endometrial Cancer Cells to Estrogen.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chengcheng; Xie, Bingying; Zhang, Lin; Li, Chunsheng; Shan, Weiwei; Yang, Bingyi; Luo, Xuezhen; Gu, Chao; He, Qizhi; Jin, Hongyan; Chen, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhenbo; Feng, Youji

    2016-03-15

    Persistent unopposed estrogen stimulation is a central oncogenic mechanism driving the formation of type I endometrial cancer. Recent epidemiologic and clinical studies of endometrial cancer have also revealed a role for insulin resistance, clinically manifested by chronic inflammation. However, the role of inflammation in estrogen-driven endometrial cancer is not well characterized. In this study, we investigated the association between infiltrating macrophages and estrogen sensitivity in endometrial cancer. Evaluating tissue samples and serum from patients with precancerous lesions or endometrial cancer, we found that tissue macrophage infiltration, but not serum estradiol levels, correlated positively with endometrial cancer development. Furthermore, IL4/IL13-induced CD68(+)CD163(+) macrophages enhanced the proliferative effects of estradiol in endometrial cancer cells by upregulating estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), but not ERβ. Mechanistic investigations revealed that CD68(+)CD163(+) macrophages secreted cytokines, such as IL17A, that upregulated ERα expression through TET1-mediated epigenetic modulation of the ERα gene. Overall, our findings show how cytokines produced by infiltrating macrophages in the endometrial microenvironment can induce epigenetic upregulation of ERα expression, which in turn sensitizes endometrial cells to estrogen stimulation. The concept that inflammation-induced estrogen sensitivity in the endometrium acts as a driver of type I endometrial cancer has implications for infiltrating macrophages as a prognostic biomarker of progression in this disease setting. PMID:26744532

  7. [The role of miRNA in endometrial cancer in the context of miRNA 205].

    PubMed

    Wilczyński, Miłosz; Danielska, Justyna; Dzieniecka, Monika; Malinowski, Andrzej

    2015-11-01

    MiRNAs are small, non-coding molecules of ribonucleic acids of approximately 22 bp length, which serve as regulators of gene expression and protein translation due to interference with messenger RNA (mRNA). MiRNAs, which take part in the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis, may be associated with carcinogenesis. Aberrant expression of miRNAs in endometrial cancer might contribute to the endometrial cancer initiation or progression, as well as metastasis formation, and may influence cancer invasiveness. Specific-miRNAs expressed in endometrial cancer tissues may serve as diagnostic markers of the disease, prognostic biomarkers, or play an important part in oncological therapy We aimed to describe the role of miRNAs in endometrial cancer with special consideration of miRNA 205. PMID:26817318

  8. Recurrent hormone-binding domain truncated ESR1 amplifications in primary endometrial cancers suggest their implication in hormone independent growth.

    PubMed

    Holst, Frederik; Hoivik, Erling A; Gibson, William J; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Schumacher, Steven E; Asmann, Yan W; Grossmann, Patrick; Trovik, Jone; Necela, Brian M; Thompson, E Aubrey; Meyerson, Matthew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Salvesen, Helga B; Cherniack, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is highly expressed in both endometrial and breast cancers, and represents the most prevalent therapeutic target in breast cancer. However, anti-estrogen therapy has not been shown to be effective in endometrial cancer. Recently it has been shown that hormone-binding domain alterations of ERα in breast cancer contribute to acquired resistance to anti-estrogen therapy. In analyses of genomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we observe that endometrial carcinomas manifest recurrent ESR1 gene amplifications that truncate the hormone-binding domain encoding region of ESR1 and are associated with reduced mRNA expression of exons encoding the hormone-binding domain. These findings support a role for hormone-binding alterations of ERα in primary endometrial cancer, with potentially important therapeutic implications. PMID:27160768

  9. Recurrent hormone-binding domain truncated ESR1 amplifications in primary endometrial cancers suggest their implication in hormone independent growth

    PubMed Central

    Holst, Frederik; Hoivik, Erling A.; Gibson, William J.; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Schumacher, Steven E.; Asmann, Yan W.; Grossmann, Patrick; Trovik, Jone; Necela, Brian M.; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Meyerson, Matthew; Beroukhim, Rameen; Salvesen, Helga B.; Cherniack, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is highly expressed in both endometrial and breast cancers, and represents the most prevalent therapeutic target in breast cancer. However, anti-estrogen therapy has not been shown to be effective in endometrial cancer. Recently it has been shown that hormone-binding domain alterations of ERα in breast cancer contribute to acquired resistance to anti-estrogen therapy. In analyses of genomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we observe that endometrial carcinomas manifest recurrent ESR1 gene amplifications that truncate the hormone-binding domain encoding region of ESR1 and are associated with reduced mRNA expression of exons encoding the hormone-binding domain. These findings support a role for hormone-binding alterations of ERα in primary endometrial cancer, with potentially important therapeutic implications. PMID:27160768

  10. Temsirolimus With or Without Megestrol Acetate and Tamoxifen Citrate in Treating Patients With Advanced, Persistent, or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC1 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC2 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  11. Determination of Heavy Metal Concentrations in Normal and Pathological Human Endometrial Biopsies and In Vitro Regulation of Gene Expression by Metals in the Ishikawa and Hec-1b Endometrial Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Tomkiewicz, Céline; Leblanc, Alix; Pierre, Stéphane; El Balkhi, Souleiman; Le Frère-Belda, Marie-Aude; Lecuru, Fabrice; Poupon, Joël; Barouki, Robert; Aggerbeck, Martine; Coumoul, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that several metals, such as lead, mercury, cadmium, and vanadium, can mimic the effects of estrogens (metallo-estrogens). Nevertheless, there are only a few studies that have assessed the effects of toxic metals on the female genital tract and, in particular, endometrial tissue. In this context, we measured the concentrations of several trace elements in human endometrial tissue samples from individuals with hyperplasia or adenocarcinoma and in normal tissues. Hyperplasic endometrial tissue has a 4-fold higher concentration of mercury than normal tissue. Mercury can affect both the AhR and ROS signaling pathways. Thus, we investigated the possible toxic effects of mercury by in vitro studies. We found that mercury increases oxidative stress (increased HO1 and NQO1 mRNA levels) and alters the cytoskeleton in the human endometrial Ishikawa cell line and to a lesser extent, in the “less-differentiated” human endometrial Hec-1b cells. The results might help to explain a potential link between this metal and the occurrence of endometrial hyperplasia. PMID:26600472

  12. Use of Myometrium as an Internal Reference for Endometrial and Cervical Cancer on Multiphase Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Ni; Liao, Yu-San; Chen, Wen-Chang; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Lee, Li-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background Myometrial smooth muscle is normally within the field of view for the gynecological imaging. This study aimed to investigate the use of normal myometrium as an internal reference for endometrial and cervical cancer during multiphase contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MCE-MRI) and to explore whether this information regarding tumor enhancement relative to the myometrium could be used to discriminate between endometrial and cervical cancer. Methods MRI images, before and after contrast enhancement, were analyzed in newly diagnosed cervical (n = 18) and endometrial cancer (n = 19) patients. Signal intensities (SIs) from tumor tissue and non-neoplastic myometrium were measured using imaging software. Results The relative signal for cervical cancer was approximately 30% higher than that of endometrial cancer after contrast administration. The area under receiver operating characteristic curve for SI, relative signal enhancement, and tumor to myometrium contrast ratio (as used to discriminate between cervical cancer and endometrial cancer) was 0.7807, 0.7456 and 0.7895, respectively. There was no difference in SI of the normal myometrium between endometrial and cervical cancer patients prior to and after contrast administration. Using non-tumorous myometrium as an internal reference, the tumor to myometrium contrast ratio was significantly higher in tumor tissue from cervical cancer compared with that from endometrial cancer at 25 s post contrast enhancement (p = 0.0016), with an optimal sensitivity of 72.22% and specificity of 84.21%. Conclusion With SI normalized to baseline or normal myometrium, tumor tissue from cervical cancer patients showed significant hyperintensity compared with that of tumor tissue from endometrial cancer patients after contrast enhancement, yielding acceptable performance. The use of the myometrium as an internal reference may provide an alternative method to analyze MCE-MRI data. PMID:27326456

  13. Interleukin 6 promotes endometrial cancer growth through an autocrine feedback loop involving ERK–NF-κB signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Che, Qi; Liu, Bin-Ya; Wang, Fang-Yuan; He, Yin-Yan; Lu, Wen; Liao, Yun; Gu, Wei; Wan, Xiao-Ping

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • IL-6 could promote endometrial cancer cells proliferation. • IL-6 promotes its own production through an autocrine feedback loop. • ERK and NF-κB pathway inhibitors inhibit IL-6 production and tumor growth. • IL-6 secretion relies on the activation of ERK–NF-κB pathway axis. • An orthotopic nude endometrial carcinoma model confirms the effect of IL-6. - Abstract: Interleukin (IL)-6 as an inflammation factor, has been proved to promote cancer proliferation in several human cancers. However, its role in endometrial cancer has not been studied clearly. Previously, we demonstrated that IL-6 promoted endometrial cancer progression through local estrogen biosynthesis. In this study, we proved that IL-6 could directly stimulate endometrial cancer cells proliferation and an autocrine feedback loop increased its production even after the withdrawal of IL-6 from the medium. Next, we analyzed the mechanism underlying IL-6 production in the feedback loop and found that its production and IL-6-stimulated cell proliferation were effectively blocked by pharmacologic inhibitors of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and extra-cellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Importantly, activation of ERK was upstream of the NF-κB pathways, revealing the hierarchy of this event. Finally, we used an orthotopic nude endometrial carcinoma model to confirm the effects of IL-6 on the tumor progression. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-6 promotes endometrial carcinoma growth through an expanded autocrine regulatory loop and implicate the ERK–NF-κB pathway as a critical mediator of IL-6 production, implying IL-6 to be an important therapeutic target in endometrial carcinoma.

  14. Total PC Activity Is Increased in Uterine Lavage of Post-Menopausal Endometrial but Not Ovarian Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Sophea; Stephens, Andrew N.; Jobling, Tom W.; Nie, Guiying

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial and ovarian cancers are two most common cancers affecting women in their post-menopausal years. To date, there are no simple biochemical tests to detect these cancers at early stages. Our previous study has demonstrated that the activity of total proprotein convertases (PCs) is significantly increased in uterine lavage at all stages of endometrial cancer, suggesting uterine lavage which can be obtained relatively non-invasively may provide a simple tool for the detection of endometrial cancer. However, uterine lavage may also contain ovarian-derived factors, and PCs are also reported to be up-regulated in ovarian cancer. In this study we determined whether increases in uterine lavage PC activity are specific to endometrial cancer or are also associated with ovarian cancer. PC activity was detected in all uterine lavages examined but no difference was found between women with and without ovarian cancer. On the other hand, the PC activity was significantly higher in post-menopausal endometrial cancer patients, consistent with our previous report. These results suggest that measuring total PC activity in uterine lavage is a useful tool to detect endometrial cancer specifically. PMID:27698920

  15. A Common Variant at the 14q32 Endometrial Cancer Risk Locus Activates AKT1 through YY1 Binding.

    PubMed

    Painter, Jodie N; Kaufmann, Susanne; O'Mara, Tracy A; Hillman, Kristine M; Sivakumaran, Haran; Darabi, Hatef; Cheng, Timothy H T; Pearson, John; Kazakoff, Stephen; Waddell, Nicola; Hoivik, Erling A; Goode, Ellen L; Scott, Rodney J; Tomlinson, Ian; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; French, Juliet D; Salvesen, Helga B; Pollock, Pamela M; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B; Edwards, Stacey L

    2016-06-01

    A recent meta-analysis of multiple genome-wide association and follow-up endometrial cancer case-control datasets identified a novel genetic risk locus for this disease at chromosome 14q32.33. To prioritize the functional SNP(s) and target gene(s) at this locus, we employed an in silico fine-mapping approach using genotyped and imputed SNP data for 6,608 endometrial cancer cases and 37,925 controls of European ancestry. Association and functional analyses provide evidence that the best candidate causal SNP is rs2494737. Multiple experimental analyses show that SNP rs2494737 maps to a silencer element located within AKT1, a member of the PI3K/AKT/MTOR intracellular signaling pathway activated in endometrial tumors. The rs2494737 risk A allele creates a YY1 transcription factor-binding site and abrogates the silencer activity in luciferase assays, an effect mimicked by transfection of YY1 siRNA. Our findings suggest YY1 is a positive regulator of AKT1, mediating the stimulatory effects of rs2494737 increasing endometrial cancer risk. Identification of an endometrial cancer risk allele within a member of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway, more commonly activated in tumors by somatic alterations, raises the possibility that well tolerated inhibitors targeting this pathway could be candidates for evaluation as chemopreventive agents in individuals at high risk of developing endometrial cancer.

  16. P-LAP/IRAP-induced cell proliferation and glucose uptake in endometrial carcinoma cells via insulin receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Kiyosumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Ino, Kazuhiko; Nawa, Akihiro; Nomura, Seiji; Mizutani, Shigehiko; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2007-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia or hyperinsulinemia contributes to poorer endometrial cancer survival. It was shown that P-LAP/IRAP translocates to the plasma membrane in response to insulin stimulation. Recently, we demonstrated that P-LAP/IRAP is associated with a poor prognosis in endometrial adenocarcinoma patients. The aim of this study was to examine whether the malignant potential of endometrial cancer enhanced by P-LAP/IRAP is due to increased glucose uptake via the P-LAP/IRAP-mediated activation of insulin signaling. Methods We transfected P-LAP/IRAP cDNA into A-MEC cells (endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line), and A-MEC-LAP cells expressed a remarkably high level of GLUT4 proteins. Results 3H-2-deoxyglucose uptake which responds to insulin in A-MEC-LAP cells was significantly higher than that of A-MEC-pc cells. A-MEC-LAP cells exhibited a significant growth-stimulatory effect compared to A-MEC-pc cells. A-MEC-LAP cells expressed a remarkably high level of p85PI3K protein compared to A-MEC-pc cells, and showed a higher degree of AKT phosphorylation by insulin stimulation. Conclusion In summary, P-LAP/IRAP was involved in the increasing malignant potential of endometrial cancer mediated by insulin. P-LAP/IRAP was suggested to be a potential new target of molecular-targeted therapy for endometrial cancer. PMID:17233921

  17. Relationship Between Murine Double Minute 2 (MDM2) T309G Polymorphism and Endometrial Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zhuowei; Zhu, Xiaolu; Teng, Yincheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Endometrial cancer is one of the most common cancers in female patients. Many studies have investigated the association between the MDM2 T309G genotype and endometrial cancer incidence, but the results have been inconclusive. Material/Methods We performed a systematic search in PubMed and Web of Science databases (update until October 21, 2015) for all English-language publications. The associations are indicated as pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results We identified 8 relevant publications (9 case-control studies), including 2188 cases and 4654 controls, that assessed the relationship between MDM2 T309G polymorphism and endometrial cancer risk. There was a significant association between MDM2 T309G polymorphism and endometrial cancer risk in the overall population in the recessive model (OR=1.61; 95% CI: 1.19–2.19; P=0.002). In the subgroup of different ethnic populations, the subgroup analysis showed MDM2 T309G polymorphism was significantly associated with increased endometrial cancer risk in Caucasians (OR=1.75; 95% CI: 1.16–2.63; P=0.007). No similar result was found in Asians. Conclusions Our meta-analysis provides evidence that MDM2 T309G polymorphism is associated with endometrial cancer, especially in Caucasians. PMID:27604213

  18. Novel Roles for Hypoxia and Prostaglandin E2 in the Regulation of IL-8 During Endometrial Repair

    PubMed Central

    Maybin, Jacqueline A.; Hirani, Nikhil; Jabbour, Henry N.; Critchley, Hilary O.D.

    2011-01-01

    The endometrium has a remarkable capacity for efficient repair; however, factors involved remain undefined. Premenstrual progesterone withdrawal leads to increased prostaglandin (PG) production and local hypoxia. Here we determined human endometrial expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and the roles of PGE2 and hypoxia in its regulation. Endometrial biopsy specimens (n = 51) were collected. Endometrial cells and explants were exposed to 100 nmol/L of PGE2 or 0.5% O2. The endometrial IL-8 concentration peaked during menstruation (P < 0.001) and had a significant proangiogenic effect. IL-8 was increased by PGE2 and hypoxia in secretory but not proliferative explants, which suggests that exposure to progesterone is essential. In vitro progesterone withdrawal induced significant IL-8 up-regulation in proliferative explants primed with progestins, but only in the presence of hypoxia. Epithelial cells treated simultaneously with PGE2 and hypoxia demonstrated synergistic increases in IL-8. Inhibition of HIF-1 by short hairpin RNA abolished hypoxic IL-8 induction, and inhibition of NF-κB by an adenoviral dominant negative inhibitor decreased PGE2-induced IL-8 expression (P > 0.05). Increased menstrual IL-8 is consistent with a role in repair. Progesterone withdrawal, hypoxia, and PGE2 regulate endometrial IL-8 by acting via HIF-1 and NF-κB. Hence, progesterone withdrawal may activate two distinct pathways to initiate endometrial repair. PMID:21356375

  19. The Production of Interleukin-11 and Decidualization Are Compromised in Endometrial Stromal Cells Derived from Patients with Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Karpovich, Natalia; Klemmt, Petra; McVeigh, J. Enda; Barlow, David H.; Mardon, Helen J.; Hwang, Jung Hye; Heath, John K.

    2006-01-01

    IL-11 signaling is critical for decidualization of the endometrial stroma in early pregnancy in the mouse. In this study, we investigate the function of IL-11 signaling in cAMP-induced decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells. We show that treatment of endometrial stromal cells with 8-bromo-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP) results in an increase in the levels of secreted IL-11, whereas levels of cell surface IL-11 receptor α are similar with or without 8-Br-cAMP treatment. The production of IL-11 correlates with the production of molecular markers of decidualization, prolactin and IGF-binding protein-1. The expression of these markers is inhibited when IL-11 signaling is specifically blocked in decidualizing endometrial stromal cells by the IL-11 antagonist W147A. We demonstrate that 8-Br-cAMP-induced endometrial stromal cells derived from patients with primary infertility produce lower levels of prolactin, IGF-binding protein-1, and IL-11 than cells derived from fertile women. Our results suggest that IL-11 expression is critically important during decidualization in the human endometrium, and that aberrant regulation of endometrial IL-11 production may be associated with some types of infertility. PMID:15613426

  20. Synergism between PGC-1α and estrogen in the survival of endometrial cancer cells via the mitochondrial pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Yang, Rui; Liu, Hao; Ren, Zhongqian; Kong, Fanfei; Li, Da; Ma, Xiaoxin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is involved in the progression of hormone-related cancers, and there may exist an association between estrogen and PGC-1α. Notably, emerging evidence has led to considerable interest in the role of PGC-1α in endometrial cancer development. However, whether the synergism exists between PGC-1α and estrogen for regulating mitochondrial function to promote the development of endometrial cancer remains largely unknown. Here, we show that: 1) knockdown of PGC-1α attenuates the survival of endometrial cancer cells by inducing cell apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway; 2) estrogen remedies the PGC-1α efficiency-induced decline of endometrial cancer cell viability; and 3) estrogen modulates the mitochondrial function to inhibit the PGC-1α deficiency-induced apoptosis in endometrial cancer cells. Collectively, these results demonstrated that the synergism between PGC-1α and estrogen was required for the survival of endometrial cancer cells, which was dependent on the mitochondrial pathway. PMID:27418839

  1. Total PC Activity Is Increased in Uterine Lavage of Post-Menopausal Endometrial but Not Ovarian Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Heng, Sophea; Stephens, Andrew N.; Jobling, Tom W.; Nie, Guiying

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial and ovarian cancers are two most common cancers affecting women in their post-menopausal years. To date, there are no simple biochemical tests to detect these cancers at early stages. Our previous study has demonstrated that the activity of total proprotein convertases (PCs) is significantly increased in uterine lavage at all stages of endometrial cancer, suggesting uterine lavage which can be obtained relatively non-invasively may provide a simple tool for the detection of endometrial cancer. However, uterine lavage may also contain ovarian-derived factors, and PCs are also reported to be up-regulated in ovarian cancer. In this study we determined whether increases in uterine lavage PC activity are specific to endometrial cancer or are also associated with ovarian cancer. PC activity was detected in all uterine lavages examined but no difference was found between women with and without ovarian cancer. On the other hand, the PC activity was significantly higher in post-menopausal endometrial cancer patients, consistent with our previous report. These results suggest that measuring total PC activity in uterine lavage is a useful tool to detect endometrial cancer specifically.

  2. Endometrial transcriptome analysis indicates superiority of natural over artificial cycles in recurrent implantation failure patients undergoing frozen embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Altmäe, Signe; Tamm-Rosenstein, Karin; Esteban, Francisco J; Simm, Jaak; Kolberg, Liis; Peterson, Hedi; Metsis, Madis; Haldre, Kai; Horcajadas, José A; Salumets, Andres; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli

    2016-06-01

    Little consensus has been reached on the best protocol for endometrial preparation for frozen embryo transfer (FET). It is not known how, and to what extent, hormone supplementation in artificial cycles influences endometrial preparation for embryo implantation at a molecular level, especially in patients who have experienced recurrent implantation failure. Transcriptome analysis of 15 endometrial biopsy samples at the time of embryo implantation was used to compare two different endometrial preparation protocols, natural versus artificial cycles, for FET in women who have experienced recurrent implantation failure compared with fertile women. IPA and DAVID were used for functional analyses of differentially expressed genes. The TRANSFAC database was used to identify oestrogen and progesterone response elements upstream of differentially expressed genes. Cluster analysis demonstrated that natural cycles are associated with a better endometrial receptivity transcriptome than artificial cycles. Artificial cycles seemed to have a stronger negative effect on expression of genes and pathways crucial for endometrial receptivity, including ESR2, FSHR, LEP, and several interleukins and matrix metalloproteinases. Significant overrepresentation of oestrogen response elements among the genes with deteriorated expression in artificial cycles (P < 0.001) was found; progesterone response elements predominated in genes with amended expression with artificial cycles (P = 0.0052).

  3. Relationship Between Murine Double Minute 2 (MDM2) T309G Polymorphism and Endometrial Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhuowei; Zhu, Xiaolu; Teng, Yincheng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Endometrial cancer is one of the most common cancers in female patients. Many studies have investigated the association between the MDM2 T309G genotype and endometrial cancer incidence, but the results have been inconclusive. MATERIAL AND METHODS We performed a systematic search in PubMed and Web of Science databases (update until October 21, 2015) for all English-language publications. The associations are indicated as pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS We identified 8 relevant publications (9 case-control studies), including 2188 cases and 4654 controls, that assessed the relationship between MDM2 T309G polymorphism and endometrial cancer risk. There was a significant association between MDM2 T309G polymorphism and endometrial cancer risk in the overall population in the recessive model (OR=1.61; 95% CI: 1.19-2.19; P=0.002). In the subgroup of different ethnic populations, the subgroup analysis showed MDM2 T309G polymorphism was significantly associated with increased endometrial cancer risk in Caucasians (OR=1.75; 95% CI: 1.16-2.63; P=0.007). No similar result was found in Asians. CONCLUSIONS Our meta-analysis provides evidence that MDM2 T309G polymorphism is associated with endometrial cancer, especially in Caucasians. PMID:27604213

  4. Investigations on the endometrial response to intrauterine administration of N-acetylcysteine in oestrous mares.

    PubMed

    Melkus, E; Witte, T; Walter, I; Heuwieser, W; Aurich, C

    2013-08-01

    In mares, mating-induced persistent endometritis contributes to low fertility. The condition is in part related to delayed clearance of mucus accumulated within the uterine lumen. The objective of this study was to investigate the endometrial response of healthy mares to intrauterine (i.u.) treatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Oestrous mares (n = 12) were randomly assigned to a treatment (TM) or control (C) group and received an i.u. infusion of 5% NAC and saline (total volume 140 ml), respectively. Endometrial biopsies were collected in five of the mares 24 h after treatment, in the remaining seven mares 72 h after treatment. Endometrial biopsies were evaluated for integrity of the luminal epithelium, number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), staining for cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), staining with Kiel 67 antigen (Ki-67), lectins and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS). The integrity of endometrial epithelial cells was not affected by treatment (no statistical differences between groups or times). At 24 h after treatment, the mean number of PMN in endometrial biopsies from NAC- and C-mares did not differ, but at 72 h after treatment, number of PMN was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in C (3.9 ± 0.6 PMN/field) compared with NAC-treated mares (2.3 ± 0.2 PMN/field). At 72 h after treatment, the intensity of staining for COX2 was significantly higher after saline than after NAC treatment (p < 0.05). In the epithelium, no differences in staining for the proliferation marker Ki-67 were seen with respect to time and treatment. Score for the lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was slightly higher in NAC-treated mares than in C-mares 72 h after treatment (p < 0.05). Score for PAS staining of mucus in deep uterine glands differed significantly between groups at 24 h after treatment (p < 0.05). The present study demonstrates that NAC does not adversely affect the endometrial function. Moreover, an anti-inflammatory effect on the equine endometrium was

  5. Investigations on the endometrial response to intrauterine administration of N-acetylcysteine in oestrous mares.

    PubMed

    Melkus, E; Witte, T; Walter, I; Heuwieser, W; Aurich, C

    2013-08-01

    In mares, mating-induced persistent endometritis contributes to low fertility. The condition is in part related to delayed clearance of mucus accumulated within the uterine lumen. The objective of this study was to investigate the endometrial response of healthy mares to intrauterine (i.u.) treatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Oestrous mares (n = 12) were randomly assigned to a treatment (TM) or control (C) group and received an i.u. infusion of 5% NAC and saline (total volume 140 ml), respectively. Endometrial biopsies were collected in five of the mares 24 h after treatment, in the remaining seven mares 72 h after treatment. Endometrial biopsies were evaluated for integrity of the luminal epithelium, number of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), staining for cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), staining with Kiel 67 antigen (Ki-67), lectins and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS). The integrity of endometrial epithelial cells was not affected by treatment (no statistical differences between groups or times). At 24 h after treatment, the mean number of PMN in endometrial biopsies from NAC- and C-mares did not differ, but at 72 h after treatment, number of PMN was significantly higher (p < 0.05) in C (3.9 ± 0.6 PMN/field) compared with NAC-treated mares (2.3 ± 0.2 PMN/field). At 72 h after treatment, the intensity of staining for COX2 was significantly higher after saline than after NAC treatment (p < 0.05). In the epithelium, no differences in staining for the proliferation marker Ki-67 were seen with respect to time and treatment. Score for the lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was slightly higher in NAC-treated mares than in C-mares 72 h after treatment (p < 0.05). Score for PAS staining of mucus in deep uterine glands differed significantly between groups at 24 h after treatment (p < 0.05). The present study demonstrates that NAC does not adversely affect the endometrial function. Moreover, an anti-inflammatory effect on the equine endometrium was

  6. Endometrial transcriptional profiling of a bovine fertility model by Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, F.S.; Ramos, R.S.; Pugliesi, G.; Andrade, S.C.S.; Van Hoeck, V.; Langbeen, A.; Oliveira, M.L.; Gonella-Diaza, A.M.; Gasparin, G.; Fukumasu, H.; Pulz, L.H.; Membrive, C.M.; Coutinho, L.L.; Binelli, M.

    2015-01-01

    Studying the multitude of molecular networks and pathways that are potentially involved in a complex trait such as fertility requires an equally complex and broad strategy. Here, we used Next-Generation Sequencing for the characterization of the transcriptional signature of the bovine endometrial tissue. Periovulatory endocrine environments were manipulated to generate two distinctly different fertility phenotypes. Cycling, non-lactating, multiparous Nelore cows were manipulated to ovulate larger (> 13 mm; LF group; high fertility phenotype) or smaller (< 12 mm; SF group) follicles. As a result, greater proestrus estrogen concentrations, corpora lutea and early diestrus progesterone concentrations were also observed in LF group in comparison to SF group. Endometrial cell proliferation was estimated by the protein marker MKI67 on tissues collected 4 (D4) and 7 (D7) days after induction of ovulation. Total RNA extracts from D7 were sequenced and compared according to the transcriptional profile of each experimental group (LF versus SF). Functional enrichment analysis revealed that LF and SF endometria were asynchronous in regards to their phenotype manifestation. Major findings indicated an LF endometrium that was switching phenotypes earlier than the SF one. More specifically, a proliferating SF endometrium was observed on D7, whereas the LF tissue, which expressed a proliferative phenotype earlier at D4, seemed to have already shifted towards a biosynthetically and metabolically active endometrium on D7. Data on MKI67 support the transcriptomic results. RNA-Seq-derived transcriptional profile of the endometrial tissue indicated a temporal effect of the periovulatory endocrine environment, suggesting that the moment of the endometrial exposure to the ovarian steroids, E2 and P4, regulates the timing of phenotype manifestation. Gene expression profiling revealed molecules that may be targeted to elucidate ovarian steroid-dependent mechanisms that regulate

  7. Endometrial implantation factors in women with submucous uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Ben-Nagi, J; Miell, J; Mavrelos, D; Naftalin, J; Lee, C; Jurkovic, D

    2010-11-01

    Uterine fibroids are benign tumours, which are associated with subfertility and early pregnancy loss. This study was carried out to examine the effect of submucous fibroids on concentrations of glycodelin, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) and osteopontin in uterine flushings. Premenopausal women with a certain diagnosis of submucous fibroid confirmed on three-dimensional saline infusion sonohysterography were recruited into the study. The control group included women without ultrasonic evidence of any uterine or endometrial pathology. All women had uterine flushings performed 7days post LH surge. Enzyme linked immunoassays were performed to analyse glycodelin, IL-6, IL-10, TNFα and osteopontin, whilst immunoradiometric assay was used to analyse IGFBP-1. In 23 women with submucous fibroids, the concentrations of glycodelin and IL-10 in uterine flushings were significantly lower compared with 17 women in the control group (P=0.002; P=0.007, respectively). There were no significant differences between the two groups in concentrations of IGFBP-1, IL-6, TNFα and osteopontin. Women with submucous fibroids had significantly lower concentrations of glycodelin and IL-10 in mid-luteal phase uterine flushings. This finding may explain the association with submucous fibroids and adverse reproductive outcomes. Uterine fibroids are small growths from the muscle of the uterus (womb). Submucous fibroids protrude into the cavity of the womb. We do not know what causes fibroids to form and grow. In most women, fibroids cause no symptoms and they are sometimes detected on routine gynaecological examination. In some women, however, fibroids can cause heavier and longer menstrual periods. Another problem associated with fibroids is bleeding between periods. The effect of fibroids on fertility is not clear, but some doctors believe that they may also cause infertility and early

  8. Adjuvant Brachytherapy Removes Survival Disadvantage of Local Disease Extension in Stage IIIC Endometrial Cancer: A SEER Registry Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Peter J. Jani, Ashesh B.; Horowitz, Ira R.; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of radiotherapy (RT) in women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The 17-registry Survival, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was searched for patients with lymph node-positive non-Stage IV epithelial endometrial cancer diagnosed and treated between 1988 and 1998. Two subgroups were identified: those with organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and those with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer with direct extension of the primary tumor. RT was coded as external beam RT (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT). Observed survival (OS) was reported with a minimum of 5 years of follow-up; the survival curves were compared using the log-rank test. Results: The therapy data revealed 611 women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer during this period. Of these women, 51% were treated with adjuvant EBRT, 21% with EBRT and BT, and 28% with no additional RT (NAT). Of the 611 patients, 293 had organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and 318 patients had Stage IIIC endometrial cancer with direct extension of the primary tumor. The 5-year OS rate for all patients was 40% with NAT, 56% after EBRT, and 64% after EBRT/BT. Adjuvant RT improved survival compared with NAT (p <0.001). In patients with organ-confined Stage IIIC endometrial cancer, the 5-year OS rate was 50% for NAT, 64% for EBRT, and 67% for EBRT/BT. Again, adjuvant RT contributed to improved survival compared with NAT (p = 0.02). In patients with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer and direct tumor extension, the 5-year OS rate was 34% for NAT, 47% for EBRT, and 63% for EBRT/BT. RT improved OS compared with NAT (p <0.001). Also, in this high-risk subgroup, adding BT to EBRT was superior to EBRT alone (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Women with Stage IIIC endometrial cancer receiving adjuvant EBRT and EBRT/BT had improved OS compared with patients receiving NAT. When direct extension of the primary tumor was present, the addition of BT to EBRT was even more beneficial.

  9. Vulvar extrauterine endometrial stromal sarcoma: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zaza, Khaled J; Arafah, Maria A; Al-Badawi, Ismail A

    2015-09-01

    Endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) is an extremely rare neoplasm accounting for only 0.2% of all uterine malignancies and for 15-26% of primary uterine sarcomas. The annual incidence of ESS is 1-2 per million women. Herein, to the best of our knowledge, we present the first reported case of ESS of the vulva in a 50-year-old female presenting with per vaginal spotting over a period of three months. Her past surgical history included a subtotal hysterectomy and left salpingo-oophorectomy for uterine fibroids ten years previously. On examination, a 3.5×3×2 cm cystic mass was found in the right labia majora. The mass was excised and the diagnosis of endometrial stromal sarcoma was made. Subsequent metastatic workup was negative and the patient was started on megestrol acetate. She has remained disease free with no signs or symptoms of recurrent or advanced disease for 28 months.

  10. Endometrial cancer: therapeutic decision and the staging process in "early" disease.

    PubMed

    Lewis, G C; Mortel, R; Slack, N H

    1977-02-01

    An all inclusive, widely accepted system for correlation of indices of pathophysiology in endometrial cancer with a spectrum of therapeutic management has yet to be developed. Improved understanding of tumor growth should lead to more logical, individualized treatment especially in terms of irradiation. To support these philosophies a brief review of past reports and studies, especially the Endometrial Adjuvant Study is provided. From an analysis of 574 patients in this study, it is apparent that prognostic factors could be separated as major, differentiation, and tumor penetration and minor, number of capsules of radium and depth of uterus. A pilot study under the Gynecologic Oncology Group suggests the correlation of the major factors with lymph node involvement. Since depth of penetration and lymph node involvement are most accurately determined by surgery and pathology, surgical staging is suggested as a guide for therapeutic decision. PMID:319900

  11. Totally Laparoscopic Repair of an Ileal and Uterine Iatrogenic Perforation Secondary to Endometrial Curettage

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Rosario; Marchese, Salvatore; Leanza, Vito; Leanza, Antonio; Intagliata, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel perforation is a unique, serious complication during endometrial biopsy. The authors report a case of a double uterine-ileal perforation totally managed by primary laparoscopic repair. A 63-year-old female was admitted with acute abdomen 2 days after an endometrial curettage. Abdominal X-ray shows signs of pneumoperitoneum. Emergency diagnostic laparoscopy was performed and a uterine-ileal perforation was identified. Repair was accomplished by a totally laparoscopic intracorporeally suturing of the 2 breaches. Postoperative course showed only a delayed ileus and the patient was discharged after 5 days with no complications. When acute abdomen arises following uterine biopsy, a potential iatrogenic intestinal laceration always has to be ruled out. Laparoscopic approach is a quick and safe technique in these cases. Totally laparoscopic primary closure of the iatrogenic ileal laceration may be accomplished with low morbidity. PMID:25692425

  12. The immune system in the normal endometrium and implications for endometrial cancer development.

    PubMed

    Vanderstraeten, A; Tuyaerts, S; Amant, F

    2015-06-01

    Although described for the first time some decades ago, the contribution of the immune system to the establishment of tumors has not been extensively pursued for a long time. Over the last decade, however, more and more evidence has been accumulating concerning the role the immune system plays in tumor development and progression and its possible role in patient prognosis. In addition, interest is growing in preclinical and clinical research concerning the use of the immune system in the treatment of cancer. Immunotherapy for gynecological cancers in general, and for endometrial cancer in particular, is still in its infancy. Only a small number of studies, with varying success rates, have been published. Here, we provide a concise overview of the literature available on the role of the immune system in the normal endometrium and in endometrial cancer, in addition to the possible implications for future immunotherapeutic studies.

  13. Endometrial polyps in the bitch: a retrospective study of 21 cases.

    PubMed

    Marino, G; Barna, A; Rizzo, S; Zanghì, A; Catone, G

    2013-11-01

    Endometrial polyps (EPs) are tumour-like lesions reported frequently in domestic carnivores. The present report describes the clinical and pathological features of EPs in 21 bitches. Most affected bitches had a regular reproductive history. Five bitches had no clinical signs and eleven showed clinical signs of pyometra. Four bitches had a large EP which resulted in compression of the abdominal viscera. One bitch had an acute uterine torsion. A clinical diagnosis of EPs was only made when the lesions were large and identified by abdominal palpation or ultrasound. Grossly, the EPs were 5-25 cm in diameter and were single, sessile or pedunculated. They were often associated with cystic endometrial hyperplasia. Microscopically, the EPs were fibroglandular with the stroma sometimes being haemorrhagic and infiltrated by inflammatory cells. In one case, there were areas of stromal smooth muscle and epithelial squamous metaplasia, which may have been consistent with preneoplastic change. PMID:23651692

  14. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Adjuvant Management of Early-Stage Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Andrew O; Gaffney, David K; Jhingran, Anuja; Yashar, Catheryn M; Biagioli, Matthew; Elshaikh, Mohamed A; Jolly, Shruti; Kidd, Elizabeth; Lee, Larissa J; Li, Linna; Moore, David H; Rao, Gautam G; Williams, Ned L; Small, William

    2016-09-15

    These consensus guidelines on adjuvant radiotherapy for early-stage endometrial cancer were developed from an expert panel convened by the American College of Radiology. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria® are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method; and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation, or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. After a review of the published literature, the panel voted on three variants to establish best practices for the utilization of imaging, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy after primary surgery for early-stage endometrial cancer. PMID:27633412

  15. IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor enhances the cytotoxic effect of methyl jasmonate in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Bruchim, Ilan; Sarfstein, Rive; Reiss, Ari; Flescher, Eliezer; Werner, Haim

    2014-10-01

    The present study evaluated the cytotoxic activity of methyl jasmonate (MJ) in endometrial cancer cells and examined the hypothesis that the apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions of MJ in these cell lines can be enhanced by co-targeting the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) signaling pathway. MJ had a potent pro-apoptotic effect and exhibited significant toxicity in all cell lines tested. MJ in combination with NVP-AEW541, a selective IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor, had significantly increased cytotoxicity. MJ decreased IGF1R phosphorylation, however, it enhanced AKT phosphorylation and abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of IGF1. These findings suggest that combined IGF1R inhibitor and MJ administration may constitute an attractive modality for treating endometrial cancer.

  16. Does IGF-1 play a role in the biology of endometrial cancer?

    PubMed

    Majchrzak-Baczmańska, Dominika; Malinowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a mitogen which plays a key role in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. It belongs to the family of proteins also composed of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2), two types of membrane receptors (IGF-1R and IGF-2R), 6 binding proteins (IGFBP 1-6), hydrolyzing proteases, and reactive molecules binding proteins, which regulate the activity of growth factors. Disturbances in the functioning of IGFBP/IGF/1GF1R can lead to induction of carcinogenesis, which has been demonstrated in breast, prostate or colon cancers. Findings evaluating the role of IGF-1 in endometrial cancer biology are ambiguous and contradictory. Therefore, in the present study, we analyzed the role of IGF-1 in the process of carcinogenesis of endometrial cancer, based on the available literature. PMID:27629137

  17. Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma Metastatic from the Uterus to the Inferior Vena Cava and Right Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Nghiem, William; Aziz, Salim; Rahbar, Rodeen; Banks, Whitney; Venbrux, Anthony; Sarin, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial stromal sarcoma metastases usually occur within the pelvis and rarely involve the great vessels or the heart. We present the case of a 55-year-old woman who was referred for endovascular therapy to treat presumed thrombosis of the inferior vena cava. The suspected thrombus was recalcitrant to endovascular removal with use of an AngioVac venous drainage device. Results of an intraprocedural transvenous biopsy revealed the mass to be the intravascular extension of an endometrial stromal sarcoma. The patient underwent surgical excision of the tumor, and, shortly thereafter, a hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy. This complex case highlights both the rarity of malignancy masquerading as caval thrombus and the importance of multispecialty collaboration. PMID:26664311

  18. Predictive value of endometrial thickness, pattern and sub-endometrial blood flows on the day of hCG by 2D doppler in in-vitro fertilization cycles: A prospective clinical study from a tertiary care unit

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neeta; Bahadur, Anupama; Mittal, Suneeta; Malhotra, Neena; Bhatt, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the role of endometrial thickness, pattern and sub-endometrial blood flows measured by 2D power Doppler ultrasound to predict pregnancy during in-vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective, non-randomized clinical study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a prospective observational study. A total of 101 infertile women were recruited from our IVF-ET program from January to December, 2009. Women with tubal factor, male factor and unexplained infertility were included in the study. RESULTS: The mean age was 35 years and mean duration of infertility was 8 years. Seventy five (74.25%) patients had primary infertility and 26 (25.74%) had secondary infertility. The mean endometrial thickness was 8.1 mm and endometrial blood flow was in Zone I in 18 patients, 28 patients had blood flow in Zone II and 54 had in Zone III. Overall, 27 (26.73%) patients conceived and in these women the endometrial thickness was between 6 and 12 mm. CONCLUSIONS: With a thin endometrium (≤7 mm) and no-triple-line endometrial pattern coexisting in an in-vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI) candidate, cryopreservation should be recommended. With a thin endometrium and a good texture (triple-line), other prognostic factors, such as embryo quality, should be taken into account. The endometrial vascularity has a useful predictive value on the implantation rate in IVF cycles irrespective of the morphological appearance of the endometrium. However, further study is needed to make a definitive conclusion. PMID:21772737

  19. Genistein promotes DNA demethylation of the steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) promoter in endometrial stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukura, Hiroshi; Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Matsushima, Yuko; Kanno, Jun; Muramatsu, Masaaki; Sudo, Katsuko; Sato, Noriko

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Genistein (GEN) is a phytoestrogen found in soy products. {yields} GEN demethylated/unsilenced the steroidogenic factor 1 gene in endometrial tissue. {yields} GEN thus altered mRNA expression in uteri of ovariectomized (OVX) mice. {yields} A high-resolution melting assay was used to screen for epigenetic change. {yields} We isolated an endometrial cell clone that was epigenetically modulated by GEN. -- Abstract: It has recently been demonstrated that genistein (GEN), a phytoestrogen in soy products, is an epigenetic modulator in various types of cells; but its effect on endometrium has not yet been determined. We investigated the effects of GEN on mouse uterine cells, in vivo and in vitro. Oral administration of GEN for 1 week induced mild proliferation of the endometrium in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, which was accompanied by the induction of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) gene expression. GEN administration induced demethylation of multiple CpG sites in the SF-1 promoter; these sites are extensively methylated and thus silenced in normal endometrium. The GEN-mediated promoter demethylation occurred predominantly on the luminal side, as opposed to myometrium side, indicating that the epigenetic change was mainly shown in regenerated cells. Primary cultures of endometrial stromal cell colonies were screened for GEN-mediated alterations of DNA methylation by a high-resolution melting (HRM) method. One out of 20 colony-forming cell clones showed GEN-induced demethylation of SF-1. This clone exhibited a high proliferation capacity with continuous colony formation activity through multiple serial clonings. We propose that only a portion of endometrial cells are capable of receiving epigenetic modulation by GEN.

  20. Lipocalin 2 Enhances Migration and Resistance against Cisplatin in Endometrial Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Hiroyasu; Yamada, Yasushi; Kobara, Hisanori; Asaka, Ryoichi; Ando, Hirofumi; Higuchi, Shotaro; Ida, Koichi; Mvunta, David Hamisi; Shiozawa, Tanri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is a secretory protein that is involved in various physiological processes including iron transport. We previously identified LCN2 as an up-regulated gene in endometrial carcinoma, and found that the overexpression of LCN2 and its receptor, SLC22A17, was associated with a poor prognosis. However, the functions and mechanism of action of LCN2 currently remain unclear. Methods The LCN2-overexpressing endometrial carcinoma cell lines, HHUA and RL95-2, and LCN2-low-expressing one, HEC1B, were used. The effects of LCN2 on cell migration, cell viability, and apoptosis under various stresses, including ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and cisplatin treatment, were examined using the scratch wound healing assay, WST-1 assay, and Apostrand assay, respectively. Results LCN2-silencing using shRNA method significantly reduced the migration ability of cells (p<0.05). Cytotoxic stresses significantly decreased the viability of LCN2-silenced cells more than that of control cells. In contrast, LCN2 overexpression was significantly increased cisplatin resistance. These effects were canceled by the addition of the iron chelator, deferoxamine. After UV irradiation, the expression of phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) was decreased in LCN2-silenced cells, and the PI3K inhibitor canceled the difference induced in UV sensitivity by LCN2. The cisplatin-induced expression of pAkt was not affected by LCN2; however, the expression of p53 and p21 was increased by LCN2-silencing. Conclusions These results indicated that LCN2 was involved in the migration and survival of endometrial carcinoma cells under various stresses in an iron-dependent manner. The survival function of LCN2 may be exerted through the PI3K pathway and suppression of the p53-p21 pathway. These functions of LCN2 may increase the malignant potential of endometrial carcinoma cells. PMID:27168162

  1. Association of Metformin Use with Outcomes in Advanced Endometrial Cancer Treated with Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ezewuiro, Obiageli; Grushko, Tatyana A.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Habis, Mohammed; Hurteau, Jean A.; Mills, Kathryn A.; Hunn, Jessica; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Fleming, Gini F.; Romero, Iris L.

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that metformin, a commonly used treatment for diabetes, might have the potential to be repurposed as an economical and safe cancer therapeutic. The aim of this study was to determine whether stage III-IV or recurrent endometrial cancer patients who are using metformin during treatment with chemotherapy have improved survival. To test this we analyzed a retrospective cohort of subjects at two independent institutions who received chemotherapy for stage III-IV or recurrent endometrial cancer from 1992 to 2011. Diagnosis of diabetes, metformin use, demographics, endometrial cancer clinico-pathologic parameters, and survival duration were abstracted. The primary outcome was overall survival. The final cohort included 349 patients, 31 (8.9%) had diabetes and used metformin, 28 (8.0%) had diabetes but did not use metformin, and 291 (83.4%) did not have diabetes. The results demonstrate that the median overall survival was 45.6 months for patients with diabetes who used metformin compared to 12.5 months for patients with diabetes who did not use metformin and 28.5 months for patients without diabetes (log-rank test comparing the three groups P = 0.006). In a model adjusted for confounders, the difference in survival between the three groups remained statistically significant (P = 0.023). The improvement in survival among metformin users was not explained by better baseline health status or more aggressive use of chemotherapy. Overall, the findings in this retrospective cohort of endometrial cancer patients with stage III-IV or recurrent disease treated with chemotherapy indicate that patients with diabetes who were concurrently treated with metformin survived longer than patients with diabetes who did not use metformin. PMID:26788855

  2. Acceleration of the Glycolytic Flux by Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 Is Essential for Endometrial Decidualization

    PubMed Central

    Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Szwarc, Maria M.; Kovanci, Ertug; Gibbons, William E.; Putluri, Nagireddy; Maity, Suman; Creighton, Chad J.; Sreekumar, Arun; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2013-01-01

    Early embryo miscarriage is linked to inadequate endometrial decidualization, a cellular transformation process that enables deep blastocyst invasion into the maternal compartment. Although much of the cellular events that underpin endometrial stromal cell (ESC) decidualization are well recognized, the individual gene(s) and molecular pathways that drive the initiation and progression of this process remain elusive. Using a genetic mouse model and a primary human ESC culture model, we demonstrate that steroid receptor coactivator-2 (SRC-2) is indispensable for rapid steroid hormone-dependent proliferation of ESCs, a critical cell-division step which precedes ESC terminal differentiation into decidual cells. We reveal that SRC-2 is required for increasing the glycolytic flux in human ESCs, which enables rapid proliferation to occur during the early stages of the decidualization program. Specifically, SRC-2 increases the glycolytic flux through induction of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2, 6-bisphosphatase 3 (PFKFB3), a major rate-limiting glycolytic enzyme. Similarly, acute treatment of mice with a small molecule inhibitor of PFKFB3 significantly suppressed the ability of these animals to exhibit an endometrial decidual response. Together, these data strongly support a conserved mechanism of action by which SRC-2 accelerates the glycolytic flux through PFKFB3 induction to provide the necessary bioenergy and biomass to meet the demands of a high proliferation rate observed in ESCs prior to their differentiation into decidual cells. Because deregulation of endometrial SRC-2 expression has been associated with common gynecological disorders of reproductive-age women, this signaling pathway, involving SRC-2 and PFKFB3, promises to offer new clinical approaches in the diagnosis and/or treatment of a non-receptive uterus in patients presenting idiopathic infertility, recurrent early pregnancy loss, or increased time to pregnancy. PMID:24204309

  3. Endometrial polypoid adenomyomatosis in a bitch with ovarian granulosa cell tumour and pyometra.

    PubMed

    Zanghì, A; Catone, G; Marino, G; Quartuccio, M; Nicòtina, P A

    2007-01-01

    Endometrial polypoid adenomyomatosis in an 8-year-old German shepherd bitch is described. The lesion was associated with ovarian granulosa cell tumour and pyometra; grossly, it consisted of sessile or pedunculated processes with both epithelial and non-epithelial components, in which smooth muscle cells were predominant. The endometrium was diffusely atrophic and showed multifocal squamous metaplasia. The findings are discussed as possible consequences of the functioning ovarian tumour and pyometra, but an involvement of growth factors is also proposed.

  4. Association of Metformin Use with Outcomes in Advanced Endometrial Cancer Treated with Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ezewuiro, Obiageli; Grushko, Tatyana A; Kocherginsky, Masha; Habis, Mohammed; Hurteau, Jean A; Mills, Kathryn A; Hunn, Jessica; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Fleming, Gini F; Romero, Iris L

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that metformin, a commonly used treatment for diabetes, might have the potential to be repurposed as an economical and safe cancer therapeutic. The aim of this study was to determine whether stage III-IV or recurrent endometrial cancer patients who are using metformin during treatment with chemotherapy have improved survival. To test this we analyzed a retrospective cohort of subjects at two independent institutions who received chemotherapy for stage III-IV or recurrent endometrial cancer from 1992 to 2011. Diagnosis of diabetes, metformin use, demographics, endometrial cancer clinico-pathologic parameters, and survival duration were abstracted. The primary outcome was overall survival. The final cohort included 349 patients, 31 (8.9%) had diabetes and used metformin, 28 (8.0%) had diabetes but did not use metformin, and 291 (83.4%) did not have diabetes. The results demonstrate that the median overall survival was 45.6 months for patients with diabetes who used metformin compared to 12.5 months for patients with diabetes who did not use metformin and 28.5 months for patients without diabetes (log-rank test comparing the three groups P = 0.006). In a model adjusted for confounders, the difference in survival between the three groups remained statistically significant (P = 0.023). The improvement in survival among metformin users was not explained by better baseline health status or more aggressive use of chemotherapy. Overall, the findings in this retrospective cohort of endometrial cancer patients with stage III-IV or recurrent disease treated with chemotherapy indicate that patients with diabetes who were concurrently treated with metformin survived longer than patients with diabetes who did not use metformin.

  5. Growth hormone receptor antagonism suppresses tumour regrowth after radiotherapy in an endometrial cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Evans, Angharad; Jamieson, Stephen M F; Liu, Dong-Xu; Wilson, William R; Perry, Jo K

    2016-08-28

    Human GH expression is associated with poor survival outcomes for endometrial cancer patients, enhanced oncogenicity of endometrial cancer cells and reduced sensitivity to ionising radiation in vitro, suggesting that GH is a potential target for anticancer therapy. However, whether GH receptor inhibition sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo has not been tested. In the current study, we evaluated whether the GH receptor antagonist, pegvisomant (Pfizer), sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo in an endometrial tumour xenograft model. Subcutaneous administration of pegvisomant (20 or 100 mg/kg/day, s.c.) reduced serum IGF1 levels by 23% and 68%, respectively, compared to vehicle treated controls. RL95-2 xenografts grown in immunodeficient NIH-III mice were treated with vehicle or pegvisomant (100 mg/kg/day), with or without fractionated gamma radiation (10 × 2.5 Gy over 5 days). When combined with radiation, pegvisomant significantly increased the median time tumours took to reach 3× the pre-radiation treatment volume (49 days versus 72 days; p = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that 100 mg/kg pegvisomant every second day was sufficient to abrogate MAP Kinase signalling throughout the tumour. In addition, treatment with pegvisomant increased hypoxic regions in irradiated tumours, as determined by immunohistochemical detection of pimonidazole adducts, and decreased the area of CD31 labelling in unirradiated tumours, suggesting an anti-vascular effect. Pegvisomant did not affect intratumoral staining for HIF1α, VEGF-A, CD11b, or phospho-EGFR. Our results suggest that blockade of the human GH receptor may improve the response of GH and/or IGF1-responsive endometrial tumours to radiation.

  6. [INDOCYANINE GREEN (ICG) IN THE DETECTION OF SENTINEL LYMPH NODES IN ENDOMETRIAL AND CERVIX CANCER].

    PubMed

    Berlev, I V; Ulrikh, E A; Ibragimov, Z N; Guseinov, K D; Gorodnova, T V; Korolkova, E N; Trifanov, Yu N; Nekrasova, E A; Saparov, A B; Khadzhimba, A V; Mikaya, N A; Urmancheeva, A F

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the international and our own experience of using different dyes in the identification of sentinel lymph nodes in oncogynecological practice. We evaluated the possibility of using indocyanine green (ICG) in the detection of sentinel lymph nodes in patients with endometrial and cervical cancer. The first results of the use of ICG at the Oncogynecology Department of the N.N.Petrov Research Institute of Oncology are presented.

  7. Robot-assisted versus conventional laparoscopic surgery for endometrial cancer staging: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Hui; Li, Zhao-Ai; Huang, Rui; Xue, Hui-Qin

    2016-08-01

    This meta-analysis broadly compared the safety and efficacy of robot-assisted laparoscopy (RAL) with that of conventional laparoscopy (CL) for endometrial cancer staging. The advantages of RAL were evaluated through the outcomes in terms of conversion rates, complications, length of operation, blood loss, number of lymph nodes harvested, and length of hospitalization. Three electronic databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, and EmBASE) were searched to identify eligible studies. We selected all retrospective studies documenting a comparison between RAL and CL for endometrial cancer staging between 2005 and 2015, and tallied with meta-analyses criteria. Only studies published in English were included in this analysis. The outcomes of the extracted data were pooled and estimated by the Review Manager version 5.1 software. Seventeen studies met the eligibility criteria. Among the 2105 patients reported, 912 underwent RAL and the other 1193 underwent CL for endometrial cancer staging. Compared with CL, RAL had lower conversion rates [risk ratio, 0.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.25-0.64; p = 0.0002]. Its complications were also less than that of CL (risk ratio, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.56-0.94; p = 0.02). RAL was associated with significantly less intraoperative blood loss (weighted mean difference, -79.2 mL; 95% CI, from -103.43 to -54.97; p < 0.00001) and a shorter length of hospitalization (weighted mean difference, -0.37 days; 95% CI, from -0.57 to -0.17; p = 0.0003). We found no significant differences in the length of operation and number of lymph nodes harvested between the two groups. From our meta-analysis results, RAL is a safe and effective alternative to CL for endometrial cancer staging. Further studies are required to determine potential advantages or disadvantages of RAL.

  8. MiR-183 Regulates ITGB1P Expression and Promotes Invasion of Endometrial Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Gu, Lin; Ni, Jie; Hu, Ping; Hu, Kai; Shi, Ying-Li

    2015-01-01

    We applied in the previous study miRNA microarray screening analysis to identify several differentially expressed miRNAs, including miR-183 in normal, eutopic, and ectopic endometrium. Knockdown of miR-183 expression induced the invasiveness and inhibition of apoptosis in endometrial stromal cells. The current study aims to identify the miR-183 targets with relevance to cell functions in endometrial stromal cells, to verify the interaction of miR-183 with its target genes, and to confirm the role of miR-183 in the process of endometriosis. Using microarray analysis, we identified 27 differentially expressed genes (19 were upregulated and 8 downregulated), from which we selected 4 downregulated genes (ITGB1, AMIGO2, VAV3, and PSEN2) based on GO databases for functional analysis and significant pathway analysis. Western blotting analyses showed that integrin β1 (ITGB1), but not AMIGO2, was affected by miR-183 overexpression, whereas no protein expression of VAV3 and PSEN2 was detected. Luciferase reporter assay verified that ITGB1 is a target gene of miR-183. Moreover, we found that ITGB1 is overexpressed in the endometrium of endometriosis patients. Furthermore, overexpression of ITGB1 rescued the repressive effects of miR-183 on the invasiveness of endometrial stromal cells. These findings, together with the fact that ITGB1 is a critical factor for cell adhesion and invasiveness, suggest that miR-183 may be involved in the development of endometriosis by regulating ITGB1 in endometrial stromal cells. PMID:26357653

  9. High levels of Nrf2 determine chemoresistance in type II endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tao; Chen, Ning; Zhao, Fei; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Kong, Beihua; Zheng, Wenxin; Zhang, Donna D.

    2010-01-01

    Type II endometrial cancer, which mainly presents as serous and clear cell types, has proved to be the most malignant and recurrent carcinoma among various female genital malignancies. The transcription factor, Nrf2, was first described as having chemopreventive activity. Activation of the Nrf2-mediated cellular defense response protects cells against the toxic and carcinogenic effects of environmental insults by upregulating an array of genes that detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS) and restore cellular redox homeostasis. However, the cancer-promoting role of Nrf2 has recently been revealed. Nrf2 is constitutively upregulated in several types of human cancer tissues and cancer cell lines. Furthermore, inhibition of Nrf2 expression sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. In this study, the constitutive level of Nrf2 was compared in different types of human endometrial tumors. It was found that Nrf2 was highly expressed in endometrial serous carcinoma (ESC), whereas complex hyperplasia (CH) and endometrial endometrioid carcinoma (EEC) had no or marginal expression of Nrf2. Likewise, the ESC derived SPEC-2 cell line had a higher level of Nrf2 expression and was more resistant to the toxic effects of cisplatin and paclitaxel than that of the Ishikawa cell line, which was generated from EEC. Silencing of Nrf2 rendered SPEC-2 cells more susceptible to chemotherapeutic drugs while it had a limited effect on Ishikawa cells. Inhibition of Nrf2 expression by overexpressing Keap1 sensitized SPEC-2 cells or SPEC-2-derived xenografts to chemotherapeutic treatments using both cell culture and SCID mouse models. Collectively, we provide a molecular basis for the use of Nrf2 inhibitors to increase the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs and to combat chemoresistance, the biggest obstacle in chemotherapy. PMID:20530669

  10. Clinical Study of Endometrial Polyp and Role of Diagnostic Hysteroscopy and Blind Avulsion of Polyp

    PubMed Central

    Remadevi, Chithra; Sumathy, Sudha; Sharma, Deepti; Sreedhar, Sarala; Jose, Amrutha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Endometrial polyp is one of the common causes of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) in the reproductive age group as well as postmenopausal age group. Aim To study the clinical features of endometrial polyp and the safety and feasibility of blind polypectomy following diagnostic hysteroscopy. Materials and Methods Total of 256 women who were diagnosed to have endometrial polyp by transvaginal ultrasound and underwent diagnostic hysteroscopy and blind polypectomy by simple avulsion in the period of January 2008 to December 2014 were included in our study. Polyp was confirmed by the histopathology. Results The prevalence of polyp among women who underwent diagnostic hysteroscopy and blind polypectomy was more common in the age group of 40-49years. Polyps manifested as AUB in 45.6% of our study population. The mean size of the polyp was not significantly different between premenopausal and postmenopausal women and single and multiple polyps. Histopathological study of the polyp showed two malignant polyps in our study population. Premalignant lesions i.e., endometrial hyperplasia without atypia and with atypia was found in 33 women. There was one uterine perforation, one cervical tear; one false passage and one patient had mild bleeding after the procedure. In our study, in the mean follow-up period of 37.57±28.12 months, 3.9% (7 women) had recurrence. In the follow-up period of 16.56±18.96 months, 78.9% women didn’t have recurrence. Conclusion Diagnostic hysteroscopy and blind polypectomy has low complication rate and recurrence rate and technically feasible for the practicing gynaecologists which don’t need much training and is cost-effective also. PMID:27504357

  11. Robot-assisted versus conventional laparoscopic surgery for endometrial cancer staging: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Hui; Li, Zhao-Ai; Huang, Rui; Xue, Hui-Qin

    2016-08-01

    This meta-analysis broadly compared the safety and efficacy of robot-assisted laparoscopy (RAL) with that of conventional laparoscopy (CL) for endometrial cancer staging. The advantages of RAL were evaluated through the outcomes in terms of conversion rates, complications, length of operation, blood loss, number of lymph nodes harvested, and length of hospitalization. Three electronic databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, and EmBASE) were searched to identify eligible studies. We selected all retrospective studies documenting a comparison between RAL and CL for endometrial cancer staging between 2005 and 2015, and tallied with meta-analyses criteria. Only studies published in English were included in this analysis. The outcomes of the extracted data were pooled and estimated by the Review Manager version 5.1 software. Seventeen studies met the eligibility criteria. Among the 2105 patients reported, 912 underwent RAL and the other 1193 underwent CL for endometrial cancer staging. Compared with CL, RAL had lower conversion rates [risk ratio, 0.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.25-0.64; p = 0.0002]. Its complications were also less than that of CL (risk ratio, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.56-0.94; p = 0.02). RAL was associated with significantly less intraoperative blood loss (weighted mean difference, -79.2 mL; 95% CI, from -103.43 to -54.97; p < 0.00001) and a shorter length of hospitalization (weighted mean difference, -0.37 days; 95% CI, from -0.57 to -0.17; p = 0.0003). We found no significant differences in the length of operation and number of lymph nodes harvested between the two groups. From our meta-analysis results, RAL is a safe and effective alternative to CL for endometrial cancer staging. Further studies are required to determine potential advantages or disadvantages of RAL. PMID:27590368

  12. Prediction of lymph node metastasis in patients with apparent early endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Son, Joo-Hyuk; Kong, Tae-Wook; Kim, Su Hyun; Paek, Jiheum; Lee, Eun Ju; Ryu, Hee-Sug

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate the incidence of lymph node metastasis in early endometrial cancer patients and to evaluate preoperative clinicopathological factors predicting lymph node metastasis. Methods We identified 142 patients with endometrial cancer between January 2000 and February 2013. All patients demonstrated endometrioid adenocarcinoma with grade 1 or 2 on preoperative endometrial biopsy. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging showed that tumors were confined to the uterine corpus with superficial myometrial invasion (less than 50%), and there were no lymph nodes enlargements. All patients had complete staging procedures and were surgically staged according to the 2009 FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) staging system. Clinical and pathological data were obtained from medical records and statistically analyzed. Results Of the 142 patients, 127 patients (89.4%) presented with stage 1A, 8 (5.6%) with stage IB, 3 (2.1%) with stage II, and 4 (2.8%) with stage III disease. Three patients (2.1%) had lymph node metastasis-2 IIIC1 and 1 IIIC2 disease. Age, preoperative tumor grade, and myometrial invasion less than 50% on preoperative MRI were not associated with lymph node metastasis. A high preoperative serum CA-125 level (>35 IU/mL) was a statistically significant factor for predicting lymph node metastasis on univariate and multivariate analyses. Lymph node metastasis was only found in patients with preoperative grade 2 tumors or a high serum CA-125 level. Conclusion Preoperative tumor grade and serum CA-125 level can predict lymph node metastasis in apparent early endometrial cancer patients. PMID:26430663

  13. Akt regulates Progesterone Receptor B dependent transcription and angiogenesis in endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Irene I.; Maniar, Kruti; Lydon, John P.; Kim, J. Julie

    2016-01-01

    Progestins have long been used clinically for the treatment of endometrial cancers, however, the response rates to progestin therapy vary and the molecular mechanisms behind progestin insensitivity are poorly understood. We hypothesized that in PTEN mutated endometrial cancers, hyperactive Akt signaling downregulates Progesterone Receptor B (PRB) transcriptional activity, leading to overall impaired progestin responses. We report that inhibition of Akt with the Akt inhibitor, MK-2206 (MK), in conjunction with progestin (R5020) treatment, is sufficient to upregulate a subset of PRB target genes in Ishikawa cells stably expressing PRB (PRB-Ishikawa). Through gene ontology analysis of Akt-regulated PRB target genes, angiogenesis was found to be the principle process regulated by Akt-PRB. To further interrogate the mechanism by which Akt modulates PRB transcriptional activity, ChIP-Mass Spectrometry was performed to identify potential cofactors that differentially interact with PRB in the presence of the R5020 and MK+R5020. 14-3-3σ was identified as a protein enriched in the MK+R5020 dataset, and it was demonstrated that 14-3-3σ is required for the upregulation in PRB target gene expression following inhibition of Akt. In order to determine the ramifications of MK+R5020 treatment on angiogenesis, in vitro assays were performed and combinatorial MK+R5020 treatment significantly decreased endothelial cell invasion and tube formation more than MK or R5020 treatment alone. Furthermore, we found that combinatorial MK-2206+Progesterone treatments decreased angiogenesis and proliferation in the Ptend/d conditional mouse model of endometrial cancer. Taken together, these findings suggest that a combinatorial therapeutic approach utilizing Akt inhibitors with progestins may improve the efficacy of progestin therapy for the treatment of endometrial cancer. PMID:26996671

  14. Effect of Bushenantai recipe on the expression of endometrial LIF in mice with embryonic implantation dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingmin; Huang, Yuqin; Zhu, Guijin; Huang, Guangying; Dong, Liping; Zhang, Jinjin

    2008-02-01

    In order to observe the effect of Bushenantai recipe on the expression of endometrial leukemia-inhibitory factor (LIF) in mice with embryonic implantation dysfunction (EID), 120 Kunming mice post coition were randomized into three groups: normal control group, model group and traditional Chinese medicine group (TCM group) (n=40 in each group). Uterus was collected on the pregnancy day (Pd) 4, 5, 6 after an intravenous injection of Evan's blue. The endometrium was dyed by Evan's blue and the mean points of response were observed on Pd 5. The expression of LIF mRNA and protein was detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry respectively and analyzed statistically by image system. The results showed that the number of implantation sites in model group was remarkably less than in normal control group and TCM group. There was no significant difference between normal control group and TCM group. The expression of LIF mRNA and protein in model group was delayed. Bushenantai recipe could increase the expression of LIF mRNA and protein in endometria of mice with EID. It was suggested that Bushenantai recipe could improve embryo implantation of mice with EID by promoting the endometrial LIF expression and endometrial decidualization.

  15. Analysis of Prognostic Factors and Patterns of Recurrence in Patients With Pathologic Stage III Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Samir; Portelance, Lorraine . E-mail: lorraine.portelance@muhc.mcgill.ca; Gilbert, Lucy; Tan, Leonard; Stanimir, Gerald; Duclos, Marie; Souhami, Luis

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess prognostic factors and patterns of recurrence in patients with pathologic Stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2003, 107 patients with pathologic International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage III endometrial adenocarcinoma confined to the pelvis were treated at our institution. Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) was delivered to 68 patients (64%). The influence of multiple patient- and treatment-related factors on pelvic and distant control and overall survival (OS) was evaluated. Results: Median follow-up for patients at risk was 41 months. Five-year actuarial OS was significantly improved in patients treated with adjuvant RT (68%) compared with those with resection alone (50%; p = 0.029). Age, histology, grade, uterine serosal invasion, adnexal involvement, number of extrauterine sites, and treatment with adjuvant RT predicted for improved survival in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed that grade, uterine serosal invasion, and treatment with adjuvant RT were independent predictors of survival. Five-year actuarial pelvic control was improved significantly with the delivery of adjuvant RT (74% vs. 49%; p = 0.011). Depth of myometrial invasion and treatment with adjuvant RT were independent predictors of pelvic control in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Multiple prognostic factors predicting for the outcome of pathologic Stage III endometrial cancer patients were identified in this analysis. In particular, delivery of adjuvant RT seems to be a significant independent predictor for improved survival and pelvic control, suggesting that pelvic RT should be routinely considered in the management of these patients.

  16. Chemotherapy-induced endometrial pathology: mimicry of malignancy and viral endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Yoon, Gun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a common type of preoperative neoadjuvant treatment and postoperative adjuvant or palliative therapy for many different types of malignancies. Certain chemotherapeutic agents can induce bizarre epithelial atypia that mimics malignancy. Unfamiliarity with these changes could potentially cause confusion with a neoplastic or infectious process. The endometrium is one of the few sites where chemotherapy-induced epithelial atypia has not been appreciated. We identified four patients with marked cytologic atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium from the surgical pathology files of Severance Hospital. The histopathologic features, immunostaining results and medical records of these patients were reviewed. All patients underwent hysteroscopic examination with endometrial curettage for investigation of vaginal bleeding. They had previously undergone chemotherapy for uterine cervical cancer (n=1), rectal cancer (n=2) and myelodysplastic syndrome (n=1). The chemotherapy regimens included alkylating agents (busulfan, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin), pyrimidine antagonists (capecitabine, decitabine, and 5-fluorouracil), taxanes (paclitaxel), and topoisomerase inhibitors (irinotecan and etoposide). On histopathological examination, the atypical epithelial changes included marked nuclear enlargement and pleomorphism, a degenerative-looking chromatin pattern, abundant microvacuolated cytoplasm, and preservation of the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio. This study demonstrates that certain chemotherapeutic agents may cause bizarre, reactive atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium. These changes should not be interpreted as neoplastic or infectious in nature. An awareness of prior exposure to cytotoxic agents and a familiarity with the nature and distribution of these bizarre alterations is essential to avoid misinterpretation of the morphologic features and prevent unnecessary treatment. PMID:27347355

  17. Feasibility study of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate for endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ruijie; Wang, Junjie; Xu, Feng; Li, Hua; Zhang, Xile

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the feasibility, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate (VMAT-CDR) for whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) of endometrial cancer. The nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), VMAT with variable dose-rate (VMAT-VDR), and VMAT-CDR plans were created for 9 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue (NT) were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each VMAT-CDR plan, a dry run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Compared with IMRT, the VMAT-CDR plans delivered a slightly greater V{sub 20} of the bowel, bladder, pelvis bone, and NT, but significantly decreased the dose to the high-dose region of the rectum and pelvis bone. The MUs decreased from 1105 with IMRT to 628 with VMAT-CDR. The delivery time also decreased from 9.5 to 3.2 minutes. The average gamma pass rate was 95.6% at the 3%/3 mm criteria with MatriXX pretreatment verification for 9 patients. VMAT-CDR can achieve comparable plan quality with significant shorter delivery time and smaller number of MUs compared with IMRT for patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. It can be accurately delivered and be an alternative to IMRT on the linear accelerator without VDR capability.

  18. Nurses’ Health Study Contributions on the Epidemiology of Less Common Cancers: Endometrial, Ovarian, Pancreatic, and Hematologic

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Mollie E.; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Bao, Ying; Crous-Bou, Marta; Wolpin, Brian M.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contributions of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) to epidemiologic knowledge of endometrial, ovarian, pancreatic, and hematologic cancers. Methods. We reviewed selected NHS publications from 1976 to 2016, including publications from consortia and other pooled studies. Results. NHS studies on less common cancers have identified novel risk factors, such as a reduced risk of endometrial cancer in women of advanced age at last birth, and have clarified or prospectively confirmed previously reported associations, including an inverse association between tubal ligation and ovarian cancer. Through biomarker research, the NHS has furthered understanding of the pathogenesis of rare cancers, such as the role of altered metabolism in pancreatic cancer risk and survival. NHS investigations have also demonstrated the importance of the timing of exposure, such as the finding of a positive association of early life body fatness, but not of usual adult body mass index, with non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk. Conclusions. Evidence from the NHS has informed prevention strategies and contributed to improved survival from less common but often lethal malignancies, including endometrial, ovarian, pancreatic, and hematologic cancers. PMID:27459458

  19. Synuclein-γ (SNCG) protein expression is associated with poor outcome in endometrial adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Wang, Dan; Syriac, Susanna; Godoy, Heidi; Dupont, Nefertiti; Liu, Song; Odunsi, Kunle

    2016-01-01

    Objective Synuclein-γ (SNCG) is a marker for adverse and aggressive disease in breast cancer. In previous study, we found SNCG mRNA to be overexpressed in uterine serous carcinoma compared to uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma. The aim of this study is to explore the prognostic value of SNCG in patients with endometrial cancer. Methods 279 endometrial cancer patients were retrieved from the archives. The tissue paraffin blocks were stained for SNCG antibody and its expression was correlated with clinicopathological prognostic factors. Results There was a positive association between SNCG+ immunoexpression and tumor grade, tumor stage, type II carcinomas, deep myometrial invasion and lymphovascular invasion. A correlation between SNCG+ and adverse outcomes, such as shorter overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS), was also detected. Following adjuvant therapy (radiation and chemotherapy or chemotherapy alone), we observed a difference in 5 years DFS rate between SNCG+ (41.6%) and SNCG− patients (59.5%). Conclusion Overexpression of SNCG seemed to be a predictor biomarker for aggressive tumor behavior and adverse outcome in patients with endometrial cancer. Future exploration of SNCG as a potential therapeutic target for selected patients could be of interest. PMID:22015044

  20. Chemotherapy-induced endometrial pathology: mimicry of malignancy and viral endometritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Yoon, Gun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a common type of preoperative neoadjuvant treatment and postoperative adjuvant or palliative therapy for many different types of malignancies. Certain chemotherapeutic agents can induce bizarre epithelial atypia that mimics malignancy. Unfamiliarity with these changes could potentially cause confusion with a neoplastic or infectious process. The endometrium is one of the few sites where chemotherapy-induced epithelial atypia has not been appreciated. We identified four patients with marked cytologic atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium from the surgical pathology files of Severance Hospital. The histopathologic features, immunostaining results and medical records of these patients were reviewed. All patients underwent hysteroscopic examination with endometrial curettage for investigation of vaginal bleeding. They had previously undergone chemotherapy for uterine cervical cancer (n=1), rectal cancer (n=2) and myelodysplastic syndrome (n=1). The chemotherapy regimens included alkylating agents (busulfan, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin), pyrimidine antagonists (capecitabine, decitabine, and 5-fluorouracil), taxanes (paclitaxel), and topoisomerase inhibitors (irinotecan and etoposide). On histopathological examination, the atypical epithelial changes included marked nuclear enlargement and pleomorphism, a degenerative-looking chromatin pattern, abundant microvacuolated cytoplasm, and preservation of the nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio. This study demonstrates that certain chemotherapeutic agents may cause bizarre, reactive atypia of the endometrial glandular epithelium. These changes should not be interpreted as neoplastic or infectious in nature. An awareness of prior exposure to cytotoxic agents and a familiarity with the nature and distribution of these bizarre alterations is essential to avoid misinterpretation of the morphologic features and prevent unnecessary treatment. PMID:27347355

  1. Triclosan and bisphenol a affect decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Mita, Luigi; Cobellis, Luigi; Merafina, Verdiana; Specchio, Raffaella; Rossi, Sergio; Mita, Damiano Gustavo; Mosca, Lavinia; Castaldi, Maria Antonietta; De Falco, Maria; Laforgia, Vincenza; Crispi, Stefania

    2016-02-15

    In recent years, impaired fertility and endometrium related diseases are increased. Many evidences suggest that environmental pollution might be considered a risk factor for endometrial physiopathology. Among environmental pollutants, endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) act on endocrine system, causing hormonal imbalance which, in turn, leads to female and male reproductive dysfunctions. In this work, we studied the effects of triclosan (TCL) and bisphenol A (BPA), two widespread EDCs, on human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs), derived from endometrial biopsies from woman not affected by endometriosis. Cell proliferation, cell cycle, migration and decidualization mechanisms were investigated. Treatments have been performed with both the EDCs separately or in presence and in absence of progesterone used as decidualization stimulus. Both TCL and BPA did not affect cell proliferation, but they arrested ESCs at G2/M phase of cell cycle enhancing cell migration. TCL and BPA also increased gene expression and protein levels of some decidualization markers, such as insulin growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) and prolactin (PRL), amplifying the effect of progesterone alone. All together, our data strongly suggest that TCL and BPA might alter human endometrium physiology so affecting fertility and pregnancy outcome. PMID:26604029

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of preoperative tests for lymph node status in endometrial cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Trum, J.W.; Bakers, F.C.H.; Beets-Tan, R.G.H.; Smits, L.J.M.; Kruitwagen, R.F.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background: Approximately 72% of endometrial cancers are FIGO stage I at diagnosis and about 10% have lymph node metastases. An ideal diagnostic test for nodal disease would be able to prevent both overtreatment (i.e. unnecessary lymphadenectomy) and undertreatment (i.e. withholding lymphadenectomy or adjuvant postoperative treatment to patients with lymph node metastases). Objectives: In this review we compare the accuracy of preoperative tests (computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography-computed tomography, CA-125 serum levels, and ultrasonography) for the detection of lymph node metastases in endometrial cancers with the final histopathologic diagnosis after complete pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy as the gold standard. Method: A systematic search in MEDLINE (using PubMed), Embase and The Cochrane Library was performed up to 23 July 2012. Results: We found one article that met our inclusion criteria for computed tomography, none for magnetic resonance imaging, 2 for positron emission tomography/computed tomography), 2 for CA-125 and none for ultrasonography. Conclusions: Due to the lack of high-quality articles on a preoperative test for lymph node status in endometrial cancer, no proper comparison between these modalities can be made. PMID:23876490

  3. The role of Lipoxin A4 in endometrial biology and endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Canny, GO; Lessey, BA

    2014-01-01

    Lipoxin A4 (LXA4), an endogenous anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory mediator studied in many disease states, is recently appreciated as a potentially significant player in the endometrium. This eicosanoid, synthesized from arachidonic acid via the action of lipoxygenase enzymes, is likely regulated in endometrial tissue during the menstrual cycle. Recent studies revealed that LXA4 acts as an estrogen receptor agonist in endometrial epithelial cells, antagonizing some estrogen-mediated activities in a manner similar to the weak estrogen estriol, with which it shares structural similarity. LXA4 may also be an anti-inflammatory molecule in the endometrium, though its precise function in various physiological and pathological scenarios remains to be determined. The expression patterns for LXA4 and its receptor in the female reproductive tract suggest a role in pregnancy. The present review provides an oversight of its known and putative roles in the context of immuno-endocrine crosstalk. Endometriosis, a common inflammatory condition and a major cause of infertility and pain, is currently treated by surgery or anti-hormone therapies that are contraceptive and associated with undesirable side effects. LXA4 may represent a potential therapeutic and further research to elucidate its function in endometrial tissue and the peritoneal cavity will undoubtedly provide valuable insights. PMID:23485944

  4. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and survivin in endometrioid and nonendometrioid endometrial cancers and clinicopathologic significance

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Evren; Koyuncuoglu, Meral; Görken, İlknur Bilkay; Saatli, Bahadir; Ulukus, Emine Cagnur; Saygili, Ugur

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine matrix metalloproteinase-2 and survivin expressions in endometrial cancers, their relation to clinical and histologic parameters and to investigate any difference in the expression of these markers between endometrioid and nonendometrioid cancers. Methods Ninety-five patients with endometrial cancer, were included. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 and survivin expressions were analyzed immunohistochemically from paraffin-embedded tissues by using specific monoclonal antibodies. Results Survivin nuclear expression was higher in endometrioid cancer as compared to nonendometrioid cancer (p=0.040), but there was no difference for cytoplasmic survivin and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expressions between type I and type II carcinomas. Survivin cytoplasmic staining was significantly lower in patients with deep myometrial invasion (p=0.038). Nuclear expression of survivin is decreased in histologic grade 3 tumors compared to grade 1 and 2 tumors (p=0.013), but there is no difference between grade 1 and 2. We did not find any statistically significant difference between survivin or matrix metalloproteinase-2 expressions and survival. Conclusion Survivin and matrix metalloproteinase-2 are present in endometrioid and nonendometrioid cancers. Grade 1 and 2 tumors and carcinomas having myometrial invasion less than 50% have higher survivin expression. These results supports that, survivin may play an important role in early stage tumors and early phases of tumor development. We did not find any association between matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression and classical prognostic factors in endometrial cancer and both proteins were not associated with survival. PMID:21860734

  5. Premalignant and malignant lesions in endometrial polyps in patients undergoing hysteroscopic polypectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lenci, Marco Antonio; do Nascimento, Vanessa Alessandra Lui; Grandini, Ana Beatriz; Fahmy, Walid Makin; Depes, Daniella de Batista; Baracat, Fausto Farah; Lopes, Reginaldo Guedes Coelho

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the incidence of premalignant lesions and cancer in endometrial polyps, in patients undergoing hysteroscopic polypectomy. Methods: The results of 1,020 pathological examinations of patients submitted to hysteroscopic polypectomy were analyzed, as well as their diagnostic and surgical hysteroscopy findings. As to their menstrual status, 295 (28.9%) patients were in menacme. Of the total, 193 (65.4%) presented abnormal uterine bleeding, and 102 (34.6%) were asymptomatic with altered endometrial echo on transvaginal ultrasound. Out of 725 (71.1%) postmenopausal patients, 171 (23.6%) were symptomatic (abnormal uterine bleeding), and 554 (76.4%) were asymptomatic with endometrial echo >5.0mm. Results: Twenty-one (2.0%) patients presented premalignant lesions in the polyps, 13 had simple glandular hyperplasia, of which 5 had no atypia, and eight presented atypia. Eight polyps presented focal area of complex hyperplasia: 4 with atypia and 4 without lesions. Cancer was diagnosed in 5 (0.5%) polyps. Of the 21 polyps that harbored premalignant lesions, 12 were interpreted as benign in diagnostic and surgical hysteroscopy. Of the polyps with cancer, 4 were also histeroscopically interpreted as normal. Conclusion: Symptomatic polyps in menacme and in all postmenopausal women should be resected and submitted to histopathological examination, since they may have a benign aspect, even when harboring areas of cellular atypia or cancer. PMID:24728240

  6. Growth factor induced proliferation, migration, and lumen formation of rat endometrial epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    ISLAM, Md. Rashedul; YAMAGAMI, Kazuki; YOSHII, Yuka; YAMAUCHI, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial modulation is essential for the preservation of normal uterine physiology, and this modulation is driven by a number of growth factors. The present study investigated the mitogenic, motogenic, and morphogenic effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on rat endometrial epithelial (REE) cells. The REE cells were isolated and cultured and then characterized based on their morphology and their expression of epithelial cell markers. The MTT assay revealed that EGF and HGF induce proliferation of REE cells. Consistent with increased proliferation, we found that the cell cycle regulatory factor Cyclin D1 was also upregulated upon EGF and HGF addition. REE cell migration was prompted by EGF, as observed with the Oris Cell Migration Assay. The morphogenic impact of growth factors on REE cells was studied in a three-dimensional BD Matrigel cell culture system, wherein these growth factors also increased the frequency of lumen formation. In summary, we show that EGF and HGF have a stimulatory effect on REE cells, promoting proliferation, cell migration, and lumen formation. Our findings provide important insights that further the understanding of endometrial regeneration and its regulation. PMID:26946922

  7. Cyclic remodeling of the nonhuman primate endometrium: a model for understanding endometrial receptivity.

    PubMed

    Slayden, Ov Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Old World monkeys display physiological responses to steroid hormones that are similar to those of women. In this review, we describe cyclic morphological changes that take place within the uterus of Old World primates during the menstrual cycle. In primates, estrogen stimulates endometrial growth in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Progesterone secreted in the luteal phase acts to induce secretory differentiation, which is required for successful embryo implantation. During the differentiation process, endometrial estrogen receptor-1 (ESR-1) is suppressed, and reduced staining for ESR-1 is a definitive marker of the onset of uterine receptivity. Downregulation of ESR-1 is topographically limited to the functionalis (upper) zones of the endometrium, the zones in which embryo implantation occurs, indicating that zone-specific factors play a role in the differentiation process. Future genomic and proteomic studies are expected to reveal additional markers for diagnosing endometrial receptivity. Due to the distinct zonal response of the endometrium to ovarian steroids, accurate histological characterization will remain necessary to interpret novel targets in the assessment of fertility. PMID:24959820

  8. The clock protein period 2 synchronizes mitotic expansion and decidual transformation of human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Muter, Joanne; Lucas, Emma S; Chan, Yi-Wah; Brighton, Paul J; Moore, Jonathan D; Lacey, Lauren; Quenby, Siobhan; Lam, Eric W-F; Brosens, Jan J

    2015-04-01

    Implantation requires coordinated interactions between the conceptus and surrounding decidual cells, but the involvement of clock genes in this process is incompletely understood. Circadian oscillations are predicated on transcriptional-translational feedback loops, which balance the activities of the transcriptional activators CLOCK (circadian locomotor output cycles kaput) and brain muscle arnt-like 1 and repressors encoded by PER (Period) and Cryptochrome genes. We show that loss of PER2 expression silences circadian oscillations in decidualizing human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs). Down-regulation occurred between 12 and 24 hours following differentiation and coincided with reduced CLOCK binding to a noncanonical E-box enhancer in the PER2 promoter. RNA sequencing revealed that premature inhibition of PER2 by small interfering RNA knockdown leads to a grossly disorganized decidual response. Gene ontology analysis highlighted a preponderance of cell cycle regulators among the 1121 genes perturbed upon PER2 knockdown. Congruently, PER2 inhibition abrogated mitotic expansion of differentiating HESCs by inducing cell cycle block at G2/M. Analysis of 70 midluteal endometrial biopsies revealed an inverse correlation between PER2 transcript levels and the number of miscarriages in women suffering reproductive failure (Spearman rank test, ρ = -0.3260; P = 0.0046). Thus, PER2 synchronizes endometrial proliferation with initiation of aperiodic decidual gene expression; uncoupling of these events may cause recurrent pregnancy loss. PMID:25573754

  9. Low grade endometrial stromal sarcoma of uterine: review of 17 cases.

    PubMed

    Behtash, Nadereh; Akhavan, Setareh; Gilani, Mitra Modares; Mousavi, Azamsadat; Ghaemmaghami, Fatemeh; Mazhari, Marjan Moradi

    2011-01-01

    Endometrial stromal sarcomas (ESS) are the second most common uterine sarcomas. Endometrial stromal sarcomas account for 0.25% of all uterine malignancies. Uterine sarcomas most often affect postmenopausal women. The aim of this retrospective study was to review the experience in the treatment and clinical outcome of low grade malignant endometrial stromal sarcoma. Seventeen patients with histologically proven low grade ESS in department of Gynecologic Oncology of the Vali-e-Asr Hospital, Tehran-Iran, between 1999 and 2008 were included in the analysis. Demographics, pathology, treatment, time to recurrence, salvage therapy and survival information was collected. The median age of our patients was 45.35 ± 6.8 (range 36-61). The median parity of the patients was 5 (range 0-8). Most patients were diagnosed at FIGO stage I. The mean survival for patients with stage I and II was 73.5 ± 35.09 and 57.6 ± 5.37 months, respectively, with mortality rate of 5.9% through a median follow-up time of 68.82 ± 30 months. Of 17 patients, seven cases (35.29%) were disease free at 6 years after hysterectomy. Radiotherapy was administered to four patients (23.53%). Only one patient recurred at 10th month after surgery. Surgeries not preserving ovarian function were helpful to decrease the risk of recurrence compared with those sparing ovarian function.

  10. Anti-tumor effect of estrogen-related receptor alpha knockdown on uterine endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Hiroshi; Mori, Taisuke; Ito, Fumitake; Yamamoto, Takuro; Akiyama, Makoto; Kokabu, Tetsuya; Yoriki, Kaori; Umemura, Shiori; Akashi, Kyoko; Kitawaki, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptor (ERR)α presents structural similarities with estrogen receptor (ER)α. However, it is an orphan receptor not binding to naturally occurring estrogens. This study was designed to investigate the role of ERRα in endometrial cancer progression. Immunohistochemistry analysis on 50 specimens from patients with endometrial cancer showed that ERRα was expressed in all examined tissues and the elevated expression levels of ERRα were associated with advanced clinical stages and serous histological type (p < 0.01 for each). ERRα knockdown with siRNA suppressed angiogenesis via VEGF and cell proliferation in vitro (p < 0.01). Cell cycle and apoptosis assays using flow cytometry and western blot revealed that ERRα knockdown induced cell cycle arrest during the mitotic phase followed by apoptosis initiated by caspase-3. Additionally, ERRα knockdown sensitized cells to paclitaxel. A significant reduction of tumor growth and angiogenesis was also observed in ERRα knockdown xenografts (p < 0.01). These findings indicate that ERRα may serve as a novel molecular target for the treatment of endometrial cancer. PMID:27153547

  11. Rapamycin inhibits cell proliferation in type I and type II endometrial carcinomas: A search for biomarkers of sensitivity to treatment☆

    PubMed Central

    Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Zhou, Chunxiao; Boggess, John F.; Whang, Young E.; Barroilhet, Lisa; Gehrig, Paola A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Our goal was to evaluate the effect of rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, in type I and II human endometrial cancer tumor explants. Methods Short-term tissue culture with fresh endometrial cancer tumor explants was performed. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTS assay after treatment with rapamycin. Akt and PTEN status were documented by Western blotting. The effect of rapamycin on phosphorylated-S6 and 4E-BP-1 was also assessed by Western blotting. Real-time RT-PCR was used to quantify hTERT mRNA expression. Telomere length was determined by terminal restriction fragment Southern blotting. Results Thirteen fresh endometrial cancer tumor explants (nine Type I, four Type II) were placed in short-term culture and treated with rapamycin. Nine of the endometrial cancer tumors responded to rapamycin, with a median IC50 of 11.4 nM. Sensitivity to rapamycin was independent of PTEN and Akt status. Tumors (13/13) had a reduction in phosphorylated-S6 and 10/13 had a reduction in phosphorylated 4E-BP-1. Rapamycin decreased hTERT mRNA expression in all of the endometrial cancer tumors. Telomere length did not correspond with responsiveness to this drug. Conclusions Rapamycin demonstrated activity in fresh endometrial tumor explants independent of PTEN and Akt status. Some tumors demonstrated a reduction in phosphorylated-S6 and 4E-BP-1 without a significant change in cellular proliferation, suggesting that additional pathways may modulate cellular proliferation. Thus, mTOR inhibitors may be a useful targeted therapy for both type I and type II endometrial cancers, but the search remains for a predictive biomarker of sensitivity to this therapy. PMID:20863555

  12. Reversing the reduced level of endometrial GLUT4 expression in polycystic ovary syndrome: a mechanistic study of metformin action

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Cui, Peng; Jiang, Hong-Yuan; Guo, Yan-Rong; Pishdari, Bano; Hu, Min; Feng, Yi; Billig, Håkan; Shao, Ruijin

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting results have been reported regarding whether or not insulin-regulated glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) is expressed in human and rodent endometria. There is an inverse relationship between androgen levels and insulin-dependent glucose metabolism in women. Hyperandrogenemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance are believed to contribute to endometrial abnormalities in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, it has been unclear in previous studies if endometrial GLUT4 expression is regulated by androgen-dependent androgen receptors (ARs) and/or the insulin receptor/Akt/mTOR signaling network. In this study, we demonstrate that GLUT4 is expressed in normal endometrial cells (mainly in the epithelial cells) and is down-regulated under conditions of hyperandrogenemia in tissues from PCOS patients and in a 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced PCOS-like rat model. Western blot analysis revealed reduced endometrial GLUT4 expression and increased AR expression in PCOS patients. However, the reduced GLUT4 level was not always associated with an increase in AR in PCOS patients when comparing non-hyperplasia with hyperplasia. Using a human tissue culture system, we investigated the molecular basis by which GLUT4 regulation in endometrial hyperplasia tissues is affected by metformin in PCOS patients. We show that specific endogenous organic cation transporter isoforms are regulated by metformin, and this suggests a direct effect of metformin on endometrial hyperplasia. Moreover, we demonstrate that metformin induces GLUT4 expression and inhibits AR expression and blocks insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in the same hyperplasia human tissues. These findings indicate that changes in endometrial GLUT4 expression in PCOS patients involve the androgen-dependent alteration of AR expression and changes in the insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling network. PMID:26045896

  13. Eight Functional Polymorphisms in the Estrogen Receptor 1 Gene and Endometrial Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Gu, Yang; Wang, Ding-ning; Ni, Sha; Yan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective Emerging evidence indicates that common functional polymorphisms in the estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) gene may have an impact on an individual’s susceptibility to endometrial cancer, but individually published results are inconclusive. The aim of this meta-analysis is to derive a more precise estimation of the associations between eight polymorphisms in the ESR1 gene and endometrial cancer risk. Methods A literature search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and China Biology Medicine (CBM) databases was conducted on publications published before November 1st, 2012. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Statistical analyses were performed using the STATA 12.0 software. Results Thirteen case-control studies were included with a total of 7,649 endometrial cancer cases and 16,855 healthy controls. When all the eligible studies were pooled into the meta-analysis, the results indicated that PvuII (C>T) polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer, especially among Caucasian populations. There were also significant associations between rs3020314 (C>T) polymorphism and an increased risk of endometrial cancer. Furthermore, rs2234670 (S/L) polymorphism may decrease the risk of endometrial cancer. However, no statistically significant associations were found in XbaI (A>G), Codon 325 (C>G), Codon 243 (C>T), VNTR (S/L) and rs2046210 (G>A) polymorphisms. Conclusion The current meta-analysis suggests that PvuII (C>T) and rs3020314 (C>T) polymorphisms may be risk factors for endometrial cancer, especially among Caucasian populations. PMID:23593326

  14. Reversing the reduced level of endometrial GLUT4 expression in polycystic ovary syndrome: a mechanistic study of metformin action.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Cui, Peng; Jiang, Hong-Yuan; Guo, Yan-Rong; Pishdari, Bano; Hu, Min; Feng, Yi; Billig, Håkan; Shao, Ruijin

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting results have been reported regarding whether or not insulin-regulated glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) is expressed in human and rodent endometria. There is an inverse relationship between androgen levels and insulin-dependent glucose metabolism in women. Hyperandrogenemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance are believed to contribute to endometrial abnormalities in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, it has been unclear in previous studies if endometrial GLUT4 expression is regulated by androgen-dependent androgen receptors (ARs) and/or the insulin receptor/Akt/mTOR signaling network. In this study, we demonstrate that GLUT4 is expressed in normal endometrial cells (mainly in the epithelial cells) and is down-regulated under conditions of hyperandrogenemia in tissues from PCOS patients and in a 5α-dihydrotestosterone-induced PCOS-like rat model. Western blot analysis revealed reduced endometrial GLUT4 expression and increased AR expression in PCOS patients. However, the reduced GLUT4 level was not always associated with an increase in AR in PCOS patients when comparing non-hyperplasia with hyperplasia. Using a human tissue culture system, we investigated the molecular basis by which GLUT4 regulation in endometrial hyperplasia tissues is affected by metformin in PCOS patients. We show that specific endogenous organic cation transporter isoforms are regulated by metformin, and this suggests a direct effect of metformin on endometrial hyperplasia. Moreover, we demonstrate that metformin induces GLUT4 expression and inhibits AR expression and blocks insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling in the same hyperplasia human tissues. These findings indicate that changes in endometrial GLUT4 expression in PCOS patients involve the androgen-dependent alteration of AR expression and changes in the insulin receptor/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling network. PMID:26045896

  15. The roles of tricellular tight junction protein lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor in malignancy of human endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Hiroshi; Satohisa, Seiro; Kohno, Takayuki; Takahashi, Syunta; Hatakeyama, Tsubasa; Konno, Takumi; Tsujiwaki, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) has been identified as a novel molecular constituent of tricellular contacts that have a barrier function for the cellular sheet. LSR recruits tricellulin (TRIC), which is the first molecular component of tricellular tight junctions. Knockdown of LSR increases cell motility and invasion of certain cancer cells. However, the behavior and the roles of LSR in endometrial cancer remain unknown. In the present study, we investigated the behavior and roles of LSR in normal and endometrial cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. In endometriosis and endometrial cancer, LSR was observed not only in the subapical region but also throughout the lateral region as well as in normal endometrial epithelial cells in the secretory phase, and LSR in the cancer was reduced in correlation with the malignancy. Knockdown of LSR by the siRNA in cells of the endometrial cancer cell line Sawano, induced cell migration, invasion and proliferation, while TRIC relocalized from the tricellular region to the bicellular region at the membrane. In Sawano cells and normal HEEs, a decrease of LSR induced by leptin and an increase of LSR induced by adiponectin and the drugs for type 2 diabetes metformin and berberine were observed via distinct signaling pathways including JAK2/STAT. In Sawano cells, metformin and berberine prevented cell migration and invasion induced by downregulation of LSR by the siRNA and leptin treatment. The dissection of the mechanism in the downregulation of endometrial LSR during obesity is important in developing new diagnostic and therapy for endometrial cancer. PMID:27036040

  16. Androgen receptors are acquired by healthy postmenopausal endometrial epithelium and their subsequent loss in endometrial cancer is associated with poor survival

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, A M; Bulmer, J N; DeCruze, S B; Stringfellow, H F; Martin-Hirsch, P; Hapangama, D K

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endometrial cancer (EC) is a hormone-driven disease, and androgen receptor (AR) expression in high-grade EC (HGEC) and metastatic EC has not yet been described. Methods: The expression pattern and prognostic value of AR in relation to oestrogen (ERα and ERβ) and progesterone (PR) receptors, and the proliferation marker Ki67 in all EC subtypes (n=85) were compared with that of healthy and hyperplastic endometrium, using immunohistochemisty and qPCR. Results: Compared with proliferative endometrium, postmenopausal endometrtial epithelium showed significantly higher expression of AR (P<0.001) and ERα (P=0.035), which persisted in hyperplastic epithelium and in low-grade EC (LGEC). High-grade EC showed a significant loss of AR (P<0.0001), PR (P<0.0001) and ERβ (P<0.035) compared with LGEC, whilst maintaining weak to moderate ERα. Unlike PR, AR expression in metastatic lesions was significantly (P=0.039) higher than that in primary tumours. Androgen receptor expression correlated with favourable clinicopathological features and a lower proliferation index. Loss of AR, with/without the loss of PR was associated with a significantly lower disease-free survival (P<0.0001, P<0.0001, respectively). Conclusions: Postmenopausal endometrial epithelium acquires AR whilst preserving other steroid hormone receptors. Loss of AR, PR with retention of ERα and ERβ may promote the unrestrained growth of HGEC. Androgen receptor may therefore be a clinically relevant prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target in EC. PMID:26930451

  17. Progesterone regulation of the endometrial WNT system in the ovine uterus.

    PubMed

    Satterfield, M Carey; Song, Gwonhwa; Hayashi, Kanako; Bazer, Fuller W; Spencer, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    WNT signalling regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, polarity and organisation. The present study investigated the effects of progesterone (P4) on the endometrial WNT system in relation to blastocyst development and growth in sheep. Ewes received daily intramuscular injections of either corn oil (CO) vehicle or 25 mg P4 from 36 h after mating (Day 0) until hysterectomy on Day 9 or 12. Another group received P4 until Day 8 and 75 mg mifepristone (RU486) from Day 8 to Day 12. Early P4 treatment increased blastocyst growth on Days 9 and 12, whereas no blastocysts were recovered from P4 + RU486-treated ewes. Levels of WNT2 mRNA in the stroma and WNT11 and WNT7A mRNAs in the endometrial luminal epithelia (LE) were reduced in P4 + RU486-treated ewes on Day 9, whereas WNT11 mRNA was reduced in the endometria of both P4- and P4 + RU486-treated ewes on Day 12. On Day 12, WNT2 mRNA was increased in the stroma, WNT7A mRNA was increased in the LE and WNT5A mRNA was increased in the LE and stroma of P4 + RU486- compared with P4-treated ewes. DKK1 mRNA was absent in the endometrial stroma of P4 + RU486-treated ewes. Expression of transcription factor 7 like-2 (TCF7L2) was transiently increased in endometrial epithelia of P4-treated ewes on Day 9, but decreased in these ewes on Day 12. MSX1 mRNA was decreased by P4 treatment on Day 9 and levels of both MSX1 and MSX2 mRNA were higher in P4 + RU486-treated ewes on Day 12. Thus, P4 modulates the endometrial WNT system and elicits a transient decline in selected WNT pathways and signalling components, which is hypothesised to alter tight and adherens junctions, thereby stimulating blastocyst growth and development. PMID:19007558

  18. Decidualization and syndecan-1 knock down sensitize endometrial stromal cells to apoptosis induced by embryonic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Boeddeker, Sarah Jean; Baston-Buest, Dunja Maria; Fehm, Tanja; Kruessel, Jan; Hess, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Human embryo invasion and implantation into the inner wall of the maternal uterus, the endometrium, is the pivotal process for a successful pregnancy. Whereas disruption of the endometrial epithelial layer was already correlated with the programmed cell death, the role of apoptosis of the subjacent endometrial stromal cells during implantation is indistinct. The aim was to clarify whether apoptosis plays a role in the stromal invasion and to characterize if the apoptotic susceptibility of endometrial stromal cells to embryonic stimuli is influenced by decidualization and Syndecan-1. Therefore, the immortalized human endometrial stromal cell line St-T1 was used to first generate a new cell line with a stable Syndecan-1 knock down (KdS1), and second to further decidualize the cells with progesterone. As a replacement for the ethically inapplicable embryo all cells were treated with the embryonic factors and secretion products interleukin-1β, interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, transforming growth factor-β1 and anti-Fas antibody to mimic the embryo contact. Detection of apoptosis was verified via Caspase ELISAs, PARP cleavage and Annexin V staining. Apoptosis-related proteins were investigated via antibody arrays and underlying signaling pathways were analyzed by Western blot. Non-decidualized endometrial stromal cells showed a resistance towards apoptosis which was rescinded by decidualization and Syndecan-1 knock down independent of decidualization. This was correlated with an altered expression of several pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and connected to a higher activation of pro-survival Akt in non-differentiated St-T1 as an upstream mediator of apoptotis-related proteins. This study provides insight into the largely elusive process of implantation, proposing an important role for stromal cell apoptosis to successfully establish a pregnancy. The impact of Syndecan-1 in attenuating the apoptotic signal is particularly interesting in the light of an already

  19. High-grade endometrial carcinoma: serous and grade 3 endometrioid carcinomas have different immunophenotypes and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Alkushi, Abdulmohsen; Köbel, Martin; Kalloger, Steve E; Gilks, C Blake

    2010-07-01

    High-grade endometrial carcinomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors and include grade 3 endometrioid (EC-3), serous (SC), and clear cell carcinomas (CCC). There are conflicting data about the prognosis of these subtypes of high-grade endometrial carcinoma; this may be a result of lack of reproducibility in classifying tumor cell type. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in immunophenotype and outcome in a series of high-grade endometrial carcinomas, focusing on the comparison of EC-3 versus SC. We selected 180 endometrial carcinomas of SC, EC, or CCC type. No mixed carcinomas were included in the study. We chose the following immunohistochemical markers, estrogen receptor (ER), insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 3 (IMP3), p16, p53, progesterone receptor (PR), and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) as being significantly differentially expressed in endometrial carcinoma subtypes. The tumors were stratified into 4 groups on the basis of their cell type and grade: EC grade 1 or 2, EC-3, SC, and CCC. Univariate survival analysis revealed significant differences in outcome between the 4 groups (P<0.0001), with significantly longer disease-specific survival for grade 1 or 2 EC versus EC-3 (P=0.0001), and EC-3 versus SC (P=0.0003). p16, PTEN, and IMP3 expression was observed more frequently in SC compared with EC-3 (P<0.0001, P=0.021, and P=0.031, respectively). These 3 markers showed the highest sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing between EC-3 and SC, with receiver operating characteristics area under the curve of 0.85, 0.69, and 0.71, respectively. ER and p53 approached but did not reach significance for differential expression in EC-3 versus SC (P=0.055 and P=0.068, respectively). A combination of p16 and PTEN predicts EC-3 versus SC with a sensitivity of 90.0% and specificity of 96.8%. p16 and PTEN can aid in distinguishing between EC-3 and SC of the endometrium, and are superior to ER, PR, and p53 for this purpose. EC-3

  20. The role of colony-stimulating factor 1 and its receptor in the etiopathogenesis of endometrial adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Smith, H O; Anderson, P S; Kuo, D Y; Goldberg, G L; DeVictoria, C L; Boocock, C A; Jones, J G; Runowicz, C D; Stanley, E R; Pollard, J W

    1995-03-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) is a homodimeric growth factor that humorally regulates the growth and differentiation of mononuclear phagocytes, and locally regulates maternal-fetal interactions during pregnancy. It exerts these actions through a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R), the product of the c-fms proto-oncogene. Recent studies have demonstrated overexpression of CSF-1 and its receptor in breast, ovarian, and endometrial adenocarcinomas. To further investigate the possible role of CSF-1 and its receptor in the pathogenesis of endometrial adenocarcinoma, a prospective study was undertaken to study CSF-1 expression in benign and neoplastic endometrial epithelium and to compare serum CSF-1 levels in endometrial adenocarcinoma patients with healthy perimenopausal women. The mean serum levels of CSF-1 in 71 patients with endometrial cancer (4.9 +/- 1.8 microgram/liter) were significantly elevated compared with levels found in the 32 controls (3.5 +/- 1.1 microgram/liter). Within the endometrial adenocarcinoma group, circulating CSF-1 levels were significantly elevated in patients with large tumor volume, high grade, myometrial invasion, residual disease, and circulating CA-125 levels. High serum levels of serum CSF-1 were associated with elevated serum CA19-9 and CA-125 levels. Immunohistochemistry results revealed in tumor epithelium intense staining for CSF-1R (27 of 54 cases, 50%) and elevated staining for CSF-1 (41 of 54 cases, 75.9%), with intense staining of CSF-1 in 16 of 54 cases (29.6%). Staining was significantly greater in intensity and number of cells involved in malignant compared with benign epithelium for CSF-1R and CSF-1 (P = 0.05 and <0.0001, respectively). A positive correlation between amount and intensity of CSF-1 and CSF-1R staining in endometrial adenocarcinoma tissue was also demonstrated (P = 0.007). CSF-1 and CSF-1R mRNA was also detected in the tumor samples, confirming the

  1. Vitamin D and calcium intake in relation to risk of endometrial cancer: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Marjorie L.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Moore, Dirk F.; Kushi, Lawrence H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective In response to a recent ecologic study of UV exposure and endometrial cancer incidence, we present the epidemiologic evidence on the relation between intake of vitamin D and its metabolically related nutrient, calcium, and the occurrence of endometrial cancer. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis of vitamin D and calcium in relation to endometrial cancer, including peer-reviewed manuscripts published up to May 2007. Random and fixed effects summary estimates were computed. Results Pooled analyses of the three case-control studies of dietary vitamin D and endometrial cancer uncovered heterogeneous results that were not significant in random or fixed effects analyses. Cut-points for the highest vitamin D intakes ranged from >244 to >476 IU/day. Qualitatively similar findings were observed for dietary calcium. Only two studies provided estimates for calcium supplements (random effects OR=0.62, 95% CI 0.39–0.99; fixed effects OR=0.62, 95% CI 0.42–0.93, for top vs bottom category, p for heterogeneity=0.25). Conclusions The limited epidemiological evidence suggests no relation between endometrial cancer in the ranges of dietary vitamin D examined, and suggests a possible inverse association for calcium from supplements. Prospective studies, ideally including plasma 25(OH) D to estimate vitamin D input from diet and sun exposure, are needed to further explore these hypotheses. PMID:18155758

  2. Association Between Single Nucleotide Polymorphism +276G > T (rs1501299) in ADIPOQ and Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bieńkiewicz, Jan; Smolarz, Beata; Malinowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Current literature gives evidence of an indisputable role adiponectin plays in adipose tissue metabolism and obesity-related diseases. Moreover, latest research efforts focus on linking genetic markers of this adipocytokine's gene (ADIPOQ) with cancer. Aim of this study was to determine the genotype distribution of single nucleotide polymorphism +276G > T (rs1501299) in ADIPOQ and an attempt to identify the impact this polymorphism exerts on endometrial cancer risk in obese females. The test group comprised 90 women treated surgically for endometrial cancer between 2000 and 2012 in the Department of Surgical & Endoscopic Gynecology and Gynecologic Oncology, Polish Mothers' Memorial Hospital - Research Institute, Lodz, Poland. 90 individuals treated in the parallel period for uterine fibroids constituted the control group. Patients within both groups were stratified according to BMI into: lean, overweight and obese subjects. Statistical analysis was performed between two major groups and, furthermore, within the abovementioned subgroups. The analysis revealed that allele G of the investigated polymorphism in obese women with endometrial cancer is significantly more frequent, and allele T is significantly less frequent than in lean controls. However, no significant correlation was observed between the polymorphism and endometrial cancer in lean and overweight females. Single nucleotide polymorphism +276G > T (rs1501299) in ADIPOQ may be considered to be a risk factor of endometrial cancer. Further research on SNP in EC is warranted to obtain more conclusive outcomes. PMID:26386690

  3. Association Between Single Nucleotide Polymorphism +276G > T (rs1501299) in ADIPOQ and Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bieńkiewicz, Jan; Smolarz, Beata; Malinowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Current literature gives evidence of an indisputable role adiponectin plays in adipose tissue metabolism and obesity-related diseases. Moreover, latest research efforts focus on linking genetic markers of this adipocytokine's gene (ADIPOQ) with cancer. Aim of this study was to determine the genotype distribution of single nucleotide polymorphism +276G > T (rs1501299) in ADIPOQ and an attempt to identify the impact this polymorphism exerts on endometrial cancer risk in obese females. The test group comprised 90 women treated surgically for endometrial cancer between 2000 and 2012 in the Department of Surgical & Endoscopic Gynecology and Gynecologic Oncology, Polish Mothers' Memorial Hospital - Research Institute, Lodz, Poland. 90 individuals treated in the parallel period for uterine fibroids constituted the control group. Patients within both groups were stratified according to BMI into: lean, overweight and obese subjects. Statistical analysis was performed between two major groups and, furthermore, within the abovementioned subgroups. The analysis revealed that allele G of the investigated polymorphism in obese women with endometrial cancer is significantly more frequent, and allele T is significantly less frequent than in lean controls. However, no significant correlation was observed between the polymorphism and endometrial cancer in lean and overweight females. Single nucleotide polymorphism +276G > T (rs1501299) in ADIPOQ may be considered to be a risk factor of endometrial cancer. Further research on SNP in EC is warranted to obtain more conclusive outcomes.

  4. Polychlorinated biphenyls impair endometrial receptivity in vitro via regulating mir-30d expression and epithelial mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jia-Li; Liu, Lan-Lan; Hu, Yuqin; Jiang, Xiao-Ming; Qiu, Hui-Ling; Sha, Ai-Guo; Wang, Chong-Gang; Zuo, Zheng-Hong; Ren, Jian-Zhi

    2016-07-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous legacy persistent pollutants and epidemiological data showed that PCB burdens were associated with failed implantation in human. However, the mechanism how PCB exposure affects the embryo implantation is not clear. Using an in vitro model for human embryo implantation employing the human choriocarcinoma cell line JAR and the human endometrial cell line Ishikawa, we have shown that PCB mixture Aroclor 1254 at environmental-relevant concentrations (2.5, 12.5, and 62.5μM) dose-dependently impaired the endometrial receptivity by reducing the adhesion of JAR spheroid attachment and increasing the spheroid outgrowth. The receptive-up-regulated micro-RNA, mir-30d was also down-regulated in endometrial cells by the exposure. Following transient transfection of mir-30d mimic, the disrupted attachment and outgrowth of JAR spheroids was partially restored in the model. By measurement of cadherin switch and vimentin expression, the PCB exposure also activated epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in endometrial cells. In accordance, mir-30d mimic suppressed the EMT markers induced by PCBs. Luciferase reporter assay confirmed that the EMT regulator Snai1 was targeted by mir-30d, and the expression of Snai1 was dose-dependently up-regulated by PCB exposure. Taken together, our study revealed that PCBs may affect the receptivity of endometrial cells by impairing the interaction between receptivity-up-regulated microRNA and EMT process. PMID:27481218

  5. Heparin-Binding Epidermal Growth Factor and Its Receptors Mediate Decidualization and Potentiate Survival of Human Endometrial Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chobotova, Katya; Karpovich, Natalia; Carver, Janet; Manek, Sanjiv; Gullick, William J.; Barlow, David H.; Mardon, Helen J.

    2006-01-01

    Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) has pleiotropic biological functions in many tissues, including those of the female reproductive tract. It facilitates embryo development and mediates implantation and is thought to have a function in endometrial receptivity and maturation. The mature HB-EGF molecule manifests its activity as either a soluble factor (sol-HB-EGF) or a transmembrane precursor (tm-HB-EGF) and can bind two receptors, EGFR and ErbB4/HER4. In this study, we identify factors that modulate expression of HB-EGF, EGFR, and ErbB4 in endometrial stromal cells in vitro. We demonstrate that levels of sol- and tm-HB-EGF, EGFR, and ErbB4 are increased by cAMP, a potent inducer of decidualization of the endometrial stroma. We also show that production of sol- and tm-HB-EGF is differentially modulated by TNFα and TGFβ. Our data suggest that HB-EGF has a function in endometrial maturation in mediating decidualization and attenuating TNFα- and TGFβ-induced apoptosis of endometrial stromal cells. PMID:15562026

  6. The expression pattern of MUC1 glycoforms and other biomarkers of endometrial receptivity in fertile and infertile women.

    PubMed

    Horne, A W; Lalani, E-N; Margara, R A; Ryder, T A; Mobberley, M A; White, J O

    2005-10-01

    Changes in the surface epithelium of the endometrium, characterized in part by alterations in cell-surface molecules, sex steroid receptors and the appearance of pinopodes, coincide with the window of endometrial receptivity in the menstrual cycle. This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of hematoxylin and eosin staining, scanning and transmission microscopy, and MUC1 glycoform, sex steroid receptor, and interleukin receptor (type 1) expression as biomarkers of endometrial receptivity using carefully characterized clinical fertile and infertile groups of women. Using a combination of immunohistochemistry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) called scanning immunoelectron microscopy (SIM), we confirmed that MUC1 mucin was not associated with the endometrial pinopodes, which have been linked with embryo adhesion. We also showed that failure of embryo implantation was associated with an abnormal endometrial expression of MUC1 mucin, and retention of nuclear progesterone receptor (PR) particularly in epithelial cells. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), SEM in isolation and immunohistochemistry for interleukin receptor were not shown to be useful markers. Progesterone-dependent regulation of MUC1 appears to be an important factor in determining endometrial receptivity.

  7. Parabolic trend in endometrial thickness at embryo transfer in in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection cases with clinical pregnancy evidence.

    PubMed

    Lamanna, Giuseppina; Scioscia, Marco; Lorusso, Filomenamila; Serrati, Giuseppe; Selvaggi, Luigi E; Depalo, Raffaella

    2008-10-01

    Sonographic measurement of endometrial thickness at embryo transfer is thought to be a good predictor of the success of in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles because the clinical pregnancy rate increases as the endometrium thickens. Nevertheless, a retrospective analysis of a study population of 606 patients showed a decrease of clinical pregnancy rates in the setting of extreme endometrial thicknesses.

  8. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer

  9. The Kruppel-like factor 9 (KLF9) network in HEC-1-A endometrial carcinoma cells suggests the carcinogenic potential of dys-regulated KLF9 expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Krüppel-like factor 9 (KLF9) is a transcriptional regulator of uterine endometrial cell proliferation, adhesion and differentiation; processes essential for pregnancy success and which are subverted during tumorigenesis. The network of endometrial genes controlled by KLF9 is largely unknown. Over-...

  10. Age at menarche and endometrial cancer risk: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ting-Ting; Wang, Yong-Lai; Ma, Xiao-Xin

    2015-09-11

    Evidence between age at menarche and endometrial cancer risk have been controversial. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies to analyze the aforementioned association. Relevant studies were identified by searching PubMed and EMBASE databases until the end of June 2015. A random-effects model was used to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between menarcheal age and endometrial cancer risk. Our meta-analysis included eight prospective studies involving 4553 subjects with endometrial cancer. The summarized RRs of endometrial cancer for menarcheal age were 0.68 (95%CI = 0.58-0.81, I(2) = 41.9%, P = 0.099, n = 8) when comparing women with oldest category of menarcheal age with women with youngest category of menarcheal age. Notably, there was an 4% reduction in risk for per 2 years delay in menarcheal age (summarized RR = 0.96; 95%CI = 0.94-0.98, I(2) = 45.7%, P = 0.101, n = 6). Additionally, significant inverse associations were consistent within all stratified analyses. There was no evidence of publication bias or significant heterogeneity between subgroups detected by meta-regression analyses. Our findings support the hypothesis that late menarcheal age is inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk. Further larger prospective or pooled studies are warranted to fully adjust for potential confounders and distinguish whether the associations differ by histological subtypes of endometrial cancer.

  11. Genetic variation in the progesterone receptor gene and risk of endometrial cancer: a haplotype-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunjung; Hsu, Chris; Haiman, Christopher A.; Razavi, Pedram; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; Van Den Berg, David; Bernstein, Leslie; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E.; Setiawan, V. Wendy; Ursin, Giske

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is well established that estrogen increases endometrial cancer risk, whereas progesterone opposes the estrogen effects. The PROGINS allele of the progesterone receptor (PGR) gene reduces the function of PGR and has been associated with increased risk of the endometrioid type ovarian cancer. We investigated whether genetic variation in PGR is also associated with endometrial cancer risk using a haplotype-based approach. Methods: We pooled data from two endometrial cancer case–control studies that were nested within two prospective cohorts, the Multiethnic Cohort Study and the California Teachers Study. Seventeen haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across four linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks spanning the PGR locus were genotyped in 583 incident cases and 1936 control women. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) associated with each haplotype were estimated using conditional logistic regression, stratified by age and ethnicity. Results: Genetic variation in LD block 3 of the PGR locus was associated with endometrial cancer risk (Pglobal test = 0.002), with haplotypes 3C, 3D and 3F associated with 31–34% increased risk. Among whites (383 cases/840 controls), genetic variation in all four blocks was associated with increased endometrial cancer risk (Pglobal test = 0.010, 0.013, 0.005 and 0.020). Haplotypes containing the PROGINS allele and several haplotypes in blocks 1, 3 and 4 were associated with 34–77% increased risk among whites. SNP analyses for whites suggested that rs608995, partially linked to the PROGINS allele (r2 = 0.6), was associated with increased risk (OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.06–1.59). Conclusions: Our results suggest that genetic variation in the PGR region is associated with endometrial cancer risk. PMID:20547493

  12. KSR1 Is Overexpressed in Endometrial Carcinoma and Regulates Proliferation and TRAIL-Induced Apoptosis by Modulating FLIP Levels

    PubMed Central

    Llobet, David; Eritja, Nuria; Domingo, Monica; Bergada, Laura; Mirantes, Cristina; Santacana, Maria; Pallares, Judit; Macià, Anna; Yeramian, Andree; Encinas, Mario; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Palacios, Jose; Lewis, Robert E.; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavi

    2011-01-01

    The Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway participates in many processes altered in development and progression of cancer in human beings such as proliferation, transformation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Kinase suppressor of Ras 1 (KSR1) can interact with various kinases of the Raf/MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway to enhance its activation. The role of KSR1 in endometrial carcinogenesis was investigated. cDNA and tissue microarrays demonstrated that expression of KSR1 was up-regulated in endometrial carcinoma. Furthermore, inhibition of KSR1 expression by specific small hairpin RNA resulted in reduction of both proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth properties of endometrial cancer cells. Because inhibition of apoptosis has a pivotal role in endometrial carcinogenesis, the effects of KSR1 in regulation of tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)–induced apoptosis were investigated. KSR1 knock-down sensitized resistant endometrial cell lines to both TRAIL- and Fas-induced apoptosis. Sensitization to TRAIL and agonistic anti-Fas antibody was caused by down-regulation of FLIP (FLICE-inhibitory protein). Also investigated was the molecular mechanism by which KSR1 regulates FLIP protein levels. It was demonstrated that KSR1 small hairpin RNA did not affect FLIP transcription or degradation. Rather, FLIP down-regulation was caused by Fas-associated death domain protein–dependent inhibition of FLIP translation triggered after TRAIL stimulation in KSR1-silenced cells. Re-expression of heterologous KSR1 in cells with down-regulated endogenous KSR1 restored FLIP protein levels and TRAIL resistance. In conclusion, KSR1 regulates endometrial sensitivity to TRAIL by regulating FLIP levels. PMID:21435442

  13. Endometrial ablation in the management of abnormal uterine bleeding.

    PubMed

    Laberge, Philippe; Leyland, Nicholas; Murji, Ally; Fortin, Claude; Martyn, Paul; Vilos, George; Leyland, Nicholas; Wolfman, Wendy; Allaire, Catherine; Awadalla, Alaa; Dunn, Sheila; Heywood, Mark; Lemyre, Madeleine; Marcoux, Violaine; Potestio, Frank; Rittenberg, David; Singh, Sukhbir; Yeung, Grace

    2015-04-01

    Contexte : Les saignements utérins anormaux (SUA) sont directement à l’origine d’un fardeau de santé considérable que doivent porter les femmes, leur famille et la société en général. Jusqu’à 30 % des femmes chercheront à obtenir l’aide d’un médecin pour contrer ce problème au cours de leurs années de fertilité. Objectif : Fournir des lignes directrices factuelles à jour quant aux techniques et aux technologies utilisées aux fins de l’ablation de l’endomètre (AE), soit une intervention à effraction minimale permettant la prise en charge des SUA d’origine bénigne. Méthodes : Les membres du comité sur la directive clinique ont été sélectionnés en fonction de leurs spécialisations respectives en vue de représenter une gamme d’expériences pratiques et universitaires : le milieu de pratique au Canada, le type de pratique, la sous-spécialité et les antécédents généraux en gynécologie ont donc été pris en considération. Le comité a analysé les données pertinentes issues de la littérature médicale anglophone (y compris les lignes directrices publiées), en plus d’évaluer les issues chirurgicales et les issues qu’ont connues les patientes à la suite de l’utilisation de diverses techniques d’AE. Les recommandations ont été formulées par consensus. Données : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans MEDLINE et The Cochrane Library en 2013 et en 2014 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé et de mots clés appropriés (p. ex. « endometrial ablation », « hysteroscopy », « menorrhagia », « heavy menstrual bleeding », « AUB », « hysterectomy »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux études observationnelles et aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs publiés en anglais entre janvier 2000 et novembre 2014. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon r

  14. Oxidative damage of DNA induced by X-irradiation decreases the uterine endometrial receptivity which involves mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Liang, Jin-Xiao; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Chang; Liu, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Yan, Qiu

    2015-01-01

    X irradiation may lead to female infertility and the mechanism is still not clear. After X irradiation exposure, significantly morphological changes and functional decline in endometrial epithelial cells were observed. The mitochondrial and lysosomal dysfunction and oxidative DNA damage were noticed after X irradiation. In addition, pretreatment with NAC, NH4Cl or Pep A reduced the X irradiation induced damages. These studies demonstrate that the oxidative DNA damage which involved dysfunctional lysosomal and mitochondrial contribute to X irradiation-induced impaired receptive state of uterine endometrium and proper protective reagents can be helpful in improving endometrial function. PMID:26064230

  15. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D.; Rose, Brent S.; Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal; McHale, Michael T.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Vaida, Florin; Mell, Loren K.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  16. Nutrient-based dietary patterns and endometrial cancer risk: an Italian case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bravi, Francesca; Bertuccio, Paola; Turati, Federica; Serraino, Diego; Edefonti, Valeria; Dal Maso, Luigino; Decarli, Adriano; Montella, Maurizio; Zucchetto, Antonella; La Vecchia, Carlo; Bosetti, Cristina; Ferraroni, Monica

    2015-02-01

    Diet has been suggested to have a role on endometrial cancer risk, but few data are available on the role of dietary patterns on this neoplasm. A case-control study was carried out in Italy, including 454 women with endometrial cancer and 908 hospital controls admitted to the same hospitals for acute, non-neoplastic diseases. Dietary information was based on a reproducible and valid food frequency questionnaire. A posteriori dietary patterns were obtained using principal component factor analysis on 28 nutrients. Odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained from multiple logistic regression models conditioned on age and study center, and adjusted for major known confounding factors. Positive associations were found for the "Western-type diet" (OR=1.63, 95% CI: 1.12-2.38, for the highest versus the lowest quartile category) and the "Animal-derived nutrients and polyunsaturated fatty acids" patterns (OR=1.76, 95% CI: 1.23-2.52). The corresponding risk estimates among women with a body mass index ≥30 were 2.08 (95% CI: 0.92-4.69) and 2.30 (95% CI: 1.03-5.16) for the two patterns, respectively. No association was found for the other three patterns (i.e., "Vitamins and fiber", OR=0.96, 95% CI: 0.67-1.37, "Starch-rich", OR=0.99, 95% CI: 0.69-1.42, and "Other fats", OR=1.03, 95% CI: 0.70-1.52). This study indicates that dietary habits characterized by high intakes of animal products increase endometrial cancer risk, the association being appreciably stronger for obese women.

  17. A systematic review of tests for lymph node status in primary endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Selman, Tara J; Mann, Christopher H; Zamora, Javier; Khan, Khalid S

    2008-01-01

    Background The lymph node status of a patient is a key determinate in staging, prognosis and adjuvant treatment of endometrial cancer. Despite this, the potential additional morbidity associated with lymphadenectomy makes its role controversial. This study systematically reviews the accuracy literature on sentinel node biopsy; ultra sound scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computer tomography (CT) for determining lymph node status in endometrial cancer. Methods Relevant articles were identified form MEDLINE (1966–2006), EMBASE (1980–2006), MEDION, the Cochrane library, hand searching of reference lists from primary articles and reviews, conference abstracts and contact with experts in the field. The review included 18 relevant primary studies (693 women). Data was extracted for study characteristics and quality. Bivariate random-effect model meta-analysis was used to estimate diagnostic accuracy of the various index tests. Results MRI (pooled positive LR 26.7, 95% CI 10.6 – 67.6 and negative LR 0.29 95% CI 0.17 – 0.49) and successful sentinel node biopsy (pooled positive LR 18.9 95% CI 6.7 – 53.2 and negative LR 0.22, 95% CI 0.1 – 0.48) were the most accurate tests. CT was not as accurate a test (pooled positive LR 3.8, 95% CI 2.0 – 7.3 and negative LR of 0.62, 95% CI 0.45 – 0.86. There was only one study that reported the use of ultrasound scanning. Conclusion MRI and sentinel node biopsy have shown similar diagnostic accuracy in confirming lymph node status among women with primary endometrial cancer than CT scanning, although the comparisons made are indirect and hence subject to bias. MRI should be used in preference, in light of the ASTEC trial, because of its non invasive nature. PMID:18457596

  18. Outcome and Prognostic Factors in Endometrial Stromal Tumors: A Rare Cancer Network Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schick, Ulrike; Bolukbasi, Yasmin; Thariat, Juliette; Abdah-Bortnyak, Roxolyana; Kuten, Abraham; Igdem, Sefik; Caglar, Hale; Ozsaran, Zeynep; Loessl, Kristina; Schleicher, Ursula; Zwahlen, Daniel; Villette, Sylviane; Vees, Hansjoerg

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To provide further understanding regarding outcome and prognostic factors of endometrial stromal tumors (EST). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on the records of 59 women diagnosed with EST and treated with curative intent between 1983 and 2007 in the framework of the Rare Cancer Network. Results: Endometrial stromal sarcomas (ESS) were found in 44% and undifferentiated ESS (UES) in 49% of the cases. In 7% the grading was unclear. Of the total number of patients, 33 had Stage I, 4 Stage II, 20 Stage III, and 1 presented with Stage IVB disease. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 12 patients, all with UES. External-beam radiotherapy (RT) was administered postoperatively to 48 women. The median follow-up was 41.4 months. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 96.2% and 64.8% for ESS and UES, respectively, with a corresponding 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate of 49.4% and 43.4%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT was an independent prognostic factor for OS (p = 0.007) and DFS (p = 0.013). Locoregional control, DFS, and OS were significantly associated with age ({<=}60 vs. >60 years), grade (ESS vs. UES), and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage (I-II vs. III-IV). Positive lymph node staging had an impact on OS (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The prognosis of ESS differed from that of UES. Endometrial stromal sarcomas had an excellent 5-year OS, whereas the OS in UES was rather low. However, half of ESS patients had a relapse. For this reason, adjuvant treatment such as RT should be considered even in low-grade tumors. Multicenter randomized studies are still warranted to establish clear guidelines.

  19. Extracorporeal spread and its prognostic impact in stages I and II (FIGO) endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sakuragi, N; Tanaka, T; Satoh, C; Nishiya, M; Ohkouchi, T; Tsumura, N; Takeda, N; Hirahatake, K; Sagawa, T; Ohkubo, H

    1991-09-01

    Prognostic risk factors were statistically analyzed from the histopathologic data obtained from 90 Japanese women with stages I and II endometrial carcinoma treated surgically, including systemic retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, between June 1979 and June 1989. In stage Ia endometrial carcinoma, pelvic and paraaortic nodes metastasis were seen in 13.8(4/29)% and 0.0(0/19)% of patients, respectively. In stage Ib, the incidence of pelvic and paraaortic node metastasis was 25.6(11/43)% and 9.7(3/31)%, respectively. In stage II, the incidence was 38.9(7/18)% and 13.3(2/15)%, respectively. Prognosis of patients even with deep myometrial invasion (greater than or equal to 2/3) or G3 tumor was fairly good (5-year survival rate: 87.5% and 85.7%, respectively) if the disease was histologically confined to the uterine corpus. Once the tumor spread outside the corpus uteri, the survival rate of patients was strongly affected by the grade of the tumor, moderate to marked lymph-vascular space invasion of tumor cells, or tumor invading middle or outer third of myometrium (P less than 0.05 for each factor). In summary, endometrial cancer frequently metastasize to pelvic and paraaortic lymph nodes even in the early stages, and lymph node metastasis and other extracorporeal spread of disease have a serious impact on patient survival. Prognosis of patients with extracorporeal spread of disease seems to be determined by the high grade of tumor and lymph-vascular space invasion. These results suggest that surgical exploration including paraaortic lymph node dissection to accurately evaluate the extent of the disease is essential to estimate the patient's prognostic risk and to individualize the treatment schedule.

  20. Autophagy inhibition augments resveratrol-induced apoptosis in Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Tomohiko; Oda, Katsutoshi; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Sone, Kenbun; Inaba, Kanako; Ikeda, Yuji; Makii, Chinami; Miyasaka, Aki; Kashiyama, Tomoko; Tanikawa, Michihiro; Arimoto, Takahide; Yano, Tetsu; Kawana, Kei; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV), a polyphenolic compound derived from red wine, inhibits the proliferation of various types of cancer. RSV induces apoptosis in cancer cells, while enhancing autophagy. Autophagy promotes cancer cell growth by driving cellular metabolism, which may counteract the effect of RSV. The present study aimed to elucidate the correlation between RSV and autophagy and to examine whether autophagy inhibition may enhance the antitumor effect of RSV in endometrial cancer cells. Cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis were examined, following RSV exposure, by performing MTT assays, flow cytometry and annexin V staining, respectively, in an Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell line. Autophagy was evaluated by measuring the expression levels of light chain 3, II (LC3-II; an autophagy marker) by western blotting and immunofluorescence. Chloroquine (CQ) and small interfering RNAs targeting autophagy related (ATG) gene 5 (ATG5) or 7 (ATG7) were used to inhibit autophagy, and the effects in combination with RSV were assessed using MTT assays. RSV treatment suppressed cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in Ishikawa cells. In addition, RSV exposure increased the abundance of the sub-G1 population and induced apoptosis. LC3-II accumulation was observed following RSV treatment, indicating that RSV induced autophagy. Combination treatment with CQ and RSV more robustly suppressed growth inhibition and apoptosis, compared with RSV treatment alone. Knocking down ATG5 or ATG7 expression significantly augmented RSV-induced apoptosis. The results of the present study indicated that RSV-induced autophagy may counteract the antitumor effect of RSV in Ishikawa cells. Combination treatment with RSV and an autophagy inhibitor, such as CQ, may be an attractive therapeutic option for treating certain endometrial cancer cells. PMID:27698828

  1. Estrogen receptor-alpha as a predictive biomarker in endometrioid endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Backes, Floor J.; Walker, Christopher J.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Hade, Erinn M; Agarwal, Garima; Mutch, David; Cohn, David E.; Suarez, Adrian A.

    2016-01-01

    Background We sought to validate the prognostic significance of Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) expression and to investigate the relationship between ESR1 mutation status and outcomes in a large cohort of patients with endometrial cancer. We also investigated the predictive value of ERα for lymph node involvement in a large surgically staged cohort. Methods A tumor microarray (TMA) was constructed including only pure endometrioid adenocarcinomas, stained with ER50 monoclonal antibody, and assessed using digital image analysis. For mutation analysis, somatic DNA was extracted and sequenced for ESR1 gene hotspot regions. Differences in patient and tumor characteristics, recurrence and survival between ERα positive and negative, mutated and wild-type tumors were evaluated. Results Sixty (18.6%) tumors were negative for ERα. Absence of ERα was significantly associated with stage and grade, but not with disease-free or overall survival. ERα was a strong predictor of lymph node involvement (RR: 2.37, 95% CI: 1.12–5.02). Nineteen of 1034 tumors (1.8%) had an ESR1 hotspot mutation; twelve in hotspot 537Y, four in 538D and three in 536L. Patients with an ESR1 mutation had a significantly lower BMI, but were comparable in age, stage and grade, and progression-free survival. Conclusion Patients with ERα negative endometrioid endometrial cancer are more often diagnosed with higher grade and advanced stage disease. Lymph node involvement is more common with lack of ERα expression, and may be able to help triage which patients should undergo lymphadenectomy. Mutations in ESR1 might explain why some low risk women with low BMI develop endometrial cancer. PMID:26957478

  2. Chemotherapy Response Rates among Endometrial Cancer Patients with Elevated Serum Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Kizer, Nora T.; Hatem, Hatem; Nugent, Elizabeth K.; Zhou, Gongfu; Moore, Kathleen; Heller, Paul; Mutch, David G.; Thaker, Premal H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This retrospective study evaluates the influence of serum platelet count on chemotherapy response rates among women with endometrial cancer. Methods From three separate cancer centers, a total of 318 patients with endometrial cancer who received post-operative chemotherapy between June 1999 and October 2009 were retrospectively identified. Endometrioid, serous, clear cell, and carcinosarcoma histologies were included. Subjects were classified as having an elevated platelet count if their serum platelet count was greater than 400 × 109/L at the time of initial diagnosis. Primary outcome was chemotherapy response, classified as either complete or partial/refractory. Secondary outcomes were disease free and disease specific survival (DFS, DSS). Chi-square and Student t-tests were performed as appropriate. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess serum platelet effect on survival. Results There were 125 deaths, 76 recurrences, and 48 disease progressions. Of the total group, 53 (16.7%) were categorized as having an elevated platelet count. An elevated platelet count was associated with a lower chemotherapy response rate in univariate analysis (HR 2.8; 95% CI 1.46, 5.38; p <0.01). Multivariate analysis showed elevated platelets to be independently associated with decreased DFS (HR 2.24; 95% CI 1.26, 3.98; p<0.01) but not DSS (HR 1.03, 95%CI 0.56, 1.88, p=0.93). Conclusions Endometrial cancer patients with an elevated serum platelet count > 400 × 109/L may have lower chemotherapy response rates and are at increased risk for recurrence when compared to patients with a count within normal range. PMID:26098089

  3. Validation of endogenous control reference genes for normalizing gene expression studies in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ayakannu, Thangesweran; Taylor, Anthony H; Willets, Jonathon M; Brown, Laurence; Lambert, David G; McDonald, John; Davies, Quentin; Moss, Esther L; Konje, Justin C

    2015-09-01

    Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a powerful technique used for the relative quantification of target genes, using reference (housekeeping) genes for normalization to ensure the generation of accurate and robust data. A systematic examination of the suitability of endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in endometrial cancer tissues is absent. The aims of this study were therefore to identify and evaluate from the thirty-two possible reference genes from a TaqMan(®) array panel their suitability as an internal control gene. The mathematical software packages geNorm qBasePLUS identified Pumilio homolog 1 (Drosophila) (PUM1), ubiquitin C (UBC), phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK1), mitochondrial ribosomal protein L19 (MRPL19) and peptidylpropyl isomerase A (cyclophilin A) (PPIA) as the best reference gene combination, whilst NormFinder identified MRPL19 as the best single reference gene, with importin 8 (IPO8) and PPIA being the best combination of two reference genes. BestKeeper ranked MRPL19 as the most stably expressed gene. In addition, the study was validated by examining the relative expression of a test gene, which encodes the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). A significant difference in CB1 mRNA expression between malignant and normal endometrium using MRPL19, PPIA, and IP08 in combination was observed. The use of MRPL19, IPO8 and PPIA was identified as the best reference gene combination for the normalization of gene expression levels in endometrial carcinoma. This study demonstrates that the arbitrary selection of endogenous control reference genes for normalization in qRT-PCR studies of endometrial carcinoma, without validation, risks the production of inaccurate data and should therefore be discouraged.

  4. Endometrial gene expression of acute phase extracellular matrix components following estrogen disruption of pregnancy in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Morgan D; Ross, Jason W; Stein, Daniel; White, Frank; Geisert, Rodney D

    2010-12-01

    In pigs, administration of estrogen to gilts on Days 9 and 10 of pregnancy causes conceptus fragmentation and death between Days 15 and 18 of gestation. Conceptus degeneration is associated with breakdown of the microvilli surface glycocalyx on the lumenal epithelium (LE). We previously identified endometrial expression of inter-α-trypsin inhibitor (ITI) and hyaluronic acid (HA), which are key components of extracellular matrix (ECM), during the period of conceptus attachment to the uterine surface in the pig. Tumor necrosis factor-α-inducible protein-6 (TNFAIP6) serves as a linker for ECM expansion and is stimulated by prostaglandin E (PGE). We hypothesized that early estrogen administration alters the normal ECM components forming glycocalyx on the LE. Bred gilts (4 gilts/trt/day) were treated with either 5mg estradiol cypionate (E) or corn oil (CO) on Days 9 and 10 of gestation. The uterus was surgically removed on either Days 10, 12, 13, 15 and 17 of gestation and endometrial tissue snap frozen in liquid nitrogen. Endometrial tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF), TNFAIP6, interleukin 6 (IL6), and inter-α-trypsin inhibitor heavy chains (ITIH) were detected during early pregnancy thereby indicating all components for maintenance of the extracellular glycocalyx are present in the endometrium of pigs. However, only gene expression of ITIH2 was suppressed by E-treatment. TNFAIP6 protein was detected across all days of gestation but was not affected by E-treatment. The present study demonstrates that while the pig endometrium expresses key components of ECM only ITIH2 gene expression was altered by E-treatment. A decrease in ITIH2 could lead to the possible loss of the uterine glycocalyx leading to conceptus degeneration; however, other factors may be involved with the loss of glycocalyx during implantation in the pig following E-treatment.

  5. The Significance of Mismatch Repair Deficiency in Young Patients With Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chu, Mandy Man-Yee; Liu, Stephanie Si; Tam, Kar-Fai; Ip, Philip Pun-Ching; Cheung, Annie Nga-Yin; Ngan, Hextan Yuen-Sheung

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the tumor characteristics associated with mismatch repair deficiency in young patients with endometrial carcinoma. Young patients (45 yr old or younger) with endometrial carcinoma treated by hysterectomy in our institution between July 2001 and June 2009 were identified. The clinical and pathologic data were obtained by review of clinical records. Among the 122 cases identified, paraffin sections were available in 67 cases for immunohistochemical staining and frozen tissue available in 62 cases for microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis. Both paraffin sections and frozen tissue were available in 36 cases. Among the 67 cases with immunohistochemical staining, 22 (32.8%) showed loss of expression of at least 1 mismatch repair protein. Defective MLH1 or MSH2 expression was associated with poor prognostic factors, including a higher incidence of pelvic lymph nodes metastasis (P=0.018) and higher stage (P=0.022) for MLH1, and an increased risk of lymphovascular permeation (P=0.015) for MSH2. On the contrary, defective MSH6 protein expression was associated with a lower incidence of high-grade tumors (P=0.04). Among the 62 cases with MSI analysis, 12 (19.4%) tumors were classified as microsatellite-high (MSI-H), whereas 2 (3.2%) were classified as microsatellite-low (MSI-L). There was no difference in the pathologic characteristics between MSI-stable and MSI-H tumor. We concluded that defective mismatch repair expression is important in young patients with endometrial carcinoma, with MSH6 protein being most commonly affected. The phenotype resulting from defective MSH6 expression was different from that caused by MLH1 or MSH2 loss.

  6. Dosimetric and toxicity comparison between prone and supine position IMRT for endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beriwal, Sushil . E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu; Jain, Sheena K.; Heron, Dwight E.; De Andrade, Regiane S.; Lin, Chyonghiou J.; Kim, Hayeon

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the dosimetric and toxicity differences between prone and supine position intensity-modulate radiotherapy in endometrial cancer patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods: Forty-seven consecutive endometrial cancer patients treated with adjuvant RT were analyzed. Of these, 21 were treated in prone position and 26 in the supine position. Dose-volume histograms for normal tissue structures and targets were compared between the two groups. Acute and chronic toxicity were also compared between the cohorts. Results: The percentage of volume receiving 10, 20, 30, 40, 45, and 50 Gy for small bowel was 89.5%, 69%, 33%, 12.2%, 5%, and 0% in the prone group and 87.5%, 62.7%, 26.4%, 8%, 4.3%, and 0% in the supine group, respectively. The difference was not statistically significant. The dose-volume histograms for bladder and rectum were also comparable, except for a slightly greater percentage of volume receiving 10 Gy (1.5%) and 20 Gy (5%) for the rectum in the prone group. Acute small bowel toxicities were Grade 1 in 7 patients and Grade 2 in 14 patients in the prone group vs. Grade 1 in 6 patients and Grade 2 in 19 patients in the supine group. Chronic toxicity was Grade 1 in 7 patients and Grade 3 in 1 patient in the prone group and Grade 1 in 5 patients in the supine group. Conclusion: These preliminary results suggest that no difference exists in the dose to the normal tissue and toxicity between prone and supine intensity-modulated radiotherapy for endometrial cancer. Longer follow-up and more outcome studies are needed to determine whether any differences exist between the two approaches.

  7. Perturbing the Cellular Levels of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 Impairs Murine Endometrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Szwarc, Maria M.; Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Wu, San-Pin; Tsai, Sophia Y.; Tsai, Ming-Jer; O’Malley, Bert W.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.

    2014-01-01

    As pleiotropic coregulators, members of the p160/steroid receptor coactivator (SRC) family control a broad spectrum of transcriptional responses that underpin a diverse array of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Because of their potent coregulator properties, strict controls on SRC expression levels are required to maintain normal tissue functionality. Accordingly, an unwarranted increase in the cellular levels of SRC members has been causally linked to the initiation and/or progression of a number of clinical disorders. Although knockout mouse models have underscored the critical non-redundant roles for each SRC member in vivo, there are surprisingly few mouse models that have been engineered to overexpress SRCs. This deficiency is significant since SRC involvement in many of these disorders is based on unscheduled increases in the levels (rather than the absence) of SRC expression. To address this deficiency, we used recent mouse technology that allows for the targeted expression of human SRC-2 in cells which express the progesterone receptor. Through cre-loxP recombination driven by the endogenous progesterone receptor promoter, a marked elevation in expression levels of human SRC-2 was achieved in endometrial cells that are positive for the progesterone receptor. As a result of this increase in coregulator expression, female mice are severely subfertile due to a dysfunctional uterus, which exhibits a hypersensitivity to estrogen exposure. Our findings strongly support the proposal from clinical observations that increased levels of SRC-2 are causal for a number of endometrial disorders which compromise fertility. Future studies will use this mouse model to decipher the molecular mechanisms that underpin the endometrial defect. We believe such mechanistic insight may provide new molecular descriptors for diagnosis, prognosis, and/or therapy in the clinical management of female infertility. PMID:24905738

  8. Pharmacokinetics of orbifloxacin and its concentration in body fluids and in endometrial tissues of mares.

    PubMed

    Haines, G R; Brown, M P; Gronwall, R R; Merritt, K A; Baltzley, L K

    2001-07-01

    Pharmacokinetics and distribution of orbifloxacin into body fluids and endometrium was studied in 6 mares after intragastric (IG) administration at a single dose rate of 7.5 mg/kg body weight. Orbifloxacin concentrations were serially measured in serum, synovial fluid, peritoneal fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and endometrial tissues over 24 hours. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of orbifloxacin were determined for 120 equine pathogens over an 11-month period. The mean peak serum concentration (Cmax) was 2.41+/-0.30 microg/mL at 1.5 hours after administration and decreased to 0.17+/-0.01 microg/mL (Cmin) at 24 hours. The mean elimination half-life (t1/2) was 9.06+/-1.33 hours and area under the serum concentration vs time curve (AUC) was 20.54+/-1.70 mg h/L. Highest mean peritoneal fluid concentration was 2.15+/-0.49 microg/mL at 2 hours. Highest mean synovial fluid concentration was 1.17+/-0.28 microg/mL at 4 hours. Highest mean urine concentration was 536.67+/-244.79 microg/mL at 2 hours. Highest mean endometrial concentration was 0.72+/-0.23 microg/g at 1.5 hours. Mean CSF concentration was 0.46+/-0.55 microg/mL at 3 hours. The minimum inhibitory concentration of orbifloxacin required to inhibit 90% of isolates (MIC90) ranged from < or = 0.12 to > 8.0 microg/mL, with gram-negative organisms being more sensitive than gram-positive organisms. Orbifloxacin was uniformly absorbed in the 6 mares and was well distributed into body fluids and endometrial tissue. At a dosage of 7.5 mg/kg once a day, many gram-negative pathogens, such as Actinobacillus equuli, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella spp., and Salmonella spp. would be expected to be susceptible to orbifloxacin.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of orbifloxacin and its concentration in body fluids and in endometrial tissues of mares.

    PubMed Central

    Haines, G R; Brown, M P; Gronwall, R R; Merritt, K A; Baltzley, L K

    2001-01-01

    Pharmacokinetics and distribution of orbifloxacin into body fluids and endometrium was studied in 6 mares after intragastric (IG) administration at a single dose rate of 7.5 mg/kg body weight. Orbifloxacin concentrations were serially measured in serum, synovial fluid, peritoneal fluid, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and endometrial tissues over 24 hours. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of orbifloxacin were determined for 120 equine pathogens over an 11-month period. The mean peak serum concentration (Cmax) was 2.41+/-0.30 microg/mL at 1.5 hours after administration and decreased to 0.17+/-0.01 microg/mL (Cmin) at 24 hours. The mean elimination half-life (t1/2) was 9.06+/-1.33 hours and area under the serum concentration vs time curve (AUC) was 20.54+/-1.70 mg h/L. Highest mean peritoneal fluid concentration was 2.15+/-0.49 microg/mL at 2 hours. Highest mean synovial fluid concentration was 1.17+/-0.28 microg/mL at 4 hours. Highest mean urine concentration was 536.67+/-244.79 microg/mL at 2 hours. Highest mean endometrial concentration was 0.72+/-0.23 microg/g at 1.5 hours. Mean CSF concentration was 0.46+/-0.55 microg/mL at 3 hours. The minimum inhibitory concentration of orbifloxacin required to inhibit 90% of isolates (MIC90) ranged from < or = 0.12 to > 8.0 microg/mL, with gram-negative organisms being more sensitive than gram-positive organisms. Orbifloxacin was uniformly absorbed in the 6 mares and was well distributed into body fluids and endometrial tissue. At a dosage of 7.5 mg/kg once a day, many gram-negative pathogens, such as Actinobacillus equuli, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella spp., and Salmonella spp. would be expected to be susceptible to orbifloxacin. PMID:11480524

  10. Clinical significance of COX-2, GLUT-1 and VEGF expressions in endometrial cancer tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaoping; Hui, Yuzuo; Lin, Li; Wu, Yu; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Peishu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical significance of COX-2, GLUT-1 and VEGF expressions in endometrial cancer tissues. Methods: One hundred and eight tissue samples from the patients with endometrial cancer enrolled in our hospital from August 2011 to July 2014 were selected, including 60 normal tissue samples (normal group), 60 neoplastic tissue samples (neoplastic group) and 60 cancer tissue samples (cancer group). All the samples were subjected to immunohistochemical assay to detect the expressions of COX-2, GLUT-1 and VEGF. The clinical data were also investigated for correlation analysis. Results: The positive rates of COX-2 in normal group, neoplastic group and cancer groups were 3.3%, 21.7% and 55.0% respectively. The positive rates of GLUT-1 in normal group, neoplastic group and cancer groups were 3.3%, 25.0% and 70.0% respectively. The positive rates of VEGF in normal group, neoplastic group and cancer groups were 1.7%, 23.3% and 63.3% respectively. With increasing stage of such cancer, decreasing degree of differentiation and lymphatic metastasis, the positive expression rates of COX-2, GLUT-1 and VEGF proteins were raised significantly (P<0.05). Spearman’s correlation analysis showed that the expressions of COX-2 and GLUT-1 (r=0.207, P<0.05), COX-2 and VEGF (r=0.243, P<0.05), as well as GLUT-1 and VEGF (r=0.758, P<0.05) were positively correlated. Conclusion: COX-2, GLUT-1 and VEGF were highly prominent in endometrial cancer, especially in the patients with low degree of differentiation, late stage and metastasis. They functioned synergistically in the onset and progression of this cancer. PMID:26101475

  11. Clinical outcomes of stage I endometrial carcinoma patients treated with surgery alone: Siriraj Hospital experiences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the recurrence rates and patterns of failure in patients with stage I endometrial carcinoma after surgical staging without adjuvant therapy. Methods Medical records of 229 patients with stage I endometrial carcinoma, treated with surgery alone between 2002 and 2010 at Siriraj Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. The primary objective of this study was recurrence rates. The secondary objectives were patterns of failure, disease-free survival, overall survival, and prognostic factors related to outcomes. Results During median follow-up time of 53.3 months, 11 recurrences (4.8%) occurred with a median time to recurrence of 21.2 months (range, 7.7 to 77.8 months). Vaginal recurrence was the most common pattern of failure (8/11 patients, 72.7%). Other recurrences were pelvic, abdominal and multiple metastases. Factors that appeared to be prognostic factors on univariate analyses were age and having high intermediate risk (HIR) (Gynecologic Oncology Group [GOG] 99 criteria), none of which showed significance in multivariate analysis. The recurrence rates were higher in the patients with HIR criteria (22.2% vs. 4.1%, p=0.013) or patients with stage IB, grade 2 endometrioid carcinoma (9.4% vs. 4.3%, p=0.199). Five-year disease-free survival and 5-year overall survival were 93.9% (95% CI, 89.9 to 5.86) and 99.5% (95% CI, 97.0 to 99.9), respectively. Conclusion The patients with low risk stage I endometrial carcinoma had excellent outcomes with surgery alone. Our study showed that no single factor was demonstrated to be an independent predictor for recurrence. PMID:27329196

  12. Adjuvant paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy with involved field radiation in advanced endometrial cancer: A sequential approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lupe, Krystine; Kwon, Janice . E-mail: Janice.kwon@lhsc.on.ca; D'Souza, David; Gawlik, Christine; Stitt, Larry; Whiston, Frances; Nascu, Patricia; Wong, Eugene; Carey, Mark S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of adjuvant paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy interposed with involved field radiotherapy for women with advanced endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a prospective cohort study of women with Stage III and IV endometrial cancer. Adjuvant therapy consisted of 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) and carboplatin (350 mg/m{sup 2}) every 3 weeks, followed sequentially by external beam radiotherapy (RT) to the pelvis (45 Gy), followed by an additional two cycles of chemotherapy. Para-aortic RT and/or HDR vault brachytherapy (BT) were added at the discretion of the treating physician. Results: Thirty-three patients (median age, 63 years) received treatment between April 2002 and June 2005. Median follow-up was 21 months. Stage distribution was as follows: IIIA (21%), IIIC (70%), IVB (9%). Combination chemotherapy was successfully administered to 30 patients (91%) and 25 patients (76%), before and after RT respectively. Nine patients (27%) experienced acute Grade 3 or 4 chemotherapy toxicities. All patients completed pelvic RT; 19 (58%) received standard 4-field RT and 14 (42%) received intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Ten (30%) received extended field radiation. Four patients (12%) experienced acute Grade 3 or 4 RT toxicities. Six (18%) patients developed chronic RT toxicity. There were no treatment-related deaths. Two-year disease-free and overall survival rates were both 55%. There was only one pelvic relapse (3%). Conclusions: Adjuvant treatment with combination chemotherapy interposed with involved field radiation in advanced endometrial cancer was well tolerated. This protocol may be suitable for further evaluation in a clinical trial.

  13. Autophagy inhibition augments resveratrol-induced apoptosis in Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Tomohiko; Oda, Katsutoshi; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Sone, Kenbun; Inaba, Kanako; Ikeda, Yuji; Makii, Chinami; Miyasaka, Aki; Kashiyama, Tomoko; Tanikawa, Michihiro; Arimoto, Takahide; Yano, Tetsu; Kawana, Kei; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV), a polyphenolic compound derived from red wine, inhibits the proliferation of various types of cancer. RSV induces apoptosis in cancer cells, while enhancing autophagy. Autophagy promotes cancer cell growth by driving cellular metabolism, which may counteract the effect of RSV. The present study aimed to elucidate the correlation between RSV and autophagy and to examine whether autophagy inhibition may enhance the antitumor effect of RSV in endometrial cancer cells. Cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis were examined, following RSV exposure, by performing MTT assays, flow cytometry and annexin V staining, respectively, in an Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell line. Autophagy was evaluated by measuring the expression levels of light chain 3, II (LC3-II; an autophagy marker) by western blotting and immunofluorescence. Chloroquine (CQ) and small interfering RNAs targeting autophagy related (ATG) gene 5 (ATG5) or 7 (ATG7) were used to inhibit autophagy, and the effects in combination with RSV were assessed using MTT assays. RSV treatment suppressed cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in Ishikawa cells. In addition, RSV exposure increased the abundance of the sub-G1 population and induced apoptosis. LC3-II accumulation was observed following RSV treatment, indicating that RSV induced autophagy. Combination treatment with CQ and RSV more robustly suppressed growth inhibition and apoptosis, compared with RSV treatment alone. Knocking down ATG5 or ATG7 expression significantly augmented RSV-induced apoptosis. The results of the present study indicated that RSV-induced autophagy may counteract the antitumor effect of RSV in Ishikawa cells. Combination treatment with RSV and an autophagy inhibitor, such as CQ, may be an attractive therapeutic option for treating certain endometrial cancer cells.

  14. Endometrial adenocarcinoma in young patients: evaluation and fertility-preserving treatment.

    PubMed

    Benshushan, Abraham

    2004-12-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common female pelvic malignancy in the US. Although it is primarily a disease of the postmenopausal female, 25% of patients are premenopausal, with 3-5% in women 40 years old or younger. The younger group of women with endometrial carcinoma are frequently nulligravid with a history of infertility, and a strong desire to preserve fertility. This may pose a therapeutic dilemma for both patients and treating physicians. Medical treatment for young patients with grade 1 endometrial carcinoma who wish to preserve fertility is a reasonable and appealing option. A comprehensive evaluation prior to counseling the patient should include. A complete history and physical examination. A formal D&C with review of histology with an experienced gyn-onc pathologist. Evaluation of the pelvic and abdomen preferably with contrast-enhanced MRI or transvaginal ultrasound. In patients found to have a clinical stage I grade 1 tumor and who want to preserve fertility, thorough counseling including risks and benefits, and explanation that the data is partial and incomplete due to the lack of appropriate controlled studies is mandatory. In patients considered for medical treatment, a high dose progestin regimen should be started with endometrial sampling every 3 months until complete regression of the tumor is documented. For patients willing to conceive at this stage, treatment options should be discussed. In women who do not want pregnancy at this stage, a maintenance treatment with oral contraceptive agent or Depo-provera (medroxyprogesterone acetate 150 mg i.m. q 12 weeks) should be recommended, with periodic ultrasound evaluation of the endometrium. When the patient finishes her fertility plans, the option of hysterectomy should be considered. Although most responses are long standing, there is a small risk of progression during or after cessation of progestin therapy.

  15. [Electronmicroscopical aspects of endometrial distrophy induced by oral contraceptives (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gómez, F; Merchan, J; Caballero-Peregrin, P; Aldama Magnet, J

    1975-01-01

    An electron-optical study on the endometrium of 5 controls and 25 patients subjected during 3-12 months to 0.25 mg norgestrel + 0.05 mg etinil-estradiol association treatment is performed. The most prominent electronmicroscopical features of endometrial changes are described, such as the asynchronical maturation of the epithelium and the stroma, the shorthening of the proliferative and secretory phases and the epithelial involution towards the last days of the cycle. Special emphasis is placed on the zonal distribution of these changes. An increase of the nostocitosis phenomena is reported and its significance as a complementary contraceptive mechanism is discussed.

  16. The role of radiation therapy in uterine-confined endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Boyle, John M; Diavolitsis, Virginia M; Small, William

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of endometrial cancer begins with surgery, including total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, peritoneal lavage, and a consideration for lymph node evaluation. Selection of adjuvant therapy is based on an approximation of the risk of recurrence with features such as stage, tumor histology, lymphovascular space invasion, and patient age. The role of adjuvant radiation therapy in patients with intermediate risk of recurrence is a matter of ongoing controversy. Several randomized trials indicate that adjuvant radiation therapy improves loco-regional control. However, the ideal form of radiation therapy in these patients continues to be under debate.

  17. Endometrial and ovarian carcinomas with undifferentiated components: clinically aggressive and frequently underrecognized neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tafe, Laura J; Garg, Karuna; Chew, Ivy; Tornos, Carmen; Soslow, Robert A

    2010-06-01

    Carcinomas of the endometrium and ovary with undifferentiated components are uncommon neoplasms that are likely underdiagnosed. They are important to recognize as they have been shown to be clinically aggressive. We identified 32 carcinomas with undifferentiated components as defined by Silva and co-workers, 26 endometrial and 6 of ovarian origin. The patient age ranged from 21 to 76 years (median 55); 40% of patients were endometrial and 83% of ovarian carcinomas with undifferentiated components) presented at advanced stages (FIGO III-IV). Pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes were the most frequent sites of metastases. Twenty tumors, entirely undifferentiated, consisted of sheets of dyshesive, ovoid cells with uniform, large vesicular nuclei, whereas 12 tumors contained combinations of differentiated endometrioid adenocarcinoma with undifferentiated components. Although most undifferentiated tumors had a monotonous cytologic appearance without prominent stroma, six showed focal nuclear pleomorphism and eight cases had variably sized zones of rhabdoid cells in a background of myxoid stroma. The tumors were frequently misdiagnosed; they received a wide range of diagnoses, including FIGO grade 2 or 3 endometrioid carcinoma, carcinosarcoma, high-grade sarcoma including endometrial stromal sarcoma, neuroendocrine carcinoma, lymphoma, granulosa cell tumor and epithelioid sarcoma. Up to 86% of the cases showed focal, but strong keratin and/or epithelial membrane antigen staining, with CK18 being the most frequently positive keratin stain. They were predominantly negative for neuroendocrine markers, smooth muscle markers and estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor. Mismatch repair protein expression by immunohistochemistry was evaluated in 17 cases, and 8 (47%) were abnormal (7 with loss of MLH1/PMS2 and 1 with MSH6 loss). Follow-up was available for 27 patients, although it was very short in many cases, ranging from 0.5 to 89

  18. Two Cases of Endometrial Cancer in Twin Sisters with Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We describe two cases of endometrial cancer (EC) occurring in nulligravid twin sisters with myotonic dystrophy. Both tested negative for Lynch syndrome and both were treated with laparoscopic hysterectomy with bilateral salpingooophorectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. Although EC tends to run in families, the diagnosis in itself is not considered sufficient cause for screening or prophylactic measures in close relatives. However, the presence of additional risk factors, such as nulligravidity and myotonic dystrophy in the underlying cases, may call for extra vigilance in first-degree family members. PMID:27595026

  19. Effect of luteal-phase support on endometrial microRNA expression following controlled ovarian stimulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies suggested that microRNAs influence cellular activities in the uterus including cell differentiation and embryo implantation. In assisted reproduction cycles, luteal phase support, given to improve endometrial characteristics and to facilitate the implantation process, has been a standard practice. The effect of different types of luteal phase support using steroid hormones in relation to endometrial miRNA profiles during the peri-implantation period has not seen described. This study was designed to evaluate the expression of miRNAs during the luteal phase following controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF and the influence of different luteal phase support protocols on miRNA profiles. Methods The study was approved by the Johns Hopkins Hospital Institutional Review Board. Endometrial biopsies were obtained on the day of oocyte retrieval from 9 oocyte donors (group I). An additional endometrial biopsy was obtained 3–5 days later (Group II) after the donors were randomized into three groups. Group IIa had no luteal-phase support, group IIb had luteal support with micronized progesterone (P), and Group IIc had luteal support with progesterone plus 17-beta-estradiol (P + E). Total RNA was isolated and microarray analysis was performed using an Illumina miRNA expression panel. Results A total of 526 miRNAs were identified. Out of those, 216 miRNAs were differentially regulated (p < 0.05) between the comparison groups. As compared to the day of retrieval, 19, 11 and 6 miRNAs were differentially regulated more than 2 fold in the groups of no support, in the P support only, and in the P + E support respectively, 3–5 days after retrieval. During the peri-implantation period (3–5 days after retrieval) the expression of 33 and 6 miRNAs increased, while the expression of 3 and 0 miRNAs decreased, in the P alone and in the P + E group respectively as compared to the no steroid supplementation group. Conclusion Luteal support

  20. Relationships between Circulating Urea Concentrations and Endometrial Function in Postpartum Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhangrui; Oguejiofor, Chike F.; Swangchan-Uthai, Theerawat; Carr, Susan; Wathes, D. Claire

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Dairy cows fed high levels of protein to increase milk yield tend to have reduced fertility but the reasons behind this are unclear. Differing dietary protein levels are reflected in altered urea concentrations in both blood and other tissues including the uterus. We showed that the circulating urea concentration was highly correlated to changed expression levels of many genes in the endometrium shortly after calving. These were predominantly associated with tissue repair, innate immunity and lipid metabolism. A subsequent study found no effect of altered urea concentration on endometrial gene expression in vitro implying that the dietary influence is indirect. Abstract Both high and low circulating urea concentrations, a product of protein metabolism, are associated with decreased fertility in dairy cows through poorly defined mechanisms. The rate of involution and the endometrial ability to mount an adequate innate immune response after calving are both critical for subsequent fertility. Study 1 used microarray analysis to identify genes whose endometrial expression 2 weeks postpartum correlated significantly with the mean plasma urea per cow, ranging from 3.2 to 6.6 mmol/L. The biological functions of 781 mapped genes were analysed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. These were predominantly associated with tissue turnover (e.g., BRINP1, FOXG1), immune function (e.g., IL17RB, CRISPLD2), inflammation (e.g., C3, SERPINF1, SERPINF2) and lipid metabolism (e.g., SCAP, ACBD5, SLC10A). Study 2 investigated the relationship between urea concentration and expression of 6 candidate genes (S100A8, HSP5A, IGF1R, IL17RB, BRINP1, CRISPLD2) in bovine endometrial cell culture. These were treated with 0, 2.5, 5.0 or 7.5 mmol/L urea, equivalent to low, medium and high circulating values with or without challenge by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS increased S100A8 expression as expected but urea treatment had no effect on expression of any tested gene

  1. Efficacy of systematic pelvic lymphadenectomy in endometrial cancer (MRC ASTEC trial): a randomised study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) is the standard surgery for stage I endometrial cancer. Systematic pelvic lymphadenectomy has been used to establish whether there is extra-uterine disease and as a therapeutic procedure; however, randomised trials need to be done to assess therapeutic efficacy. The ASTEC surgical trial investigated whether pelvic lymphadenectomy could improve survival of women with endometrial cancer. Methods From 85 centres in four countries, 1408 women with histologically proven endometrial carcinoma thought preoperatively to be confined to the corpus were randomly allocated by a minimisation method to standard surgery (hysterectomy and BSO, peritoneal washings, and palpation of para-aortic nodes; n=704) or standard surgery plus lymphadenectomy (n=704). The primary outcome measure was overall survival. To control for postsurgical treatment, women with early-stage disease at intermediate or high risk of recurrence were randomised (independent of lymph-node status) into the ASTEC radiotherapy trial. Analysis was by intention to treat. This study is registered, number ISRCTN 16571884. Findings After a median follow-up of 37 months (IQR 24–58), 191 women (88 standard surgery group, 103 lymphadenectomy group) had died, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1·16 (95% CI 0·87–1·54; p=0·31) in favour of standard surgery and an absolute difference in 5-year overall survival of 1% (95% CI −4 to 6). 251 women died or had recurrent disease (107 standard surgery group, 144 lymphadenectomy group), with an HR of 1·35 (1·06–1·73; p=0·017) in favour of standard surgery and an absolute difference in 5-year recurrence-free survival of 6% (1–12). With adjustment for baseline characteristics and pathology details, the HR for overall survival was 1·04 (0·74–1·45; p=0·83) and for recurrence-free survival was 1·25 (0·93–1·66; p=0·14). Interpretation Our results show no evidence of benefit in terms of overall

  2. Maternal placenta-like endometrial hyperplasia in a beagle dog (Canine deciduoma).

    PubMed

    Koguchi, A; Nomura, K; Fujiwara, T; Kawai, Y; Okaniwa, A

    1995-07-01

    Three thumb-sized segmental swellings were found in both uterine horns of a 15 month-old, non-pregnant and non-pseudopregnant female beagle dog. Histopathological examination of the uterus revealed a marked proliferation of the endometrium that was characterized by two distinct parts, an inner tightly-folded banded layer and an outer dilated spongy layer, quite similar to the maternal placenta except for the fetus and chorion in the lumen. Because the plasma level of progesterone was unusually high at autopsy, this hormonal disorder might be related to the pathogenesis of the endometrial hyperplasia in the present case.

  3. A case of advanced-stage endometrial stromal sarcoma of the ovary arising from endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Back, Ju A; Choi, Myeong Gyune; Ju, U Chul; Kang, Woo Dae

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) is a rare malignancy. Development of extrauterine ESS form endometriosis is particularly rare. The majority of extrauterine ESS occurs in areas with preexisting endometriosis. The most common site is the ovary. We experienced a case of ESS of the ovary that arose from endometriosis with multiple disseminated lesions. This disease was managed by total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, both pelvic lymph nodes dissection, omentectomy, and appendectomy followed by postoperative high-dose progesterone therapy. Here, we report this case with literature review. PMID:27462602

  4. The role of radiation therapy in uterine-confined endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Boyle, John M; Diavolitsis, Virginia M; Small, William

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of endometrial cancer begins with surgery, including total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, peritoneal lavage, and a consideration for lymph node evaluation. Selection of adjuvant therapy is based on an approximation of the risk of recurrence with features such as stage, tumor histology, lymphovascular space invasion, and patient age. The role of adjuvant radiation therapy in patients with intermediate risk of recurrence is a matter of ongoing controversy. Several randomized trials indicate that adjuvant radiation therapy improves loco-regional control. However, the ideal form of radiation therapy in these patients continues to be under debate. PMID:24673950

  5. inv(12)(p11.2q13) in an endometrial polyp.

    PubMed

    Walter, T A; Fan, S X; Medchill, M T; Berger, C S; Decker, H J; Sandberg, A A

    1989-08-01

    A benign endometrial polyp from a 50-year-old postmenopausal woman has been cytogenetically investigated. A single clonal karyotypic anomaly, inv(12)(p11.2q13), was found in about 30% of cells analyzed after short-term culture. This finding contributes further to the hypothesis that the chromosomal segment 12q13-q14, which is also involved in chromosomal rearrangements in uterine leiomyomas, pleomorphic adenomas of the salivary glands, lipomas, and myxoid liposarcomas, contains a gene or genes that are related to cellular proliferation rather than to malignant transformation.

  6. Differences in estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in endometrial polyps and atrophic endometrium of postmenopausal women with and without exposure to tamoxifen

    PubMed Central

    LEÃO, ROGERIO BARROS FERREIRA; ANDRADE, LILIANA; VASSALO, JOSE; ANTUNES, ARMANDO; PINTO-NETO, AARÃO; COSTA-PAIVA, LUCIA

    2013-01-01

    Postmenopausal women who use tamoxifen present with an increased incidence of endometrial alterations, such as polyps and hyperplasia, in addition to a higher risk of malignant endometrial neoplasms. Among these endometrial changes, polyps are the most common, with a pathogenesis associated with hormonal influence. The objective of this study was to compare the expression of estrogen receptors (ERs) and progesterone receptors (PRs) in endometrial polyps from tamoxifen users with that in endometrial polyps and the atrophic endometrium of postmenopausal tamoxifen non-users. Among women undergoing surgical hysteroscopy, 84 tamoxifen users with benign endometrial polyps were selected. This group was compared to 84 samples of atr