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  1. Dr. William Briggs: ophthalmic physician at St. Thomas' Hospital, London.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, J

    2001-01-01

    William Briggs, MD, established himself as one of the first ophthalmic physicians, whom today we would call a neuro-ophthalmologist, to practice in the United Kingdom. After graduating with an MD from Cambridge in 1677, and while a Fellow of Corpus Christi College, he carried out original studies in visual anatomy and physiology. He described and named the optic papilla and the retinal nerve fibers in his book Ophthalmographia, published in 1676. He published his New Theory of Vision in 1682. While at Cambridge, he was a contemporary and a friend of Isaac Newton, with whom Briggs worked but who, in matters of visual anatomy and physiology, came to reach different conclusions from Briggs. In 1683, Briggs came to London to practice as a physician at St. Thomas' Hospital, where he established a considerable reputation as an ophthalmologist. For political reasons he was forced to resign from the Hospital prematurely.

  2. Revolutionary changes in medicine and ophthalmology--the St. Louis, MO, effect: Homer G. Phillips Hospital and Dr. Howard Phillip venable.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Andrew S.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide information on the revolutionary changes in medicine, particularly on the development of African-Americans in ophthalmology, created by Homer G. Phillips Hospital in St. Louis and the late Dr. Howard Phillip Venable. METHODS: Very little has been written about Homer G. Phillips Hospital and Dr. H. Phillip Venable. Through personal interviews with physicians trained by Dr. Venable and literature review, I was able to obtain information on Homer G. Phillips Hospital and Dr. Venable's influence in breaking the color line in medicine and ophthalmology. RESULTS: Homer G. Phillips Hospital in St. Louis was a major teaching hospital for African-American doctors. Dr. Venable was one of a few African-American ophthalmologists in the 1940s. Dr. Venable then trained approximately 40 African-American ophthalmologists at Homer G. Phillips Hospital between 1943 to 1979, when the hospital closed. CONCLUSION: The ophthalmologists trained by Dr. Venable have gone forward to treat thousands of patients with blinding eye diseases such as glaucoma and diabetes, and to influence others to become ophthalmologists. Although the hospital has closed and Dr. Venable has passed away, their existence has reformed the medical treatment received by African-Americans and other people. Images p484-a PMID:12856914

  3. Evaluation of Nosocomial Infection in Patients at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, A; Farhangi, H; Badiee, Z; Banihashem, A; Mosaddegh, MR

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections in critical care unit are high, and they are serious hospital problems. Infections acquired during the hospital stay are generally called nosocomial infections, initially known as infections arising after 48 h of hospital admission. The mostfrequent nosocomial infections (urinary, respiratory, gastroenteritis and blood stream infection) were common in patients at hospital.The aim was to study, the current status of nosocomial infection, rate of infection among hospitalized children at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Materials and Methods Data were collected from 200 patient's records presented with symptoms of nosocomial infection at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital from March 2014 to September 2014. Descriptive statistics using percentage was calculated. Results Incidence of nosocomial infections inpatients athematology-oncology ward was 31% (62/200). Of which 69.35% (43/62) blood stream infection being the most frequent; followed by 30.64% (19/62) was urinary tract infection (UTI), and the most common blood culture isolate was been Staphylococcus epidermidis 18 (41.86%), andour study showed that large numbers ofnosocomial UTIs causing by Gram‑negative bacteria. Conclusion This study showed blood stream infection and UTI are the common nosocomial infections among patients athematology-oncology ward. Early recognition of infections and short term use of invasive devices along with proper infection control procedures can significantly decrease the incidence of nosocomial infections in patients. PMID:26985350

  4. [Prevalence of gastrointestinal disorders in adults with common variable immunodeficiency at Specialty Hospital Dr. Bernardo Sepulveda].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Negrete, Elda Victoria; Mayoral-Zavala, Arturo; Rodríguez-Mireles, Karen Alicia; Díaz de León-Salazar, Oscar Edmundo; Hernández-Mondragón, Oscar; Gómez-Jiménez, Luz María; Moreno-Alcántar, R; González-Virla, Baldomero

    2015-01-01

    Antecedentes: la incidencia de la inmunodeficiencia común variable (IDCV) es de 1 por cada 15,000 a 117,000 casos, sin predominio de género. La incidencia de manifestaciones gastrointestinales en estos pacientes es de 20 a 60% y pueden ser la primera y única manifestación clínica de IDCV. En México existe escasa información en relación con el tipo y frecuencia de alteraciones gastrointestinales que padecen los pacientes adultos con IDCV. Objetivo: determinar la prevalencia de alteraciones gastrointestinales en pacientes adultos con inmunodeficiencia común variable. Material y método: estudio descriptivo, observacional y transversal en el que participaron pacientes con inmunodeficiencia común variable de la Clínica de Inmunodeficiencias del Servicio de Alergia e Inmunología Clínica del Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI. A todos los pacientes se les aplicó un cuestionario de síntomas gastrointestinales y se les realizaron estudios de laboratorio, gabinete, endoscopia y prueba de aliento para determinar sobrepoblación bacteriana. Resultados: evaluamos 17 pacientes, 8 hombres y 9 mujeres, con edad promedio de 36 años y diagnóstico definitivo de inmunodeficiencia común variable de acuerdo con criterios internacionales. El 59% refirió dolor abdominal, 53% distensión abdominal y 17.6% estreñimiento. El 47% tenía diarrea crónica, en dos de ellos (11.8%) acompañada de pujo rectal. Las enfermedades gastrointestinales de esta población fueron: 18% diarrea crónica, enfermedad celiaca y sobrepoblación bacteriana, 24% trastorno funcional digestivo, 12% estreñimiento, 6% dispepsia. Sólo un paciente (6%) no tenía síntomas gastrointestinales. Conclusión: la prevalencia de las enfermedades gastrointestinales en pacientes adultos con inmunodeficiencia común variable fue de 94%, sin predominio de género. Debido a la frecuencia de manifestaciones gastrointestinales, es importante realizar protocolos de estudio al respecto

  5. Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, Indonesia from 2009-2013

    PubMed Central

    Suwarsa, Oki; Dharmadji, Hartati Purbo; Sutedja, Endang

    2016-01-01

    Background Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR) with high mortality and have a significant public health impact because of high mortality and morbidity. Objective To describe data the epidemiological features, etiology, and treatment of retrospectively reviewed data of all patients with SJS and TEN. Methods Retrospective study was conducted in patients with SJS and TEN treated from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2013 in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung, Indonesia. Results A total of 57 patients were enrolled in the study. Thirty-nine cases of SJS (21 males and 18 females), 7 cases of SJS overlapping TEN (4 males and 3 females), and 11 cases of TEN (5 males and 6 females) were reported. All cases of SJS and TEN were caused by drugs, such as paracetamol (16.56%), carbamazepine (7%), amoxicillin (5.73%), ibuprofen (4.46%), rifampicin (3.18%), and trihexyphenidyl (3.18%). All cases were treated systemically with corticosteroid alone (100%). Seven from 57 patients (12,28%) died; 5 cases developed sepsis and 2 cases developed respiratory failure. The mortality rate was 7.69% in SJS, 0% in SJS/TEN overlap, and 36.36% in TEN. Conclusion The role of systemic corticosteroids in SJS and TEN are still controversial, but with a prompt and earlier treatment reduces mortality and improves outcomes of SJS and TEN patients. PMID:26844219

  6. Association between Severe Dehydration in Rotavirus Diarrhea and Exclusive Breastfeeding among Infants at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Prasetyo, Dwi; Sabaroedin, Iesje Martiza; Ermaya, Yudith Setiati; Soenarto, Yati

    2015-01-01

    Background. Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe acute diarrhea in children. Infants who are exclusively breastfed develop fewer infections and have less severe illnesses. This study aimed to determine association between severe dehydration in rotavirus diarrhea and exclusive breastfeeding. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study in infants ≤ 6 months old with acute diarrhea in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia. Results. From 134 infants ≤ 6 months old with acute diarrhea enrolled from April 2009 to December 2012, there were 88 (65.6%) boys and 46 (34.4%) girls in this study. Rotavirus was detected in 60 (44.8 %), 32 (53.3%) of whom were exclusively breastfed. From rotavirus positive subjects, severe dehydration occurred in 4 (12.6%) exclusively breastfed infants and 6 (21.5%) not exclusively breastfed infants. No significant association was found between severe dehydration and exclusive breastfeeding (p = 0.491) in rotavirus diarrhea. Conclusions. In rotavirus diarrhea, there was no significant association between exclusive breastfeeding and severe dehydration. PMID:26612990

  7. The contribution of Dr. Mary Walker towards myasthenia gravis and periodic paralysis whilst working in poor law hospitals in London.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J D

    2005-06-01

    Dr. Mary Walker discovered in 1934 that physostigmine and Prostigmin temporarily restored muscle function in patients with myasthenia gravis. In the next five years, Dr. Walker and colleagues provided clinical evidence for the weakness of myasthenia gravis being caused by a "disturbance of transmission of excitation from motor nerve to voluntary muscle presumably caused by a deficiency of acetylcholine. Physostigmine (or Prostigmin) compensated for the lack of acetylcholine by delaying its destruction." Dr. Walker and colleagues also described the association between familial periodic paralysis and hypokalaemia.

  8. PREVALENCE OF METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS FROM NOSE AND THROAT OF PATIENTS ON ADMISSION TO MEDICAL WARDS OF DR SOETOMO HOSPITAL, SURABAYA, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Kuntaman, K; Hadi, Usman; Setiawan, Firman; Koendori, Eko Budi; Rusli, Musofa; Santosaningsih, Dewi; Severin, Juliette; Verbrugh, Henri A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in Indonesian hospitals are still scarce. These data are required for health management of infectious diseases in order to control hospital MRSA. The carriage rate of MRSA in nose and throat of patients on admission to Dr Soetomo Hospital Surabaya, Indonesia was 8.1% of 643 patients, 5.4% from throat, 3.9% from nose and 1.2% from both sites. Prevalence of MRSA among patients admitted to surgical and non-surgical ward was not different (8.2% and 8.0%, respectively). Although MRSA prevalence in Indonesian hospitals is low compared to many other countries worldwide, appropriate health strategies will be needed to be implemented if this infection is to be controlled.

  9. PREVALENCE OF METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS FROM NOSE AND THROAT OF PATIENTS ON ADMISSION TO MEDICAL WARDS OF DR SOETOMO HOSPITAL, SURABAYA, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Kuntaman, K; Hadi, Usman; Setiawan, Firman; Koendori, Eko Budi; Rusli, Musofa; Santosaningsih, Dewi; Severin, Juliette; Verbrugh, Henri A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in Indonesian hospitals are still scarce. These data are required for health management of infectious diseases in order to control hospital MRSA. The carriage rate of MRSA in nose and throat of patients on admission to Dr Soetomo Hospital Surabaya, Indonesia was 8.1% of 643 patients, 5.4% from throat, 3.9% from nose and 1.2% from both sites. Prevalence of MRSA among patients admitted to surgical and non-surgical ward was not different (8.2% and 8.0%, respectively). Although MRSA prevalence in Indonesian hospitals is low compared to many other countries worldwide, appropriate health strategies will be needed to be implemented if this infection is to be controlled. PMID:27086426

  10. The development of pediatric anesthesiology and critical care medicine at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital: an interview with Dr. Theodore Striker.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zulfiqar; Samuels, Paul J; Mai, Christine L; Rodriguez, Samuel; Iftikhar, Ahmed Raza; Yaster, Myron

    2015-08-01

    Dr. Theodore W. 'Ted' Striker (1936-), Professor of Anesthesiology and Pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati, has played a pioneering role in the development of pediatric anesthesiology in the United States. As a model educator, clinician, and administrator, he shaped the careers of hundreds of physicians-in-training and imbued them with his core values of honesty, integrity, and responsibility. PMID:25989362

  11. Specificity of 136 patient's antibodies to human red blood cells in Dr. Max Peralta J Hospital Blood Bank 2004-February 2009.

    PubMed

    Cerdas-Quesada, César

    2010-04-01

    The development of alloantibodies and erythrocyte autoantibodies complicates transfusion therapy. The antibodies detection of potential clinical significance in 136 samples of Dr. Max Peralta J Hospital Blood Bank patients, Cartago, Costa Rica between 2004 and February, 2009 were evaluated. Transfusion of phenotypically matched blood for Rh and Kell systems proved to be effective in preventing alloimmunization because it been found in this study that there is good evidence that a high proportion of antibodies produced in response to transfusion are Rh and K specificity.

  12. Cost of hospital care for HIV/AIDS infected patients in three general reference hospitals in Lubumbashi, DR Congo: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Tshamba, Henri Mundongo; a Kaut, Clarence Mukeng; Kyalubile, Nono Mulubwa; Kakambal, Alphonse Kaij; Yav, Grevisse Ditend; Kaj, Françoise Malonga; Vancaillie, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This article analyses the composition of healthcare costs for HIV/AIDS infected patients in a country with limited resources and attempts to identify the factors that influence these costs. The aims are to calculate medical care costs, analysing how they vary depending on patients’ income, and to evaluate the factors explaining healthcare consumption. Methods This is a prospective cohort study focusing on patients who were admitted to hospital for a short stay between January 2010 and June 2011, before their integration into a specialised program. The patients were selected randomly. Free consent was obtained from all participants. Data were analysed using the SPSS 19.0 software. The significance threshold was set at 5% and the CI (Confidence Interval) at 95%. We used Kruskal-Wallis tests, Fisher's exact test and multiple linear regression. Results We monitored 209 patients. Their average age was 36.37 years (SD: 8.72). The sex ratio was 0.58 and the women patients were generally younger than the male ones (p=0.011). The overall cost of healthcare amounted to $US 41,922. The cost of Antiretroviral Therapy represented 21.6% ($US 9,045). The price of para-clinical examinations represented 46% ($US 19,136) of the overall cost. The patient's average monthly income was $US 157.40 whereas the average direct cost per patient was$US 201.45. Both monthly income (t=4.385; p=0.0000) and education level (t=3.703 p=0.0003) were statistically significant predictive factors for healthcare consumption. The medical care costs for patients with opportunistic infections were nine times higher than those for patients who presented none. The presence of opportunistic infections increased healthcare consumption by approximately 31$ US (CI 95%: 15-46.9). Conclusion The average direct cost for patients on each short-term stay was higher than the average monthly income. To be able to access the necessary services, the patients need additional resources, which are derived

  13. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun with Dr. Eberhard Rees and R.W. Cook at a press conference concerning Dr. Von Braun's assignment to NASA headquarters and Dr. Rees' subsequent assignment as Marshall Center director.

  14. Dr. Wernher Von Braun with Dr. Christian Barnard.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Christian Barnard Tours Marshall Space Flight Center. Shown in Dr. Von Braun's office are (left to right): Dr. Ernst Sthulinger, a representative from General Electric, Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Dr. Christian Barnard, and Dr. Eberhard Rees.

  15. Mortality according to age and burned body surface in the Virgen del Rocio University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cía, T; Mallén, J; Márquez, T; Portela, C; Lopez, I

    1999-06-01

    The application of updated clinical protocols for the treatment of burned patients is showing very good results. The mortality curves according to age and the percentage of burned body surface could be of great use for the comparison of clinical results between different burns units. The probability of survival in 1000 consecutive patients admitted to the Burns Unit of the Virgen del Rocio University Hospital between July, 1993 and August, 1997, is compared, by graphic analysis, with the mortality curves of other centers, obtaining similar results. We conclude that the results of medical attendance in our unit are in line with those considered as a reference.

  16. [Registry of myocardial infarction in a tertiary hospital of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social].

    PubMed

    González-Pliego, José Angel; Gudiño-Amezcua, Diego Armando; Celis, Alfredo; Gutiérrez-Díaz, Gonzalo Israel

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: dado que el pronóstico de infarto del miocardio con elevación del segmento ST (IMCEST) depende de su manejo inmediato y de las medidas de prevención secundaria, el no seguir las recomendaciones actuales impide mejorar las expectativas de la población afectada por este padecimiento. El objetivo es describir el perfil clínico-epidemiológico y el proceso de atención del IMCEST en un hospital de tercer nivel. Métodos: se analiza la información clínica, la estratificación de riesgo, la terapia de revascularización y los hábitos de prescripción al egreso de los casos con IMCEST atendidos en un año. Resultados: se incluyeron 246 pacientes con edad promedio de 61 años; el 76 % fueron varones. La mayoría (37.3 %) de IMCEST ocurrió entre los 60 y los 69 años. El sedentarismo fue el factor de riesgo predominante. El 81.7 % de los casos tuvo score TIMI de riesgo bajo. El 35 % tuvo isquemia/viabilidad y en todos los cateterizados se demostraron obstrucciones coronarias. El 76 % se revascularizó con stent, principalmente farmacológico (77.5 %). Al egreso más del 90 % de los casos recibió estatina y antiplaquetarios, mientras otras drogas se prescribieron al 64-82 % de los casos. Conclusiones: el IMCEST predomina en hombres sedentarios de la séptima década. Estratificar el riesgo, buscar isquemia/viabilidad residual y revascularizar con stent farmacológico son prácticas comunes; el cumplimiento de recomendaciones basadas en la evidencia es mejor que en el pasado, pero todavía no es óptimo.

  17. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccot, Sila

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  18. CONHECIMENTO DA LEI GERAL DE SAÚDE – RESPEITO ÀS TRANSFUSÕES SANGUÍNEAS EM MÉDICOS E PACIENTES TESTEMUNHAS DE JEOVÁ DO HOSPITAL DR. DARÍO CONTRERAS DA REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

    PubMed Central

    SANTANA, ELSA DÍAZ

    2010-01-01

    Este estudo avalia quanto o corpo médico do Hospital Dr. Darío Contreras de República Dominicana conhece, respeita, informa e aplica a Lei Geral de Saúde em relação aos direitos do paciente Testemunha de Jeová de negar-se a ser transfundido (respeito a sua autonomia); também se os Testemunhas de Jeová conhecem a Lei Geral de Saúde e até que ponto têm se beneficiado diante dessa proposição. O estudo revelou que nem médicos, nem Testemunhas de Jeová conhecem de fato essa lei. PMID:20689657

  19. Dr. Barnett's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.

    1990-04-01

    In 1986, AstroPower was a tiny R D company located at the University of Delaware. Like many other entrepreneurs in the field at that time, the company's president, Dr. Allen Barnett, had a good idea, a good research staff, and the dream of becoming a successful manufacturer of photovoltaic (PV) cells. If the Newark, Del. company's projections remain on track, Barnett plans to become the third largest PV manufacturer in the United States by the end of next year. Were it not for the company's performance to date, such a claim might well be dismissed as idle dreaming. AstroPower Inc. is pursuing a two-pronged strategy: to rapidly bring a new thin-crystal silicon PV cell to commercialization; and, in the meantime, to gain experience in manufacturing and distributing conventional single-crystal and polycrystal silicon cells. The company sold approximately 200 kilowatts (kWp) of cells last year (about half single-crystal and half polycrystal). Its current production capacity is 360 kWp. The company and its products are described.

  20. ["Del governo tecnico sanitario degli Ospedali" (Italian) ("Hospital governance") by E. Ronzani (1877-1943)- Padua (Italy), 1910].

    PubMed

    Renzulli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the contents of the first edition of the Italian textbook "Del governo tecnico sanitario degli ospedali" ("Hospital Governance") written by Prof. Enrico Ronzani (1877- 1943) and published in Padua (Italy) in 1910. The textbook contains a a preface by Prof. A. Serafini. Prof. Ronzani, a lecturer in Hygiene and health in 1910, introduced the first university course in "Hygiene and hospital technique" in Italy, in Padua in the academic year 1910-1911. The book focuses principally on the duties and responsibilities inherent in the role of the medical director. PMID:24770366

  1. Afebrile pneumonia (whooping cough) syndrome in infants at Hospital Universitario del Valle, Cali, 2001-2007

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Dolly; Echandía-Villegas, Connie Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Afebrile pneumonia syndrome in infants, also called infant pneumonitis, pneumonia caused by atypical pathogens or whooping cough syndrome is a major cause of severe lower respiratory infection in young infants, both in developing countries and in developed countries. Objective: To describe children with afebrile pneumonia syndrome. Methods: Through a cross-sectional study, we reviewed the medical records of children diagnosed with afebrile pneumonia treated at Hospital Universitario del Valle, a reference center in southwestern Colombia, between June 2001 and December 2007. We obtained data on maternal age and origin, prenatal care, the childs birth, breastfeeding, vaccination status, symptoms, signs, diagnosis, treatment, and complications. Results: We evaluated 101 children with this entity, noting a stationary presentation: June-August and November- December. A total of 73% of the children were under 4 months of age; the most common symptoms were: cyanotic and spasmodic cough (100%), respiratory distress (70%), and unquantified fever (68%). The most common findings: rales (crackles) (50%), wheezing and expiratory stridor (37%); 66% were classified as mild and of the remaining 33%, half of them required attention in the intensive care unit. In all, there was clinical diagnosis of afebrile pneumonia syndrome in infants, but no etiologic diagnosis was made and despite this, 94% of the children received macrolides. Conclusions: These data support the hypothesis that most of these patients acquired the disease by airway, possibly caused by viral infection and did not require the indiscriminate use of macrolides. PMID:24893051

  2. [Programme review of somatropin deficit in pediatrics at the Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío].

    PubMed

    Lavaredas, A; de la Puerta, R; Álvarez del Vayo, C

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: Elaborar una revisión del programa de déficit de somatropina aplicado en pediatría en el Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, utilizando dos grupos de pacientes, los diagnosticados con déficit de esta hormona y los nacidos pequeños para edad gestacional, con la intención de evaluar su efectividad en el primer año de tratamiento. Método: Realización de un estudio retrospectivo de la cohorte de pacientes en tratamiento con la hormona del crecimiento bajo los diagnósticos mencionados, con metodología observacional y transversal, a los cuales se aplicó un análisis estadístico con el programa Statistical Package for Social Sciences®. Resultados: Tras inicio del tratamiento la velocidad de crecimiento y la talla aumentaron y la edad ósea se aproximó a la edad cronológica. En los dos grupos tratados, en el primer año de tratamiento fueron los pacientes del sexo femenino con edad comprendida entre los 0 a 12 años con déficit de la hormona del crecimiento que respondieron mejor a la terapéutica establecida. Conclusiones: Pudimos observar que el tratamiento instituido se presentó altamente efectivo en ambos grupos de pacientes, permitiendo obtener un aumento favorable de estatura.

  3. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Thomas Paine, Deputy Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, examines an ordinary man's shoe outfitted for use in the Saturn I workshop. Pictured from the left in the Saturn I workshop mockup are William Brooksbank, propulsion and vehicle engineering laboratory; Dr. Paine; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Center director; Colonel Clare F. Farley, Executive Officer in the Office Of The Administrator; and Charles J. Donlan, Deputy Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight, Technical. the shoe Dr. Paine is holding has a unique fastener built into the sole to allow an astronaut to move about on the workshop floor and to remain in one position if he desires.

  4. [Influence of tobacco smoking on newborn's birth weight--analisys of dates concerning births from Maternity Hospital named. Dr S. Mossor's in Opole City].

    PubMed

    Guzikowski, Wojciech; Pirogowicz, Iwona

    2008-01-01

    Despite wide education, tobacco smoking while being pregnant is very important issue in perinatology. It is important problem because of life style of polish society, including pregnant women. Clinical observation of this issue is pointing on risk of occurring pathology in pregnancy, unfavorable consequences for neonate also many distant pathological effects among children. Purpose of this was getting an answer for question: whether in current social and economic situation there is connection between low birth mass and smoking tobacco during pregnancy. Under analysis were found births between 38th and 40th one hundred successive births (according to book of birth-room from 2860 labors in hospital in Opol, 2007) of mothers are smoking up to 10 cigarettes a day (group I), mothers smoking 11-20 cigarettes a day (group II) and mothers that are not smoking. This works affirms that smoking has negative influence on child birth mass. It is also displayed that higher the number of smoked cigarettes the higher percent of newborns with low birth mass and higher number o fetus with intrauterine growth retardation. Among mothers that are smoking the biggest group were young women (mean. 24, years) and multipara female (58%). PMID:19189515

  5. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (left) and Fred W. Kelley examine a ST-100 Stellar Instrument Platform in the astrionics lab. Dr. Von Braun, then deputy associate administrator for planning, NASA, was visiting on the anniversary of the establishment of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  6. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Shown viewing the Apollo telescope mockup are, from left to right, Charles Donlan, deputy associate administrator for manned space flight; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director; William Horton, astrionics lab; Dr. Thomas Paine, NASA deputy administrator; Warner Kuers, director of the ME lab.

  7. Dr. Daniel Carter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Carter, president of New Century Pharmaceuticals in Huntsville, Al, is one of three principal investigators in NASA's microgravity protein crystal growth program. Dr. Carter's experties is in albumins. Albumins are proteins in the bloodstream that transport materials, drugs, nutrients, and wastes. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  8. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, stands in front of a Saturn IB Launch Vehicle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Dr. Von Braun was Marshall's first Center Director (1960-1970). Under his leadership Marshall was responsible for the development of the Saturn rockets, the Skylab project and getting the United States into Space and landing on the moon with the Apollo missions.

  9. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the astronautics lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics lab.

  10. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the Astronautics Lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics Lab.

  11. Goldie Brangman Remembers the Operation to Save Dr King.

    PubMed

    Koch, Evan; Brangman, Goldie

    2015-12-01

    In September 1958 the Rev Dr Martin Luther King Jr was stabbed and nearly assassinated. Surgeons at Harlem Hospital in New York City removed a 17.8-cm (7-in)-long letter opener from Dr King's chest. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Goldie Brangman remembers this event because she participated in Dr King's anesthetic. This article correlates Brangman's memories with published accounts of the event. It also places the event within the context of the modern civil rights movement that Dr King led. PMID:26742331

  12. Goldie Brangman Remembers the Operation to Save Dr King.

    PubMed

    Koch, Evan; Brangman, Goldie

    2015-12-01

    In September 1958 the Rev Dr Martin Luther King Jr was stabbed and nearly assassinated. Surgeons at Harlem Hospital in New York City removed a 17.8-cm (7-in)-long letter opener from Dr King's chest. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Goldie Brangman remembers this event because she participated in Dr King's anesthetic. This article correlates Brangman's memories with published accounts of the event. It also places the event within the context of the modern civil rights movement that Dr King led.

  13. Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. von Braun is looking out from a 10th floor window of building 4200 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). He was the first Center Director and served as the Director from July 1960 through February 1970. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under the Project Paperclip (American acquisition of German rocket experts) to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his German Rocket Team (also called the Peenemuende Team) were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Under Dr. von Braun's leadership, MSFC developed the Saturn V launch vehicle, which placed the first men, two American astronauts, on the Moon. Wernher von Braun's life was dedicated to expanding man's knowledge through the exploration of space.

  14. Dr Pugh: a poisoner?

    PubMed

    Paull, J D; Morris, G M

    2012-07-01

    On 16 February 1845 the Reverend W. H. Browne, rector of St John's Church in Launceston, Van Diemen's Land, wrote in his journal, "My dear Wife died very suddenly almost immediately after and in consequence of taking a preparation of Hyd. Cyan. Acid prepared & supplied by Dr Pugh". This journal entry raises a number of questions. Was Dr Pugh treating a condition which he thought merited that treatment or was it a ghastly mistake? Was Caroline Browne suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis? Was hydrocyanic acid an accepted treatment at that time? Did Mrs Browne take the wrong dose? Was an incorrect concentration of the drug prepared by Dr Pugh? Did he use the wrong pharmacopoeia in preparing the hydrocyanic acid? Why was there no inquest? Only some of these questions can be answered. PMID:23230685

  15. Dr. Eberhard Rees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Dr. Eberhard Rees served as director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from March 1, 1970 until January 19, 1973 when he retired from NASA. Prior to his appointment as Director, Rees served as the Center's deputy director under Dr. Wernher von Braun, 1960-1970. Rees came to the United States as part of the Dr. Wernher von Braun's German Rocket team following World War II. He transferred to Huntsville, Alabama from Fort Bliss, Texas in 1950 to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal. From 1956 to 1960 he served as deputy director of development operations at the Army Ballistic Missile Agency under von Braun. In 1960 Rees was transferred to NASA's Marshall Center.

  16. Dr Pugh: a poisoner?

    PubMed

    Paull, J D; Morris, G M

    2012-07-01

    On 16 February 1845 the Reverend W. H. Browne, rector of St John's Church in Launceston, Van Diemen's Land, wrote in his journal, "My dear Wife died very suddenly almost immediately after and in consequence of taking a preparation of Hyd. Cyan. Acid prepared & supplied by Dr Pugh". This journal entry raises a number of questions. Was Dr Pugh treating a condition which he thought merited that treatment or was it a ghastly mistake? Was Caroline Browne suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis? Was hydrocyanic acid an accepted treatment at that time? Did Mrs Browne take the wrong dose? Was an incorrect concentration of the drug prepared by Dr Pugh? Did he use the wrong pharmacopoeia in preparing the hydrocyanic acid? Why was there no inquest? Only some of these questions can be answered.

  17. 1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 (structure no. 735) on left, DR 2 (structure no. 736) in center, and DR 3 (structure no. 737) looking north 30 degrees west, with tracking radar (large radome) and satcom (satellite communication) system in small radome in view between DR 2 and DR 3 antennae. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  18. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A camerman catches Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, his son, Peter, and daughter, Martgrit, as they arrive at the employee picnic held to celebrate man's first landing on the moon 6 days earlier. In the foreground is David R. Newby, Director of Administration and Technical Services at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  19. Dr. Goddard Transports Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard tows his rocket to the launching tower behind a Model A Ford truck, 15 miles northwest of Roswell, New Mexico. 1930- 1932. Dr. Goddard has been recognized as the 'Father of American Rocketry' and as one of three pioneers in the theoretical exploration of space. Robert Hutchings Goddard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on October 15, 1882. He was a theoretical scientist as well as a practical engineer. His dream was the conquest of the upper atmosphere and ultimately space through the use of rocket propulsion. Dr. Goddard, who died in 1945, was probably as responsible for the dawning of the Space Age as the Wright Brothers were for the begining of the Air Age. Yet his work attracted little serious attention during his lifetime. When the United States began to prepare for the conquest of space in the 1950's, American rocket scientists began to recognize the debt owed to the New England professor. They discovered that it was virtually impossible to construct a rocket or launch a satellite without acknowledging the work of Dr. Goddard. This great legacy was covered by more than 200 patents, many of which were issued after his death.

  20. Ask Dr. Sue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the need for child care providers to be sure children in their care who are between the ages of 15 months and 5 years have had Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine. Urges child care center staff to avoid use of bean bag infant cushions and to inform parents about the hazards posed by the cushions. (DR)

  1. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, explains the purpose of a thermal curtain in the mockup of a Saturn I workshop to U.S. Representative Armistead Seldon of Alabama. The Congressman visited the Marshall Center on March 2, 1968 to tour the workshop and to visit Marshall Center facilities.

  2. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    U.S. Representative Armistead Seldon (D.-Al) inspects the food preparation area of the Saturn I workshop mockup during a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center. Explaining the operation of the food preparation area to the congressman is Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director.

  3. Hospital marketing.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    This article looks at a prescribed academic framework for various criteria that serve as a checklist for marketing performance that can be applied to hospital marketing organizations. These guidelines are drawn from some of Dr. Noel Capon of Columbia University's book Marketing Management in the 21st Century and applied to actual practices of hospital marketing organizations. In many ways this checklist can act as a "marketing" balanced scorecard to verify performance effectiveness and develop opportunities for innovation.

  4. Hospital marketing.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    This article looks at a prescribed academic framework for various criteria that serve as a checklist for marketing performance that can be applied to hospital marketing organizations. These guidelines are drawn from some of Dr. Noel Capon of Columbia University's book Marketing Management in the 21st Century and applied to actual practices of hospital marketing organizations. In many ways this checklist can act as a "marketing" balanced scorecard to verify performance effectiveness and develop opportunities for innovation. PMID:14753323

  5. Dr. Faustus: Theist or Atheist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karim, Shah Mohammad Sanaul; Fathema, Fawzia; Hakim, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Faustus is the greatest but the most controversial of Marlowe's plays. Among the causes of controversy, whether Dr. Faustus is an atheist or theist deserves utmost attention. This paper is intended to deal with the issue. Though at various stages of the development of the action, Dr. Faustus abjures Trinity, resorts to necromancy, becomes…

  6. Introduction of Dr. Andrew V Schally

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Valdés, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    I first met Dr. Andrew V Schally (PhD, MDhc (Multi), DSc, Distinguished Medical Research Scientist, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Professor of Pathology and Department of Medicine,
Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA) many years ago, probably around the beginning of the 1990's in one of his visits to Mexico City (Figure 1). He has many friends in my country since some of the investigations that led to the development of the LHRH agonists were made in a couple of Mexican hospitals in collaboration with some outstanding Mexican physicians that I will mention later. In that time, I was the head of the Department of Urology of the Mexican National Cancer Institute and our Director, Dr. Jaime de la Garza, invited him for a meeting. I was surprised by his humbleness, intelligence and easy going personality, in spite of being a Nobel Prize scientist. PMID:26112485

  7. [Radiological percutaneous gastrostomy (GRP), 17 años de experiencia, serie de casos del hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío].

    PubMed

    Navarro Falcón, Magnolia Del Carmen; Parejo Campos, Juana; Pereira Cunill, José Luis; García Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2014-10-25

    When assessing a patient nutritional support the state of the gastrointestinal tract is the most important point to consider, whenever possible we should choose the enteral nutrition (EN) over parenteral nutrition (PN) and recognized by its various advantages. The percutaneous gastrostomy (GRP) were introduced in clinical practice as an alternative to surgical gastrostomy (GQ). The speed, simplicity, low cost, low morbidity and low mortality of these techniques has allowed its rapid development.The feeding tubes types used were the balloon-retained devices catheter, the pig tail and the ballon-retained with gastropexia (gastropexia). It is a retrospective study of all patients who were placed GPR in the Virgen del Rocío University Hospital, Sevilla, between September 1996 and September 2013, which aims to study is to describe the characteristics of patients and the complications presented for different types of enteral feeding tubes used. GPR 186 were performed in 176 patients (135 males (76.70%), with an average duration of 303.6 days, the most frequent diseases were cancers of the head and neck 49.46%. The types of feeding tubes used were pigtail 118 (63.44%), balloon-retained devices 22 (11.83%), and gastropexia 46 (24.73%). The most common early complications in the pigtail group were early purulent exudate and early bleeding (2.5 and 3.4% respectively), while in the balloon catheter group the initial output of the probe was most frequent early complication (13.7%), none of these complications were observed in the group of gastropexy. The most common late complication was obstruction probe. The GPR is a safe technique with lower mortality of 1%; Low frequently of early and late complications. A better understanding of this technique can reduce the frequency of complications.

  8. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Dr. Nadine Foreman, M.D., August 19, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Dr. Nadine Foreman was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). Dr. Foreman was selected for interview because of the position she held at the University of California, San Francisco. Following a brief biographical sketch, Dr. Foreman describes her work with Dr. Mayo Soley using I-131 in treatment of hyperthyroidism, selection criteria for patients in the radioiodine project, work with Dr. Earl Miller, work at Highland Hospital, radioiodine treatment of diffuse toxic goiter (myxedema), the radiophosphorus and radioiodine programs with Dr. Bert Low-Beer, and treatment of polycythemia vera.

  9. Teaching Peace with Dr. Seuss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Rosemarie; Podesta, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    Educators seeking novel ways to instill conflict-resolution skills in young children should consider Dr. Seuss, whose books provide a synthesis of fantasy and reality that works for teaching values endemic to peace education. This paper discusses how students can learn peace and educators can teach peace using Dr. Seuss books, examining steps to…

  10. 5. View of middle DR 2 antenna with DR 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of middle DR 2 antenna with DR 1 antenna in background. Photograph shows on left side at bottom foundation berm and along right side bottom stanchion concrete foundations at bottom structural steel assembly. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  11. Dr. John Richardson: Arctic Doctor

    PubMed Central

    Houston, C. Stuart

    1988-01-01

    Dr. John Richardson was foremost among a special breed of men, the surgeon-naturalists, one of whom accompanied every exploration party sent out by Great Britain. In addition to performing medical duties, the surgeon-naturalist was expected to identify and collect specimens of plants, animals, and rocks. Dr. Richardson was a member of two of the arctic expeditions led by Sir John Franklin, and participated in the search for the long-overdue third Franklin expedition. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:21253036

  12. Wally Schirra Greets Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Apollo 7 Commander Walter M. Schirra, Jr., left, greets Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director, Marshall Space Flight Center and Dr. Kurt Debus, Right, KSC Director, during a prelaunch mission briefing held at the Florida Spaceport.

  13. [Prevention of hepatitis B--HLA DR/DQ in HBs Ag nonresponder].

    PubMed

    Ouchi, E; Hoshino, A; Miura, T; Nagahara, N; Kudo, Y; Tamura, M

    1989-11-01

    To evaluate the immunological background in HBs Ag nonresponders against hepatitis B vaccine, the lymphocyte surface marker and HLA-DR/DQ antigen were determined on hospital personnel, 70 males and 256 females, injected hepatitis B vaccine for three times. The vaccine made from the plasma of HBs Ag carriers was injected at the first and second vaccination and recombinant hepatitis B vaccine was injected at the third vaccination. A month after the third vaccination, blood was withdrawn for HBs antigen test by RIA. Border line cases (cut off index 1.0-1.9) are included in nonresponder (cut off index less than 0.9). Both nonresponders and low responders (cut off index 2-49) are more often seen in males than females and high responder (cut off index 50 or more) are seen more often in young females than males. Lymphocyte surface markers were studied by flow cytometry using the following monoclonal antibodies; OKT 3, 4, 8, DR, NK, Ia 1 and B7. No differences between lymphocyte surface markers of nonresponders and responders were noted. HLA-DR/DQ antigens were studied by the cytotoxicity test using Locus DR/DQ, Terasaki Second DR W-60 Tray and using following antibodies; DR 1, DR 2, DRW 15, DR 4, DR 5, DR 7, DR 9, DRW 10, DRW 8, DRW 12, DRW 13, DRW 6, DRW 52, DRW 53, DQW 1, DQW 6, DQW 2, DQW 3, DQW 7 and DQW 4. No significant differences between HLA-DR/DQ of nonresponders and responders were noted. PMID:2601078

  14. Experience of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis with HLA Matching at the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Spain: Technical and Clinical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Raquel María; Peciña, Ana; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; Sánchez, Beatriz; Guardiola, Jordi; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of genetic diseases, combined with HLA matching (PGD-HLA), is an option for couples at risk of transmitting a genetic disease to select unaffected embryos of an HLA tissue type compatible with that of an existing affected child. Here we present the results of our PGD-HLA program at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. Seven couples have participated in our program because of different indications. Overall, 26 cycles were performed, providing a total of 202 embryos. A conclusive molecular diagnosis and HLA-typing could be assured in 96% of the embryos. The percentage of transfers per cycle was 26.9% and the birth rate per cycle was 7.7% per transfer. Our PGD-HLA program resulted in the birth of 2 healthy babies, HLA-identical to their affected siblings, with successful subsequent haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantations. Both HSC-transplanted children are currently doing well 48 and 21 months following transplantation, respectively. All the procedures, including HSCs umbilical cord transplantation, were performed in our hospital. PMID:24868528

  15. Experience of preimplantation genetic diagnosis with HLA matching at the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Spain: technical and clinical overview.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Raquel María; Peciña, Ana; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; Sánchez, Beatriz; Guardiola, Jordi; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of genetic diseases, combined with HLA matching (PGD-HLA), is an option for couples at risk of transmitting a genetic disease to select unaffected embryos of an HLA tissue type compatible with that of an existing affected child. Here we present the results of our PGD-HLA program at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. Seven couples have participated in our program because of different indications. Overall, 26 cycles were performed, providing a total of 202 embryos. A conclusive molecular diagnosis and HLA-typing could be assured in 96% of the embryos. The percentage of transfers per cycle was 26.9% and the birth rate per cycle was 7.7% per transfer. Our PGD-HLA program resulted in the birth of 2 healthy babies, HLA-identical to their affected siblings, with successful subsequent haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantations. Both HSC-transplanted children are currently doing well 48 and 21 months following transplantation, respectively. All the procedures, including HSCs umbilical cord transplantation, were performed in our hospital.

  16. 42 CFR 415.162 - Determining payment for physician services furnished to beneficiaries in teaching hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... exceed $30,000. Example No: 2. Dr. Smith received $25,000 from Hospital X for services as a department head in a teaching hospital. Dr. Smith also voluntarily furnished direct medical services to... compensated services ($25,000) exceeds the $30,000 maximum amount allowable for all of Dr. Smith's...

  17. [Neuroblastoma: prognostic factors and survival. Experience in Hospital de Pediatria del Centro Medico Nacional del Siglo XXI and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    López-Aguilar, Enrique; Cerecedo-Díaz, Fernando; Rivera-Márquez, Hugo; Valdéz-Sánchez, Martha; Sepúlveda-Vildósola, Ana Carolina; Delgado Huerta, Sandra; Vera-Hermosillo, Herlinda; Vázquez-Langle, José Raúl; Wanzke del Angel, Volkmar

    2003-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most frequent extracranial solid tumor in children according to the literature. In Mexico it is less frequent, fallen to 8th place. Our objective was to analyze our experience and compare it with the one reported in other countries. We included all patients admitted to our hospital during the previous five years and who had not received any treatment. Patients with stages I, II, and IV received cyclophosphamide and epirrubicin. Patients with stages were III and IV received the same chemotherapy alternating with cisplatinum., ifosfamide and etoposide during 12 months as well as massive doses of 131-MIBG and surgical ablation of the remaining tumor when possible. We included 30 patients, 25 with initial presentation in the abdomen. Five were in early stages and 20 (70%) were advanced with an overall survival of 100% and 27% at 5 years respectively. When analyzed by age, 40% were 12 months of age and 60% older, with survival of 100% and 27% in the same period, respectively. According to histology there was 91% survival for differentiated and 23% for undifferentiated tumors. The chemotherapeutic regimen reported is effective but not better than that reported by other authors, in which some benefits are seen with use of transplant and immunotherapy. The most important prognostic factors are still considered to be age, stage and histology.

  18. White Dwarfs in SDSS DR9 and DR10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile Fusillo, Nicola Pietro; Gänsicke, Boris; Koester, Detlev

    2015-06-01

    Currently the largest catalogue of spectroscopically identified WDs is based on the 7th Data Release (DR) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and contains over 20000 WDs (Kleinman et al. 2013). However, only a fraction of all WDs in the photometric footprint of SDSS have been spectroscopically followed up. Using DR7 spectroscopy as a training sample, we developed a method to select high confidence photometric WD candidates. The novelty of our selection is that it allows us to assign to any object with multi-colour and proper motion data a well-defined "probability of being a white dwarf" (or a contaminant). Exploiting this selection method we compiled a catalogue (Gentile Fusillo et al. in prep) which currently covers the entire photometric footprint of SDSS, 14555sq deg, with a limiting magnitude of g ≤ 19. The catalogue contains over 20000 high-confidence WDs and WD candidates 11500 of which have not yet been followed up with Sloan spectroscopy. Even though, so far, our catalogue relies only SDSS we plan to extend the sky coverage as additional deep multi-colour large area surveys become available. DR10 includes over 1.4 million spectra taken with the new BOSS spectrograph, which improves over the original SDSS spectograph in both resolution and wavelength coverage, but has so far not been systematically mined for WD science. As part of this project, we also inspected over 8000 BOSS spectra of bright (g ≤ 19) colour selected sources and classified 1765 new WDs. We used this independent, spectroscopically confirmed sample to further validate our selection method. Finally we discuss possible application of our catalogue , focusing on the selection and follow up of 9 new DZs which show strong pollution from elements other than Ca and IR excess emission emission consistent with the presence of debris discs.

  19. [The American bacteriologist: Dr. Meyer].

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Li, Zhi-ping

    2009-01-01

    Karl F. Meyer who was born in Switzerland was American famous bacteriologist of 20th century. During the World War II, Dr. Meyer urged the U. S. military to take positive reply measures against the bacteria war started by Japanese army and achieved significant accomplishments in the preventive and therapeutic theory of plague as well as the manufacture of plague vaccine. After the World War II, Meyer devoted to the scientific field of plague prevention and made great achievements in the area of animal diseases and public health. In 1951, he received the Lasker Award of America.

  20. [Cutaneous myiasis by Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera Calliphoridae) in Hospital Universidad del Norte, Soledad, Atlántico].

    PubMed

    de la Ossa, Napoleón; Castro, Luis Eduardo; Visbal, Lila; Santos, Ana María; Díaz, Esther; Romero-Vivas, Claudia M E

    2009-03-01

    Human myiasis is the parasitism of human tissues by fly larvae. Diagnoses are based on clinical pattern of tissue damage and presence of insect stages. Herein, a case myiasis is described in a seven-year-old female child. She presented with fever associated with abscessed scalp lesions containing exposed larvae. Severe pediculosis was also observed. The patient was hospitalized and treated with clindamycin, gentamicin (for bacterial secondary infections) and ivermectin (treatment for lice) after which the patient showed clinical improvement and was discharged four days later. Since human myiasis can be caused by a number of different species, larvae were collected from the patient and identified as those of Cochliomyia hominivorax (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Because other cases of coinfestation of flies and lice are on record, health workers are to be alerted about the possible pediculosis-myasis risk. PMID:19753834

  1. [Cutaneous myiasis by Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera Calliphoridae) in Hospital Universidad del Norte, Soledad, Atlántico].

    PubMed

    de la Ossa, Napoleón; Castro, Luis Eduardo; Visbal, Lila; Santos, Ana María; Díaz, Esther; Romero-Vivas, Claudia M E

    2009-03-01

    Human myiasis is the parasitism of human tissues by fly larvae. Diagnoses are based on clinical pattern of tissue damage and presence of insect stages. Herein, a case myiasis is described in a seven-year-old female child. She presented with fever associated with abscessed scalp lesions containing exposed larvae. Severe pediculosis was also observed. The patient was hospitalized and treated with clindamycin, gentamicin (for bacterial secondary infections) and ivermectin (treatment for lice) after which the patient showed clinical improvement and was discharged four days later. Since human myiasis can be caused by a number of different species, larvae were collected from the patient and identified as those of Cochliomyia hominivorax (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Because other cases of coinfestation of flies and lice are on record, health workers are to be alerted about the possible pediculosis-myasis risk.

  2. [Dr. John Baptiste Edouard Gélineau].

    PubMed

    Janković, S; Susić, V; Sokić, D; Lević, Z

    1996-01-01

    became the "Intern" of the Navy Hospital and next year a "Surgeon of the Third Class". As a Navy surgeon he visited French colonies in the Indian ocean: first the Reunion island and then Mayotte island of the Commores Archipelago. Of this period he wrote "Voyage a i'lle de la Réunion", memoirs published much later, in 1905, in which he described colonial life and abolition of slavery. The story of Elise, a beauteous Creole woman, a concubine of a young naval Commander, who delivered a child that soon died, inexorably points to the autobiographic character of his work. He defended a doctoral thesis "Aperçu Medical de I'lle de Mayotte" at Montpellier University School of Medicine in 1858, using the data collected during his year-and-a-half stay on a Mayotte island; at that time he was a "Navy Surgeon of the Second Class". For his dedication in fighting against epidemics that broke out during the French-German war in 1870 he was nominated for the Legion of Honor, but received it only later. In 1871 Gélineau introduced "Doctor Gélineau's tablets" for the treatment of epilepsy (contained bromide and arsenic). He was a member of the Société de Médicine, Société d' Hypnologie, La-Société Française d' Hygiène, and a few others. After retirement at the age of 72, Gélineau switched to wine production, continuing the family tradition; for the quality of his Bordeaux wines he was awarded gold medals at the Anvers and Paris Exhibitions. Dr. Gélineau died on March 2, 1906, at Argeles Gazost in Pyrnees honored by the titles of Chevalier de la Légion d' Honneur, Officier d'Academie and Commander of Nichan of the Ottoman Empire.

  3. Interview with Dr. Charley Zeanah

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Charles Zeanah is the Mary K. Sellars-Polchow Chair in Psychiatry, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics and Vice Chair for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans. He is also Executive Director of the Institute for Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health at Tulane. He is the recipient of multiple awards including the Irving Phillips Award for Prevention, (AACAP), the Presidential Citation for Distinguished Research and Leadership in Infant Mental Health (American Orthopsychiatric Association), the Sarah Haley Memorial Award for Clinical Excellence (International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies), the Blanche F. Ittelson Award for Research in Child Psychiatry (APA), and the Serge Lebovici Award for International Contributions in Infant Mental Health (World Association for Infant Mental Health). Dr. Zeanah is a Distinguished Fellow of AACAP, a Distinguished Fellow of the APA and a Board Member of Zero to Three. He is the Editor of Handbook of Infant Mental Health (3rd edition) considered as the state of the art textbook and standard reference in the field of Infant Mental Health. PMID:23667354

  4. Dr. Harry Whelan With the Light Emitting Diode Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The red light from the Light Emitting Diode (LED) probe shines through the fingers of Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Whelan uses the long waves of light from the LED surgical probe to activate special drugs that kill brain tumors. Laser light previously has been used for this type of surgery, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of tumors that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. Also, it can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research Program grant. The program is part of NASA's Technology Transfer Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  5. Dr. von Braun Briefing Walt Disney

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. von Braun began his association with Walt Disney in the 1950s when the rocket scientist appeared in three Disney television productions related to the exploration of space. Years later, Dr. von Braun invited Disney and his associates to tour the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This photograph is dated April 13, 1965. From left are R.J. Schwinghamer from the MSFC, Disney, B.J. Bernight, and Dr. von Braun.

  6. Clinical and Technical Overview of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Fragile X Syndrome: Experience at the University Hospital Virgen del Rocio in Spain.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Raquel M; Peciña, Ana; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; Sánchez, Beatriz; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) accounts for about one-half of cases of X-linked intellectual disability and is the most common monogenic cause of mental impairment. Reproductive options for the FXS carriers include preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). However, this strategy is considered by some centers as wasteful owing to the high prevalence of premature ovarian failure in FXS carriers and the difficulties in genetic diagnosis of the embryos. Here we present the results of our PGD Program applied to FXS, at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. A total of 11 couples have participated in our PGD Program for FXS since 2010. Overall, 15 cycles were performed, providing a total of 43 embryos. The overall percentage of transfers per cycle was 46.67% and the live birth rate per cycle was 13.33%. As expected, these percentages are considerably lower than the ones obtained in PGD for other pathologies. Our program resulted in the birth of 3 unaffected babies of FXS for 2 of the 11 couples (18.2%) supporting that, despite the important drawbacks of PGD for FXS, efforts should be devoted in offering this reproductive option to the affected families.

  7. Experience of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Hemophilia at the University Hospital Virgen Del Rocío in Spain: Technical and Clinical Overview.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Raquel M; Peciña, Ana; Sánchez, Beatriz; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Garrido, Rosario; Núñez, Ramiro; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are the most common hereditary hemorrhagic disorders, with an X-linked mode of inheritance. Reproductive options for the families affected with hemophilia, aiming at the prevention of the birth of children with severe coagulation disorders, include preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Here we present the results of our PGD Program applied to hemophilia, at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. A total of 34 couples have been included in our program since 2005 (30 for hemophilia A and 4 for hemophilia B). Overall, 60 cycles were performed, providing a total of 508 embryos. The overall percentage of transfers per cycle was 81.7% and the live birth rate per cycle ranged from 10.3 to 24.1% depending on the methodological approach applied. Although PGD for hemophilia can be focused on gender selection of female embryos, our results demonstrate that methodological approaches that allow the diagnosis of the hemophilia status of every embryo have notorious advantages. Our PGD Program resulted in the birth of 12 healthy babies for 10 out of the 34 couples (29.4%), constituting a relevant achievement for the Spanish Public Health System within the field of haematological disorders.

  8. Experience of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Hemophilia at the University Hospital Virgen Del Rocío in Spain: Technical and Clinical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Raquel M.; Peciña, Ana; Sánchez, Beatriz; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Garrido, Rosario; Núñez, Ramiro; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are the most common hereditary hemorrhagic disorders, with an X-linked mode of inheritance. Reproductive options for the families affected with hemophilia, aiming at the prevention of the birth of children with severe coagulation disorders, include preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Here we present the results of our PGD Program applied to hemophilia, at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. A total of 34 couples have been included in our program since 2005 (30 for hemophilia A and 4 for hemophilia B). Overall, 60 cycles were performed, providing a total of 508 embryos. The overall percentage of transfers per cycle was 81.7% and the live birth rate per cycle ranged from 10.3 to 24.1% depending on the methodological approach applied. Although PGD for hemophilia can be focused on gender selection of female embryos, our results demonstrate that methodological approaches that allow the diagnosis of the hemophilia status of every embryo have notorious advantages. Our PGD Program resulted in the birth of 12 healthy babies for 10 out of the 34 couples (29.4%), constituting a relevant achievement for the Spanish Public Health System within the field of haematological disorders. PMID:26258137

  9. Experience of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Hemophilia at the University Hospital Virgen Del Rocío in Spain: Technical and Clinical Overview.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Raquel M; Peciña, Ana; Sánchez, Beatriz; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Garrido, Rosario; Núñez, Ramiro; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are the most common hereditary hemorrhagic disorders, with an X-linked mode of inheritance. Reproductive options for the families affected with hemophilia, aiming at the prevention of the birth of children with severe coagulation disorders, include preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Here we present the results of our PGD Program applied to hemophilia, at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. A total of 34 couples have been included in our program since 2005 (30 for hemophilia A and 4 for hemophilia B). Overall, 60 cycles were performed, providing a total of 508 embryos. The overall percentage of transfers per cycle was 81.7% and the live birth rate per cycle ranged from 10.3 to 24.1% depending on the methodological approach applied. Although PGD for hemophilia can be focused on gender selection of female embryos, our results demonstrate that methodological approaches that allow the diagnosis of the hemophilia status of every embryo have notorious advantages. Our PGD Program resulted in the birth of 12 healthy babies for 10 out of the 34 couples (29.4%), constituting a relevant achievement for the Spanish Public Health System within the field of haematological disorders. PMID:26258137

  10. [Dr. Eva Haljecka (18??-1947), the first female obstetrician-gynecologist in the Yugoslav countries].

    PubMed

    Berić, B M

    1983-01-01

    The author presents data on the first women obstetricians and gynecologists in the Yugoslav countries. Their work started in Belgrade in the last decade of the 19th century (Dr Eva Haljecka in 1892 and Dr Ljubica Godevac-Durić in 1896). The life, work, and other biographical data concerning Dr E. Haljecka (1869-1947) are given in more detail. She was the first woman obstetrician-gynecologist not only in Belgrade, Nis and the whole of Serbia but also in all Yugoslav countries. In 1920 she became the first head of the Gynecologico-Obstetric Department of the Nis Hospital, where she had worked since 1910. Before the First World War Dr E. Haljecka distinguished herself as a prominent fighter for the social and other rights and equality of women physicians in the then Kingdom of Serbia.

  11. Dr. Wernher Von Braun greeting dignitaries.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, left, greets vice president Spiro T. Agnew in the Launch Control Center for the Apollo 14 mission. Between Dr. Von Braun and Mr. Agnew are their Royal Highnesses, The Prince and Princess of Spain. The royal visitors greeted the launch control team in th enter after the launch of Apollo 14.

  12. Dr. Wernher Von Braun at a picnic.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, stakes claim to a table for the picnic celebrating man's first lunar landing. With Dr. Von Braun are his wife, Maria (seated, right), and son, Peter (back to camera). His daughter, Margrit, was also present, but is hidden from view by friends in this view.

  13. Dr. von Braun Discusses 'Bottle Suit' Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun (center), then Chief of the Guided Missile Development Division at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, discusses a 'bottle suit' model with Dr. Heinz Haber (left), an expert on aviation medicine, and Willey Ley, a science writer on rocketry and space exploration. The three men were at the Disney studios appearing in the motion picture, entitled 'Man in Space.'

  14. An Interview with Dr. Robert W. Young.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silentman, Irene

    1996-01-01

    Dr. Robert W. Young discusses what led him to work in the Navajo Nation and to begin studying Navajo, the method he used for developing a Navajo orthography, his professional relationship with Dr. William Morgan, the system they used to develop an English-Navajo dictionary, his views on language loss, and his greatest accomplishment--a reservation…

  15. [Interculturality in the medical practice of Dr. Albert Schweitzer].

    PubMed

    Campos-Navarro, Roberto; Ruiz-Llanos, Adriana

    2004-01-01

    Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965) was a young and promising German who at age 29 decided to undertake the profession of Medical Doctor at the University of Strassburg after finishing a career in musical studies in Paris (1899) and obtaining in Berlin a doctoral degree in Philosophy and Theology. Surprisingly, Albert Schweitzer, despite his comfortable life in Europe, decided in 1913 to practice his medical career in a remote and small Equatorial African country. He devoted nearly 50 years of his life caring for the Black population at Lamaberene, where he built a hospital. In this paper, we attempt to develop some theoretical aspects related with interculturality in the medical practice of Dr. Albert Schweitzer. We begin by considering certain sociocultural variables in hospitals that give care to patients with cultural characteristics that are substantially different from those of the health care personnel who organize, administer, and execute medical functions.

  16. [Interculturality in the medical practice of Dr. Albert Schweitzer].

    PubMed

    Campos-Navarro, Roberto; Ruiz-Llanos, Adriana

    2004-01-01

    Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965) was a young and promising German who at age 29 decided to undertake the profession of Medical Doctor at the University of Strassburg after finishing a career in musical studies in Paris (1899) and obtaining in Berlin a doctoral degree in Philosophy and Theology. Surprisingly, Albert Schweitzer, despite his comfortable life in Europe, decided in 1913 to practice his medical career in a remote and small Equatorial African country. He devoted nearly 50 years of his life caring for the Black population at Lamaberene, where he built a hospital. In this paper, we attempt to develop some theoretical aspects related with interculturality in the medical practice of Dr. Albert Schweitzer. We begin by considering certain sociocultural variables in hospitals that give care to patients with cultural characteristics that are substantially different from those of the health care personnel who organize, administer, and execute medical functions. PMID:15633574

  17. [Portrait of Dr Milenko Petrović (1884-1950)].

    PubMed

    Kljaić, Leposava; Borota, Radoslav

    2008-01-01

    Dr Milenko Petrović was one of the very distinguished physicians in the history of Sombor city, who significantly contributed to the development of health care in Voivodina. His father Dimitrije was a professor in the High Teacher-training School in Sombor, recognized writer and politician of his epoch. He was born in Sombor in 1884, where he was educated and finished grammar school. For medical studies he moved to Budapest as a boarder of the famous Tekelianum, and graduated in 1908. He started specialisation in surgery, but being a great patriot he voluntarily recruited in the Serbian army to fight in Balkan liberation wars against Turkey. For his excellent work as a war surgeon he obtained many recognitions. After completing specialization in surgery in Debrecin, he returned to his native city Sombor, where he intended to practice as a physician, but because af the outbreak of the first world he was mobilized and sent to the front in Galicia. After the war he again returned to Sombor where he was immediatelly nominated for the main county physician and then begins his fruitful many year's work on the establishment and promotion of the health care in Sombor and broader territory. As the main county phsician he initiated the foundation and construction of the hospital in Sombor, because of high mortality rate among children, and spreading of contagious diseases like tuberculosis and trachoma. The construction of the hospital was completed in 1925 and Dr. Petrović was appointed its first director and this duty he performed for many years till the World War 2 in 1941. Under his management the hospital in Sombor became one of the best quality hospitals in the country and gave a big contribution to the promotion of health of the inhabitants of Voivodina. In spite of his extensive duties in the hospital. Dr. Milenko Petrović was very much engaged in social work, as the president of library "Laza Kosti ć". in the Soko association, Fire brigade, Rotary club, and he

  18. From the Field: Speech Therapy Outcome Measures--Interview with Dr. Pam Enderby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Judy K.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an interview with Dr. Pam Enderby--a speech language therapist and professor at the Institute of General Practice and Primary Care at the University of Sheffield, Community Sciences Centre, Northern General Hospital, in the United Kingdom--conducted by Judy Montgomery, Editor in Chief, of "Communication Disorders…

  19. Letter to Dr. Felix Bronner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Dear Dr. Bronner: I have been reading in The Physiologist the letters from senior physiologists for many years with great interest. It is impressive that many of the respondents are still pursuing scientific endeavours in their 70's and some even in their 80's. The interesting task is to ponder the relative causative proportions of heredity and environment responsible. One wonders whether knowing something about physiology engenders longer and more productive lives? I suspect so because of the accompanying self-discipline. But another factor would seem to be the pervasive joy of working in this profession. I have been fortunate to be able to acquire the joy of physiology during my graduate studies at Illinois, and to have been able to carry it over here at NASA, Ames Research Center for the past 40 years. A truly academic style research environment at a federal research center is rare. The trick to a joyous research career is to overcome those ever-present slings and arrows of outrageous fortune with dignity whenever possible. To that end I have found solace and guidance in reading the history of warfare and its leaders, especially Sun Tsu's The Art of War and Clauswitz's On War. I became eligible for retirement in 1993, but to insure domestic tranquility and also the joy of pursuing my research hobby have continued working in the laboratory on human research. It is troubling to see that funding for individual scientists conducting human research is declining rapidly, along with their new ideas; perhaps the old ones are more comfortable. Hopefully I can provide a similar response when I'm 80! Thanks for your interest. Sincerely, John Greenleaf

  20. [Development of internal medicine since the establishment of the Regional Hospital in Sarajevo from 1894 until today].

    PubMed

    Grujić, M

    1994-01-01

    The first bigger regular hospital in Sarajevo was built by the Bosnian vali Osman-pasha in the year 1866 and had only 32 beds. The construction expenses and keeping, according the Porta's approval was supported by Gazi-Husrevbeg's Vakuf, the name was The Vakuf's Hospital. In the year 1894, initiated by the Regional Government (Landesregierung) the Regional Hospital (Landesspital) came to existence, 1894, when opened had 238 beds, with modern outfits and technical facilities. There were 4 departments: Internal, Surgery, Dermatovenerology and Gynecology-Obstetrics. The Department for Internal Diseases had 50 beds. The first chief was Primarius Dr Geza Kobler, came from the Viennese Medical Faculty and had been assistant to Prof. Schretter. Simultaneously, he was director of the Hospital. His assistants were: Dr Berthold Haas to 1898 and Dr Heinrich Propper to 1900 and the interns were: Dr Bodo Koloman, Dr Alexander Dorner, Dr Erwin Horn, Dr Dragan Plentaj and Dr Risto Jeremić. Later, as chief was appointed Dr Ludomil Sas-Korcinski, professor of the Cracau University, his associates were to the year 1910: Dr Hamdija Karamehmedović, later to became chief of the Department for Infectious Diseases and the Intern, Dr Mustafa Kadić. At the eve of the World War 1, in 1914, the pavilion "K" was built, where the Department housed. At that time chief was Primarius Dr Ljubo Bilić, while his associates were Dr Gavro Bozić, Dr Vjekoslav Kusan and Dr Duro Ostojić. Later, some other doctors same, having a permanent job, Dr Bogdan Zimonjić, Dr Miron Simić, Dr David Pinto, Dr Sreten Kaluräercić and Dr David Baruh.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard and liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket in the frame from which it was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Mass. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet away in a cabbage patch. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  2. Dr. Irvin Yalom Discusses Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forester-Miller, Holly

    1989-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Irvin Yalom, director of the Adult Psychiatry Clinic at Stanford University School of Medicine, discusses his beginnings as a group psychotherapist, current issues in group work, and the future of group work. (Author/TE)

  3. But Dr. Meisels Is Not Convinced.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meisels, Samuel J.

    1987-01-01

    Commenting on the Gesell Institute's response to his original article concerning the Gesell assessments, Dr. Meisels continues to maintain that the Gesell readiness tests lack sufficient proof of validity. (BB)

  4. [Dr. Torafumi Okuyama, naval medical officer and the author of the dictionaries of medical terms].

    PubMed

    Fukase, Y

    1996-03-01

    Dr. Genryo Torafumi Okuyama, the second son of Dr. Genchu Okuyama of the Kaminoyama clan, was born on Dec. 4th, 1847. His elder brother Dr. Toraakira Okuyama was promoted to Dai Ikan (Senior Captain), the highest rank of medical officer in the Japanese Navy, and rendered distinguished services in the establishment of the naval medical systematization in the early Meiji era. Dr. Trafumi Okuyama, who was appointed as medical officer of the Yokohama army Hospital and transferred to Daibyoin in Edo, was engaged in medical treatment of injured soldiers during the Boshin-war in 1868. He went to Kagoshima with William Willis and as one of the founders of the Kagoshima Medical school, gave students education there. He resigned his naval position in 1874, when he was Dai Gun I (Senior Leutenant) and died at the age of 41 in April 16th 1887. Dr. Torafumi Okuyama compiled A medical vocabulary in English and Japanese ("Igo Ruizyu") and Deutsch-Japanisches Hand-Wörterbuch für Medizin ("Dokuwa Igaku Ziten) and published "Koen Hikki", the translation of the lectures by Dr. Edwin Wheeler. PMID:11618875

  5. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Goddard rocket with four rocket motors. This rocket attained an altitude of 200 feet in a flight, November 1936, at Roswell, New Mexico. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  6. Dr. von Braun With German Rocket Experimenters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Dr. von Braun was among a famous group of rocket experimenters in Germany in the 1930s. This photograph is believed to be made on the occasion of Herman Oberth's Kegelduese liquid rocket engine being certified as to performance during firing. From left to right are R. Nebel, Dr. Ritter, Mr. Baermueller, Kurt Heinish, Herman Oberth, Klaus Riedel, Wernher von Braun, and an unidentified person.

  7. The Old Library of the Pennsylvania Hospital *

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Whitfield J.

    1972-01-01

    The first medical book acquired by the Pennsylvania Hospital was William Lewis's Experimental History of the Materia Medica. Dr. John Fothergill of London donated it in 1762. The next year the Managers resolved to establish a library, and the physicians assigned their fees from hospital students for the purchase of books. Books were regularly ordered from William Strahan in London, and gifts and bequests added still more volumes. From 1790 to 1810 Dr. John Coakley Lettsom of London was the hospital's principal adviser on purchases. As the library grew, it expanded beyond purely medical works to include some in natural history, many purchased in 1817 from the estate of Dr. Benjamin Smith Barton. Catalogues were printed in the years 1790-94, 1806, 1829, and 1857. At midcentury the hospital library numbered about 9,000 volumes. At that time it was the largest medical library in the United States. PMID:4563538

  8. [[The Lactéol's laboratory of Dr Boucard (Laboratoire du Dr Boucard].

    PubMed

    Raynal, Cécile; Lefebvre, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    Shortly before 1910, Dr Boucard creates his laboratory in Paris. It manufactures and sells a drug based on lactic ferments the " Lactéol du Dr Boucard" (Dr's Boucard Lactéol) that will make the fortune of the physician. The article explains Dr Boucard's life and his relationship with the arts (painting and photography), and tells the story of his laboratory until the 2000s, referring to the pharmacists who succeeded them, as well as the various buildings where were elaborated Lactéol's variants. PMID:27281930

  9. Dr. Wernher von Braun and Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger Sign Citizenship Certificates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1955-01-01

    The members of the Peenemuende team and their family members were awarded the United States citizenship on April 14, 1955. Pictured here is Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger (middle) and Dr. Wernher von Braun signing U.S. citizenship certificates. Martin Schilling is at left.

  10. Geophysical survey of 105-DR Pluto Crib, 116-DR-4, 100-D Area

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstrom, K.A.

    1993-10-01

    The objective of this Geophysical Survey was to verify the location of the 105-DR Pluto Crib, 116-DR-4. A surface monument currently marks its location. The crib is 10 feet by 10 feet and 15 feet deep. Ground-Penetrating Radar was the geophysical method selected to conduct the investigation.

  11. Dr. Wernher von Braun Laid to Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun served as Marshall Space Flight Center's first director from July 1, 1960 until January 27, 1970, when he was appointed NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under Project Paper Clip to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his rocket team were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Under von Braun's leadership, Marshall developed the Saturn V launch vehicle which took Apollo astronauts to the moon. Dr. von Braun died in Alexandria, Va., on June 16, 1977, seven years after his NASA appointment. This photo was taken at the site where he was laid to rest.

  12. [Dr. Avni Mahmud and the teaching of mental disease in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Er, H

    2001-01-01

    Mental illness and insanity, as distinct from other departments of medicine occupy a special place with their mental aspect and their effect on the conscious consequent, treatment methods before and during middle ages were mainly based on superstition. Here in Turkey, a modern clinic of mental illness and neuropathy was put into the first by Dr. Mongeri. Dr. Avni Mahmud graduated from civilian medical school in 1880 and in 1882 he started as a physician at Toptaşi Asylum. His father Mahund Efendi, was an army physician. Dr. Avni Mahmud became the director of Toptaşi Asylum in 1909 until his death. Dr. Avni Mahmud, who had no special training on mental illness acquired his knowledge and experience here; studying basic works on this subject, he wrote a book titled Muhtasar Emraz-i Akliye, which is thought to be the first of its kind. Dr. Avni Mahmud spent all his effort, with limited means, to make Toptaşi Asylum an orderly and good hospital in his time.

  13. DR and CR: Recent advances in technology.

    PubMed

    Schaefer-Prokop, C M; De Boo, D W; Uffmann, M; Prokop, M

    2009-11-01

    After some initial reluctance, nowadays transition from conventional analogue-to-digital radiographic technique is realized in the vast majority of institutions. The eventual triumph of digital over conventional technique is related to its undoubted advantages with respect to image quality and improved image handling in the context of a picture archiving and communication system. CR represents the older system, which matured over decades and experienced some important recent improvements with respect to dose efficiency and work-flow efficiency that strengthened its position. It represents a very versatile, economically attractive system that is equally suited for integrated systems as well as for cassette-based imaging at the bedside. DR systems offer superb image quality and realistic options for dose reduction based on their high dose efficiency. While for a long time only integrated systems were on the market suited for a large patient throughput, also mobile DR systems became recently available. While for the next years, it is likely that DR and CR systems will coexist, the long term perspective of CR will depend on further innovations with respect to dose efficiency and signal-to-noise characteristics while for DR economical aspects and broader availability of mobile systems will play a role. PMID:19695809

  14. Dr. Akira Tonomura: Master of Experimental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Dr. Akira Tonomura, Hitachi Fellow, passed away on May 2, 2012 at the age of 70. As a classmate at the University of Tokyo and his long-time friend, I would like to describe my personal memory of Tonomura and a brief review of his contributions to fundamental physics.

  15. Dr. von Braun Visits Huntsville Boys Club

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Dr. von Braun, Director of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and chairman of this year's United Givers Fund (UGF) drive at MSFC, takes time out from the problems of sending a man to the Moon to talk baseball with 11-year-old Randy Smith at the Huntsville Boys Club.

  16. Dr. Wernher Von Braun presents a certificate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (left), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, presents a humorous certificate to Major General Charles W. Eifler, commanding general of Redstone Arsenal, at the close of a farewell luncheon for the general prior to General Eifler moving to a new European duty station.

  17. Walt Disney and Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Dr. Werhner von Braun, then Chief, Guided Missile Development Operation Division at Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, was visited by Walt Disney in 1954. In the 1950's, von Braun worked with Disney Studio as a technical director, making three films about space exploration for television. A model of the V-2 rocket is in background.

  18. ["Allergy testing" with "Dr. Voll electroacupuncture"].

    PubMed

    Bresser, H

    1993-06-01

    Electroacupuncture according to Dr. Voll (EAV) is one of the numerous unconventional methods propagated for allergy testing in Germany. From an experimental examination for "drug testing" of this method, it can be concluded that EAV is unsuitable for any form of allergy testing.

  19. An Interview with Dr. Deborah W. Proctor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsberger, Joe

    2007-01-01

    In an interview, Dr. Deborah W. Proctor, eCurriculum Director for Academic Innovations/ Minnesota Online and Co-Chair for the MERLOT International Conference, outlines her academic path that led to her current position and interests. As e-Curriculum Director for Academic Innovations in the Office of the Chancellor she works with system…

  20. Interview [with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Educational Research, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey, author of "Reading Educational Research: How to Avoid Getting Statistically Snookered." During the interview, Bracey explains why he considers the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) as a "weapon of mass destruction" and that he sees nothing to suggest that NCLB has improved schools.…

  1. ORAC-DR: Astronomy data reduction pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenness, Tim; Economou, Frossie; Cavanagh, Brad; Currie, Malcolm J.; Gibb, Andy

    2013-10-01

    ORAC-DR is a generic data reduction pipeline infrastructure; it includes specific data processing recipes for a number of instruments. It is used at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, AAT, and LCOGT. This pipeline runs at the JCMT Science Archive hosted by CADC to generate near-publication quality data products; the code has been in use since 1998.

  2. A TRIBUTE TO DR. WILLIAM PENN WATKINSON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. William Penn Watkinson (known to colleagues as "Penn") of EPA¿s health research lab (National Health and Environmental Research Laboratory) of Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, died Wednesday, December 13 after a battle with lung cancer. He was a member of the Pulmonar...

  3. Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby: The Complete Eugenicist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodwell, Grant

    1997-01-01

    Profiles the work of Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby, a late 19th-century propagandist for eugenics. Eugenics is a science that deals with the transmission of hereditary racial traits, coupled with a desire to use this for the elimination of social ills. Discusses Saleeby's work with the Eugenics Education Society. (MJP)

  4. Dr. Israel Cuellar (1946-2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamarripa, Manuel X.

    2009-01-01

    On September 7th, 2008, the mental health field lost a trailblazing researcher and clinician as he lost his battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease. Dr. Israel Cuellar made significant contributions to the study of acculturation including its importance in delivering appropriate mental health…

  5. [Maternal mortality rate in the Aurelio Valdivieso General Hospital: a ten years follow up].

    PubMed

    Noguera-Sánchez, Marcelo Fidias; Arenas-Gómez, Susana; Rabadán-Martínez, Cesar Esli; Antonio-Sánchez, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Antecedentes: en México, la mortalidad materna ha disminuido en las últimas décadas. En Oaxaca esto no se ha manifestado porque se incrementó la tasa de mortalidad materna. Este estado se ubica entre las entidades con más muertes maternas. Objetivo: analizar 10 años de mortalidad materna en el Hospital General Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso de los Servicios de Salud de Oaxaca, para conocer el comportamiento epidemiológico y caracterización de los decesos. Material y métodos: estudio retrospectivo, transversal y descriptivo efectuado mediante la revisión de expedientes clínicos de mortalidad materna en la División de Gineco-Obstetricia. Se consideraron variables sociales, obstétricas y circunstanciales y las comprobaciones se efectuaron con estadística general y descriptiva. Resultados: entre el 1 de enero de 2000 y el 31 de diciembre de 2009 se registraron 109 muertes maternas, excluidas dos que no fueron obstétricas; es decir, que hubo 107 muertes maternas: 75 directas y 32 indirectas. La tasa de mortalidad materna fue de 172.14 × 100,000 nacidos vivos. De las muertes maternas revisadas 89 pudieron evitarse (83%) y 18 no (17%), esto con base en el dictamen del Comité ad hoc del Hospital General Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso. La enfermedad hipertensiva aguda del embarazo fue la de mayor mortalidad; la escolaridad y el puerperio ueron el mayor riesgo. Conclusiones: las variables atribuibles a bajo índice de desarrollo humano, como: baja escolaridad y paridad elevada incrementaron el riesgo de mortalidad materna, que fue intrahospitalaria y durante el puerperio. La tasa de mortalidad materna fue la mayor encontrada en publicaciones nacionales con respecto a este referente.

  6. Leading Healthcare Change Across the Care Continuum: An Interview With Dr Kenneth Rempher.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Lyn Stankiewicz; Joseph, M Lindell

    2016-01-01

    Kenneth Rempher, PhD, MBA, CENP, RN, is the chief nursing officer for the University of Iowa (UI) Hospitals and Clinics. In his 20-year career, he has distinguished himself as a visionary healthcare leader. Colleagues describe Dr Rempher as a strong, transformational leader, guiding the UI enterprise through a time of uncertainty and change. This interview by the CGEAN provides insight to his leadership style, successes, and ideas on the future of care delivery. PMID:27442899

  7. Leading Healthcare Change Across the Care Continuum: An Interview With Dr Kenneth Rempher.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Lyn Stankiewicz; Joseph, M Lindell

    2016-01-01

    Kenneth Rempher, PhD, MBA, CENP, RN, is the chief nursing officer for the University of Iowa (UI) Hospitals and Clinics. In his 20-year career, he has distinguished himself as a visionary healthcare leader. Colleagues describe Dr Rempher as a strong, transformational leader, guiding the UI enterprise through a time of uncertainty and change. This interview by the CGEAN provides insight to his leadership style, successes, and ideas on the future of care delivery.

  8. [Establishment and application of DR automatic system based on DICOM3.0 BPE].

    PubMed

    Wang, Longchen; Hu, Shundong; Li, Bin

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a new application of PACS in our hospital. Through the integration of PACS, HIS and RIS, digital transformation is made in every step. The functional modules of Body Parts Examined in DICOM is set and good link between PACS and DR is made. So the equipment can retrieval the inspection area automatically and make adjustment on the parameters correspondingly. It makes the workflow optimized and improves the efficiency greatly. PMID:22571147

  9. NASA Sponsors Cancer Research at Children's Hospital

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (left), during a visit at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, discussed how NASA's special lighting technology may soon treat cancer. Goldin talked with Dr.Harry Whelan (right) and Dr. Kerneth Reichert (center left), both pediatric neurologists with the Hospital and professors at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Accompanied by Astronaut Mary Ellen Weber, Goldin was shown this innovative treatment, called Photodynamic Therapy, a method used to destroy the tumor without damaging the delicate brain tissue around it. The treatment uses tiny pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) developed for Space Product Development plant growth experiments.

  10. Dr. von Braun and Dr. Stuhlinger With a Model of the Nuclear-Electric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, taken at the Walt Disney Studios in California, Dr. Wernher von Braun and Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger are shown discussing the concepts of nuclear-electric spaceships designed to undertake the mission to the planet Mars. As a part of the Disney 'Tomorrowland' series on the exploration of space, the nuclear-electric vehicles were shown in the last three television films, entitled 'Mars and Beyond,' which first aired in December 1957.

  11. Dr Charles Thomas Jackson's (1805-80) life after death: the 20th century mythology.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Richard

    2007-08-01

    References to Dr Charles Thomas Jackson in 20th century anaesthesia literature and biographical dictionaries and encyclopedias emphasize his maniacal insanity and its relation to his usurpations of the discoveries of others, including the controversy with William TG Morton concerning the honour of the discovery of surgical anaesthesia. In 1873, seven years before his death, he experienced sudden collapse and paralysis requiring hospitalization. Seminal 19th century brain research before his hospitalization correlated the signs and symptoms of his illness with pathology found at his autopsy.

  12. Global collapse of the DR21 filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.

    2011-05-01

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying the most massive and dense star-forming clump in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing DR21 and DR21(OH), we obtained observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. For that, we used molecular line data from our 13CO 1→0, CS 2→1, and N_2H^+ 1→0 survey of the Cygnus X region (FCRAO) and high-angular resolution observations in isotopomeric lines of CO, CS, HCO^+, N_2H^+, and H_2CO, obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. The observations reveal a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e. dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO^+ and 12CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of ˜0.6 km s-1 and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10-3 M_⊙ yr-1 for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M_⊙ at densities of around 10^5 cm-3 within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting (with free-fall times much shorter than sound crossing times and low virial parameter α). The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows on large scales and is now in a state of global gravitational

  13. [The life of Dr. John William Heron, the second superintendent of Chejungwon].

    PubMed

    Kim, D K; Kim, T S

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to overview the life of John W. Heron, M. D. who was the first appointed medical missionary to Korea by the Presbyterian Church USA. Although he was a competent doctor as well as a devoted missionary, he is not well-known yet, because he died early after 5 years' service in Korea. Dr. Heron was born in Derbyshire, England on June 15, 1856. His father, Rev. E. S. Heron, was a Scotch Minister of Congregational Church. His family emigrated to America in 1870 when he was fourteen years old and settled in Knoxville, Tennessee. In 1881, he was admitted to the University of Tennessee Medical School and graduated with highest honors in 1883. After training in New York University Hospital, he refused the offer of professorship from the University of Tennessee to become a medical missionary to Korea. He arrived in Seoul on June 21, 1885 and began to work in Royal Government Hospital, Chejungwon, the predecessor of Severance Hospital. In 1887, he became the superintendent of the Hospital following Dr. Horace N. Allen. He also worked for the Royal family and sometimes traveled to the rural areas to care for the patients. He started Chejungwon Church which later became Namdaemoon Presbyterian Church. In 1887, Dr. Heron worked as a member of the Bible translation committee and in 1889, he was elected as the chairman of the Public Committee of the Presbyterian Churches. In 1890, he established 'The Korean Religious Tract Society (Chosunsyungkyoseohoi) with Underwood and Ohlinger. The society published and replenished Christian books, periodical magazines and booklets. In the Summer of 1890, Dr. Heron did his best to take care of the sick suffering from an epidemic dysentery and himself got infected because of the terrible overwork. He passed away on July 26th, 1890. On his deathbed, he told his soldier and native friends around him as follow: "Jesus loves you. He gave His life for you. Stand by Him!" The martyrdom of Dr. Heron should be remembered in

  14. The Japanese Hospital in Broome, 1910-1926. A harmony of contrasts.

    PubMed

    Stride, P; Louws, A

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese Hospital in Broome remains the only hospital in Australia's history predominantly staffed, controlled and funded by a linguistically, culturally and geographically alien nation. Initially the proposal, challenging prevailing attitudes, was bitterly opposed by the white community, but the hospital became respected thanks to Dr Tadashi Suzuki, the hospital's first doctor, and his successors' clinical skills and compassion.

  15. Centennial Presidential Perspective: Dr. Alfred Blalock

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Claude A.; George, Timothy J.; Conte, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Great men are not a common occurrence. Indeed, they are a rare find. Though respected and lauded in their time, it is only in retrospect that their true contributions can be adequately measured as a surgeon, an educator and a scientist. Such is the case of Dr. Alfred Blalock. Many have considered him the father of modern cardiac surgery. All consider his “blue baby” operation to be one of the landmarks of cardiac surgery and, as the chief of surgery at Johns Hopkins, he trained many who would become the leaders of our discipline. His continual reach for excellence helped him to not only affect, but revolutionize the paradigm of surgical research, an understanding of the physiology of shock and the surgical management of pulmonic stenosis/atresia. Dr. Blalock was the 30th president of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery and his presidential address was given in 1951. PMID:22248679

  16. Dr. Wernher von Braun In His Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun served as Marshall Space Flight Center's first director from July 1, 1960 until January 27, 1970, when he was appointed NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under Project Paperclip to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his rocket team were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Under von Braun's leadership, Marshall developed the Saturn V launch vehicle which took Apollo astronauts to the moon. This photo depicts von Braun in his office at MSFC.

  17. Dr.L: Distributed Recursive (Graph) Layout

    2007-11-19

    Dr. L provides two-dimensional visualizations of very large abstract graph structures. it can be used for data mining applications including biology, scientific literature, and social network analysis. Dr. L is a graph layout program that uses a multilevel force-directed algorithm. A graph is input and drawn using a force-directed algorithm based on simulated annealing. The resulting layout is clustered using a single link algorithm. This clustering is used to produce a coarsened graph (fewer nodes)more » which is then re-drawn. this process is repeated until a sufficiently small graph is produced. The smallest graph is drawn and then used as a basis for drawing the original graph by refining the series of coarsened graphs that were produced. The layout engine can be run in serial or in parallel.« less

  18. Dr. Wernher Von Braun examines a ruby crystal.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, and Dr. Eberhard Rees (left), deputy director, technical, examine a ruby crystal used in laser experiments in the Marshall Center's Space Sciences Laboratory.

  19. [Homage to Professor Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda].

    PubMed

    1998-11-01

    During a solemn academic act, de Main Classroom of the Facultad de Odontologia de Buenos Aires was named after Prof. Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda. He has been the first professor at the Escuela de Odontologia and its organizer, after having obtained his Dentistry degree at the Dental School of Paris, in 1882. The new school was founded in 1891, and its activities began the following year.

  20. 1895: Dr W G Grace's golden summer.

    PubMed Central

    Toghill, P.

    1995-01-01

    One hundred years ago there was another wonderful summer. Dr. W G Grace, England's greatest cricketer, in his 47th year, completed his "century of centuries" and scored 2346 runs. This remarkable achievement was celebrated with enthusiasm and affection by the Victorian public. In more practical terms generous testimonials raised 9073 pound sterling 8s 6d, which made it a golden summer in more ways than one. Images p618-a PMID:7663257

  1. Dr Amos G Babcock - fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Smith, Douglas

    2014-11-01

    The War of 1812-14 between the United States of America and Great Britain gave rise to several journals relating the sufferings of prisoners of war confined in prison ships and gaols in England. One of these is A Journal of a Young Man from Massachusetts, said to have been written by Dr Amos G Babcock, an American ship's surgeon, and first published in 1816. This article sets out arguments for and against the truth of this assertion.

  2. Working with Dr. Per V. Bruel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade Kjaer, Svend

    2002-11-01

    For more than a decade I have had the pleasure to work as an application specialist together with--and for--Dr. Bruel, one of the founders of the Bruel & Kjaer Company, famous for sound and vibration measurement instrumentation, often nicknamed ''Green Boxes.'' It has been a great experience for me, and I recall this period in my life as one where I was much inspired by Dr. Bruel's methods, both as a private person and with his work as a director for the company and leader of both the sales and the innovation departments. In this presentation I will highlight some funny stories that are told about Dr. Bruel combined with the episodes that I have experienced myself. In short, the most simple way to characterize this rather complex person is maybe by repeating his vision statement for the company: ''We shall have fun and we shall make money. On the other hand we shall not have so much fun that we do not make any money, and we shall not make so much money that we do not have any fun!'' For Per Bruel, acoustics is one of his great hobbies. He has others such as cars, airplanes, motorbikes (he is the lucky owner of a Danish Nimbus) and wine.

  3. Dr. Wernher Von Braun talkes with George Hardy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    George Hardy of the Marshall Space Flight center's Astronautics Laboratory, talks with Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), deputy associate administrator for planning. Dr. Von Braun was inspecting the mockup of the Saturn workshop during a visit to the Marshall Center. The visit coincided with the 10th anniversary celebration of the center of which Dr. Von Braun was director until March 1, 1970.

  4. Interview with Dr Joseph Murray (by Francis L Delmonico).

    PubMed

    Murray, Joseph

    2002-10-01

    The Editors asked Dr Delmonico to interview Dr Joseph Murray, winner of the Nobel prize in Medicine 1990 for performing the first successful renal transplant, to record recollections of the issues of the 1950s, when clinical transplantation was born, on Dr Murray's medical career in transplantation, and on some contemporary issues.

  5. The Harvard Neurosurgical Service at the Children's Hospital Boston and Brigham & Women's Hospital, 1912-2007.

    PubMed

    Shillito, John; Black, Peter M

    2008-09-01

    The Harvard Neurosurgical Service at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Children's Hospital Boston has a distinguished history, beginning in 1912 when Dr. Harvey Cushing became surgeon-in-chief at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. After Cushing left in 1932, the Children's Hospital had a dominant role, with the creation and development of pediatric neurosurgery under Franc D. Ingraham, Donald Matson, John Shillito, and Keasley Welch. In 1987, the service at Brigham and Women's Hospital began to grow with the appointment of Dr. Peter Black as chief. In 2000, it became a department. In 2002, the clinical services at the two institutions were large enough to separate, with Dr. Black continuing as academic chair of both. By 2005, the Brigham and Women's Hospital service had 10 neurosurgeons with brain tumor, cerebrovascular, spine, and intensive care unit divisions; the Children's service had 5 neurosurgeons under Dr. Michael Scott. There were also six full-time scientists in the group. Despite reporting on more than 2500 cases a year, the combined service continued to have a strong academic program. This was helped by a residency with two required research years, an academic day each week, faculty committed to research, strong scientific collaborations, and contributions from many visiting neurosurgeons and research fellows. In its first 94 years, the service has been a strong force in clinical, educational, political, and research efforts in neurosurgery. PMID:18812970

  6. DR JOHN ADAMCZYK AND DR LONNIE REID EXAMINE SOFTWARE FOR THE NEW START-UP SOFTWARE - ELECTRONICS - A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    DR JOHN ADAMCZYK AND DR LONNIE REID EXAMINE SOFTWARE FOR THE NEW START-UP SOFTWARE - ELECTRONICS - AND COMMUNICATIONS - SEC - INCUBATOR OPENED MAY 1 1999 AS PART OF THE LEWIS INCUBATOR FOR TECHNOLOGY - LIFT

  7. Hospital Utilization for Injection Drug Use-Related Soft Tissue Infections in Urban versus Rural Counties in California

    PubMed Central

    Etzioni, David A.; Hurley, Brian; Holtom, Paul; Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Asch, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Drug related-soft tissue infections (DR-STIs) are a significant source of hospital utilization in inner-city urban areas where injection drug use is common but the magnitude of hospital utilization for DR-STIs outside of inner-city urban areas is not known. We described the magnitude and characteristics of hospital utilization for DR-STIs in urban versus rural counties in California. All discharges from all nonfederal hospitals in California in 2000 with ICD-9 codes for a soft tissue infection and for drug dependence/abuse were abstracted from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development discharge database. There were 4,152 DR-STI discharges in 2000 from hospitals in 49 of California's 58 counties. Residents of 12 large metropolitan counties accounted for 3,598 discharges (87% of total). The majority of DR-STI discharges were from urban safety net hospitals with county indigent programs and Medicaid as the expected payment source and opiate related discharge diagnoses. Hospital utilization for DR-STIs in California is highest in large urban metropolitan counties, although DR-STI discharges are widespread. Increased access to harm reduction services and drug treatment may reduce government health care expenditures by preventing unnecessary hospital utilization for DR-STIs. PMID:16736367

  8. [Septic abortion in the Hospital de Ginecología y Obstetricia no. 3 del Instituto Mexicana de Seguridad Social. Late and early morbidity].

    PubMed

    López Ortiz, E; Sandoval Sevilla, S; Arteaga, V M; Rosas Arceo, J; Ortíz Arroyo, R

    1974-02-01

    268 cases of septic abortion which occurred between 1964-72 in a large metropolitan hospital in Mexico were analyzed retrospecively. There cases represented 0.88% of all cases of abortion during the same time. Most patients were between 21-30, and 48% with parity 2-5; 63% were at their first abortion; only 16 patients declared to have attempted abortion, and most cases were first trimester abortion. Pre- and postoperative procedures and vital signs were carefully taken, and time elapsed from medical treatment to surgery was 4-12 hours. There were 237 curettages, and 28 hysterectomies. Complication from surgery were 4.1%; there were 19 deaths, i.e. 7.5% of patients, of which 10 only 24 hours after hospitalization. Protocol of treatment of septic abortion is discussed, and surgical treatment highly recommended.

  9. HLA-DR alleles determine responsiveness to Borrelia burgdoferi antigens

    PubMed Central

    Iliopoulou, Bettina Panagiota; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Huber, Brigitte T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Arthritis is a prominent manifestation of Lyme disease, caused upon infection with Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb). Persistent chronic Lyme arthritis, even after antibiotic treatment, is linked to HLA-DRB1*0401 (DR4) and related alleles. On the contrary, Lyme patients who resolve arthritis within 3 months post-infection show an increased frequency of HLA-DRB1*1101 (DR11). The aim of this study was to analyze the underlying mechanism by which HLA-DR alleles confer genetic susceptibility or resistance to antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. Methods We generated DR11 transgenic (tg) mice on a murine class II−/− background and compared their immune response to Bb-antigens to that of DR4 tg mice after immunization with Bb outer surface protein (Osp)A or infection with live Bb. Results We report that the T cells of OspA-immunized and Bb-infected DR11 tg mice were defective in IFN-γ production compared to those of DR4 mice. On the other hand, DR11 tg mice developed higher titers of anti-OspA and anti-Bb Abs, respectively, than DR4 mice. In accordance with this observation, we found that Bb-infected DR11 tg mice had decreased spirochetal burden compared to DR4 mice, measured by qPCR. Conclusion This study provides direct evidence that in the presence of HLA-DR11 the immune response against Bb-antigens is directed towards a protective Ab response. In contrast, an inflammatory Th1 response is induced in the presence of DR4. These observations offer an explanation for the differential genetic susceptibility of DR4+ and DR11+ individuals for the development of chronic Lyme arthritis and eventually the progression to antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis. PMID:19950279

  10. The Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled Renamed The Hospital for Special Surgery 1940; The War Years 1941–1945

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In 1939, the 75th anniversary program marking the founding of the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled (R & C), the oldest orthopaedic hospital in the nation, was held at the hospital site in New York City. Dr. Philip D. Wilson, Surgeon-in-Chief since 1935, used this event to mark the return of the hospital to its leadership role in the country. When the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled first opened its doors on May 1, 1863, the name of the hospital was not unusual; it described the type of patients treated. In 1940, the Board of Managers with guidance from Dr. Wilson changed the name to the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). In 1941, with Britain engaged in a European war, Dr. Wilson felt there was a need for the Americans to support the British. He personally organized the American Hospital in Britain, a privately funded voluntary unit, to help care for the wounded. After the United States actually entered World War II in December 1941, HSS quickly organized support at all levels with a significant number of professional and auxiliary staff, eventually enlisting in the military. Even with such staff turnover, the hospital continued to function under Dr. Wilson’s leadership. After the war ended in 1945, Wilson forged ahead to further restore HSS as a leader in musculoskeletal medicine and surgery. PMID:19048348

  11. Association between human leukocyte antigen-DR and demylinating Guillain-Barré syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Zaki N.; Zalzala, Haider H.; Mohammedsalih, Hyam R.; Mahdi, Batool M.; Abid, Laheeb A.; Shakir, Zena N.; Fadhel, Maithem J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To find an association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, and DRB5 alleles frequencies in a sample of Iraqi patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and compare with a healthy control group. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study consisting of 30 Iraqi Arab patients with GBS attending the Neurological Department in the Neuroscience Hospital, Baghdad, Iraq between September 2012 and June 2013. The control group comprised 42 apparently healthy volunteers. Human leukocyte antigen genotyping for HLA DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, and DRB5 was performed using the polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primers method. The allele frequencies were compared across both groups. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-class II HLA-DR genotyping and serotyping were performed by software analysis. Results: We found increased frequencies of HLA genotype DRB1*03:01 (p=0.0009), DRB1*07:01 (p=0.0015), and DRB4*01:01 (p<0.0001) in patients with GBS compared with healthy controls. The HLA DR6 was increased in the control group (p<0.0001). Conclusions: Our results suggest an association between HLA-DRB1*03:01, DRB1*07:01, DRB4*01:01, and HLA DR3, DR7 and a susceptibility to GBS. PMID:25274590

  12. [Life and work of Dr. Bozo Pericić (1865-1947), genius of our medicine].

    PubMed

    Perović, Slavko; Sirovica, Stjepan

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the life and work of on of our most distinguished physicians--Dr Bozo Pericić. Togheter with another young physician Dr Nikola Lalić the Sibenik hospital became a sort of Meca for medical people. Dr Pericić succeded to clarify an unknown disease--so called "Skrljevo disease", paved the path of to the knowledge about achinococcus etc. He published also number of valuable medical articles and books and avarded a number af aknowledgements. One of the biggest was his nomination for membership of the Supreme Haelth Council in Wienna. He contributed e lot to the medical journals, especially to the "Physician's Journal". As person of wide culture, famous linguist and polyglot Dr Pericić published the "Medical dictionary of Croatian and German Language". He lay foundation of the craniology, quite a new branch of arheology at the time. His accounts of travels, reviews on famous writers, translation of Hamlet, etc--are valuable literary works. PMID:15918326

  13. Multiwavelength observations of two B-star nurseries - DR 15 and DR 20

    SciTech Connect

    Odenwald, S.F.; Campbell, M.F.; Shivanandan, K.; Schwartz, P.; Fazio, G.G.; Moseley, H. Colby College, Waterville, ME Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD )

    1990-01-01

    New observations of DR 15 and 20 are reported as part of a study of compact H II regions in the Cyg X region. The radio and FIR data for these objects, when combined with (C-12)O maps, IRAS imagery, and optical photographs, provide new insights into the structure of this complex region and the nature of the star-formation process there. The observations show that DR 15 may consist of one or two B0 ZAMS stars whose H I regions have formed a low-density cavity within a molecular cloud. DR 20 appears to be a young OB cluster. The cluster is dominated by an O5.5 ZAMS star and also contains an approximately 3500-yr-old B0 star appearing as a compact H II region, along with weak FIR sources that may be B0-star candidates. 36 refs.

  14. On the trail of Dr. Fifer.

    PubMed Central

    Asche, G

    1996-01-01

    A gift from a patient drew Hope, BC, family physician Gerd Asche irrevocably into the local medical history of the 1858 Fraser River Gold Rush. Because of his interest in Dr. Max William Fifer, Asche undertook research missions in British Columbia, England and the US, converted his computer room to a research and writing centre, and wrote a biography of his predecessor and colleague. He recounts his experience and the growing satisfaction provided by his interest in medical history. Images p1398-a PMID:8616743

  15. Singultus foetalis and Dr. Alfons Mermann.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher C; Petroianu, Georg A

    2016-01-01

    During intrauterine life, hiccups are universally present, their incidence peaking in the third trimester. Alfons Mermann (1852-1908), a gynecologist from Mannheim, Germany, best known for having established the Luisenheim Woechnerinnenasyl [lying-in asylum] there in 1887, is viewed as the first physician to name and describe singultus foetalis [fetal hiccups] in a modern peer-reviewed scientific publication. This short report attempts to shed some light on the work of Dr. Mermann and to explore whether or not he was indeed the first to recognize this phenomenon. PMID:26529591

  16. Dr. Jan Rogers with Electrostatic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Jan Rogers, project scientist for the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center(MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an obejct (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials sciences program.

  17. White dwarfs identified in LAMOST DR 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jincheng; Zhao, Jingkun; Tziamtzis, Anestis; Liu, Jifeng; Li, Lifang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei

    2015-12-01

    Here we present a catalogue of 1056 spectroscopically identified hydrogen-dominated white dwarfs (DAWDs), 34 helium-dominated white dwarfs (DBWDs) and 276 white dwarf main sequence (WDMS) binaries from the Large sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) survey data release 2 (DR2). 383 DAWDs, 4 DBWDs and 138 WDMSs are new identifications after cross-match with literature. There are ˜4100 k spectra in total from DR 2. The low ratio of white dwarfs found in LAMOST is attributed to biased selection of LAMOST input catalogue and much brighter targets relative to stars observed in Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In this paper, a new DAWD selection method is adopted as a new attempt and supplement to the traditional methods. The effective temperature, surface gravity, mass, cooling age and distance of high signal-to-noise DAWDs are estimated. The peak of the mass distribution is found to be ˜0.6 M⊙, which is consistent with previous work. The parameters of WDMS binaries are also provided in this paper. As the foundation of our future work, which is to identify more WDs with debris disc, WDs found in LAMOST showed a lot of potential. Interesting infrared-excess WDs will be reported in our forthcoming paper.

  18. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2012-05-07

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

  19. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

    2016-07-12

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

  20. The life-work of Prof. MUDr. Zdenek Lojda, Dr.Sc., Dr. Med. et Iur. h.c.

    PubMed

    Hach, P

    2008-01-01

    Professor Zdenek Lojda, MD., Dr.Sc., Dr. Med.h.c., Dr. Jur. h.c., vice-rector emeritus of the Charles University and director emeritus of the Institute of Histology and Embryology of the 1st Medical Faculty of the Charles University in Prague died on the 24th April 2004. Born in Trebíc (in a local maternal hospital on the 7th December 1927) he grew up in Moravské Budejovice where he graduated from a primary and secondary school (he passed out each class as well as the leaving exam at the local gymnasium in 1946 cum laude). He was growing up in an inspiring atmosphere of a family of a professor at gymnasium that helped him to form his fundamental moral attitude and to gain high knowledge of an almost Renaissance comprehension. He was a gifted linguist (he spoke fluently several languages including Latin) and musician (he did community singing among others) and he was interested in natural sciences. In 1946 he enrolled for the medical faculty and coincidentally he was grouped among students that completed histology and embryology at the Institute of Embryology headed by professor Zdenek Frankenberger, MD., who had recognised his interest in this field of study. The young student gave himself and his free time to the work of an unqualified lab-worker and only later he became assistant conducting practical tutorials. He took his degree cum laude in 1952 and he received certificate of competence because of his excellent results. He showed his preoccupation with histology (strongly influenced by the personality of professor Frankenberger) after the graduation when he entered the job of the assistant professor at the Institute of Embryology and he stayed there until 1961. When he was about to decide which problems he should target, professor Frankenberger drew his attention to a very interesting part of histology that was just in advance and that was the use of diazonic salts for formation of colour reaction product demonstrating enzyme activity in tissues. In 1962

  1. The life-work of Prof. MUDr. Zdenek Lojda, Dr.Sc., Dr. Med. et Iur. h.c.

    PubMed

    Hach, P

    2008-01-01

    Professor Zdenek Lojda, MD., Dr.Sc., Dr. Med.h.c., Dr. Jur. h.c., vice-rector emeritus of the Charles University and director emeritus of the Institute of Histology and Embryology of the 1st Medical Faculty of the Charles University in Prague died on the 24th April 2004. Born in Trebíc (in a local maternal hospital on the 7th December 1927) he grew up in Moravské Budejovice where he graduated from a primary and secondary school (he passed out each class as well as the leaving exam at the local gymnasium in 1946 cum laude). He was growing up in an inspiring atmosphere of a family of a professor at gymnasium that helped him to form his fundamental moral attitude and to gain high knowledge of an almost Renaissance comprehension. He was a gifted linguist (he spoke fluently several languages including Latin) and musician (he did community singing among others) and he was interested in natural sciences. In 1946 he enrolled for the medical faculty and coincidentally he was grouped among students that completed histology and embryology at the Institute of Embryology headed by professor Zdenek Frankenberger, MD., who had recognised his interest in this field of study. The young student gave himself and his free time to the work of an unqualified lab-worker and only later he became assistant conducting practical tutorials. He took his degree cum laude in 1952 and he received certificate of competence because of his excellent results. He showed his preoccupation with histology (strongly influenced by the personality of professor Frankenberger) after the graduation when he entered the job of the assistant professor at the Institute of Embryology and he stayed there until 1961. When he was about to decide which problems he should target, professor Frankenberger drew his attention to a very interesting part of histology that was just in advance and that was the use of diazonic salts for formation of colour reaction product demonstrating enzyme activity in tissues. In 1962

  2. [Dr. Hideyo Noguchi and Hajime Hoshi].

    PubMed

    Misawa, M

    1991-01-01

    Hajime Hoshi is a founder of Hoshi Pharmaceutical Company and of Hoshi University. He became acquainted with Dr. Hideyo Noguchi in the United States in 1901 during his study abroad. Hoshi often stayed overnight at Noguchi's apartment in Philadelphia. Hoshi and Noguchi were both from Fukushima, Japan, and Hoshi was three years older than Noguchi. Both persons had been good friends until Hoguchi died in 1928. Hoshi and Noguchi together had met Hirobumo Ito and Thomas Edison. In 1906, Hoshi came back to Japan after a 12-year stay in the United States. The financial support by Hoshi enabled the only and one temporary returning of Noguchi to Japan in 1915. In this paper, the friendship between the famous two persons is described in detail.

  3. [Dr. Hideyo Noguchi and Hajime Hoshi].

    PubMed

    Misawa, M

    1991-01-01

    Hajime Hoshi is a founder of Hoshi Pharmaceutical Company and of Hoshi University. He became acquainted with Dr. Hideyo Noguchi in the United States in 1901 during his study abroad. Hoshi often stayed overnight at Noguchi's apartment in Philadelphia. Hoshi and Noguchi were both from Fukushima, Japan, and Hoshi was three years older than Noguchi. Both persons had been good friends until Hoguchi died in 1928. Hoshi and Noguchi together had met Hirobumo Ito and Thomas Edison. In 1906, Hoshi came back to Japan after a 12-year stay in the United States. The financial support by Hoshi enabled the only and one temporary returning of Noguchi to Japan in 1915. In this paper, the friendship between the famous two persons is described in detail. PMID:11623302

  4. Dr. Cheryl Nickerson studies Salmonella Typhimurium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Cheryl Nickerson of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  5. Cogeneration for hospitals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    With health care costs on the rise, hospitals are looking for ways to reduce operating expenses-especially utility bills. But hospitals, more than anyone else, need a continuous source of electricity, heating and air conditioning. They cannot turn off medical equipment or climate control systems in the name of energy conservation. Hospital Corporation of America (HCA), with the help of the Gas Research Institute (GRI), has found a way to supply affordable and efficient power to a mid-size hospital in Houston, Texas. A 500-kilowatt (kw) gasfired cogeneration system, sold as a package, is now being field-tested at the Medical Center Del Oro, a 258-bed hospital facility. The cogeneration system, which began operating last month, will supply the medical center with 145 tons of cooling (or 2.3 MMBtu/hour space heating) and 500,000 Btu/hour for water heating, in addition to the 500 kw of electricity. A Caterpillar continuous-duty turbocharged gas-fueled engine serves as the prime mover, and heat is recovered from its exhaust and from water used to cool the engine. A Trane single-effect absorption chiller supplies chilled water for air conditioning the hospital.

  6. Entrevue avec le Dr Charley Zeanah

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Le Dr Charles Zeanah est titulaire de la chaire de psychiatrie Mary K. Sellars-Polchow, professeur de pédiatrie clinique et vice-président de la pédopsychiatrie au département de psychiatrie et des sciences du comportement de la faculté de médecine de l’Université Tulane, à la Nouvelle-Orléans. Il est également directeur général de l’institut de la santé mentale des nourrissons et des jeunes enfants de Tulane. Il est récipiendaire de nombreux prix, notamment le prix de prévention Irving Phillips (AACAP), la mention élogieuse présidentielle pour sa recherche et son leadership exceptionnels en santé mentale des nourrissons (American Orthopsychiatric Association), le prix d’excellence clinique Sarah Haley Memorial (International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies), le prix de recherche en pédopsychiatrie Blanche F. Ittelson (APA), et le prix Serge Lebovici Award soulignant les contributions internationales à la santé mentale des nourrissons (World Association for Infant Mental Health). Le Dr Zeanah est fellow distingué de l’AACAP, fellow distingué de l’APA et membre du conseil d’administration de Zero to Three. Il est l’éditeur scientifique de Handbook of Infant Mental Health (3e édition) qui est considéré comme étant le manuel de pointe et la référence de base du domaine de la santé mentale des nourrissons.

  7. Rheumatic fever in Ireland: the role of Dr Monica Lea Wilson (1889-1971).

    PubMed

    Ward, O Conor

    2013-02-01

    In 1869 William Stokes pointed out that the severity of rheumatic fever in Dublin had declined over recent decades. Similar worldwide decline led to the closure of many internationally famous rheumatic fever centres. The discovery by Robert Collis that rheumatic fever was a sequel to haemolytic streptococcal infection and the subsequent discovery of penicillin accelerated the decline. St Gabriel's Hospital in Dublin opened in 1951 under the clinical direction of Dr Monica Lea Wilson. Contrary to contemporary medical opinion a regimen of very prolonged bed rest was enforced. From 1961 the family doctors became concerned at the adverse psychological effects of the unnecessarily prolonged hospital stay. Twenty-seven of the 56 inpatients were re-assessed. None of them showed any evidence of active rheumatic fever and their parents took them home. The hospital closed in 1968. Dr Lea Wilson distanced herself from mainstream medicine and she is best remembered for having presented an unrecognized Caravaggio painting to the Jesuit Order in recognition of their pastoral support at the time of the controversial assassination in 1920 of her husband Percival, an Inspector in the Royal Irish Constabulary.

  8. Rheumatic fever in Ireland: the role of Dr Monica Lea Wilson (1889-1971).

    PubMed

    Ward, O Conor

    2013-02-01

    In 1869 William Stokes pointed out that the severity of rheumatic fever in Dublin had declined over recent decades. Similar worldwide decline led to the closure of many internationally famous rheumatic fever centres. The discovery by Robert Collis that rheumatic fever was a sequel to haemolytic streptococcal infection and the subsequent discovery of penicillin accelerated the decline. St Gabriel's Hospital in Dublin opened in 1951 under the clinical direction of Dr Monica Lea Wilson. Contrary to contemporary medical opinion a regimen of very prolonged bed rest was enforced. From 1961 the family doctors became concerned at the adverse psychological effects of the unnecessarily prolonged hospital stay. Twenty-seven of the 56 inpatients were re-assessed. None of them showed any evidence of active rheumatic fever and their parents took them home. The hospital closed in 1968. Dr Lea Wilson distanced herself from mainstream medicine and she is best remembered for having presented an unrecognized Caravaggio painting to the Jesuit Order in recognition of their pastoral support at the time of the controversial assassination in 1920 of her husband Percival, an Inspector in the Royal Irish Constabulary. PMID:23610223

  9. Proc, Dr. Sam, Uncle Henry, and the "Little Green Book". Interview by Charles F. Wooley.

    PubMed

    Harvey, W Proctor

    2005-01-01

    During his house staff training before World War II, Dr. W. Proctor Harvey encountered Dr. Samuel A. Levine at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston. Following military service, Harvey returned to Boston and became Levine's first cardiology fellow. The book Clinical Auscultation of the Heart--the Little Green Book by Levine and Harvey in 1949 combined Levine's clinical wisdom with Harvey's objective phonocardiographic methods and brought an important objective dimension to the art of cardiac auscultation. Both Levine and Harvey shared experiences and friendship with Henry Christian, the first Physician-in-Chief when the new Brigham Hospital Opened in 1913. Christian, appointed Dean of the Harvard Medical School in 1908 at the age of 32, was referred to as the "Boy Dean." He held the Hersey Chair of Theory and Practice of Physic from 1908 until 1939, was one of the founding group of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and a major force in academic medicine. Levine served as intern to Christian and then joined the Brigham medical staff in 1915. Proctor Harvey followed Henry Christian's path from their mutual hometown of Lyunchburg, VA to the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. A series of illuminating and respectful professional interactions--initially between Christian and Levine, between Levine and Harvey in the early 1940s, and between Harvey and Christian in the 1950s--provide the background for the genesis of the Little Green Book and a remarkable example of academic heritage.

  10. Hospitals may be bound by terms added in supplier's acceptance of an offer.

    PubMed

    Decker, R

    1992-03-01

    A hospital materials manager reports that a supplier is attempting to hold the hospital to new terms that the supplier added in the acceptance of an offer to buy. The offer to buy was made in the hospital's purchase order. In this dialogue, Dr. Decker develops the law relating to such a transaction. PMID:10117869

  11. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... Symptoms start within 24 to 48 hours of infection, and can last for 1 ... norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  12. Healing bodies or saving souls? Reverend Dr Peter Parker (1804-1888) as medical missionary.

    PubMed

    Fu, Louis

    2016-05-01

    The important role played by medical services in the preaching of the Gospel in China was undeniable. Anglo-American missionaries entered Canton in the early 18th century and introduced modern Western medicine to China. Reverend Dr Peter Parker, founder of medical missionaries to China, was more than that, far more advanced than his predecessors including Drs Pearson, Livingstone and Colledge. He was an enthusiastic missionary of exceptional ability and vigour as witnessed his labours at the Canton Ophthalmic Hospital. His 20 years in the medical field unexpectedly paved the way for his future career as a diplomat in the American Legation. PMID:24833546

  13. Healing bodies or saving souls? Reverend Dr Peter Parker (1804-1888) as medical missionary.

    PubMed

    Fu, Louis

    2016-05-01

    The important role played by medical services in the preaching of the Gospel in China was undeniable. Anglo-American missionaries entered Canton in the early 18th century and introduced modern Western medicine to China. Reverend Dr Peter Parker, founder of medical missionaries to China, was more than that, far more advanced than his predecessors including Drs Pearson, Livingstone and Colledge. He was an enthusiastic missionary of exceptional ability and vigour as witnessed his labours at the Canton Ophthalmic Hospital. His 20 years in the medical field unexpectedly paved the way for his future career as a diplomat in the American Legation.

  14. A Crusade Against Scorpion Sting: Life and Works of Dr. Himmatrao Bawaskar

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Ajinkya A.

    2012-01-01

    In the times of rapid advancement of science and technology, advance medical equipment and hi tech hospitals represent the face of medical science. The aspirations and ambitions of medical professionals are also shifting, with growing concerns of deterioration of doctor patient relationship as well as disconnect between services and the community needs. The life of Dr Himmatrao Bawaskar defies several conventions of today's medical practice. His outstanding dedication towards patients and commitment to provide high quality care in resource poor setting makes him an ideal role model for younger generation of physicians in India. PMID:24479002

  15. The DraC usher in Dr fimbriae biogenesis of uropathogenic E. coli Dr(+) strains.

    PubMed

    Zalewska-Piatek, Beata; Kur, Marta; Wilkanowicz, Sabina; Piatek, Rafał; Kur, Józef

    2010-05-01

    Biogenesis of Dr fimbriae encoded by the dra gene cluster of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains requires the chaperone-usher pathway. This secretion system is based on two non-structural assembly components, the DraB periplasmic chaperone and DraC outer-membrane usher. The DraB controls the folding of DraE subunits, and DraC forms the assembly and secretion platform for polymerization of subunits in linear fibers. In this study, mutagenesis of the DraC N-terminus was undertaken to select residues critical for Dr fimbriae bioassembly. The DraC-F4A, DraC-C64, DraC-C100A and DraC-W142A significantly reduced the adhesive ability of E. coli strains. The biological activity of the DraC mutants as a assembly platform for Dr fimbriae polymerization was verified by agglutination of human erythrocytes and adhesion to DAF localized at the surface of CHO-DAF(+) and HeLa cells. The residue F4 of the DraC usher conserved among FGL and FGS chaperone-assembled adhesive organelles can be used to design pillicides blocking the biogenesis of Dr fimbriae. Because the draC and afaC-III genes share 100% identity the range of the virulence determinant inhibitors could also be extended to E. coli strains encoding afa-3 gene cluster. The investigations performed showed that the usher N-terminus plays an important role in biogenesis of complete fiber.

  16. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest [U.S. Energy Secretary

    2016-07-12

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  17. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest

    2014-02-03

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  18. Reexamining the Writings of Dr. Seuss To Promote Character Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Dave F.; Varady, Joe

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the use of children's literature by Dr. Seuss in the middle school classroom to help students explore issues of their character and social development, adult expectations, and changes in their personal environment. Discusses themes addressed in selected Dr. Seuss books, and how these can be used as thematic units for classroom…

  19. Dr. Wernher Von Braun near the mobile launcher.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George Mueller, NASA associate administrator for manned space flight, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, are seen near the mobile launcher carrying a 363 foot tall Saturn V space launch vehicle as the rocket is rolled from the vehicle assembly building at KSC for its three mile trip to the launch pad.

  20. Dr. Albert Carr--Science Educator 1930-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    The very first issue of "Educational Perspectives" was published in October of 1962. Dr. Albert Carr wrote one of the inaugural essays on the topic of current developments in science education, and he went on to write several other articles for the journal. This article shares why Dr. Albert Carr's colleagues remember him for his…

  1. Biotechnology Symposium - In Memoriam, the Late Dr. Allan Zipf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A one-day biotechnology symposium was held at Alabama A&M University (AAMU), Normal, AL on June 4, 2004 in memory of the late Dr. Allan Zipf (Sept 1953-Jan 2004). Dr. Zipf was a Research Associate Professor at the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, AAMU, who collaborated extensively with ARS/MS...

  2. Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher 2012 Wilder Silver Medal Recipient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher, Oregon State University, was awarded the 2012 Wilder Medal by the American Pomological Society for his contributions to hazelnut genetics and cultivar development. Dr. Mehlenbacher took over the leadership of the Oregon State University hazelnut breeding program in 1986 aft...

  3. Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. John Hope Franklin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert L., Jr.; Levering-Lewis, David; French, John D.; Wharton, Clifton R., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. John Hope Franklin chronicled the experiences of African-Americans like no one before him, forcing America to recognize Black history as American history. His contributions were innumerable and his impact was abiding. In celebration of his life and legacy, the authors profile the celebrated scholar and activist, Dr. John Hope Franklin.

  4. Dr. Irene Sänger-Bredt, a life for astronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaganescu, Nicolae-Florin

    2004-12-01

    Irene Bredt (b.1911 at Bonn) obtained her Doctorate in Physics in 1937; in the same year she became a scientific researcher at the German Research Center for Aviation at Trauen, led by Prof. Dr. Eugen Sänger. Soon, the young but efficient Dr. Irene Bredt became the first assistant of Dr. Sänger, who married her (1951). During 1973-1978, Dr. Bredt was in correspondence with Prof. Dr. Nikolae-Florin Zaganescu and helped him to familiarize the Romanian readers with Prof. Sänger's life and achievements. As for Dr. Bredt's life, she specified three main periods of her activity: 1937-1942, when she was researcher in charge of thermodynamic problems of liquid-fuelled rocket engines at Trauen 1942-1945, when she was Senior Researcher in charge of Ramjet in flight performances at Ainring, and also coauthored the Top Secret Technical report entitled 'A Rocket Engine for a Long-Range Bomber', which was finished in 1941 but edited only in 1944 the post world war II period, when she was Scientific Advisor or Director at various civil and military research institutes, universities, etc. Dr. Irene Sänger-Bredt helped her husband to develop many scientific theories like Ramjet thermodynamic theory, and photon rocket theory and also in establishing IAF and IAA. In 1970, Dr. Irene Sänger-Bredt was honored with 'Hermann Oberth Gold Medal' for her impressive scientific activity.

  5. The 1850 Webster/Parkman Trial: Dr. Keep's forensic evidence.

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2003-03-01

    Shortly before two o'clock on a chilly November afternoon in 1849, the celebrated Harvard physician and surgeon, Dr. George Parkman, left his home on Boston's fashionable Beacon Hill, expecting to return in a few hours. He was never seen alive again. This account describes Parkman's brutal murder and explores the dynamics which preceded this crime. It explains how and why Dr. John White Webster, MD, Professor of Chemistry and Mineralogy at Harvard University, killed Dr. Parkman and unsuccessfully attempted to destroy the physical evidence. Webster's subsequent trial, conviction and ultimate punishment are also detailed. The Parkman-Webster case remains one of the classic murders in the annals of American crime. Compelling dental evidence presented by the famous American dentist, Dr. Nathan Cooley Keep, directly led to the conviction of Dr. Webster. This graphic, ground-breaking case clearly established the viable role of forensic dentistry in legal criminal investigation.

  6. Carbon Stars from LAMOST DR2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Cui, Wenyuan; Liu, Chao; Luo, Ali; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Bo

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present the new catalog of carbon stars from the LAMOST DR2 catalog. In total, 894 carbon stars are identified from multiple line indices measured from the stellar spectra. We are able to identify the carbon stars by combining the CN bands in the red end with C2 and other lines. Moreover, we also classify the carbon stars into spectral sub-types of C–H, C–R, and C–N. These sub-types show distinct features in the multi-dimensional line indices, implying that in the future they can be used to identify carbon stars from larger spectroscopic data sets. While the C–N stars are clearly separated from the others in the line index space, we find no clear separation between the C–R and C–H sub-types. The C–R and C–H stars seem to smoothly transition from one to another. This may hint that the C–R and C–H stars may not be different in their origins, instead their spectra look different because of different metallicities. Due to the relatively low spectral resolution and lower signal-to-noise ratio, the ratio of 12C/13C is not measured and thus the C–J stars are not identified.

  7. Dr. Otto "Tiger" Freer: inventor and innovator.

    PubMed

    Chittiboina, Prashant; Connor, David E; Nanda, Anil

    2012-08-01

    Every neurosurgeon develops his or her own standard approach to common intracranial pathologies in terms of the order in which different stages are performed and which instruments are used to perform individual tasks. The majority of the basic steps in performing a craniotomy are learned through repetition and practice during residency training. Significant amounts of energy are devoted to mastering technical skills and developing an operative rhythm. What often receives little attention is the historical origin of the instruments that make the work possible. The Freer elevator represents a particularly interesting example. To people unfamiliar with the accomplishments of turn-of-the-century laryngologist Otto "Tiger" Freer, it can be assumed that the name of the instrument in one's hand is simply named for what it can do, that is, to "free" the nasal mucosa from the bony and cartilaginous septum during the transsphenoidal approach. The technique this master surgeon spent his life and career perfecting is now repeated almost daily by skull base neurosurgeons approaching pathologies from the inferior frontal lobe to the foramen magnum. In reviewing his life and work, the authors of this paper discovered an interesting creative process that led to the design of the eponymous instrument. Additionally, they discovered important advances toward the development of the transnasal approach and in our understanding of the anterior skull base. They present a historical perspective on the life and accomplishments of Dr. Freer and the ubiquitous surgical instrument that he invented and popularized. PMID:22853830

  8. SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.; Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, Ingrid; Pecanha, Viviane; Costa, J. E. S.; Koester, D.; Krzesinski, J.; Dufour, P.; Lachapelle, F.-R.; Bergeron, P.; Yip, Ching-Wa; Harris, Hugh C.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Althaus, L.; Corsico, A.

    2013-01-15

    We present a new catalog of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog. We find 20,407 white dwarf spectra, representing 19,712 stars, and provide atmospheric model fits to 14,120 DA and 1011 DB white dwarf spectra from 12,843 and 923 stars, respectively. These numbers represent more than a factor of two increase in the total number of white dwarf stars from the previous SDSS white dwarf catalogs based on DR4 data. Our distribution of subtypes varies from previous catalogs due to our more conservative, manual classifications of each star in our catalog, supplementing our automatic fits. In particular, we find a large number of magnetic white dwarf stars whose small Zeeman splittings mimic increased Stark broadening that would otherwise result in an overestimated log g if fit as a non-magnetic white dwarf. We calculate mean DA and DB masses for our clean, non-magnetic sample and find the DB mean mass is statistically larger than that for the DAs.

  9. Carbon Stars from LAMOST DR2 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Cui, Wenyuan; Liu, Chao; Luo, Ali; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Bo

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present the new catalog of carbon stars from the LAMOST DR2 catalog. In total, 894 carbon stars are identified from multiple line indices measured from the stellar spectra. We are able to identify the carbon stars by combining the CN bands in the red end with C2 and other lines. Moreover, we also classify the carbon stars into spectral sub-types of C-H, C-R, and C-N. These sub-types show distinct features in the multi-dimensional line indices, implying that in the future they can be used to identify carbon stars from larger spectroscopic data sets. While the C-N stars are clearly separated from the others in the line index space, we find no clear separation between the C-R and C-H sub-types. The C-R and C-H stars seem to smoothly transition from one to another. This may hint that the C-R and C-H stars may not be different in their origins, instead their spectra look different because of different metallicities. Due to the relatively low spectral resolution and lower signal-to-noise ratio, the ratio of 12C/13C is not measured and thus the C-J stars are not identified.

  10. Dr. Hall and the work cure.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kathlyn L

    2005-01-01

    Herbert James Hall, MD (1870-1923), was a pioneer in the systematic and organized study of occupation as therapy for persons with nervous and mental disorders that he called the "work cure." He began his work in 1904 during the early years of the Arts and Crafts Movement in the United States. His primary interest was the disorder neurasthenia, a condition with many symptoms including chronic fatigue, stress, and inability to work or perform everyday tasks. The prevailing treatment of the day was absolute bed rest known as the "rest cure." Hall believed that neurasthenia was not caused by overwork but by faulty living habits that could be corrected through an ordered life schedule and selected occupations. He identified several principles of therapy that are still used today including graded activity and energy conservation. Dr. Adolph Meyer credits Hall for organizing the ideas on the therapeutic use of occupation (Meyer, 1922). Hall also provided the name American Occupational Therapy Association for the professional organization and served as the fourth president. For his many contributions to the profession Hall deserves to be recognized as a major contributor to the development and organization of occupational therapy. PMID:23927746

  11. Dr. Otto "Tiger" Freer: inventor and innovator.

    PubMed

    Chittiboina, Prashant; Connor, David E; Nanda, Anil

    2012-08-01

    Every neurosurgeon develops his or her own standard approach to common intracranial pathologies in terms of the order in which different stages are performed and which instruments are used to perform individual tasks. The majority of the basic steps in performing a craniotomy are learned through repetition and practice during residency training. Significant amounts of energy are devoted to mastering technical skills and developing an operative rhythm. What often receives little attention is the historical origin of the instruments that make the work possible. The Freer elevator represents a particularly interesting example. To people unfamiliar with the accomplishments of turn-of-the-century laryngologist Otto "Tiger" Freer, it can be assumed that the name of the instrument in one's hand is simply named for what it can do, that is, to "free" the nasal mucosa from the bony and cartilaginous septum during the transsphenoidal approach. The technique this master surgeon spent his life and career perfecting is now repeated almost daily by skull base neurosurgeons approaching pathologies from the inferior frontal lobe to the foramen magnum. In reviewing his life and work, the authors of this paper discovered an interesting creative process that led to the design of the eponymous instrument. Additionally, they discovered important advances toward the development of the transnasal approach and in our understanding of the anterior skull base. They present a historical perspective on the life and accomplishments of Dr. Freer and the ubiquitous surgical instrument that he invented and popularized.

  12. Dr. Samuel Ting, nobel laureate, visits SSPF.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Nobel laureate Professor Samuel C. C. Ting of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology pauses for a photo in the Space Station Processing Facility. Dr. Ting is directing an experiment, an international collaboration of some 37 universities and laboratories, using a state-of-the-art particle physics detector called the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), which will fly on a future launch to the International Space Station. Using the unique environment of space, the AMS will study the properties and origin of cosmic particles and nuclei including antimatter and dark matter. AMS flew initially as a Space Shuttle payload on the June 1998 mission STS-91 that provided the investigating team with data on background sources and verified the detector's performance under actual space flight conditions. The detector's second space flight is scheduled to be launched on mission UF-4 October 2003 for installation on the Space Station as an attached payload. Current plans call for operating the detector for three years before it is returned to Earth on the Shuttle. Using the Space Station offers the science team the opportunity to conduct the long-duration research above the Earth's atmosphere necessary to collect sufficient data required to accomplish the science objectives.

  13. 78 FR 29781 - Before Administrative Judges: Ronald M. Spritzer, Chairman, Dr. Anthony J. Baratta, Dr. Randall J...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Before Administrative Judges: Ronald M. Spritzer, Chairman, Dr. Anthony J. Baratta, Dr. Randall J. Charbeneau; In the Matter of Detroit Edison Company (Fermi...

  14. [Hospitals' evolution through the ages].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    The predecessor institutions of modern hospitals--Byzantine nosocómeion, European hospitale and Islamic maristan--were dissimilar both in their patients and their aims. The first charitable organizations in West Europe (Rome) and in the East (Cesarea in Cappadocia) were rather hospices. After the collapse of the Western Roman Empire (476 A.D.), some monastic centers were prepared to provide medical assistance to religious and secular patients. Since the XI and XII Centuries in all of Christian Europe the charitable institutions, designated as hospitale, multiplied. Among the Italian ones, the Roman Santo Spirito (Holy Ghost) Hospital, built in the 1201-1204 period, reached a preeminet position. This one soon became the most important of the entire Christendom (archihospital), with a lot of affiliated hospitals in Europe and later in America. The first American hospital, Saint Nicholas Hospital, opened on December 29, 1503 in Santo Domingo, obtained in 1541 its affiliation to the Santo Spirito archihospital. Regarding continental America, the first health centers were established in Mexico: the Immaculate Conception Hospital and the Saint Lazarus Hospital, both established by Hernán Cortés. For its part, clinical teaching was systematized at the Saint Francis Hospital in Padua and by there moved to Leyden. In Mexico, the chair of medical clinics or practical medicine was established in 1806 at the Saint Andrew Hospital. During the XX century, Dr. Ignacio Chávez was the driving force behind the creation of the modern Mexican Health Institutes. These ones are dedicated to the treatment of poor patients, as well as to medical teaching and research.

  15. [Historical exploration of Acapulco hospitals, Guerrero, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Salcedo-Alvarez, Rey Arturo

    2006-01-01

    This study attempts to recount the history of the main hospitals of the port of Acapulco from colonial times until the end of the 20th century. The Augustine friars began hospital care at the end of the first part of the 16th century. Later, Bernardino Alvarez (1514?-1584), with the support of the Spanish crown, founded the first formal hospital in Acapulco called Hospital de Nuestra Señora de la Consolación (Our Lady of Consolation Hospital). During the 16th and 17th centuries, the sick were attended by friars, and by the end of the 19th century there were physicians and surgeons. From the end of the Independence War until the end of the 19th century, the port did not have any true hospital. The first degreed physicians and surgeons arrived and resided in Acapulco in 1920. In 1938, the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital) began providing services. It was replaced by the Hospital General de Acapulco (General Hospital of Acapulco). At the fourth decade of the past century the Cruz Roja (Red Cross) was created. In 1957 the hospital services of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS, Mexican Institute of Social Security), which was founded in 1963, was inaugurated with the Unidad Medico/Social (Medical and Social Unit) of the IMSS in Acapulco. This began the journey of modernity in Acapulco. In 1992, Hospital Regional Vicente Guerrero (Regional Hospital Vicente Guerrero) of the IMSS, initiated its services. In 1960, medical services for civil workers and their families were housed in the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital). Shortly afterwards, the Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE, Security and Social Services Institute for State Employees) had their own hospital. During the 20th century, Acapulco has added other hospital services to care for members of the navy and armed forces, as well as for those persons with financial resources for private care.

  16. [DR. SHOSHANA SZKOP-FRENKIEL: THE FIRST FEMALE PLASTIC SURGEON IN ISRAEL].

    PubMed

    Shehory-Rubin, Zipora

    2015-11-01

    In the history of Israeli medicine, Dr. Shoshana Szkop-Frenkiel is regarded as the first plastic surgeon in the country and among the founders of the profession of plastic surgery. This article describes the long road she traveled, from her acceptance into medical studies in Vilna--at a time when the entry of any woman to the faculty of medicine was strictly limited and of Jewish women in particular; her emigration to Eretz Israel and her struggles as she underwent training in internal medicine at the "Hadassah" Hospital in Tel-Aviv, when she was denied training as a surgeon; and up to the moment she was accepted by the plastic surgery unit of the Tel Hashomer Hospital and became the first such female practitioner in Israel. Dr. Shoshana Szkop-Frenkiel thus fulfilled a childhood dream to become a surgeon at a time when women were excluded from surgery on the grounds that it called for "male" characteristics. This article is intended to illustrate the character of a female doctor pursuing a career in surgery during the time of the British Mandate, to illuminate her professional travails in Israel, and to emphasize her important contribution in the field.

  17. Dr. Harvey Cushing's attempts to cure migraine based on theories of pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Katherine; Pendleton, Courtney; Rosenberg, Jason; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2011-11-01

    A multitude of theories characterized medical thought on migraine in the early 20th century. Newly discovered historical case files revealed Dr. Harvey Cushing's previously unpublished early attempts at surgical cure of migraine. Following institutional review board approval, and through the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, the authors reviewed the microfilm surgical records for The Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1896 to 1912. Patients undergoing surgical intervention by Dr. Harvey Cushing for the treatment of migraine were selected for further review. All 4 patients in the series were women and ranged in age from 29 to 41 years old. The women were admitted and observed in the hospital until a migraine occurred. Surgeries were performed while the women were in the midst of an attack. Cushing used surgical strategies including decompression, temporal artery ligation, and removal of the spine of the second vertebra. In each case, the patients' headaches eventually returned following surgery. Cushing relied on a combination of contemporary theories on migraine including humeral science, vasospastic theory, organic cause, and increased intracranial pressure. His unpublished efforts foreshadowed future surgical efforts at curing migraines. PMID:21682563

  18. Oligonucleotide-genotyping as a method of detecting the HLA-DR2 (DRw15)-Dw2, -DR2 (DRw15)-Dw12, -DR4-Dw15, and -DR4-D"KT2" haplotypes in the Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Obata, F; Ito, I; Kaneko, T; Ohkubo, M; Ishimoto, A L; Abe, A; Kashiwagi, N

    1989-05-01

    We synthesized pairs of four different oligonucleotides, F22, F29, F42, and F158, to analyse the HLA-DR2 (DRw15) and -DR4 haplotypes in the Japanese population. After enzymatically amplifying the HLA-DRB1 gene, we hybridized the oligonucleotide probes with DNA extracted from 42 donors. Hybridization was completed between F22 and the DNA of haplotype DR2 (DRw15)-Dw2, between F29 and the DNA of DR2 (DRw15)-Dw12, between F42 and the DNA of DR4-D"KT2", and between F158 and the DNA of DR4-Dw15. In keeping with the nucleotide sequences of the probes, F29 hybridized also with DNA from the DR9-Dw23 haplotype and F158 with that from some of the DRw8 haplotypes (DRw8-Dw8.3) in the Japanese population. Results of this study demonstrate that the four oligonucleotides make useful probes for detecting the haplotypes above.

  19. The decisive decade. Interview: Dr. Nafis Sadik.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    The interview with Dr. Nafis Sadik, Director of the UN Family Planning Association (UNFPA), involved questions about the Fund's major achievements, the effect of withdrawal of US funds on UNFPA programs, the role of UNFPA in bridging environmental, population, and development objectives as stated in the Bruntland Commission initiatives, awareness building, the role of UNFPA in dealing with resource deficits in countries with high growth populations, the seriousness of the 1990s decade as critical to the future. and UNFPA's priorities for the next 10 years. The Fund's accomplishments are in getting political systems to recognize as an important part of development, in broadening the concept of population to include quality of life and spatial distribution and growth, and in obtaining funding to continue operating without US funds. The US withdrawal of funds has affected UNFPA's funding in Africa since 1985. UNFPA is actively working to help other agencies integrate FP into conservation strategies, and to consider the education of women and provision for FP information in a variety of programs. Sustainable development must occur at the grass roots level, or from the ground up. Programs must be implemented with an understanding of local needs and desires and with cultural sensitivity. A review of findings over 20 years led to an understanding that many countries had no strategy or plans for population programs even with a lot of development assistance, and programs were transplanted without consideration of local needs. UNFPA is not urging that national development strategies must incorporate population planning, and to target education to young people who will soon be entering reproductive ages during the decade ahead. Governments have begun to recognize that the next 10 years will determine the future, and population does affect the crisis of resources. UNFPA's priorities are to the education of youth, to design special curricula in schools for educating about

  20. [Dr. Halfdan Mahler's speech in Guatemala].

    PubMed

    Mahler, H

    1989-12-01

    A major focus of Dr. Mahler throughout his life has been the war against female discrimination and to reduce the extreme inequalities between men and women. The Latin American Region of IPPF selected the participation of women as its goal for the decade of the 90's. It is known that fertility is inversely related to female education and occupation, and that the poorest homes worldwide are those headed by poor and illiterate women. The number of female-headed households is increasing and in Barbados, Dominica, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama and Uruguay these have increased by 31% Married women often find that their husbands are the main obstacles to family planning services. Violence against women takes many forms including physical abuse, adolescent pregnancy, psychological and economic stress, the "machismo" syndrome, and having unwanted pregnancies. Latin America and the Caribbean pregnancy and illegal abortion account for the high mortality rates among those 15-19. Men must face the consequences of the socioeconomic conditions that they have created for women. For example if FPP were designed to really reflect a women's perspective such programs would have reached the goals of success. He recommends that IPPF's goal for the Year 2000 will be to have 9 women to each man in Committees of 10. He suggests that changes towards women must begin with the men themselves so that policies and programs reflect these new attitudes. If society wants a less aggressive and materialistic world, then the role of women must be raised so that her contribution can be felt worldwide.

  1. Adapting the neurology area of the Gustavo Fricke Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankelen, A.; González, S.; Aguirre, L.

    2007-11-01

    Within the framework of the subject Clinical Engineering taught at Hospital Dr. Gustavo Fricke of Viña del Mar Chile, we were assigned to undertake a detailed study on the quality of the electrical power main supply of the Neurology Department, on account of reported malfunctioning of some equipment used in this unit. The study results indicated that the problems occurred only in a device for auditory evoked potentials device and, contrary to what was expected, the problem was unrelated to the quality of the electrical main supply. It was also found that the cause for the problem was electromagnetic interference (EMI) emitted from the system's very own components. To solve the problem, we built a Faraday Cage for the signal-processing unit and increased the separating distance among the various system components. This approach enhanced system performance and significantly improved the recorded signals of patients. The solution adopted from this experience was suggested to others health care centers of our country that had been experiencing similar difficulties with the same type of medical equipment.

  2. Evidence for a new HLA class II determinant present on cells from HLA-DR1 and/or -DR4 individuals.

    PubMed

    Lepage, V; Alcalay, D; Douay, C; Mallet, C; Loiseau, P; Degos, L; Colombani, M; Colombani, J

    1985-02-01

    Evidence for a new HLA class II specificity is presented. It is recognized by LE serum, which reacts with most DR1 and/or DR4 individuals (r = 0.86). Its frequency in the French population is 0.33. Absorption-elution experiments showed that the serum reactivity was not due to a mixture of anti-DR1 and anti-DR4 antibodies, but to a single antibody population which could be absorbed on and eluted from both DR1(+) or DR4(+) cells. LE specificity seemed to be expressed on DR but not on DQ molecules since the serum reacted with and could be absorbed by DR+,DQw- cells; it did not react with a DR-,DQw+ mutant cell, but did react with the DR+,DQw+ parental cell. The relationship between LE specificity and MC1 and Te23 specificities remains to be determined. PMID:2581334

  3. Pathogenesis of Afa/Dr Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Servin, Alain L.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last few years, dramatic increases in our knowledge about diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) pathogenesis have taken place. The typical class of DAEC includes E. coli strains harboring AfaE-I, AfaE-II, AfaE-III, AfaE-V, Dr, Dr-II, F1845, and NFA-I adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC); these strains (i) have an identical genetic organization and (ii) allow binding to human decay-accelerating factor (DAF) (Afa/DrDAF subclass) or carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (Afa/DrCEA subclass). The atypical class of DAEC includes two subclasses of strains; the atypical subclass 1 includes E. coli strains that express AfaE-VII, AfaE-VIII, AAF-I, AAF-II, and AAF-III adhesins, which (i) have an identical genetic organization and (ii) do not bind to human DAF, and the atypical subclass 2 includes E. coli strains that harbor Afa/Dr adhesins or others adhesins promoting diffuse adhesion, together with pathogenicity islands such as the LEE pathogenicity island (DA-EPEC). In this review, the focus is on Afa/Dr DAEC strains that have been found to be associated with urinary tract infections and with enteric infection. The review aims to provide a broad overview and update of the virulence aspects of these intriguing pathogens. Epidemiological studies, diagnostic techniques, characteristic molecular features of Afa/Dr operons, and the respective role of Afa/Dr adhesins and invasins in pathogenesis are described. Following the recognition of membrane-bound receptors, including type IV collagen, DAF, CEACAM1, CEA, and CEACAM6, by Afa/Dr adhesins, activation of signal transduction pathways leads to structural and functional injuries at brush border and junctional domains and to proinflammatory responses in polarized intestinal cells. In addition, uropathogenic Afa/Dr DAEC strains, following recognition of β1 integrin as a receptor, enter epithelial cells by a zipper-like, raft- and microtubule-dependent mechanism. Finally, the presence of other, unknown virulence factors and the way that

  4. [Red Cross hospital in Krapina, during the First world war from 1914 to 1918].

    PubMed

    Fures, Rajko; Habek, Dubravko; Kozina, Drago

    2016-08-01

    Red Cross Hospital in Krapina, during the First World War, was active from 1914 to 1918. Hospital led by Dr. Mirko Crkvenac, oriented humanist. The hospital is operated thanks to the help of municipalities and citizens. The hospital staff concern is for civilian and military victims of the First World War. Dr. Crkvenac, with the support of the City of Krapina and Mayor Vilibald Sluga, he succeeds to the organization and operation of the hospital to an enviable level. Across the Austro-Hungarian Empire and Croatian, Hospitals Red Cross, had a significant role in caring for the wounded, injured and sick soldiers and civilians. Red Cross Hospital in Krapina, is an example of a well-organized hospital in the toughest conditions. Such an organization was not simple in its implementation, and left the valuable lessons and experience. PMID:27598958

  5. [Red Cross hospital in Krapina, during the First world war from 1914 to 1918].

    PubMed

    Fures, Rajko; Habek, Dubravko; Kozina, Drago

    2016-08-01

    Red Cross Hospital in Krapina, during the First World War, was active from 1914 to 1918. Hospital led by Dr. Mirko Crkvenac, oriented humanist. The hospital is operated thanks to the help of municipalities and citizens. The hospital staff concern is for civilian and military victims of the First World War. Dr. Crkvenac, with the support of the City of Krapina and Mayor Vilibald Sluga, he succeeds to the organization and operation of the hospital to an enviable level. Across the Austro-Hungarian Empire and Croatian, Hospitals Red Cross, had a significant role in caring for the wounded, injured and sick soldiers and civilians. Red Cross Hospital in Krapina, is an example of a well-organized hospital in the toughest conditions. Such an organization was not simple in its implementation, and left the valuable lessons and experience.

  6. Introduction to pediatric hospital medicine.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Daniel A; Percelay, Jack M; Zipes, David

    2005-08-01

    This article provides a brief summary of the past, present, and future of pediatric hospital medicine. In its short history, it already has made an impact on the way pediatrics is practiced and taught. There is no denying Dr. Menna's prescience when he wrote his opinion in 1990. As the field continues to emerge and mature, the current leadership is cognizant of the obstacles ahead and the need to maintain the goal of the well-being of all children. Maintaining that goal means redoubling efforts to maintain contact with primary care providers for continuity of care in and out of the hospital. Only by promoting patient- and family-centered care, inclusive of all providers, can children's health best be served.

  7. 74. ARAII. Dr. William Zinn of combustion engineering company and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. ARA-II. Dr. William Zinn of combustion engineering company and others at controls of SL-1. August 8, 1959. Ineel photo no. 59-4109. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. GOES-R with Dr. Kathy Sullivan and Tim Samaras

    NASA Video Gallery

    This short video features highlights from a live Nationwide broadcast that took place on April 3, 2012, from the studio of NASA Goddard TV. NOAA’s Deputy Administrator and Chief Scientist Dr. Ka...

  9. Grantee Spotlight: Dr. Kolawole Okuyemi - Improving Cervical Cancer Screening Attitudes

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Kolawole Okuyumi is studying cervical cancer screening attitudes and behaviors of African immigrants and refugees in Minnesota, and introducing “cancer” and “cervix” to their everyday vocabulary.

  10. Dr. von Braun Escorts President Kennedy and Vice President Johnson

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center Director Dr. Wernher von Braun explains a detail from a Saturn IB mockup and engine to President John F. Kennedy, Vice President Lyndon Johnson and other guests, September 11, 1962.

  11. NES Live Video Chat: Dr. John C. Mather

    NASA Video Gallery

    NES welcomed Nobel Prize winner Dr. John C. Mather for a video webchat on May 17, 2011. He spoke about the James Webb Space Telescope and how it gives us a look into the past to see how galaxies ha...

  12. Dr. Wernher Von Braun at the launch of Apollo 11.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mission officials relax, all smiles, a few moments after the successful launch of the Apollo 11 spacecraft by Saturn V vehicle AS-506. Relieved of the tension of waiting through the countdown are (left to right) Charles W. Matthews, NASA deputy associate administrator for manned space flight; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center; Dr. George E. Meuller, NASA associate administrator for manned spaceflight, and Lt. General Samuel C. Phillips, director of the Apollo program.

  13. Portrait of Dr. Von Braun with Walt Disney, 1954.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Marshall Center Director Dr. Wernher Von Braun is pictured with Walt Disney during a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1954. In the 1950s, Dr. Von Braun while working in California on the Saturn project, also worked with Disney studios as a technical director in making three films about Space Exploration for television. Disney's tour of Marshall in 1965 was Von Braun's hope for a renewed public interest in the future of the Space Program at NASA.

  14. Dr. Peter Emil Becker and the Third Reich.

    PubMed

    Hill, Frank

    2013-08-01

    In 1985 the physician after whom Becker Muscular Dystrophy is named, German neurologist Dr. Peter Emil Becker (1908-2000), published an autobiographical article in the American Journal of Medical Genetics in which he disavowed any association with the Nazi Party. A closer look at the evidence, however, suggests otherwise. Review of war records and related sources raise concern for Dr. Becker's affiliation with the Nazi Party and his contributions to its ideology.

  15. Dr. von Braun at 'Wernher von Braun Day' Celebration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    In 1970 Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director Dr. Wernher von Braun (right) was reassigned to NASA Headquarters to serve as Deputy Associate Administrator for Plarning. Prior to his transfer, Dr. von Braun was honored for his career in Huntsville, Alabama, with the celebration of 'Wernher von Braun Day.' Among those participating were Alabama Governor Albert Brewer (left) and Alabama Senator John Sparkman (center). (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public library)

  16. Dr-FtsA, an actin homologue in Deinococcus radiodurans differentially affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ functions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Modi, Kruti; Misra, Hari S

    2014-01-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes homologues of divisome proteins including FtsZ and FtsA. FtsZ of this bacterium (Dr-FtsZ) has been recently characterized. In this paper, we study FtsA of D. radiodurans (Dr-FtsA) and its involvement in regulation of FtsZ function. Recombinant Dr-FtsA showed neither ATPase nor GTPase activity and its polymerization was ATP dependent. Interestingly, we observed that Dr-FtsA, when compared with E. coli FtsA (Ec-FtsA), has lower affinity for both Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. Also, Dr-FtsA showed differential effects on GTPase activity and sedimentation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ. For instance, Dr-FtsA stimulated GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ while GTPase activity of Ec-FtsZ was reduced in the presence of Dr-FtsA. Stimulation of GTPase activity of Dr-FtsZ by Dr-FtsA resulted in depolymerization of Dr-FtsZ. Dr-FtsA effects on GTPase activity and polymerization/depolymerisation characteristics of Dr-FtsZ did not change significantly in the presence of ATP. Recombinant E. coli expressing Dr-FtsA showed cell division inhibition in spite of in trans expression of Dr-FtsZ in these cells. These results suggested that Dr-FtsA, although it lacks ATPase activity, is still functional and differentially affects Dr-FtsZ and Ec-FtsZ function in vitro.

  17. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols. PMID

  18. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols.

  19. Biochemical characteristic of biofilm of uropathogenic Escherichia coli Dr(+) strains.

    PubMed

    Zalewska-Piątek, Beata; Wilkanowicz, Sabina; Bruździak, Piotr; Piątek, Rafał; Kur, Józef

    2013-07-19

    Urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli are very common health problem in the developed countries. The virulence of the uropathogenic E. coli Dr(+) IH11128 is determined by Dr fimbriae, which are homopolymeric structures composed of DraE subunits with the DraD protein capping the fiber. In this study, we have analyzed the structural and biochemical properties of biofilms developed by E. coli strains expressing Dr fimbriae with or without the DraD tip subunit and the surface-exposed DraD protein. We have also demonstrated that these E. coli strains form biofilms on an abiotic surface in a nutrient-dependent fashion. We present evidence that Dr fimbriae are necessary during the first stage of bacterial interaction with the abiotic surface. In addition, we reveal that the DraD alone is also sufficient for the initial surface attachment at an even higher level than Dr fimbriae and that chloramphenicol is able to reduce the normal attachment of the analyzed E. coli. The action of chloramphenicol also shows that protein synthesis is required for the early events of biofilm formation. Additionally, we have identified reduced exopolysaccharide coverage in E. coli that express only Dr fimbrial polyadhesins at the cell surface with or without the DraD capping subunit.

  20. Dr. C.E. Brown-Séquard, M.D., F.R.C.P., F.R.S., London: the casting of the die.

    PubMed

    Gooddy, W

    1996-04-01

    In 1858 Dr. Brown-Séquard arrived in London. During his stay there, he was appointed physician at the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic (now the National Hospital), and was elected Fellow of the Royal College of Physician's of London, as well as Fellow of the Royal society. During this time he also published his 'Course of Lectures on the Physiology and Pathology of the Central Nervous System' an early exposition of what is now know as 'his' syndrome. During his time in London, Dr. Brown-Séquard made many well-known acquaintances, amongst others Charles Darwin, T.H. Huxley, and Louis Pasteur. Three years after his appointment as physician at the National Hospital, he left London. Increasingly, he was to abondon fashionable practice to concentrate on his study of what are now known as the endocrinal glands. In this way, he became a pioneer of the study of endocrinology.

  1. ["The future must look to the past"* : Prof. Dr. Abraham Aaron Buschke (1868-1943) and Wilhelm Ludwig Löwenstein (1895-1959)].

    PubMed

    Dräger, D L; Protzel, C; Hakenberg, O W

    2015-11-01

    Like many other areas of medicine, dermatology with its comparatively high proportion of Jewish physicians was also not spared from the National Socialist appointment policy with dismissals, laws on "appreciation of the people", research influenced by National Socialist policies, and persecution of Jewish physicians. Prof. Abraham Aaron Buschke and Dr. Wilhelm Ludwig Lowenstein, who were the first to describe the Buschke-Lowenstein tumor, also suffered this destiny. In March 1933, Professor Buschke was dismissed from the position of directing physician at the Virchow Hospital in Berlin and in 1934 his teaching license was revoked. Despite affidavits of his "loyalty to the regime", Dr. Lowenstein fared the same treatment.

  2. ["The future must look to the past"* : Prof. Dr. Abraham Aaron Buschke (1868-1943) and Wilhelm Ludwig Löwenstein (1895-1959)].

    PubMed

    Dräger, D L; Protzel, C; Hakenberg, O W

    2015-11-01

    Like many other areas of medicine, dermatology with its comparatively high proportion of Jewish physicians was also not spared from the National Socialist appointment policy with dismissals, laws on "appreciation of the people", research influenced by National Socialist policies, and persecution of Jewish physicians. Prof. Abraham Aaron Buschke and Dr. Wilhelm Ludwig Lowenstein, who were the first to describe the Buschke-Lowenstein tumor, also suffered this destiny. In March 1933, Professor Buschke was dismissed from the position of directing physician at the Virchow Hospital in Berlin and in 1934 his teaching license was revoked. Despite affidavits of his "loyalty to the regime", Dr. Lowenstein fared the same treatment. PMID:26450094

  3. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise. PMID:23614267

  4. Dr Louis T. Wright and the NAACP: pioneers in hospital racial integration.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, P P

    2000-01-01

    Louis Tompkins Wright, the son of a man born into slavery, was an outstanding African American surgeon who devoted his life to the racial integration of health care in the United States. Despite the fact that both his father and stepfather were physicians, despite his innate intellectual gifts and disciplined character, Wright experienced discrimination throughout his life and career. This experience led him to fight for the rights of African Americans, both health care professionals and patients. In addition to making numerous contributions in the fields of surgery and infectious disease, Wright held leadership positions in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People for more than 20 years, leaving a legacy of equity for African Americans in medical education and in health care. PMID:10846505

  5. [Dr. Joseph Chazanowicz (1844-1919) and the National Library in Jerusalem].

    PubMed

    Ohry, Avi

    2014-01-01

    Dr. Joseph Chazanowicz (1844-1919), was a Russian physician, and founder of the Jewish National Library in JerusaLem. After completing his studies at the Jewish school and at the gymnasium of Grodno, Chazanowicz went to Königsberg, Germany to study medicine and finished his studies in 1872. Returning to Russia, he began to practice at Byelostok's Jewish hospital. Chazanowicz founded the Hovevei Ziyyon ["Lovers of Zion"] society and also the Linat Ha-Zedek ("Hospice for the Poor")--caring for the poor. In 1890 he visited Palestine and conceived the idea of founding a library in Jerusalem, together with the B'nai B'rith organization. In 1896 he sent his large collection of books, amounting to nearly 10,000 volumes, to Jerusalem as the beginning of the Abarbanel library. The enlargement of this library and the collection of funds to erect a special building for it became the life-work of Chazanowicz.

  6. Dr. Haakon Sæthre: a Norwegian neuroscientist and his resistance against Nazi Germany.

    PubMed

    Zeidman, Lawrence A

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Haakon Sæthre was a leader of Norwegian neurology and psychiatry. He was resourceful, compassionate and had immense pride in his independent homeland. He described Sæthre-Chotzen syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly type III). When Nazi Germany occupied Norway during World War II, Sæthre fearlessly and actively resisted, from revoking his medical association membership, to hiding persecuted Jews as patients in his psychiatric ward and aiding in their escape to Sweden, to managing the largest "illegal" food warehouse in Oslo with Danish humanitarian aid. As a prominent and noticeable citizen, he was arrested and executed by the Nazis in reprisal for the resistance's assassination of a hated Norwegian Nazi. His legacy lives on in Norway, where he was honored by a scholarship fund, a portrait and multiple plaques at Ullevål Hospital, and a street and memorial statue in his hometown. He was a hero and should be remembered by all who practice neurology.

  7. Study of photoluminescence properties of thin films DR1

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Ulya, Naily

    2015-09-30

    Fabrication of thin films DR1 have been carried out by the EFA-PDF (Electric Field-Assisted Physical Vapor Deposition) method to obtain films with parallel dipole arrangement. Molecular deposition process is performed by applying an electric field that is placed between the substrate ITO (Indium Tin Oxide) and copper mesh. The resulting films were characterized by using a spectrofluorometer. Analysis of the emission spectrum, indicate that DR1 molecules in the film oriented perpendicular to the substrate and arranged in parallel order (H-aggregate). As an effect, the peak of the emission spectrum appears stronger along with the increase of electric field strength.

  8. Sequence and evolution of HLA-DR7- and -DRw53-associated beta-chain genes.

    PubMed

    Young, J A; Wilkinson, D; Bodmer, W F; Trowsdale, J

    1987-07-01

    cDNA clones representing products of the DR7 and DRw53 beta-chain genes were isolated from the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line MANN (DR7,DRw53,DQw2, DPw2). The DRw53 beta sequence was identical to a DRw53 beta sequence derived from cells with a DR4 haplotype. In contrast, the DR7 beta sequence was as unrelated to DR4 beta sequence as it was to other DR beta-related genes, except at the 3'-untranslated region. These results suggest that the DR7 and DR4 haplotypes may have been derived relatively recently from a common ancestral haplotype and that the DR4 and DR7 beta-chain genes have undergone more rapid diversification in their beta 1 domains, most probably as a result of natural selection, than have the DRw53 beta-chain genes. Short tracts of sequence within the DR7 and DRw53 beta 1 domains were shared with other DR beta sequences, indicating that exchanges of genetic information between beta 1 domains of DR beta-related genes have played a part in their evolution. Serological analysis of mouse L-cell transfectants expressing surface HLA-DR7 molecules, confirmed by antibody binding and allelic sequence comparisons, identified amino acid residues that may be critical to the binding of a monomorphic DR- and DP-specific monoclonal antibody.

  9. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  10. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  11. Seoul National University Bundang Hospital's Electronic System for Total Care

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Kee Hyuck; Lee, Hak Jong; Ha, Kyooseob; Lim, Cheong; Chin, Ho Jun; Yun, Jonghoar; Cho, Eun-Young; Chung, Eunja; Baek, Rong-Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Wee, Won Ryang; Lee, Chul Hee; Lee, Hai-Seok; Byeon, Nam-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, which is the first Stage 7 hospital outside of North America, has adopted and utilized an innovative and emerging information technology system to improve the efficiency and quality of patient care. The objective of this paper is to briefly introduce the major components of the SNUBH information system and to describe our progress toward a next-generation hospital information system (HIS). Methods SNUBH opened in 2003 as a fully digital hospital by successfully launching a new HIS named BESTCare, "Bundang hospital Electronic System for Total Care". Subsequently, the system has been continuously improved with new applications, including close-loop medication administration (CLMA), clinical data warehouse (CDW), health information exchange (HIE), and disaster recovery (DR), which have resulted in the achievement of Stage 7 status. Results The BESTCare system is an integrated system for a university hospital setting. BESTCare is mainly composed of three application domains: the core applications, an information infrastructure, and channel domains. The most critical and unique applications of the system, such as the electronic medical record (EMR), computerized physician order entry (CPOE), clinical decision support system (CDSS), CLMA, CDW, HIE, and DR applications, are described in detail. Conclusions Beyond our achievement of Stage 7 hospital status, we are currently developing a next-generation HIS with new goals of implementing infrastructure that is flexible and innovative, implementing a patient-centered system, and strengthening the IT capability to maximize the hospital value. PMID:22844650

  12. STATISTICAL STUDY OF 2XMMi-DR3/SDSS-DR8 CROSS-CORRELATION SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanxia; Zhou Xinlin; Zhao Yongheng; Wu Xuebing

    2013-02-01

    Cross-correlating the XMM-Newton 2XMMi-DR3 catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8, we obtain one of the largest X-ray/optical catalogs and explore the distribution of various classes of X-ray emitters in the multidimensional photometric parameter space. Quasars and galaxies occupy different zones while stars scatter in them. However, X-ray active stars have a certain distributing rule according to spectral types. The earlier the type of stars, the stronger its X-ray emitting. X-ray active stars have a similar distribution to most stars in the g - r versus r - i diagram. Based on the identified samples with SDSS spectral classification, a random forest algorithm for automatic classification is performed. The result shows that the classification accuracy of quasars and galaxies adds up to more than 93.0% while that of X-ray emitting stars only amounts to 45.3%. In other words, it is easy to separate quasars and galaxies, but it is difficult to discriminate X-ray active stars from quasars and galaxies. If we want to improve the accuracy of automatic classification, it is necessary to increase the number of X-ray emitting stars, since the majority of X-ray emitting sources are quasars and galaxies. The results obtained here will be used for the optical spectral survey performed by the Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also named the Guo Shou Jing Telescope), which is a Chinese national scientific research facility operated by the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  13. Dr. David Sawyer, Mickey Mouse and Dr. David Brown attend a ceremony at Ronald McNair Middle School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. David Sawyer (left), Superintendent of the Brevard County School District, Mickey Mouse, and Dr. David Brown, a NASA astronaut, attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair held in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. During the tribute, Walt Disney World presented a portrait of McNair to the school, which had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut. McNair was one of a crew of seven who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

  14. Dr. Seuss's Sound Words: Playing with Phonics and Spelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Traci

    Boom! Br-r-ring! Cluck! Moo!--exciting sounds are everywhere. Whether visiting online sites that play sounds or taking a "sound hike," ask your students to notice the sounds they hear, then write their own book, using sound words, based on Dr. Seuss's "Mr. Brown Can MOO! Can You?" During the three 45-minute sessions, grade K-2 students will:…

  15. Another Use for Dr. Seuss: Reading for Social Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Janice J.; Baker, Pamela Hudson

    2012-01-01

    Time is limited. Teachers often struggle to address the diverse needs of learners in their classrooms, especially when faced with academic and social skills concerns. Finding effective ways to teach social skills in the context of academic instruction makes sense. Books by Dr. Seuss provide a variety of high-interest stories that can be used to…

  16. Dr. Wernher Von Braun with Congressman Gerald R. fod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center in April, 1964, Congressman Gerald R. Ford, Jr. Republican of Michigan, was warmly greeted by Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director. Ford, along with two other congressmen, visited the center for a briefing on the Saturn program and for a tour of the facilities.

  17. 3. View of middle DR 2 antenna looking north 30 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of middle DR 2 antenna looking north 30 degrees west and showing radar scanner building no. 105 east face through antenna. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  18. 2. View of southerly DR 1 antenna looking north 25 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of southerly DR 1 antenna looking north 25 degrees west and and showing radar scanner building no. 105 east face through antenna. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  19. 7. View of DR 3 antenna typical front stay concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View of DR 3 antenna typical front stay concrete showing embedment anchors, foundation steel base plate, vertical member with small diameter turnbuckles, antenna assembly in background, and story board for scale. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  20. Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats and Numeracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Anne

    2006-01-01

    In education, the term "metacognition" describes thinking about thinking. Within mathematics, the term "metacomputation" describes thinking about computational methods and tools. This article shows how Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats can be used to demonstrate metacognition and metacomputation in the primary classroom. The article suggests…

  1. Dr. Chad E. Finn, 2013 Wilder Medal Recipient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Chad Finn took over the leadership of the USDA-ARS small fruit breeding program in Corvallis, Oregon in 1993 after three years working as an extension horticulturist in the Department of Horticulture at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Since taking over this program he has developed what is...

  2. A Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Curriculum: Playing the Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Sydney Gurewitz

    1988-01-01

    Discusses curriculum for young children centered around the beliefs and teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. His works are interpreted in a human rights context in which children find their voice in the peaceable resolution of everyday conflicts. Describes the Child of the Day program. (Author/RWB)

  3. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Washington State Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia, WA. Div. of Instructional Programs and Services.

    The Washington State Resource Guide on Martin Luther King, Jr., supplies a wide variety of materials for use with all grade levels in classroom and assembly presentations in public schools. The goal is for every child enrolled in Washington State schools to learn about Dr. King during the days of January 15 to January 17. Resolutions supporting an…

  4. Gifted Kids, Social Issues, and the Works of Dr. Seuss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granada, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Gifted students often share a sense of justice and a concern for the welfare of mankind and the planet. This humanitarian feeling may sometimes be overlooked, given today's academic focus. The author has taken an in-depth look at the works of Theodor Geisel, popularly known as Dr. Seuss, and moved beyond his whimsical illustrations and wordplay to…

  5. 39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, TR chains, and special checkout target control located in CSMR in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. Trial by Newspaper: The Strange Case of Dr. Karl Muck.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Sheldon S.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the case of Dr. Karl Muck, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra who was accused of espionage in 1917. Suggests that the espionage charge was a fiction created by newspapers, beginning with "The Providence Journal." Concludes that Muck admitted to being a spy rather than reveal the name of the woman with whom he had an extramarital…

  7. Dr. von Braun With a Model of a Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    Dr. von Braun stands beside a model of the upper stage (Earth-returnable stage) of the three-stage launch vehicle built for the series of the motion picture productions of space flight produced by Walt Disney in the mid-1950's.

  8. Oxygen and Metastasis: A Conversation with Dr. Nick Restifo

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Nick Restifo, a senior investigator in NCI’s Center for Cancer Research, discusses his recently published study finding that Oxygen, a molecule necessary for life, paradoxically aids cancer metastasis to the lung by impairing cancer-killing immune cells.

  9. Bullying Among Teenage Girls: An Interview with Dr. Harriet Mosatche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevention Researcher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Harriet Mosatche is an advice columnist on a web site for teen girls, as well as the Senior Director of Research and Programs at the Girl Scouts of the USA. Because of these dual roles, she has a unique perspective on the bullying issue. In this interview she answers a number of questions about bullying among teenage girls, including how boys…

  10. 6. View of DR 3 antenna typical backstay concrete stanchion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View of DR 3 antenna typical back-stay concrete stanchion showing embedded anchors and structural steel leg with pin attachment. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  11. 28. View of data test area for DR data take ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. View of data test area for DR data take off set operators panel and cabinet at second floor of transmitter building no. 102 in MIP area. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  12. Effect of Selenium on HLA-DR Expression of Thyrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Balázs, Csaba; Kaczur, Viktória

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATDs) represent the most frequent forms of the organ-specific autoimmune thyroid disorders that result from interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Selenium has been shown to exert a beneficial effect on the autoimmune thyroiditis. In spite of therapeutical effect of selenium on autoimmunity, the mechanism of its action has not been revealed. Objective. To determine whether selenium in vitro thyrocytes cultures are able to influence the HLA-DR molecule expression of human thyrocytes and production of free oxygen radicals. Method. Thyrocytes were prepared from human thyroid gland and cultured in vitro in the presence of interferon-γ and sodium selenite. The expression of HLA-DR molecules induced by interferon-γ in the presence of sodium selenite of various concentration was measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Results. Selenium has a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on the expression of HLA-DR molecules of thyrocytes induced by interferon-γ. This effect of selenium was in the inverse correlation with antioxidative capacity. Conclusion. Beneficial effect of selenium on autoimmune mechanism is a complex mechanism in which the inhibitory effect on HLA-DR molecule expression and antioxidative capacity are involved into therapy of autoimmune thyroiditis. PMID:22400102

  13. Dr Skateboard's Action Science: Teaching Physics in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, William H.

    2009-01-01

    In order to create student interest and promote new connections to the understanding of fundamental physics concepts, there is a need for new approaches and methods that are both contemporary and relevant. Dr Skateboard's Action Science, a curriculum supplement comprising video instruction and classroom activities, is an example that focuses on…

  14. CGS3DR: UKIRT CGS3 data reduction software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridger, Alan; Beard, Steven M.; Lightfoot, John F.; Krisciunas, Kevin; Daly, Phil N.

    2014-11-01

    CGS3DR is data reduction software for the UKIRT CGS3 mid-infrared grating spectrometer instrument. It includes a command-line interface and a GUI. The software, originally on VMS, was ported to Unix. It uses Starlink (ascl:1110.012) infrastructure libraries.

  15. 18. View from DR 2 antenna looking south 45 degrees ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View from DR 2 antenna looking south 45 degrees west to backside transmitter building 101 and in left foreground showing site well system building. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  16. The life and legacy of Dr. Lee Baldwin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper outlines the life and legacy of the late Dr. Ransom L. Baldwin, V. The purpose was to highlight the impact his teaching and research had on the international energy and protein metabolism communities at their fourth international conference. The paper will be presented at the outset of ...

  17. Dynamic Star Formation in the Massive DR21 Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-25

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. We use molecular line data from our {sup 13}CO 1 {yields} 0, CS 2 {yields} 1, and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 1 {yields} 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and CO, CS, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO data obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO{sup +} and {sup 12}CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of {approx}0.6 km s{sup -1} and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10{sup -3} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1} for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M{sub {circle_dot}} at densities of around 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting. The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. Conclusions. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows on large

  18. Functional polymorphism of each of the two HLA-DR beta chain loci demonstrated with antigen-specific DR3- and DRw52-restricted T cell clones

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    HLA-DR3- and HLA-DRw52-associated functional polymorphism was investigated with selected tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific T cell clones. We have shown earlier that HLA-DR antigens are encoded by two distinct loci, DR beta I and DR beta III. The alloantigenic determinant(s) defined by the serological HLA-DR3 specificity map to the former, while the supratypic HLA-DRw52 determinants map to DR beta III. Furthermore, we have recently recognized by DNA sequencing three alleles of HLA- DRw52 at locus DR beta III, referred to as 52 a, b, and c. Our objective was to correlate the pattern of T cell restriction with the gene products of individual DR beta chain loci and with the three newly described alleles of locus DR beta III. Among the selected T cell clones, 5 reacted exclusively when TT was presented by HLA-DR3+ APCs (TT-DR3-APC). In contrast, two T cell clones were stimulated by TT- DRw52-APC. More specifically, these two T cell clones (Clones 10 and 16) were stimulated by different subsets of TT-DRw52-APC. Clone 16 responded to some DR3 and TT-DRw6-APC, while clone 10 was stimulated by other TT-DR3 and TT-DRw6, and all TT-DR5-APC. This same pattern of DRw52 restriction was found in panel, as well as in family studies. Because this suggested a correlation with the pattern of DRw52 polymorphism observed earlier by DNA sequencing and oligonucleotide hybridization, the APC used in these experiments were typed for the 52 a, b, and c alleles of locus DR beta III by allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. This distribution overlapped exactly with the stimulation pattern defined by the T cell clones. Clone 16 responded to TT-52a-APC, clone 10 to TT-52b-APC, and both clones to a TT-52c-APC. The response of the T cell clones was inhibited differentially by mAbs to DR. Raising TT concentration, or increasing HLA-class II expression with INF-gamma both affected the magnitude of response of the TT- specific clones but did not modify their specificities. These results demonstrate that

  19. Sampling From the Proteome to the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR (HLA-DR) Ligandome Proceeds Via High Specificity.

    PubMed

    Mommen, Geert P M; Marino, Fabio; Meiring, Hugo D; Poelen, Martien C M; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A M; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the complex nature of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II ligandome is of utmost importance to understand the basis for CD4(+)T cell mediated immunity and tolerance. Here, we implemented important improvements in the analysis of the repertoire of HLA-DR-presented peptides, using hybrid mass spectrometry-based peptide fragmentation techniques on a ligandome sample isolated from matured human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The reported data set constitutes nearly 14 thousand unique high-confident peptides,i.e.the largest single inventory of human DC derived HLA-DR ligands to date. From a technical viewpoint the most prominent finding is that no single peptide fragmentation technique could elucidate the majority of HLA-DR ligands, because of the wide range of physical chemical properties displayed by the HLA-DR ligandome. Our in-depth profiling allowed us to reveal a strikingly poor correlation between the source proteins identified in the HLA class II ligandome and the DC cellular proteome. Important selective sieving from the sampled proteome to the ligandome was evidenced by specificity in the sequences of the core regions both at their N- and C- termini, hence not only reflecting binding motifs but also dominant protease activity associated to the endolysosomal compartments. Moreover, we demonstrate that the HLA-DR ligandome reflects a surface representation of cell-compartments specific for biological events linked to the maturation of monocytes into antigen presenting cells. Our results present new perspectives into the complex nature of the HLA class II system and will aid future immunological studies in characterizing the full breadth of potential CD4(+)T cell epitopes relevant in health and disease.

  20. Sampling From the Proteome to the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR (HLA-DR) Ligandome Proceeds Via High Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Mommen, Geert P. M.; Marino, Fabio; Meiring, Hugo D.; Poelen, Martien C. M.; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A. M.; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J. R.; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the complex nature of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II ligandome is of utmost importance to understand the basis for CD4+ T cell mediated immunity and tolerance. Here, we implemented important improvements in the analysis of the repertoire of HLA-DR-presented peptides, using hybrid mass spectrometry-based peptide fragmentation techniques on a ligandome sample isolated from matured human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The reported data set constitutes nearly 14 thousand unique high-confident peptides, i.e. the largest single inventory of human DC derived HLA-DR ligands to date. From a technical viewpoint the most prominent finding is that no single peptide fragmentation technique could elucidate the majority of HLA-DR ligands, because of the wide range of physical chemical properties displayed by the HLA-DR ligandome. Our in-depth profiling allowed us to reveal a strikingly poor correlation between the source proteins identified in the HLA class II ligandome and the DC cellular proteome. Important selective sieving from the sampled proteome to the ligandome was evidenced by specificity in the sequences of the core regions both at their N- and C- termini, hence not only reflecting binding motifs but also dominant protease activity associated to the endolysosomal compartments. Moreover, we demonstrate that the HLA-DR ligandome reflects a surface representation of cell-compartments specific for biological events linked to the maturation of monocytes into antigen presenting cells. Our results present new perspectives into the complex nature of the HLA class II system and will aid future immunological studies in characterizing the full breadth of potential CD4+ T cell epitopes relevant in health and disease. PMID:26764012

  1. Human T cells expressing V beta 8 do not predominantly recognize DR2 alloantigen.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Brew, R; Crosby, I; Gecim, I E; Sells, R A

    1992-06-01

    A panel of seven monoclonal antibodies recognizing human T-cell antigen receptor (TcR) V alpha or V beta subsets has been used to measure TcR gene expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes and mixed lymphocyte culture responses (MLR) between DR2- and DR2+ (DRw15+) donors. There were no significant differences between DR2- and DR2+ donors in per cent T cells in fresh peripheral blood labelled with any of these antibodies, which included an antibody recognizing V beta 8. This indicates strongly that increased negative selection of V beta 8+ T cells does not occur in DR2+ compared with DR2- individuals. In MLR between DR2- and DR2+ donors the only significant change compared with fresh peripheral lymphocytes was that T cells expressing V beta 5.1 were decreased in DR2- lymphocyte populations responding to DR2 alloantigen. No changes in levels of V beta 8+ T cells were detected in MLR between DR2- and DR2+ donors. This suggests that V beta 8+ T cells are not predominantly reactive against DR2 (DRw15). The data support the concept that alloreactivity against a single class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatch is mediated by T cells expressing a range of different TcR V beta molecules.

  2. Dr. Howard Jones, Jr. (1910-2015): In Memoriam

    PubMed Central

    Oehninger, S.; Kruger, T.F.

    2015-01-01

    We honor the life of Howard W. Jones, Jr., MD, 104, a pioneer and visionary in reproductive medicine, a dedicated mentor, internationally renowned gynecological surgeon, and the father of in vitro fertilization IVF) in the United States. Dr. Jones founded the Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine, in Norfolk, Virginia, at Eastern Virginia Medical School, in 1983. Today, IVF has grown exponentially not only in its direct application but also in the development of newer techniques would have been unimaginable a couple of decades ago. Throughout the years Dr. Howard has been a teacher and a mentor to many around the world. To us he also was a friend, a supporter at the time of difficult decisions, someone who would inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning and untangling some of the complexities of the field, even of the human condition. His leadership, vision, knowledge, enthusiasm and inquisitive mind will be missed.

  3. Star Formation in the DR21 Region (B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated mosaic

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is an exceptionally bright source of radio emission called DR21. Visible light images reveal no trace of what is happening in this region because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    The upper image is a large-scale mosaic assembled from individual photographs obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon. The mosaic is a composite of images obtained at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of 10,000 light-years.

    Protruding out from DR21 toward the bottom left of the image is a gaseous outflow (green), containing both carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen. Data from the Spitzer spectrograph, which breaks light into its constituent individual wavelengths, indicate the presence of hot steam formed as the outflow heats the surrounding molecular gas. Outflows are physical signatures of processes that create supersonic beams, or jets, of gas. They are usually accompanied by discs of material around the new star, which likely contain the materials from which future planetary systems are formed. Additional newborn stars

  4. Dr. Wernher Von Braun leads a tour of the S-IC checkout area.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Eberhard Rees, Charles Schultze, James Webb, Elmer Staats, Comptroller General of the United States, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun tour the S-IC checkout area in the Marshall Space Flight Center quality lab.

  5. 21. Dr. Harrison E. Stroud poses in front of his ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Dr. Harrison E. Stroud poses in front of his newly completed building at the northeast corner of Central Avenue and the alley north of Washington Street in about 1900 or 1901. In 1901, the building seen here was enlarged by the construction of an addition of similar design immediately to the north (left). Virtually the entire west elevation of the initial building is depicted in this view. Credit ADLAPR. - Stroud Building, 31-33 North Central Avenue, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  6. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING [VAB] & TOPPING OFF CEREMONIES SPEAKER DR. DEBUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. Kurt H. Debus, KSC's first director, was a major speaker at the ceremonies ''topping off'' the Vehicle Assembly Building on April 14, 1965. A crawler-transporter is at the right. At the time of its completion, the 129 million cubic foot structure was the largest building in the world. Originally designed and built to accommodate the Saturn V/Apollo used in Project Apollo, the VAB was later modified for its role in the Space Shuttle program.

  7. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, and activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950`s and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the 105-DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF was initially used only for engineering-scale alkali metal reaction studies. In addition, the Fusion Safety Support Studies program sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium lead compounds. The facility has also been used to store and treat alkali metal waste, therefore the LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610. This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

  8. 8. View of DR 3 antenna showing lower front connector, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of DR 3 antenna showing lower front connector, third from left vertical member at first level above foundation level, showing small diameter turnbuckle stays, vertical member with flange connection, and various struts and connectors with antenna assembly in background. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  9. Dr. von Braun In Front of a Display of Missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    In this photo, Director of the US Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) Development Operations Division, Dr. Wernher von Braun, is standing before a display of Army missiles celebrating ABMA's Fourth Open House. The missiles in the background include (left to right) a satellite on a Juno II shroud with a Nike Ajax pointing left in front of a Jupiter missile. The Lacrosse is in front of the Juno II. The Nike Hercules points skyward in front of the Juno II and the Redstone.

  10. 4. View of northerly DR 3 antenna looking north 35 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of northerly DR 3 antenna looking north 35 degrees west and showing radar scanner building no. 106 east face through antenna and partial view of satcom communication dome (attached to radar transmitter building 102) in left side of photograph. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  11. Of brain and bone: the unusual case of Dr. A.

    PubMed

    Narvid, J; Gorno-Tempini, M L; Slavotinek, A; Dearmond, S J; Cha, Y H; Miller, B L; Rankin, K

    2009-06-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical syndrome characterized by progressive decline in social conduct and a focal pattern of frontal and temporal lobe damage. Its biological basis is still poorly understood but the focality of the brain degeneration provides a powerful model to study the cognitive and anatomical basis of social cognition. Here, we present Dr. A, a patient with a rare hereditary bone disease (hereditary multiple exostoses) and FTD (pathologically characterized as Pick's disease), who presented with a profound behavioral disturbance characterized by acquired sociopathy. We conducted a detailed genetic, pathological, neuroimaging and cognitive study, including a battery of tests designed to investigate Dr. A's abilities to understand emotional cues and to infer mental states and intentions to others (theory of mind). Dr. A's genetic profile suggests the possibility that a mutation causing hereditary multiple exostoses, Ext2, may play a role in the pattern of neurodegeneration in frontotemporal dementia since knockout mice deficient in the Ext gene family member, Ext1, show severe CNS defects including loss of olfactory bulbs and abnormally small cerebral cortex. Dr. A showed significant impairment in emotion comprehension, second order theory of mind, attribution of intentions, and empathy despite preserved general cognitive abilities. Voxel-based morphometry on structural MRI images showed significant atrophy in the medial and right orbital frontal and anterior temporal regions with sparing of dorsolateral frontal cortex. This case demonstrates that social and emotional dysfunction in FTD can be dissociated from preserved performance on classic executive functioning tasks. The specific pattern of anatomical damage shown by VBM emphasizes the importance of the network including the superior medial frontal gyrus as well as temporal polar areas, in regulation of social cognition and theory of mind. This case provides new evidence regarding the

  12. ORAC-DR: A generic data reduction pipeline infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenness, Tim; Economou, Frossie

    2015-03-01

    ORAC-DR is a general purpose data reduction pipeline system designed to be instrument and observatory agnostic. The pipeline works with instruments as varied as infrared integral field units, imaging arrays and spectrographs, and sub-millimeter heterodyne arrays and continuum cameras. This paper describes the architecture of the pipeline system and the implementation of the core infrastructure. We finish by discussing the lessons learned since the initial deployment of the pipeline system in the late 1990s.

  13. Dr. John Stack and other NASA Langley Research Center Visitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Front Row, left to right: Mrs. Elsa Hoare and Major Philip L. Teed - staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England: Dr. Barnes Wallis - Chief of Aeronautical Research, Vicers-Armstrong, Ltd., Weybridge, England. Back Row, left to right: Norman W. Boorer and Cecil W. Hayes - Staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England; John R. Christie - Ministry of Supply, London, England; Philip A. Hufton - Chief Supt., Royal Aircraft Establishment, Bedford, England; Lindsey I. Turner, Jr. - Langley Research Center. Photographed November 13, 1958.

  14. Dr. Lytle Adams' incendiary "bat bomb" of World War II.

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2004-11-01

    On December 7, 1941, a 60-year old dentist from Irwin, Pennsylvania, Dr. Lytle S. Adams, was driving home from a vacation at Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico. Hours earlier, he had been gripped with amazement as he witnessed millions of bats exiting the caves of Carlsbad. Listening to his car radio on his return trip, he was shocked to hear that Japan had just attacked Pearl Harbor. Dr. Adams, outraged over this travesty, began to mentally construct a plan for U.S. retaliation. As his thoughts returned to the countless bats that had awed him, he formed a tentative plan: millions of these small, flying mammals could be connected to tiny, time-fused incendiary bombs, and then released to land on the flimsily constructed structures which dotted the cities of Japan. Within a few minutes, the bombs would explode and enflame the entire urban areas. He postulated that these immeasurable numbers of fires, spreading their devastation over such vast areas within Japanese cities would result in the enemy's speedy surrender. This article documents the futile efforts of Dr. Adams, his team and the U.S. government to develop and employ an effective, incendiary bat bomb. The recently developed atom bomb, a far more deadly weapon was used in its place. PMID:15666497

  15. Dr. Lytle Adams' incendiary "bat bomb" of World War II.

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2004-11-01

    On December 7, 1941, a 60-year old dentist from Irwin, Pennsylvania, Dr. Lytle S. Adams, was driving home from a vacation at Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico. Hours earlier, he had been gripped with amazement as he witnessed millions of bats exiting the caves of Carlsbad. Listening to his car radio on his return trip, he was shocked to hear that Japan had just attacked Pearl Harbor. Dr. Adams, outraged over this travesty, began to mentally construct a plan for U.S. retaliation. As his thoughts returned to the countless bats that had awed him, he formed a tentative plan: millions of these small, flying mammals could be connected to tiny, time-fused incendiary bombs, and then released to land on the flimsily constructed structures which dotted the cities of Japan. Within a few minutes, the bombs would explode and enflame the entire urban areas. He postulated that these immeasurable numbers of fires, spreading their devastation over such vast areas within Japanese cities would result in the enemy's speedy surrender. This article documents the futile efforts of Dr. Adams, his team and the U.S. government to develop and employ an effective, incendiary bat bomb. The recently developed atom bomb, a far more deadly weapon was used in its place.

  16. Dr.LiTHO: a development and research lithography simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fühner, Tim; Schnattinger, Thomas; Ardelean, Gheorghe; Erdmann, Andreas

    2007-03-01

    This paper introduces Dr.LiTHO, a research and development oriented lithography simulation environment developed at Fraunhofer IISB to flexibly integrate our simulation models into one coherent platform. We propose a light-weight approach to a lithography simulation environment: The use of a scripting (batch) language as an integration platform. Out of the great variety of different scripting languages, Python proved superior in many ways: It exhibits a good-natured learning-curve, it is efficient, available on virtually any platform, and provides sophisticated integration mechanisms for existing programs. In this paper, we will describe the steps, required to provide Python bindings for existing programs and to finally generate an integrated simulation environment. In addition, we will give a short introduction into selected software design demands associated with the development of such a framework. We will especially focus on testing and (both technical and user-oriented) documentation issues. Dr.LiTHO Python files contain not only all simulation parameter settings but also the simulation flow, providing maximum flexibility. In addition to relatively simple batch jobs, repetitive tasks can be pooled in libraries. And as Python is a full-blown programming language, users can add virtually any functionality, which is especially useful in the scope of simulation studies or optimization tasks, that often require masses of evaluations. Furthermore, we will give a short overview of the numerous existing Python packages. Several examples demonstrate the feasibility and productiveness of integrating Python packages into custom Dr.LiTHO scripts.

  17. Early growth response-1 is a regulator of DR5-induced apoptosis in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, D; Natoni, A; Keane, M; Samali, A; Szegezdi, E

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces tumour cell apoptosis by binding to death receptor 4 (DR4) and DR5. DR4 and DR5 activation however can also induce inflammatory and pro-survival signalling. It is not known how these different cellular responses are regulated and what the individual role of DR4 vs DR5 is in these processes. Methods: DNA microarray study was carried out to identify genes differentially expressed after DR4 and DR5 activation. RT–PCR and western blotting was used to examine the expression of early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1) and the proteins of the TRAIL signalling pathway. The function of Egr-1 was studied by siRNA-mediated knockdown and overexpression of a dominant-negative version of Egr-1. Results: We show that the immediate early gene, Egr-1, regulates TRAIL sensitivity. Egr-1 is constitutively expressed in colon cancer cells and further induced upon activation of DR4 or DR5. Our results also show that DR4 mediates a type II, mitochondrion-dependent apoptotic pathway, whereas DR5 induces a mitochondrion-independent, type I apoptosis in HCT15 colon carcinoma cells. Egr-1 drives c-FLIP expression and the short splice variant of c-FLIP (c-FLIPS) specifically inhibits DR5 activation. Conclusion: Selective knockdown of c-FLIPS sensitises cells to DR5-induced but not DR4-induced apoptosis and Egr-1 exerts an effect as an inhibitor of the DR5-induced apoptotic pathway, possibly by regulating the expression of c-FLIPS. PMID:20087343

  18. Dr. Wernher Von Braun greeting dignitaries at the Redstone Arsenal airfield.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George E. Mueller, center, associate administrator for manned space flight, is flanked by Dr. Wernher Von Braun, left, and Dr. Eberhard Rees at the Redstone Arsenal airstrip. the associate adminstrator was making his annual staff visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  19. Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-DR: California's 2007 Implementation Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccote, Sila; Wikler, Greg; Chiu, Albert; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Hennage, Dan; Thomas, Chuck

    2007-12-18

    This paper describes automated demand response (Auto-DR) activities, an innovative effort in California to ensure that DR programs produce effective and sustainable impacts. Through the application of automation and communication technologies coupled with well-designed incentives and DR programs such as Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP), Auto-DR is opening up the opportunity for many different types of buildings to effectively participate in DR programs. We present the results of Auto-DR implementation efforts by the three California investor-owned utilities for the Summer of 2007. The presentation emphasizes Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PG&E) Auto-DR efforts, which represents the largest in the state. PG&E's goal was to recruit, install, test and operate 15 megawatts of Auto-DR system capability. We describe the unique delivery approaches, including optimizing the utility incentive structures designed to foster an Auto-DR service provider community. We also show how PG&E's Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP) options were called and executed under the automation platform. Finally, we show the results of the Auto-DR systems installed and operational during 2007, which surpassed PG&E's Auto-DR goals. Auto-DR is being implemented by a multi-disciplinary team including the California Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs), energy consultants, energy management control system vendors, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the California Energy Commission (CEC).

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LAMOST DR2 white dwarfs (Guo+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Zhao, J.; Tziamtzis, A.; Liu, J.; Li, L.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2016-07-01

    LAMOST DR1 released 2204860 spectra, which included 717660 objects from the pilot survey, observed from 2011 October to 2012 June and 1487200 objects from the regular survey from 2012 September to 2013 June. DR2, which included DR1, released 1588 746 new spectra during the second year in 2014. (4 data files).

  1. Prospective HLA-DR matching in cadaveric renal transplants: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Mendez, R; Iwaki, Y; Mendez, R; Bogaard, T; Self, B

    1983-03-01

    We reviewed 77 potential cadaveric allograft recipients who had undergone prospective HLA-A and B locus and HLA-DR antigen identification. Matching was accomplished, giving first priority to HLA-DR compatibility and relying on HLA-A and B antigen matching only in situations of total HLA-DR incompatibility. Complete HLA-DR identification occurred in 56 per cent of all patients. There were 15 patients (19.5 per cent) who received a 2/2 HLA-DR perfect match, with 86.7 plus or minus 8.8 per cent 1-year actuarial graft survival, and 41 (53 per cent) who received a 1/2 HLA-DR match, with 58.2 plus or minus 7.8 per cent 1-year actual allograft survival. Finally, 21 patients (27 per cent) received a 0/2 HLA-DR match, with 64.9 plus or minus 10.7 per cent actual survival. These results and their mirrored mismatching results showed statistically significant allograft success in only the HLA-DR 2/2 matches. Matching for HLA 2 DR donors proved a statistically significant success over the other HLA-DR allograft matches and the older controversial matching system based on HLA-A and B locus antigens. The restricted gene polymorphism of the HLA-DR systems allows for a relatively high percentage of perfect HLA-DR matches.

  2. HLA-DR9 and DR14 are associated with the allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity in hematologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Woo; Kim, Ju-Young; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Cho, Sang-Heon; Park, Seon-Yang; Kang, Hye-Ryun

    2014-01-01

    Allopurinol, a widely used urate-lowering agent, is a leading cause of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), especially in patients with HLA-B*58:01. Despite its routine use for the prevention of tumor lysis-related hyperuricemia prior to chemotherapy, the risk of allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity has not been investigated in patients with hematologic malignancies. This retrospective cohort study was conducted to investigate the incidence and risk factors of allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity in patients at least 18 years of age with hematologic malignancies. We reviewed 463 patients who had ever taken allopurinol for the prevention of hyperuricemia prior to chemotherapy and had undergone serologic HLA typing as a pre-transplant evaluation from January 2000 to May 2010. Thirteen (2.8%) patients experienced maculopapular eruptions (MPE) and none experienced SCARs. Among subtypes of underlying hematologic malignancies, percentage of chronic myeloid leukemia was significantly higher in the allopurinol hypersensitivity group compared with the tolerant group (23.1% (3/13) vs. 5.9% (26/440), P = 0.044). According to HLA subtypes, the incidence of allopurinol-induced MPE was 4.0% in HLA-B58 (+) patients (2/50) and 2.7% in HLA-B58 (-) patients (11/403) but this difference was statistically insignificant. In contrast to HLA-B58, the frequencies of DR9 and DR14 were significantly higher in the allopurinol-induced MPE group compared with the allopurinol tolerant group (38.5% (5/13) vs. 13.6% (53/443), P = 0.019, and 38.5% (5/13) vs. 15.6% (41/440), P = 0.038, respectively). In conclusion, HLA-DR9 and DR14, but not HLA-B58, are associated with hypersensitivity reaction by allopurinol when administered in patients with hematologic malignancy prior to chemotherapy.

  3. Human immune responsiveness to Lolium perenne pollen allergen Lol p III (rye III) is associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Freidhoff, L R; Meyers, D A; Bias, W B; Marsh, D G

    1989-05-01

    A well-characterized allergen of Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen, Lol p III, has been used as a model antigen to study the genetic control of the human immune response. Associations between HLA type and IgE or IgG antibody (Ab) responsiveness to Lol p III were studied in two groups of skin-test-positive Caucasoid adults (N = 135 and 67). We found by nonparametric and parametric analyses that immune responsiveness to Lol p III was significantly associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5. No association was found between any DQ type and immune responsiveness to Lol p III. Geometric mean IgE or IgG Ab levels to Lol p III were not different between B8+, DR3+ subjects and B8-, DR3+ subjects, showing that HLA-B8 had no influence on the association. Lol p III IgG Ab data obtained on subjects after grass antigen immunotherapy showed that 100% of DR3 subjects and 100% of DR5 subjects were Ab+. A comparison of all the available protein sequences of DRB gene products showed that the first hypervariable region of DR3 and DR5 (and DRw6), and no other region, contains the sequence Glu9-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Ser13. Our observations are consistent with the possibility that immune responsiveness to the allergen Lol p III is associated with this amino acid sequence in the first hypervariable region of the DR beta 1 polypeptide chain.

  4. Dynamic star formation in the massive DR21 filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.

    2010-09-01

    Context. The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. In addition, magnetic fields may play a decisive role in the star-formation process since they influence the efficiency of gas infall onto the protostar. Aims: By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. Methods: We use molecular line data from our 13CO 1 to 0, CS 2 to 1, and N2H+ 1 to 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and high-angular resolution observations in isotopomeric lines of CO, CS, HCO+, N2H+, and H2CO, obtained with the IRAM 30 m telescope, to investigate the distribution of the different phases of molecular gas. Gravitational infall is identified by the presence of inverse P Cygni profiles that are detected in optically thick lines, while the optically thinner isotopomers are found to reach a peak in the self-absorption gap. Results: We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO+ and 12CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of 0.6 km s-1 and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10-3 M_⊙ yr-1 for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M_⊙ at densities of around 105 cm-3 within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting (with free-fall times much shorter

  5. Hospitals for sale.

    PubMed

    Costello, Michael M; West, Daniel J; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    The pace of hospital merger and acquisition activity reflects the economic theory of supply and demand: Publicly traded hospital companies, private equity funds, and large nonprofit hospital systems are investing capital to purchase and operate freestanding community hospitals at a time when many of those hospitals find themselves short of capital reserves and certain forms of management expertise. But the sale of those community hospitals also raises questions about the impact of absentee ownership on the communities which those hospitals serve.

  6. Billing delays cause hassles, but hospitals still have to pay for services provided.

    PubMed

    Decker, R

    1988-06-01

    A hospital has a contract with the manufacturer to maintain and service copying machines owned by the hospital. The contract calls for the hospital to pay a set minimum monthly fee plus a per-copy charge for all copies made over a set amount. The supplier doesn't furnish any paper products. Recently the hospital received an invoice for 17 months' service. When contacted about this large bill, the supplier told the hospital that it had inadvertently dropped the hospital from its billing computer and had failed to bill the hospital each month. The hospital protested the pressure that this billing practice put upon its budget and asked for an adjustment. The supplier refused to make any adjustment in the amount but did agree to accept the arrears in monthly payments over a year with no interest charges. In this dialogue below, Dr. Decker discusses the legal issues involved in this situation. PMID:10287890

  7. DR Resources for Energy and Ancillary Services in the West (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, M.; Kiliccote, S.

    2014-04-01

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility however, DR in grid models is limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the co-optimization of DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model of the Colorado "test system". We assume each DR resource can provide energy services by either shedding load or shifting its use between different times, as well as operating reserves: frequency regulation, contingency reserve, and flexibility (or ramping) reserve. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves.

  8. Amplification of a single-locus variable-number direct repeats with restriction fragment length polymorphism (DR-PCR/RFLP) for genetic typing of Acinetobacter baumannii strains.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Zaleska, Alicja; Krawczyk, Beata; Kotłowski, Roman; Mikucka, Agnieszka; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2008-01-01

    In search of an effective DNA typing technique for Acinetobacter baumannii strains for hospital epidemiology use, the performance and convenience of a new target sequence was evaluated. Using known genomic sequences of Acinetobacter baumannii strains AR 319754 and ATCC 17978, we developed single-locus variable-number direct-repeat analysis using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (DR-PCR/RFLP) method. A total of 90 Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from patients of the Clinical Hospital in Bydgoszcz, Poland, were examined. Initially, all strains were typed using macrorestriction analysis of the chromosomal DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (REA-PFGE). Digestion of the chromosomal DNA with the ApaI endonuclease and separation of the fragments by PFGE revealed 21 unique types. Application of DR-PCR/RFLP resulted in recognition of 12 clusters. The results showed that the DR-PCR/RFLP method is less discriminatory than REA-PFGE, however, the novel genotyping method can be used as an alternative technique for generating DNA profiles in epidemiological studies of intra-species genetic relatedness of Acinetobacter baumannii strains.

  9. Regulation of human peripheral blood monocyte DR antigen expression in vitro by lymphokines and recombinant interferons.

    PubMed Central

    Sztein, M B; Steeg, P S; Johnson, H M; Oppenheim, J J

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro regulation of adult human monocyte DR antigen expression was studied. Normally about 75% of freshly obtained human peripheral blood monocytes express DR antigens as determined by anti-DR and complement-mediated cytotoxicity assays. DR expression on monocytes in unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures persisted to variable degrees for up to 5 d of incubation. However, when the mononuclear cells were thoroughly depleted of nonadherent cells, cultured monocytes consistently exhibited progressively decreased DR expression over 2-5 d of incubation. Readdition of nonadherent cells to the adherent cell population prevented or delayed this decrease in monocyte DR antigen expression. Thus, monocyte DR expression diminished markedly during in vitro incubation; however, the presence of nonadherent cells somehow interfered with this process. In other experiments, peripheral adherent monocytes, which had been cultured for 2-3 d to reduce their DR expression, could be induced to reexpress DR antigens after 2 d of incubation with unpurified lymphokine-containing culture supernatants, recombinant human interferon-alpha, or recombinant human gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). The reinduction of DR expression on human monocytes by lymphokines was abrogated by an antiserum produced to the synthetic N-terminal amino acids of human IFN-gamma, indicating that IFN-gamma is the active mediator in the lymphokine-containing preparations. Monocytes cultured with lymphokines or recombinant interferons also could initiate a significantly greater mixed lymphocyte response than control monocytes. Thus, IFN-gamma-containing lymphokines and recombinant interferons are required to induce human monocyte DR expression and accessory cell capacity in vitro, since in their absence monocytes become DR antigen-deficient. Finally, incubation of unfractionated human mononuclear cells with anti-human IFN-gamma also promoted the loss of monocyte DR expression. These findings suggest

  10. [DR image denoising based on Laplace-Impact mixture model].

    PubMed

    Feng, Guo-Dong; He, Xiang-Bin; Zhou, He-Qin

    2009-07-01

    A novel DR image denoising algorithm based on Laplace-Impact mixture model in dual-tree complex wavelet domain is proposed in this paper. It uses local variance to build probability density function of Laplace-Impact model fitted to the distribution of high-frequency subband coefficients well. Within Laplace-Impact framework, this paper describes a novel method for image denoising based on designing minimum mean squared error (MMSE) estimators, which relies on strong correlation between amplitudes of nearby coefficients. The experimental results show that the algorithm proposed in this paper outperforms several state-of-art denoising methods such as Bayes least squared Gaussian scale mixture and Laplace prior.

  11. Halo Stream candidates in the LAMOST DR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jingkun

    2015-08-01

    We have detected eight stellar halo stream candidates in the solar neighborhood using a sample including 64,819 FGK metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -0.7) dwarfs extracted from the cross-match among the LAMOST DR2, WISE, 2MASS and PPMXL catalogues. With the strategy of halo stream detection in Klement et al, several significant ‘phase-space overdensi- ties” of stars on very similar orbits are identified. Three structures are known previously. Five new halo stream candidates are also found. The kinematics and metallicity of these stream candidates are then analyzed. Detailed element abundance are needed to better know the ori-gin of these streams.

  12. STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker is assisted by a suit technician as she dons her launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. Her third spaceflight will be an historic one for Baker, a medical doctor, as she oversees the series of scientific investigations that will be conducted during the first docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir. Baker and six fellow crew members -- four Americans and two Russian cosmonauts -- will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff during a 10- minute launch window opening at 3:32 p.m. EDT.

  13. STS-72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Looking elated at the prospect of his upcoming spaceflight, STS- 72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry dons his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with assistance from a suit technician. The trip into space will be the first for Barry, a medical doctor who also has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. He and five fellow crew members will soon depart for Launch Pad 39, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour is undergoing final preparations for liftoff during an approximately 49-minute window opening at about 4:18 am EST, January 11.

  14. Dr. Christopher Kraft looks over packaged 'parasol' in bldg 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Dr. Christopher C. Kraft J. (left), JSC Director, and George A Post, JSC Crew Systems Division, look over the packaged 'parasol' during fabrication and checkout of the umbrella-like mechanical device in the Technical Services shop in bldg 10 at JSC. The 'parasol' is designed to fit into the T027 experiment photometer canister. The canopy portion of the 'parasol' measures 24 feet by 22 feet. The 'parasol' is one of several sunscreen possibilities being considered for use in shading the overheated Skylab 1 Orbital Workshop.

  15. Rapidity: The Special Relativity Work of Dr. Vladimir Karapetoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Hamilton

    2014-03-01

    Between 1924 and 1944 Dr. Vladimir Karapetoff, a professor in the electrical engineering department of Cornell University, authored 11 papers on the topic of special relativity. While his initial papers focused on the then popular oblique angle treatment of special relativity, he soon became a vocal proponent of performing special relativistic calculations using rapidity, a technique that emphasizes the hyperbolic geometric nature of Minkowski space-time. While rapidity has fallen out of usage with the exception of a specialized dialect within particle physics, it offers interesting technical and pedagogical perspectives on the geometrical nature of space-time not evident in the present day relativistic parlance.

  16. 89. View of DR 2 antenna (structure no. 736) at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    89. View of DR 2 antenna (structure no. 736) at 65 percent completion showing erection process. Antenna system designed and factory construction by D.S. Kennedy & Company., Comasset, MA, 1958. Note scanner radar building in background. Official photograph BMEWS Project by unknown photographer, 11 July, 1960, Photographic Services, Riverton, NJ, BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-824. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  17. The Chicago Board of Education Desegregation Policies and Practices [1975-1985]: A Historical Examination of the Administrations of Superintendents Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and Dr. Ruth Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study will be to examine the policies and practices of two distinguished superintendents of the Chicago Public Schools: Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and the first African American female Superintendent Dr. Ruth Love. Hannon's four year administration extended from 1975 through 1979. Love's administration encompassed the years 1980…

  18. Clinical and molecular studies in full trisomy 22: Further delineation of the phenotype and review of the literature. Reply to Dr. Robinson and Dr. Kalousek

    SciTech Connect

    Bacino, C.A.; Graham, J.M. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    This {open_quotes}Letter to the Editor{close_quotes} responds to the comments by Dr. Robinson and Dr. Kalousek regarding the implications of meiotic versus somatic chromosomal aberrations. The survival time of the patient may depend on the detection of mosicism; the discussion of the existence of full trisomy 22 remains controversial. 2 refs.

  19. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  20. Pathogenesis of Human Diffusely Adhering Escherichia coli Expressing Afa/Dr Adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC): Current Insights and Future Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The pathogenicity and clinical pertinence of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing the Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC) in urinary tract infections (UTIs) and pregnancy complications are well established. In contrast, the implication of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC in diarrhea is still under debate. These strains are age dependently involved in diarrhea in children, are apparently not involved in diarrhea in adults, and can also be asymptomatic intestinal microbiota strains in children and adult. This comprehensive review analyzes the epidemiology and diagnosis and highlights recent progress which has improved the understanding of Afa/Dr DAEC pathogenesis. Here, I summarize the roles of Afa/Dr DAEC virulence factors, including Afa/Dr adhesins, flagella, Sat toxin, and pks island products, in the development of specific mechanisms of pathogenicity. In intestinal epithelial polarized cells, the Afa/Dr adhesins trigger cell membrane receptor clustering and activation of the linked cell signaling pathways, promote structural and functional cell lesions and injuries in intestinal barrier, induce proinflammatory responses, create angiogenesis, instigate epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like events, and lead to pks-dependent DNA damage. UTI-associated Afa/Dr DAEC strains, following adhesin-membrane receptor cell interactions and activation of associated lipid raft-dependent cell signaling pathways, internalize in a microtubule-dependent manner within urinary tract epithelial cells, develop a particular intracellular lifestyle, and trigger a toxin-dependent cell detachment. In response to Afa/Dr DAEC infection, the host epithelial cells generate antibacterial defense responses. Finally, I discuss a hypothetical role of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC strains that can act as “silent pathogens” with the capacity to emerge as “pathobionts” for the development of inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal carcinogenesis. PMID:25278576

  1. M-giant star candidates identified in LAMOST DR 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jing; Lépine, Sébastien; Li, Jing; Chen, Li; Hou, Jin-Liang; Yang, Ming; Li, Guang-Wei; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yong-Hui

    2015-08-01

    We perform a discrimination procedure with the spectral index diagram of TiO5 and CaH2+CaH3 to separate M giants from M dwarfs. Using the M giant spectra identified from LAMOST DR1 with high signal-to-noise ratio, we have successfully assembled a set of M giant templates, which show more reliable spectral features. Combining with the M dwarf/subdwarf templates in Zhong et al., we present an extended library of M-type templates which includes not only M dwarfs with a well-defined temperature and metallicity grid but also M giants with subtypes from M0 to M6. Then, the template-fitting algorithm is used to automatically identify and classify M giant stars from LAMOST DR1. The resulting catalog of M giant stars is cross-matched with 2MASS JHKs and WISE W1/W2 infrared photometry. In addition, we calculated the heliocentric radial velocity of all M giant stars by using the cross-correlation method with the template spectrum in a zero-velocity rest frame. Using the relationship between the absolute infrared magnitude MJ and our classified spectroscopic subtype, we derived the spectroscopic distance of M giants with uncertainties of about 40%. A catalog of 8639 M giants is provided. As an additional result of this analysis, we also present a catalog of 101 690 M dwarfs/subdwarfs which are processed by our classification pipeline.

  2. CENSUS OF BLUE STARS IN SDSS DR8

    SciTech Connect

    Scibelli, Samantha; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Yanny, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a census of the 12,060 spectra of blue objects ((g – r){sub 0} < –0.25) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). As part of the data release, all of the spectra were cross-correlated with 48 template spectra of stars, galaxies, and QSOs to determine the best match. We compared the blue spectra by eye to the templates assigned in SDSS DR8. 10,856 of the objects matched their assigned template, 170 could not be classified due to low signal-to-noise ratio, and 1034 were given new classifications. We identify 7458 DA white dwarfs, 1145 DB white dwarfs, 273 rarer white dwarfs (including carbon, DZ, DQ, and magnetic), 294 subdwarf O stars, 648 subdwarf B stars, 679 blue horizontal branch stars, 1026 blue stragglers, 13 cataclysmic variables, 129 white dwarf-M dwarf binaries, 36 objects with spectra similar to DO white dwarfs, 179, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), and 10 galaxies. We provide two tables of these objects, sample spectra that match the templates, figures showing all of the spectra that were grouped by eye, and diagnostic plots that show the positions, colors, apparent magnitudes, proper motions, etc., for each classification. Future surveys will be able to use templates similar to stars in each of the classes we identify to automatically classify blue stars, including rare types.

  3. PREFACE: Eighth International Conference on Dissociative Recombination (DR2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guberman, Steven L.; Orel, Ann E.

    2011-07-01

    In dissociative recombination (DR), a molecular ion captures an electron and falls apart. One might initially conclude that this process is relatively simple. However, a review of the DR literature over the past 60 years, since the pioneering papers of Sir David Bates [1], shows that the study of DR has proved to be highly challenging for both theorists and experimentalists. Both this challenge and the ubiquitous importance of the process have made its study rewarding, endlessly interesting, and full of surprises. DR is fundamentally the interaction of an electronic continuum with a vibrational continuum often connected by quasibound intermediate states. Autoionization in the first continuum competes with dissociation in the second. DR occurs at the total energy of an ion plus a free electron and is in the same region as vibrationally excited Rydberg states and other neutral superexcited states. All these states interact with each other prior to dissociation, forming a complex that controls the quantum yields of products. The complexity of the process has required both innovation and ingenuity on the part of both theorists and experimentalists. Over the years, it has become apparent that in order to compare theoretical and experimental results, the experiments must identify the electronic, vibrational and for low mass ions, the rotational state. The traditional disagreement between theoretical and experimental results has been due, in part, to the sensitivity of DR cross sections and rate constants to the state of the recombining ion. Great progress has been made in recent years in both flowing afterglow and storage ring experiments aimed at reducing this uncertainty. The latest advances and insights in theory and experiment were the topics of the Eighth International Conference on Dissociative Recombination held at the Granlibakken Lodge at Lake, Tahoe, California, 16-20 August 2010. The conference was part of a series of conferences on DR that started at Chateau

  4. Abnormal urothelial HLA-DR expression in interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Bottazzo, G F

    1992-03-01

    Interstitial cystitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the urinary bladder that predominantly afflicts middle-age women. The end stage of the disease is ulceration of the urothelium, the so-called Hunner's ulcer. The aetiology of interstitial cystitis remains obscure. We have studied bladder biopsies from 22 cases of interstitial cystitis and control groups consisting of six cases of bacterial cystitis and eight healthy women. Indirect immunofluorescence was performed on the biopsies using murine MoAbs to human HLA class I molecules, and class II molecules, HLA-DP, HLA-DQ and HLA-DR. In interstitial cystitis, bacterial cystitis and normal controls most cells expressed HLA class I products. In six cases of interstitial cystitis and one case of bacterial cystitis there was evidence of HLA class I hyperexpression. In normal bladder and bacterial cystitis HLA class II expression was restricted to submucosal dendritic cells, Langerhans cells macrophages, vascular endothelial cells and activated lymphocytes. All but two cases of interstitial cystitis showed surface expression of HLA-DR (but not HLA-DP or DQ). In all cases of interstitial cystitis there was an increase in the numbers of macrophages, activated lymphocytes and vascular endothelial cells expressing HLA class II molecules within the submucosa. These findings provide further evidence for the importance of inappropriate HLA molecule expression in a disease suspected of having an autoimmune pathogenesis and where cellular autoimmune mechanisms play a decisive role in the destruction of the target cells--the bladder urothelium.

  5. Alloantiserum recognizing a DQw2 split which is associated with DR3.

    PubMed

    Flesch, B; Neppert, J; Ziegler, P; Achtert, G

    1991-01-01

    A typing serum MUE 38539 II, was found to recognize a DR3-associated split of DQw2. In cytotoxicity tests, MUE 38539 II yielded positive test results with B lymphocytes but not with monocytes of DR3-positive cell donors. This was in contrast to other typing reagents for DR3 that react with B lymphocytes as well as monocytes. Lymphocytotoxicity tests using MUE 38539 II were negative with DR7- and DQw2-positive cells. The assumption that the serum recognizes a DR3-associated split of DQw2, and not DR3 itself, was confirmed by the lack of reactivity with a DQw4- and DR3-positive lymphoblastoid cell line (RSH). The assumption was also corroborated using reagents from a family in which DR3 and DQw2 were not found in the usually described linkage. In two lines, DR3 was associated with DQw- (2707 and 2710), and in the cell line 2704, DQw2 was associated with DRw-. The serum MUE 38539 II was exclusively cytotoxic with lymphoblastoid cell lines from those family members who were positive for DQw2, independently of the DR3 antigens of the cells. PMID:2031339

  6. Examination of HLA-DR4 as a severity marker for rheumatoid arthritis in Greek patients.

    PubMed Central

    Boki, K A; Drosos, A A; Tzioufas, A G; Lanchbury, J S; Panayi, G S; Moutsopoulos, H M

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Previous reports have shown that HLA-DR4 may be a severity marker for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients of northern European origin. The aim of the present study was to investigate this relation in Greek patients with RA, as RA in Greece differs from the RA described previously on clinical, serological, and immunological grounds. METHODS--Eighty four patients were studied in whom HLA-DR typing was performed by restriction fragment length polymorphism and the subtypes of HLA-DR4 were determined by the polymerase chain reaction. The absence or presence of HLA-DR4 and its subtypes was correlated with the clinical and serological characteristics of the patients and with the side effects due to disease modifying drugs. RESULTS--Twenty one of the 84 (25%) patients with RA were DR4+. There was no difference between the DR4+ and DR4-patients with respect to duration of disease, severity of arthritis, functional grade, and joint erosion score. The DR4+ group were more likely to have side effects due to disease modifying drugs (43%) than DR4- patients (36%), but this difference was not statistically significant. DR4-patients had more extra-articular manifestations, including Sjögren's syndrome (47 v 19%). Analysis of the DR4 subtypes showed that Dw15 was the most common variant (9/21 patients; 43%). There was no statistical difference in the clinical manifestations among patients with different DR4 subtypes. The same was also true when the clinical picture was correlated with the 'shared RA epitope' (QKRAA/QRRAA/RRRAA), which is common to all HLA-DRB1 alleles positively associated with RA. CONCLUSIONS--These results suggest that HLA-DR4 is not a severity marker in Greek patients with RA and further indicate differences in the clinical expression of RA in Greece. PMID:8102226

  7. [Dr. Elizabeth Ross: heroine and victim of the World War I in Serbia].

    PubMed

    Mikić, Želimir; Lešić, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    At the beginning of 1915, several months after the World War I started, Serbia was in an extremely difficult situation.The country was war-ravaged, full of sick and wounded soldiers, there was a desperate shortage of doctors, nurses and other medical personnel, and the epidemic of typhus fever exploded and violently attacked the entire country. At that time, however, a number of both foreign allied medical missions and individual volunteers, from various countries, mostly from Great Britain, came to Serbia to help. Among them mostly were women, and they were of enormous support to Serbia in that grave situation. It is estimated that there were more than 600 foreign women volunteers in Serbia at that time and that 22 of them died there. Dr. Elizabeth Ross was one of those brave volunteers who came to Serbia early in 1915. That noble Scottish lady doctor was born in 1878 and finished her medical studies at the University of Glasgow in 1901. After graduation she worked in various places in Great Britain until 1909, when she went to Persia (Iran), where she worked until the beginning of the so called Great War. When she heard of the urgent need in Serbia she left Persia as soon as she could and volunteered to serve in Serbia. She came to Kragujevac at the beginning of January 1915, where she worked at the First Military Reserve Hospital, which at that time was actually a typhus hospital. Working there intensively and devotedly for several weeks under shocking conditions she contracted typhus herself and died there on her 37th birthday on February 14th, 1915. She was buried in Kragujevac, next to two British ladies who also died in Serbia of typhus. Her grave was restored in 1980 when the town of Kragujevac started holding commemorations at the graveside every February 14th at noon to honor her and all other brave and noble women who lost their lives helping Serbia at that unfortunate time.

  8. [The fate of the old Jejoong Won following the establishment of the new Jejoong Won (Severance Hospital)].

    PubMed

    Yeo, I S; Park, Y J; Lee, K l; Park, H W

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Allen, the first Protestant missionary in Korea, had an opportunity of saving the life of the queen's nephew shortly after his arrival in Korea in 1884. In gratitude the King established the Royal Korean Hospital (Jejoong Won), the first hospital in Korea, and appointed Dr. Allen in charge of the medical affairs of the hospital. After Dr. Allen's resignation from the mission, the work was successively carried on by Drs. JW Heron, RA Hardie, CC Vinton and OR Avison, the last of whom arrived in 1893. In 1894 the connection of the Hospital with the Korean Government was severed and the work taken over by the Northern Presbyterian Mission. Since then, it has been a distinctly mission institute. In 1900, while attending the Ecumenical Conference of Foreign Missions in Carnegie Hall, New York, Dr. Avison made the acquaintance of a philanthropist LH Severance, who made a gift of $10,000 for a new hospital. This building, the first modern hospital in Korea, was opened and dedicated in 1904. It was named the Severance Hospital. As the new hospital was built, the old hospital building was to be returned to the Korean Government according to the agreement made in 1894. On retaking the old hospital, the Korean Government paid $30,289.99 won for the renovation of the original building and new buildings established in the site during the period of Avison's entire charge of Jejoong Won. The old hospital building was used as an official residence for a diplomatic adviser Stevens, who was assassinated for his pro-Japan activities, and as a social club for Japanese officials. PMID:11624251

  9. Hospital Charges of Potentially Preventable Pediatric Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Sam; Kuo, Dennis Z.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Reducing the number of preventable hospitalizations represents a possible source of healthcare savings. However, the current literature lacks a description of the extent of potentially preventable pediatric hospitalizations. The study objectives are to (1) identify the charges and (2) demographic characteristics associated with potentially preventable pediatric hospitalizations. Methods Secondary analysis of the 2006 Kids’ Inpatient Database (weighted N=7,558,812). ICD-9-CM codes for 16 previously validated pediatric ambulatory care-sensitive (ACS) conditions identified potentially preventable hospitalizations; seven additional conditions reflected updated care guidelines. Outcome variables included number of admissions, hospitalization days, and hospital charges. Demographic and diagnostic variables associated with an ACS condition were compared with regression analyses using appropriate person-level weights. Results Pediatric ACS hospitalizations totaled $4.05B in charges and 1,087,570 hospitalization days in 2006. Two respiratory conditions—asthma and bacterial pneumonia—comprised 48.4% of ACS hospital charges and 46.7% of ACS hospitalization days. In multivariate analysis, variables associated with an ACS condition included: male gender (OR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.07–1.13); race/ethnicity of black (OR: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.16–1.27) or Hispanic (OR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.06–1.18); and emergency department (ED) as admission source (OR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.27–1.48). Conclusions Respiratory conditions comprised the largest proportion of potentially preventable pediatric hospitalizations, totaling as much as $1.96B in hospital charges. Children hospitalized with an ACS condition tend to be male, non-white, and admitted through the ED. Future research to prevent pediatric hospitalizations should examine targeted interventions in the primary care setting, specifically around respiratory conditions and minority populations. PMID:22922047

  10. [Story of three SS dentists during World War II: Pr Hugo Blaschke, Dr Hermann Pook and Dr Willy Frank].

    PubMed

    Riaud, Xavier

    2006-12-01

    This story of three SS dentists shows very clearly that the medical code of ethics, under a totalitarian regime, ends where ideology begins. Professor Hugo Blaschke provided dental care to the most eminent Nazi leaders, but he also was the senior SS dentist. He was in charge of dental care in the Waffen-SS, and therefore, he had responsibility for the stocks of dental gold collected from the mouths of those who died in the concentration camps, in order to make dentures for his soldiers. Dr Hermann Pook was the dentist in charge of all the other dentists practising in the concentration camps. He was responsible for gathering statistics on the dental care provided for prisoners in the camps. His instructions were very clear: "No conservation or restorative treatment. Only extractions, and with no anaesthesia!" He was also in charge of gathering the gold that was collected in the camps, for the financial department of the SS. Dr Willy Frank, an Auschwitz dentist, took part in the selection of some of the convoys for the gas chambers. His participation in the collection of gold from the mouths of the dead was also established. These three men were sentenced to prison for War Crimes and Crimes against Humanity.

  11. [Story of three SS dentists during World War II: Pr Hugo Blaschke, Dr Hermann Pook and Dr Willy Frank].

    PubMed

    Riaud, Xavier

    2006-12-01

    This story of three SS dentists shows very clearly that the medical code of ethics, under a totalitarian regime, ends where ideology begins. Professor Hugo Blaschke provided dental care to the most eminent Nazi leaders, but he also was the senior SS dentist. He was in charge of dental care in the Waffen-SS, and therefore, he had responsibility for the stocks of dental gold collected from the mouths of those who died in the concentration camps, in order to make dentures for his soldiers. Dr Hermann Pook was the dentist in charge of all the other dentists practising in the concentration camps. He was responsible for gathering statistics on the dental care provided for prisoners in the camps. His instructions were very clear: "No conservation or restorative treatment. Only extractions, and with no anaesthesia!" He was also in charge of gathering the gold that was collected in the camps, for the financial department of the SS. Dr Willy Frank, an Auschwitz dentist, took part in the selection of some of the convoys for the gas chambers. His participation in the collection of gold from the mouths of the dead was also established. These three men were sentenced to prison for War Crimes and Crimes against Humanity. PMID:17575817

  12. [Dr. Piotr Borsukiewicz--one of the pleiad of physicians in Lublin (the 75th anniversary of his death)].

    PubMed

    Staszyc, J

    1992-01-01

    Seventy years have passed since the death of dr Piotr Borsukiewicz. He spent 9 out of his 22 years of work in Lublin (1909-1918) being the head of the paediatric hospital (1911-1918), the member of the Lublin Medical Society, the president and vice president of some other public service organizations and inscribed himself in letters of gold in the history of medicine and people of Lublin. He worked and lived in the difficult years of two wars (1904-1905 and 1914-1918), the rapid development of medical sciences and the separation of medical specialties. His diligence, loyalty to the Hippocratic code and the instructions of dr W. Biegański as well as to the patriotic dictates resulted in the union of the meaning of his own existence with the deep belief in man and the favourite work as a physician. Helping the poor and those in need he contracted spotted fever but belittled his complaints and died on April 12, 1918 in Lublin. He left us the special patterns of the ideal medical care which are still alive today, so non omnis moriar. PMID:1365791

  13. Dr. Arvid Lindau and discovery of von Hippel-Lindau disease.

    PubMed

    Huntoon, Kristin; Oldfield, Edward H; Lonser, Russell R

    2015-10-01

    Arvid Lindau, MD, PhD, consolidated the disparate array of benign and malignant visceral and nervous system lesions into the neoplastic syndrome known as von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. Based on this pioneering work, Dr. Lindau was awarded both a Rockefeller fellowship to work in Dr. Harvey Cushing's laboratory in Boston, Massachusetts, and the Lennmalm Prize. While working in Dr. Cushing's laboratory, Dr. Lindau continued his study of CNS hemangioblastomas. His work with Dr. Cushing led to their lifelong friendship and scientific collaboration. In this paper the authors describe Arvid Lindau's pioneering work in nervous system tumor pathology, his relationship to Dr. Cushing, and his role in advancing neurological surgery and research in Europe. PMID:25748307

  14. Association of HLA-Bw46DR9 combination with juvenile myasthenia gravis in Chinese.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W H; Chiu, H C; Hseih, R P

    1993-01-01

    One hundred and fifty two Chinese patients with myasthenia gravis in Taiwan were investigated for HLA-A, B, C and DR/DQ typing. HLA-Bw46 and DR9 frequencies were significantly increased in patients compared with the control group, and there was a decrease in DR3. Further analysis between different subgroups of patients showed Bw46 and DR9 were more significantly increased in the juvenile group than in the adult group. No single HLA allele was associated with either clinical type or thymic pathology, but there was an excess of BW46DR9 combination in both juvenile and ocular type patients. The Chinese population with myasthenia gravis is characterised by earlier age at onset, more ocular forms and less clinically severe illness than in whites, and these characteristics indicate a special subgroup that correlates with the strong Bw46DR9 association. PMID:8482958

  15. Replacement of the DR alpha chain with the E alpha chain enhances presentation of Mycoplasma arthritidis superantigen by the human class II DR molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, T; Pergolizzi, R; Ito, K; Silver, J; Atkin, C; Cole, B C; Chang, M D

    1995-01-01

    Mycoplasma arthritidis mitogen (MAM) is produced by an organism which can cause chronic proliferative arthritis in rodents. MAM possesses a typical superantigenic activity; it has the ability to activate a large panel of T cells which express specific V beta segments of the T-cell receptor. The presentation of MAM to T cells by antigen-presenting cells is mediated primarily through its binding to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II E alpha chain in mice and the DR alpha chain in humans. However, MAM is much less active for human peripheral blood lymphocytes than for mouse splenocytes. It was suggested that a difference in MAM binding affinity between human and mouse class II molecules may account for their different MAM activities. To examine this possibility, we generated a panel of B-cell transfectants whose DR molecule is composed of either the DR alpha or the E alpha chain paired with a DR3 beta chain. The ability of these transfectants to present MAM to human peripheral T cells was analyzed. Our data show that transfectants expressing E alpha DR beta chimeric molecules have higher MAM-presenting activity than transfectants expressing wild-type DR alpha DR beta molecules, while the latter have higher activity in stimulating DR3-alloreactive T cells. Since both types of transfectants present MAM to T cells expressing the same T-cell receptor V beta gene families, the higher MAM-presenting activity of the E alpha transfectant is not due to its ability to interact with a different set of T cells. Furthermore, both the E alpha 1 and E alpha 2 domains contribute to this increased affinity for MAM binding. Taken together, our data suggest that there may be multiple MAM binding sites on the E alpha and DR alpha chains and residues unique to the E alpha chain may provide additional affinity for MAM. PMID:7642264

  16. Hospital Library Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    The objectives of a hospital are to improve patient care, while the objectives of a hospital library are to improve services to the staff which will support their efforts. This handbook dealing with hospital administration is designed to aid the librarian in either implementing a hospital library, or improving services in an existing medical…

  17. Hospital marketing revisited.

    PubMed

    Costello, M M

    1987-05-01

    With more hospitals embracing the marketing function in their organizational management over the past decade, hospital marketing can no longer be considered a fad. However, a review of hospital marketing efforts as reported in the professional literature indicates that hospitals must pay greater attention to the marketing mix elements of service, price and distribution channels as their programs mature.

  18. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  19. The UV-bright Quasar Survey (UVQS): DR1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, TalaWanda R.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Tejos, Nicolas; Worseck, Gabor; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Schmidt, Tobias; Tumlinson, Jason; Shen, Yue

    2016-07-01

    We present the first data release (DR1) from our UV-bright Quasar Survey for new z ˜ 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) across the sky. Using simple GALEX UV and WISE near-IR color selection criteria, we generated a list of 1450 primary candidates with FUV < 18.5 mag. We obtained discovery spectra, primarily on 3 m-class telescopes, for 1040 of these candidates and confirmed 86% as AGNs, with redshifts generally at z > 0.5. Including a small set of observed secondary candidates, we report the discovery of 217 AGNs with FUV < 18 mag that previously had no reported spectroscopic redshift. These are excellent potential targets for UV spectroscopy before the end of the Hubble Space Telescope mission. The main data products are publicly available through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes.

  20. Dr. Richard Grugel examines an ampoule of a succinonitrile mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    On Earth when scientists melt metals, bubbles that form in the molten material can rise to the surface, pop and disappear. In microgravity -- the near-weightless environment created as the International Space Station orbits Earth -- the lighter bubbles do not rise and disappear. Prior space experiments have shown that bubbles often become trapped in the final metal or crystal sample -similar to the bubbles trapped in this sample. In the solid, these bubbles, or porosity, are defects that diminish both the material's strength and usefulness. The Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation will melt samples of a transparent modeling material, succinonitrile and succinonitrile water mixtures, shown here in an ampoule being examined by Dr. Richard Grugel, the principal investigator for the experiment at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. As the samples are processed in space, Grugel will be able to observe how bubbles form in the samples and study their movements and interactions.

  1. The Chymistry of "The Learned Dr Plot" (1640-96).

    PubMed

    Roos, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the seventeenth century, there were developing norms of openness in the presentation of scientific knowledge that were at odds with traditions of secrecy among chymists, particularly practitioners of chrysopoeia, or the transmutation of metals. This chapter analyzes how Dr. Robert Plot, the first professor of chymistry at Oxford, negotiated these boundaries within an institutional context. I first delineate his chymical and experimental practice, which incorporated procedures from medieval alchemical sources, particularly the Lullian corpus, as well as more novel practices from seventeenth-century chymistry. Then, I analyze how personal and institutional ambitions and economic considerations shaped to what extent Plot negotiated the boundaries between secrecy and the public dissemination of chymical knowledge. PMID:26103749

  2. GPS/DR Error Estimation for Autonomous Vehicle Localization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Song, Jong-Hwa; Im, Jun-Hyuck; Im, Sung-Hyuck; Heo, Moon-Beom; Jee, Gyu-In

    2015-08-21

    Autonomous vehicles require highly reliable navigation capabilities. For example, a lane-following method cannot be applied in an intersection without lanes, and since typical lane detection is performed using a straight-line model, errors can occur when the lateral distance is estimated in curved sections due to a model mismatch. Therefore, this paper proposes a localization method that uses GPS/DR error estimation based on a lane detection method with curved lane models, stop line detection, and curve matching in order to improve the performance during waypoint following procedures. The advantage of using the proposed method is that position information can be provided for autonomous driving through intersections, in sections with sharp curves, and in curved sections following a straight section. The proposed method was applied in autonomous vehicles at an experimental site to evaluate its performance, and the results indicate that the positioning achieved accuracy at the sub-meter level.

  3. In Memoriam: Prof. Dr Dragutin Djurovic (1937-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-12-01

    Prof. dr Dragutin Djurovic was born in Guca, Serbia, on December 20, 1937. He completed his primary and secondary education in Guca and Cacak. In the period 1956-1958, he studied at the General Military Academy in Belgrade. He enrolled at the Faculty of Sciences and Mathematics - Astronomy Group in 1958 and graduated in 1963. After graduation he went to study visits to Paris (1966) and Bruxelles (1972 and 1975). He obtained his MSc degree in 1970 from the University of Belgrade with a thesis entitled "Application of different types of telescopes for astronomical determination of time". His supervisor for the master thesis was Prof. Zaharije Brkic. Dragutin Djurovic defended his PhD thesis "Contribution to determination of Earth-rotation variations and polar motion" at the University of Belgrade in 1974. Most of the thesis-related research was done in Bruxelles during 1972 under the supervision of Prof. Paul Melchior.

  4. GPS/DR Error Estimation for Autonomous Vehicle Localization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Song, Jong-Hwa; Im, Jun-Hyuck; Im, Sung-Hyuck; Heo, Moon-Beom; Jee, Gyu-In

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles require highly reliable navigation capabilities. For example, a lane-following method cannot be applied in an intersection without lanes, and since typical lane detection is performed using a straight-line model, errors can occur when the lateral distance is estimated in curved sections due to a model mismatch. Therefore, this paper proposes a localization method that uses GPS/DR error estimation based on a lane detection method with curved lane models, stop line detection, and curve matching in order to improve the performance during waypoint following procedures. The advantage of using the proposed method is that position information can be provided for autonomous driving through intersections, in sections with sharp curves, and in curved sections following a straight section. The proposed method was applied in autonomous vehicles at an experimental site to evaluate its performance, and the results indicate that the positioning achieved accuracy at the sub-meter level. PMID:26307997

  5. GPS/DR Error Estimation for Autonomous Vehicle Localization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Song, Jong-Hwa; Im, Jun-Hyuck; Im, Sung-Hyuck; Heo, Moon-Beom; Jee, Gyu-In

    2015-01-01

    Autonomous vehicles require highly reliable navigation capabilities. For example, a lane-following method cannot be applied in an intersection without lanes, and since typical lane detection is performed using a straight-line model, errors can occur when the lateral distance is estimated in curved sections due to a model mismatch. Therefore, this paper proposes a localization method that uses GPS/DR error estimation based on a lane detection method with curved lane models, stop line detection, and curve matching in order to improve the performance during waypoint following procedures. The advantage of using the proposed method is that position information can be provided for autonomous driving through intersections, in sections with sharp curves, and in curved sections following a straight section. The proposed method was applied in autonomous vehicles at an experimental site to evaluate its performance, and the results indicate that the positioning achieved accuracy at the sub-meter level. PMID:26307997

  6. Dr. Cheryl Nickerson studies Salmonella in simulated low-g

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Cheryl Nickerson of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  7. Dr. Cheryl Nickerson studying Salmonella at Tulane University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Cheryl Nickerson (right) of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  8. The Investigation of SBS Galaxies from SDSS DR 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyulzadyan, M. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Paronyan, G. M.

    2016-09-01

    The Second Byurakan Survey (SBS) is a well-known combined survey, which uses the presence of UV-excess radiation in the continuum, or the presence of emission lines in the spectra for the identification of active and star-forming galaxies. This work reports on a comparative study of galaxies identified with UV-excess (UVX), and galaxies identified via emission-line techniques (ELG) in the fields of the SBS. The spectroscopic parameters used for the comparison are the [OII]λ3727Å/Hβ and [OIII]λ5007Å/Hβ emission-line ratios, the equivalent widths of [OII]λ3727Å, [OIII]λ5007Å, and Hβ emission lines. Spectroscopic parameters were determined from the spectra obtained from SDSS DR7. Based on emission line ratios, we have built also diagnostic diagrams to distinguish AGN (Seyferts and LINERs) and SB galaxies.

  9. Catalytic antibodies: balancing between Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

    PubMed

    Belogurov, Alexey; Kozyr, Arina; Ponomarenko, Natalia; Gabibov, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    The immunoglobulin molecule is a perfect template for the de novo generation of biocatalytic functions. Catalytic antibodies, or abzymes, obtained by the structural mimicking of enzyme active sites have been shown to catalyze numerous chemical reactions. Natural enzyme analogs for some of these reactions have not yet been found or possibly do not exist at all. Nowadays, the dramatic breakthrough in antibody engineering and expression technologies has promoted a considerable expansion of immunoglobulin's medical applications and is offering abzymes a unique chance to become a promising source of high-precision "catalytic vaccines." At the same time, the discovery of natural abzymes on the background of autoimmune disease revealed their beneficial and pathogenic roles in the disease progression. Thus, the conflicting Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde protective and destructive essences of catalytic antibodies should be carefully considered in the development of therapeutic abzyme applications. PMID:19795406

  10. User's Manual for FEMOM3DR. Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.

    1998-01-01

    FEMoM3DR is a computer code written in FORTRAN 77 to compute radiation characteristics of antennas on 3D body using combined Finite Element Method (FEM)/Method of Moments (MoM) technique. The code is written to handle different feeding structures like coaxial line, rectangular waveguide, and circular waveguide. This code uses the tetrahedral elements, with vector edge basis functions for FEM and triangular elements with roof-top basis functions for MoM. By virtue of FEM, this code can handle any arbitrary shaped three dimensional bodies with inhomogeneous lossy materials; and due to MoM the computational domain can be terminated in any arbitrary shape. The User's Manual is written to make the user acquainted with the operation of the code. The user is assumed to be familiar with the FORTRAN 77 language and the operating environment of the computers on which the code is intended to run.

  11. The Chymistry of "The Learned Dr Plot" (1640-96).

    PubMed

    Roos, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the seventeenth century, there were developing norms of openness in the presentation of scientific knowledge that were at odds with traditions of secrecy among chymists, particularly practitioners of chrysopoeia, or the transmutation of metals. This chapter analyzes how Dr. Robert Plot, the first professor of chymistry at Oxford, negotiated these boundaries within an institutional context. I first delineate his chymical and experimental practice, which incorporated procedures from medieval alchemical sources, particularly the Lullian corpus, as well as more novel practices from seventeenth-century chymistry. Then, I analyze how personal and institutional ambitions and economic considerations shaped to what extent Plot negotiated the boundaries between secrecy and the public dissemination of chymical knowledge.

  12. Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle and the case of congenital syphilis.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Arthur M; Ruggere, Christine

    2006-01-01

    In 1894, Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle wrote "The Third Generation," a short story involving the transmission of congenital syphilis from generation to generation. Analysts of his writings have interpreted the pathogenetic mechanism involved in modern terms: infection of mother by father and then transplacental infection of the fetus. However, a review of the contemporary literature and the history of the concepts of congenital and "hereditary" syphilis demonstrates that the late 19th-century understanding of the process involved a Lamarckian transmission of paternal infection, via the sperm at the moment of conception. It was undoubtedly this concept that Doyle learned in medical school in the late 1870s and that provided the background to his story.

  13. Biography: Dr Iain Frame, director of research, prostate cancer UK.

    PubMed

    Frame, Iain; Maprayil, Sophia

    2014-11-01

    Sophia Maprayil, Commissioning Editor for Expert Review of Anticancer Therapy, talks to Dr Iain Frame, Director of Research for Prostate Cancer UK. Iain is Prostate Cancer UK's first Director of Research, responsible for overseeing the development and implementation of the charity's ambitious new research strategy. He joined Prostate Cancer UK in 2012 from Diabetes UK where he held the post of Research Director for 5 years. Since joining Prostate Cancer UK in 2012 Iain has overseen a dramatic increase in the charity's research spend, from 2 million a year, to 7.5 million a year. Previously Iain worked in research management at the Wellcome Trust and before that as a parasitologist and researcher exploring various aspects of molecular biology of a number of different parasites.

  14. Characteristics of dr1790 disruptant and its functional analysis in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianhui; Wang, Hu; Xu, Xin; Wang, Liangyan; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans (DR) is an extremophile that is well known for its resistance to radiation, oxidants and desiccation. The gene dr1790 of D. radiodurans was predicted to encode a yellow-related protein. The primary objective of the present study was to characterize the biological function of the DR1790 protein, which is a member of the ancient yellow/major royal jelly (MRJ) protein family, in prokaryotes. Fluorescence labeling demonstrated that the yellow-related protein encoded by dr1790 is a membrane protein. The deletion of the dr1790 gene decreased the cell growth rate and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and radiation and increased the membrane permeability of D. radiodurans. Transcript profiling by microarray and RT-PCR analyses of the dr1790 deletion mutant suggested that some genes that are involved in protein secretion and transport were strongly suppressed, while other genes that are involved in protein quality control, such as chaperones and proteases, were induced. In addition, the expression of genes with predicted functions that are involved in antioxidant systems, electron transport, and energy metabolism was significantly altered through the disruption of dr1790. Moreover, the results of proteomic analyses using 2-DE and MS also demonstrated that DR1790 contributed to D. radiodurans survival. Taken together, these results indicate that the DR1790 protein from the ancient yellow protein family plays a pleiotropic role in the survival of prokaryotic cells and contributes to the extraordinary resistance of D. radiodurans against oxidative and radiation stresses. PMID:26273280

  15. HLA-A, -B and -DR allele and haplotype frequencies in Malays.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J S; Shahnaz, M; Too, C L; Azrena, A; Maiselamah, L; Lee, Y Y; Irda, Y A; Salawati, M

    2007-03-01

    One thousand four hundreds and forty-five Malays registered with the Malaysian Marrow Donor Registry were typed for HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DR. Fifteen HLA-A, twenty nine HLA-B and fourteen HLA-DR alleles were detected. The most common HLA-A alleles and their frequencies were HLA-A24 (0.35), HLA-A11 (0.21) and HLA-A2 (0.15). The most common HLA-B alleles were HLA-B15 (0.26), HLA-B35 (0.11) and HLA-B18 (0.10) while the most common HLA-DR alleles were HLA-DR15 (0.28), HLA-DR12 (0.27) and HLA-DR7 (0.10). A24-B15-DR12 (0.047), A24-B15-DR15 (0.03) and the A24-B35-DR12 (0.03) were the most frequent haplotypes. This data may be useful in determining the probability of finding a matched donor and for estimating the incidence of HLA associated diseases.

  16. Safety evaluation for packaging for 1720-DR sodium-filled tank

    SciTech Connect

    Mercado, M.S.

    1996-03-09

    Preparations are under way to sell the sodium stored in the 1720-DR tank in the 1720-DR building. This will require that the tank, as well as the 1720-DR facility, be moved to the 300 Area, so that the sodium may be melted and transferred into a railroad tanker car. Because the sodium is a hazardous material and is being shipped in a nonspecification packaging, a safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) is required. This SEP approves the sodium-filled tank for a single shipment from the 105-DR area to the 300 Area.

  17. Characteristics of dr1790 disruptant and its functional analysis in Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jianhui; Wang, Hu; Xu, Xin; Wang, Liangyan; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans (DR) is an extremophile that is well known for its resistance to radiation, oxidants and desiccation. The gene dr1790 of D. radiodurans was predicted to encode a yellow-related protein. The primary objective of the present study was to characterize the biological function of the DR1790 protein, which is a member of the ancient yellow/major royal jelly (MRJ) protein family, in prokaryotes. Fluorescence labeling demonstrated that the yellow-related protein encoded by dr1790 is a membrane protein. The deletion of the dr1790 gene decreased the cell growth rate and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and radiation and increased the membrane permeability of D. radiodurans. Transcript profiling by microarray and RT-PCR analyses of the dr1790 deletion mutant suggested that some genes that are involved in protein secretion and transport were strongly suppressed, while other genes that are involved in protein quality control, such as chaperones and proteases, were induced. In addition, the expression of genes with predicted functions that are involved in antioxidant systems, electron transport, and energy metabolism was significantly altered through the disruption of dr1790. Moreover, the results of proteomic analyses using 2-DE and MS also demonstrated that DR1790 contributed to D. radiodurans survival. Taken together, these results indicate that the DR1790 protein from the ancient yellow protein family plays a pleiotropic role in the survival of prokaryotic cells and contributes to the extraordinary resistance of D. radiodurans against oxidative and radiation stresses. PMID:26273280

  18. Characteristics of dr1790 disruptant and its functional analysis in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianhui; Wang, Hu; Xu, Xin; Wang, Liangyan; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans (DR) is an extremophile that is well known for its resistance to radiation, oxidants and desiccation. The gene dr1790 of D. radiodurans was predicted to encode a yellow-related protein. The primary objective of the present study was to characterize the biological function of the DR1790 protein, which is a member of the ancient yellow/major royal jelly (MRJ) protein family, in prokaryotes. Fluorescence labeling demonstrated that the yellow-related protein encoded by dr1790 is a membrane protein. The deletion of the dr1790 gene decreased the cell growth rate and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and radiation and increased the membrane permeability of D. radiodurans. Transcript profiling by microarray and RT-PCR analyses of the dr1790 deletion mutant suggested that some genes that are involved in protein secretion and transport were strongly suppressed, while other genes that are involved in protein quality control, such as chaperones and proteases, were induced. In addition, the expression of genes with predicted functions that are involved in antioxidant systems, electron transport, and energy metabolism was significantly altered through the disruption of dr1790. Moreover, the results of proteomic analyses using 2-DE and MS also demonstrated that DR1790 contributed to D. radiodurans survival. Taken together, these results indicate that the DR1790 protein from the ancient yellow protein family plays a pleiotropic role in the survival of prokaryotic cells and contributes to the extraordinary resistance of D. radiodurans against oxidative and radiation stresses.

  19. Expression and mutational analysis of DinB-like protein DR0053 in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Appukuttan, Deepti; Seo, Ho Seong; Jeong, Sunwook; Im, Sunghun; Joe, Minho; Song, Dusup; Choi, Jungjoon; Lim, Sangyong

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanism governing radiation resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans, current efforts are aimed at identifying potential candidates from a large repertoire of unique Deinococcal genes and protein families. DR0053 belongs to the DinB/YfiT protein family, which is an over-represented protein family in D. radiodurans. We observed that dr0053 transcript levels were highly induced in response to gamma radiation (γ-radiation) and mitomycin C (MMC) exposure depending on PprI, RecA and the DrtR/S two-component signal transduction system. Protein profiles demonstrated that DR0053 is a highly induced protein in cultures exposed to 10 kGy γ-radiation. We were able to determine the transcriptional start site of dr0053, which was induced upon irradiation, and to assign the 133-bp promoter region of dr0053 as essential for radiation responsiveness through primer extension and promoter deletion analyses. A dr0053 mutant strain displayed sensitivity to γ-radiation and MMC exposure, but not hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that DR0053 helps cells recover from DNA damage. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that DR0053 is similar to the Bacillus subtilis protein YjoA, which is a substrate of bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases. Taken together, the DNA damage-inducible (din) gene dr0053 may be regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels.

  20. Weak association between HLA-DR4 and rheumatoid arthritis in Chilean patients.

    PubMed Central

    Massardo, L; Jacobelli, S; Rodríguez, L; Rivero, S; González, A; Marchetti, R

    1990-01-01

    Evidence has suggested a genetic link between the HLA-DR4 phenotype and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), particularly in its seropositive form. Such an association varies among different ethnic groups and remains controversial for seronegative patients. Data obtained for a group of 64 Chilean patients with RA (46 seropositive, 18 seronegative), as defined by the 1987 criteria of the American Rheumatism Association, and for 76 controls are reported here. The prevalence of HLA-DR4 and DR9 was significantly increased in the group of patients considered as a whole. The prevalence of HLA-DR4 was not significantly higher, however, when seronegative and seropositive patients were separately compared with controls. Also, it did not correlate with the severity of the disease within each subgroup of patients. On the other hand, HLA-DR9 showed a highly significant difference, not previously described, only for the seropositive patients in comparison with controls. The prevalence of DQ specificities showed no relevant differences among the groups. The HLA-DR4 serotype, therefore, is a weak marker for RA and does not differentiate any subgroup of patients in the Chilean group studied. This new finding, indicating an association between RA and the DR9 antigen, may be explained by the suggestion that susceptibility epitopes are shared among different DR molecules. This hypothesis might also account for the variation in the association of DR4 with RA. PMID:2344208

  1. Expression and Mutational Analysis of DinB-Like Protein DR0053 in Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Appukuttan, Deepti; Seo, Ho Seong; Jeong, Sunwook; Im, Sunghun; Joe, Minho; Song, Dusup; Choi, Jungjoon; Lim, Sangyong

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the mechanism governing radiation resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans, current efforts are aimed at identifying potential candidates from a large repertoire of unique Deinococcal genes and protein families. DR0053 belongs to the DinB/YfiT protein family, which is an over-represented protein family in D. radiodurans. We observed that dr0053 transcript levels were highly induced in response to gamma radiation (γ-radiation) and mitomycin C (MMC) exposure depending on PprI, RecA and the DrtR/S two-component signal transduction system. Protein profiles demonstrated that DR0053 is a highly induced protein in cultures exposed to 10 kGy γ-radiation. We were able to determine the transcriptional start site of dr0053, which was induced upon irradiation, and to assign the 133-bp promoter region of dr0053 as essential for radiation responsiveness through primer extension and promoter deletion analyses. A dr0053 mutant strain displayed sensitivity to γ-radiation and MMC exposure, but not hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that DR0053 helps cells recover from DNA damage. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that DR0053 is similar to the Bacillus subtilis protein YjoA, which is a substrate of bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases. Taken together, the DNA damage-inducible (din) gene dr0053 may be regulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. PMID:25706748

  2. A Failed Utopia in Marcela Del Río's "Proceso a Faubritten"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manickam, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    In Marcela del Río's science fiction novel "Proceso a Faubritten," utopia comes in the form of eternal life for all of humanity, thanks to Dr. Alexander Faubritten's "Bomba L." This polyphonic work includes diaries by Faubritten and his Mexican lover, María Corona. In my analysis of these two diaries, I will show how…

  3. GENESI-DR Portal: a scientific gateway to distributed repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncalves, Pedro; Brito, Fabrice; D'Andria, Fabio; Cossu, Roberto; Fusco, Luigi

    2010-05-01

    GENESI-DR (Ground European Network for Earth Science Interoperations - Digital Repositories) is a European Commission (EC)-funded project, kicked-off early 2008 lead by ESA; partners include Space Agencies (DLR, ASI, CNES), both space and no-space data providers such as ENEA (I), Infoterra (UK), K-SAT (N), NILU (N), JRC (EU) and industry as Elsag Datamat (I), CS (F) and TERRADUE (I). GENESI-DR intends to meet the challenge of facilitating "time to science" from different Earth Science disciplines in discovery, access and use (combining, integrating, processing, …) of historical and recent Earth-related data from space, airborne and in-situ sensors, which are archived in large distributed repositories. "Discovering" which data are available on a "geospatial web" is one of the main challenges ES scientists have to face today. Some well- known data sets are referred to in many places, available from many sources. For core information with a common purpose many copies are distributed, e.g., VMap0, Landsat, and SRTM. Other data sets in low or local demand may only be found in a few places and niche communities. Relevant services, results of analysis, applications and tools are accessible in a very scattered and uncoordinated way, often through individual initiatives from Earth Observation mission operators, scientific institutes dealing with ground measurements, service companies or data catalogues. In the discourse of Spatial Data Infrastructures, there are "catalogue services" - directories containing information on where spatial data and services can be found. For metadata "records" describing spatial data and services, there are "registries". The Geospatial industry coins specifications for search interfaces, where it might do better to reach out to other information retrieval and Internet communities. These considerations are the basis for the GENESI-DR scientific portal, which adopts a simple model allowing the geo-spatial classification and discovery of

  4. A quiet revolution in Brighton: Dr Helen Boyle's pioneering approach to mental health care, 1899-1939.

    PubMed

    Westwood, L

    2001-12-01

    At the close of the nineteenth century, the English lunacy laws in relation to pauper cases made no concessions for acute, temporary, or recoverable cases. They were all located in the asylum along with severe and chronic cases. Dr Helen Boyle worked among London's poor in the 1890s and observed the deterioration of cases of nervous disorder and borderline insanity due to their lack of treatment. The early treatment of borderline cases was the aim of Boyle's charitable hospital, founded in 1905, for nervous disorders in women and girls. Boyle's interest in mental disorder included the mentally defective and she was a founder member of the Guardianship Society which sought to keep those defined as such within the community. The history of the care and treatment of the 'insane' has concentrated largely on the public and private asylums. London-based facilities such as the Tavis-tock clinic and the Maudsley Hospital, which both treated rate-aided patients in the inter-war period, have been given a great deal of attention because of wealthy benefactors and the involvement of high profile individuals. Boyle's unique in-patient facility in Brighton preceded the Maudsley by almost 20 years and as such fills an important gap in mental health history. Boyle's work challenged the lunacy laws and set out to establish a holistic system of care for recoverable conditions outside the asylum system. This essay concentrates on the work of Dr Helen Boyle in Brighton but also highlights other facilities that were available for rate-aided patients, which have been neglected in the historiography of mental health care.

  5. Race-specific type 1 diabetes risk of HLA-DR7 haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Noble, J A; Johnson, J; Lane, J A; Valdes, A M

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that closely related human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes containing the DRB1*07:01 gene ['DR7' (DRB1*07:01-DQA1*02:01-DQB1*02:01g or DRB1*07:01-DQA1*03:01-DQB1*02:01g) haplotypes] derived from European and African populations differ in their genetic susceptibility for type 1 diabetes (T1D) depending on the DQ-α molecule present. A combined total of 98 African American T1D patients from the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium and from Children's Hospital and Research Center Oakland were genotyped for the HLA class II loci DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1. DNA samples extracted from newborn blood spot cards from African Americans born in California (n = 947) were used as a population-based control group. Among African American cases, the European-derived DRB1*07:01-DQA1*02:01-DQB1*02:01g haplotype was protective for T1D risk (odds ratio (OR) = 0.34; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.14-0.78; P < 0.011), but the African-derived DRB1*07:01-DQA1*03:01-DQB1*02:01g haplotype increased T1D risk (OR = 3.96; 95% CI 1.94-8.08; P < 5.5E-05). The effect of DRB1*07:01-DQB1*02:01g on T1D susceptibility depends on the DQA1 allele. DRB1*07:01-DQA1*02:01-DQB1*02:01g is protective for T1D; however, the presence of DQA1*03:01 on the DRB1*07:01-DQB1*02:01g haplotype not only renders the DR7 haplotype not protective but also creates a haplotype with significant T1D risk. These data underscore the importance of assessing genetic effects within ethnic context.

  6. Influence of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor or Influenza Vaccination on HLA-DR, Infection and Delirium Days in Immunosuppressed Surgical Patients: Double Blind, Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, Gunnar; Renius, Markus; von Haefen, Clarissa; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Bahra, Marcus; Schiemann, Alexander; Paupers, Marco; Meisel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Surgical patients are at high risk for developing infectious complications and postoperative delirium. Prolonged infections and delirium result in worse outcome. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and influenza vaccination are known to increase HLA-DR on monocytes and improve immune reactivity. This study aimed to investigate whether GM-CSF or vaccination reverses monocyte deactivation. Secondary aims were whether it decreases infection and delirium days after esophageal or pancreatic resection over time. Methods In this prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, double dummy trial setting on an interdisciplinary ICU of a university hospital 61 patients with immunosuppression (monocytic HLA-DR [mHLA-DR] <10,000 monoclonal antibodies [mAb] per cell) on the first day after esophageal or pancreatic resection were treated with either GM-CSF (250 μg/m2/d), influenza vaccination (Mutagrip 0.5 ml/d) or placebo for a maximum of 3 consecutive days if mHLA-DR remained below 10,000 mAb per cell. HLA-DR on monocytes was measured daily until day 5 after surgery. Infections and delirium were followed up for 9 days after surgery. Primary outcome was HLA-DR on monocytes, and secondary outcomes were duration of infection and delirium. Results mHLA-DR was significantly increased compared to placebo (p < 0.001) and influenza vaccination (p < 0.001) on the second postoperative day. Compared with placebo, GM-CSF-treated patients revealed shorter duration of infection (p < 0.001); the duration of delirium was increased after vaccination (p = 0.003). Conclusion Treatment with GM-CSF in patients with postoperative immune suppression was safe and effective in restoring monocytic immune competence. Furthermore, therapy with GM-CSF reduced duration of infection in immune compromised patients. However, influenza vaccination increased duration of delirium after major surgery. Trial Registration www.controlled-trials.com ISRCTN27114642 PMID

  7. Pioneers of Study on Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions; Achievements by Dr. Yoshioki Ishikawa and Dr. Yoshio Ohta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, Kazuhiko; Nambu, Akira

    Dr. Yoshioki Ishikawa is a pioneer who carried out systematic electron stimulated desorption (ESD) investigations for hydrogen adsorbed on a clean platinum plate (H2/Pt) under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions in 1942. (His name is spelled as Yosioki Isikawa in the original papers.) Although his papers are referred in several papers on desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET), these seem to be not as well-known as famous ones by Menzel, Gomer, and Redhead in 1964. We describe his pioneering work in this article. He developed an UHV apparatus made of glass with a Pt plate and an oxide cathode pumped by a small mercury pump via a liquid air trap. Clear ESD signals were observed for H2/Pt at excitation energies of 8, 12, 14, 33-46, and 46-51 eV. He assigned the desorbate to atomic hydrogen (H), because it was pumped by a glass wall baked above 350°C. Based on these results and the potential curves of H2 in the gas phase, he proposed a model for the ESD of H from H2/Pt that is, the first step is an electronic transition of adsorbed H2, and the second is the desorption of H along the repulsive potential surface of the excited state. This was the first introduction of the notion of DIET. He also carried out an ESD study of H2O/Pt in 1943. We also introduce achievements by Dr. Yoshio Ohta, who was another pioneer in the field of DIET. He measured electron-stimulated ion desorption from an oxidized Ni plate. He found that the threshold excitation energy for ion desorption is 22 eV, and that the kinetic energy of the desorbed ion is 1˜2 eV. To explain these results, he also proposed the concept of DIET.

  8. A supertypic HLA class II determinant shared by DR1 and DRw9, and crossreactive with DR2, defined by human monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Kosinski, S; Yang, S Y; Pistillo, M P; Hämmerling, U

    1988-03-01

    A human monoclonal antibody Pez.2F5, produced by a lymphoblastoid cell line, has been established in vitro by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transformation of B lymphocytes isolated from the blood of a volunteer immunized with allogeneic peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). The antibody reacted with a new supertypic determinant expressed on all lymphoblastoid cell lines homozygous for HLA-DR1, -2, and -w9. The genetic linkage of the Pez.2F5 determinant to the HLA region was demonstrated by family segregation studies. Quantitative absorption studies indicated that DR2-positive cells required more Pez.2F5 antibody for lysis, and since their absorption capacity was significantly lower than that of DR1- or DRw9-positive cells, it is likely that the Pez.2F5 determinant of the DR2 haplotype is crossreactive but not identical with the determinant found on the latter haplotypes. In addition, on a test panel of HLA-typed B lymphocytes, Pez.2F5 showed perfect correlation with DR1 and DRw9, but reacted with only a fraction of DR2-positive cells. The Pez.2F5 determinant was found to be absent from resting T lymphocytes, but its expression could be identified on IL-2-dependent T-cell lines by cytotoxicity and flow cytofluorometric analysis. By sequential immunoprecipitation and SDS gel analysis of antigens of DR1 cells it was determined that the Pez.2F5 determinant is carried by HLA class II DR molecules. Thus, the Pez.2F5 is the first described human monoclonal antibody able to immunoprecipitate HLA class II-related molecules. PMID:2453492

  9. [Dr. Svetislav Sp. Barjaktarović--30 years later].

    PubMed

    Jovanović-Simić, Jelena; Pavlović, Budimir

    2002-01-01

    Doctor Svetislav Sp. Barjaktarovitsh (1893-1971), full professor of University School of Medicine in Belgrade, Head of the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics since its foundation, Director of the University Teaching Hospital of Gynaecology and Obstetrics from 1937 to 1948, was dismissed from University for political reasons in December 1948. He was the author of classical gynaecological and obstetrics textbooks, popular books, as well as of fifty scientific papers published in domestic and foreign professional literature. While being the Director of the University Teaching Hospital of Gynaecology and Obstetrics he managed to raise money to start the building of a new hospital. He was engaged in experimental work and improved the diagnosis and therapy of genital tuberculosis, extrauterine pregnancy, adnexal inflammation, puerperal fever, etc. He was especially concerned with the determination of the child's sex before his/her birth. As a medical student he participated in the First World War working in the Company Hospital of the Morava Division. He was holder of the Albanian Commemorative Medal, The Cross of Mercy and other decorations.

  10. Star Formation in the DR21 Region (A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated mosaic

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is a stellar nursery called DR21, which is giving birth to some of the most massive stars in our galaxy. Visible light images reveal no trace of this interstellar cauldron because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    The colorful image (top panel) is a large-scale composite mosaic assembled from data collected at a variety of different wavelengths. Views at visible wavelengths appear blue, near-infrared light is depicted as green, and mid-infrared data from the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope is portrayed as red. The result is a contrast between structures seen in visible light (blue) and those observed in the infrared (yellow and red). A quick glance shows that most of the action in this image is revealed to the unique eyes of Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon.

    Each of the constituent images is shown below the large mosaic. The Digital Sky Survey (DSS) image (lower left) provides a familiar view of deep space, with stars scattered around a dark field. The reddish hue is from gas heated by foreground stars in this region. This fluorescence fades away in the near-infrared Two-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) image (lower center), but other features start to appear through the obscuring clouds of dust, now increasingly transparent. Many more

  11. Hospitable Classrooms: Biblical Hospitality and Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper contributes to a Christian hermeneutic of special education by suggesting the biblical concept of hospitality as a necessary characteristic of classroom and school environments in which students with disabilities and other marginalized students can be effectively incorporated into the body of the classroom. Christian hospitality, seen…

  12. [WHO AFFECTS THE PATIENT, DR. GOOGLE OR THE DOCTOR?].

    PubMed

    Mishali, Moshe; Avrech, Tova

    2015-09-01

    In the last decade the World Wide Web has become one of the prime sources for medical data searches. The abundance of information and emphasis on consumer communication, which are the main characteristics of the new generation of the web named "Web 2.0", enable users to engage and educate others by sharing and collaborating knowledge. It also enables them to receive medical information based on the experience of other patients, while the duration of the traditional physician's visit has shortened. However, using Web 2.0 for health collaboration has drawbacks as well: When alternative ways of "knowing" replace objective medical facts, there is danger of misinformation and truth "flattening". This article examines the distribution of medical misinformation online: Its characteristics, the nature of the messages presented online and the means that might help protect users and patients from it. The authors hold positions in the Israeli Dairy Board (IDB): Dr. Averch manages the health field on the IDB, and the findings in this article are based on research that she is leading as part of this position, and Dr. Mishali is a trained psychologist, and acts as a strategic consultant for IDB in the field of coping with the opposition to milk and its products. In this article it is initially shown how the characteristics of information distribution in general help spreading medical misinformation online: The decline of doctors' authority as sole providers of medical information, disillusionment and suspicion towards science and the notion of expertise, and the emergence of new ways to evaluate information, based on community ties. The nature of this pseudo-medical information will then be discussed, including the range of the phenomenon and the probability of users to be affected by it. Furthermore, we will raise specific tactics in which anti-establishment messages are portrayed; examples will be given of the use of emotion evoking content in the anti-establishment messages

  13. [WHO AFFECTS THE PATIENT, DR. GOOGLE OR THE DOCTOR?].

    PubMed

    Mishali, Moshe; Avrech, Tova

    2015-09-01

    In the last decade the World Wide Web has become one of the prime sources for medical data searches. The abundance of information and emphasis on consumer communication, which are the main characteristics of the new generation of the web named "Web 2.0", enable users to engage and educate others by sharing and collaborating knowledge. It also enables them to receive medical information based on the experience of other patients, while the duration of the traditional physician's visit has shortened. However, using Web 2.0 for health collaboration has drawbacks as well: When alternative ways of "knowing" replace objective medical facts, there is danger of misinformation and truth "flattening". This article examines the distribution of medical misinformation online: Its characteristics, the nature of the messages presented online and the means that might help protect users and patients from it. The authors hold positions in the Israeli Dairy Board (IDB): Dr. Averch manages the health field on the IDB, and the findings in this article are based on research that she is leading as part of this position, and Dr. Mishali is a trained psychologist, and acts as a strategic consultant for IDB in the field of coping with the opposition to milk and its products. In this article it is initially shown how the characteristics of information distribution in general help spreading medical misinformation online: The decline of doctors' authority as sole providers of medical information, disillusionment and suspicion towards science and the notion of expertise, and the emergence of new ways to evaluate information, based on community ties. The nature of this pseudo-medical information will then be discussed, including the range of the phenomenon and the probability of users to be affected by it. Furthermore, we will raise specific tactics in which anti-establishment messages are portrayed; examples will be given of the use of emotion evoking content in the anti-establishment messages

  14. HLA-DR typing of women with recurrent late spontaneous abortion and unsuccessful cervical cerclage.

    PubMed

    Mohapeloa, H; Christiansen, O B; Grunnet, N

    1998-04-01

    The release of certain cytokines, e.g. tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, in the amniotic fluid has been suggested to be a cause of preterm birth. The predisposition to excessive liberation of cytokines from peripheral leukocytes has been shown to depend partly on the individual's HLA-DR genotype. The HLA-DR1 and -DR3 alleles have previously been reported as being associated with a TNF-alpha high responder status and have also been associated with unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortions. In the present study, HLA-DR typing was performed in 10 women who had experienced recurrent very early preterm births resulting in perinatal death, or late spontaneous abortions under a clinical picture resembling that traditionally attributed to cervical incompetence. All patients had had at least one mid-trimester miscarriage in spite of the insertion of a cervical cerclage. Nine out of 10 (90%) patients had the HLA-DR phenotypes DR1 and/or DR3 compared with 37% in the background population (P < 0.005). The results suggest that HLA-DR-associated immunological factors might play a part in recurrent late spontaneous abortions and extremely preterm births under a cervical incompetence-like picture, at least in the subset of cases not treatable by cervical cerclage.

  15. Vikrant Sahasrabuddhe, MBBS, MPH, DrPH | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Vikrant Sahasrabuddhe received his medical degree from the University of Pune in India, his master's and doctorate degrees in public health from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and completed fellowship training in epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health and at the National Cancer Institute. Before joining NCI in 2015, Dr. |

  16. Dr. Bernard Langer — inductee into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Paul D.; Rotstein, Ori D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dr. Bernard Langer’s induction into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame acknowledges his profound effect on medicine and surgery in Canada and an impact that has been truly international. In this brief biography, we highlight the major accomplishments that have made Dr. Langer a pre-eminent leader, innovator, teacher and exemplary surgeon. PMID:25799243

  17. Annotated Bibliography of Dr Salmani Nodoushan's Research on Education and Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etemadfar Kashani, Abbas Ali

    2016-01-01

    This is an annotated bibliography of the research conducted on education and language teaching and assessment by Dr. Mohammad Ali Salmani Nodoushan in the past 25 years. This bibliography is a precise picture of the current state of education and language teaching and assessment in Iran. Dr. Salmani Nodoushan is the most distinguished Iranian…

  18. HLA-DR and -DQ gene polymorphism in Latvian patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shtauvere, A; Rumba, I; Dzivite, I; Sanjeevi, C B

    1998-10-01

    Latvian insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) patients (n=101) and healthy controls (n=111) were analyzed for HLA-DR and DQ polymorphism. DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8 were positively associated and DR15-DQ6, DR13-DQ6, DR1-DQ5 and DQ7 negatively associated with the disease. The incidence of IDDM in Latvia is very low (6.5 per 100,000) compared to Sweden (24.4 per 100,000), even though Latvia is close to Sweden. The reasons for the decreased incidence are not clear. When the negatively associated DQ were taken together in the healthy controls, more than 75% of the healthy controls were positive for one of the four negatively associated DQ molecules. The excess frequency of the negatively associated DQ molecules in the general population could explain the lower incidence of IDDM in Latvia. Association of HLA-DR and DQ genes with autoantibody markers shows DR3, but not DQ2, to be increased in GAD65 antibody-positive compared to antibody-negative patients. This association was not observed with ICA512 antibodies.

  19. Reader-Response to Dr. Seuss: Middle School Students and Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Susan M.

    A study investigated to what extent average middle school students were able to perceive the social issues embedded in literature by Dr. Seuss. Seventy-four seventh-grade students responded to five Dr. Seuss stories in free-writing exercises, response worksheets, and question worksheets. Results showed that the majority of students (approximately…

  20. Genomic analysis identifies class II mismatches in serologically DR-compatible human renal allografts.

    PubMed

    Bushell, A; Wood, K J; Morris, P J

    1988-11-01

    Many studies, including those from our own center, have shown that matching the donor and recipient for HLA-DR antigens has a beneficial effect on the outcome of cadaveric renal transplantation. However, cases of irreversible graft rejection are sometimes seen in patients who have received an HLA-DR-compatible kidney, suggesting that serologic compatibility for HLA-DR may not always ensure reduced alloreactivity toward the graft. We have examined a number of recipients and their serologically DR-compatible cadaveric donors by Southern blotting and hybridization with locus specific HLA class II probes in order to determine whether in these patients there were class II mismatches that had been undetected by serology. The results show that the analysis of DR beta restriction fragment patterns does little more than complement and confirm the serologic identification of HLA-DR. Hybridization with DQ alpha and DQ beta probes, however, significantly extends the number of DQ specificities that can be detected and suggests that DQ mismatches in DR-compatible donor-recipient pairs may be more common than previously supposed, although it is not possible to draw any conclusions on the influence of DQ incompatibilities in the presence of DR compatibility on graft outcome.

  1. HLA class II genes polymorphism in DR4 giant cell arteritis patients.

    PubMed

    Bignon, J D; Ferec, C; Barrier, J; Pennec, Y; Verlingue, C; Cheneau, M L; Lucas, V; Muller, J Y; Saleun, J P

    1988-11-01

    We have previously reported a significant increase of HLA-DR4 antigen frequency in giant cell arteritis (GCA). This finding suggested an important role of immunogenetic factors in this syndrome. Recent data suggest that inherited susceptibility to several autoimmune diseases was associated with specific DR4 associated DQ beta alleles. DNAs from 27 DR4 positive patients with GCA were digested with Taq I and Bam HI, analysed on 0.7% agarose gel and hybridized with DR beta, DQ alpha and DQ beta probes. DR beta hybridization produced no variant detectable within DR4. DQ beta probe confirmed two clusters among DR4 associated DQW3 alleles: DQW 3.1 (Bam HI 360 Kb) and DQw 3.2 (Taq I 1.9 Kb and Bam HI 11 Kb). Among our 27 DR4 positive patients, 34% were DQW 3.1 and 66% were DQW 3.2. These frequencies are the same as those observed in healthy controls. PMID:2906182

  2. GLI3-dependent repression of DR4 mediates hedgehog antagonism of TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kurita, S; Mott, J L; Almada, L L; Bronk, S F; Werneburg, N W; Sun, S-Y; Roberts, L R; Fernandez-Zapico, M E; Gores, G J

    2010-08-26

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through its cognate receptors death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5), preferentially in malignant cells. However, many malignant cells remain resistant to TRAIL cytotoxicity by poorly characterized mechanisms. Here, using cholangiocarcinoma cells, as a model for TRAIL resistance, we identified a role for the oncogenic Hedgehog (Hh)-GLI pathway in the regulation of TRAIL cytotoxicity. Blockade of Hh using pharmacological and genetic tools sensitizes the cells to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Restoration of apoptosis sensitivity coincided with upregulation of DR4 expression, while expression of other death effector proteins remained unaltered. Knockdown of DR4 mimics Hh-mediated resistance to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Hh regulates the expression of DR4 by modulating the activity of its promoter. Luciferase, chromatin immunoprecipitation and expression assays show that the transcription factor GLI3 binds to the DR4 promoter and Hh requires an intact GLI3-repression activity to silence DR4 expression. Finally, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeted knockdown of GLI3, but not GLI1 or GLI2, restores DR4 expression and TRAIL sensitivity, indicating that the Hh effect is exclusively mediated by this transcription factor. In conclusion, these data provide evidence of a regulatory mechanism, which modulates TRAIL signaling in cancer cells and suggest new therapeutic approaches for TRAIL-resistant neoplasms. PMID:20562908

  3. GLI3-dependent repression of DR4 mediates hedgehog antagonism of TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, S; Mott, JL; Almada, LL; Bronk, SF; Werneburg, NW; Sun, S-Y; Roberts, LR; Fernandez-Zapico, ME; Gores, GJ

    2010-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis through its cognate receptors death receptor 4 (DR4) and death receptor 5 (DR5), preferentially in malignant cells. However, many malignant cells remain resistant to TRAIL cytotoxicity by poorly characterized mechanisms. Here, using cholangiocarcinoma cells, as a model for TRAIL resistance, we identified a role for the oncogenic Hedgehog (Hh)-GLI pathway in the regulation of TRAIL cytotoxicity. Blockade of Hh using pharmacological and genetic tools sensitizes the cells to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Restoration of apoptosis sensitivity coincided with upregulation of DR4 expression, while expression of other death effector proteins remained unaltered. Knockdown of DR4 mimics Hh-mediated resistance to TRAIL cytotoxicity. Hh regulates the expression of DR4 by modulating the activity of its promoter. Luciferase, chromatin immunoprecipitation and expression assays show that the transcription factor GLI3 binds to the DR4 promoter and Hh requires an intact GLI3-repression activity to silence DR4 expression. Finally, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-targeted knockdown of GLI3, but not GLI1 or GLI2, restores DR4 expression and TRAIL sensitivity, indicating that the Hh effect is exclusively mediated by this transcription factor. In conclusion, these data provide evidence of a regulatory mechanism, which modulates TRAIL signaling in cancer cells and suggest new therapeutic approaches for TRAIL-resistant neoplasms. PMID:20562908

  4. Dr. James McGee shows three astronauts how to handle non-poisonous snake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Dr. James W. McGee (right), Medical Operations Office, Manned Spacecraft Center, shows three astronauts how to handle a non-poisonous snake during desert survival training in Washington state. Left to right, are Astronauts Thomas K. Mattingly, Alfred M. Worden, and John L. Swigert Jr.; and Dr. McGee. The astronauts are dressed in faked Arab clothing.

  5. 76 FR 14407 - Exchange of Letters Between Dr. Murray M. Lumpkin, Deputy Commissioner, International Programs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Exchange of Letters Between Dr. Murray M. Lumpkin, Deputy... providing notice of exchange of letters between Dr. Murray M. Lumpkin, Deputy Commissioner,...

  6. HLA-DR antigens in normal, inflammatory, and neoplastic salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Zarbo, R J; Regezi, J A; Lloyd, R V; Crissman, J D; Batsakis, J G

    1987-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody to HLA-DR antigens that is reactive in formalin-fixed tissues was used with the immunoperoxidase method to evaluate 212 salivary gland lesions (normal, nonspecific, and autoimmune inflammatory, benign, and malignant tumors). Results of immunostaining showed that (1) intercalated ducts, myoepithelial cells, and acinous cells of normal salivary glands express HLA-DR antigens, (2) autoimmune salivary gland disease results in greater HLA-DR expression than that seen in nonspecific inflammatory lesions or normal glands, (3) stromal cells associated with benign and malignant salivary gland tumors express HLA-DR antigens, and (4) numerous benign and malignant salivary gland tumors express HLA-DR antigens. It was of interest that lymphocyte-rich Warthin's tumors displayed epithelial immunoreactivity, whereas oncocytomas devoid of a lymphocytic component were invariably negative. This suggests a lymphocyte-mediated role in salivary epithelial HLA-DR expression. It appears that HLA-DR expression is both a normal and an inducible phenomenon in salivary glands, salivary gland neoplasia, and the desmoplastic host response. There is no discriminatory role in the immunologic detection of HLA-DR for differential diagnosis of salivary gland tumors.

  7. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority.

  8. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority. PMID:23424818

  9. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Knaus, Z.C.

    1995-06-12

    This is the decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan for the closure activities at the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility at Hanford Reservation. This document supports the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan, DOE-RL-90-25. The 105-DR LSFF, which operated from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The LSFF was established to investigate fire fighting and safety associated with alkali metal fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor facilities. The decontamination, sampling, and analysis plan identifies the decontamination procedures, sampling locations, any special handling requirements, quality control samples, required chemical analysis, and data validation needed to meet the requirements of the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  10. Psychometrics of the Drinker Inventory of Consequences (DrInC).

    PubMed

    Forcehimes, Alyssa A; Tonigan, J Scott; Miller, William R; Kenna, George A; Baer, John S

    2007-08-01

    The Drinker Inventory of Consequences (DrInC) was developed for Project MATCH to assess the consequences of drinking in five domains. The present study, using baseline data from the 1382 participants involved in the COMBINE Study, analyzed the psychometrics of the 50-item DrInC and its shorter form, the 15-item SIP. Findings indicate the DrInC is reliable, valid, and clinically useful and that DrInC subscales are internally consistent and non-redundant. In an examination of the shorter version of the DrInC, findings suggest that the SIP is suitable when assessing the overall level of drinking-related consequences.

  11. Hospital materials managers need to be aware of actions that constitute legal acceptance.

    PubMed

    Decker, R

    1990-12-01

    A hospital invited bids for building materials for a hospital construction project. A supplier submitted a bid which asked the hospital to sign and return a trade association form contract. The hospital didn't return the form but used the supplier's bid as part of the general contract for the entire project and notified the supplier and the general contractor. Later, the supplier submitted a higher bid for the same material contending that the hospital hadn't accepted the first bid as they hadn't followed the instructions. The hospital materials manager feels that the bid was properly accepted. In this dialogue, Dr. Decker reviews the legal issues involved in the different ways of accepting an offer. PMID:10108690

  12. Low expression of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-DR is associated with hypermethylation of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-DR alpha gene regions in B cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Sano, H; Compton, L J; Shiomi, N; Steinberg, A D; Jackson, R A; Sasaki, T

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between the expression of HLA-DR antigens and the HLA-DR alpha gene methylation was examined in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Using permanent B cell lines, we found reduced DR expression in SLE. The low DR expression was correlated with high anti-DNA antibody titers in patients' sera. The amounts of DR alpha message were lower in SLE cells than in normal controls, suggesting that the low expression of DR antigens is associated with gene functions. The extent of DNA methylation was examined at five CCGG sites in the HLA-DR alpha locus. DNA from both SLE and normal cells showed variable methylation patterns. Since the DR alpha gene is a single-copy gene, such a variability is the result of assaying a mixture of transformed clones containing methylated DR alpha gene, with other clones containing unmethylated DR alpha gene. A distinctive feature of normal cells was a consistent methylation pattern: 12 normal cell lines showed exactly the same pattern. In contrast, 28 SLE cell lines showed a cell-line-specific methylation, and hypermethylation at the DR alpha locus. The hypermethylation is often associated with transcriptionally inactive genes. Thus, our results suggest that (a) B cells with hypermethylated DR genes might express no or few DR antigens; (b) the ratio of cells with differently methylated DR genes is consistent in normal individuals, while, in SLE patients, cells with hypermethylated DR genes predominate, resulting in apparently reduced DR antigen expression; and (c) the aberrant DR expression could be associated directly with immunoregulatory dysfunctions in SLE disease. Images PMID:2997276

  13. [Life and work of Dr. Jovan Jovanović Zmaj].

    PubMed

    Lesić, Aleksandar; Bumbasirević, Marko; Zizić-Borjanović, Slavica

    2006-10-01

    The year of 2004 was the 100th anniversary of death of the poet and physician Dr. Jovan Jovanović Zmaj. Jovan Jovanović Zmaj was born in 1833 in Novi Sad, and died in 1904 in Sremska Kamenica J.J. Zmaj himself studied law and worked in the Novi Sad magistrate court. It was not until he turned 30 that he began practicing medicine. He developed as a poet as early as during his studies. He remained loyal to the vocations of physician and poet throughout his life. He wrote over 5000 poems, ranging from those for children through those for adults and those with which he addressed the rulers satirically. He was a founder of a number of magazines (Javor, Neven, Komarac, Danica). At that time of Romanticism, the work of J.J. Zmaj also had a national character. However, he succeeded in achieving something more: he introduced a literary genre till then unknown in Serb literature--literature for children. Through his genre he promoted not only Serbian language but also hygiene, by which he played a significant health care role, similar to that played by his friend Milan Jovanović Batut, only from a different aspect. He also used to draw, and his drawing of the emblem of the Serbian Literary Association has remained on the cover of every book published by it until these days. PMID:18172968

  14. "Treating Lungs": The Scientific Contributions of Dr. Theodor Kolobow.

    PubMed

    Trahanas, John M; Kolobow, Mary Anne; Hardy, Mark A; Berra, Lorenzo; Zapol, Warren M; Bartlett, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    We are fortunate to live in an age in which biomedical technology has provided us with unprecedented ability to supplant the functions of organs and support the physiologic processes of the human body. Ingenious doctors, physiologists, and engineers helped create these advances with new and innovative ideas. One of these pioneers was Dr. Theodor Kolobow. He is best known for one of his earliest inventions, the spiral coil membrane lung. His contributions to medical innovation, however, are diverse, as he also contributed to advances in hemodialysis, improvements in extracorporeal life support technology/circuit components, and through his laboratory experiments helped shape our current understanding of cardiopulmonary pathophysiology. In retrospect, much of Kolobow's work was unified by the theme of preventing iatrogenic lung injury caused by mechanical ventilation. This tenet became more obvious as his later studies progressed to developing techniques and devices intended to limit ventilator pressures, and prevent bacterial colonization of the lungs. Although he formally retired from his research endeavors in 2009, the impact of his contributions remains prominent in our everyday use of techniques and equipment that he either originated or helped to develop. PMID:26720733

  15. 2012 DR30, The Most Distant Solar System Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Csaba; Szabó, G.; Pál, A.; Kiss, L.; Sárneczky, K.; Müller, T.; Vilenius, E.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Lellouch, E.; Conn, B.; Ortiz, J.; Duffard, R.; Morales, N.; Horner, J.; Bannister, M.; Stansberry, J.

    2012-10-01

    2012 DR30, the most distant TNO in the Solar System (a=1103 AU) has recently been observed with the Herschel Space Observatory. Radiometric model results using the far-infrared fluxes and visual range data show a dark and cratered surface (p_V = 6%) and provide a diameter of 200km. If considered as a Centaur, this is the fifth largest object known in this dynamical class. Recent visual range measurements indicate the presence of methane ice on the surface, a feature that has been seen previously for objects with diameters of >=1000km only (like Eris, Makemake and Pluto). The presence of methane ice can be explained assuming that the object spent most of its lifetime in a very cold environment and has been recently placed to its present orbit. This scenario is in agreement with the results of a dynamical study of the object's orbit, also suggesting an Oort-cloud origin. This research has been supported by the following grants: (1) The PECS program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Hungarian Space Office, PECS-98073; (2) C.K. and A.P. acknowledges the support of the Bolyai Research Fellowship of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

  16. Reflections of a soon-to-be former DR

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, N.I.

    1997-12-31

    SRP, formerly known as Salt River Project, is actually a combination of two organizations, The Salt River Valley Water Users` Association (the {open_quotes}Association{close_quotes}), and the Salt River Project Agricultural Improvement and Power District (the {open_quotes}District{close_quotes}). The Association was incorporated under the laws of the Territory of Arizona in 1903, and is one of the first projects authorized under the Federal Reclamation Act of 1902. The District was formed in 1937 as a political subdivision of the State of Arizona, and is responsible for the construction, operation and maintenance of the Electric System and the irrigation and water supply system. Generation and sale of electrical power and energy represent a significant portion of the District`s investment and revenues. SRP has a total capability of over 5000 MW from hydroelectric, thermal and purchased sources, Of this, almost 2400 MW is provided by Title IV, Phase II affected units. Phase II units must comply with the SO{sub 2} allowance program starting in the year 2000. SRP operates four facilities having Title IV units. The implementation of Title IV requires the selection of a Designated Representative (DR) to represent the utility and all utilities in the participation plants the utility may operate, to be responsible for reporting emissions of sulfur dioxide and oxides of nitrogen to the United States Environmental Protection Agency on a quarterly and annual basis and certify to the accuracy and completeness of the information.

  17. Candidate members of star clusters from LAMOST DR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Chao; Chen, Li; Deng, Li-Cai; Hou, Jin-Liang; Shao, Zheng-Yi; Yang, Fan; Wu, Yue; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yong-Hui; Wang, Yue-Fei

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we provide 2189 photometrically- and kinematically-selected candidate members of 24 star clusters from the LAMOST DR2 catalog. We perform two-step membership identification: selection along the stellar track in the color-magnitude diagram, i.e., photometric identification, and selection from the distribution of radial velocities, i.e. the kinematic identification. We find that the radial velocities from the LAMOST data are very helpful in the membership identification. The mean probability of membership is 40% for the sample selected with radial velocity. With these 24 star clusters, we investigate the performance of the radial velocity and metallicity estimated with the LAMOST pipeline. We find that the systematic offsets in radial velocity and metallicity are 0.85 ± 1.26 km s-1 and -0.08 ± 0.04 dex, with dispersions of 5.47+1.16-0.71 km s-1 and 0.13+0.04-0.02 dex, respectively. Finally, we propose that the photometrically-selected candidate members of the clusters covered by the LAMOST footprint should be assigned higher priority so that more candidate stars can be observed.

  18. 2011 AMCA Memorial Lecture honoree: Dr. Harrison Gray Dyar Jr.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Terry L; Klein, Terry A

    2011-09-01

    Dr. Harrison Gray Dyar Jr. (1866-1929) was an early-20th-century expert in taxonomy and biology of culicid Diptera. At an early age, Dyar became interested in the biology, life history, and taxonomy of Lepidoptera, which he continued throughout his entire career. Dyar pursued his passion for entomology, and during his formative years, professionals sent Lepidoptera specimens to him for identification. As his prominence was well known to Leland Howard, then the honorary curator of the US National Museum of Natural History, he was asked and accepted the position as honorary custodian of Lepidoptera in 1897, which later included periods of service with the US Department of Agriculture Bureau of Entomology and the US Army Officers' Reserve Corps. This position went without stipend and it was Dyar's personal wealth that allowed him to continue his love of entomology. However, the museum did provide limited staff and funds for illustrators, supplies, and travel. In the early 1900s, his interests expanded to include mosquitoes where he concentrated on their life histories and taxonomy. Throughout his career, Dyar often criticized colleagues, both personally and in publications, often with interludes of peace to coauthor articles and books. His legacy of original scientific work is of lasting significance to public health and entomology communities, in recognition of which he was selected as the 2011 AMCA memorial lecture honoree. PMID:22017104

  19. Identification of the HLA-DM/HLA-DR interface.

    PubMed

    Davies, Matthew N; Lamikanra, Abigail; Sansom, Clare E; Flower, Darren R; Moss, David S; Travers, Paul J

    2008-02-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DM is a critical participant in antigen presentation that catalyzes the dissociation of the Class II-associated Invariant chain-derived Peptide (CLIP) from the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II molecules. There is competition amongst peptides for access to an MHC Class II groove and it has been hypothesised that DM functions as a 'peptide editor' that catalyzes the replacement of one peptide for another within the groove. It is established that the DM catalyst interacts directly with the MHC Class II but the precise location of the interface is unknown. Here, we combine previously described mutational data with molecular docking and energy minimisation simulations to identify a putative interaction site of >4000A2 which agrees with known point mutational data for both the DR and DM molecule. The docked structure is validated by comparison with experimental data and previously determined properties of protein-protein interfaces. A possible dissociation mechanism is suggested by the presence of an acidic cluster near the N terminus of the bound peptide. PMID:17870168

  20. Dr. Monaco Examines Lab-on a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Lisa Monaco, Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) project scientist for the Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development (LOCAD) program, examines a lab on a chip. The small dots are actually ports where fluids and chemicals can be mixed or samples can be collected for testing. Tiny channels, only clearly visible under a microscope, form pathways between the ports. Many chemical and biological processes, previously conducted on large pieces of laboratory equipment, can now be performed on these small glass or plastic plates. Monaco and other researchers at MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama, are customizing the chips to be used for many space applications, such as monitoring microbes inside spacecraft and detecting life on other planets. The portable, handheld Lab-on-a Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) made its debut flight aboard Discovery during the STS-116 mission launched December 9, 2006. The system allowed crew members to monitor their environment for problematic contaminants such as yeast, mold, and even E.coli, and salmonella. Once LOCAD-PTS reached the International Space Station (ISS), the Marshall team continued to manage the experiment, monitoring the study from a console in the Payload Operations Center at MSFC. The results of these studies will help NASA researchers refine the technology for future Moon and Mars missions. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  1. Three moving groups detected in the LAMOST DR1 archive

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. K.; Zhao, G.; Chen, Y. Q.; Tan, K. F.; Oswalt, T. D.; Zhang, Y. E-mail: oswaltt1@erau.edu

    2014-05-20

    We analyze the kinematics of thick disk and halo stars observed by the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope. We have constructed a sample of 7993 F, G, and K nearby main-sequence stars (d < 2 kpc) with estimates of position (x, y, z) and space velocity (U, V, W) based on color and proper motion from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR9 catalog. Three 'phase-space overdensities' are identified in (V, √(U{sup 2}+2V{sup 2})) with significance levels of σ > 3. Two of them (the Hyades-Pleiades stream and the Arcturus-AF06 stream) have been identified previously. We also find evidence for a new stream (centered at V ∼ –180 km s{sup –1}) in the halo. The formation mechanisms of these three streams are analyzed. Our results support the hypothesis that the Arcturus-AF06 stream and the new stream originated from the debris of a disrupted satellite, while the Hyades-Pleiades stream has a dynamical origin.

  2. Kinematics and activity of M dwarfs in LAMOST DR1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhen-Ping; Luo, A.-Li; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Song, Yi-Han; Pan, Jing-Chang; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-06-01

    We report on the first investigation into kinematics and chromospheric activity of M dwarfs from the Guo Shou Jing Telescope (also called the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope - LAMOST) data release one (DR1). The sample comprises 71 304 M dwarfs. Their fundamental parameters such as spectral types, radial velocities, important molecular band indices and magnetic activities are measured. Their distances are determined by a spectroscopic parallax relation. Space motion (U, V, W) and Galactocentric cylindrical coordinates (R, θ, Z) for the M dwarfs are also computed. We examine velocity dispersion as a function of height from the Galactic plane and find that all three components of velocity dispersion increase with height as measured with respect to the Galactic plane. The investigation into chromospheric activities along the height from the Galactic plane confirms that M dwarfs closer to the Galactic plane are more likely to be active. We take a pure kinematical approach to select thin disk stars and thick disk stars from our sample, then to investigate the differences in properties between these two populations. Our analysis is in excellent agreement with previous studies and leads to a better understanding of the structure of the Galactic disk. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  3. 2015 AMCA Memorial Lecture Honoree: Dr. Richard Floyd Darsie, Jr.

    PubMed

    Day, Jonathan F

    2015-12-01

    Richard Floyd Darsie, Jr. (1915-2014) is the 2015 American Mosquito Control Association Memorial Lecture Honoree. He was one of the greatest mosquito taxonomists of the 20th century and died peacefully on April 10, 2014, in Grove City, PA, at the age of 99 after a professional career that spanned eight decades. Dick's broad areas of interest and training made him a versatile scientist, teacher, and researcher. His intense interest in adult and immature mosquito morphology and taxonomy, as well as mosquito distribution and bionomics, started early in his career at two early academic postings: Franklin and Marshall College (1949-54) and the University of Delaware (1954-62). Dick would take his mosquito interests with him to postings and research projects around the world: Nepal, the Philippines, Atlanta, El Salvador, Guatemala, Fort Collins, South Carolina, Argentina, and Florida. His travels and studies would make him an international expert on mosquito taxonomy. Dick's legacy lives on in the hundreds of students from across the globe who learned mosquito identification skills from this world-renowned mosquito taxonomist. All will proudly profess that, "I learned mosquito identification from Dr. Darsie." And that is all that is needed to prove one's credentials in the field, learning the art from the best there is. PMID:26675466

  4. Hospitals as health educators

    MedlinePlus

    ... than your local hospital. From health videos to yoga classes, many hospitals offer information families need to ... care and breastfeeding Parenting Baby sign language Baby yoga or massage Babysitting courses for teens Exercise classes ...

  5. Surviving Your Child's Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The parent of a young child who required major open heart surgery shares his suggestions for coping with a young child's hospitalization including parent visitation, relating to the hospital staff, getting answers to questions, and utilizing available services. (DB)

  6. [The Hospital de Especialidades "Bernardo Sepúlveda Gutiérrez", and the generation of knowledge].

    PubMed

    Cuevas-García, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The history of the Hospital de Especialidades "Bernardo Sepúlveda Gutiérrez," formerly called Hospital General del Centro Médico Nacional, has been marked by ups and downs, as well as by the development of cutting-edge medical knowledge. In this supplement we show a series of articles, whose authors belong in their entirety to that hospital.

  7. Dr William Wilson Ingram (1888-1982): doctor-soldier, physician and Antarctic expeditioner.

    PubMed

    Pearn, J H

    2011-09-01

    Dr William Wilson Ingram (1888-1982), a Scottish-born physician, contributed significantly to the health and heritage of Australia, his adopted land. Born on Speyside and educated in Aberdeen, he was a doctor-soldier in two World Wars and decorated with the Military Cross. Ingram was a Foundation Fellow (1938) of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and established one of the first specialist diabetic clinics in Australia, in Sydney in 1928. As an arachnologist, he published clinical descriptions of both surviving and fatal cases of envenomation by the Sydney funnel web spider, Atrax robustus. He founded the Kolling Institute of Medical Research at the Royal North Shore Hospital in Sydney where for two generations he was a leader in both undergraduate and postgraduate medical education. The international significance of his life's work relates to his service as the medical officer and biologist on the two British, Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expeditions (BANZARE) of 1929-1931, for which service he was awarded the Polar Medal and subsequent Clasp. Those expeditions secured, for the British Crown, what was to become the Australian Antarctic Territory, ceded to Australia by a British Order in Council of 24 August 1936. Sir Douglas Mawson, polar expeditioner and the leader of BANZARE, described Ingram as 'an ideal medical officer', one who in addition to his clinical skills and judgement, manifested courage and 'physical endurance and a full measure of camaraderie'. Ingram has no published obituary or biography. This précis records some details of his extraordinary life. PMID:21949929

  8. University Hospitals for Sale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culliton, Barbara J.

    1984-01-01

    Although faculty opposition stopped the sale of Harvard's McLean Hospital to the Hospital Corporation of America (HCA), a partnership remains a possibility. Issues related to the proposed sale as well as those affecting hospital economics are considered. Proposed terms of the sale are included. (JN)

  9. HOSPITALS FOR RURAL PEOPLE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MANNY, ELSIE S.; ROGERS, CHARLES E.

    MODERN ADVANCEMENTS IN MEDICAL SCIENCE HAVE PRECIPITATED THE NEED FOR ADEQUATE UP-TO-DATE HOSPITAL FACILITIES REASONABLY CLOSE TO ALL PEOPLE. RURAL COMMUNITIES HAVE UTILIZED FEDERAL AID, STATE AID, ASSISTANCE FROM FOUNDATIONS, CIVIC BONDS, AND VOLUNTEER CONTRIBUTIONS AND DRIVES TO ERECT AND EQUIP HOSPITALS. HOSPITAL CARE FOR RURAL PEOPLE USUALLY…

  10. A clinical examination of the efficacy of preparation of Dr Michaels® (also branded as Soratinex®) products in the treatment of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Hercogovấ, J; Fioranelli, M; Gianfaldoni, S; Chokoeva, A A; Tchernev, G; Wollina, U; Tirant, M; Novotny, F; Roccia, M G; Maximov, G K; França, K; Lotti, T

    2016-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with negative impacts both physically and psychologically. It is a common disorder affecting 2-3% of the total world population, in some cases causing changes to the nail and joints as well as skin lesions. The cutaneous manifestations of psoriasis can vary in morphology and severity and therapy should be tailored accordingly. The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of Dr Michaels® (Soratinex®) product line in the treatment of psoriatic patients with different age and disease severity. A total number of 270 patients with verified psoriasis, aged 9-60 years old participated in the studies, including 128 children: 23 girls and 105 boys, (all of them selected from the Department of Dermato-allergology of the Russian Pediatric Hospital Clinic, Moscow, and of the 4th Department of Dermatology of the 52nd Moscow City Hospital Clinic). The patients were separated into 3 groups according to the severity of the disease (based on the PASI-index). All the patients have been treated with Dr Michaels® (Soratinex®) products twice daily, as three different forms were available for application: a cleansing gel, an ointment and a conditioner. The severity of the disease and the efficacy of the treatment have been defined with the evaluation of the PASI index of each patient. The obtained results were recorded in a graphic form showing the changes of the PASI-index on days 3, 7, 14, and 21 counted from the start of the trial. Clinical remission was achieved in 147 patients, a significant improvement in 73, partial improvement in 32, while no effect was seen in 12 patients and deterioration in 6. This open trial demonstrated the clinical efficacy of topical application of Dr Michaels® (Soratinex®) preparation. We observed clinical remissions of psoriasis in adults and in children. PMID:27498653

  11. Morphology and Absolute Magnitudes of the SDSS DR7 QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, B.; Andrei, A. H.; Antón, S.

    2014-10-01

    The ESA mission Gaia will furnish a complete census of the Milky Way, delivering astrometrics, dynamics, and astrophysics information for 1 billion stars. Operating in all-sky repeated survey mode, Gaia will also provide measurements of extra-galactic objects. Among the later there will be at least 500,000 QSOs that will be used to build the reference frame upon which the several independent observations will be combined and interpreted. Not all the QSOs are equally suited to fulfill this role of fundamental, fiducial grid-points. Brightness, morphology, and variability define the astrometric error budget for each object. We made use of 3 morphological parameters based on the PSF sharpness, circularity and gaussianity, which enable us to distinguish the "real point-like" QSOs. These parameters are being explored on the spectroscopically certified QSOs of the SDSS DR7, to compare the performance against other morphology classification schemes, as well as to derive properties of the host galaxy. We present a new method, based on the Gaia quasar database, to derive absolute magnitudes, on the SDSS filters domain. The method can be extrapolated all over the optical window, including the Gaia filters. We discuss colors derived from SDSS apparent magnitudes and colors based on absolute magnitudes that we obtained tanking into account corrections for dust extinction, either intergalactic or from the QSO host, and for the Lyman α forest. In the future we want to further discuss properties of the host galaxies, comparing for e.g. the obtained morphological classification with the color, the apparent and absolute magnitudes, and the redshift distributions.

  12. Dr. Nicholas Ionescu-Pallas at His 70-th Anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlad, Valentin I.

    The article is devoted to 70-th Anniversary of Dr. Nicholas Ionescu-Pallas (borne on July 30, 1932 in Pallas village close to the town of Constanţa, Romania as the son of Ion Ionescu and Maria Dincă), an outstanding Romanian physicist with contributuions in a large area of theoretical and experimental physics, from Theoretical Classical and Quantum Mechanics to General Relativity and Gravitation. He was graduated from the University of Bucharest (1955), a disciple of Professor Ion Agârbiceanu, Doctor of Physics in 1971. He is the author of more than 300 scientific papers and 3 fundamental monographs in these areas, unique in Romania, and of great international circulation. He was one of the creators of the First Romanian Laser. He was elected the Honorary President of the Romanian Society on Genereal Relativity and Gravitation. A great erudition by Ionescu-Pallas allowed him to make also contributions in History of Sciencs. He has been a member of the Academic Commitee for the Philosophy and history of science, of the European Physical Society (1971), of the European Group for Atomic spectroscopy (1970), of the Institute for Scientific Culture E. Majorana (1976), of the International Society of Gravitation and General Relativity (1978) and of the Astronomical Society of India (1982). He was a representative of the intellectuals in the Scientific Council of the Institute for Atomic Physics, 1970-1975; a member of the National Commitee for physics in 1970, and a member of the Coordinating Commitee for the Romanian Enclclopaedia of Physics in 1983. His biographical data are available in Men of Achievement, Who's Who in the World, and Short History of the Romanian Scientific and Technical Creativeness.

  13. Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    The 465-bed Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital is the largest medical facility on the California coast between Los Angeles and the San Francisco bay area. The hospital dates back to 1888, when a group of local citizens began raising funds to build a "cottage-style" hospital for the growing community. Their original plans called for a complex in which each medical specialty would be housed in a separate bungalow. Even then, however, such a decentralized plan was too costly, so work began instead on a single cottage for all hospital departments. The first Cottage Hospital opened in 1891, with 25 beds housed in a two story Victorian building. Now a hugh medical complex employing some 1,500 people, the hospital continues to be called "Cottage" after the original home-like building. Rodney J. Lamb has been Hospital Administrator for the last 30 years.

  14. Dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jie; Thériault Lauzier, Pascal; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    A technique for dose reduction using prior image constrained compressed sensing (DR-PICCS) in computed tomography (CT) is proposed in this work. In DR-PICCS, a standard FBP reconstructed image is forward projected to get a fully sampled projection data set. Meanwhile, it is low-pass filtered and used as the prior image in the PICCS reconstruction framework. Next, the prior image and the forward projection data are used together by the PICCS algorithm to obtain a low noise DR-PICCS reconstruction, which maintains the spatial resolution of the original FBP images. The spatial resolution of DR-PICCS was studied using a Catphan phantom by MTF measurement. The noise reduction factor, CT number change and noise texture were studied using human subject data consisting of 20 CT colonography exams performed under an IRB-approved protocol. In each human subject study, six ROIs (two soft tissue, two colonic air columns, and two subcutaneous fat) were selected for the CT number and noise measurements study. Skewness and kurtosis were used as figures of merit to indicate the noise texture. A Bland-Altman analysis was performed to study the accuracy of the CT number. The results showed that, compared with FBP reconstructions, the MTF curve shows very little change in DR-PICCS reconstructions, spatial resolution loss is less than 0.1 lp/cm, and the noise standard deviation can be reduced by a factor of 3 with DR-PICCS. The CT numbers in FBP and DR-PICCS reconstructions agree well, which indicates that DR-PICCS does not change CT numbers. The noise textures indicators measured from DR-PICCS images are in a similar range as FBP images.

  15. Combined use of RFLP and PCR-ASO typing for HLA-DR-Dw and DQw typing.

    PubMed

    Bignon, J D; Bidwell, J L

    1991-01-01

    Due to some limitations of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis in HLA-DR-DQ typing, we present a combined use of RFLP and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) typing. This scheme consists in selectively amplifying the few RFLP ill-defined genes (DR1/DR'Br' and DR4-Dw subsets) using PCR with allele specific primers to avoid cross-hybridization. PMID:1676910

  16. Dr. John Frederick May and the identification of John Wilkes Booth's body.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A D

    1998-10-01

    Shortly after President Abraham Lincoln's assassin was killed on April 26, 1865, a formal inquest was held to positively identify the body. Dr. John Frederick May, a leading surgeon in the District of Columbia, was summoned to examine the remains. Two years earlier, Dr. May had removed a fibroid tumor from the back of the assassin's neck and an identifiable large ugly scar resulted when the wound inadvertently opened and healed by granulation. Based upon the recognition of the scar made by his scalpel, Dr. May made a positive identification. PMID:9793835

  17. Dr. Ray Gause examines student Skylab experiment ED-52 Web Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Dr. Ray Gause of the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) places dinner, in the form of a housefly, in the web of Arabella - the prime spider for the ED-52 Web Formation Experiment. Arabella can be delineated near the end of the black pen in Dr. Gause's hand. The experiment is one of 25 student experiments accepted for the Skylab program and will be performed during the Skylab 3 mission. Judy Miles, a 17-year-old high school student from Lexington, Massachusetts, is the student experimenter and Dr. Gause is the NASA student advisor.

  18. The extraordinary career of Professor Dr. Simon van Creveld.

    PubMed

    Stoelinga, Paul J W; Berdon, Walter E; Cohen, M Michael

    2014-11-01

    Simon van Creveld received both the MD and PhD degrees and had a multifaceted medical and scientific education at many hospitals and research institutes in the Netherlands, Germany, and the UK. He and his wife were the first to develop insulin for the Netherlands. His major interests were in hemophilia and hemorrhagic disorders, which accounted for 87 of his publications. In 1934, van Creveld demonstrated that a dispersed protein fraction obtained from serum could reduce the clotting time of hemophilic blood. His interest in glycogen storage disease resulted in van Creveld-von Gierke disease for which van Creveld contributed four published articles. The Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, also known as chondroectodermal dysplasia, was published in 1940 and became well known to medical geneticists. During the Nazi occupation of the Netherlands, van Creveld's professorship was taken away from him because he was Jewish. His visits to hospitals of concentration camps to treat babies and give pediatric advice while wearing a Jewish Yellow Star and interacting with SS Commandants in charge, and then leaving can only be described as amazing. After the war, his professorship was returned, and in the same year as his retirement, he established a large Hemophila Treatment and Research Center now known as the Van Creveld Clinic, which celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2005. PMID:25269937

  19. The enigmatic figure of Dr Henry Maudsley (1835-1918).

    PubMed

    Pantelidou, Maria; Demetriades, Andreas K

    2014-08-01

    In spite of his contribution to psychiatry in 19th century Britain, Henry Maudsley remains a mysterious figure, a man mostly known for his donation to the London County Council for the building of the Maudsley Hospital and for The Maudsley Annual Lecture created in honour of his benevolence. Besides Sir Aubrey Lewis' article in 1951 and Michael Collie's attempt in 1988 to construct a biographical study on Maudsley, there does not seem to be any current endeavour to tell the story of his life, whereas Trevor Turner's contribution to the 2004 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography gives a somewhat scathing but unattributed account of Maudsley's personality. This essay attempts to explore his contributions to the Medico-Psychological Association (MPA), the current Royal College of Psychiatrists, his editorship of the Journal of Mental Health (currently named the British Journal of Psychiatry), his literary contributions and his vision for a psychiatric hospital. This essay is an attempt to demystify his figure and to explore some of the rumours and criticisms surrounding his name and the reasons why so little has been written about him. It is also a venture to unravel his complex personality and his intricate philosophy. PMID:24944050

  20. The enigmatic figure of Dr Henry Maudsley (1835-1918).

    PubMed

    Pantelidou, Maria; Demetriades, Andreas K

    2014-08-01

    In spite of his contribution to psychiatry in 19th century Britain, Henry Maudsley remains a mysterious figure, a man mostly known for his donation to the London County Council for the building of the Maudsley Hospital and for The Maudsley Annual Lecture created in honour of his benevolence. Besides Sir Aubrey Lewis' article in 1951 and Michael Collie's attempt in 1988 to construct a biographical study on Maudsley, there does not seem to be any current endeavour to tell the story of his life, whereas Trevor Turner's contribution to the 2004 Oxford Dictionary of National Biography gives a somewhat scathing but unattributed account of Maudsley's personality. This essay attempts to explore his contributions to the Medico-Psychological Association (MPA), the current Royal College of Psychiatrists, his editorship of the Journal of Mental Health (currently named the British Journal of Psychiatry), his literary contributions and his vision for a psychiatric hospital. This essay is an attempt to demystify his figure and to explore some of the rumours and criticisms surrounding his name and the reasons why so little has been written about him. It is also a venture to unravel his complex personality and his intricate philosophy.

  1. Hospital diversification strategy.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    To determine the impact of health system restructuring on the levels of hospital diversification and operating ratio this article analyzed 94 teaching hospitals and 94 community hospitals during the period 2008-2013. The 47 teaching hospitals are matched with 47 other teaching hospitals experiencing the same financial market position in 2008, but with different levels of preference for risk and diversification in their strategic plan. Covariates in the analysis included levels of hospital competition and the degree of local government planning (for example, highly regulated in New York, in contrast to Texas). Moreover, 47 nonteaching community hospitals are matched with 47 other community hospitals in 2008, having varying manager preferences for service-line diversification and risk. Diversification and operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield better financial position, and the better operating profits provide the firm the wherewithal to diversify. Some services are in a growth phase, like bariatric weight-loss surgery and sleep disorder clinics. Hospital managers' preferences for risk/return potential were considered. An institution life cycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification, and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger. PMID:25223156

  2. Hospital diversification strategy.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    To determine the impact of health system restructuring on the levels of hospital diversification and operating ratio this article analyzed 94 teaching hospitals and 94 community hospitals during the period 2008-2013. The 47 teaching hospitals are matched with 47 other teaching hospitals experiencing the same financial market position in 2008, but with different levels of preference for risk and diversification in their strategic plan. Covariates in the analysis included levels of hospital competition and the degree of local government planning (for example, highly regulated in New York, in contrast to Texas). Moreover, 47 nonteaching community hospitals are matched with 47 other community hospitals in 2008, having varying manager preferences for service-line diversification and risk. Diversification and operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield better financial position, and the better operating profits provide the firm the wherewithal to diversify. Some services are in a growth phase, like bariatric weight-loss surgery and sleep disorder clinics. Hospital managers' preferences for risk/return potential were considered. An institution life cycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification, and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger.

  3. [Clinic of environmental pediatric care in a high complexity hospital].

    PubMed

    Gaioli, Marisa; Amoedo, Diego; González, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Children environmental health is considered by The World Health Organization as one of the main challenges of Public Health during the Century XXI. They promote the development of programs that allow approaching, disclosure or mitigation of the impact of polluting agents on health at every level of pediatric attention. The Children Hospital "Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan" has created an Environmental Health Office in order to address the demands of those patients with suspected or verified exposure to environmental risks. An Environmental Clinical History has been elaborated with this purpose.

  4. Mrs. Chandrasekhar addresses the media in TRW Media Hospitality Tent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mrs. Lalitha Chandrasekhar (right), wife of the late Indian- American Nobel Laureate Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, addresses the media and other invited guests in the TRW Media Hospitality Tent at the NASA Press Site at KSC as Dr. Alan Bunner, Science Program Director, Structure and Evolution of the Universe, Office of Space Science, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C., looks on. The name 'Chandra,' a shortened version of her husband's name which he preferred among friends and colleagues, was chosen in a contest to rename the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility. 'Chandra' also means 'Moon' or 'luminous' in Sanskrit. The observatory is scheduled to be launched aboard Columbia on Space Shuttle mission STS-93.

  5. [100 years of surgery in the Kosevo Hospital in Sarajevo].

    PubMed

    Durić, O

    1994-01-01

    The surgery Department of the Regional Hospital was opened on 1st July, 1894 in Sarajevo, what meant the beginnings of European surgery school influence here. The School was in the second half of its activity, better known as "century of surgery". The building, fittings, equipment and staff continued their work here coping the Viennese school achievements. It was headed by the prominent European surgeon, primarius Dr Josef Preindisberger, first assistant to the great personality Dr. Billroth. In the way this institution became a referral centre for two other hospitals in Sarajevo: the Vakuf's and the Military Hospital, but for some 17 more in BH, which were built in the course of ten years. Because of the therapeutic success in the domain of the general surgery and diseases of the eye and according the annual reports, the first 50 beds became insufficient for all those who wanted the treatment. So, the Department was enlarged, in 1905 a new regional Hospital was planned, to act as clinics. The World War 1 stopped the plans. During the period of Kingdom of Yugoslavia, destroyed by war, the Surgery Department continued its work with the doctors educated to continue the work on the pre war level. As a broad pathology basis, but the need of space that time chief surgeon. Primarius Milivoje Kostić worked out in details the former plan of the new hospital building up with a base for clinics. It was accepted as a ten years project, which, to the regrets, did not come to existence to the World War 2.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Ask Dr. Sue--Updates: Infectious Diseases, SIDS, HIV/AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1995-01-01

    Describes new concerns about infectious diseases in childcare settings (tuberculosis, gastrointestinal infections, and lice); sleep position and SIDS; HIV/AIDS issues; and the use of sterilized sand in sand boxes. (DR)

  7. Eye-Eye with Dr. Rachel Bishop | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Glaucoma Eye-to-Eye with Dr. Rachel Bishop Past Issues / Spring 2015 ... new patient comes in because they scratched their eye while working in the yard, or they think ...

  8. The role of HLA-DR antigens in PPD-stimulated lymphocyte-monocyte interactions.

    PubMed

    Haar, D; Heron, I

    1982-11-01

    Autologous monocytes are required for an optimal lymphocyte proliferative response to purified protein derivate of tuberculin (PPD) in vitro and for a mixed lymphocyte culture induced by alloantigens. In the proliferative response to PPD we found that autologous monocytes could be replaced with HLA-DR-compatible monocytes and partly with HLA-DR semi-identical. In spite of a statistically significant difference between autologous and HLA-DR disparate monocytes in their cooperative capacity with PPD-stimulated lymphocytes, replacement in nearly one third of the cases was possible. These findings were supported by more detailed studies in which increasing numbers of allogenic and autologous monocytes were added to the isolated lymphocytes in the presence of PPD. It is concluded that the serologically defined HLA-DR antigens alone give insufficient information of the restriction elements controlling the PPD-stimulated lymphocyte-monocyte interactions. PMID:6184773

  9. High Blood Cholesterol Q&A Dr. Michael Lauer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: High Cholesterol High Blood Cholesterol Q&A with Dr. Michael Lauer Past Issues / ... heavier and older, what does recent research on cholesterol and heart health tell us that Americans need ...

  10. Dr Mary Crosse, OBE, MD (1900–1972) and the premature baby

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, P M

    2007-01-01

    On behalf of Birmingham's Department of Public Health, Dr Crosse developed the Sorrento Premature Baby Unit in 1931 and pioneered the modern care of these small newborn infants in Britain. PMID:17337665

  11. ISS Update: Dr. Steve Squyres, NEEMO 16 Aquanaut and Cornell Professor

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan interviews Dr. Steve Squyres, NEEMO 16 Aquanaut and Cornell Professor, about simulating a mission to an asteroid underwater. The Aquarius habitat simulates the isola...

  12. Profiles in Performing Arts Medicine Courage--A Tribute to Dr. Alice Brandfonbrener.

    PubMed

    Manchester, Ralph A

    2015-09-01

    I was honored and privileged to join Dr. Robert Sataloff in delivering a tribute to Dr. Alice Brandfonbrener at the 2015 Symposium on the Medical Problems of Performing Artists in Snowmass, Colorado. As virtually everyone who reads this journal knows, Dr. Brandfonbrener organized the first symposium (then focused on the medical problems of musicians), was the founding editor of Medical Problems of Performing Artists, and was the first president of the Performing Arts Medicine Association. She died in 2014, just prior to last year's symposium. This year, after Dr. Sataloff presented a very engaging overview of Alice's career and impressive accomplishments, I gave a short address that was based on some of the editorials Alice wrote in this journal during her 20 year tenure as editor. I have chosen a few examples of how the courage that she demonstrated in launching an international medical conference, a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a professional association continued to present itself in her writing.

  13. Dr. Louis Sullivan: Treating America's Most Critical Health and Human Services Ills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, William E,; Matthews, Frank L.

    1989-01-01

    Interview with Dr. Louis Sullivan, Secretary of Health and Human Services. Discusses his views on health education, budget, access to health care, minority health, abortion, infant mortality, drugs, the Head Start Program, federal planning effects, and family influences. (JS)

  14. Dr. Grant Heikan examines lunar material in sieve from sample container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Dr. Grant Heikan, Manned Spacecraft Center and a Lunar Sample preliminary Examination Team member, examines lunar material in a sieve from the bulk sample container which was opened in the Biopreparation Laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory.

  15. President Kennedy, Vice President Johnson and Dr. von Braun at Redstone Airfield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    President John F. Kennedy, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson and Marshall Space Flight Center Director Dr. Wernher von Braun at the Redstone Arsenal Airfield, September 11, 1962. Kennedy and Johnson visited the Marshall Center to tour national space facilities.

  16. New NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins on Medical Research That Benefits Everyone's Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. New NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins on Medical Research ... Our goal is to advance biomedical research in new, innovative ways that will benefit everyone's health." — NIH ...

  17. VISIT TO DR SHARP - BEN PINKEL - ABE SILVERSTEIN - OSCAR SCHEY - JESSE HALL - JOHN COLLINS BY CONGRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1949-01-01

    VISIT TO DR SHARP - BEN PINKEL - ABE SILVERSTEIN - OSCAR SCHEY - JESSE HALL - JOHN COLLINS BY CONGRESSMAN CARL HENSHAW FROM CALIFORNIA - NORWICK ROSS DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE - SENOR BUCH DE PERADA REPRESENTATIVE FROM MEXICO -

  18. Dr. Michael DeBakey "is a magician of the heart…"

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Then & Now Dr. Michael DeBakey "is a magician of the heart…" Past ... NLM's David Nash and admiring students from the Michael E. DeBakey High School for Health Professionals in ...

  19. Interview with ARPA-E Acting Director Dr. Cheryl Martin on Platts Energy Week

    ScienceCinema

    Martin, Cheryl; Loveless, Bill

    2016-07-12

    Bill Loveless from Platts Energy Week interviews ARPA-E Acting Director, Dr. Cheryl Martin, about the many transformational energy technologies on display at ARPA-E's 5th annual Energy Innovation Summit.

  20. APOLLO 14 DR. WERNHER VON BRAUN WATCHES FROM FIRING ROOM 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun, the NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Future Programs, uses binoculars to monitor data on closed- circuit television screens in Firing Room 2 of the Launch Control Center during final Apollo 14 launch preparations today.

  1. Dr. Ravindra Lal follows a live downlink of experiments operations on shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Dr. Ravindra Lal, principal investigator for a crystal growth experiment for Spacelab 3, follows a live downlink of the experiments operations in the shuttle science module. He is in the payload operations control center (POCC) in JSC's mission control center.

  2. Description of work for 100-DR-2 Operable Unit Vadose Drilling/test pits

    SciTech Connect

    Naiknimbalkar, N.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the scope of work for the boreholes/test pits of the 100-DR-2 Operable Unit. Sampling and field activities include: Soil screening; geologic sampling; soil sampling (physical property); analytical sampling and depths; and geophysical logging.

  3. Interview with ARPA-E Acting Director Dr. Cheryl Martin on Platts Energy Week

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Cheryl; Loveless, Bill

    2014-03-18

    Bill Loveless from Platts Energy Week interviews ARPA-E Acting Director, Dr. Cheryl Martin, about the many transformational energy technologies on display at ARPA-E's 5th annual Energy Innovation Summit.

  4. Bernard John Dowling Irwin and the development of the field hospital at Shiloh.

    PubMed

    Fahey, John H

    2006-05-01

    The field hospital remains a centerpiece of casualty care evacuation systems, dating back to the Civil War. Dr. Bernard John Dowling Irwin is credited with establishing the first tent field hospital during the battle of Shiloh. However, controversy regarding this claim exists because of the confusing practice of using the term "field hospital" to refer to facilities with different capabilities. By examining the specific levels of care available on the battlefield, I review the evolution of the different types of field hospitals, focusing on the increasingly complex capabilities that evolved in the spring of 1862 in the Western Theater. I conclude that Irwin's hospital was the first practical demonstration that sufficient inpatient care could be provided on the battlefield, eliminating the need to evacuate unstable patients. PMID:16761879

  5. Measuring Hospital Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Ruchlin, Hirsch S.; Leveson, Irving

    1974-01-01

    This study presents a comprehensive method for quantifying hospital output and estimating hospital productivity. A number of less comprehensive productivity measures that can be quantified from data available from regional third-party payers and from the American Hospital Association are also developed and evaluated as proxies for the comprehensive measure, which is based on local area data. Methods are discussed for estimating the necessary variables on a regional or national level. PMID:4461703

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Gaia DR1 (Gaia Collaboration, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaia Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Gaia DR1 is based on observations collected between 25 July 2014 and 16 September 2015. Gaia DR1 contains positions (RA,DE) and G magnitudes for all sources with acceptable formal standard errors on positions. Positions and individual uncertainties are computed using a generic prior and Bayes' rule (detailed description in "Gaia astrometry for stars with too few observations. A Bayesian approach", Michalik et al., 2015A&A...583A..68M). The five-parameter astrometric solution - positions, parallaxes, and proper motions - for stars in common between the Tycho-2 Catalogue and Gaia is contained in Gaia DR1. This part of Gaia DR1 is based on the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (paper with detailed description (Michalik et al., 2015A&A...574A.115M); paper describing theory and background (Michalik et al., 2014A&A...571A..85M); paper describing quasar extension (Michalik & Lindegren, 2016A&A...586A..26M)). At the beginning of the routine phase, for a period of 4 weeks, a special scanning mode repeatedly covering the ecliptic poles on every spin was executed for calibration purposes. Photometric data of selected RR Lyrae and Cepheid variable stars based on these high-cadence measurements are contained in Gaia DR1. Positions (RA,DE) and G magnitudes for 2152 ICRF quasars (F. Mignard et al., 2016, A&A, in press.). The Gaia Archive DR1 data is available at archives.esac.esa.int/gaia. Tgas and Gaia Sources can be downloaded as VOTables, FITS or CSV at http://1016243957.rsc.cdn77.org/Gaia/ If you use public Gaia DR1 data in your paper, please take note of our guide on how to acknowledge and cite Gaia DR1: http://gaia.esac.esa.int/documentation/GDR1/Miscellaneous/\\ seccreditandcitationinstructions.html (9 data files).

  7. Differential expression of HLA-DR antigens in subsets of human CFU-GM.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J D; Sabbath, K D; Herrmann, F; Larcom, P; Nichols, K; Kornacki, M; Levine, H; Cannistra, S A

    1985-10-01

    Expression of HLA-DR surface antigens by granulocyte/monocyte colony-forming cells (CFU-GM) may be important in the regulation of proliferation of these cells. Using immunological techniques to enrich for progenitor cells, we investigated the expression of HLA-DR in subsets of CFU-GM. "Early" (day 14) CFU-GM express higher levels of HLA-DR than do "late" (day 7) CFU-GM. Among late CFU-GM, cells destined to form monocyte (alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase-positive) colonies express higher levels of HLA-DR than do CFU-GM destined to form granulocyte (chloroacetate esterase-positive) colonies. Because high-level expression of DR antigen was a marker for monocyte differentiation, we examined several lymphokines for their effects on both DR expression and in vitro commitment to monocyte differentiation by myeloid precursor cells. DR antigen density could be increased by more than twofold over 48 hours upon exposure to gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN), whereas colony-stimulating factors had no effect. This was associated with a dose-dependent inhibition of total CFU-GM number, and a relative, but not absolute, increase in the ratio of monocyte colonies to granulocyte colonies. Similarly, in day 7 suspension cultures of purified myeloid precursor cells, gamma-IFN inhibited cell proliferation and increased the ratio of monocytes to granulocytes. Thus, despite the induction of high levels of HLA-DR antigen on precursor cells (a marker of monocyte commitment), the dominant in vitro effect of gamma-IFN was inhibition of granulocyte differentiation.

  8. Gamification of Clinical Routine: The Dr. Fill Approach.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Mark; Kühn, Martin; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Bettermann, Ralf; Jonas, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Gamification is used in clinical context in the health care education. Furthermore, it has shown great promises to improve the performance of the health care staff in their daily routine. In this work we focus on the medication sorting task, which is performed manually in hospitals. This task is very error prone and needs to be performed daily. Nevertheless, errors in the medication are crucial and lead to serious complications. In this work we present a real world gamification approach of the medication sorting task in a patient's daily pill organizer. The player of the game needs to sort the correct medication into the correct dispenser slots and is rewarded or punished in real time. At the end of the game, a score is given and the user can register in a leaderboard.

  9. Gamification of Clinical Routine: The Dr. Fill Approach.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Mark; Kühn, Martin; Zhao, Xiaoqing; Bettermann, Ralf; Jonas, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Gamification is used in clinical context in the health care education. Furthermore, it has shown great promises to improve the performance of the health care staff in their daily routine. In this work we focus on the medication sorting task, which is performed manually in hospitals. This task is very error prone and needs to be performed daily. Nevertheless, errors in the medication are crucial and lead to serious complications. In this work we present a real world gamification approach of the medication sorting task in a patient's daily pill organizer. The player of the game needs to sort the correct medication into the correct dispenser slots and is rewarded or punished in real time. At the end of the game, a score is given and the user can register in a leaderboard. PMID:27332203

  10. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  11. Limited field investigation report for the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This limited field investigation (LFI) report summarizes the data collection and analysis activities conducted during the 100-DR-1 Source Operable Unite LFI and the associated qualitative risk assessment (QRA), and makes recommendations on the continued candidacy of high-priority sites for interim remedial measures (IRM). The results and recommendations presented in this report are generally independent of future land use scenarios. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit is one of four operable units associated with the 100 D/DR Area at the Hanford Site. The 100-DR-1 Operable Unit encompasses approximately 1.5 km{sup 2} (0.59 mi{sup 2}) and is located immediately adjacent to the Columbia River shoreline. In general, it contains waste facilities associated with the original plant facilities constructed to support D Reactor facilities, as well as cooling water retention basin systems for both D and DR Reactors. The 100-DR-1 LFI began the investigative phase of the remedial investigation for a select number of high-priority sites. The LFI was performed to provide additional data needed to support selection, design and implementation of IRM, if needed. The LFI included data compilation, nonintrusive investigations, intrusive investigations, summarization of 100 Area aggregate studies, and data evaluation.

  12. DR 21(OH), a cluster in the making. 1: Observations in carbon monosulphide and methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, K. J.; Sandell, G.; Cunningham, C. T.; Davies, S. R.

    1994-06-01

    The star formation region DR 21(OH) was observed in the J=5-4 transitions of CS and C34S, and in several J=5-4 transitions of methanol. High velocity wings are detected in CS towards the main DR 21(OH) peak, extending over 80 km/s. They are very faint, and the outer wings are detected only at the center position. Since the outflow is not seen in the CO J=1-0 or 2-1 transitions, the CS observations suggest that this is a young, compact, dense and hot outflow. Many of the known NH3 cores are also seen in CS and methanol. Three known submm-continuum sources, DR 21(OH)S, DR 21(OH)SW, and DR 21(OH)NW, are suprisingly faint in the CS J=5-4 line, probably because the gas, though sufficiently dense, is too cold to fully excite the CS J=5-4 transition. They are, however, strong in methanol. An additional source, DR 21(OH)SE, is strong in CS but weak in methanol. The methanol lines were interpreted with an local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis to estimate rotational temperatures and column densities at the main peaks, and the results discussed in the context of chemical models.

  13. Dr John Dickinson (1832-1863): The man behind the bird.

    PubMed

    Conacher, I D

    2016-08-01

    The surgeon/naturalists Dr John Kirk, Dr Charles Meller and Dr John Dickinson, associated with the Zambezi Expedition (1857-1864) under the leadership of Dr David Livingstone are, like him, credited with the discovery of new species' of birds. A raptor, Falco dickinsoni, is named after Dr John Dickinson. Dickinson, born in the north east of England, trained in medicine in Newcastle upon Tyne. He volunteered to join the Universities' Mission to Central Africa and arrived as part of a second group to join Bishop Frederick Mackenzie, then attempting to build a Mission in Magomero, on the Shire Mountain Plateau in modern Malawi. Livingstone and Mackenzie had sown the seeds of disaster for the first UMCA venture while Dickinson was on his way to Central Africa, and his one meeting with Livingstone was trigger to a chain of events that threatened the whole expedition. Shortly after Dickinson's arrival in Magomero, Bishop Mackenzie and a fellow traveller, Reverend Henry de Wint Burrup, died. Magomero was abandoned and the remaining missionaries retrenched in Chibisa's Village on the River Shire. There, where Dickinson did most of his bird collecting, on 17 March 1863, he died of blackwater fever. Livingstone and Kirk were present at the burial. A marble cross at Chikwawa in Malawi is marker to the event that occurred on the day of Dr John Dickinson's 32nd birthday. PMID:24906404

  14. The structure of HLA-DR52c: Comparison to other HLA-DRB3 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Shaodong; Crawford, Frances; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.

    2008-09-05

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHCII) molecules present antigens to CD4{sup +} T cells. In addition to the most commonly studied human MHCII isotype, HLA-DR, whose {beta} chain is encoded by the HLA-DRB1 locus, several other isotypes that use the same {alpha} chain but have {beta} chains encoded by other genes. These other DR molecules also are expressed in antigen-presenting cells and are known to participate in peptide presentation to T cells and to be recognized as alloantigens by other T cells. Like some of the HLA-DRB1 alleles, several of these alternate DR molecules have been associated with specific autoimmune diseases and T cell hypersensitivity. Here we present the structure of an HLA-DR molecule (DR52c) containing one of these alternate {beta} chains (HLA-DRB3*0301) bound to a self-peptide derived from the Tu elongation factor. The molecule shares structurally conserved elements with other MHC class II molecules but has some unique features in the peptide-binding groove. Comparison of the three major HLA-DBR3 alleles (DR52a, b, and c) suggests that they were derived from one another by recombination events that scrambled the four major peptide-binding pockets at peptide positions 1, 4, 6, and 9 but left virtually no polymorphisms elsewhere in the molecules.

  15. The life and contribution of Dr. Ronald Gitelman: a pioneer of modern chiropractic science

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The life and contribution to chiropractic science of Dr. Ronald Gitelman is reviewed. Methods: Sources for this article included review of the notes prepared by Dr. Joseph Keating in his “biography” of the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College (CMCC); review of the important articles published by Dr. Gitelman; review of the important projects undertaken by him along with various colleagues; notes from reminiscences obtained from many of these colleagues and discussions with his family. Discussion: Dr. Gitelman’s academic career spanned from 1963 to the late 1980’s. During that time, he made foundational contributions to the development of chiropractic science including: developing the Archives (1974), the first collection of scientific articles supporting chiropractic science (which was subsequently published as the Chiropractic Archives Research Collection (CRAC)); delivering one of the few chiropractic papers at the seminal NINCDS conference (1975) and, developing the collaboration between CMCC and Dr. Kirkaldy-Willis at the University of Saskatoon (1976). He practiced in Toronto from 1961 to 2007. Summary: Dr. Gitelman was a pioneer in the development of chiropractic science. He died on October 7, 2012. PMID:23482630

  16. Polymorphism of the HLA-D region in American blacks. A DR3 haplotype generated by recombination.

    PubMed

    Hurley, C K; Gregersen, P; Steiner, N; Bell, J; Hartzman, R; Nepom, G; Silver, J; Johnson, A H

    1988-02-01

    The polymorphism of HLA class II molecules in man is particularly evident when comparisons between population groups are made. This study describes a DR3 haplotype commonly present in the American black population. Unlike the Northern European population in which almost all DR3 individuals are DQw2, approximately 50% of DR3-positive American blacks express a serologically undefined DQ allelic product. DNA restriction fragment analysis with the use of several unrelated individuals and an informative family has allowed us to identify unique DQ alpha- and beta-fragments associated with the DR3, DQw- haplotype. Based on fragment size, the DQ alpha genes of the DR3, DQw- and DRw8, DQw- haplotypes are similar as are the DQ beta genes of DR3, DQw-; DRw8, DQw-; and DR4, DQw- haplotypes. In addition, a DX beta gene polymorphism has been identified which is associated with some DR3 haplotypes including the American black DR3, DQw- haplotype. cDNA sequence analysis has revealed a DQw2-like alpha gene and a DQ beta gene which is similar to that previously described for a DR4, DQw- haplotype. It is postulated that recombination between DQ alpha and DQ beta genes and between the DQ and DX subregions has generated the various DR3 haplotypes and has played an important role in creating diversity in the HLA-D region. PMID:2892884

  17. Contributions of Dr. George Washington Carver to global food security: historical reflections of Dr. Carver’s fungal plant disease survey in the southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. George Washington Carver was a world renowned scientist whose research in the agricultural sciences in the late 1800’s and early 1900’s was critical for improving the living standards of American farmers especially in the southern United States. Although best known for developing the many uses o...

  18. Special issue dedicated in memory of Dr. Edward H. Ahrens, Jr.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Edward H

    2002-01-01

    This special issue of the "Cardiovascular Drug Reviews" is dedicated in memory of Dr. Edward H. Ahrens, Jr., who died on Dec. 9th, 2000 at the Princeton Medical Center in New Jersey at the age of 85. Dr. Ahrens was the Director of the Lipid Metabolism Laboratory at the Rockefeller University. Dr. Alexander Scriabine conceived the idea for the issue at the special memorial symposium held at the Rockefeller University on Feb. 05, 2002 under the auspices of The New York Lipid and Vascular Biology Research Club. Dr. Ahrens was the first president of the club. He started this club with Drs. Howard Eder and DeWitt Goodman. Dr. Eder thought that it would be a fitting attribute to honor one of the founding fathers of the club by hosting a memorial symposium. I, as the President of the club for that academic year, had no hesitation in accepting the proposal. This year will be the 40th anniversary of the club and its continued success provides a glimpse of the fine legacy left behind by Dr. Ahrens. Dr. Ahrens also played a pivotal role in the establishment of the Journal of Lipid Research. This is the 43rd year of the journal and in this commemorative issue we are reproducing a review he wrote for the 25th anniversary of the journal. I was never personally acquainted with Dr. Ahrens. However, I am honored that I got this opportunity to pay tribute to a great scientist whose work has contributed immensely to the progress of lipid research. He was a person who touched many lives and still continues to do so. My involvement in the remembrance of Dr. Ahrens shows that science not only impacts your contemporaries but also generations that follow you. Scientific research is a journey where you can leave your trails behind and be remembered for your work long after your departure from this world. Dr. Ahrens contributed immensely to the understanding of cholesterol metabolism. In the early stages of his career he showed that phospholipids solubilize fat in the blood. Now we know

  19. Induction of pro-apoptotic antibodies to triple negative breast cancer by vaccination with TRAIL death receptor DR5 DNA

    PubMed Central

    Piechocki, Marie P.; Wu, Gen Sheng; Jones, Richard F.; Jacob, Jennifer B.; Gibson, Heather; Ethier, Stephen P.; Abrams, Judith; Yagita, Hideo; Venuprasad, K; Wei, Wei-Zen

    2012-01-01

    TNF-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand Receptor 2 (TRAIL-R2 or DR5) is expressed at elevated levels in a broad range of solid tumors to mediate apoptotic signals from TRAIL or agonist antibodies. We tested the hypothesis that DR5 DNA vaccination will induce pro-apoptotic antibody to trigger apoptosis of tumor cells. BALB/c mice were electrovaccinated with DNA encoding wild type human DR5 (phDR5) or its derivatives. Resulting immune serum or purified immune IgG induced apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells, which were also TRAIL-sensitive. The pro-apoptotic activity of immune serum at dilutions of 0.5-2% was comparable to that of 1-2 μg/ml of TRAIL. Apoptotic activity of immune serum was enhanced by antibody cross-linking. Apoptotic cell death induced by anti-DR5 antibody was shown by the cleavage of PARP and caspase-3. In contrast, immune serum had no effect on the proliferation of activated human T cells, which expressed low levels of DR5. In vivo, hDR5 reactive immune serum prevented growth of SUM159 TNBC cells in SCID mice. DR5 specific IFN-γ secreting T cells were also induced by DNA vaccination. Furthermore, the feasibility to overcome immune tolerance to self DR5 was shown by the induction of mouse DR5 binding antibody after electrovaccination of BALB/c mice with pmDR5ectm-Td1 encoding a fusion protein of mouse DR5 and an immunogenic fragment of tetanus toxin. These findings support DR5 as a promising vaccine target for controlling TNBC and other DR5 positive cancers. PMID:22419388

  20. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, Amit

    2012-05-22

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  1. High Temperature Superconductors: From Delivery to Applications (Presentation from 2011 Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award-winner, Dr. Amit Goyal, and including introduction by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Goyal, Amit (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    2016-07-12

    Dr. Amit Goyal, a high temperature superconductivity (HTS) researcher at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was named a 2011 winner of the Department of Energy's Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award honoring U.S. scientists and engineers for exceptional contributions in research and development supporting DOE and its mission. Winner of the award in the inaugural category of Energy Science and Innovation, Dr. Goyal was cited for his work in 'pioneering research and transformative contributions to the field of applied high temperature superconductivity, including fundamental materials science advances and technical innovations enabling large-scale applications of these novel materials.' Following his basic research in grain-to-grain supercurrent transport, Dr. Goyal focused his energy in transitioning this fundamental understanding into cutting-edge technologies. Under OE sponsorship, Dr. Goyal co-invented the Rolling Assisted Bi-Axially Textured Substrate technology (RABiTS) that is used as a substrate for second generation HTS wires. OE support also led to the invention of Structural Single Crystal Faceted Fiber Substrate (SSIFFS) and the 3-D Self Assembly of Nanodot Columns. These inventions and associated R&D resulted in 7 R&D 100 Awards including the 2010 R&D Magazine's Innovator of the Year Award, 3 Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer National Awards, a DOE Energy100 Award and many others. As a world authority on HTS materials, Dr. Goyal has presented OE-sponsored results in more than 150 invited talks, co-authored more than 350 papers and is a fellow of 7 professional societies.

  2. Hospital benefit segmentation.

    PubMed

    Finn, D W; Lamb, C W

    1986-12-01

    Market segmentation is an important topic to both health care practitioners and researchers. The authors explore the relative importance that health care consumers attach to various benefits available in a major metropolitan area hospital. The purposes of the study are to test, and provide data to illustrate, the efficacy of one approach to hospital benefit segmentation analysis.

  3. [Music in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Bouteloup, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Occasional events, regular workshops, concerts, shows, artists in residence, cultural outings...Hospital does not necessarily have to be a place of silence and sadness. But this situation has not always been so straightforward as on the face of it, nothing is more incompatible with a hospital environment than music, which, by definition, is festive and noisy. PMID:20684389

  4. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  5. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  6. Library Services in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health and Social Security, London (England).

    The memorandum gives guidance to the provision and organization of library services at hospitals both for staff and for patients. It also draws attention to the assistance available from outside sources towards the development and maintenance of these services so hospital authorities may make the most effective use of the available facilities.…

  7. Hospitals are dangerous places.

    PubMed

    de Richemond, Albert L

    2010-01-01

    Hospital fire dangers are real, widespread, and ever present, the article demonstrates, spelling out the locations, conditions, and ignition potentials which exist in such a setting. Knowledge of codes and standards, good maintenance practices, and frequent drills in fire prevention and suppression are among the practices recommended for keeping a hospital fire from becoming a disaster, the author says. PMID:20873506

  8. Smaller hospitals accept advertising.

    PubMed

    Mackesy, R

    1988-07-01

    Administrators at small- and medium-sized hospitals gradually have accepted the role of marketing in their organizations, albeit at a much slower rate than larger institutions. This update of a 1983 survey tracks the increasing competitiveness, complexity and specialization of providing health care and of advertising a small hospital's services. PMID:10288550

  9. Hospitality services generate revenue.

    PubMed

    Bizouati, S

    1993-01-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are undertaking external revenue-generating activities to supplement their shrinking budgets. Written at the request of Leadership, this article outlines an example of a successful catering service -- a money-generating business that more Canadian hospitals could profitably consider.

  10. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  11. Hospital 360°.

    PubMed

    Giraldo Valencia, Juan Carlos; Delgado, Liliana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    There are forces that are greater than the individual performance of each hospital institution and of the health system structural of each country. The world is changing and to face up to the future in the best possible way, we need to understand how contexts and emerging trends link up and how they affect the hospital sector. The Columbian Association of Hospitals and Clinics, ACHC, has thus come up with the Hospital 360° concept which uses hospitals capable of anticipating changing contexts by means of the transition between present and future and takes on board the experience of global, socio-economic, demographic, political, environmental and technological fields as its model. Hospital 360° is an invitation to reinvent processes and institution themselves allowing them to adapt and incorporate a high degree of functional flexibility. Hospital 360° purses goals of efficiency, effectiveness and relevance, but also of impact and sustainability, and is coherent with the internal needs of hospital institutions and society for long-term benefits. PMID:26521380

  12. Mental hospitals in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K; Venugopal, D; Alimchandani, A K

    2000-04-01

    This review traces the history of the mental hospital movement, initially on the world stage, and later in India, in relation to advances in psychiatric care. Mental hospitals have played a significant role in the evolution of psychiatry to its present statusThe earliest hospital in India were established during the British colonial rule. They served as a means to isolate mentally ill persons from the societal mainstream and provide treatments that were in vogue at the time. Following India's independence, there has been a trend towards establishing general hospital psychiatry units and deinstitutionalization, while at the same time improving conditions in the existing mental hospitals.Since 1947, a series of workshops of superintendents was conducted to review the prevailing situations in mental hospitals and to propose recommendations to improve the same. Implementation of the Mental Health Act, 1987, and grovernmental focus upon mental hospital reform have paved way for a more specific and futuristic role for mental hospitals in planning psychiatric services for the new millenium, especially for severe mental illnesses. PMID:21407925

  13. [Music in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Bouteloup, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Occasional events, regular workshops, concerts, shows, artists in residence, cultural outings...Hospital does not necessarily have to be a place of silence and sadness. But this situation has not always been so straightforward as on the face of it, nothing is more incompatible with a hospital environment than music, which, by definition, is festive and noisy.

  14. Handbook on Hospital Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prynne, T. A.

    Designed for both hospital personnel interested in television and audiovisual personnel entering the medical field, this handbook is a verbal and pictorial survey of what is being done with TV within the medical profession. After an introduction which answers technical questions about medical TV posed during the American Hospital Association's…

  15. Designing sustainable acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cory, Alistair

    2008-01-01

    The need to provide sustainable hospitals lies in the fact that we have an obligation to act responsibly towards good stewardship of our environment and the world's precious resources, ensuring a healthy future for coming generations. As such, a sustainable hospital must sit squarely in a sustainable society, and the global and local context should be considered when designing a sustainable health facility.

  16. Hospitality services generate revenue.

    PubMed

    Bizouati, S

    1993-01-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are undertaking external revenue-generating activities to supplement their shrinking budgets. Written at the request of Leadership, this article outlines an example of a successful catering service -- a money-generating business that more Canadian hospitals could profitably consider. PMID:10127850

  17. [Hospital medicine in Chile].

    PubMed

    Eymin, Gonzalo; Jaffer, Amir K

    2013-03-01

    After 15 years of development of Hospital Medicine in Chile, there are several benefits of this discipline. Among others, a reduction in the length of hospital stay, readmissions, costs, and improved medical teaching of students, residents and fellows have been observed. However, in South América there are only isolated groups dedicated to Hospital Medicine in Chile, Argentina and Brazil, with a rather slow growth. The unjustified fear of competition from sub specialists, and the fee for service system of payment in our environment may be important factors to understand this phenomenon. The aging of the population makes imperative to improve the safety of our patients and to optimize processes and resources within the hospital, to avoid squandering healthcare resources. The following is a detailed and evidence-based article, on how hospital medicine might benefit both the public and prívate healthcare systems in Chile. PMID:23900327

  18. [Yesterdays and happenings at hospitals of Tehuacán, Puebla, México].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo

    2004-01-01

    The history of the hospital of Tehuacán, the second city importance in Puebla State, began in 1744, when the Hospital de San Juan de Dios (Hospital of St. John) was founded; in 1820, it was converted into the Municipal of Civil Hospital. The medical establishement continues to provide services to the poor to this day annual also covers health public workers of services for the municipality. The Hospital de la Cruz Roja Mexicana (The Mexican Red Cross Hospital) was created in 1934 provide medical services for accident victims: The hospital services of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) began in 1953; an earthquake destroyed the building in 1973, and a new hospital was inaugurated in 1979; at present, it readers services to 98,000 persons. The Sanatorio del Sagrado Corazón (Sacred Heart Sanatorium) is a private religious institution founded at the beginning of the second half the 20th century. In 1996, the Hospital General (General Hospital) began to provide services, takes care of the poor of the geographical region, and is financed with federal funds. The Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para Trabajadores del Estado (Institute of Securtiy and Social Services for the Workers of the State, ISSSTE) has a small hospital with 10 beds, it was founded in 1995. PMID:15087055

  19. [Yesterdays and happenings at hospitals of Tehuacán, Puebla, México].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo

    2004-01-01

    The history of the hospital of Tehuacán, the second city importance in Puebla State, began in 1744, when the Hospital de San Juan de Dios (Hospital of St. John) was founded; in 1820, it was converted into the Municipal of Civil Hospital. The medical establishement continues to provide services to the poor to this day annual also covers health public workers of services for the municipality. The Hospital de la Cruz Roja Mexicana (The Mexican Red Cross Hospital) was created in 1934 provide medical services for accident victims: The hospital services of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) began in 1953; an earthquake destroyed the building in 1973, and a new hospital was inaugurated in 1979; at present, it readers services to 98,000 persons. The Sanatorio del Sagrado Corazón (Sacred Heart Sanatorium) is a private religious institution founded at the beginning of the second half the 20th century. In 1996, the Hospital General (General Hospital) began to provide services, takes care of the poor of the geographical region, and is financed with federal funds. The Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para Trabajadores del Estado (Institute of Securtiy and Social Services for the Workers of the State, ISSSTE) has a small hospital with 10 beds, it was founded in 1995.

  20. Assessment of DR-55 as a Drop-In Replacement for R-410A

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Abdelaziz, Omar

    2016-01-01

    R410A has no ozone depletion potential (ODP), and is the most commonly used refrigerant in vapor compression systems for space cooling and heating applications. However, it has significant global warming potential with GWP higher than 1900. To mitigate the global warming effect, industry and research institutes are actively pursuing a replacement for R-410A with the following attributes, much lower GWP along with similar or higher efficiency and capacity. DR-55 (aka R452B) is a design-compatible refrigerant replacement for R-410A. It decreases the GWP by 70%, and has lower working pressure, comparable discharge temperature, and uses the same lubricant, tubing, and valves. In this study, we experimentally evaluated the performance of DR-55 as a drop-in replacement for R-410A in a high efficiency rooftop air conditioning unit. The experimental results demonstrated that DR-55 led to 5% higher efficiency at the working conditions of Integrated Energy Efficiency Rating (IEER). DR-55 also showed significantly better high ambient performance from 95 F to 125 F. In addition to the experimental study, we used the DOE/ORNL Heat Pump Design Model to model the RTU using R-410A and DR-55, respectively. The model results were compared to the laboratory measurements. The model validation demonstrates that the refrigerant heat transfer and pressure drop correlations, developed for conventional refrigerants like R-410A, are usable for DR-55. Also, a converted compressor model for DR-55, i.e. reducing volumetric and isentropic efficiencies as a function of the suction and discharge pressures from an R-410A compressor map can predict the compressor mass flow rate and power accurately.

  1. Hospitality as an Environmental Metaphor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwood, Bert

    1991-01-01

    Compares stewardship and hospitality as they relate to the biosphere. Traces the origin of the word "hospitality," discusses cultural traditions of hospitality, and applies the concept of hospitality to the natural world. Considers forms of symbiosis in nature: commensals, mutualism, and parasitism. Hospitality promotes respect, humility, and…

  2. Death receptor-4 (DR4) expression is regulated by transcription factor NF-kappaB in response to etoposide treatment.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Francisco José; Ishdorj, Ganchimeg; Hu, Xiaojie; Gibson, Spencer B

    2008-06-01

    Tumour necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) binds to death receptor 4 (DR4) activating the apoptotic signalling pathway. DNA damaging agents (genotoxins) such as etoposide increase DR4 expression and when combined with TRAIL induce a synergistic apoptotic response. The mechanism for up-regulation of DR4 expression following genotoxin treatment is not well understood. Herein, we determined that transcription factor NF-kappaB plays a role in genotoxin induced DR4 expression. Increased expression of DR4 following etoposide treatment is blocked by inhibition of the NF-kappaB pathway. Moreover, expression of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB is sufficient to increase DR4 protein levels. Indeed, knockdown of p65 by RNA interference blocked etoposide up-regulation of DR4. We further identified a functional NF-kappaB binding site located in the DR4 promoter. Mutation of this site abrogates the induction of luciferase activity after p65 over-expression. Furthermore, electromobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitaton suggest that NF-kappaB binds to this site upon etoposide treatment. MEK kinase 1 (MEKK1) is a serine threonine kinase that is activated following etoposide treatment and activates NF-kappaB. Expression of the kinase inactive MEKK1 (MEKK1-KM) abrogates the up-regulation of DR4 after etoposide treatment. Taken together, NF-kappaB plays a role in up-regulation of DR4 following etoposide treatment.

  3. Natural ligand motifs of closely related HLA-DR4 molecules predict features of rheumatoid arthritis associated peptides.

    PubMed

    Friede, T; Gnau, V; Jung, G; Keilholz, W; Stevanović, S; Rammensee, H G

    1996-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), one of the most common autoimmune disorders, is believed to be mediated via. T lymphocytes and genetic studies have shown that it is strongly associated with HLA-DR4. The DR4 subtypes DR4Dw4, DR4Dw14 and DR4Dw15 represent increased risk factors for RA, whereas DR4Dw10 is not associated with the disorder. Our study determines and compares the natural ligand motifs of these MHC class II molecules and identifies 60 natural ligands. At relative position 4 (P4), only the RA-associated DR4 molecules allow, or even prefer, negatively charged amino acids, but do not allow those which are positively charged (Arg, Lys). In the case of DR4Dw10 the preference for these amino acids is reversed. The results predict features of the putative RA-inducing peptide(s). A remarkable specificity, almost exclusively for negative charges (Asp, Glu), is found at P9 of the DR4Dw15 motif. This specificity can be ascribed to amino acid beta57 of the DR beta chain, and gives an important insight into the beta57-association of another autoimmune disease, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus type I. PMID:8672555

  4. HLA-D region genes and rheumatoid arthritis (RA): importance of DR and DQ genes in conferring susceptibility to RA.

    PubMed Central

    Singal, D P; Green, D; Reid, B; Gladman, D D; Buchanan, W W

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of HLA-D region antigens was studied in three groups (I, IIa, and IIb) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA): group I comprised 43 patients with mild, non-progressive RA, controlled by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs without progression or erosions; group II comprised 94 patients with severe disease, who had earlier been treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and all had incomplete response requiring treatment with gold (sodium aurothiomalate). Of these, 46 patients (group IIa) responded to gold and the disease was well controlled, and the remaining 48 patients (group IIb) did not respond to gold and developed gold induced toxic reactions, including thrombocytopenia or proteinuria, or both. HLA-D region antigens were defined by serological and molecular (Southern blot analysis and oligonucleotide typing) techniques. The results show that DR4 was significantly increased in all three groups of patients. The prevalence of DR1, or DR1 in DR4 negative patients, and DR3 and DR4 associated DQw7 specificities, however, showed differences in these three groups of patients. The prevalence of DR1 and of DR1 in DR4 negative patients was increased only in patients with mild (group I) RA, but not in patients with severe (groups IIa and IIb) disease. On the other hand, the prevalence of DR4 associated DQw7 was significantly increased in patients with severe disease, but not in patients with mild RA. In addition, DR3 was significantly increased only in patients with severe disease who developed gold induced toxic reactions (group IIb). These data suggest that the HLA-D region genes which cause susceptibility to mild RA may be different from those causing susceptibility to severe RA. The results suggest that both DR and DQ (A, B) genes may be important in conferring susceptibility to RA: DR in mild disease and DQ in severe RA. Images PMID:1371662

  5. Hospital diversification: evaluating alternatives.

    PubMed

    Hammer, L

    1987-05-01

    The appropriateness of diversification as a growth strategy for hospitals is discussed, and planning for diversification is described. Because new forms of health-care delivery are now in direct competition with hospitals, many hospitals are confronting environmental pressures and preparing for future survival through diversification. To explore the potential risks and benefits of diversification, the hospital must identify opportunities for new business ventures. Diversification can be "related," through an expansion of the primary product line (health care), or "unrelated," into areas not directly associated with health care. The hospital must establish specific criteria for evaluating each diversification alternative, and the two or three most attractive options should be analyzed further through a financial feasibility study. The hospital should also seek legal advice to determine the implications of diversification for maintenance of tax status, antitrust limitations, and applicability of certificate of need. Although diversification may not be appropriate for every institution, hospitals should consider it as a strategy for increasing their revenue base, confronting environmental pressures, and securing future survival. PMID:3300300

  6. Philanthropy and hospital financing.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D G; Clement, J P; Wheeler, J R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study explores the relationships among donations to not-for-profit hospitals, the returns provided by these hospitals, and fund-raising efforts. It tests a model of hospital behavior and addresses an earlier debate regarding the supply price of donations. DATA SOURCES. The main data source is the California Office of Statewide Health Planning data tapes of hospital financial disclosure reports for fiscal years 1980/1981 through 1986/1987. Complete data were available for 160 hospitals. STUDY DESIGN. Three structural equations (donations, returns, and fund-raising) are estimated as a system using a fixed-effects, pooled cross-section, time-series least squares regression. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Estimation results reveal the expected positive relation between donations and returns. The reverse relation between returns and donations is insignificant. The estimated effect of fund-raising on donations is insignificantly different from zero, and the effect of donations on fund-raising is negative. Fund-raising and returns are negatively associated with one another. CONCLUSION. The empirical results presented here suggest a positive donations-returns relations and are consistent with a positive supply price for donations. Hospitals appear to view a trade-off between providing returns and soliciting donations, but donors do not respond equally to these two activities. Attempts to increase free cash flow through expansion of community returns or fund-raising activity, at least in the short run, are not likely to be highly successful financing strategies for many hospitals. PMID:8537223

  7. Hospitals' Internal Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  8. Hospital diversification: evaluating alternatives.

    PubMed

    Hammer, L

    1987-05-01

    The appropriateness of diversification as a growth strategy for hospitals is discussed, and planning for diversification is described. Because new forms of health-care delivery are now in direct competition with hospitals, many hospitals are confronting environmental pressures and preparing for future survival through diversification. To explore the potential risks and benefits of diversification, the hospital must identify opportunities for new business ventures. Diversification can be "related," through an expansion of the primary product line (health care), or "unrelated," into areas not directly associated with health care. The hospital must establish specific criteria for evaluating each diversification alternative, and the two or three most attractive options should be analyzed further through a financial feasibility study. The hospital should also seek legal advice to determine the implications of diversification for maintenance of tax status, antitrust limitations, and applicability of certificate of need. Although diversification may not be appropriate for every institution, hospitals should consider it as a strategy for increasing their revenue base, confronting environmental pressures, and securing future survival.

  9. Hospitals' internal accountability.

    PubMed

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  10. Milk Flow Rates From Bottle Nipples Used for Feeding Infants Who Are Hospitalized

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinhee; Thoyre, Suzanne M.; Estrem, Hayley; Nix, W. Brant

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study tested the milk flow rates and variability in flow of currently available nipples used for bottle-feeding infants who are hospitalized. Method Clinicians in 3 countries were surveyed regarding nipples available to them for feeding infants who are hospitalized. Twenty-nine nipple types were identified, and 10 nipples of each type were tested by measuring the amount of infant formula expressed in 1 min using a breast pump. Mean milk flow rate (mL/min) and coefficient of variation were used to compare nipples within brand and within category (i.e., Slow, Standard, Premature). Results Flow rates varied widely between nipples, ranging from 2.10 mL/min for the Enfamil Cross-Cut to 85.34 mL/min for the Dr. Brown's Y-Cut Standard Neck. Variability of flow rates among nipples of the same type ranged from a coefficient of variation of 0.05 for Dr. Brown's Level 1 Standard- and Wide-Neck to 0.42 for the Enfamil Cross-Cut. Mean coefficient of variation by brand ranged from 0.08 for Dr. Brown's to 0.36 for Bionix. Conclusions Milk flow is an easily manipulated variable that may contribute to the degree of physiologic instability experienced by infants who are medically fragile during oral feeding. This study provides clinicians with information to guide appropriate selection of bottle nipples for feeding infants who are hospitalized. PMID:26172340

  11. Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM): 25 Years Of Excellent Service

    PubMed Central

    Kamari, Zaidun

    2009-01-01

    Our Hospital University Sains Malaysia (HUSM) was given the Cabinet approval to exist under the Ministry of Education on 23 November 1982. The Deputy Prime Minister during that period, Yang Berhormat Tun Musa Hitam announced this after the cabinet meeting was held together with the presence of the Yang Berhormat Ministers of Health; and Education, Director of the Public Works Department and the Implementation and Coordinating Unit, Prime Minister’s Department. The first patients moved in on 14 March 1983 and the inauguration of HUSM was done on 26 August 1984 by the Duli Yang Maha Mulia Tuanku Ismail Petra Ibni Al-Marhum Sultan Yahya Petra, the Sultan of Kelantan Darul Naim. HUSM celebrated it’s 25th anniversary at the Dewan Utama, USM Health Campus on the 15th December 2008 which was inaugurated by Yang Berhormat, Minister of Higher Education Dato’ Seri Mohamed Khaled Nordin. USM’s Vice Chancellor Professor Tan Sri Dato’ Dzulkifli Abdul Razak, Chairman of the USM Board of Directors Tan Sri Dato’ Haji Dr. Ani bin Arope, Health Campus Director Professor Dato’ Dr. Mafauzy Mohamed, former Campus Director, Dato’ Prof Mohd Roslani Abdul Majid, the current and previous Hospital Directors and Deputy Directors since 1983 were present. The achievements of HUSM since its establishment and its vision to fulfil the University’s Accelerated Programme for Excellence (APEX) are elaborated. PMID:22589644

  12. RCE-DR, a novel process for coated conductor fabrication with high performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Hun; Lee, Hunju; Lee, Jung-Woo; Choi, Soon-Mi; Yoo, Sang-Im; Moon, Seung-Hyun

    2014-04-01

    We report in detail on SuNAM’s reactive co-evaporation by deposition and reaction (RCE-DR) process. We have successfully fabricated a high performance GdBCO coated conductor (CC) with high throughput by the RCE-DR process, that consists of two steps for the deposition of elemental metal oxides and the conversion of cation oxides into the GdBCO superconducting phase. Constituting metals such as Gd, Ba and Cu were first deposited on LaMnO3 (LMO)-buffered IBAD-MgO templates at low temperatures and low pressures followed by a high temperature treatment step under high oxygen partial pressure for fast phase conversion. GdBCO CCs fabricated by RCE-DR showed excellent transport properties such as a critical current of 794 A cm-1 width at 77 K in self-field. With the RCE-DR process, we have achieved an overall processing speed of more than 120 m h-1 (in terms of a real process linear tape speed equivalent). SuNAM’s RCE-DR technique showed great potential as the highest throughput fabrication process compared with other methods developed previously for second generation high temperature superconducting wires, meeting the current and future need of industry in terms of price and production speed.

  13. A portrait of the extreme solar system object 2012 DR30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Cs.; Szabó, Gy.; Horner, J.; Conn, B. C.; Müller, T. G.; Vilenius, E.; Sárneczky, K.; Kiss, L. L.; Bannister, M.; Bayliss, D.; Pál, A.; Góbi, S.; Verebélyi, E.; Lellouch, E.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Ortiz, J. L.; Duffard, R.; Morales, N.

    2013-07-01

    2012 DR30 is a recently discovered solar system object on a unique orbit, with a high eccentricity of 0.9867, a perihelion distance of 14.54 AU, and a semi-major axis of 1109 AU, in this respect outscoring the vast majority of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs). We performed Herschel/PACS and optical photometry to uncover the sizeand albedo of 2012 DR30, together with its thermal and surface properties. The body is 185 km in diameter and has a relatively low V-band geometric albedo of ~8%. Although the colours of the object indicate that 2012 DR30 is an RI taxonomy class TNO or Centaur, we detected an absorption feature in the Z-band that is uncommon among these bodies. A dynamical analysis of the target's orbit shows that 2012 DR30 moves on a relatively unstable orbit and was most likely only recently placed on its current orbit from the most distant and still highly unexplored regions of the solar system. If categorised on dynamical grounds 2012 DR30 is the largest Damocloid and/or high inclination Centaur observed so far. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  14. Dr. Walter C. McCrone--his contributions to environmental microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kubic, Thomas A

    2004-03-01

    This paper briefly highlights Dr. McCrone's contributions to the recently emerging field of forensic environmental microscopy. Few, if any, criminalists are not familiar with Dr. Walter C. McCrone's voluminous contributions to the field of forensic microscopy and the analyses of micro and ultra micro transfer (trace) evidence. Dr. McCrone was renowned for his life long efforts in promoting the application of the Polarized Light Microscope (PLM) to problem solving. It is therefore not surprising that Dr. McCrone would also apply his analytical and deductive skills employing the PLM to problems in environmental analysis. He is well known for his many publications dealing with the analysis of asbestos and asbestos like materials by PLM. His philosophy of presenting intense professional training courses stressing the practical applications of the PLM carried over to a series of courses offered to students requiring education in other areas of microscopical analysis. Through McCrone Research Institute, Dr. McCrone can be said to have been responsible for the training of a large majority of microscopists who literally analyzed tens of millions of samples. These analyses were performed utilizing methodologies developed predominately by him and adopted by regulatory agencies in the United States and abroad. The methods he fostered are a major part of the arsenal of microscopical techniques employed by forensic environmental microscopists in their efforts to identify a manufacturer of an insulation product for the purpose of litigation. PMID:15027546

  15. 50th anniversary of the discovery of ibuprofen: an interview with Dr Stewart Adams.

    PubMed

    Halford, Gayle M; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Watson, Steve P

    2012-01-01

    2011 marks the 50th anniversary of the discovery of ibuprofen. This article is a focus on the personal reflections and career of Dr Stewart Adams OBE, the scientist whose research lead to the discovery of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor. When Dr Adams discovered ibuprofen, he was working as a pharmacologist in the Research Department for the Boots Pure Drug Company Ltd. Dr Adams was assigned to work on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and chose in 1953 to search for a drug that would be effective in RA but would not be a corticosteroid. He was one of the first workers in this field that later became known as NSAIDs (Non-Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs). In 1961, Dr Adams with John Nicholson, the organic chemist, filed a patent for the compound 2-(4-isobutylphenyl) propionic acid, later to become one of the most successful NSAIDs in the modern world, ibuprofen. In this article, Dr Adams gives his modest insight into the early stages and initial observations which led to this world-wide success.

  16. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... but can also be caused by fungi. Hospital construction. Hospital staff do everything they can to prevent ... patients staying at hospitals where there is ongoing construction or renovation. 5 This is thought to be ...

  17. Hospital free cash flow.

    PubMed

    Kauer, R T; Silvers, J B

    1991-01-01

    Hospital managers may find it difficult to admit their investments have been suboptimal, but such investments often lead to poor returns and less future cash. Inappropriate use of free cash flow produces large transaction costs of exit. The relative efficiency of investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals in the product market for hospital services is examined as the free cash flow theory is used to explore capital-market conditions of hospitals. Hypotheses concerning the current competitive conditions in the industry are set forth, and the implications of free cash flow for risk, capital-market efficiency, and the cost of capital to tax-exempt institution is compared to capital-market norms.

  18. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAH Conditions of Participation . What are the location requirements for CAH status? Critical Access Hospitals must be ... clinic that does not meet the CAH distance requirements? As of January 1, 2008, all CAHs, including ...

  19. Objections to hospital philosophers.

    PubMed Central

    Ruddick, W; Finn, W

    1985-01-01

    Like morally sensitive hospital staff, philosophers resist routine simplification of morally complex cases. Like hospital clergy, they favour reflective and principled decision-making. Like hospital lawyers, they refine and extend the language we use to formulate and defend our complex decisions. But hospital philosophers are not redundant: they have a wider range of principles and categories and a sharper eye for self-serving presuppositions and implicit contradictions within our practices. As semi-outsiders, they are often best able to take an 'external point of view,' unburdened by routine, details, and departmental loyalties. Their clarifications can temporarily disrupt routine, but can eventually improve staff morale, hence team practice and patient welfare. PMID:3981573

  20. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bed? Todd says that there is no standard definition for hospital beds, a fact that consumers shopping ... in retail stores that don’t meet the definition of medical devices under the law, but which ...

  1. Hospital free cash flow.

    PubMed

    Kauer, R T; Silvers, J B

    1991-01-01

    Hospital managers may find it difficult to admit their investments have been suboptimal, but such investments often lead to poor returns and less future cash. Inappropriate use of free cash flow produces large transaction costs of exit. The relative efficiency of investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals in the product market for hospital services is examined as the free cash flow theory is used to explore capital-market conditions of hospitals. Hypotheses concerning the current competitive conditions in the industry are set forth, and the implications of free cash flow for risk, capital-market efficiency, and the cost of capital to tax-exempt institution is compared to capital-market norms. PMID:1743965

  2. Home versus hospital confinement

    PubMed Central

    Barry, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    The case for hospital rather than home delivery has been powerfully argued, especially in and since the Report of the Peel Committee. Nevertheless, evidence of comparison with other countries, notably the Netherlands, suggests the choice is not necessarily simple. Some general practitioner units are now reporting perinatal mortality rates which are consistently lower than those of specialist units, and recent statistical analyses suggest that the presence of more high risk cases in consultant units does not explain this. The only big controlled home-versus-hospital trial did not lead to a significantly lower perinatal mortality rate in the hospital group. The onus of proof now seems to lie with those who advocate 100 per cent hospital confinement. PMID:7373581

  3. Serologic and nucleotide sequencing analyses of a novel DR52-associated DRB1 allele with the DR 'NJ25' specificity, designated DRB1*1307.

    PubMed

    Kaneshige, T; Hashimoto, M; Matsumoto, Y; Kinoshita, T; Hirasawa, T; Uchida, K; Inoko, H

    1994-10-01

    A novel DR52-associated DRB1* allele, designated DRB1*1307, was encountered in the course of our HLA-DRB1 genotyping study in a Japanese population by PCR-RFLP. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence of its second exon with those of the other known DRB1 alleles revealed that DRB1*1307 was most similar to DRB1*1101, differing by two amino acid substitutions. From a family study, DRB1*1307 was found to segregate with a haplotype of DRB3*0202-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0301, which was also observed with DRB1*1101 in a Japanese population. DRB1*1307 was recognized in three of 652 healthy Japanese controls (gene frequency: 0.24%) with the same DR-DQ haplotype, indicating that DRB1*1307 arose from DRB1*1101 by a gene conversionlike event(s) and/or point mutations. Further, it was also observed that this allele had a strong linkage disequilibrium with HLA-B70 (p < 0.001). This new DRB1*1307 allele was serologically defined as DR 'NJ25,' and it gave an almost identical serologic pattern to DRB1*1406. On sequence comparison, however, no unique amino acid residues conserved in DRB1*1406 and DRB1*1307 but absent in all the other DRB1 alleles could be found, indicating that two amino acid changes at positions 47 and 58 abolished the reactivity against the DR11 antisera.

  4. [Visa at a tertiary hospital].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Jiménez, S; Lluch-Colomer, A; Desongles-Corrales, T; Bernal-González, D; Santos-Rubio, M D; Alfaro-Lara, E R; Galván-Banqueri, M

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: Analizar el procedimiento de visado y su actividad en un hospital de tercer nivel. Material y métodos: Estudio descriptivo del procedimiento de visado durante el período abril 2011-abril 2012. Se diseñó una base de datos y se definieron categorías relativas a las variables de estudio: pacientes y recetas. Para los pacientes atendidos en la Unidad de Visado se registraron las incidencias detectadas en base a una clasificación previamente establecida. Resultados: Se incluyeron 6.738 pacientes (8.465 recetas visadas). Se visaron 170 medicamentos y productos de nutrición diferentes, siendo el mayoritario Tacrolimus. Se detectaron un total de 420 incidencias, siendo las más frecuentes la «Ausencia de documento clínico» (46,67 %) y los «Errores formales de cumplimentación» (28,57%). Conclusiones: El presente trabajo ha permitido un conocimiento más pormenorizado de la actividad, los tipos de incidencias y la identificación de áreas de mejora.

  5. Managing diversity in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R H; Sullivan, D B

    1993-01-01

    Hospital work force diversity, although potentially a source of creativity and improved problem solving, is often a source of political strife and the mistreatment of people based on their identification with one or another of the diverse groups that are employed in hospitals. Factors linked to these phenomena are discussed and are the basis for suggestions about how administrators can deal with the organizational pathologies that are often associated with unmanaged work force diversity.

  6. [Hospital organizational structure].

    PubMed

    Bittar, O J

    1994-01-01

    The basic point for an Institution to work is the existence of a definite organizational structure that puts together similar areas allowing decisions and the operationalization of different tasks. Knowledge and analysis of structures of private and public hospitals and a bibliography review about the issue is the purpose of this paper. Suggestions are given about the elaboration of small structures and the utilization of matrix management in order to accomplish the hospitals objectives.

  7. Organizational leadership in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Longest, B B; Darr, K; Rakich, J S

    1993-01-01

    Hospitals face very dynamic environments and must meet diverse needs in the communities they serve and respond to multiple expectations imposed by their stakeholders. Coupled with these variables, the fact that leadership in these organizations is a shared phenomenon makes organizational leadership in them very complicated. An integrative overview of the organizational leadership role of CEOs in hospitals is presented, and determinants of success in playing this role are discussed.

  8. Cisplatin containing chemotherapy influences HLA-DR expression on monocytes from cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Novellino, P S; Trejo, Y G; Beviacqua, M; Bordenave, R H; Rumi, L S

    1999-12-01

    The effect of cisplatin-containing chemotherapy regimen was evaluated on the expression of HLA-DR antigen in peripheral blood monocytes from patients with lung (LCP) and colorectal (CCP) cancer. Chemotherapeutic schedules employed in patients were etoposide and cisplatin for LCP and 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin for CCP. The results obtained showed a diminished percentage of monocytes expressing HLA-DR antigen in LCP (52.4 +/- 2.6, p < 0.004) and CCP (50.1 +/- 2.1, p < 0.001) respectively versus healthy donors (71.0 +/- 1.1%), and that their values increased during chemotherapy, raising them up to control level after the second cycle of treatment, independently of the course of the cancer growth. We conclude that both modalities of treatment allowed an increase of monocytes expressing HLA-DR antigen, suggesting that this effect may be due to cisplatin action. PMID:10746974

  9. Collected Papers in Structural Mechanics Honoring Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr. (Compiler); Nemeth, Michael P. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    2006-01-01

    This special publication contains a collection of structural mechanics papers honoring Dr. James H. Starnes, Jr. presented at the 46th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference held in Austin, Texas, April 18-21, 2005. Contributors to this publication represent a small number of those influenced by Dr. Starnes' technical leadership, his technical prowess and diversity, and his technical breath and depth in engineering mechanics. These papers cover some of the research areas Dr. Starnes investigated, which included buckling, postbuckling, and collapse of structures; composite structural mechanics, residual strength and damage tolerance of metallic and composite structures; and aircraft structural design, certification and verification. He actively pursued technical understanding and clarity, championed technical excellence, and modeled humility and perseverance.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP-DR1) catalogs (Lutz+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, D.; Poglitsch, A.; Altieri, B.; Andreani, P.; Aussel, H.; Berta, S.; Bongiovanni, A.; Brisbin, D.; Cava, A.; Cepa, J.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Dominguez-Sanchez, H.; Elbaz, D.; Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Grazian, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Harwit, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G.; Magnelli, B.; Maiolino, R.; Nordon, R.; Perez Garcia, A. M.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Saintonge, A.; Sanchez Portal, M.; Santini, P.; Shao, L.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L. J.; Valtchanov, I.; Wetzstein, M.; Wieprecht, E.

    2013-11-01

    PACS catalogs built by the PEP team, with key contributions by Stefano Berta, Benjamin Magnelli, Paola Popesso, Dieter Lutz, Francesca Pozzi, Bruno Altieri, Herve Aussel, Hoseong Hwang, Emeric Le Floc'h, Georgios Magdis, Raanan Nordon, Albrecht Poglitsch, Laurie Riguccini, Amelie Saintonge, Li Shao. For more details, please refer to Lutz et al. (2011A&A...532A..90L) and to the PDF documentation associated to the release. Data and catalogs can be retrieved from the web page http://www.mpe.mpg.de/ir/Research/PEP/publicdatareleases.php See the PDF documentation associated to the PEP DR1 release, http://www.mpe.mpg.de/resources/PEP/DR1tarballs/readmePEP_global.pdf and http://www.mpe.mpg.de/resources/PEP/DR1tarballs/readmePEP_SPIRE.pdf for more details. (69 data files).

  11. Financing hospital disaster preparedness.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Disaster preparedness and response have gained increased attention in the United States as a result of terrorism and disaster threats. However, funding of hospital preparedness, especially surge capacity, has lagged behind other preparedness priorities. Only a small portion of the money allocated for national preparedness is directed toward health care, and hospitals receive very little of that. Under current policy, virtually the entire funding stream for hospital preparedness comes from general tax revenues. Medical payers (e.g., Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance) directly fund little, if any, of the current bill. Funding options to improve preparedness include increasing the current federal grants allocated to hospitals, using payer fees or a tax to subsidize preparedness, and financing other forms of expansion capability, such as mobile hospitals. Alternatively, the status quo of marginal preparedness can be maintained. In any event, achieving higher levels of preparedness likely will take the combined commitment of the hospital industry, public and private payers, and federal, state, and local governments. Ultimately, the costs of preparedness will be borne by the public in the form of taxes, higher healthcare costs, or through the acceptance of greater risk.

  12. Sisters in Dutch hospitals.

    PubMed

    van den Bergh-Braam, A H

    1985-11-01

    This study focuses on hospital sisters in 30 Dutch hospitals. The so-called role-set approach has been adopted. In this approach the sisters are the focal persons. Direct superiors, specialists, registered nurses and student nurses acted as role-senders. The possible number of respondents is 600 (120 of each group). The response of hospital sisters is 100%, that of role-senders 88%. The study started out as an attempt to collect background information on the causes of wastage of sisters. High wastage rates are generally regarded as an indication of an unfavourable working environment. Since hospital sisters occupy a key position in hospitals, the ward problems will be studied from their angle. Although wastage rates have dropped recently, it does not necessarily follow that the working environment has improved. Wastage is known to act as a safety valve, thus allowing tensions to resolve. The threat of unemployment clogs this outlet, which increases the tensions on the hospital ward. Data from the study show that work overload is one of the major stress factors for sisters. Analyses demonstrated that there exists a relationship between work overload and tensions with the management and direct superiors, tensions in job execution, irritableness on the ward, low self-esteem, health complaints and psychological condition. Sisters with an excessive job involvement refer to work overload more often than their moderate colleagues. There is a relationship between an unfavourable working environment and irritableness of sisters.

  13. BEopt-CA (Ex): A Tool for Optimal Integration of EE, DR and PV in Existing California Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Craig; Horowitz, Scott; Maguire, Jeff; Velasco, Paulo Tabrares; Springer, David; Coates, Peter; Bell, Christy; Price, Snuller; Sreedharan, Priya; Pickrell, Katie

    2014-04-01

    This project targeted the development of a software tool, BEopt-CA (Ex) (Building Energy Optimization Tool for California Existing Homes), that aims to facilitate balanced integration of energy efficiency (EE), demand response (DR), and photovoltaics (PV) in the residential retrofit1 market. The intent is to provide utility program managers and contractors in the EE/DR/PV marketplace with a means of balancing the integration of EE, DR, and PV

  14. Association between risk for pre-eclampsia and HLA DR4

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-17

    Dr. Kilpatrick and colleagues report results of a family study showing an association between HLA DR4 and mild and proteinuric pre-eclampsia in a British (Edinburgh) maternal population. Among 76 parous sisters of women with protein uric pre-eclampsia, they found that sisters with pregnancy-induced hypertension (pre-eclampsia with or without proteinuria) had a higher frequency of HLA DR4 antigen than did normotensive sisters. In addition, they cited unpublished findings in which they found a higher frequency of HLA DR4 antigen in a large sample of pre-eclamptic women and their babies than in appropriate controls. The authors have completed a study of HLA antigens and pregnancy outcome among a coherent of 715 black (50.9%) and white (49.1%) primigravida who were delivered at a medical center in southern USA. HLA DR typing was done by the one-color fluorescence technique with reagents. On the basis of standard criteria for diagnosis of pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, 6.9 of the cohort had mild non-proteinuric pre-eclampsia, 8.8% had pregnancy-induced hypertension, and 9.5% had combined pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. Whereas black women had higher rates than white women in all three clinical categories (eg, pregnancy-induced hypertension 10.7% vs 6.8%, respectively), differences were not significant and frequencies of HLA DR4 antigen were higher among normotensives in both races (results not shown). They therefore pooled the two racial groups for analyses.

  15. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production using waste vegetable oil by Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin Hwan; Jeon, Che Ok; Choi, Mun Hwan; Yoon, Sung Chul; Park, Woojun

    2008-08-01

    To produce polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) from inexpensive substrates by bacteria, vegetable-oil-degrading bacteria were isolated from a rice field using enrichment cultivation. The isolated Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 showed clear orange or red spots of accumulated PHA granules when grown on phosphate and nitrogen limited medium containing vegetable oil as the sole carbon source and stained with Nile blue A. Up to 37.34% (w/w) of intracellular PHA was produced from corn oil, which consisted of three major 3-hydroxyalkanoates; octanoic (C8:0, 37.75% of the total 3-hydroxyalkanoate content of PHA), decanoic (C10:0, 36.74%), and dodecanoic (C12:0, 11.36%). Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 accumulated up to 23.52% (w/w) of PHAMCL from waste vegetable oil. The proportion of 3- hydroxyalkanoate of the waste vegetable-oil-derived PHA [hexanoic (5.86%), octanoic (45.67%), decanoic (34.88%), tetradecanoic (8.35%), and hexadecanoic (5.24%)] showed a composition ratio different from that of the corn-oil-derived PHA. Strain DR2 used three major fatty acids in the same ratio, and linoleic acid was the major source of PHA production. Interestingly, the production of PHA in Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 could not occur in either acetate- or butyrate-amended media. Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 accumulated a greater amount of PHA than other well-studied strains (Chromobacterium violaceum and Ralstonia eutropha H16) when grown on vegetable oil. The data showed that Pseudomonas sp. strain DR2 was capable of producing PHA from waste vegetable oil.

  16. Enhanced elimination of HgCl{sub 2} from natural water by a broad-spectrum Hg-resistant Bacillus pasteurii strain DR2 in presence of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Pahan, K; Chaudhun, J.; Gnosn, D.

    1995-10-01

    Mercury (Hg) compounds are extensively used in agriculture as seed-dressers and pesiticides, in hospitals as disinfectants, in sewage treatment and in industries including pulp and paper and chlor-alkali industries as chemical catalysts. Several thousand millions of tons of mercury are dispersed into the environment every year. Rain water washes mercury from soils and rocks. In aquatic environments sediments are the richest deposits of mercury compounds. The mutagenicity and teratogenicity of these Hg-containing compounds are well-documented. This paper reports on a study of the increased rate of the elimination of HgCl2 by Bacillus pasteurii strain DR2 from natural river water in the presence of organic compounds. This bacteria has the dual characteristics of elimination of mercury compounds and utilization of aromatic compounds in natural conditions. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. [Study of anti-DR antibodies in sterility and infertility (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Balasch, J; Vanrell, J A; González-Merlo, J; Ercilla, M G; Vives, J; Castillo, R

    1980-01-01

    The presence of anti-DR antibodies with lymphocyte cytotoxicity test was studied in five groups of patients: 50 males with no history of blood transfusions who comprised the control group, 44 contraceptive-using women, 55 pregnant women, 41 primary sterile and 47 infertile patients. The high and similar degree of sensitization found in both pregnant and sterile patients lead us to the conclusion that anti-DR antibodies are not a cause of sterility and that spermatozoa are highly immunogenic. The biological significance of the antibodies is discussed.

  18. Genetic engineering of a mouse: Dr. Frank Ruddle and somatic cell genetics.

    PubMed

    Jones, Dennis

    2011-06-01

    Genetic engineering is the process of modifying an organism's genetic composition by adding foreign genes to produce desired traits or evaluate function. Dr. Jon W. Gordon and Sterling Professor Emeritus at Yale Dr. Frank H. Ruddle were pioneers in mammalian gene transfer research. Their research resulted in production of the first transgenic animals, which contained foreign DNA that was passed on to offspring. Transgenic mice have revolutionized biology, medicine, and biotechnology in the 21st century. In brief, this review revisits their creation of transgenic mice and discusses a few evolving applications of their transgenic technology used in biomedical research.

  19. Doppler transcranien au cours de la drépanocytose chez l'enfant Malagasy

    PubMed Central

    Herinirina, Nicolas Fanantenana; Rajaonarison, Lova Hasina Ny Ony Narindra; Herijoelison, Andry Roussel; Rakoto, Olivat Aimée Alson; Ahmad, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Le doppler transcrânien est un outil efficace permettant de dépister les enfants drépanocytaires à risque d'AVC. Méthodes Nous avons réalisé une étude descriptive transversale sur des enfants Malagasy âgés entre 24 mois et 15 ans (groupe 1: 57 drépanocytaires, groupe 2: 43 témoins) afin d’évaluer le profil vélocimétrique des artères cérébrales chez les drépanocytaires. Un examen Doppler transcrânien a été réalisé avec étude des flux sanguins cérébraux chez les enfants des deux groupes. Résultats Pour les sujets drépanocytaires, la vitesse moyenne (VM) de l'artère cérébrale moyenne était de 100,9 ± 26,8 cm/s, l'indice de pulsatilité (IP) de 0,73 ± 0,20, la différence entre les artères cérébrales moyennes droite et gauche (ACMr) de 19,8 ± 21,5 cm/s, le rapport des vitesses de l'artère cérébrale antérieure/artère cérébrale moyenne (ACA/ACM) de 0,7 ± 0,2. Pour les enfants non drépanocytaires, VM: 80,6 ± 19,3 cm/s, IP: 0,79 ± 0,14, ACMr: 17 ± 20,1 cm/s, ACA/ACM: 0,8 ± 0,2. La vélocité des enfants drépanocytaires était supérieure au groupe contrôle. Les vitesses ont été corrélées avec le taux d'hémoglobine et l’âge et non pas avec le sexe et le volume globulaire moyen. Conclusion Les vitesses circulatoires cérébrales sont élevées chez les drépanocytaires que les enfants non drépanocytaires et sont influencées par le taux d'hémoglobine et l’âge. PMID:27516829

  20. Genetic engineering of a mouse: Dr. Frank Ruddle and somatic cell genetics.

    PubMed

    Jones, Dennis

    2011-06-01

    Genetic engineering is the process of modifying an organism's genetic composition by adding foreign genes to produce desired traits or evaluate function. Dr. Jon W. Gordon and Sterling Professor Emeritus at Yale Dr. Frank H. Ruddle were pioneers in mammalian gene transfer research. Their research resulted in production of the first transgenic animals, which contained foreign DNA that was passed on to offspring. Transgenic mice have revolutionized biology, medicine, and biotechnology in the 21st century. In brief, this review revisits their creation of transgenic mice and discusses a few evolving applications of their transgenic technology used in biomedical research. PMID:21698043

  1. The medical ethics of the 'father of gynaecology', Dr J Marion Sims.

    PubMed Central

    Ojanuga, D

    1993-01-01

    Vesico-vaginal fistula (VVF) was a common ailment among American women in the 19th century. Prior to that time, no successful surgery had been developed for the cure of this condition until Dr J Marion Sims perfected a successful surgical technique in 1849. Dr Sims used female slaves as research subjects over a four-year period of experimentation (1845-1849). This paper discusses the controversy surrounding his use of powerless women and whether his actions were acceptable during that historical period. PMID:8459435

  2. Dr. Tom Chalmers, 1917-1995: the trials of a randomizer

    PubMed Central

    Maclure, Malcolm

    1996-01-01

    Dr. Thomas Chalmers, an American physician who played a pivotal role in the scientific development of the randomized control trial and meta-analysis, died late last year. Shortly before Chalmers' death, Dr. Malcolm Maclure of the British Columbia Ministry of Health conducted a wideranging interview with him about his life and the past and future of clinical trials and evidence-based medicine. The first part is published below; the second part will appear in the Oct. 1 issue of CMAJ. Imagesp758-a PMID:8823220

  3. Preparation and spectral characterization of polymeric nanocapsules containing DR1 organic dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifimehr, Mohammad Reza; Ghanbari, Khadijeh; Ayoubi, Kazem; Mohajerani, Ezedin

    2015-07-01

    In order to provide necessary degree of freedom for organic dye molecules in optical applications and also for safety improvement, water insoluble Disperse Red 1 (DR1) dye molecules were placed inside the polymeric nanocapsules along with suitable surfactants and using controlled phase-separation method. TEM images were used to investigate the morphology of prepared nanocapsules. Total dye concentration for a solution consist of obtained polymeric nanocapsules was determined using decomposition of nanocapsules and a reference absorption spectrum. Absorption spectrum of a solution containing DR1 and dichloromethane was also compared with prepared nanocapsules at the same dye concentration, thereby a red-shift in absorption spectrum was detected.

  4. MTB-DR-RIF 9G test: Detection and discrimination of tuberculosis and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Song, Keum-Soo; Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Cho, Nam Hoon; Sung, Nackmoon; Kim, Hee-Jin; Yang, Jeongseong; Kim, Taisun

    2015-12-01

    This report describes the evaluation of the novel MTB-DR-RIF 9G test for the accurate detection and discrimination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and rifampicin-resistant M. tuberculosis (MTB-DR-RIF) in the clinical samples. The procedure included the amplification of a nucleotide fragment of the rpoB gene of the MTB and MTB-DR-RIF strains and their hybridization with the immobilized probes. The MTB-DR-RIF 9G test was evaluated for its ability to detect and discriminate MTB and MTB-DR-RIF strains in 113 known clinical samples. The accuracy of the MTB-DR-RIF 9G test was determined by comparing its results with sequencing analysis and drug susceptibility testing. The sensitivity and specificity of the MTB-DR-RIF 9G test at 95% confidence interval were found to be 95.4% (89.5-98.5) and 100% (69.2-100), respectively. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the MTB-DR-RIF 9G test at 95% confidence interval were found to be 100% (85.0-95.9) and 66.7% (38.4-88.18), respectively. Sequencing analysis of all samples indicated that the mutations present in the regions identified with the MTB-DR-RIF 9G assay can be detected accurately.

  5. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Dr. George Voelz, M.D., November 29, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Dr. George Voelz was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). This oral history covers Dr. Voelz`s research on Manhattan Engineering District plutonium workers, the acute and long term effects of radiation, his inhalation studies, and his activities at the 1961 INL reactor accident (SL-1 Reactor). After a brief biographical sketch, Dr. Voelz his remembrances on tissue studies of plutonium workers, the plutonium injection studies of 1945-1946, the controlled environmental radioiodine tests of 1963-1968, and tracer studies with human volunteers at Los Alamos. Dr. Voelz states his opinions concerning misconceptions about the Los Alamos Human Radiation Experiments.

  6. [Dr Leonor Michaelis and early days of Hokkaido University School of Medicine; episodes among three medical researchers in the roaring twenties].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Makoto; Koyama, Akio; Saito, Takeshi; Terasawa, Kouich; Fujita, Hiroyoshi; Saito, Kazuo

    2011-08-01

    Little has been known about the personal history of Dr. Takaichi Mohri (Nakashima), the first professor of department of hygiene at Hokkaido University School of Medicine. We, therefore, have been inquiring academic backgrounds of Dr. Mohri for two decades. These inquiries show interesting episodes between Dr. Leonor Michaelis, one of the biggest names in enzymologists, and early days of this Medical School. In this article, we describe that at least two professors, Drs. Takaichi Mohri and Kaoru Ohguro, were in good acquaintances with Dr. Michaelis as follows; 1) the latter half of 1921, Dr. Ohguro visited a laboratory of Dr. Michaelis in Berlin, 2) from November 1922 to June 1923, Dr. Michaelis in Nagoya collaborated with Dr. Mohri in Sapporo, 3) Dr. Michaelis in Nagoya visited Dr. Ohguro's house and office in Sapporo at March 1925, and 4) at the same occasion, Dr. Michaelis made his lecture on biochemistry in Hokkaido University School of Medicine. Since Drs. Ohguro and Mohri were classmates of the University of Tokyo Faculty of Medicine, Dr. Ohguro could introduce Dr. Michaelis to Dr. Mohri who used to be a graduate student in department of biochemistry. As a result of relationships, Drs. Michaelis and Mohri published a paper entitled "Eine weitere Methode zur Bestimmung des isoelektrischen Punktes von Eiweisskoerpern und ihre Anwendung auf die Serumalbumine verschiedener Tiere" in Biochemische Zeitschrift, which was a part of Dr. Mohri's Ph.D. thesis. PMID:21877585

  7. Renkioi: a forgotten Crimean War hospital and its significance.

    PubMed

    Silver, C P

    2004-12-01

    Renkioi Civil Hospital was built late in the Crimean War (1854-6) in Turkey on the Dardanelles. Designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, its prefabricated structure was a brilliant engineering innovation. As a civil hospital for military patients, it was staffed by experienced civilian doctors, thereby relieving the shortage of military doctors. Renkioi is remembered as an astonishing early prefabricated structure. However the war was soon to end and it was never used to near capacity. Thus, its other successful features are largely forgotten. It demonstrated the advantages of a doctors, rather than a military officer, being in complete command of a hospital and this was later accepted by the army. Renkioi also showed how infection could be reduced by able staff in a well administered, properly designed hospital with good sanitation. After the war, Dr. Edmund Parkes, its Medical Superintendent, became the first Professor of Hygiene at the new Army Medical School, ensuring that "the prevention of disease and the promotion of health" became the first function of the Army Medical Services.

  8. [Communication among hospital leaders].

    PubMed

    Haberey-Knuessi, Véronique; Heeb, Jean-Luc; De Morgan, Paula Emilie

    2013-12-01

    New management styles imposed on hospital institutions in recent years, have fundamentally changed the organization of the latter. Many texts discuss the consequences, specifically on the field of communication. The aim of this study was to understand the real impact of new management methods on communication by managers in hospital, but also on care teams in termes of satisfaction and/or stress. This two-year study was conducted among 900 executives in hospitals in Western Switzerland using a mixed methodology. A first phase of questionnaires highlighted the problematic areas, while a second phase in the form of organized group interviews in each hospital, had the objective of achieving a better understanding of the relationship between management and communication. The latter proved to be particularly significant in terms of results, and this is the one we focused on in this article.These results indeed show that a crucial role is given to communication by carers, and, at the same time a lessening of the time devoted to relationships, both among peers and with patients. Frustration then arises, which is not without consequences both for the management of patients and the institutions themselves. It is by means of these results that awareness is raised of the omnipresence of communication at all levels and the major advantages that positive dynamic supports. And, on the contrary, of the serious problems which may arise from management practice that do not give due importance to the dimension of communication, present in all sectors of the hospital. PMID:24490450

  9. Utilization of hospital resources.

    PubMed

    Black, C D; Roos, N P; Burchill, C A

    1995-12-01

    A population-based approach was used to analyze the utilization patterns of hospital care by Manitoba residents during the fiscal year 1991/1992. Patterns were analyzed for eight administrative regions, with use assigned to the patient's region of residence, regardless of the location of the hospitalization. Regional boundaries consistent with those used for presentation of data on health status and socioeconomic risk permitted integration of findings across the Population Health Information System. Marked differences in acute hospital use were found. Residents of the urban Winnipeg ("good health") region had the lowest rates of use of acute care overall, and northern rural ("poor health") regions had significantly higher rates of use. However, almost one half of hospital days by Winnipeg residents were used in long-stay care (60+ days), while rural residents were more likely to use short-stay hospital care. Despite a concentration of surgical specialists in Winnipeg, there were only small regional differences in overall rates of surgery. PMID:7500670

  10. Impact of telemedicine in hospital culture and its consequences on quality of care and safety

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, Milton; Morbeck, Renata Albaladejo; Pires, Philippe Vieira; Abreu, Carlos Alberto Cordeiro; Andrade, Ana Helena Vicente; Terra, Jose Claudio Cyrineu; Teixeira, José Carlos; Kanamura, Alberto Hideki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To describe the impact of the telemedicine application on the clinical process of care and its different effects on hospital culture and healthcare practice. Methods The concept of telemedicine through real time audio-visual coverage was implemented at two different hospitals in São Paulo: a secondary and public hospital, Hospital Municipal Dr. Moysés Deutsch, and a tertiary and private hospital, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. Results Data were obtained from 257 teleconsultations records over a 12-month period and were compared to a similar period before telemedicine implementation. For 18 patients (7.1%) telemedicine consultation influenced in diagnosis conclusion, and for 239 patients (92.9%), the consultation contributed to clinical management. After telemedicine implementation, stroke thrombolysis protocol was applied in 11% of ischemic stroke patients. Telemedicine approach reduced the need to transfer the patient to another hospital in 25.9% regarding neurological evaluation. Sepsis protocol were adopted and lead to a 30.4% reduction mortality regarding severe sepsis. Conclusion The application is associated with differences in the use of health services: emergency transfers, mortality, implementation of protocols and patient management decisions, especially regarding thrombolysis. These results highlight the role of telemedicine as a vector for transformation of hospital culture impacting on the safety and quality of care. PMID:26676268

  11. DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism of HLA-DR2 haplotypes in normal individuals and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Singal, D P; Reid, B; Green, D; Bensen, W G; D'Souza, M

    1990-01-01

    A strong association between HLA-DR4 and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been found in a number of populations. In contrast, the incidence of DR2 is decreased in patients with RA, suggesting that this specificity may confer some protection against the disease. A number of subtypes of DR2 have been defined by serology, by responses in mixed lymphocyte culture reaction, and, more recently, by restriction fragment length polymorphism. These subtypes of DR2 are in linkage disequilibrium with different subspecificities of DQw1. It is thus likely that the distribution of these subtypic DR,DQ haplotypes in DR2 positive patients with RA may be important in understanding the genetic basis of susceptibility/resistance to RA. In this paper a study of the subtypes of DR2,DQw1 haplotypes in 18 patients with RA, who required sodium aurothiomalate as a disease remitting drug, and unrelated healthy individuals is reported. Three subtypes of DR2 haplotypes, DRw15 (Dw2),DQw1.2(DQw6), DRw15(Dw12),DQw1.12(DQw6), and DRw16(Dw21),DQw1, AZH (DQw5), were analysed with a cDNA probe for the DQ beta gene. The data show that DR2 positive patients with RA carried either the DRw15(Dw2),DQw6 or DRw15(Dw12),DQw6 haplotype. No patient with RA was positive for the DRw16(Dw21),DQw5 subspecificity. In contrast, six of 29 (21%) normal healthy DR2,DQw1 positive individuals carried the DRw16(Dw21),DQw5 haplotype. These data together with earlier results on the distribution of the DR4,DQw7 haplotype in patients with RA support the hypothesis that DQB1 chain polymorphism may be important in determining susceptibility to severe RA. Images PMID:1969727

  12. [The hospital at Hillersleben Germany, April 1945].

    PubMed

    Weisskopf, Varda

    2014-01-01

    On 6th April 1945, nine days before the liberation of the Bergen Belsen Concentration Camp, about 2,500 Jewish prisoners were ordered to prepare to leave the camp on the next day. On 7th April, the prisoners left through the gates of the camp and began to walk about 10 kilometers to the train station near the city of Celle. There they were ordered to board a train that would take them to the Theresienstadt Concentration Camp. After six days of travel, the train stopped near the village of Farsleben, Germany, where it was liberated by the 743rd Tank Battalion of the 30th Infantry Division, of the U.S. 9th Army, on 13th April 1945. The 105th Medical Battalion of the same Division was the primary care provider for the survivors, who were then taken in vehicles available from the 30th Infantry Division, and organized into a convoy by the Division's Liaison Officer, Lt. Frank W. Towers, to the town of Hillersleben. A former German Air Force Base was located at Hillersleben with a small hospital that could not provide medical attention to all the survivors. On 21st April, Company C of the 95th Medical Battalion, received an order to go to Hillersleben. Colonel Dr. William W. Hurteau, the Commanding Officer of this Battalion, determined that the biggest task given to the Battalion during World War II, was establishing another hospital in the town of Hillersleben and providing additional beds in the existing hospital, which was a structure that had served as a boarding school. Furthermore, they needed to acquire hospital equipment which was obtained from German equipment and supplies that had been captured by the U.S. MiLitary. Also, they took care of obtaining food supplies from German warehouses, and meat and milk from local dairy farms. The lives of the prisoners on this train were saved by the heroism and dedicated work of those brave soldiers of the 30th Infantry Division and the 95th Medical Battalion. PMID:24791569

  13. Dr. Bowdler's Legacy: A History of Expurgated Books in England and America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, Noel

    This history of expurgation of English and American literature from 1724 until the 1960's focuses on the influence of changing taste upon literature, especially the changing standards of what constitutes decency. Discussed are (1) expurgations of literary works in the 18th century and the causes of bowdlerism; (2) Dr. Bowdler, his sister (the true…

  14. HUCKLEBERRY FINN. DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE. SHORT STORIES. LITERATURE CURRICULUM IV, TEACHER VERSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

    A CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR THE TEACHING OF "HUCKLEBERRY FINN,""DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE," AND FOUR SHORT STORIES WAS PRESENTED. THE SHORT STORIES WERE (1) "THE APPLE TREE" BY JOHN GALSWORTHY, (2) "THE COUNTRY OF THE BLIND" BY H.G. WELLS, (3) "A DOUBLE-DYED DECEIVER" BY O. HENRY, AND (4) "A MYSTERY OF HEROISM" BY STEPHEN CRANE. THE GUIDE PROVIDED…

  15. HUCKLEBERRY FINN. DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE. SHORT STORIES. LITERATURE CURRICULUM IV, STUDENT VERSION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KITZHABER, ALBERT R.

    A STUDENT'S CURRICULUM GUIDE FOR THE STUDY OF "HUCKLEBERRY FINN,""DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE," AND THREE SHORT STORIES WAS PRESENTED. THE SHORT STORIES INCLUDED WERE (1) "THE COUNTRY OF THE BLIND" BY H.G. WELLS (COMPLETE TEXT), (2) "A DOUBLE-DYED DECEIVER" BY O. HENRY, AND (3) "A MYSTERY OF HEROISM" BY STEPHEN CRANE (COMPLETE TEXT). STUDY QUESTIONS,…

  16. State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Checklist for the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, as well as for activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950's and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous wastes. Clean closure is the proposed method of closure for the LSFF. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 (Ecology 1989). This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of wastes managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

  17. Dr. Wernher Von Braun on Tour With U.S. congressman Armistead Seldon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    U.S. representative Armistead Seldon (D.-Al) tries on an astronaut maneuvering unit mockup during a tour of the Saturn I workshop at the Marshall Space Flight center. Explaining the unit and the workshop to Representative Seldon is Dr. Wernher Von Braun, director of the Marshall Center.

  18. Dr. Wernher Von Braun at the Marshall Space Flight Center's neutral buoyancy simulator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director, points and asks a question about the operation of the center's neutral buoyancy facility in the Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory. The facility was used to test and evaluate hardware and operations hat were planned for Apollo applications program flights.

  19. If Dr. King Were a Principal: Building the "Beloved Community" in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillis, Michael; Woolworth, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer a more humanistic vision of educational community, one that is substantive in content yet flexible in its application to the diverse contexts in which American schooling occurs. In doing so, the authors turn specifically to the nonviolent philosophy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and consider what a school…

  20. Dr. Anna Julia Cooper, 1858-1964: Teacher, Scholar, and Timeless Womanist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Mark S.

    2006-01-01

    The study examines the various accomplishments and achievements of Dr. Anna Julia Cooper, a social activist-educator, scholar and an early model for African-American feminist theory. Cooper was a great public intellectual and teacher, as she highly attacked the prevalence of racism, sexism and poverty through her writings and by working with…