Science.gov

Sample records for del hematoma intracraneal

  1. Intracraneal complications after raquis surgery.

    PubMed

    Sierra, J J; Malillos, M

    2017-07-07

    Intracraneal bleeding is a rare complication after raquis surgery. It is believed to occur as a drop in the intracraneal pressure after a loss of CSF secondary to an iatrogenic dural tear. We report a patient who after surgery for lumbar stenosis presented a subarachnoid haemorrhage, an intraparenchymal haematoma, and a subdural haematoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature with such complications after this type of surgery. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Intracranial Hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... one that causes only a brief lapse of consciousness (concussion) — can be minor, an intracranial hematoma is ... Increasing headache Vomiting Drowsiness and progressive loss of consciousness Dizziness Confusion Unequal pupil size Slurred speech As ...

  3. Intracranial Hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... vessel ruptures within your brain or between your skull and your brain. The collection of blood (hematoma) ... slide forcefully against the inner wall of your skull and become bruised. Although some head injuries — such ...

  4. Subdural Hematoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    greater than 21 days old. They have a tendency to present in older patients and after non- accidental trauma in children and may be associated with...of head trauma. In children, chronic subdural hematoma may be caused by unrecognized or unreported accidental trauma, nonaccidental trauma or...whiplash force caused by violent shaking. Subdural hematomas in infants are only rarely caused by accidental injury. A heterogeneous subdural

  5. Chronic subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    Subdural hemorrhage - chronic; Subdural hematoma - chronic; Subdural hygroma ... A subdural hematoma develops when bridging veins tear and leak blood. These are the tiny veins that run between the ...

  6. Nasal septal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, C M

    1998-04-01

    Nasal septal hematoma is a rare but potentially serious complication of nasal trauma. Proper management consists of early recognition, prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma, and antimicrobial therapy if a secondary nasal septal abscess is suspected. Clindamycin is recommended as initial therapy until the results of cultures and susceptibility studies are available.

  7. Nasal septal hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the nose between the 2 nostrils. An injury disrupts the blood vessels so that fluid and blood may collect under the lining. Causes A septal hematoma can be caused by: A broken nose Injury to the soft tissue of the area Surgery ...

  8. Epidural Hematoma in Lacrosse.

    PubMed

    Rimel, R W; Nelson, W E; Persing, J A; Jane, J A

    1983-03-01

    In brief: Several hours after being hit by a lacrosse stick in the left temporoparietal area slightly anterior to the ear, a lacrosse player was found unresponsive and wrapped in a blanket in his dormitory room. He had not lost consciousness during the game, sat out only five minutes, and completed the game. His Glasgow Coma Scale score was 12 of a possible 15. A CT scan showed an epidural hematoma and a skull fracture. He underwent an immediate left temporoparietal craniotomy and evacuation of the epidural hematoma. He recovered fully and requested permission to return to play six months after the injury. The authors think that an improved lacrosse helmet design would help prevent this type of injury.

  9. Symptomatic calcified subdural hematomas.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R R; Mahapatra, A; Pawar, S J; Sousa, J; Athale, S D

    1999-09-01

    Two unique cases of chronic calcified subdural hematomas are reported in children as a long-term complication of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Both the patients had undergone shunt procedures in infancy for congenital hydrocephalus. In one patient, the cause of the hydrocephalus was aqueduct stenosis, while in the second patient, a lumbar meningomyelocele was associated with hydrocephalus. In both these patients, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was done in infancy. In one of them, following the shunt surgery, a bilateral subdural collection was noticed which required burr hole evacuation. Both the patients remained asymptomatic for 9 years, when they presented to our center with acute raised intracranial pressure and contralateral hemiparesis. Both the patients had a relatively short history and had altered sensorium at admission. Surprisingly, in both the patients, the CT scan showed significant mass effect producing calcified subdural hematomas. The shunt systems were found to be working well at surgery. Craniotomy and excision of the calcified subdural hematomas was undertaken. Postoperatively, the patients showed satisfactory recovery, and at discharge the patients were doing well. At the follow-up at the outpatient clinic, the patients were asymptomatic.

  10. Microwave hematoma detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2001-01-01

    The Microwave Hematoma Detector is a non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots near the outer surface of the body. While being geared towards finding sub-dural and epi-dural hematomas, the device can be used to detect blood pooling anywhere near the surface of the body. Modified versions of the device can also detect pneumothorax, organ hemorrhage, atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid arteries, evaluate perfusion (blood flow) at or near the body surface, body tissue damage at or near the surface (especially for burn assessment) and be used in a number of NDE applications. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with a specialized antenna, signal processing/recognition algorithms and a disposable cap worn by the patient which will facilitate accurate mapping of the brain and proper function of the instrument. The invention may be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of sub-dural or epi-dural hematoma in human or animal patients, detection of hemorrhage within approximately 5 cm of the outer surface anywhere on a patient's body.

  11. Traumatic acute spinal subarachnoid hematoma.

    PubMed

    Jang, Woo-Youl; Lee, Jung-Kil; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Kwak, Hyung-Jun; Joo, Sung-Pil; Kim, In-Young; Kim, Jae-Hyoo; Kim, Soo-Han

    2007-01-01

    This report describes a 66-year-old man who presented with progressive paraparesis after a fall. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an acute spinal hematoma at T11-12 with spinal cord compression. The patient underwent an emergency left T11-12 hemilaminectomy. The hematoma was subarachnoid and the source of bleeding was an injured radicular vein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of traumatic spinal subarachnoid hematoma. We discuss the possible mechanism and our case illustrates an injured radicular vein can be a source of traumatic spinal subarachnoid hematoma.

  12. Contralateral development of chronic subdural hematoma after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma. A case report.

    PubMed

    Sucu, H Kamil; Gökmen, M; Bezircioglu, H; Tektaş, S

    2006-09-01

    Contralateral acute complications such as acute epi/subdural hematomas can be encountered after evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma, though they are rare. We found only one case of chronic subdural hematoma following the surgery for contralateral chronic subdural hematoma, have been published in English language literature. A 73-year-old male admitted to our hospital with a right-sided subdural hematoma. The subdural hematoma was evacuated through a burr-hole. A left-sided subdural higroma appeared after operation and turned into classical subdural hematoma in the course of time. After evacuation of contralateral chronic subdural hematoma, the patient recovered completely. All stages of the development of contralateral chronic subdural hematomas were shown by serial computed tomograms. It was suggested that traumatic chronic subdural hematomas develop from mostly subdural higromas. If contralateral subdural higroma is seen after surgical evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma, the possibility of development of contralateral chronic subdural hematoma must be kept on mind.

  13. Chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad R.; Parihar, Vijay; Namdev, Hemant; Bajaj, Jitin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurosurgical conditions. There is lack of uniformity in the treatment of CSDH amongst surgeons in terms of various treatment strategies. Clinical presentation may vary from no symptoms to unconsciousness. CSDH is usually diagnosed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is more sensitive in the diagnosis of bilateral isodense CSDH, multiple loculations, intrahematoma membranes, fresh bleeding, hemolysis, and the size of capsule. Contrast-enhanced CT or MRI could detect associated primary or metastatic dural diseases. Although definite history of trauma could be obtained in a majority of cases, some cases may be secondary to coagulation defect, intracranial hypotension, use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs, etc., Recurrent bleeding, increased exudates from outer membrane, and cerebrospinal fluid entrapment have been implicated in the enlargement of CSDH. Burr-hole evacuation is the treatment of choice for an uncomplicated CSDH. Most of the recent trials favor the use of drain to reduce recurrence rate. Craniotomy and twist drill craniostomy also play a role in the management. Dural biopsy should be taken, especially in recurrence and thick outer membrane. Nonsurgical management is reserved for asymptomatic or high operative risk patients. The steroids and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors may also play a role in the management. Single management strategy is not appropriate for all the cases of CSDH. Better understanding of the nature of the pathology, rational selection of an ideal treatment strategy for an individual patient, and identification of the merits and limitations of different surgical techniques could help in improving the prognosis. PMID:27695533

  14. [Chronic subdural hematoma: historical studies].

    PubMed

    Guénot, M

    2001-11-01

    The first description of a chronic subdural hematoma was made in 1658 by J.J. Wepfer, followed in 1761 by Morgagni. A possible case was described by Honoré de Balzac in 1840 including its traumatic origin and surgical treatment. Virchow, in 1857, denied a traumatic origin, and gave the name of "pachymeningitis hemorrhagica interna" to this pathology which he explained by inflammatory processes. The traumatic etiology of chronic subdural hematoma was recognized in the XXth century, especially by Trotter in 1914. Pathophysiology was considered later on in the XXth century.

  15. HISTOTRIPSY LIQUEFACTION OF LARGE HEMATOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Khlokhova, Tatiana D.; Monsky, Wayne L.; Haider, Yasser A.; Maxwell, Adam; Wang, Yak-Nam; Matula, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Intra- and extra-muscular hematomas result from repetitive injury as well as sharp and blunt limb trauma. The clinical consequences can be serious, including debilitating pain and functional deficit. There are currently no short-term treatment options for large hematomas, only lengthy conservative treatment. The goal of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-based technique, termed histotripsy, for rapid (within a clinically relevant timeframe of 15–20 min) liquefaction of large volume (up to 20 mL) extra-vascular hematomas for subsequent fine-needle aspiration. Experiments were performed using in vitro extravascular hematoma phantoms—fresh bovine blood poured into 50 mL molds and allowed to clot. The resulting phantoms were treated by boiling histotripsy (BH), cavitation histotripsy (CH) or a combination in a degassed water tank under ultrasound guidance. Two different transducers operating at 1 MHz and 1.5 MHz with f-number = 1 were used. The liquefied lysate was aspirated and analyzed by histology and sized in a Coulter Counter. The peak instantaneous power to achieve BH was lower than (at 1.5 MHz) or equal to (at 1 MHz) that which was required to initiate CH. Under the same exposure duration, BH-induced cavities were one and a half to two times larger than the CH-induced cavities, but the CH-induced cavities were more regularly shaped, facilitating easier aspiration. The lysates contained a small amount of debris larger than 70 μm, and 99% of particulates were smaller than 10 μm. A combination treatment of BH (for initial debulking) and CH (for liquefaction of small residual fragments) yielded 20 mL of lysate within 17.5 minutes of treatment and was found to be most optimal for liquefaction of large extravascular hematomas. PMID:27126244

  16. Spinal Subdural Hematoma Associated with Intracranial Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Sook Young

    2015-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of an intracranial and a spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is rare. We describe a case of cranial SDH with a simultaneous spinal SDH. An 82-year-old woman visited the emergency room because of drowsiness and not being able to walk 6 weeks after falling down. A neurological examination showed a drowsy mentality. Brain computed tomography showed bilateral chronic SDH with an acute component. The patient underwent an emergency burr-hole trephination and hematoma removal. She exhibited good recovery after the operation. On the fourth postoperative day, she complained of low-back pain radiating to both lower limbs, and subjective weakness of the lower limbs. Spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed a thoracolumbosacral SDH. A follow-up spinal magnetic resonance imaging study that was performed 16 days later showed a significant decrease in the size of the spinal SDH. We discuss the pathogenesis of this simultaneous occurrence of spinal and cranial SDH. PMID:26587198

  17. Chronic Expanding Hematoma Following Abdominoplasty.

    PubMed

    Tatsuta, Sayo; Morioka, Daichi; Murakami, Naoki; Ohkubo, Fumio

    2017-02-01

    Chronic expanding hematoma (CEH) is a relatively rare complication of trauma or surgery. We report a patient with CEH as a late complication of abdominoplasty. A 58-year-old woman underwent conventional abdominoplasty and thereafter refused to use a compression binder, citing discomfort. One month postoperatively, she presented with a gradually enlarging, painful abdominal mass. The results of ultrasonography and computed tomography were highly suspicious for CEH. The lesion was completely removed, together with surrounding fibrous tissue. Histopathology revealed a chronic hemorrhage collection with a fibrous capsule, consistent with CEH. This condition as a late complication of abdominoplasty has not previously been reported in the literature. However, an online medical consultation site features several abdominoplasty patients asking about persistent hematomas that sound suspicious for CEH. CEH might be underdiagnosed by surgeons. Although a postoperative binder may increase the risk of skin necrosis and deep vein thrombosis, appropriate compression treatment is necessary to prevent hematoma formation. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  18. Pocket Hematoma: A Call for Definition.

    PubMed

    DE Sensi, Francesco; Miracapillo, Gennaro; Cresti, Alberto; Severi, Silva; Airaksinen, Kari Eino Juhani

    2015-08-01

    Pocket hematoma is a common complication of cardiac implantable electronic device procedures and a potential risk factor for device infections, especially in patients on oral anticoagulation or antiplatelet treatment. There is a wide variability in the incidence of pocket hematoma and bleeding complications in the literature and the major cause for this seems to be the variability of the used definitions for hematomas. The lack of generally accepted definition for pocket hematoma renders the comparisons across the studies difficult. In this article, we briefly review the current literature on this issue and propose a uniform definition for pocket hematoma and criteria for grading the severity of hematoma in clinical practice and research. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Chronic epidural hematoma with rapid ossification.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jong Hee; Choi, Jae Young; Chang, Jin Woo; Park, Yong Gou; Kim, Tai Seung; Chung, Sang Sup

    2002-12-01

    The authors present a rare case of ossified chronic epidural hematoma. A 13-year-old female patient presented with an ossified chronic epidural hematoma. She had sustained a head injury about 10 weeks previously and had received conservative care for a delayed-onset epidural hematoma at a local hospital. Ossification was identified about 4 weeks after the head injury and then progressed rapidly. A chronic epidural hematoma with a thick collagenous capsule and newly formed bone was removed 73 days after the head injury. An epidural hematoma with mild symptoms can be treated conservatively. When, however, the hematoma is observed not to be naturally absorbed during serial follow-up examinations, surgical removal must be considered, even if the patient's condition is good, because this entity carries the risk of bone calcification and ossification.

  20. Histotripsy Liquefaction of Large Hematomas.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Monsky, Wayne L; Haider, Yasser A; Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Yak-Nam; Matula, Thomas J

    2016-07-01

    Intra- and extra-muscular hematomas result from repetitive injury as well as sharp and blunt limb trauma. The clinical consequences can be serious, including debilitating pain and functional deficit. There are currently no short-term treatment options for large hematomas, only lengthy conservative treatment. The goal of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-based technique, termed histotripsy, for rapid (within a clinically relevant timeframe of 15-20 min) liquefaction of large volume (up to 20 mL) extra-vascular hematomas for subsequent fine-needle aspiration. Experiments were performed using in vitro extravascular hematoma phantoms-fresh bovine blood poured into 50 mL molds and allowed to clot. The resulting phantoms were treated by boiling histotripsy (BH), cavitation histotripsy (CH) or a combination in a degassed water tank under ultrasound guidance. Two different transducers operating at 1 MHz and 1.5 MHz with f-number = 1 were used. The liquefied lysate was aspirated and analyzed by histology and sized in a Coulter Counter. The peak instantaneous power to achieve BH was lower than (at 1.5 MHz) or equal to (at 1 MHz) that which was required to initiate CH. Under the same exposure duration, BH-induced cavities were one and a half to two times larger than the CH-induced cavities, but the CH-induced cavities were more regularly shaped, facilitating easier aspiration. The lysates contained a small amount of debris larger than 70 μm, and 99% of particulates were smaller than 10 μm. A combination treatment of BH (for initial debulking) and CH (for liquefaction of small residual fragments) yielded 20 mL of lysate within 17.5 minutes of treatment and was found to be most optimal for liquefaction of large extravascular hematomas. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Intramyocardial Hematoma After Ebstein Anomaly Repair.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joel Kian Boon; Lee, Jan Hau; Mok, Yee Hui; Chen, Ching Kit; Loh, Yee Jim

    2017-01-01

    Intramyocardial hematoma is a rare condition and is an incomplete form of myocardial rupture, which may occur after myocardial infarction, cardiac surgery, trauma, percutaneous coronary intervention, or spontaneously. We describe a case of a 16-year-old girl with intramyocardial hematoma mimicking an intracavitary thrombus following repair of Ebstein anomaly. The intramyocardial hematoma was incorrectly diagnosed on echocardiography as a right ventricular thrombus, and the true nature of the lesion was only realized during repeat surgical intervention for severe tricuspid regurgitation. The hematoma was managed conservatively and spontaneously resolved.

  2. Cellular composition of the initial fracture hematoma compared to a muscle hematoma: a study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina; Schell, Hanna; Kolar, Paula; Pfaff, Michael; Perka, Carsten; Buttgereit, Frank; Duda, Georg; Lienau, Jasmin

    2009-09-01

    Bone fracture leads to a cycle of inflammation, cellular migration, and proliferation to restore tissue integrity. Immune cells at the site of injury are involved especially in the early phase of the healing process, but little is known about the cells present in the initial fracture hematoma. The hypothesis of this study was that the cellular composition in a fracture hematoma differs from that found in a muscle hematoma and that these divergences get more pronounced over time. By using a reproducible osteotomy model and muscle trauma in sheep the distributions of the immune cell subpopulations were evaluated 1 and 4 h after surgery. The cell amount within the first 4 h increased in both hematoma. The number of dead cells was higher in the muscle hematoma. One hour postoperatively the initial fracture hematoma revealed a lower granulocyte percentage compared to the muscle hematoma. The ratio of T helper to cytotoxic T cells was higher in the fracture hematoma compared to the muscle hematoma at both investigated time points. B cell percentage increased in the fracture but not in the muscle hematoma from 1 to 4 h. This is the first study that compares the immune cell subpopulations of a fracture and muscle hematoma.

  3. Cervical epidural hematoma after chiropractic spinal manipulation.

    PubMed

    Heiner, Jason D

    2009-10-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma is a rare but potentially devastating complication of spinal manipulation therapy. This is a case report of a healthy pregnant female who presented to the emergency department with a cervical epidural hematoma resulting from chiropractic spinal manipulation therapy that responded to conservative treatment rather than the more common route of surgical management.

  4. Traumatic subdural hematoma in the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Song, Jenn-Yeu; Chen, Yu-Hao; Hung, Kuang-Chen; Chang, Ti-Sheng

    2011-10-01

    Traumatic spinal subdural hematoma is rare and its mechanism remains unclear. This intervention describes a patient with mental retardation who was suffering from back pain and progressive weakness of the lower limbs following a traffic accident. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed a lumbar subdural lesion. Hematoma was identified in the spinal subdural space during an operation. The muscle power of both lower limbs recovered to normal after surgery. The isolated traumatic spinal subdural hematoma was not associated with intracranial subdural hemorrhage. A spinal subdural hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord compression, especially for patients who have sustained spinal trauma. Emergency surgical decompression is usually the optimal treatment for a spinal subdural hematoma with acute deterioration and severe neurological deficits.

  5. [Bilateral cerebellar hematoma after supratentorial glioma surgery].

    PubMed

    Czepko, Ryszard; Kwinta, Borys; Uhl, Henryka; Urbanik, Andrzej; Libionka, Witold; Pietraszko, Wojciech

    2004-01-01

    We present a case of bilateral hematoma in cerebellar hemispheres in a 30-year-old man after surgical treatment of extensive left frontal glioma. 16 hours after surgery the patient lost consciousness. An immediate CT revealed hematoma in both cerebellar hemispheres. The hematoma was subsequently removed via bilateral suboccipital craniectomy. After the operation the clinical status of the patient gradually improved - he was discharged in a good general condition. In the presented case the hematoma developed presumably as a consequence of extensive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) loss (670 ml) via postoperative wound drainage. The resulting cerebellar displacement caused strain of the draining veins, affecting blood outflow, and causing parenchymal hemorrhage. In order to prevent the complication, massive CSF loss during and after operation should be avoided. Careful monitoring of the patient's condition in the postoperative period, even if the general status is good, is important because only an immediate intervention may prevent the development of irreversible consequences of cerebellar hematoma formation.

  6. [Retroperitoneal hematoma in pelvic fractures].

    PubMed

    Purghel, F; Jemna, C; Ciuvică, R

    2011-01-01

    Retroperitoneal trauma implies a wide variety of organs in multiple systems (digestive, urinary, circulatory, musculoskeletal); although their common result is the retroperitoneal hematoma, their management is completely different, an intervention indicated for a particular lesion being able to completely decompensate other lesions in case of insufficient diagnostic. The present material highlights the recent diagnostic and therapeutic particularities in retroperitoneal hematoma from pelvic fractures. We noted a recent trend in diminishing the role of the fracture pattern on standard pelvis X-ray in assessing the risk of hemodinamic instability, new markers being indicated as more predictive. CT scan with contrast substance, when applies, remains the gold standard in identifying the source of the vascular bleeding and in guiding the subsequent therapeutic maneuvers. The angiographic embolisation in arterial lesions remains the main therapeutic procedure in hemodinamical unstable patients, with the possibility of repeating it when needed; the C-clamp external fixator application is associated. The pre-peritoneal packing constantly gains support as an emergency hemostasis maneuver. The treatment should be adapted in each case, the hemodinamic instability being the trigger in initiation and repetition of the emergency therapeutic interventions mentioned above.

  7. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in Women.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kazuko; Sorimachi, Takatoshi; Honda, Yumie; Matsumae, Mitsunori

    2017-09-01

    Sex differences in various diseases recently have been recognized as an important factor in the approach to more efficient preventive and therapeutic medicine. We clarified sex differences in the clinical characteristics of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) by comparing men and women with CSDH, as there is a well-known male predominance in the prevalence of CSDH. Clinical factors and computed tomography findings were investigated retrospectively in 490 consecutive patients admitted to our hospital between 2006 and 2015 who were diagnosed with CSDH. On univariate analysis, women were significantly older than men (P < 0.05). In women, premorbid impaired activities of daily living, consciousness disturbance, acute-to-chronic subdural hematoma, and death as outcomes at discharge were significantly more frequent than in men (P < 0.05). In contrast, women had less frequent instances of good recovery and less alcohol intake (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated female sex as an independent predictor of consciousness disturbance at admission. Female sex also was identified as a predictor of death at discharge. We demonstrated sex differences in the clinical characteristics of CSDH. In the future, management of patients with CSDH with regard to sex differences in disease characteristics could be expected to improve the outcomes of women, which have been worse than in men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors predicting contralateral hematoma growth after unilateral drainage of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Shigeta; Ishikawa, Osamu; Miura, Keisuke; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Goto, Haruo; Maeda, Keiichiro

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common form of intracranial hemorrhage with a recurrence rate of 9.2%-26.5% after bur hole surgery. Occasionally patients with bilateral CSDH undergo unilateral surgery because the contralateral hematoma is deemed to be asymptomatic, and in some of these patients the contralateral hematoma may subsequently enlarge, requiring additional surgery. The authors investigated the factors related to the growth of these hematomas. METHODS Ninety-three patients with bilateral CSDH who underwent unilateral bur hole surgery at Aizu Chuo Hospital were included in a retrospective analysis. Findings on preoperative MRI, preoperative thickness of the drained hematoma, and the influence of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs were considered and evaluated in univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS The overall growth rate was 19% (18 of 93 hematomas), and a significantly greater percentage of the hematomas that were iso- or hypointense on preoperative T1-weighted imaging showed growth compared with other hematomas (35.4% vs 2.3%, p < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that findings on preoperative T1-weighted MRI were the sole significant predictor of hematoma growth, and other factors such as antiplatelet or anticoagulant drug use, patient age, patient sex, thickness of the treated hematoma, and T2-weighted MRI findings were not significantly related to hematoma growth. The adjusted odds ratio for hematoma growth in the T1 isointense/hypointense group relative to the T1 hyperintense group was 25.12 (95% CI 3.89-51.58, p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS The findings of preoperative MRI, namely T1-weighted sequences, may be useful in predicting the growth of hematomas that did not undergo bur hole surgery in patients with bilateral CSDH.

  9. Subcapsular hematoma after ureteroscopy and laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Peter Ka-Fung; Chan, Chun-Ki; Ma, Wai-kit; To, Kim-Chung; Cheung, Fu-Keung; Yiu, Ming-kwong

    2013-09-01

    Renal hematoma after ureteroscopic lithotripsy (URSL) using holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser is a rare complication. We aimed to review our center's experience of post-URSL subcapsular hematoma. From 2007 to 2012, 1114 URSLs using 7.5F semi-rigid ureteroscopes were performed. Patients with post-URSL symptomatic renal hematoma were reviewed. Perioperative information on patients' preoperative morbidity, renal function, stone characteristics, and degree of hydronephrosis were reviewed. Operative information, postoperative presentation of symptoms, changes in blood parameters, CT findings, and subsequent management were documented. Post-URSL subcapsular hematoma was diagnosed in 4 of 1114 (0.36%) patients, who ranged in age from 43 to 63 years. Preoperative imaging showed that all four patients had obstructing proximal ureteral stones ranging in size from 0.7 to 2.1 cm, and three of them had thin renal cortices. Pressure bags were not used, and Double-J ureteral stents were inserted in all cases. All four patients had the triad of loin pain, fever, and significant hemoglobin drop necessitating transfusion. Three patients presented within 2 days of URSL, and one patient presented on day 20. One patient was treated conservatively and recovered with bed rest and antibiotics. Urgent angiography was performed on one patient in view of a significant drop in hemoglobin, but no embolization was needed. One patient underwent ultrasonography-guided drainage of the hematoma, and another had an emergency open clot evacuation because of significant compression on the kidney by the hematoma. Follow-up CT scans confirmed the resolution of the hematoma in all cases. Post-URSL subcapsular hematoma is a rare but potentially serious complication. A high index of suspicion is needed when patients present with significant loin pain and fever after URSL for obstructing proximal ureteral stones with thin renal cortices. The management of post-URSL subcapsular hematomas needs

  10. Subperiosteal Hematoma of the Ankle

    PubMed Central

    Hui, S H; Lui, T H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Periosteal reaction has a long list of differential diagnoses ranging from trauma, infection, metabolic disease to malignancy. The morphology of periosteal reaction shown in imaging studies helps to narrow down the list of differential diagnoses. Case report: A 25 year old gentleman had an inversion injury to his left ankle. He complained of lateral ankle and posterior heel pain and swelling after the injury. Radiograph of his left ankle revealed solid, smooth periosteal reaction at posterior aspect of left distal tibia. MRI showed periosteal reaction at the corresponding site, which was better demonstrated in CT scan. Follow up MRI and CT showed maturation of the new bone formation at the site of periosteal reaction. Findings were compatible with subperiosteal hematoma formation from injury, which ossified with time. Conclusion: Smooth, thick periosteal reaction favours benign process, while interrupted pattern is an alarming feature for more aggressive causes. PMID:27299131

  11. Delayed intrahepatic subcapsular hematoma after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Steve M M; Reekers, Jim A; Dwars, Boudewijn J

    2012-01-01

    Intrahepatic subcapsular hematoma after laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a rare complication and is potentially life threatening. When radiologic studies confirm the presence of the hematoma, the decision to follow a conservative treatment should involve clinical monitoring. If there are signs of infection, the collection can safely be drained percutaneously. If there are signs of active bleeding, a selective embolization should be attempted first. If unsuccessful, subsequent surgical evacuation should be performed. We report the case of a patient with an intrahepatic subcapsular hematoma after laparoscopic cholecystectomy, which occurred 6 weeks after surgery, and review the literature concerning the management of these bleedings.

  12. Spinal subdural hematoma following cranial subdural hematoma : a case report with a literature review.

    PubMed

    Ji, Gyu Yeul; Oh, Chang Hyun; Chung, Daeyeong; Shin, Dong Ah

    2013-12-01

    Coexistence of cranial and spinal subdural hematomas is rare and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of cranial and spinal subdural hematomas after previous head trauma. As the pathogenesis of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma yet remains unclear, we developed an alternative theory to those proposed in the literature for their coexistence, the migration of blood through the subdural space.

  13. Spinal subdural hematoma following meningioma removal operation.

    PubMed

    Jun, Hyo Sub; Oh, Jae Keun; Park, Young Seok; Song, Joon Ho

    2014-03-01

    Although blood contamination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after an intracranial operation can occur, the development of a symptomatic spinal hematoma after craniotomy has been anecdotally reported and it is uncommon reported after a supratentorial meningioma removal operation. We report a case of spinal subdural hematoma following a supratentorial meningioma removal operation and discuss the mechanism of spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) development. A 54-year-old woman presented with lumbago and radicular pain on both legs 4 days after a right parietooccipital craniotomy for meningioma removal. Only the straight leg raising sign was positive on neurologic examination but the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a lumbosacral spinal subdural hematoma. The patient received serial lumbar tapping, after which her symptoms showed improvement.

  14. Spinal Subdural Hematoma Following Meningioma Removal Operation

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Hyo Sub; Oh, Jae Keun; Park, Young Seok

    2014-01-01

    Although blood contamination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after an intracranial operation can occur, the development of a symptomatic spinal hematoma after craniotomy has been anecdotally reported and it is uncommon reported after a supratentorial meningioma removal operation. We report a case of spinal subdural hematoma following a supratentorial meningioma removal operation and discuss the mechanism of spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH) development. A 54-year-old woman presented with lumbago and radicular pain on both legs 4 days after a right parietooccipital craniotomy for meningioma removal. Only the straight leg raising sign was positive on neurologic examination but the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a lumbosacral spinal subdural hematoma. The patient received serial lumbar tapping, after which her symptoms showed improvement. PMID:24891866

  15. A rare case of infected splenic hematoma.

    PubMed

    Godkar, Darshan; Anandacoomarswamy, Dharshan; Bansal, Goldy; Patel, Rajnikant; Recco, Recco

    2007-01-01

    Splenic hematoma is a relatively benign condition in consideration that a majority are spontaneously absorbed. Rarely, they can become infected, a condition that is difficult to diagnose and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if left untreated. We present a patient with a known history of intravenous drug abuse and recent abdominal trauma who was found to have infective endocarditis and subsequently an infected splenic hematoma. The related literature is also discussed.

  16. [Spontaneous hepatic hematoma in twin pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Quesnel, Carlos; Weber, Alejandro; Mendoza, Dalila; Garteiz, Denzil

    2012-02-01

    The hepatic hematoma or rupture appear in 1 of every 100,000 pregnancies. The most common causes of hepatic hematoma in pregnancy are severe preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome; some predisposing factors are seizures, vomiting, labor, preexistent hepatic disease and trauma. A 33 year old primigravid with a normal 33 week twin pregnancy presented abdominal pain and hypovolemic shock due to spontaneous subcapsular hepatic hematoma; laparoscopy was performed to evaluate the possibility of rupture, which was not found, later emergency cesarean section was carried out followed by hepatic hematoma drainage and abdominal packaging by laparoscopy. After surgery the flow through drainage was too high additionally hemodynamic instability and consumption coagulopathy. Abdominal panangiography was performed without identifying bleeding areas. Intesive care was given to the patient evolving satisfactorily, was discharged 19 days after the event. Seven months later she had laparoscopic cholecystectomy due to acute litiasic colecistitis. We found 5 cases in literatura about hepatic hematoma during pregnancy no related to hypertensive disorders of pregnancy; these were related to hepatoma, amebian hepatic abscess, falciform cell anemia, cocaine consumption and molar pregnancy. Hepatics hematomas have high morbidity and mortality so is significant early diagnosis and multidisciplinary approach.

  17. History of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Trephination or trepanation is an intentional surgical procedure performed from the Stone Age. It looks like escaping a black evil from the head. This technique is still used for treatment of chronic subdural hematoma (SDH). Now, we know the origin, pathogenesis and natural history of this lesion. The author try to explore the history of trephination and modern discovery of chronic SDH. The author performed a detailed electronic search of PubMed. By the key word of chronic SDH, 2,593 articles were found without language restriction in May 2015. The author reviewed the fact and way, discovering the present knowledge on the chronic SDH. The first authentic report of chronic SDH was that of Wepfer in 1657. Chronic SDH was regarded as a stroke in 17th century. It was changed as an inflammatory disease in 19th century by Virchow, and became a traumatic lesion in 20th century. However, trauma is not necessary in many cases of chronic SDHs. The more important prerequisite is sufficient potential subdural space, degeneration of the brain. Modifying Virchow's description, chronic SDH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by severe degeneration of the brain. From Wepfer's first description, nearly 350 years passed to explore the origin, pathogenesis, and fate of chronic SDH. The nature of the black evil in the head of the Stone Age is uncovering by many authors riding the giant's shoulder. Chronic SDH should be categorized as a degenerative lesion instead of a traumatic lesion. PMID:27169062

  18. Traumatic duodenal hematoma in the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Winthrop, A L; Wesson, D E; Filler, R M

    1986-09-01

    Twenty children with duodenal hematomas secondary to blunt trauma were treated between 1953 and 1983. The duodenal injury was isolated in ten cases and associated with intra-abdominal injuries in the others. In ten, the duodenal injury was suspected on admission and the diagnosis was confirmed within 24 hours by radiographic contrast studies. All ten were managed successfully with nasogastric suction and intravenous fluids. Ten patients underwent laparotomy for increasing abdominal tenderness and guarding. An isolated duodenal hematoma was found in four and treated by evacuation and/or gastroenterostomy. In five of the remaining six surgical patients, all of whom had multiple intra-abdominal injuries, the duodenum was left untouched. Three of these patients had postoperative contrast studies that showed early resolution of the duodenal hematoma. No duodenal stricture or leak developed in any patient. The children with isolated duodenal hematomas who were treated conservatively had a mean hospital stay of six days, whereas those treated surgically had a mean stay of 17 days. The ten patients with multiple intra-abdominal injuries had a mean hospital stay of 32 days. In this group, eight required total parenteral nutrition or nasojejunal feeds for nutritional support. In these patients, an isolated duodenal hematoma resulted in minimal morbidity and nonoperative management was usually successful. The presence of associated intra-abdominal injuries was responsible for the prolonged hospitalization and delayed return of normal intestinal function in some patients.

  19. Subdural hematoma following spinal cord stimulator implant.

    PubMed

    Chiravuri, Srinivas; Wasserman, Ronald; Chawla, Amit; Haider, Naeem

    2008-01-01

    Headache following interventional procedures is a diagnostic challenge due to the multitude of possible etiologies involved. Presentation can be simple (PDPH alone) or complex (exacerbation of pre-existing chronic headache along with PDPH) or headache associated with a new onset intracranial process. Subdural hematoma is a rare complication of cranio-spinal trauma. Cranial subdural hematoma may present in an acute, sub-acute, or chronic fashion. Diagnosis of a subdural hematoma in the wake of a PDPH is difficult, requiring a high level of suspicion. Delayed diagnosis of subdural hematoma is usually related to failure to consider it in the differential diagnosis. Thorough history, assessment of the evolution of symptoms, and imaging studies may identify the possible cause and help direct treatment. Change in the character of initial presenting symptoms may be a sign of resolution of the headache or the onset of a secondary process. We report a case of acute intracranial subdural hematoma secondary to unintentional dural puncture during placement of a permanent spinal cord stimulator lead for refractory angina. There is need for careful follow-up of patients with a known post-dural tear. Failure to identify uncommon adverse events in patients with complicated spinal cord stimulator implantation may lead to permanent injury.

  20. Massive expanding hematoma of the chin following blunt trauma

    PubMed Central

    Niazi, K. Thanvir Mohamed; Raja, Dharmesh Kumar; Prakash, R.; Balaji, V. R.; Manikandan, D.; Ulaganathan, G.; Yoganandha, R.

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic hematoma of the face is common and usually self-limiting in nature. We report an unusual massive expanding hematoma of the chin within 9 h following a blunt trauma with no associated injuries or fracture. PMID:27829776

  1. Massive expanding hematoma of the chin following blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Niazi, K Thanvir Mohamed; Raja, Dharmesh Kumar; Prakash, R; Balaji, V R; Manikandan, D; Ulaganathan, G; Yoganandha, R

    2016-10-01

    Posttraumatic hematoma of the face is common and usually self-limiting in nature. We report an unusual massive expanding hematoma of the chin within 9 h following a blunt trauma with no associated injuries or fracture.

  2. Rectus sheath hematoma: three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Kapan, Selin; Turhan, Ahmet N; Alis, Halil; Kalayci, Mustafa U; Hatipoglu, Sinan; Yigitbas, Hakan; Aygun, Ersan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is an accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear. It could occur spontaneously or after trauma. They are usually located infraumblically and often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen, inflammatory diseases or tumours of the abdomen. Case presentation We reported three cases of rectus sheath hematoma presenting with a mass in the abdomen and diagnosed by computerized tomography. The patients recovered uneventfully after bed rest, intravenous fluid replacement, blood transfusion and analgesic treatment. Conclusion Rectus sheath hematoma is a rarely seen pathology often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen that may lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Computerized tomography must be chosen for definitive diagnosis since ultrasonography is subject to error due to misinterpretation of the images. Main therapy is conservative management. PMID:18221529

  3. Chronic subdural hematoma: demonstration by magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Sipponen, J.T.; Sepponen, R.E.; Sivula, A.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of magnetic resonance (MR) to identify intracranial hematomas was tested in five patients with clinical and computed tomographic signs of chronic subdural hematoma. The extracerebral collections were displayed as a zone of bright intensity using the T1-weighted inversion recovery (IR 1500/400) sequence, reflecting the lesions' short T1 relaxation times. The collections also showed high intensity using the spin echo (SE) sequence, with a longer delay of 100ms and 160ms, reflecting the long T2 relaxation time. The spin echo sequence with a repetition time of 500ms and an echo delay of 160ms (SE 500/160) almost effaced other structures in the image, thus increasing the specificity of this pulse scheme for detection of chronic blood collections. Although in two of the five patients the subdural hematomas were in the isodense CT phase, all were easily visualized with MR.

  4. Chronic subdural hematoma in capoeira sport.

    PubMed

    Türkoğlu, Erhan; Serbes, Gökhan; Sanli, Metin; Sari, Onur; Sekerci, Zeki

    2008-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas in young people is extremely rare and has some provoking factors such as V-P shunts, arachnoid cyst, anticoagulant drug usage, vigorous sports and coagulopathies. A static or dynamic mechanical load is almost always delivered to skull associated with either mild or severe head trauma. A 25-year old-man who was previously healthy has complained of intermittent headache for six months. He had been interested in capoiera (Brazilian exciting sport) for two years and has had no any evidence of head injury. After admission, he was operated immediately because of chronic subdural hematoma. We report a patient who is the first chronic subdural hematoma in the literature due to playing capoeira.

  5. Myocardial Ischemia Caused by Subepicardial Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Grieshaber, Philippe; Nef, Holger; Böning, Andreas; Niemann, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Background Bleeding from bypass anastomosis leakage occurs early after coronary artery bypass grafting. Later, once the anastomosis is covered by intima, spontaneous bleeding is unlikely. Case Description A 63-year-old male patient developed a pseudoaneurysm-like, subepicardial late-term bleeding resulting in a hematoma that compromised coronary artery flow by increasing extracoronary pressure. This resulted in severe angina pectoris (Canadian Cardiovascular Society IV) and myocardial ischemia within the affected area. After surgical removal of the hematoma and repair of the anastomosis, the patient's symptoms disappeared and no signs of myocardial ischemia were present. Conclusion Surgical removal is an efficient therapy for subepicardial hematoma inducing myocardial ischemia. PMID:28352501

  6. Rapid Spontaneously Resolving Acute Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Gan, Qi; Zhao, Hexiang; Zhang, Hanmei; You, Chao

    2017-01-18

    This study reports a rare patient of a rapid spontaneously resolving acute subdural hematoma. In addition, an analysis of potential clues for the phenomenon is presented with a review of the literature. A 1-year-and-2-month-old boy fell from a height of approximately 2 m. The patient was in a superficial coma with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 8 when he was transferred to the authors' hospital. Computed tomography revealed the presence of an acute subdural hematoma with a midline shift beyond 1 cm. His guardians refused invasive interventions and chose conservative treatment. Repeat imaging after 15 hours showed the evident resolution of the hematoma and midline reversion. Progressive magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the complete resolution of the hematoma, without redistribution to a remote site. Even though this phenomenon has a low incidence, the probability of a rapid spontaneously resolving acute subdural hematoma should be considered when patients present with the following characteristics: children or elderly individuals suffering from mild to moderate head trauma; stable or rapidly recovered consciousness; and simple acute subdural hematoma with a moderate thickness and a particularly low-density band in computed tomography scans.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License, where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0.

  7. Subcorneal hematomas in excessive video game play.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Maria; Rizzo, Jason; Lennox, Luke; Rothman, Ilene

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of subcorneal hematomas caused by excessive video game play in a 19-year-old man. The hematomas occurred in a setting of thrombocytopenia secondary to induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. It was concluded that thrombocytopenia subsequent to prior friction from heavy use of a video game controller allowed for traumatic subcorneal hemorrhage of the hands. Using our case as a springboard, we summarize other reports with video game associated pathologies in the medical literature. Overall, cognizance of the popularity of video games and related pathologies can be an asset for dermatologists who evaluate pediatric patients.

  8. Retroperitoneal hematoma following radical orchiectomy: Two cases

    PubMed Central

    Glicksman, Rachel; Hamilton, Robert J.; Chung, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of testicular cancer is dependent on the stage of disease at presentation. Stage 1 testicular cancer is treated with radical orchiectomy, followed by active surveillance, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy. Occasionally, unusual and unexpected postoperative changes can be seen on computed tomography (CT), and may raise concern for metastatic disease. Here, we present two cases of testicular cancer patients who developed retroperitoneal hematomas post-radical orchiectomy, one as a classical clinical presentation, and the other as an atypical radiological entity only. The first is a case of a 38-year-old male with a non-seminoma testicular cancer, who developed severe flank pain, hemodynamic instability, and progressive anemia from a retroperitoneal hematoma in the immediate (<24 hours) postoperative period, requiring urgent surgical evacuation. The second is a case of a 33-year-old male with a testicular seminoma who had a large, suspicious retroperitoneal mass on a staging CT scan concerning for metastatic disease, which was later diagnosed as a retroperitoneal hematoma. These cases reveal the clinical variability with which a retroperitoneal hematoma post-radical orchiectomy may present. In addition, the second case demonstrates the importance of recognizing radiological postoperative changes and ensuring that these findings are not mistaken for and treated as metastatic disease. PMID:28163811

  9. Organized hematoma mimicking retroperitoneal cystic tumors.

    PubMed

    Ivankiv, Taras; Ogurtsov, Oleksii; Pokhylevych, Galina

    2016-01-01

    Isolated retroperitoneal cysts are uncommon with an estimated incidence of 1/5750-1/250,000. In women they occur about 1.5-2 times more often than in men. The largest numbers of patients are young or middle aged (20-50 years). Lack of knowledge about the causes of these rare entities and asymptomatic clinical picture often leads to diagnostic and tactical mistakes. The medical history of 54-year old male patient B., who has been hospitalized at Surgical Department №1 of Danylo Halytsky Lviv National Medical University (Surgical Department of Lviv Regional Clinical Hospital), was processed retrospectively. Diagnosing of retroperitoneal organized hematoma in the early stages is not always possible, because exploration of retroperitoneal space can be difficult. General tests and tumor markers are usually normal range and not prognostically informative in this case. Decisively important were imaging diagnostic methods-USG and CT. As clinical cases of organized hematoma are quite rare, finding out retroperitoneal formation with irregular contours and infiltrative component indicates for retroperitoneal tumors. Thus, this formation accumulated contrast that says for increased vascularization. Intraoperative: formation with thick walls and heterogeneous structure. Histological diagnosis: hematoma in a phase of deep organization. On our opinion, taking into account location and structure of tumors, laparoscopic intervention was not appropriate, open surgery was reasonable approach. Preoperative biopsy has a crucial role to set preliminary diagnosis. Despite the fact that organized retroperitoneal hematomas are quite rare, their diagnosis requires detailed examination and histological verification. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Spontaneous retroclival hematoma: a case series.

    PubMed

    Narvid, Jared; Amans, Matthew R; Cooke, Daniel L; Hetts, Steven W; Dillon, William P; Higashida, Randall T; Dowd, Christopher F; Halbach, Van V

    2016-03-01

    Retroclival hematomas are rare, appearing mostly as posttraumatic phenomena in children. Spontaneous retroclival hematoma (SRH) in the absence of trauma also has few descriptions in the literature. None of the reported clinical cases features the combination of an SRH and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH). Nevertheless, despite extensive cases of idiopathic or angiographically negative subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) of the posterior fossa, only a single case report of a patient with a unique spontaneous retroclival hematoma has been identified. In this study, the authors reviewed the presentation, management, and clinical outcome of this rare entity. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of all patients with diagnosed SRH at their institution over a 3-year period. Collected data included clinical history, laboratory results, treatment, and review of all imaging studies performed. Four patients had SRH. All were appropriately evaluated for coagulopathic and/or traumatic etiologies of hemorrhage, though no etiology could be found. Moreover, all of the patients demonstrated SRH that both clearly crossed the basioccipital synchondrosis and was contained within a nondependent configuration along the retroclival dura mater. Spontaneous retroclival hematoma, often associated with IVH, is a rare subtype of intracranial hemorrhage frequently recognized only when MRI demonstrates compartmentalization of the posterior fossa hemorrhage. When angiography fails to reveal an underlying lesion, SRH patients, like patients with traditional angiographically negative SAH, enjoy a remarkably good prognosis.

  11. Cardiovascualr changes with acute subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    VanderArk, G D

    1975-06-01

    Of 100 consecutive patients with acute subdural hematoma, 53 survived. Blood pressure and heart rate changes were not reliable indicators of increased intracranial pressure or cerebral disaster. Electrocardiographic changes in these patients were dramatic. Forty-one patients developed a new cardiac arrhythmia. Increased intracranial pressure and brain lesions adversely affect the heart. These effects must be recognized and appropriately treated.

  12. Chronic expanding hematoma of thorax extended to the neck.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Hitoshi; Baba, Hiromitsu; Ondo, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of chronic expanding hematoma of thorax extended to the neck. An 83-year-old man with a history of Lucite ball plombage and thoracoplasty of bilateral thorax was admitted with numbness of left upper extremity. In 6 months, left supraclavicular fossa was gradually bulged like tumor. The lesion was diagnosed as chronic expanding hematoma. Surgically, Lucite balls were removed with surrounding hematoma debris and fluid, and neck hematoma, which was slightly communicated to the thorax, was extirpated. We discussed the genesis of this hematoma and its extension to the neck.

  13. Factors Associated With Neck Hematoma After Thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sayaka; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Saito, Yuki; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To identify risk factors for post-thyroidectomy hematoma requiring airway intervention or surgery (“wound hematoma”) and determine post-thyroidectomy time to intervention. Post-thyroidectomy hematoma is rare but potentially lethal. Information on wound hematoma in a nationwide clinical setting is scarce. Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we extracted data from records of patients undergoing thyroidectomy from July 2010 to March 2014. Patients with clinical stage IV cancer or those with bilateral neck dissection were excluded because they could have undergone planned tracheotomy on the day of thyroidectomy. We assessed the association between background characteristics and wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy, using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Among 51,968 patients from 880 hospitals, wound hematoma occurred in 920 (1.8%) ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy and in 203 (0.4%) ≥3 days post-thyroidectomy (in-hospital mortality = 0.05%). Factors significantly associated with wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy were male sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30–1.77); higher age (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00–1.02); overweight or obese (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04–1.44); type of surgery (partial thyroidectomy for benign tumor compared with: total thyroidectomy, benign tumor [OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.45–2.63]; partial thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.00–1.46]; total thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.82–3.49]; and thyroidectomy for Graves disease [OR 3.88, 95% CI 2.59–5.82]); neck dissection (OR, 1.53, 95% CI 1.05–2.23); antithrombotic agents (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.15–2.17); and blood transfusion (OR 5.33, 95% CI 2.39–11.91). Closer monitoring of airway and neck is recommended for patients with risk factors, and further cautious monitoring beyond 3 days post-thyroidectomy. PMID:26886632

  14. [Six cases of organized chronic subdural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Isobe, Naoyuki; Sato, Hideki; Murakami, Taro; Kurokawa, Yasuharu; Seyama, Go; Oki, Shuichi

    2008-12-01

    Surgical procedures for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) are performed using various methods on the basis of burr hole irrigation and drainage, but treatment for organized CSDH is rarely required. Primary operation for CSDH was performed in our hospital for 535 patients (391 men, 144 woman; age, 8 months to 104 years) between December 1991 and March 2007. Of these, 6 patients diagnosed with organized CSDH were reviewed. Five patients had a history of burr hole surgery. Computed tomography showed membranous structure and heterogenous distribution of air after burr hole surgery had perforated the subdural space. As for treatment, craniotomy was performed in all cases (small craniotomy, n=4; enlarged craniotomy, n=2), and additional treatment was required in 2 patients. Diagnosis of organized CSDH is not easy before a primary operation, but removal of both organized CSDH and the outer membrane by craniotomy in proportion to hematoma expansion is important once the presence of organized CSDH has been determined.

  15. The radiological findings in chronic expanding hematoma.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T; Nakata, H; Watanabe, H; Maeda, H; Toyonaga, T; Hashimoto, H; Nakamura, T

    1999-07-01

    To identify the characteristic MRI findings of chronic expanding hematoma correlated with the pathology. Three patients who had a chronic expanding hematoma involving the musculoskeletal system were reviewed retrospectively. Huge soft tissue masses suggestive of malignancy with destruction of the bony structure were revealed on radiography and computed tomography. MRI showed the masses to exhibit heterogeneous signal intensity on both T1 and T2-weighted images with a peripheral rim of low signal intensity, reflecting the central zones of fluid collection due to fresh and altered blood with a wall of collagenous fibrous tissue. These MRI findings were seen in all three patients and are considered to be characteristic; they assist in differentiation from neoplasm in consideration of the history of trauma or surgery.

  16. Ultra-delayed lumbar surgical wound hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Kinon, Merritt D.; Nakhla, Jonathan; Brown, Kenroy; Bhashyam, Niketh; Yassari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: There exists an inherent risk of increased venous thromboembolism (VTE) in surgical spine patients, which is independent of their existing risk factors. Prophylaxis and treatment of VTE is an imprecise practice and may have serious complications even well after the initial surgery. Furthermore, there are no clear guidelines on how to manage postoperative spine patients with regards to the timing of anticoagulation. Case Description: Here, we present the case of a middle-aged male, status post L2/3 laminectomy and discectomy who developed bilateral below the knee deep venous thrombosis. He was started on Enoxaparin and transitioned to Warfarin and returned with axial back pain, and was found to have a postoperative hematoma almost 3 weeks later in a delayed fashion. Conclusion: Delayed surgical wound hematoma with neural compression is an important complication to identify and should remain high on the differential diagnosis in patients on warfarin who present with axial spinal pain. PMID:28144491

  17. Orbital subperiosteal hematoma from scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Rosenberry, Clark; Angelidis, Matthew; Devita, Diane

    2010-09-01

    Only a few cases of nontraumatic orbital subperiosteal hematoma due to scuba diving have been reported, and this is the first of such cases that underwent surgical intervention. This injury results from negative pressure within the face mask, suctioning orbital tissues into the mask after incomplete equilibration of pressure on descent. Valsalva maneuver is a second mechanism implicated in the etiology of this injury. Recognition of this injury is of the utmost importance because vision loss is a possible complication if there is compression of the optic nerve or increased intraocular pressure. In many cases of nontraumatic orbital hematoma, conservative management is adequate; however, this case was an exception due to worsening exam findings. Divers may be able to prevent this injury by frequent and gentle equilibration of mask pressure on descent. Copyright 2010 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Aortic intramural hematoma: an unpredictable evolution.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Marta; Dias Ferreira, Nuno; Bettencourt, Nuno; Caeiro, Daniel; Fonseca, Marlene; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Vouga, Luís; Gama, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) is an acute aortic syndrome characterized by bleeding into the media of the aortic wall without intimal disruption or the classic flap formation. Its natural history is variable and still poorly understood, so strategies for therapeutic management are not fully established. In some cases there is partial or complete regression of the hematoma under medical treatment, but most progress to dissection, aneurysmal dilatation or aortic rupture. The authors present the case of a 44-year-old hypertensive male patient admitted with a diagnosis of IMH of the descending aorta. Despite initial symptom resolution and optimal medical therapy, the IMH evolved to a pseudoaneurysm, which was successfully treated by an endovascular approach. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Intracranial subdural hematomas with elevated rivaroxaban concentration and subsequently detected spinal subdural hematoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Koga, Masatoshi; Matsuki, Takayuki; Hino, Tenyu; Yokota, Chiaki; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2016-07-01

    A 79-year-old lean man with a height of 157cm and weight of 42kg (body mass index, 17.2kg/m(2)) receiving rivaroxaban developed an intracranial subdural hematoma and was treated conservatively. Because he had a reduced creatinine clearance of 44mL/min, his dosage of rivaroxaban was reduced from 15 to 10mg daily according to official Japanese prescribing information. However, he developed bilateral intracranial subdural hematomas 2weeks later. Plasma rivaroxaban concentration on anti-factor Xa chromogenic assay was elevated at 301ng/mL, suggesting excessive accumulation. He underwent burr hole drainage and resumed anticoagulation with warfarin. Subsequently, he developed a lumbosacral hematoma. He was treated conservatively and discharged without neurological sequelae. The main cause of the increased concentration of rivaroxaban was believed to be his older age and low body weight. The etiology of the spinal hematoma was suspected to be the migration of intracranial hematoma to the spinal subdural space.

  20. Fibrin glue injection into the hematoma cavity for refractory chronic subdural hematoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Saiko; Amagasaki, Kenichi; Shono, Naoyuki; Nakaguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Repeat burr hole irrigation and drainage has been effective in most cases of recurrent chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), however, refractory cases require further procedures or other interventions. Case Description: An 85-year-old male presented with left CSDH, which recurred five times. The hematoma was irrigated and drained through a left frontal burr hole during the first to third surgery and through a left parietal burr hole during the fourth and fifth surgery. The hematoma had no septation and was well-evacuated during each surgery. Antiplatelet therapy for preventing ischemic heart disease was stopped after the second surgery, the hematoma cavity was irrigated with artificial cerebrospinal fluid at the third surgery, and the direction of the drainage tube was changed to reduce the postoperative subdural air collection at the fourth surgery. However, none of these interventions was effective. He was successfully treated by fibrin glue injection into the hematoma cavity after the fifth surgery. Conclusion: This procedure may be effective for refractory CSDH in elderly patients. PMID:27999712

  1. Urologic manifestations of the iliacus hematoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Colapinto, V; Comisarow, R H

    1979-08-01

    Anticoagulated patients may have a characteristic syndrome of femoral neuropathy from an iliacus muscle hematoma. They may present with urologic signs and symptoms, including groin, flank and thigh pain, groin tenderness, an iliac fossa mass and hematuria. Urography may reveal an enlarged psoas shadow and hydronephrosis from ureteral obstruction. Prompt diagnosis is essential so that early operative decompression of the femoral nerve can be done. The urologist has an important role in the diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome.

  2. Organized hematoma mimicking retroperitoneal cystic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ivankiv, Taras; Ogurtsov, Oleksii; Pokhylevych, Galina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Isolated retroperitoneal cysts are uncommon with an estimated incidence of 1/5750–1/250,000. In women they occur about 1.5–2 times more often than in men. The largest numbers of patients are young or middle aged (20–50 years). Lack of knowledge about the causes of these rare entities and asymptomatic clinical picture often leads to diagnostic and tactical mistakes. Methods The medical history of 54-year old male patient B., who has been hospitalized at Surgical Department №1 of Danylo Halytsky Lviv National Medical University (Surgical Department of Lviv Regional Clinical Hospital), was processed retrospectively. Result Diagnosing of retroperitoneal organized hematoma in the early stages is not always possible, because exploration of retroperitoneal space can be difficult. General tests and tumor markers are usually normal range and not prognostically informative in this case. Decisively important were imaging diagnostic methods—USG and CT. As clinical cases of organized hematoma are quite rare, finding out retroperitoneal formation with irregular contours and infiltrative component indicates for retroperitoneal tumors. Thus, this formation accumulated contrast that says for increased vascularization. Intraoperative: formation with thick walls and heterogeneous structure. Histological diagnosis: hematoma in a phase of deep organization. On our opinion, taking into account location and structure of tumors, laparoscopic intervention was not appropriate, open surgery was reasonable approach. Preoperative biopsy has a crucial role to set preliminary diagnosis. Conclusion Despite the fact that organized retroperitoneal hematomas are quite rare, their diagnosis requires detailed examination and histological verification. PMID:26764890

  3. Thyroid Gland Hematoma After Blunt Neck Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Saylam, Baris; Çomçali, Bülent; Ozer, Mehmet Vasfi; Coskun, Faruk

    2009-01-01

    Hemorrhage of a previously normal thyroid gland as a result of blunt trauma is a very rare condition. We report a case of blunt trauma that caused acute hemorrhage into the thyroid gland and presented with hoarseness. The diagnosis of thyroid gland hematoma was made with a combination of fiberoptic laryngoscopy, cervical computed tomography, and carotid angiography. The patient was treated conservatively, had a favorable course without further complications, and was discharged four days after admission. PMID:20046242

  4. An obscure case of hepatic subcapsular hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ndzengue, Albert; Hammoudeh, Fadi; Brutus, Pierre; Ajah, Ofem; Purcell, Roland; Leadon, Joseph; Rafal, Richard B; Balmir, Simon; Enriquez, Danilo A; Posner, Gerald L; Jaffe, Eric A; Chandra, Pradeep

    2011-04-13

    Spontaneous liver bleeding is often reported in preeclampsia. It is otherwise rare and has been linked to gross anatomical lesions and coagulopathy. We report a case of subcapsular hematoma of the liver without any apparent lesion and in the absence of coagulopathy. A 41-year-old male, paraplegic for 16 years, presented to the emergency department 3 days after sudden onset of right upper quadrant and shoulder pain. He had been on vitamins and 5,000 units subcutaneous heparin 12-hourly at the nursing home for the last month. He was in no distress, afebrile, with stable vitals. Physical examination showed a diverting colostomy, tender hepatomegaly and sacral decubiti. A fecal occult blood test was negative. There was spastic paraplegia below the level of T12. Two days after admission, the patient was afebrile and hemodynamically stable. PTT, PT, liver profile, BUN and creatinine were all normal, however his hemoglobin had dropped from 11.3 to 7.6 g/dl. An abdominal CT scan revealed an isolated 9.0 × 1.8 cm subcapsular hematoma. The patient received blood transfusion in the intensive care unit and was discharged 7 days later. In conclusion, spontaneous liver hemorrhage occurs in the nonobstetrical population in the setting of gross anatomical lesions or coagulopathy. This is the first report of an isolated subcapsular liver hematoma.

  5. Subdural Thoracolumbar Spine Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia: A Rare Occurrence and Literature Review of Spinal Hematomas after Spinal Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Maddali, Prasanthi; Walker, Blake; Fisahn, Christian; Page, Jeni; Diaz, Vicki; Zwillman, Michael E; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R Shane; Moisi, Marc

    2017-02-16

    Spinal hematomas are a rare but serious complication of spinal epidural anesthesia and are typically seen in the epidural space; however, they have been documented in the subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas likely exist within a traumatically induced space within the dural border cell layer, rather than an anatomical subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas present a dangerous clinical situation as they have the potential to cause significant compression of neural elements and can be easily mistaken for spinal epidural hematomas. Ultrasound can be an effective modality to diagnose subdural hematoma when no epidural blood is visualized. We have reviewed the literature and present a full literature review and a case presentation of an 82-year-old male who developed a thoracolumbar spinal subdural hematoma after spinal epidural anesthesia. Anticoagulant therapy is an important predisposing risk factor for spinal epidural hematomas and likely also predispose to spinal subdural hematomas. It is important to consider spinal subdural hematomas in addition to spinal epidural hematomas in patients who develop weakness after spinal epidural anesthesia, especially in patients who have received anticoagulation.

  6. Subdural Thoracolumbar Spine Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia: A Rare Occurrence and Literature Review of Spinal Hematomas after Spinal Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Maddali, Prasanthi; Walker, Blake; Fisahn, Christian; Page, Jeni; Diaz, Vicki; Zwillman, Michael E; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2017-01-01

    Spinal hematomas are a rare but serious complication of spinal epidural anesthesia and are typically seen in the epidural space; however, they have been documented in the subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas likely exist within a traumatically induced space within the dural border cell layer, rather than an anatomical subdural space. Spinal subdural hematomas present a dangerous clinical situation as they have the potential to cause significant compression of neural elements and can be easily mistaken for spinal epidural hematomas. Ultrasound can be an effective modality to diagnose subdural hematoma when no epidural blood is visualized. We have reviewed the literature and present a full literature review and a case presentation of an 82-year-old male who developed a thoracolumbar spinal subdural hematoma after spinal epidural anesthesia. Anticoagulant therapy is an important predisposing risk factor for spinal epidural hematomas and likely also predispose to spinal subdural hematomas. It is important to consider spinal subdural hematomas in addition to spinal epidural hematomas in patients who develop weakness after spinal epidural anesthesia, especially in patients who have received anticoagulation. PMID:28357164

  7. Chronic expanding hematoma: a late complication 45 years after thoracoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    A chronic expanding hematoma is a hematoma with long term, continuous growth. A 69-year-old male presented with an extra-thoracic chronic expanding hematoma 45 years after thoracoplasty. Six months prior to his visit with us, he had noticed a slight swelling on his back. Three months before his visit with us, the size of the swollen area gradually increased after bowling. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an extra-thoracic lesion measuring 120 mm in diameter. Heterogeneous signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images inside the lesion was reflected as hematoma of various ages. The hematoma was successfully resected after preoperative embolization. Chronic expanding hematoma can be a delayed complication after thoracoplasty. PMID:28203429

  8. [Chronic subdural hematoma: a disease of elderly people].

    PubMed

    Tagle, Patricio; Mery, Francisco; Torrealba, Gonzalo; Del Villar, Sergio; Carmona, Hans; Campos, Manuel; Méndez, Jorge; Chicharro, Ada

    2003-02-01

    The lack of specificity and heterogeneity of the clinical picture of chronic subdural hematoma, hampers its diagnosis. To report the experience of a Neurosurgical Service in chronic subdural hematoma. One hundred patients (77 male, mean age 77 +/- 13 years) with chronic subdural hematoma were analyzed. The main clinical presentations were mental status changes (50%) and progressive focal neurological deficit (46%). Five cases presented as a transient neurological deficit. All patients were treated with burr hole drainage. Thirteen had recurrence of the hematoma and they were reoperated. The surgical mortality was 3%. Eighty seven patients were followed for a mean of 66 months. Eighty one of these had a complete recovery, 6 had permanent neurological deficit and 2 of these were unable to care for themselves. Bad prognosis was associated with the absence of a previous trauma to explain the hematoma and symptoms of dementia as the clinical presentation. Most patients with chronic subdural hematoma treated with burr hole drainage have a good outcome.

  9. Chronic expanding hematoma: a late complication 45 years after thoracoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Akio; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    A chronic expanding hematoma is a hematoma with long term, continuous growth. A 69-year-old male presented with an extra-thoracic chronic expanding hematoma 45 years after thoracoplasty. Six months prior to his visit with us, he had noticed a slight swelling on his back. Three months before his visit with us, the size of the swollen area gradually increased after bowling. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an extra-thoracic lesion measuring 120 mm in diameter. Heterogeneous signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images inside the lesion was reflected as hematoma of various ages. The hematoma was successfully resected after preoperative embolization. Chronic expanding hematoma can be a delayed complication after thoracoplasty.

  10. Hematoma Shape, Hematoma Size, Glasgow Coma Scale Score and ICH Score: Which Predicts the 30-Day Mortality Better for Intracerebral Hematoma?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Wei; Liu, Yi-Jui; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Yang, Fu-Chi; Hsueh, Chun-Jen; Kao, Hung-Wen; Juan, Chun-Jung; Hsu, Hsian-He

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the performance of hematoma shape, hematoma size, Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score, and intracerebral hematoma (ICH) score in predicting the 30-day mortality for ICH patients. To examine the influence of the estimation error of hematoma size on the prediction of 30-day mortality. Materials and Methods This retrospective study, approved by a local institutional review board with written informed consent waived, recruited 106 patients diagnosed as ICH by non-enhanced computed tomography study. The hemorrhagic shape, hematoma size measured by computer-assisted volumetric analysis (CAVA) and estimated by ABC/2 formula, ICH score and GCS score was examined. The predicting performance of 30-day mortality of the aforementioned variables was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, paired t test, nonparametric test, linear regression analysis, and binary logistic regression. The receiver operating characteristics curves were plotted and areas under curve (AUC) were calculated for 30-day mortality. A P value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results The overall 30-day mortality rate was 15.1% of ICH patients. The hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH score, and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality for ICH patients, with an AUC of 0.692 (P = 0.0018), 0.715 (P = 0.0008) (by ABC/2) to 0.738 (P = 0.0002) (by CAVA), 0.877 (P<0.0001) (by ABC/2) to 0.882 (P<0.0001) (by CAVA), and 0.912 (P<0.0001), respectively. Conclusion Our study shows that hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH scores and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality in an increasing order of AUC. The effect of overestimation of hematoma size by ABC/2 formula in predicting the 30-day mortality could be remedied by using ICH score. PMID:25029592

  11. Renal subcapsular hematoma associated with brodifacoum toxicosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Radi, Zaher A; Thompson, Larry J

    2004-04-01

    A 5-y-old female dog died acutely and was presented for postmortem examination. Hemorrhage in the thoracic and peritoneal cavities and a large subcapsular renal hematoma were present at necropsy. Brodifacoum, a second-generation coumarin anticoagulant, was detected in the liver by HPLC analysis. Renal subcapsular hematoma is a well known, but uncommon condition in man. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a brodifacoum-associated renal subcapsular hematoma in a non-human species.

  12. Diagnosis and Management of HELLP Syndrome Complicated by Liver Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ditisheim, Agnès; Sibai, Baha M

    2017-03-01

    Subcapsular liver hematoma is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of preeclampsia and hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets syndrome. It may present with nonspecific signs and symptoms, none of which are diagnostic, and can mimic pulmonary embolism of cholecystitis. There is no consensus on the management of subcapsular liver hematoma. Unruptured liver hematoma can be conservatively managed. When rupture occurs, surgical, endovascular approaches and, rarely, liver transplantation, may be required. Actual literature is scant and retrospective in nature. Data on follow-up, time to resolution and outcome of subsequent pregnancies are very limited. We here review the diagnosis and management of liver hematoma.

  13. Image-guided endoscopic surgery for spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hematoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guo-Chen; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Hou, Yuan-Zheng; Yu, Xin-Guang; Ma, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Gang; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Jia-Shu; Tang, Hao; Zhu, Ru-Yuan; Zhou, Ding-Biao; Xu, Bai-Nan

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Endoscopic removal of intracerebral hematomas is becoming increasingly common, but there is no standard technique. The authors explored the use of a simple image-guided endoscopic method for removal of spontaneous supratentorial hematomas. METHODS Virtual reality technology based on a hospital picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) was used in 3D hematoma visualization and surgical planning. Augmented reality based on an Android smartphone app, Sina neurosurgical assist, allowed a projection of the hematoma to be seen on the patient's scalp to facilitate selection of the best trajectory to the center of the hematoma. A obturator and transparent sheath were used to establish a working channel, and an endoscope and a metal suction apparatus were used to remove the hematoma. RESULTS A total of 25 patients were included in the study, including 18 with putamen hemorrhages and 7 with lobar cerebral hemorrhages. Virtual reality combined with augmented reality helped in achieving the desired position with the obturator and sheath. The median time from the initial surgical incision to completion of closure was 50 minutes (range 40-70 minutes). The actual endoscopic operating time was 30 (range 15-50) minutes. The median blood loss was 80 (range 40-150) ml. No patient experienced postoperative rebleeding. The average hematoma evacuation rate was 97%. The mean (± SD) preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score was 6.7 ± 3.2; 1 week after hematoma evacuation the mean GCS score had improved to 11.9 ± 3.1 (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Virtual reality using hospital PACS and augmented reality with a smartphone app helped precisely localize hematomas and plan the appropriate endoscopic approach. A transparent sheath helped establish a surgical channel, and an endoscope enabled observation of the hematoma's location to achieve satisfactory hematoma removal.

  14. Encapsulated acute subdural hematoma mimicking acute epidural hematoma on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Miki, Shunichiro; Fujita, Keishi; Katayama, Wataru; Sato, Masayuki; Kamezaki, Takao; Matsumura, Akira; Sakashita, Shingo

    2012-01-01

    An 87-year-old woman presented with an atypical case of acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) manifesting as disturbance of consciousness and left hemiparesis. Computed tomography revealed a high density lentiform lesion in the right convexity, which was thought to be acute epidural hematoma preoperatively. Emergent decompressive craniotomy revealed an encapsulated solid fresh clot in the subdural space and a bleeding small cortical artery under the clot. The arachnoid membrane and the brain parenchyma were intact, and no other abnormal feature such as aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation was observed. The encapsulated ASDH was removed en bloc and the patient fully recovered. Histological examination confirmed that both the outer thicker and the inner membrane were fibrinous single structures without vasculature. The red blood cells constituting the clot in the capsule maintained their cell structure. The reported pathological mechanisms of lentiform ASDH are adhesion of the arachnoid membrane and the dura mater or intracapsular bleeding from sinusoidal vessels in the outer membrane of the chronic subdural hematoma. However, in our case, the arachnoid membrane had not adhered to the dura mater and the capsule was a fibrinous single structural membrane without vasculature, which probably resulted from a previous hematoma due to initial bleeding from the cortical artery. The possible mechanism in our case was that the re-bleeding dissected and flowed into the fibrinous single structural membrane, resulting in formation of the lentiform ASDH.

  15. Rapid reduction of acute subdural hematoma and redistribution of hematoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Arata; Omata, Tomohiro; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    An 88-year-old woman presented with acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) which showed rapid resolution on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. She was transferred to our hospital after falling out of bed. On admission, she was comatose with Japan Coma Scale score of 200 and Glasgow Coma Scale score of E1V1M2. Brain CT showed a thick left frontotemporal ASDH. Conservative treatment consisted of 200 ml of glycerol administered intravenously twice a day, and maintenance in the approximately 20 degree head-up position to reduce intracranial pressure. Three days later, her consciousness recovered to Japan Coma Scale score of 30 and Glasgow Coma Scale score of E2V4M5. CT showed obvious reduction of the hematoma without brain or scalp swelling. Spinal MR imaging detected no redistribution of hematoma to the spine. The present case illustrates that rapid spontaneous reduction of ASDH may occur by redistribution of hematoma, mainly to the supratentorial subdural space because of brain atrophy.

  16. [Renal angiomyolipoma complicated by retroperitoneal hematoma].

    PubMed

    Rabii, R; Fekak, H; Moufid, K; Joual, A; Benjelloun, S; Khaleq, K; Idali, B; Harti, A; Barrou, L

    2002-07-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma (AML) is a benign tumor, they are generally asymptomatic or can manifested by abdominal pain, palpable mass or hematuria. We report an uncommoun case of 65 years old women who consulted for retroperitoneal hemorrhage by spontaneous rupture of renal AML with palpable mass. The ultrasound and CT abdominopelvic scan were performed in the preoperative diagnosis and showed a typical right renal AML with retroperitoneal hematoma. The right nephrectomy by transperitoneal approach was performed with a good follow-up. The histological examination confirmed the diagnosis for renal AML. About this case, the authors discuses the diagnosis and the management for AML with retroperitoneal hemorrhage.

  17. Chronic Subdural Hematoma: Epidemiology and Natural History.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wuyang; Huang, Judy

    2017-04-01

    This article discusses the epidemiology and natural history of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH), a common disease prevalent in the elderly population. The incidence of CSDH ranges from 1.72 to 20.6 per 100,000 persons per year. Risk factors include advancing age, male gender, and antiplatelet or anticoagulant use. Clinical progression is separated into 3 distinct periods, including the initial traumatic event, the latency period, and the clinical presentation period. The recurrence of CSDH and nonsurgical predictive factors are described in detail to provide a comprehensive understanding of the outcome of this disease.

  18. Bilateral occipital extradural hematoma in a child

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sharad; Sharma, Vivek; Shinde, Neeraj; Sharma, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Extradural hematoma (EDH) occurs in approximately 2% of all patients with head injuries. Bilateral EDHs account for 2–10% of all acute EDHs in adults but are exceedingly rare in children. Posterior fossa EDHs occurs in 5% of all cases of EDHs. EDHs in children are more frequently venous (from tears of a dural sinus or diploic veins) and consequently have a better prognosis than EDHs in adults. Once the diagnosis of BEH is confirmed, urgent surgical treatment should be considered. We are reporting such rare form of injury as bilateral occipital EDH with supratentorial extension in 12 years child following road traffic accident. PMID:26557174

  19. The risk factors for recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Shigeo; Kinoshita, Yu; Nakagawa, Toru; Murakami, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common disease in the elderly, and the recurrence rate of CSDH is reported to range from 2.3 to 33%. We performed a retrospective review of a number of CSDH cases and the potential factors associated with CSDH recurrence. The patient population comprised 112 men and 65 women with a mean age of 74.7 years. We analyzed the following factors: age, sex, antiplatelet and anticoagulant use, hematoma laterality, hematoma thickness, degree of midline shift and internal architecture of the hematoma in the preoperative CT films, use of irrigation, direction of the drainage tube, width of the subdural space, and degree of midline shift and the presence of a massive subdural air collection in the postoperative CT films. Univariate analysis revealed that there was a trend for different rates of recurrence among the different types of hematomas. The presence of a postoperative massive subdural air collection tended to be associated with the recurrence of hematoma. Multivariate analysis revealed that separated hematomas were significantly associated with CSDH recurrence, whereas the presence of postoperative massive subdural air collection tended to be associated with hematoma recurrence. Neither univariate nor multivariate analysis could demonstrate an association between the direction of the drainage tube and the recurrence of CSDH.

  20. Subdural actinomycoma presenting as recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, N. J.; Bot, G. M.; Sahabi, S.; Aliu, S.; Usman, B.; Shilong, D. J.; Obande, J. O.; Shehu, B. B.

    2015-01-01

    Actimomycosis is a rare chronic bacterial infection of the central nervous system, and subdural actinomycoma is extremely rare. This case report brings to bear an uncommon association between subdural actinomycosis with chronic subdural hematoma. Subdural actinomycoma may present as a diagnostic conundrum and could be mistaken radiologically for either a subdural hematoma or an empyaema. PMID:25972947

  1. Subdural actinomycoma presenting as recurrent chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ismail, N J; Bot, G M; Sahabi, S; Aliu, S; Usman, B; Shilong, D J; Obande, J O; Shehu, B B

    2015-01-01

    Actimomycosis is a rare chronic bacterial infection of the central nervous system, and subdural actinomycoma is extremely rare. This case report brings to bear an uncommon association between subdural actinomycosis with chronic subdural hematoma. Subdural actinomycoma may present as a diagnostic conundrum and could be mistaken radiologically for either a subdural hematoma or an empyaema.

  2. Subcapsular liver hematoma causing cardiac tamponade in HELLP syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kinthala, S; Fakoory, M; Greaves, T; Kandamaran, L; Thomas, H; Moe, S

    2012-07-01

    HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets) syndrome is an obstetric complication with heterogeneous presentation, multisystem involvement and variable prognosis, but which usually resolves after delivery. We report a case of HELLP syndrome with subcapsular hematoma of the liver causing extrapericardial cardiac tamponade. The subcapsular hematoma and cardiac tamponade were managed conservatively.

  3. Subcapsular Liver Hematoma in Metastatic GIST Complicating Imatinib (Gleevec) Therapy.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Sridhar

    2007-01-01

    We report two patients with metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who had large subcapsular hepatic hematomas that developed while on imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) therapy. We describe the pertinent radiologic features of the subcapsular hematomas in these patients, and discuss possible etiologies for the bleeding in each patient.

  4. Balzac's 'Pierette'. An early description of chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    van den Doel, E M

    1986-12-01

    In his novel Pierrette, written in 1840, Balzac describes a case of chronic subdural hematoma, including its traumatic origin and surgical treatment. The description was written at a time when subdural hematoma was not seen as a separate clinical entity, and was generally thought to be the result of inflammation.

  5. Recurrent subdural hematoma secondary to headbanging: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Jito, Junya; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: “Headbanging” is the slang term used to denote violent shaking of one's head in time with the music. This abrupt flexion-extension movement of the head to rock music extremely rarely causes a subdural hematoma. Case Description: A 24-year-old female was admitted to our department because of right sided partial seizure and acute or subacute subdural hematoma over the left cerebral convexity. She had no history of recent head trauma but performed headbanging at a punk rock concert at 3 days before admission. Since, she had a previous acute subdural hematoma on the same side after an accidental fall from a baby buggy when she was 11 months old, the present was recurrent subdural hematoma probably due to headbanging. Conclusions: Headbanging has the hazardous potential to cause a subdural hematoma. PMID:26664766

  6. Femoral neuropathy and meralgia paresthetica secondary to an iliacus hematoma.

    PubMed

    Yi, Tae Im; Yoon, Tae Hee; Kim, Joo Sup; Lee, Ga Eun; Kim, Bo Ra

    2012-04-01

    Compressive femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathies from an iliacus hematoma are unusual presentation. We report a case of a 16-year-old boy who developed right femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathies as a complication of traumatic ipsilateral iliacus hematoma formation. The patient complained of numbness in the right thigh and calf as well as right leg weakness, and pain in the right inguinal area. Nerve conduction study and needle electromyography identified the neuropathies. After the electrodiagnostic studies, the pelvic bone MRI revealed a large, 9×5×4.5 cm right iliacus hematoma. As a result, diagnosis of a right iliacus hematoma compressing the femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves was made, and the patient underwent an operation to remove the hematoma. Symptoms and neurological signs showed notable improvement after surgical decompression. Subsequent follow-up electrodiagnostic studies after 11 weeks demonstrated regeneration evidence.

  7. Femoral Neuropathy and Meralgia Paresthetica Secondary to an Iliacus Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tae Im; Kim, Joo Sup; Lee, Ga Eun; Kim, Bo Ra

    2012-01-01

    Compressive femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathies from an iliacus hematoma are unusual presentation. We report a case of a 16-year-old boy who developed right femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathies as a complication of traumatic ipsilateral iliacus hematoma formation. The patient complained of numbness in the right thigh and calf as well as right leg weakness, and pain in the right inguinal area. Nerve conduction study and needle electromyography identified the neuropathies. After the electrodiagnostic studies, the pelvic bone MRI revealed a large, 9×5×4.5 cm right iliacus hematoma. As a result, diagnosis of a right iliacus hematoma compressing the femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves was made, and the patient underwent an operation to remove the hematoma. Symptoms and neurological signs showed notable improvement after surgical decompression. Subsequent follow-up electrodiagnostic studies after 11 weeks demonstrated regeneration evidence. PMID:22639754

  8. [Spontaneous epidural hematoma after open heart surgery: case report].

    PubMed

    Anegawa, S; Hayashi, T; Furukawa, Y; Nagashima, T; Kumate, M

    1999-11-01

    Acute epidural hematoma not associated with head injury is rarely encountered and is known as spontaneous epidural hematoma. To our knowledge, only five cases with epidural hematoma after open-heart surgery have been published. Pathogenesis and preventive measures have not yet been determined. We report a case of such spontaneous epidural hematoma and consider the possible pathogenesis. A 12-year-old female received a radical operation for severe subaortic stenosis. The intraoperative course was uneventful except for massive hemorrhage which was adequately controlled. Postoperatively, she was moved to the CCU still not having aroused from anesthesia. Eleven hours later, it was found that her pupils were fixed and dilated. CT scan demonstrated a huge bifrontal epidural hematoma with disappearance of the basal cistern. Even though immediate emergency evacuation was performed, the patient died of acute brain swelling four days after the operation.

  9. Developing a model of chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jingyang; Ai, Jinglu; Macdonald, R Loch

    2011-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common neurosurgical condition that has a high incidence in the increasing elderly population of many countries. Pathologically, it is defined as a persistent liquefied hematoma in the subdural space more than 3 weeks old that is generally encased by a membraneous capsule. CSDHs likely originate after minor head trauma, with a key factor in its development being the potential for a subdural cavity to permit its expansion within, which is usually due to craniocerebral disproportion. The pathogenesis of CSDH has been attributed to osmotic or oncotic pressure differences, although measurements of these factors in the CSDH fluid do not support this theory. Current belief is that CSDH arises from recurrent bleeding in the subdural space, caused by a cycle of local angiogenesis, inflammation, coagulation and ongoing fibrinolysis. However, because of a lack of detailed knowledge about the precise mechanisms, treatment is often limited to surgical interventions that are invasive and often prone to recurrence. Thus, it is possible that an easily reproducible and representative animal model of CSDH would facilitate research in the pathogenesis of CSDH and aid with development of treatment options.

  10. [Infected subdural hematoma having a surgery of chronic subdural hematoma 1 year ago:a case report].

    PubMed

    Nagao, Takaaki; Miyazaki, Chikao; Ando, Shunpei; Haga, Daisuke; Kuroki, Takao; Sugo, Nobuo; Nagao, Takeki

    2015-02-01

    We report a case of an infected subdural hematoma that occurred 1 year after burr-hole irrigation for chronic subdural hematoma. A 78-year-old woman who had developed left hemiparesis was admitted to our hospital. A computed tomography(CT)scan revealed the presence of a chronic subdural hematoma in the right hemisphere. Her clinical symptoms improved immediately after emergency burr-hole irrigation, which allowed her discharge from the hospital. One year after the initial surgery, she developed an infection of the urinary tract infection, which led to severe pyelonephritis and septic shock. Treatment of the urological symptoms eliminated the systemic inflammation. One month after the urinary infection, the patient was readmitted to the hospital in a comatose state. A CT scan showed regrowth of a residual subdural hematoma surrounded by a thick capsule, causing a midline shift in the brain. An emergency operation for removal of the subdural hematoma by burr-hole irrigation was performed, and pus was drained from the subdural mass. Microbiological cultures of the abscess revealed the presence of Proteus mirabilis. After surgery, the patient was administered an antibiotic treatment for three weeks and she was discharged with no neurological deficits. Cultures of blood from the septic shock as well as from the abscess both revealed the presence of Proteus mirabilis. Therefore, a diagnosis of infected subdural hematoma, which was caused by hematogenous infection, was made. We conclude that attention should be paid to the risk of infection of the hematoma capsule in subdural hematomas.

  11. Catheter placement for lysis of spontaneous intracerebral hematomas: does a catheter position in the core of the hematoma allow more effective and faster hematoma lysis?

    PubMed

    Malinova, Vesna; Schlegel, Anna; Rohde, Veit; Mielke, Dorothee

    2017-07-01

    For the fibrinolytic therapy of intracerebral hematomas (ICH) using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA), a catheter position in the core of the hematoma along the largest clot diameter was assumed to be optimal for an effective clot lysis. However, it never had been proven that core position indeed enhances clot lysis if compared with less optimal catheter positions. In this study, the impact of the catheter position on the effectiveness and on the time course of clot lysis was evaluated. We analyzed the catheter position using a relative error calculating the distance perpendicular to the catheter's center in relation to hematoma's diameter and evaluated the relative hematoma volume reduction (RVR). The correlation of the RVR with the catheter position was evaluated. Additionally, we tried to identify patterns of clot lysis with different catheter positions. The patient's outcome at discharge was evaluated using the Glasgow outcome score. A total of 105 patients were included in the study. The mean hematoma volume was 56 ml. The overall RVR was 62.7 %. In 69 patients, a catheter position in the core of the clot was achieved. We found no significant correlation between catheter position and hematoma RVR (linear regression, p = 0.14). Core catheter position leads to more symmetrical hematoma RVR. Faster clot lysis happens in the vicinity of the catheter openings. We found no significant difference in the patient's outcome dependent on the catheter position (linear regression, p = 0.90). The catheter position in the core of the hematoma along its largest diameter does not significantly influence the effectiveness of clot lysis after rtPA application.

  12. [Spontaneous hematoma of the atrial wall].

    PubMed

    Iglesias López, A; Rodríguez Pan, A; Pazos Silva, V

    2014-01-01

    The clinical signs of heart masses tend to be nonspecific, generally depending more on their repercussions on heart function caused by their location rather than on their type. Imaging techniques make it possible to limit the differential diagnosis of heart masses based on their location, morphology, and characteristics of echogenicity, density, or intensity, depending on the technique used to study them. We present the case of a woman with squeezing mid chest pain irradiating to her shoulder and positive cardiac markers in whom a left atrial mass was identified at echocardiography. This finding was confirmed at chest CT. The signs at chest CT were compatible with a mural hematoma and this diagnosis was confirmed after intraoperative biopsy. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Retroperitoneal hematoma following trauma: its clinical importance.

    PubMed

    Grieco, J G; Perry, J F

    1980-09-01

    Records of 100 consecutive patients treated in 1973 through 1977 with post-traumatic retroperitoneal hematomas (RH) were studied. Eighty RH followed blunt injury and 20 were due to penetrating trauma. Overall mortality was 26%. The worst prognosis was associated with RH from automobile accidents and pedestrian injuries. Pelvic RH were almost uniformly associated with pelvic fracture and were the primary cause of 39% of deaths. Blunt perinephric RH required renal exploration in 47% of patients. Blunt RH in other locations were associated with major visceral or vascular injury in half the patients and were the cause of death in five. Sixty-five per cent of RH due to penetrating trauma had visceral or vascular injury requiring operative correction. Contained rupture of descending choracic aorta presented as retrogastric RH in two patients. RH from penetrating trauma should be explored routinely, since 65% are associated with visceral or vascular injury.

  14. Life-threatening paraspinal muscle hematoma after percutaneous vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Chang-Hoon; Chung, Nam-Su; Lee, Jae-Heon; Lee, Han-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding and hematoma formation is rarely reported in percutaneous vertebroplasty procedure. An 84 year old male presented with a large paraspinal muscle hematoma after a percutaneous vertebroplasty. The patient had neither any prior bleeding disorder nor any anticoagulant treatment. Vital signs of the patient were unstable, and his hemoglobin level decreased daily. After a month of conservative treatment, including transfusion, cryotherapy, pain control and bed rest, his hemoglobin level remained stable and he showed relief from pain. Four months later, hematoma resolved spontaneously and he could walk without back pain. PMID:27746502

  15. Dabigatran-related intracerebral hemorrhage resulting in hematoma expansion.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Claus Z; Steiner, Thorsten; Tietze, Anna; Damgaard, Dorte

    2014-02-01

    Warfarin-related intracerebral hemorrhage carries a particularly high risk of neurologic deterioration and death because of a high rate of hematoma expansion of about 50%. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs)--apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban--have a significantly smaller risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, two facts make this situation complicated: First, the risk of hematoma expansion is unknown for NOACs. Second, there is no specific antidote for neither of the NOACs. We present a case that suggests that hematoma expansion may occur after NOAC-related ICH.

  16. Intramural esophagic hematoma secondary to coumarinic anticoagulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Esophagic Intramural Hematoma is an uncommon clinical condition, with a prognosis which is essentially benign. On most cases, a predisposing or precipitating factor may be seen, with the most common ones being the history of esophagic instrumentation, food impactations and thrombocytopenia. In the following manuscript, the authors present the case of a 54-years-old male with history of valve replacement surgery, who was treated at the Clinica Cardiovascular (Medellin, Colombia), with a clinical case of Intramural Esophagic Hematoma that was later confirmed to be due to a Coumarinic overanticoagulation. On this case, it is evidenced that Intramural Esophagic Hematoma is an unrecognized complication of Courmarinic anticoagulation therapy. PMID:20069068

  17. Acute spinal epidural hematoma and cranial interdural hematoma due to a rupture of a posterior communicating artery aneurysm: case report.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Andrea; Kotowski, Marc; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Schaller, Karl

    2011-10-01

    We describe an unusual presentation of a ruptured aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery with an acute intracranial hematoma between the dural layers associated with an acute spinal epidural hematoma descending to L1. A 35-year-old woman presented 3 hours after ictus with a postcoital headache, neck stiffness, and bilateral abducens cranial nerve palsy. No other neurological deficits were present. Clinically, she had a subarachnoid hemorrhage World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade 1. CT scan demonstrates an acute subdural hematoma, extending from the right parasellar region, around the clivus, tentorium, and falx. Angio-CT showed a posterior communicating artery aneurysm and an anterior communicating artery aneurysm and an extension of the hematoma to the cervical spine. This justified a spinal and cerebral MRI that confirmed an extension of the hematoma to the epidural space at the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar levels. Three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography confirmed aneurysms on the right posterior communicating artery and on the anterior communicating artery. Both aneurysms were completely occluded by coiling. With reference to the concept of the cranial subdural compartment described in studies conducted using an electron microscope, this group of hematomas was classified as interdural. Ruptured aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery may cause cranial acute interdural hematoma with a typical subarachnoid hemorrhage clinical presentation, and it rarely can extend to spinal epidural space.

  18. Compressive hematoma and deep arteriovenous malformation: Emergency endovascular occlusion via a venous approach with surgical evacuation of the hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Yves; Sachet, Marina; Cattet, Florian; Lonjon, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Compressive hematoma associated with deep arterio-venous malformation is a difficult surgery. Arterial presurgical embolization is often indicated but rarely effective. Endovascular occlusion via a venous approach is a technique that has recently been undertaken successfully to treat certain types of sub-pial vascular malformation. The venous endovascular approach has succeeded in a 20-year-old man of who presented with a compressive hematoma due to rupture of a deep arteriovenous malformation. By fully endovascular occlusion, the surgery consisted of surgical removal of the hematoma, with reduced cortical damage. PMID:26825136

  19. Compressive hematoma and deep arteriovenous malformation: Emergency endovascular occlusion via a venous approach with surgical evacuation of the hematoma.

    PubMed

    Sedat, Jacques; Chau, Yves; Sachet, Marina; Cattet, Florian; Lonjon, Michel

    2016-02-01

    Compressive hematoma associated with deep arterio-venous malformation is a difficult surgery. Arterial presurgical embolization is often indicated but rarely effective. Endovascular occlusion via a venous approach is a technique that has recently been undertaken successfully to treat certain types of sub-pial vascular malformation. The venous endovascular approach has succeeded in a 20-year-old man of who presented with a compressive hematoma due to rupture of a deep arteriovenous malformation. By fully endovascular occlusion, the surgery consisted of surgical removal of the hematoma, with reduced cortical damage.

  20. Evaluation of closed-suction drainage for treating auricular hematomas.

    PubMed

    Swaim, S F; Bradley, D M

    1996-01-01

    The principal and dynamics of closed-suction wound drainage lend themselves to use on auricular hematomas. This type of drainage was evaluated in the treatment of 10 auricular hematomas on nine animals. Seven animal owners rated the results of the procedure as "good," and two rated them as "fair." The two rating the procedure as having "fair" results owned dogs with allergic dermatitis, and the auricular hematomas recurred. In both dogs, auricular hematomas again recurred after other means of treatment were used. If the pocket for the vacuum tube is not secure and the animal is quite active, or if it molests the bandage, or both, it is possible for the tube to break or the needle to come off of the tubing.

  1. Case report: subcapsular hepatic hematoma: retraction injury during laparoscopic adrenalectomy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Gerald H; Dunn, Matthew D

    2006-02-01

    We present a case of subcapsular hepatic hematoma resulting from retraction of the liver during laparoscopic adrenalectomy. We discuss the management and prevention of this rare and important complication.

  2. Acute femoral neuropathy secondary to an iliacus muscle hematoma.

    PubMed

    Seijo-Martínez, M; Castro del Río, M; Fontoira, E; Fontoira, M

    2003-05-15

    We present a patient with a spontaneous iliacus muscle hematoma, appearing immediately after a minor physical maneuver, presenting with pain and femoral neuropathy initially evidenced by massive quadriceps muscle fasciculations. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of the pelvic area confirmed the diagnosis, showing a hematoma secondary to a partial muscle tear. The patient was managed conservatively, and the continuous muscle activity ceased in 3 days, with progressive improvement of the pain and weakness. The recovery was complete. Femoral neuropathy is uncommon and usually due to compression from psoas muscle mass lesions of diverse nature, including hematomas. Usually subacute, femoral neuropathy may present acutely in cases of large or strategically placed compressive femoral nerve lesions, and may require surgical evacuation. The case presented herein is remarkable since the muscle hematoma appeared after a nonviolent maneuver, fasciculations were present at onset, and conservative management was sufficient for a full recovery.

  3. Subdural hematoma as clinical presentation of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Groninger, Anja; Schaper, Jörg; Messing-Juenger, Martina; Mayatepek, Ertan; Rosenbaum, Thorsten

    2005-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is an inherited collagenous disease. The mildest form may present with less severe findings, for example blue sclera, but can also lead to significant handicap such as deafness or multiple bone fractures. We describe an 11-month-old female in whom bilateral chronic subdural hematoma was the leading clinical presentation of osteogenesis imperfecta type I. She was hospitalized due to epileptic seizures caused by these bilateral subdural hematomas without preceding trauma. Osteogenesis imperfecta type I was diagnosed on the basis of clinical and radiologic findings. This case demonstrates that nontraumatic chronic subdural hematoma in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type I may be caused by impaired bone calcification, vascular fragility, and permanent friction between multiple bone fragments of the skull. Osteogenesis imperfecta type I should be considered as an underlying disease in cases of nontraumatic subdural hematoma. A thorough clinical examination is recommended to exclude subtle characteristics of the disease.

  4. Acute cervical spinal subdural hematoma not related to head injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Yul; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Seok Won

    2010-06-01

    We report an extremely rare case of traumatic cervical spinal subdural hematoma not related to intracranial injury. There has been no report on traumatic cervical spinal subdrual hematoma not related to intracranial injury. A 27-year-old female patient was admitted to our emergency room due to severe neck pain and right arm motor weakness after car collision. On admission, she presented with complete monoplegia and hypoesthesia of right arm. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed subdural hematoma compressing spinal cord. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed 210,000 red blood cells/mm(3). She was managed conservatively by administrations of steroid pulse therapy and CSF drainage. Her muscle power of right arm improved to a Grade III 16 days after admission. Follow-up MRI taken 16th days after admission revealed almost complete resolution of the hematoma. Here, the authors report a traumatic cervical spinal SDH not associated with intracranial injury.

  5. Hand-held instrument should relieve hematoma pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raggio, L. J.; Robertson, T. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable instrument relieves hematomas beneath fingernails and toenails without surgery. This device simplifies the operative procedure with an instant variable heating tip, adjustable depth settings and interchangeable tip sizes for cauterizing small areas and relieving pressurized clots.

  6. Spontaneous Intracranial Extradural Hematoma in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    N'dri Oka, Dominique; Tokpa, André; Bah, Alpha; Derou, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous extradural hematoma is rare in patients with sickle cell disease. We report a clinical case of a 19-year-old young man with sickle cell anemia who presented a sickle cell crisis complicated by the development of multiple acute extradural and subgaleal hematomas that had not been treated surgically. We discuss the physiopathology of this event. Although it is rare, clinicians should be aware of this phenomenon as part of a spectrum of neurologic complications in these patients. PMID:26251822

  7. Epidural Anesthesia Complicated by Subdural Hygromas and a Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Marovic, Paul; Ingram, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent dural puncture during epidural anesthesia leads to intracranial hypotension, which if left unnoticed can cause life-threatening subdural hematomas or cerebellar tonsillar herniation. The highly variable presentation of intracranial hypotension hinders timely diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a young laboring adult female, who developed subdural hygromas and a subdural hematoma following unintentional dural puncture during initiation of epidural anesthesia. PMID:27651956

  8. [A case of infected subdural hematoma accompanied by cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Norio; Naito, Yuichiro; Takanashi, Shigehiko; Ueno, Toshiaki; Nakagomi, Tadayoshi

    2013-05-01

    Infected subdural hematoma(ISH)is a rare disease caused by hematogenous infection of a preexisting subdural hematoma. We report a rare case of ISH accompanied by cerebral infarction. A 76-year-old man who had suffered a closed head injury 3 months before presented fever, headache and left hemiparesis during the medical treatment of acute cholangitis and obstructive jaundice with pancreatic cancer at the department of surgical gastroenterology. At the consultation, computed tomography(CT)scan indicated right chronic subdural hematoma. We performed a burr hole opening surgery on the same day. Abscess and hematoma was aspirated from the subdural space, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA)was detected in this specimen. Thus the diagnosis of the infected subdural hematoma was confirmed. However, despite the antibiotics therapy, follow-up CT showed a low-density area close to the residual abscess, which suggested cerebral infarction. Cerebral angiography showed a vasospasm at the cortical segment of the right middle cerebral artery near the residual abscess. Eventually we carried out a small craniotomy to evacuate the abscess. Our case showed that prompt surgical treatment is required in case of ISH and the whole hematoma and abscess should be removed as soon as possible with an image diagnosis and an additional surgical operation.

  9. Primary Enlarged Craniotomy in Organized Chronic Subdural Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    CALLOVINI, Giorgio Maria; BOLOGNINI, Andrea; CALLOVINI, Gemma; GAMMONE, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of craniotomy and membranectomy as initial treatment of organized chronic subdural hematoma (OCSH). We retrospectively reviewed a series of 34 consecutive patients suffering from OCSH, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or contrast computer tomography (CCT) in order to establish the degree of organization and determine the intrahematomal architecture. The indication to perform a primary enlarged craniotomy as initial treatment for non-liquefied chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with multilayer loculations was based on the hematoma MRI appearance—mostly hyperintense in both T1- and T2-weighted images with a hypointense web- or net-like structure within the hematoma cavity. The reason why some hematomas evolve towards a complex and organized architecture remains unclear; the most common aspect to come to light was the “long standing” of the CSDHs which, in our series, had an average interval of 10 weeks between head injury and initial scan. Recurrence was found to have occurred in 2 patients (6% of cases) in the form of acute subdural hematoma. One patient died as the result of an intraventricular and subarachnoid haemorrhage, while 2 patients (6%) suffered an haemorrhagic stroke ipsilateral to the OCSH. Eighty-nine percent of cases had a good recovery, while 11% remained unchanged or worsened. In select cases, based on the MRI appearance, primary enlarged craniotomy seems to be the treatment of choice for achieving a complete recovery and a reduced recurrence rate in OCSH. PMID:24305027

  10. Immunological characterization of the early human fracture hematoma.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Paula; Gaber, T; Strehl, C; Schmidt-Bleek, K; Lang, A; Huscher, D; Burmester, G R; Schmidmaier, G; Perka, C; Duda, G N; Buttgereit, F

    2016-12-01

    The initial inflammatory phase of fracture healing is of great importance for the clinical outcome. We aimed to develop a detailed time-dependent analysis of the initial fracture hematoma. We analyzed the composition of immune cell subpopulations by flow cytometry and the concentration of cytokines and chemokines by bioplex in 42 samples from human fractures of long bones <72 h post-trauma. The early human fracture hematoma is characterized by maturation of granulocytes and migration of monocytes/macrophages and hematopoietic stem cells. Both T helper cells and cytotoxic T cells proliferate within the fracture hematoma and/or migrate to the fracture site. Humoral immunity characteristics comprise high concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, IL-8, IFNγ and TNFα, but also elevated concentration of anti-inflammatory cytokines, e.g., IL-1 receptor antagonist and IL-10. Furthermore, we found that cells of the fracture hematoma represent a source for key chemokines. Even under the bioenergetically restricted conditions that exist in the initial fracture hematoma, immune cells are not only present, but also survive, mature, function and migrate. They secrete a cytokine/chemokine cocktail that contributes to the onset of regeneration. We hypothesize that this specific microenvironment of the initial fracture hematoma is among the crucial factors that determine fracture healing.

  11. Primary enlarged craniotomy in organized chronic subdural hematomas.

    PubMed

    Callovini, Giorgio Maria; Bolognini, Andrea; Callovini, Gemma; Gammone, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the efficacy of craniotomy and membranectomy as initial treatment of organized chronic subdural hematoma (OCSH). We retrospectively reviewed a series of 34 consecutive patients suffering from OCSH, diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or contrast computer tomography (CCT) in order to establish the degree of organization and determine the intrahematomal architecture. The indication to perform a primary enlarged craniotomy as initial treatment for non-liquefied chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with multilayer loculations was based on the hematoma MRI appearance--mostly hyperintense in both T1- and T2-weighted images with a hypointense web- or net-like structure within the hematoma cavity. The reason why some hematomas evolve towards a complex and organized architecture remains unclear; the most common aspect to come to light was the "long standing" of the CSDHs which, in our series, had an average interval of 10 weeks between head injury and initial scan. Recurrence was found to have occurred in 2 patients (6% of cases) in the form of acute subdural hematoma. One patient died as the result of an intraventricular and subarachnoid haemorrhage, while 2 patients (6%) suffered an haemorrhagic stroke ipsilateral to the OCSH. Eighty-nine percent of cases had a good recovery, while 11% remained unchanged or worsened. In select cases, based on the MRI appearance, primary enlarged craniotomy seems to be the treatment of choice for achieving a complete recovery and a reduced recurrence rate in OCSH.

  12. Postural stability in patients with chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Sundström, Nina; Djerf, Linda; Olivecrona, Zandra; Koskinen, Lars-Owe D

    2016-08-01

    Gait disturbances and falls are common in patients with chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). Postural stability is mainly visually assessed and has not been described using an objective and quantitative measurement tool. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate postural stability in cSDH patients by measuring trunk sway during stance and gait compared to healthy elderly (HE). It was also to evaluate the relationships among postural stability and age, hematoma size, brain midline shift and hematoma location. Using a gyroscopic method, trunk sway was measured in 22 cSDH patients preoperatively, 5 postoperatively and 58 HE during seven standing and walking tasks. Trunk sway amplitude and velocity in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions were assessed. Postural stability was reduced in the cSDH group compared to HE for all standing tasks. During gait, the sway angle was increased while velocity was decreased in the cSDH group. Only 18 % of the patients could perform all tasks without losing their balance. Postoperatively, postural stability was normalized in the medial-lateral direction during standing. There were no correlations among age, hematoma size, brain midline shift or location of the hematoma and trunk sway. The majority of cSDH patients had reduced postural stability that was partly reversed soon after surgery. It was not correlated to hematoma characteristics, indicating that an increased risk to fall is present regardless of hematoma size and midline shift. This must be accounted for when handling these patients and measures taken to prevent further fall accidents during hospital stays.

  13. Encapsulated Unresolved Subdural Hematoma Mimicking Acute Epidural Hematoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Soo; Shin, Woo-Ram; Kim, Hyo-Joon; Kwon, Chang-Young

    2014-10-01

    Encapsulated acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) has been uncommonly reported. To our knowledge, a few cases of lentiform ASDH have been reported. The mechanism of encapsulated ASDH has been studied but not completely clarified. Encapsulated lentiform ASDH on a computed tomography (CT) scan mimics acute epidural hematoma (AEDH). Misinterpretation of biconvex-shaped ASDH on CT scan as AEDH often occurs and is usually identified by neurosurgical intervention. We report a case of an 85-year-old man presenting with a 2-day history of mental deterioration and right-sided weakness. CT scan revealed a biconvex-shaped hyperdense mass mixed with various densities of blood along the left temporoparietal cerebral convexity, which was misinterpreted as AEDH preoperatively. Emergency craniectomy was performed, but no AEDH was found beneath the skull. In the subdural space, encapsulated ASDH was located. En block resection of encapsulated ASDH was done. Emergency craniectomy confirmed that the preoperatively diagnosed AEDH was an encapsulated ASDH postoperatively. Radiologic studies of AEDH-like SDH allow us to establish an easy differential diagnosis between AEDH and ASDH by distinct features. More histological studies will provide us information on the mechanism underlying encapsulated ASDH.

  14. A tale of two acute extradural hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Adeleye, Amos Olufemi; Jite, Ikechi E.; Smith, Omolara A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In much of the Western hemisphere, mortality from traumatic acute extradural hematomas (AEDH) has been drastically brought down toward 0%. This is still not the case however in most developing countries. Case Description: This report represents a tragi-comic tale of two cases of traumatic AEDH managed by an academic neurosurgeon in a neurosurgically ill-resourced private health facility during a nationwide industrial strike action preventing clinical-surgical care in the principal author's University Teaching Hospital. A young man presented with altered consciousness, Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 14/15, following a road accident. The cranial computed tomography (CT) scan was obtained only 9 h after its request, long after the man had actually deteriorated to GCS 7/15 with pupillary changes. The neurosurgeon, summoned from the nearby University Teaching Hospital for the operative care of this man, arrived on-site and was about moving the patient into the operative room when he took the final breaths and died, all within 2 h of the belated neuroimaging. This scenario repeated itself in the same health facility just 24 h later with another young man who presented GCS 7/15 and another identical CT evidence of traumatic AEDH. With more financially able relations, the diagnostic/surgical care of this second patient was much more prompt. He made a very brisk recovery from neurosurgical operative intervention. He is alive and well, 5-month postoperative. Conclusions: In most low-resourced health systems of the developing countries, a significant proportion of potentially salvageable cases of AEDH still perish from this disease condition. PMID:27213108

  15. Atorvastatin May Attenuate Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua; Luo, Zhengxiang; Liu, Zhongkun; Yang, Jian; Kan, Shifeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common form of intracranial hemorrhage with a substantial recurrence rate. Atorvastatin may reduce CSDH via its anti-inflammatory and pro-angiogenesis effects, but its effectiveness for preventing recurrent CSDH has never been explored. We hypothesized that atorvastatin is effective in reducing recurrence of CSDH after surgery and identified determining factors predictive of hematoma recurrence. Methods: A prospective study was conducted in 168 surgical cases of CSDH.All patients were randomly assigned to the group treated with atorvastatin or control group. Clinically relevant data were compared between two groups, and subsequently between the recurrence and non-recurrence patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis of the relationship between atorvastatin treatment and the recurrence using brain atrophy, septated and bilateral hematoma was performed. Results: Atorvastatin group conferred an advantage by significantly decreasing the recurrence rate (P = 0.023), and patients managed with atorvastatin also had a longer time-to-recurrence (P = 0.038). Admission brain atrophy and bilateral hematoma differed significantly between the recurrence and non-recurrence patients (P = 0.047 and P = 0.045). The results of logistic regression analysis showed that atorvastatin significantly reduced the probability of recurrence; severe brain atrophy and bilateral hematoma were independent risk factors for recurrent CSDH. Conclusions: Atorvastatin administration may decrease the risks of recurrence.Patients with severe brain atrophy and bilateral CSDH are prone to the recurrence. PMID:27445673

  16. Subcapsular hematoma of the graft after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Massarollo, P C B; Shiroma, M E; Rodrigues, A J; Mies, S

    2004-05-01

    Subcapsular hematoma of the graft is an underreported complication of liver transplantation (LT). Among 408 LT performed from September 1, 1985, to September 1, 2000, eight patients developed a subcapsular hematoma within 30 days after LT (8/408 = 2.0%). Among the six early cases observed, five required further surgical approaches due to hematoma progression, rupture, and hemorrhage. One patient underwent liver retransplantation due to uncontrollable hepatic hemorrhage. The two more recent cases were successfully treated by early opening of the Glisson's capsule with hemostasis of the hepatic raw bleeding surface. The five patients who developed acute renal failure required dialysis. Three patients died during hospitalization. Among the survivors, two were discharged on the postoperative (PO) day 15; the others on PO day 37, 38, and 56. In conclusion, subcapsular hematoma of the graft is a potentially serious complication of LT that may produce severe hemorrhage, shock, and in extreme cases, graft loss or even death. The severity of the complication is related to the extension of the decapsulated area of the graft. An early surgical approach with intentional opening of the hematoma before progression of the lesion seems to facilitate hemostasis and improve results.

  17. [Multiple chronic subdural hematoma in shaken-baby syndrome].

    PubMed

    Haga, Sei; Ishido, Katsuya; Inada, Nariyasu; Sakata, Shuji

    2004-08-01

    We described a case of shaken-baby syndrome with multiple chronic subdural hematomas. A 10-month-old male baby was admitted to our hospital because of loss of consciousness and convulsions. CT scan revealed an acute subarachnoid hemorrhage extending into the interhemispheric fissure and supracerebellar space. The patient was treated conservatively, and discharged from the hospitaL Two months after ictus, a baby was admitted to our hospital with general fatigue. CT scan demonstrated multiple chronic subdural hematomas. Burr hole irrigation and drainage brought about complete disappearance of these lesions. Retrospectively, it was found that these multiple subdural hematomas were due to shaken-baby syndrome. Shaken-baby syndrome is a form of child abuse that can cause significant head injury, and subdural hematoma is the most common manifestation. It is well known that the outcome of shaken-baby syndrome is generally not good. It is important to suspect shaken-baby syndrome when a chronic subdural hematoma is seen in a baby.

  18. Splenic hematoma in acute pancreatitis. Role of coagulation disorders.

    PubMed

    Clavé, P; Guillaumes, S; Blanco, I; Martínez de Hurtado, J; Esquius, J; Marruecos, L; Fontcuberta, J; Pérez, C; Farré, A; Lluís, F

    1992-08-01

    Splenic hematomas are infrequent complications of acute pancreatitis. In some cases, local factors that may play a role in the pathogenesis of the hematoma (thrombosis of the splenic artery or veins, intrasplenic pseudocysts, perisplenic adhesions, enzymatic digestion) are found. In the absence of local factors, the etiology of splenic hemorrhage remains unknown. We report two cases of splenic hematoma occurring during an acute necro-hemorrhagic pancreatitis associated with renal failure that required renal replacement therapy (hemodialysis and continuous arteriovenous hemodialysis). In both cases, more than half of splenic parenchyma was affected by multiple infarctions. No local factors responsible for the splenic abnormalities were detected in either case. Thrombosis of the splenic arterial microcirculation and a coagulation disorder consistent with disseminated intravascular coagulation was detected in one patient. In the second patient, coagulation disorders secondary to either liver disease, pancreatitis and its septic complications, or extracorporeal circuit heparinization for renal replacement therapy were present. Coagulation disorders should be considered whenever a splenic hematoma is found in a patient with acute pancreatitis. Disseminated intravascular coagulation may be the etiology of a splenic hematoma in acute pancreatitis.

  19. Bilateral Traumatic Intracranial Hematomas and its Outcome: a Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sharad; Sharma, Vivek; Singh, Kulwant; Pandey, Deepa; Sharma, Mukesh; Patil, Deepak Bhanudas; Shende, Neeraj; Chauhan, Richa Singh

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the age distribution, mode of injury, type of hematomas, and their surgical outcome in patients with bilateral traumatic head injuries. The present study included 669 cases of traumatic head injury who presented at the neurosurgery emergency out of which 94 cases had bilateral head injuries from the period of August 2009 to April 2014. The data from the hospital computerized database were retrospectively analysed. Cases of bilateral traumatic head injury included 94 patients out of which 88.29 % (n = 83) were males and 11.70 % (n = 11) were females. Commonest mode of injury was road traffic accident in 56.38 % (n = 53) followed by fall from height in 29.78 % (n = 28). In our study, 25.53 % patients had epidural hematoma (EDH) with intracerebral hematoma (ICH) or contusion (n = 24), followed by EDH with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in 18.08 % (n = 17). At the time of discharge, all those patients managed conservatively had good Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) while with surgical intervention 58 % patients had good GOS, 19 % had moderate disability, and 9 % remained with severe disability. In cases of bilateral hematomas, EDH is most common and should be managed in neurosurgical emergency. Other combinations of bilateral intracranial hematomas should be managed according to the surgical indication and serial CT imaging.

  20. Transversus abdominal plane block as a sole anesthetic technique for abdominal wall hematoma drainage.

    PubMed

    Varela, N; Golvano, M; Monedero, P

    2016-10-01

    Transversus abdominal plane (TAP) block is a known and useful technique, widely used for postoperative pain management of abdominal wall incisions. During the past years, and following the expansion of ultrasound guided techniques, its use has even gained more adepts. It is usually used as an adjuvant technique, primarily in order to control postoperative pain and reduce opioids consumption. We report the case of an 82 years old patient admitted for drainage of a postoperative abdominal wall hematoma after correction of a McBurney incisional hernia. The corrective surgery had gone on without incident, under general anesthesia with laryngeal mask. Two weeks later, the patient came back to our emergency department with a clear hematoma of the abdominal wall. Surgery was decided. A sole local anesthetic technique was achieved, using a TAP block. The block was performed under ultrasound guidance, using a subcostal approach. The surgery went on without complications. Therefore, TAP block offers a hemodynamic stability, appropriate intra-operative anesthesia and post-surgical analgesia of the abdominal wall. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Chronic subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cyst. Two case histories with pathological observations.

    PubMed

    Takayasu, Takeshi; Harada, Kunyu; Nishimura, Shigeru; Onda, Jun; Nishi, Tohru; Takagaki, Hisashi

    2012-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are well known to induce chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) after head injury. However, histological observations of the arachnoid cyst and hematoma membrane have only been rarely described. An 8-year-old boy and a 3-year-old boy presented with CSDH associated with arachnoid cyst. Surgical removal of the hematoma and biopsy of the hematoma membrane and cyst wall were performed. Clinical courses were good and without recurrence more than 1.5 years after surgery. Histological examination suggested that the cysts did not contribute to hematoma development. Pediatric hematoma membranes, similar to adult hematoma membranes, are key in the growth of CSDH. Therefore, simple hematoma evacuation is adequate as a first operation for CSDH associated with arachnoid cyst.

  2. [Intracerebral hemorrhages following drainage of chronic subdural hematomas].

    PubMed

    Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel; Gutiérrez-Paternina, Juan José; Niño-Hernández, Lucía Mercedes; Polo-Torres, Carolina; Romero-Ramírez, Haroldo; Sabogal-Barrios, Rubén

    2011-01-01

    postoperative intracerebral hemorrhage after drainage of chronic subdural hematoma is a rarely reported complication; however, its incidence, according to different series may be underestimated. this report presents a 77 year old male patient who, after the drainage of bilateral chronic subdural hematomas, developed an extensive hemorrhage in the thalami, basal ganglia, midbrain and pons, with extension into the ventricles and obstructive hydrocephalus. compression by extra-axial collection decreases cerebral blood flow on the affected hemisphere and alters its vascular self-adjustment. The rapid increase in cerebral blood flow in brain areas with altered vascular self-adjustment appears to be the precipitating mechanism of intracerebral hemorrhage after surgical evacuation of chronic subdural hematomas.

  3. Subserosal hematoma of the sigmoid colon after vaginal delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bacalbașa, N; Bohîlțea, RE; Dumitru, M; Turcan, N; Cîrstoiu, MM

    2017-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage is an obstetrical emergency that represents the leading cause of maternal mortality. Severe hemorrhagic complications that could appear postpartum are the abdomino-pelvic hematomas, which result from the rupture of the pelvic vessels. We reported a very rare case of puerperal retroperitoneal subserosal hematoma of sigmoid colon following vaginal delivery, which was successfully managed by conservative methods. As far as we know, there are only a few case reports of intramural hematoma of sigmoid colon in literature, having other etiologies than vaginal delivery trauma. The particularities of the case consisted in the association of hemangiomas and the low risk thrombophilia. Diagnosis was based on the clinical exam and the paraclinical founding. Laparotomy is generally considered the last choice, in life threatening cases with hemodynamic instability, compression signs, and presence of contrast leakage on noninvasive imaging methods, but avoiding colonic resection after dissection represented the true challenge of the case. PMID:28255383

  4. [Subcapsular hematoma and rupture of the liver graft].

    PubMed

    Görög, Dénes; Fehérvári, Imre; Doros, Attila; Nemes, Balázs; Máthé, Zoltán; Kóbori, László; Járay, Jeno

    2008-08-01

    Subcapsular hematoma and/or rupture of the graft is uncommon but serious complication of liver transplantation. It may develop spontaneously or following parenchymal injuries or percutaneous transhepatic invasive procedures. This report describes three cases of subcapsular hematoma and/or rupture of the graft with different courses among 350 liver transplantations. In the first case, the patient died due to graft rupture caused by a pseudoaneurysm after biopsy. In the second case, a small injury of the donor liver resulted in a deep rupture, which required partial resection of the graft. The patient died in sepsis later. The third patient presented with a large subcapsular haematoma during transplantation, which was successfully treated. The authors' strategies developed intraoperatively for the management of hematomas. These involve opening and removing of the haematoma, haemostasis with Argon coagulation, which resulted in an adherent Glisson's capsule to the parenchyma and covering with collagen fleece coated with fibrinogen and thrombin.

  5. Liver Subcapsular Hematoma: A Rare Cause of Sudden Unexpected Death.

    PubMed

    Oualha, Dorra; Aissaoui, Abir; Belhaj, Meriam; Mesrati, Mohamed Amin; Moussa, Adnene; Salem, Nidhal Haj; Zakhama, Abdelfateh; Chadly, Ali

    2017-03-01

    The spontaneous subcapsular hematoma of the liver is very rare. There are only a few reported cases in the literature.Most reported cases of liver hematoma often occur during pregnancy as part of the hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome. The other causes may be due to amylosis, rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma, adenoma, focal nodular hyperplasia, hemorrhagic cyst, or hemopathy. Idiopathic spontaneous subscapular hematoma is a rare and often fatal condition.We report a case of a 43-year-old woman having Steinert disease who died because of a fatal spontaneous liver hemorrhage occurring without any traumatism. We did not find any apparent cause that could explain this hemorrhage even after a histological study of the liver.

  6. [Post-traumatic intramural hematoma of the duodenum].

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Hulin, A; Desbordes, J M

    1986-01-01

    A post-traumatic intramural hematoma of duodenum in a 9 year old child was detected during exploratory laparotomy but left undisturbed. Postoperative follow up during parenteral feeding included surveillance by repeated gastrografin follow through examinations, normal transit being restored by the 12th day. Intramural hematoma of duodenum is usually due to injury and often affects male children. Symptomatology is that of upper digestive occlusion. The principal investigation should be gastro-duodenal follow through examinations with gastrografin, because of the risk of an associated perforation, to reveal possible partial or total duodenal obstruction. Conservative treatment is possible, but in case of failure or in adults surgery is indicated with evacuation of the hematoma and in some cases a gastro-jejunostomy.

  7. Spontaneous sternocleidomastoid muscle hematoma following thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Della Marca, Giacomo; Broccolini, Aldobrando; Pilato, Fabio; Profice, Paolo; Morosetti, Roberta; Caliandro, Pietro; Frisullo, Giovanni

    2014-06-15

    Spontaneous or traumatic bleeding is a common complication of systemic thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke. We report the case of an 83 y.o. woman with right facio-brachio-crural hemiparesis, left deviation of the head and aphasia who developed, after thrombolytic therapy, a spontaneous sternocleidomastoid muscle hematoma that regressed few days later. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature of asymptomatic and spontaneous skeletal muscle hematoma following thrombolysis for the treatment of acute ischemic stroke. The occurrence of lateral cervical tuberculosis lymphadenitis ipsilateral to sternocleidomastoid muscle hematoma may suggest a causal relationship between local chronic inflammation of active mycobacterial infection and thrombolysis-related extravasation. This case should suggest caution in thrombolytic treatment in patients with chronic immune dysregulation and vascular inflammation such as extra-pulmonary tuberculosis.

  8. Retrochorionic hematoma in congenital afibrinogenemia: resolution with fibrinogen concentrate infusions.

    PubMed

    Aygören-Pürsün, E; Martinez Saguer, I; Rusicke, E; Louwen, F; Geka, F; Ivaskevicius, V; Oldenburg, J; Klingebiel, T; Kreuz, W

    2007-04-01

    Without treatment, pregnancies in patients with congenital afibrinogenemia terminate in miscarriage at 5-6 weeks of gestation. Animal model studies have suggested that implantation site bleeding contributes to miscarriage in afibrinogenemia; however, retrochorionic hematoma in human congenital afibrinogenemia has not been previously observed. A patient with congenital afibrinogenemia receiving fibrinogen prophylaxis developed a retrochorionic hematoma in the first trimester. With continuous intensified fibrinogen concentrate replacement the hematoma resolved over 6 weeks, and the patient delivered a healthy infant. Median fibrinogen levels in the first trimester were 48 mg/dL and in second and third trimester 44 mg/dL. Median fibrinogen levels under 60 mg/dL may be adequate to maintain pregnancy in patients with congenital afibrinogenemia, although it is possible that higher levels might reduce the risk of hemorrhagic events.

  9. Review of the Management of Infected Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Dabdoub, Carlos B; Adorno, Juan Oscar; Urbano, Jair; Silveira, Elisabeth N; Orlandi, Bianca Maria M

    2016-03-01

    Infection of a subdural hematoma is an unusual cause of subdural empyema, with fewer than 50 cases reported in the literature. The appropriate surgical option for this entity has not been determined because of its rarity. We present a case report of a post-traumatic subdural hematoma infected with Escherichia coli that was successfully treated with craniotomy. In addition, we performed a PubMed search to comprehensively illustrate the causative organism, source of infection, clinical picture, surgical treatment, and outcome for this condition. This article presents an update on the condition. A 55-year-old man was admitted to our hospital complaining of headache, seizure, and urinary incontinence. He had a history of alcoholism and several hospitalizations for mild head trauma. Neuroimaging studies revealed a chronic hematic collection in the left frontal-parietal region. Laboratory tests showed increased C-reactive protein levels. In addition, surgical results revealed an infected subdural hematoma. A bacterial culture of the purulent specimen identified E. coli. In view of the urinary complaint and leukocyturia, the cause of the infected subdural hematoma was postulated as a urinary tract infection. Infected subdural hematoma is an unusual disorder. We must keep in mind the possibility of this complication when seeing a patient who presents with any of the 3 most common symptoms in this review. In these patients, craniotomy should be the method of surgical drainage, especially in adults. It ensures maximal drainage of the loculated pus and allows the total removal of the infected hematoma capsule. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Delayed postoperative hematoma formation after inflatable penile prosthesis implantation.

    PubMed

    Garber, Bruce B; Bickell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Infrequent but serious postoperative complications following inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP) insertion include infection, malfunction, and bleeding. Although prior publications report methods to reduce immediate postoperative bleeding, there is little in the literature concerning the etiology, diagnosis, imaging, and management of delayed bleeding after IPP insertion. The aim of the study was to review cases of delayed postoperative bleeding following IPP insertion in a large single-surgeon series. We carried out a retrospective chart review of 600 patients implanted with a Coloplast Titan IPP with One-Touch Release pump by a single surgeon, and analyzed cases of delayed postoperative bleeding. The main outcome measure was an analysis of the incidence, causes, diagnostic methods, treatment, and final outcome of these cases. Three out of 600 consecutive patients (0.5%) developed a delayed (defined as >5 days postoperative) hematoma following IPP insertion. All patients presented postoperatively with a swollen surgical site, and all were evaluated with a pelvic computed tomography scan to completely define the extent of the hematoma. Two patients developed a delayed hematoma because of excessive physical activity; the remaining patient bled because of premature administration of enoxaparin sodium (Lovenox) by his cardiologist. All three patients were successfully treated with hospital admission, intravenous antibiotics, wound exploration, hematoma evacuation, and antibiotic washout. All three IPPs were successfully salvaged; none developed peri-prosthetic infection. The incidence of delayed postoperative hematoma following IPP surgery was 0.5% in our series of 600 cases. All cases were successfully managed with intravenous antibiotics, hematoma evacuation, and antibiotic washout. Because of the low incidence of this complication, definitive statements concerning prevention and management cannot be made. However, we now recommend avoiding postoperative

  11. [Chronic spinal subdural hematoma associated with chronic intracranial subdural hematoma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masateru; Fukuda, Shin; Ikeda, Hisato; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2009-10-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with chronic spinal subdural hematoma (CSSH) associated with intracranial chronic subdural hematoma (CSH), manifesting as pain in the bilateral buttocks and posterior thighs. She had fallen and struck her lumbar region and occiput while walking 2 weeks previously. Neurological examination on admission demonstrated no paresis of the lower extremities. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed left CSH. Irrigation and drainage were performed the day after admission (3 weeks after injury). The gait disturbance disappeared and the pain of the bilateral buttocks and posterior thighs improved postoperatively. However, the pain reocurred 3 days after the operation. Brain CT showed no recurrence of CSH. Lumbar spinal radiography demonstrated spondylolisthesis at the L3-4 intervertebral space. Sagittal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed CSSH extending from the T-12 level to the sacrum as isointense to the spinal cord on T1-weighted images. Axial MR imaging showed the CSSH located in the subdural space and was compressing the cauda equina anteriorly. The pain was not so severe and she refused surgery. Therefore, we selected conservative treatment and observed her clinical course as an outpatient. Her pain had gradually improved at 3 months after injury, and disappeared at 4 months. MR imaging showed reduction of the CSSH 2 months after injury, and almost complete disappearance at 5 months. CSSH is a rare disease, but early diagnosis is important because remission can be achieved by early operation. The present case illustrates spontaneous resolution is also possible, so observation may be selected if the symptoms are mild and without motor weakness. (Received: March 25, 2009, Accepted :June 16, 2009)

  12. Chronic subdural hematoma - an up-to-date concept.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoji; Ohno, Kikuo

    2013-06-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is prevalent among elderly populations worldwide, and its mysterious pathogenesis has been discussed in the literature for decades. The issues remaining to be solved in regard to CSDH include the initiating events; the bleeding into the subdural space and the formation of the outer and inner membranes, its development; increase and liquefaction of hematoma, the optimal treatments, and the natural history. The pathophysiology is becoming more clear due to recent findings from computed tomography studies and human models of CSDH. In this work, we review previous studies on CSDH and present a new integrated concept about the development of this common condition after head injuries.

  13. Subcapsular hematoma of the liver after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Geeta S; Falconer, J Stuart; Benyounes, Hakim

    2005-02-01

    Two female patients underwent an uneventful laparoscopic chloecystectomy (LC) for cholelithiasis. Their past medical history was insignificant. The first patient had diclofenac sodium for her postoperative pain relief. Both patients returned in the early postoperative period with pain in the right hypochondrium. Laboratory investigations revealed elevated leucocytes, C reactive protein (CRP), and deranged liver function tests. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed subcapsular haematoma of liver. CT-guided aspiration of hematoma was done in one case. Both patients improved over a period of time and a follow-up radiological scan showed resolving hematoma. The presentation, diagnostic evaluation, treatment, and possible causes are discussed.

  14. Two rare cases of intrahepatic subcapsular hematoma after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Minaya Bravo, Ana María; González González, Enrique; Ortíz Aguilar, Manuel; Larrañaga Barrera, Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    The appearance of subcapsular liver hematoma after a laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is an infrequent complication and seldom studied. Some cases have been connected to ketorolac given during surgery and after surgery. Other described causes are : hemangiomas or small iatrogenic lesions that could be aggravated by administration of ketorolac. Coagulation dysfunction like circulating heparin as seen in hemathological diseases is cause of bleeding after aggressive procedures. We describe two cases of subcapsular liver hematoma after LC, both of them have been given intravenous ketorolac and one of them had multiple myeloma. We discuss the causes and treatment of it.

  15. Subcapsular Liver Hematoma in HELLP Syndrome: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kapan, Murat; Evsen, Mehmet Siddik; Gumus, Metehan; Onder, Akin; Tekbas, Guven

    2010-06-01

    Subcapsular liver hematoma, as a rare complication of HELLP syndrome, must be managed in a tertiary center for prompt recognition and treatment with close monitoring of hemodynamic and coagulation parameters, treatment of underlying disorders, and assessment by the imaging techniques. These patients underwent different therapeutic options varying from conservative therapy to operative management, including liver transplantation. As a choice of treatment, patients with HELLP syndrome can be followed up conservatively in stable hemodynamic conditions. In this report, we presented a 32-year-old woman with subcapsular liver hematoma secondary to HELLP syndrome managed conservatively.

  16. Spontaneous Meckel's cave hematoma: A rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Alafaci, Concetta; Grasso, Giovanni; Granata, Francesca; Marino, Daniele; Salpietro, Francesco M.; Tomasello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background: The most common etiology of classic trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is vascular compression. However, other causes must be considered. Among these, spontaneous hematoma of the Meckel's cave (MC) causing symptomatic TN is very rare. Case Description: We present the case of a 60-year-old woman with a 2-month history of left TN and diplopia. Neuroradiological examinations revealed a well-defined hematoma in the left MC. The patient underwent surgical decompression with a progressive neurological improvement. Conclusion: Despite the number of lesions potentially affecting the MC, spontaneous hemorrhage is rare but should be taken into account in the differential diagnosis. PMID:26539319

  17. A Giant Parietal Wall Hematoma: Unusual Complication of Laparoscopic Appendectomy

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sanjay; Shetty, Sadanand V.

    2000-01-01

    Laparoscopic appendectomy is an established procedure in the treatment of appendicitis. Complications of the procedure are related to the Veress needle and trocar insertions or pertain to actual operative procedures. Trocar-related major bleeding is rare, and, if it occurs, is detected on the table or during the immediate postoperative period. Delay in recognition may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. We report a case of giant parietal wall hematoma in a 34-year-old female, presenting one week after discharge from the hospital. The hematoma was completely evacuated by exploration through paramedian incision, followed by an uneventful recovery. PMID:10987406

  18. Enlarged cerebrospinal fluid spaces in infants with subdural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kapila, A.; Trice, J.; Spies, W.G.; Siegel, B.A.; Gado, M.H.

    1982-03-01

    Computed tomography in 16 infants with subdural hematomas showed enlarged basal cisterns, a wide interhemispheric fissure, prominent cortical sulci, and varying degrees of ventricular enlargement. Radionuclide cisternography in eight of the 16 patients showed findings consistent with enlargement of the subarachnoid space rather than those of communicating hydrocephalus. Clinical findings and brief follow-up showed no convincing evidence for cerebral atrophy in 13 patients. These findings suggest that the enlarged subarachnoid space, which is encountered in some infants and may be a developmental variant, predisposes such infants to subdural hematomas.

  19. Spontaneous epidural hematoma due to cervico-thoracic angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Eap, C; Bannwarth, M; Jazeron, J-F; Kleber, J-C; Theret, É; Duntze, J; Litre, C-F

    2015-12-01

    Epidural angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumors of the spine. Their clinical presentation is usually a progressive spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient who presented with an acute paraparesis and a spontaneous epidural hematoma, which revealed a epidural angiolipoma which extended from C7 to T3. The patient underwent a C7-T3 laminectomy, in emergency, with evacuation of the hematoma and extradural complete resection of a fibrous epidural tumor bleeding. The postoperative course was favorable with regression of neurological symptoms. Epidural angiolipomas can be revealed by spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage without traumatism. The standard treatment is total removal by surgery.

  20. [Isolated cheiro-facial formication caused by a thalamic hematoma].

    PubMed

    Awada, A

    1989-01-01

    A 25 year-old Saudi female patient presented with numbness of the left half of the face and the tongue and the left hand. Neurological and neuropsychological examinations were normal. Brain CT showed a small hematoma (5 to 7 mm diameter) of the right thalamus probably destroying or compressing the ventropostero-median and ventropostero-lateral thalamic nuclei. Thalamic hematoma has been reported only twice as a cause of pure sensory stroke. The absence of clinical signs together with the presence of symptoms, and the particular topography of the symptoms are discussed.

  1. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882.1935 Section 882.1935 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma...

  2. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882.1935 Section 882.1935 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma...

  3. 21 CFR 882.1935 - Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. 882.1935 Section 882.1935 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector. (a) Identification. A Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma...

  4. Surgery for Bilateral Large Intracranial Traumatic Hematomas: Evacuation in a Single Session

    PubMed Central

    Kompheak, Heng; Kim, Dong-Sung; Shin, Dong-Sung; Kim, Bum-Tae

    2014-01-01

    Objective Management guidelines for single intracranial hematomas have been established, but the optimal management of multiple hematomas has little known. We present bilateral traumatic supratentorial hematomas that each has enough volume to be evacuated and discuss how to operate effectively it in a single anesthesia. Methods In total, 203 patients underwent evacuation and/or decompressive craniectomies for acute intracranial hematomas over 5 years. Among them, only eight cases (3.9%) underwent operations for bilateral intracranial hematomas in a single session. Injury mechanism, initial Glasgow Coma Scale score, types of intracranial lesions, surgical methods, and Glasgow outcome scale were evaluated. Results The most common injury mechanism was a fall (four cases). The types of intracranial lesions were epidural hematoma (EDH)/intracerebral hematoma (ICH) in five, EDH/EDH in one, EDH/subdural hematoma (SDH) in one, and ICH/SDH in one. All cases except one had an EDH. The EDH was addressed first in all cases. Then, the evacuation of the ICH was performed through a small craniotomy or burr hole. All patients except one survived. Conclusion Bilateral intracranial hematomas that should be removed in a single-session operation are rare. Epidural hematomas almost always occur in these cases and should be removed first to prevent the hematoma from growing during the surgery. Then, the other hematoma, contralateral to the EDH, can be evacuated with a small craniotomy. PMID:25237431

  5. Prediction and Observation of Post-Admission Hematoma Expansion in Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ovesen, Christian; Havsteen, Inger; Rosenbaum, Sverre; Christensen, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Post-admission hematoma expansion in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) comprises a simultaneous major clinical problem and a possible target for medical intervention. In any case, the ability to predict and observe hematoma expansion is of great clinical importance. We review radiological concepts in predicting and observing post-admission hematoma expansion. Hematoma expansion can be observed within the first 24 h after symptom onset, but predominantly occurs in the early hours. Thus capturing markers of on-going bleeding on imaging techniques could predict hematoma expansion. The spot sign observed on computed tomography angiography is believed to represent on-going bleeding and is to date the most well investigated and reliable radiological predictor of hematoma expansion as well as functional outcome and mortality. On non-contrast CT, the presence of foci of hypoattenuation within the hematoma along with the hematoma-size is reported to be predictive of hematoma expansion and outcome. Because patients tend to arrive earlier to the hospital, a larger fraction of acute ICH-patients must be expected to undergo hematoma expansion. This renders observation and radiological follow-up investigations increasingly relevant. Transcranial duplex sonography has in recent years proven to be able to estimate hematoma volume with good precision and could be a valuable tool in bedside serial observation of acute ICH-patients. Future studies will elucidate, if better prediction and observation of post-admission hematoma expansion can help select patients, who will benefit from hemostatic treatment. PMID:25324825

  6. Medicolegal cases for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    French, Keisha L; Daniels, Eldra W; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2013-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess are rare surgical emergencies resulting in significant neurologic deficits. Making the diagnosis for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess can be challenging; however, a delay in recognition and treatment can be devastating. The objective of this retrospective analysis study was to identify risk factors for an adverse outcome for the provider. The LexisNexis Academic legal search database was used to identify a total of 19 cases of spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess filed against medical providers. Outcome data on trial verdicts, age, sex, initial site of injury, time to consultation, time to appropriate imaging studies, time to surgery, and whether a rectal examination was performed or not were recorded. The results demonstrated a significant association between time to surgery more than 48 hours and an unfavorable verdict for the provider. The degree of permanent neurologic impairment did not appear to affect the verdicts. Fifty-eight percent of the cases did not present with an initial deficit, including loss of bowel or bladder control. All medical professionals must maintain a high level of suspicion and act quickly. Physicians who are able to identify early clinical features, appropriately image, and treat within a 48 hour time frame have demonstrated a more favorable medicolegal outcome compared with their counterparts in filed lawsuits for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess cases.

  7. Hepatic subcapsular hematoma: a rare late complication after ERCP.

    PubMed

    Servide, María José; Prieto, Mikel; Marquina, Teresa

    2016-04-01

    We present a clinical case of a 83 years old man, who consulted to the Emergency Department by continuous pain in right upper quadrant, having been discharged a week ago after ERCP for choledocholithiasis. TAC was performed showing a subcapsular hematoma without active bleeding. This complication post ERCP has been described on few occasions.

  8. [Subcapsular hepatic hematoma: an uncommon complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography].

    PubMed

    Baudet, Juan-Salvador; Arguiñarena, Xabier; Redondo, Ignacio; Tadeo, Eva; Navazo, Lucía; Mendiz, Javier; Montiel, Raquel

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the case of a patient who developed a subcapsular hepatic hematoma 48 hours after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. She was treated by embolizing the sites of bleeding and by surgically resecting the area. We review the literature and discuss the potential mechanisms that cause this complication.

  9. Left atrial intramural hematoma after percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Franks, Russell J; de Souza, Anthony; Di Mario, Carlo

    2015-09-01

    We describe a rare complication of a complex chronic total occlusion recanalization procedure. Perforation of a distal right coronary artery collateral results in a left atrial intramural hematoma with consequent circulatory collapse. Access to prompt transoesophageal echocardiography and urgent surgical intervention were lifesaving and the case highlights possible implications on the planning of complex chronic total occlusion recanalization procedures.

  10. Delayed Acute Subdural Hematoma Associated With Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tabuse, Masanao; Miyazaki, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Delayed acute subdural hematoma (DASH) is a subdural hematoma which is detected later. An initial computed tomography (CT) does not reveal any intracranial hemorrhage at all. Few patients of DASH after mild traumatic brain injury associated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have been published. Patient Presentation: A 63-year-old woman presented with cardiac pulmonary arrest due to acute myocardial infarction and lethal arrhythmia. She had hit her head on the road. The initial CT did not reveal any hemorrhage in the intra-cranium. She fully recovered after PCI. However, 1 hour after PCI, she lost consciousness and immediate CT showed acute subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage. The period from losing consciousness to brain herniation presenting as anisocoria was very short—only 30 minutes in our patient. Although emergent evacuation of hematoma and external decompression were performed, the patient died 1 day after the operation. Conclusion: The authors encountered a patient of DASH after PCI that resulted in death. Clinicians should be aware that subdural hemorrhage can occur after PCI if no hemorrhage is noted in the initial head CT, and the operation should be performed as soon as possible when the consciousness level decreases. PMID:27526240

  11. Traumatic bilateral basal ganglia hematoma: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Pranshu; Grewal, Sarvpreet Singh; Gupta, Bharat; Jain, Vikas; Sobti, Harman

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic Basal ganglia hemorrhage is relatively uncommon. Bilateral basal ganglia hematoma after trauma is extremely rare and is limited to case reports. We report two cases of traumatic bilateral basal ganglia hemorrhage, and review the literature in brief. Both cases were managed conservatively. PMID:23293672

  12. Rectus sheath hematoma: a complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, D; Jessel, J; Freund, U

    1992-12-01

    We describe a complication in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The routine introduction of a midclavicular secondary trocar resulted in a large hematoma of the rectus sheath. The patient developed atelectasis and pneumonia and required extended hospitalization. This previously described complication is detailed with recommendations to prevent its occurrence.

  13. Duodenal hematoma caused by endoscopic hemostatic procedures (sclerotherapy).

    PubMed

    Irisarri Garde, Rebeca; Vila Costas, Juan José

    2017-09-01

    Endoscopic hemostatic procedures such as local injection of epinephrine are commonly used for the treatment of bleeding ulcers. Although the risks are usually considered to be minimal, there are reports describing that duodenal intramural hematomas may develop as a complication after endoscopy especially in patients susceptible to hemorrhage such as those with anticoagulants therapy or blood dyscrasia.

  14. iPhone-Assisted Augmented Reality Localization of Basal Ganglia Hypertensive Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Hou, YuanZheng; Ma, LiChao; Zhu, RuYuan; Chen, XiaoLei

    2016-10-01

    A low-cost, time-efficient technique that could localize hypertensive hematomas in the basal ganglia would be beneficial for minimally invasive hematoma evacuation surgery. We used an iPhone to achieve this goal and evaluated its accuracy and feasibility. We located basal ganglia hematomas in 26 patients and depicted the boundaries of the hematomas on the skin. To verify the accuracy of the drawn boundaries, computed tomography (CT) markers surrounding the depicted boundaries were attached to 10 patients. The deviation between the CT markers and the actual hematoma boundaries was then measured. In the other 16 patients, minimally invasive endoscopic hematoma evacuation surgery was performed according to the depicted hematoma boundary. The deflection angle of the actual trajectory and deviation in the hematoma center were measured according to the preoperative and postoperative CT data. There were 40 CT markers placed on 10 patients. The mean deviation of these markers was 3.1 mm ± 2.4. In the 16 patients who received surgery, the deflection angle of the actual trajectory was 4.3° ± 2.1. The deviation in the hematoma center was 5.2 mm ± 2.6. This new method can locate basal ganglia hematomas with a sufficient level of accuracy and is helpful for minimally invasive endoscopic hematoma evacuation surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [A case of liver abscess with subcapsular hematoma mimicking ruptured hepatic cholangiocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Kim, Chung Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hyun Jung; Lee, Young Sun; Choi, Jong Hwan; Jung, Young Kul; Yeon, Jong Eun; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2009-03-01

    Subcapsular hematoma is a very rare complication of liver abscess. We report a case of liver abscess with subcapsular hematoma mimicking ruptured hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. A 59-year-old man presented with right upper quadrant pain and febrile sense. Computed tomography showed a low attenuated mass with extensive subcapsular hematoma on the right hepatic lobe. The initial impression was a hematoma caused by the rupture of cholangiocarcinoma. Hepatic arteriography was performed, but no active bleeding focus was found. After drainage of the subcapsular hematoma, a hematoma wall biopsy through the drainage catheter and a liver biopsy of the low attenuated mass were performed. The biopsies showed many neutrophils, macrophages, and granulation tissues consistent with an abscess, but no malignant cells were detected. After antibiotics therapy for 6 weeks, computed tomography was performed 4 months later, and revealed complete resolution of the hematoma and the low attenuated hepatic lesion.

  16. Rapid onset mediastinal hematoma due to vertebral fracture and review of relevant literature.

    PubMed

    Koksal, Vaner; Coskun, Selcuk; Coskun, Pinar Koksal

    2015-12-01

    Patients with vertebral fractures are frequently encountered and those with thoracic and lumbar spine fractures are likely to have associated injuries. Detection of a widened mediastinum after trauma is very nonspecific and most of the time it is related to aortic injury or mediastinal hematoma. Vertebral or sternal fractures can also be the cause of mediastinal hematoma with or without aortic injury. This report reviews an unusual case of rapid onset mediastinal hematoma due to vertebral fracture after a fall. In the case, there was a mediastinal hematoma adjacent to a burst fracture of the T8 vertebral body. There was a rapid increase in identified hematoma during the emergency follow up and urgent erythrocyte transfusion was carried out. We would like to raise awareness of this infrequent presentation of mediastinal hematoma, as it is insidious and possibly fatal. In the evaluation of mediastinal hematoma, the detection of osseous injuries is a requirement.

  17. Optoacoustic detection of intra- and extracranial hematomas in rats after blast injury

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Andrey; Wynne, Karon E.; Parsley, Margaret A.; Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Ruppert, Katherine A.; Prough, Donald S.; DeWitt, Douglas S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical drainage of intracranial hematomas is often required within the first four hours after traumatic brain injury (TBI) to avoid death or severe disability. Although CT and MRI permit hematoma diagnosis, they can be used only at a major health-care facility. This delays hematoma diagnosis and therapy. We proposed to use an optoacoustic technique for rapid, noninvasive diagnosis of hematomas. In this study we developed a near-infrared OPO-based optoacoustic system for hematoma diagnosis and cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring in rats. A specially-designed blast device was used to inflict TBI in anesthetized rats. Optoacoustic signals were recorded from the superior sagittal sinus and hematomas that allowed for measurements of their oxygenations. These results indicate that the optoacoustic technique may be used for early diagnosis of hematomas and may provide important information for improving outcomes in patients with TBI. PMID:25302157

  18. Why Cannot Suction Drains Prevent Postoperative Spinal Epidural Hematoma?

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Dong Ki; Kim, Jin Woo; Yi, Seong Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative spinal epidural hematoma (POSEH) is different from spontaneous or post-spinal procedure hematoma because of the application of suction drains. However, it appeared that suction drains were not effective for prevention of POSEH in previous studies. The purpose of this study was to test our hypothesis that POSEH can be caused by hypercoagulability. Methods This was an experimental study. One hundred fifty milliliters of blood was donated from each of the 12 consecutive patients who underwent spine surgery and infused into 3 saline bags of 50 mL each. One of the 3 bags in each set contained 5,000 units of thrombin. All of them were connected to 120 ± 30 mmHg vacuum suctions: drainage was started 8 minutes after connection to the vacuum system for 12 normal blood bags (BV8) and 12 thrombin-containing blood bags (TBV8) and 15 minutes after connection for the remaining 12 normal blood bags (BV15). The amount of initial and remaining hematoma at 20 minutes, 120 minutes, and 24 hours after vacuum application were measured by their weight (g). The primary endpoint was the difference between BV8 and TBV8. The secondary end point was the difference between BV8 and BV15. Results The remaining hematoma in TBV8 was significantly greater than that in BV8 at all measurement points: 46.3 ± 12.4 vs. 17.0 ± 1.3 (p = 0.000) at 20 minutes; 33.0 ± 8.2 vs. 16.3 ± 1.2 (p = 0.000) at 120 minutes; and 26.1 ± 4.0 vs. 15.8 ± 1.6 (p = 0.000) at 24 hours after vacuum application. The remaining hematoma of BV15 was significantly greater than that of BV8 at all measurement points: 30.0 ± 12.0 vs. 17.0 ± 1.3 (p = 0.002) at 20 minutes; 24.2 ± 7.6 vs. 16.3 ± 1.2 at 120 minutes (p = 0.002); and 22.2 ± 6.6 vs. 15.8 ± 1.6 (p = 0.004) at 24 hours after vacuum application. Conclusions With a suction drain in place, the amount of remaining hematoma could be affected by coagulability. Thrombin-containing local hemostatics and the length of time elapsed before the

  19. The question is whether hemiparesis is more common in unilateral than bilateral chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Juković, Mirela; Petrović, Kosta; Till, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma is an intracranial hemorrhagic lesion that illustrates various expressions in clinical and radiological practice. The aim of this study was to emphasize the correlation between the brain site of chronic subdural hematoma and clinical symptoms/signs of disease. Furthermore, the study denotes the significance of hemiparesis occurrence in the patients with unilateral chronic subdural hematomas more than in those with bilateral ones, associated with time required to diagnose hematoma. A three-year study included 72 patients with chronic subdural hematoma. According to their clinical and neurological symptoms on hospital admission, all patients underwent non-contrast brain computed tomography scan, which confirmed the diagnosis. The radiological parameters, including the site of chronic subdural hematoma, a hematoma width and midline shift were recorded to give precise data about the correlation with neurological symptoms. A special focus was put on the lag time between the onset of symptoms and signs to diagnosis of chronic subdural hematoma. The study proved that the patients with unilateral chronic subdural hematoma had more frequent occurrence of hemiparesis than the patients with bilateral chronic subdural hematoma. It took the left-sided chronic subdural hematomas less time (about 200 hours earlier) than the right-sided ones to present its symptoms although the average hematoma diameter value was almost the same. The site and the form of intracranial lesion-chronic subdural hematoma could have a great influence on neurological and functional condition in a patient. Although the length of time required for making diagnosis as well as clinical symptoms greatly differ and the latter are not always so clear, physicians should maintain a high level of suspicion for this disease and thus contribute to prompt diagnosis and better clinical outcome of patients.

  20. A spinal epidural hematoma with symptoms mimicking cerebral stroke.

    PubMed

    Shima, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Muneyoshi; Nomura, Motohiro; Mori, Kentaro; Miyashita, Katsuyoshi; Tamase, Akira; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Osuka, Koji; Takayasu, Masakazu

    2012-02-01

    A spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma (SCEH) is a rare condition, which usually requires urgent treatment. However, unusual manifestations, such as hemiparesis, may lead to a misdiagnosis. We herein report a case of SCEH that presented with pure motor hemiparesis to discuss the appropriate and prompt diagnosis and treatment of such cases. An 84-year-old female was brought to our emergency department complaining of nuchal pain, followed by right hemiparesis. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of the neck demonstrated a spinal epidural hematoma right posterolateral to the spinal cord, extending from C2 to C3. She was managed conservatively and her symptoms improved significantly. The authors emphasize that cervical spinal lesions should be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients with acute onset of hemiparesis, when they are associated with neck pain. Even though magnetic resonance imaging is the gold standard, a CT scan is also useful for quick screening for SCEH.

  1. Hepatic subcapsular hematoma: two neonates with disparate presentations.

    PubMed

    Anjay, Maliyackel Aiyappanpillai; Sasidharan, Chaniyil Krishnan; Anoop, Parameswaran

    2012-04-01

    Subcapsular hematoma of the liver rarely occurs in neonates and the diagnosis is often missed or delayed. We report two babies who had this uncommon condition in the early neonatal period. In the first baby, the hematoma was associated with ventouse delivery and presented with abdominal distension and worsening jaundice. In contrast, the other baby was relatively well, with progressive pallor as the only clinical finding. The former had no other identifiable risk factors, whereas the latter was confirmed as having classical hemophilia. The literature is briefly reviewed with regards to incidence, etiology, diagnosis and management. Awareness of this unusual entity coupled with a high index of suspicion is essential for early identification and stabilization of such babies.

  2. Postpartum spontaneous subcapsular hepatic hematoma related to preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Anyfantakis, Dimitrios; Kastanakis, Miltiades; Fragiadakis, Georgios; Karona, Paraskevi; Katsougris, Nikolaos; Bobolakis, Emmanouil

    2014-01-01

    Subcapsular hematoma of the liver represents an unusual clinical phenomenon in the pregnancy and postpartum period with serious complications in terms of fetal and maternal mortality. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old primiparous female at 36 weeks of gestation, admitted to a maternity ward of a private clinic for preeclampsia. The woman underwent an emergency caesarean section with the extraction of an alive foetus. A few hours after delivery, she was transferred to the emergency department of our institution complaining of severe epigastric pain. Diagnostic work-up was suggestive of a subcapsular right lob hepatic hematoma which was successfully managed conservatively. Timely diagnosis is necessary for the prevention of life-threatening events in mother and fetus. For this reason acute care physicians have to be vigilant of the condition and consider this in the differential diagnosis of epigastric pain during pregnancy and postpartum.

  3. [A Case of Spinal Epidural Hematoma Presenting with Transient Hemiplegia].

    PubMed

    Komai, Takanori; Nakashima, Kazuya; Tominaga, Takashi; Nogaki, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with spinal epidural hematoma who presented with transient hemiplegia. A 90-year-old man awakened from sleep due to sudden neck pain. Fifteen minutes later, the man experienced progressively worsening weakness in his left hand, and was transported in an ambulance to our hospital. At the hospital, he presented with hemiplegia, and we suspected intracranial disease. Therefore, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which revealed no intracranial lesions. Shortly after the MRI, the patient showed no signs of hemiplegia. However, since the severe neck pain persisted, we performed cervical MRI, which showed a high-intensity area at the C2-C5 level, predominantly on the left side. Despite recovery from hemiplegia, we performed a laminectomy of C3-C5 with evacuation of a hematoma at the C2-C6 level. After the surgery, the patient had no neck pain.

  4. Posterior left atrial wall hematoma mimicking cystic intracavitary atrial mass.

    PubMed

    Bahnacy, Yasser; Suresh, Cheriyil; Dawoud, Hamed; Zubaid, Mohammad

    2010-10-01

    Atrial myxoma is the most common benign primary tumor of the heart most commonly in the left atrium (LA). Cystic or cavitated intracardiac masses are rare. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient admitted with chest infection, hemoptysis, and severe respiratory distress, who had to be ventilated. Chest computed tomography showed bilateral lung consolidation with large mass occupying the region of the LA. Transthoracic echocardiography and transesophageal echocardiography showed a large intracavitary left atrial cystic mobile mass. Open-heart surgical exploration did not show any mass inside the LA. A posterior left atrial wall hematoma was found and evacuated. Biopsies confirmed the presence of blood clots. Posterior left atrial wall hematoma may appear as left atrial intracavitary cystic mass and should be included in the differential diagnosis of cystic left atrial mass.

  5. Diplopia from Subacute Bilateral Subdural Hematoma after Spinal Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Hassen, Getaw Worku; Kalantari, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Subdural hematoma (SDH) is a rare, but life-threatening complication of spinal anesthesia. Subdural hematoma resulting from this procedure could present with vague symptoms such as chronic headache and could easily be missed. Chronic headache is one of the symptoms of chronic SDH in postpartum women. Diplopia as the presenting complaint in SDH secondary to peripartum spinal anesthesia has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported. Here, we report a case of diplopia secondary to postpartum subacute bilateral SDHs with transtentorial herniation after spinal anesthesia in a healthy primagravid 25-year-old woman. SDH can expand gradually and the initial symptoms might be subtle as in our case, despite critically high intracranial pressure. PMID:22461938

  6. [Chronic subdural hematoma of the posterior cranial fossa].

    PubMed

    Kachkov, I A; Rusinov, A I; Stashuk, G A

    1999-01-01

    The 41-year-old patient experienced a trauma in childhood. Her examination revealed the hypertensive syndrome, truncal and cerebellar symptoms, suboccipital pain. Computed tomography indicated that in the posterior cranial fossa was a 48 x 78 x 37-mm spreading from the tentorium of the cerebellum to the foramen magnum and descending along the clivus. At surgery, chronic subdural hematoma of the posterior cranial fossa was totally removed, the total volume of liquid and dense fractions was as high as 100 ml. After surgery, the patient recovered working capacity. The interest of this clinical case is due to a rare traumatic pathology, long disease, problematic preoperative diagnosis of chronic hematoma, a large formation, fair postoperative outcome.

  7. Small supratentorial, extraaxial primitive neuroectodermal tumor causing large intracerebral hematoma.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Kockro, Ralf A; Dohmen-Scheufler, Hildegard; Woernle, Christoph M; Bellut, David; Kollias, Spyros; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy presented with an unusual case of a supratentorial, extraaxial small round blue cell tumor of the central nervous system, which was most likely a primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET). Preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a large multistage hematoma in the left central region. Intraoperatively, a small, superficial tumorous lesion was found between the sagittal sinus and a large cortical vein hidden by the hematoma. The histological diagnosis was PNET. This tumor is one of the most aggressive intracerebral tumors, not only in children, so treatment strategies must be early, profound, and interdisciplinary. This case represents an important example of atypical extraaxial appearance of this lesion, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cortical or subcortical hemorrhage, since complete resection of this lesion is critical for the successful treatment and outcome.

  8. Treatment of septal hematomas and abscesses in children.

    PubMed

    Menger, Dirk Jan; Tabink, Ivar; Nolst Trenité, Gilbert J

    2007-11-01

    The cartilaginous part of the nasal septum of a child with a septal hematoma or abscess is at risk of destruction. Consequently, the noses of these children can collapse, causing a saddle nose deformity, and in time, the normal outgrowth of both the nose and maxilla will be disturbed. In adulthood, they will have an underdeveloped saddle nose deformity with too much upward rotation of the nasal tip and a retroposition of the midface. Sequelae like these should be prevented by prompt diagnosis and surgical intervention. In this article, the management of septal hematomas and abscesses is discussed with special focus on reconstruction of destructed septal cartilage with the use of autologous cartilage grafts fixed to a polydioxanon plate.

  9. Intracranial subdural empyema mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Patel, Mohit; Nguyen, Ha Son; Mountoure, Andrew; Shabani, Saman; Gelsomino, Michael; Janich, Karl; Kurpad, Shekar

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial subdural empyema (ISDE) is a life-threatening condition. The risk for ISDE increases in patients that have undergone prior intracranial procedures. The non-specificity in its clinical presentation often makes ISDE difficult to diagnose. Here, we present a rare case of ISDE mimicking a recurrent chronic subdural hematoma, emphasizing the significance of obtaining early magnetic resonance images of the brain for early diagnosis and treatment to achieve the optimal outcome. PMID:27651110

  10. Congenital afibrinogenemia: a case report of a spontaneous hepatic hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Malaquin, Stephanie; Rebibo, Lionel; Chivot, Cyril; Badoux, Louise; Mahjoub, Yazine; Dupont, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Afibrinogenemia is a rare coagulation disorder. Clinical features of spontaneous bleeding, bleeding after minor trauma, or after surgery have been described as well as thrombo-embolic complications. In this article, we presented the case of a 19-year old female with congenital afibrinogenemia who was admitted with a spontaneous intrahepatic hematoma. Conclusions: Supportive treatment including transfusion and fibrinogen administration, associated with repeated packing surgeries and selective embolization, were successfully performed. PMID:27428204

  11. Femoral Nerve Palsy due to Anticoagulant Induced Retroperitoneal Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Gurbuz, Orcun; Ercan, Abdulkadir; Kumtepe, Gencehan; Karal, İlker Hasan; Velioglu, Yusuf; Ener, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    A forty-one-year-old man who, sought evaluation for a sudden hip flexion contracture and groin pain with a history of mechanical mitral valve replacement, had been misdiagnosed and treated as having lumbar discopathy for two days. This patient finally was diagnosed with compressive femoral neuropathy due to warfarin-induced retroperitoneal hematoma and successfully managed nonoperatively. This case is reported in order to draw attention to this rare presentation. PMID:25386195

  12. [Ruptured subcapsular hepatic hematoma associated with HELLP syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pilco, Paul; McCormack, Lucas; Perez, Daniel; Clavien, P A

    2006-01-01

    HELLP syndrome is a rare condition related to pregnancy; however, it can cause complications such as a ruptured subcapsular hepatic hematoma. In most cases, this is managed surgically, but the mortality rate is high, up to 50% of all patients. We present a case with conservative management by percutaneous embolization of the right hepatic artery with a successful outcome and we propose a modern treatment algorithm.

  13. Loculated cardiac hematoma causing hemodynamic compromise after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Andreia; Cassandra, Miryan; Pinto, Carlos; Oliveira, Catarina; Antunes, Manuel; Gonçalves, Lino

    2015-09-01

    The authors describe a case of a rare complication occurring after cardiac surgery. Three weeks after aortic valve replacement a young male became hemodynamically unstable. The echocardiogram showed a large loculated hematoma compressing the right atrium. The patient was reoperated and the mass was removed. Recovery was complete. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. Congenital afibrinogenemia: a case report of a spontaneous hepatic hematoma.

    PubMed

    Malaquin, Stephanie; Rebibo, Lionel; Chivot, Cyril; Badoux, Louise; Mahjoub, Yazine; Dupont, Herve

    2016-07-01

    Afibrinogenemia is a rare coagulation disorder. Clinical features of spontaneous bleeding, bleeding after minor trauma, or after surgery have been described as well as thrombo-embolic complications. In this article, we presented the case of a 19-year old female with congenital afibrinogenemia who was admitted with a spontaneous intrahepatic hematoma. Supportive treatment including transfusion and fibrinogen administration, associated with repeated packing surgeries and selective embolization, were successfully performed.

  15. Iliopsoas muscle hematoma secondary to alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Suguru; Tanaka, Nobutaka; Nomura, Yukihiro; Miyahara, Takuya; Furuya, Takatoshi

    2012-09-01

    Iliopsoas muscle hematoma in a patient with alcoholic liver cirrhosis is rarely seen, however it has a high mortality. Thus we should cautiously make a diagnosis and treatment. This is the case of a 60-year-old male. He had a 15-year history of alcoholic liver disease and emphysema. He presented with low back pain after a fall that had happened 2 months before. Due to persistent back pain, he went to see a local physician who, after detailed examination, suspected rupture of bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms and transferred the patient to our hospital. The same presumptive diagnosis was made, and on this basis, an aortic bifemoral Y-graft was implanted. He developed aspiration pneumonia and hepatic and renal dysfunction postoperatively, which led to multiple organ failure and subsequent in-hospital death on postoperative day 62. This was believed to be a case of iliopsoas muscle hematoma developed in a patient with liver cirrhosis, and considering it was a case with poor surgical risk, a conservative treatment option such as transcatheter arterial embolization should also have been considered. Although iliopsoas muscle hematoma with alcoholic liver cirrhosis is rare, an appropriate treatment plan should be determined on a case-by-case basis despite its poor prognosis.

  16. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in the Aged, Trauma or Degeneration?

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs) are generally regarded to be a traumatic lesion. It was regarded as a stroke in 17th century, an inflammatory disease in 19th century. From 20th century, it became a traumatic lesion. CSH frequently occur after a trauma, however, it cannot occur when there is no enough subdural space even after a severe head injury. CSH may occur without trauma, when there is sufficient subdural space. The author tried to investigate trends in the causation of CSH. By a review of literature, the author suggested a different view on the causation of CSH. CSH usually originated from either a subdural hygroma or an acute subdural hematoma. Development of CSH starts from the separation of the dural border cell (DBC) layer, which induces proliferation of DBCs with production of neomembrane. Capillaries will follow along the neomembrane. Hemorrhage would occur into the subdural fluid either by tearing of bridge veins or repeated microhemorrhage from the neomembrane. That is the mechanism of hematoma enlargement. Trauma or bleeding tendency may precipitate development of CSH, however, it cannot lead CSH, if there is no sufficient subdural space. The key determinant for development of CSH is a sufficient subdural space, in other words, brain atrophy. The most common and universal cause of brain atrophy is the aging. Modifying Virchow's description, CSH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by degeneration of the brain. Now, it is reasonable that degeneration of brain might play pivotal role in development of CSH in the aged persons.

  17. Perineural hematoma may result in nerve inflammation and myelin damage.

    PubMed

    Steinfeldt, Thorsten; Wiesmann, Thomas; Nimphius, Wilhelm; Cornelius, Valér; Eismann, Daniel; Kratz, Thomas; Hadzic, Admir; Wulf, Hinnerk; Werner, Tilmann

    2014-01-01

    Perineural hematoma may occur during performance of peripheral nerve blocks. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that an iatrogenic hematoma in the immediate vicinity of a peripheral nerve may cause histologic evidence of nerve injury. Fifty milliliters of autologous blood was injected adjacent to the right sciatic nerve in 20 anesthetized female pigs. In order to discern between blood-related volume and immune effects, 50 mL of albumin was injected at the same location in an additional 22 pigs. Either blood or albumin was injected in random order. The left sciatic nerve served as a negative control in all animals, that is, either no needle placement or needle placement without injection. After 48 hours, the nerves were resected. The grade of nerve injury was scored from 0 (no injury) to 3 (severe injury) by histologic analysis of myelin tissue and inflammatory cells. Eighty-two nerve specimens were examined. Injury scores were significantly (P < 0.01) higher in the blood injection (n = 20; median [interquartile range] 2 [2-2]) and albumin injection (n = 22, 1 [1-2]) conditions compared with the no needle placement (n = 22, 0 [0-1]) and "dry needle placement" (n = 20, 1 [0-1]) conditions. Widespread inflammatory changes were seen in the blood injection group, in which 15% of nerve specimens showed damage to myelin. Our data suggest that hematoma adjacent to nerve tissue may result in structural nerve injury and inflammatory changes.

  18. Chronic Subdural Hematoma in the Aged, Trauma or Degeneration?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs) are generally regarded to be a traumatic lesion. It was regarded as a stroke in 17th century, an inflammatory disease in 19th century. From 20th century, it became a traumatic lesion. CSH frequently occur after a trauma, however, it cannot occur when there is no enough subdural space even after a severe head injury. CSH may occur without trauma, when there is sufficient subdural space. The author tried to investigate trends in the causation of CSH. By a review of literature, the author suggested a different view on the causation of CSH. CSH usually originated from either a subdural hygroma or an acute subdural hematoma. Development of CSH starts from the separation of the dural border cell (DBC) layer, which induces proliferation of DBCs with production of neomembrane. Capillaries will follow along the neomembrane. Hemorrhage would occur into the subdural fluid either by tearing of bridge veins or repeated microhemorrhage from the neomembrane. That is the mechanism of hematoma enlargement. Trauma or bleeding tendency may precipitate development of CSH, however, it cannot lead CSH, if there is no sufficient subdural space. The key determinant for development of CSH is a sufficient subdural space, in other words, brain atrophy. The most common and universal cause of brain atrophy is the aging. Modifying Virchow's description, CSH is sometimes traumatic, but most often caused by degeneration of the brain. Now, it is reasonable that degeneration of brain might play pivotal role in development of CSH in the aged persons. PMID:26885279

  19. Surgical treatment of intramural hematoma of the ascending aorta.

    PubMed

    Susak, Stamenko; Redzek, Aleksandar; Torbica, Vladimir; Rajić, Jovan; Todić, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Intramural hematoma of the aorta presents potentially fatal condition developing as a result of a vasa vasorum rupture. It is a major risk factor for developing a frank aortic dissection. A 65-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic for the second time, after her symptoms of chest pain and vertigo (with no electrocardiographic signs of myocardial infarction) hadn't disappeared after several months of medicament treatment (indicated in the first hospitalization). Computed tomography arteriography of the aorta showed no sign of acute aortic dissection, but revealed a contrast depo in the aortic wall of 8 x 14 mm dimensions, with no extravasation of contrast. Also, massive pericardial effusion was observed (10-30 mm in thickness). Transesophageal echocardiography confirmed these findings completely. The patient underwent surgery, in which plaque exulceration was detected on the convex side of the ascending aorta, 3 cm above the aortic valve, 1 cm in diameter, with no signs of intimal tear. A resection of the ascending aorta was performed, and the aorta was reconstructed with a 30 mm Dacron tube graft. The patient was discharged on the 14th postoperative day with satisfactory results. Intramural hematoma is not a common event, but it is potentially a fatal one. Open surgery in patients with an intramural hematoma is an effective treatment strategy, although percutaneous endovascular treatment options are being described.

  20. Sarcoma the great "masquerader" hematoma/deep vein thrombosis manifestation.

    PubMed

    Valverde, J; Vinagreiro, M; Gouveia, P; Koch, P; Soares, V; Gomes, T

    2016-01-01

    The clinical presentation of patients with soft-tissue sarcoma is highly variable. Most patients present with a painless mass, typically one that is increasing in size, and few have systemic symptoms such as fever, weight loss, or malaise. Soft tissue sarcomas can initially present as, or even be misdiagnosed as, deep venous thrombosis (DVT), leading to a late diagnosis. A 51-year-old woman presented to the hospital with complaints of pain and swelling in her left thigh, interpreted as an infected hematoma with an associated deep vein thrombosis and treated accordingly. The patient presented to our emergency department two more times. In the last visit and due to an unresolving clinical scenario a MRI and surgical byopsies were made that confirmed a sarcoma diagnosis. When a patient presents with an expanding, nontraumatic mass simulating a haematoma, several other differential diagnoses should be considered including aneurysm, bleeding tendency, chronic expanding haematoma and soft-tissue sarcoma. The growth of the tumor undetected while being treated for the DVT and then posteriorly for the hematoma, was without a doubt dismal to the patient, so earlier diagnosis would have been preferable. When a patient presents with an unusual history of hematoma in the extremities, it is necessary to consider the possibility of a malignant soft tissue tumor. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. [A Case of Subgaleal Hematoma with Exophthalmos and Diplopia].

    PubMed

    Takano, Issei; Suzuki, Kensuke; Sugiura, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryotaro; Nagaishi, Masaya; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Hyodo, Akio

    2015-08-01

    A 9-year-old girl struck the left side of her head on a doorknob, after which she gradually developed swelling. She was treated conservatively at another hospital before being referred and admitted to our hospital 9 days after injury, with complaints of exophthalmos and diplopia. Computed tomography (CT) scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a subgaleal hematoma (SGH). We therefore attempted to treat the patient by aspiration of the hematoma via needle puncture through the skin, for which we wrapped an elastic band around the head while infusing a hemostatic agent. No vascular anomalies and no abnormal shunts were identified by angiography under general anesthesia 13 days after injury. The patient was treated surgically due to increased head swelling and deteriorated exophthalmos. The liquefied, dark-red SGH was aspirated via a few cm of skin and a galeal incision on the left side of her head. A multiperforated drainage catheter was introduced into the hematoma cavity and the drainage catheter was connected to the vacuum-drain pump. After the surgery, the left exophthalmos disappeared. Twenty-three days after injury, she was discharged from our hospital without any neurological deficits.

  2. Traumatic tentorial hematoma in two-wheeler riders: Correlation with helmet use

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Deepak; Dawar, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tentorial hematoma is frequently seen in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients, especially in motorized two-wheeler riders following head injury. However its relevance and prognostic significance are not known. Objective: To evaluate patients of TBI with tentorial hematoma using a simple grading system and attempt to correlate this grading with factors like helmet use and neurological outcome. Materials and Methods: This prospective study over a 1-year period included patients with TBI who had tentorial hematoma in the initial plain head. Patients were divided into three grades based on the initial CT findings: Grade I: Isolated tentorial hematoma, grade II: tentorial hematoma with midline shift but open cisterns and grade III: Tentorial hematoma with effaced cisterns. Clinical and radiological records of patients including admission GCS and GOS at discharge were assessed in all cases. Observations: A total of 1786 patients of TBI were admitted during the study period. Of these, 106 (5.9%) patients had tentorial hematoma. 84.9% (n = 90) were male and 15.1% (n = 16) were female with the mean age being 36.5 years (range 2-66 years). The mean admission GCS was 13, 11 and 8 in patients with grade I, II and III tentorial hematoma respectively. 43.4% (n = 46) of the patients had grade I, 32.1% (n = 34) had grade II and 24.5% (n = 26) patients had grade III tentorial hematoma. Seventy-one patients (84.5%) were riding motorized two wheelers with 63 (89%) wearing helmets. The majority of the patients wearing helmets (58.8%) had grade I hematoma with 35% (n = 22) having grade II hematoma and only 6.3% (n = 4) having grade III hematoma. Overall, there were 20 deaths. 50% (n = 10) of the deaths were in patients with grade III hematoma and 40% (n = 8) of the deaths were in patients with grade II hematoma. There were two (10%) deaths in patients with grade I hematoma (both unrelated to head injury). The mean GOS at the time of discharge was 5, 4.1 and 2.2 in patients

  3. Sensitivity of radionuclide brain imaging and computerized transaxial tomography in detecting subdural hematoma

    SciTech Connect

    Razzak, M.A.; Mudarris, F.; Christie, J.H.

    1980-04-01

    In a series of 23 patients with surgically proven subdural hematoma of durations ranging between two days to seven months, the detection rate of Tc-99m-pertechnetate brain imaging was higher than computerized transaxial tomography (CT). With dynamic perfusion scanning, the detection rate was 71.5%. In contrast, CT demonstrated the hematoma in 52% of the cases. Lastly, the result of CT scanning was dependent on the size of the subdural hematoma as evaluated at the time of operation.

  4. [Subcapsular liver hematoma, severe complication of pregnancy toxemia. A case report].

    PubMed

    Chenoufi, Mohamed Badis; Ouerhani, Radhia; el Hitmi, Nadia; Tbatou, Adnane; Smaili, Lamia; Sfar, Ezzedine; Chelli, Hela

    2002-04-01

    Subcapsular liver hematoma is a rare and severe complication of pregnancy. This event is already known to have a poor maternal and foetal prognosis. The authors report a case of spontaneous rupture of subcapsular hematoma of the liver in 40 year old multiparous. Confirmation of diagnosis is obtained by abdominal echotomography or TOM. The surgical treatment of this hematoma joints the traumatic surgery of the liver. In every case foetal extraction by cesarean section constitutes the first therapeutic procedure.

  5. Quantitative estimation of hemorrhage in chronic subdural hematoma using the /sup 51/Cr erythrocyte labeling method

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Saito, K.; Ikeda, K.; Hisada, K.

    1987-06-01

    Red cell survival studies using an infusion of chromium-51-labeled erythrocytes were performed to quantitatively estimate hemorrhage in the chronic subdural hematoma cavity of 50 patients. The amount of hemorrhage was determined during craniotomy. Between 6 and 24 hours after infusion of the labeled red cells, hemorrhage accounted for a mean of 6.7% of the hematoma content, indicating continuous or intermittent hemorrhage into the cavity. The clinical state of the patients and the density of the chronic subdural hematoma on computerized tomography scans were related to the amount of hemorrhage. Chronic subdural hematomas with a greater amount of hemorrhage frequently consisted of clots rather than fluid.

  6. Rectal colonic mural hematoma following enema for constipation while on therapeutic anticoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Rentea, Rebecca M.; Fehring, Charles H.

    2017-01-01

    Causes of colonic and recto-sigmoid hematomas are multifactorial. Patients can present with a combination of dropping hemoglobin, bowel obstruction and perforation. Computed tomography imaging can provide clues to a diagnosis of intramural hematoma. We present a case of rectal hematoma and a review of current management literature. A 72-year-old male on therapeutic anticoagulation for a pulmonary embolism, was administered an enema resulting in severe abdominal pain unresponsive to blood transfusion. A sigmoid colectomy with end colostomy was performed. Although rare, colonic and recto-sigmoid hematomas should be considered as a possible diagnosis for adults with abdominal pain on anticoagulant therapy. PMID:28108634

  7. Twist-Drill or Burr Hole Craniostomy for Draining Chronic Subdural Hematomas: How to Choose It for Chronic Subdural Hematoma Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seong-Jong; Im, Soo Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although twist-drill craniostomy (TDC) has a number of procedural advantages and an equivalent outcome compared to burr hole craniostomy (BHC) for the treatment of chronic subdural hematomas (CSDHs), the latter technique remains the preferred method. We analyzed symptomatic CSDHs in whom TDC at the pre-coronal suture entry point (PCSEP) was the primary method for hematoma drainage and BHC on the parietal was the secondary option. Methods CSDHs in 86 consecutive patients were included. TDC at the PCSEP, which is 1 cm anterior to coronal suture at the level of the superior temporal line, was the primary operational technique when the hematoma thickness was suitable, and BHC was performed via the parietal when TDC was unreasonable or failed. The clinical feasibility and outcomes of these approaches were analyzed. Results Of the 86 patients, 68 (79.1%) were treated by TDC, and 18 (20.9%) by BHC. All patients showed improvements in their symptoms after hematoma drainage. Neither morbidity nor mortality was associated with either technique, and there were no differences in drainage days between the groups. Ten patients had bilateral hematomas and were treated using TDC. Two patients were not sufficiently treated by TDC and, as a result, BHC was applied. Only six hematomas (7% of 86 hematomas) exhibited insufficient thickness on the computed tomography to perform TDC. Conclusion When the hematoma was thick enough, a majority of the CSDHs were drained using TDC at the PCSEP as the first procedure, which was especially useful for bilateral hematomas and in elderly patients. PMID:27857917

  8. Optoacoustic detection and monitoring of blast-induced intracranial hematomas in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Wynne, Karon E.; Prough, Donald S.; Dewitt, Douglas S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Parsley, Margaret A.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Patients with acute intracranial hematomas often require surgical drainage within the first four hours after traumatic brain injury (TBI) to avoid death or severe neurologic disability. CT and MRI permit rapid, noninvasive diagnosis of hematomas, but can be used only at a major health-care facility. At present, there is no device for noninvasive detection and characterization of hematomas in pre-hospital settings. We proposed to use an optoacoustic technique for rapid, noninvasive diagnosis and monitoring of hematomas, including intracranial hematomas. Unlike bulky CT and MR equipment, an optoacoustic system can be small and easily transported in an emergency vehicle. In this study we used a specially-designed blast device to inflict TBI in rats. A near-infrared OPO-based optoacoustic system developed for hematoma diagnosis and for blood oxygenation monitoring in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in small animals was used in the study. Optoacoustic signals recorded simultaneously from the SSS and hematomas allowed for measurements of their oxygenations. The presence of hematomas was confirmed after the experiment in gross pictures of the exposed brains. After blast the hematoma signal and oxygenation increased, while SSS oxygenation decreased due to the blastinduced TBI. The increase of the oxygenation in fresh hematomas may be explained by the leakage of blood from arteries which have higher blood pressure compared to that of veins. These results indicate that the optoacoustic technique can be used for early diagnosis of hematomas and may provide important information for improving outcomes in patients with TBI or stroke (both hemorrhagic and ischemic).

  9. Absorption fever characteristics due to percutaneous renal biopsy-related hematoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tingyang; Liu, Qingquan; Xu, Qin; Liu, Hui; Feng, Yan; Qiu, Wenhui; Huang, Fei; Lv, Yongman

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to describe the unique characteristics of absorption fever in patients with a hematoma after percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) and distinguish it from secondary infection of hematoma.We retrospectively studied 2639 percutaneous renal biopsies of native kidneys. We compared the clinical characteristics between 2 groups: complication group (gross hematuria and/or perirenal hematoma) and no complication group. The axillary temperature of patients with a hematoma who presented with fever was measured at 06:00, 10:00, 14:00, and 18:00. The onset and duration of fever and the highest body temperature were recorded. Thereafter, we described the time distribution of absorption fever and obtained the curve of fever pattern.Of 2639 patients, PRB complications were observed in 154 (5.8%) patients. Perirenal hematoma was the most common complication, which occurred in 118 (4.5%) of biopsies, including 74 small hematoma cases (thickness ≤3 cm) and 44 large hematoma cases (thickness >3 cm). Major complications were observed in only 6 (0.2%) cases resulting from a large hematoma. Of 118 patients with a perirenal hematoma, absorption fever was observed in 48 cases. Furthermore, large hematomas had a 5.23-fold higher risk for absorption fever than the small ones.Blood pressure, renal insufficiency, and prothrombin time could be risk factors for complications. Fever is common in patients with hematoma because of renal biopsy and is usually noninfectious. Evaluation of patients with post-biopsy fever is necessary to identify any obvious infection sources. If no focus is identified, empiric antibiotic therapy should not be initiated nor should prophylactic antibiotics be extended for prolonged durations. Absorption fevers will resolve in time without specific therapeutic interventions.

  10. Black Hole Sign: Novel Imaging Marker That Predicts Hematoma Growth in Patients With Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Zhang, Gang; Xiong, Xin; Wang, Xing-Chen; Yang, Wen-Song; Li, Ke-Wei; Wei, Xiao; Xie, Peng

    2016-07-01

    Early hematoma growth is a devastating neurological complication after intracerebral hemorrhage. We aim to report and evaluate the usefulness of computed tomography (CT) black hole sign in predicting hematoma growth in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were screened for the presence of CT black hole sign on admission head CT performed within 6 hours after onset of symptoms. The black hole sign was defined as hypoattenuatting area encapsulated within the hyperattenuating hematoma with a clearly defined border. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of CT black hole sign in predicting hematoma expansion were calculated. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess the presence of the black hole sign and early hematoma growth. A total of 206 patients were enrolled. Black hole sign was found in 30 (14.6%) of 206 patients on the baseline CT scan. The black hole sign was more common in patients with hematoma growth (31.9%) than those without hematoma growth (5.8%; P<0.001). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of back hole sign in predicting early hematoma growth were 31.9%, 94.1%, 73.3%, and 73.2%, respectively. The time-to-admission CT scan, baseline hematoma volume, and the presence of black hole sign on admission CT independently predict hematoma growth in multivariate model. The CT black hole sign could be used as a simple and easy-to-use predictor for early hematoma growth in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Absorption fever characteristics due to percutaneous renal biopsy-related hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tingyang; Liu, Qingquan; Xu, Qin; Liu, Hui; Feng, Yan; Qiu, Wenhui; Huang, Fei; Lv, Yongman

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aims to describe the unique characteristics of absorption fever in patients with a hematoma after percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) and distinguish it from secondary infection of hematoma. We retrospectively studied 2639 percutaneous renal biopsies of native kidneys. We compared the clinical characteristics between 2 groups: complication group (gross hematuria and/or perirenal hematoma) and no complication group. The axillary temperature of patients with a hematoma who presented with fever was measured at 06:00, 10:00, 14:00, and 18:00. The onset and duration of fever and the highest body temperature were recorded. Thereafter, we described the time distribution of absorption fever and obtained the curve of fever pattern. Of 2639 patients, PRB complications were observed in 154 (5.8%) patients. Perirenal hematoma was the most common complication, which occurred in 118 (4.5%) of biopsies, including 74 small hematoma cases (thickness ≤3 cm) and 44 large hematoma cases (thickness >3 cm). Major complications were observed in only 6 (0.2%) cases resulting from a large hematoma. Of 118 patients with a perirenal hematoma, absorption fever was observed in 48 cases. Furthermore, large hematomas had a 5.23-fold higher risk for absorption fever than the small ones. Blood pressure, renal insufficiency, and prothrombin time could be risk factors for complications. Fever is common in patients with hematoma because of renal biopsy and is usually noninfectious. Evaluation of patients with post-biopsy fever is necessary to identify any obvious infection sources. If no focus is identified, empiric antibiotic therapy should not be initiated nor should prophylactic antibiotics be extended for prolonged durations. Absorption fevers will resolve in time without specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:27631225

  12. Positron emission tomography in the evaluation of subdural hematomas

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, K.; Bergstroem, M.; Eriksson, L.

    1980-12-01

    Fifteen patients with 21 subdural effusions were investigated both with transmission computer assisted tomography (CAT) and positron emission tomography (PET). The tracer in the emission studies was /sup 68/Ga-EDTA. Twelve lesions were visualized both with CAT and PET. Five lesions that were negative or doubtful on CAT were visualized with PET, whereas four lesions negative or doubtful on PET were demonstrated by CAT. The two methods complement each other due to the fact that they are based on different mechanisms: CAT mainly on attenuation of the fluid collection. PET on isotope accumulation, particularly in the hematoma membranes.

  13. [Hepatic subcapsular hematoma: a case report and management update].

    PubMed

    Berveiller, P; Vandenbroucke, L; Popowski, T; Afriat, R; Sauvanet, E; Giovangrandi, Y

    2012-06-01

    Hepatic subcapsular hematoma (HSH) is a rare complication of pregnancy that keeps a materno-fetal high mortality rate. Given this severity, HSH management requires a prompt diagnosis and an appropriate care. Before focusing on the current management strategy of HSH, we illustrate this article with a clinical case presenting an original method of abdominal exploration, which has not been described to our knowledge. Thus, taking into account the presence of a moderate hemoperitoneum during a caesarean section procedure for HSH, introduction of laparoscopy through the same incision allowed a satisfactory evaluation of the abdominal cavity and hepatic area without performing an invasive midline laparotomy.

  14. Late onset of subdural hematoma after bifrontal contusion

    PubMed Central

    Gürer, Bora; Kertmen, Hayri; Dolgun, Habibullah; Sekerci, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral cortical contusions are one of the most common computed tomography findings in head-injured patients and common sequel of traumatic brain injury. These contusions tend to show a progressive increase in mass effect on repeated imaging, most small contusions do not require surgical evacuation. However, progression to subdural hematoma (SDH) in a late aspect is unique. Here we present a 71-year-old man with bifrontal contusion, who deteriorated 43 days after initial trauma with sudden onset of acute SDH. This unusual case suggests that neurosurgeons should be alert for the possibility of very late onset of acute SDH after bifrontal contusions. PMID:27695560

  15. Dengue Fever with rectus sheath hematoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anurag; Bhatia, Sonia; Singh, Rajendra Pratap; Malik, Gaurav

    2014-04-01

    Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is an infectious tropical disease caused by the Dengue virus. It is associated with a number of complications, which are well documented. However, Dengue fever associated with rectus sheath hematoma (RSH) is a very rare complication. Only one case report has been published prior supporting the association of Dengue fever with RSH. We report a case of Dengue fever who presented with RSH and was successfully treated conservatively. RSH is also an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear.

  16. Cortical membranectomy in chronic subdural hematoma: Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Altinel, Faruk; Altin, Cihan; Gezmis, Esin; Altinors, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Different surgical procedures have been used in the management of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Nowadays treatment with burr hole is more preferable than craniotomy in most clinics. We present two cases of CSDH, which caused neurological deficits. In both cases cortical membranectomy was performed following craniotomy. After this procedure, significant improvement was observed in patients neurological deficits. We recommend that craniotomy and subtotal membranectomy may be a more adequate choice in such cases. This report underlined that craniotomy is still an acceptable, safe, efficient and even a better procedure in selected patients with CSDH. PMID:26396617

  17. The study of traumatic intracerebral hematoma at Buri Ram Hospital.

    PubMed

    Nagabhand, A; Sangcham, K

    1993-07-01

    This report describes the study of traumatic intracerebral hematoma at Buri Ram Hospital. The total number was 71 cases. There were 26 cases with no investigation and were treated by exploratory burr hole with the mortality rate of 57.5 per cent, and 45 cases which were sent for CT scan before operation with the mortality rate of 37.5 per cent. CT scanning is a useful investigative tool for correct diagnosis and rapid treatment of head injury and the operation which helps to reduce the mortality rate.

  18. Innovative management of nasal septal hematoma in an infant

    PubMed Central

    Sumitha, R.; Anandan, Ajay Kumar; Govarthanaraj, Aberna

    2015-01-01

    Nasal septal hematoma is a collection of blood between the cartilage or bone and mucoperichondrium or mucoperiosteum of the nose. This condition requires immediate surgical drainage to prevent complications. All patients need nasal packing postoperatively to prevent recurrence. This causes a lot of discomforts due to mouth breathing more in infants who are obligatory nose breathers. They can go for cyanosis in the postoperative period. Here, we discuss the case report of an infant who had tubular nasal pack with endotracheal tube postoperatively to maintain the patency of nose. PMID:26015758

  19. Innovative management of nasal septal hematoma in an infant.

    PubMed

    Sumitha, R; Anandan, Ajay Kumar; Govarthanaraj, Aberna

    2015-04-01

    Nasal septal hematoma is a collection of blood between the cartilage or bone and mucoperichondrium or mucoperiosteum of the nose. This condition requires immediate surgical drainage to prevent complications. All patients need nasal packing postoperatively to prevent recurrence. This causes a lot of discomforts due to mouth breathing more in infants who are obligatory nose breathers. They can go for cyanosis in the postoperative period. Here, we discuss the case report of an infant who had tubular nasal pack with endotracheal tube postoperatively to maintain the patency of nose.

  20. Remote Postoperative Epidural Hematoma after Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ho-Jung; Park, Jae-Sung; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH) is a serious and embarrassing complication, which usually occurs at the site of operation after intracranial surgery. However, remote EDH is relatively rare. We report three cases of remote EDH after brain tumor surgery. All three cases seemed to have different causes of remote postoperative EDH; however, all patients were managed promptly and showed excellent outcomes. Although the exact mechanism of remote postoperative EDH is unknown, surgeons should be cautious of the speed of lowering intracranial pressure and implement basic procedures to prevent this hazardous complication of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26605271

  1. Nasolacrimal sac hematoma masquerading as an orbital mass.

    PubMed

    Yen, Michael T; Hipps, W Michael

    2004-03-01

    A distended or infiltrated nasolacrimal sac can present as a mass in the medial orbit. We present a case of aspergillus sinusitis complicated by intractable epistaxis after debridement of the nasal septum, which caused pain and rapid distension of the nasolacrimal sac. The clinical and radiographic appearance of the distended nasolacrimal sac mimicked the appearance of an orbital mass and orbital extension of aspergillosis. After embolization of the maxillary artery to control the epistaxis, the nasolacrimal sac hematoma spontaneously resolved, and the patient proceeded with his medical treatment without the need for orbital surgery.

  2. Intramural hematoma of the esophagus mimicking hemorrhaging esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Yeng Kwang; Tay, Jia Yin; Dandie, Lachlan; Gribbin, John

    2013-01-01

    Intramural hematoma of the esophagus (IHE) is an uncommon esophageal injury. Diagnosis requires high index of suspicion as it can mimic various other cardiovascular, pulmonary, mediastinal or esophageal diseases. Although multiple imaging modalities have been reported to be useful, CT with intravenous contrast should be the imaging modality of choice if not contraindicated. Treatment of IHE is mainly supportive; complete resolution in several weeks is the expected outcome. It is crucial that this condition is recognized and considered in the differential diagnosis of any patients who present with chest pain or dysphagia. PMID:24714326

  3. Enhancement of isodense subdural hematoma on delayed-high-dose contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.L.; Hinck, V.C.

    1983-02-01

    A case is presented in which bilateral, isodense subdural hematomas, not readily apparent on immediate rapid-high-dose computed tomography, became enhanced and clearly visible on delayed scans. If difficulty is encountered in interpreting the immediate scan of a patient suspected of having isodense subdural hematoma, further scans after a one-hour delay may resolve the dilemma.

  4. Noninvasive, optoacoustic detection and characterization of intra- and extracranial hematomas and cerebral hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Andrey; Prough, Donald S.; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Irene Y.; Robertson, Claudia S.; Asokan, Vasantha; Agbor, Adaeze; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2015-03-01

    Early diagnosis of intracranial hematomas is necessary to improve outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). CT and MRI can diagnose intracranial hematomas, but cannot be used until the patient arrives at a major healthcare facility, resulting in delayed diagnosis. Near infrared spectroscopy may suggest the presence of unilateral intracranial hematomas, but provides minimal information on hematoma type and location due to limitations associated with strong light scattering. We have used optoacoustics (which combines high endogenous optical contrast with the resolution of ultrasound) to diagnose hematomas and monitor cerebral oxygenation. We performed animal and clinical studies on detection and characterization of hematomas and on monitoring cerebral hypoxia by probing the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). Recently, we built a medical grade, multi-wavelength, OPO-based optoacoustic system tunable in the near infrared spectral range. We developed new patient interfaces for noninvasive, transcranial measurements in the transmission mode in the presence of dense hair and used it in patients with TBI. The optoacoustic system was capable of detecting and characterizing intra- and extracranial hematomas. SSS blood oxygenation was measured as well with the new interface. The obtained results indicate that the optoacoustic system in the transmission mode provides detection and characterization of hematomas in TBI patients, as well as cerebral venous blood oxygenation monitoring. The transmission mode approach can be used for optoacoustic brain imaging, tomography, and mapping in humans.

  5. Ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma in pregnancy: a case report of nonsurgical management.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Kari L; Bader, Cheryl L

    2004-02-01

    Ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma in pregnancy is a rare condition that is usually managed surgically. Recently, however, surgical and obstetric literature has discussed conservative management. We describe successful conservative management of ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma in a woman with preeclampsia who had hemoperitoneum seen at cesarean section.

  6. An alarming but self-limited case of isolated large spontaneous liver hematoma in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Vikal Chandra; Regmi, Mohan Chandra; Sah, Pannalal; Khaniya, Sudeep; Adhikary, Shailesh

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous subcapsular liver hematoma is rare but potentially life-threatening complication of pregnancy usually associated with severe preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets). We present here a case of such a large spontaneous liver hematoma presenting in pregnancy, but without other known associated abnormalities, which has not been described before and it resolved on itself without any intervention.

  7. Pulmonary artery thrombus and subcapsular liver hematoma in a patient with HELLP syndrome: a therapeutic conundrum.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Eduardo G; Khawar, Sarwat; Cunningham, Jennifer A; Russell, Lori D; Alpert, Martin A

    2002-03-01

    HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevation of liver enzymes, and low platelet count) occurs during pregnancy. Intrahepatic hemorrhage and subcapsular liver hematoma with or without rupture are reported complications of this syndrome. The patient described in this report developed HELLP syndrome associated with a subcapsular liver hematoma and pulmonary artery thrombus, complications that created a therapeutic conundrum.

  8. [Spontaneous peri-pancreatic hematoma associated with celiac trunk stenosis: diagnostic difficulties and therapeutic management].

    PubMed

    El Alaoui, Mounia; Olivié, Damien; Gandon, Yves; Bretagne, Jean-François

    2005-11-01

    We report a case of spontaneous peri-pancreatic hematoma which was associated with a celiac trunk stenosis. Hematoma was probably due to the rupture of a pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysm. This diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma, initially retained, illustrates the difficult diagnostic process. Therapeutic modalities for preventing recurrence are discussed.

  9. Spontaneous Intramural Duodenal Hematoma: Pancreatitis, Obstructive Jaundice, and Upper Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Somsap, Kulyada; Ruangwannasak, Somchai; Sripanaskul, Anan

    2016-01-01

    Nontraumatic intramural duodenal hematoma can cause upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction, upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, jaundice, and pancreatitis and may be present in patients with normal coagulation. However the pathogenesis of the condition and its relationship with acute pancreatitis remain unknown. We present a case of spontaneous intramural duodenal hematoma and a case of successful nonoperative treatments. PMID:27891286

  10. Epidural hematoma secondary to sinusitis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Aviner, Shraga; Olshinka, Noam; Cherniavsky, Evgenia; Forer, Boaz; Bibi, Haim

    2014-02-01

    Epidural hematoma is a potentially life threatening event that demands prompt diagnosis and surgical treatment, usually following head trauma. We present a case of a 9-year-old boy with no history of head trauma, and who was diagnosed with epidural hematoma secondary to frontal sinusitis; and the medical literature was reviewed.

  11. Cylinder syringe suction: a simple and efficient technique for the evacuation of subcutaneous hematoma.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ayato; Matsuda, Norifumi; Horiguchi, Masatoshi; Matsumura, Takashi; Komoto, Masakazu; Natori, Yuhei; Komuro, Yuzo; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    Subcutaneous hematoma is commonly caused by trauma or surgery. Proper treatment of the condition is needed to avoid severe complications. The present paper introduces a simple technique of hematoma evacuation, called cylinder syringe suction (CSS). Experiments were also performed to determine the detailed mechanism underlying its effectiveness. The CSS procedure was performed as follows. A cylindrical plastic cylinder syringe was used. Either a few stitches were removed or a very small incision was made on the site of the hematoma. The edge of the syringe was compressed to the skin, which was covered by a thin hydrocolloid dressing. Vacuum aspiration was enforced at the site of the wound or incision, and the hematoma was gradually aspirated.For the experiment, house rabbits were used. Hematoma evacuation was performed in 4 different ways, including needle aspiration alone (group 1), needle puncture followed by CSS (group 2), and creation of a small wound (5 mm) followed by needle aspiration (group 3) or CSS (group 4). The amount of evacuated hematoma and the suction pressure created by each of the 4 methods were compared. Group 4 showed the highest suction pressure and the greatest evacuated amount of hematoma. High suction pressure was also obtained in group 1; however, the amount of evacuated hematoma was small as the other 2 groups. The CSS technique becomes effective mainly by creating high suction pressure, and the opening of a small wound enables the viscous coagula to pass through the skin.

  12. Cystic hematoma formation following use of a biodegradable arrow for meniscal repair.

    PubMed

    Hechtman, K S; Uribe, J W

    1999-03-01

    This is a case report of a cystic hematoma formation following the use of a biodegradable arrow for repair of a medial meniscus tear. A literature search found no previous report of this complication. Open hematoma debridement and arrow removal were effective in the treatment of this complication following all-inside meniscal repair with a biodegradable arrow.

  13. Spinal subdural hematoma following cranial surgery: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinping; Wu, Bo; Feng, Hailong; You, Chao

    2011-01-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) following a cranial surgery is extremely rare. We described a 26-year-old patient who developed an SDH at L3-S1 level after the excision of intraventricular meningioma. He was surgically treated with an excellent outcome. It is postulated that the SDH resulted from downward migration of intracranial hematoma.

  14. In-hospital mortality after pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents or oral anticoagulants and hematoma evacuation of intracerebral hematomas.

    PubMed

    Stein, Marco; Misselwitz, Björn; Hamann, Gerhard F; Kolodziej, Malgorzata; Reinges, Marcus H T; Uhl, Eberhard

    2016-04-01

    Pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents is described to be a risk factor for mortality after spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, the impact of antithrombotic agents on mortality in patients who undergo hematoma evacuation compared to conservatively treated patients with ICH remains controversial. This analysis is based on a prospective registry for quality assurance in stroke care in the State of Hesse, Germany. Patients' data were collected between January 2008 and December 2012. Only patients with the diagnosis of spontaneous ICH were included (International Classification of Diseases 10th Revision codes I61.0-I61.9). Predictors of in-hospital mortality were determined by univariate analysis. Predictors with P<0.1 were included in a binary logistic regression model. The binary logistic regression model was adjusted for age, initial Glasgow Coma Score (GCS), the presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and pre-ICH disability prior to ictus. In 8,421 patients with spontaneous ICH, pre-treatment with oral anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents was documented in 16.3% and 25.1%, respectively. Overall in-hospital mortality was 23.2%. In-hospital mortality was decreased in operatively treated patients compared to conservatively treated patients (11.6% versus 24.0%; P<0.001). Patients with antiplatelet pre-treatment had a significantly higher risk of death during the hospital stay after hematoma evacuation (odds ratio [OR]: 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24-4.97; P=0.010) compared to patients without antiplatelet pre-treatment treatment (OR: 0.9; 95% CI: 0.79-1.09; P=0.376). In conclusion a higher rate of in-hospital mortality after pre-treatment with antiplatelet agents in combination with hematoma evacuation after spontaneous ICH was observed in the presented cohort.

  15. Significance of monitoring the initial intracranial pressure on hematoma irrigation with trephination therapy for acute subdural hematomas in critical conditions.

    PubMed

    Otani, Naoki; Takasato, Yoshio; Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Takanori; Yoshino, Yoshikazu; Yatsushige, Hiroshi; Miyawaki, Hiroki; Sumiyoshi, Kyoko; Sugawara, Takashi; Chikashi, Aoyagi; Takeuchi, Satoru; Suzuki, Go

    2010-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) patients presenting in a severe condition tend to have poor outcomes due to the significant brain edema required to maintain the ICP at less than 20-25 mmHg. This study compared the surgical outcomes of 16 critically ill patients with ASDH who underwent hematoma irrigation with trephination therapy (HITT) based on their initial ICP values. The initial mean GCS score upon admission was four. A unilateral dilated pupil was seen in one and bilateral dilated pupils were seen in seven patients. The co-existence of a brain contusion was seen in seven patients, brain swelling was noted in six patients, and both basal cistern effacement and a midline shift greater than 5 mm were observed in all patients. The mean initial ICP value was 45 mmHg (range: 3 to 85 mmHg). Ten patients (62.5%) underwent a rapid external decompression to evacuate the hematoma. By using the Glasgow Outcome Scale upon discharge a score of good recovery (GR) was assigned to two (12.5 %), moderate disability (MD) to four (25.0 %), vegetative state (VS) to two (12.5 %), and death (D) to eight (50.0 %) patients. All six patients who showed an initial ICP greater than 60 mmHg died despite intensive care. Eight patients who showed an initial ICP less than 40 mmHg had a favorable outcome, but two patients deteriorated due to a traumatic cerebrovascular disorder. It seems that the initial ICP monitoring with HITT for ASDH patients in critical condition may be an important factor for predicting both surgical outcome and clinical course.

  16. Association Between Hypodensities Detected by Computed Tomography and Hematoma Expansion in Patients With Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Boulouis, Gregoire; Morotti, Andrea; Brouwers, H Bart; Charidimou, Andreas; Jessel, Michael J; Auriel, Eitan; Pontes-Neto, Octávio; Ayres, Alison; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Schwab, Kristin M; Rosand, Jonathan; Viswanathan, Anand; Gurol, Mahmut E; Greenberg, Steven M; Goldstein, Joshua N

    2016-08-01

    Hematoma expansion is a potentially modifiable predictor of poor outcome following an acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The ability to identify patients with ICH who are likeliest to experience hematoma expansion and therefore likeliest to benefit from expansion-targeted treatments remains an unmet need. Hypodensities within an ICH detected by noncontrast computed tomography (NCCT) have been suggested as a predictor of hematoma expansion. To determine whether hypodense regions, irrespective of their specific patterns, are associated with hematoma expansion in patients with ICH. We analyzed a large cohort of 784 patients with ICH (the development cohort; 55.6% female), examined NCCT findings for any hypodensity, and replicated our findings on a different cohort of patients (the replication cohort; 52.7% female). Baseline and follow-up NCCT data from consecutive patients with ICH presenting to a tertiary care hospital between 1994 and 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Data analyses were performed between December 2015 and January 2016. Hypodensities were analyzed by 2 independent blinded raters. The association between hypodensities and hematoma expansion (>6 cm3 or 33% of baseline volume) was determined by multivariable logistic regression after controlling for other variables associated with hematoma expansion in univariate analyses with P ≤ .10. A total of 1029 patients were included in the analysis. In the development and replication cohorts, 222 of 784 patients (28.3%) and 99 of 245 patients (40.4%; 321 of 1029 patients [31.2%]), respectively, had NCCT scans that demonstrated hypodensities at baseline (κ = 0.87 for interrater reliability). In univariate analyses, hypodensities were associated with hematoma expansion (86 of 163 patients with hematoma expansion had hypodensities [52.8%], whereas 136 of 621 patients without hematoma expansion had hypodensities [21.9%]; P < .001). The association between hypodensities and hematoma expansion

  17. Association Between Hypodensities Detected by Computed Tomography and Hematoma Expansion in Patients With Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Boulouis, Gregoire; Morotti, Andrea; Brouwers, H. Bart; Charidimou, Andreas; Jessel, Michael J.; Auriel, Eitan; Pontes-Neto, Octávio; Ayres, Alison; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Schwab, Kristin M.; Rosand, Jonathan; Viswanathan, Anand; Gurol, Mahmut E.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Goldstein, Joshua N.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Hematoma expansion is a potentially modifiable predictor of poor outcome following an acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The ability to identify patients with ICH who are likeliest to experience hematoma expansion and therefore likeliest to benefit from expansion-targeted treatments remains an unmet need. Hypodensities within an ICH detected by noncontrast computed tomography (NCCT) have been suggested as a predictor of hematoma expansion. OBJECTIVE To determine whether hypodense regions, irrespective of their specific patterns, are associated with hematoma expansion in patients with ICH. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We analyzed a large cohort of 784 patients with ICH (the development cohort; 55.6% female), examined NCCT findings for any hypodensity, and replicated our findings on a different cohort of patients (the replication cohort; 52.7% female). Baseline and follow-up NCCT data from consecutive patients with ICH presenting to a tertiary care hospital between 1994 and 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Data analyses were performed between December 2015 and January 2016. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Hypodensities were analyzed by 2 independent blinded raters. The association between hypodensities and hematoma expansion (>6 cm3 or 33% of baseline volume) was determined by multivariable logistic regression after controlling for other variables associated with hematoma expansion in univariate analyses with P ≤ .10. RESULTS A total of 1029 patients were included in the analysis. In the development and replication cohorts, 222 of 784 patients (28.3%) and 99 of 245 patients (40.4%; 321 of 1029 patients [31.2%]), respectively, had NCCT scans that demonstrated hypodensities at baseline (κ = 0.87 for interrater reliability). In univariate analyses, hypodensities were associated with hematoma expansion (86 of 163 patients with hematoma expansion had hypodensities [52.8%], whereas 136 of 621 patients without hematoma expansion had hypodensities [21

  18. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma on the Ventral Portion of Whole Spinal Canal: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Young; Ha, Young-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma is an uncommon but disabling disease. This paper reports a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma and treatment by surgical management. A 32-year-old male presented with a 30-minute history of sudden headache, back pain, chest pain, and progressive quadriplegia. Whole-spinal sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed spinal epidural hematoma on the ventral portion of the spinal canal. Total laminectomy from T5 to T7 was performed, and hematoma located at the ventral portion of the spinal cord was evacuated. Epidural drainages were inserted in the upper and lower epidural spaces. The patient improved sufficiently to ambulate, and paresthesia was fully recovered. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma should be considered when patients present symptoms of spinal cord compression after sudden back pain or chest pain. To prevent permanent neurologic deficits, early and correct diagnosis with timely surgical management is necessary. PMID:26512277

  19. A Knowledge Discovery Approach to Diagnosing Intracranial Hematomas on Brain CT: Recognition, Measurement and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chun-Chih; Xiao, Furen; Wong, Jau-Min; Chiang, I.-Jen

    Computed tomography (CT) of the brain is preferred study on neurological emergencies. Physicians use CT to diagnose various types of intracranial hematomas, including epidural, subdural and intracerebral hematomas according to their locations and shapes. We propose a novel method that can automatically diagnose intracranial hematomas by combining machine vision and knowledge discovery techniques. The skull on the CT slice is located and the depth of each intracranial pixel is labeled. After normalization of the pixel intensities by their depth, the hyperdense area of intracranial hematoma is segmented with multi-resolution thresholding and region-growing. We then apply C4.5 algorithm to construct a decision tree using the features of the segmented hematoma and the diagnoses made by physicians. The algorithm was evaluated on 48 pathological images treated in a single institute. The two discovered rules closely resemble those used by human experts, and are able to make correct diagnoses in all cases.

  20. Large intraluminal ileal hematoma presenting as small bowel obstruction in a child.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yun Jung; Nam, So Hyun; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-04-01

    Intraluminal small bowel hematoma has been rarely reported in children, as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. We present a case of an intraluminal ileal hematoma presenting as small bowel obstruction in a child. Computed Tomography (CT) indicated a large intraluminal hyperdense lesion in the distal ileum as the cause of small bowel obstruction. Abdominal ultrasonography (US) showed an echogenic mass-like lesion with multiple septa in the distal ileum. Small bowel obstruction due to a complicated cystic mass was provisionally diagnosed. Histopathologic examination of the resected mass suggested a submucosal ileal hematoma. Although intraluminal small bowel hematoma is rare in children, it can present as an intraluminal cystic mass and should be considered as a rare cause of small bowel obstruction. The US and CT findings of submucosal ileal hematoma could be useful for the diagnosis of such cases in the future.

  1. [Clinical Manifestations of Spinal Epidural Hematoma-Stroke Mimic and Pitfalls in Diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Masaru

    2017-02-01

    Clinical manifestations of spinal epidural hematoma are presented, and the cases mimicking acute ischemic stroke have been reviewed from the literature. Many reports described the cases of spinal epidural hematoma with acute hemiparesis mimicking ischemic stroke in which intravenous thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator was considered. A correct diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke must be made within 4.5 hours from the onset of symptoms, a relatively short window period. A spinal epidural hematoma is a potentially important stroke mimic in a wide variety of conditions that mimic a stroke. The literature review and discussion will emphasize allowing the distinction between these hemiparetic presentation of spinal epidural hematoma and acute ischemic stroke. A spinal epidural hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute onset of hemiparesis when associated with neck pain and signs of Horner's syndrome and Brown-Sēquard syndrome.

  2. Migration of traumatic intracranial subdural hematoma to lumbar spine causing radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Charles H.; Yew, Andrew Y.; Lu, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There have been rare reports of intracranial subdural hematoma (SDH) that migrated into the spine. All previous cases have been surgically managed and in this case report, we describe the first case of conservatively managed spinal hematoma secondary to migratory intracranial SDH. Case Description: A 26-year-old male presented with a left tentorial SDH after blunt trauma. He was conservatively managed and discharged home. He presented 8 days later with worsening lower back pain that was found to be secondary to a spinal SDH. Conclusion: Spinal hematomas can be a serious sequelae of migrated intracranial hematomas. Tentorial and other caudally located intracranial hematomas may be more prone to this phenomenon. PMID:23869281

  3. Intradiploic hematoma of the frontal bone with secondary exophthalmos in a mare.

    PubMed

    Kafarnik, Christiane; Donaldson, David; Payne, Richard; Holloway, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A 13-year-old cob mare was presented with exophthalmos and periocular swelling of the left eye. The diagnostic work-up included ocular ultrasound, sonographic examination through the thinned frontal bone, radiography, standing computed tomography of the skull and exploratory osteoplastic surgery. Histopathology was consistent with an organized hematoma. An intradiploic hematoma of the frontal bone was diagnosed 5 years after head trauma, with progressive expansion and deformation of the skull resulting in exophthalmos. Exophthalmos with facial bone deformation was the only clinical finding of intradiploic hematoma. Standing computed tomography (CT) aided the diagnosis to differentiate intradiploic hematoma from other, more common causes of facial bone distortion associated with paranasal sinus diseases. Intradiploic hematoma of possible traumatic origin is a differential diagnosis for sinonasal disease and exophthalmos in the horse.

  4. Delayed neurological deficits induced by an epidural hematoma associated with a thoracic osteoporotic compression fracture.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Soo; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Choon-Dae; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2012-01-01

    A 79-year-old woman developed neurological deficits 6 weeks after the onset of a thoracic osteoporotic compression fracture. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the thoracic spine revealed an epidural hematoma at the T10-L2 levels. Acute decompressive laminectomy and percutaneous vertebroplasty were performed. Following the surgery, the patient's neurologic deficits improved and follow-up MR imaging showed complete resolution of the hematoma. Spinal epidural hematomas are rare and associated delayed neurological deficits are extremely rare. Conservative treatment may be effective for epidural hematomas in neurologically intact patients, but epidural hematomas can be a cause of neural compression and symptomatic deterioration resulting in delayed neurological deficits during the follow-up period.

  5. Endoscopic therapy for esophageal hematoma with blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takasumi, Mika; Hikichi, Takuto; Takagi, Tadayuki; Sato, Masaki; Suzuki, Rei; Watanabe, Ko; Nakamura, Jun; Sugimoto, Mitsuru; Waragai, Yuichi; Kikuchi, Hitomi; Konno, Naoki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Obara, Katsutoshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2014-12-16

    A 57-year-old woman previously diagnosed with blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS) reported hematemesis. BRBNS is a rare vascular anomaly syndrome consisting of multifocal hemangiomas of the skin and gastrointestinal (GI) tract but her GI tract had never been examined. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a large bleeding esophageal hematoma positioned between the thoracic esophagus and the gastric cardia. An endoscopic injection of polidocanol was used to stop the hematoma from bleeding. The hematoma was incised using the injection needle to reduce the pressure within it. Finally, argon plasma coagulation (APC) was applied to the edge of the incision. The esophageal hematoma disappeared seven days later. Two months after the endoscopic therapy, the esophageal ulcer healed and the hemangioma did not relapse. This rare case of a large esophageal hematoma originating from a hemangioma with BRBNS was treated using a combination of endoscopic therapy with polidocanol injection, incision, and APC.

  6. Nasalseptal hematoma/abscess: management and outcome in a tertiary hospital of a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Nwosu, Jones N; Nnadede, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasal hematoma/abscess is an uncommon entity, but capable of leading to serious consequences if not handled meticulously, and with urgency. Objective To present the management, and outcome of nasal septal hematoma/abscess in a Nigerian tertiary institution. Method Consecutive patients diagnosed with nasal septal hematoma/abscess over a 10-year period, treated at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria, were prospectively studied. The processes leading to diagnosis, treatment, and outcome were sequentially evaluated. Results Fifty-three patients (37 males and 16 females), age 5–65 years (with mean age of 23.10 years), were included. Surgical drainage of the hematoma/abscess, intranasal packing with insertion of drain was performed with total resolution of problem in all the cases. Conclusion Incision and drainage, and intranasal packing with insertion of drain was effective in treating nasal septal hematoma/abscess. PMID:26251577

  7. Midline Shift Threshold Value for Hemiparesis in Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Juković, Mirela F; Stojanović, Dejan B

    2015-01-01

    Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) has a variety of clinical presentations, with numerous neurological symptoms and signs. Hemiparesis is one of the leading signs that potentially indicates CSDH. Purpose of this study was to determine the threshold (cut-off) value of midsagittal line (MSL) shift after which hemiparesis is likely to appear. The study evaluated 83 patients with 53 unilateral and 30 bilateral CSDHs in period of three years. Evaluated computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with CSDH were diameter of the hematoma and midsagittal line shift, measured on non-contrast CT scan in relation with occurrence of hemiparesis. Threshold values of MSL shift for both types of CSDHs were obtained as maximal (equal) sensitivity and specificity (intersection of the curves). MSL is a good predictor for hemiparesis occurrence (total sample, AUROC 0.75, p=0.0001). Unilateral and bilateral CSDHs had different threshold values of the MSL for hemiparesis development. Results suggested that in unilateral CSDH the threshold values of MSL could be at 10 mm (AUROC=0.65; p=0.07). For bilateral CSDH the threshold level of MSL shift was 4.5 mm (AUROC=0.77; p=0.01). Our study pointed on the phenomenon that midsagittal line shift can predict hemiparesis occurrence. Hemiparesis in patients with bilateral CSDH was more related to midsagittal line shift compared with unilateral CSDH. When value of midsagittal line shift exceed the threshold level, hemiparesis occurs with certain probability.

  8. Spontaneous rapid reduction of a large acute subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Hee; Kang, Dong Ho; Hwang, Soo Hyun; Park, In Sung; Jung, Jin-Myung; Han, Jong Woo

    2009-12-01

    The majority of acute post-traumatic subdural hematomas (ASDH) require urgent surgical evacuation. Spontaneous resolution of ASDH has been reported in some cases. We report here on a case of a patient with a large amount of ASDH that was rapidly reduced. A 61-yr-old man was found unconscious following a high speed motor vehicle accident. On initial examination, his Glasgow Coma Score scale was 4/15. His pupils were fully dilated and non-reactive to bright light. Brain computed tomography (CT) showed a massive right-sided ASDH. The decision was made to treat him conservatively because of his poor clinical condition. Another brain CT approximately 14 hr after the initial scan demonstrated a remarkable reduction of the previous ASDH and there was the new appearance of high density in the subdural space adjacent to the falx and the tentorium. Thirty days after his admission, brain CT revealed chronic SDH and the patient underwent surgery. The patient is currently able to obey simple commands. In conclusion, spontaneous rapid resolution/reduction of ASDH may occur in some patients. The mechanisms are most likely the result of dilution by cerebrospinal fluid and the redistribution of hematoma especially in patients with brain atrophy.

  9. Pitfalls in soft tissue sarcoma imaging: chronic expanding hematomas.

    PubMed

    Jahed, Kiarash; Khazai, Behnaz; Umpierrez, Monica; Subhawong, Ty K; Singer, Adam D

    2017-09-08

    Solid or nodular enhancement is typical of soft tissue sarcomas although high grade soft tissue sarcomas and those with internal hemorrhage often appear heterogeneous with areas of nonenhancement and solid or nodular enhancement. These MRI findings often prompt an orthopedic oncology referral, a biopsy or surgery. However, not all masses with these imaging findings are malignant. We report the multimodality imaging findings of two surgically proven chronic expanding hematomas (CEH) with imaging features that mimicked sarcomas. A third case of nonenhancing CEH of the lower extremity is also presented as a comparison. It is important that in the correct clinical scenario with typical imaging findings, the differential diagnosis of a chronic expanding hematoma be included in the workup of these patients. An image-guided biopsy of nodular tissue within such masses that proves to be negative for malignancy should not necessarily be considered discordant. A correct diagnosis may prevent a morbid unnecessary surgery and may indicate the need for a conservative noninvasive follow-up with imaging.

  10. Do cranial subdural hematomas migrate to the lumbar spine?

    PubMed

    Moscovici, S; Paldor, I; Ramirez de-Noriega, F; Itshayek, E; Shoshan, Y; Spektor, S; Attia, M

    2011-04-01

    We report a patient with minor head trauma-related bilateral hemispheric subdural hematoma (SDH) and subsequent delayed spinal SDH or presumed migration to the lumbar spine. An acutely confused 88-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department after minor head trauma. Head CT scan revealed a small hemispheric SDH. The patient was admitted for observation. CT scan 6 hours later showed bilateral SDH with extension to the tentorium. Three days later SDH had resolved leaving bilateral subdural hygromas. Local leg weakness localized to the lumbar spine developed on day 6; spinal CT scan and MRI revealed a posterior L5-S1 collection. A pure subacute subdural hematoma compressing the cauda equina was drained after an L5 laminectomy. His lower leg weakness improved. The patient was discharged to rehabilitation two weeks after surgery. Patients with traumatic SDH who develop late-onset neurological deterioration attributable to any region of the spine should be evaluated for spinal SDH. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Vertex epidural hematoma: An analysis of a large series

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Vengalathur Ganesan; Kodeeswaran, Marappan; Deiveegan, Kunjithapatham; Sundar, Venkataraman; Sriram, Kuchalambal

    2017-01-01

    Context: Vertex epidural hematoma (VEDH) is uncommon. A high index of suspicion is required to suspect and diagnose this condition, and the surgical management is a challenge to neurosurgeons. There are only isolated case reports or small series of VEDH in the literature. Aims: We have tried to analyze a large series of VEDH seen in our institute. Settings and Design: Retrospective observational study. Subjects and Methods: This is an analysis of case records of patients with VEDH during 17 years period from 1995 to 2012. Statistical Analysis Used: Nil. Results: Twenty nine cases of VEDH encountered over a period of 17 years have been analyzed, including 26 males and 3 females. Majority were due to road accidents. Headache, papilledema and lower limb weakness have been the major presenting features in these cases. The diagnosis was by direct coronal computerized tomography (CT) scan in most of them. Majority were managed conservatively with observation and serial imaging. Four patients who had large VEDH with altered sensorium were managed surgically. The source of bleeding was mainly from superior sagittal sinus. Conclusions: VEDH has to be suspected when a patient presents with impact over the vertex and features of raised intracranial pressure. Direct coronal CT or magnetic resonance imaging is useful in the diagnosis. Surgery is required when the patient develops progressive deterioration in sensorium and/or with the hematoma volume more than 30 ml. The present series of 29 cases is the largest reported so far. PMID:28484524

  12. Subdural Hematoma Associated With Labor Epidural Analgesia: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Lim, Grace; Zorn, Jamie M; Dong, Yuanxu J; DeRenzo, Joseph S; Waters, Jonathan H

    2016-01-01

    This report aimed to describe the characteristics and impact of subdural hematoma (SDH) after labor epidural analgesia. Eleven obstetric patients had SDHs associated with the use of labor epidural analgesia over 7 years at a tertiary care hospital. Ten of 11 patients had signs consistent with postdural puncture headache before the diagnosis of SDH. Five patients (45%) had a recognized unintentional dural puncture, 1 (9%) had a combined spinal-epidural with a 24-gauge needle, and 5 (45%) had no recognized dural puncture. For 10 of the 11 cases, SDH was diagnosed at a mean of 4.1 days (range, 1-7 days) after performance of labor epidural analgesia; one case was diagnosed at 25 days. Ten (91%) of 11 cases had a second hospital stay for a mean of 2.8 days (range, 2-4 days) for observation, without further requirement for neurosurgical intervention. One case (9%) had decompressive hemicraniectomy after becoming unresponsive. The observed rate of labor epidural analgesia-associated SDH was 0.026% (11 in 42,969, approximately 1:3900), and the rate of SDH was 1.1% (5 in 437, approximately 1:87) if a recognized dural puncture occurred during epidural catheter placement. Subdural hematoma after labor epidural anesthesia is rare but potentially more common than historically estimated. Cases of postdural puncture headache after labor epidural anesthesia should be monitored closely for severe neurologic signs and symptoms that could herald SDH.

  13. Management of acute spontaneous thoracic spinal epidural hematoma causing paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Alić, Fahrudin; Bečulić, Hakija; Jusić, Aldin; Skomorac, Rasim; Moranjkić, Mirza; Hrvat, Lejla; Tandir, Lejla

    2017-02-01

    Aim To emphasize the importance of early recognition, diagnostic processing and emergent surgical treatment of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). Methods A 39-year-old female presented with sudden onset of severe pain between the shoulder blades followed by paraparesis and alerted sensibility in the lower extremities. An hour later she developed paraplegia with sensory deficits below ThIV level, absence of patellar reflex, ankle jerk reflex and sphincter dysfunction. Results Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated acute extensive epidural mass of thoracic spinal segments (ThI-ThIII). The patient underwent emergent decompressive laminectomy ThI-ThIII with epidural hematoma evacuation within 24 hours of symptoms onset. After the surgical treatment, because of suspicion on spinal arteriovenous malformation, complete diagnostic evaluation with spinal angiography was done and no form of vascular malformation was found. Idiopathic SSEH was diagnosed. Two months later the patient reached complete neurological improvement. Conclusion The SSEH is a rare condition that should be kept in mind in patients presenting with neurological deficit and a sudden onset of back pain like it was in our case. For early diagnosis, immediate MRI is essential. Prompt surgical decompression such as laminectomy is an absolute surgical indication widely accepted for patients with progressive neurological deficit. The SSEH should be considered as one of the important differential diagnoses in patients who have developed acute myelopathy.

  14. Intraparenchymal hematoma as a late complication of retrograde intrarenal surgery.

    PubMed

    Yahsi, Sedat; Tonyali, Senol; Ceylan, Cavit; Yildiz, Kenan Y; Ozdal, Levent

    2017-01-01

    A 34 year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with left flank pain. A non-contrast enhanced computerized tomography (NCCT) revealed a 1.5x2cm left proximal ureter stone. Patient was scheduled for ureterorenoscopy (URS) and stone removal. She was submitted to retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS). At the postoperative 1st day, the patient began to suffer from left flank pain. A NCCT was taken, which revealed a subcapsular hematoma and perirenal fluid. The patient was managed conservatively with intravenous fluid, antibiotic and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy and was discharged at the postoperative 6th day. Two weeks after the discharge the patient was admitted to emergency department with severe left flank pain, palpitation and malaise. KUB (kidney-ureter-bladder) radiography showed double-J stent (DJS) to be repositioned to the proximal ureter. Patient was evaluated with contrast enhanced CT which revealed an 8cm intraparenchymal hematoma/abscess in the middle part of the kidney. A percutaneous drainage catheter was inserted into the collection. The percutaneous drainage catheter and the DJS were removed at the 10th day of second hospitalization. RIRS surgery is an effective and feasible choice for renal stones with high success and acceptable complication rates. However, clinician should be alert to possible complications.

  15. Subcortical hematoma caused by cerebral amyloid angiopathy: does the first evidence of hemorrhage occur in the subarachnoid space?

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shigeki; Yamazaki, Kazunori; Miyakawa, Teruo; Onda, Kiyoshi; Hinokuma, Kaoru; Ikuta, Fusahiro; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2003-12-01

    Six autopsy cases of subcortical hematoma caused by CAA were examined to elucidate the primary site of hemorrhage. Immunohistochemistry for amyloid beta-protein (A beta) revealed extensive CAA in the intrasulcal meningeal vessels rather than in the cerebral cortical vessels. All of the examined cases had multiple hematomas in the subarachnoid space, mainly in the cerebral sulci, as well as intracerebral hematomas. Each intracerebral hematoma was connected to the subarachnoid hematomas at the depth of cerebral sulci or through the lateral side of the cortex. There was no debris of the cerebral cortical tissue in the subarachnoid hematomas. In case 2, another solitary subarachnoid hematoma, which was not connected to any intracerebral hematoma, was seen. In all of these subarachnoid hematomas, many ruptured A beta-immunopositive arteries were observed. These ruptured arteries did not accompany any debris of the brain tissue, some of them were large in diameter (250-300 microm), and several of them were far from the cerebral cortex. Therefore, it was considered that they were not cortical arteries but meningeal arteries. Within the cerebral cortex, there were only a few ruptured arteries associated with small hemorrhages. There were no ruptured vessels within the intracerebral hematomas. There was a strong suggestion that all of the subarachnoid hematomas, including the solitary one in case 2, originated from the rupture of the meningeal arteries. The present study indicates that in some cases of subcortical hematoma caused by CAA, the primary hemorrhage occurs in the subarachnoid space, in particular the cerebral sulci, because of rupture of multiple meningeal arteries. Infarction occurs subsequently in the cortex around the hematoma, the hematoma penetrates into the brain parenchyma, and finally, a subcortical hematoma is formed.

  16. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension manifesting as a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Joji; Moriya, Shigeta; Shibata, Junpei; Kumai, Tadashi; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is a syndrome in which hypovolemia of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results in various symptoms. Although its prognosis is usually benign, cases with a rapid neurologic deterioration resulting in an altered mental status have been reported. One of the characteristic radiographic findings in such cases is the presence of bilateral accumulation of subdural fluid (hematoma/hygroma). When SIH-related subdural hematoma is present only unilaterally with a concomitant midline shift, making an accurate diagnosis may be challenging, and inadvertent hematoma evacuation may result in further neurologic deterioration. We report a 58-year-old woman with an altered mental status who had visited a local hospital and in whom a brain CT showed a unilateral subdural hematoma with a marked midline shift. She was referred to our department because of her neurologic deterioration after hematoma evacuation. A CT myelography revealed a massive CSF leakage in the entire thoracic epidural space. She made a full neurologic recovery following blood patch therapy. Our case is unique and educational because the suspicion for SIH as an underlying cause of subdural hematoma is warranted in nongeriatric patients not only with bilateral but also unilateral lesions. An immediate search for CSF leakage may be important in cases with failed hematoma evacuation surgery.

  17. Management of subcapsular hematoma of the graft after living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Sik; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Sung, Gyu-Bo; Ko, Gi-Young; Park, Kwang-Min; Kim, Ki-Hun; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won

    2006-07-01

    Subcapsular hematoma of the graft is a serious complication of liver transplantation (LT), and there has been no discussion in the literature about optimal management except in sporadic case reports. The aim of this work is to review our experience of subcapsular hematoma in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to introduce our management strategy. Among the 818 cases of adult-to-adult LDLT between February 1997 and November 2005, there have been 4 cases of subcapsular hematoma. Two of these developed after percutaneous liver biopsy and the other 2 developed after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). Two developed immediately after the procedure, whereas the other 2 developed 8 and 12 days after the procedure, respectively, due to rupture of a pseudoaneurysm. Our management strategy was as follows; after performing dynamic computed tomography for initial diagnosis, these 3 steps were taken: 1) hepatic arteriography and selective embolization of bleeding focus; 2) pigtail catheter drainage (PCD) of subcapsular hematoma; and 3) hepatic vein stenting if there was a sign of outflow disturbance due to compression by a large hematoma. All 4 of our patients recovered from the insult of subcapsular hematoma. In conclusion, our results indicate that patients who develop subcapsular hematoma after LDLT can be treated nonsurgically.

  18. Does pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography predict active bleeding at angiography for pelvic fracture?

    PubMed

    Brown, Carlos V R; Kasotakis, George; Wilcox, Alison; Rhee, Peter; Salim, Ali; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2005-09-01

    Pelvic angiography plays an increasing role in the management of pelvic fractures (PFs). Little has been written regarding the size of pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography (CT) and how it relates to angiography results after PF. This is a retrospective review of trauma patients with PF who underwent an admission abdominal/pelvic CT scan and pelvic angiography from 2001 to 2003. CT pelvic hematoma was measured and classified as minimal or significant based on hematoma dimensions. Presence of a contrast blush on CT scan was also documented. Thirty-seven patients underwent an admission CT scan and went on to pelvic angiography. Of the 22 patients with significant pelvic hematoma, 73 per cent (n = 16) had bleeding at angiography. Fifteen patients had minimal pelvic hematoma, with 67 per cent (n = 10) showing active bleeding at angiography. In addition, five of six patients (83%) with no pelvic hematoma had active bleeding at angiography. Six patients had a blush on CT scan, with five of these (83%) having a positive angiogram. But, 22 of 31 (71%) patients with no blush on CT scan had bleeding at angiography. The absence of a pelvic hematoma or contrast blush should not alter indications for pelvic angiography, as they do not reliably exclude active pelvic bleeding.

  19. Comparison of the Tada formula with software slicer: precise and low-cost method for volume assessment of intracerebral hematoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinghua; Chen, Xiaolei; Zhang, Jun; Zheng, Yi; Sun, Guochen; Yu, Xinguang; Xu, Bainan

    2014-11-01

    The Tada (ABC/2) formula has been used widely for volume assessment of intracerebral hematoma. However, the formula is crude for irregularly shaped hematoma. We aimed to compare the accuracy of the ABC/2 formula with open source software Slicer. Computed tomographic images of 294 patients with spontaneous intracerebral hematoma were collected. Hematoma volumes were assessed with the ABC/2 formula and calculated with software 3D Slicer. Results of these 2 methods were compared with regard to hematoma size and shape. The estimated hematoma volume was 58.41±37.83 cm(3) using the ABC/2 formula, compared with 50.38±31.93 cm(3) with 3D Slicer (mean percentage deviation, 16.38±9.15%). When allocate patients into groups according to hematoma size, the mean estimation error were 3.24 cm(3) (17.72%), 5.85 cm(3) (13.72%), and 15.14 cm(3) (17.48%) for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. When divided by shape, estimation error was 3.33 cm(3) (9.76%), 7.19 cm(3) (18.37%), and 29.39 cm(3) (39.12%) for regular, irregular, and multilobular hematomas. There is significant estimation error using the ABC/2 formula to calculate hematoma volume. Compared with hematoma size, estimation error is more significantly associated with hematoma shape. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Epidural hematomas after the implantation of thoracic paddle spinal cord stimulators.

    PubMed

    Moufarrij, Nazih A

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE There is little information on the frequency of symptomatic epidural hematomas after the implantation of paddle spinal cord stimulators (SCSs) in the thoracic spine. The purpose of this paper is to provide this metric and compare it to the frequency of symptomatic epidural hematomas for all other thoracic laminectomies combined. METHODS This study involved retrospectively analyzing the experience of a single surgeon in a consecutive series of patients who underwent the implantation of a thoracic paddle SCS with respect to the occurrence of a symptomatic epidural hematoma. For comparison, the occurrence of a symptomatic epidural hematoma in non-SCS thoracic laminectomies done during the same period of time was determined. RESULTS One hundred fifty-four thoracic paddle SCSs were implanted between May 2002 and February 2015. Despite perfect hemostasis and no preoperative risk factors, 4 of 154 patients (2.60%) developed postoperative lower-extremity weakness caused by an epidural hematoma. There were no other causes of a neurological deficit. In 3 of the 4 patients, the symptoms were delayed. Over the same time period, only 1 of 119 patients (0.84%) developed a postoperative motor deficit from a symptomatic epidural hematoma after a non-SCS laminectomy. CONCLUSIONS The occurrence of epidural hematomas after thoracic paddle SCS implantation may be underreported. Suggestions are given to decrease its incidence. It seems paradoxical that an epidural hematoma occurred 3 times more often after small SCS thoracic laminectomies than after larger non-SCS thoracic laminectomies. If confirmed by future studies, this finding may suggest that the intrusion of instruments into a confined epidural sublaminar space or the presence of a paddle and a hematoma in this restricted space may account for this differential.

  1. CTA Spot Sign Predicts Hematoma Expansion in Patients with Delayed Presentation After Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Guido J.; McNamara, Kristen A.; Ayres, Alison M.; Oleinik, Alexandra; Schwab, Kristin; Romero, Javier M.; Viswanathan, Anand; Greenberg, Steven M.; Rosand, Jonathan; Goldstein, Joshua N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hematoma expansion after acute intracerebral hemorrhage occurs most frequently in patients presenting within 3 h of symptom onset. However, the majority of patients present outside this window or with an unknown onset time. We investigated the prevalence of hematoma expansion in these patients and assessed the accuracy of the CT angiography (CTA) spot sign for identifying risk of hematoma expansion. Methods We analyzed 391 consecutive patients undergoing CTA and a followup CT. CTA spot sign readings were performed by two experienced readers and hematoma expansion was assessed by means of semi-automated software. Results Hematoma expansion occurred in 18 % of patients. When stratified by time from symptom onset to initial CT, hematoma expansion rates were: 39 % within 3 h; 11 % between 3 and 6 h, 11 % beyond 6 h (but with known onset), and 20 % in patients with unknown symptom onset. Of patients who developed hematoma expansion, only 38 % presented within 3 h. The accuracy of the spot sign in predicting hematoma expansion was 0.67 for patients presenting within 3 h, 0.83 between 3 and 6 h, 0.88 after 6 h, and 0.76 for patients presenting with an unknown onset time. Conclusions A substantial number of patients destined to suffer from hematoma expansion present either late or with an unknown symptom onset time. The CTA spot sign accurately identifies patients destined to expand regardless of time from symptom onset, and may therefore open a path to offer clinical trials and novel therapies to the many patients who do not present acutely. PMID:22878870

  2. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma presenting as paraplegia after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kin, Hajime; Mukaida, Masayuki; Koizumi, Junichi; Kamada, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Yoshino; Iwase, Tomoyuki; Ikai, Akio; Okabayashi, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    An 86-year-old woman was scheduled to undergo aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass graft. On postoperative day 3, she developed sudden-onset neck pain followed by weakness in the right arm. Her symptoms worsened with time, and she developed paraplegia. At 60 h after the first complaint, spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) from C2 to C6 with spinal cord compression was diagnosed from a magnetic resonance image of the cervical region. We decided on conservative therapy because operative recovery was impossible. Delayed diagnosis led to grievous results in the present case. When neurological abnormalities follow neck or back pain after open heart surgery, SSEH must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Further, if it is suspected, early cervical computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging and surgery should be considered.

  3. Pancreatic Pseudocyst with Splenic Artery Erosion, Retroperitoneal and Splenic Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Botianu, Petre V. H.; Dobre, Adrian S.; Botianu, Ana-Maria V.; Onisor, Danusia

    2015-01-01

    The erosion of the peripancreatic vascular structures is a rare but life-endangering complication of pancreatic diseases. We report a female patient with a multicompartmentalized pancreatic pseudocyst that eroded the splenic artery resulting in a retroperitoneal and splenic hematoma with hemodynamic instability which required emergency laparotomy with splenectomy, partial cystectomy, ligation of the splenic artery at the level of the vascular erosion, cholecystectomy (lithiasis), and multiple drainage. The postoperative course was difficult (elevated level of platelets, pancreatic fistula) but eventually favourable, with no abdominal complaints and no recurrence at 2-year follow-up. The case shows that the pancreatic pseudocysts may present with acute hemorrhagic complications with life-endangering potential and significant postoperative morbidity. PMID:26783490

  4. Polymicrobial skull osteomyelitis: a rare complication of subdural hematoma evacuation.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, Scott W; Graves, Richard M; Baum, Sue E; Teff, Richard J

    2007-08-01

    Osteomyelitis of the skull (SO) is a rare condition. The infection may complicate community-acquired sinusitis, otitis, or mastoiditis, in which case, the skull base is affected most commonly. The flora typically seen in these conditions, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, tends also to be responsible for the SO. Osteomyelitis also may follow neurosurgical procedures that breach the skull, in which case, the pathogens frequently are typical cutaneous flora such as Staphylococcus aureus or coagulase-negative staphylococci. A case report of post-neurosurgical SO and a review of the relevant English-language literature. We report a delayed presentation of SO after craniotomy for the evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma. Cranial tissue cultures grew Staphylococcus aureus, Corynebacterium spp., and Escherichia coli. The isolation of Escherichia coli as an infecting organism in SO has been reported rarely and may reflect a unique pathogenesis.

  5. Cervical spontaneous epidural hematoma as a complication of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, L; Carletti, S; Frondizi, D; Spera, C; Maira, G

    1996-01-01

    Epidural hematoma is a rare cause of spinal cord compression, which usually provokes severe neurological deficits. It is presumed to originate from venous or, more probably, arterial bleeding. Thrombocytopenia and other disorders of coagulation may precipitate the onset of epidural hematoma and facilitate the evolution of the disease. We report the case of a patient suffering from a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with severe thrombocytopenia during a MACOP-B schedule, who presented with a spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma. We discuss the etiopathological aspects, diagnosis, and treatment of this rare cause of acute cervical spinal cord compression.

  6. Two cases of sublingual hematoma as a manifestation of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Muneesh; Chiesa, Antonia E; Sirotnak, Andrew P

    2015-12-01

    Common intraoral manifestations of child abuse include tears of the frenula, burns, and pharyngeal perforations. Sublingual hematomas can also occur as a result of trauma, but to the best of our knowledge, only 1 case has been previously described in the context of child abuse. We report 2 new cases of sublingual hematoma in infants that were the result of physical abuse. Cases of sublingual hematoma in infants and children without a clear and legitimate explanation of the cause should prompt consideration of child abuse.

  7. Post-operative hematoma after surgery for intracranial meningiomas: causes, avoidable risk factors and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Rüdiger; Raabe, Andreas; Scharrer, Inge; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Seifert, Volker

    2004-01-01

    Intracranial meningiomas are mainly benign lesions amenable for surgical resection. However, removal of an intracranial meningioma carries a higher risk of post-operative hemorrhage compared to surgery for other intracranial neoplasms. Because avoidance of post-operative hematoma is of vital interest for neurosurgical patients, the aim of this retrospective study was to analyze risk factors of post-operative hematoma associated with meningioma surgery. Two hundred and ninety six patients with intracranial meningiomas, operated between June 1998 and June 2002, were included in this study. Patients who developed a space-occupying post-operative intracranial hemorrhage and were treated surgically were identified. Data of patients with and without hematoma were retrospectively analyzed to identify risk factors associated with post-operative hematoma. Variables analyzed included patients' age, invasion of venous sinus by the meningioma, tumor vascularization, arachnoidal infiltration, pre-operative prophylaxis of thromboembolic events, peri-operative coagulation abnormalities, residual tumor, location and histology of the tumor. Outcome of patients with post-operative hematoma was assessed according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) at discharge and at three months. 21 patients (7.1 %) of 296 patients developed a post-operative intracranial hematoma requiring surgical evacuation. Age was significantly higher in the hematoma group 62.4 +/- 14.0 years compared to patients without post-operative hematoma 56.1 +/- 12.0 (p < 0.05; t-test). Patients older than 70 years had a six-fold increased risk to develop a post-operative hematoma (Chi2 test, 95% CI 1.949-13.224). Patients with post-operative hemorrhage had significant lower post-operative prothrombin time, fibrinogen and platelets immediately after surgery and lower platelets at day 1. None of the other parameters, including pre-operative routine coagulation values, differed significantly between patients with and

  8. Acute Scrotum Following Traumatic Spermatic Cord Hematoma: A Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Pepe, Pietro; Bonaccorsi, Astrid; Candiano, Giuseppe; Pietropaolo, Francesco; Panella, Paolo; Pennisi, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Acute scrotum constitutes the most common urological emergency secondary to spermatic cord torsion, testicular trauma, orchiepididymitis and hernias. We report a very rare case of unique traumatic spermatic cord hematoma following scrotum injury occurred during a football match. Clinical exam showed an increased volume of the left spermatic cord; the color Doppler ultrasound (CDU) demonstrated left testicular ischemia secondary to a large spermatic cord hematoma that needs surgical exploration. Spermatic cord hematoma rarely induces acute scrotum, however it could be treated conservatively surgery is mandatory when pain is persistent or testicular ischemia is confirmed by CDU. PMID:26793493

  9. Spontaneous subdural hematoma of the thoracolumbar region with massive recurrent bleed

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; de Asis Lorente, Francisco; Rivero, David; Eiras, José; Ara, José Ramón

    2009-01-01

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disorder and can be caused by abnormalities of coagulation, blood dyscrasias, lumbar puncture, trauma, underlying neoplasm, and arteriovenous malformation. We discuss an unusual case of an elderly woman who presented with spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma and developed massive rebleeding on the third day following initial evacuation of hematoma. This case illustrates that a patient with routine normal coagulation profile and adequate hemostasis can still harbor platelet dysfunction (in present case due to polycythemia) and later on can manifest as rebleeding and neurological deterioration. PMID:19838395

  10. CT Findings of Ruptured Intramural Hematoma of the Aorta Extending Along the Pulmonary Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Sueyoshi, Eijun Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka; Matsuoka, Yojiro; Suenaga, Etsuro

    2007-04-15

    Mediastinal hematoma extending along the pulmonary artery is a rare complication of Stanford type A classic (double-barreled) aortic dissection. Rupture from the posterior aspect of the aortic root penetrates the shared adventitia of the aorta and pulmonary artery. From this location, hematoma can spread along the adventitial planes of the pulmonary arteries out into the lungs. We report a case of ruptured intramural hematoma of the aorta (IMH) extending along the pulmonary artery. To our knowledge, this finding in patients with IMH has not been reported in the literature.

  11. [Delayed Traumatic Intracerebral Hematoma during Antiplatelet Therapy after Operations for Ruptured Left ICPC Aneurysm and Right Traumatic Epidural Hematoma: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Nomura, Shunsuke; Iwata, Yukiya; Baba, Motoki; Kawashima, Akitsugu; Sato, Hidetaka; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2015-07-01

    Delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma (DTICH) is a rare complication of head injury that appears suddenly after an interval of several days or months. Here, we report a case of DTICH during antiplatelet therapy for vasospasm following surgeries for a ruptured left internal carotid-posterior communicating (ICPC) aneurysm and right acute epidural hematoma (EDH). A 77-year-old man with no medical history was diagnosed with a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to rupturing of a left ICPC aneurysm and a right linear fracture of the right parietal bone due to a head injury following the rupture. On day 2, the patient underwent successful clipping of the left ICPC aneurysm. Computed tomography (CT) performed post-clipping revealed a right acute EDH below the linear fracture of the right parietal bone, which was removed immediately. A next-day CT revealed minor contusions in both temporal poles. Fasudil, ozagrel, and cilostazol were administered from Day 3 post-clipping and EDH evacuation to prevent vasospasm. The contusions did not enlarge until Day 10. On Day 11, the patient became comatose, and a huge hematoma was identified in the right temporal lobe to frontal lobe. Although the hematoma was removed immediately, the patient died on Day 13. The hematoma was considered to be a rare case of DTICH that developed from a minor contusion of the right temporal lobe during antiplatelet therapy for vasospasm. In cases of aneurysmal SAH with head injury and contusion, we must pay attention to DTICH and select more deliberate treatment for vasospasm.

  12. Case report: treatment of subdural hematoma in the emergency department utilizing the subdural evacuating port system.

    PubMed

    Asfora, Wilson T; Klapper, Hendrik B

    2013-08-01

    Patients with acute or chronic subdural hematomas may present with rapidly deteriorating neurological function and are at risk for irreversible brainstem injury. In such cases, rapid surgical intervention is required to evacuate the hematoma and reverse critically elevated intracranial pressure. A variety of surgical drainage methods are in existence, none of which are clearly superior to the others. This report presents the case of a 74-year-old woman who suffered an acute-on-chronic subdural hematoma which was evacuated in the emergency department utilizing the subdural evacuating port system (SEPS). The SEPS provides for a minimally invasive technique to drain subdural hematomas and is advantageous in that it can be performed at the bedside. The SEPS is relatively simple to use and may be especially useful to emergency department staff in outlying areas where there is a shortage of neurosurgical coverage.

  13. Scintigraphic demonstration of intracranial communication between arachnoid cyst and associated subdural hematoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, K.; Tonami, N.; Kimura, M.; Kinoshita, A.; Aburano, T.; Hisada, K.

    1989-05-01

    An arachnoid cyst found to have a communication to an associated subdural hematoma was demonstrated with the Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy. Although arachnoid cysts are known to be silent, when a patient with an arachnoid cyst develops signs of increased intracranial pressure or neurological deficits, the presence of a complication, including subdural hematoma, intracystic hemorrhage or subdural hygroma, is highly suspected. In the present case, the patient with an arachnoid cyst had a subdural hematoma following minor head injury. Tc-99m DTPA brain scintigraphy showed abnormal accumulation of the tracer not only in the hematoma but in the arachnoid cyst. This observation suggested communication of the two lesions, which was confirmed at surgery.

  14. Retropharyngeal hematoma secondary to cervical spine surgery: report of one fatal case.

    PubMed

    Dedouit, Fabrice; Grill, Stéphane; Guilbeau-Frugier, Céline; Savall, Frédéric; Rougé, Daniel; Telmon, Norbert

    2014-09-01

    A 53-year-old woman suffering from radicular pain due to cervical herniation underwent a spinal surgery consisting of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with an implantable titanium cage. Five hours after the procedure, the patient developed cervical swelling and dyspnea. An emergency surgery permitted evacuation of a deep cervical hematoma and intubation of the patient, who died some minutes later. The family of the deceased lodged a complaint with the public prosecutor because of unclear circumstances of death. After analysis of the medical records by two forensic pathologists, a medicolegal autopsy was ordered. Massive retropharyngeal and mediastinal hematomas were diagnosed. Pathological study confirmed acute cervical hemorrhage, but failed to detect the source of bleeding. The forensic pathologists concluded that death was due to mechanical asphyxia secondary to pharyngeal compression by the cervical hematoma. To the best of our knowledge, death secondary to retropharyngeal hematoma in this neurosurgical context is rarely encountered.

  15. Posttraumatic retroclival acute subdural hematoma: report of two cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Krishnamurthy; Venkateswara, Prasanna G; Ramakrishnaiah, Sridhar; Iyer, Vijay

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic retroclival hematomas are uncommon lesions usually associated with significant trauma. Majority of the reported hematomas are epidural; and in the pediatric population. Retroclival acute subdural hematomas (RSDH) are very rare, with only two previous cases reported in English literature. An 18-year-old man presented with headache and no deficits following an accident. Computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an acute RSDH extending into the spinal subdural space. He developed bilateral sixth nerve palsies, with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure within the next 24 hours. He underwent evacuation of hematoma with a good outcome. Another 19-year-old man presented with neck pain following a fall from a moving bus. He had no neurological deficits. CT scan showed a RSDH extending across the craniovertebral junction. He was managed conservatively with good outcome.

  16. The early fracture hematoma and its potential role in fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Paula; Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina; Schell, Hanna; Gaber, Timo; Toben, Daniel; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Perka, Carsten; Buttgereit, Frank; Duda, Georg N

    2010-08-01

    Research regarding the potency and potential of the fracture hematoma has begun to receive increasing attention. However, currently there is a paucity of relevant literature on the capability and composition of the fracture hematoma. This review briefly summarizes the regenerative fracture healing process and the close interplay between the skeletal and immune systems. The role of immune cells in wound healing is also discussed to clarify their involvement in immunological processes during regeneration. We attempt to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the fracture hematoma as the initial stage of the regenerative process of fracture healing. The review discusses how a better understanding of immune reactions in the hematoma may have implications for bone tissue engineering strategies. We conclude the review by emphasizing how additional investigations of the initial phase of healing will allow us to better differentiate between deleterious and beneficial aspects of inflammation, thereby facilitating improved fracture treatment strategies.

  17. Subdural hematoma occurrence: comparison between ethanol and cocaine use at death.

    PubMed

    Heninger, Michael

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to show that, in a medical examiner population, ethanol intoxication is associated with an increase in the occurrence of subdural hematoma (SDH), whereas the presence of cocaine is not associated with an increase in the occurrence of SDH. This was a retrospective evaluation of 967 SDH including the investigative information, autopsy, and toxicological findings derived from 18,314 medical examiner cases over 8 years. Subdural hematoma is found in 7% to 9% of cases with either no ethanol or less than 100 mg/dL of ethanol. Subdural hematoma is found in 18% of cases with ethanol levels of greater than 100 mg/dL. Subdural hematoma is found in 11% of cases negative for cocaine, whereas SDH is found in 9% of cases with any form of cocaine present at death.

  18. Endoscopic drainage for duodenal hematoma following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ya-Min; Wang, Tian-Tian; Wu, Jun; Hu, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Intramural duodenal hematoma (IDH) is a rare complication following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Blunt damage caused by the endoscope or an accessory has been suggested as the main reason for IDH. Surgical treatment of isolated duodenal hematoma after blunt trauma is traditionally reserved for rare cases of perforation or persistent symptoms despite conservative management. Typical clinical symptoms of IDH include abdominal pain and vomiting. Diagnosis of IDH can be confirmed by imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Duodenal hematoma is mainly treated by drainage, which includes open surgery drainage and percutaneous transhepatic cholangial drainage, both causing great trauma. Here we present a case of massive IDH following ERCP, which was successfully managed by minimally invasive management: intranasal hematoma aspiration combined with needle knife opening under a duodenoscope. PMID:23599635

  19. CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and improves neurological functions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen-Jing; Yu, Hong-Quan; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qun; Meng, Hong-Mei

    2016-07-01

    Clinical outcomes are positively associated with hematoma absorption. The monocyte-macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163, plays an important role in the metabolism of hemoglobin, and a soluble form of CD163 is present in plasma and other tissue fluids; therefore, we speculated that serum CD163 affects hematoma absorption after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were divided into high- and low-level groups according to the average CD163 level (1,977.79 ± 832.91 ng/mL). Compared with the high-level group, the low-level group had a significantly slower hematoma absorption rate, and significantly increased National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores and modified Rankin Scale scores. These results suggest that CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and the recovery of neurological function in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

  20. CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and improves neurological functions in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-jing; Yu, Hong-quan; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qun; Meng, Hong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Clinical outcomes are positively associated with hematoma absorption. The monocyte-macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163, plays an important role in the metabolism of hemoglobin, and a soluble form of CD163 is present in plasma and other tissue fluids; therefore, we speculated that serum CD163 affects hematoma absorption after intracerebral hemorrhage. Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage were divided into high- and low-level groups according to the average CD163 level (1,977.79 ± 832.91 ng/mL). Compared with the high-level group, the low-level group had a significantly slower hematoma absorption rate, and significantly increased National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores and modified Rankin Scale scores. These results suggest that CD163 promotes hematoma absorption and the recovery of neurological function in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27630696

  1. Risk factors for reoperation after initial burr hole trephination in chronic subdural hematomas.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Falko; Loos, Franz; Dünisch, Pedro; Sakr, Yasser; Safatli, Diaa Al; Kalff, Rolf; Ewald, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The optimal management of chronic subdural hematomas remains a challenge. Twist drill craniotomy or burr hole trephination are considered optimal initial treatments, but the reoperation rate for hematoma recurrence and other complications is still high. Therefore, evaluation of possible risk factors for initial treatment failure is crucial. In this context, we performed a study to define a possible subpopulation that may benefit from a more invasive initial treatment regime. We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of 193 patients with 250 chronic subdural hematomas who had undergone burr hole trephination as first-line therapy in our institution between January 2005 and October 2012. To identify risk factors for reoperation, a multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed with reoperation as the dependent variable. Surgical complications, including acute rebleeding, infection and chronic hematoma recurrence, were analyzed separately using a logistic regression model. The mean age of the cohort was 71.4 years. The male/female ratio was 137:56. Reoperation was necessary in 56 cases (29%) for recurrent hematomas and surgical complications. Predictors for reoperation for surgical complications were midline shift (odds ratio [OR] (per mm) 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.29, p=0.006), arterial hypertension (OR 5.44, 95% CI: 1.45-20.41, p=0.012) and bilateral hematomas (OR 4.22, 95% CI: 1.22-14.58, p=0.023). There was a trend toward a higher risk of surgically-relevant hematoma recurrence in patients with prior treatment with vitamin K antagonists (OR 1.76, 95% CI: 0.75-4.13, p=0.191). Burr hole trephination is the therapy of choice in most chronic subdural hematomas, but the rate of recurrent hematomas is high. Every hematoma should be treated individually especially in relation to midline-shift and pre-existing conditions. Further prospective studies evaluating types of treatment and hematoma density are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  2. Significant Risk Factors for Postoperative Enlargement of Basal Ganglia Hematoma after Frameless Stereotactic Aspiration: Antiplatelet Medication and Concomitant IVH.

    PubMed

    Son, Wonsoo; Park, Jaechan

    2017-09-01

    Frameless stereotactic aspiration of a hematoma can be the one of the treatment options for spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage in the basal ganglia. Postoperative hematoma enlargement, however, can be a serious complication of intracranial surgery that frequently results in severe neurological deficit and even death. Therefore, it is important to identify the risk factors of postoperative hematoma growth. During a 13-year period, 101 patients underwent minimally invasive frameless stereotactic aspiration for basal ganglia hematoma. Patients were classified into two groups according to whether or not they had postoperative hematoma enlargement in a computed tomography scan. Baseline demographic data and several risk factors, such as hypertension, preoperative hematoma growth, antiplatelet medication, presence of concomitant intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), were analysed via a univariate statistical study. Nine of 101 patients (8.9%) showed hematoma enlargement after frameless stereotactic aspiration. Among the various risk factors, concomitant IVH and antiplatelet medication were found to be significantly associated with postoperative enlargement of hematomas. In conclusion, our study revealed that aspirin use and concomitant IVH are factors associated with hematoma enlargement subsequent to frameless stereotactic aspiration for basal ganglia hematoma.

  3. Conservative vs. Surgical Management of Post-Traumatic Epidural Hematoma: A Case and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Maugeri, Rosario; Anderson, David Greg; Graziano, Francesca; Meccio, Flavia; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2015-11-14

    Trauma is the leading cause of death in people younger than 45 years and head injury is the main cause of trauma mortality. Although epidural hematomas are relatively uncommon (less than 1% of all patients with head injuries and fewer than 10% of those who are comatose), they should always be considered in evaluation of a serious head injury. Patients with epidural hematomas who meet surgical criteria and receive prompt surgical intervention can have an excellent prognosis, presumably owing to limited underlying primary brain damage from the traumatic event. The decision to perform a surgery in a patient with a traumatic extraaxial hematoma is dependent on several factors (neurological status, size of hematoma, age of patients, CT findings) but also may depend on the judgement of the treating neurosurgeon. A 30-year old man arrived at our Emergency Department after a traumatic brain injury. General examination revealed severe headache, no motor or sensory disturbances, and no clinical signs of intracranial hypertension. A CT scan documented a significant left fronto-parietal epidural hematoma, which was considered suitable for surgical evacuation. The patient refused surgery. Following CT scan revealed a minimal increase in the size of the hematoma and of midline shift. The neurologic examination maintained stable and the patient continued to refuse the surgical treatment. Next follow up CT scans demonstrated a progressive resorption of hematoma. We report an unusual case of a remarkable epidural hematoma managed conservatively with a favorable clinical outcome. This case report is intended to rather add to the growing knowledge regarding the best management for this serious and acute pathology.

  4. Intramural hematoma of duodenum: An unusual complication after endoscopic therapy for a bleeding peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramesh; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Bhatia, Vikram; Garg, Hitendra Kumar; Sundar, Shyam

    2011-04-01

    Intramural hematoma of duodenum (IDH) is a relatively unusual complication associated with endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer. This unusual condition is usually seen in children following blunt trauma to the abdomen. We describe here a case of IDH occurring following endoscopic therapy for bleeding duodenal ulcer in an adult patient with end-stage renal disease. The hematomas appeared on the second day of endoscopic intervention, caused transient duodenal obstruction and resolved spontaneously with conservative treatment in a week.

  5. Subcapsular liver hematoma after fibrinolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Safi, Morteza; Khaheshi, Isa; Memaryan, Mehdi; Naderian, Mohammadreza

    2017-01-16

    Hemorrhagic complications of thrombolytic therapy are rare but also serious and sometimes life-threatening. Liver hematoma is a very uncommon complication following thrombolytic therapy. We present a rare case of sub-capsular liver hematoma following streptokinase therapy of acute myocardial infarction as a challenging condition. This case report highlights that emergency physicians and cardiologists should be familiar with the significant and uncommon complications of thrombolytic agents, particularly streptokinase which is used generally in under- developed countries.

  6. CO2 demonstration of multiple extravasations into a subcapsular hematoma of the liver.

    PubMed

    Terayama, Noboru; Matsui, Osamu; Ueda, Fumiaki; Hattori, Yuki; Nishijima, Hiroshi; Sanada, Junichiro

    2004-01-01

    In a case of esophageal cancer with liver metastases, rupture of a liver metastasis resulted in subcapsular hematoma of the liver. Digital subtraction angiography with carbon dioxide showed multiple extravasations at the surface of the liver suggesting multiple ruptures of the penetrating hepatic capsular arteries. It was suggested that these findings are not rare in cases of subcapsular hematoma; however, they have received little attention.

  7. CO{sub 2} Demonstration of Multiple Extravasations into a Subcapsular Hematoma of the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Terayama, Noboru Matsui, Osamu; Ueda, Fumiaki; Hattori, Yuki; Nishijima, Hiroshi; Sanada, Junichiro

    2004-09-15

    In a case of esophageal cancer with liver metastases, rupture of a liver metastasis resulted in subcapsular hematoma of the liver. Digital subtraction angiography with carbon dioxide showed multiple extravasations at the surface of the liver suggesting multiple ruptures of the penetrating hepatic capsular arteries. It was suggested that these findings are not rare in cases of subcapsular hematoma; however, they have received little attention.

  8. Expanding Hematoma's Life-Threatening Neck and Face Emergency Management of Ballistic Injuries.

    PubMed

    Shuker, Sabri T

    2016-07-01

    This article aims to bring attention to the morbidity and fatality of hemorrhage, how expanding hematoma and air compromise neck/face N/F injuries and present challenges. Large neck vessel ballistic injuries may lead to hemorrhage and expanding hematoma, resulting in airway compromise, due to injuries to the internal and/or external carotid arteries, internal jugular veins "internal carotid artery, external carotid artery, internal jugular vein," and the external carotid artery deep branches. This also leads to injuries to the cervical fascial layers (barriers of deep spaces) that facilitate pooling blood and hematoma into compartmental and large potential space which effects the pharynx, larynx, esophagus, and trachea.The expanding hematomas distort neck anatomical landmarks so "no neck zones" classifications are applicable. As the spectrum of injuries continues to evolve, the clinical characterization needs a new categorization based on compartmental hematoma and potential space anatomical location like retropharyngeal, parapharyngeal, sublingual, submandibular spaces, retrobulbar, and cheek compartment space hematomas.Presence of symptoms and location of the hematoma generally dictate what type of procedure is needed and how urgently it needs to be appropriately performed.Two unusual patients of pseudoaneurysms facial artery injuries with extravasation of blood producing a pulsating hematoma are referred to. Another patient considers large internal carotid artery injuries pseudoaneurysms revealed in angiography.The immediate management of life-saving patients requires aggressive airway maintenance at the scene, conscious victim will often obtain a posture that clears his airway and the semiconscious or unconscious put him in prone position. Air compromise may need emergency intubation, large bore cannula cricothyroidotomy, cricothyrotomy and at medical facilities tracheostomy.

  9. Complete paralysis of the quadriceps muscle caused by traumatic iliacus hematoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tamai, Kazuya; Kuramochi, Taro; Sakai, Hiroya; Iwami, Norio; Saotome, Koichi

    2002-01-01

    A15-year-old girl who developed traumatic iliacus hematoma and complete paralysis of the quadriceps muscle is reported. The current case and literature review revealed that incomplete quadriceps paralysis associated with traumatic iliacus hematoma is likely to progress to complete paralysis in days or weeks as a result of increased intracompartmental pressure. However, surgical decompression of the femoral nerve could produce good results even in patients who have complete quadriceps paralysis preoperatively.

  10. Medical and Surgical Management of a Descending Aorta Penetrating Atherosclerotic Ulcer and Associated Ascending Intramural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Matthew C.; Lawrance, Christopher P.; Braverman, Alan C.; Sanchez, Luis; Lawton, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    A 69-year-old man presented with chest pain and a computed tomography scan demonstrated an acute penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU) of the proximal descending aorta with an associated intramural hematoma (IMH) extending retrograde to the aortic root and distally to the renal arteries. He successfully underwent endovascular repair of the PAU and medical management of the associated ascending intramural hematoma with complete resolution at 6 months. PMID:26798718

  11. Cleaning up after ICH: the role of Nrf2 in modulating microglia function and hematoma clearance

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiurong; Sun, Guanghua; Ting, Shun-Ming; Song, Shen; Zhang, Jie; Edwards, Nancy J; Aronowski, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    As a consequence of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), blood components enter brain parenchyma causing progressive damage to the surrounding brain. Unless hematoma is cleared, the reservoirs of blood continue to inflict injury to neurovascular structures and blunt the brain repair processes. Microglia/macrophages (MM Φ) represent the primary phagocytic system that mediates the cleanup of hematoma. Thus the efficacy of phagocytic function by MM Φ is an essential step in limiting ICH-mediated damage. By using primary microglia to model red blood cell (main component of hematoma) clearance, we studied the role of transcription factor Nrf2, a master-regulator of anti-oxidative defense, in the hematoma clearance process. We showed that in cultured microglia, activators of Nrf2 1) induce anti-oxidative defense components, 2) reduce peroxide formation, 3) upregulate phagocytosis-mediating scavenger receptor CD36, and 4) enhance RBC phagocytosis. Through inhibiting Nrf2 or CD36 in microglia, by DNA-decoy or neutralizing antibody, we documented the important role of Nrf2 and CD36 in RBC phagocytosis. Using autologous blood injection ICH model to measure hematoma resolution, we showed that Nrf2 activator, sulforaphane, injected to animals after the onset of ICH, induced CD36 expression in ICH-affected brain and improved hematoma clearance in rats and wild-type mice, but expectedly not in Nrf2-knockout-(KO) mice. Normal hematoma clearance was impaired in Nrf2-KO mice. Our experiments suggest that Nrf2 in microglia play an important role in augmenting the anti-oxidative capacity, phagocytosis and hematoma clearance after ICH. PMID:25328080

  12. The role of craniotomy and trephination in the treatment of chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Voelker, J L; Sambasivan, M

    2000-07-01

    The treatment of chronic subdural hematoma by craniotomy was the procedure of choice in the early part of this century. It has since been replaced by less invasive techniques but retains a limited role in the management of this condition. A new procedure involving a small craniectomy and marsupialization of the hematoma cavity to the temporalis muscle is described. The results of this treatment compare favorably with the more commonly performed drainage methods.

  13. Development of a renal subcapsular hematoma during angiography for diagnosis and subsequent treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Akihiro; Tomonari, Testu; Tanaka, Hironori; Tanaka, Kumiko; Kagawa, Miwako; Tanaka, Takahiro; Taniguchi, Tatsuya; Harada, Rie; Sato, Momoko; Muguruma, Naoki; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2014-04-01

    A renal subcapsular hematoma rarely occurs without a history of trauma. It has been reported as a complication of urological interventions and also reported to occur spontaneously in patients with renal malignancies. However, there are no previous reports of renal subcapsular hematomas occurring in connection with abdominal angiography. We report here a case of a renal subcapsular hematoma that developed and was recognized during abdominal angiography for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). An 80-year-old male was referred to our hospital for transarterial embolization for multiple HCCs. His past medical history included hypertension. His laboratory data showed slightly decreased number of platelets and hepaplastin test due to liver cirrhosis. When computed tomography angiography was performed, a 7-cm subcapsular hematoma developed and was recognized over the right kidney during the procedure. He was successfully managed supportively with blood transfusion, tranexamic acid and antibiotics. Since thrombocytopenia and hypertension are reportedly risk factors for hematoma formation, careful manipulation is required during angiography in HCC patients with liver cirrhosis and hypertension. It must be kept in mind that rare complications, such as a renal subcapsular hematoma, can happen during abdominal angiography for diagnostic and interventional treatment of HCC.

  14. Intracranial Hematoma Detection by Near Infrared Spectroscopy in a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service: Practical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Bossers, Sebastiaan M.

    2017-01-01

    In (helicopter) emergency medical services, (H)EMS, the prehospital detection of intracranial hematomas should improve patient care and the triage to specialized neurosurgical hospitals. Recently, noninvasive detection of intracranial hematomas became possible by applying transcranial near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Herein, second-generation devices are currently available, for example, the Infrascanner 2000 (Infrascan), that appear suited also for prehospital (H)EMS applications. Since (H)EMS operations are time-critical, we studied the Infrascanner 2000 as a “first-time-right” monitor in healthy volunteers (n = 17, hospital employees, no neurologic history). Further, we studied the implementation of the Infrascanner 2000 in a European HEMS organization (Lifeliner 1, Amsterdam, The Netherlands). The principal results of our study were as follows: The screening for intracranial hematomas in healthy volunteers with first-time-right intention resulted in a marked rate of virtual hematomas (false positive results, i.e., 12/17), rendering more time consuming repeat measurements advisable. The results of the implementation of the Infrascanner in HEMS suggest that NIRS-based intracranial hematoma detection is feasible in the HEMS setting. However, some drawbacks exist and their possible solutions are discussed. Future studies will have to demonstrate how NIRS-based intracranial hematoma detection will improve prehospital decision making in (H)EMS and ultimately patient outcome. PMID:28717647

  15. Partial achilles tendon rupture presenting with giant hematoma; MRI findings of 4 year follow up.

    PubMed

    Sarsilmaz, Aysegul; Varer, Makbule; Coskun, Gulten; Apaydın, Melda; Oyar, Orhan

    2011-12-01

    In the young population, spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon is very rare. The big hematoma is also rare finding of the Achilles tendon partial rupture. It is usually seen with complete rupture. We presented imaging findings of 4 years follow up of the spontaneous partial rupture of Achilles tendon presenting with giant expanding hematoma and mimicking complete rupture radiologically. We discussed the alterations of tendon signal intensity and result of conservative therapy after partial rupture with big hematoma in the long term. A 29 year-old man, applied with pain and swelling in the retrocalcaneal region of left ankle. He did not have chronic metabolic disease. He was not active in physical activities. X-ray radiograms were normal. At magnetic resonance images (MRI), there was an intratendinous big hematoma, subcutanous fat planes were edematous around tendon. The diagnosis was partial rupture and giant hematoma. Hematoma was drained. The conservative treatment was applied and his complaints disappeared. After treatment, approximately 4 years later, control MRI showed thickened and hypointense tendon in all images. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Leakage Sign for Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Novel Predictor of Hematoma Growth.

    PubMed

    Orito, Kimihiko; Hirohata, Masaru; Nakamura, Yukihiko; Takeshige, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Takachika; Hattori, Gousuke; Sakata, Kiyohiko; Abe, Toshi; Uchiyama, Yuusuke; Sakamoto, Teruo; Morioka, Motohiro

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies of intracerebral hemorrhage treatments have highlighted the need to identify reliable predictors of hematoma expansion. Several studies have suggested that the spot sign on computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is a sensitive radiological predictor of hematoma expansion in the acute phase. However, the spot sign has low sensitivity for hematoma expansion. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of a novel predictive method, called the leakage sign. We performed CTA for 80 consecutive patients presenting with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Two scans were completed: CTA phase and delayed phase (5 minutes after the CTA phase). By comparing the CTA phase images, we set a region of interest with a 10-mm diameter and calculated the Hounsfield units. We defined a positive leakage sign as a >10% increase in Hounsfield units in the region of interest. Additionally, hematoma expansion was determined on plain computed tomography at 24 hours in patients who did not undergo emergent surgery. Positive spot signs and leakage signs were present in 18 (22%) patients and 35 (43%) patients, respectively. The leakage sign had higher sensitivity (93.3%) and specificity (88.9%) for hematoma expansion than the spot sign. The leakage sign, but not the spot sign, was significantly related with poor outcomes (severely disabled, vegetative state, and death) in all of the patients (P=0.03) and in patients with a hemorrhage in the putamen (P=0.0016). The results indicate that the leakage sign is a useful and sensitive method to predict hematoma expansion. © 2016 The Authors.

  17. Microwave Hematoma Detector for the Rapid Assessment of Head Injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Hadded, W.; Chang, J.; Rosenbury, T.; Dallum, G.; Welsch, P.; Scott, D.; Duarte, D.; Acevedo-Bolton, V.

    2000-02-11

    A non-invasive microwave device for the detection of epi/subdural hemorrhaging (hematoma) is under current development. The final device will be highly portable and allow real time assessment of head injuries, thereby satisfying early detection needs of the field technician as well as providing a tool for repetitious monitoring of high-risk individuals. The device will adopt the advanced technology of micropower impulse radar (MIR) which is a state of the art low cost ultra wide band (UWB) microwave radar developed here at LLNL. It will consist of a MIR transmitting and receiving module, a computer based signal processing module, and a device-to-patient signal coupling module--the UWB antenna. The prototype design is being guided by the needs of the patient and the practitioner along with the prerequisites of the technology including issues such as the specificity of the device, efficacy of diagnosis, accuracy, robustness, and patient comfort. The prototype development follows a concurrent approach which .includes experiments designed to evaluate requirements of the radar and antenna design, phantom development to facilitate laboratory investigations, and investigation into the limits of adapting pre-existing non-medical MIR devices to medical applications. This report will present the accomplishments and project highlights to date in the fiscal year 1999. Future project projections will also be discussed.

  18. Spontaneous retroclival hematoma in pituitary apoplexy: case series.

    PubMed

    Azizyan, Avetis; Miller, Joseph M; Azzam, Ramzi I; Maya, Marcel M; Famini, Pouyan; Pressman, Barry D; Moser, Franklin G

    2015-09-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is a rare and potentially life-threatening disorder that is most commonly characterized by a combination of sudden headache, visual disturbance, and hypothalamic/hormonal dysfunction. In many cases, there is hemorrhagic infarction of an underlying pituitary adenoma. The resulting clinical symptoms are due to compression of the remaining pituitary, cavernous sinuses, or cranial nerves. However, there are only 2 case reports in the literature describing spontaneous retroclival expansion of hemorrhage secondary to pituitary apoplexy. Ten cases of this entity with a review of the literature are presented here. This is a single-institution retrospective review of 2598 patients with sellar and parasellar masses during the 10-year period between 1999 and 2009. The pituitary and brain MRI and MRI studies were reviewed by 2 neuroradiologists for evidence of apoplexy, with particular attention given to retroclival extension. Eighteen patients (13 men and 5 women; mean age 54 years) were identified with presenting symptoms of sudden onset of headache and ophthalmoplegia, and laboratory findings consistent with pituitary apoplexy. Ten of these patients (8 men and 2 women; mean age 55 years) had imaging findings consistent with retroclival hematoma. Retroclival hemorrhage was seen in the majority of cases of pituitary apoplexy (56%), suggesting that it is more common than previously thought.

  19. Late Intervention-Related Complication - A Huge Subepicardial Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ko, Po-Yen; Chang, Chih-Ping; Yang, Chen-Chia; Lin, Jen-Jyh

    2013-05-01

    A 75-year-old man had a history of triple vessel coronary artery disease. In August 2009, he had undergone successful percutaneous coronary intervention to the left circumflex coronary artery (LCX) for management of an in-stent restenosis (ISR) lesion. However, in September 2010, he began experiencing recurrent episodes of exertional chest pain. Chest radiography showed the left cardiac border bulging upwards. Transthoracic echocardiography and chest computed tomography revealed a huge oval mass of about 10.4 cm × 7.9 cm × 8.6 cm, which showed calcification and was obliterating the LCX. Subsequent coronary angiography revealed significant instent restenosis, with extravasation of a small amount of contrast material at the stent location, suggesting that the coronary artery had ruptured. We implanted a polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent to seal the coronary perforation and to release the occlusion. The patient was symptom-free and had an uneventful outcome until the 1-year follow up. Coronary artery perforation; Covered stent; Hematoma.

  20. Clinical Characteristics of Bilateral versus Unilateral Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungjun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) is a common intracranial hemorrhage that is associated with significant morbidity. Bilateral lesions are occasionally found in neurosurgical practice. The purpose of this study is to analyze clinical characteristics of bilateral CSDH compared with unilateral CSDH. Methods Between January 2005 and January 2013, the authors treated 114 surgical patients with CSDH. Clinical presentations, precipitating factors, computed tomography (CT) findings, postoperative complications, and outcomes of patients were retrospectively analyzed in the bilateral and unilateral CSDH groups. Results Bilateral CSDH was identified in 28 (24.6%) of the 114 CSDH patients. The mean age was 77.85 years in the bilateral CSDH group. The frequency of altered consciousness as a presenting symptom was significantly higher in the bilateral CSDH, and that of hemiparesis was significantly higher in the unilateral CSDH (p=0.015). Diabetes mellitus was more common in the bilateral CSDH (p=0.001). CT scans revealed significant differences in the degree of midline shift (p=0.001). The mean modified Rankin scale at discharge was 1.5 in the bilateral CSDH group and 0.6 in the unilateral group (p=0.019). Conclusion Bilateral CSDH showed different clinical characteristics from unilateral CSDH. Bilateral CSDH is prone to occurrence in the patient of old and diabetics. The patients of bilateral CSDH seem to reveal worse mental status and neurologic sign than unilateral CSDH in both baseline and postoperative state. PMID:27169033

  1. Acute subdural hematoma in a high school football player.

    PubMed

    Litt, D W

    1995-03-01

    A 16-year-old football player developed a headache following a collision during a game. When his headache persisted for 1 week, he underwent a computerized tomographic (CT) scan to determine the cause. Findings were normal and a concussion was diagnosed. Seventeen days after the injury, the athlete reported disappearance of his symptoms. Provocative testing failed to recreate symptoms. The athlete continued to deny any symptoms and was cleared for unlimited participation 30 days after the initial injury. In the next game, the athlete collided with an opposing player, ran to the sidelines, and deteriorated on the sidelines after complaining of dizziness. Local Emergency Medical Squad personnel intubated him and transported him to a local hospital emergency room. Attending neurosurgeons diagnosed a right subdural hematoma by CT scan. A burr hole craniotomy evacuated the lesion. The operative report noted a second area of chronic membrane formation consistent with past head trauma. This lesion had escaped detection on two CT scans. In an interview 4 months postoperatively, the athlete admitted having experienced constant symptoms between the first and second injuries.

  2. Symptomatic Acute-on-Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Clinicopathological Study.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Rudy J; Mojica-Sanchez, Gruschenka; Schwartzbauer, Gary; Hersh, David S

    2017-06-01

    The pathophysiology of acute-on-chronic subdural hematoma (ACSDH) is complex and incompletely understood. Evidence to date indicates that the overall process is initiated by rotational force with movement of the brain inside the skull, which exerts tensile strain and rupture of bridging veins, leading in turn to acute hemorrhage in the subdural potential space. This is followed by the proliferation of mesenchymal elements with angiogenesis and inflammation, which in turn becomes a substrate for repeated hemorrhage and expansion of the lesion. Given the prevalence of traumatic subdural processes in the forensic setting and the importance of proper assessment of timing, etiology, risk factors, and clinicopathological correlation, we studied 47 patients presenting to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, all of whom underwent craniotomy with resection of the outer membrane due to symptomatic ACSDH. The surgically resected tissue was examined for histopathologic features in all cases. Our findings highlight that ACSDH is a condition precipitated by trauma that affects middle-aged and older adults, is relatively indolent, is unilateral or asymmetric, and has a low in-hospital mortality rate. Pathological analysis demonstrates a substantial outer membrane in all cases with varying degrees of inflammation and organization that cannot be precisely dated as a function of clinical presentation. The extrapolation of adult ACSDH to mixed acute and chronic subdural hemorrhage in the pediatric setting is problematic due to substantial differences in clinical presentation, severity of underlying brain injury, gross and microscopic findings, and outcome.

  3. Subdural hematomas in boxing: the spectrum of consequences.

    PubMed

    Miele, Vincent J; Bailes, Julian E; Cantu, Robert C; Rabb, Craig H

    2006-10-15

    Boxing is a violent sport in which every participant accepts the risk of brain damage or death. This sport has been linked to acute neurological injury and chronic brain damage. The most common life-threatening injury encountered by its participants is subdural hematoma (SDH), and the most feared consequence of chronic insult to the nervous system is dementia pugilistica, or punch drunkenness. Although advances in imaging and neuropsychological testing have improved our ability to diagnose these injuries, the unprecedented sensitivity and wide availability of these modalities have increased the detection of mild cognitive impairment and small, asymptomatic imaging abnormalities. The question has thus been raised as to where on the spectrum of these injuries an athlete should be permanently banned from the sport. In this report the authors describe six boxers who were evaluated for SDH sustained during participation in the sport, and who experienced remarkably different outcomes. Their presentations, clinical courses, and boxing careers are detailed. The athletes ranged in age from 24 to 55 years at the time of injury. Two were female and four were male; half of them were amateurs and half were professionals. Treatments ranged from observation only to decompressive craniectomy. Two of the athletes were allowed to participate in the sport after their injury (one following a lengthy legal battle), with no known sequelae. One boxer died within 48 hours of her injury and at least two suffered permanent neurological deficits. In a third, dementia pugilistica was diagnosed 40 years later, and the man died while institutionalized.

  4. Prenatal diagnosis of a placental infarction hematoma associated with fetal growth restriction, preeclampsia and fetal death: clinicopathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Aurioles-Garibay, Alma; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Romero, Roberto; Qureshi, Faisal; Ahn, Hyunyoung; Jacques, Suzanne M; Garcia, Maynor; Yeo, Lami; Hassan, Sonia S

    2014-01-01

    The lesion termed 'placental infarction hematoma' is associated with fetal death and adverse perinatal outcome. Such a lesion has been associated with a high risk of fetal death and abruption placentae. The fetal and placental hemodynamic changes associated with placental infarction hematoma have not been reported. This paper describes a case of early and severe growth restriction with preeclampsia, and progressive deterioration of the fetal and placental Doppler parameters in the presence of a placental infarction hematoma.

  5. Do Age and Anticoagulants Affect the Natural History of Acute Subdural Hematomas?

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Turner, Ryan C.; Josiah, Darnell; Knotts, Chelsea; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma is a serious complication following traumatic brain injury. Large volume hematomas or those with underlying brain injury can cause mass effect, midline shift, and eventually herniation of the brain. Acute subdural hematomas in the young are associated with high-energy trauma and often have underlying contusions, while acute subdural hematomas in the elderly are associated with minor trauma and an absence of underlying contusions, even though the elderly are more likely to be on anticoagulants or anti-platelet therapy. In the young patients with high impact injuries the hematomas tend to be small and the underlying brain injury and swelling is responsible for the increased intracranial pressure and midline shift. In the elderly, the injuries are low impact (e.g fall from standing), the underlying brain is intact, and the volume of the hematoma itself produces symptoms. In addition the use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents in the elderly population has been thought to be a poor prognostic indicator and is considered to be responsible for larger hematomas and poor outcome. When managed conservatively, acute subdural hematomas can sometimes progress to chronic subdural hematoma formation, further enlargement, seizures, and progressive midline shift. Another potential difference in the young and the elderly is brain atrophy, which increases the potential space to accommodate a larger hematoma. It is not known if these two groups differ in other ways that might have implications for treatment or prognosis. In this paper, we investigate the clinical course of 80 patients admitted to our institution with acute subdural hematomas, to identify differences in patients above or below the age of 65 years. The natural progression/resolution of acute subdural hematomas was mapped by measuring volume expansion/regression over time. In this retrospective chart review, we investigated clinical baseline metrics and subsequent volumetric expansion

  6. Do Age and Anticoagulants Affect the Natural History of Acute Subdural Hematomas?

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Turner, Ryan C; Josiah, Darnell; Knotts, Chelsea; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma is a serious complication following traumatic brain injury. Large volume hematomas or those with underlying brain injury can cause mass effect, midline shift, and eventually herniation of the brain. Acute subdural hematomas in the young are associated with high-energy trauma and often have underlying contusions, while acute subdural hematomas in the elderly are associated with minor trauma and an absence of underlying contusions, even though the elderly are more likely to be on anticoagulants or anti-platelet therapy. In the young patients with high impact injuries the hematomas tend to be small and the underlying brain injury and swelling is responsible for the increased intracranial pressure and midline shift. In the elderly, the injuries are low impact (e.g fall from standing), the underlying brain is intact, and the volume of the hematoma itself produces symptoms. In addition the use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents in the elderly population has been thought to be a poor prognostic indicator and is considered to be responsible for larger hematomas and poor outcome. When managed conservatively, acute subdural hematomas can sometimes progress to chronic subdural hematoma formation, further enlargement, seizures, and progressive midline shift. Another potential difference in the young and the elderly is brain atrophy, which increases the potential space to accommodate a larger hematoma. It is not known if these two groups differ in other ways that might have implications for treatment or prognosis. In this paper, we investigate the clinical course of 80 patients admitted to our institution with acute subdural hematomas, to identify differences in patients above or below the age of 65 years. The natural progression/resolution of acute subdural hematomas was mapped by measuring volume expansion/regression over time. In this retrospective chart review, we investigated clinical baseline metrics and subsequent volumetric expansion

  7. Non-contact hematoma damage and healing assessment using reflectance photoplethysmographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelard, Robert; Pfisterer, Kaylen J.; Clausi, David A.; Wong, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Impact trauma may cause a hematoma, which is the leakage of venous blood into surrounding tissues. Large hematomas can be dangerous as they may inhibit local blood ow. Hematomas are often diagnosed visually, which may be problematic if the hematoma leaks deeper than the visible penetration depth. Furthermore, vascular wound healing is often monitored at home without the aid of a clinician. We therefore investigated the use of near infrared (NIR) re ectance photoplethysmographic imaging (PPGI) to assess vascular damage resulting from a hematoma, and monitor the healing process. In this case study, the participant experienced internal vascular damage in the form of a hematoma. Using a PPGI system with dual-mode temporally coded illumination for ambient-agnostic data acquisition and mounted optical elements, the tissue was illuminated with a spatially uniform irradiance pattern of 850 nm wavelength light for increased tissue penetration and high oxy-to-deoxyhemoglobin absorption ratio. Initial and follow-up PPGI data collection was performed to assess vascular damage and healing. The tissue PPGI sequences were spectrally analyzed, producing spectral maps of the tissue area. Experimental results show that spatial differences in spectral information can be observed around the damaged area. In particular, the damaged site exhibited lower pulsatility than the surrounding healthy tissue. This pulsatility was largely restored in the follow-up data, suggesting that the tissue had undergone vascular healing. These results indicate that hematomas can be assessed and monitored in a non-contact visual manner, and suggests that PPGI can be used for tissue health assessment, with potential extensions to peripheral vascular disease.

  8. Significance of satellite sign and spot sign in predicting hematoma expansion in spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Zheng, Jun; Ali, Hasan; Guo, Rui; Li, Mou; Wang, Xiaoze; Ma, Lu; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2017-09-20

    Hematoma expansion is related to poor outcome in spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Recently, a non-enhanced computed tomography (CT) based finding, termed the 'satellite sign', was reported to be a novel predictor for poor outcome in spontaneous ICH. However, it is still unclear whether the presence of the satellite sign is related to hematoma expansion. Initial computed tomography angiography (CTA) was conducted within 6h after ictus. Satellite sign on non-enhanced CT and spot sign on CTA were detected by two independent reviewers. The sensitivity and specificity of both satellite sign and spot sign were calculated. Receiver-operator analysis was conducted to evaluate their predictive accuracy for hematoma expansion. This study included 153 patients. Satellite sign was detected in 58 (37.91%) patients and spot sign was detected in 38 (24.84%) patients. Among 37 patients with hematoma expansion, 22 (59.46%) had satellite sign and 23 (62.16%) had spot sign. The sensitivity and specificity of satellite sign for prediction of hematoma expansion were 59.46% and 68.97%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of spot sign were 62.16% and 87.07%, respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) of satellite sign was 0.642 and the AUC of spot sign was 0.746. (P=0.157) CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the satellite sign is an independent predictor for hematoma expansion in spontaneous ICH. Although spot sign has the higher predictive accuracy, satellite sign is still an acceptable predictor for hematoma expansion when CTA is unavailable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Rehabilitation Augments Hematoma Clearance and Attenuates Oxidative Injury and Ion Dyshomeostasis After Brain Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Michael R; Dietrich, Kristen; Hackett, Mark J; Caine, Sally; Nadeau, Colby A; Aziz, Jasmine R; Nichol, Helen; Paterson, Phyllis G; Colbourne, Frederick

    2017-01-01

    We assessed the elemental and biochemical effects of rehabilitation after intracerebral hemorrhage, with emphasis on iron-mediated oxidative stress, using a novel multimodal biospectroscopic imaging approach. Collagenase-induced striatal hemorrhage was produced in rats that were randomized to enriched rehabilitation or control intervention starting on day 7. Animals were euthanized on day 14 or 21, a period of ongoing cell death. We used biospectroscopic imaging techniques to precisely determine elemental and molecular changes on day 14. Hemoglobin content was assessed with resonance Raman spectroscopy. X-ray fluorescence imaging mapped iron, chlorine, potassium, calcium, and zinc. Protein aggregation, a marker of oxidative stress, and the distribution of other macromolecules were assessed with Fourier transform infrared imaging. A second study estimated hematoma volume with a spectrophotometric assay at 21 days. In the first experiment, rehabilitation reduced hematoma hemoglobin content (P=0.004) and the amount of peri-hematoma iron (P<0.001). Oxidative damage was highly localized at the hematoma/peri-hematoma border and was decreased by rehabilitation (P=0.004). Lipid content in the peri-hematoma zone was increased by rehabilitation (P=0.016). Rehabilitation reduced the size of calcium deposits (P=0.040) and attenuated persistent dyshomeostasis of Cl(-) (P<0.001) but not K(+) (P=0.060). The second study confirmed that rehabilitation decreased hematoma volume (P=0.024). Rehabilitation accelerated clearance of toxic blood components and decreased chronic oxidative stress. As well, rehabilitation attenuated persistent ion dyshomeostasis. These novel effects may underlie rehabilitation-induced neuroprotection and improved recovery of function. Pharmacotherapies targeting these mechanisms may further improve outcome. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Spontaneous bilobar subcapsular hematoma of the liver while undergoing anticoagulation therapy: our experience and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Behranwala, K A; Tisdall, M; Habib, N H; Canelo, R

    2004-01-01

    We report on a case of bilateral subcapsular hematoma of the liver, occurring during treatment with warfarin. A 64-year-old woman was put on long-term warfarin therapy. After a bout of severe right hypochondriac pain, computed tomography (CT) scan showed subcapsular hematoma of the liver. Subsequent CT scan, conservative policy only, showed regression of the hematoma. The patient was discharged from the hospital on the 23rd day. We conclude that a nonruptured spontaneous liver hematoma should not be surgically removed. A conservative management with close observation is the mainstay therapy. A switch from warfarin therapy to another anticoagulation therapy is strongly suggested.

  11. Point-of-Care Ultrasound Use to Differentiate Hematoma and Sarcoma of the Thigh in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Le, Cathie-Kim; Harvey, Gregory; McLean, Lianne; Fischer, Jason

    2017-02-01

    Hematomas and soft tissue sarcomas can be difficult to differentiate clinically, even with the addition of traditional imaging modalities. There are several case reports of sarcomas being misdiagnosed as hematomas, most commonly with a history of mild trauma. In this case report, we described a sarcoma initially misinterpreted as a hematoma on ultrasound. Key clinical features and sonographic findings that may assist clinicians using point-of-care ultrasound to correctly differentiate sarcomas from hematomas are reviewed. A soft tissue mass larger than 5 cm, with internal vascular Doppler flow, presenting without a clear mechanism of injury or with constitutional symptoms should be considered as suspicious for malignancy.

  12. Chronic subdural hematoma associated with an arachnoid cyst in a juvenile taekwondo athlete: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kertmen, Hayri; Gürer, Bora; Yilmaz, Erdal Resit; Sekerci, Zeki

    2012-01-01

    Both chronic subdural hematoma and arachnoid cysts are common lesions in neurosurgical practice. Arachnoid cysts are a well-known predisposing factor for chronic subdural hematoma. Here, we present a 12-year-old taekwondo athlete with chronic subdural hematoma associated with arachnoid cysts. The chronic subdural hematoma was evacuated through 2 burr holes and the patient was discharged in good condition. To our knowledge, this is the first case of chronic subdural hematoma with associated arachnoid cysts in a taekwondo athlete. We also review the literature on sports-related chronic subdural hematomas associated with arachnoid cysts in children.

  13. [Microsurgical treatment of intracraneal arachnoid cysts].

    PubMed

    Saura Rojas, J Enrique; Horcajadas Almansa, Ángel; Ros López, Bienvenido

    2016-01-01

    Craniotomy and fenestration of membranes is one of the main treatment options for symptomatic arachnoid cysts. Open surgery advantages include, direct inspection of the cyst, biopsy sampling, fenestration in multilocular cysts and, in certain locations, cyst communication to basal cisterns. The aim of this paper is to review the advantages and disadvantages of this treatment modality for arachnoid cysts taking into account the different anatomical locations.

  14. Diagnostic evaluation and treatment of patients with rectus abdominis hematoma.

    PubMed

    Isik, Arda; Peker, Kemal; Soyturk, Mehmet; Firat, Deniz; Yoruker, Uygar; Yilmaz, Ismayil

    2015-11-01

    To identify clinical characteristics, treatment modalities, and course of spontaneous rectus sheath hematoma (SRSH). In the literature, there is no prospective clinical trial that is intended for treatment in clinical research. Seventeen SRSH patients diagnosed and treated between March 2012 and March 2014 at the general Surgery Department of Erzincan University Training and Research Hospital were included. Age, sex, weight, height, predisposing factors, comorbid diseases, Charlson index, current medical treatment, physical examination signs, imaging methods, lowest hemoglobin value, blood type, SRSH type, INR/Factor V Leiden mutation/Factor VII/Factor VIII/Factor X/Protein S/Protein C values, treatment method, transfusions hospitalization duration, and outcome were studied. Thirteen patients were female. The mean age was 63.3 ± 18.7 years (range, 22-87 years), and the mean BMI was 27.8 ± 3.5 (range, 20.9-33.7). Six patients had Grade I SRSH, 5 had Grade II SRSH, and 6 had Grade III SRSH. Thirteen were hospitalized for a mean duration of 9.3 ± 8.1 days (range, 1-30 days). The death rate attributable to SRSH was 5.8%. Early diagnosis of SRSH by ultrasonography and/or computerized tomography is important for a low mortality rate. Even though medical treatments are important, arterial embolization by interventional radiology, or more radical interventions such as surgery, may be required. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Seizures and Epileptiform Discharges in Patients With Acute Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Pollandt, Sebastian; Ouyang, Bichun; Bleck, Thomas P; Busl, Katharina M

    2017-01-01

    Subdural hematomas (SDH) are associated with seizures and epileptiform discharges, but little is known about the prevalence and impact of seizures, status epilepticus (SE), and epileptiform discharges on outcomes in patients with isolated acute SDH (aSDH). Continuous EEG reports from 76 adult patients admitted to Rush University Medical Center with aSDH between January 2009 and March 2012 were reviewed. Clinical and radiographic findings, comorbidities, treatment, and outcome parameters, such as mortality, discharge destination, need for tracheostomy/percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement, and length of stay (LOS), were assessed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the impact of clinical seizures, SE, and epileptiform EEG on outcomes. Of 76 patients with aSDH who underwent EEG monitoring, 74 (97.4%) received antiseizure prophylaxis. Thirty-two (41.1%) patients had seizures, most of which were clinical seizures. Twenty-four (32%) patients had epileptiform EEG findings. Clinical or nonconvulsive SE was diagnosed in 12 (16%) patients. Clinical seizures were not associated with outcome parameters. Epileptiform EEG findings were independently associated with longer hospital LOS (13 vs. 8 days, P = 0.04) and intensive care unit LOS (10 vs. 4 days, P = 0.002). The SE also predicted longer intensive care unit LOS (10 vs. 4 days, P = 0.002). Neither epileptiform EEG nor SE was significantly related to mortality, discharge destination, or need for tracheostomy/percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement. Seizures and epileptiform EEG findings are very common in patients with aSDH despite antiseizure prophylaxis. While clinical seizures did not affect outcomes, the presence of epileptiform EEG findings and SE was independently associated with longer intensive care unit LOS and hospital LOS.

  16. Results of surgical treatment of intrasylvian hematomas due to ruptured intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Başkaya, M K; Menendez, J A; Yüceer, N; Polin, R S; Nanda, A

    2001-04-01

    In this retrospective study, the surgical outcome of patients with intrasylvian hematomas due to rupture of intracranial aneurysms was analyzed. The authors studied ten patients who underwent aneurysm surgery and evacuation of the hematoma within 12 h of the onset of bleeding. All patients had an intrasylvian hematoma classified with computerized tomography and all patients underwent pre-operative angiography. In all patients, the origin of bleeding was a middle cerebral artery aneurysm, with the exception of one patient whose bleeding originated from a posterior communicating artery aneurysm. Three patients achieved good recovery without any significant neurological deficit and four achieved good recovery with moderate disabilities. One patient died due to pneumonia and two were in a vegetative state. Notably, three patients who were comatose (Hunt and Hess Grade V) at the time of presentation achieved good recovery following surgery. In this study, neurological status at presentation did not predict the outcome. The only significant prognostic factor in those patients who had intrasylvian hematoma was early surgery within 12 h of the bleeding. We suggest that early surgical treatment be performed in patients with intrasylvian hematoma, regardless of the neurological findings and grade on admission. Pre-operative angiography seems to be essential in identifying the source of bleeding.

  17. Skull infarction and epidural hematomas in a patient with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Resar, L M; Oliva, M M; Casella, J F

    1996-11-01

    Epidural hematomas are unusual manifestations of sickling disorders. We report a patient with sickle cell anemia and multiple skull infarctions associated with epidural hematomas. The association of skull infarctions and epidural hematomas in sickling hemoglobinopathies is reviewed. A 14-year-old boy with hemoglobin SS presented with lower back pain, left hip pain, headache, and fever. A bone scan was used to evaluate the patient for possible osteomyelitis. Head computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were employed to delineate intracranial pathology. The bone scan showed multiple areas of decreased uptake in the skull consistent with acute infarction before abnormalities were present on physical examination. CT scan showed a bony contour deformity of the right frontal bone, suggestive of infarction. A right frontal extra-axial collection of blood was also observed below the bony abnormality. MRI further delineated bilateral frontal and left parietal collections adjacent to the bony abnormalities consistent with subacute epidural hematomas. This case emphasizes the need to recognize skull infarctions and epidural hematomas as rare but potential complications of sickle cell disease. The diagnosis was facilitated by MRI, which has not been used in previous cases of skull infarctions. Moreover, our patient was successfully managed without surgical intervention.

  18. Rectus sheath hematoma with low molecular weight heparin administration: a case series.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Laura E J; Wortham, Dale C; Litton, Kayleigh M

    2014-09-01

    Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon but potentially serious bleeding complication that can occur spontaneously or as a result of anticoagulation administration. Case number one: A 62 year old chronically ill Caucasian female develops a rectus sheath hematoma seven days after hospital discharge. The previous hospitalization included low molecular weight heparin administration for deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis. The patient ultimately chooses comfort care and expires due to sepsis and respiratory failure. Case number two: A 79 year old Caucasian male develops a rectus sheath hematoma during hospital admission where LMWH is used for deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis. He is managed conservatively; however, his hematocrit drops from 46 to 25.8%. Case number three: A 44 year old chronically ill Caucasian female is treated with therapeutic low molecular weight heparin for recent deep vein thrombosis during a hospital admission. She develops a large rectus sheath hematoma requiring embolization as well as blood transfusion. We believe this reflects an underreported significant cause of morbidity and mortality with low molecular weight heparin administration. We review the pathophysiology of rectus sheath hematoma as well as its presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. We identify at-risk populations and proposed contributing factors. We also discuss factors leading to underreporting as well as preventive strategies implemented at our institution.

  19. CHRONIC SPONTANEOUS LUMBAR EPIDURAL HEMATOMA SIMULATING EXTRADURAL SPINAL TUMOR : A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    MATSUI, HIROKI; IMAGAMA, SHIRO; ITO, ZENYA; ANDO, KEI; HIRANO, KENICHI; TAUCHI, RYOJI; MURAMOTO, AKIO; MATSUMOTO, TOMOHIRO; ISHIGURO, NAOKI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is an uncommon disorder, and chronic SEHs are rarer than acute SEHs. However, there is few reported involving the bone change of the vertebral body in chronic SEHs. We present a case report of lumbar epidural hematoma that required differentiation from extramedullary spinal tumors by a long process because the CT scan revealed scalloping of the vertebral body and review the relevant literature. A 78-year-old man had experienced a gradual onset of low back pain and excruciating pain in both legs. Lumbar MRI on T1-weighted images revealed a space-occupying lesion with a hyperintense signal relative to the spinal cord with no enhancement on gadolinium adminisration. Meanwhile, T2-weighted images revealed a heterogeneous intensity change, accompanying a central area of hyperintense signals with a hypointense peripheral border at the L4 vertebra. Moreover, the CT scan demonstrated scalloping of the posterior wall of the L4 vertebral body which is generally suspected as the CT finding of spainal tumor. During the epidural space exploration, we found a dark red-colored mass surrounded by a capsular layer, which was fibrous and adhered to the flavum and dura mater. Microscopic histological examination of the resected mass revealed a mixture of the relatively new hematoma and the hematoma that was moving into the connective tissue. Accordingly, the hematoma was diagnosed as chronic SEH. The particular MRI findings of chronic SEHs are helpful for making accurate preoperative diagnoses of this pathology. PMID:25130006

  20. Auricular hematoma and cauliflower deformation of the ear: from art to medicine.

    PubMed

    Mudry, Albert; Pirsig, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Auricular hematoma and cauliflower deformation of the ear are unique in several respects. Knowledge about it began, in antiquity, through artists, particularly Greek and Roman, and then Japanese in the 18th century with their representation of cauliflower deformation of the ear on sculptures and paintings of pugilists and wrestlers. It is only in the 19th century that physicians began to make substantive progress in understanding this abnormality. It was first thought to be associated with mental disease, but by the beginning of the 20th century, its etiology was recognized as being caused by trauma and was then named auricular hematoma. The second step in the understanding of this affliction was the observation that auricular hematoma progresses toward cauliflower deformation of the ear, which was named cauliflower ear. Recognition of this evolution led to the development of therapies. During the second half of the 20th century, different treatments were developed. They included various hematoma drainage techniques with special bandages to prevent hematoma recurrence and ensuing progression to cauliflower ear. In summary, cauliflower deformation of the ear is an old artistic affliction that has only recently received medical attention.

  1. Airway and circulatory collapse due to retropharyngeal hematoma after blunt vertebral artery injury.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Shunsuke; Fukushima, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Motonori; Furutake, Masayuki; Tanaka, Keiji; Okada, Kunihiko

    2016-12-09

    Retropharyngeal hematoma following blunt cervical spine injury is a known cause of airway obstruction, but it is not known to cause hemorrhagic shock. We report the case of a massive retropharyngeal hematoma caused by a blunt vertebral artery transection leading simultaneously to airway obstruction and hemorrhagic shock. An 83-year-old woman was injured in a motorcycle accident. In the field, the patient exhibited paradoxical breathing with no breath sounds, and her blood pressure could not be measured. Therefore, emergency intubation and fluid resuscitation were initiated and the patient was transferred to the emergency department. Computed tomography angiography revealed a massive retropharyngeal hematoma with contrast extravasation from the right vertebral artery, which caused airway obstruction and hemorrhagic shock. The right vertebral artery was transected at the C5 level, which was associated with C4/C5 dislocation. Vertebral artery transection was successfully treated by endovascular embolization, which was followed by complication of asymptomatic posterior circulation stroke. Blunt vertebral artery transection can cause massive retropharyngeal hematoma, which can rapidly expand and lead to hemorrhagic shock in addition to airway obstruction. In cases of massive retropharyngeal hematoma with hemorrhagic shock following blunt cervical spine injury, blunt vertebral artery transection should be suspected. If blunt vertebral artery transection is detected and hemorrhagic shock is persistent, endovascular embolization should be performed immediately in addition to emergency intubation.

  2. Impact of Helmet Use on Severity of Epidural Hematomas in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Saksham; Iv, Vycheth; Sam, Nang; Vuthy, Din; Klaric, Katherine; Shrime, Mark G; Park, Kee B

    2017-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, often necessitating neurosurgical intervention to evacuate intracranial bleeding. Since the early 2000s, Cambodia has been undergoing a rapid increase in motorcycle transit and in road traffic accidents, but the prevalence of helmet usage remains low. Epidural hematomas are severe traumatic brain injuries that can necessitate neurosurgical intervention. This is a retrospective cohort study of patients with epidural hematoma secondary to motorcycle accidents who presented to a major national tertiary care center in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, between November 2013 and March 2016. All patients were diagnosed with computed tomography of the head. In this cohort, 21.6% of patients in motorcycle accidents presented with epidural hematoma and 89.1% of patients were men, 47.6% were intoxicated, and were 87.8% were not wearing helmets at the moment of impact. Not wearing a helmet was associated with a 6.90-fold increase in odds of presenting with a moderate-to-severe Glasgow coma scale score and a 3.76-fold increase in odds of requiring craniotomy or craniectomy for evacuation of hematoma. Male sex was also associated with increased odds of higher clinical severity at presentation and indication for craniotomy or craniectomy, and alcohol intoxication at the time of accident was not associated with either. Helmet usage is protective in reducing the severity of presentation and need for neurosurgical intervention for patients with epidural hematoma secondary to motorcycle accidents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Huge Intramural Hematoma in a Thrombosed Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysm: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Jin; Lee, Sang Won; Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Young Soo

    2015-09-01

    We describe a case of a huge intramural hematoma in a thrombosed middle cerebral artery aneurysm. A 47-year-old female patient with liver cirrhosis and thrombocytopenia presented to the neurosurgical unit with a 5-day history of headache and cognitive dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography of the brain showed a thrombosed aneurysm located in the right middle cerebral artery with a posteriorly located huge intramural hematoma mimicking an intracerebral hematoma. Imaging studies and cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed no evidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Angiography showed a partially thrombosed aneurysm at the origin of the right anterior temporal artery and an incidental aneurysm at the bifurcation of the right middle cerebral artery. Both aneurysms were embolized by coiling. After embolization, the thrombosed aneurysmal sac and intramural hematoma had decreased in size 4 days later and almost completely disappeared 8 months later. This is the first reported case of a nondissecting, nonfusiform aneurysm with a huge intramural hematoma, unlike that of a dissecting aneurysm.

  4. Antiplatelet Therapy and Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hematoma: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Walid; Mohamed, Abdelaziz; Sheikh, Muhammed; Shokr, Mohamed; Hassan, Abubaker; Weinberger, Jarrett; Afonso, Luis C.

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 66 Final Diagnosis: Spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma seconday dual antiplatelet therapy Symptoms: Anemia • knee joint pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Rare disease Background: Dual antiplatelet therapy has proven efficacy in primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease with a relatively good safety profile. Review of the literature revealed 8 cases of spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma secondary to antiplatelet treatment. Case Report: We report the case of a 66-year-old male with a flare of acute gout secondary to uncontrolled chronic myeloid leukemia. The patient was started on dual antiplatelet treatment following a drug-eluted stent placement for symptomatic coronary artery disease. He suffered from an unexplained acute drop of five grams of hemoglobin from 10.4 to 5.8 g/dL and symptomatic anemia. The initial labs excluded occult GI bleeding, hemolysis, and bone marrow suppression. However, an abdominal CT scan showed an approximately 7.2×4.7×6.7 cm spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma involving the left iliacus muscle. The patient was successfully treated conservatively by discontinuing antiplatelet therapy and supportive measures. Conclusions: A spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma often presents without localizing signs and symptoms and therefore should be considered in any case of unexplained blood loss in patients on antiplatelet therapy. CT without contrast is the modality of choice to diagnose retroperitoneal hematoma. PMID:28119516

  5. Chronic intradiploic hematomas of the skull without coagulopathy: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tokmak, Mehmet; Ozek, Erdinc; Iplikçioğlu, Celal

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intradiploic hematoma was first described by Chorbski and Davis in 1934. To date, only twelve cases have been reported in the literature. Chronic intradiploic hematomas have also been described as non-neoplastic cysts of the diploe, traumatic cysts, and giant cell repetitive granulomas. The term chronic intradiploic hematoma was coined by Sato et al. in 1994. Case 1: a 16-year-old male presented with a non-tender scalp swelling on the right fronto-orbital region. Computed tomography (CT) scans showed an intraosseous isodense lesion with surrounding sclerosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results revealed an intradiploic mass with homogeneous cystic and abnormal signal intensities. Case 2: a 64-year-old male presented with a 6-month history of headaches and visual disturbances. CT scans showed an isodense lesion with surrounding sclerosis in the posterolateral left orbit. MRI results revealed a hypointense lesion on both the T1weighted and T2-weighted images of the posterolateral left orbit. Although rarely seen, the presence of a benign chronic hematoma should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis for each intradiploic mass lesion. When taking the medical history, all patients with such mass lesions should be asked about previous minor or major head traumas. Due to the possibility of progressive growth, surgical excision of an intradiploic hematoma is recommended after radiological diagnosis of the condition. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Delayed Femoral Nerve Palsy Associated with Iliopsoas Hematoma after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Femoral nerve neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty is rare but catastrophic complication. Pain and quadriceps muscle weakness caused by this complication can significantly affect the functional outcome. Here we present a case report, describing delayed onset femoral nerve palsy associated with iliopsoas hematoma following pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery after 3 months of primary total hip arthroplasty in an 80-year-old female patient with single kidney. Hip arthroplasty was done for painful primary osteoarthritis of left hip. Diagnosis of femoral nerve palsy was made by clinical examination and computed tomography imaging of pelvis. Patient was managed by surgical evacuation of hematoma and physiotherapy. The patient's clinical symptoms were improved after surgical evacuation of hematoma. This is the first case report of its kind in English literature regarding delayed onset femoral nerve palsy after primary total hip arthroplasty due to pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery without any obvious precipitating factor. PMID:27752378

  7. 'Subarachnoid cyst' after evacuation of chronic subdural hematoma: Case report of an unusual postoperative morbidity.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Low Y Y; Wai Hoe, N G

    2016-01-01

    Burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural hematomas are routine operative procedures done by neurosurgical residents. Common postoperative complications include acute epidural and/or subdural bleeding, tension pneumocephalus, intracranial hematomas and ischemic cerebral infarction. We report an interesting post-operative complication of a 'subarachnoid cyst' after burr-hole evacuation of a chronic subdural hematoma. The authors hypothesize that the 'cyst' is likely secondary to the splitting of the adjacent neomembrane within its arachnoid-brain interface by iatrogenic irrigation of the subdural space. Over time, this 'cyst' develops into an area of gliosis which eventually causes long-term scar epilepsy in the patient. As far as we are aware, this is the first complication of such a 'subarachnoid cyst' post burr-hole drainage reported in the literature.

  8. Ruptured hepatic subcapsular hematoma following laparoscopic cholecystectomy: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Kentaro; Midorikawa, Yutaka; Mushiake, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masato; Yamakawa, Tatsuo; Sugiyama, Yasuyuki

    2010-12-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is now a standard procedure for cholecystolithiasis because of its minimally invasive nature compared to the conventional method. However, severe complications that have never been seen for open surgery have also been reported. Here, we report the case of a 28-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy and then developed a ruptured subcapsular hematoma. On postoperative day 1, she developed shock, and postoperative bleeding was suspected. During re-operation, a ruptured subcapsular hematoma of the whole right lobe of the liver with active bleeding was found, and hemostasis was achieved. In this case, it was assumed that the rupture of the subcapsular hematoma was due to compression of the liver by the clamp for retrieving the spilled gallstones during the first operation and perioperative administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  9. Subcapsular hematoma after right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Mureo; Kozaki, Koichi; Yoshida, Toru; Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Ogawa, Kohei; Ogura, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    Because right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation was introduced in adult-to-adult liver transplantation to mitigate the problems of small-for-size grafts, some technical controversies have been reported. This report describes a case of graft subcapsular hematoma due to parenchymal injury. A 53-year-old woman underwent a right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation for acute-on-chronic liver failure due to primary biliary cirrhosis. A huge subcapsular hematoma was discovered by routine Doppler echogram examination on the first posttransplantation day. Relaparotomy findings revealed that rotation of the graft for the hemostasis procedure during the transplant operation had induced a compression injury to the graft by the xiphoid process. It was speculated that a small laceration in the graft parenchyma led to the major subcapsular hematoma. This experience suggests that the graft liver must be handled with special care to prevent potential mechanical injury.

  10. Scalp Hematoma Characteristics Associated With Intracranial Injury in Pediatric Minor Head Injury.

    PubMed

    Burns, Emma C M; Grool, Anne M; Klassen, Terry P; Correll, Rhonda; Jarvis, Anna; Joubert, Gary; Bailey, Benoit; Chauvin-Kimoff, Laurel; Pusic, Martin; McConnell, Don; Nijssen-Jordan, Cheri; Silver, Norm; Taylor, Brett; Osmond, Martin H

    2016-05-01

    Minor head trauma accounts for a significant proportion of pediatric emergency department (ED) visits. In children younger than 24 months, scalp hematomas are thought to be associated with the presence of intracranial injury (ICI). We investigated which scalp hematoma characteristics were associated with increased odds of ICI in children less than 17 years who presented to the ED following minor head injury and whether an underlying linear skull fracture may explain this relationship. This was a secondary analysis of 3,866 patients enrolled in the Canadian Assessment of Tomography of Childhood Head Injury (CATCH) study. Information about scalp hematoma presence (yes/no), location (frontal, temporal/parietal, occipital), and size (small and localized, large and boggy) was collected by emergency physicians using a structured data collection form. ICI was defined as the presence of an acute brain lesion on computed tomography. Logistic regression analyses were adjusted for age, sex, dangerous injury mechanism, irritability on examination, suspected open or depressed skull fracture, and clinical signs of basal skull fracture. ICI was present in 159 (4.1%) patients. The presence of a scalp hematoma (n = 1,189) in any location was associated with significantly greater odds of ICI (odds ratio [OR] = 4.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.06 to 6.02), particularly for those located in temporal/parietal (OR = 6.0, 95% CI = 3.9 to 9.3) and occipital regions (OR = 5.6, 95% CI = 3.5 to 8.9). Both small and localized and large and boggy hematomas were significantly associated with ICI, although larger hematomas conferred larger odds (OR = 9.9, 95% CI = 6.3 to 15.5). Although the presence of a scalp hematoma was associated with greater odds of ICI in all age groups, odds were greatest in children aged 0 to 6 months (OR = 13.5, 95% CI = 1.5 to 119.3). Linear skull fractures were present in 156 (4.0%) patients. Of the 111 patients with scalp hematoma and ICI, 57 (51%) patients had

  11. [Transformation from chronic subdural hematoma into subdural empyema following cat bites: a case report].

    PubMed

    Konno, Takuya; Yamada, Kei; Kasahara, Sou; Umeda, Yoshitaka; Oyake, Mutsuo; Fujita, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old man developed motor aphasia and right hemiparesis with severe headache, during the treatment of cellulitis and sepsis due to cat bites. Brain CT showed a low density, crescent-shaped lesion in the left subdural space, which was hypointense on brain diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). One week later, when his neurological symptoms had worsened, the signal of the subdural lesion had changed to hyperintense on DWI. The lesion was capsule-shaped when enhanced by Gadolinium. The signal changes on DWI of the lesion indicated the existing hematoma had changed to an empyema, or so-called infected subdural hematoma, due to a hematogenous bacterial infection. Pasteurella multocida, a resident microbe in the oral cavity of cats, could be the responsible pathogen in this case. The patient recovered completely after treatment with intravenous high dose antibiotics. This is an important case report describing the transformation from a chronic subdural hematoma into a subdural empyema by DWI.

  12. The hematoma block: a simple, effective technique for closed reduction of ankle fracture dislocations.

    PubMed

    Ross, Adrianne; Catanzariti, Alan R; Mendicino, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Management of a dislocated ankle fracture can be challenging because of instability of the ankle mortise, a compromised soft tissue envelope, and the potential neurovascular compromise. Every effort should be made to quickly and efficiently relocate the disrupted ankle joint. Within the emergency department setting, narcotics and benzodiazepines can be used to sedate the patient before attempting closed reduction. The combination of narcotics and benzodiazepines provides relief of pain and muscle guarding; however, it conveys a risk of seizure as well as respiratory arrest. An alternative to conscious sedation is the hematoma block, or an intra-articular local anesthetic injection in the ankle joint and the associated fracture hematoma. The hematoma block offers a comparable amount of analgesia to conscious sedation without the additional cardiovascular risk, hospital cost, and procedure time. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Management of simple nail bed lacerations and subungual hematomas in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Patel, Lina

    2014-10-01

    Fingertip crush injuries are common hand injuries in children and often are evaluated initially in an emergency department. Nail bed injuries can be classified into subungual hematomas, simple or stellate lacerations, crush injuries, and avulsions. Emergency department physicians with good knowledge of fingertip anatomy can appropriately manage these injuries so as to prevent long-term fingertip deformities and functional deficits. The management of simple nail bed lacerations and subungual hematomas has remained somewhat controversial with much debate surrounding the necessity of removing the nail plate for repair of a nail bed laceration versus trephination alone of a large subungual hematoma. This article will discuss the management and evaluation of simple nail bed injuries by emergency department physicians to prevent chronic nail and fingertip deformities.

  14. Colonic Angiodysplasia with a Huge Submucosal Hematoma in the Sigmoid Colon.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takayuki; Koike, Daisuke; Nomura, Yukihiro; Ooe, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Colonic angiodysplasia (AD) with bleeding as a comorbidity in the aging population is being increasingly reported. However, to our knowledge, there is no report on colonic AD accompanied by a huge hematoma. Herein, we report a case of colonic AD with a huge submucosal hematoma. A 75-year-old man with sudden melena was referred to our hospital. Helical computed tomographic angiography (CTA) revealed bleeding from the sigmoid colon. Additionally, colonoscopy showed a huge submucosal hematoma with bleeding in the sigmoid colon. As endoscopic hemostasis was difficult, sigmoidectomy was performed. The pathological diagnosis was colonic AD. The present case indicates that colonic AD should be considered in the differential diagnosis for melena. In addition, the case shows that helical CTA, which is a noninvasive imaging modality, is useful for the diagnosis of colonic AD and is as effective as colonoscopy and angiography for diagnosis.

  15. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from acute traumatic tentorial subdural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Victoria; Kouliev, Timur

    2016-01-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (SDH) resulting from head trauma is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires expedient diagnosis and intervention to ensure optimal patient outcomes. Rapidly expanding or large hematomas, elevated intracranial pressure, and associated complications of brain herniation are associated with high mortality rates and poor recovery of neurological function. However, smaller bleeds (clot thickness <10 mm) or hematomas occurring in infrequent locations, such as the tentorium cerebelli, may be difficult to recognize and patients may present with unusual or subtle signs and symptoms, including isolated cranial nerve palsies. Knowledge of neuroanatomy supported by modern neuroimaging can greatly aid in recognition and diagnosis of such lesions. In this report, we present a case of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from compressive tentorial SDH following blunt head trauma, review the literature concerning similar cases, and make recommendations regarding the diagnosis of SDH in patients presenting with isolated cranial nerve palsies. PMID:27843362

  16. Proptosis, skull infarction, and retro-orbital and epidural hematomas in a child with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Mallouh, A A; Young, M; Hamdan, J; Salamah, M M

    1987-10-01

    A Saudi child with homozygous sickle cell disease (SS) presented with bilateral periorbital swelling, right-sided proptosis, skull bone infarcts, and retro-orbital and epidural hematomas. The findings of skull bone infarcts, retro-orbital and epidural hematomas are rare in patients with sickle cell disease.

  17. Novel use of ultrasound in the ED: ultrasound-guided hematoma block of a proximal humeral fracture.

    PubMed

    Lovallo, Emily; Mantuani, Daniel; Nagdev, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Proximal humeral fractures are a common injury after falls, particularly in the elderly population. An ultrasound-guided hematoma block is a novel technique for analgesia in cases when standard intravenous analgesia is not efficacious. We present a case in which ultrasound-guided hematoma block was the ideal method for adjunctive pain control in a patient with a comminuted humeral head fracture.

  18. Clinical Course and Results of Surgery for Chronic Subdural Hematomas in Patients on Drugs Affecting Hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Dziedzic, Tomasz Andrzej; Kunert, Przemysław; Marchel, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Objective An apparent increase of use of drugs affecting hemostasis in our neurosurgical department since the 1990s has encouraged us to investigate whether these drugs influence the clinical course and results of surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Methods This retrospective analysis included 178 patients admitted for CSDH from 2007 to 2011 who were divided into two groups: on drugs affecting hemostasis (40; 22%) and no bleeding disorders (138; 78%). Medications in the first group included oral anticoagulants (33; 82.5%), antiplatelets (5; 12.5%) and low molecular weight heparins (2; 5%). Results The patients on drugs affecting hemostasis were older (74.3±7.4 vs. 68.4±14.8; p-value 0.01) and the group without bleeding disorders had more head trauma history (61% vs. 38%, p-value 0.01). The groups did not differ in bilateral hematoma rates (25% vs. 20%, p-value=NS). At diagnosis, mean hematoma thickness was lower in patients on drugs affecting hemostasis (18.7±7.4 mm vs. 21.9±7.9 mm, p-value<0.01). Average stay of hospital was 1 day longer in patients on drugs affecting hemostasis (11.7±4.1 vs.10.9±5.3, p-value=NS) and was related to the necessity of bleeding disorder reversal. Mean neurological status at presentation was similar between the groups (p-value=NS) as was the likelihood of hematoma recurrence (p-value=NS). Glasgow Outcome Scale results were comparable. Conclusion Patients on drugs affecting hemostasis are less often aware of a head trauma history, possibly suggesting a higher CSDH risk after minor trauma in this group. In these patients, smaller hematomas are symptomatic, probably due to faster hematoma formation. Drugs affecting hemostasis do not affect treatment results. PMID:28264245

  19. [Factors Contributing to Surgical Intervention for Subacute Subdural Hematoma Enlargement in Patients with Mild Head Injuries].

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Yosuke; Sasaki, Tohru; Kanamori, Masayuki; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Uenohara, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2017-09-01

    Delayed neurological deterioration following mild head injury(MHI)usually occurs within 24 hours. However, some cases require delayed surgical evacuation of an acute subdural hematoma(ASDH), owing to subacute progressive hematoma enlargement. This study aimed to determine radiological or clinical parameters associated with surgical intervention in ASDH cases in which surgery was not initially considered necessary. From 2010 to 2015, 64 patients were non-surgically treated for ASDH following MHI. We evaluated the various outcomes of eventual surgical ASDH evacuation after the first 48 hours following injury, due to hematoma enlargement and clinical deterioration. Univariate and multivariate analyses were applied to both the demographic and initial radiographic features to identify risk factors for ASDH progression and surgery. Overall, at the time of their last follow-up computed tomography, 57 patients(89%)demonstrated minimal ASDH or spontaneous hematoma resolution with conservative non-surgical management. The remaining 7 patients(11%)received delayed surgical ASDH evacuation a median of 5.1 days after the head trauma. There were no significant differences between the two groups for baseline characteristics, including age, prior history of anticoagulants, the presence of cerebral contusions, or subarachnoid hemorrhages. On multivariate analysis, use of antiplatelet drugs(p=0.013, OR=28, 95%CI=1.82-24)was independently associated with delayed hematoma evacuation. These data indicate that as much as 11% of patients with minimal ASDHs after MHI can deteriorate over the course of a week and then require surgical intervention, and that patients on concurrent antiplatelet medication require especially careful monitoring of hematoma progression.

  20. Subdural drainage versus subperiosteal drainage in burr-hole trepanation for symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas.

    PubMed

    Bellut, David; Woernle, Christoph Michael; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Kockro, Ralf Alfons; Bertalanffy, Helmut; Krayenbühl, Niklaus

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic chronic subdural hematoma (scSDH) is one of the most frequent diseases in neurosurgical practice, and its incidence is increasing. However, treatment modalities are still controversial. The aim of this retrospective single-center study is to compare for the first time two surgical methods in the treatment of subdural hematoma that have been proven to be efficient in previous studies in a direct comparison. We analyzed the data of 143 scSDHs in 113 patients undergoing surgery for subdural hematoma with placement of subperiosteal or subdural drainage after double burr-hole trepanation for hematoma evacuation. Overall, there were no statistically significant differences regarding general patient characteristics, preoperative and postoperative symptoms, postoperative hematoma remnant, rates of recurrences, mortality, complications, and outcome at discharge and at 3-month follow up between the groups. There was a close to significant tendency of lower mortality after placement of subperiosteal drainage system and a tendency towards lower rate of recurrent hematoma after placement of subdural drainage system. Our study shows for the first time a direct comparison of two mainly used surgical techniques in the treatment of scSDH. Both methods proved to be highly effective, and general patient data, complications, outcome and mortality of both groups are equal or superior compared with previously published series. Because there is a clear tendency to less mortality and fewer serious complications, treatment with double burr-hole trepanation, irrigation, and placement of subperiosteal drainage is our treatment of choice in patients with predictable high risk of complications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. CT Angiography Spot Sign, Hematoma Expansion, and Outcome in Primary Pontine Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Morotti, Andrea; Jessel, Michael J; Brouwers, H Bart; Falcone, Guido J; Schwab, Kristin; Ayres, Alison M; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Anderson, Christopher D; Viswanathan, Anand; Greenberg, Steven M; Gurol, M Edip; Romero, Javier M; Rosand, Jonathan; Goldstein, Joshua N

    2016-08-01

    The computed tomography angiography (CTA) spot sign is a validated predictor of hematoma expansion and poor outcome in supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), but patients with brainstem ICH have typically been excluded from the analyses. We investigated the frequency of spot sign and its relationship with hematoma expansion and outcome in patients with primary pontine hemorrhage (PPH). We performed a retrospective analysis of PPH cases obtained from a prospectively collected cohort of consecutive ICH patients who underwent CTA. CTA first-pass readings for spot sign presence were analyzed by two trained readers. Baseline and follow-up hematoma volumes on non-contrast CT scans were assessed by semi-automated computer-assisted volumetric analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), positive and negative likelihood ratio, and accuracy of spot sign for prediction of in-hospital mortality were calculated. 49 subjects met the inclusion criteria of whom 11 (22.4 %) showed a spot sign. In-hospital mortality was higher in spot sign-positive versus spot sign-negative subjects (90.9 vs 47.4 %, p = 0.020). Spot sign showed excellent specificity (95 %) and PPV (91 %) in predicting in-hospital mortality. Absolute hematoma growth, defined as parenchymal and intraventricular hematoma expansion of any amount, was significantly higher in spot sign-positive versus spot sign-negative subjects (13.72 ± 20.93 vs 3.76 ± 8.55 mL, p = 0.045). As with supratentorial ICH, the CTA spot sign is a common finding and is associated with higher risk of hematoma expansion and mortality in PPH. This marker may assist clinicians in prognostic stratification.

  2. Identification of hematomas in mild traumatic brain injury using an index of quantitative brain electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Prichep, Leslie S; Naunheim, Rosanne; Bazarian, Jeffrey; Mould, W Andrew; Hanley, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification of traumatic intracranial hematomas following closed head injury represents a significant health care need because of the potentially life-threatening risk they present. This study demonstrates the clinical utility of an index of brain electrical activity used to identify intracranial hematomas in traumatic brain injury (TBI) presenting to the emergency department (ED). Brain electrical activity was recorded from a limited montage located on the forehead of 394 closed head injured patients who were referred for CT scans as part of their standard ED assessment. A total of 116 of these patients were found to be CT positive (CT+), of which 46 patients with traumatic intracranial hematomas (CT+) were identified for study. A total of 278 patients were found to be CT negative (CT-) and were used as controls. CT scans were subjected to quantitative measurements of volume of blood and distance of bleed from recording electrodes by blinded independent experts, implementing a validated method for hematoma measurement. Using an algorithm based on brain electrical activity developed on a large independent cohort of TBI patients and controls (TBI-Index), patients were classified as either positive or negative for structural brain injury. Sensitivity to hematomas was found to be 95.7% (95% CI = 85.2, 99.5), specificity was 43.9% (95% CI = 38.0, 49.9). There was no significant relationship between the TBI-Index and distance of the bleed from recording sites (F = 0.044, p = 0.833), or volume of blood measured F = 0.179, p = 0.674). Results of this study are a validation and extension of previously published retrospective findings in an independent population, and provide evidence that a TBI-Index for structural brain injury is a highly sensitive measure for the detection of potentially life-threatening traumatic intracranial hematomas, and could contribute to the rapid, quantitative evaluation and treatment of such patients.

  3. Clinically Significant Pocket Hematoma Increases Long-Term Risk of Device Infection: BRUISE CONTROL INFECTION Study.

    PubMed

    Essebag, Vidal; Verma, Atul; Healey, Jeff S; Krahn, Andrew D; Kalfon, Eli; Coutu, Benoit; Ayala-Paredes, Felix; Tang, Anthony S; Sapp, John; Sturmer, Marcio; Keren, Arieh; Wells, George A; Birnie, David H

    2016-03-22

    The BRUISE CONTROL trial (Bridge or Continue Coumadin for Device Surgery Randomized Controlled Trial) demonstrated that a strategy of continued warfarin during cardiac implantable electronic device surgery was safe and reduced the incidence of clinically significant pocket hematoma (CSH). CSH was defined as a post-procedure hematoma requiring further surgery and/or resulting in prolongation of hospitalization of at least 24 h, and/or requiring interruption of anticoagulation. Previous studies have inconsistently associated hematoma with the subsequent development of device infection; reasons include the retrospective nature of many studies, lack of endpoint adjudication, and differing subjective definitions of hematoma. The BRUISE CONTROL INFECTION (Bridge or Continue Coumadin for Device Surgery Randomized Controlled Trial Extended Follow-Up for Infection) prospectively examined the association between CSH and subsequent device infection. The study included 659 patients with a primary outcome of device-related infection requiring hospitalization, defined as 1 or more of the following: pocket infection; endocarditis; and bloodstream infection. Outcomes were verified by a blinded adjudication committee. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify predictors of infection. The overall 1-year device-related infection rate was 2.4% (16 of 659). Infection occurred in 11% of patients (7 of 66) with previous CSH and in 1.5% (9 of 593) without CSH. CSH was the only independent predictor and was associated with a >7-fold increased risk of infection (hazard ratio: 7.7; 95% confidence interval: 2.9 to 20.5; p < 0.0001). Empiric antibiotics upon development of hematoma did not reduce long-term infection risk. CSH is associated with a significantly increased risk of infection requiring hospitalization within 1 year following cardiac implantable electronic device surgery. Strategies aimed at reducing hematomas may decrease the long-term risk of infection. (Bridge or Continue

  4. A retropharyngeal–mediastinal hematoma with supraglottic and tracheal obstruction: The role of multidisciplinary airway management

    PubMed Central

    Birkholz, Torsten; Kröber, Stefanie; Knorr, Christian; Schiele, Albert; Bumm, Klaus; Schmidt, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    A 77-year-old man suffered hypoxemic cardiac arrest by supraglottic and tracheal airway obstruction in the emergency department. A previously unknown cervical fracture had caused a traumatic retropharyngeal–mediastinal hematoma. A lifesaving surgical emergency tracheostomy succeeded. Supraglottic and tracheal obstruction by a retropharyngeal–mediastinal hematoma with successful resuscitation via emergency tracheostomy after hypoxemic cardiac arrest has never been reported in a context of trauma. This clinically demanding case outlines the need for multidisciplinary airway management systems with continuous training and well-implemented guidelines. Only multidisciplinary staff preparedness and readily available equipments for the unanticipated difficult airway solved the catastrophic clinical situation. PMID:21063569

  5. Metastatic prostate cancer mimicking chronic subdural hematoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shashikant; Veron, Ayme; Hosseini, Pegah; Bates, Rachel; Brown, Benjamin; Guthikonda, Bharat; DeSouza, Rowena

    2010-01-01

    Cancer of the prostate is extremely common and is well known to metastasize to the pelvic lymph nodes and axial skeleton (vertebral column, pelvis, cranium, and proximal femur). However, reports of intracranial metastasis are rare and commonly discovered postmortem. Moreover, metastatic lesions mimicking subdural hematoma are extremely rare and are uncommonly reported in the literature. We found only three such cases in the literature. We present a unique case of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with headaches after head trauma with classic radiologic findings of subdural hematoma. The diagnosis may have been made sooner with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Tarbé de Saint Hardouin, A-L; Grévent, D; Sainte-Rose, C; Angoulvant, F; Chéron, G

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma is uncommon in children, making rapid diagnosis difficult. In this report, we present a case of traumatic cervical epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy, diagnosed with computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Management was conservative and the lesion regressed spontaneously. The presentation in childhood is often nonspecific. MRI is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing these lesions. Conservative treatment has to be considered in cases with a benign clinical course and provided that the patient is followed up neurologically with repeated MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Spontaneous Subcapsular Hematoma of the Fetal Liver: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Maher, James E; Van Beek, Brittany; Kelly, Randall T; Hsu, Peter

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a cystic abdominal mass on ultrasound which presented a diagnostic dilemma at 32 weeks gestation. A presumptive antenatal diagnosis of a subcapsular liver hematoma (SCH) was made based on the location and ultrasound appearance similar to SCH seen in pediatric and adult patients. Sequential evaluation of the mass showed an evolving ultrasound appearance which reinforced our initial impression of a subcapsular hematoma of the fetal liver. Postnatal ultrasound confirmed the resolving SCH as well as a previously undetected echo bright lesion characteristic of an infantile focal hemangioma directly adjacent to the resolving SCH. A review of the literature is provided.

  8. Spontaneous subcapsular hematoma of liver in pregnancy of unknown etiology--conservative management: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Veenu; Shamas, Ambrin G; Cameron, Alan D; Cameron, Allan D

    2010-01-01

    Mrs. AB, a 40-year-old woman, in her second pregnancy had a spontaneous hematoma of liver of unknown etiology that was managed successfully conservatively under the umbrella of the multidisciplinary care. The subcapsular hematoma was diagnosed at 31 weeks gestational age while she was being investigated because of sudden and gross drop of hemoglobin from 12.8 to 8 g/dl in 2 weeks duration. The dilemma remains as how to manage her future pregnancies and what are the risks of recurrence.

  9. Subdural hematoma in a teenager related to roller-coaster ride.

    PubMed

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Facha, M T; Martinez-Lopez, Manuel; Herrera-Mora, Patricia

    2006-07-01

    Reports about neurological injury related to roller-coaster rides mostly involve adults; we present a case of subdural hematoma in a pediatric patient presented 14 days after a roller-coaster ride. These rides show extreme up-and-down, to-and-fro, and rotatory acceleration/deceleration forces that could produce tensile and shearing stresses with tearing of bridging cerebral veins resulting in subdural hemorrhage. Pediatricians should consider roller-coaster riding a modern cause of subdural hematoma, as well as a possible cause of unexplained neurologic events in otherwise healthy adolescents.

  10. PET/CT imaging of abdominal aorta with intramural hematomas, penetrating ulcer, and saccular pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Vien X; Nguyen, Ba D

    2014-05-01

    Acute aortic syndromes, encompassing intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, and pseudoaneurysm, are best demonstrated by angiographic CT and magnetic resonance imaging. These imaging modalities provide an accurate evaluation and allow timely therapies of these frequently symptomatic lesions, thus reducing their morbidity and mortality. The inflammatory pathogenesis of these acute aortic syndromes may exhibit positive PET findings predictive of prognosis and outcomes of these vascular events. The authors present a case of PET/CT imaging showing asymptomatic intramural hematomas with penetrating ulcer and saccular pseudoaneurysm of the proximal abdominal aorta.

  11. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Coexisting Guillan-Barré Syndrome in a Child: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi Hyung; Song, Geun Sung; Kim, Young Ha; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) has been reported as a rare cause of spinal cord compression, especially in children. Clinical features are usually nonspecific, although cervicothoracic location of hematoma could be presented with progressive paraplegia. Guillian-Barré syndrome (GBS) is clinically defined as an acute peripheral neuropathy causing progressive limb weakness. Because SSEH and GBS have very similar signs and symptoms, SSEH could be misdiagnosed as GBS. Nevertheless, they can be presented together. We describe a rare case of SSEH coexisting with GBS.

  12. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Coexisting Guillan-Barré Syndrome in a Child: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Hyung; Kim, Young Ha; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) has been reported as a rare cause of spinal cord compression, especially in children. Clinical features are usually nonspecific, although cervicothoracic location of hematoma could be presented with progressive paraplegia. Guillian-Barré syndrome (GBS) is clinically defined as an acute peripheral neuropathy causing progressive limb weakness. Because SSEH and GBS have very similar signs and symptoms, SSEH could be misdiagnosed as GBS. Nevertheless, they can be presented together. We describe a rare case of SSEH coexisting with GBS. PMID:27800000

  13. Clinical features and management of posttraumatic subperiosteal hematoma of the orbit

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Usha R; Arora, Vipul; Shah, Akash D; Solanki, Urvashi

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic subperiosteal hematoma (SpH) usually presents late, after the initial trauma. It is generally seen in young males. Computed tomography is the best mode of imaging and helps to rule out orbital fracture or associated subdural hematoma. We present the clinical features and management of four patients seen at the orbit clinic with SpH. Management is based on time of presentation, visual acuity and any communicating bleed. The prognosis of traumatic SpH is excellent if treated with an individualized patient approach. PMID:21157076

  14. Sonographic diagnosis of spontaneous intramural small bowel hematoma in a case of warfarin overdose.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sheng-Wen; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Kuo-Chih; Ko, Shih-Yu; Wong, Chung-Shun; Chong, Chee-Fah

    2008-01-01

    A 38-year-old man who had been treated with warfarin since mitral valve replacement 10 years earlier presented with acute onset of epigastralgia and melena. Coagulation tests were abnormal with a prolonged prothrombin time of >60 seconds and a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time of >120 seconds. Abdominal sonographic examination revealed duodenal intramural hematoma that was confirmed on CT. Warfarin therapy was stopped and the patient was treated conservatively with vitamin K and fresh frozen plasma. Recovery was uneventful, and the patient was re-warfarinized 2 weeks later. Duodenal hematoma can be readily diagnosed with bedside sonography.

  15. Indium-111-labeled leukocyte localization in hematomas: a pitfall in abscess detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; vanSonnenberg, E.; Kipper, S.; Bieberstein, M.P.

    1984-07-01

    Indium-111-labeled white-blood-cell scanning is a useful modality in abscess detection and has replaced gallium scanning in many institutions. Sensitivities of 72% to 90% and specificities of 90% to 100% have been reported. In searching for abscesses seven cases of indium-111-labeled leukocyte uptake were encountered in collections subsequently proved to be noninfected hematomas. Abundant red blood cells with few or no white blood cells, no bacteria, and a benign clinical course identified these noninfected hematomas. Five of the patients were being treated with hemodialysis and three were recent allograft recipients. The results indicate some limitation and nonspecificity in indium-111 scanning, despite its many benefits.

  16. Subcapsular Renal-Infected Hematoma After Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery: A Rare but Serious Complication

    PubMed Central

    Consigliere, Lucas; Gallegos, Hector; Rojas, Francisco; Astroza, Gastón

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report a case of a 53-year-old woman affected by a left kidney stone and persistent positive urinary culture treated by retrograde intrarenal surgery. During postoperative day 1, she developed a sudden back pain associated with a decrease in hemoglobin. CT scan showed a subcapsular hematoma giving the impression of partial compression of kidney and upper urinary tract. For that reason, in the first instance, a Double-J ureteral stent was installed. Unfortunately, an open surgical drainage was necessary because a secondary infection of the hematoma was evident during the following days. PMID:27579416

  17. Outcomes and management of type A intramural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Harleen K.; Tanaka, Akiko; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M.; Afifi, Rana O.; Miller, Charles C.; Safi, Hazim J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Initial optimal management of acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) with intramural hematoma (ATAIMH) remains controversial, especially between centers in the Eastern vs. Western worlds. We examined the literature and our experience to report outcomes after repair of ATAIMH. Methods We reviewed the hospital, follow-up clinic records and online mortality databases for all patients who presented to our center for open repair of ATAAD between 1999 and 2014. Preoperative characteristics, early and long-term outcomes were compared between classic ATAAD vs. ATAIMH. Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier and log-rank statistics. Results Of the 523 repaired ATAAD, 101 patients (19%) presented with IMH and 422 (81%) had classic dissection. ATAIMH were significantly older (64.8±12.9 vs. 56.8±14.6 years; P<0.001), more commonly females (39% vs. 26%; P=0.010), had poor baseline renal function (i.e., glomerular filtration rate) (P<0.017), more retrograde dissections (27% vs. 8.3%; P<0.001), and less distal malperfusion (5% vs. 15%; P<0.001). Age greater than 60 years, female sex, retrograde dissection, and Marfan syndrome were strongly correlated with ATAIMH. Time to repair for ATAIMH was longer (median, 55.3 vs. 9.8 hours; P<0.001) with one death in ATAIMH within three days of presentation (0.9% vs. 6%; P=0.040). In all, 30-day mortality in ATAIMH was not different from classic ATAAD (12% vs.16%; P=0.289). A significantly lower incidence of postoperative dialysis in ATAIMH was noted (10% vs. 19%; P=0.034). When adjusted for age and renal function, late survival was improved with IMH (P<0.039). Conclusions ATAIMH continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality, comparable to classic aortic dissection. A multidisciplinary management approach involving aggressive medical management and risk stratification for timely surgical intervention, along with genetic profiling, is recommended for optimal care. Long-term monitoring is mandatory to assess

  18. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration versus core needle biopsy: comparison of post-biopsy hematoma rates and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Chae, In Hye; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Park, Vivian Y; Kwak, Jin Young

    2017-07-01

    To compare post-biopsy hematoma rates between ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy, and to investigate risk factors for post-biopsy hematoma. A total of 5304 thyroid nodules which underwent ultrasound guided biopsy were included in this retrospective study. We compared clinical and US features between patients with and without post-biopsy hematoma. Associations between these features and post-biopsy hematoma were analyzed. Post-biopsy hematoma rate was 0.8% (43/5121) for ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and 4.9% (9/183) for ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy (P < 0.001). For ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration, gender, age, size, presence of vascularity, and suspicious US features were not associated with post-biopsy hematoma according to experience level. Post-biopsy hematoma occurred significantly more with ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy (9/179, 5.0%) than with ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration (9/1138, 0.8%) (P < 0.001) in experienced performers and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy was the only significant risk factor for post-biopsy hematoma (adjusted Odds Ratio, 6.458, P < 0.001). Post-biopsy hematoma occurred significantly more in ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy than in ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy was the only independent factor of post-biopsy hematoma in thyroid nodules.

  19. A Huge Subcutaneous Hematoma in an Adult with Kasabach-Merritt Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuan-Lin; Liao, Chiung-Ying; Chang, Chen-Kuang; Ho, Shang-Yun; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng; Huang, Yuan-Chun

    2017-06-19

    BACKGROUND Kasabach-Merritt syndrome is a potentially fatal disease that consists of hemangioma(s) with thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and coagulopathy. Extensive hemangiomatosis is rare. We present the radiological features and treatment strategy of a young adult suffering from Kasabach-Merritt syndrome with widespread hemangiomas and an infected huge hematoma in the right thigh. CASE REPORT A 33-year-old Taiwanese male presented with a painful 20-cm mass over his right thigh and gross hematuria for 2 days. Hemangiomatosis was bioptically proven in infancy and the patient was under regular follow-up. Physical examination revealed normal heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature. Multiple palpable lumps with brown and purple areas of skin over the neck, trunk, and right thigh were noted. Laboratory examinations revealed thrombocytopenia anemia and elevated fibrin degradation products. There were no signs of sepsis. Blood transfusion and steroid therapy were executed. Computed tomography showed a huge complicated subcutaneous hematoma in the right thigh. Drainage of the huge hematoma was performed and antibiotics were prescribed. After the local infection in the right thigh and the bleeding tendency were controlled, the patient was discharged in a stable condition two weeks later. CONCLUSIONS A huge infected hematoma and widespread hemangiomas are extremely rare complications of Kasabach-Merritt syndrome. There are no known treatment guidelines currently available. Our patient was successfully treated with steroids, drainage, and antibiotics.

  20. 77 FR 16925 - Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 882 Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the Near Infrared (NIR)...

  1. A case of acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured aneurysm detected by postmortem angiography.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Go; Makino, Yohsuke; Yajima, Daisuke; Motomura, Ayumi; Chiba, Fumiko; Torimitsu, Suguru; Hoshioka, Yumi; Iwase, Hirotaro

    2016-03-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is mostly caused by head trauma, but intrinsic causes also exist such as aneurysm rupture. We describe here a case involving a man in his 70s who was found lying on the bedroom floor by his family. CT performed at the hospital showed ASDH and a forensic autopsy was requested. Postmortem cerebral angiography showed dilatation of the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery, which coincided with the dilated part of the Sylvian fissure. Extravasation of contrast medium into the subdural hematoma from this site was suggestive of a ruptured aneurysm. Autopsy revealed a fleshy hematoma (total weight 110 g) in the right subdural space and findings of brain herniation. As indicated on angiography, a ruptured saccular aneurysm was confirmed at the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery. Obvious injuries to the head or face could not be detected on either external or internal examination, and intrinsic ASDH due to a ruptured middle cerebral artery aneurysm was determined as the cause of death. One of the key points of forensic diagnosis is the strict differentiation between intrinsic and extrinsic onset for conditions leading to death. Although most subdural hematomas (SDH) are caused by extrinsic factors, forensic pathologists should consider the possibility of intrinsic SDH. In addition, postmortem angiography can be useful for identifying vascular lesions in such cases.

  2. Acute epidural-like appearance of an encapsulated solid non-organized chronic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Ruth; Pascual, José M; Subhi-Issa, Issa; Yus, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    We report the exceptional case of an encapsulated solid non-organized chronic subdural hematoma (SDH) in a 67-year-old woman that was admitted with acute hemiplegia followed by rapid deterioration in consciousness 5 months after a minor head trauma. Computed tomography (CT) showed an extracerebral biconvex shaped hyperdense mass that led to the misdiagnosis of an acute epidural hematoma. Urgent craniotomy revealed an encapsulated mass filled with solid fresh clot in the subdural space. Complete evacuation of this SDH, including both its inner and outer membranes, was achieved, and the patient recovered successfully. Histological analysis confirmed that the content of the hematoma corresponded to a newly formed clot that was enclosed between an inner membrane, composed of two collagen layers, and an outer membrane with a three layered structure. Chronic SDH may seldom present as an encapsulated solid non-organized lesion that consists of a fibrous capsule enclosing a fresh clot and lacking the thick fibrous septations that typically connect the inner and outer membranes of organized chronic SDH. This entity mimics the clinical course and radiological appearance of acute epidural hematomas and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of extracerebral hyperdense biconvex shaped lesions.

  3. Spontaneous acute spinal subdural hematoma: spontaneous recovery from severe paraparesis--case report and review.

    PubMed

    Payer, Michael; Agosti, Reto

    2010-11-01

    Spontaneous idiopathic acute spinal subdural hematomas are highly exceptional. Neurological symptoms are usually severe, and rapid diagnosis with MRI is mandatory. Surgical evacuation has frequently been used therapeutically; however, spontaneous recovery in mild cases has also been reported. We present a case of spontaneous recovery from severe paraparesis after spontaneous acute SSDH, and review the English-speaking literature.

  4. Subarachnoid Hematoma of the Craniocervical Junction and Upper Cervical Spine After Traumatic Cerebral Contusion: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Di Rienzo, Alessandro; Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Colasanti, Roberto; Moriconi, Elisa; Gladi, Maurizio; Nocchi, Niccolo'; Scerrati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Spinal subarachnoid hematoma (SSH) is a rare condition, more commonly occurring after lumbar puncture for diagnostic or anesthesiological procedures. It has also been observed after traumatic events, in patients under anticoagulation therapy or in case of arteriovenous malformation rupture. In a very small number of cases no causative agent can be identified and a diagnosis of spontaneous SSH is established. The lumbar and thoracic spine are the most frequently involved segments and only seven cases of cervical spine SSH have been described until now. Differential diagnosis between subdural and subarachnoid hematoma is complex because the common neuroradiological investigations, including a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are not enough sensitive to exactly define clot location. Actually, confirmation of the subarachnoid location of bleeding is obtained at surgery, which is necessary to resolve the fast and sometimes dramatic evolution of clinical symptoms. Nonetheless, there are occasional reports on successful conservative treatment of these lesions. We present a peculiar case of subarachnoid hematoma of the craniocervical junction, developing after the rupture of a right temporal lobe contusion within the adjacent arachnoidal spaces and the following clot migration along the right lateral aspect of the foramen magnum and the upper cervical spine, causing severe neurological impairment. After surgical removal of the hematoma, significant symptom improvement was observed. PMID:24067775

  5. Subcapsular hematoma of the liver due to intercostal anesthesic blockage after cholecystectomy: case report.

    PubMed

    Santos Rodrigues, A L; Silva Santana, A C; Crociati Meguins, L; Felgueiras Rolo, D; Lobato Ferreira, M; Ribeiro Braga, C A

    2009-01-01

    The subcapsular hematoma of the liver (SHL) are the results of injuries such as liver needle biopsy, liver trauma, pregnancy illnesses, parasitic diseases and others. The approach of these lesions depends on the various clinical presentations of subcapsular hematoma of the liver because it may be small with minimal clinical repercussion, managed only by ultrasound observation. In some situations the SHL may present large dimensions with hemodinamic instability. A case of subcapsular hematoma of the liver secondary to anesthetic intercostal blockade to control the postoperative pain after cholecystectomy is reported. A 34-year-old woman was submitted to intercostal anesthetic blockade after cholecystectomy for treatment of cholelithiasis. The blockade evolved with pain in right flank followed of mucocutaneous pallor and fall of the haematocrit and hemoglobin levels. At relaparotomy, subcapsular hematoma of the liver was proven and tamponed with compresses. The patient had good postoperative evolution being discharged from hospital, after removing the compresses. In conclusion, the intercostal anesthesic blockade, as any other medical procedure, is not exempt of complications. Therefore, it must be carried through in well selected cases; Anyway nowadays, there are efficient drugs for the control of postoperative pain.

  6. [Subcapsular hepatic hematoma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: case report and literature review].

    PubMed

    Petit-Laurent, Fabien; Scalone, Olivia; Penigaud, Marianne; Barbeys, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Subcapsular hepatic hematoma is a rare complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The mechanism of this lesion has not been clearly established. The following observation clarifies the physiopathology, as well as providing a review of the various cases described in the literature.

  7. Spontaneous subdural hematoma associated with preeclampsia: a case report and litterature review

    PubMed Central

    Oudghiri, Nezha; Behat, Mehdi; Elchhab, Nada; Doumiri, Mouhssine; Tazi, Anas Saoud

    2014-01-01

    A patient with pre-eclampsia at 31 weeks’ gestation developed neurologic signs. Computerized tomography revealed a large cranial subdural hematoma. This diagnostic should be considered in any pre-eclamptic patient demonstrating neurological symptoms and must be treated effectively because of the poor maternel and fetal prognosis. Our patient was succesfully treated. PMID:25829978

  8. [Suspicious case of epidural hematoma due to coagulopathy caused by vitamin K deficiency associated with antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Hirata, Naoyuki; Kanaya, Noriaki; Shimizu, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Masanori; Namiki, Akiyoshi

    2007-02-01

    We experienced a case of epidural hematoma caused by coagulopathy 3 days after surgery. A 72-year-old man, who had undergone a total gastrectomy, suffered from nausea and vomiting by ileus. He underwent repair of ileus under general anesthesia with thoracic epidural anesthesia. Three days after surgery, abnormal bleeding followed by disorder of prothrombin activity (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and paralysis due to thoracic epidural hematoma developed. It was suspected that these coagulopathies were the results of vitamin K deficiency. Vitamin K deficiency in this patient was considered to have been caused by cephem antibiotics containing N-methyl-thiotetrazole (NMTT) side chain and no oral intake of food for a few days preoperatively. The patient was treated with fresh frozen plasma and intravenous menatetrenon, which improved abnormal bleeding and disorder of PT and aPTT within 24hr. After a discussion with orthopedic consultants, we selected a conservative therapy rather than surgical removal of the hematoma. Thoracic epidural hematoma disappeared two months after surgery, but motor paralysis requiring rehabilitation remained. In conclusion, when patients have not eaten anything for a few days and antibiotics with an NMTT sidechain has been administered, care must be taken to prevent vitamin K deficiency and coagulopathy.

  9. Subdural Hematomas in Children under 2 Years. Accidental or Inflicted? A 10-Year Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzioumi, Dimitra; Oates, R. Kim

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of 38 children under 2 with subdural hematomas found the most common causes were nonaccidental injury (55%), accidents (39%), and nontraumatic causes (6%). Also, the frequent presence of retinal hemorrhages, bone and rib fractures, delay in presentation, and young age suggests child abuse as the most common cause of these injuries.…

  10. Restoration of the ascending reticular activating system compressed by hematoma in a stroke patient

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Seo, Jeong Pyo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: We report on restoration of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS), compressed by an intracerebral hematoma and perihematomal edema following a stroke. The restoration of the ARAS was demonstrated by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). Patient concerns: In a 60-year-old male, a brain MRI taken at 2 weeks after the surgery showed a hematoma and perihematomal edema in the left posterolateral pons and cerebellum, which were markedly resolved on a brain MRI after 5 weeks. Diagnoses: Intraventricular hemorrhage. Interventions: Navigation-guided stereotactic drainage of a hematoma in the left cerebellum, comprehensive rehabilitative therapy, including hypersomnia medication (modafinil), physical therapy, and occupational therapy. Outcomes: His hypersomnia improved significantly with rehabilitation, with no daytime hypersomnia beginning 3 weeks after the surgery. On 2-week DTT, neither the neural tract of the left lower dorsal or ventral ARAS were reconstructed, but these neural tracts were wellreconstructed on 5-week DTT. Lessons: In conclusion, restoration of nonreconstructed neural tracts of the lower ARAS with the resolution of the hematoma and perihematomal edema was demonstrated in a stroke patient, using DTT. PMID:28207526

  11. Pain control for sternal fracture using an ultrasound-guided hematoma block.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sharon R; Price, Daniel D; Penner, Erik

    2010-04-01

    In this case report, an ultrasound-guided hematoma block was performed in the Emergency Department (ED) for immediate and effective pain control in a patient suffering from a sternal fracture. This technique of anesthesia may allow safer and more effective analgesia and a more rapid discharge from the hospital or ED in selected cases.

  12. Subdural Hematomas in Children under 2 Years. Accidental or Inflicted? A 10-Year Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzioumi, Dimitra; Oates, R. Kim

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of 38 children under 2 with subdural hematomas found the most common causes were nonaccidental injury (55%), accidents (39%), and nontraumatic causes (6%). Also, the frequent presence of retinal hemorrhages, bone and rib fractures, delay in presentation, and young age suggests child abuse as the most common cause of these injuries.…

  13. Medical devices; neurological devices; classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-03-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the Near Infrared (NIR) Brain Hematoma Detector into class II (special controls). The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  14. [Orbital subperiosteal hematoma in child with sickle cell thalassemia. A case report].

    PubMed

    Douira-Khomsi, W; Jarraya, M; Ben Hassine, L; Louati, H; Chebbi, A; Lahmar, L; Bouguila, H; Bellagha, I

    2010-08-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common hemoglobinopathy worldwide; its musculoskeletal complications consist more often of medullary infarctions involving long bones. Orbital infarction is uncommon. We report on a case of orbital subperiosteal hematoma in a 9-year-old male with a medical history of sickle cell thalassemia. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Predictive Value of CTA Spot Sign on Hematoma Expansion in Intracerebral Hemorrhage Patients.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wen-Jie; Reis, Cesar; Reis, Haley; Zhang, John; Yang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Hematoma expansion (HE) occurs in approximately one-third of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and leads to high rates of mortality and morbidity. Currently, contrast extravasation within hematoma, termed the spot sign on computed tomography angiography (CTA), has been identified as a strong independent predictor of early hematoma expansion. Past studies indicate that the spot sign is a dynamic entity and is indicative of active hemorrhage. Furthermore, to enhance the spot sign's accuracy of predicting HE, spot parameters observed on CTA or dynamic CTA were used for its quantification. In addition, spot signs detected on multiphase CTA and dynamic CTA are shown to have higher sensitivity and specificity when compared with simple standardized spot sign detection in recent studies. Based on the spot sign, novel methods such as leakage sign and rate of contrast extravasation were explored to redefine HE prediction in combination with clinical characteristics and spot sign on CTA to assist clinical judgment. The spot sign is an accepted independent predictor of active hemorrhage and is used in both secondary intracerebral hemorrhage and the process of surgical assessment for hemorrhagic risk in patients with ischemic stroke. Spot sign predicts patients at high risk for hematoma expansion.

  16. Predictive Value of CTA Spot Sign on Hematoma Expansion in Intracerebral Hemorrhage Patients

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wen-Jie; Reis, Cesar; Reis, Haley

    2017-01-01

    Hematoma expansion (HE) occurs in approximately one-third of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and leads to high rates of mortality and morbidity. Currently, contrast extravasation within hematoma, termed the spot sign on computed tomography angiography (CTA), has been identified as a strong independent predictor of early hematoma expansion. Past studies indicate that the spot sign is a dynamic entity and is indicative of active hemorrhage. Furthermore, to enhance the spot sign's accuracy of predicting HE, spot parameters observed on CTA or dynamic CTA were used for its quantification. In addition, spot signs detected on multiphase CTA and dynamic CTA are shown to have higher sensitivity and specificity when compared with simple standardized spot sign detection in recent studies. Based on the spot sign, novel methods such as leakage sign and rate of contrast extravasation were explored to redefine HE prediction in combination with clinical characteristics and spot sign on CTA to assist clinical judgment. The spot sign is an accepted independent predictor of active hemorrhage and is used in both secondary intracerebral hemorrhage and the process of surgical assessment for hemorrhagic risk in patients with ischemic stroke. Spot sign predicts patients at high risk for hematoma expansion. PMID:28852647

  17. Intracerebral hematoma secondary to lightning stroke: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stanley, L D; Suss, R A

    1985-05-01

    A young boy sustained a lightning stroke to his head. He was rendered immediately unconscious and hemiplegic. Computed tomography revealed three discrete basal ganglia hematomas. This patient's management is discussed, and a review of lightning injuries to the central nervous system is presented.

  18. [Iatrogenic cervical epidural hematoma: case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Jusué-Torres, I; Ortega-Zufiria, J M; Tamarit-Degenhardt, M; Navarro Torres, R; López-Serrano, R; Riqué-Dormido, J; Aragonés-Cabrerizo, P; Gómez-Angulo, J C; Poveda-Nuñez, P; Jerez-Fernández, P; Del Pozo-García, J M

    2011-08-01

    Around 600 spinal epidural hematoma cases have been previously reported. Incidence of paraplegia after epidural anesthesia varies between 0,0005 and 0,02%. Several possible etiologies have been described in the literature, including surgery, trauma, anticoagulant therapy, arteriovenous malformations, pregnancy and lumbar puncture. Spinal and epidural anesthesic procedures represent the tenth most common cause. But in combination with anticoagulant therapy, the forementioned procedures increase its incidence until reaching the fifth most common etiological group. We report the case of an 80 year-old-man with a cervical epidural hematoma who had a good outcome with conservative management. 80 year-old-man that developed intense cervicalgia with lower limbs weakness showing complete paraplegia and arreflexia 2 hours after analgesic treatment with epidural cervical infiltration for cervicoartrosis. Cervical MRI showed epidural cervical hematoma between C4 and T1 levels. The patient is transferred to our facilities in order to perform surgery. But after showing fast recovery, medical conservative management was elected. After one month, the patient's condition has improved showing no neurological deficits and complete resorption is seen in MRI. Nowadays, trend is to perform surgery in patients with spinal hematoma and significant neurological deterioration during the first hours. However, good neurological outcomes can be achieved with conservative management, in well selected patients with non progressive, incomplete and partial deficits. Presently, we can not predict which is the best treatment for each case.

  19. [Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma after stillbirth in hepatosis of pregnancy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Panitz, K; Neundörfer, B; Taglieber, U; Susemihl, D

    1975-02-28

    The case history of a 26-year-old woman with spinal epidural hematoma after the expulsion of a fetus dead in utero and with a slight hepatosis of pregnancy. The case is discussed in the light of the previously known literature.

  20. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report.

  1. Trephination mini-craniectomy for traumatic posterior fossa epidural hematomas in selected pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Han-Song; You, Chao-Guo; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Nu; Lin, Jian; Lin, Fen-Chun; Wang, Mao-De

    2017-08-01

    Posterior fossa epidural hematomas (PFEDH) are uncommon in children but usually require timely surgical intervention due to the risk of life-threatening brainstem compression. We attempt to make the surgical procedure less invasive by treating selected pediatric patients with trephination mini-craniectomy. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical courses, radiological findings, surgical procedures, and prognoses of the pediatric patients who were treated in our departments for traumatic PFEDH from January 2010 to January 2015. During this period, a total of 17 patients were surgically treated for PFEDH and 7 were managed with trephination mini-craniectomy for hematoma evacuation. The outcomes were good in all 7 patients as evaluated with Glasgow Outcome Score. There was no mortality in this series. The on average 30-month clinical follow-up showed that patients experienced satisfactory recoveries without complications. Our results suggest that trephination mini-craniectomy is a safe surgical technique for selected PFEDH patients with moderate hematoma volume and stabilized neurological functions. However, standard craniectomy is recommend when there are rapid deteriorations in patients' neurological functions or the hematomas are large and exerted severe mass effects. Copyright © 2017 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Factors Associated With Neck Hematoma After Thyroidectomy: A Retrospective Analysis Using a Japanese Inpatient Database.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Sayaka; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Saito, Yuki; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-02-01

    To identify risk factors for post-thyroidectomy hematoma requiring airway intervention or surgery ("wound hematoma") and determine post-thyroidectomy time to intervention. Post-thyroidectomy hematoma is rare but potentially lethal. Information on wound hematoma in a nationwide clinical setting is scarce.Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database, we extracted data from records of patients undergoing thyroidectomy from July 2010 to March 2014. Patients with clinical stage IV cancer or those with bilateral neck dissection were excluded because they could have undergone planned tracheotomy on the day of thyroidectomy. We assessed the association between background characteristics and wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy, using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Among 51,968 patients from 880 hospitals, wound hematoma occurred in 920 (1.8%) ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy and in 203 (0.4%) ≥3 days post-thyroidectomy (in-hospital mortality = 0.05%). Factors significantly associated with wound hematoma ≤2 days post-thyroidectomy were male sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30-1.77); higher age (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00-1.02); overweight or obese (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.04-1.44); type of surgery (partial thyroidectomy for benign tumor compared with: total thyroidectomy, benign tumor [OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.45-2.63]; partial thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.00-1.46]; total thyroidectomy, malignant tumor [OR 2.49, 95% CI 1.82-3.49]; and thyroidectomy for Graves disease [OR 3.88, 95% CI 2.59-5.82]); neck dissection (OR, 1.53, 95% CI 1.05-2.23); antithrombotic agents (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.15-2.17); and blood transfusion (OR 5.33, 95% CI 2.39-11.91). Closer monitoring of airway and neck is recommended for patients with risk factors, and further cautious monitoring beyond 3 days post-thyroidectomy.

  3. [Evaluation of computerized tomography-guided stereotactic evacuation of putaminal hematomas by somatosensory evoked potentials].

    PubMed

    Takizawa, T; Sato, S; Sano, A; Murakami, Y; Matsumoto, A; Ohta, K

    1986-04-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) guided stereotactic evacuation of intracerebral hematomas is effective and little invasive treatment at subacute or chronic stage. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) of 23 patients with putaminal hemorrhage whose stereotactic evacuations were performed from day 4 to day 24 are studied about surgical result and CT findings. As for SEP, N20 which is thought to be generated in the thalamus or in the primary parietal area receiving direct projections from the thalamus is used for comparison with functional recovery. Among 12 patients whose N20s before the evacuation showed normal, 9 had good recovery of their hemiplegia. Motor recovery tended to begin quickly after the evacuation and the evacuation of hematomas were thought to make better result than conservative treatment. CT findings of 9 patients with good recovery revealed that the hematomas didn't invade to the internal capsule or invaded to the posterior part of the posterior limb alone. Among 3 patients whose N20s before the evacuation were not distinct and those after the evacuation were normal, 2 had good recovery of their hemiplegia. As those hematomas were relatively large but located laterally, the internal capsule was seem to be not invaded but only compressed. Among 8 patients whose N20s were not distinct both before and after the evacuation, 7 could not get the recovery of their hemiplegia. CT findings of them revealed that the hematomas were large or invaded toward the internal capsule and thalamus. From this study N20s of SEPs are thought to be useful to the decision of indication and the prediction of the functional prognosis about stereotactic evacuation of putaminal hemorrhage.

  4. [Progressive hematoma in anterior neck after endovascular treatment of middle cerebral artery aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ankay Yilbas, Aysun; Kanburoglu, Cigdem; Uzumcugil, Filiz; Cifci, Coskun; Saralp, Ozge Ozen; Karagoz, Heves; Akinci, Seda Banu; Arat, Anil

    2016-12-23

    Cervical hematomas can lead to airway compromise, a life threatening condition, regardless of the cause. The following case is the first presentation of cervical hematoma as a complication of endovascular treatment of middle cerebral artery aneurysm. A 49 year-old woman was scheduled for stent placement under general anesthesia for middle cerebral artery aneurysm. Few days before intervention, acetyl salicylic acid and clopidogrel treatment was started. Following standard monitoring and anesthesia induction, the patient's trachea was intubated with a 7.5mm endotracheal tube and the procedure was completed without any complications. Three hours later, dyspnea developed and physical examination revealed progressive swelling and stiffness in the neck. Endotracheal intubation was performed with a 6mm diameter uncuffed tube with the aid of sedation. The vocal cords were completely closed due to compression. There was no leak around the endotracheal tube. The rapidly performed computerized tomography scans showed an enormous hematoma around the neck and extravasation of contrast medium through superior thyroid artery. After coil embolization of superior thyroid artery, she was taken to the intensive care unit as intubated and sedated. Surgical exploration of the hematoma was not recommended by the surgeons, because she was on clopidogrel. After two days, the patient's trachea was extubated safely ensuring that the swelling was sufficiently ceased and leak detected around the endotracheal tube. Securing the airway rapidly by endotracheal intubation is the most crucial point in the management of cervical hematomas. Diagnostic and therapeutic procedures should be performed only afterwards. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Spontaneous Resolution of Chronic Subdural Hematoma : Close Observation as a Treatment Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Chan; Yoo, Dong Soo; Lee, Sang-Koo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH) is common condition in neurosurgical field. It is difficult to select the treatment modality between the surgical method and the conservative method when patients have no or mild symptoms. The purpose of this study is to provide a suggestion that the patients could be cured with conservative treatment modality. Methods We enrolled 16 patients who had received conservative treatment for cSDH without special medications which could affect hematoma resolution such as mannitol, steroids, tranexamic acid and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. The patients were classified according to the Markwalder's Grading Scale. Results Among these 16 patients, 13 (81.3%) patients showed spontaneously resolved cSDH and 3 (18.7%) patients received surgery due to symptom aggravation and growing hematoma. They were categorized into two groups based on whether they were cured with conservative treatment or not. The first group was the spontaneous resolution group. The second group was the progression-surgery group. The mean hematoma volume in the spontaneous resolution group was 43.1 mL. The mean degree of midline shift in the spontaneous resolution group was 5.3 mm. The mean hematoma volume in the progression-surgery group was 62.0 mL. The mean degree of midline shift in the second group was 6 mm. Conclusion We suggest that the treatment modality should be determined according to the patient's symptoms and clinical condition and close observation could be performed in patients who do not have any symptoms or in patients who have mild to moderate headache without neurological deterioration. PMID:27847578

  6. Comparison of hematoma shape and volume estimates in warfarin versus non-warfarin-related intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Kevin N; Cushing, Tracy A; Wendell, Lauren; Lev, Michael H; Romero, Javier M; Schwab, Kristin; Smith, Eric E; Greenberg, Steven M; Rosand, Jonathan; Goldstein, Joshua N

    2010-02-01

    Hematoma volume is a major determinant of outcome in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Accurate volume measurements are critical for predicting outcome and are thought to be more difficult in patients with oral anticoagulation-related ICH (OAT-ICH) due to a higher frequency of irregular shape. We examined hematoma shape and methods of volume assessment in patients with OAT-ICH. We performed a case-control analysis of a prospectively identified cohort of consecutive patients with ICH. We retrospectively reviewed 50 consecutive patients with OAT-ICH and 50 location-matched non-OAT-ICH controls. Two independent readers analyzed CT scans for hematoma shape and volume using both ABC/2 and ABC/3 methods. Readers were blinded to all clinical variables including warfarin status. Gold-standard ICH volumes were determined using validated computer-assisted planimetry. Within this cohort, median INR in patients with OAT-ICH was 3.2. Initial ICH volume was not significantly different between non-OAT-ICH and OAT-ICH (35 +/- 38 cc vs. 53 +/- 56 cc, P = 0.4). ICH shape did not differ by anticoagulation status (round shape in 10% of OAT-ICH vs. 16% of non-OAT-ICH, P = 0.5). The ABC/3 calculation underestimated median volume by 9 (3-28) cc, while the ABC/2 calculation did so by 4 (0.8-12) cc. Hematoma shape was not statistically significantly different in patients with OAT-ICH. Among bedside approaches, the standard ABC/2 method offers reasonable approximation of hematoma volume in OAT-ICH and non-OAT-ICH.

  7. Intraoperative Gastric Intramural Hematoma: A Rare Complication of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Chan; Ravindranathan, Sharmila; Choksi, Vivek; Kattalan, Jestin Pudussery; Shankar, Uday; Kaplan, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 73 Final Diagnosis: Gastric intramural hematoma Symptoms: Bleeding Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Diagnostic/therapeutic accident Background: Intramural hematomas primarily present in the esophagus or duodenum. We report a case of intramural hematoma in the gastric wall (GIH) secondary to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement in a setting of platelet dysfunction. Case Report: This case study reviews the hospitalization of a 73-year-old male with a history of chronic kidney disease who was admitted for coronary artery bypass graft surgery and mitral valve repair. During his complicated hospital course, he inadvertently required the placement of a PEG tube. His coagulation profile prior to this procedure was within normal limits. The patient had no history of coagulopathy and was taking aspirin 81 mg per day. PEG tube placement was withheld due to an expanding hematoma that was noted at the site of needle insertion in the gastric wall. A single dose of intravenous desmopressin (0.3 microgram/kilogram) was administered under the suspicion of uremic bleeding. No further gastrointestinal bleeding events were observed. A platelet function assay (PFA) and collagen/epinephrine closure time indicated platelet dysfunction. Three days later, we again attempted a PEG tube placement. His PFA prior to this procedure had normalized due to aspirin discontinuation and improvement of renal function. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) showed an area of flat bluish gastric submucosal bruising at the site of the previous hematoma. The PEG tube was placed successfully at an adjacent site. Over the course of the following month, the patient underwent uneventful feeding through the PEG tube. Conclusions: To our knowledge, cases of GIH are rarely documented in literature. Multidisciplinary vigilance is required to maintain a high index of suspicion for this

  8. Distal aortic intramural hematoma: clinical importance of focal contrast enhancement on CT images.

    PubMed

    Park, Gyung-Min; Ahn, Jung-Min; Kim, Dae-Hee; Kang, Joon-Won; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Song, Jae-Kwan

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence, fate, and effect of focal contrast enhancement lesion within the hematoma on contrast material-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) images in patients with distal aortic intramural hematoma (IMH). This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board; informed consent was waived. Clinical and CT data in 107 patients with distal IMH who received medical treatment were analyzed, including remodeling processes of IMH at follow-up CT. IMH progression was defined as development of aortic dissection (AD) and aneurysm or hematoma increase. The frequency of focal contrast enhancement was 39.3%, and hematoma was thicker in patients with focal contrast enhancement than in those without (12.3 mm ± 3.6 [standard deviation] vs 10.1 mm ± 4.1, P = .006). Although development of AD occurred more frequently in patients with focal contrast enhancement (21% vs 3%, P = .006), hematoma resorption (57% vs 71%) was the most common pattern of remodeling in both groups without any significant difference (P = .148). The frequency of development of aortic aneurysm (17% vs 14%, P = .690) and increase of hematoma (0% vs 5%, P = .278) was not significantly different between groups. The 1-, 3-, 5-, and 7-year survival rates were 96.3% ± 1.8, 95.2% ± 2.1, 87.9% ± 3.4, and 80.7% ± 4.4, respectively. Patients with IMH progression showed lower survival rates than those without (P = .028). While no significant difference in the overall survival rates could be demonstrated in patients with and those without focal contrast enhancement (P = .442), our study had only 17% power to detect a difference of 10%. Initial maximal aortic diameter was the only factor associated with survival rates (hazard ratio = 1.129; 95% confidence interval: 1.063, 1.199). The optimal cutoff for prediction of mortality within 7 years was 41 mm. Urgent intervention for patients with focal contrast enhancement is not necessary during the acute stage, and long-term close

  9. Airway management in patients who develop neck hematomas after carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Shakespeare, William A; Lanier, William L; Perkins, William J; Pasternak, Jeffrey J

    2010-02-01

    Progressive airway compromise from neck hematoma and edema is a feared complication of carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Despite this, the relationship of airway management technique to patient outcome has not been systematically studied in this population. We report the rate of successful airway management using various techniques in post-CEA patients. A 10-year retrospective analysis was conducted to identify patients requiring airway management for neck exploration within 72 hours after CEA at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Three thousand two hundred twenty-five patients underwent CEA over a 10-year period at our institution. Forty-four (1.4%) required neck exploration for hematoma, and 42 of these required airway management immediately before neck exploration surgery. (The tracheal tube had not been removed after CEA in the remaining 2 patients.) The average interval between the completion of CEA and return to the operating room for hematoma evacuation was 6.0 +/- 6.0 hours (mean +/- SD; range, <1-32 hours). Fiberoptic airway management, performed before the induction of anesthesia, was successful in 15 of 20 patients (75%) and, in patients in whom fiberoptic tracheal intubation failed, direct laryngoscopy (DL) was successful in all 5 (3 before and 2 after the induction of general anesthesia). In the remaining 22 patients, DL was used as the initial management technique without a trial of fiberoptic intubation. DL was successful in 5 of 7 patients (71%) when performed before induction of general anesthesia and was successful in 13 of 15 patients (87%) when performed after induction of general anesthesia. Hematoma decompression facilitated DL in 3 of 4 failures of DL; tracheostomy was performed in the remaining patient. An arterial site of bleeding was subsequently identified in 36% of patients in whom no difficulty was encountered during laryngoscopy for hematoma evacuation versus 6% in whom difficulty was noted (P = 0.03). In 36 of 44 patients (82%), the tracheal

  10. Outcome and prognostic factors for dogs with a histological diagnosis of splenic hematoma following splenectomy: 35 cases (2001-2013).

    PubMed

    Patten, Steve G; Boston, Sarah E; Monteith, Gabrielle J

    2016-08-01

    Canine splenic hematoma can be indistinguishable from hemangiosarcoma on clinical presentation and grossly at the time of surgery. However, hemangiosarcoma represents an aggressive malignancy and a misdiagnosis of hematoma would forgo indications for chemotherapy. This study describes a long-term follow-up of cases with a histologic diagnosis of splenic hematoma following splenectomy to determine if the clinical course of the disease corroborated the diagnosis. Thirty-five dogs were evaluated to determine survival and prognostic associations with signalment and clinical data. Overall median survival time was 647 days (range: 0 to 3287 days). Statistically significant variables included a palpable abdominal mass during physical examination, sub-clinical coagulopathy, and metastasis. Four cases (11%) had reported evidence of metastasis at the time of euthanasia; 1 case was histologically confirmed. Overall prognosis for splenic hematoma appears excellent, as expected, but a small proportion of cases may have an undiagnosed malignant component.

  11. Outcome and prognostic factors for dogs with a histological diagnosis of splenic hematoma following splenectomy: 35 cases (2001–2013)

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Steve G.; Boston, Sarah E.; Monteith, Gabrielle J.

    2016-01-01

    Canine splenic hematoma can be indistinguishable from hemangiosarcoma on clinical presentation and grossly at the time of surgery. However, hemangiosarcoma represents an aggressive malignancy and a misdiagnosis of hematoma would forgo indications for chemotherapy. This study describes a long-term follow-up of cases with a histologic diagnosis of splenic hematoma following splenectomy to determine if the clinical course of the disease corroborated the diagnosis. Thirty-five dogs were evaluated to determine survival and prognostic associations with signalment and clinical data. Overall median survival time was 647 days (range: 0 to 3287 days). Statistically significant variables included a palpable abdominal mass during physical examination, sub-clinical coagulopathy, and metastasis. Four cases (11%) had reported evidence of metastasis at the time of euthanasia; 1 case was histologically confirmed. Overall prognosis for splenic hematoma appears excellent, as expected, but a small proportion of cases may have an undiagnosed malignant component. PMID:27493283

  12. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in a Case of Colonic Intramural Hematoma After Mild Blunt Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ulysses S; Cesar, Daniel Nicoletti; DʼIppolito, Giuseppe

    Intramural hematomas can occur along any part of the gastrointestinal tract, being more common in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. Intramural colonic hematomas are very rare, and their main causes include abdominal trauma, anticoagulation, and coagulopathies. We report on a 27-year-old man with right lower quadrant pain for 1 day after a mild blunt trauma sustained during a soccer match. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation revealed an intramural hematoma of the right colon, subsequently confirmed and drained through laparoscopic surgery. Although computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings in such a context are scarce in the radiological literature, imaging has an important role in the preoperative diagnosis and evaluation of the extent of bowel hematomas to assist in treatment planning.

  13. Splenic Subcapsular Hematoma After Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in a Liver Transplant Recipient: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Montenovo, Martin; Javed, Emran; Bakthavatsalam, Ramasamy; Reyes, Jorge

    2017-02-01

    Splenic injuries after an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are a rare but lethal complication. We describe a subcapsular splenic hematoma requiring emergent splenectomy after an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in a liver transplant recipient.

  14. Conservatively treated Type B intramural hematoma: Progression into acute aortic dissection followed by spontaneous resolution, assessed by CT.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Guadalupe; Vasaturo, Sabina; Kroft, Lucia J M

    2014-01-01

    This case report shows the full spectrum evolution of type B intramural hematoma under conservative treatment, with initial progression into a true aortic dissection, followed by extremely rare near-complete healing of the dissection at followup.

  15. Conservatively treated Type B intramural hematoma: Progression into acute aortic dissection followed by spontaneous resolution, assessed by CT

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago, Guadalupe; Vasaturo, Sabina; Kroft, Lucia J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This case report shows the full spectrum evolution of type B intramural hematoma under conservative treatment, with initial progression into a true aortic dissection, followed by extremely rare near-complete healing of the dissection at followup. PMID:27186244

  16. Risk factors for neck hematoma after thyroid or parathyroid surgery: ten-year analysis of the nationwide inpatient sample database.

    PubMed

    Dehal, Ahmed; Abbas, Ali; Hussain, Farabi; Johna, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative neck hematoma is a well-known complication of thyroid and parathyroid surgery. Better understanding of risk factors for hematoma formation will help define high-risk populations. To examine possible risk factors for neck hematoma after thyroid or parathyroid surgery. Retrospective analysis of hospital discharge data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis and procedures codes, we identified adults who underwent thyroid or parathyroid surgery and in whom neck hematoma subsequently developed. Information about demographic, clinical, and hospital characteristics was collected. Multivariate regression analyses were used to predict independent risk factors for neck hematoma. We identified 147,344 thyroid and parathyroid operations performed nationwide between 2000 and 2009. Overall incidence of postoperative neck hematoma was 1.5% (n = 2210). In multivariate analysis, age 65 years and older (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4-2.1), male sex (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.2-1.4), African-American race (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2-1.7), being from the South (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1-1.4), comorbidity score of 3 or more (OR = 2, 95% CI = 1.6-2.6), history of alcohol abuse (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.6-2.5), Graves disease (OR = 3, 95% CI = 2.1-4.1), and substernal thyroidectomy (OR = 3.3, 95% CI = 2.8-3.9) were associated with a higher risk of neck hematoma. We identified demographic and clinical factors associated with increased risk of neck hematoma after thyroid or parathyroid surgery.

  17. Perihematomal Edema Is Greater in the Presence of a Spot Sign but Does Not Predict Intracerebral Hematoma Expansion.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Luna, David; Stewart, Teri; Dowlatshahi, Dar; Kosior, Jayme C; Aviv, Richard I; Molina, Carlos A; Silva, Yolanda; Dzialowski, Imanuel; Lum, Cheemun; Czlonkowska, Anna; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Kase, Carlos S; Gubitz, Gord; Bhatia, Rohit; Padma, Vasantha; Roy, Jayanta; Subramaniam, Suresh; Hill, Michael D; Demchuk, Andrew M

    2016-02-01

    Perihematomal edema volume may be related to intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) volume at baseline and, consequently, with hematoma expansion. However, the relationship between perihematomal edema and hematoma expansion has not been well established. We aimed to investigate the relationship among baseline perihematomal edema, the computed tomographic angiography spot sign, hematoma expansion, and clinical outcome in patients with acute ICH. Predicting Hematoma Growth and Outcome in Intracerebral Hemorrhage Using Contrast Bolus CT (PREDICT) was a prospective observational cohort study of ICH patients presenting within 6 hours from onset. Patients underwent computed tomography and computed tomographic angiography scans at baseline and 24-hour computed tomography scan. A post hoc analysis of absolute perihematomal edema and relative perihematomal edema (absolute perihematomal edema divided by ICH) volumes was performed on baseline computed tomography scans (n=353). Primary outcome was significant hematoma expansion (>6 mL or >33%). Secondary outcomes were early neurological deterioration, 90-day mortality, and poor outcome. Absolute perihematomal edema volume was higher in spot sign patients (24.5 [11.5-41.8] versus 12.6 [6.9-22] mL; P<0.001), but it was strongly correlated with ICH volume (ρ=0.905; P<0.001). Patients who experienced significant hematoma expansion had higher absolute perihematomal edema volume (18.4 [10-34.6] versus 11.8 [6.5-22] mL; P<0.001) but similar relative perihematomal edema volume (1.09 [0.89-1.37] versus 1.12 [0.88-1.54]; P=0.400). Absolute perihematomal edema volume and poorer outcomes were higher by tertiles of ICH volume, and perihematomal edema volume did not independently predict significant hematoma expansion. Perihematomal edema volume is greater at baseline in the presence of a spot sign. However, it is strongly correlated with ICH volume and does not independently predict hematoma expansion. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Risk Factors for Neck Hematoma after Thyroid or Parathyroid Surgery: Ten-Year Analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample Database

    PubMed Central

    Dehal, Ahmed; Abbas, Ali; Hussain, Farabi; Johna, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Context: Postoperative neck hematoma is a well-known complication of thyroid and parathyroid surgery. Better understanding of risk factors for hematoma formation will help define high-risk populations. Objective: To examine possible risk factors for neck hematoma after thyroid or parathyroid surgery. Design: Retrospective analysis of hospital discharge data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Methods: Using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis and procedures codes, we identified adults who underwent thyroid or parathyroid surgery and in whom neck hematoma subsequently developed. Information about demographic, clinical, and hospital characteristics was collected. Multivariate regression analyses were used to predict independent risk factors for neck hematoma. Results: We identified 147,344 thyroid and parathyroid operations performed nationwide between 2000 and 2009. Overall incidence of postoperative neck hematoma was 1.5% (n = 2210). In multivariate analysis, age 65 years and older (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4–2.1), male sex (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.2–1.4), African-American race (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2–1.7), being from the South (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1–1.4), comorbidity score of 3 or more (OR = 2, 95% CI = 1.6–2.6), history of alcohol abuse (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.6–2.5), Graves disease (OR = 3, 95% CI = 2.1–4.1), and substernal thyroidectomy (OR = 3.3, 95% CI = 2.8–3.9) were associated with a higher risk of neck hematoma. Conclusion: We identified demographic and clinical factors associated with increased risk of neck hematoma after thyroid or parathyroid surgery. PMID:25663203

  19. The Accuracy of the Spot Sign and the Blend Sign for Predicting Hematoma Expansion in Patients with Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Yu, Zhiyuan; Xu, Zhao; Li, Mou; Wang, Xiaoze; Lin, Sen; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Background Hematoma expansion is associated with poor outcome in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients. The spot sign and the blend sign are reliable tools for predicting hematoma expansion in ICH patients. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of the two signs in the prediction of hematoma expansion. Material/Methods Patients with spontaneous ICH were screened for the presence of the computed tomography angiography (CTA) spot sign and the non-contrast CT (NCCT) blend sign within 6 hours after onset of symptoms. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the spot sign and the blend sign in predicting hematoma expansion were calculated. The accuracy of the spot sign and the blend sign in predicting hematoma expansion was analyzed by receiver-operator analysis. Results A total of 115 patients were enrolled in this study. The spot sign was observed in 25 (21.74%) patients, whereas the blend sign was observed in 22 (19.13%) patients. Of the 28 patients with hematoma expansion, the CTA spot sign was found on admission CT scans in 16 (57.14%) and the NCCT blend sign in 12 (42.86%), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the spot sign for predicting hematoma expansion were 57.14%, 89.66%, 64.00%, and 86.67%, respectively. In contrast, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the blend sign were 42.86%, 88.51%, 54.55%, and 82.80%, respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) of the spot sign was 0.734, which was higher than that of the blend sign (0.657). Conclusions Both the spot sign and the blend sign seemed to be good predictors for hematoma expansion, and the spot sign appeared to have better predictive accuracy. PMID:28498827

  20. The Accuracy of the Spot Sign and the Blend Sign for Predicting Hematoma Expansion in Patients with Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Yu, Zhiyuan; Xu, Zhao; Li, Mou; Wang, Xiaoze; Lin, Sen; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2017-05-12

    BACKGROUND Hematoma expansion is associated with poor outcome in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) patients. The spot sign and the blend sign are reliable tools for predicting hematoma expansion in ICH patients. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of the two signs in the prediction of hematoma expansion. MATERIAL AND METHODS Patients with spontaneous ICH were screened for the presence of the computed tomography angiography (CTA) spot sign and the non-contrast CT (NCCT) blend sign within 6 hours after onset of symptoms. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the spot sign and the blend sign in predicting hematoma expansion were calculated. The accuracy of the spot sign and the blend sign in predicting hematoma expansion was analyzed by receiver-operator analysis. RESULTS A total of 115 patients were enrolled in this study. The spot sign was observed in 25 (21.74%) patients, whereas the blend sign was observed in 22 (19.13%) patients. Of the 28 patients with hematoma expansion, the CTA spot sign was found on admission CT scans in 16 (57.14%) and the NCCT blend sign in 12 (42.86%), respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the spot sign for predicting hematoma expansion were 57.14%, 89.66%, 64.00%, and 86.67%, respectively. In contrast, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the blend sign were 42.86%, 88.51%, 54.55%, and 82.80%, respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) of the spot sign was 0.734, which was higher than that of the blend sign (0.657). CONCLUSIONS Both the spot sign and the blend sign seemed to be good predictors for hematoma expansion, and the spot sign appeared to have better predictive accuracy.

  1. Traumatic pelvic hematoma after a military static-line parachute jump: a case series.

    PubMed

    Barbee, George A; Booms, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    The authors report five cases of pelvic hematoma without associated pelvic fracture after military static-line parachute operations, a significantly underreported injury. The case reports and discussion include initial emergency department presentation, stabilization requirements, and imaging, disposition, and management recommendations. Data were collected retrospectively through review of medical records from a single institution over the course of a single calendar year, 2012-2013. Pelvic hematoma should be strongly considered in the patient with lower abdominal, hip, or pelvic pain after blunt injury from parachute landing fall even in the absence of associated fracture. The cases discussed display this underreported injury and highlight the frequent necessity for admission to a high-acuity care center for close monitoring.

  2. Refractory Spontaneous Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Rare Presentation of an Intracranial Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The author has encountered a 67-year-old man with dural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) presenting as a non-traumatic chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). This previously healthy patient was hospitalized due to progressive headache with subacute onset. He underwent burr-hole surgery twice for evacuating the left CSDH that was thickest at the posterior temporal area. The operative procedure and finding was not extraordinary, but subdural hematoma slowly progressed for days following the revision surgery. After investigation by super-selective external carotid angiography, a dural AVF found near the transverse-sigmoid sinus was diagnosed. Dural AVF was completely occluded with trans-arterial injecting polyvinyl alchol particles into the petrosquamosal branch of the middle meningeal artery. The patient showed a good neurological outcome with no additional intervention. Brain surgeons have to consider the possibility of dural AVF and perform cerebral angiogram if necessary when they manage the cases that have a spontaneously occurred and repeatedly recurring CSDH. PMID:28184348

  3. Can subdural hematoma be a trigger for Guillain-Barré syndrome?

    PubMed

    Yardimci, Nilgul; Gulsen, Salih; Avci, Aynur Yilmaz; Altinors, Nur; Zileli, Turgut; Can, Ufuk

    2009-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute inflammatory polyneuropathy which follows a precipitating event in approximately two thirds of cases. Although its pathogenesis is unclear, it is likely to be a consequence of an immune-mediated process. In the literature there are three case reports of GBS following subarachnoid hemorrhage, subdural hematoma, and facial bone fracture after head trauma.The unique feature of our case with GBS after subdural hematoma is the presence of cerebellar symptoms. We believe that GBS results from an aberrant immune response following trauma that somehow mistakenly attacks the nerve tissue of its host, and we discuss the effects of the trauma of head injury on cellular and humoral immunities and the absence of antiganglioside antibody (anti-GD1b IgG, which is accused of ataxia and cerebellar symptoms) in this case report.

  4. A preliminary study of aquaporin 1 immunolocalization in chronic subdural hematoma membranes.

    PubMed

    Basaldella, Luca; Perin, Alessandro; Orvieto, Enrico; Marton, Elisabetta; Itskevich, David; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Longatti, Pierluigi

    2010-07-01

    Aquaporin 1 (AQP1) is a molecular water channel expressed in many anatomical locations, particularly in epithelial barriers specialized in water transport. The aim of this study was to investigate AQP1 expression in chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) membranes. In this preliminary study, 11 patients with CSDH underwent burr hole craniectomy and drainage. Membrane specimens were stained with a monoclonal antibody targeting AQP1 for immunohistochemical analysis. The endothelial cells of the sinusoid capillaries of the outer membranes exhibited an elevated immunoreactivity to AQP1 antibody compared to the staining intensity of specimens from the inner membrane and normal dura. These findings suggest that the outer membrane might be the source of the increased fluid accumulation responsible for chronic hematoma enlargement.

  5. Spinal Epidural Hematoma After Thrombolysis for Deep Vein Thrombosis with Subsequent Pulmonary Thromboembolism: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Young-Min Kwak, Ho-Sung; Jin, Gong-Young; Chung, Gyung-Ho; Song, Kyung-Jin

    2006-06-15

    A 38-year-old male was initially admitted for left leg swelling. He was diagnosed as having deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the left leg and a pulmonary thromboembolism by contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) with delayed lower extremity CT. The DVT was treated by thrombolysis and a venous stent. Four hours later, he complained of severe back pain and a sensation of separation of his body and lower extremities; he experienced paraplegia early in the morning of the following day. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a spinal epidural hematoma between T11 and L2, which decompressed following surgery. We, therefore, report a case of a spinal epidural hematoma after thrombolysis in a case of DVT with a pulmonary thromboembolism.

  6. A case of idiopathic gastroesophageal submucosal hematoma and its disappearance observed by endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Oe, Shinji; Watanabe, Tatsuyuki; Kume, Keiichiro; Shibata, Michihiko; Hiura, Masaaki; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Harada, Masaru

    2014-06-01

    A 74-year-old man was hospitalized due to hematemesis. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a very large and dark red mass in the cardiac region of the stomach that extended from the upper esophagus. A biopsy specimen showed hemorrhagic tissue and no malignant cells. The tumor-like region ulcerated at 5 days after the administration of intravenous lansoprazole at a dose of 30 mg twice a day and resolved with scar formation at 2 months after a change to oral rabeprazole at a dose of 10 mg/day.We diagnosed the patient with gastroesophageal submucosal hematoma. Gastroesophageal submucosal hematoma is a rare complication. In this case, we could follow the process of its disappearance by endoscopy.

  7. Rivaroxaban-Induced Nontraumatic Spinal Subdural Hematoma: An Uncommon Yet Life-Threatening Complication

    PubMed Central

    Zaarour, Mazen; Hassan, Samer; Thumallapally, Nishitha; Dai, Qun

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the desire for safer oral anticoagulants (OACs) led to the emergence of newer drugs. Available clinical trials demonstrated a lower risk of OACs-associated life-threatening bleeding events, including intracranial hemorrhage, compared to warfarin. Nontraumatic spinal hematoma is an uncommon yet life-threatening neurosurgical emergency that can be associated with the use of these agents. Rivaroxaban, one of the newly approved OACs, is a direct factor Xa inhibitor. To the best of our knowledge, to date, only two published cases report the incidence of rivaroxaban-induced nontraumatic spinal subdural hematoma (SSDH). Our case is the third one described and the first one to involve the cervicothoracic spine. PMID:26543654

  8. Chronic Subdural Hematoma after Eccentric Exercise Using a Vibrating Belt Machine

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hey-Ran; Bae, Hack-Gun

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) in a 75-year-old man after exercise using a vibrating belt machine on the head. He suffered from headache and intermittent left side numbness for ten days. He denied any head injuries except eccentric exercise using a vibrating belt on his own head for 20 days. An MRI revealed bilateral CSDH. The hematoma was isodense on the CT scan. We made burr-holes on the both sides under local anesthesia. We identified the neomembrane and dark red subdural fluid on both sides. In the postoperative CT scan, we found an arachnoid cyst on the left temporal pole. Although the arachnoid cyst itself is asymptomatic, trivial injury such as vibrating the head may cause a CSDH. PMID:24278662

  9. [Chronic subdural hematoma with a markedly fibrous hypertrophic membrane. Case report].

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Kuwana, N; Kojima, Y; Tanaka, N; Kitamura, H

    1990-01-01

    A 40-year-old female, who had taken low-dose oral contraceptives for 2 months before onset, developed transient dysarthria, left hemiparesis, and left hemihypesthesia. One month later, a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a uniformly enhanced, convex-shaped, hypertrophic membrane with a lobulated lumen in the subdural space of the right parietal region. A right parietal craniotomy was performed. The membrane, consisting of elastic-hard, hypertrophic granulation tissue and yellowish, sticky fluid in the lumen, was readily freed and totally extirpated. Subsequently, the patient recovered without persistent symptoms. Light microscopic examination detected the sinusoidal channel layer and the fibrous layer in an alternating configuration, along with intramembranous hemorrhagic foci. Such hypertrophy must have been caused by repeated intramembranous hemorrhages and reactive granulation. Such findings of hematoma membrane have never previously been reported. Thus, this is an interesting case, clearly distinguished from typical chronic subdural hematoma.

  10. [Importance of computerized tomography for surgical treatment of intracranial hematomas (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Diemath, H E

    1982-03-31

    The improved treatment by using computerized tomography (CT) located between operating theater and intensive care unit is reported in comparison of 3,382 patients with severe head injuries. By preoperative use of CT the frequency of diagnosed hematomas was about the same (29.5% before CT; 27.0% with CT) but the preoperative diagnosed multiple hematomas were much more frequent (14.0% resp. 27.0%). The most important advantage however is the saving of time by CT in this localisation by which the chance of survival has increased from 54% to 69%. Without any doubt everywhere in neurotraumatology the CT should be situated as near as possible to the intensive care unit and to the operating theater and should be available 24 hours a day.

  11. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma after abrupt sneezing with prompt recovery of severe paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Štětkářová, Ivana; Jelínková, Lenka; Janík, Vaclav; Peisker, Tomas

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is a rare neurologic condition with threatening consequences when spinal cord compression is present. The diagnosis must be performed quickly using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which shows collection of blood in the epidural space. With spinal cord compression, there is an indication for urgent surgical decompression. Here, we present a 64-year-old woman who developed sudden thoracic and lower back pain accompanied by severe paraparesis and urinary retention after sneezing abruptly. An MRI revealed a posterior thoracic epidural hematoma extending from the T6 to T11 vertebral level with spinal cord compression. Decompression was recommended, but the patient refused surgery, while neurologically improving with time. Complete neurologic recovery was observed within 24 hours after SSEH onset. A conservative therapeutic approach with careful observation may therefore be considered as a treatment of choice in some cases where surgery is refused, (due to high risk or other reasons) and neurologic recovery is early and sustained.

  12. Immunologically restricted patients exhibit a pronounced inflammation and inadequate response to hypoxia in fracture hematomas.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Paula; Gaber, T; Schmidt-Bleek, K; Sentürk, U; Tran, C L; Blankenstein, K; Lütkecosmann, S; Bredahl, J; Schüler, H J; Simon, P; Wassilew, G; Unterhauser, F; Burmester, G R; Schmidmaier, G; Perka, C; Duda, G N; Buttgereit, F

    2011-10-01

    For patients who are known to have an impaired immune system, bone healing is often impaired. Therefore, it has been suggested that an effectively functioning immune system will have an influence on the quality of bone healing. Here, we demonstrate that cells within the fracture hematoma of immunologically restricted patients (1) exhibit a disturbed osteogenic differentiation (normal SPP1 but diminished RUNX2 expression), (2) show a strong inflammatory reaction (high IL8 and CXCR4), and (3) react on local hypoxia (high expression of HIF1A) but with inadequate target gene responses (diminished LDHA and PGK1 expression). Thus, it is already within the early inflammatory phase of fracture healing that the local gene expression in fracture hematomas of immunologically restricted patients points toward a critical regeneration.

  13. Epidural hematoma associated with spinal fracture in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Ryoji; Imagama, Shiro; Satake, Kotaro; Iwase, Toshiki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe the clinical findings, radiographic appearance and surgical treatment of a spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) associated with spinal fracture in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). An 81-year-old male patient injured after falling from a 2.5 m tree presented with severe back pain. On plain radiographs and CT images, DISH with anterolateral osteophytes and fused thoracolumbar vertebrae was found along with a T12 fracture. Patient was initially treated with bed rest followed by placement into a body cast. Three weeks later, he presented with incomplete paraplegia of his lower limbs. CT images did not reveal any fracture displacement, but MRI images showed an epidural hematoma compressing the dura mater. The patient was successfully treated by posterior fixation surgery using pedicle screws and rod with vertebroplasty. We aimed to report a unique case of a SEH complicating a spinal fracture in DISH.

  14. Continuous Suction Drainage of Postoperative Hematoma and Seroma Using Cystofix Device.

    PubMed

    Temiz, Gökhan; Yeşiloğlu, Nebil; Şirinoğlu, Hakan; Yalçin, Sultan; Sarici, Murat; Bozkurt, Mehmet

    2015-12-01

    In this study, an easy and useful method used for the drainage of seroma and hematoma formations occurring after operations requiring extensive tissue undermining is presented. The method utilizes the trocar of the conventional suprapubic urinary catheterization system in combination with the catheter of the negative pressure vacuum drainage system. It provides quick, safe, and painless seroma and hematoma evacuation and can easily be performed in office setting. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each submission to which Evidence-Based Medicine rankings are applicable. This excludes Review Articles, Book Reviews, and manuscripts that concern Basic Science, Animal Studies, Cadaver Studies, and Experimental Studies. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors http://www.springer.com/00266.

  15. Chronic subdural hematoma in a patient with congenital afibrinogenemia successfully treated with fibrinogen replacement.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Naoto; Akamine, Soichi; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Sugiyama, Kenji; Kanayama, Naohiro; Namba, Hiroki

    2011-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman with congenital afibrinogenemia presented with chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) manifesting as severe headache, nausea, and somnolence after a minor head trauma. Brain computed tomography scans showed a right subdural hematoma associated with midline shift. Laboratory studies showed prolongation of prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and undetectably low level of fibrinogen. Until the present episode, she had received plasma-derived fibrinogen concentrate around menstruation and pregnancy. She had also suffered from spinal cord infarction due to vertebral artery occlusion. Burr-hole evacuation and drainage of CSDH was successfully performed using fibrinogen concentrate. The development of CSDH with afibrinogenemia is very rare. Although the past repeated administrations of fibrinogen concentrate were suspected to generate CSDH, paradoxical thrombotic complications caused by upregulation of prothrombin activation, thrombin generation, and growth factors released from platelets might be related to the development of CSDH with congenital afibrinogenemia.

  16. Acute Spinal Subdural Hematoma after Vertebroplasty: A Case Report Emphasizing the Possible Etiologic Role of Venous Congestion.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Tobias A; Rehman, Azeem A; Dinh, Dzung H

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Case report and literature review. Objective Spinal subdural hematomas are rare events that often progress with severe neurologic deficits. Although there have been several case reports in the literature of spontaneous spinal subdural hematomas in the setting of anticoagulation, antiplatelet therapy, or coagulation disorders, the exact pathophysiology of such phenomena remains obscure. Methods We present the first report of a subdural hematoma after a percutaneous vertebroplasty and provide a comprehensive review on the anatomy of venous drainage of the vertebral bodies with emphasis on the possible effects of venous congestion caused by cement obstruction. Results Because the subdural hematoma occurred in the absence of major cement extravasation to the spinal canal and two levels above the site of the vertebroplasty, we discuss the possible role of venous congestion as the main etiologic factor leading to rupture of the fragile, valveless radiculomedullary veins into the subdural space. Conclusions The reported case supports a possible new pathophysiological scheme for the development of spinal subdural hematoma in which venous congestion plays a pivotal etiologic role. The reported findings suggests that future anatomical and histologic studies investigating the response of the radiculomedullary veins to congestive venous hypertension may shed new light into the pathophysiology of spinal subdural hematomas.

  17. Acute Spinal Subdural Hematoma after Vertebroplasty: A Case Report Emphasizing the Possible Etiologic Role of Venous Congestion

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Tobias A.; Rehman, Azeem A.; Dinh, Dzung H.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report and literature review. Objective Spinal subdural hematomas are rare events that often progress with severe neurologic deficits. Although there have been several case reports in the literature of spontaneous spinal subdural hematomas in the setting of anticoagulation, antiplatelet therapy, or coagulation disorders, the exact pathophysiology of such phenomena remains obscure. Methods We present the first report of a subdural hematoma after a percutaneous vertebroplasty and provide a comprehensive review on the anatomy of venous drainage of the vertebral bodies with emphasis on the possible effects of venous congestion caused by cement obstruction. Results Because the subdural hematoma occurred in the absence of major cement extravasation to the spinal canal and two levels above the site of the vertebroplasty, we discuss the possible role of venous congestion as the main etiologic factor leading to rupture of the fragile, valveless radiculomedullary veins into the subdural space. Conclusions The reported case supports a possible new pathophysiological scheme for the development of spinal subdural hematoma in which venous congestion plays a pivotal etiologic role. The reported findings suggests that future anatomical and histologic studies investigating the response of the radiculomedullary veins to congestive venous hypertension may shed new light into the pathophysiology of spinal subdural hematomas. PMID:26430602

  18. [Acute extra-axial hematoma post-traumatic of the clivus].

    PubMed

    Castillo, C; Lambré, H; Meli, F; Boero, A; Lylyk, P

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has amply shown its usefulness for the evaluation of traumatic cranio-encephalic lesions, particularly those involving the posterior fossa, due to the absence of bone artifacts, the availability of multiplanar sections and the greater sensitivity as regards Computerized Tomography (C. T.). We present an MRI examination of an extra-axial hematoma of the clivus in a child with head trauma, not visible on C. T. scans.

  19. HELLP Syndrome Complicated by Subcapsular Hematoma of Liver: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Karateke, Atilla; Silfeler, Dilek; Karateke, Faruk; Kurt, Raziye; Guler, Ayse; Kartal, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Subcapsular liver hematoma (SLH) is a rare complication of severe preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. These patients must be followed up in intensive care unit for advanced medical support with infused fluid, replacement of blood products, and treatment of underlying disorders. There are a lot of therapeutic options varying from conservative management to surgical treatment including hepatic resection, hepatic artery ligation, and liver transplantation. In this report we aimed to present a 26-year-old woman with SLH secondary to HELLP syndrome.

  20. HELLP Syndrome Complicated with Postpartum Subcapsular Ruptured Liver Hematoma and Purtscher-Like Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Cernea, Daniela; Dragoescu, Alice; Novac, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Purtscher's retinopathy is usually associated with trauma, acute pancreatitis, vasculitis, lupus, and bone fractures. It was rarely described postpartum in patients with preeclampsia as well as associated with HELLP syndrome. We present a case of a multiparous patient aged 44 with severe preeclampsia and postpartum HELLP syndrome complicated with Purtscher-like retinopathy and large ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma that required emergency abdominal surgery after premature delivery of a dead fetus. Postsurgical outcome was favorable regarding both liver function and visual acuity.

  1. Intramural hematomas of the gastrointestinal system: a 5-year single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Kones, Osman; Gonenc, Murat; Karabulut, Mehmet; Akarsu, Cevher; Gok, Ilhan; Bozkurt, M. Abdussamet; Ilhan, Mehmet; Alıs, Halil

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although spontaneous intramural hematomas of the gastrointestinal tract are very rare, they may be observed with the use of oral anticoagulant, though less frequently in cases of hematological malignancy and other bleeding disorders. Cases diagnosed as spontaneous intramural hematoma have been assessed in our clinic. Methods The cases, which were diagnosed as spontaneous intramural hematoma in the gastrointestinal tract (SIHGT) following anamnesis, physical examination, biochemical, radiological and endoscopic findings from July 2008 to July 2012, have been assessed retrospectively. Results Seven out of 13 cases were women and the mean age was 65.1 years (34 to 82 years). The most frequent complaint on admission was abdominal pain. The most frequent location of SIHGT was the ileum (n = 8). Oral anticoagulant use was the most common cause of etiology (n = 12). In 10 cases, International normalized ratio values were higher than treatment range (2 to 3, where mechanical valve replacement was 2.5 to 3.5) and mean value was 7.6 (1.70 to 23.13). While 12 cases were discharged without problems with medical treatment, one case with acute myeloid leukemia died in the intensive care unit following cerebrovascular attack. Conclusion Spontaneus bleeding and hematomas that may arise in connection with bleeding diathesis may be fatal in cases with long-term oral anticoagulant treatment and insufficient follow-up. In management of these cases, it may be necessary to arrange conservative follow up and/or initialize low molecular weight heparin, and administer vitamin K as well as replace blood products and coagulation factors when indicated. PMID:23908961

  2. Posttraumatic hematoma of iliacus muscle with paralysis of the femoral nerve.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Anantham, J; Wan, Z

    1992-01-01

    One case of traumatic rupture of the iliacus muscle associated with a femoral nerve paralysis is described. The clinical picture was characterized by posttraumatic gradual worsening of pain in the groin, a tender mass in the iliac fossa, flexion deformity of the hip, and femoral nerve paralysis. The review of literature revealed a description of only nine similar cases. Early evacuation of the hematoma is suggested.

  3. Surgically Confirmed Intra- and Extratesticular Hematoma Clinically Mimicing Epididymo-Orchitis and Radiologically Mimicing Traumatic Torsion

    PubMed Central

    Akay, Sinan; Kaygisiz, Mustafa; Oztas, Muharrem; Turgut, Mustafa Suphi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Scrotal blunt trauma may result in injuries, such as testicular rupture, dislocation, torsion, hematoma, spermatic cord injury or contusion, and epididymal, scrotal, and urethral injuries. Ultrasonography (US) has a crucial role in the evaluation of those kinds of pathologies. Early diagnosis of testicular rupture may lead to the salvaging of the testicle by prompt surgical exploration within 72 h. Case Report A 21-year-old male with right scrotal swelling and pain complaints was admitted to another hospital one month ago. Epididymo-orchitis was diagnosed and the patient was given medical treatment. The patient was admitted to our emergency service with ongoing complaints. The patient stated that the pain and swelling suddenly developed after prolonged marching. On US, a large hematoma was detected between the leaves of the tunica vaginalis, and rupture from the lower pole was diagnosed. On color Doppler US, no vascularity was observed in the heterogeneous testicular parenchyma. Traumatic torsion was primarily suggested. Intraoperatively, an extratesticular hematoma, hematocele, and rupture were confirmed but torsion was not found. Because the hematoma entirely replaced the normal parenchyma, orchiectomy was performed. Conclusions Testicular rupture may occur even after moderate sportive action such as prolonged marching. If any delay occurs in diagnosis and/or operation, the coagulum may replace the entire parenchyma. We think that US and clinical findings may sometimes mislead the physicians and cause misdiagnoses, such as inflammation or torsion. In this paper, we present a complex delayed diagnosed example case of testicular rupture clinically mimicing epididymo-orchitis and radiologically mimicing traumatic testicular torsion. PMID:26600877

  4. No more Doritos and lobster tails: a case report of life-threatening sublingual hematoma.

    PubMed

    Kausar, Huma; Gilani, Javed M; Khan, Omar A

    2009-07-01

    This case report highlights a life-threatening complication of mild hemophilia A. We report the onset of airway compromise through a massive sublingual hematoma in a 67-year-old male suffering from the mild form of hemophilia A. This case emphasizes the need for prompt medical attention and recognition of potentially serious complications of the disease in patients suffering with even mild form of this bleeding diathesis.

  5. Intramural hematoma of the ascending colon leading to intraperitoneal hemorrhage: a possible post-polypectomy complication

    PubMed Central

    Voudoukis, Evangelos; Spiridakis, Konstantinos G.; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Georgiou, Georgios; Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos; Psilakis, Konstantinos; Miliadis, Odysseas; Tribonias, Georgios; Paspatis, Gregorios A.

    2012-01-01

    A 61-year-old male on anticoagulant therapy underwent an endoscopic multiple colon polypectomy in our Department according to established procedures. Several days later he developed an intramural colonic hematoma, which burst into the peritoneal cavity leading to fatal intra-peritoneal hemorrhage. Herein we present the case and discuss the causative role of the anticoagulant therapy but also of the endoscopic procedure per se. PMID:24714100

  6. Intramural hematoma of the ascending colon leading to intraperitoneal hemorrhage: a possible post-polypectomy complication.

    PubMed

    Voudoukis, Evangelos; Spiridakis, Konstantinos G; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Georgiou, Georgios; Kontopodis, Nikolaos; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos; Psilakis, Konstantinos; Miliadis, Odysseas; Tribonias, Georgios; Paspatis, Gregorios A

    2012-01-01

    A 61-year-old male on anticoagulant therapy underwent an endoscopic multiple colon polypectomy in our Department according to established procedures. Several days later he developed an intramural colonic hematoma, which burst into the peritoneal cavity leading to fatal intra-peritoneal hemorrhage. Herein we present the case and discuss the causative role of the anticoagulant therapy but also of the endoscopic procedure per se.

  7. Time interval to surgery and outcomes following the surgical treatment of acute traumatic subdural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Khanna, Arjun; Kwon, Churl-Su; Phillips, H Westley; Nahed, Brian V; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2014-12-01

    Although the pre-surgical management of patients with acute traumatic subdural hematoma prioritizes rapid transport to the operating room, there is conflicting evidence regarding the importance of time interval from injury to surgery with regards to outcomes. We sought to determine the association of surgical timing with outcomes for subdural hematoma. A retrospective review was performed of 522 consecutive patients admitted to a single center from 2006-2012 who underwent emergent craniectomy for acute subdural hematoma. After excluding patients with unknown time of injury, penetrating trauma, concurrent cerebrovascular injury, epidural hematoma, or intraparenchymal hemorrhage greater than 30 mL, there remained 45 patients identified for analysis. Using a multiple regression model, we examined the effect of surgical timing, in addition to other variables on in-hospital mortality (primary outcome), as well as the need for tracheostomy or gastrostomy (secondary outcome). We found that increasing injury severity score (odds ratio [OR] 1.146; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.035-1.270; p=0.009) and age (OR1.066; 95%CI 1.006-1.129; p=0.031) were associated with in-hospital mortality in multivariate analysis. In this model, increasing time to surgery was not associated with mortality, and in fact had a significant effect in decreasing mortality (OR 0.984; 95%CI 0.971-0.997; p=0.018). Premorbid aspirin use was associated with a paradoxical decrease in mortality (OR 0.019; 95%CI 0.001-0.392; p=0.010). In this patient sample, shorter time interval from injury to surgery was not associated with better outcomes. While there are potential confounding factors, these findings support the evaluation of rigorous preoperative resuscitation as a priority in future study.

  8. Intraoperative Gastric Intramural Hematoma: A Rare Complication of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi Chan; Ravindranathan, Sharmila; Choksi, Vivek; Pudussery Kattalan, Jestin; Shankar, Uday; Kaplan, Steven

    2016-12-19

    BACKGROUND Intramural hematomas primarily present in the esophagus or duodenum. We report a case of intramural hematoma in the gastric wall (GIH) secondary to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement in a setting of platelet dysfunction. CASE REPORT This case study reviews the hospitalization of a 73-year-old male with a history of chronic kidney disease who was admitted for coronary artery bypass graft surgery and mitral valve repair. During his complicated hospital course, he inadvertently required the placement of a PEG tube. His coagulation profile prior to this procedure was within normal limits. The patient had no history of coagulopathy and was taking aspirin 81 mg per day. PEG tube placement was withheld due to an expanding hematoma that was noted at the site of needle insertion in the gastric wall. A single dose of intravenous desmopressin (0.3 microgram/kilogram) was administered under the suspicion of uremic bleeding. No further gastrointestinal bleeding events were observed. A platelet function assay (PFA) and collagen/epinephrine closure time indicated platelet dysfunction. Three days later, we again attempted a PEG tube placement. His PFA prior to this procedure had normalized due to aspirin discontinuation and improvement of renal function. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) showed an area of flat bluish gastric submucosal bruising at the site of the previous hematoma. The PEG tube was placed successfully at an adjacent site. Over the course of the following month, the patient underwent uneventful feeding through the PEG tube. CONCLUSIONS To our knowledge, cases of GIH are rarely documented in literature. Multidisciplinary vigilance is required to maintain a high index of suspicion for this complication in patients with uremia or other coagulopathies to aid in prompt diagnosis.

  9. Mini-Craniotomy under Local Anesthesia to Treat Acute Subdural Hematoma in Deteriorating Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo, Alessandro; Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Colasanti, Roberto; Somma, Lucia Giovanna Maria Di; Nocchi, Niccolo; Gladi, Maurizio; Scerrati, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Background and Study Aims Surgical treatment for acute subdural hematomas (ASDHs) in elderly patients is still considered unsatisfactory. Series focusing on the use of conventional craniotomy or decompressive craniectomy in such patients report discouraging results. Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score at admission seems to be crucial in the decision-making process. Deteriorating patients with a GCS score between 9 and 11 are those who would benefit most from the surgical treatment. Unfortunately, elderly patients often present other comorbidities that greatly increase the risk of severe complications after major neurosurgical procedures under general anesthesia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of performing a mini-craniotomy under local anesthesia to treat ASDHs in a select group of elderly patients who were somnolent but still breathing autonomously at admission (GCS 9-11). Material and Methods Twenty-eight elderly patients (age > 75 years) with ASDH and a GCS score at surgery ranging from 9 to 11 were surgically treated under local anesthesia by a single burr-hole mini-craniotomy (transverse diameter 3-5 cm) and hematoma evacuation. At the end of the procedure, an endoscopic inspection of the surgical cavity was performed to look for residual clots that were not visible under direct vision. Results The median operation time was 65 minutes. Hematoma evacuation was complete in 22 cases, complete consciousness recovery was observed in all patients but one, and reoperation was required for two patients. Conclusion Historically, elderly patients with ASDH treated with a traditional craniotomy performed under general anesthesia have not had a good prognosis. Our preliminary experience with this less invasive surgical and anesthesiological approach suggests that somnolent but autonomously breathing elderly patients could benefit from this approach, achieving an adequate hematoma evacuation and bypassing the complications related to

  10. Giant acute epidural hematoma after ventriculoperitoneal shunt: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Noleto, Gustavo; Neville, Iuri Santana; Tavares, Wagner Malagó; Saad, Felippe; Pinto, Fernando Campos; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Paiva, Wellingson Silva

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid over-drainage is a common complication of ventriculoperitoneal devices. In terms of haemorrhage, subdural haematomas are usually more frequent lesions than epidural hematomas, which, more rarely, may also be seen after ventricular shunt procedures and may lead to rapid neurological decline and even death unless a surgical procedure can be promptly performed. This study reports the case of a 47 years-old Dandy Walker man, with clinical condition compatible with the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus submitted to a ventriculoperitoneal shunt with a high fixed pressure valve. After discharge, on the second day after the procedure, he presented with headache and impaired level of consciousness. At hospital admission he was in a coma and anisochoric. Underwent endotracheal intubation and a head CT, showed epidural hematoma. We performed emergency craniotomy to drain the hematoma, the patient died in the operating room despite resuscitation attempts. In conclusion, prompt diagnosis and emergency craniotomy is recommended in these cases. We must be aware of this possible evolution and maintain high suspicion besides a longer in-hospital observation after these procedures.

  11. Idiopathic scrotal hematoma simulating a testicular torsion, in association with cryptorchidism: US findings

    PubMed Central

    Crisci, Vincenzina; Esposito, Ciro; Giurin, Ida; Vitale, Valerio; Vallone, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background An acute scrotum concerns endoscrotal organs (testicles, spermatic cord, tunica vaginalis) and is characterized by pain, swelling and hyperemia of the hemi-scrotum. It represents one of the most common surgical emergencies in children often caused by testicular torsion; the diagnosis is mostly clinical but must be supported by ultrasonographic examination of the scrotal region in association with a colour Doppler study of the spermatic cord vessels and glandular parenchyma. An idiopathic scrotal hematoma is a very rare condition that can simulate it. Case Report A 3-day-old full-term baby, otherwise in good health, showed swelling and pain of the left inguinal-scrotal region. A testicular torsion was suspected, so the baby underwent an ultrasound examination of the testis and spermatic cord that showed a left scrotal hematoma with superior displacement of the didymus; the right testicle was located in the internal inguinal canal. Surgical intervention confirmed the sonographic diagnosis of left testicular hematoma and of the right cryptorchidism. Conclusions Although testicular torsion is the most frequent cause of acute scrotum, the possibility of a persistent idiopathic scrotal haematoma and/or haematoma secondary to a trauma of the inguino-scrotal region, must be always taken into account. US diagnosis can avoid unnecessary emergency surgical treatment, required in case of testicular torsion. PMID:25061495

  12. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma management with minimally invasive surgery through tubular retractors

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chao-Feng; Zhuang, Yuan-Dong; Chen, Chun-Mei; Cai, Gang-Feng; Zhang, Hua-Bin; Zhao, Wei; Ahmada, Said Idrissa; Devi, Ramparsad Doorga; Kibria, Md Golam

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To report a minimally invasive paraspinal approach in the treatment of a case of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH). We additionally aim to review the relevant literature to enhance our knowledge of this disease. SSEH is an uncommon but potentially catastrophic disease. Currently, most appropriate management is emergence decompression laminectomy and hematoma evacuation. An 81-year-old woman was admitted to the neurology department with a chief complaint of bilateral numbness and weakness of the lower limbs and difficulty walking for 4 days with progressive weakness developed over the following 3 days accompanied with pain in the lower limbs and lower back. No history of trauma was reported. Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracolumbar spine demonstrated an epidural hematoma extending from T-12 to L-5 with thecal sac and cauda equina displacement anterior. The patient was treated in our department with a minimally invasive approach. This operation method had been approved by Chinese Independent Ethics Committee. Three months following the operation, the patient had regained the ability to walk with the aid of a cane and myodynamia tests revealed normal results for the left lower limb and a 4/5 grade for the right limb. Importantly, no complications were exhibited from the surgical operation. The minimally invasive paraspinal approach through tubular retractors is demonstrated here as an effective alternative method for the treatment of SSEH. PMID:27367986

  13. Chronic Subdural Hematoma: A Questionnaire Survey of Management Practice in India and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Avanali, Raghunath; Bhadran, Biju; Krishna Kumar, P; Vijayan, Abhishek; Arun, S; Musthafa, Aneeze M; Panchal, Sunil; Gopal, Vinu V

    2016-12-01

    To identify the current management modalities practiced by neurosurgeons in India for chronic subdural hematoma. A questionnaire was prepared for the survey and sent via e-mail to neurosurgeons. It covered the following aspects of managing chronic subdural hematoma: 1) demographic and institutional details; 2) choice of surgical procedure; 3) surgical adjutants such as placing a subdural drain; 4) pre- and postoperative care; and 5) recurrences and management. Responses obtained were entered in a SPSS data sheet and analyzed. Response rate of the survey was 9.3%. The majority of neurosurgeons (75%) preferred to do burr whole drainage for primary chronic subdural hematoma and also for recurrences. Only one third of routinely placed a subdural drain. Considerable practice variations exist for medical and perioperative management. Bedside twist drill drainage, which is effective and less costly than operative room procedures, has not gained popularity in practice. The present survey points towards the importance of making management guidelines for this common neurosurgical entity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Non-traumatic spontaneous acute epidural hematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Serarslan, Yurdal; Aras, Mustafa; Altaş, Murat; Kaya, Hasan; Urfalı, Boran

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old female with sickle cell anemia (SCD) was referred to our hospital after two days of hospitalization at another hospital for a headache crisis. This headache crisis was due to a raised intracranial pressure; these symptoms were noted and included in her comprehensive list of symptoms. There was an acute drop in the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. The cranial CT scan demonstrated a left fronto-parietal acute epidural hematoma (AEH) and a calvarial bone expansion, which was suggestive of medullary hematopoiesis. The patient underwent emergent craniotomy and evacuation of the hematoma. There were no abnormal findings intra-operatively apart from the AEH, except skull thickening and active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries. Repeated CT scan showed a complete evacuation of the hematoma. The possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms were discussed. In addition to the factors mentioned in the relevant literature, any active petechial bleeding from the dural arteries on the separated surface of the dura from the skull could have contributed to the expanding of the AEH in our patient. Neurosurgeons and other health care providers should be aware of spontaneous AEH in patients with SCD. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Subcapsular Hepatic Hematoma After Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Zizzo, Maurizio; Lanaia, Andrea; Barbieri, Italo; Zaghi, Claudia; Bonilauri, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is one of the most frequently performed procedures for the diagnosis and treatment of biliary-pancreatic diseases. ERCP-related complications total around 2.5% to 8%, with a mortality rate ranging from 0.5% to 1%. An exceptional ERCP complication is subcapsular hepatic hematoma, and few cases are reported worldwide.We present the case of a 52-year-old woman with a history of recurring upper abdominal pain and a clinical and ultrasonographic diagnosis of obstructive jaundice due to common bile duct stones. After 2 difficult endoscopic biliary procedures, common bile duct stones clearance was obtained. Post-ERCP course was symptomatic with upper abdominal pain and anemization with hemodynamic instability.CT scan demonstrated a 15 cm × 11 cm subcapsular hepatic hematoma filled with air and liquid on the surface of the right hepatic lobe. The patient was successfully treated with the embolization of a small branch of right hepatic artery angiographically identified as the cause of bleeding.Subcapsular hepatic hematoma after ERCP is a rare complication that must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of symptomatic cases after ERCP. Its diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory data and especially on imaging (ultrasound, CT, or MRI). Treatment is often conservative but, in some cases, embolization or percutaneous drainage or surgery may be necessary.

  16. Massive Intrapelvic Hematoma after a Pubic Ramus Fracture in an Osteoporotic Patient

    SciTech Connect

    Haruki, Funao Takahiro, Koyanagi

    2016-03-24

    An 88-year-old female presented with a left thigh pain and dysuria. She visited our hospital 2 week after she noticed her symptoms. She stated that she might have a low-energy fall, but she could not identify the exact onset. Her radiograph of the pelvis (Figure 1) showed displaced left pubic ramus fracture. Her computed tomographic scanning of the pelvis (Figure 2) showed massive intrapelvic hematoma (axial size, 11 cm by 5 cm) around the fracture site, although she did not use any anticoagulants. Because her bone mineral density was 0.357 g/cm{sup 2}, and T score was -4.8 SD, she started a bisphosphonate therapy. She received a bed-rest physical therapy for 6 weeks, and the hematoma regressed spontaneously. She started full weight bearing after 6 weeks, and walked by a walker after 8 weeks. Although it is extremely rare to develop massive chronic intra-pelvic hematoma after a lowenergy pubic ramus fracture without any use of anticoagulants, it may occur in elderly and severely osteoporotic patient.

  17. Chronic Subdural Hematoma Associated with Thrombocytopenia in a Patient with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Luchuo, Engelbert Bain; Teuwafeu, Denis; Nepetsoun, Ines; Nkouonlack, Cyrille

    2017-01-01

    Hematological abnormalities including thrombocytopenia are common in patients living with HIV infection. Patients with HIV infection related thrombocytopenia present generally with only minor bleeding problems. But cases of subdural hematoma are very rare. A 61-year-old female with a history of HIV infection of 9 years' duration presented with a 3-month history of generalized headache associated with visual blurring and anterograde amnesia. There was no history of trauma or fever. She was treated empirically for cerebral toxoplasmosis for 6 weeks without any improvement of the symptoms. One week prior to admission, she developed weakness of the left side of the body. Clinical examination revealed left-sided hemiparesis. Computed tomography scan of the brain showed a 25 mm chronic right frontoparietotemporal subdural hematoma compressing the lateral ventricle with midline shift. There was no appreciable cerebral atrophy. A complete blood count showed leucopenia and thrombocytopenia at 92,000 cells/mm3. Her CD4-positive cell count was 48 cells/mm3 despite receiving combination antiretroviral therapy for 9 years. A complete blood count analysis suggestive of thrombocytopenia should raise suspicion of possibilities of noninfectious focal brain lesions like subdural hematoma amongst HIV infected patients presenting with nonspecific neurological symptoms. This will enable prompt diagnosis and allow early appropriate intervention. PMID:28168070

  18. Delayed Diagnosis of Pelvic Hematoma without Fracture Due to Military Parachuting.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Cord W; Kotwal, Russ S; Kragh, John F

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. military has been conducting static-line parachute jumps for nearly a century. Beginning with World War II, military forces have also employed full-scale airborne operations as a method for insertion into combat. Through the years, injuries from blunt trauma as a result of static-line parachute jumps have evolved little with the refinement of equipment, training, and tactics. Parachute jumps continue to invoke primarily musculoskeletal injuries, especially to the lower extremities, back, neck, and head. These injuries are usually straightforward in their presentation and diagnosis. We describe the delayed diagnosis of a pelvic hematoma due to an uncommon blunt trauma jump injury. The purpose of this case report is to increase awareness of injury patterns during paratrooper operations, as well as to review the diagnosis and management of occult hemorrhage. Specific objectives for the readers are to (1) know the common injury types and patterns for airborne operations, (2) know the descent rate of T-10C/D parachutes and factors influencing the rate, (3) recognize signs and symptoms associated with a pelvic hematoma, and (4) recognize common complications resulting from a pelvic hematoma.

  19. Giant acute epidural hematoma after ventriculoperitoneal shunt: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Noleto, Gustavo; Neville, Iuri Santana; Tavares, Wagner Malagó; Saad, Felippe; Pinto, Fernando Campos; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Paiva, Wellingson Silva

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid over-drainage is a common complication of ventriculoperitoneal devices. In terms of haemorrhage, subdural haematomas are usually more frequent lesions than epidural hematomas, which, more rarely, may also be seen after ventricular shunt procedures and may lead to rapid neurological decline and even death unless a surgical procedure can be promptly performed. This study reports the case of a 47 years-old Dandy Walker man, with clinical condition compatible with the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus submitted to a ventriculoperitoneal shunt with a high fixed pressure valve. After discharge, on the second day after the procedure, he presented with headache and impaired level of consciousness. At hospital admission he was in a coma and anisochoric. Underwent endotracheal intubation and a head CT, showed epidural hematoma. We performed emergency craniotomy to drain the hematoma, the patient died in the operating room despite resuscitation attempts. In conclusion, prompt diagnosis and emergency craniotomy is recommended in these cases. We must be aware of this possible evolution and maintain high suspicion besides a longer in-hospital observation after these procedures. PMID:25232436

  20. [Right sensory-motor syndrome as the presentation of a spontaneous cervico-thoracic epidural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Castro, M; Egido, J A; Saldaña, C; Andrés, M T

    1998-10-01

    A spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma is an infrequent cause of cord compression. The commonest clinical presentations are with paraparesia and tetraparesia. Transient hemiparesia is very rare and a sensory-motor syndrome is exceptional. A 38 year old man had sudden onset of spontaneous interscapular vertebral pain with bilateral root radiation. A few minutes later he started to have weakness and sensory loss in his right limbs. On clinical examination there was pain on pressure over the spinal apophyses of the T4 and T5 vertebrae, hemiparesia and hemi-hypoalgesia of the right limbs. After ten hours this had all returned to normal. MRI of the cord showed an epidural hematoma extending from C6 to T2. Coagulation studies and spinal arteriography were normal. The sensory motor syndrome is an unusual form of presentation of a spontaneous cervico-thoracic epidural hematoma. Root pain is a symptom of great value for orientation of a syndrome which would otherwise seem to be of central origin. The explanation for this clinical findings may be compression of both lateral cord pathways due to their particular blood distribution. Regarding therapeutic approach, this should be conservative, with close observation to see whether it will resolve spontaneously in a short period of time.

  1. [Anesthetic management for a patient with chronic expanding hematoma of the thorax associated with respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Kurotaki, Kenji; Yoshida, Akiko; Ito, Yosuke; Nagaya, Kei

    2015-01-01

    Chronic expanding hematoma (CEH) of the thorax is an intractable disease which induces long-standing growing hematoma after tuberculosis or thoracic surgery. It causes respiratory failure and heart failure by compressing the mediastinum. A 68-year-old man with a history of tuberculosis during childhood had suffered from progressive exertional dyspnea for 20 years. Because a huge hematoma occupying whole right thoracic cavity compressed the heart and the trachea to the left, he was scheduled for extrapleural pneumonectomy. Bronchial arterial embolization was performed preoperatively to prevent hemoptysis and reduce intraoperative blood loss. There was no problem in the airway management using a double lumen endotracheal tube. However, severe hypotension and a decrease in cardiac index were observed due to excessive bleeding, leading to total blood loss of 11,000 g. In addition, surgical manipulation caused abrupt severe hypotension. Monitoring of arterial pressure-based cardiac output and deep body temperature was useful for the hemodynamic management during the operation. The successful postoperative course resulted in remarkable improvement of Huge-Jones dyspnea criteria from IV to II. In the anesthetic management of CEH precautions should be taken against the excessive intraoperative bleeding and abrupt hemodynamic changes.

  2. Full-endoscopic interlaminar removal of chronic lumbar epidural hematoma after spinal manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yen-Po; Lee, Kwo-Whei; Lin, Ping-Yi; Huang, Abel Po-Hao; Cheng, Chun-Yuan; Ma, Hsin-I; Chen, Chien-Min; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spinal manipulation is widely used for low back pain treatments. Complications associated with spinal manipulation are seen. Lumbar epidural hematoma (EDH) is one of the complications reported in the literature. If lumbar chronic EDH symptoms are present, which are similar to those of a herniated nucleus pulposus, surgery may be considered if medical treatment fails. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy utilizing an interlaminar approach can be successfully applied to those with herniated nucleus pulposus. We use the same technique to remove the lumbar chronic EDH, which is the first documented report in the related literature. Methods: We present a case with chronic lumbar EDH associated with spinal manipulation. Neurologic deficits were noted on physical examination. We arranged for a full-endoscopic interlaminar approach to remove the hematoma for the patient with the rigid endoscopy (Vertebris system; Richard Wolf, Knittlingen, Germany). Results: After surgery, the patient's radiculopathy immediately began to disappear. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up 10 days after the surgery revealed no residual hematoma. No complications were noted during the outpatient department follow up. Conclusions: Lumbar EDH is a possible complication of spinal manipulation. Patient experiencing rapidly progressive neurologic deficit require early surgical evacuation, while conservative treatment may only be applied to those with mild symptoms. A percutaneous full-endoscopic interlaminar approach may be a viable alternative for the treatment of those with chronic EDH with progressive neurologic deficits. PMID:24872917

  3. Surgical Management of Traumatic Acute Subdural Hematoma in Adults: A Review

    PubMed Central

    KARIBE, Hiroshi; HAYASHI, Toshiaki; HIRANO, Takayuki; KAMEYAMA, Motonobu; NAKAGAWA, Atsuhiro; TOMINAGA, Teiji

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is a major clinical entity in traumatic brain injury (TBI). It acts as a space occupying lesion to increase intracranial pressure, and is often complicated by co-existing lesions, and is modified by cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes, coagulopathy, and delayed hematomas. Because of its complicated pathophysiology, the mortality of ASDH is still remaining high. In this review article, its epidemiology, pathophyiology, surgical treatment, and salvage ability are described. With regard to epidemiology, as the population ages, growing number of elderly patients with ASDH, especially patients with prehospital anticoagulant and antiplatelets, increase. Concerning pathophysiology, in addition to well-known initial intracranial hypertension and subsequent ischemia, delayed hyperemia/hyperperfusion, or delayed hematoma is being recognized frequently in recent years. However, optimal treatments for these delayed phenomenons have not been established yet. With regard to surgical procedures, all of craniotomy, decompressive craniectomy, and initial trephination strategies seem to be effective, but superiority of each procedure have not been established yet. Since Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, age, papillary reaction, and computed tomographic findings are strongly correlated to outcome, each factor has been investigated as an indicator of salvage ability. None of them, however, has been defined as such one. In future studies, epidemiological changes as population ages, management of delayed pathophysiology, superiority of each surgical procedures, and salvage ability should be addressed. PMID:25367584

  4. Local skull trephination before transfer is associated with favorable outcomes in cerebral herniation from epidural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Nelson, James A

    2011-01-01

    The patient with epidural hematoma and cerebral herniation has a good prognosis with immediate drainage, but a poor prognosis with delay to decompression. Such patients who present to nonneurosurgical hospitals are commonly transferred without drainage to the nearest neurosurgical center. This practice has never been demonstrated to be the safest approach to treating these patients. A significant minority of emergency physicians (EPs) have advised and taught bedside burr hole drainage or skull trephination before transfer for herniating patients. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of nonneurosurgeon drainage on neurologic outcome in patients with cerebral herniation from epidural hematoma. A structured literature review was performed using EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the Emergency Medicine Abstracts database. No evidence meeting methodologic criteria was found describing outcomes in patients transferred without decompressive procedures. For patients receiving local drainage before transfer, 100% had favorable outcomes. Although the total number of patients is small and the population highly selected, the natural history of cerebral herniation from epidural hematoma and the best available evidence suggests that herniating patients have improved outcomes with drainage procedures before transport. © 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  5. Rare complication after a transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy: a giant retroperitoneal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Chiancone, Francesco; Mirone, Vincenzo; Fedelini, Maurizio; Meccariello, Clemente; Pucci, Luigi; Carrino, Maurizio; Fedelini, Paolo

    2016-05-24

    Common complications related to transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostatic needle biopsy are hematuria, hematospermia, and hematochezia. To the best of our knowledge, we report the second case of a very large hematoma extending from the pelvis into the retroperitoneal space in literature.A 66-year-old man with a serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of 5.4 ng/ml was admitted to our department for a TRUS-guided prostatic needle biopsy. Laboratory values on the day before biopsy, including coagulation studies, were all normal. The patients did not take any anticoagulant drugs. No immediate complications were encountered. Nevertheless, 7 hours after the biopsy, the patient reached our emergency department with severe diffuse abdominal pain, hypotension, tachycardia, and confusional state. He underwent an ultrasonography and then a computed tomography (CT) scan that showed "a blood collection in the pelvis that extending to the lower pole of left kidney associated with a focus of active contrast extravasation, indicating active ongoing prostate bleeding." Consequently, he underwent a diagnostic angiography that showed no more contrast extravasation, without the need of embolization. Management of hematoma has been conservative and hematoma was completely reabsorbed 4 months later.

  6. Low-density lipoprotein and intracerebral hematoma expansion in daily alcohol users.

    PubMed

    Pletsch, Gayle R; Boehme, Amelia K; Albright, Karen C; Burns, Christopher; Beasley, T Mark; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that the intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) rate correlates with alcohol consumption. Alcohol leads to elevated blood pressure (BP) and inhibition of platelet aggregation. These factors could promote excessive bleeding. To our knowledge, in the setting of normal liver function tests, there are no studies that have systematically evaluated the relationship between daily alcohol use and hematoma expansion. The aim of this study is to compare the baseline ICH characteristics, frequency of hematoma expansion, and outcomes in patients with ICH who are daily alcohol users with those who are not daily alcohol users. A retrospective chart review was performed on consecutive patients who presented from July 2008 to July 2013 to the Tulane University Hospital in New Orleans, La., USA, with a spontaneous ICH. Ninety-nine patients who met these criteria were admitted. Patients who underwent hematoma evacuation were excluded. Hemorrhage volumes were calculated based on the ABC/2 method. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was dichotomized into low (<100 mg/dl) and high (≥100 mg/dl) values. Comparisons were made using t tests, χ(2) and nonparametric equivalents where appropriate. ICH growth in 24 h and LDL were evaluated using linear regression. Of the 226 patients who met inclusion criteria, 20.4% had a history of daily alcohol use. The average age was 61 years (range 19-94), 55.6% of the patients were males, and 67.1% were of African American origin. Daily alcohol use was associated with male gender, lower rate of home antihypertensive, higher presenting BP, and lower platelet counts, but there was no difference in ICH characteristics, ICH growth, or clinical outcome. Daily alcohol use in patients with a low LDL level was associated with supratentorial location and trends for lower baseline Glasgow Coma Scale score, higher ICH score, and follow-up ICH volume, but no significant difference in significant hematoma expansion or clinical outcome except for

  7. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Concentration in Chronic Subdural Hematoma Fluid Is Related to Computed Tomography Appearance and Exudation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Ralf; Hohenstein, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Chronic subdural hematoma (CSH) is characterized by a net increase of volume over time. Major underlying mechanisms appear to be hemorrhagic episodes and a continuous exudation, which may be studied using labeled proteins to yield an exudation rate in a given patient. We tested the hypothesis that the concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in hematoma fluid correlates with the rate of exudation. Concentration of VEGF was determined in 51 consecutive patients with CSH by the sandwich immune enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. Mean values were correlated with exudation rates taken from the literature according to the appearance of CSH on computed tomography (CT) images. The CT appearance of each CSH was classified as hypodense, isodense, hyperdense, or mixed density. Mean VEGF concentration was highest in mixed-density hematomas (22,403±4173 pg/mL; mean±standard error of the mean; n=27), followed by isodense (9715±1287 pg/mL; n=9) and hypodense (5955±610 pg/mL; n=18) hematomas. Only 1 patient with hyperdense hematoma fulfilled the inclusion criteria, and the concentration of VEGF found in this patient was 24,200 pg/mL. There was a statistically significant correlation between VEGF concentrations and exudation rates in the four classes of CT appearance (r=0.98). The current report is the first to suggest a pathophysiological link between the VEGF concentration and the exudation rate underlying the steady increase of hematoma volume and CT appearance.With this finding, the current report adds another piece of evidence in favor of the pathophysiological role of VEGF in the development of CSH, including mechanisms contributing to hematoma growth and CT appearance. PMID:24245657

  8. Risk of Epidural Hematoma after Neuraxial Techniques in Thrombocytopenic Parturients: A Report from the Multicenter Perioperative Outcomes Group.

    PubMed

    Lee, Linden O; Bateman, Brian T; Kheterpal, Sachin; Klumpner, Thomas T; Housey, Michelle; Aziz, Michael F; Hand, Karen W; MacEachern, Mark; Goodier, Christopher G; Bernstein, Jeffrey; Bauer, Melissa E

    2017-06-01

    Thrombocytopenia has been considered a relative or even absolute contraindication to neuraxial techniques due to the risk of epidural hematoma. There is limited literature to estimate the risk of epidural hematoma in thrombocytopenic parturients. The authors reviewed a large perioperative database and performed a systematic review to further define the risk of epidural hematoma requiring surgical decompression in this population. The authors performed a retrospective cohort study using the Multicenter Perioperative Outcomes Group database to identify thrombocytopenic parturients who received a neuraxial technique and to estimate the risk of epidural hematoma. Patients were stratified by platelet count, and those requiring surgical decompression were identified. A systematic review was performed, and risk estimates were combined with those from the existing literature. A total of 573 parturients with a platelet count less than 100,000 mm who received a neuraxial technique across 14 institutions were identified in the Multicenter Perioperative Outcomes Group database, and a total of 1,524 parturients were identified after combining the data from the systematic review. No cases of epidural hematoma requiring surgical decompression were observed. The upper bound of the 95% CI for the risk of epidural hematoma for a platelet count of 0 to 49,000 mm is 11%, for 50,000 to 69,000 mm is 3%, and for 70,000 to 100,000 mm is 0.2%. The number of thrombocytopenic parturients in the literature who received neuraxial techniques without complication has been significantly increased. The risk of epidural hematoma associated with neuraxial techniques in parturients at a platelet count less than 70,000 mm remains poorly defined due to limited observations.

  9. Spontaneous cervical epidural hematomas with acute hemiparesis should be considered a contraindication for intravenous thrombolysis: a case report with a literature review of 50 cases.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hirotaka; Takai, Keisuke; Taniguchi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 63-year-old woman with an acute spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma who presented with acute hemiparesis and was successfully managed with surgery. Based on a literature review of 50 cases of spontaneous cervical epidural hematomas, we concluded that the relatively high frequency of hemiparesis (12 of 50 cases, 24%) is the result of the fact that epidural hematomas are predominantly distributed dorsolaterally in the region of the mid and lower cervical spine, leading to unilateral cervical cord compression. Clinicians should keep in mind that acute hemiparesis can be caused by spontaneous cervical epidural hematomas for which intravenous thrombolysis is contraindicated.

  10. Elucidation of the role of biological factors and device design in cerebral NIRS using an in vivo hematoma model based on high-intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianting; Huang, Stanley; Myers, Matthew; Chen, Yu; Welle, Cristin; Pfefer, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) is an emerging medical countermeasure for rapid, field detection of hematomas caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI). Bench and animal tests to determine NIRS sensitivity and specificity are needed. However, current animal models involving non-invasively induced, localized neural damage are limited. We investigated an in vivo murine hematoma model in which cerebral hemorrhage was induced noninvasively by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) with calibrated positioning and parameters. To characterize the morphology of induced hematomas, we used skull-intact histological evaluation. A multi-wavelength fiber-optic NIRS system with three source-detector separation distances was used to detect hematoma A 1.1 MHz transducer produced consistent small-to-medium hematoma localized to a single hemisphere, along with bruising of the scalp, with a low mortality rate. A 220 kHz transducer produced larger, more diffuse hematomas, with higher variability in size and a correspondingly higher mortality rate. No skin bruising or blood accumulation between the skin and skull was observed following injury application with the 220 kHz transducer. Histological analysis showed higher sensitivity for larger hematomas (>4x4 mm2). NIRS optical density change after HIFU was able to detect all hematomas, with sensitivity dependent on wavelength and separation distance. While improvements in methods for validating cerebral blood distribution are needed, the HIFU hematoma model provided useful insights that will inform development of biologically relevant, performance test methods for cerebral NIRS systems.

  11. [Evaluation of the hypertensive intracerebral hematoma based on the study on long-term outcome--Part I. Mode of hematoma extension and its clinical significance in putaminal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Kanno, T; Nagata, J; Hoshino, M; Nakagawa, T; Chaudhari, M; Sano, H; Katada, K

    1986-09-01

    A retrospective analysis of our series of 355 cases of putaminal hemorrhage revealed some interesting aspects of its pathogenesis. All the cases were studied in detail with special attention to clinical presentation, diagnostic findings and the long-term clinical outcome. Role of surgery in management of putaminal hemorrhage is still controversial. Inability to form proper useful classification has been one of the reasons responsible for this controversy. A new classification is formulated which divides putaminal hemorrhage into four types. Mild type has hematoma localized to external capsule while moderate type shows hematoma extension to corona radiata from external capsule. In severe type, hematoma extends to internal capsule also while in very severe type it further extends to midbrain. These four types could be very well correlated to long-term clinical outcome. Accessory hematoma is discussed in detail. It is found to be more common in severe and very severe types. Its presence in mild or moderate types results in worse clinical outcome. Hypertension (BP greater than 200 mm of Hg) may play an important role in further extension of hematoma.

  12. Routine use of ultrasound guidance in femoral arterial access for peripheral vascular intervention decreases groin hematoma rates.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Jeffrey; Eslami, Mohammad; Gillespie, David; Schermerhorn, Marc; Rybin, Denis; Doros, Gheorghe; Farber, Alik

    2015-05-01

    Use of fluoroscopy and bone landmarks to guide percutaneous common femoral artery (CFA) access has decreased access site complications compared with palpation alone. However, only limited case series have examined the benefits of ultrasound to guide CFA access during peripheral vascular intervention (PVI). We evaluated the effect of routine vs selective use of ultrasound guidance (UG) on groin hematoma rates after PVI. The Vascular Study Group of New England database (2010-2014) was queried to identify the complication of postprocedural groin hematoma after 7359 PVIs performed through CFA access. Hematoma (including pseudoaneurysms) was defined as minor (requiring compression or observation), moderate (requiring transfusion or thrombin injection), and major (requiring operation). Both procedure-level and interventionalist-level analyses were performed. Multivariable Poisson regression models were used to compare hematoma rates of interventionalists based on routine (≥80% of PVIs) and selective (<80%) utilization of UG in the adjusted overall sample and in multiple subgroups. The overall postprocedural groin hematoma rate after PVI was 4.5%, and the rate of combined moderate and major hematoma was 0.8%. Among 114 interventionalists with ≥10 PVI procedures, routine and selective UG was used by 31 (27%) and 83 (73%) interventionalists, respectively. Routine UG was protective against hematoma (rate ratio [RR], 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.46-0.84; P < .01). Subgroup analysis revealed that routine UG was also protective against hematoma under the following circumstances: age >80 years (RR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.27-0.85; P = .01), body mass index ≥30 (RR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.29-0.90; P = .02), and sheath size >6F (RR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.23-0.79; P < .01). Routine UG may potentially protect against the complication of hematoma for both modifiable and nonmodifiable patient and procedural characteristics. Encouraging routine UG is a feasible quality improvement

  13. Spot sign on 90 second delayed CTA improves sensitivity for hematoma expansion and mortality: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ciura, Viesha A.; Brouwers, H. Bart; Pizzolato, Raffaella; Ortiz, Claudia J.; Rosand, Jonathan; Goldstein, Joshua; Greenberg, Steven M.; Pomerantz, Stuart R; Gonzalez, R. Gilberto; Romero, Javier M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The CTA spot sign is a validated biomarker for poor outcome and hematoma expansion in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The spot sign has proven to be a dynamic entity, with multimodal imaging proving to be of additional value. We investigated whether the addition of a 90 second delayed CTA acquisition would capture additional ICH patients with the spot sign and increase the sensitivity of the spot sign. Methods We prospectively enrolled consecutive ICH patients undergoing first pass and 90 second delayed CTA over 18 months at a single academic center. Uni- and multivariate logistic regression were performed to assess clinical and neuroimaging covariates for relationship with hematoma expansion and mortality. Results Sensitivity of the spot sign for hematoma expansion on first pass CTA was 55%, which increased to 64% if the spot sign was present on either CTA acquisition. In multivariate analysis the spot sign presence was associated with significant hematoma expansion: odds ratio (OR) 17.7 (95% CI 3.7-84.2, p=0.0004), 8.3 (95% CI 2.0-33.4, p=0.004), and 12.0 (95% CI 2.9-50.5, p=0.0008) if present on first pass, delayed, or either CTA acquisition respectively. Spot sign presence on either acquisitions was also significant for mortality. Conclusions We demonstrate improved sensitivity for predicting hematoma expansion and poor outcome by adding a 90 second delayed CTA, which may enhance selection of patients that may benefit from hemostatic therapy. PMID:25300974

  14. On-site Rapid Diagnosis of Intracranial Hematoma using Portable Multi-slice Microwave Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Mobashsher, Ahmed Toaha; Abbosh, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Rapid, on-the-spot diagnostic and monitoring systems are vital for the survival of patients with intracranial hematoma, as their conditions drastically deteriorate with time. To address the limited accessibility, high costs and static structure of currently used MRI and CT scanners, a portable non-invasive multi-slice microwave imaging system is presented for accurate 3D localization of hematoma inside human head. This diagnostic system provides fast data acquisition and imaging compared to the existing systems by means of a compact array of low-profile, unidirectional antennas with wideband operation. The 3D printed low-cost and portable system can be installed in an ambulance for rapid on-site diagnosis by paramedics. In this paper, the multi-slice head imaging system’s operating principle is numerically analysed and experimentally validated on realistic head phantoms. Quantitative analyses demonstrate that the multi-slice head imaging system is able to generate better quality reconstructed images providing 70% higher average signal to clutter ratio, 25% enhanced maximum signal to clutter ratio and with around 60% hematoma target localization compared to the previous head imaging systems. Nevertheless, numerical and experimental results demonstrate that previous reported 2D imaging systems are vulnerable to localization error, which is overcome in the presented multi-slice 3D imaging system. The non-ionizing system, which uses safe levels of very low microwave power, is also tested on human subjects. Results of realistic phantom and subjects demonstrate the feasibility of the system in future preclinical trials. PMID:27897197

  15. Blood Aggravates Histological and Functional Damage after Acute Subdural Hematoma in Rats.

    PubMed

    Jussen, Daniel; Krenzlin, Harald; Papaioannou, Chrysostomos; Ens, Swetlana; Kempski, Oliver; Alessandri, Beat

    2017-02-15

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Whether the volume effect of the hematoma and increase of intracranial pressure (ICP) or the local effect of blood are responsible for this severe pathophysiology is unclear. Therefore, we compared subdural infusion of autologous blood and paraffin oil in a rat model of ASDH. In a histological study, we investigated the effects on acute ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), cerebral blood flow (CBF), tissue oxygen changes, and brain damage at 2, 24, and 96 h post-infusion. Inflammatory reaction was analyzed by immuno-staining for microglia (ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 [Iba1]) and activated astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP]). Besides acute ICP and CBF changes, we investigated the development of behavior (neuroscore and beamwalk test) for up to 4 days after injury in a behavioral study. Despite comparably increased ICP, there was a more pronounced lesion growth in the blood infusion group during the first 96 h. Further, there was an increased peri-lesional immunoreactive area of Iba1 and GFAP 96 h post-infusion, primarily in the blood infusion group, whereas hippocampal damage was comparable in both infusion groups. In the behavioral evaluation, paraffin-infused animals showed a better recovery, compared with the blood infusion group. In conclusion, comparable acute time-course of ICP, CPP, and CBF clearly indicates that the differences in lesion size, inflammatory reaction, and behavioral deficits after blood- and paraffin oil-induced ASDH are partially due to blood constituents. Therefore, current data suggest that subdural hematomas should be completely removed as quickly as possible; decompression alone may not be sufficient to prevent secondary brain damage.

  16. Surgical treatment for ruptured dural arteriovenous fistula with large intracranial hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xianwang; Wang, Haifeng; Huang, Yi; Zhou, Shengjun; Gao, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The rupture of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) is a serious complication endangering the lives of patients. It is difficult to treat such ruptured DAVF with large intracranial hematoma since lacking of early diagnostic methods. Meanwhile, there was no consensus of how to surgically treat these patients in early stage. In this study, we tried to use 4D-CTA to diagnose DAVF and guide surgical treatment. Based on the result of 4D-CTA, we attempted to eliminate DAVF at the same time we removed hematoma. The result was encouraging. 7 patients with ruptured DAVF presented as large spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage were included in this research between May, 2010 and August, 2012 in our hospital. 4D-CTA was performed in all cases. All results of 4D-CTA inspections were studied by both neurosurgeon and neuroradiologist. The therapeutic options were evaluated based on the clinical and angiographic results. All fistulas of seven patients were eliminated at the same time the hematoma being evacuated. 4D-CTA was sufficient for detecting and recognizing basic vessel angioarchitecture of DAVF to guide surgical treatment. Main arterial supplies, fistula location and CVDs found during surgery are consistent with the results 4D-CTA. All seven cases achieved completely fistula occlusion in operation without new neurological complication. We favor one stage surgical treatment for ruptured DAVF with large intracranial hemorrhage. 4D-CTA plays an important role in preoperative emergent inspection for its safety, rapidity and accuracy. However, it still needs further and larger investigations to optimize such treatment methods and to find out other potential risks. PMID:25664027

  17. Acute aortic intramural hematoma: an analysis from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kevin M; Braverman, Alan C; Eagle, Kim A; Woznicki, Elise M; Pyeritz, Reed E; Myrmel, Truls; Peterson, Mark D; Voehringer, Matthias; Fattori, Rossella; Januzzi, James L; Gilon, Dan; Montgomery, Daniel G; Nienaber, Christoph A; Trimarchi, Santi; Isselbacher, Eric M; Evangelista, Arturo

    2012-09-11

    Acute aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) is an important subgroup of aortic dissection, and controversy surrounds appropriate management. Patients with acute aortic syndromes in the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (1996-2011) were evaluated to examine differences between patients (based on the initial imaging test) with IMH or classic dissection (AD). Of 2830 patients, 178 had IMH (64 type A [42%], 90 type B [58%], and 24 arch). Patients with IMH were older and presented with similar symptoms, such as severe pain. Patients with type A IMH were less likely to present with aortic regurgitation or pulse deficits and were more likely to have periaortic hematoma and pericardial effusion. Although type A IMH and AD were managed medically infrequently, type B IMH were more frequently treated medically. Overall in-hospital mortality was not statistically different for type A IMH compared to AD (26.6% versus 26.5%; P=0.998); type A IMH managed medically had significant mortality (40.0%), although less than classic AD (61.8%; P=0.195). Patients with type B IMH had a hospital mortality that was less but did not differ significantly (4.4% versus 11.1%; P=0.062) from classic AD. One-year mortality was not significantly different between AD and IMH. Acute IMH has similar presentation to classic AD but is more frequently complicated with pericardial effusions and periaortic hematoma. Patients with IMH have a mortality that does not differ statistically from those with classic AD. A small subgroup of type A IMH patients are managed medically and have a significant in-hospital mortality.

  18. Evidence-based assessment of well-established interventions: the parachute and the epidural hematoma.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kyle S; Brearley, Ann M; Haines, Stephen J

    2014-11-01

    The methods of evidence-based medicine are a relatively recent development in the understanding of clinical practice. They are criticized as not providing support for interventions long held to be highly effective based on experience that predated the availability of evidence-based analysis. To determine if the methods of evidence-based medicine can be successfully applied to interventions established before those methods were developed. Systematic review of English language literature on the natural history and treated prognosis of acute epidural hematoma and analysis of existing data on mortality associated with parachute use. Sources of data included Medline, Old Medline, Science Citation Index, British and US Parachute Associations, and Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board databases (both of the United States). Also included were national databases reporting mortality and total number of parachute uses. The estimated mortality of falling from an airplane with an ineffective parachute is 74% (69-79). Mortality associated with effective parachute deployment is between 0.0011% and 0.0017%. For acute epidural hematoma, estimated mortality is 98.54% (95.1-99.9) without treatment and 12.9% (10.5-15.3) with treatment. The number needed to treat to prevent 1 death for the parachute is estimated to be 1.35 (1.27-1.45) and for epidural hematoma 1.17 (1.13-1.22) (95% binomial confidence intervals in parentheses). The methods of evidence-based medicine are robust and can deal with interventions of great face validity and those considered well established before such methods were well developed. We propose initial criteria for evaluating the quality of evidence supporting long-established interventions.

  19. Subperiosteal Drainage versus Subdural Drainage in the management of Chronic Subdural Hematoma (A Comparative Study).

    PubMed

    Chih, Adrian Ng Wei; Hieng, Albert Wong Sii; Rahman, Noor Azman A; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2017-03-01

    Symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH) remain one of the most frequent diagnoses in current neurosurgical practice. Burr-hole craniostomy with irrigation and placement of close-system drainage is the current recommended surgery for symptomatic CSDH. The aim of this study is to perform a direct comparison between two surgical techniques in the treatment of symptomatic CSDH, which have been proven in previous studies to be efficient. Our main objective was to compare the efficacy of placement of a subperiosteal drain (SPD) and a subdural drain (SDD) following single burr-hole craniostomy and irrigation, and to demonstrate any significant differences in terms of overall surgical complications, functional outcome at three months and mortality rate. The study was carried out in two local neurosurgical centres. The SPD group was performed in Hospital Umum Sarawak (HUS) and the SDD group was performed in Hospital Sultanah Aminah Johor Bahru (HSAJB), from 1 January 2012 till 30 January 2014 with a total of 30 patients in both treatment groups. Overall, there were no statistically significant difference in terms of patient general characteristics, pre-operative and post-operative symptoms, Markwalder grades, post-operative hematoma volume and recurrence, mortality and functional outcome at discharge and at three month follow-up between both groups. Albeit not achieving statistical significance, we observed a lower rate of surgical complication especially for post-operative intracranial hematoma with placement of the SPD system. Our study concludes that both treatment methods proved to be highly effective in the treatment of CSDH. However, with a lower overall surgical complication rate, treatment with single burr-hole craniostomy, irrigation and placement of the SPD system can be considered a treatment of choice for the management of symptomatic CSDH.

  20. A Pilot Placebo Controlled Randomized Trial of Dexamethasone for Chronic Subdural Hematoma.

    PubMed

    Prud'homme, Michel; Mathieu, François; Marcotte, Nicolas; Cottin, Sylvine

    2016-03-01

    Current opinions regarding the use of dexamethasone in the treatment of chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH) are only based on observational studies. Moreover, the use of corticosteroids in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patient with this condition remains controversial. Here, we present data from a prospective randomized pilot study of CSDH patients treated with dexamethasone or placebo. Twenty patients with imaging-confirmed CSDH were recruited from a single center and randomized to receive dexamethasone (12 mg/day for 3 weeks followed by tapering) or placebo as a conservative treatment. Patients were followed for 6 months and the rate of success of conservative treatment with dexamethasone versus placebo was measured. Parameters such as hematoma thickness and clinical changes were also compared before and after treatment with chi-square tests. Adverse events and complications were documented. During the 6-month follow-up, one of ten patients treated with corticosteroids had to undergo surgical drainage and three of ten patients were treated surgically after placebo treatment. At the end of the study, all remaining patients had complete radiological resolution. No significant differences were observed in terms of hematoma thickness profile and impression of change; however, patients experienced more severe side effects when treated with steroids as compared with placebo. Dexamethasone contributed to many serious adverse events. Given the small sample size, these preliminary results have not shown a clear beneficial effect of dexamethasone against placebo in our patients. However, the number of secondary effects reported was much greater for corticosteroids, and dexamethasone treatment was responsible for significant complications.

  1. On-site Rapid Diagnosis of Intracranial Hematoma using Portable Multi-slice Microwave Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobashsher, Ahmed Toaha; Abbosh, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Rapid, on-the-spot diagnostic and monitoring systems are vital for the survival of patients with intracranial hematoma, as their conditions drastically deteriorate with time. To address the limited accessibility, high costs and static structure of currently used MRI and CT scanners, a portable non-invasive multi-slice microwave imaging system is presented for accurate 3D localization of hematoma inside human head. This diagnostic system provides fast data acquisition and imaging compared to the existing systems by means of a compact array of low-profile, unidirectional antennas with wideband operation. The 3D printed low-cost and portable system can be installed in an ambulance for rapid on-site diagnosis by paramedics. In this paper, the multi-slice head imaging system’s operating principle is numerically analysed and experimentally validated on realistic head phantoms. Quantitative analyses demonstrate that the multi-slice head imaging system is able to generate better quality reconstructed images providing 70% higher average signal to clutter ratio, 25% enhanced maximum signal to clutter ratio and with around 60% hematoma target localization compared to the previous head imaging systems. Nevertheless, numerical and experimental results demonstrate that previous reported 2D imaging systems are vulnerable to localization error, which is overcome in the presented multi-slice 3D imaging system. The non-ionizing system, which uses safe levels of very low microwave power, is also tested on human subjects. Results of realistic phantom and subjects demonstrate the feasibility of the system in future preclinical trials.

  2. Mantle Cell Lymphoma with Central Nervous System Involvement Simulating Bilateral Subdural Hematomas.

    PubMed

    González-Bonet, Luis Germán; García-Boyero, Raimundo; Gaona-Morales, John

    2017-03-01

    We describe a 71-year-old-patient receiving antiplatelet therapy and being attended by emergency medical services for psychomotor retardation and gait disturbance. An emergency computed tomographic scan showed a bilateral subacute hematoma. The patient reported a fall 2 weeks earlier. We performed bilateral drills and saw a solid mass that was biopsied. The patient had a history of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) in complete remission (results of bone marrow biopsy and whole-body positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans were normal 6 months earlier). We diagnosed an intracranial MCL by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and fluorescence in situ hybridization. We performed magnetic resonance imaging. The results of a new bone marrow biopsy were positive for recurrence of MCL. MCL constitutes approximately 5%-6% of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The incidence of central nervous system (CNS) involvement between MCLs is 4.1%. After a review of the literatures we found small series comprising 3-5 cases and a multicenter study with 57 cases. Until now, the median survival was 3.7 months. Ibrutinib, an oral Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has demonstrated efficacy and CNS penetration in relapsed or refractory MCL with rapid and complete response even after 1 year of follow-up. Our patient received ibrutinib and had a complete response at 3 months, which was maintained to the present (6 months). After a review of the literature, we found different pathologies that can mimic subdural hematomas. However, this is the first report of a lymphoma with CNS involvement mimicking bilateral subdural hematomas. This report contributes to the knowledge of lymphomas with CNS involvement. Its strange radiographic appearance and histologic type make it unique.

  3. Effects of transsylvian-transinsular approach to hypertensive putaminal hematoma operation and electroacupuncture on motor recovery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuhai; Ding, Wei; Yang, Yunxue; Xu, Houchi; Xiong, Feng; Liu, Cunzhi

    2011-09-01

    In this study, a comparison of motor recovery on hypertensive putaminal hematoma (HPH) with 30 mL or more has been made between conventional treatment and decompressive craniectomy (DC) combined with electroacupuncture (EA). This study aims to examine whether transsylvian-transinsular approach (TTA) to HPH evacuation, DC, and EA have additional value to post-cerebral hemorrhage motor rehabilitation. One hundred twenty patients with HPH of 30-mL volume or greater, who were admitted within 6 hours after ictus, were included in this study. Of the 120 patients, 80 were operated on for hematoma evacuation DC through TTA. The postoperative patients were divided into combined therapy group (CTG) and operation with exercises group (OEG). Combined therapy group (n = 40) was treated with EA, functional exercises from 1 to 3 days after hematoma evacuation DC through TTA, twice each day, and OEG (n = 40) accepted only the same operation and functional exercises. Another 40 patients were classified as functional exercises group to be treated conservatively and with functional exercises only after their relatives declined authorization for surgery and EA. The habilitation effects were assessed by blinded assessors at weeks 0 and 8. Outcome measures included Fugl-Meyer assessment, Barthel Index, and Functional Independence Measure. The statistical difference on the motor recovery was considerable (P < 0.05) between CTG and OEG. Significant differences were observed between CTG and physical therapy group (P < 0.01), and we also found statistical difference (P < 0.05) between OEG and functional exercises group. Surgically treated patients received significantly better motor recovery than did the conservatively treated patients. Microsurgical treatment via TTA of HPH and postoperative EA at an early stage result in improved outcome of motor recovery. Transsylvian-transinsular approach for HPH operation and postoperative EA at an early stage are advocated.

  4. Subperiosteal Drainage versus Subdural Drainage in the management of Chronic Subdural Hematoma (A Comparative Study)

    PubMed Central

    Chih, Adrian Ng Wei; Hieng, Albert Wong Sii; Rahman, Noor Azman A.; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Symptomatic chronic subdural hematomas (CSDH) remain one of the most frequent diagnoses in current neurosurgical practice. Burr-hole craniostomy with irrigation and placement of close-system drainage is the current recommended surgery for symptomatic CSDH. The aim of this study is to perform a direct comparison between two surgical techniques in the treatment of symptomatic CSDH, which have been proven in previous studies to be efficient. Our main objective was to compare the efficacy of placement of a subperiosteal drain (SPD) and a subdural drain (SDD) following single burr-hole craniostomy and irrigation, and to demonstrate any significant differences in terms of overall surgical complications, functional outcome at three months and mortality rate. Materials and Methods The study was carried out in two local neurosurgical centres. The SPD group was performed in Hospital Umum Sarawak (HUS) and the SDD group was performed in Hospital Sultanah Aminah Johor Bahru (HSAJB), from 1 January 2012 till 30 January 2014 with a total of 30 patients in both treatment groups. Results Overall, there were no statistically significant difference in terms of patient general characteristics, pre-operative and post-operative symptoms, Markwalder grades, post-operative hematoma volume and recurrence, mortality and functional outcome at discharge and at three month follow-up between both groups. Albeit not achieving statistical significance, we observed a lower rate of surgical complication especially for post-operative intracranial hematoma with placement of the SPD system. Conclusions Our study concludes that both treatment methods proved to be highly effective in the treatment of CSDH. However, with a lower overall surgical complication rate, treatment with single burr-hole craniostomy, irrigation and placement of the SPD system can be considered a treatment of choice for the management of symptomatic CSDH. PMID:28381926

  5. CD163/Hemoglobin Oxygenase-1 Pathway Regulates Inflammation in Hematoma Surrounding Tissues after Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Liu, BaoHua; Hu, BeiLei; Shao, ShengMin; Wu, Wei; Fan, LiuBo; Bai, GuangHui; Shang, Ping; Wang, XiaoTong

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate changes in the expression of CD163 and hemoglobin oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in brain tissue surrounding hematomas after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and correlations with other factors. Brain tissues in the close surrounding of ICH hematomas (n = 27, ICH group) were collected at 6 hours or less, 6-24 hours, 24-72 hours, and more than 72 hours after bleeding onset, and more distant tissues (n = 12, control group) were histologically analyzed with hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy. Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, as well as the expression of CD163 and HO-1, were assessed using immunochemistry, Western blotting, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Apoptosis rates were determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assays. The expressions of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were increased at 6-24 hours (P <.05), reached a peak at 24-72 hours (P <.001 and P <.01), at which time histopathological changes became most obvious and apoptosis rates were highest, but diminished for more than 72 hours after ICH onset. The anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 peaked at 6-24 hours (P < .01) after ICH onset but dropped in the following periods to lower levels than the control (P <.05). CD163 and HO-1 expressions gradually increased from 6 to 24 hours to peaks at more than 72 hours after ICH onset (P <.001). The highest inflammation level in tissues surrounding ICH hematomas occurred 2-3 days after bleeding onset, but was accompanied by an anti-inflammatory factor IL-10 expression enhancement. In the period of more than 72 hours after ICH onset, CD163 and HO-1 expressions reached peaks and inflammatory cytokine expressions dropped. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bilateral Ossified Chronic Subdural Hematoma Presenting as Diabetes Insipidus-Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Saquib A; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Sawarkar, Dattaraj; Singh, Manmohanjit; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2017-02-01

    Calcified chronic subdural hematomas are an occurrence rarely seen in neurosurgical clinical practice. And when they occur bilaterally, the radiologic image they present is fascinating, as is the clinical presentation, but their management may be challenging. They have been reported to present with a multitude of neurologic deficits but never with diabetes insipidus, which is described here. Due to the rarity of this pathology, the management protocol is not well defined, though there have been quite a few papers on this condition. This review article gathers information published over the years on this rare entity to suggest a treatment protocol.

  7. Subdural hematoma occurred after spinal anesthesia in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Tae; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Eun Mi; Kim, Jun Hyun

    2017-01-01

    A 25-year-old male patient who was infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) underwent a condyloma excision under spinal anesthesia. The patient complained of suspicious postdural puncture headache. The patient did not respond to conservative management. Subsequently, the subdural hematoma (SDH) was found through magnetic resonance imaging. In response, an epidural blood patch was used to improve the symptoms and inhibit the enlargement of the SDH. The patient was discharged after it was confirmed that a headache had subsided without increasing SDH. Anesthesiologist should be aware of other causes of headaches after spinal anesthesia in HIV-infected patients and should carefully and accurately identify the cause. PMID:28217066

  8. [Postero-medial bulbar hematoma with a favorable outcome. Study of dysautonomia].

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, M; Griffie, G; Dhellemmes, P; Dupard, T; Caron, J

    1988-01-01

    A case of postero-medial medullary hematoma in a 21 year-old woman is reported. An initial neurovegetative severe disregulation had a favorable outcome after surgery. Late deficits, characterizing the postero-medial medullary syndrome have been studied: paresis of the tongue, suppression of the nauseous reflex, instability with retropulsion, and downbeating nystagmus in primary position of the eyes were noted. Heart rate and arterial blood pressure analysis showed explosive tachycardic reactions and transitory disappearance of oculo-cardiac reflexes, suggesting the involvement of the efferent parasympathetic system coming from the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve.

  9. Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Perihemorrhagic Edema and Secondary Hematoma Expansion: From Bench Work to Ongoing Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Manoj K.; LacKamp, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a medical emergency, which often leads to severe disability and death. ICH-related poor outcomes are due to primary injury causing structural damage and mass effect and secondary injury in the perihemorrhagic region over several days to weeks. Secondary injury after ICH can be due to hematoma expansion (HE) or a consequence of repair pathway along the continuum of neuroinflammation, neuronal death, and perihemorrhagic edema (PHE). This review article is focused on PHE and HE and will cover the animal studies, related human studies, and clinical trials relating to these mechanisms of secondary brain injury in ICH patients. PMID:27917153

  10. Acute subdural hematoma: potential soccer injury in an otherwise healthy child.

    PubMed

    Lutfi, Riad; Mullett, Charles J; Nield, Linda S

    2009-09-01

    A 16-year-old adolescent boy presented with headache, dizziness, loss of consciousness, and a tonic-clonic seizure after heading a soccer ball in a competitive match. A computed tomographic scan of the head revealed an acute subdural hematoma with a mass effect. The patient was emergently referred to a tertiary care facility where he eventually recovered completely with conservative care. No predisposing medical conditions were found. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an intracranial hemorrhage secondary to the heading of a soccer ball alone in an otherwise healthy child without any underlying predisposing central nervous system abnormalities.

  11. HELLP Syndrome Complicated with Postpartum Subcapsular Ruptured Liver Hematoma and Purtscher-Like Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cernea, Daniela; Dragoescu, Alice; Novac, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Purtscher's retinopathy is usually associated with trauma, acute pancreatitis, vasculitis, lupus, and bone fractures. It was rarely described postpartum in patients with preeclampsia as well as associated with HELLP syndrome. We present a case of a multiparous patient aged 44 with severe preeclampsia and postpartum HELLP syndrome complicated with Purtscher-like retinopathy and large ruptured subcapsular liver hematoma that required emergency abdominal surgery after premature delivery of a dead fetus. Postsurgical outcome was favorable regarding both liver function and visual acuity. PMID:22852104

  12. Hemorrhagic thoracic schwannoma presenting with intradural hematoma and acute paraplegia after spinal manipulation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, C. Rory; Sciubba, Daniel; Bydon, Ali; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Witham, Timothy; Gokaslan, Ziya L.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic conversion of spinal schwannomas represents a rare occurrence; also rare is the development of a spinal intradural hematoma after spinal manipulation therapy. We report a unique presentation of paraplegia in a patient who underwent spinal manipulation therapy and was found to have a hemorrhagic thoracic schwannoma at time of surgery in the setting of anti-platelet therapy use. In patients with spinal schwannomas, tumor hemorrhage is a rare occasion, which can be considered in the setting of additive effects of spinal manipulation therapy and antiplatelet therapy. PMID:28377856

  13. Pneumomediastinum and Mediastinal Hematoma Secondary to Right Brachiocephalic Vein Thrombectomy Mimicking STEMI

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Prem; Nivera, Noel

    2017-01-01

    A 50-year-old male with a history of hemodialysis dependent chronic kidney disease presented to our emergency department with acute midsternal crushing chest pain. Patient was diagnosed with acute anterolateral wall Myocardial Infraction due to the presence of corresponding ST segment elevations in EKG and underwent emergent cardiac catheterization which revealed normal patent coronaries without any disease. He continued to have chest pain for which CT of the chest was done which revealed pneumomediastinum with mediastinal hematoma, due to the recent attempted thrombectomy for thrombus in his right brachiocephalic vein. PMID:28804656

  14. Bilateral Subperiosteal Hematoma and Orbital Compression Syndrome in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Sundu, Cem; Dinç, Erdem; Sari, Ayça; Ünal, Selma; Dursun, Özer

    2017-09-21

    A 14-year-old boy with sickle cell disease presented with preseptal cellulitis findings as proptosis, eyelid edema, and hyperemia. His best corrected visual acuity in the right eye was 20/20 and 16/20 in the left eye. He had limited ductions in vertical and lateral gazes in both eyes. Bilateral venous tortuosity was observed in posterior segment examination. Orbital bone infarction and subperiosteal hematoma were seen in magnetic resonance imaging. He was diagnosed as having orbital compression syndrome secondary to vaso-occlusive crisis of sickle cell disease and was treated with intravenous ampicilin-sulbactam and methylprednisolone.

  15. [Hematoma of the psoas. Comparative diagnostic contributions of ultrasonography and x-ray computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Rivasseau, T; Vandermarcq, P; Boissonnot, L; Drouineau, J; Gil, R

    1985-11-01

    A 11 cases study of hematoma of the iliacus muscle underlines better results obtained by C.T. Scanner compared to those of ultrasonography examination in term of definite diagnoses. Comparison of density values and repeated examination were useful to assert diagnosis and to appreciate the course of the illness. Only C.T. Scanner was able to show which portion of the muscle was concerned. Authors correlated the C.T. Scanner results to the nature of the entrapment neuropathy clinically found: an isolated femoral nerve palsy or association with an obturator nerve dysfunction.

  16. Pin-site epidural hematoma: A catastrophic complication of cranial fixation in a child.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Prasad; Kumar, Soumen Kanti; Kartikueyan, Rajaraman; Patel, Sachinkumar Maheshbhai

    2016-01-01

    Cranial fixation with pins is a routine adjunct in neurosurgery and is usually considered safe. A rarely reported complication is skull fracture at the pin site and consequent epidural hematoma. Usually, these are picked up only postoperatively and rarely, intraoperatively if there is unexplained "brain bulge" in which case the operation should be terminated and urgent imaging has to be done. We describe such a complication that occurred while operating on a 12-year-old child with a posterior fossa tumor and review the available literature dealing with such events.

  17. Intramural hematoma of the thoracic aorta as a form of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Juszkat, Robert; Pukacki, Fryderyk; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Zarzecka, Anna; Majewski, Wacław

    2007-01-01

    Intramural hematoma (IMH) of the thoracic aorta is a complication with unknown etiology and a poorly predictable prognosis. There is also considerable controversy about the management and prognosis of IMH as well as the treatment. We present two cases of endovascular treatment of IMH with stent-graft placement. On the basis of references, we discuss risks of progression of the given pathology and possible complications. Despite the lack of uniform opinion about the management of this disorder, we present our observations of and experiences with endovascular treatment of IMH of the thoracic aorta.

  18. Can We Prevent a Postoperative Spinal Epidural Hematoma by Using Larger Diameter Suction Drains?

    PubMed

    Ahn, Dong Ki; Kim, Jin Hak; Chang, Byung Kwon; Lee, Jae Il

    2016-03-01

    Epidural hematoma is a rare but serious complication. According to previous studies, it is not prevented by suction drains. This study evaluated the following alternative hypothesis: the larger the diameter of a suction drain, the less the remaining epidural hematoma after spinal surgery. This was a randomized prospective study. Patients who underwent posterior lumbar decompression and instrumented fusion were divided into two groups: the large drain (LD, 2.8-mm-diameter tube) and small drain (SD, 1.6-mm-diameter tube) groups according to the diameter of the suction drains. All patients were consecutive and allocated alternately according to the date of operations. Suction drains were removed on day 3 and magnetic resonance imaging was performed on day 7 postoperatively. The size of remaining hematomas was measured by the degree of thecal sac compression in cross section using the following 4-point numeric scale: G1, less than one quarter; G2, between one quarter and half; G3, more than half; and G4, more than subtotal obstruction. There were 39 patients with LDs and 38 with SDs. They did not differ significantly in terms of sex, number of fusion segments, revision or not, antiplatelet medication, intraoperative injection of tranexamic acid. However, patient age differed significantly between the two groups (LD, 63.3 years and < SD, 68.6 years; p = 0.007). The two groups did not differ significantly in terms of prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, platelet number, blood loss, or operation duration. However, platelet function analysis exhibited a significant difference (LD, 164.7 seconds and < SD, 222.3 seconds; p = 0.002). The two blinded readers showed high consistency (Kappa value = 0.740; p = 0.000). The results of reader 1 were as follows: LD and SD had 21 and 21 cases of G1, 9 and 11 cases of G2, 6 and 6 cases of G3, and 3 and 0 cases of G4, respectively. The results of reader 2 were as follows: LD and SD had 22 and 23 cases of G1, 7 and 9

  19. Spinal subdural hematoma with cauda equina syndrome: A complication of combined spinal epidural anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Neha; Sethi, Priyanka; Jain, Jitesh Kumar; Agarwal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSE) is considered safe in lower limb surgeries. We report a case of sudden neurological deterioration in a stable postoperative patient who was given CSE for total knee replacement and low molecular weight heparin in postoperative period. On the 4th postoperative day, she developed sudden onset weakness in left lower limb along with bladder incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging spine revealed a subdural hematoma at L2-L3 level. Immediate laminectomy along with cord decompression was done and patient recovered well except for a persistent foot drop on left side. PMID:25948911

  20. [Bleeding during central venous catheterization : Cannot intubate, cannot ventilate due to massive cervical hematoma].

    PubMed

    Engelen, C; Trebes, C; Czarnecki, S; Junger, A

    2016-03-01

    Central venous catheterization is an invasive procedure which can be associated with severe complications. These include in particular unsuccessful arterial puncture and vascular injuries, which in addition to loss of blood can lead to massive soft tissue swelling. A 63-year-old female patient developed massive cervical bleeding during ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein puncture and the rapidly enlarging hematoma led to compromisation of the airway. A cannot intubate, cannot ventilate situation developed and the subsequent hypoxia led to cardiac arrest that was only resolved after emergency surgical tracheotomy during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  1. Acute Cervical Epidural Hematoma, Screw Pullout, and Esophageal Perforation After Anterior Cervical Corpectomy Surgery: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-San; Liu, Jing-Chen; Wu, Yun-Tao

    2015-01-01

    To report a series of complications related to anterior cervical surgery in the same patient. There have been many reports of complications related to anterior cervical surgeries. These include cervical hematoma, instrumentation extrusion, or esophageal injury after anterior cervical decompression. However, there have been no reports of all these complications occurring in 1 patient. This is our report of a patient who experienced all 3 of these complications. The patient was a 73-year-old man suffering from cervical spondylotic myelopathy who was treated with C5 anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with titanium mesh and bone graft. The patient successively experienced cervical hematoma, screw pullout, and esophageal perforation, and was treated accordingly. Although the patient suffered a series of complications after anterior cervical corpectomy, all the complications were treated successfully. It serves as a caution that a first complication such as hematoma in anterior cervical corpectomy with fusion should be given enough attention to prevent further complications. PMID:25692439

  2. The effect of brain hematoma location on volumetric inductive phase shift spectroscopy of the brain with circular and magnetron sensor coils: a numerical simulation study.

    PubMed

    Rojas, R; Rubinsky, B; González, C A

    2008-06-01

    This numerical simulation study addressed the effects of the location of a discrete brain hematoma on the volumetric inductive phase shift of the brain measured with an induction circular sensor coil and an induction magnetron sensor coil. The theoretical study simulates the brain cavity as a circular sphere transversely centered with respect to the circular and magnetron sensor coils. As a case study for the effects of hematoma location, we employed similar size simulated spherical hematomas placed at three different positions from the center of the brain outward. A three-dimensional finite element analysis of the field equations in the frequency range from 100 kHz to 100 MHz revealed a substantial effect of hematoma location on the ability of both the circular and magnetron sensors to detect the hematomas. In particular it was found that there are frequencies, which may be related to resonance, at which the occurrence of the hematomas has no effect on the volumetric inductive phase shift of the brain. Furthermore it was found that the relative sensitivity of circular and magnetron sensor coils with respect to the occurrence of hematoma varies with the location of the hematoma.

  3. A low or high BMI is a risk factor for renal hematoma after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for kidney stones.

    PubMed

    Nussberger, Fabio; Roth, Beat; Metzger, Tobias; Kiss, Bernhard; Thalmann, George N; Seiler, Roland

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors for renal hematoma after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) for kidney stones in a matched case-control analysis of a subgroup of patients recruited from a prospective randomized cohort. Between 06/2010 and 03/2013, 418 patients underwent SWL with the MODULITH(®)-SLX-F2-lithotripter for kidney stones. In 39/418 patients (9 %), ultrasound at post-treatment day 1 revealed renal hematomas. For 37 of these patients, a matched group without hematoma could be selected according to the following matching criteria: age, gender, number and energy of shock waves, stone burden and localization. Risk factors for renal hematoma after SWL were compared between the two groups. The rates of diabetes, stopped anticoagulant/antiplatelet medications and arterial hypertension were not different between the two groups (p > 0.2). The skin-kidney distance was virtually the same in both groups (p = 0.5). In the hematoma group, significantly more patients had a high (>30: n = 16) as well as a low (<21.5: n = 4) BMI when compared to the control group (n = 4; n = 0; p < 0.001). Importantly, all patients with BMI <21.5 developed renal hematomas after SWL. Patients with a high (>30) or low (<21.5) BMI had a higher risk for renal damage after SWL. Therefore, alternative endoscopic treatment options should be considered in these patients.

  4. Incidental Finding of Malpositioned Pacing Lead in the Left Ventricle in a Patient With Subacute Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Asma; Salim, Sohail; Castillo, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Malposition of the right ventricular lead into the left ventricle is an unusual complication of challenging management. We report a case of an elderly woman with a dual chamber permanent pacemaker implanted 2 months before admission because of high grade AV block, who presented to our institution with sub acute subdural hematoma along the left fronto-parietal area. Incidental ventricular pacemaker lead in the left ventricle was found on chest CT scan. The patient was not candidate for anticoagulation due to her recent subdural hematoma, hence a discussion about the risks of explantation of the pacemaker lead led to patient’s lead extraction without any complication.

  5. Automated detection of extradural and subdural hematoma for contrast-enhanced CT images in emergency medical care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Takeshi; Matoba, Naoto; Zhou, Xiangrong; Yokoi, Shinya; Aizawa, Hiroaki; Fujita, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Keiji; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2007-03-01

    We have been developing the CAD scheme for head and abdominal injuries for emergency medical care. In this work, we have developed an automated method to detect typical head injuries, rupture or strokes of brain. Extradural and subdural hematoma region were detected by comparing technique after the brain areas were registered using warping. We employ 5 normal and 15 stroke cases to estimate the performance after creating the brain model with 50 normal cases. Some of the hematoma regions were detected correctly in all of the stroke cases with no false positive findings on normal cases.

  6. Orbital compression syndrome complicated by epidural hematoma and wide cephalohematoma in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Ilhan, Nilufer; Acipayam, Can; Aydogan, Fusun; Atci, Nesrin; Ilhan, Ozgur; Coskun, Mesut; Daglioglu, Mutlu Cihan; Tuzcu, Esra Ayhan

    2014-04-01

    Orbital wall infarctions resulting in orbital and epidural hematomas are rare manifestations of sickle cell disease (SCD). We report orbital compression syndrome associated with an epidural hematoma and wide cephalohematoma in a 15-year-old boy with SCD. An infarcted orbital bone was observed on magnetic resonance imaging and three-phase bone scintigraphy with Technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate. The patient recovered completely without surgical intervention at the end of the fourth week. Prompt diagnosis and proper management are critical for complete recovery. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization of Concurrent Spontaneous Hematomas of the Rectus Sheath and Psoas Muscle in Patients Undergoing Anticoagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, Antonio; Medina, Jose Garcia; Mundo, Elena; Medina, Vicente Garcia; Leal, Rafael

    2004-11-15

    We report a case of concurrent rectus sheath and psoas hematomas in a patient undergoing anticoagulant therapy, treated by transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) of inferior epigastric and lumbar arteries. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated signs of active bleeding in two hematomas of the anterior and posterior abdominal walls. Transfemoral arteriogram confirmed the extravasation of contrast from the right inferior epigastric artery (RIEA). Indirect signs of bleeding were also found in a right lumbar artery (RLA). We successfully performed TAE of the feeding arteries. There have been few reports in the literature of such spontaneous hemorrhages in patients undergoing anticoagulation, successfully treated by TAE.

  8. Chronic Expanding Hematoma in the Dorsal Cervicothoracic Region as a Long-Term Complication of Retained Bullet Fragments: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saima; Ehmed, Salman; Blume, Terri; Fai, Emmanuel K; Khan, Agha S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic expanding hematoma is a rare pathology, which has not been previously described as a complication of gunshot injury with retained bullet fragments. Because of the similar characteristics of chronic expanding hematoma to malignancy, it can present a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. Imaging and biopsy evaluation is needed to reach a conclusive diagnosis and implement appropriate treatment. In this case report, we will discuss the development, diagnosis, and management of a chronic superficial cervicothoracic mass in a patient who presented 30 years post-gunshot injury with retained bullet fragments.  PMID:27917326

  9. Scrotal Hematoma Precipitated by Centrifuge Training in a Fighter Pilot with an Asymptomatic Varicocele.

    PubMed

    Kampel, Liyona; Klang, Eyal; Winkler, Harry; Gordon, Barak; Frenkel-Nir, Yael; Shoam, Yifat Erlich

    2015-12-01

    Varicocele is quite common in the general population, affecting up to 15% of men. It is not considered disqualifying for the pilot's training program of the Israeli Air Force as long as there are no related symptoms or associated pathologies. During combat flight, increased venous pressure due to acceleration forces and anti-G straining maneuvers, used to counteract high gravitational G forces, can theoretically aggravate the venous blood pooling in varicocele, leading to rupture. We describe a case of a young fighter-jet pilot presenting with a painful inguinal hematoma extending to the scrotum a day after participating in centrifuge training. Sonographic examination demonstrated dilated spermatic veins and intratesticular varicocele along with subcutaneous thickening of the scrotal wall consistent with hematoma. The effects of high G loads on blood flow in spermatic veins, and especially in varicocele, still need to be determined. Varicocele rupture has been described in relation to increased intra-abdominal pressure and could theoretically occur during anti-G straining maneuvers. Such an acute adverse event during combat flight can be detrimental to flight safety and the pilot's well-being.

  10. Peri-Hemorrhagic Edema and Secondary Hematoma Expansion after Intracerebral Hemorrhage: From Benchwork to Practical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Babi, Marc-Alain; James, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH) is the most lethal type of stroke. Half of these deaths occur within the acute phase. Frequently observed deterioration during the acute phase is often due to rebleeding or peri-hematomal expansion. The exact pathogenesis that leads to rebleeding or peri-hemorrhagic edema remains under much controversy. Numerous trials have investigated potential predictor of peri-hemorrhagic edema formation or rebleeding but have yet to come with consistent results. Unfortunately, almost all of the “classical” approaches have failed to show a significant impact in regard of significant clinical outcome in randomized clinical trials. Current treatment strategies may remain “double-edged swords,” for inherent reasons to the pathophysiology of sICH. Therefore, the right balance and possibly the combination of current accepted strategies as well as the evaluation of future approaches seem urgent. This article reviews the role of disturbed autoregulation following SICH, surgical and non-surgical approaches in management of SICH, peri-hematoma edema, peri-hematoma expansion, and future therapeutic trends. PMID:28154550

  11. Cardiac Mass, Aortic Intramural Hematoma, and IgG4-related Disease: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Li, Luocheng; Wang, Zhiwei; Xu, Peng; Ruan, Yongle; Jiang, Wanli; Wu, Zhiyong

    2016-08-01

    As a designated entity within medicine, immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease is relatively new. It is immune-mediated origin, characterized by a tendency for formation of tumefactive lesions, the infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells, and frequent but not invariable elevations of IgG4 levels in the serum. IgG4-related cardiac mass accompanying aortic intramural hematoma is an extremely rare clinical presentation. Herein we present the case of a patient who was admitted to our department complaining of severe chest pain. Computed tomographic angiography examination revealed a cardiac mass accompanying an aortic intramural hematoma. He underwent a surgical resection of the cardiac mass and a replacement of the ascending aorta with Hemashield Platinum graft and made an uneventful recovery. A diagnosis of an IgG4-related disease was made based on laboratory results and pathological examination. Corticosteroids were administered postoperatively. This case shows that the heart itself can also be a potential site for IgG4-related disease.

  12. Spinal Epidural Hematoma after Thoracolumbar Posterior Fusion Surgery without Decompression for Thoracic Vertebral Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Tsuyoki; Miyagi, Masayuki; Saito, Wataru; Shoji, Shintaro; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Gen; Imura, Takayuki; Minehara, Hiroaki; Matsuura, Terumasa; Kawamura, Tadashi; Namba, Takanori; Takahira, Naonobu; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) after thoracolumbar posterior fusion without decompression surgery for a thoracic vertebral fracture. A 42-year-old man was hospitalized for a thoracic vertebral fracture caused by being sandwiched against his back on broken concrete block. Computed tomography revealed a T12 dislocation fracture of AO type B2, multiple bilateral rib fractures, and a right hemopneumothorax. Four days after the injury, in order to promote early orthostasis and to improve respiratory status, we performed thoracolumbar posterior fusion surgery without decompression; the patient had back pain but no neurological deficits. Three hours after surgery, he complained of acute pain and severe weakness of his bilateral lower extremities; with allodynia below the level of his umbilicus, postoperative SEH was diagnosed. We performed immediate revision surgery. After removal of the hematoma, his symptoms improved gradually, and he was discharged ambulatory one month after revision surgery. Through experience of this case, we should strongly consider the possibility of preexisting SEH before surgery, even in patients with no neurological deficits. We should also consider perioperative coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, as in this case. PMID:26989542

  13. Relationship of plasma matrix metalloproteinase-9 and hematoma expansion in acute hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingwei; Zhuang, Xiaorong; Peng, Feng; Zheng, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to investigate the relationship of plasma matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and hematoma expansion (HE) in acute hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage (AHCH) (HE-in-AHCH). Patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage, confirmed by head computed tomography (CT) within 12 h of onset, were prospectively collected. Venous blood was sampled within 4 h of the confirmation to determine the serum MMP-9 concentration. The blood pressure and National Institute of Health Stroke Score of the patients were recorded on hospital admission. CT re-scanning was performed within 42-54 h of the first head CT examination or immediately after worsening of the patients' consciousness disorder. The relationship between MMP-9 level and HE was analyzed. A total of 186 patients were included. Of these patients, 41 had HE (22.0%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that, in addition to the short interval between onset and the first CT examination, and the irregularity of hematoma shape, increasing MMP-9 level was an independent risk factor for HE-in-AHCH (OR value = 15.65, 95% CI: 5.30-46.15). Moreover, increasing plasma MMP-9 level was identified as an independent risk factor in patients with HE-in-AHCH.

  14. Spinal anterior epidural hematoma in an elderly man with unrecognized lupic anticoagulant taking warfarin.

    PubMed

    Zuliani, Giovanni; Guerra, Gianluca; Dalla Nora, Edoardo; Fainardi, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is a rare acute condition defined as a hematoma occurring at spinal epidural level. It is defined as "spontaneous" (SSEH) when possible causes have been ruled out; in other cases, clotting disorders and systemic lupus erythematosus have been associated with SEH. If identified rapidly, SEH can be completely cured, with complete recovery in about 50% of cases. We describe the case of an 86-year-old man affected by SEH, with rare anterior location, presenting with painful paraparesis and bladder dysfunction. The patient was taking warfarin for chronic atrial fibrillation. A prolongation of partial thromboplastin time was observed, consistent with the presence, in plasma, of previously unrecognized lupus anticoagulant antibodies (LA). The diagnosis of SEH was confirmed by MRI, and the patient was not surgically treated. Following a rehabilitation program, the patient had complete neurological recovery. Although the epidural lesion might have been a true case of SSEH, anticoagulation therapy and AL may have played a role in the pathogenesis, spread and spontaneous resolution of SEH. In cases of acute thoracic pain, associated with signs and symptoms of spinal cord compression, the diagnosis of SEH, which is a potentially devastating condition, must be carefully investigated by clinicians.

  15. Spontaneous subdural hematoma and antiplatelet therapy: Does efficacy of Ticagrelor come with added risk?

    PubMed

    Suryanarayana Sharma, Pattanagere Manjunatha; Tekkatte Jagannatha, Aniruddha; Javali, Mahendra; Hegde, Anupama Venkatasubba; Mahale, Rohan; Madhusudhan; Srinivasa, Rangasetty

    2015-12-01

    Antiplatelet therapy has established clinical benefit on cardiovascular outcome and has reduced the rates of re-infarction/in stent thrombosis following percutaneous coronary intervention in acute coronary syndromes. Major bleeding episodes can occur with antiplatelet therapy and intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most feared complications resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Identification of high risk groups and judicious use of antiplatelet therapy reduces the bleeding risk. Ticagrelor is a newer P2Y12 receptor antagonist with established clinical benefit. However, risks of having an ICH with these newer molecules cannot be ignored. Here, we report a case of spontaneous acute subdural hematoma developing in a patient on antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and ticagrelor. Early recognition, discontinuation of the medication and appropriate management resulted in resolution of hematoma and good clinical outcome. Authors have reviewed the antithrombotic drugs and their tendencies in causing intracranial bleeds from a neurophysicians perspective. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Sudden motor and sensorial loss due to retroperitoneal hematoma during postoperative periods: a case report].

    PubMed

    Şen, Pelin; Gültekin, Havva Gül; Caymaz, İsmail; Özel, Ömer; Türköz, Ayda

    A 68 year-old male patient was hospitalized for radical prostatectomy. He had no abnormal medical history including neurological deficit before the operation. Prior to general anesthesia, an epidural catheter was inserted in the L3-4 interspace for intraoperative and postoperative analgesia. After surgery for nine hours, he developed confusion and flaccid paralysis of bilateral lower extremities occurred. No pathology was detected from cranial computed tomography and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging no pathology was detected. His thoracic/lumbar magnetic resonance imaging. Intraabdominal pressure was shown to be 25mmHg, and abdominal ultrasonography revealed progression in the inflammation/edema/hematoma in the perirenal region. The Bromage score was back to 1 in the right foot on the 24th hour and in the left foot on the 26th hour. Paraplegia developed in patients after epidural infusion might be caused by potentiated local anesthetic effect due to retroperitoneal hematoma and/or elevated intra-abdominal pressure. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Hematoma and abscess formation caused by Mycoplasma hominis following cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Koshiba, Hisato; Koshiba, Akemi; Daimon, Yasushi; Noguchi, Toshifumi; Iwasaku, Kazuhiro; Kitawaki, Jo

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma species cannot be identified by routine bacteriological culture methods and are resistant to common antimicrobial agents. Mycoplasma hominis usually colonizes the lower urogenital tract and causes pyelonephritis, pelvic inflammatory disease, chorioamnionitis, rupture of fetal membranes, preterm labor, postpartum fever, postabortal fever, and neonatal infection. This organism is highly prevalent in cervicovaginal cultures of sexually active women. M. hominis, M. genitalis, Ureaplasma urealyticum, and U. parvum may invade and infect placental and fetal tissues, leading to adverse pregnancy outcomes. M. hominis occasionally causes nongenitourinary infection of the blood, wounds, central nervous system, joints, or respiratory tract. We present a case of a 27-year-old woman who developed abdominal wound hematoma and abscess after cesarean section. The wound was drained, but her high fever persisted, in spite of antibiotic treatment using flomoxef sodium and imipenem·cilastatin sodium. Because the exudate exhibited M. hominis growth in an anaerobic environment, we administered the quinolone ciprofloxacin. This therapy resolved her fever, and her white blood cell count and C-reactive protein level diminished to the normal ranges. To our knowledge, there are four published articles regarding the isolation of M. hominis from postcesarean incisions. Based on the current study and the literature, infection by this pathogen may cause hematoma formation with or without abscess after cesarean section or in immunosuppressed postoperative patients. In such cases, physicians may need to suspect Mycoplasma infection and initiate appropriate antibacterial treatment as soon as possible in order to avoid persistent fever. PMID:21339933

  18. Spontaneous Cervical Epidural Hematoma Presenting as Brown-Sequard Syndrome Following Repetitive Korean Traditional Deep Bows

    PubMed Central

    Seon, Hyo-Jeong; Song, Min-Keun; Han, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma (SCEH) is an uncommon cause of acute nontraumatic myelopathy. SCEH presenting as Brown-Sequard syndrome is extremely rare. A 65-year-old man had motor weakness in the left extremities right after his mother's funeral. He received thrombolytic therapy under the impression of acute cerebral infarction at a local hospital. However, motor weakness of the left extremities became aggravated without mental change. After being transferred to our hospital, he showed motor weakness in the left extremities with diminished pain sensation in the right extremities. Diagnosis of SCEH was made by cervical magnetic resonance imaging. He underwent left C3 to C5 hemilaminectomy with hematoma removal. It is important for physicians to be aware that SCEH can be considered as one of the differential diagnoses of hemiplegia, since early diagnosis and management can influence the neurological outcome. We think that increased venous pressure owing to repetitive Korean traditional deep bows may be the cause of SCEH in this case. PMID:23526134

  19. Fatal endocarditis with methicilin-sensible Staphylococcus aureus and major complications: rhabdomyolysis, pericarditis, and intracerebral hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Georgescu, Anca Meda; Azamfirei, Leonard; Szalman, Krisztina; Szekely, Edit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Over the last decades Staphylococcus aureus (SA) has become the dominant etiology of native valve infective endocarditis, with the community-acquired methicillin-sensible Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MSSA) strains being the prevailing type. Case: We report here a case of extremely severe CA-MSSA aortic valve acute endocarditis associated with persistent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) in a previously healthy man and include a literature review. The patient developed severe and rare complications (purpura, purulent pericarditis, intracerebral hematoma, and rhabdomyolysis) through systemic embolism; they required drainage of pericardial empyema and cerebral hematoma, the latter eventually caused a fatal outcome. The strains recovered from sequential blood culture sets and pericardial fluid were MSSA negative for genes encoding for staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST)-1 and Panton–Valentine leukocidin. C, G, and I enterotoxin genes were detected. Conclusions: This case with unusually severe evolution underlines the limited ability of vancomycin to control some MSSA infections, possibly due to potential involvement of SA virulence factors, hence the importance of clinical vigilance for community SAB cases. PMID:27741135

  20. Local inflammation in fracture hematoma: results from a combined trauma model in pigs.

    PubMed

    Horst, K; Eschbach, D; Pfeifer, R; Hübenthal, S; Sassen, M; Steinfeldt, T; Wulf, H; Ruchholtz, S; Pape, H C; Hildebrand, F

    2015-01-01

    Background. Previous studies showed significant interaction between the local and systemic inflammatory response after severe trauma in small animal models. The purpose of this study was to establish a new combined trauma model in pigs to investigate fracture-associated local inflammation and gain information about the early inflammatory stages after polytrauma. Material and Methods. Combined trauma consisted of tibial fracture, lung contusion, liver laceration, and controlled hemorrhage. Animals were mechanically ventilated and under ICU-monitoring for 48 h. Blood and fracture hematoma samples were collected during the time course of the study. Local and systemic levels of serum cytokines and diverse alarmins were measured by ELISA kit. Results. A statistical significant difference in the systemic serum values of IL-6 and HMGB1 was observed when compared to the sham. Moreover, there was a statistical significant difference in the serum values of the fracture hematoma of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and HMGB1 when compared to the systemic inflammatory response. However a decrease of local proinflammatory concentrations was observed while anti-inflammatory mediators increased. Conclusion. Our data showed a time-dependent activation of the local and systemic inflammatory response. Indeed it is the first study focusing on the local and systemic inflammatory response to multiple-trauma in a large animal model.

  1. Psychiatric manifestation of chronic subdural hematoma: the unfolding of mystery in a homeless patient.

    PubMed

    Kar, Sujita Kumar; Kumar, Deepak; Singh, Paramjeet; Upadhyay, Pankaj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The clinical manifestation of chronic subdural hematoma is not limited to neurological deficits or cognitive impairment. It may present with behavioral abnormalities. When the behavioral abnormalities present without obvious neurological deficits and in the absence of trauma, it leads to misdiagnosis. A trivial trauma may cause intracranial bleed that is either missed or ignored in the clinical history. This case report highlights the clinical picture of a homeless patient who presented with withdrawn and disorganized behavior, apathy and poverty of speech in the absence of any neurological deficit. His clinical presentation led to a possibility of psychosis and he was started on antipsychotics. He had developed extrapyramidal side effects in low dose of antipsychotic without any clinical benefit in his clinical picture. Neuroimaging done to rule out any possible organicity-revealed bilateral subdural hematoma, which was later evacuated by neurosurgical intervention in multiple settings and the patient had improved. This case report unfolds the mystery behind the psychotic presentation in a homeless adult.

  2. Hemostatic proteins and their association with hematoma growth in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Borrell, Montserrat; Silva, Yolanda; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Martínez-Ramírez, Sergi; de Juan-Delago, Manuel; Tirado, Isabel; Alejaldre, Aída; Marín, Rebeca; Martí-Vilalta, Josep-Lluis; Fontcuberta, Jordi

    2010-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that proteins of hemostasia could be associated with hematoma growth (HG) in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage. We prospectively studied patients with spontaneous supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage within the first 6 hours after the onset of symptoms. HG was defined as an increase > 33% in the volume of hematoma on CT obtained 24 to 72 hours after the onset of symptoms in comparison with the CT obtained at admission. We collected admission and follow-up blood samples. We measured fibrinogen, factor XIII, thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor, plasminogen, α₂-antiplasmin, tissue plasminogen activator, d-dimer, thrombomodulin, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and plasmin-antiplasmin complex. We included 90 patients with a mean age of 71 ± 10.8 years; 61% were men. HG was observed in 35 (39%) of the patients. Mean baseline and follow-up protein measurements showed no difference between the groups with and without HG. The analysis of variance showed that factor XIII activity decreased in the non-HG group in the 24 to 72 hours sample, whereas it increased in the HG group (P = 0.001). Factor XIII was the only measured protein related to HG. The levels at the follow-up sample decreased in the non-HG group and increased in the HG group. Further studies are needed to confirm this association.

  3. Rediscovering the wound hematoma as a site of hemostasis during major arterial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    White, N J; Mehic, E; Wang, X; Chien, D; Lim, E; St John, A E; Stern, S A; Mourad, P D; Rieger, M; Fries, D; Martinowitz, U

    2015-12-01

    Treatments for major internal bleeding after injury include permissive hypotension to decrease the rate of blood loss, intravenous infusion of plasma or clotting factors to improve clot formation, and rapid surgical hemostasis or arterial embolization to control bleeding vessels. Yet, little is known regarding major internal arterial hemostasis, or how these commonly used treatments might influence hemostasis. (i) To use a swine model of femoral artery bleeding to understand the perivascular hemostatic response to contained arterial hemorrhage. (ii) To directly confirm the association between hemodynamics and bleeding velocity. (iii) To observe the feasibility of delivering an activated clotting factor directly to internal sites of bleeding using a simplified angiographic approach. Ultrasound was used to measure bleeding velocity and in vivo clot formation by elastography in a swine model of contained femoral artery bleeding with fluid resuscitation. A swine model of internal pelvic and axillary artery hemorrhage was also used to demonstrate the feasibility of local delivery of an activated clotting factor. In this model, clots formed slowly within the peri-wound hematoma, but eventually contained the bleeding. Central hemodynamics correlated positively with bleeding velocity. Infusion of recombinant human activated factor VII into the injured artery near the site of major internal hemorrhage in the pelvis and axillae was feasible. We rediscovered that clot formation within the peri-wound hematoma is an integral component of hemostasis and a feasible target for the treatment of major internal bleeding using activated clotting factors delivered using a simplified angiographic approach. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. Acute posterior fossa epidural hematoma in a newborn infant with Menkes disease.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Horikawa, Masahiro; Wakamatsu, Hajime; Hashimoto, Jyunya; Nawashiro, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) in newborn infants is rare compared with other types of intracranial hemorrhages. Furthermore, posterior fossa EDH is extremely rare. We present a case of posterior fossa EDH in an infant with Menkes disease with accessory bones in the occiput. A male infant with a condition diagnosed with Menkes disease by prenatal testing was born at 39 weeks via vacuum extraction. The patient presented with a mild tremor at 2 days after delivery. A brain computed tomography (CT) scan showed an acute EDH in the posterior fossa, extending into the occipitoparietal area. Three-dimensional CT and bone window CT scan revealed several accessory bones, diastasis of 1 accessory suture, a communicated fracture, and a linear fracture in the occipital bone. Furthermore, a bone fragment from a communicated fracture displaced toward the inside. The patient was treated conservatively for EDH because of his good general condition. The hematoma gradually resolved, and his tremor did not recur. We suggest the following mechanism of posterior fossa EDH development in our patient: (1) external force was applied to the occiput inside the birth canal during delivery, resulting in diastasis; (2) a communicated fracture occurred, and a bone fragment displaced toward the inside (linear fracture was caused indirectly by the force); (3) a transverse sinus was injured by the fragment; and (4) EDH developed in both the posterior fossa and supratentorial region. Copper deficiency can also cause fragility of connective tissues, vessels, and bones.

  5. Challenging the Pathophysiologic Connection between Subdural Hematoma, Retinal Hemorrhage and Shaken Baby Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gabaeff, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Child abuse experts use diagnostic findings of subdural hematoma and retinal hemorrhages as near-pathognomonic findings to diagnose shaken baby syndrome. This article reviews the origin of this link and casts serious doubt on the specificity of the pathophysiologic connection. The forces required to cause brain injury were derived from an experiment of high velocity impacts on monkeys, that generated forces far above those which might occur with a shaking mechanism. These forces, if present, would invariably cause neck trauma, which is conspicuously absent in most babies allegedly injured by shaking. Subdural hematoma may also be the result of common birth trauma, complicated by prenatal vitamin D deficiency, which also contributes to the appearance of long bone fractures commonly associated with child abuse. Retinal hemorrhage is a non-specific finding that occurs with many causes of increased intracranial pressure, including infection and hypoxic brain injury. The evidence challenging these connections should prompt emergency physicians and others who care for children to consider a broad differential diagnosis before settling on occult shaking as the de-facto cause. While childhood non-accidental trauma is certainly a serious problem, the wide exposure of this information may have the potential to exonerate some innocent care-givers who have been convicted, or may be accused, of child abuse. PMID:21691518

  6. A novel method for the management of post-thyroidectomy or parathyroidectomy hematoma: a single-institution experience after over 4,000 central neck operations.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Jennifer L; Snyder, Samuel K; Lairmore, Terry C; Jupiter, Daniel; Govednik, Cara; Hendricks, John C

    2014-06-01

    Cervical hematoma is a rare but serious complication of thyroid and parathyroid surgery that has historically required inpatient monitoring. With improved surgical technique and experience, operations are being performed increasingly as outpatient procedures. Therefore, a safe and systematic approach to cervical exploration of a postoperative hematoma needs to be defined. From 1996 to 2013, a retrospective review was performed of 4,140 thyroid and parathyroid operations. Surgical outcomes data were recorded, specifically including the occurrence of a cervical hematoma, time interval to presentation, and methods of management. A total of 18 patients (0.43 %) developed a postoperative cervical hematoma that required surgical intervention. The occurrence of hematoma was 0.66 % (n = 11) for bilateral thyroid procedures, 0.21 % (n = 3) for unilateral thyroid procedures, and 0.13 % (n = 1) for parathyroid procedures. There were 3 (1.69 %) patients who had combined unilateral thyroid and parathyroid procedures and developed hematomas. Emergent bedside decompression was required for only two patients, both of whom suffered respiratory arrest in the postoperative anesthesia recovery unit. The remaining 16 patients were explored in the operating room, utilizing initial local anesthesia in the semi-upright position in 11 patients (69 %). From our experience, hematomas that caused significant airway compromise leading to respiratory arrest occurred in the postoperative anesthesia recovery room, and hematoma presentation after this time did not require emergent bedside decompression. Hematoma, when it occurs, can otherwise be managed safely in the operating room after inpatient or outpatient procedures using initial local anesthesia with the patient in the semi-upright position for hematoma evacuation.

  7. Subdural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizures High-pitched cry, irritability Increased head size (circumference) Increased sleepiness or lethargy Persistent vomiting ... head injuries, so try to keep the person's neck still if you must move them before help ...

  8. Epidural hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... that results in even a brief loss of consciousness , or if there are any other symptoms after a head injury (even without loss of consciousness). The typical pattern of symptoms that indicate an ...

  9. Subungual Hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Osteopathic Medicine Disease Database Contributors Doctor Derm App Skin Facts Aging and Sun Damage Beauty Myths Preventing Sun Damage Skin Cancer Detection Skin Disease Links Sun Safety Document ...

  10. Intracranial hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... head injury, which could be signs of a concussion: Persistent or worsening headache Imbalance Vomiting Memory loss ... www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 31, 2014. Concussion. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www. ...

  11. Treatment of ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm accompanying intracerebral hematomas: endovascular coiling followed by hematoma evacuation with burr hole trephination and catheterization.

    PubMed

    Chung, Joonho; Kim, Byung Moon; Shin, Yong Sam; Lim, Yong Cheol; Park, Sang Kyu

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of endovascular coiling of ruptured anterior communicating artery (AcomA) aneurysms followed by intracerebral hematoma (ICH) evacuation with burr hole trephination and catheterization. Twelve patients treated by coiling with subsequent ICH drainage with burr hole trephination and catheterization were recruited from 290 patients with ruptured AcomA aneurysm in our hospital between January 2001 and June 2007. The clinical and radiographic characteristics and outcomes of the 12 patients were retrospectively analyzed. All 12 patients were male, aged from 29 to 62 years, and had ICHs with 16-ml to 45-ml volumes; nine (75%) of them had frontal ICHs on the opposite side of the dominant A1. Admission Hunt-Hess (HH) grade was 4 in eight patients, 3 in two, and 5 in two. The treatment outcomes in 8 of the 12 patients were good recovery or moderately disabled (Glasgow Outcome Scale; GOS 5 or 4), and functionally dependent (GOS 3 or 2) in the other 4 patients at the 6-month clinical follow-up. There was no rebleeding during the follow-up (mean, 22.9 months; range, 7 to 68 months). The result of our series suggests that coiling with subsequent evacuation of the ICH with burr hole trephination and catheterization may be an alternative treatment option for ruptured AcomA aneurysm with an ICH requiring evacuation on the opposite side of the dominant A1.

  12. Investigating the Relationship between Cerebrospinal Fluid and Magnetic Induction Phase Shift in Rabbit Intracerebral hematoma expansion Monitoring by MRI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingsheng; Yan, Qingguang; Sun, Jian; Jin, Gui; Qin, Mingxin

    2017-09-11

    In a prior study of intracerebral hemorrhage monitoring using magnetic induction phase shift (MIPS), we found that MIPS signal changes occurred prior to those seen with intracranial pressure. However, the characteristic MIPS alert is not yet fully explained. Combining the brain physiology and MIPS theory, we propose that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may be the primary factor that leads to hematoma expansion being alerted by MIPS earlier than with intracranial pressure monitoring. This paper investigates the relationship between CSF and MIPS in monitoring of rabbit intracerebral hemorrhage models, which is based on the MIPS measurements data, the quantified data on CSF from medical images and the amount of injected blood in the rabbit intracerebral hemorrhage model. In the investigated results, a R value of 0.792 with a significance of 0.019 is observed between the MIPS and CSF, which is closer than MIPS and injected blood. Before the reversal point of MIPS, CSF is the leading factor in MIPS signal changing in an early hematoma expansion stage. Under CSF compensation, CSF reduction compensates for hematoma expansion in the brain to keep intracranial pressure stable. MIPS decrease results from the reducing CSF volume. This enables MIPS to detect hematoma expansion earlier than intracranial pressure.

  13. Human immune cells' behavior and survival under bioenergetically restricted conditions in an in vitro fracture hematoma model.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Paula; Maschmeyer, Patrick; Gaber, Timo; Schütze, Tabea; Raue, Tobias; Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina; Dziurla, René; Schellmann, Saskia; Lohanatha, Ferenz Leonard; Röhner, Eric; Ode, Andrea; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Duda, Georg N; Perka, Carsten; Buttgereit, Frank

    2013-03-01

    The initial inflammatory phase of bone fracture healing represents a critical step for the outcome of the healing process. However, both the mechanisms initiating this inflammatory phase and the function of immune cells present at the fracture site are poorly understood. In order to study the early events within a fracture hematoma, we established an in vitro fracture hematoma model: we cultured hematomas forming during an osteotomy (artificial bone fracture) of the femur during total hip arthroplasty (THA) in vitro under bioenergetically controlled conditions. This model allowed us to monitor immune cell populations, cell survival and cytokine expression during the early phase following a fracture. Moreover, this model enabled us to change the bioenergetical conditions in order to mimic the in vivo situation, which is assumed to be characterized by hypoxia and restricted amounts of nutrients. Using this model, we found that immune cells adapt to hypoxia via the expression of angiogenic factors, chemoattractants and pro-inflammatory molecules. In addition, combined restriction of oxygen and nutrient supply enhanced the selective survival of lymphocytes in comparison with that of myeloid derived cells (i.e., neutrophils). Of note, non-restricted bioenergetical conditions did not show any similar effects regarding cytokine expression and/or different survival rates of immune cell subsets. In conclusion, we found that the bioenergetical conditions are among the crucial factors inducing the initial inflammatory phase of fracture healing and are thus a critical step for influencing survival and function of immune cells in the early fracture hematoma.

  14. Serial imaging and SWAN sequence of developmental venous anomaly thrombosis with hematoma: Diagnosis and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Monique, Boukobza; Sandra, Calvez; Marie-Cécile, Henry-Feugeas; Jean-Pierre, Laissy

    2017-09-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are usually asymptomatic. We report a case of DVA thrombosis with recurrent tiny frontal hematoma in a 24-year-old man. The contribution of T2-GRE and SWAN sequences are discussed. Follow-up attested complete recanalization after anticoagulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The course of chronic subdural hematomas after burr-hole craniostomy with and without closed-system drainage.

    PubMed

    Markwalder, T M

    2000-07-01

    The author provides a comprehensive review of the results of surgical treatment of chronic subdural hematomas (CSHs). The postoperative clinical course of CSH is studied with respect to the influence of neomembranous organization, cortical expansion, and subdural pressure. The importance of subdural drainage is emphasized.

  16. Axillary artery injury combined with delayed brachial plexus palsy due to compressive hematoma in a young patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Axillary artery injury in the shoulder region following blunt trauma without association with either shoulder dislocation or fracture of the humeral neck has been previously reported. Axillary artery injury might also be accompanied with brachial plexus injury. However, delayed onset of brachial plexus palsy caused by a compressive hematoma associated with axillary injury after blunt trauma in the shoulder region has been rarely reported. In previous reports, this condition only occurred in old patients with sclerotic vessels. We present a case of a young patient who suffered axillary artery injury associated with brachial plexus palsy that occurred tardily due to compressive hematoma after blunt trauma in the shoulder region without association of either shoulder dislocation or humeral neck fracture. Case presentation A 16-year-old male injured his right shoulder in a motorbike accident. On initial physical evaluation, the pulses on the radial and ulnar arteries in the affected arm were palpable. Paralysis developed later from 2 days after the injury. Functions in the right arm became significantly impaired. Angiography showed complete occlusion of the axillary artery. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass measuring 4 × 5 cm that was suspected to be a hematoma compressing the brachial plexus in a space between the subscapular muscle and the pectoralis minor muscle. Surgery was performed on the third day after injury. In intraoperative observations, the axillary artery was occluded with thrombus along 5 cm; a subscapular artery was ruptured; the brachial plexus was compressed by the hematoma. After evacuation of the hematoma, neurolysis of the brachial plexus, and revascularization of the axillary artery, the patient had an excellent functional recovery of the affected upper limb, postoperatively. Conclusion Surgeons should be aware that axillary artery injuries may even occur in young people after severe blunt trauma in the shoulder region

  17. Adverse Outcomes After Initial Non-surgical Management of Subdural Hematoma: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Morris, Nicholas A; Merkler, Alexander E; Parker, Whitney E; Claassen, Jan; Connolly, E Sander; Sheth, Kevin N; Kamel, Hooman

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the natural history of non-surgically managed subdural hematoma (SDH). The purpose of this study is to determine rates of adverse events after non-surgical management of SDH and whether these outcomes differ depending on traumatic versus nontraumatic etiology. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using administrative claims data on all emergency department visits and acute care hospitalizations at nonfederal facilities in California from 2005 to 2011, Florida from 2005 to 2012, and New York from 2006 to 2011. We included patients who were discharged home after hospitalization with a first-recorded diagnosis of SDH and no record of surgical hematoma evacuation. Patients were followed for readmission with SDH, readmission for surgical SDH evacuation, and fatal readmission with SDH. Survival statistics and the log-rank test were used to compare rates of these adverse events after traumatic versus nontraumatic SDH. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to compare hazards for traumatic versus nontraumatic etiology while adjusting for age, sex, race, insurance status, presence of dementia, alcohol use, acquired abnormalities in coagulation, acquired abnormalities in platelet function, hypertension, atrial fibrillation, venous thromboembolism, ischemic stroke, coronary heart disease, and valvular disease. We identified 27,502 conservatively treated patients with SDH, of which 70.9% were traumatic and 29.1% nontraumatic. Compared to patients with traumatic SDH, patients with nontraumatic SDH had significantly higher rates of subsequent hospitalization with SDH (cumulative 90-day rates: 15.3 % [95% CI 14.5-16.1%] vs. 10.3% [95% CI 9.9-10.8%]), surgical SDH evacuation (7.8% [95% CI 7.3-8.5%] vs. 5.5% [95% CI 5.2-5.8%]), and SDH-related in-hospital death (1.0% [95% CI 0.8-1.2%] vs. 0.4% [95 % CI 0.3-0.5%]). In multivariable Cox regression analysis, nontraumatic etiology was associated with a higher hazard of readmission with SDH (HR 1

  18. Predictors of Hematoma Volume in Deep and Lobar Supratentorial Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Guido J.; Biffi, Alessandro; Brouwers, H. Bart; Anderson, Christopher D.; Battey, Thomas W. K.; Ayres, Alison M.; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Schwab, Kristin; Rost, Natalia S.; Goldstein, Joshua N.; Viswanathan, Anand; Greenberg, Steven M.; Rosand, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Importance Hematoma volume is the strongest predictor of outcome in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Despite known differences in the underlying biology between deep and lobar ICHs, limited data are available on location specificity of factors reported to affect hematoma volume. Objective To evaluate whether determinants of ICH volume differ by topography, we sought to estimate location-specific effects for potential predictors of this radiological outcome. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Academic medical center. Participants A total of 744 supratentorial primary ICH patients (388 deep and 356 lobar) aged older than 18 years admitted between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2010. Main Outcomes and Measures Intracerebral hemorrhage volume measured from the computed tomography scan obtained on presentation to the emergency department. Linear regression analysis, stratified by ICH location, was implemented to identify determinants of log-transformed ICH volume. Results Median ICH volume was larger in lobar hemorrhages (39 mL; interquartile range, 16-75 mL) than in deep hemorrhages (13 mL; interquartile range, 5-40 mL; P<.001). In multivariable linear regression, independent predictors of deep ICH volume were intensity of anticoagulation (β=0.32; standard error [SE]=0.08; P<.001; test for trend across 4 categories of the international normalized ratio), history of coronary artery disease (β=0.33; SE=0.17; P=.05), male sex (β=0.28; SE=0.14; P=.05), and age (β=−0.02; SE=0.01; P=.001). Independent predictors of lobar ICH volume were intensity of anticoagulation (β=0.14; SE=0.06; P=.02) and antiplatelet treatment (β=0.27; SE=0.13; P=.03). Conclusions and Relevance Predictors of hematoma volume only partially overlap between deep and lobar ICHs. These findings suggest that the mechanisms that determine the extent of bleeding differ for deep and lobar ICHs. Further studies are needed to characterize the specific biological pathways that underlie the observed

  19. Management of Liver Allograft Trauma Resulting in Massive Subcapsular Hematoma After Living Donor Liver Transplantation: Can We Salvage the Liver Allograft?

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shih-Chao; Thorat, Ashok; Poon, Kin-Shing; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Chen, Te-Hung; Yang, Horng-Ren; Jeng, Long-Bin

    2017-01-05

    BACKGROUND Liver allograft trauma resulting in subcapsular hematoma after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), although rare, is a life-threatening condition and requires prompt management to avoid any catastrophe. Herein we describe our successful experience in dealing with liver allograft hematoma that developed in the post-operative period after LDLT. MATERIAL AND METHODS From January 2002 to May 2015, a total of 616 recipients underwent LDLT at our institute. The intra-operative and postoperative records of these patients were analyzed to study the cases of liver allograft hematoma. Four patients (n=4) who developed liver allograft subcapsular hematoma during the intra-operative and post-operative periods were included in study. The outcomes of these patients were studied after the administration of the medical, surgical, or combined modalities of treatment. RESULTS Out of 616 LDLT recipients, 4 (0.64%) developed subcapsular hematoma. Patients were managed by a stepwise approach: Initial non-operative management with transarterial embolization (if extravasation of the contrast was noticed during imaging studies) was performed (n=1). Three patients developed hemodynamic instability with signs of hematoma rupture and were successfully treated by surgical exploration. CONCLUSIONS Timely diagnosis and suitable management can successfully salvage a liver allograft even in the presence of massive subcapsular hematoma. Our emphasis is on perihepatic packing rather than open surgical drainage if exploration is required, which can achieve a 100% success rate.

  20. Late-onset posttraumatic septal hematoma and abscess formation in a six-year-old Tamil girl--case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Dubach, Patrick; Aebi, Christoph; Caversaccio, Marco

    2008-12-01

    Nasal septal hematoma with abscess (NSHA) is an uncommon complication of trauma and studies on children are especially rare. We discuss the case of a 6-year-old girl, who was initially evaluated independently by three doctors for minor nasal trauma but had to be re-hospitalized 6 days later with NSHA. Although septal hematoma had initially been excluded (5, 7 and 24 hours after trauma), a secondary accumulation of blood seems to have occured. Delayed hematoma formation has been described in the orbit as a result of possible venous injuries after endoscopic sinus surgery. However, such an observation is new for septal hematoma in children. Thus, we recommend re-evaluation for septal hematoma 48h to 72h after paediatric nasal trauma. Such a scheduled re-examination offers a chance to treat delayed subperichondral hematoma on time before almost inevitable superinfection leads to abscess formation and destruction of the nasal infrastructure. We suggest that parents should be vigilant for delayed nasal obstruction as possible herald of hematoma accumulation within the first week.