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  1. Oxyuriasis at the Department of Pediatrics, Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan.

    PubMed

    Hasibuan, B; Naim, M; Lubis, A H; Pasaribu, S; Lubis, C P

    1989-01-01

    During the period of 3 months (February-April 1987), a prospective study on oxyuariasis among children had been conducted at Child Health Department of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan. All children over 8 months of age were included in this study. The diagnosis was based on the modified Scoth's technique. Oxyuriasis ova were found in 21 out 119 children (17.65%). The peak incidence was found in the school age.

  2. Intussusception at the pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan.

    PubMed

    Lubis, A H; Sinuhaji, A B; Sutanto, A H; Yosodiharjo, A

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective study had been conducted on hospitalized infants and children in the Pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan from January 1, 1987 through December 31, 1988. The purpose is to assess the incidence and clinical manifestations of intussusception. During the same period, there were 6484 infants and children hospitalized, 39 (0.6%) with intussusception, consisting of 23 (58.9%) males and (41.1%) females. Most of the cases (53.85%) were in age group of 4-6 months. Thirty four patients (87.12%) were wellnourished, and 5 patients (12.82%) undernourished. The major symptoms of intussusception were bloody diarrhoea (87.17%), vomiting (82.05%) and abdominal distention (66.41%). Successful reposition with barium enema occurred in 1 (20%) out of 5 patients. The major symptoms of intussusception were bloody diarrhoea (87.17%), vomiting. Surgical intervention was performed in 22 patients (56.41%). The result was as follows: discharged in good condition in 15 (68.18%) and deaths occurred in the remaining cases (7 cases = 31.82%). Of those 7 cases who died after operation, 2 cases were hospitalized in less than 2 days, 3 cases in less than 3 days and the remaining 2 cases in more than 3 days, after the symptoms developed.

  3. Infantile diarrhea in the Pediatric Ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan.

    PubMed

    Metrizal; Sinuhaji, A B; Sutanto, A H

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective study was done on infants with diarrhea who were hospitalized at the Pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan in a period of one year (January 1 to December 31, 1986). There were 3317 hospitalized patients and 1506 (45.40%) of them had diarrhea. Of these, 773 (51.32%) were in the age group of under 2 years. Thirty eight patients (4.91%) with infantile diarrhea died and prolonged diarrhea was found in 54 (6.98%) cases.

  4. Dr. William Briggs: ophthalmic physician at St. Thomas' Hospital, London.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, J

    2001-01-01

    William Briggs, MD, established himself as one of the first ophthalmic physicians, whom today we would call a neuro-ophthalmologist, to practice in the United Kingdom. After graduating with an MD from Cambridge in 1677, and while a Fellow of Corpus Christi College, he carried out original studies in visual anatomy and physiology. He described and named the optic papilla and the retinal nerve fibers in his book Ophthalmographia, published in 1676. He published his New Theory of Vision in 1682. While at Cambridge, he was a contemporary and a friend of Isaac Newton, with whom Briggs worked but who, in matters of visual anatomy and physiology, came to reach different conclusions from Briggs. In 1683, Briggs came to London to practice as a physician at St. Thomas' Hospital, where he established a considerable reputation as an ophthalmologist. For political reasons he was forced to resign from the Hospital prematurely.

  5. Dr Digby Moynagh (1911-1963) and the Graylands Day Hospital, 1959-1965.

    PubMed

    Martyr, Philippa

    2017-10-01

    To describe the establishment of Australia's first psychiatric day hospital in Western Australia in April 1959 by Dr Digby Moynagh (1911-1963). A range of primary and secondary sources were consulted. Moynagh was able to establish the Graylands Day Hospital because he had an outsider's perspective, and was familiar with the day hospital model from UK psychiatric literature. However, he was opposed by local medical and political interests, which eventually led to his departure from the State. The Graylands Day Hospital and Digby Moynagh both contributed towards the process of psychiatric deinstitutionalisation in Australia.

  6. Revoking hospital privileges: new directions in Ontario. Dr. N. v. Brantford General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Liswood, J; McClure, A E

    1993-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Ontario Hospital Appeal Board have helped hospital boards understand the importance of due process when revoking a physician's hospital privileges. The authors illustrate the need to have a mechanism to suspend privileges immediately but which also provides physicians with the opportunity to respond to allegations. The article outlines 11 clauses that serve as a practical guide to due process and can be added to hospital by-laws.

  7. Congenital malformation among newborns at Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan during 1981-1984.

    PubMed

    Lubis, B; Tjipta, G D; Panjaitan, A J; Raid, N; Siregar, H

    1989-01-01

    A study on the incidence of congenital malformation had been assessed among 15,185 newborns delivered in the Neonatal Unit, Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan during 1981-1984. Still-births were not included in this study. Out of these 15,185 newborns there were 77 cases (0.51%) of congenital malformation. The four leading malformations were pes-equinovarus 7 cases (9.1%), labiognathopalatoschizis, hydrocephalus and anencephalus 6 cases each (7.7%). The number of congenital malformations was higher in the age group of mothers older than 35 years (0.78%) and in the group of babies born in the birth order as third and further (53.85%) and as first born babies (33.33%). From 77 cases with congenital malformation only 2 (2.56%) were operated soon after birth, while 49 cases (64.1%) went home without surgical intervention, and 28 cases (35.9%) died during hospitalization.

  8. A portrait of prefrontal lobotomy performed at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney by Dr Rex Money.

    PubMed

    White, Richard T; McGee-Collett, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this article is to provide a portrait of prefrontal lobotomy performed at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney by the Head of Neurosurgery Dr Rex Money and to describe Dr Money's role in the promotion of psychosurgery in Sydney. We draw attention to an oral presentation by Dr Rex Money in 1951, a journal article written by Money, archival information held at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, including Dr Money's accounts of his travels and his reports regarding neurosurgery - both internationally and in Australia. Dr Rex Money performed a series of 13 prefrontal lobotomies between 1945 and 1951, and presented the theoretical basis for his series, his operative procedures and the outcomes at the annual meeting of its medical officers' association. Notwithstanding various deficiencies in his clinical research, Money's descriptions give a relatively comprehensive account of one of the first series of prefrontal lobotomies performed in Australia. The current article also describes Dr Money's contributions to the promotion of psychosurgery in Sydney, and illustrates the participation of a senior neurosurgeon and of a major Sydney teaching hospital during the psychosurgery saga. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  9. [DR ALEKSANDAR DORŠNER THE FIRST HOSPITAL OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGIST IN SPLIT AND DALMATIA].

    PubMed

    Ivanišević, Petar; Poljak, Nikola Kolja; Cikojević, Draško; Doršner, Katarina; Ivanišević, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Dr Aleksandar Doršner (Trebinje, 1892 - Lima, 1967) was the first hospital otorhinolaryngologist in Split and Dalmatia. He graduated from the Faculty of Medicine in Prague in 1919, and specialized otorhinolaryngology in Graz and Vienna. He led and organized otorhinolaryngological service in Split Hospital from 1923 to 1934, and he also had a private practice. Temporarily he also worked outside Split in Dalmatian hinterland and in Šibenik, Zadar and Dubrovnik. Most frequently he performed the following otorhinolaryngological operations: tonsillectomies and adenoidectomies and operations of purulent middle ear inflammations with mastoiditis, nasal polyps, deviated nasal septum, maxillary sinus empyema and otorhinolaryngological trauma. In 1928 he became a member of Otorhinolaryngological section of Croatian Medical Chamber. He participated in the work of the first otorhinolaryngological congress of the former Yugoslavia in 1931, taken place in Zagreb. From 1928 he was a member of Oto-Neuro-Ophthalmological Society. From 1933 to 1937 he was a vice-president of the main board of Free Organization of Dalmatian Physicians in Split. In 1938 he left Split permanently and continued living with his family in Lima (Peru) where he died in 1967. He was an erudite. He lived for his profession which he liked very much and dedicated his life to. He is one of the most meritorious doctors in Split medical history, whom otorhinolaryngology service in Split Hospital started with.

  10. Diarrhea in neonates at the Subdivision of Perinatology Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan.

    PubMed

    Nurjannah; Tjipta, G D; Aldy, D; Raid, N

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective study on diarrheal manifestation in newborn babies was conducted at the ward of Neonatology, Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan from January to December 1988. There were all 3367 babies hospitalized during the study period. One hundred and thirty five (4.0%) had diarrhea, including 106 (78.5%) babies with birth weights of greater than or equal to 2500 gram. Of 2478 babies with spontaneous delivery, 34 (1.4%) babies had diarrhea, while of 889 babies with obstetrical intervention delivery 101 (11.4%) babies had diarrhea. The difference was statistically significant (p less than 0.001). Of 135 babies with diarrhea, there were 82 (60.7%) with moderate and 31 (23.0%) with severe dehydration. The mortality rate was 47.5% in patients with accompanying diseases and 0.0% in them without. The mortality rate in babies with birth weights less than 2500 gr was 37.9% and 16.9% in babies with birthweights greater than or equal to 2500 gram (p less than 0.001). The mortality rate increased with the increase of severity of dehydration (p less than 0.03).

  11. Gastroenteritis in the pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan in 1983.

    PubMed

    Pasaribu, S; Lubis, M; Arsyad, F; Barus, N; Sutanto, A H

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, 2869 infants and children were hospitalized in the pediatric ward of the Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Mecan. Of these, 1317 (46.2%) were gastroenteritis cases; 635 of these patients (48.2%) were those ages 0-1 year. The highest prevalence is found among this group. The months of July and August accounted for the majority of gastroenteritis cases, 15.6% in the 1st and 14.2% in the 2nd. This condition held true for all age groups. Mild, moderate, and severe dehydration were encountered in 4.3%, 35.7%, and 60.6% of the cases. The over 3 year olds had the highest number of severe dehydration cases; 76.5% of all patients in the same age group. Most of these cases occurred in July; 71.2% in that month. A significant inverse correlation between age and diarrhea duration was evident--the younger the age, the longer the duration of diarrhea (p0.01). Administration of oral electrolyte solution did not significantly alter the duration of diarrhea. The overall mortality rate was 13%. The highest age specific fatality rate was found among those ages 0-1 (20.3%). Mortality for those children older than 3 was 1.8%.

  12. Perinatal mortality and morbidity at Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan 1985-1986.

    PubMed

    Tjipta, G D; Aldy, D; Raid, N; Sembiring, B R

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted on babies born during January 1985 to December 1986 at Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan. The aim of this study was to evaluate perinatal mortality and morbidity, and various possible factors related to the subject matter. The main results can be summarized as follows: There were 7102 deliveries during the study period consisting of 999 babies weighing less than 2500 gram and 6103 with body weight of 2500 gram or more. Perinatal mortality rate was 563.56% in the first group and 78.49% in the second while the overall++ mortality rate was 146.72%. Rate of perinatal demise was high in babies born from mothers in the age groups of below 20 and above 35 years, namely 681.82% and 202.19%. It was also high among primiparae (165.67%) and more so among grandmultiparae (246.46%). There were 1966 (30.49%) ill newborn babies with asphyxia neonatorum accounting for 44.91%, infection 30.42% and respiratory problems 9.21% of the main causes of illness, while respiratory problems (40.05%) and infection (28.68%) constituted the main causes of death. We concluded that the rate of perinatal mortality and morbidity is still high at this hospital. Quality of prenatal and neonatal care with extensive public health education is necessary to be enhanced for the reduction of perinatal mortality and morbidity.

  13. [Obstetric hysterectomy in the General Hospital Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso: three-year review].

    PubMed

    Calvo-Aguilar, O; Vásquez-Martínez J; Hernández-Cuevas, P

    2016-02-01

    Post-cesarean hysterectomy is the most extensive procedure used during the postpartum stage. This is an indicator of quality substantially associated with extreme obstetric morbidity. To determine the incidence, indications, and complications associated with obstetric hysterectomy in a hospital, after three years to implement the program of prevention and management of massive obstetric hemorrhage. Observational, transversal, retrospective and descriptive study conducted from January 2011 to November 2013. We records patients who underwent obstetric hysterectomy, of any age and at any time during pregnancy were reviewed. The results are expressed as frequencies, percentages and central tendency measures. 38 patients were recorded with obstetric hysterectomy. We found prevalence of 18.4 per 10,000, and incidence per year of 1.7, 1.4 and 2.6 per 1,000 births for 2011, 2012 and 2013. The prevalence of post-cesarean hysterectomy was 63.05 per 10,000 while postpartum was 9.05 per 10,000 births. The only difference between scheduled and emergency surgery was operating time. The procedure is associated with anemia in postpartum 13 times and the main indications for the procedures were hypo/atony and placenta accrete. The prenatal diagnoses of placenta accrete and improvement in the use of blood products and surgical technique has eliminated maternal mortality by massive obstetric hemorrhage in the last three years at the General Hospital "Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso".

  14. Clinical features of severe malnutrition at the pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan.

    PubMed

    Barus, S T; Rani, R; Lubis, N U; Hamid, E D; Tarigan, S

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective study on severe malnutrition concerning children hospitalized at the Pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan from January 1 to December 31, 1988 was conducted. Patients less than five years old were included in this study. The purpose of this study was to know the incidence of severe malnutrition, its symptoms and signs, the immunization status, feeding pattern and socio-economic factors. Out of the 3370 hospitalized patients, 2453 (72.78%) were children under five years old. Of these, 312 (12%) suffered from severe malnutrition. It consisted of marasmus 131 (41.9%), marasmic kwashiorkor 94 (30.1%) and kwashiorkor 87 (27.8%). The highest incidence was found in the age group of 0-2 years (58%). Clinical manifestation of marasmus were old man face (131 or 100%), muscular hypotrophy (118 or 71.9%) and decreased subcutaneous fat (116 or 71.1%) in marasmic kwashiorkor children 46 or 50% had their hair easily picked out, 45 or 46.3% showed hyperpigmentation and 48 or 52% had pretibial edema in the kwashiorkor group 29 or 63% had moon face, 52 or 60.4% showed crazy pavement dermatosis, 77 or 51.3% had hepatomegaly and 87 or 48% pretebial edema. Moon face was seen in 29 (63%), crazy Pavement Dermatosis in 52 (60.4%), hepatomegaly in 77 (51.3%), and pretebial edema in 87 (48%) of kwashiorkor cases. The accompanying diseases were mostly diarrhea (95%) and bronchopneumonia (22%). Immunization status showed that BCG comprised 50.6%, while DPT III and OPV III in 13.7% and 10.5% respectively and measles only 0.64%. More than half (59.6%) of them were breast-fed up to 6 months.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Revolutionary changes in medicine and ophthalmology--the St. Louis, MO, effect: Homer G. Phillips Hospital and Dr. Howard Phillip venable.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Andrew S.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide information on the revolutionary changes in medicine, particularly on the development of African-Americans in ophthalmology, created by Homer G. Phillips Hospital in St. Louis and the late Dr. Howard Phillip Venable. METHODS: Very little has been written about Homer G. Phillips Hospital and Dr. H. Phillip Venable. Through personal interviews with physicians trained by Dr. Venable and literature review, I was able to obtain information on Homer G. Phillips Hospital and Dr. Venable's influence in breaking the color line in medicine and ophthalmology. RESULTS: Homer G. Phillips Hospital in St. Louis was a major teaching hospital for African-American doctors. Dr. Venable was one of a few African-American ophthalmologists in the 1940s. Dr. Venable then trained approximately 40 African-American ophthalmologists at Homer G. Phillips Hospital between 1943 to 1979, when the hospital closed. CONCLUSION: The ophthalmologists trained by Dr. Venable have gone forward to treat thousands of patients with blinding eye diseases such as glaucoma and diabetes, and to influence others to become ophthalmologists. Although the hospital has closed and Dr. Venable has passed away, their existence has reformed the medical treatment received by African-Americans and other people. Images p484-a PMID:12856914

  16. Immunization in the Well Baby Clinic of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan.

    PubMed

    Dalimunthe, S; Tjipta, G D; Lubis, I Z; Manoeroeng, S M; Lubis, C P

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective study on an immunization programme was carried out in the Well Baby Clinic, Child Health Department, School of Medicine, University of North Sumatera, Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan from January to December 1986. Of the 5951 total visits (an average of 495 visits each month) 3960 were primary and 1991 secondary visits. Most were first children in the family (39.9%) of which 37.6% were from one child families. Of 3275 live births 57.6% were immunized with BCG immediately after birth. The average BCG immunization visits to the Well Baby Clinic was 17 visits/day. When compared with DPT I and polio I visits we recorded a decrease of 27.1% for DPT II; 47.9% DPT III; 27.4% polio II; and 49.1% polio III respectively. Daily coverage of measles immunization visits was 4.6%. Complete immunization among the under-one-year-old children was 5.7% of which 44.9% were of the 9-12 months old group. The simultaneous immunization (BCG, DPT, polio, measles) comprised 0.5% of all visits. 4.1% of all visits were not immunized of which 36.5% was because they were beyond the immunization schedule.

  17. Intestinal parasitic infestation in pediatric gastroenterology outpatient clinic Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, R; Siregar, C D; Sinuhaji, A B; Sutanto, A H

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective study had been done at the outpatient clinic sub division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Dr. Pirngcdi Hospital Medan, comprising patients from 1 January 1985-31 December 1987. There were 874 patients. Three hundred seventy eight (43.25%) patients consisting of 210 (55.56%) males and 168 (44.44%) females had intestinal parasitic infestations. The youngest patient was 5 months and the oldest was 14 years and 3 months. Ascaris lumbricoides was found in 215 patients (24.60%) while Trichuris trichiura, hookworm, Oxyuris vermicularis, Hymenolepis nana, and Taenia were in 152 (17.39%), 13 (1.49%), 4 (0.46%), 15 (1.72%) and 4 (0.46%) cases respectively. Entamoeba histolytica was found in 121 (13.84%) and Giardia lamblia in 16 (1.83%) patients. The highest age specific attack rate was found in the age group of 5-10 years (65.67%). Ascaris lumbricoides was most frequently found namely in 100 children (26.46%), followed by Entameba histolytica in 73 (19.31%) and mixed infestation of Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura in 68 (17.99%) patients. One hundred seventy three (66.28%) under five patients with intestinal parasitic infestation had malnutrition while of the 433 under fives without intestinal parasitic infestation only 201 (46.42%) suffered from malnutrition (P less than 0.001).

  18. Dr Walter Henry Anderson (1870-1937) and the mission hospital at Safed, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Gordon S

    2013-02-01

    Walter Henry Anderson, a brewer's clerk in Burton-upon-Trent, became a missionary doctor, supported by a society promoting welfare and evangelism in Jewish communities abroad. His family background was rich in pastoral ministry at home and adventure abroad. Arguably, this background played a part in his decision to serve the Jews of Safed. His life in Palestine entailed much enterprise and hardship as he raised a family, fought disease and set up a mission hospital serving not only the Jewish community but persons of all faiths. His years in Palestine, from 1894 to 1915, were times of peace in the Middle East before the turmoil unleashed by the Great War. Jews from the Diaspora were gaining an increasing foothold in Palestine, their 'Promised Land'. Themes of that era - the rise of Zionism, confrontation between Judaism and evangelical Christianity, conflict between immigrant Jew and Palestinian Arab and the remarkable travels of Lawrence of Arabia were interwoven with the lives of Dr Anderson and his family.

  19. Evaluation of Nosocomial Infection in Patients at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, A; Farhangi, H; Badiee, Z; Banihashem, A; Mosaddegh, MR

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections in critical care unit are high, and they are serious hospital problems. Infections acquired during the hospital stay are generally called nosocomial infections, initially known as infections arising after 48 h of hospital admission. The mostfrequent nosocomial infections (urinary, respiratory, gastroenteritis and blood stream infection) were common in patients at hospital.The aim was to study, the current status of nosocomial infection, rate of infection among hospitalized children at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Materials and Methods Data were collected from 200 patient's records presented with symptoms of nosocomial infection at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital from March 2014 to September 2014. Descriptive statistics using percentage was calculated. Results Incidence of nosocomial infections inpatients athematology-oncology ward was 31% (62/200). Of which 69.35% (43/62) blood stream infection being the most frequent; followed by 30.64% (19/62) was urinary tract infection (UTI), and the most common blood culture isolate was been Staphylococcus epidermidis 18 (41.86%), andour study showed that large numbers ofnosocomial UTIs causing by Gram‑negative bacteria. Conclusion This study showed blood stream infection and UTI are the common nosocomial infections among patients athematology-oncology ward. Early recognition of infections and short term use of invasive devices along with proper infection control procedures can significantly decrease the incidence of nosocomial infections in patients. PMID:26985350

  20. [Prevalence of gastrointestinal disorders in adults with common variable immunodeficiency at Specialty Hospital Dr. Bernardo Sepulveda].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Negrete, Elda Victoria; Mayoral-Zavala, Arturo; Rodríguez-Mireles, Karen Alicia; Díaz de León-Salazar, Oscar Edmundo; Hernández-Mondragón, Oscar; Gómez-Jiménez, Luz María; Moreno-Alcántar, R; González-Virla, Baldomero

    2015-01-01

    Antecedentes: la incidencia de la inmunodeficiencia común variable (IDCV) es de 1 por cada 15,000 a 117,000 casos, sin predominio de género. La incidencia de manifestaciones gastrointestinales en estos pacientes es de 20 a 60% y pueden ser la primera y única manifestación clínica de IDCV. En México existe escasa información en relación con el tipo y frecuencia de alteraciones gastrointestinales que padecen los pacientes adultos con IDCV. Objetivo: determinar la prevalencia de alteraciones gastrointestinales en pacientes adultos con inmunodeficiencia común variable. Material y método: estudio descriptivo, observacional y transversal en el que participaron pacientes con inmunodeficiencia común variable de la Clínica de Inmunodeficiencias del Servicio de Alergia e Inmunología Clínica del Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI. A todos los pacientes se les aplicó un cuestionario de síntomas gastrointestinales y se les realizaron estudios de laboratorio, gabinete, endoscopia y prueba de aliento para determinar sobrepoblación bacteriana. Resultados: evaluamos 17 pacientes, 8 hombres y 9 mujeres, con edad promedio de 36 años y diagnóstico definitivo de inmunodeficiencia común variable de acuerdo con criterios internacionales. El 59% refirió dolor abdominal, 53% distensión abdominal y 17.6% estreñimiento. El 47% tenía diarrea crónica, en dos de ellos (11.8%) acompañada de pujo rectal. Las enfermedades gastrointestinales de esta población fueron: 18% diarrea crónica, enfermedad celiaca y sobrepoblación bacteriana, 24% trastorno funcional digestivo, 12% estreñimiento, 6% dispepsia. Sólo un paciente (6%) no tenía síntomas gastrointestinales. Conclusión: la prevalencia de las enfermedades gastrointestinales en pacientes adultos con inmunodeficiencia común variable fue de 94%, sin predominio de género. Debido a la frecuencia de manifestaciones gastrointestinales, es importante realizar protocolos de estudio al respecto

  1. [Genotyping of Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii complex clinical isolates from Hospital "Dr. Julio C. Perrando", Resistencia city (Chaco, Argentina)].

    PubMed

    Cattana, Maria E; Tracogna, Maria F; Fernández, Mariana S; Carol Rey, Mariana C; Sosa, Maria A; Giusiano, Gustavo E

    2013-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a fungal infection caused by yeast species of Cryptococcus genus, particularly Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii species complex. The knowledge of the cryptococcosis casuistic in northeastern Argentina is scarce and there is no information about the molecular types circulating in this area. The aim of this study was to genotyping C. neoformans/C. gattii complex clinical isolates obtained at Hospital "Dr. Julio C. Perrando", Resistencia city (Chaco, Argentina), in order to determine species, variety and molecular type. During two years and one month 26 clinical isolates were studied. Using conventional and molecular methods one isolate was identified as C. gattii VGI type, and 25 isolates as C. neoformans var. grubii; 23 of these belonged to VNI type and two belonged to VNII type. This data is a contribution to the knowledge of cryptococcosis epidemiology in Argentina and the first report about C. neoformans/ C. gattii complex molecular types from clinical isolates in northeastern Argentina.

  2. Acute hepatitis at the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of North Sumatra/Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan.

    PubMed

    Mahadi; Pasaribu, S; Lubis, M; Lubis, C P

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective study was done during 1984-1988 in the pediatric ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital revealing 41 cases of acute hepatitis, consisted of 61.0% boys and 39.0% girls. The majority of patients were below five years of age (68.3%). There were 37.1% cases with malnutrition. The common symptoms were fever, jaundice, vomiting and dark urine. On laboratory examination there were 10 cases with positive HBs Ag. Accompanying diseases were malnutrition, bronchopneumonia, anemia, bronchitis and pulmonary tuberculosis. A total of 63.4% of patients were healed, 29.3% discharged against medical advice and 7.3% died because of bronchopneumonia and hepatic coma.

  3. Spectrum of digestive tract diseases 1985-1987 at the Pediatric Gastroenterology Outpatient Clinic of Dr. Pirngadi General Hospital, Medan.

    PubMed

    Siregar, C D; Sinuhaji, A B; Sutanto, A H

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective study has been done on infants and children attending to the Pediatric Gastroenterology Outpatient Clinic of Dr. Pirngadi General Hospital in Medan, from 1985 through 1987. During the study there were 874 patients, 477 (54.58%) suffered from diarrhea, 209 (23.91%) had bloody stool, 20 (2.99%) jaundice, 57 (6.52%) abdominal pain, 48 (5.49%) abdominal distention, 30 (3.43%) vomiting, 13 (1.49%) constipation, and 20 (2.29%) others. Of all cases with diarrhoea, watery diarrhoea were found in only 319 (66.88%), diarrhoea with vomiting 84 (17.61%), and bloody diarrhoea 74 (15.51%). Stool examination in patients with diarrhoea revealed 144 (30.19%) cases with Candida albicans, while 16 (3.35%) of them with steatorrhoea. Of 63 patients with diarrhoea on which the clinitest had been performed, sugar intolerance were found in 30 (47.62%) cases.

  4. Social support and diabetes control: a study among patients admitted to specialized clinic of Dr. Gharazi hospital in Isfahan.

    PubMed

    Keyvanara, Mahmoud; Hosseini, Seyed Mohssen; Emami, Parirokh

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes causes premature mortality, disability and sometimes irreversible health consequences. Scholars believe that social factors directly and indirectly could impact patient in control of diabetes. The main purpose of this research is to understand how social support related to control of diabetes. 320 diabetic patients were randomly chosen from specialized clinic of Dr. Gharazy hospital in Isfahan. The element was questionnaire which its reliability was calculated according to coefficients Cronbach's alpha (r = 0.78). The patients 'two previous sessions 'blood sugar level and also their HbA1C were studied via referring to their medical records. Then the patients were categorized into successful and unsuccessful groups in controlling the diabetes. Their relationship of social support and diabetes control was analyzed through SPSS software. The findings show that there is a direct relationship between social support and control of diabetes. The patients who had better instrumental, emotional and informational social support, better controlled their diabetes.

  5. [Tuberculous meningitis: a 10-year analysis at the "Dr. Federico Gómez" Children's Hospital of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Karam Bechara, J; Sosa, R; Naime Libien, J E; Posada Maldonado, E E

    1991-01-01

    Of all the forms of tuberculous infection in children, the most frequent is the pulmonary, but the tuberculous meningitis is the most severe and mortal, it occurs mainly in children under five years old, and the highest mortality is in children under two. The results of a retrospective study carried out at the Children Hospital of Mexico "Dr. Federico Gómez" about all the patients hospitalized with tuberculous meningitis diagnose during the January 1975 to December 1985 period were presented. One hundred and eighteen cases were studied: the majority (80%) corresponded to children under four years old, a percentage of 79 presented some degree of malnutrition, and 86 per cent showed clinical data of neurological affection. The confirmation of the diagnose was made in the majority of cases through laboratory and cabinet studies. Forty per cent showed no alteration in the chest X-rays, and the isolation of the bacillus was in a very low percentage (15%). All the patients were treated with the antituberculous drugs mentioned, with a better development in the ones associated with steroids. The hospital stay was over 30 days in 15 per cent of the cases. The mortality of the series reviewed was 44.5 per cent.

  6. Factors influencing the mortality of children with gastroenteritis at the Pediatric Ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan.

    PubMed

    Lubis, N U; Sinuhaji, A B; Sutanto, A H

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective study was done on infants and children hospitalized from January 1, 1988 to December 31, 1988 at the Pediatric Ward of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan. In this period a total of 3370 patients had been hospitalized and 1356 (40.24%) had gastroenteritis of whom 96 patients (7.08%) died. The causes of death as the complications were encephalopathy in 27 patients (28.12%), bronchopneumonia in 32 (33.33%), shock in 27 (28.12%), sepsis in 6 (6.25%) and acidosis in 4 (4.17%). Fifty one (53.12%) of those 96 patients who died were in the age group of under one year. The age specific mortality rate was highest in the age group of 1 month (14.28%). Of those 1356 patients with gastroenteritis 566 (41.74%) were well nourished of whom 8 patients died (1.42%); mildly malnourished in 532 patients of whom 36 (6.77%) died; and severely malnourished in 258 patients of whom 52 (20.16%) died. As far as the duration of illness was concerned 43 patients (12.73%) who died had a history of illness at home of 1 day. Beside the complications of the disease it seemed that the nutritional factors might have interfered with the mortality of patients with gastroenteritis.

  7. [Maternal mortality in the Hospital General de Matamoros Dr. Alfredo Pumarejo Lafaurie for a period of 10 years].

    PubMed

    González-Rosales, Ricardo; Ayala-Leal, Isabel; Cerda-López, Jorge Alejandro; Cerón-Saldaña, Miguel Angel

    2010-04-01

    In Mexico, maternal mortality has fallen substantially in recent decades. Although according to the Secretaria de Salud, in Tamaulipas the maternal mortality rate has increased in recent years. Despite these facts, Tamaulipas ranks among the ten institutions with the lowest level of maternal mortality. To describe the basic elements of epidemiologic behavior of maternal mortality during a period of ten years at the Gynecology and Obstetrics department of the Hospital General de Matamoros Dr. Alfredo Pumarejo Lafaurie in Tamaulipas, Mexico. A descriptive, transverse, retrospective and a cases series research was carried out at the Gynecology and Obstetrics department of the Hospital General de Matamoros Dr. Alfredo Pumarejo Lafaurie in Tamaulipas, Mexico. There was a revision of the expedients of direct and indirect obstetric maternal deaths occurred from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2007. We used descriptive statistics with central trend measurements and standard deviation. 30 obstetric maternal deaths were registered. Maternal death ratio was 87.2 x 100,000 live births during the 10 years. The average age of patients was 25.1 +/- 7.8 years old. 54% were in their first pregnancy. Only 20% had adequate prenatal control. Direct obstetric causes were 60% and indirect obstetric causes 40%. The main causes of maternal deaths were preeclampsia/eclampsia (27%), obstetric hemorrhage (20%) and gravid-puerperal sepsis (13%). 83% was foreseeable. It was noted a clear trend towards the reduction in the maternal mortality ratio in the decade from 1998 to 2007. Preeclampsia-eclampsia and obstetric hemorrhage remain the main causes of maternal death. The maternal mortality ratio tended to invest when comparing the first five years with the last five years of the study, which talks about improvements in management and direct obstetric causes prevention.

  8. [Gallstone ileus, experience in the Dr. Eduardo Liceaga General Hospital of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pérez, Eder Alejandro; Álvarez-Álvarez, Sinuhé; Madrigal-Téllez, Marco Antonio; Gutiérrez-Uvalle, Gabriela Elaine; Ramírez-Velásquez, Jorge Enrique; Hurtado-López, Luis Mauricio

    Gallstone ileus is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction (1-4%). It results from the migration of a gallstone through a bilio-enteric fistula. Treatment begins with fluid therapy, followed by enterolithotomy, fistula closure, and cholecystectomy. To determine the clinical presentation in patients with gallstone ileus and subsequent medical -surgical management outcomes. A retrospective, observational, descriptive and transversal study was conducted on patients diagnosed with intestinal obstruction secondary to a gallstone ileus from May 2013 to October 2014. The following variables were recorded: age, sex, comorbidities, mean time of onset of symptoms, length of preoperative and postoperative stay, imaging studies, biochemical tests, type of surgical management, stone location and size, complications, mortality, and postoperative follow-up. The study included 10 patients (male: female ratio 1:4), with a mean age of 61.9 years. The mean time of onset symptoms 15.4 days, and preoperative stay was 2days. On admission, 80% of patients had leukocytosis and neutrophilia, and 70% with renal failure. The most common surgical management was enterolithotomy with primary closure (50%), finding 80% of the stones in the terminal ileum. Recurrence was found in 2 cases. Mean postoperative hospital stay was 6.3 days. Mortality was 20%. Gallstone ileus most commonly presented in women in the seventh decade of life, with intermittent bowel obstruction. On hospital admission, they presented with systemic inflammatory response, electrolyte imbalance and abnormal liver function tests. Initial treatment must include fluid-electrolyte replacement, and tomography scans must be made in all cases. In our experience, the best procedure is enterolithotomy and primary closure, which presented lower morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. The Completion of Non-Steady-State Queue Model on The Queue System in Dr. Yap Eye Hospital Yogyakarta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmi Manggala Putri, Arum; Subekti, Retno; Binatari, Nikenasih

    2017-06-01

    Dr Yap Eye Hospital Yogyakarta is one of the most popular reference eye hospitals in Yogyakarta. There are so many patients coming from other cities and many of them are BPJS (Badan Penyelenggara Jaminan Sosial, Social Security Administrative Bodies) patients. Therefore, it causes numerous BPJS patients were in long queue at counter C of the registration section so that it needs to be analysed using queue system. Queue system analysis aims to give queue model overview and determine its effectiveness measure. The data collecting technique used in this research are by interview and observation. After getting the arrival data and the service data of BPJS patients per 5 minutes, the next steps are investigating steady-state condition, examining the Poisson distribution, determining queue models, and counting the effectiveness measure. Based on the result of data observation on Tuesday, February 16th, 2016, it shows that the queue system at counter C has (M/M/1):(GD/∞/∞) queue model. The analysis result in counter C shows that the queue system is a non-steady-state condition. Three ways to cope a non-steady-state problem on queue system are proposed in this research such as bounding the capacity of queue system, adding the servers, and doing Monte Carlo simulation. The queue system in counter C will reach steady-state if the capacity of patients is not more than 52 BPJS patients or adding one more server. By using Monte Carlo simulation, it shows that the effectiveness measure of the average waiting time for BPJS patients in counter C is 36 minutes 65 seconds. In addition, the average queue length of BPJS patients is 11 patients.

  10. Prognosis of tetanus patients in the intensive care unit of Provincial Hospital Jason Sendwe, Lubumbashi, DR Congo

    PubMed Central

    Muteya, Michel Manika; Kabey, Alain Kabey a; Lubanga, Théophile Muyumba; Tshamba, Henri Mundongo; Nkoy, Albert Mwembo Tambwe a

    2013-01-01

    Tetanus is still a public health problem in developing countries including the Democratic Republic of Congo. The objective of this study was to determine the prognosis of patients with tetanus admitted in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Provincial Hospital Jason Sendwe, Lubumbashi, DR Congo. This is a descriptive study which collected information from registers and medical records of patients admitted for tetanus in the ICU of Jason Sendwe Hospital, between January 2005 and December 2009. We calculated the parameters of position, dispersion as well as frequencies. We used the test of independent association of prognosis (death versus survival). Tetanus constituted 2.1% of admissions in the ICU during the 5-year period. The average age of patients was 39.38 ± 17; majority of patients were males (95.5%). The majority of patients lived the townships of Kampemba (27.3%), Kenya (22.7%), and Annexe (18.2%). All patients presented the generalized form of the infection. The door of entry was detectable in 71.5% of cases, localized mainly to the lower limbs (61.9%). The average length of stay was 11.29 ± 11.39 days. Mortality was observed in 52.4% of cases. This mortality was statistically significant in patients aged mrore than 40 years (p=0.029) but not not related to the length of stay (p=0.080) nor the location of point of entry(p=0.28). In our environment the prognosis of tetanus remains severe. This disease is still frequent in the city of Lubumbashi; sensibilisation of population on preventive strategies as well as setting up appropriate structures for better management of cases is required. PMID:23717709

  11. The development of pediatric critical care medicine at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: an interview with Dr. John J. 'Jack' Downes.

    PubMed

    Mai, Christine L; Schreiner, Mark S; Firth, Paul G; Yaster, Myron

    2013-07-01

    Dr. John J. 'Jack' Downes (1930-), the anesthesiologist-in-chief at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (1972-1996), has made numerous contributions to pediatric anesthesia and critical care medicine through a broad spectrum of research on chronic respiratory failure, status asthmaticus, postoperative risks of apnea in premature infants, and home-assisted mechanical ventilation. However, his defining moment was in January 1967, when The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia inaugurated its pediatric intensive care unit--the first of its kind in North America. During his tenure, he and his colleagues trained an entire generation of pediatric anesthesiologists and intensivists and set a standard of care and professionalism that continues to the present day. Based on an interview with Dr. Downes, this article reviews a career that advanced pediatric anesthesia and critical care medicine and describes the development of that first pediatric intensive care unit at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

  12. Evaluation of the efficiency of hospital antibiotic policy applied Dr Jan Biziel University Hospital No 2 in Bydgoszcz in 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Kuziemski, Arkadiusz; Frankowska, Krystyna; Gonia, Ewa; Czerniak, Beata; Bakhurynska, Olena; Sobociński, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    The Hospital Infection Control Team (HICT) of Dr Jan Biziel University Hospital No 2 in Bydgoszcz developed and implemented the principles of a rational antibiotic therapy in 2008. A behavior algorithm has worked since 01.10.2008. Implementation of the principles of a rational antibiotic therapy was part of the hospital antibiotic policy. is to evaluate either introductory principles of the rational antibiotic therapy, after five-year experience lived up to expectations in the range specified by the authors. Hospital microbiological maps, comparisons of antibiotic cost, specification of microbiological tests made before and after introduction of the principles of a rational antibiotic therapy have been analyzed. Annual antibiotic consumption has been counted according to the defined daily dose (DDD) index created by the WHO. After 6 years of implementation of the rational antibiotic therapy principles, the decrease in number of isolated strains which are resistant to Klebsiella pneumoniae ESBL and Acinetobacter baumanii (resistant to carbapenems) has been indicated. The number of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates has increased approximately three times, and the number of resistant isolates to carbapenem has grown six times. The cost of antibiotics has been gradually decreased in 2012 in order to represent 9,66% of all drug budget (without drug programs). Detailed analysis of antibiotic consumption has showed that after the implementation of rational antibiotic therapy principles the consumption of meropenem has increased twice in comparison to the all drugs. The number of microbiological tests grew from 0,20 to 0,29 per one patient, which means material to microbiological tests has been taken from every third patient. Annual DDD index calculated on 100 person-days has been reduced from 59,552 in 2007 to 39,90 in 2009, and it is 47,88 in 2013. The principles of rational antibiotic therapy in comparison with the other elements of antibiotic policy in hospital have

  13. Factors influencing the practice of bottle feeding in infants at the well-child clinic Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan.

    PubMed

    Lukman, H; Kaswadharma, K C; Lubis, I Z; Manoeroeng, S M; Lubis, C P

    1991-01-01

    From July to August 1988, a cross sectional analytical study on factors influencing bottle-feeding practice in infants at the Well-Child Clinic Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan, was conducted by using a designated interview and questionnaire. The sample size was determined by a standard formula. The purpose of this study was to define factors influencing bottle-feeding practice in infants. During that period, 264 cases were studied. Of 85 infants age 0-3 months, 10 infants (11.7%) were exclusively bottle-fed, 35 (41.2%) bottle- and breast fed and 40 (47.1%) exclusively breast-fed. The practice of bottle feeding seemed to increase with age. In 85 infants of 7-12 months old, 28 (32.9%) were bottle-fed, 29 (34.2%) breast and bottle-fed, and 28 (32.9%) breast-fed. The main reason to use bottle-feeding was that the mother worked outside the house as in the group of infants with working-mothers 30.7% were bottle-fed. In relation to mother's education, it seemed that the practice of bottle-feeding was more frequently found in infants of high-educated mothers (26%). The one child families preferred bottle-feeding more (30.7%). Based on the family income, it seemed that the higher the income, the more they tended to give bottle-feeding. In the age group of 0-6 months, there were 176 well-nourished babies of which 74 were (42.1%) breast feeding, 75 (42.6%) breast- and bottle-feeding, and 27 (15.3%) bottle-feeding. Whereas, of 54 wellnourished babies aged 7-12 months, 15 infants (27.7%) were breast-fed, 20 (37.7%) breast- and bottle-fed, and 19 (35.2%) bottle-fed.

  14. The contribution of Dr. Mary Walker towards myasthenia gravis and periodic paralysis whilst working in poor law hospitals in London.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J D

    2005-06-01

    Dr. Mary Walker discovered in 1934 that physostigmine and Prostigmin temporarily restored muscle function in patients with myasthenia gravis. In the next five years, Dr. Walker and colleagues provided clinical evidence for the weakness of myasthenia gravis being caused by a "disturbance of transmission of excitation from motor nerve to voluntary muscle presumably caused by a deficiency of acetylcholine. Physostigmine (or Prostigmin) compensated for the lack of acetylcholine by delaying its destruction." Dr. Walker and colleagues also described the association between familial periodic paralysis and hypokalaemia.

  15. The protestant medical missions to China: Dr Thomas Richardson Colledge (1796-1879) and the founding of the Macao Ophthalmic Hospital.

    PubMed

    Fu, Louis

    2013-05-01

    A surgeon of the British East India Company, Dr Thomas Richardson Colledge, founded the Macao Ophthalmic Hospital in 1827. This was not only the first Western hospital ever opened in China for the purpose of bringing modern medicine to the Chinese but also the precursor of similar efforts of later medical missions in China. The gratifying results of this institute proved that employing Western medicine was an effective way to introduce Christianity to China and to open her door to the outside world. Though not a missionary himself, Colledge is rightfully regarded as the originator of medical missionaries to China.

  16. PREVALENCE OF METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS FROM NOSE AND THROAT OF PATIENTS ON ADMISSION TO MEDICAL WARDS OF DR SOETOMO HOSPITAL, SURABAYA, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Kuntaman, K; Hadi, Usman; Setiawan, Firman; Koendori, Eko Budi; Rusli, Musofa; Santosaningsih, Dewi; Severin, Juliette; Verbrugh, Henri A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in Indonesian hospitals are still scarce. These data are required for health management of infectious diseases in order to control hospital MRSA. The carriage rate of MRSA in nose and throat of patients on admission to Dr Soetomo Hospital Surabaya, Indonesia was 8.1% of 643 patients, 5.4% from throat, 3.9% from nose and 1.2% from both sites. Prevalence of MRSA among patients admitted to surgical and non-surgical ward was not different (8.2% and 8.0%, respectively). Although MRSA prevalence in Indonesian hospitals is low compared to many other countries worldwide, appropriate health strategies will be needed to be implemented if this infection is to be controlled.

  17. The development of pediatric anesthesiology and critical care medicine at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital: an interview with Dr. Theodore Striker.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zulfiqar; Samuels, Paul J; Mai, Christine L; Rodriguez, Samuel; Iftikhar, Ahmed Raza; Yaster, Myron

    2015-08-01

    Dr. Theodore W. 'Ted' Striker (1936-), Professor of Anesthesiology and Pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati, has played a pioneering role in the development of pediatric anesthesiology in the United States. As a model educator, clinician, and administrator, he shaped the careers of hundreds of physicians-in-training and imbued them with his core values of honesty, integrity, and responsibility.

  18. Dr. Weil responds.

    PubMed

    Weil, T P

    1986-11-01

    The July, 1986, issue of HCSM included an article by Thomas P. Weil, Ph.D., President, Bedford Health Associates, Asheville, North Carolina, entitled "The Effects of Ownership, System Affiliation and Corporate Unbundling on the Performance of Hospitals", p. 4-9. Several health executives have inquired whether Dr. Weil could provide substantive evidence to support his conclusions on the differences between not-for-profit and investor-owned hospitals. Here, are Dr. Weil's responses. It should be noted that this substantive evidence was included in the original paper and was deleted, however, when it was edited for publication.

  19. Effects of dietary pattern and education on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus at Dr. Sardjito Central General Hospital, Yogyakarta.

    PubMed

    Sinorita, Hemi; Saádah; Jazakillah, Setyowati

    2008-04-01

    to recognize the effect of education and diet on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus at Dr. Sardjito Central General Hospital, Jogjakarta. a cross-sectional study was conducted in 88 patients with type 2 DM who had routine visit to the outpatient clinic in Endocrinology Division of Dr. Sardjito Central General Hospital, Jogjakarta. As inclusion criteria, patients who had routine visit in 3 month continuously with fasting plasma glucose (GDN) < or = 126 mg/dl was participated as a well glycemic control group, and the one with GDN > 126 mg/dl as poor glycemic control group. Data were recorded which included age, sex, period of DM, daily diet pattern, and education received. we found that glycemic control was not affected by sex (p=0.52) and age (p=0.38), but it was affected by period of DM (p=0.02). Glycemic control in the present study was affected by dietary pattern (p=0.01), but not by education (p=1.00). the present study has found significant correlation between regulation of dietary pattern and glycemic control (p=0.01).

  20. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease at the Department of Child Health, School of Medicine, University of North Sumatera/Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan (1983-1985).

    PubMed

    Naim, M; Tjipta, G D; Siregar, A A; Halim, S

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study on rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in children was conducted at the Department of Child Health, Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan, during 1983-1985. The patients consisted of 43 females and 30 males. Most of the patients were over 12 years of age. Of the 73 patients there were 60 patients (82.19%) accompanied by valvular disorders. The most frequent major criteria of Jones found in this study were carditis and polyarthritis. Thirty one patients (42.46%) had functional status (NYHA) of grade II-IV, and 43 patients (58.90%) had cardiomegaly. The major ECG findings were enlargement of the atria or ventricles and first degree AV block. Compliance was only achieved in 25 (34.24%) cases. Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease still remain a challenge for the medical professionals to cope with in the region.

  1. Interacciones de galaxias en medios de diferente densidad a partir del catálogo SDSS DR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, M. S.; García Lambas, D.; Tissera, P.; Coldwell, G.

    From the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 2 (SDSS DR2), we construct a Catalog of 11274 pair galaxies with orbital parameters: rp< 100 kpc h-1 and Delta V < 350 km/sec. We analyze the star formation rate and colour indexes (u-r), (g-r) as a funcion of the orbital parameters in different environments. At low separation between pair members there is an important increase in the star formation activity and the fraction of blue colour indexes, which indicates that interactions are responsible of triggering SFR, increasing the young stellar population. The triggering of star formation by tidal torques seems to be more efficient in low density environments

  2. St John's Hospital (Morton House), Launceston, Australia: A history of the hospital and Dr William Russ Pugh's first operations under ether.

    PubMed

    Haridas, R P; Paull, J D

    2017-03-01

    On 7 June 1847, William Russ Pugh, MD, performed two operations at the St John's Hospital and Self-Supporting Dispensary, Launceston, Tasmania, while his patients were rendered insensible by the inhalation of sulphuric ether. These operations are the earliest documented surgical operations under ether in Australia. St John's Hospital officially opened on 1 September 1845. The hospital may have closed in late 1853 because of financial difficulties. The two-storey Georgian-style building which served as the hospital was completed c1831-1832. It has served as a residence, school, boarding school, hospital, medical consulting rooms and commercial offices. The building is now known as Morton House. We could not identify the date when the name Morton House was adopted, or explain the origin of the name. The earliest identified use of this name is in May 1873 in a newspaper advertisement for boarders. No person with the surname Morton is known to have been associated with the building as an owner or as a tenant. The name Morton House may honour William T.G. Morton, MD, the Boston dentist who performed the first public demonstration of surgical etherisation on 16 October 1846.

  3. The knowledge of parents of children with diarrhea on oralit at the department of child health, Dr. Pirngadi General Hospital Medan.

    PubMed

    Saragih, M; Ramayati, R; Karo-Karo, M; Harahap, E; Sutanto, A H; Siregar, H

    1983-01-01

    Over the October 1-December 30, 1981 period, the parents of all inpatients and outpatients at the Department of Child Health, Dr. Pirngadi General Hospital Medan (Indonesia) were interviewed to assess their knowledge or oralit, an oral rehydration treatment. The interviewer asked the educational level of the parents, knowledge and use of oralit, source of information, where oralit was obtained, and whether or not oralit is kept at home. 285 parents were interviewed. 227 had knowledge of oralit, but only 153 had used it; 58 had never heard of it. The primary information source was doctors (63.9%); newspapers and magazines (1.8%) had a minor role. Dispensaries (86.9%) were the places where people obtained oralit easily. Only 74 (48.3%) of the users kept oralit at home; 41 sometimes had it available; and 38 (24.9%) never had it. The main reason (44.3%) why the parents of children with diarrhea never kept it at home was the easy availability of oralit. Of 128 patients who sought treatment from medical staff (doctors and nurses) before they came to the hospital to be treated as inpatients or outpatients, 49% of the doctors and 50% of the nurses did not give oralit beforehand. The promotion of oralit would be more successful if village leaders, teachers, youths, and women's organizations participated in the program.

  4. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the Department of Child Health, School of Medicine, University of North Sumatera/Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan (1980-1988).

    PubMed

    Arifin, Z; Nasution, F; Sutjipto, A

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective study on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was conducted to assess the pattern of childhood ALL at the Subdivision of Pediatric of Hematology, School of Medicine, University of North Sumatera/Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan, in a period of 8 years (1980-1988). There were 120 cases, consisting of 63 (52.5%) males and 57 (47.5%) females. By the FAB classification (Bennett, 1976) (77.5%) were found as FAB L 1, 25 (20.8%) as FAB L 2, and 2 (1.7%) as FAB L 3. The youngest was 4 months old. The majority of signs and symptoms appeared in the forms of pallor 102 (85%), fever 84 (70%), hemorrhage 52 (43.3%), hepatomegaly 64 (53.3%), splenomegaly 54 (45%) and lymphadenopathy 18 (15%). On first admission, 76 (63.33%) cases were with a leukocyte count of less than 20,000/microliters, and 72 (60%) with Hb content of less than 5 g/dl. Twenty one cases died in the first year. The received cytostatic protocol; 11 (52.38%) were treated regularly and first remission were found in 8 (72.73%) cases. The average of admissions per year for the age group of 2-8 years was higher than the age groups of 0-2 years and 8-16 years (p less than 0.05).

  5. Arrhythmias and conduction disturbances in children at the Department of Child Health, School of Medicine University of North Sumatra/Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan.

    PubMed

    Keliat, D K; Hasibuan, B; Siregar, A A; Halim, S

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study on arrhythmias and conduction disturbances was conducted in 1986 in the Division of Pediatric Cardiology of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan. There were 106 (35.33%) cases with arrhythmias and conduction disturbances out of 300 patients studied. The most common type of arrhythmia among the patients under 5 was intraventricular conduction defects, whilst in the age group of 5-10 were sinus tachycardia and intraventricular conduction defects, and in the age group of 10-15 was first degree A-V block. Rheumatic heart diseases and VSD were the most common cardiac diseases associated with arrhythmias, where the frequency were 18.86% and 10.37%, respectively. Arrhythmias associated with several extracardiac diseases were found in 60 (56.61%). Two out of 7 cases treated with antiarrhythmic agents died with SVT associated with bronchopneumonia, and atrial fibrillation associated with gastroenteritis, dehydration and malnutrition. Treatment against the main diseases (without antiarrhythmic agents) was done in the remainder. Even though the overall mortality rate was 13.20%, it was not due to arrhythmia itself but most of them died of non-arrhythmic origin.

  6. The pattern of thalassemia in children at the Department of Child Health, School of Medicine University of North Sumatera/Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan.

    PubMed

    Sinulingga, S; Loebis, I F; Sutjipto, A

    1991-01-01

    A study of the characteristics of childhood thalassemia was conducted at the Sub Department of Pediatric Hematology, Dr. Pirngadi Hospital from June 1979 to May 1989. There were 131 cases, consisting of 75 (57.25%) boys and 56 (42.75%) girls with an average of 12 admission every year. The predominant age group was 0-2 years, and the youngest was 3 months old. Javanese ethnic group appeared predominant in 36 (63.15%) cases. Clinical symptoms of anemia were found in 112 (85.49%), hepatomegaly in 91 (69.46%), hepatosplenomegaly in 84 (64.12%), without enlargement of organ in 17 (12.97%), and icterus in 6 (4.58%). Hb-Electrophoresis was done in 42 cases, revealing 26 (61.90%) with thalassemia major, 15 (35.71%) Hb E thalassemia, and 1 (2.20%) Hb H thalassemia. Hb value at the first admission in 65 (49.62%) was less than 5 g/dl, in 63 (48.09%) it was 5-10 g/dl and in 3 (2.29%) more than 10 g/dl.

  7. Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia in the Department of Child Health School of Medicine, University of North Sumatera/Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan (1983-1988), a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Nasution, F; Arifin, Z; Sutjipto, A

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective study on Acute Non Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ANLL) was conducted at the Sub Division of Pediatric Hematology, School of Medicine, University of North Sumatera/Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan, in a period of 5 years (1983-1988). There were 18 cases consisted of 14 (77.78%) males and 4 (22.22%) females with the age group of 0-2 years: 6 (30%), 2-8 years: 9 (50%), 8-15 years: 3 (30%). By the FAB classification, they were of FAB M-1: 1 (5.55%). FAB M-2: 1 (5.55%), FAB M-3: 1 (5.55%), FAB M-4: 2 (11.12%) and FAB M-6: 13 (72.23%). Only 7 (38.88%) were treated with cytostatics while the others received only supportive therapy. The result of cytostatic treatment was unsatisfactory: 4 (57.14%) died within the first 2 months of treatment, 3 (42.86%) discontinued their cytostatics treatment.

  8. Cost of hospital care for HIV/AIDS infected patients in three general reference hospitals in Lubumbashi, DR Congo: prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tshamba, Henri Mundongo; a Kaut, Clarence Mukeng; Kyalubile, Nono Mulubwa; Kakambal, Alphonse Kaij; Yav, Grevisse Ditend; Kaj, Françoise Malonga; Vancaillie, Didier

    2013-01-01

    This article analyses the composition of healthcare costs for HIV/AIDS infected patients in a country with limited resources and attempts to identify the factors that influence these costs. The aims are to calculate medical care costs, analysing how they vary depending on patients' income, and to evaluate the factors explaining healthcare consumption. This is a prospective cohort study focusing on patients who were admitted to hospital for a short stay between January 2010 and June 2011, before their integration into a specialised program. The patients were selected randomly. Free consent was obtained from all participants. Data were analysed using the SPSS 19.0 software. The significance threshold was set at 5% and the CI (Confidence Interval) at 95%. We used Kruskal-Wallis tests, Fisher's exact test and multiple linear regression. We monitored 209 patients. Their average age was 36.37 years (SD: 8.72). The sex ratio was 0.58 and the women patients were generally younger than the male ones (p=0.011). The overall cost of healthcare amounted to $US 41,922. The cost of Antiretroviral Therapy represented 21.6% ($US 9,045). The price of para-clinical examinations represented 46% ($US 19,136) of the overall cost. The patient's average monthly income was $US 157.40 whereas the average direct cost per patient was$US 201.45. Both monthly income (t=4.385; p=0.0000) and education level (t=3.703 p=0.0003) were statistically significant predictive factors for healthcare consumption. The medical care costs for patients with opportunistic infections were nine times higher than those for patients who presented none. The presence of opportunistic infections increased healthcare consumption by approximately 31$ US (CI 95%: 15-46.9). The average direct cost for patients on each short-term stay was higher than the average monthly income. To be able to access the necessary services, the patients need additional resources, which are derived from various sources. Monthly income and the

  9. Cost of hospital care for HIV/AIDS infected patients in three general reference hospitals in Lubumbashi, DR Congo: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Tshamba, Henri Mundongo; a Kaut, Clarence Mukeng; Kyalubile, Nono Mulubwa; Kakambal, Alphonse Kaij; Yav, Grevisse Ditend; Kaj, Françoise Malonga; Vancaillie, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This article analyses the composition of healthcare costs for HIV/AIDS infected patients in a country with limited resources and attempts to identify the factors that influence these costs. The aims are to calculate medical care costs, analysing how they vary depending on patients’ income, and to evaluate the factors explaining healthcare consumption. Methods This is a prospective cohort study focusing on patients who were admitted to hospital for a short stay between January 2010 and June 2011, before their integration into a specialised program. The patients were selected randomly. Free consent was obtained from all participants. Data were analysed using the SPSS 19.0 software. The significance threshold was set at 5% and the CI (Confidence Interval) at 95%. We used Kruskal-Wallis tests, Fisher's exact test and multiple linear regression. Results We monitored 209 patients. Their average age was 36.37 years (SD: 8.72). The sex ratio was 0.58 and the women patients were generally younger than the male ones (p=0.011). The overall cost of healthcare amounted to $US 41,922. The cost of Antiretroviral Therapy represented 21.6% ($US 9,045). The price of para-clinical examinations represented 46% ($US 19,136) of the overall cost. The patient's average monthly income was $US 157.40 whereas the average direct cost per patient was$US 201.45. Both monthly income (t=4.385; p=0.0000) and education level (t=3.703 p=0.0003) were statistically significant predictive factors for healthcare consumption. The medical care costs for patients with opportunistic infections were nine times higher than those for patients who presented none. The presence of opportunistic infections increased healthcare consumption by approximately 31$ US (CI 95%: 15-46.9). Conclusion The average direct cost for patients on each short-term stay was higher than the average monthly income. To be able to access the necessary services, the patients need additional resources, which are derived

  10. [Incidence of cleft lip and palate in the General Hospital Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso of Oaxaca, México, between 2008 and 2010].

    PubMed

    Contreras-Acevedo, Flor de María; Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Martínez-Mendoza, Santa Adriana; Pontigo-Loyola, América Patricia; Estrada-Meráz, Herman Adolfo; Escoffié-Ramírez, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) is the most common craniofacial anomaly. to determine the incidence of cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) in patients born in the Hospital "Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso" in the city of Oaxaca between 2008 and 2010. A retrospective, cross-sectional study on all live births with non-syndromic orofacial cleft was realized. The variables included were CL/P presence, sex, and birth year. Clinical records of CL/P subjects were reviewed and clefts classified according to Kernahan and Stark. Tables were generated to present data. The total number of live births (LB) was 24,043 for the 2008 to 2010 period. In 2008, 9 cases (rate 1.01 per 1,000 LB) were identified: 7 boys and 2 girls. In 2009, there were 4 cases (rate 0.54 per 1,000 LB), 3 boys and 1 girl. In 2010, there were 11 cases (rate 1.42 per 1,000 LB), 7 boys and 4 girls. The total for the period 2008-2010 were 24 cases (rate 1.00 per 1,000 LB), 17 boys and 7 girls. Incidence rate was higher among male than among female. As for the distribution according to Kernahan and Stark classification, there were 4 boys and 3 girls in group "C", 10 boys and 4 girls in group "D", and only 3 boys in group "E"; not a single case in groups "A" and "B". The incidence for the period was 1.00 per 1,000 LB. The CL/P was more frequent in boys for each year included in the study.

  11. Dr. Wernher Von Braun with Dr. Christian Barnard.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Christian Barnard Tours Marshall Space Flight Center. Shown in Dr. Von Braun's office are (left to right): Dr. Ernst Sthulinger, a representative from General Electric, Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Dr. Christian Barnard, and Dr. Eberhard Rees.

  12. Dr. Wernher Von Braun with Dr. Christian Barnard.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Christian Barnard Tours Marshall Space Flight Center. Shown in Dr. Von Braun's office are (left to right): Dr. Ernst Sthulinger, a representative from General Electric, Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Dr. Christian Barnard, and Dr. Eberhard Rees.

  13. [Epidemiological profile of traumatic brain injury at the Dr. Rafael A. Calderón Guardia Hospital, Neurosurgery Department, during the period from 2007 to 2012].

    PubMed

    Petgrave-Pérez, Alexander; Padilla, Juan I; Díaz, José; Chacón, Rosarito; Chaves, Carlos; Torres, Héctor; Fernández, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    To determine the epidemiological profile of the patients who suffered traumatic brain injury (TBI) and were treated at the Dr. Rafael A. Calderón Guardia Hospital (HCG) Neurosurgery department, during the period from 2007 to 2012. An observational, descriptive, retrospective and cross section study was performed on all the patients with TBI and who were admitted to the emergency room of the HCG during the period 2007 to 2012. There were a total of 721 cases, of which 566 records were obtained of patients who had the variables established in this study, excluding those with incomplete or inconsistent information. The present study established the epidemiological profile of the TBI in the population seen during the period 2007 to 2012 at the HCG. It was determined that the male sex made up the majority of the cases were male, with mean age of 46 years. The mortality rate was 12.69% (n=69). Car accidents were the most frequent cause of TBI (n=259 persons) in the age group of 25 to 44 years, followed by falls (n=174). It was observed that the majority were farmers, followed by students, and then construction workers. No chronic illnesses were recorded in 71.6% of the medical charts. No alcohol or other drugs were reported in 74.9% of the cases, while there was evidence of the presence of alcohol recorded in 22.8%. The clinical and laboratory parameters that had statistical significance (P<.05) were GCS equal to less than 8 (P=.035), presence of mydriasis (P=.00), deviation of the LM (P=.006), cranial fracture (P=.04), lack of endotracheal intubation on admission (P=.007), prolonged PT (P=.04), prolonged PTT (P=.025), and MAP<60 (P=.002). The most frequent surgical procedure in the study population was craniotomy with hematoma drainage alone or associated with some other procedure (esquillectomy or monitoring of PIC) (n=298). There is great difficulty in determining the epidemiology of TBI worldwide, due to the lack of standardisation of the international studies. From

  14. Approaches to substance abuse in Cuba: Ricardo A. González MD PhD DrSc. Psychiatrist and consulting professor, Eduardo B. Ordaz Psychiatric Hospital, Havana. Interviewed by Christina Mills.

    PubMed

    González, Ricardo

    2013-10-01

    For over 40 years, he has done one of the most difficult jobs in medicine; 4000 of his patients are among those many might write off as "lost causes." Yet he radiates optimism, his stories and experience reflecting a belief in the human potential to change and grow and a vocation to help his patients do so. Now an internationally recognized expert on addictions, in 1976 Dr González founded Cuba's first patient service for substance abuse at the Eduardo B. Ordaz Psychiatric Hospital in Havana, a program he directed until last year. It is now the national reference center for another 17 such programs, two more in Havana and one in every other Cuban province. In addition, it serves as a model for treatment centers catering to international patients (undoubtedly the most well known among them Diego Maradona, the Argentine soccer star): two in Holguin Province and one in Santiago Province, with another being developed at Las Praderas International Health Center in Havana. Dr González's 25 books on psychiatry, medical ethics and addictions attest to a prolific career in research and practice. Today, he continues to work "from retirement" as consulting professor and psychiatrist in the addiction service he founded, and also chairs Cuba's National Medical Ethics Commission. In this interview, Dr González shares insights from his years of experience addressing substance abuse, as well as on repercussions and management of such conditions in Cuba.

  15. Dr Edward Macgowan (1795-1860), a long-term pioneer physician in mid-nineteenth century Jerusalem: founder and director of the first modern hospital in the Holy Land.

    PubMed

    Lev, Efraim; Perry, Yaron

    2008-02-01

    At the age of 46, Dr Edward Macgowan, by now a well-established physician, joined the ranks of the London Society for Promoting Christianity among the Jews with the aim of establishing the first modern hospital in Palestine. For the first six months of 1842, Macgowan established his work among the Jerusalem population on a regular basis and managed to establish a close relationship with the Jewish community and some of its leaders in Jerusalem. On 12 December 1844, the Jews' Hospital was opened in Jerusalem and became a source of great pride for the missionaries. Edward Macgowan died in Jerusalem after 18 years of service and was buried in the Protestant cemetery in his beloved city.

  16. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccot, Sila

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  17. Mortality according to age and burned body surface in the Virgen del Rocio University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cía, T; Mallén, J; Márquez, T; Portela, C; Lopez, I

    1999-06-01

    The application of updated clinical protocols for the treatment of burned patients is showing very good results. The mortality curves according to age and the percentage of burned body surface could be of great use for the comparison of clinical results between different burns units. The probability of survival in 1000 consecutive patients admitted to the Burns Unit of the Virgen del Rocio University Hospital between July, 1993 and August, 1997, is compared, by graphic analysis, with the mortality curves of other centers, obtaining similar results. We conclude that the results of medical attendance in our unit are in line with those considered as a reference.

  18. The past, present, and future of paediatric cardiology training at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, in the tradition of Dr Helen Taussig.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Gary S; Murphy, Anne M; Brenner, Joel I; Ravekes, William J

    2016-12-01

    Johns Hopkins has been a leader in paediatric cardiology for over 85 years. In the 1940s, Dr Helen Taussig began training fellows in paediatric cardiology at Johns Hopkins at a time when the diagnosis and treatment of CHD were in the earliest stage. Under her leadership, the fellowship developed a strong foundation that has continued to evolve to meet the current needs of learners and educators. In the current era, the Johns Hopkins programme implements the current theories of adult education and actively engages our fellows in learning as well as teaching. The programme uses techniques such as flipped classroom, structured case-based small-group learning, observed and structured clinical examination, simulations, and innovative educational technology. These strategies combined with our faculty and rich history give our fellows a unique educational experience.

  19. Dr. Barnett's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.

    1990-04-01

    In 1986, AstroPower was a tiny R D company located at the University of Delaware. Like many other entrepreneurs in the field at that time, the company's president, Dr. Allen Barnett, had a good idea, a good research staff, and the dream of becoming a successful manufacturer of photovoltaic (PV) cells. If the Newark, Del. company's projections remain on track, Barnett plans to become the third largest PV manufacturer in the United States by the end of next year. Were it not for the company's performance to date, such a claim might well be dismissed as idle dreaming. AstroPower Inc. is pursuing a two-pronged strategy: to rapidly bring a new thin-crystal silicon PV cell to commercialization; and, in the meantime, to gain experience in manufacturing and distributing conventional single-crystal and polycrystal silicon cells. The company sold approximately 200 kilowatts (kWp) of cells last year (about half single-crystal and half polycrystal). Its current production capacity is 360 kWp. The company and its products are described.

  20. CONHECIMENTO DA LEI GERAL DE SAÚDE – RESPEITO ÀS TRANSFUSÕES SANGUÍNEAS EM MÉDICOS E PACIENTES TESTEMUNHAS DE JEOVÁ DO HOSPITAL DR. DARÍO CONTRERAS DA REPÚBLICA DOMINICANA

    PubMed Central

    SANTANA, ELSA DÍAZ

    2010-01-01

    Este estudo avalia quanto o corpo médico do Hospital Dr. Darío Contreras de República Dominicana conhece, respeita, informa e aplica a Lei Geral de Saúde em relação aos direitos do paciente Testemunha de Jeová de negar-se a ser transfundido (respeito a sua autonomia); também se os Testemunhas de Jeová conhecem a Lei Geral de Saúde e até que ponto têm se beneficiado diante dessa proposição. O estudo revelou que nem médicos, nem Testemunhas de Jeová conhecem de fato essa lei. PMID:20689657

  1. [Prioritization of the main health problems having impact upon the activity of the Emergency Military Hospital "Dr. Iacob Cihac" of Iaşi in the years 1995-2003].

    PubMed

    Maria Liliana, Iliescu; Botez, C; Zanoschi, Georgeta

    2005-01-01

    The various health problems that are faced by a hospital institution at any given point in time, compete for the usually limited resources that are available, while the health needs are infinite.Therefore, the prioritization process is a key to a functional activity. The prioritization method involves the formal selection criteria and system used to prioritize the health conditions. The Hanlon method is a quality one, and considers the following criteria: the magnitude of the problem, the severity of the problem, the predicted effectiveness of the intervention, and the feasibility of intervening to address the problem. This method requires a technique to allocate a score for each criterion and each health condition. According to hospitalized morbidity rates registered between 1995-2003, using prioritization method, we detected the main causes to address for improving the activity of Emergency Military Hospital "Dr. Iacob Cihac" Iaşi through a better selection of the inpatients and primary health care and community involvement. The presentation of the results situated on the top cardiovascular diseases, and on the last place the bone and articular diseases.

  2. [Registry of myocardial infarction in a tertiary hospital of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social].

    PubMed

    González-Pliego, José Angel; Gudiño-Amezcua, Diego Armando; Celis, Alfredo; Gutiérrez-Díaz, Gonzalo Israel

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: dado que el pronóstico de infarto del miocardio con elevación del segmento ST (IMCEST) depende de su manejo inmediato y de las medidas de prevención secundaria, el no seguir las recomendaciones actuales impide mejorar las expectativas de la población afectada por este padecimiento. El objetivo es describir el perfil clínico-epidemiológico y el proceso de atención del IMCEST en un hospital de tercer nivel. Métodos: se analiza la información clínica, la estratificación de riesgo, la terapia de revascularización y los hábitos de prescripción al egreso de los casos con IMCEST atendidos en un año. Resultados: se incluyeron 246 pacientes con edad promedio de 61 años; el 76 % fueron varones. La mayoría (37.3 %) de IMCEST ocurrió entre los 60 y los 69 años. El sedentarismo fue el factor de riesgo predominante. El 81.7 % de los casos tuvo score TIMI de riesgo bajo. El 35 % tuvo isquemia/viabilidad y en todos los cateterizados se demostraron obstrucciones coronarias. El 76 % se revascularizó con stent, principalmente farmacológico (77.5 %). Al egreso más del 90 % de los casos recibió estatina y antiplaquetarios, mientras otras drogas se prescribieron al 64-82 % de los casos. Conclusiones: el IMCEST predomina en hombres sedentarios de la séptima década. Estratificar el riesgo, buscar isquemia/viabilidad residual y revascularizar con stent farmacológico son prácticas comunes; el cumplimiento de recomendaciones basadas en la evidencia es mejor que en el pasado, pero todavía no es óptimo.

  3. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Thomas Paine, Deputy Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, examines an ordinary man's shoe outfitted for use in the Saturn I workshop. Pictured from the left in the Saturn I workshop mockup are William Brooksbank, propulsion and vehicle engineering laboratory; Dr. Paine; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Center director; Colonel Clare F. Farley, Executive Officer in the Office Of The Administrator; and Charles J. Donlan, Deputy Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight, Technical. the shoe Dr. Paine is holding has a unique fastener built into the sole to allow an astronaut to move about on the workshop floor and to remain in one position if he desires.

  4. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Shown viewing the Apollo telescope mockup are, from left to right, Charles Donlan, deputy associate administrator for manned space flight; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director; William Horton, astrionics lab; Dr. Thomas Paine, NASA deputy administrator; Warner Kuers, director of the ME lab.

  5. Dr. Daniel Carter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Carter, president of New Century Pharmaceuticals in Huntsville, Al, is one of three principal investigators in NASA's microgravity protein crystal growth program. Dr. Carter's experties is in albumins. Albumins are proteins in the bloodstream that transport materials, drugs, nutrients, and wastes. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  6. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Shown viewing the Apollo telescope mockup are, from left to right, Charles Donlan, deputy associate administrator for manned space flight; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director; William Horton, astrionics lab; Dr. Thomas Paine, NASA deputy administrator; Warner Kuers, director of the ME lab.

  7. Dr. Daniel Carter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Daniel Carter, president of New Century Pharmaceuticals in Huntsville, Al, is one of three principal investigators in NASA's microgravity protein crystal growth program. Dr. Carter's experties is in albumins. Albumins are proteins in the bloodstream that transport materials, drugs, nutrients, and wastes. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  8. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (left) and Fred W. Kelley examine a ST-100 Stellar Instrument Platform in the astrionics lab. Dr. Von Braun, then deputy associate administrator for planning, NASA, was visiting on the anniversary of the establishment of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  9. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Launch Control Center, officials monitor the “Mode VII” emergency landing simulation being conducted at Kennedy Space Center and managed and directed from the LCC. From left are Dr. Luis Moreno and Dr. David Reed, with Bionetics Life Sciences, and Dr. Philip Scarpa, with the KSC Safety, Occupational Health and Environment Division. The purpose of the Mode VII is to exercise emergency preparedness personnel, equipment and facilities in rescuing astronauts from a downed orbiter and providing immediate medical attention. This simulation presents an orbiter that has crashed short of the Shuttle Landing Facility in a wooded area 2-1/2 miles south of Runway 33. Emergency crews are responding to the volunteer “astronauts” who are simulating various injuries inside the crew compartment mock-up. Rescuers must remove the crew, provide triage and transport to hospitals those who need further treatment. Local hospitals are participating in the exercise.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-18

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Launch Control Center, officials monitor the “Mode VII” emergency landing simulation being conducted at Kennedy Space Center and managed and directed from the LCC. From left are Dr. Luis Moreno and Dr. David Reed, with Bionetics Life Sciences, and Dr. Philip Scarpa, with the KSC Safety, Occupational Health and Environment Division. The purpose of the Mode VII is to exercise emergency preparedness personnel, equipment and facilities in rescuing astronauts from a downed orbiter and providing immediate medical attention. This simulation presents an orbiter that has crashed short of the Shuttle Landing Facility in a wooded area 2-1/2 miles south of Runway 33. Emergency crews are responding to the volunteer “astronauts” who are simulating various injuries inside the crew compartment mock-up. Rescuers must remove the crew, provide triage and transport to hospitals those who need further treatment. Local hospitals are participating in the exercise.

  10. Bronchopneumonia with measles in infants and children at the Department of Child Health School of Medicine, University of North Sumatera/Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan (January 1985-December 1989).

    PubMed

    Hutasoit, C; Dj, M K; Daulay, R M; Lubis, H M; Siregar, Z

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective study was done on patients with bronchopneumonia hospitalized at the Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan/School of Medicine, University of North Sumatera, during January 1985 through December 1989. The purpose of this study is to assess the morbidity and mortality of bronchopneumonia with measles and the nutritional status of the patients. Out of the 14.082 patients admitted, 1310 children suffered from bronchopneumonia (10.7%). Ninetynine of them were also with measles (7.6%). Most of the patients with bronchopneumonia without measles were in the age group 0-1 year (58.7%). The mortality was 24.8% and the highest mortality rate was in the age group of 4-5 years (34.6%). Most of the patients with bronchopneumonia and measles were in the age group of 1-2 years (30.3%). The mortality rate of bronchopneumonia with measles was 22.2% and the highest mortality rate was in the age group of 3-4 years (35.7%). Bronchopneumonia with or without measles occurred more in malnourished patients rather than in well-nourished cases. All of the patients who had bronchopneumonia with measles in the present study had never been immunized against measles.

  11. [Statistical data on head trauma with frontal sinus involvement at the Emergency Hospital Clinic "Prof. Dr. Nicolae Oblu", Iaşi, Romania].

    PubMed

    Dobrin, Irina; Dobrin, N; Poeata, I; Ianovici, N

    2011-01-01

    We present here some interesting points of view concerning head and brain injury with frontal sinus involvement. In general neurosurgical practice the frontal sinus traumatic involvement is about 3-5 per cent from all head trauma; we proposed to realise a extensive 5 years study to finnaly sumarise the characteristical elements for our geographical area. The amount of patients hospitalized in our clinic was about 80 000 in five years. Concerning our statistical data, there are 677 patients with frontal sinus injury, 490 from this were complicated with brain pathology. We concluded there are differences between our series and the other studies from developed countries, in our region the domestical (agricultural works) causes are about 10% higher.

  12. [Epidemiology of gunshot wounds in the University Hospital "Dr. José Eleuterio González" of the Autonomous University of Nuevo León].

    PubMed

    Canseco Cavazos, José; Palacios-Zertuche, Jorge; Reyna-Sepúlveda, Francisco; Álvarez-Villalobos, Neri; Alatorre-López, Louisiana; Muñoz-Maldonado, Gerardo

    The incidence of deaths and injuries associated with gunshot wounds deserves special attention, mainly because of its repercussions on hospital resources and the diagnosis and treatment protocols. To perform an analysis on the epidemiological factors associated with gunshot wounds. An analysis was made of multiple variables of all patients diagnosed with gunshot wounds during the period between 2005 and 2015. A total of 605 cases were found, and an additional sub-group of 314 cases was obtained for a deeper analysis. The overall mortality rate was 7.9%. The main anatomical region was the abdomen, with 44%. A total of 324 laparotomies were performed, 124 incisions of the thoracic wall, and 72 vascular examinations. In the sub-group of 314 cases, a 16.9% and 42% of laparotomies and vascular examinations, respectably, were reported without evidence of injury to internal organs. Morbidity and mortality increases when 2 or more wounds are present with multiple organ injuries, in patients with multiple transfusions, or in those transferred to the intensive care unit. The incorporation of a physical evaluation format by all the departments involved is suggested for patients that are attended with gunshot wounds, in order to obtain more epidemiological information of these injuries for further studies. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Dissecting DR3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Pobezinskaya, Yelena L; Liu, Zhenggang; Choksi, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Receptor signaling can be evaluated in multiple ways, including analysis of phosphorylation of downstream molecules and analysis of proteins that are recruited to the receptor upon ligand binding. Majority of studies on the mechanism of DR3 signaling were performed using overexpression systems that can often lead to artifacts. In this chapter we describe how to analyze DR3 downstream events with most attention being paid to endogenous immunoprecipitation.

  14. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the astronautics lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics lab.

  15. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the Astronautics Lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics Lab.

  16. Dr. Robert Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Dr. Robert Goddard with his apparatus for solar energy study at Clark University, Worcester, Mass. (1932-1934). Dr. Goddard's interest in the subject began much earlier. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  17. [Dr. John Argyropulos (1410-1492)].

    PubMed

    Colović, Radoje

    2008-01-01

    Dr. John Argyropulos (Dr. John Argyropulus, Dr. John Argyropoulos) was the last but, along with Dr. John Hortazmen, the most well known professor of Medical School, founded in 1308 by the Serbian king Stefan Uro II Milutin at the Hospital of St. John the Baptist monastery in Constantinople. After the town fell to the Turkish hands, Dr. Argyropulos stayed at Peloponnesus from 1453 to 1456, when he moved to Italy, in which he spent the rest of his life. He is not important only for the Serbs, he is more important for the Greeks and particularly for the Italians and Italy, in which he spent the largest part of his life, in which he achieved the university education, taught the Greek philosophy, language and literature, as well as translated a number of Aristotle's works from old Greek to Latin and New Greek, wrote a number of poems, letters and notes and made a strong influence on a number of Renaissance humanists in Florence, Italy, as well as on a number of intelectuals throghout Europe. We found no evidence that Dr. John Argiropulos either practised medicine in Italy, or that he taught medicine at the Italian medical schools.

  18. [Comparative profile of medications at the "Hospital Infantil de México" and the "Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social"].

    PubMed

    Jasso-Gutiérrez, Luis; Santos-Preciado, José Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    Compare the distribution of medications according to therapeutic groups (TGs) as a function of codes, cost, price weighted index (PWI) and volume between the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, a conglomerate of hospitals and family medicine clinics and the Hospital Infantil de México "Federico Gómez" a tertiary care referral pediatric hospital. Medications were classified by TGs according to drug code, purchase cost, PWI, and volumes purchased. TGs showed similar profiles according to cost of purchase, volume and code numbers, not according to PWI. There were only minor differences in cost among the 15 most expensive medications among both institutions. Despite the marked asymmetry between both institutions, drug profiles were not significantly different, to a large extent due to the fact that the Hospital Infantil de Mexico acquires all TGs.

  19. Afebrile pneumonia (whooping cough) syndrome in infants at Hospital Universitario del Valle, Cali, 2001-2007

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Dolly; Echandía-Villegas, Connie Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Afebrile pneumonia syndrome in infants, also called infant pneumonitis, pneumonia caused by atypical pathogens or whooping cough syndrome is a major cause of severe lower respiratory infection in young infants, both in developing countries and in developed countries. Objective: To describe children with afebrile pneumonia syndrome. Methods: Through a cross-sectional study, we reviewed the medical records of children diagnosed with afebrile pneumonia treated at Hospital Universitario del Valle, a reference center in southwestern Colombia, between June 2001 and December 2007. We obtained data on maternal age and origin, prenatal care, the childs birth, breastfeeding, vaccination status, symptoms, signs, diagnosis, treatment, and complications. Results: We evaluated 101 children with this entity, noting a stationary presentation: June-August and November- December. A total of 73% of the children were under 4 months of age; the most common symptoms were: cyanotic and spasmodic cough (100%), respiratory distress (70%), and unquantified fever (68%). The most common findings: rales (crackles) (50%), wheezing and expiratory stridor (37%); 66% were classified as mild and of the remaining 33%, half of them required attention in the intensive care unit. In all, there was clinical diagnosis of afebrile pneumonia syndrome in infants, but no etiologic diagnosis was made and despite this, 94% of the children received macrolides. Conclusions: These data support the hypothesis that most of these patients acquired the disease by airway, possibly caused by viral infection and did not require the indiscriminate use of macrolides. PMID:24893051

  20. Afebrile pneumonia (whooping cough) syndrome in infants at Hospital Universitario del Valle, Cali, 2001-2007.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Dolly; Echandía-Villegas, Connie Alejandra; Echandía, Carlos Armando

    2012-04-01

    Afebrile pneumonia syndrome in infants, also called infant pneumonitis, pneumonia caused by atypical pathogens or whooping cough syndrome is a major cause of severe lower respiratory infection in young infants, both in developing countries and in developed countries. To describe children with afebrile pneumonia syndrome. Through a cross-sectional study, we reviewed the medical records of children diagnosed with afebrile pneumonia treated at Hospital Universitario del Valle, a reference center in southwestern Colombia, between June 2001 and December 2007. We obtained data on maternal age and origin, prenatal care, the childs birth, breastfeeding, vaccination status, symptoms, signs, diagnosis, treatment, and complications. We evaluated 101 children with this entity, noting a stationary presentation: June-August and November- December. A total of 73% of the children were under 4 months of age; the most common symptoms were: cyanotic and spasmodic cough (100%), respiratory distress (70%), and unquantified fever (68%). The most common findings: rales (crackles) (50%), wheezing and expiratory stridor (37%); 66% were classified as mild and of the remaining 33%, half of them required attention in the intensive care unit. In all, there was clinical diagnosis of afebrile pneumonia syndrome in infants, but no etiologic diagnosis was made and despite this, 94% of the children received macrolides. These data support the hypothesis that most of these patients acquired the disease by airway, possibly caused by viral infection and did not require the indiscriminate use of macrolides.

  1. ["Del governo tecnico sanitario degli Ospedali" (Italian) ("Hospital governance") by E. Ronzani (1877-1943)- Padua (Italy), 1910].

    PubMed

    Renzulli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the contents of the first edition of the Italian textbook "Del governo tecnico sanitario degli ospedali" ("Hospital Governance") written by Prof. Enrico Ronzani (1877- 1943) and published in Padua (Italy) in 1910. The textbook contains a a preface by Prof. A. Serafini. Prof. Ronzani, a lecturer in Hygiene and health in 1910, introduced the first university course in "Hygiene and hospital technique" in Italy, in Padua in the academic year 1910-1911. The book focuses principally on the duties and responsibilities inherent in the role of the medical director.

  2. [Programme review of somatropin deficit in pediatrics at the Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío].

    PubMed

    Lavaredas, A; de la Puerta, R; Álvarez del Vayo, C

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: Elaborar una revisión del programa de déficit de somatropina aplicado en pediatría en el Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, utilizando dos grupos de pacientes, los diagnosticados con déficit de esta hormona y los nacidos pequeños para edad gestacional, con la intención de evaluar su efectividad en el primer año de tratamiento. Método: Realización de un estudio retrospectivo de la cohorte de pacientes en tratamiento con la hormona del crecimiento bajo los diagnósticos mencionados, con metodología observacional y transversal, a los cuales se aplicó un análisis estadístico con el programa Statistical Package for Social Sciences®. Resultados: Tras inicio del tratamiento la velocidad de crecimiento y la talla aumentaron y la edad ósea se aproximó a la edad cronológica. En los dos grupos tratados, en el primer año de tratamiento fueron los pacientes del sexo femenino con edad comprendida entre los 0 a 12 años con déficit de la hormona del crecimiento que respondieron mejor a la terapéutica establecida. Conclusiones: Pudimos observar que el tratamiento instituido se presentó altamente efectivo en ambos grupos de pacientes, permitiendo obtener un aumento favorable de estatura.

  3. Dr Pugh: a poisoner?

    PubMed

    Paull, J D; Morris, G M

    2012-07-01

    On 16 February 1845 the Reverend W. H. Browne, rector of St John's Church in Launceston, Van Diemen's Land, wrote in his journal, "My dear Wife died very suddenly almost immediately after and in consequence of taking a preparation of Hyd. Cyan. Acid prepared & supplied by Dr Pugh". This journal entry raises a number of questions. Was Dr Pugh treating a condition which he thought merited that treatment or was it a ghastly mistake? Was Caroline Browne suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis? Was hydrocyanic acid an accepted treatment at that time? Did Mrs Browne take the wrong dose? Was an incorrect concentration of the drug prepared by Dr Pugh? Did he use the wrong pharmacopoeia in preparing the hydrocyanic acid? Why was there no inquest? Only some of these questions can be answered.

  4. Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. von Braun is looking out from a 10th floor window of building 4200 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). He was the first Center Director and served as the Director from July 1960 through February 1970. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under the Project Paperclip (American acquisition of German rocket experts) to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his German Rocket Team (also called the Peenemuende Team) were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Under Dr. von Braun's leadership, MSFC developed the Saturn V launch vehicle, which placed the first men, two American astronauts, on the Moon. Wernher von Braun's life was dedicated to expanding man's knowledge through the exploration of space.

  5. Dr. Eberhard Rees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Dr. Eberhard Rees served as director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from March 1, 1970 until January 19, 1973 when he retired from NASA. Prior to his appointment as Director, Rees served as the Center's deputy director under Dr. Wernher von Braun, 1960-1970. Rees came to the United States as part of the Dr. Wernher von Braun's German Rocket team following World War II. He transferred to Huntsville, Alabama from Fort Bliss, Texas in 1950 to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal. From 1956 to 1960 he served as deputy director of development operations at the Army Ballistic Missile Agency under von Braun. In 1960 Rees was transferred to NASA's Marshall Center.

  6. Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. von Braun is looking out from a 10th floor window of building 4200 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). He was the first Center Director and served as the Director from July 1960 through February 1970. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under the Project Paperclip (American acquisition of German rocket experts) to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his German Rocket Team (also called the Peenemuende Team) were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Under Dr. von Braun's leadership, MSFC developed the Saturn V launch vehicle, which placed the first men, two American astronauts, on the Moon. Wernher von Braun's life was dedicated to expanding man's knowledge through the exploration of space.

  7. Goldie Brangman Remembers the Operation to Save Dr King.

    PubMed

    Koch, Evan; Brangman, Goldie

    2015-12-01

    In September 1958 the Rev Dr Martin Luther King Jr was stabbed and nearly assassinated. Surgeons at Harlem Hospital in New York City removed a 17.8-cm (7-in)-long letter opener from Dr King's chest. Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist Goldie Brangman remembers this event because she participated in Dr King's anesthetic. This article correlates Brangman's memories with published accounts of the event. It also places the event within the context of the modern civil rights movement that Dr King led.

  8. Interview: Dr. Nathan Hare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pete, Gregory

    1986-01-01

    Presents an interview with Dr. Nathan Hare, who proposes to address some of the problems of lower class, Black male youth by developing a formally supervised ritual to initiate the Black boy into adult male maturity and asserts that materialism prevents rather than promotes success. (KH)

  9. Ask Dr. Sue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the need for child care providers to be sure children in their care who are between the ages of 15 months and 5 years have had Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine. Urges child care center staff to avoid use of bean bag infant cushions and to inform parents about the hazards posed by the cushions. (DR)

  10. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A camerman catches Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, his son, Peter, and daughter, Martgrit, as they arrive at the employee picnic held to celebrate man's first landing on the moon 6 days earlier. In the foreground is David R. Newby, Director of Administration and Technical Services at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  11. Dr. Robert Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Dr. Robert Hutchings Goddard (1882-1945). Dr. Goddard has been recognized as the father of American rocketry and as one of the pioneers in the theoretical exploration of space. Robert Hutchings Goddard, born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on October 5, 1882, was theoretical scientist as well as a practical engineer. His dream was the conquest of the upper atmosphere and ultimately space through the use of rocket propulsion. Dr. Goddard, died in 1945, but was probably as responsible for the dawning of the Space Age as the Wrights were for the beginning of the Air Age. Yet his work attracted little serious attention during his lifetime. However, when the United States began to prepare for the conquest of space in the 1950's, American rocket scientists began to recognize the debt owed to the New England professor. They discovered that it was virtually impossible to construct a rocket or launch a satellite without acknowledging the work of Dr. Goddard. More than 200 patents, many of which were issued after his death, covered this great legacy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  12. Dr. Robert H. Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Dr. Robert Hutchings Goddard (1882-1945). Dr. Goddard has been recognized as the father of American rocketry and as one of the pioneers in the theoretical exploration of space. Robert Hutchings Goddard, born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on October 5, 1882, was theoretical scientist as well as a practical engineer. His dream was the conquest of the upper atmosphere and ultimately space through the use of rocket propulsion. Dr. Goddard, died in 1945, but was probably as responsible for the dawning of the Space Age as the Wrights were for the beginning of the Air Age. Yet his work attracted little serious attention during his lifetime. However, when the United States began to prepare for the conquest of space in the 1950's, American rocket scientists began to recognize the debt owed to the New England professor. They discovered that it was virtually impossible to construct a rocket or launch a satellite without acknowledging the work of Dr. Goddard. More than 200 patents, many of which were issued after his death, covered this great legacy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  13. Dr. Goddard Transports Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard tows his rocket to the launching tower behind a Model A Ford truck, 15 miles northwest of Roswell, New Mexico. 1930- 1932. Dr. Goddard has been recognized as the 'Father of American Rocketry' and as one of three pioneers in the theoretical exploration of space. Robert Hutchings Goddard was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on October 15, 1882. He was a theoretical scientist as well as a practical engineer. His dream was the conquest of the upper atmosphere and ultimately space through the use of rocket propulsion. Dr. Goddard, who died in 1945, was probably as responsible for the dawning of the Space Age as the Wright Brothers were for the begining of the Air Age. Yet his work attracted little serious attention during his lifetime. When the United States began to prepare for the conquest of space in the 1950's, American rocket scientists began to recognize the debt owed to the New England professor. They discovered that it was virtually impossible to construct a rocket or launch a satellite without acknowledging the work of Dr. Goddard. This great legacy was covered by more than 200 patents, many of which were issued after his death.

  14. Ask Dr. Sue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the need for child care providers to be sure children in their care who are between the ages of 15 months and 5 years have had Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine. Urges child care center staff to avoid use of bean bag infant cushions and to inform parents about the hazards posed by the cushions. (DR)

  15. 1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of three detection radar (DR) antennas. DR 1 (structure no. 735) on left, DR 2 (structure no. 736) in center, and DR 3 (structure no. 737) looking north 30 degrees west, with tracking radar (large radome) and satcom (satellite communication) system in small radome in view between DR 2 and DR 3 antennae. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  16. Dr. Timothy Hammond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Dr. Timothy G. Hammond of the Department of Internal Medicine, Nephrology Section, Tulane University Medical Center, New Orleans, LA, is one of NASA's principal investigators conducting research with the NASA Bioreactor project directed by Johrnson Space Center. Hammond's investigations include Production of 1-25- diOH D3 by Renal Epithelial Cells in Simulated Microgravity Culture and Differentiation of Cultured Normal Human Renal Epithelial Cells in Microgravity. Photo credit: Tulane University.

  17. Dr. Faustus: Theist or Atheist?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karim, Shah Mohammad Sanaul; Fathema, Fawzia; Hakim, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Faustus is the greatest but the most controversial of Marlowe's plays. Among the causes of controversy, whether Dr. Faustus is an atheist or theist deserves utmost attention. This paper is intended to deal with the issue. Though at various stages of the development of the action, Dr. Faustus abjures Trinity, resorts to necromancy, becomes…

  18. Gaia DR1 documentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, F.; de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Arenou, F.; Comoretto, G.; Eyer, L.; Farras Casas, M.; Hambly, N.; Hobbs, D.; Salgado, J.; Utrilla Molina, E.; Vogt, S.; van Leeuwen, M.; Abreu, A.; Altmann, M.; Andrei, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Bastian, U.; Biermann, M.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Bombrun, A.; Borrachero, R.; Brown, A. G. A.; Busonero, D.; Busso, G.; Butkevich, A.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carrasco, J. M.; Castañeda, J.; Charnas, J.; Cheek, N.; Clementini, G.; Crowley, C.; Cuypers, J.; Davidson, M.; De Angeli, F.; De Ridder, J.; Evans, D.; Fabricius, C.; Findeisen, K.; Fleitas, J. M.; Gracia, G.; Guerra, R.; Guy, L.; Helmi, A.; Hernandez, J.; Holl, B.; Hutton, A.; Klioner, S.; Lammers, U.; Lecoeur-Taïbi, I.; Lindegren, L.; Luri, X.; Marinoni, S.; Marrese, P.; Messineo, R.; Michalik, D.; Mignard, F.; Montegriffo, P.; Mora, A.; Mowlavi, N.; Nienartowicz, K.; Pancino, E.; Panem, C.; Portell, J.; Rimoldini, L.; Riva, A.; Robin, A.; Siddiqui, H.; Smart, R.; Sordo, R.; Soria, S.; Turon, C.; Vallenari, A.; Voss, H.; European Space Agency; Gaia Data Processing Analysis Consortium

    2017-02-01

    We present the first Gaia data release, Gaia DR1, consisting of astrometry and photometry for over 1 billion sources brighter than magnitude 20.7 in the white-light photometric band G of Gaia. The Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) processed the raw measurements collected with the Gaia instruments during the first 14 months of the mission, and turned these into an astrometric and photometric catalogue. Gaia DR1 consists of three parts: an astrometric data set which contains the positions, parallaxes, and mean proper motions for about 2 million of the brightest stars in common with the Hipparcos and Tycho-2 catalogues (the primary astrometric data set) and the positions for an additional 1.1 billion sources (the secondary astrometric data set). The primary set forms the realisation of the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS). The second part of Gaia DR1 is the photometric data set, which contains the mean G-band magnitudes for all sources. The third part consists of the G-band light curves and the characteristics of 3000 Cepheid and RR Lyrae stars observed at high cadence around the south ecliptic pole. The positions and proper motions in the astrometric data set are given in a reference frame that is aligned with the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) to better than 0.1 mas at epoch J2015.0, and non-rotating with respect to the ICRF to within 0.03 mas yr^-1. For the primary astrometric data set, the typical standard error for the positions and parallaxes is about 0.3 mas, while for the proper motions the typical standard error is about 1 mas yr^-1. To the parallax uncertainties a systematic component of ˜0.3 mas should be 'added'. For the subset of 94000 Hipparcos stars in the primary data set, the proper motion standard errors are much smaller, at about 0.06 mas yr^-1. For the secondary astrometric data set, the typical standard error on the positions is 10 mas. The median standard errors on the mean G-band magnitudes range from the

  19. Dr. Rocco A. Petrone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Dr. Rocco A. Petrone served at director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from January 26, 1973 to March 15, 1974. Prior to his tenure at Marshall, Petrone served as director of the Apollo program and director of launch operations at Kennedy Space Center. His career in rocket development and space programs began with his participation in the development of the Redstone missiles at the Army's Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. Upon his departure from Marshall, Petrone served as NASA Associate Administrator for Center Operations.

  20. [Bacterial strains isolated from systemic infections and reported for evaluation and antibiotic resistance surveillance by the "Dr. Victor Babeş" Clinical Hospital for Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Bucharest].

    PubMed

    Nica, Maria; Biolan, Tatiana; Dascălu, Amalia; Mozes, Elena; Toderan, Andreea; Calistru, Petre; Ceauşu, Emanoil

    2010-01-01

    Testing antibiotic resistance of bacterial strains (compulsor, reported for EARSS surveillance) isolated from patients hospitalised for systemic infection in the "Dr. V. Babe" Hospital for Infectious and Tropical Diseases during 01.01.2005-11.11.2009, for a dynamic evaluation and for the surveillance of resistance emergence for certain classes of antibiotics. Bacterial isolation: BacT/ALERT system; strain identification in classic and automated system (ATB Expression. VITEK 2C): antibioresistance: disk-difussion method (NCCLS 2005--CLSI 2009), MIC (E-Test, ATB/ Expression, VITEK 2C). Screening of ESBL-producing strains performed with double disk-difussion method (DDD). Reference strains used: S. aureus ATCC 25923, S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619, E. coli A TCC 25922, Enterococcus fiecalis ATCC 29212. During the studied period, 245 bacterial strains have been isolated, identified and tested (Staphylococcus aureus / 70, Streptococcus pneumoniae / 61, Enterococcus faecalis / 18, Enterococcus faecium / 5, Neisseria meningitidis / 18, E. coli / 73). out of 166 hemocultures and 79 cerebrospinal fluids / CSF. The average incidence of MRSA strains in systemic infections was 34.28%. 44.28% of the S. aureus strains were resistant to erythromycin, 17.14% to cyprofloxacyne, 15.71% to rifampicine, 14.49% to gentamycine. No strain resistant to vancomycine and linezolide. Streptococcus pneumoniae presented an average high resistance to penicillin G of 11.47%. and a 1.63% resistance to third generation cephalosporines. 0% resistance to vancomycine and rifampicine. 7/ 18 Enterococcus faecalis strains and 4/5 Enterococcus faecium strains presented high level resistance to gentamycine (CN 120 microg/disk) and no strain was resistant to vancomycine, teicoplanin or linezolid. The 18 Neisseria meningitidis strains were all sensitive to beta-lactams, macrolides, fluoroquinolones and cloramphenicol. For the 73 Escherichia coli strains, the average incidence of ESBL-producing isolates was 10

  1. Dr. Robert Goddard

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    The Goddard Space Flight Center was named in honor of Dr. Robert Goddard, a pioneer in rocket development. Dr. Goddard received patents for a multi-stage rocket and liquid propellants in 1914 and published a paper describing how to reach extreme altitudes six years later. That paper, "A Method of Reaching Extreme Altitudes," detailed methods for raising weather-recording instruments higher than what could be achieved by balloons and explained the mathematical theories of rocket propulsion. The paper, which was published by the Smithsonian Institution, also discussed the possibility of a rocket reaching the moon-a position for which the press ridiculed Goddard. Yet several copies of the report found their way to Europe, and by1927, the German Rocket Society was established, and the German Army began its rocket program in 1931. Goddard, meanwhile, continued his work. By 1926, he had constructed and tested the first rocket using liquid fuel. Goddard's work largely anticipated in technical detail the later German V-2 missiles, including gyroscopic control, steering by means of vanes in the jet stream of the rocket motor, gimbal-steering, power-driven fuel pumps and other devices. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  2. Three MSFC Directors; Dr. Petrone, Dr. Rees, and Dr. von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Three Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Directors: at left, Dr. Rocco A. Petrone (1973-1974), who had been named to succeed Dr. Rees, then-present director (Center); Dr. Eberhard Rees (1970-1973); and past director (right), Dr. Wernher von Braun (1960-1970). This photo was taken at the Redstone Arsenal Officers Club where over three hundred people had gathered to honor the career of Dr. Rees which sparned more than thirty years in rocketry and space exploration and wish him well upon his pending retirement on January 26, 1973.

  3. A pioneering female neurosurgeon: Dr. Aysima Altinok.

    PubMed

    Balak, N; Elmaci, I

    2007-01-01

    This article will look at how one female neurosurgeon in Turkey made her mark in the field. In 1954, Dr. Aysima Altinok began her residency training in neurosurgery at Haydarpaşa Numune Hospital where the first official department of neurosurgery in Turkey had been founded five years earlier. On November 22, 1959, she successfully completed her training and was certified officially as a neurosurgeon. Hence, Dr. Altinok was a leader in neurosurgery. Dr. Altinok was the chief of the department of neurosurgery from 1968 to 1992 at Bakirköy Mental and Psychological Health Hospital in Istanbul. She was among the founders of the Turkish Neurosurgical Society in 1968 and was awarded the honour of "Medical Doctor of the Year in Turkey" by the Ministry of Health in 1990. On May 15, 1996, she was accepted as an honorary member of Turkish Society of Neurosurgery for her contributions to neurosurgery. For proving the capability of a woman as a neurosurgeon, her contribution to the world history of neurosurgery should be respected.

  4. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    On September 8, 1960 President Dwight D. Eisenhower visited Huntsville, Alabama to dedicate a new NASA field center in honor of General George C. Marshall, Eisenhower's wartime colleague and the founder of the famous Marshall Plan for European recover after World War II. The new George C. Marshall Space Flight Center was placed under the control of Dr. Wernher Von Braun shown here talking with President Eisenhower. As parto f his remarks dedicating the center, President Eisenhowe refereed to General Marshall as a 'man of yar, yet a builder of peace'. the Marshall Center's first major assignment including building the huge Saturn V rocket that launched human beings on their first journey to the surface of the moon in 1969.

  5. Introduction of Dr. Andrew V Schally

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Valdés, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    I first met Dr. Andrew V Schally (PhD, MDhc (Multi), DSc, Distinguished Medical Research Scientist, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Professor of Pathology and Department of Medicine,
Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA) many years ago, probably around the beginning of the 1990's in one of his visits to Mexico City (Figure 1). He has many friends in my country since some of the investigations that led to the development of the LHRH agonists were made in a couple of Mexican hospitals in collaboration with some outstanding Mexican physicians that I will mention later. In that time, I was the head of the Department of Urology of the Mexican National Cancer Institute and our Director, Dr. Jaime de la Garza, invited him for a meeting. I was surprised by his humbleness, intelligence and easy going personality, in spite of being a Nobel Prize scientist. PMID:26112485

  6. Maniac Talk - Dr. Marshall Shepherd

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-14

    Marshall Shepherd Maniac Lecture, July 14, 2015 Dr. Marshall Shepherd, professor, University of Georgia, also the host of Sunday's talk show Weather Geeks, presented a Maniac lecture entitled "Zombies, Sports, and Cola: Implications for Communicating Weather and Climate." Believe it or not, Dr. Shepherd ties zombies, sports, and cola together to provide a compelling look at how we communicate (miscommunicate) weather and climate.

  7. Teaching Peace with Dr. Seuss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pace, Rosemarie; Podesta, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    Educators seeking novel ways to instill conflict-resolution skills in young children should consider Dr. Seuss, whose books provide a synthesis of fantasy and reality that works for teaching values endemic to peace education. This paper discusses how students can learn peace and educators can teach peace using Dr. Seuss books, examining steps to…

  8. [Hospital admissions due to whooping cough: experience of the del niño hospital in Panama. Period 2001-2008].

    PubMed

    Nieto Guevara, J; Luciani, K; Montesdeoca Melián, A; Mateos Durán, M; Estripeaut, D

    2010-03-01

    Bordetella pertussis (whooping cough) is a worldwide public health problem. It is estimated that there are about 20 to 40 million cases with 200,000-400,000 deaths and is increasing in infants and adults. An observational, retrospective study was made. We reviewed the epidemiologic surveillance notification forms from 2001 to 2008 period at the Epidemiology Department of Hospital Del Niño, a tertiary paediatric reference centre in Panama City. All pertussis (whooping cough) cases confirmed by PCR and cultures were selected. From a total of 759 notifications of suspected whooping cough cases, 180 confirmed cases using PCR and culture were analyzed for this study. The admission rate in all ages was 14.4/10,000 admissions, predominantly in < or =3 months with 42.76/10,000 admissions and which accounted for 75% of the cases. Cough was the most important symptom (91%). Cyanosis, leucocytosis and lymphocytosis were the most characteristic clinical findings when comparing positive pertussis with negative. More than two thirds of the subjects less than 3 months of age had not been vaccinated at the time of admission. The death rate was 8.3%, more than half of them in subjects less than 1 month of age. Whooping cough is an important public health problem. Post-partum vaccination could be a strategy to reduce morbidity and mortality in infants less than 3 months of age. 2009 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. [Frequency of peritoneal transport in a population of the Hospital General Regional No. 46, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social].

    PubMed

    Chávez Valencia, Venice; Orizaga de la Cruz, Citlalli; Pazarin Villaseñor, Héctor Leonardo; Fuentes Ramírez, Francisco; Parra Michel, Renato; Aragaki, Yuritomo; Márquez Magaña, Isela; García Cárdenas, Mario Alberto; Campos Enrique, Rojas

    2014-12-01

    The peritoneal equilibration test (PET) is a common test used in the adequacy of peritoneal dialysis (PD). To determine the frequency of presentation of different types of peritoneal transport in patients on PD ranking with Twardowski, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (INCMNSZ) and Hospital de Especialidades del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social Centro Médico Nacional de Occidente (IMSS-HE, CMNO) and establish themselves. Descriptive and transversal study. Included with PET on PD patients between April 2011 to September 2012; any gender, 16 years or older, in DP minimum of 4 weeks. PEP performed standardized bags of 2.5%. Performed 235 PET. We can classify peritoneal transport with Twardowski in high (H) 34%, high average (HA) 37%, low average (LA) 25%, and low (L) 4% peritoneal transport rates. INCMNSZ percentages H was 34%, HA 32%, LA 23%, and L 11%; using the CMNO HE was H 26%, HA 31%, LA 31%, and L 12%. From our data, the percentage of patients with H was 22%, HA 33%, LA 32%, and L13%. Classifying patients according to type of transport with Twardowski will under-diagnose the low and overestimate high transport, and can alter survival forecasts.

  10. Hospital marketing.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    This article looks at a prescribed academic framework for various criteria that serve as a checklist for marketing performance that can be applied to hospital marketing organizations. These guidelines are drawn from some of Dr. Noel Capon of Columbia University's book Marketing Management in the 21st Century and applied to actual practices of hospital marketing organizations. In many ways this checklist can act as a "marketing" balanced scorecard to verify performance effectiveness and develop opportunities for innovation.

  11. Hypermobility among school children aged five to eight years: the Hospital del Mar Criteria gives higher prevalence for hypermobility than the Beighton score.

    PubMed

    Öhman, A; Westblom, C; Henriksson, M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the distribution of hypermobility among school children aged five to eight years. One hundred and twenty-eight participants were assessed using the Beighton score and the Hospital del Mar criteria. With the Beighton score using the cut-off ≥4, the prevalence was 12%, and with the Hospital del Mar criteria the prevalence was 34%. There were significantly higher scores for females on both the Beighton (p=0.01) and Hospital del Mar criteria (p<0.0001). The youngest children aged five to six years scored higher compared with the seven- and eight-year-olds (p=0.016). The knee flexion was most likely to be hypermobile (97%), followed by shoulder rotation (80%), thumb (31%), elbow (27%), metatarsal-phalangeal (16%), hip (15.5%), fingers (10%) or knee (10%), ankle (6%), trunk (4%) and patella (2%). Gender and probably age must be taken into account when children are assessed for hypermobility. The Hospital del Mar criteria need to be modified for some of the motions.

  12. 5. View of middle DR 2 antenna with DR 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of middle DR 2 antenna with DR 1 antenna in background. Photograph shows on left side at bottom foundation berm and along right side bottom stanchion concrete foundations at bottom structural steel assembly. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  13. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years. Oral history of Dr. Nadine Foreman, M.D., August 19, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Dr. Nadine Foreman was interviewed by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments (OHRE). Dr. Foreman was selected for interview because of the position she held at the University of California, San Francisco. Following a brief biographical sketch, Dr. Foreman describes her work with Dr. Mayo Soley using I-131 in treatment of hyperthyroidism, selection criteria for patients in the radioiodine project, work with Dr. Earl Miller, work at Highland Hospital, radioiodine treatment of diffuse toxic goiter (myxedema), the radiophosphorus and radioiodine programs with Dr. Bert Low-Beer, and treatment of polycythemia vera.

  14. Remembering Dr. Frederick Griffith Pearson

    PubMed Central

    Finley, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Canada has lost a remarkable surgeon and leader. Dr. Frederick Griffith “Griff” Pearson, aged 90, died in Kitchener, Ont., on Aug. 10, 2016, surrounded by his wife, Hilppa Pearson, and his family. PMID:28234612

  15. Dr. Millie Cleveland: chiropractic achiever.

    PubMed

    Nash, J

    1998-06-01

    Dr. Mildred Genoa Allison-Cleveland, affectionately known as "Dr. Millie," was an important part of life at Cleveland Chiropractic College for over thirty years, serving first as a clerical assistant, then instructor, administrative assistant, and trusted right hand of her husband, Dr. Carl Cleveland, Jr. Yet Mildred Cleveland, like many other women who have helped the profession grow and survive over the years, has never been the subject of an article in print. In this paper, the author will strive to outline Dr. Mildred Cleveland's accomplishments, as well as to give the reader as clear a picture as possible of the woman who was the wife of one chiropractic pioneer and mother of another.

  16. [Incidence of dentofacial deformities in the Specialty Hospital of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social].

    PubMed

    Delgado Galíndez, Blanca; Villalpaondo Carreón, Mónika

    2005-01-01

    To report the incidence and classification of dentofacial deformities from the Maxillofacial Department at the Specialty Hospital at the 21st Century National Medical Center of the Mexican Institute of Social Security in Mexico City. A descriptive, retrospective and transversal study was carried out. Clinical files from 120 patients were reviewed from May 1997 to May 1998 with the purpose of classifying and determining the types of maxillofacial deformities and also to report whether these deformities were corrected by orthognatic surgery. One hundred twenty clinical files were reviewed and dentofacial deformities were found in 47 (39%). All patients were treated with orthognatic surgery. Surgical treatment was often combined (orthodontia and surgery). Regardless of the type of dentofacial deformities, an individualized treatment protocol must be designed for each patient. It is important to list the priorities and needs of the patients in order to find appropriate solutions, in regard to their importance.

  17. [Radiological percutaneous gastrostomy (GRP), 17 años de experiencia, serie de casos del hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío].

    PubMed

    Navarro Falcón, Magnolia Del Carmen; Parejo Campos, Juana; Pereira Cunill, José Luis; García Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2014-10-25

    When assessing a patient nutritional support the state of the gastrointestinal tract is the most important point to consider, whenever possible we should choose the enteral nutrition (EN) over parenteral nutrition (PN) and recognized by its various advantages. The percutaneous gastrostomy (GRP) were introduced in clinical practice as an alternative to surgical gastrostomy (GQ). The speed, simplicity, low cost, low morbidity and low mortality of these techniques has allowed its rapid development.The feeding tubes types used were the balloon-retained devices catheter, the pig tail and the ballon-retained with gastropexia (gastropexia). It is a retrospective study of all patients who were placed GPR in the Virgen del Rocío University Hospital, Sevilla, between September 1996 and September 2013, which aims to study is to describe the characteristics of patients and the complications presented for different types of enteral feeding tubes used. GPR 186 were performed in 176 patients (135 males (76.70%), with an average duration of 303.6 days, the most frequent diseases were cancers of the head and neck 49.46%. The types of feeding tubes used were pigtail 118 (63.44%), balloon-retained devices 22 (11.83%), and gastropexia 46 (24.73%). The most common early complications in the pigtail group were early purulent exudate and early bleeding (2.5 and 3.4% respectively), while in the balloon catheter group the initial output of the probe was most frequent early complication (13.7%), none of these complications were observed in the group of gastropexy. The most common late complication was obstruction probe. The GPR is a safe technique with lower mortality of 1%; Low frequently of early and late complications. A better understanding of this technique can reduce the frequency of complications.

  18. [Dr Erwin Treu--the first permanent ophthalmologist in Split].

    PubMed

    Ivanisević, Milan; Bojić, Lovro; Bućan, Kajo; Kovacić, Zeljko

    2009-01-01

    Dr. Erwin Treu (Kotor, 1875-Skopje, 1937) was the first permanent ophthalmologist in Split, Croatia. He finished his ophthalmological specialization at the Eye Clinic in Prague in 1900 at W.P. Czermak. He originates from Tirol. Dr. Treu led and organized ophthalmological service in Split and worked from 1902 to 1921 in the Split Hospital, and had a private practice until 1923. From 1904 to 1910 he temporarily worked outside Split, in Sibenik, Zadar, Dubrovnik, Kotor and Cetinje. During the First World War he was a military doctor in Split and Trogir. He performed ophthalmological operations, cataracts, glaucomas (iridectomy), strabismus (tenotomies), ocular adnexa, injuries, trachoma etc. In 1923 he left for Skopje where he at first worked as a medical major in Military Hospital, and after that as a primarius in Civil Hospital at the Department of Ophthalmology till the end of his life.

  19. Dr. John Richardson: Arctic Doctor

    PubMed Central

    Houston, C. Stuart

    1988-01-01

    Dr. John Richardson was foremost among a special breed of men, the surgeon-naturalists, one of whom accompanied every exploration party sent out by Great Britain. In addition to performing medical duties, the surgeon-naturalist was expected to identify and collect specimens of plants, animals, and rocks. Dr. Richardson was a member of two of the arctic expeditions led by Sir John Franklin, and participated in the search for the long-overdue third Franklin expedition. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:21253036

  20. Dr. von Braun With Management Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Dr. von Braun is shown in this photograph, which was probably taken in the early 1960s, with members of his management team. Pictured from left to right are, Werner Kuers, Director of the Manufacturing Engineering Division; Dr. Walter Haeussermarn, Director of the Astrionics Division; Dr. William Mrazek, Propulsion and Vehicle Engineering Division; Dr. von Braun; Dieter Grau, Director of the Quality Assurance Division; Dr. Oswald Lange, Director of the Saturn Systems Office; and Erich Neubert , Associate Deputy Director for Research and Development.

  1. Maniac Talk - Dr. Anne Thompson

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-30

    Anne Thompson Maniac Lecture, 30 April 2014 NASA climate scientist Dr. Anne Thompson presented a Maniac Talk entitled "A Career in Many Ozone Layers." Anne shared some of her long scientific career both as a researcher at Goddard and Meteorology professor at Penn State. She also described some of the problems she has worked on and tried to convey an enthusiasm for Earth Observations

  2. [Urología Clínica, bulletin of the Urology Service of Dr. Sánchez Covisa of the Hospital Provincial of Madrid, edited between 1928 and 1936].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Albacete, M; Saiz, A

    2012-02-01

    Make known the important urological work of Sanchez Covisa, third chief of the Urology Service of the Hospital Provincial de Madrid, who beginning in 1928 was able to transform and convert it into possibly the more outstanding one of its time in Spain, comparable to the best hospitals in foreign countries. We have analyzed the contents of the publication Urología Clínica, that collect the changes introduced and the work carried out in said service between 1928 and 1936, reflected in a careful yearly statistics on the care, operations and mortality in addition to the articles published by the members of the Service together with a short bibliographic review of each one. In 1914, he became chief of the Service, and after 14 years, was able to overcome all the obstacles and to extend and modernize the surgery rooms, hospitalization wards and examination resources. In 1931, once the changes were made, he began important clinical and scientific activity, and constituted one of the principal urological schools of the first half of the XXth century in our country. The prestige reached by the Urology Unit of the Hospital Provincial of Madrid attracted patients from all over Spain, many of them treated or operated on in their place of origin. This explains why the condition was complicated with some acceptable results. The quality and honesty of the Urology unit justify its qualification. The works in general are mere reviews and those regarding surgery of the uretero-intestinal shunt stand out. Copyright © 2011 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Maniac Talk - Dr. Eugenia Kalnay

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-31

    Eugenia Kalnay Maniac Lecture, March 31, 2015 Dr. Eugenia Kalnay, Distinguished University Professor and the first woman to get a doctorate in Meteorology from MIT, presented a Maniac Talk entitled, "Sheer luck: How I stumbled my way through a fantastic scientific career." Eugenia shared her life and times at the University of Buenos Aires, MIT, NASA, NOAA and University of Maryland, infused with dreams from her mother.

  4. Maniac Talk - Dr. Anne Douglass

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-03-27

    Anne Douglass Maniac Lecture, 27 March, 2013 NASA climate scientist Dr. Anne Douglass presented a Maniac Talk entitled "Satellite Observations - the Touchstone of Atmospheric Modeling." Anne shared some of her scientific career that is filled with unexpected twists and turns and even a few blind alleys, but most important her passion in satellite measurements of ozone and other trace gases, which have been her touchstone.

  5. Maniac Talk - Dr. Lorraine Remer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-09-13

    Lorraine Remer Maniac Lecture, 9 September 2013 NASA climate scientist Dr. Lorraine Remer presented a Maniac Talk entitled "Girls Just Wanna Have Fun: Why I came to NASA and Why I left." Lorraine shared some of the aerosol science she has been involved in at NASA Goddard over the past 21 years, as well as a reflection on her route to becoming a NASA scientist and key factors that influenced her to leave a tenured job.

  6. SDSS DR2 Merging pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, S. S.; Tucker, D. L.; SDSS Collaboration

    2004-05-01

    We present and analyze a catalog of 9,000 Merging pairs candidates to g=21 from the imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Second Data Release (DR2). Candidates were selected using an automated algorithm (Allam et al. 2004) that is efficient in its selection of galaxy pairs. We highlight possible science applications of such a large photometric sample of merging pais and discuss future improvements, including incorporating magnitudes and pushing to higher redshifts and fainter pairs.

  7. Maniac Talk - Dr. Jack Kaye

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-07-23

    Jack Kaye Maniac Lecture, July 23, 2014 Dr. Jack Kaye, Associate Director for Research at NASA Headquarters presented a Maniac Talk entitled, "An Unlikely but Rewarding Journey--From Quantum Chemistry to Earth Science Research Program Leadership." Jack took stock of his 30+ years at NASA, noting the people, opportunities, lessons learned, and choices that helped him get to where he is today and accomplish what he have.

  8. Maniac Talk - Dr. James Garvin

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-28

    James Garvin Maniac Lecture, 28 May 2014 Dr. James Garvin, Chief Scientist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, presented a Maniac Talk entitled "From Brownian Motion to Mars, by way of hockey on the rocks." Jim shared how his passion for rocks and landscapes drove him to promote new remote sensing approaches for measuring their topologies and led to founding of the Mars Science Laboratory and its Curiosity Rover.

  9. Maniac Talk - Dr. Brian Dennis

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-09-24

    Brian Dennis Maniac Lecture, September 24, 2014 NASA Solar Physicist Dr. Brian Dennis presented a Maniac Talk entitled "From Picking Potatoes to Measuring the Biggest Bangs in the Solar System -- Always a Farm Boy!" Brian described his formative years in England, then summarized our present understanding of how solar flares work and reviewed possible advances in instrumentation that could lead to major breakthroughs in the future.

  10. Maniac Talk - Dr. William Lau

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-01-24

    William Lau Maniac Lecture, 24 January, 2014 Dr. William Lau, Deputy Director for Atmospheres, Earth Science Division at NASA Goddard, presented a Maniac Talk entitled "My Story: A Tale of Three Continents." Bill shared his early childhood under a colonial education system with strong Chinese cultural influence and how world events, cultural and education system of three major continents, Europe, Asia and North America shaped his upbringing career goals and work ethics.

  11. Dr. Hugh L. Dryden - portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    Dr. Hugh Latimer Dryden, had many titles after his name in his lifetime. In 1949 he became the director of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). Dr. Dryden received many accolades and awards both during his life and after his death, but the greatest and most appropriate honor came on March 26, 1976, when NASA renamed the NASA Flight Research Center as the NASA Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center. At the dedication ceremony NASA Administrator James C. Fletcher stated: 'in 1924, when the fastest racing planes did well to fly at 280 m.p.h., Dryden was already probing the transonic range of . . . flight. Later in the 1920s, he sought to develop methods of accurately measuring . . . turbulence in wind tunnels. In 1938 he was the first American to deliver the Wright Brothers lecture. His 'Turbulence and the Boundary Layer' became a classic summary on the subject. It is most fitting that this Flight Research Center, with its unique and highly specialized capability for solving aerospace problems, should memorialize the genius of Hugh Dryden.' Dr. Dryden was initially an aerodynamicist with the National Bureau of Standards. He did important early work in high-speed aerodynamics. In 1947 he became the director of aeronautical research for the NACA (a predecessor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration). Two years later, he became NACA's director, a position he held until 1958 when he became deputy administrator of NASA.

  12. Dr. Francis Collins Is New NIH Director

    MedlinePlus

    ... the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. President Barack Obama nominated Dr. Collins, who served as ... by a unanimous vote. Announcing his choice, the President said, "Dr. Collins is one of the top ...

  13. [Analysis of maternal mortality during three periods at Hospital de Ginecología y Obstetricia del Centro Médico Nacional de Occidente].

    PubMed

    Angulo Vázquez, José; Cortés Sanabria, Laura; Torres Gómez, Luís Guillermo; Aguayo Alcaraz, Guadalupe; Hernández Higareda, Salvador; Avalos Nuño, Joel

    2007-07-01

    Most of deceases due to pregnancy, delivery, puerperium and them attention are avoidable with current medicine resources. To analyze some basic elements of epidemiologic behavior of a hospital environment maternal mortality in a third level hospital during a period of 21 years. Analytical cross-sectional study, 222 maternal deaths registered at Hospital de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Centro Medico Nacional de Occidente del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, were included, during the period 1985-2005. Deaths were analyzed in three periods of 7 years each one. The analysis of results was made based on descriptive statistic. chi2 was used for comparison between periods. Maternal death ratio was 73 per 100,000 live births during the 21 years. Maternal mortality was lower in the group of women under 20 years and increase agreed maternal age. Frequency of direct obstetric deaths decreased when comparing the 3 periods. The main causes of maternal death were preeclampsia/eclampsia and obstetric hemorrhage, which were responsible for almost 50% of maternal deaths. There was no significant difference to anticipation by comparing periods, between 28 and 37% of deaths were foreseen. 98% of deaths occurred at Intensive Care Units. Direct and indirect maternal deaths show very similar values in the third period, which translates in an improvement in anticipation. It must be reinforce the simple and opportune information to the patient with regard to warning signs and the permanent medical training must be a priority at the 3 medical levels.

  14. FOREWORD: Dr Trevor J Hicks Dr Trevor J Hicks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Darren

    2009-03-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter has been assembled to recognize the valuable contribution of Dr Trevor J Hicks to the field of neutron scattering and magnetism. Trevor began his study of magnetism as a PhD student at Monash University in Melbourne in the early 1960s, working with Professor Jack Smith. From the very beginning magnetism in alloys, and disordered systems in general, became a key aspect of his career. After a postdoctoral position at Harwell working with Dr Graeme Low Trevor returned to Australia and took up a position with Monash. He soon became a key figure in developing the capability for neutron scattering using the HIFAR reactor at the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, now the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, ANSTO. The instrumentation was always developed to further his studies of magnetism. The development of polarization analysis measurements of diffuse magnetic scattering, first using iron filters and then his own design of supermirror benders for beam polarization, took place through the 1970s, 1980s and into the 1990s. Throughout this time, Trevor mentored a series of PhD students and postdoctoral fellows, many of whom have contributed to this issue (and, indeed, guest edited it). As befits a scientist and university academic for whom teaching has always been important, Trevor has not only created a strong body of significant research, he has also made a major contribution to preparing several generations of neutron scattering scientists, and this issue reflects that. When I approached Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter with a proposal for an issue in honour of Trevor, the response was immediate and positive. It is with great pleasure that I present the result of that proposal. The great diversity of the content, all centred on neutron scattering and magnetism, reflects the breadth of Trevor's own career and of the scientists with whom he has interacted. Finally, I would like to make some

  15. [The American bacteriologist: Dr. Meyer].

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Li, Zhi-ping

    2009-01-01

    Karl F. Meyer who was born in Switzerland was American famous bacteriologist of 20th century. During the World War II, Dr. Meyer urged the U. S. military to take positive reply measures against the bacteria war started by Japanese army and achieved significant accomplishments in the preventive and therapeutic theory of plague as well as the manufacture of plague vaccine. After the World War II, Meyer devoted to the scientific field of plague prevention and made great achievements in the area of animal diseases and public health. In 1951, he received the Lasker Award of America.

  16. 100-DR-1 radiological surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Naiknimbalkar, N.M.

    1994-01-28

    This report summarizes and documents the results of the radiological surveys conducted over the surface of the 100-DR-1 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. In addition, this report explains the survey methodology using the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS). The 100-DR-1 radiological survey field task consisted of two activities: characterization of the operable unit-specific background conditions and the radiological survey of the operable unit surface area. The survey methodology was based on utilization of USRADS for automated recording of the gross gamma radiation levels at or near 6 in. and at 3 ft from the surface soil. The purpose of the survey is to identify the location of unidentified subsurface radioactive material areas and any surface contamination associated with these areas. The radiological surveys were conducted using both a digital count rate meter with a NaI detector reporting in counts per minute (CPM) and a dose rate meter reporting micro-Roentgen per hour (uR) connected to a CHEMRAD Tennessee Corp. Series 2000 USRADS. The count rate meter was set for gross counting, i.e., Window ``out``. The window setting allows detection of low, intermediate, and high energy photons. The USRADS equipment is used to record the detector readings verses the location of the readings, generate a map of the survey area, and save the data on computer storage media.

  17. Remembering Dr. Lyle Wheeler Sherman.

    PubMed

    Hart, J F

    1996-12-01

    Lyle Wheeler Sherman was a chiropractor with a passion for chiropractic. He brought dignity to the chiropractor; but most profoundly, he brought dignity to the chiropractic profession. He rendered a quality professional service and helped his fellow chiropractor do the same. He was a published author and co-developer of various chiropractic instruments. A renowned teacher, former assistant director and chief of staff of the B.J. Palmer Chiropractic Research Clinic in Davenport, Iowa, he was a sought-after speaker at both state and national chiropractic conventions. Dr. Sherman was a man of knowledge and wisdom. Local chiropractors sought his technical advice and assistance which he provided at no charge. Both laymen and chiropractors recognized him as a chiropractic authority. He regularly received letters from patients who had traveled both the medical route and the chiropractic route and were seeking the more specific care offered by Dr. Sherman. He always attempted to accommodate them. His gentle personality and sense of humor, coupled with his exactness in chiropractic analysis and adjustment procedures, won the respect of students, colleagues and patients. His expertise was recognized by his appointment to many state and national offices and by the many awards he received. His greatest and most lasting award was the chiropractic college that bears his name: Sherman College of Straight Chiropractic in Spartanburg, South Carolina--the first chiropractic college in the southeast.

  18. [Dr. John Baptiste Edouard Gélineau].

    PubMed

    Janković, S; Susić, V; Sokić, D; Lević, Z

    1996-01-01

    became the "Intern" of the Navy Hospital and next year a "Surgeon of the Third Class". As a Navy surgeon he visited French colonies in the Indian ocean: first the Reunion island and then Mayotte island of the Commores Archipelago. Of this period he wrote "Voyage a i'lle de la Réunion", memoirs published much later, in 1905, in which he described colonial life and abolition of slavery. The story of Elise, a beauteous Creole woman, a concubine of a young naval Commander, who delivered a child that soon died, inexorably points to the autobiographic character of his work. He defended a doctoral thesis "Aperçu Medical de I'lle de Mayotte" at Montpellier University School of Medicine in 1858, using the data collected during his year-and-a-half stay on a Mayotte island; at that time he was a "Navy Surgeon of the Second Class". For his dedication in fighting against epidemics that broke out during the French-German war in 1870 he was nominated for the Legion of Honor, but received it only later. In 1871 Gélineau introduced "Doctor Gélineau's tablets" for the treatment of epilepsy (contained bromide and arsenic). He was a member of the Société de Médicine, Société d' Hypnologie, La-Société Française d' Hygiène, and a few others. After retirement at the age of 72, Gélineau switched to wine production, continuing the family tradition; for the quality of his Bordeaux wines he was awarded gold medals at the Anvers and Paris Exhibitions. Dr. Gélineau died on March 2, 1906, at Argeles Gazost in Pyrnees honored by the titles of Chevalier de la Légion d' Honneur, Officier d'Academie and Commander of Nichan of the Ottoman Empire.

  19. Carrying Skills From One C-Suite to Another: An Interview With Dr Maureen Swick.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jeffrey M

    This interview of Dr Maureen Swick chronicles career development and preparation for a transition into the role of CEO of the American Organization of Nurse Executives. While there are an estimated 400 000 nurses in middle management roles in the United States and 5700 in the most senior nursing positions in US hospitals, Dr Swick has assumed a role leading the leaders and highlights those experiences that have influenced her and provides insights into her vision for nursing leadership.

  20. Molecular characterization of a recombinant HLA-DR1/DR2 haplotype.

    PubMed

    Bidwell, J L; Bidwell, E A; Dupont, E; Andrien, M; Bouillenne, C; Klouda, P T; Bradley, B A

    1992-04-01

    Serologic analysis of two families identified an HLA-DR haplotype in which DR1 and DR2 cosegregated. DNA-RFLP analysis of these families with an HLA-DRB probe revealed a pattern of hybridization suggestive of a recombination between DR1 and DR15. Following amplification, cloning, and nucleotide sequencing of HLA-DRB-gene second-exon DNA sequences, three DRB amplification products associated with the novel haplotype were identified: these corresponded to DRB1*0101, DR2 pseudogene, and DRB5*0101. Clones representing the DRB1*1501 and DR1 pseudogenes were not identified: oligonucleotide typing with DRB1*1501-specific probes confirmed the absence of this gene within the DR1/DR2 haplotype. We postulate that the DR1/DR2 haplotype represents a recombinant between those of DR1-Dw1 and DR15-Dw2, and that the crossing-over may have been between the DRB1*0101 gene and the DR2 pseudogene. This is further supported by DNA-RFLP analysis with HLA-DQB and DQA CDNA probes, which revealed conserved linkage genes between the DQB1*0501, DQA1*0101, and DRB1*0101 genes.

  1. Dr. Jason Dworkin, Project Scientist

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Dr. Jason Dworkin, Project Scientist for NASA's OSIRIS-Rex mission is seen hear sealing a glass test tube with a sample of Allende meteorite dust which is 4.567 BILLION years old. Jason is the Chief of NASA Goddard's Astrochemistry Lab. Read more about the mission here: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/osiris-rex Credit: NASA/Goddard/Debbie Mccallum NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  2. Dr House, TV, and reality...

    PubMed

    Lapostolle, Frédéric; Montois, Sylvie; Alhéritière, Armelle; De Stefano, Carla; Le Toumelin, Philippe; Adnet, Frédéric

    2013-02-01

    Medical practice in the media is usually far from reality. Thus, the viewer may be led astray. The world-famous fictional Dr House has to face a difficult diagnosis every week. His practice does not seem to reflect reality. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnosis strategy involved in this television program. An observer has previewed the 2011 season. The episode running time, the patient's age and sex, the list of all investigations and interventions, the final diagnosis, and the patient's outcome were collected. Number and proportion of French viewers for each episode were recorded. We analyzed 18 episodes. The median running time was 42.5 (42.1-43.2) minutes. Main patient characters were 12 men (66%) and 6 women (33%); the average age was 31 (22-38) years. There were 225 investigations or interventions reported, averaging 14 (9-15) per episode, representing one examination every 3.1 (2.9-4.8) minutes. The most frequently prescribed investigations were magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 13; 72%), blood sample (11; 61%), and biopsy (10; 56%). The most frequent interventions were surgery, anti-infectious treatments, and steroid treatments (9 each; 50%). Two patients (11%) died. The median number of spectators was 8.4 (8.1-8.7) million, corresponding to 33% (33%-34%) of the French national audience. The population and the examination strategies used by Dr House were unrealistic. Because of this distortion, patients may not understand, nor accept the delay, the investigation choices, the intervention costs, risks, nor failures of a daily medical practice. Physicians should be aware of this "information bias." Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. SDSS DR7 superclusters. Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einasto, M.; Liivamägi, L. J.; Tago, E.; Saar, E.; Tempel, E.; Einasto, J.; Martínez, V. J.; Heinämäki, P.

    2011-08-01

    Aims: We study the morphology of a set of superclusters drawn from the SDSS DR7. Methods: We calculate the luminosity density field to determine superclusters from a flux-limited sample of galaxies from SDSS DR7 and select superclusters with 300 and more galaxies for our study. We characterise the morphology of superclusters using the fourth Minkowski functional V3, the morphological signature (the curve in the shapefinder's K1-K2 plane) and the shape parameter (the ratio of the shapefinders K1/K2). We investigate the supercluster sample using multidimensional normal mixture modelling. We use Abell clusters to identify our superclusters with known superclusters and to study the large-scale distribution of superclusters. Results: The superclusters in our sample form three chains of superclusters; one of them is the Sloan Great Wall. Most superclusters have filament-like overall shapes. Superclusters can be divided into two sets; more elongated superclusters are more luminous, richer, have larger diameters and a more complex fine structure than less elongated superclusters. The fine structure of superclusters can be divided into four main morphological types: spiders, multispiders, filaments, and multibranching filaments. We present the 2D and 3D distribution of galaxies and rich groups, the fourth Minkowski functional, and the morphological signature for all superclusters. Conclusions: Widely different morphologies of superclusters show that their evolution has been dissimilar. A study of a larger sample of superclusters from observations and simulations is needed to understand the morphological variety of superclusters and the possible connection between the morphology of superclusters and their large-scale environment.

  4. Five-year economic evaluation of non-melanoma skin cancer surgery at the Costa del Sol Hospital (2006-2010).

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Bernier, M; González-Carrascosa, M; Padilla-España, L; Rivas-Ruiz, F; Jiménez-Puente, A; de Troya-Martín, M

    2014-03-01

    The cost associated with treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer is expected to rise considerably over the coming decades. This important public health problem is therefore expected to have an enormous economic impact for the various public health services. To estimate the cost of the surgical-care process of non-melanoma skin cancer at the Costa del Sol Hospital and seek areas to improve its efficiency, using the activity-based costing (ABC) method and the tools designed for decision analysis. To compare the costs for hospitalized patients obtained using the ABC method with the data published by the Spanish Ministry of Health, using the diagnosis-related groups (DRG) classification system. Retrospective analysis of the cost of non-melanoma skin cancer surgery at the Costa del Sol Hospital. The total estimated cost from 2006 to 2010 was 3 398 540€. Most of the episodes (47.3%) corresponded to minor outpatient surgery. The costs of the episodes varied greatly according to the type of admission: 423€ (minor outpatient surgery), 1267€ (major outpatient surgery), and 1832€ (inpatient surgery). The average cost of an inpatient episode varied significantly depending on the calculation system used (ABC: 2328€ vs. DRG: 5674€). The ABC cost analysis system favours standardization of the care process for these tumours and the detection of areas to improve efficiency. This would enable more reliable economic studies than those obtained using traditional methods, such as the DRG. © 2013 The Authors Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2013 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  5. Dr. von Braun Briefing Walt Disney

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. von Braun began his association with Walt Disney in the 1950s when the rocket scientist appeared in three Disney television productions related to the exploration of space. Years later, Dr. von Braun invited Disney and his associates to tour the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This photograph is dated April 13, 1965. From left are R.J. Schwinghamer from the MSFC, Disney, B.J. Bernight, and Dr. von Braun.

  6. Dr. von Braun Briefing Walt Disney

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. von Braun began his association with Walt Disney in the 1950s when the rocket scientist appeared in three Disney television productions related to the exploration of space. Years later, Dr. von Braun invited Disney and his associates to tour the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This photograph is dated April 13, 1965. From left are R.J. Schwinghamer from the MSFC, Disney, B.J. Bernight, and Dr. von Braun.

  7. Dr. Harry Whelan With the Light Emitting Diode Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The red light from the Light Emitting Diode (LED) probe shines through the fingers of Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Whelan uses the long waves of light from the LED surgical probe to activate special drugs that kill brain tumors. Laser light previously has been used for this type of surgery, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of tumors that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. Also, it can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research Program grant. The program is part of NASA's Technology Transfer Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  8. Dr. Irmfried Eberl (1910-1948): mass murdering MD.

    PubMed

    Strous, Rael D

    2009-04-01

    There are isolated cases of physicians who murdered their patients. However, never had a single physician personally supervised the mass murder of hundreds of thousands of individuals, until Dr. Irmfried Eberl. Commander of the Nazi death camp Treblinka, he killed both the ill and those he considered "a disease to his nation." At age 32 Dr. Eberl established Treblinka, where he was responsible for the killing of approximately 280,000 individuals within a few weeks. The position of camp commandant was earned following his success as head of two psychiatric hospitals in Germany where he coordinated the murder of thousands of mentally ill Jews and non-Jews within the context of the euthanasia program. However, few in medicine have heard of him or the harm he caused to the ethical practice of the profession and to human rights.

  9. Dr. Harry Whelan With the Light Emitting Diode Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The red light from the Light Emitting Diode (LED) probe shines through the fingers of Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Whelan uses the long waves of light from the LED surgical probe to activate special drugs that kill brain tumors. Laser light previously has been used for this type of surgery, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of tumors that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. Also, it can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research Program grant. The program is part of NASA's Technology Transfer Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  10. Dr. Wernher Von Braun greeting dignitaries.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, left, greets vice president Spiro T. Agnew in the Launch Control Center for the Apollo 14 mission. Between Dr. Von Braun and Mr. Agnew are their Royal Highnesses, The Prince and Princess of Spain. The royal visitors greeted the launch control team in th enter after the launch of Apollo 14.

  11. Dr. Wernher Von Braun at a picnic.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, stakes claim to a table for the picnic celebrating man's first lunar landing. With Dr. Von Braun are his wife, Maria (seated, right), and son, Peter (back to camera). His daughter, Margrit, was also present, but is hidden from view by friends in this view.

  12. An Interview with Dr. Robert W. Young.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silentman, Irene

    1996-01-01

    Dr. Robert W. Young discusses what led him to work in the Navajo Nation and to begin studying Navajo, the method he used for developing a Navajo orthography, his professional relationship with Dr. William Morgan, the system they used to develop an English-Navajo dictionary, his views on language loss, and his greatest accomplishment--a reservation…

  13. Dr. William Morgan: A Granddaughter's Remembrance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Jennifer M.

    1996-01-01

    Dr. William Morgan, a Navajo linguist, devoted his career to the development and preservation of the Navajo language. Morgan collaborated with Dr. Robert Young in writing "The Navajo Language," an unabridged Navajo-English dictionary. He also taught Navajo at the Navajo Community College and worked for the Native American Materials…

  14. Dr. Wernher Von Braun at a picnic.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, stakes claim to a table for the picnic celebrating man's first lunar landing. With Dr. Von Braun are his wife, Maria (seated, right), and son, Peter (back to camera). His daughter, Margrit, was also present, but is hidden from view by friends in this view.

  15. Dr. von Braun Discusses 'Bottle Suit' Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun (center), then Chief of the Guided Missile Development Division at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, discusses a 'bottle suit' model with Dr. Heinz Haber (left), an expert on aviation medicine, and Willey Ley, a science writer on rocketry and space exploration. The three men were at the Disney studios appearing in the motion picture, entitled 'Man in Space.'

  16. Dr. von Braun Tries Out the NBS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director, Dr. von Braun, is shown fitted with suit and diving equipment as he prepares for a tryout in the MSFC Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS). Weighted to a neutrally buoyant condition, Dr. von Braun was able to perform tasks underwater which simulated weightless conditions found in space.

  17. Dr. von Braun Discusses 'Bottle Suit' Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun (center), then Chief of the Guided Missile Development Division at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, discusses a 'bottle suit' model with Dr. Heinz Haber (left), an expert on aviation medicine, and Willey Ley, a science writer on rocketry and space exploration. The three men were at the Disney studios appearing in the motion picture, entitled 'Man in Space.'

  18. [Interview with Dr. Ricardo Bressani].

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    In an interview Dr. Ricardo Bressani, a chemical engineer by profession and a consultant of the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP), talks about the search for a product later given the name of Incaparina, which was eventually developed for food supplementation programs by INCAP. Experiments were made with soybeans, cottonseed, and various cereals to arrive at the optimal mixture of 62% cereal and 38% protein for this product. In addition, vitamins and lysine were added. The major demand for this biscuit occurred between 1976 and 1978. Since that time sales have ebbed partly owing to the soaring commodity prices. Incaparina is sold in Guatemala and El Salvador and there are tests going on in Mexico, Colombia, and Cuba to produce it locally. This product is also proof of the benefit of developing leguminous cereal systems. The optimal combination is 70% cereals and 30% legumes, each providing 50% protein. The potential of mixing various other cereals and fruits are also being studied. A large number (up to 60 annually) of nutritional research papers are published on the national level and in Latin America in prestigious scientific journals whose monitoring calls for coordination between different authors.

  19. Dr Valter Rukavina - amateur painter.

    PubMed

    Glavocic, Daina

    2008-01-01

    In this essay Dr Valter Rukavina (Rijeka 1896-1972), excellent specialist in infectious diseases and professor of the Rijeka University School of Medicine, is presented as successful amateur painter. He had been refining his talent through relentless practice since the school days, complementing it with skills and advice from established painters he associated with. He favoured figurative, realistic and somewhat romantic expression for his themes such as coastal landscapes, marinas, Quarnero sceneries, still life in tempera or oil, and drawings in ink or sepia. Despite partial colour blindness, he successfully used colour. He featured in a number of group exhibitions such as that of amateur painters of Rijeka in 1950, of painters physicians of Yugoslavia (Zagreb, 1956), in the Second International Exhibition of Contemporary Art (Florence, 1964), exhibition of the Rijeka branch of the Croatian Association of Visual Artists (Belgrade, 1966), and the 1969 exhibition in Opatija. His native city hosted two one-man exhibitions, the first retrospective in 1971, while he was still alive, and the second posthumous in 2007, with a good selection of his life's work.

  20. Dr. Sadik decries early parenthood.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    At the Tenth Anniversary Conference of the Center for Population Options, which was held in Washington on September 24, 1990, Dr. Nafis Sadik, Executive Director of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), spoke concerning the problems created by early parenthood. Childbirth is the greatest health risk young women, after reaching puberty, face in developing countries; their children are less likely to survive than those born to those over 20. Early childbearing means larger families; this, when combined with shorter time spans between generations, leads to rapid population growth and endangers sustainable development in societies with limited natural resources. As a social and economic issue, adolescent fertility limits educational achievement, status, and full participation in the community for women and girls. In many societies, women are second class citizens; they are more likely to die in infancy than boys, they are less likely to attend school, and they leave school earlier. They derive their status from motherhood and spend practically all of their fertile years pregnant and caring for children. They have no other option because their futures are determined by others.

  1. Letter to Dr. Felix Bronner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Dear Dr. Bronner: I have been reading in The Physiologist the letters from senior physiologists for many years with great interest. It is impressive that many of the respondents are still pursuing scientific endeavours in their 70's and some even in their 80's. The interesting task is to ponder the relative causative proportions of heredity and environment responsible. One wonders whether knowing something about physiology engenders longer and more productive lives? I suspect so because of the accompanying self-discipline. But another factor would seem to be the pervasive joy of working in this profession. I have been fortunate to be able to acquire the joy of physiology during my graduate studies at Illinois, and to have been able to carry it over here at NASA, Ames Research Center for the past 40 years. A truly academic style research environment at a federal research center is rare. The trick to a joyous research career is to overcome those ever-present slings and arrows of outrageous fortune with dignity whenever possible. To that end I have found solace and guidance in reading the history of warfare and its leaders, especially Sun Tsu's The Art of War and Clauswitz's On War. I became eligible for retirement in 1993, but to insure domestic tranquility and also the joy of pursuing my research hobby have continued working in the laboratory on human research. It is troubling to see that funding for individual scientists conducting human research is declining rapidly, along with their new ideas; perhaps the old ones are more comfortable. Hopefully I can provide a similar response when I'm 80! Thanks for your interest. Sincerely, John Greenleaf

  2. Letter to Dr. Felix Bronner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Dear Dr. Bronner: I have been reading in The Physiologist the letters from senior physiologists for many years with great interest. It is impressive that many of the respondents are still pursuing scientific endeavours in their 70's and some even in their 80's. The interesting task is to ponder the relative causative proportions of heredity and environment responsible. One wonders whether knowing something about physiology engenders longer and more productive lives? I suspect so because of the accompanying self-discipline. But another factor would seem to be the pervasive joy of working in this profession. I have been fortunate to be able to acquire the joy of physiology during my graduate studies at Illinois, and to have been able to carry it over here at NASA, Ames Research Center for the past 40 years. A truly academic style research environment at a federal research center is rare. The trick to a joyous research career is to overcome those ever-present slings and arrows of outrageous fortune with dignity whenever possible. To that end I have found solace and guidance in reading the history of warfare and its leaders, especially Sun Tsu's The Art of War and Clauswitz's On War. I became eligible for retirement in 1993, but to insure domestic tranquility and also the joy of pursuing my research hobby have continued working in the laboratory on human research. It is troubling to see that funding for individual scientists conducting human research is declining rapidly, along with their new ideas; perhaps the old ones are more comfortable. Hopefully I can provide a similar response when I'm 80! Thanks for your interest. Sincerely, John Greenleaf

  3. [Neuroblastoma: prognostic factors and survival. Experience in Hospital de Pediatria del Centro Medico Nacional del Siglo XXI and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    López-Aguilar, Enrique; Cerecedo-Díaz, Fernando; Rivera-Márquez, Hugo; Valdéz-Sánchez, Martha; Sepúlveda-Vildósola, Ana Carolina; Delgado Huerta, Sandra; Vera-Hermosillo, Herlinda; Vázquez-Langle, José Raúl; Wanzke del Angel, Volkmar

    2003-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most frequent extracranial solid tumor in children according to the literature. In Mexico it is less frequent, fallen to 8th place. Our objective was to analyze our experience and compare it with the one reported in other countries. We included all patients admitted to our hospital during the previous five years and who had not received any treatment. Patients with stages I, II, and IV received cyclophosphamide and epirrubicin. Patients with stages were III and IV received the same chemotherapy alternating with cisplatinum., ifosfamide and etoposide during 12 months as well as massive doses of 131-MIBG and surgical ablation of the remaining tumor when possible. We included 30 patients, 25 with initial presentation in the abdomen. Five were in early stages and 20 (70%) were advanced with an overall survival of 100% and 27% at 5 years respectively. When analyzed by age, 40% were 12 months of age and 60% older, with survival of 100% and 27% in the same period, respectively. According to histology there was 91% survival for differentiated and 23% for undifferentiated tumors. The chemotherapeutic regimen reported is effective but not better than that reported by other authors, in which some benefits are seen with use of transplant and immunotherapy. The most important prognostic factors are still considered to be age, stage and histology.

  4. Clinical and HLA phenotypes of type 1 autoimmune hepatitis in North American patients outside DR3 and DR4.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J; Carpenter, Herschel A; Moore, S Breanndan

    2006-06-01

    To determine the clinical phenotype and outcome of patients with definite type 1 autoimmune hepatitis, who lack human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR3 and DR4, and to assess the importance of HLA DR7 and DR13. Two hundred and seven adult patients were typed for DR3, DR4, DR7, and DR13 by DNA-based techniques. One hundred and two blood donors constituted a normal population. Twenty-six patients lacked DR3 and DR4 (13%). Treatment failure occurred more commonly in these individuals than in the 68 patients with DR4 (20% vs. 3%, P = 0.03), and relapse after drug withdrawal was less frequent than in the 84 patients with DR3 (55% vs. 87%, P = 0.03). HLA DR13 occurred more often than in those with DR3 (54% vs. 15%, P = 0.0002) or DR4 (54% vs. 12%, P = 0.00005), and it was more frequent than in normal adults (54% vs. 22%, P = 0.003), including those without DR3 or DR4 (54% vs. 27%, P = 0.03). HLA DR7 was not associated with susceptibility or outcome. White North American patients who lack DR3 and DR4 respond differently to corticosteroid treatment than patients with classical HLA phenotypes. HLA DR13 is common in these adult patients, and it may affect treatment outcome.

  5. Experience of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis with HLA Matching at the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Spain: Technical and Clinical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Raquel María; Peciña, Ana; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; Sánchez, Beatriz; Guardiola, Jordi; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Borrego, Salud; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of genetic diseases, combined with HLA matching (PGD-HLA), is an option for couples at risk of transmitting a genetic disease to select unaffected embryos of an HLA tissue type compatible with that of an existing affected child. Here we present the results of our PGD-HLA program at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. Seven couples have participated in our program because of different indications. Overall, 26 cycles were performed, providing a total of 202 embryos. A conclusive molecular diagnosis and HLA-typing could be assured in 96% of the embryos. The percentage of transfers per cycle was 26.9% and the birth rate per cycle was 7.7% per transfer. Our PGD-HLA program resulted in the birth of 2 healthy babies, HLA-identical to their affected siblings, with successful subsequent haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantations. Both HSC-transplanted children are currently doing well 48 and 21 months following transplantation, respectively. All the procedures, including HSCs umbilical cord transplantation, were performed in our hospital. PMID:24868528

  6. Monocytic HLA DR antigens in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Krause, Daniela; Wagner, Jenny; Matz, Judith; Weidinger, Elif; Obermeier, Michael; Riedel, Michael; Gruber, Rudolf; Schwarz, Markus; Mueller, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    A genetic association of specific human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DR genes and schizophrenia has recently been shown. These HLA play a fundamental role in the control of immune responses. Furthermore infectious agents have been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In this study we investigated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes in schizophrenic patients compared to controls with a special focus on the adaption to in vitro stimulation with toll-like receptor ligands. Patients with schizophrenia and matched controls were included. For each individual, we evaluated the rate of HLA DR positive monocytes (either incubated at 37 °C or after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide or Poly I:C). We found a significantly higher percentage of schizophrenic patients with elevated HLA DR positive cells (p=0.045) as compared to controls. The adjustment rate from baseline levels of monocytic HLA DR positive cells to stimulation with Poly I:C was significantly lower in schizophrenic patients (p=0.038). The increased monocytic HLA DR in schizophrenic patients and the maladjustment of their monocytic HLA DR levels to an infectious stimulus might be a sign for a disturbed monocytic immune balance in schizophrenic individuals.

  7. Acute kidney injury applying pRifle scale in Children of Hospital Universitario del Valle in Cali, Colombia: clinical features, management and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Julián A; Alexandre Cardona, Sergio; Marmolejo, Andrés F; Paz, Juan F; de Castaño, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To know the epidemiology of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) in the pediatric population at Hospital Universitario del Valle (HUV), a tertiary University Hospital in Cali, Colombia. Methods: We obtained a series of cases through daily surveillance for a seven-month period (June 1 to December 31, 2009) in patients older than 30 days and under 18 years at HUV. We excluded patients with previous diagnosis of chronic renal failure. The new pRIFLE scale was used to define AKI. Results: 27 patients were detected, with mean age of 36 months. Incidence of AKI was 0.38% from pediatric admissions and 6.2% from the pediatric intensive care unit (pICU) admissions. The pRIFLE scale at study entrance was: Risk: 2 patients, Injury: 8, Failure: 17. Etiology of AKI was: pre-renal in 89%, primary renal disease in 3.7%, and post-renal in 7.4%. There was an association of AKI with sepsis in 66.7% and 48.2% progressed to septic shock. Six patients required renal replacement therapy, all required peritoneal dialysis. The AKI was multi-factorial in 59.3% and associated with systemic multi-organ failure in 59.3%. At study entry, 63% patients were in pICU. The average hospital stay was 21.3 ± 9.2 days. Six children died, 16 resolved AKI, and nine were left with renal sequelae. Conclusions: We recommended pRIFLE scale for early diagnosis of AKI in all pediatric services. Education in pRIFLE scale, prevention of AKI, and early management of sepsis and hypovolemia is recommended. PMID:24893192

  8. Acute kidney injury applying pRifle scale in Children of Hospital Universitario del Valle in Cali, Colombia: clinical features, management and evolution.

    PubMed

    Restrepo de Rovetto, Consuelo; Mora, Julián A; Alexandre Cardona, Sergio; Marmolejo, Andrés F; Paz, Juan F; de Castaño, Iris

    2012-07-01

    To know the epidemiology of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) in the pediatric population at Hospital Universitario del Valle (HUV), a tertiary University Hospital in Cali, Colombia. We obtained a series of cases through daily surveillance for a seven-month period (June 1 to December 31, 2009) in patients older than 30 days and under 18 years at HUV. We excluded patients with previous diagnosis of chronic renal failure. The new pRIFLE scale was used to define AKI. 27 patients were detected, with mean age of 36 months. Incidence of AKI was 0.38% from pediatric admissions and 6.2% from the pediatric intensive care unit (pICU) admissions. The pRIFLE scale at study entrance was: Risk: 2 patients, Injury: 8, Failure: 17. Etiology of AKI was: pre-renal in 89%, primary renal disease in 3.7%, and post-renal in 7.4%. There was an association of AKI with sepsis in 66.7% and 48.2% progressed to septic shock. Six patients required renal replacement therapy, all required peritoneal dialysis. The AKI was multi-factorial in 59.3% and associated with systemic multi-organ failure in 59.3%. At study entry, 63% patients were in pICU. The average hospital stay was 21.3 ± 9.2 days. Six children died, 16 resolved AKI, and nine were left with renal sequelae. We recommended pRIFLE scale for early diagnosis of AKI in all pediatric services. Education in pRIFLE scale, prevention of AKI, and early management of sepsis and hypovolemia is recommended.

  9. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1926-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard and liquid oxygen-gasoline rocket in the frame from which it was fired on March 16, 1926, at Auburn, Mass. It flew for only 2.5 seconds, climbed 41 feet, and landed 184 feet away in a cabbage patch. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  10. [Interculturality in the medical practice of Dr. Albert Schweitzer].

    PubMed

    Campos-Navarro, Roberto; Ruiz-Llanos, Adriana

    2004-01-01

    Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965) was a young and promising German who at age 29 decided to undertake the profession of Medical Doctor at the University of Strassburg after finishing a career in musical studies in Paris (1899) and obtaining in Berlin a doctoral degree in Philosophy and Theology. Surprisingly, Albert Schweitzer, despite his comfortable life in Europe, decided in 1913 to practice his medical career in a remote and small Equatorial African country. He devoted nearly 50 years of his life caring for the Black population at Lamaberene, where he built a hospital. In this paper, we attempt to develop some theoretical aspects related with interculturality in the medical practice of Dr. Albert Schweitzer. We begin by considering certain sociocultural variables in hospitals that give care to patients with cultural characteristics that are substantially different from those of the health care personnel who organize, administer, and execute medical functions.

  11. Dr. Sholom Wacholder - In their own words

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Sholom Wacholder, a biostatistician in the NCI Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, discusses his role on a human papillomavirus vaccine clinical trial. From the archives of the NCI Cancer Bulletin - 2010.

  12. But Dr. Meisels Is Not Convinced.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meisels, Samuel J.

    1987-01-01

    Commenting on the Gesell Institute's response to his original article concerning the Gesell assessments, Dr. Meisels continues to maintain that the Gesell readiness tests lack sufficient proof of validity. (BB)

  13. Dr. Irvin Yalom Discusses Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forester-Miller, Holly

    1989-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Irvin Yalom, director of the Adult Psychiatry Clinic at Stanford University School of Medicine, discusses his beginnings as a group psychotherapist, current issues in group work, and the future of group work. (Author/TE)

  14. Childhood Picture of Dr. von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1912-01-01

    This is a childhood picture of Dr. von Braun (center) with his brothers. Dr. Wernher von Braun was born in Wirsitz, Germany, March 23, 1912. His childhood dreams of marned space flight were fulfilled when giant Saturn rockets, developed under his direction at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, boosted the manned Apollo spacecraft to the Moon. His life was dedicated to expanding man's knowledge through the exploration of space.

  15. Dr. Robert H. Goddard and His Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Goddard rocket with four rocket motors. This rocket attained an altitude of 200 feet in a flight, November 1936, at Roswell, New Mexico. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  16. Childhood Picture of Dr. von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1912-01-01

    This is a childhood picture of Dr. von Braun (center) with his brothers. Dr. Wernher von Braun was born in Wirsitz, Germany, March 23, 1912. His childhood dreams of marned space flight were fulfilled when giant Saturn rockets, developed under his direction at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, boosted the manned Apollo spacecraft to the Moon. His life was dedicated to expanding man's knowledge through the exploration of space.

  17. [Cutaneous myiasis by Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera Calliphoridae) in Hospital Universidad del Norte, Soledad, Atlántico].

    PubMed

    de la Ossa, Napoleón; Castro, Luis Eduardo; Visbal, Lila; Santos, Ana María; Díaz, Esther; Romero-Vivas, Claudia M E

    2009-03-01

    Human myiasis is the parasitism of human tissues by fly larvae. Diagnoses are based on clinical pattern of tissue damage and presence of insect stages. Herein, a case myiasis is described in a seven-year-old female child. She presented with fever associated with abscessed scalp lesions containing exposed larvae. Severe pediculosis was also observed. The patient was hospitalized and treated with clindamycin, gentamicin (for bacterial secondary infections) and ivermectin (treatment for lice) after which the patient showed clinical improvement and was discharged four days later. Since human myiasis can be caused by a number of different species, larvae were collected from the patient and identified as those of Cochliomyia hominivorax (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Because other cases of coinfestation of flies and lice are on record, health workers are to be alerted about the possible pediculosis-myasis risk.

  18. From the Field: Speech Therapy Outcome Measures--Interview with Dr. Pam Enderby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Judy K.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an interview with Dr. Pam Enderby--a speech language therapist and professor at the Institute of General Practice and Primary Care at the University of Sheffield, Community Sciences Centre, Northern General Hospital, in the United Kingdom--conducted by Judy Montgomery, Editor in Chief, of "Communication Disorders…

  19. From the Field: Speech Therapy Outcome Measures--Interview with Dr. Pam Enderby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Judy K.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an interview with Dr. Pam Enderby--a speech language therapist and professor at the Institute of General Practice and Primary Care at the University of Sheffield, Community Sciences Centre, Northern General Hospital, in the United Kingdom--conducted by Judy Montgomery, Editor in Chief, of "Communication Disorders…

  20. Dr. von Braun with Gen. Ostrander, Dr. Rees, and Gen. Barclay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    In this 1959 photo, taken at Cape Canaveral, Florida, Dr. von Braun (2nd from left) Director of the U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency's (ABMA) Development Operations Division, is shown conferring with Air Force Major General Donald R. Ostrander (left), on assignment at NASA as launch vehicle director; Dr. Eberhard Rees, deputy to Dr. von Braun, and Army Brigadier General John Barclay, commander of the ABMA.

  1. Comparison of del Nido cardioplegia and St. Thomas Hospital solution – two types of cardioplegia in adult cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Prashant; Jadhav, Ranjit B.; Khandekar, Jayant; Raut, Chaitanya; Ammannaya, Ganesh Kumar; Seth, Harsh S.; Singh, Jaskaran; Shah, Vaibhav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction St. Thomas’ cardioplegic solution No. 2 (ST), although most widely used in adult cardiac surgery, needs to be given at short intervals, causing additional myocardial injury. Aim To determine whether del Nido (DN) cardioplegia, with longer periods of arrest, provides equivalent myocardial protection as compared to ST. Material and methods The study population comprised 100 patients who underwent elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or double valve replacement (DVR) surgery between January 2015 and January 2016. The patients were divided into two groups based on the type of cardioplegia administered during surgery: 1) intermittent ST (ST, n = 50) and 2) DN cardioplegia (DN, n = 50). We compared the aortic cross clamp (CC) and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) times, number of intra-operative DC shocks required, and postoperative changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in the two groups. Results The aortic cross clamp and bypass times were shorter with DN (110.15 ±36.84 vs. 133.56 ±35.66 and 158.60 ±39.92 vs. 179.81 ±42.36 min respectively, p < 0.05). Fewer cardioplegia doses were required in the DN group vs. the ST group (1.38 ±0.59 vs. 4.15 ±1.26; p = 0.001), while a single cardioplegia dose was given to 35 DN patients (70%) vs. 0 ST patients (p < 0.001). Postoperative LVEF was better preserved in the DN group. Conclusions The use of DN leads to shorter cross clamp and CPB times, reduces cardioplegia dosage, and provides potentially better myocardial protection in terms of LVEF preservation, with a safety profile comparable to ST cardioplegia. PMID:28096823

  2. [Clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular complications hospitalized at the Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño].

    PubMed

    Ormeño Julca, Alexis Jose; Alvarez Murillo, Carlos Melchor; Amoretti Alvino, Pedro Miguel; Florian Florian, Angel Aladino; Castro Johanson, Rosa Aurora; Celi Perez, Maria Danisa; Huamán Prado, Olga Rocío

    2017-01-01

    The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) and portopulmonary hypertension (PPHN) are distinct pulmonary vascular complications of portal hypertension (PHT) and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. To describe the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular complications hospitalized at the Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño. We included patients with HTP hospitalized from January 2012 to June 2013 and that during its evolution progressed with SHP or HTPP. For analysis, they were divided into a first group of patients with liver cirrhosis and a second group with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. Of 22 patients with HPT 45.5% were male and the age range was between 1 month and 17 years. The etiology in the group of cirrhosis (n=14) was: autoimmune hepatitis (35.7%), cryptogenic cirrhosis (35.7%), inborn error of metabolism (14.3%), chronic viral hepatitis C (7.15%) virus and atresia extra-hepatic bile ducts (7.15%). Pulmonary vascular complications more frequently occurred in patients with liver cirrhosis (1 case of HPS and a case of PPHTN). They most often dyspnea, asthenia, edema, malnutrition, ascites, hypersplenism and gastrointestinal bleeding from esophageal varices was found. Also, they had elevated ALT values, alkaline phosphatase and serum albumin values decreased. In children with pulmonary hypertension, pulmonary vascular complications are rare. In the evaluation of these patients pulse oximetry should be included to detect hypoxemia and ubsequently a Doppler echocardiography and contrast echocardiography necessary. Dueto the finding of systolic pulmonary hypertension it is necessary to perform right heart catheterization.

  3. Kawasaki disease: a rare pediatric pathology in Mexico. Twenty cases report from the Hospital Infantil del Estado de Sonora.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Norberto; González, Luis Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an etiological illness that is relatively unknown and scarcely identified in Mexico; it affects children mainly aged 1-4 years, evolves with fever, vasculitis in diverse organs, and in the heart the disease mainly affects the coronary arteries. Our aim was to inform the clinical findings and evolution of 20 patients diagnosed with KD. We reviewed the patient clinical files retrospectively and descriptively to obtain information with regard to age, sex, clinical signs, laboratory and consultory results, echocardiography findings, complications, evolution during hospitalization, followup, and out-patient ambulatory consultations. Eighteen patients were male, two were female, six developed coronary damage, two aortic mitral-valve insufficiency, one pericardial shedding, and one, myocarditis. All patients received gamma globulin treatment with aspirin, and 16 were controlled during 6-8 months after the acute medical profile. The opportune clinical diagnostic it is fundamental to establish an early treatment with gammmaglobuline to avoid injuries in the arterial coronary level. This injury may cause eventualy ischemia or myocardial infarct

  4. CancerDR: cancer drug resistance database.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Singh, Harinder; Kumar, Shailesh; Gautam, Ankur; Kapoor, Pallavi; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2013-01-01

    Cancer therapies are limited by the development of drug resistance, and mutations in drug targets is one of the main reasons for developing acquired resistance. The adequate knowledge of these mutations in drug targets would help to design effective personalized therapies. Keeping this in mind, we have developed a database "CancerDR", which provides information of 148 anti-cancer drugs, and their pharmacological profiling across 952 cancer cell lines. CancerDR provides comprehensive information about each drug target that includes; (i) sequence of natural variants, (ii) mutations, (iii) tertiary structure, and (iv) alignment profile of mutants/variants. A number of web-based tools have been integrated in CancerDR. This database will be very useful for identification of genetic alterations in genes encoding drug targets, and in turn the residues responsible for drug resistance. CancerDR allows user to identify promiscuous drug molecules that can kill wide range of cancer cells. CancerDR is freely accessible at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/cancerdr/

  5. [Incurable disease in Spain during the 19th century. The Hospital para Hombres Incurables Nuestra Señora del Carmen].

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Juan Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the State's assumption of medical care for patients with "permanent needs" in 19th century Spain. These patients were the incurably ill, the chronically ill and the elderly. This process is contextualized within the liberal reforms of the Spanish healthcare system in the reign of Isabel 11 (1833-1868). The goal of these reforms was the creation and consolidation of a national health system that would gradually replace the religious health charities. Healthcare reform became necessary due to the increase in migration that started in the 1830's and intensified in the 1850's. Traditional care networks formed by the family, local community and religious charities were no longer available to those who had left their village or town. In addition, many religious charities were bankrupted by the seizure of their properties in a programme of confiscation. Similar healthcare reform processes were taking place in the United Kingdom, France and Germany, among other European countries, and involved significant changes in the lives of patients, who became strictly controlled and medicalised. My aim was to identify changes in the patients' experience of illness through a case study of the living conditions of inmates at the Nuestra Señora del Carmen Hospital for Incurable Men, based in Madrid from 1852 to 1949. This was one of the institutions devoted to caring for patients with "permanent needs" and was under the direct control of the General State Administration.

  6. Experience of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis for Hemophilia at the University Hospital Virgen Del Rocío in Spain: Technical and Clinical Overview

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Raquel M.; Peciña, Ana; Sánchez, Beatriz; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; García-Lozano, Juan Carlos; Pérez-Garrido, Rosario; Núñez, Ramiro; Antiñolo, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia A and B are the most common hereditary hemorrhagic disorders, with an X-linked mode of inheritance. Reproductive options for the families affected with hemophilia, aiming at the prevention of the birth of children with severe coagulation disorders, include preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Here we present the results of our PGD Program applied to hemophilia, at the Department of Genetics, Reproduction and Fetal Medicine of the University Hospital Virgen del Rocío in Seville. A total of 34 couples have been included in our program since 2005 (30 for hemophilia A and 4 for hemophilia B). Overall, 60 cycles were performed, providing a total of 508 embryos. The overall percentage of transfers per cycle was 81.7% and the live birth rate per cycle ranged from 10.3 to 24.1% depending on the methodological approach applied. Although PGD for hemophilia can be focused on gender selection of female embryos, our results demonstrate that methodological approaches that allow the diagnosis of the hemophilia status of every embryo have notorious advantages. Our PGD Program resulted in the birth of 12 healthy babies for 10 out of the 34 couples (29.4%), constituting a relevant achievement for the Spanish Public Health System within the field of haematological disorders. PMID:26258137

  7. Geophysical survey of 105-DR Pluto Crib, 116-DR-4, 100-D Area

    SciTech Connect

    Bergstrom, K.A.

    1993-10-01

    The objective of this Geophysical Survey was to verify the location of the 105-DR Pluto Crib, 116-DR-4. A surface monument currently marks its location. The crib is 10 feet by 10 feet and 15 feet deep. Ground-Penetrating Radar was the geophysical method selected to conduct the investigation.

  8. Dr. Gilruth and Dr. Kraft in Mission Control Center during Apollo 5 launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Dr. Rober R. Gilruth (right), Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Director, sits with Dr. Christopher C. Kraft Jr., MSC Director of Flight Operations, at his flight operations director console in the Mission Control Center, bldg 30, during the Apollo 5 (LM-1/Saturn 204) unmanned space mission launch.

  9. Dr. Gilruth and Dr. Kraft - Mission Control Center (MCC) - Apollo V Launch - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-01-22

    S68-18733 (22 Jan. 1968) --- Dr. Robert R. Gilruth (right), MSC Director, sits with Dr. Christopher C. Kraft Jr., MSC director of flight operations, at his flight operations director console in the Mission Control Center, Building 30, during the Apollo 5 (LM-1/Saturn 204) unmanned space mission.

  10. [Patient satisfaction when seen in the Emergency room of San Juan de Dios del Aljarafe Hospital (Spain)].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Romero, V; Fajardo Molina, J; García-Garmendia, J L; Cruz Villalón, F; Rodríguez Ortiz, R; Varela Ruiz, F J

    2011-01-01

    To find out the level of satisfaction of patients seen in the Emergency room of the of San Juan de Dios Hospital, Aljarafe; to identify the determining factors and to define the areas that need improvement and reinforcement in order to improve the quality of care. A telephone survey was carried out between July and September, 2008, containing 44 questions, 2 with a closed response, 3 with yes/no answers and the remaining questions scored based on a Likert type scale of 1 (most negative answer) to 5 (most positive answer). Observations were also recorded. Overall satisfaction was 84.7%: 82% would recommend this Emergency room, and 59.6% considered it better than others. The aspects to be emphasised are: respect (97.6%), cleanliness (97.1%) and intimacy (94.6%). Following these were: the doctor's disposition to listen (93.1%); the preparation of the professionals (from 92.3% for the administration professionals to 88.6% for auxiliary nurses); kindness (from 91.8% for doctors to 89.9% for nurses); and the ease of getting orientated (90%). The information given was evaluated positively by 70.3%, and 87% acknowledged understanding this information. However, 52.4% of patients were satisfied with the information given during triage related to the stay in the emergency room, and, 22.3% as regards the probable waiting period. The satisfaction with the waiting between triage and first medical consultation was higher in the one-two-triage patients and was lower in the four-triage ones; in the waiting between first medical consultation and the discharge, the one-triage patients were more satisfied than the rest. Nevertheless, there were no statistically significant differences with satisfaction with the waiting until the triage. The percentages of satisfaction was greater than 80% in 23 of the 34 items, with certain aspects having a satisfaction rate over 90%: respect, cleanliness, the doctor's predisposition to listen, qualification and kindness of the personnel. On the

  11. Response to the editorial by Dr Geraghty.

    PubMed

    White, Peter D; Chalder, Trudie; Sharpe, Michael; Angus, Brian J; Baber, Hannah L; Bavinton, Jessica; Burgess, Mary; Clark, Lucy V; Cox, Diane L; DeCesare, Julia C; Goldsmith, Kimberley A; Johnson, Anthony L; McCrone, Paul; Murphy, Gabrielle; Murphy, Maurice; O'Dowd, Hazel; Potts, Laura; Walwyn, Rebacca; Wilks, David

    2017-08-01

    This article is written in response to the linked editorial by Dr Geraghty about the adaptive Pacing, graded Activity and Cognitive behaviour therapy; a randomised Evaluation (PACE) trial, which we led, implemented and published. The PACE trial compared four treatments for people diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome. All participants in the trial received specialist medical care. The trial found that adding cognitive behaviour therapy or graded exercise therapy to specialist medical care was as safe as, and more effective than, adding adaptive pacing therapy or specialist medical care alone. Dr Geraghty has challenged these findings. In this article, we suggest that Dr Geraghty's views are based on misunderstandings and misrepresentations of the PACE trial; these are corrected.

  12. The 3XMM-DR4 Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, S.; Watson, M.; Pye, J.; Webb, N.; Schwope, A.; Freyberg, M.; Motch, C.; Ballet, J.; Carrera, F.; Page, M.; Page, C.

    2015-09-01

    The 3XMM-DR4 catalogue is the third generation catalogue of serendipitous X-ray sources from the European Space Agency's (ESA) XMM-Newton observatory, and has been created by the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre (SSC) on behalf of ESA. Released in July 2013, 3XMM-DR4 contains 531261 detections from 372728 unique sources observed in 7427 XMM-Newton observations, about 50% more than in the preceding 2XMMi-DR3 catalogue, made public in April 2010. We review some of the key science-driven algorithmic and calibration changes to the processing pipeline adopted to enhance the scientific quality of the catalogue, such as the optimised filtering of background flares, improvements to the astrometric analysis and upgrades to the catalogue construction process. Examples of the gains obtained are illustrated.

  13. [Dr. Atanasije Puljo: pioneer of Serbian dentistry].

    PubMed

    Jovananović, Svetlana; Milovanović, Srdjan; Zagradjanin, Danica; Milovanović, Nebojša; Puzović, Dragana

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the life and work of Dr. Atanasije Puljo (1878-1944). He was a volunteer in the Balkan wars, an active participant in the First World War; he was the first who noted the importance of team-work of a dentist and a surgeon in the care of jaw and facial injuries. He established primacy in this field, as he came up with this brilliant idea three years before other colleagues. His method of treatment of the upper jaw neglected fractures, called the Balkan method, was recognized worldwide. Dr. Puljo is the pioneer of dental radiology in Serbia, founder of the Odontology Clinic of the Medical Faculty and main supporter of the establishment of the School of Dentistry. Merits of Dr. Atanasije Puljo, medical practitioner with a broad knowledge in different fields, remain within the academic institution that was founded by this pioneer of dentistry in Serbia.

  14. Dr. Wernher von Braun Laid to Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun served as Marshall Space Flight Center's first director from July 1, 1960 until January 27, 1970, when he was appointed NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under Project Paper Clip to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his rocket team were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Under von Braun's leadership, Marshall developed the Saturn V launch vehicle which took Apollo astronauts to the moon. Dr. von Braun died in Alexandria, Va., on June 16, 1977, seven years after his NASA appointment. This photo was taken at the site where he was laid to rest.

  15. Dr John McLennan MD (Aberdeen), FRCP (Lond) (1801-1874) and the Medical School of Bombay that failed.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Sunil K

    2017-01-01

    In 1826, Dr John McLennan was asked by Governor Mounstuart Elphinstone of Bombay to set up the first school to teach modern medicine to Indian citizens. He was expected to create textbooks on a variety of subjects in local languages and teach medicine to poorly educated students in their native tongues. Despite his valiant efforts, the school was deemed a failure and was abolished by the Government in 1832. Sir Robert Grant, appointed Governor of Bombay in 1835, analysed records pertaining to this medical school and concluded that the school failed since Dr McLennan was not provided the assistance he needed and as his suggestions for access to a hospital to teach medicine were not heeded. Dr McLennan provided able support to Dr Charles Morehead on his appointment as Principal and Professor of Medicine at the newly created Grant Medical College in Bombay in 1845. Dr Morehead dedicated his classic 'Clinical researches on diseases in India' to Dr McLennan. Dr McLennan headed the Board of Examiners created to assess the competence of the first batch of medical students emerging from this College. The system of evaluation set up by him remains admirable. Dr McLennan retired from service as Physician-General, full of honours.

  16. The ORAC-DR data reduction pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavanagh, B.; Jenness, T.; Economou, F.; Currie, M. J.

    2008-03-01

    The ORAC-DR data reduction pipeline has been used by the Joint Astronomy Centre since 1998. Originally developed for an infrared spectrometer and a submillimetre bolometer array, it has since expanded to support twenty instruments from nine different telescopes. By using shared code and a common infrastructure, rapid development of an automated data reduction pipeline for nearly any astronomical data is possible. This paper discusses the infrastructure available to developers and estimates the development timescales expected to reduce data for new instruments using ORAC-DR.

  17. Dr. von Braun Visits Huntsville Boys Club

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Dr. von Braun, Director of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and chairman of this year's United Givers Fund (UGF) drive at MSFC, takes time out from the problems of sending a man to the Moon to talk baseball with 11-year-old Randy Smith at the Huntsville Boys Club.

  18. Dr. von Braun and His Mercedes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    In this picture, Dr. Wernher von Braun, who was serving as Director of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency's (ABMA) Development Operations Division, is shown posed with his Mercedes 220SE automobile in front of Redstone Building 4488, which houses the ABMA.

  19. A TRIBUTE TO DR. WILLIAM PENN WATKINSON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. William Penn Watkinson (known to colleagues as "Penn") of EPA¿s health research lab (National Health and Environmental Research Laboratory) of Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, died Wednesday, December 13 after a battle with lung cancer. He was a member of the Pulmonar...

  20. Dr. Wernher Von Braun presents a certificate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (left), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, presents a humorous certificate to Major General Charles W. Eifler, commanding general of Redstone Arsenal, at the close of a farewell luncheon for the general prior to General Eifler moving to a new European duty station.

  1. Chamber of Commerce reception for Dr. Lucas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Dr. William R. Lucas, Marshall's fourth Center Director (1974-1986), delivers a speech in front of a picture of the lunar landscape with Earth looming in the background while attending a Huntsville Chamber of Commerce reception honoring his achievements as Director of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  2. Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby: The Complete Eugenicist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodwell, Grant

    1997-01-01

    Profiles the work of Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby, a late 19th-century propagandist for eugenics. Eugenics is a science that deals with the transmission of hereditary racial traits, coupled with a desire to use this for the elimination of social ills. Discusses Saleeby's work with the Eugenics Education Society. (MJP)

  3. The Contributions of Dr. Alfred Gysi.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, Rodney D; Engelmeier, Robert L

    2016-11-24

    This article is a historical overview of Dr. Alfred Gysi's contributions to the profession in the areas of denture tooth and articulator design. His understanding of occlusion and mandibular movement resulted in denture tooth designs and occlusal concepts still in widespread use.

  4. The Years of Dr. Robert Eugene Marshak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Luke W.

    I am honored and privileged to make a brief statement in memory of Dr. Marshak's distinguished achievement in science, his kindness and great humanity. I will concentrate on the part of his career at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University …

  5. Interview [with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Educational Research, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. Gerald W. Bracey, author of "Reading Educational Research: How to Avoid Getting Statistically Snookered." During the interview, Bracey explains why he considers the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) as a "weapon of mass destruction" and that he sees nothing to suggest that NCLB has…

  6. Dr. Israel Cuellar (1946-2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamarripa, Manuel X.

    2009-01-01

    On September 7th, 2008, the mental health field lost a trailblazing researcher and clinician as he lost his battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease. Dr. Israel Cuellar made significant contributions to the study of acculturation including its importance in delivering appropriate mental health…

  7. Dr. Israel Cuellar (1946-2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamarripa, Manuel X.

    2009-01-01

    On September 7th, 2008, the mental health field lost a trailblazing researcher and clinician as he lost his battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease. Dr. Israel Cuellar made significant contributions to the study of acculturation including its importance in delivering appropriate mental health…

  8. Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby: The Complete Eugenicist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodwell, Grant

    1997-01-01

    Profiles the work of Dr. Caleb Williams Saleeby, a late 19th-century propagandist for eugenics. Eugenics is a science that deals with the transmission of hereditary racial traits, coupled with a desire to use this for the elimination of social ills. Discusses Saleeby's work with the Eugenics Education Society. (MJP)

  9. Dr. Hugh L. Dryden - artist's sketch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Artist's depiction of Dr. Hugh Latimer Dryden. Dr. Dryden saw his first airplane, the Antoinette, on November 7, 1910. Years later he was fond of remarking. 'The airplane and I grew up together.' In addition to his professional work, Dr. Dryden was a licensed preacher for 45 years. One of his later sermons perhaps best describes his legacy: 'None of us knows what the final destiny of man may be, or if there is any end to his capacity for growth and adaptation. Wherever this venture leads us, I am convinced that the power to leave the Earth -- to travel where we will in space and to return at will -- marks the opening of a brilliant new stage in man's evolution.' The honors, offices and awards bestowed on Hugh Dryden were great both in significance and in number. His honorary degrees numbered 16. In 1962 the Methodist Union named him the Methodist Layman of the Year. Dr. Dryden was initially an aerodynamicist with the National Bureau of Standards. He did important early work in high-speed aerodynamics. In 1947 he became the director of aeronautical research for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA -- predecessor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration). Two years later, he became NACA's director, a position he held until 1958 when he became deputy administrator of NASA.

  10. Dr. Wernher Von Braun presents a certificate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (left), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, presents a humorous certificate to Major General Charles W. Eifler, commanding general of Redstone Arsenal, at the close of a farewell luncheon for the general prior to General Eifler moving to a new European duty station.

  11. Walt Disney and Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Dr. Werhner von Braun, then Chief, Guided Missile Development Operation Division at Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, was visited by Walt Disney in 1954. In the 1950's, von Braun worked with Disney Studio as a technical director, making three films about space exploration for television. A model of the V-2 rocket is in background.

  12. Chamber of Commerce reception for Dr. Lucas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Dr. William R. Lucas, Marshall's fourth Center Director (1974-1986), delivers a speech in front of a picture of the lunar landscape with Earth looming in the background while attending a Huntsville Chamber of Commerce reception honoring his achievements as Director of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  13. Dr. Hugh L. Dryden - artist's sketch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Artist's depiction of Dr. Hugh Latimer Dryden. Dr. Dryden saw his first airplane, the Antoinette, on November 7, 1910. Years later he was fond of remarking. 'The airplane and I grew up together.' In addition to his professional work, Dr. Dryden was a licensed preacher for 45 years. One of his later sermons perhaps best describes his legacy: 'None of us knows what the final destiny of man may be, or if there is any end to his capacity for growth and adaptation. Wherever this venture leads us, I am convinced that the power to leave the Earth -- to travel where we will in space and to return at will -- marks the opening of a brilliant new stage in man's evolution.' The honors, offices and awards bestowed on Hugh Dryden were great both in significance and in number. His honorary degrees numbered 16. In 1962 the Methodist Union named him the Methodist Layman of the Year. Dr. Dryden was initially an aerodynamicist with the National Bureau of Standards. He did important early work in high-speed aerodynamics. In 1947 he became the director of aeronautical research for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA -- predecessor of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration). Two years later, he became NACA's director, a position he held until 1958 when he became deputy administrator of NASA.

  14. [Risk factors associated with the development of perinatal asphyxia in neonates at the Hospital Universitario del Valle, Cali, Colombia, 2010-2011].

    PubMed

    Torres-Muñoz, Javier; Rojas, Christian; Mendoza-Urbano, Diana; Marín-Cuero, Darly; Orobio, Sandra; Echandía, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Perinatal asphyxia is one of the main causes of perinatal mortality and morbidity worldwide and it generates high costs for health systems; however, it has modifiable risk factors. To identify the risk factors associated with the development of perinatal asphyxia in newborns at Hospital Universitario del Valle, Cali, Colombia. Incident cases and concurrent controls were examined. Cases were defined as newborns with moderate to severe perinatal asphyxia who were older than or equal to 36 weeks of gestational age, needed advanced resuscitation and presented one of the following: early neurological disorders, multi-organ commitment or a sentinel event. The controls were newborns without asphyxia who were born one week apart from the case at the most and had a comparable gestational age. Patients with major congenital malformations and syndromes were excluded. Fifty-six cases and 168 controls were examined. Premature placental abruption (OR=41.09; 95%CI: 4.61-366.56), labor with a prolonged expulsive phase (OR=31.76; 95%CI: 8.33-121.19), lack of oxytocin use (OR=2.57; 95% CI: 1.08 - 6.13) and mothers without a partner (OR=2.56; 95% CI: 1.21-5.41) were risk factors for the development of perinatal asphyxia in the study population. Social difficulties were found in a greater proportion among the mothers of cases. Proper control and monitoring of labor, development of a thorough partograph, and active searches are recommended to ensure that all pregnant women have adequate prenatal care with the provision of social support to reduce the frequency and negative impact of perinatal asphyxia.

  15. [Dr. Avni Mahmud and the teaching of mental disease in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Er, H

    2001-01-01

    Mental illness and insanity, as distinct from other departments of medicine occupy a special place with their mental aspect and their effect on the conscious consequent, treatment methods before and during middle ages were mainly based on superstition. Here in Turkey, a modern clinic of mental illness and neuropathy was put into the first by Dr. Mongeri. Dr. Avni Mahmud graduated from civilian medical school in 1880 and in 1882 he started as a physician at Toptaşi Asylum. His father Mahund Efendi, was an army physician. Dr. Avni Mahmud became the director of Toptaşi Asylum in 1909 until his death. Dr. Avni Mahmud, who had no special training on mental illness acquired his knowledge and experience here; studying basic works on this subject, he wrote a book titled Muhtasar Emraz-i Akliye, which is thought to be the first of its kind. Dr. Avni Mahmud spent all his effort, with limited means, to make Toptaşi Asylum an orderly and good hospital in his time.

  16. Dr. von Braun and Dr. Stuhlinger With a Model of the Nuclear-Electric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, taken at the Walt Disney Studios in California, Dr. Wernher von Braun and Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger are shown discussing the concepts of nuclear-electric spaceships designed to undertake the mission to the planet Mars. As a part of the Disney 'Tomorrowland' series on the exploration of space, the nuclear-electric vehicles were shown in the last three television films, entitled 'Mars and Beyond,' which first aired in December 1957.

  17. Dr. von Braun and Dr. Stuhlinger With a Model of the Nuclear-Electric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, taken at the Walt Disney Studios in California, Dr. Wernher von Braun and Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger are shown discussing the concepts of nuclear-electric spaceships designed to undertake the mission to the planet Mars. As a part of the Disney 'Tomorrowland' series on the exploration of space, the nuclear-electric vehicles were shown in the last three television films, entitled 'Mars and Beyond,' which first aired in December 1957.

  18. Analysis of DR4 haplotypes in insulin dependent diabetes (IDD)

    SciTech Connect

    Monos, D.S.; Radka, S.F.; Zmijewski, C.M.; Kamoun, M.

    1986-03-05

    Population studies indicate that HLA-DR4 is implicated in the susceptibility of IDD. However, biochemical characterization of the serologically defined DR4 haplotype from normal individuals revealed five DR4 and three DQW3 molecular forms. Hence, in this study, they investigated the heterogeneity of the DR4 haplotype, using B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCL) generated from patients with IDD and seropositive for DR4. Class II molecules, metabolically labeled with /sup 35/S-methionine, were immunoprecipitated with monoclonal antibodies specific for DR(L243), DQ(N297), DQW3(IVD12) or DR and DQ(SG465) and analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). The isoelectrofocusing (IEF) conditions employed in this study allow representation only of the DR4 haplotype from either DR3/4 or DR4/4 cell lines. The analysis of six different DR4 haplotypes from seven IDD patients, revealed the presence of two DR4 ..beta.. and two DQW3 ..beta.. chains. Three of the six DR4 ..beta.. haplotypes analyzed shared the same DR4 ..beta.. chain and three others shared a different one. Additionally five of the six haplotypes shared a different one. Additionally five of the six haplotypes shared the same DQW3 ..beta.. chain and only one was carrying a different one. Different combinations of the two DR4 and two DQW3 ..beta.. chains constitute three distinct patterns of DR4 haplotypes. These results suggest the prevalence of a DQW3 ..beta.. chain in the small sample of IDD patients studied. Studies of a large number of patients should clarify whether IDD is associated with unique variants of DR4 or DQW3 ..beta.. chains.

  19. Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr., metallurgist extraordinaire.

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, Floyd Michael

    2010-10-01

    The organizers of the Dr. John J. Stephens, Jr. Memorial Symposium: Deformation and Interfacial Phenomena in Advanced High-Temperature Materials are honoring the memory of Dr. Stephens and his many technical contributions that were accomplished over a relatively brief twenty year career. His research spanned the areas of creep and deformation of metals, dispersion-strengthened alloys and their properties, metal matrix composite materials, processing and properties of refractory metals, joining of ceramic-ceramic and metal-ceramic systems, active braze alloy development, and mechanical modeling of soldered and brazed assemblies. The purpose of this presentation is to highlight his research and engineering accomplishments, particularly during his professional career at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM.

  20. Centennial Presidential Perspective: Dr. Alfred Blalock

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Claude A.; George, Timothy J.; Conte, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Great men are not a common occurrence. Indeed, they are a rare find. Though respected and lauded in their time, it is only in retrospect that their true contributions can be adequately measured as a surgeon, an educator and a scientist. Such is the case of Dr. Alfred Blalock. Many have considered him the father of modern cardiac surgery. All consider his “blue baby” operation to be one of the landmarks of cardiac surgery and, as the chief of surgery at Johns Hopkins, he trained many who would become the leaders of our discipline. His continual reach for excellence helped him to not only affect, but revolutionize the paradigm of surgical research, an understanding of the physiology of shock and the surgical management of pulmonic stenosis/atresia. Dr. Blalock was the 30th president of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery and his presidential address was given in 1951. PMID:22248679

  1. Dr. Wernher von Braun In His Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun served as Marshall Space Flight Center's first director from July 1, 1960 until January 27, 1970, when he was appointed NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under Project Paperclip to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his rocket team were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Under von Braun's leadership, Marshall developed the Saturn V launch vehicle which took Apollo astronauts to the moon. This photo depicts von Braun in his office at MSFC.

  2. [Homage to Professor Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda].

    PubMed

    1998-11-01

    During a solemn academic act, de Main Classroom of the Facultad de Odontologia de Buenos Aires was named after Prof. Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda. He has been the first professor at the Escuela de Odontologia and its organizer, after having obtained his Dentistry degree at the Dental School of Paris, in 1882. The new school was founded in 1891, and its activities began the following year.

  3. On the trail of Dr. Fifer.

    PubMed

    Asche, G

    1996-05-01

    A gift from a patient drew Hope, BC, family physician Gerd Asche irrevocably into the local medical history of the 1858 Fraser River Gold Rush. Because of his interest in Dr. Max William Fifer, Asche undertook research missions in British Columbia, England and the US, converted his computer room to a research and writing centre, and wrote a biography of his predecessor and colleague. He recounts his experience and the growing satisfaction provided by his interest in medical history.

  4. Working with Dr. Per V. Bruel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gade Kjaer, Svend

    2002-11-01

    For more than a decade I have had the pleasure to work as an application specialist together with--and for--Dr. Bruel, one of the founders of the Bruel & Kjaer Company, famous for sound and vibration measurement instrumentation, often nicknamed ''Green Boxes.'' It has been a great experience for me, and I recall this period in my life as one where I was much inspired by Dr. Bruel's methods, both as a private person and with his work as a director for the company and leader of both the sales and the innovation departments. In this presentation I will highlight some funny stories that are told about Dr. Bruel combined with the episodes that I have experienced myself. In short, the most simple way to characterize this rather complex person is maybe by repeating his vision statement for the company: ''We shall have fun and we shall make money. On the other hand we shall not have so much fun that we do not make any money, and we shall not make so much money that we do not have any fun!'' For Per Bruel, acoustics is one of his great hobbies. He has others such as cars, airplanes, motorbikes (he is the lucky owner of a Danish Nimbus) and wine.

  5. Gaia DR1 documentation Chapter 6: Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyer, L.; Rimoldini, L.; Guy, L.; Holl, B.; Clementini, G.; Cuypers, J.; Mowlavi, N.; Lecoeur-Taïbi, I.; De Ridder, J.; Charnas, J.; Nienartowicz, K.

    2017-02-01

    This chapter describes the photometric variability processing of the Gaia DR1 data. Coordination Unit 7 is responsible for the variability analysis of over a billion celestial sources. In particular the definition, design, development, validation and provision of a software package for the data processing of photometrically variable objects. Data Processing Centre Geneva (DPCG) responsibilities cover all issues related to the computational part of the CU7 analysis. These span: hardware provisioning, including selection, deployment and optimisation of suitable hardware, choosing and developing software architecture, defining data and scientific workflows as well as operational activities such as configuration management, data import, time series reconstruction, storage and processing handling, visualisation and data export. CU7/DPCG is also responsible for interaction with other DPCs and CUs, software and programming training for the CU7 members, scientific software quality control and management of software and data lifecycle. Details about the specific data treatment steps of the Gaia DR1 data products are found in Eyer et al. (2017) and are not repeated here. The variability content of the Gaia DR1 focusses on a subsample of Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars around the South ecliptic pole, showcasing the performance of the Gaia photometry with respect to variable objects.

  6. Dr. Norman Bethune as a surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Irving B.

    1996-01-01

    Dr. Norman Bethune’s recognition as a Canadian of renown resulted from his devoted work in China during the late 1930s. He had received a general surgical training, but his personal illness with tuberculosis led him to specialize in thoracic surgery. A surgical program at McGill University under Dr. Edward Archibald, a pioneer thoracic surgeon, was initially successful, but by the mid-1930s Bethune was rejected by McGill and Dr. Archibald. He became chief of thoracic surgery at the Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur outside Montreal. He developed thoracic surgical instruments and wrote numerous scientific papers. The outbreak of civil war in Spain in 1937 attracted Bethune to oppose what he viewed as fascist aggression. He went to Spain, where he established the value of mobile blood banking. On his return to Canada in 1937 he became aware of the escalating war between China and Japan. He joined the Chinese communist forces in northern China and spent 18 months doing Herculean mobile war surgery, while improving the state of medical services in primitive, depressing conditions. He died in 1939 at the age of 49 years of septicemia as a result of accidental laceration of his finger during surgery. The Chinese have venerated Norman Bethune and stimulated his memorialization in Canada. His surgical record can be viewed as mixed in quality, but overall his performance remains impressive for its achievement. PMID:8599799

  7. Dr. von Braun at the Manufacturing and Engineering Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Dr. von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, listens attentively to a briefing on the metal forming techniques by Dr. Mathias Siebel of the Manufacturing and Engineering Laboratory at MSFC on October 17, 1967.

  8. Dr. Wernher Von Braun examines a ruby crystal.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, and Dr. Eberhard Rees (left), deputy director, technical, examine a ruby crystal used in laser experiments in the Marshall Center's Space Sciences Laboratory.

  9. Frequency of cancer in children residing in Mexico City and treated in the hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (1996–2001)

    PubMed Central

    Juárez-Ocaña, Servando; González-Miranda, Guadalupe; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Rendón-Macías, Mario Enrique; Martínez-García, María del Carmen; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo

    2004-01-01

    Background The objective of this article is to present the frequency of cancer in Mexican children who were treated in the hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Mexico City (IMSS-MC) in the period 1996–2001. Methods The Registry of Cancer in Children, started in 1996 in the IMSS-MC, is an on-going, prospective register. The data from 1996 through 2001 were analyzed and the different types of cancer were grouped according to the International Classification for Cancer in Children (ICCC). From this analysis, the general and specific frequencies by age and by sex were obtained for the different groups of neoplasms. Also, the frequency of the stage of the disease that had been diagnosed in cases of children with solid tumors was obtained. Results A total of 1,702 new cases of children with cancer were registered, with the male/female ratio at 1.1/1. Leukemias had the highest frequency with 784 cases (46.1%) and, of these, acute lymphoblastic leukemias were the most prevalent with 614 cases (78.3%). Thereafter, in descending order of frequency, were tumors of the central nervous system (CNST) with 197 cases (11.6%), lymphomas with 194 cases (11.4%), germinal cell tumors with 110 cases (6.5%), and bone tumors with 97 cases (5.7%). The highest frequency of cancer was found in the group of one to four year-olds that had 627 cases (36.8%). In all the age groups, leukemias were the most frequent. In the present work, the frequency of Hodgkin's disease (~4%) was found to be lower than that (~10%) in previous studies and the frequency of tumors of the sympathetic nervous system was low (2.3%). Of those cases of solid tumors for which the stage of the disease had been determined, 66.9% were diagnosed as being Stage III or IV. Conclusions The principal cancers in the children treated in the IMSS-MC were leukemias, CNST, and lymphomas, consistent with those reported by developed countries. A 2.5-fold reduction in the frequency of Hodgkin's disease was found

  10. Frequency of cancer in children residing in Mexico City and treated in the hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (1996-2001).

    PubMed

    Juárez-Ocaña, Servando; González-Miranda, Guadalupe; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Rendón-Macías, Mario Enrique; Martínez-García, María del Carmen; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo

    2004-08-13

    The objective of this article is to present the frequency of cancer in Mexican children who were treated in the hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Mexico City (IMSS-MC) in the period 1996-2001. The Registry of Cancer in Children, started in 1996 in the IMSS-MC, is an on-going, prospective register. The data from 1996 through 2001 were analyzed and the different types of cancer were grouped according to the International Classification for Cancer in Children (ICCC). From this analysis, the general and specific frequencies by age and by sex were obtained for the different groups of neoplasms. Also, the frequency of the stage of the disease that had been diagnosed in cases of children with solid tumors was obtained. A total of 1,702 new cases of children with cancer were registered, with the male/female ratio at 1.1/1. Leukemias had the highest frequency with 784 cases (46.1%) and, of these, acute lymphoblastic leukemias were the most prevalent with 614 cases (78.3%). Thereafter, in descending order of frequency, were tumors of the central nervous system (CNST) with 197 cases (11.6%), lymphomas with 194 cases (11.4%), germinal cell tumors with 110 cases (6.5%), and bone tumors with 97 cases (5.7%). The highest frequency of cancer was found in the group of one to four year-olds that had 627 cases (36.8%). In all the age groups, leukemias were the most frequent. In the present work, the frequency of Hodgkin's disease (~4%) was found to be lower than that (~10%) in previous studies and the frequency of tumors of the sympathetic nervous system was low (2.3%). Of those cases of solid tumors for which the stage of the disease had been determined, 66.9% were diagnosed as being Stage III or IV. The principal cancers in the children treated in the IMSS-MC were leukemias, CNST, and lymphomas, consistent with those reported by developed countries. A 2.5-fold reduction in the frequency of Hodgkin's disease was found. Of the children, the stage of whose

  11. Interview with Dr Joseph Murray (by Francis L Delmonico).

    PubMed

    Murray, Joseph

    2002-10-01

    The Editors asked Dr Delmonico to interview Dr Joseph Murray, winner of the Nobel prize in Medicine 1990 for performing the first successful renal transplant, to record recollections of the issues of the 1950s, when clinical transplantation was born, on Dr Murray's medical career in transplantation, and on some contemporary issues.

  12. Understanding anthocyanin: Researcher and educator Dr. Ron Wrolstad

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This invited presentation is in honor of Dr. Ronald E. Wrolstad (Distinguished Professor Emeritus), recipient of the 2017 ACS AGFD Advancement of the Application of Agricultural and Food Chemistry Award. The talk will be a brief overview of Dr. Ronald E. Wrolstad’s research program and career; Dr. W...

  13. Evidence against extended DR3-related haplotypes in Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Weetman, A P; McCorkle, R

    1990-12-01

    Three HLA-DR3-linked polymorphisms of the DPA, DPB and DRB genes, previously associated with myasthenia gravis or coeliac disease, have been examined in Caucasian patients with Graves' disease. The patients did not differ from healthy DR3 subjects, indicating an absence of any association of Graves' disease with specific DR3 subtypes.

  14. Dr. von Braun Conferring With NASA Headquarters Officials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    This photograph, dated November 13, 1961, shows Dr. von Braun conferring with two officials from NASA Headquarters. Dr. Brainered Holmes is on the left. Dr. Nicholas Golovin is in the center. Holmes was Director of NASA's Office of Marned Space Flight. Golovin was Director of Systems Engineering at Headquarters.

  15. The Old Library of the Pennsylvania Hospital *

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Whitfield J.

    1972-01-01

    The first medical book acquired by the Pennsylvania Hospital was William Lewis's Experimental History of the Materia Medica. Dr. John Fothergill of London donated it in 1762. The next year the Managers resolved to establish a library, and the physicians assigned their fees from hospital students for the purchase of books. Books were regularly ordered from William Strahan in London, and gifts and bequests added still more volumes. From 1790 to 1810 Dr. John Coakley Lettsom of London was the hospital's principal adviser on purchases. As the library grew, it expanded beyond purely medical works to include some in natural history, many purchased in 1817 from the estate of Dr. Benjamin Smith Barton. Catalogues were printed in the years 1790-94, 1806, 1829, and 1857. At midcentury the hospital library numbered about 9,000 volumes. At that time it was the largest medical library in the United States. PMID:4563538

  16. Multiwavelength observations of two B-star nurseries - DR 15 and DR 20

    SciTech Connect

    Odenwald, S.F.; Campbell, M.F.; Shivanandan, K.; Schwartz, P.; Fazio, G.G.; Moseley, H. Colby College, Waterville, ME Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD )

    1990-01-01

    New observations of DR 15 and 20 are reported as part of a study of compact H II regions in the Cyg X region. The radio and FIR data for these objects, when combined with (C-12)O maps, IRAS imagery, and optical photographs, provide new insights into the structure of this complex region and the nature of the star-formation process there. The observations show that DR 15 may consist of one or two B0 ZAMS stars whose H I regions have formed a low-density cavity within a molecular cloud. DR 20 appears to be a young OB cluster. The cluster is dominated by an O5.5 ZAMS star and also contains an approximately 3500-yr-old B0 star appearing as a compact H II region, along with weak FIR sources that may be B0-star candidates. 36 refs.

  17. Dr. Richard J. Whelan: Seeing the Field of Emotional and Behavior Disorders through the Lens of a Pioneer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaff, Marilyn S.; Teagarden, Jim; Zabel, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Richard J. Whelan is a distinguished professor emeritus at the University of Kansas. His earliest professional experiences were at the Children's Hospital (Southard School) of the Menninger Clinic, where he served as a recreational therapist, teacher, and director of education. During his career at the University of Kansas and the KU Medical…

  18. Dr. Matataro Matsumoto: his career and achievements.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, S

    1976-01-01

    Dr. M. Matsumoto (1865--1943) is the most eminent figure in the history of psychology in Japan. Before the close of the last century, he acquired the scientific methods and technics of experimental psychology in America and Germany and introduced all of them into Japanese universities. Establishing psychological laboratories in both Tokyo and Kyoto, he trained many famous psychologists. He advocated "Psychocynematics" as early as 1910. Together with his followers he applied psychology to every aspect of our daily life. He organized the Japanese Psychological Association and several periodicals were started under his leadership. He also made some important artistic contributions to the fields of picture and caligraphy.

  19. A failure management prototype: DR/Rx

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammen, David G.; Baker, Carolyn G.; Kelly, Christine M.; Marsh, Christopher A.

    1991-01-01

    This failure management prototype performs failure diagnosis and recovery management of hierarchical, distributed systems. The prototype, which evolved from a series of previous prototypes following a spiral model for development, focuses on two functions: (1) the diagnostic reasoner (DR) performs integrated failure diagnosis in distributed systems; and (2) the recovery expert (Rx) develops plans to recover from the failure. Issues related to expert system prototype design and the previous history of this prototype are discussed. The architecture of the current prototype is described in terms of the knowledge representation and functionality of its components.

  20. On the trail of Dr. Fifer.

    PubMed Central

    Asche, G

    1996-01-01

    A gift from a patient drew Hope, BC, family physician Gerd Asche irrevocably into the local medical history of the 1858 Fraser River Gold Rush. Because of his interest in Dr. Max William Fifer, Asche undertook research missions in British Columbia, England and the US, converted his computer room to a research and writing centre, and wrote a biography of his predecessor and colleague. He recounts his experience and the growing satisfaction provided by his interest in medical history. Images p1398-a PMID:8616743

  1. Festschrift in honour of Dr. Roger Keith

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, Vivian

    2017-01-01

    Summary The festschrift in honour of Dr. Roger Keith, past editor of the Canadian Journal of Surgery, includes essays (available at canjsurg.ca), written from a personal perspective, on the development of specialty surgery in Canada (Richard Nason, Michael Marcaccio, Michael Kelly and Lissa Peeling), evolution of the certification examination (Ward Davies), building of a megahospital (Gerald Fried) and on the changes in surgical education (Edward Davies, Christopher DeGara, E. Christopher Ellison, Richard Prinz and William Pollett), as well as personal reflections (Andrew Warshaw, Stewart Hamilton).

  2. Maniac Talk - Dr. Aprille Joy Ericsson

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-25

    Aprille Joy Ericsson Maniac Lecture, June 25, 2014 Dr. Aprille Joy Ericsson, Deputy to the Chief Technologist for the Applied Engineering and Technology Directorate, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, presented a Maniac Talk entitled, "A Rocket Scientist grows up in Brooklyn (NY)." Aprille shared her journey of being in a Tom-girl growing up in the Bed-Sty Projects in Brooklyn (NY) with a budding interest in STEAM to becoming a Rocket Scientist for NASA. And the impact of watching men going to the moon and the ah-ha moments!

  3. [Dr. Voronoff's curious glandular xeno-implants].

    PubMed

    Cuperschmid, Ethel Mizrahy; de Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro

    2007-01-01

    Dr. Serge Voronoff visited Brazil during the Jornadas Médicas of 1928, where he demonstrated his xenotransplantation technique to the local medical community. The present article uses newspaper clippings from that time to illustrate how this controversial surgery and Voronoff's alleged miraculous preservation of good health and longevity was viewed in the popular imagination. Voronoff's initiative paved the way for other health professionals to report on their surgical experiences with xenotransplantation and also popularized the topic, which became the subject of Carnival songs and sardonic jokes in the press. An analysis is offered, based on current scientific parameters, along with a suggestion concerning the possible involvement of xenotransplantation in HIV epidemiology.

  4. Dr. Jan Rogers with Electrostatic Levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Jan Rogers, project scientist for the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center(MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an obejct (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials sciences program.

  5. White dwarfs identified in LAMOST DR 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jincheng; Zhao, Jingkun; Tziamtzis, Anestis; Liu, Jifeng; Li, Lifang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei

    2015-12-01

    Here we present a catalogue of 1056 spectroscopically identified hydrogen-dominated white dwarfs (DAWDs), 34 helium-dominated white dwarfs (DBWDs) and 276 white dwarf main sequence (WDMS) binaries from the Large sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) survey data release 2 (DR2). 383 DAWDs, 4 DBWDs and 138 WDMSs are new identifications after cross-match with literature. There are ˜4100 k spectra in total from DR 2. The low ratio of white dwarfs found in LAMOST is attributed to biased selection of LAMOST input catalogue and much brighter targets relative to stars observed in Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In this paper, a new DAWD selection method is adopted as a new attempt and supplement to the traditional methods. The effective temperature, surface gravity, mass, cooling age and distance of high signal-to-noise DAWDs are estimated. The peak of the mass distribution is found to be ˜0.6 M⊙, which is consistent with previous work. The parameters of WDMS binaries are also provided in this paper. As the foundation of our future work, which is to identify more WDs with debris disc, WDs found in LAMOST showed a lot of potential. Interesting infrared-excess WDs will be reported in our forthcoming paper.

  6. Association between human leukocyte antigen-DR and demylinating Guillain-Barré syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Zaki N.; Zalzala, Haider H.; Mohammedsalih, Hyam R.; Mahdi, Batool M.; Abid, Laheeb A.; Shakir, Zena N.; Fadhel, Maithem J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To find an association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, and DRB5 alleles frequencies in a sample of Iraqi patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and compare with a healthy control group. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study consisting of 30 Iraqi Arab patients with GBS attending the Neurological Department in the Neuroscience Hospital, Baghdad, Iraq between September 2012 and June 2013. The control group comprised 42 apparently healthy volunteers. Human leukocyte antigen genotyping for HLA DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, and DRB5 was performed using the polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primers method. The allele frequencies were compared across both groups. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-class II HLA-DR genotyping and serotyping were performed by software analysis. Results: We found increased frequencies of HLA genotype DRB1*03:01 (p=0.0009), DRB1*07:01 (p=0.0015), and DRB4*01:01 (p<0.0001) in patients with GBS compared with healthy controls. The HLA DR6 was increased in the control group (p<0.0001). Conclusions: Our results suggest an association between HLA-DRB1*03:01, DRB1*07:01, DRB4*01:01, and HLA DR3, DR7 and a susceptibility to GBS. PMID:25274590

  7. Dual agonist Surrobody™ simultaneously activates death receptors DR4 and DR5 to induce cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Milutinovic, Snezana; Kashyap, Arun K.; Yanagi, Teruki; Wimer, Carina; Zhou, Sihong; O' Neil, Ryann; Kurtzman, Aaron L.; Faynboym, Alexsandr; Xu, Li; Hannum, Charles H.; Diaz, Paul W.; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Horowitz, Michael; Horowitz, Lawrence; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Reed, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Death receptors of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) family are found on surface of most cancer cells and their activation typically kills cancer cells through the stimulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. The endogenous ligand for death receptors-4 and -5 (DR4 and DR5) is Tumor Necrosis Factor-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand, TRAIL (Apo2L). Since most untransformed cells are not susceptible to TRAIL-induced apoptosis, death receptor activators have emerged as promising cancer therapeutic agents. One strategy to stimulate death receptors in cancer patients is to use soluble human recombinant TRAIL protein, but this agent has limitations of a short half-life and decoy receptor sequestration. Another strategy that attempted to evade decoy receptor sequestration and to provide improved pharmacokinetic properties was to generate DR4 or DR5 agonist antibodies. The resulting monoclonal agonist antibodies overcame the limitations of short half-life and avoided decoy receptor sequestration, but are limited by activating only one of the two death receptors. Here, we describe a DR4 and DR5 dual agonist produced using Surrobody™ technology that activates both DR4 and DR5 to induce apoptotic death of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo and also avoids decoy receptor sequestration. This fully human anti-DR4/DR5 Surrobody displays superior potency to DR4- and DR5-specific antibodies, even when combined with TRAIL-sensitizing pro-apoptotic agents. Moreover, cancer cells were less likely to acquire resistance to Surrobody than either anti-DR4 or anti-DR5 mono-specific antibodies. Taken together, Surrobody shows promising preclinical pro-apoptotic activity against cancer cells, meriting further exploration of its potential as a novel cancer therapeutic agent. PMID:26516157

  8. High-risk genotypes HLA-DR3-DQ2/DR3-DQ2 and DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 in co-occurrence of type 1 diabetes and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Smigoc Schweiger, Darja; Mendez, Andrijana; Kunilo Jamnik, Sabina; Bratanic, Nina; Bratina, Natasa; Battelino, Tadej; Brecelj, Jernej; Vidan-Jeras, Blanka

    2016-06-01

    Shared susceptibility alleles in the HLA region contribute to the co-existence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and celiac disease (CD). The aim of our study was to identify HLA genotype variations that influence co-occurrence of T1D and CD (T1D + CD) and the order of their onset. Totally 244 patients, 67 with T1D, 68 with CD and 69 with T1D + CD, (split into "T1D first" and "CD first"), were analyzed. Control group consisted of 130 healthy unrelated individuals. Two-tailed Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. The genetic background of Slovenian CD patients resembled more northern than southern European populations with DR3-DQ2/DR3-DQ2 (odds ratio [OR] = 19.68) conferring the highest risk. The T1D + CD was associated with DR3-DQ2/DR3-DQ2 (OR = 45.53) and even more with DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 (OR = 93.76). DR3-DQ2/DR7-DQ2 played a neutral role in susceptibility for T1D + CD. The order of the onset of T1D or CD in patients with co-occurring diseases was not influenced by HLA risk genotype profile. DR3-DQ2/DR3-DQ2 was associated with an increased risk for developing CD in patients with T1D, whereas patients with CD carrying DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 were at higher risk for developing T1D. In addition to other genetic factors including HLA class I alleles present on DR3-DQ2 extended haplotype, the second extended haplotype may moderate the risk for T1D + CD conferred by DR3-DQ2. Our results suggested that individuals carrying high-risk genotypes DR3-DQ2/DR3-DQ2 or DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 would more likely develop both T1D and CD than either disease alone.

  9. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2012-05-07

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

  10. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Mildred S. Dresselhaus and Dr. Burton Richter, May 2012 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu)

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

    2016-07-12

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On May 7, 2012 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists: Dr. Mildred Dresselhaus, 'for her scientific leadership, her major contributions to science and energy policy, her selfless work in science education and the advancement of diversity in the scientific workplace, and her highly original and impactful research,' and Dr. Burton Richter, 'for the breadth of his influence in the multiple disciplines of accelerator physics and particle physics, his profound scientific discoveries, his visionary leadership as SLAC Director, his leadership of science, and his notable contributions in energy and public policy.' Dr. John Holder, Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, opened the ceremony, and Dr. Bill Brinkman, Director of DOE's Office of Science introduced the main speaker, Dr. Steven Chu, U.S. Energy Secretary.

  11. Dr. Cheryl Nickerson studies Salmonella Typhimurium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Cheryl Nickerson of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  12. Dr. Solco Tromp and the Tromp Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, J. Scott; Rietveld, Wop J.

    2017-09-01

    The Tromp Award is the highest honor awarded by the International Society of Biometeorology (ISB). The award acknowledges outstanding research in biometeorology by a scientist under the age of 35 and was established in conjunction with the Tromp Foundation and the ISB. In honor of the 60th anniversary of the ISB, this article will provide a brief summary of the life of Dr. Solco Tromp and of the six awardees of the Tromp Award since the inaugural issuance of the award in 1999. The Tromp Award was established in part to recognize and support the efforts of young biometeorological professionals. As the brief summary of the awardees and a few of their selected subsequent publications have shown, the ISB and the Tromp Award has proven effective at identifying and supporting promising young scientists.

  13. [Dr. Hideyo Noguchi and Hajime Hoshi].

    PubMed

    Misawa, M

    1991-01-01

    Hajime Hoshi is a founder of Hoshi Pharmaceutical Company and of Hoshi University. He became acquainted with Dr. Hideyo Noguchi in the United States in 1901 during his study abroad. Hoshi often stayed overnight at Noguchi's apartment in Philadelphia. Hoshi and Noguchi were both from Fukushima, Japan, and Hoshi was three years older than Noguchi. Both persons had been good friends until Hoguchi died in 1928. Hoshi and Noguchi together had met Hirobumo Ito and Thomas Edison. In 1906, Hoshi came back to Japan after a 12-year stay in the United States. The financial support by Hoshi enabled the only and one temporary returning of Noguchi to Japan in 1915. In this paper, the friendship between the famous two persons is described in detail.

  14. Dr. Solco Tromp and the Tromp Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, J. Scott; Rietveld, Wop J.

    2017-06-01

    The Tromp Award is the highest honor awarded by the International Society of Biometeorology (ISB). The award acknowledges outstanding research in biometeorology by a scientist under the age of 35 and was established in conjunction with the Tromp Foundation and the ISB. In honor of the 60th anniversary of the ISB, this article will provide a brief summary of the life of Dr. Solco Tromp and of the six awardees of the Tromp Award since the inaugural issuance of the award in 1999. The Tromp Award was established in part to recognize and support the efforts of young biometeorological professionals. As the brief summary of the awardees and a few of their selected subsequent publications have shown, the ISB and the Tromp Award has proven effective at identifying and supporting promising young scientists.

  15. Comparative binding to DR4 and DR5 receptors of TRAIL and BNNTs/PAHE/mPEG-DSPE/TRAIL nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Yves Claude; André, Claire

    2017-01-25

    TRAIL is a member of the tumor necrosis factor family of cytokines, which induces apoptosis of cancer cells, thanks to its binding to its cognate receptors DR5 and DR4. We have recently demonstrated that nanovectorization of TRAIL with single-walled carbon nanotubes enhanced TRAIL affinity to DR5. In this paper, 1-pyrenebutyric acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) were used to anchor the TRAIL protein. The resulting BNNT/1-pyrenebutyric acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester nanotubes were mixed with methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-conjugates so as to allow a good dispersion of these nanoparticle TRAIL (NPT) in aqueous solution. The difference of binding between NPT and soluble TRAIL to DR4 and DR5 receptors was then studied by the use of affinity chromatography. DR4 and DR5 receptors were thus immobilized on a chromatographic support, and the binding of the 2 ligands TRAIL and NPT to DR4 and DR5 was studied in the temperature range 30°C to 50°C. Negative enthalpy (ΔH) values indicated that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding are engaged favorably at the ligand-receptor interface. It was shown that their rank-ordered affinities were strongly different in the sequence TRAILDR4  < NPTDR4  < TRAILDR5  < NPTDR5 , and the highest affinity for NPT to DR4 and DR5 receptors observed at low pHs was due to the less accessibility of the His molecular switch to be protonated when TRAIL was immobilized on BNNTs. Taken together, our results demonstrated that nanovectorization of TRAIL with BNNTs enhanced its binding to both DR4 and DR5 receptors at 37°C. Our novel nanovector could potentially be used for delivering TRAIL to cells for cancer treatment.

  16. Entrevue avec le Dr Charley Zeanah

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Le Dr Charles Zeanah est titulaire de la chaire de psychiatrie Mary K. Sellars-Polchow, professeur de pédiatrie clinique et vice-président de la pédopsychiatrie au département de psychiatrie et des sciences du comportement de la faculté de médecine de l’Université Tulane, à la Nouvelle-Orléans. Il est également directeur général de l’institut de la santé mentale des nourrissons et des jeunes enfants de Tulane. Il est récipiendaire de nombreux prix, notamment le prix de prévention Irving Phillips (AACAP), la mention élogieuse présidentielle pour sa recherche et son leadership exceptionnels en santé mentale des nourrissons (American Orthopsychiatric Association), le prix d’excellence clinique Sarah Haley Memorial (International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies), le prix de recherche en pédopsychiatrie Blanche F. Ittelson (APA), et le prix Serge Lebovici Award soulignant les contributions internationales à la santé mentale des nourrissons (World Association for Infant Mental Health). Le Dr Zeanah est fellow distingué de l’AACAP, fellow distingué de l’APA et membre du conseil d’administration de Zero to Three. Il est l’éditeur scientifique de Handbook of Infant Mental Health (3e édition) qui est considéré comme étant le manuel de pointe et la référence de base du domaine de la santé mentale des nourrissons.

  17. [Maternal mortality rate in the Aurelio Valdivieso General Hospital: a ten years follow up].

    PubMed

    Noguera-Sánchez, Marcelo Fidias; Arenas-Gómez, Susana; Rabadán-Martínez, Cesar Esli; Antonio-Sánchez, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Antecedentes: en México, la mortalidad materna ha disminuido en las últimas décadas. En Oaxaca esto no se ha manifestado porque se incrementó la tasa de mortalidad materna. Este estado se ubica entre las entidades con más muertes maternas. Objetivo: analizar 10 años de mortalidad materna en el Hospital General Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso de los Servicios de Salud de Oaxaca, para conocer el comportamiento epidemiológico y caracterización de los decesos. Material y métodos: estudio retrospectivo, transversal y descriptivo efectuado mediante la revisión de expedientes clínicos de mortalidad materna en la División de Gineco-Obstetricia. Se consideraron variables sociales, obstétricas y circunstanciales y las comprobaciones se efectuaron con estadística general y descriptiva. Resultados: entre el 1 de enero de 2000 y el 31 de diciembre de 2009 se registraron 109 muertes maternas, excluidas dos que no fueron obstétricas; es decir, que hubo 107 muertes maternas: 75 directas y 32 indirectas. La tasa de mortalidad materna fue de 172.14 × 100,000 nacidos vivos. De las muertes maternas revisadas 89 pudieron evitarse (83%) y 18 no (17%), esto con base en el dictamen del Comité ad hoc del Hospital General Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso. La enfermedad hipertensiva aguda del embarazo fue la de mayor mortalidad; la escolaridad y el puerperio ueron el mayor riesgo. Conclusiones: las variables atribuibles a bajo índice de desarrollo humano, como: baja escolaridad y paridad elevada incrementaron el riesgo de mortalidad materna, que fue intrahospitalaria y durante el puerperio. La tasa de mortalidad materna fue la mayor encontrada en publicaciones nacionales con respecto a este referente.

  18. Dr. Goddard and a 1918 version of 'Bazooka'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Robert H. Goddard loading a 1918 version of the Bazooka of World War II. From 1930 to 1941, Dr. Goddard made substantial progress in the development of progressively larger rockets, which attained altitudes of 2400 meters, and refined his equipment for guidance and control, his techniques of welding, and his insulation, pumps, and other associated equipment. In many respects, Dr. Goddard laid the essential foundations of practical rocket technology

  19. [Questions on the first operation with ethyl ether as anaesthetic by Dr. Peter Parker].

    PubMed

    Chen, Q

    2017-01-28

    Ethyl ether was the first accepted effective general anaesthetic. It was introduced into China by an America missionary, Dr. Peter Parker. This was one of the historical events of medical communication between China and the West. In the records of the first operation with ether, however, Dr. Parker unusually omitted the patient's medical record number and the date of the operation, while those of other operations with ether anesthetics were all available. This was very unusual for a doctor like Peter Parker who always recorded every important case in detail in the hospital reports. It seems that he deliberately rather than carelessly omitted the information for some reasons. Based on the analysis of Parker's reports, a conclusion is made that the anesthetic effect of the case was actually ineffective. Furthermore, possible answers to this are outlined and question by discussion based on the situation that Parker faced in the late Qing era.

  20. The life-work of Prof. MUDr. Zdenek Lojda, Dr.Sc., Dr. Med. et Iur. h.c.

    PubMed

    Hach, P

    2008-01-01

    Professor Zdenek Lojda, MD., Dr.Sc., Dr. Med.h.c., Dr. Jur. h.c., vice-rector emeritus of the Charles University and director emeritus of the Institute of Histology and Embryology of the 1st Medical Faculty of the Charles University in Prague died on the 24th April 2004. Born in Trebíc (in a local maternal hospital on the 7th December 1927) he grew up in Moravské Budejovice where he graduated from a primary and secondary school (he passed out each class as well as the leaving exam at the local gymnasium in 1946 cum laude). He was growing up in an inspiring atmosphere of a family of a professor at gymnasium that helped him to form his fundamental moral attitude and to gain high knowledge of an almost Renaissance comprehension. He was a gifted linguist (he spoke fluently several languages including Latin) and musician (he did community singing among others) and he was interested in natural sciences. In 1946 he enrolled for the medical faculty and coincidentally he was grouped among students that completed histology and embryology at the Institute of Embryology headed by professor Zdenek Frankenberger, MD., who had recognised his interest in this field of study. The young student gave himself and his free time to the work of an unqualified lab-worker and only later he became assistant conducting practical tutorials. He took his degree cum laude in 1952 and he received certificate of competence because of his excellent results. He showed his preoccupation with histology (strongly influenced by the personality of professor Frankenberger) after the graduation when he entered the job of the assistant professor at the Institute of Embryology and he stayed there until 1961. When he was about to decide which problems he should target, professor Frankenberger drew his attention to a very interesting part of histology that was just in advance and that was the use of diazonic salts for formation of colour reaction product demonstrating enzyme activity in tissues. In 1962

  1. Apparent HLA DR triplet due to the coexpression of a DRB5-encoded molecule on a DR1 haplotype.

    PubMed

    Gebuhrer, L; Tiercy, J M; Freidel, A C; Labonne, M P; Lambert, J; Jeannet, M; Betuel, H

    1992-06-01

    HLA DR1 molecules are coded by a single polymorphic DRB1 gene. We have observed rare DR1 cells in one Caucasoid family and three unrelated individuals that also reacted with some anti-DR2 sera. Since the second DR antigen was normally expressed, these cells appeared as triplets. Contrary to serology, the cells were not typed by HTCs defining Dw2, Dw12, and Dw21. Further investigations on these unusual DR1+2* haplotypes were conducted by DNA oligotyping and by sequencing of the DRB first-domain exon. The results showed that these DR1 haplotypes, besides their DRB1*0101 allele, carried also a DRB5*0101 allele.

  2. NASA Sponsors Cancer Research at Children's Hospital

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (left), during a visit at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, discussed how NASA's special lighting technology may soon treat cancer. Goldin talked with Dr.Harry Whelan (right) and Dr. Kerneth Reichert (center left), both pediatric neurologists with the Hospital and professors at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Accompanied by Astronaut Mary Ellen Weber, Goldin was shown this innovative treatment, called Photodynamic Therapy, a method used to destroy the tumor without damaging the delicate brain tissue around it. The treatment uses tiny pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) developed for Space Product Development plant growth experiments.

  3. NASA Sponsors Cancer Research at Children's Hospital

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (left), during a visit at Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, discussed how NASA's special lighting technology may soon treat cancer. Goldin talked with Dr.Harry Whelan (right) and Dr. Kerneth Reichert (center left), both pediatric neurologists with the Hospital and professors at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Accompanied by Astronaut Mary Ellen Weber, Goldin was shown this innovative treatment, called Photodynamic Therapy, a method used to destroy the tumor without damaging the delicate brain tissue around it. The treatment uses tiny pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) developed for Space Product Development plant growth experiments.

  4. [The life of Dr. RO Kishun, a reflection of modern Korean medical history of the borders].

    PubMed

    Shin, Young-Jeon; Park, Se-Hong

    2009-06-01

    RO Kishun was born on February 2, 1893 in Ongjin County, Hwanghae Province of Joseon Korea. He graduated from the Medical Training Center, a campus associated with the Joseon Government-General Hospital, in 1915, and from Kyushu Imperial University School of Medicine in 1917. He continued his medical study at the university in 1929, majoring in biochemistry, and earned a doctorate in medicine in 1932. Dr. RO, one of the earliest pioneers in Korean biochemistry, was active in his research, publishing four studies in the Japanese Journal of Biochemistry between 1931 and 1932. After returning from Japan in 1932, Dr. RO opened a medical practice in Mokpo and Busan, port cities situated on the southern tip of Korea. Later in 1936, he moved north to Manchuria (northeast China) to practice medicine at the International Hospital in Mukden (present-day Shenyang). He also served as president of Tumen Public Hospital between 1942 and 1946. When Japan signed unconditional surrender bringing World War II to an end, Dr. RO relocated to Yanbian and began providing medical training to ethnic Koreans. In October 1946, he was appointed dean of the First Branch School of China Medical University in Longjing, and in October 1948 the first dean of Yanbian Medical School, the predecessor of Yanbian University College of Medicine. Dr. RO dedicated his life to medical practice, teaching and training students, and mentoring younger faculty. A brilliant clinician, he also inspired and helped his colleagues with his outstanding ability to diagnose and treat patients. He was one of the founding members of Yanbian University College of Medicine. RO Kishun died on June 7, 1957 at age 64. Ethnic Koreans hailed him as Sinui (literally, the physician of God), and a bronze statue of himself was erected in front of the medical college in 1988. Dr. RO's life brings modern historians' attention to the issue of determining geographical territories and nationality, in that his life unfolded at the

  5. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest [U.S. Energy Secretary

    2016-07-12

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  6. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest

    2014-02-03

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  7. [Prevalence of hip, femur and knee fractures at the High Specialty Medical Unit, Hospital de Traumatología y Ortopedia "Lomas Verdes", Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social].

    PubMed

    Lovato-Salas, F; Luna-Pizarro, D; Oliva-Ramírez, S A; Flores-Lujano, J; Núñez-Enríquez, J C

    2015-01-01

    Lower limb fractures are more frequent among older patients with osteopenia after a low energy fall and/or among young patients who sustain a high energy trauma. The prevalence of hip, femur and knee fractures at the High Specialty Medical Unit, Hospital de Traumatología y Ortopedia "Lomas Verdes" is unknown. Cross-sectional study, descriptive and retrospective design. Cases with low extremity fractures treated from January 1st, 2012 to December 31st, 2013 at the Hip, Femur and Knee Service, High Specialty Medical Unit, Hospital de Traumatología y Ortopedia "Lomas Verdes", were reviewed. Most patients (52.2%) were females; 64.1% of patients were over 60 years of age. Fracture distribution according to the segment involved was as follows: 73.4% (n = 1,327) were femur fractures, 13.5% (n = 244) tibial plateau fractures, and 13.2% (n = 238) patellar fractures. 66.8% (n = 1,209) of patients had a long hospital stay (more than 10 days). According to the anatomical location of fractures, transtrochanteric fractures (49.1%) were the most frequent ones, followed by patellar fractures (13.2%), and femur shaft fractures (12.7%). The prevalence of lower limb fractures at our hospital corresponds to what has been reported internationally.

  8. Dr. Irene Sänger-Bredt, a life for astronautics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaganescu, Nicolae-Florin

    2004-12-01

    Irene Bredt (b.1911 at Bonn) obtained her Doctorate in Physics in 1937; in the same year she became a scientific researcher at the German Research Center for Aviation at Trauen, led by Prof. Dr. Eugen Sänger. Soon, the young but efficient Dr. Irene Bredt became the first assistant of Dr. Sänger, who married her (1951). During 1973-1978, Dr. Bredt was in correspondence with Prof. Dr. Nikolae-Florin Zaganescu and helped him to familiarize the Romanian readers with Prof. Sänger's life and achievements. As for Dr. Bredt's life, she specified three main periods of her activity: 1937-1942, when she was researcher in charge of thermodynamic problems of liquid-fuelled rocket engines at Trauen 1942-1945, when she was Senior Researcher in charge of Ramjet in flight performances at Ainring, and also coauthored the Top Secret Technical report entitled 'A Rocket Engine for a Long-Range Bomber', which was finished in 1941 but edited only in 1944 the post world war II period, when she was Scientific Advisor or Director at various civil and military research institutes, universities, etc. Dr. Irene Sänger-Bredt helped her husband to develop many scientific theories like Ramjet thermodynamic theory, and photon rocket theory and also in establishing IAF and IAA. In 1970, Dr. Irene Sänger-Bredt was honored with 'Hermann Oberth Gold Medal' for her impressive scientific activity.

  9. Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher 2012 Wilder Silver Medal Recipient

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dr. Shawn Mehlenbacher, Oregon State University, was awarded the 2012 Wilder Medal by the American Pomological Society for his contributions to hazelnut genetics and cultivar development. Dr. Mehlenbacher took over the leadership of the Oregon State University hazelnut breeding program in 1986 aft...

  10. Dr. Albert Carr--Science Educator 1930-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    The very first issue of "Educational Perspectives" was published in October of 1962. Dr. Albert Carr wrote one of the inaugural essays on the topic of current developments in science education, and he went on to write several other articles for the journal. This article shares why Dr. Albert Carr's colleagues remember him for his…

  11. Interview with Smithsonian NASM Spacesuit Curator Dr. Cathleen Lewis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Cathleen; Wright, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Dr. Cathleen Lewis was interviewed by Rebecca Wright during the presentation of an "Interview with Smithsonian NASM Spacesuit Curator Dr. Cathleen Lewis" on May 14, 2012. Topics included the care, size, and history of the spacesuit collection at the Smithsonian and the recent move to the state-of-the-art permanent storage facility at the Udvar-Hazy facility in Virginia.

  12. Biotechnology Symposium - In Memoriam, the Late Dr. Allan Zipf

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A one-day biotechnology symposium was held at Alabama A&M University (AAMU), Normal, AL on June 4, 2004 in memory of the late Dr. Allan Zipf (Sept 1953-Jan 2004). Dr. Zipf was a Research Associate Professor at the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, AAMU, who collaborated extensively with ARS/MS...

  13. Dr. Wernher Von Braun near the mobile launcher.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George Mueller, NASA associate administrator for manned space flight, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, are seen near the mobile launcher carrying a 363 foot tall Saturn V space launch vehicle as the rocket is rolled from the vehicle assembly building at KSC for its three mile trip to the launch pad.

  14. Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. John Hope Franklin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert L., Jr.; Levering-Lewis, David; French, John D.; Wharton, Clifton R., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. John Hope Franklin chronicled the experiences of African-Americans like no one before him, forcing America to recognize Black history as American history. His contributions were innumerable and his impact was abiding. In celebration of his life and legacy, the authors profile the celebrated scholar and activist, Dr. John Hope Franklin.

  15. Dr. Wernher Von Braun near the mobile launcher.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George Mueller, NASA associate administrator for manned space flight, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, are seen near the mobile launcher carrying a 363 foot tall Saturn V space launch vehicle as the rocket is rolled from the vehicle assembly building at KSC for its three mile trip to the launch pad.

  16. Dr. von Braun Tries Out the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director, Dr. von Braun, submerges after spending some time under water in the MSFC Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS). Weighted to a neutrally buoyant condition, Dr. von Braun was able to perform tasks underwater which simulated weightless conditions found in space.

  17. Dr. von Braun Tries Out the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Astronaut L. Gordon Cooper checks the neck ring of a space suit worn by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director, Dr. von Braun before he submerges into the water of the MSFC Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS). Wearing a pressurized suit and weighted to a neutrally buoyant condition, Dr. von Braun was able to perform tasks underwater which simulated weightless conditions found in space.

  18. Dr. von Braun Tries Out the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director, Dr. von Braun, is shown leaving the suiting-up van wearing a pressure suit prepared for a tryout in the MSFC Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS). Weighted to a neutrally buoyant condition, Dr. von Braun was able to perform tasks underwater which simulated weightless conditions found in space.

  19. Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Dr. John Hope Franklin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Robert L., Jr.; Levering-Lewis, David; French, John D.; Wharton, Clifton R., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Dr. John Hope Franklin chronicled the experiences of African-Americans like no one before him, forcing America to recognize Black history as American history. His contributions were innumerable and his impact was abiding. In celebration of his life and legacy, the authors profile the celebrated scholar and activist, Dr. John Hope Franklin.

  20. SDSS DR7 WHITE DWARF CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.; Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, Ingrid; Pecanha, Viviane; Costa, J. E. S.; Koester, D.; Krzesinski, J.; Dufour, P.; Lachapelle, F.-R.; Bergeron, P.; Yip, Ching-Wa; Harris, Hugh C.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Althaus, L.; Corsico, A.

    2013-01-15

    We present a new catalog of spectroscopically confirmed white dwarf stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 spectroscopic catalog. We find 20,407 white dwarf spectra, representing 19,712 stars, and provide atmospheric model fits to 14,120 DA and 1011 DB white dwarf spectra from 12,843 and 923 stars, respectively. These numbers represent more than a factor of two increase in the total number of white dwarf stars from the previous SDSS white dwarf catalogs based on DR4 data. Our distribution of subtypes varies from previous catalogs due to our more conservative, manual classifications of each star in our catalog, supplementing our automatic fits. In particular, we find a large number of magnetic white dwarf stars whose small Zeeman splittings mimic increased Stark broadening that would otherwise result in an overestimated log g if fit as a non-magnetic white dwarf. We calculate mean DA and DB masses for our clean, non-magnetic sample and find the DB mean mass is statistically larger than that for the DAs.

  1. Dr. Samuel Ting, nobel laureate, visits SSPF.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Nobel laureate Professor Samuel C. C. Ting of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology pauses for a photo in the Space Station Processing Facility. Dr. Ting is directing an experiment, an international collaboration of some 37 universities and laboratories, using a state-of-the-art particle physics detector called the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), which will fly on a future launch to the International Space Station. Using the unique environment of space, the AMS will study the properties and origin of cosmic particles and nuclei including antimatter and dark matter. AMS flew initially as a Space Shuttle payload on the June 1998 mission STS-91 that provided the investigating team with data on background sources and verified the detector's performance under actual space flight conditions. The detector's second space flight is scheduled to be launched on mission UF-4 October 2003 for installation on the Space Station as an attached payload. Current plans call for operating the detector for three years before it is returned to Earth on the Shuttle. Using the Space Station offers the science team the opportunity to conduct the long-duration research above the Earth's atmosphere necessary to collect sufficient data required to accomplish the science objectives.

  2. Dr. Rudolph Binion: professor, mentor, psychohistorian.

    PubMed

    Szaluta, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    As the title of my paper indicates, Dr. Rudolph Binion was my professor, mentor, and a leading psychohistorian. My paper in memoriam to Rudolph Binion is intended as both a retrospective and an introspective account of my relationship with him, as he had a pivotal influence on me when he was my professor at Columbia University. His help and influence continued after I left graduate school. In my paper I also deal with the enormous stresses of navigating through graduate school, for those students whose goal was to earn the Ph.D. degree. Some examinations were dreaded, For Example The "Examination in Subjects," popularly called the "Oral Exam." The "incubation" period was long indeed, frequently averaging nearly ten years, and it was an ordeal, as the rate of attrition was very high. There is then also the question of "ego strength" and that of "transference" toward the professor. Graduate school is indeed a long and strenuous challenge. I took a seminar in modern French history, a requirement for the Master's degree with Professor Binion, which was consequential for me, as he taught me to be objective in writing history. Professor Binion was a demanding and outstanding teacher.

  3. Dr. Samuel Ting, nobel laureate, visits SSPF.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Nobel laureate Professor Samuel C. C. Ting of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology pauses for a photo in the Space Station Processing Facility. Dr. Ting is directing an experiment, an international collaboration of some 37 universities and laboratories, using a state-of-the-art particle physics detector called the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), which will fly on a future launch to the International Space Station. Using the unique environment of space, the AMS will study the properties and origin of cosmic particles and nuclei including antimatter and dark matter. AMS flew initially as a Space Shuttle payload on the June 1998 mission STS-91 that provided the investigating team with data on background sources and verified the detector's performance under actual space flight conditions. The detector's second space flight is scheduled to be launched on mission UF-4 October 2003 for installation on the Space Station as an attached payload. Current plans call for operating the detector for three years before it is returned to Earth on the Shuttle. Using the Space Station offers the science team the opportunity to conduct the long-duration research above the Earth's atmosphere necessary to collect sufficient data required to accomplish the science objectives.

  4. Dr. Otto "Tiger" Freer: inventor and innovator.

    PubMed

    Chittiboina, Prashant; Connor, David E; Nanda, Anil

    2012-08-01

    Every neurosurgeon develops his or her own standard approach to common intracranial pathologies in terms of the order in which different stages are performed and which instruments are used to perform individual tasks. The majority of the basic steps in performing a craniotomy are learned through repetition and practice during residency training. Significant amounts of energy are devoted to mastering technical skills and developing an operative rhythm. What often receives little attention is the historical origin of the instruments that make the work possible. The Freer elevator represents a particularly interesting example. To people unfamiliar with the accomplishments of turn-of-the-century laryngologist Otto "Tiger" Freer, it can be assumed that the name of the instrument in one's hand is simply named for what it can do, that is, to "free" the nasal mucosa from the bony and cartilaginous septum during the transsphenoidal approach. The technique this master surgeon spent his life and career perfecting is now repeated almost daily by skull base neurosurgeons approaching pathologies from the inferior frontal lobe to the foramen magnum. In reviewing his life and work, the authors of this paper discovered an interesting creative process that led to the design of the eponymous instrument. Additionally, they discovered important advances toward the development of the transnasal approach and in our understanding of the anterior skull base. They present a historical perspective on the life and accomplishments of Dr. Freer and the ubiquitous surgical instrument that he invented and popularized.

  5. Portrait of Dr Michael G. Hanna, Jr

    PubMed Central

    Hanna Jr, Michael

    2014-01-01

    While a PhD candidate, doing my thesis at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Biology Division under Dr. Charles Congdon, my introduction to the immune response was studying graft vs. host (GVH) disease as a consequence of bone marrow transplantation in mice. The sequalae of GVH was impressive, and demonstrated the potential of negative clinical consequences of the immune system. The idea of harnessing this immunological phenomena in cancer therapy was appealing even in the late 1960s. The problem was that at the time T-cells as a component of the immune system were identified but not defined. We moved to soluble antigen stimulation in mice and recognized and described the post antigen stimulation changes in lymphatic tissue germinal centers during the first 48 h after the induction of the humoral immune response. We described the extracellular localization of soluble antigens on the surface of dendritic reticular cells of the stroma, directing a response of B-cells to produce antibody against non-self. The ensuing reaction was the rapid proliferation of B-cells toward antibody secreting plasma cells. PMID:25424782

  6. Galactic rotation in Gaia DR1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovy, Jo

    2017-06-01

    The spatial variations of the velocity field of local stars provide direct evidence of Galactic differential rotation. The local divergence, shear and vorticity of the velocity field - the traditional Oort constants - can be measured based purely on astrometric measurements and in particular depend linearly on proper motion and parallax. I use data for 304 267 main-sequence stars from the Gaia DR1 Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution to perform a local, precise measurement of the Oort constants at a typical heliocentric distance of 230 pc. The pattern of proper motions for these stars clearly displays the expected effects from differential rotation. I measure the Oort constants to be: A = 15.3 ± 0.4 km s-1 kpc-1, B = -11.9 ± 0.4 km s-1 kpc-1, C = -3.2 ± 0.4 km s-1 kpc-1 and K = -3.3 ± 0.6 km s-1 kpc-1, with no colour trend over a wide range of stellar populations. These first confident measurements of C and K clearly demonstrate the importance of non-axisymmetry for the velocity field of local stars and they provide strong constraints on non-axisymmetric models of the Milky Way.

  7. Proc, Dr. Sam, Uncle Henry, and the "Little Green Book". Interview by Charles F. Wooley.

    PubMed

    Harvey, W Proctor

    2005-01-01

    During his house staff training before World War II, Dr. W. Proctor Harvey encountered Dr. Samuel A. Levine at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston. Following military service, Harvey returned to Boston and became Levine's first cardiology fellow. The book Clinical Auscultation of the Heart--the Little Green Book by Levine and Harvey in 1949 combined Levine's clinical wisdom with Harvey's objective phonocardiographic methods and brought an important objective dimension to the art of cardiac auscultation. Both Levine and Harvey shared experiences and friendship with Henry Christian, the first Physician-in-Chief when the new Brigham Hospital Opened in 1913. Christian, appointed Dean of the Harvard Medical School in 1908 at the age of 32, was referred to as the "Boy Dean." He held the Hersey Chair of Theory and Practice of Physic from 1908 until 1939, was one of the founding group of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and a major force in academic medicine. Levine served as intern to Christian and then joined the Brigham medical staff in 1915. Proctor Harvey followed Henry Christian's path from their mutual hometown of Lyunchburg, VA to the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. A series of illuminating and respectful professional interactions--initially between Christian and Levine, between Levine and Harvey in the early 1940s, and between Harvey and Christian in the 1950s--provide the background for the genesis of the Little Green Book and a remarkable example of academic heritage.

  8. Rheumatic fever in Ireland: the role of Dr Monica Lea Wilson (1889-1971).

    PubMed

    Ward, O Conor

    2013-02-01

    In 1869 William Stokes pointed out that the severity of rheumatic fever in Dublin had declined over recent decades. Similar worldwide decline led to the closure of many internationally famous rheumatic fever centres. The discovery by Robert Collis that rheumatic fever was a sequel to haemolytic streptococcal infection and the subsequent discovery of penicillin accelerated the decline. St Gabriel's Hospital in Dublin opened in 1951 under the clinical direction of Dr Monica Lea Wilson. Contrary to contemporary medical opinion a regimen of very prolonged bed rest was enforced. From 1961 the family doctors became concerned at the adverse psychological effects of the unnecessarily prolonged hospital stay. Twenty-seven of the 56 inpatients were re-assessed. None of them showed any evidence of active rheumatic fever and their parents took them home. The hospital closed in 1968. Dr Lea Wilson distanced herself from mainstream medicine and she is best remembered for having presented an unrecognized Caravaggio painting to the Jesuit Order in recognition of their pastoral support at the time of the controversial assassination in 1920 of her husband Percival, an Inspector in the Royal Irish Constabulary.

  9. The impact of DR3 microvariation on peptide binding: the combinations of specific DR beta residues critical to binding differ for different peptides.

    PubMed

    Posch, P E; Hurley, C K; Geluk, A; Ottenhoff, T H

    1996-09-01

    HLA-DR molecules are a group of highly polymorphic glycoprotein heterodimers that present peptide antigens to T lymphocytes for immune surveillance. To assess the significance of limited polymorphism on the functional differentiation of DR molecules, the binding of several immunogenic peptides to the DR3 microvariants [DR(alpha, beta 1*0302) and DR(alpha, beta 1*0301)] and to mutants of these DR3 molecules was examined. This analysis has shown that each residue (DR beta 26, DR beta 28, DR beta 47, and DR beta 86), which differentiates these two DR3 molecules, contributes to their functional distinction and that the relative contribution of each residue varies for different peptide/DR3 complexes. For example, DR beta 28 and DR beta 86 controlled the mycobacterium tuberculosis 65-kD heat shock protein peptides 3-13 and 4-15 (HSP) binding specificity to DR (alpha, beta 1*0301). [HSP does not bind to DR(alpha, beta 1*0302)], whereas DR beta 26, DR beta 28, and DR beta 86 controlled the influenza hemagglutinin peptide 306-318 (HA) binding specificity to DR(alpha, beta 1*0302). [HA does not bind to DR(alpha, beta 1*0301).] In comparison, DR beta 86 alone controlled the binding level difference of sperm whale myoglobin peptide 132-151 (SWM) and of myelin basic protein peptide 152-170 (MBP) [both bind to DR(alpha, beta 1*0301) at levels five times greater than to DR(alpha, beta 1*0302)] to the DR3 molecules. Although not critical, additional DR beta residues influenced the binding level of individual peptides of each of the DR3 molecules and, again, the combinations of these residues differed for different peptide/DR3 complexes. These data showed that individual DR residues vary in their relative contribution to the interaction between a specific DR molecule and different peptides and that limited polymorphism can create substantial differences in the peptide binding profiles among DR molecules.

  10. DR3 Regulates Negative Selection during Thymocyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eddie C. Y.; Thern, Anette; Denzel, Angela; Kitson, Jeremy; Farrow, Stuart N.; Owen, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    DR3 (Ws1, Apo3, LARD, TRAMP, TNFSFR12) is a member of the death domain-containing tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily, members of which mediate a variety of developmental events including the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. We have investigated the in vivo role(s) of DR3 by generating mice congenitally deficient in the expression of the DR3 gene. We show that negative selection and anti-CD3-induced apoptosis are significantly impaired in DR3-null mice. In contrast, both superantigen-induced negative selection and positive selection are normal. The pre-T-cell receptor-mediated checkpoint, which is dependent on TNFR signaling, is also unaffected in DR3-deficient mice. These data reveal a nonredundant in vivo role for this TNF receptor family member in the removal of self-reactive T cells in the thymus. PMID:11313471

  11. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure activities evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.G.

    1996-04-11

    This report evaluates the closure activities at the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility. The evaluation compares these activities to the regulatory requirements and closure plan requirements. The report concludes that the areas identified in the closure plan can be clean closed. This report summarizes and evaluates the closure activities performed in support of partial closure of the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF). This evaluation will be used in assessing the condition of the 105-DR LSFF for the purpose of meeting the partial clean closure conditions described in the 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1995). Based on the evaluation of the decontamination activities, sampling activities, and sample data, it is has been determined that the partial clean closure conditions for the 105-DR LSFF have been met.

  12. The 1850 Webster/Parkman Trial: Dr. Keep's forensic evidence.

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2003-03-01

    Shortly before two o'clock on a chilly November afternoon in 1849, the celebrated Harvard physician and surgeon, Dr. George Parkman, left his home on Boston's fashionable Beacon Hill, expecting to return in a few hours. He was never seen alive again. This account describes Parkman's brutal murder and explores the dynamics which preceded this crime. It explains how and why Dr. John White Webster, MD, Professor of Chemistry and Mineralogy at Harvard University, killed Dr. Parkman and unsuccessfully attempted to destroy the physical evidence. Webster's subsequent trial, conviction and ultimate punishment are also detailed. The Parkman-Webster case remains one of the classic murders in the annals of American crime. Compelling dental evidence presented by the famous American dentist, Dr. Nathan Cooley Keep, directly led to the conviction of Dr. Webster. This graphic, ground-breaking case clearly established the viable role of forensic dentistry in legal criminal investigation.

  13. Decreased human leukocyte antigen-DR expression in the lipid raft by peritoneal macrophages from women with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yorito; Maeda, Nagamasa; Izumiya, Chiaki; Kusume, Tomoaki; Oguri, Hiroyoshi; Kawashima, Masaaki; Hayashi, Kazutoshi; Nomura, Aki; Yamashita, Chika; Fukaya, Takao

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the macrophage response in endometriosis by determining the expression and localization of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-ABC and HLA-DR by the peritoneal fluid (PF) macrophages and PF concentrations of interferon (IFN)-gamma that regulate HLA expression. Case-control study. University hospital. 64 Japanese endometriosis patients, and 65 women with other laparoscopic diagnoses. Venipuncture and laparoscopic peritoneal fluid collection. Expression and localization of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR in PF macrophages were determined by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The concentration of IFN-gamma in PF was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In women with endometriosis, expression of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR by PF macrophages, and the IFN-gamma concentrations in PF were statistically significantly lower than in controls. Women with endometriosis showed a statistically significant positive correlation between HLA expression and IFN-gamma concentration. By confocal microscopy, HLA-ABC was distributed homogenously on the macrophage surface whereas HLA-DR expression on these cells corresponded to the lipid raft. In women with endometriosis, low HLA expression and particularly reduced HLA-DR in the lipid raft may be influenced by low IFN-gamma and may compromise antigen presentation, limiting the immune response to peritoneal cavity antigens such as implanted or metaplastic endometrial tissue.

  14. Study of HLA-DR synthesis in cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wikner, N E; Huff, J C; Norris, D A; Boyce, S T; Cary, M; Kissinger, M; Weston, W L

    1986-11-01

    Within the normal human epidermis only Langerhans and indeterminate cells express HLA-DR. Human keratinocytes (HK), however, may also express HLA-DR in certain disease states characterized by mononuclear cell infiltrates. Previous studies have shown that HK synthesize HLA-DR in response to stimulation by interferon gamma (INF-gamma). The purposes of this study were to define conditions under which cultured HK might express HLA-DR and to compare the HLA-DR synthesis of HK with that of monocytes. HLA-DR expression by HK as determined by indirect immunofluorescence of HK cultures was absent under standard low calcium conditions and remained absent with the addition of calcium, serum, mitogens, and supernatants from Pam-212 cells containing epidermal thymocyte-activating factor. HLA-DR expression in HK was induced by cocultivation with concanavalin A-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), but not unstimulated PBMC. This effect was time-dependent and directly related to the number of PBMC. HLA-DR expression was also induced in a time- and dose-dependent manner by addition of supernatant from stimulated PBMC (SS) or by addition of recombinant INF-gamma but not by addition of interleukin (IL)-1 or IL-2. Induction by either SS or INF-gamma was blocked by an antiserum to INF-gamma. As determined by a semiquantitative immunoprecipitation technique, HLA-DR synthesis by HK was directly related to INF-gamma concentration. The pattern of HLA-DR peptides produced by HK was similar to that of monocytes, but the relative quantity synthesized was far less than that of monocytes.

  15. Dr. T. F. Riggs and the Johns Hopkins connection: an early graduate medical experience in South Dakota.

    PubMed

    Gutch, C F

    1996-03-01

    Theodore F. Riggs, MD was born to missionary parents in Dakota Territory in 1874. His early education was a mixture of a mission school with Indian children and more conventional elementary schools in eastern communities. He graduated from Beloit College, and in 1903 received his medical degree at Johns Hopkins. After training in surgery, he began his practice in Pierre, South Dakota in 1909. In 1919 he contacted friends in Baltimore, seeking assistance with the burgeoning practice. Help came in the form of a third year medical student, Richard TeLinde (who later became head of Gynecological Surgery at Hopkins). TeLinde was so impressed by his Pierre encounter that subsequently each year he would select a recent Hopkins graduate to go to Pierre and work with Dr Riggs at St. Mary's Hospital. The Pierre rotation became a regular option in the residency program of the Brady Urological Institute. The program continued through World War II, ending after the death of Dr Hugh Young and the retirement of Dr Riggs in the early 1950's. Forty-five residents or medical students had a part of their training with T. F. Riggs at St. Mary's Hospital. Twenty-seven were from Johns Hopkins, while others were local South Dakotans or individuals known to Dr. Riggs. Of the total group, seventeen became urologists, five surgeons, five internist, two otolaryngologists, two psychiatrists and one gynecologist (Richard TeLinde). Dr Riggs died in 1962. He said his greatest joy in life was the experience he had with those men who had been at St. Mary's Hospital over the years and the friendships that were formed.

  16. 78 FR 29781 - Before Administrative Judges: Ronald M. Spritzer, Chairman, Dr. Anthony J. Baratta, Dr. Randall J...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Before Administrative Judges: Ronald M. Spritzer, Chairman, Dr. Anthony J. Baratta, Dr. Randall J. Charbeneau; In the Matter of Detroit Edison Company (Fermi...

  17. DR with a DSLR: Digital Radiography with a Digital Single-Lens Reflex camera.

    PubMed

    Fan, Helen; Durko, Heather L; Moore, Stephen K; Moore, Jared; Miller, Brian W; Furenlid, Lars R; Pradhan, Sunil; Barrett, Harrison H

    2010-02-15

    An inexpensive, portable digital radiography (DR) detector system for use in remote regions has been built and evaluated. The system utilizes a large-format digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera to capture the image from a standard fluorescent screen. The large sensor area allows relatively small demagnification factors and hence minimizes the light loss. The system has been used for initial phantom tests in urban hospitals and Himalayan clinics in Nepal, and it has been evaluated in the laboratory at the University of Arizona by additional phantom studies. Typical phantom images are presented in this paper, and a simplified discussion of the detective quantum efficiency of the detector is given.

  18. [Septic abortion in the Hospital de Ginecología y Obstetricia no. 3 del Instituto Mexicana de Seguridad Social. Late and early morbidity].

    PubMed

    López Ortiz, E; Sandoval Sevilla, S; Arteaga, V M; Rosas Arceo, J; Ortíz Arroyo, R

    1974-02-01

    268 cases of septic abortion which occurred between 1964-72 in a large metropolitan hospital in Mexico were analyzed retrospecively. There cases represented 0.88% of all cases of abortion during the same time. Most patients were between 21-30, and 48% with parity 2-5; 63% were at their first abortion; only 16 patients declared to have attempted abortion, and most cases were first trimester abortion. Pre- and postoperative procedures and vital signs were carefully taken, and time elapsed from medical treatment to surgery was 4-12 hours. There were 237 curettages, and 28 hysterectomies. Complication from surgery were 4.1%; there were 19 deaths, i.e. 7.5% of patients, of which 10 only 24 hours after hospitalization. Protocol of treatment of septic abortion is discussed, and surgical treatment highly recommended.

  19. Mother-baby friendly hospital.

    PubMed

    Aragon-choudhury, P

    1996-01-01

    In Manila, the Philippines, the Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital has been a maternity hospital for 75 years. It averages 90 deliveries a day. Its fees are P200-P500 for a normal delivery and P800-P2000 for a cesarean section. Patients pay what they can and pay the balance when they can. The hospital provides a safe motherhood package that encompasses teaching responsible parenthood, prenatal care, labor, delivery, postpartum care, breast feeding, family planning, and child survival. In 1986, the hospital introduced innovative policies and procedures that promote, protect, and support breast feeding. It has a rooming-in policy that has saved the hospital P6.5 million so far. In the prenatal stage, hospital staff inform pregnant women that colostrum protects the newborn against infections, that suckling stimulates milk production, and that there is no basis to the claim of having insufficient breast milk. Sales representatives of milk substitutes are banned from the hospital. Staff confiscate milk bottles or formula. A lactation management team demonstrates breast feeding procedures. Mothers also receive support on the correct way of breast feeding from hospital staff, volunteers from the Catholic Women's League, consumer groups, and women lawyers. The hospital's policy is no breast milk, no discharge. This encourages mothers to motivate each other to express milk immediately after birth. The hospital has received numerous awards for its breast feeding promotion efforts. UNICEF has designated Fabella Hospital as a model of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. The hospital serves as the National Lactation Management Education Training Center. People from other developing countries have received training in lactation management here. The First Lady of the Philippines, the First Lady of the US, and the Queen of Spain have all visited the hospital. The hospital has also integrated its existing services into a women's health care center.

  20. [Dr. Atkins' dietetic revolution: a critique].

    PubMed

    Hirschel, B

    1977-07-23

    Very fat people die earlier than people of normal weight because hypertension, diabetes and coronary disease are more frequent among the markedly obese. Most obese subjects, however, are only slightly overweight and their mortality is not elevated. Reasons for dieting are more often psychological than somatic. 2. Reducing diets are ineffective because the obese rarely follow them. Total fasting and intestinal bypass may provide better results, but are more dangerous. 3. Atkins' diet eliminates carbohydrates from food without restricting protein and fat intake. Deprived of carbohydrates, the body uses fat for fuel. A small part of metabolized fat is eliminated in the urine as ketone bodies, and this is why such diets are called "ketogenic". They have been known at least since 1863. 4. Caloric loss due to ketonuria does not exceed 100 Cal/day in the non-diabetic. It is maximal during total fasting and cannot be increased by a ketogenic diet. 5. In the short run, such diets produce rapid weight loss due to polyuria. On the other hand, refeeding carbohydrates causes water retention and weight gain. 6. The diet decreases appetite: patients eat less without feeling severe hunger and without measuring their food intake. 7. Orthostatic hypotension, fatigue, and nausea are frequent, despite what Dr. ATKINS claims. 8. The diet increases plasma cholesterol and uric acid. It may be dangerous in diabetes (anorexia, acidosis) and in heart or kidney failure (hypokalemia). 9. The diet, though far from good, is better than the book. ATKINS' theories are at best half-truths, and the results he claims lack credibility. The obese subject's disappointment with traditional reducing diets and the book's hard-sell style account for ATKINS' success.

  1. Interview with Dr Ghassan K Abou-Alfa.

    PubMed

    Abou-Alfa, G K

    2016-11-01

    Ghassan K Abou-Alfa joined the Gastrointestinal Oncology Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College in New York back in 2001. Dr Abou-Alfa specializes in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies. Dr Abou-Alfa received his medical degree from the American University of Beirut, Lebanon, and completed his post-doctoral training at Yale University School of Medicine. His research is dedicated to finding novel therapies and improving the effectiveness of the current therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, while continuing to understand the basic mechanisms of the diseases and its therapy. Dr Abou-Alfa has invested several years in helping develop multi-tyrosine kinases and more immune-modulator therapies. Dr Abou-Alfa has many publications in the field. He led on many occasions international teams of investigators. Dr Abou-Alfa serves as the chair of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Task Force for Hepatobiliary Cancers and the chair of the AIDS Malignancy Consortium (AMC) Non-AIDS Defining Malignancies (NADC) Liver/GI Task Force. Dr Abou-Alfa also co-chairs the hepatobiliary cancers subgroup of the Alliance cooperative group, and is a cadre member of both the gastrointestinal cancers and pharmacogenomics and population pharmacology committees. Dr Abou-Alfa who has lectured worldwide on the subject on gastrointestinal malignancies, is also a strong advocate for raising awareness and support for improving the outcome of patients with this disease, and enhancing oncologic education worldwide.

  2. The Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled Renamed The Hospital for Special Surgery 1940; The War Years 1941–1945

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In 1939, the 75th anniversary program marking the founding of the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled (R & C), the oldest orthopaedic hospital in the nation, was held at the hospital site in New York City. Dr. Philip D. Wilson, Surgeon-in-Chief since 1935, used this event to mark the return of the hospital to its leadership role in the country. When the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled first opened its doors on May 1, 1863, the name of the hospital was not unusual; it described the type of patients treated. In 1940, the Board of Managers with guidance from Dr. Wilson changed the name to the Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). In 1941, with Britain engaged in a European war, Dr. Wilson felt there was a need for the Americans to support the British. He personally organized the American Hospital in Britain, a privately funded voluntary unit, to help care for the wounded. After the United States actually entered World War II in December 1941, HSS quickly organized support at all levels with a significant number of professional and auxiliary staff, eventually enlisting in the military. Even with such staff turnover, the hospital continued to function under Dr. Wilson’s leadership. After the war ended in 1945, Wilson forged ahead to further restore HSS as a leader in musculoskeletal medicine and surgery. PMID:19048348

  3. Pathogenesis of Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Servin, Alain L

    2005-04-01

    Over the last few years, dramatic increases in our knowledge about diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) pathogenesis have taken place. The typical class of DAEC includes E. coli strains harboring AfaE-I, AfaE-II, AfaE-III, AfaE-V, Dr, Dr-II, F1845, and NFA-I adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC); these strains (i) have an identical genetic organization and (ii) allow binding to human decay-accelerating factor (DAF) (Afa/Dr(DAF) subclass) or carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (Afa/Dr(CEA) subclass). The atypical class of DAEC includes two subclasses of strains; the atypical subclass 1 includes E. coli strains that express AfaE-VII, AfaE-VIII, AAF-I, AAF-II, and AAF-III adhesins, which (i) have an identical genetic organization and (ii) do not bind to human DAF, and the atypical subclass 2 includes E. coli strains that harbor Afa/Dr adhesins or others adhesins promoting diffuse adhesion, together with pathogenicity islands such as the LEE pathogenicity island (DA-EPEC). In this review, the focus is on Afa/Dr DAEC strains that have been found to be associated with urinary tract infections and with enteric infection. The review aims to provide a broad overview and update of the virulence aspects of these intriguing pathogens. Epidemiological studies, diagnostic techniques, characteristic molecular features of Afa/Dr operons, and the respective role of Afa/Dr adhesins and invasins in pathogenesis are described. Following the recognition of membrane-bound receptors, including type IV collagen, DAF, CEACAM1, CEA, and CEACAM6, by Afa/Dr adhesins, activation of signal transduction pathways leads to structural and functional injuries at brush border and junctional domains and to proinflammatory responses in polarized intestinal cells. In addition, uropathogenic Afa/Dr DAEC strains, following recognition of beta(1) integrin as a receptor, enter epithelial cells by a zipper-like, raft- and microtubule-dependent mechanism. Finally, the presence of other, unknown virulence factors and the

  4. HLA DR4w4-binding motifs illustrate the biochemical basis of degeneracy and specificity in peptide-DR interactions.

    PubMed

    Sette, A; Sidney, J; Oseroff, C; del Guercio, M F; Southwood, S; Arrhenius, T; Powell, M F; Colón, S M; Gaeta, F C; Grey, H M

    1993-09-15

    In the present study, we describe the definition of a DRB1*0401 (DR4w4)-specific motif. The strategy used entailed a three-step process: 1) screening a large set of unrelated peptide ligands to identify good MHC binders; 2) truncation analysis of several DR4w4 binding peptides of high affinity to identify the crucial core-binding regions; 3) the use of single amino acid substitutions of the DR4w4-binding peptide hemagglutinin (HA) 307-319 to elucidate the specific residues crucial for binding. The DR4w4 motif is characterized by the presence of a hydrophobic or aromatic (F, W, Y, L, I, V, M) anchor residue in position 1, and a second hydroxyl (S, T) or aliphatic (L, I, V, or M) anchor residue in position 6. Furthermore, positive charges (R, K) are not allowed in positions 4, 7, and 9, and negative charges (D, E) are not allowed in position 9. This motif was present in 92% of good (IC50 < or = 100 nM) DR4w4-binding peptides, but less than 25% of the negative (IC50 > 45 microM) binders, indicating that the presence of the motif is necessary, but not sufficient for good DR4w4 binding capacity. The results of the present study are discussed in relation to previous work defining binding motifs and rules for other DR alleles, illustrating how different DR alleles bind variations on a similar structural theme. Finally, using two different peptide ligands [tetanus toxoid 830-843 and HA 307-319] as model systems, it is demonstrated how the fine allelic specificity of the DR binders can be predictably modulated by introducing subtle changes in the primary amino acid sequence.

  5. Systematic screening for diabetic retinopathy (DR) in Hong Kong: prevalence of DR and visual impairment among diabetic population.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jin Xiao; Gangwani, Rita A; McGhee, Sarah M; Chan, Christina K W; Lam, Cindy Lo Kuen; Wong, David Sai Hung

    2016-02-01

    To determine the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR), sight threatening DR (STDR), visual impairment and other eye diseases in a systematic DR screening programme among primary care Chinese patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) in Hong Kong. Screening for DR was provided to all subjects with DM in public primary care using digital fundus photography according to the English national screening programme. STDR was defined as preproliferative DR (R2), proliferative DR (R3) and/or maculopathy (M1). The presence of other eye diseases was noted. Visual impairment was classified as none (visual acuity in the better eye of 6/18 or better), mild (6/18 to >6/60) and severe (6/60 or worse). Of 174 532 subjects screened, most had never been screened before. The prevalence of DR was 39.0% (95% CI 38.8% to 39.2%) and STDR 9.8% (95% CI 9.7% to 9.9%). The most common DR status was R1 (35.7%), followed by M1 (8.6%), R2 (3.0%) and R3 (0.3%). The prevalence of mild and severe visual impairment was 4.2% and 1.3%, respectively. Subjects with STDR had a higher prevalence (9.8%) of visual impairment than those without (3.5%). DR was prevalent in this population and one in 10 had STDR. This suggests the need for systematic screening to ensure timely referral to an ophthalmologist for monitoring and/or treatment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Primary sclerosing cholangitis is associated with extended HLA-DR3 and HLA-DR6 haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Wiencke, K; Karlsen, T H; Boberg, K M; Thorsby, E; Schrumpf, E; Lie, B A; Spurkland, A

    2007-02-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*0301-DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 (DR3) and HLA-DRB1*1301-DQA1*0103-DQB1*0603 (DR6) haplotypes. Recently, the extended HLA class I region has been found to harbour genes that modulate or confer susceptibility independently of the HLA class II genes in several immune-mediated diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of genes in the extended HLA class I region on susceptibility to PSC. Seven microsatellite markers (MIB, D6S265, D6S2222, D6S464, D6S2223, D6S2225 and D6S2239) were analysed together with HLA class II alleles in 219 Norwegian patients with PSC and 282 random controls. To control for associations because of linkage disequilibrium (LD), 142 HLA-DR3 homozygous and 187 DR6-positive controls were included. The unstratified analysis showed significant associations with the alleles MIB*349 [odds ratio (OR) = 3.0, corrected P value (P(c)) = 3 x 10(-12)], D6S265*122 (OR = 1.7, P(c)= 0.004), D6S464*209 (OR = 1.8, P(c)= 0.03) and D6S2225*147 (OR = 2.7, P(c)= 4 x 10(-6)), which were mainly secondary to the DR3 association. When stratifying for DR6, an association with the D6S265*122 allele was still observed (OR = 3.7, P(c)= 0.0004). In the presence of the D6S265*122 allele, the risk to develop PSC conferred by DR6 was increased four times compared with the risk conferred by DR6 alone. In addition, a novel negative association of PSC with DR11 was observed (OR = 0.21, P(c)= 2 x 10(-4)). In conclusion, our study shows that a gene in LD with D6S265 contributes to susceptibility to develop PSC in individuals carrying DR6. Moreover, we found that the PSC-associated DR3 haplotype extends more telomeric than that previously reported. We also report a possible protective effect of DR11 on development of PSC.

  7. NES Live Video Chat: Dr. John C. Mather

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NES welcomed Nobel Prize winner Dr. John C. Mather for a video webchat on May 17, 2011. He spoke about the James Webb Space Telescope and how it gives us a look into the past to see how galaxies ha...

  8. Interview with Dr. Omar Khan, noted global health specialist.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Rob; Khubchandani, Jagdish

    2012-07-01

    Dr. Khan has had a distinguished career in global health. He has served as a faculty member at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health. He is currently a family medicine physician at Christiana Care Health System in Newark, Delaware, and is President of the Delaware Academy of Family Physicians. Dr. Khan has authored more than 55 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters and has conducted research and lead primary care and public health initiatives in numerous countries. Last year, Dr. Khan also coedited a book titled Megacities and Global Health sponsored by the American Public Health Association with Dr. Gregory Pappas, Deputy Health Commissioner for Washington, DC.

  9. Grantee Spotlight: Dr. Kolawole Okuyemi - Improving Cervical Cancer Screening Attitudes

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Kolawole Okuyumi is studying cervical cancer screening attitudes and behaviors of African immigrants and refugees in Minnesota, and introducing “cancer” and “cervix” to their everyday vocabulary.

  10. Dr. Omalu Talks Childhood, Concussions, and CTE | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Bennet Omalu, the famed forensic pathologist who discovered Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), recently spoke at NCI at Frederick about his upbringing as well as the trials he faced while working to educate the NFL about CTE.

  11. 10. Copy by Historic American Buildings Survey of Dr. Collins ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Copy by Historic American Buildings Survey of Dr. Collins Marchall photo Unknown photographer (App. 1880-1890) VIEW FROM NORTHWEST (front) - General John Mason House, Analostan Island or Theodore Roosevelt Island, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. GOES-R with Dr. Kathy Sullivan and Tim Samaras

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This short video features highlights from a live Nationwide broadcast that took place on April 3, 2012, from the studio of NASA Goddard TV. NOAA’s Deputy Administrator and Chief Scientist Dr. Ka...

  13. Properties of Isolated Galaxies in the SDSS DR2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, D. L.; Allam, S. S.; SDSS Collaboration

    2004-05-01

    We analyze the properties of a sample of ˜4,500 isolated galaxies selected from the SDSS DR2 photometric data following well defined criteria (Tucker & Allam 2003). The results are briefly discussed.

  14. 74. ARAII. Dr. William Zinn of combustion engineering company and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    74. ARA-II. Dr. William Zinn of combustion engineering company and others at controls of SL-1. August 8, 1959. Ineel photo no. 59-4109. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. 2. Photocopy of advertisement (from the collection of Dr. Margaret ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of advertisement (from the collection of Dr. Margaret Ballard, Union, West Virginia) late 19th century AERIAL VIEW OF TOWN - Red Sulphur Springs, Route 12, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  16. 1. Photocopy of engraved flyer (from the collection of Dr. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of engraved flyer (from the collection of Dr. Margaret Ballard, Union, West Virginia) H. Bartsch, engraver late 19th century AERIAL VIEW OF TOWN AND ADVERTISING SLOGANS - Red Sulphur Springs, Route 12, Salt Sulphur Springs, Monroe County, WV

  17. D&R Siding Co., LLC Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    D&R Siding Co., LLC (the Company) is located in Shelbyville, Tennessee. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at a property constructed prior to 1978, located in Fayetteville, Tennessee.

  18. Dr Pugh and the myth of the illicit still.

    PubMed

    Paull, J D

    2014-07-01

    In her valuable history of the arrival of the news of etherisation in Australia and its implementation by many doctors and dentists, titled One Grand Chain, the late Dr Gwen Wilson asserted that the dentist and the doctor who pioneered etherisation in Australia, "Belisario and Pugh, …were charged by the authorities with possession of an illicit still." This paper examines the evidence for the truth or otherwise of this assertion, in relation to Dr Pugh.

  19. Dr. Wernher Von Braun at the launch of Apollo 11.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mission officials relax, all smiles, a few moments after the successful launch of the Apollo 11 spacecraft by Saturn V vehicle AS-506. Relieved of the tension of waiting through the countdown are (left to right) Charles W. Matthews, NASA deputy associate administrator for manned space flight; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center; Dr. George E. Meuller, NASA associate administrator for manned spaceflight, and Lt. General Samuel C. Phillips, director of the Apollo program.

  20. A periodontal case report by Dr. S.L. Clemens.

    PubMed

    Maloney, W J

    2010-07-01

    Mark Twain provides a humorous and insightful look into the origins of periodontal therapy and anesthesia in "Happy Memories of the Dental Chair". The main character of this story is Dr. John Riggs, the father of periodontics. Dr. Horace Wells, a pioneer in the field of anesthesia, also appears in the story. Twain presents his autobiographical experiences with dentistry in his literary work in a form that can be seen to be similar to a case report in a professional dental journal.

  1. Portrait of Dr. Von Braun with Walt Disney, 1954.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Marshall Center Director Dr. Wernher Von Braun is pictured with Walt Disney during a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1954. In the 1950s, Dr. Von Braun while working in California on the Saturn project, also worked with Disney studios as a technical director in making three films about Space Exploration for television. Disney's tour of Marshall in 1965 was Von Braun's hope for a renewed public interest in the future of the Space Program at NASA.

  2. Muscle building: a scientific workout for Dr. Elisabeth Barton.

    PubMed

    Bain, Lisa J

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Elisabeth Barton spends her lab time building muscle. But no, you won't find her there lifting weights. This Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology is working out the science of muscle repair. From the repair of muscles in the face to those in the limbs, Dr. Barton's research investigations are exploring the potential to help such diverse problems as temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) and muscular dystrophy.

  3. The research contributions of Dr. Paul Van Deusen

    Treesearch

    Thomas B. Lynch; Francis A. Roesch; John Paul McTague; Jeffrey H. Gove; Gregory A. Reams; Aaron R. Weiskittel

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Paul Van Deusen’s recent passing concluded a rich 30+-year research career dedicated to development and implementation of quantitative methods for forestry and natural resources. Since the early part of his career as a biometrician with the USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station in the 1980s-1990s and continuing with his later employment at NCASI, Dr. Van...

  4. Dr. von Braun and His Family Being Honored

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director Dr. von Braun and his family were honored with a series of events prior to his relocation to Washington, D.C., where he was assigned duties at NASA Headquarters as Deputy Associate Administrator for Plarning. (Left to right) Dr. von Braun, wife Maria, son Peter, and daughter Margrit are shown on the steps of the Madison County Courthouse, Huntsville, Alabama.

  5. Complex origin of the HLA-DR10 haplotype.

    PubMed

    Gongora, R; Figueroa, F; Klein, J

    1997-12-15

    The region of the HLA complex occupied by the DRB genes has undergone many rearrangements in the course of primate evolution. The rearrangements have produced a number of haplotypes differing from one another in the number and composition of the DRB genes. Some of the rearrangements also affected the DRB genes themselves. Selective intron sequencing has revealed the DR10 haplotype to be composed of at least three segments, each of different origin. The haplotype carries three DRB genes (gene fragments): DRB1*10, DRB6, and DRB9. The 5' end of the DRB1*10 gene, from the promoter region to a site in intron 1 approximately 500 bp from the beginning of exon 2, is derived from a DRB1*03-like gene. The segment of the DR10 haplotype encompassing the rest of the DRB1*10 gene and extending to the region between the DRB1 and DRB6 genes is of independent origin; it diverged from other DRB genes (DRB1*01 and DRB1*03) approximately 30 million years ago. Finally, the third segment encompassing the remainder of the DR10 haplotype is derived from a DR1-like haplotype. Since the functional part of the DR10 haplotype is of independent origin, there is little justification for the currently common practice of placing the haplotype together with DR1 in the group of DR1 haplotypes. The rearrangements in the DR haplotypes may constitute one of several mechanisms for increasing diversity at the DRB loci. The region of high instability seems to be flanked by conservatively evolving regions.

  6. Portrait of Dr. Von Braun with Walt Disney, 1954.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Marshall Center Director Dr. Wernher Von Braun is pictured with Walt Disney during a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center in 1954. In the 1950s, Dr. Von Braun while working in California on the Saturn project, also worked with Disney studios as a technical director in making three films about Space Exploration for television. Disney's tour of Marshall in 1965 was Von Braun's hope for a renewed public interest in the future of the Space Program at NASA.

  7. [DR. SHOSHANA SZKOP-FRENKIEL: THE FIRST FEMALE PLASTIC SURGEON IN ISRAEL].

    PubMed

    Shehory-Rubin, Zipora

    2015-11-01

    In the history of Israeli medicine, Dr. Shoshana Szkop-Frenkiel is regarded as the first plastic surgeon in the country and among the founders of the profession of plastic surgery. This article describes the long road she traveled, from her acceptance into medical studies in Vilna--at a time when the entry of any woman to the faculty of medicine was strictly limited and of Jewish women in particular; her emigration to Eretz Israel and her struggles as she underwent training in internal medicine at the "Hadassah" Hospital in Tel-Aviv, when she was denied training as a surgeon; and up to the moment she was accepted by the plastic surgery unit of the Tel Hashomer Hospital and became the first such female practitioner in Israel. Dr. Shoshana Szkop-Frenkiel thus fulfilled a childhood dream to become a surgeon at a time when women were excluded from surgery on the grounds that it called for "male" characteristics. This article is intended to illustrate the character of a female doctor pursuing a career in surgery during the time of the British Mandate, to illuminate her professional travails in Israel, and to emphasize her important contribution in the field.

  8. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  9. DR-current intensity variations during substorm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitseva, S. A.; Drobinina, T. A.; Pudovkin, M. I.

    2003-04-01

    According to the concept dominated by the last time, the intensification of the DR-current takes place during the polar substorm development. In the recent papers Iyemori and Rao claim that geomagnetic storms and substorms are independent processes, and SYM-index (essentially the same as Dst-index) tends to decay after the onset of substorms. In this paper we tried to clear up the cause of this contradiction by studying the connection of ring current development with polar substorms basing on the new data: ASY-, SYM-indices describing asymmetric and symmetric parts of DR-current correspondingly and AL-index as a measure of polar disturbances. It is shown that the hourly-mean SYM- and ASY-indices correlate with AL-index (r=0.63 and 0.69 correspondingly), and the connection between these values becomes worse for strong storms. Besides, at the substorm expansive phase onset, the energy can put mainly to the asymmetric part rather than into symmetric part of DR-current. Empirical Q-index based on solar wind parameters describes the energy input into DR-current; Q correlates rather well with SYM, ASY and AL-indices. Thus the intensifications of polar disturbances and DR-current take place simultaneously and have the same source.At the same time, the proportion in which the solar wind energy is distributed between the DR-current, polar ionosphere and magnetotail depends on the Dst variation phase.

  10. Mobile robot GPS/DR integrated navigation positioning technique research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingkun; Zhang, Yuanliang; Li, Bifu; Chong, Kil To

    2010-01-01

    GPS is widely used for global positioning system. But GPS signal is easily interrupted when it is used alone. DR (dead reckoning) can calculate the position of mobile robots by using direction and speed sensors. However, DR system error can accumulate over time due to the error of electronic compass and odometer sensors. So DR system can't be used separately for a long time. The integrated navigation system combined GPS with DR will effectively integrated advantages of these two systems, higher positioning precision and reliability. In this paper Kalman filter model for GPS/DR integrated navigation system is set up to filter the GPS and DR data. And then the outputs of Kalman filter are inputted to a BP neural network for training. BP neural network is employed to predict next sampling time GPS output and a new Kalman filter based data fusion method is proposed to do the navigation information fusion with encoders and compass system. Simulation is done to validate the proposed fusion method. The simulation result shows the potential of this fusion method for outside used mobile robot navigation. Finally experiments are done to validate the proposed fusion method.

  11. Mobile robot GPS/DR integrated navigation positioning technique research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingkun; Zhang, Yuanliang; Li, Bifu; Chong, Kil To

    2009-12-01

    GPS is widely used for global positioning system. But GPS signal is easily interrupted when it is used alone. DR (dead reckoning) can calculate the position of mobile robots by using direction and speed sensors. However, DR system error can accumulate over time due to the error of electronic compass and odometer sensors. So DR system can't be used separately for a long time. The integrated navigation system combined GPS with DR will effectively integrated advantages of these two systems, higher positioning precision and reliability. In this paper Kalman filter model for GPS/DR integrated navigation system is set up to filter the GPS and DR data. And then the outputs of Kalman filter are inputted to a BP neural network for training. BP neural network is employed to predict next sampling time GPS output and a new Kalman filter based data fusion method is proposed to do the navigation information fusion with encoders and compass system. Simulation is done to validate the proposed fusion method. The simulation result shows the potential of this fusion method for outside used mobile robot navigation. Finally experiments are done to validate the proposed fusion method.

  12. Biochemical characteristic of biofilm of uropathogenic Escherichia coli Dr(+) strains.

    PubMed

    Zalewska-Piątek, Beata; Wilkanowicz, Sabina; Bruździak, Piotr; Piątek, Rafał; Kur, Józef

    2013-07-19

    Urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli are very common health problem in the developed countries. The virulence of the uropathogenic E. coli Dr(+) IH11128 is determined by Dr fimbriae, which are homopolymeric structures composed of DraE subunits with the DraD protein capping the fiber. In this study, we have analyzed the structural and biochemical properties of biofilms developed by E. coli strains expressing Dr fimbriae with or without the DraD tip subunit and the surface-exposed DraD protein. We have also demonstrated that these E. coli strains form biofilms on an abiotic surface in a nutrient-dependent fashion. We present evidence that Dr fimbriae are necessary during the first stage of bacterial interaction with the abiotic surface. In addition, we reveal that the DraD alone is also sufficient for the initial surface attachment at an even higher level than Dr fimbriae and that chloramphenicol is able to reduce the normal attachment of the analyzed E. coli. The action of chloramphenicol also shows that protein synthesis is required for the early events of biofilm formation. Additionally, we have identified reduced exopolysaccharide coverage in E. coli that express only Dr fimbrial polyadhesins at the cell surface with or without the DraD capping subunit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Class I Methanol Emission Around DR 21 (OH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polushkin, S. V.; Val'Tts, I. E.

    2010-06-01

    Results of new observations of the vicinity of DR 21 (OH) conducted on the 20-m Onsala radio telescope are presented. The goal was to search for associations between molecular hydrogen emission tracing shock waves and class I methanol maser emission. Observations at 44 and 36 GHz have shown that an extensive region of faint methanol maser emission elongated North-South is probably present in the vicinity of DR 21(OH). The linear size of this structure may be a factor of ten larger than the central region in DR 21(OH) that emits at 44 GHz. Three maser emission peaks are clearly visible in the northern (DR 21N), central (DR 21(OH)), and southern (vicinity of DR 21 West) parts of this structure. Many other structures are also embedded in this region, including the protostellar disk ERO 3 previously detected at 6.7 GHz. Maser components of these objects are formed with velocities from -5 to-2 km/s, with a velocity gradient from -5 in the North to -2 km/s in the South. The spatial resolution of the map is not high enough to distinguish fine structures at 44 GHz associated with spots and jets emitting in molecular hydrogen.

  14. [Sexuality education on the Internet : From Dr. Sommer to Dr. Google].

    PubMed

    Döring, Nicola

    2017-07-24

    Female and male adolescents in Germany are increasingly using the Internet to find information about sexuality and sexual health. This review paper summarizes what we know about the status quo of online sexuality education in Germany.Based on a systematic literature review including 40 papers from international, peer-reviewed journals spanning 2010-2017, this paper first describes different aspects of the sexuality-related online search behavior of adolescents: its prevalence, predictors, topics and contexts. One main finding is the fact that adolescents use a computer or smartphone to type their sexuality-related questions into the search engine Google or the search engine of the video platform YouTube.Based on 54 online searches, this paper subsequently presents the kind of sexuality-related online content adolescents find if they ask "Dr. Google" for sexual advice; a collection of 1236 authentic sexuality-related questions of adolescents was used for this analysis. It turned out that online sexuality education offered by leading professional organizations like the BZgA ("Bundeszentrale für gesundheitliche Aufklärung") or pro familia was nearly invisible, while numerous other providers of online sex education consistently appeared in the top Google search results. Among them were the "Dr. Sommer" team of the youth magazine Bravo; online healthcare and advice portals; online forums; the online encyclopedia Wikipedia and, above all, sex education channels on YouTube. In this paper, the latter are presented in more detail for the first time.The third part of the paper addresses the quality of online sexual education over four main areas of quality evaluation. The presentation of the status quo ends with some recommendations both for future research and for sexuality education in practice.

  15. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-DR-1, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-035

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Carlson

    2005-09-22

    Radiological characterization, decommissioning and demolition of the 132-DR-1 site, 1608-DR Effluent Pumping Station was performed in 1987. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

  16. Specific combinations of HLA-DR2 and DR3 class II haplotypes contribute graded risk for disease susceptibility and autoantibodies in human SLE.

    PubMed

    Graham, Robert R; Ortmann, Ward; Rodine, Peter; Espe, Karl; Langefeld, Carl; Lange, Ethan; Williams, Adrienne; Beck, Stephanie; Kyogoku, Chieko; Moser, Kathy; Gaffney, Patrick; Gregersen, Peter K; Criswell, Lindsey A; Harley, John B; Behrens, Timothy W

    2007-08-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) Class II antigen presentation alleles DR and DQ are associated with susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the production of lupus-related autoantibodies. Here, we explore the effect of different combinations of Class II risk haplotypes in a large, multi-center collection of 780 SLE families. Haplotypes bearing the DRB1*1501/DQB1*0602 (DR2) and DRB1*0301/DQB1*0201 (DR3) alleles were present in nearly two-thirds of SLE cases and were significantly associated with disease susceptibility in both family-based and case-control study designs. DR3-containing haplotypes conferred higher risk for disease than DR2, and individual homozygous for DR3 or compound heterozygous for DR3 and DR2 showed the highest risk profile. DR2 haplotypes were also found to be associated with antibodies to the nuclear antigen Sm, and, as previously observed, DR3 genotypes were associated with Ro and La autoantibodies. Interestingly, SLE cases and unaffected family members who were DR2/DR3 compound heterozygotes showed particularly strong risk of developing antibodies to Ro, and were enriched for La and Sm. These data provide convincing evidence that particular combinations of HLA Class II DR2 and DR3 haplotypes are key determinants of autoantibody production and disease susceptibility in human SLE.

  17. Myelin basic protein gene is associated with MS in DR4- and DR5-positive Italians and Russians.

    PubMed

    Guerini, F R; Ferrante, P; Losciale, L; Caputo, D; Lombardi, M L; Pirozzi, G; Luongo, V; Sudomoina, M A; Andreewski, T V; Alekseenkov, A D; Boiko, A N; Gusev, E I; Favorova, O O

    2003-08-26

    The myelin basic protein (MBP) gene may confer genetic susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS). The association of MS with alleles of the (TGGA)n variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) 5' to the MBP gene is the subject of conflicting reports. To study possible MS association with VNTR alleles of MBP gene in ethnic Italians and ethnic Russians. Two hundred sixty-nine unrelated patients with definite MS and 385 unrelated healthy control subjects from Italy and Russia were genotyped for the MBP VNTR region and for the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II DRB1 gene. The phenotype, allele, and genotype frequencies for two groups of MBP alleles were determined. Patients and control subjects were stratified according to HLA-DRB1 phenotypes. The distribution of MBP alleles and genotypes in the two ethnic groups, including both MS patients and control subjects, was very similar. When MS patients and healthy control subjects were stratified according to HLA-DRB1 phenotypes, a significant association of MS with MBP alleles was found only in the DR4- and DR5-positive subgroups. A significant association with MBP alleles was also observed in the nonstratified groups, owing mainly to the contribution of the DR4- and DR5-positive individuals. Polymorphism of the MBP or another gene in its vicinity appears to contribute to the etiology of MS for the subgroups of DR4- and DR5-positive Italians and Russians.

  18. Bias in parental transmission of the HLA-DR3 allele in Sardinian multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Marrosu, M G; Sardu, C; Cocco, E; Costa, G; Murru, M R; Mancosu, C; Murru, R; Lai, M; Contu, P

    2004-09-28

    The authors analyzed the female: male (F:M) ratio according to the HLA-DRB1-DQB1 genotype in a cohort of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients from Sardinia, where the disease is associated with DR3 and DR4. In the whole cohort of 1,097 patients, F:M ratio was 2.24; however, it was 2.88 in DR3/DR3 and 2.52 in DR3/DRX (X#DR3 and DR4) individuals. Parental transmission of DR3 and DR4, assessed in a set of 565 case-parent triads, showed evidence of paternal inheritance of DR3 in affected women, thus explaining the excess of females in the DR3 category.

  19. [Tumors of the heart. 16 years experience in Hospital de Cardiología, del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI in Mexico City].

    PubMed

    Alfaro-Gómez, Felipe; Careaga-Reyna, Guillermo; Valero-Elizondo, Guillermo; Argüero-Sánchez, Rubén

    2003-01-01

    We present incidence of primary cardiac tumors diagnosed from 1987 at the Hospital de Cardiología, Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI, in Mexico City. We described primary cardiac tumors based on histopathologic diagnosis, frequency, localization, implantation, implantation site, and recurrence. A total of 51 patient files were selected retrospectively. Patients underwent cardiothoracic surgery with primary cardiac tumor established by clinical and echocardiographic parameters with histopathologic corroboration between 1987 and 2002. Statistical analysis of obtained results show frequency, central tendency and standard deviation. Primary cardiac tumors were benign in 84% and malignant in 16%. Among benign tumors, myxoma was present in 74%, (38 cases) followed by papillary fibroelastoma in 6% (three cases); finally, there were two cases (4%) of fibroma. Malignant tumors belonged to two hemangioendothelioma cases (4%) and there were 6 cases of sarcoma (12%). Main affected gender was female in 61%. All cases were taken to surgical resection. There was recurrence four times (8%) belonging to three myxomas and one sarcoma. Average presentation age was 43 +/- 17 years. Cardiac primary tumors represent 0.16% of surgeries taking place at our service. Concordance was found with previous studies regarding frequency, gender, age, localization, and implant site of cardiac primary tumors with greater recurrence in our series.

  20. [Multiorgan transplantation program at the Hospital de Especialidades 71, Unidad Médica de Alta Especialidad 134, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Torreon].

    PubMed

    Juárez-de-la-Cruz, Federico Javier; Barrios-Reyes, Carmen Yolanda; Cano-López-de-nava, Laura; Adalid-Sainz, Carmen

    2011-09-01

    This is the experience in a program of multiorgan transplant at the Hospital de Especialidades 71 in Torreon, Coahuila. It is a historical overview of the beginning and development of the transplant program. Describes the logistics of the study of patients for transplantation and the test to be carried out in the laboratory of histocompatibility. We analyzed the records of the patients were transplanted in the period from January 1987 until June 2011. We found 2538 in total, of which 1940 were renal (76.4%). The 53% were male and 47% female. Average age of 37 +/- 15 years. The 82% was adult population and 18% pediatric. The most frequent cause of CRF was the chronic glomerulonephritis and 15% of the patients are diabetic. 73.5% were living donor and 26.5% were deceased donor. 7% of recipients of living donor have domino transplants. The incidence of acute rejection was 7.5%. 15% of the patients had infections and 60% was urinary. The immunosuppressive scheme most widely used is tacrolimus + mycophenolate mofetil + prednisone. The overall survival of the patient was 100, 90 and 87% to the first, third and fifth year after the transplant. The overall survival of the graft was 98, 87 and 83% in the first, third and fifth years post-transplant. It has been developed a multiple organ transplant program in Torreon that currently is one of the most important in Mexico with similar results to those obtained at the international level.

  1. [Hospitals and surgeons: Madrid 1940].

    PubMed

    de Quevedo, Francisco Vázquez

    2007-01-01

    The history of the hospitals and general surgeons that best represent the centres in Madrid are here in reviewed, comprising the period between 1940 and the closure of the Hospital Clinico (1957) as well as the Hospital General (General Hospital) (1967), both in Atocha. Other hospitals which are reviewed and highlighted are: the H. de la Princesa (the Princess Hospital), the H. del Nifio Jesus (Hospital of the Child Jesus), the H. Militar (Military Hospital) and the Cruz Roja (Red Cross). Data is provided on the permanent surgeons in the following centres: H. General: J. Goyanes, J. Die, J. de la Villa, T. Rodriguez, E. Diaz, G. Bueno e H. Huerta; H. Clinico: L. de la Peña, L. Cardenal, L. Olivares, R. Argüelles, J. Estella y M. F. Zumel; H. Militar: M. G. Ulla, M. Bastos, M. G. Durán, J. S. Galindo, y A. G. Durán; Hospital de la Cruz Roja: V. M. Noguera, L. Serrada, F. Luque y L. L. Durán; H. de la Princesa: P. Cifuentes, P. G. Duarte, L. Estella y R. Aiguabella; H. del Niño Jesús: J. Garrido Lestache; H. Clinico, last time, Atocha: F. M. Lagos, R. Vara y A. de la Fuente.

  2. Immunoregulatory T cells, LFA-3 and HLA-DR in autoimmune thyroid diseases.

    PubMed

    Nada, Aml Mohamed; Hammouda, Maha

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the changes in the expression of T-cell activation markers, namely CD4+ CD25+ and CD8+ in patients with AITD, namely Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis as well as colloid nodular goitre. HLA-DR, LFA-3, and peripheral total lymphocytic count are also measured. We compared the expression of CD4, CD25, and CD8 surface markers in peripheral blood lymphocyte in Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis as autoimmune thyroid diseases, as well as colloid goitre in comparison with healthy controls. Also, LFA-3 and HLA-DR were measured in the same groups using three-color flow cytometry. Total lymphocytic count in peripheral blood, thyroid function tests, antithyroid antibodies were also included in the laboratory investigations. The total number of participants was 65. All were recruited from endocrine clinics in a tertiary care hospital in the southern region of Saudi Arabia. All participants underwent history taking, clinical examination, laboratory workup, and radiological investigations. Neck ultrasound, technecium pertechnetate(ψψ) thyroid uptake, and fine-needle aspiration and cytology (FNAC) of the thyroid were done when indicated. The study was approved by the Hospital Research Isthics Committee and informed consents were obtained from all participants before enrollment in the study. In comparison with thecontrol group, activation markers CD4, CD25, and CD8 were lower in the autoimmune thyroid diseases. Lymphocyte function antigen-3 (CD58) and total lymphocytic count were higher in the AIT diseases whereas HLA-DR was lower than that in the control group. The CD4/CD8 ratio was lower in the AITD compared with the healthy euthyroid subjects. No difference was found between patients with colloid nodular goitre and the healthy control in any of the study variables except for LFA-3 which was significantly higher in the colloid goitre group. Our findings indicate downregulation of CD4+ CD25+ Treg as well as CD8+ T

  3. Immunoregulatory T cells, LFA-3 and HLA-DR in autoimmune thyroid diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nada, Aml Mohamed; Hammouda, Maha

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the changes in the expression of T-cell activation markers, namely CD4+ CD25+ and CD8+ in patients with AITD, namely Graves’ disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis as well as colloid nodular goitre. HLA-DR, LFA-3, and peripheral total lymphocytic count are also measured. Materials and Methods: We compared the expression of CD4, CD25, and CD8 surface markers in peripheral blood lymphocyte in Graves’ disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis as autoimmune thyroid diseases, as well as colloid goitre in comparison with healthy controls. Also, LFA-3 and HLA-DR were measured in the same groups using three-color flow cytometry. Total lymphocytic count in peripheral blood, thyroid function tests, antithyroid antibodies were also included in the laboratory investigations. The total number of participants was 65. All were recruited from endocrine clinics in a tertiary care hospital in the southern region of Saudi Arabia. All participants underwent history taking, clinical examination, laboratory workup, and radiological investigations. Neck ultrasound, technecium pertechnetateψψ thyroid uptake, and fine-needle aspiration and cytology (FNAC) of the thyroid were done when indicated. The study was approved by the Hospital Research Isthics Committee and informed consents were obtained from all participants before enrollment in the study. Results: In comparison with thecontrol group, activation markers CD4, CD25, and CD8 were lower in the autoimmune thyroid diseases. Lymphocyte function antigen-3 (CD58) and total lymphocytic count were higher in the AIT diseases whereas HLA-DR was lower than that in the control group. The CD4/CD8 ratio was lower in the AITD compared with the healthy euthyroid subjects. No difference was found between patients with colloid nodular goitre and the healthy control in any of the study variables except for LFA-3 which was significantly higher in the colloid goitre group. Conclusion: Our findings indicate

  4. Overall properties of the Gaia DR1 reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N.; Zhu, Z.; Liu, J.-C.; Ding, C.-Y.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: The first Gaia data release (Gaia DR1) provides 2191 ICRF2 sources with their positions in the auxiliary quasar solution and five astrometric parameters - positions, parallaxes, and proper motions - for stars in common between the Tycho-2 catalogue and Gaia in the joint Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution (TGAS). We aim to analyze the overall properties of Gaia DR1 reference frame. Methods: We compare quasar positions of the auxiliary quasar solution with ICRF2 sources using different samples and evaluate the influence on the Gaia DR1 reference frame owing to the Galactic aberration effect over the J2000.0-J2015.0 period. Then we estimate the global rotation between TGAS with Tycho-2 proper motion systems to investigate the property of the Gaia DR1 reference frame. Finally, the Galactic kinematics analysis using the K-M giant proper motions is performed to understand the property of Gaia DR1 reference frame. Results: The positional comparison between the auxiliary quasar solution and ICRF2 shows negligible orientation and validates the declination bias of -0.1mas in Gaia quasar positions with respect to ICRF2. Galactic aberration effect is thought to cause an offset 0.01mas of the Z axis direction of Gaia DR1 reference frame. The global rotation between TGAS and Tycho-2 proper motion systems, obtained by different samples, shows a much smaller value than the claimed value 0.24mas yr-1. For the Galactic kinematics analysis of the TGAS K-M giants, we find possible non-zero Galactic rotation components beyond the classical Oort constants: the rigid part ωYG = -0.38±0.15mas yr-1 and the differential part ω^primeYG = -0.29±0.19mas yr-1 around the YG axis of Galactic coordinates, which indicates possible residual rotation in Gaia DR1 reference frame or problems in the current Galactic kinematical model. Conclusions: The Gaia DR1 reference frame is well aligned to ICRF2, and the possible influence of the Galactic aberration effect should be taken into consideration

  5. Type 1 Diabetes in the Spanish Population: additional factors to Class II HLA-DR3 and -DR4

    PubMed Central

    Urcelay, Elena; Santiago, José L; de la Calle, Hermenegildo; Martínez, Alfonso; Méndez, Julián; Ibarra, José M; Maluenda, Carlos; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; de la Concha, Emilio G

    2005-01-01

    Background The Major Histocompatibility Complex is the main genetic contributor to susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D); genome-wide scans have consistently mapped increased predisposition to this region. The highest disease risk has been associated with HLA-DR3 and HLA-DR4. In particular, the DR3-positive ancestral haplotype 18.2 was reported as highly diabetogenic. We aimed to corroborate whether this haplotype increases the susceptibility conferred by the DQ2-DR3 alleles in a Mediterranean population. We also searched for additional susceptibility factors to the classic DQ2-DR3 and DQ8-DR4. Results Genetic MHC markers were analysed in a case-control study with 302 T1D patients and 529 ethnically matched controls. DR3-TNFa1b5 carrier rate was significantly higher in DR3-positive heterozygous T1D patients than in DR3-positive heterozygous controls (p = 0.0019; odds ratio OR [95% confidence interval CI] = 2.26 [1.3–3.93]). This data was confirmed analysing the allelic frequency, which includes the information corresponding to the DR3-homozygous individuals (p = 0.001; OR = 2.09) and by using the Arlequin software to check the DR3-positive haplotypes (p = 0.004;OR = 1.93). The present results provide strong evidence of a second susceptibility region in the ancestral haplotype 18.2 in the Spanish population. Moreover, we searched for T1D susceptibility factors in addition to the MHC classical ones, within the DR2-DQ6/DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 negative population. Several genetic markers in both MHC class II (DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501 [p = 0.007;OR = 2.81], DQA1*0201-DQB1*0202 [p = 0.03; OR = 2.35]) and III (TNFa2b1 [p = 0.01 OR = 2.74], BAT-2*2 [p = 0.004; OR = 3.19]) were found. These different alleles associated with T1D were not independent and we observed linkage disequilibrium among them leading us to describe two new risk haplotypes (DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501-TNFa2b1 and DQA1*0201-DQB1*0202- BAT-2*2). Finally, we studied a T1D susceptibility/protection marker located in

  6. Type 1 diabetes in the Spanish population: additional factors to class II HLA-DR3 and -DR4.

    PubMed

    Urcelay, Elena; Santiago, José L; de la Calle, Hermenegildo; Martínez, Alfonso; Méndez, Julián; Ibarra, José M; Maluenda, Carlos; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; de la Concha, Emilio G

    2005-04-20

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex is the main genetic contributor to susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D); genome-wide scans have consistently mapped increased predisposition to this region. The highest disease risk has been associated with HLA-DR3 and HLA-DR4. In particular, the DR3-positive ancestral haplotype 18.2 was reported as highly diabetogenic. We aimed to corroborate whether this haplotype increases the susceptibility conferred by the DQ2-DR3 alleles in a Mediterranean population. We also searched for additional susceptibility factors to the classic DQ2-DR3 and DQ8-DR4. Genetic MHC markers were analysed in a case-control study with 302 T1D patients and 529 ethnically matched controls. DR3-TNFa1b5 carrier rate was significantly higher in DR3-positive heterozygous T1D patients than in DR3-positive heterozygous controls (p = 0.0019; odds ratio OR [95% confidence interval CI] = 2.26 [1.3-3.93]). This data was confirmed analysing the allelic frequency, which includes the information corresponding to the DR3-homozygous individuals (p = 0.001; OR = 2.09) and by using the Arlequin software to check the DR3-positive haplotypes (p = 0.004;OR = 1.93). The present results provide strong evidence of a second susceptibility region in the ancestral haplotype 18.2 in the Spanish population. Moreover, we searched for T1D susceptibility factors in addition to the MHC classical ones, within the DR2-DQ6/DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 negative population. Several genetic markers in both MHC class II (DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501 [p = 0.007;OR = 2.81], DQA1*0201-DQB1*0202 [p = 0.03; OR = 2.35]) and III (TNFa2b1 [p = 0.01 OR = 2.74], BAT-2*2 [p = 0.004; OR = 3.19]) were found. These different alleles associated with T1D were not independent and we observed linkage disequilibrium among them leading us to describe two new risk haplotypes (DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501-TNFa2b1 and DQA1*0201-DQB1*0202- BAT-2*2). Finally, we studied a T1D susceptibility/protection marker located in extended class I, D6S2223

  7. [Double-balloon enteroscopy: experience in the Hospital de Especialidades del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI IMSS, Mexico City].

    PubMed

    Blancas Valencia, Juan Manuel; Paz Flores, Víctor Manuel; Yokota, Alejo Miyamoto; Huerta Fosado, Blanca Rosa; Meneses, Luis Fernando; Piccini Larco, Julio Roberto; Mejía Cuan, Luis Alvaro

    2005-01-01

    The methods used for the study of the small bowel are not ideal. Double-balloon enteroscopy is a new alternative with therapeutic potential. Evaluate the utility, efficacy and safety of double-balloon enteroscopy in Mexico. Adult patients seen in the Hospital de Especialidades Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI, Mexico City who were being studied for: chronic diarrhea, obscure gastrointestinal hemorrhage, weight-loss and chronic anemia were included in the study. Anterograde (oral) and retrograde (anal) approaches were used and study time, findings and complications were evaluated. Thirty-one enteroscopies were performed, 15 were anterograde, 8 retrograde and 8 were performed via both routes, in 23 patients studied between February and October, 2004; 10 of them were women and 13 men with ages ranging from 25 to 80 years. Fourteen patients were sedated and 9 patients were anesthetized. Study time varied form 55 to 90 minutes. With the anterograde route the ileum was reached in 56.6% of cases, 39.1% the jejunum and only in one patient (4.3%) the whole intestine was explored. With the retrograde route in 62.5% of cases the jejunum was explored and 37.5% the ileum. Four patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and 1 patient with chronic anemia had vascular ecstasies, and in 40% of patients there was no identifiable cause. In 2 patients with intestinal stenosis biopsies revealed intestinal lymphoma in one and ischemic injury in another one. The adverse effects were mild and transitoru. Double-balloon enteroscopy is a safe diagnostic and therapeutic method that is useful in cases of obscure hemorrhage, chronic anemia; small bowel pathology was found in 64.7% of cases.

  8. DR WHO: a workshop for house officer preparation.

    PubMed

    Cave, Judith; Wallace, Deirdre; Baillie, Glenda; Klingenberg, Michael; Phillips, Catherine; Oliver, Harriet; Rowles, Katherine; Dunkley, Lisa; Sturrock, Alison; Dacre, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Newly qualified doctors should be competent in advanced life support (ALS) and critical care. The Resuscitation Council has published a course about ALS for undergraduate medical students (the intermediate life support (ILS) course). However, there is no undergraduate-level course on assessing and treating critically ill patients, despite the fact that postgraduate courses on this topic are extremely popular. We have developed a new course called Direct Response Workshop for House Officer Preparation (DR WHO), which teaches both ALS and critical care at an undergraduate level. We taught the Resuscitation Council ILS course to our 2003-4 cohort of final year medical students (n = 350), and the new course (DR WHO) to our 2004-5 cohort (n = 338). Students filled in feedback forms immediately after the courses, and a subset repeated the feedback forms 4 months after they had started work as house officers. Course evaluation: Student and house officer feedback was positive. The DR WHO cohort was more confident in caring for critically ill patients (18/26 (69%) were confident after ILS, and 40/45 (89%) were confident after DR WHO (chi2 = 4.3; df = 1; p = 0.06)). Both cohorts were competent in ALS, each with a mean score of 18.6/20 in a finals level practical examination on this topic. The DR WHO course is popular with the students and practical to run. The course needs to be re-evaluated to determine the long-term competency of graduates.

  9. Hospitals may be bound by terms added in supplier's acceptance of an offer.

    PubMed

    Decker, R

    1992-03-01

    A hospital materials manager reports that a supplier is attempting to hold the hospital to new terms that the supplier added in the acceptance of an offer to buy. The offer to buy was made in the hospital's purchase order. In this dialogue, Dr. Decker develops the law relating to such a transaction.

  10. HLA-DR2 Frequency Increase in Severe Aplastic Anemia Patients is Mainly Attributed to the Prevalence of DR15 Subtype.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, Sergey I; Popova, Tamara I; Lyschov, Anton A; Togo, Alexander V; Abdulkadyrov, Kudrat M; Blinov, Michail N

    1997-01-01

    The association between severe aplastic anemia (AA) and DR2 antigen seems to be well established. However, since discrimination between two DR2-associated splits, namely DR15 and DR16, rarely was performed, it remains unclear whether one or both of these subvariants are responsible for AA susceptibility. In this study, we have analyzed the HLA-DR allelic distribution in a group of 37 AA patients of slavic origin from North-Western Russia. The experimental design included PCR-based amplification of DRB-specific sequences, followed by reverse dot-blot hybridization of the biotinylated PCR-product with the set of sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. HLA-DRB alleles were identified by non-radioactive enzymatic reaction, then standard serological specificities of HLA-DR antigen were estimated according to the WHO nomenclature. Whereas DR15 subtype occurred more often in the patients (23.0% vs. 13.3%, p< 0.05), DR16 split did not show the same tendency. The results, show the overall predominance of HLA-DR2 specificity (DR15+DR16) did not reach statistical significance (24.4% vs.17.5%, p<0.2). Thus, we conclude that repeatedly reported DR2 frequency increase in AA patients is mainly attributed to the prevalence of DR15 subtype.

  11. Evolution of the Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery Service at Texas Children's Hospital: 1954-2015.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Charles D

    2015-01-01

    Heart surgery at Texas Children's Hospital can trace its origins to the beginning of pediatric and congenital heart surgery. Pioneers in the field--Dr. Denton Cooley and Dr. Dan McNamara--started the program in 1954 at a new pediatric hospital in Houston. Over the past 60 years, what is now Texas Children's Heart Center has grown become one of the leading pediatric heart institutions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Study of photoluminescence properties of thin films DR1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Ulya, Naily

    2015-09-01

    Fabrication of thin films DR1 have been carried out by the EFA-PDF (Electric Field-Assisted Physical Vapor Deposition) method to obtain films with parallel dipole arrangement. Molecular deposition process is performed by applying an electric field that is placed between the substrate ITO (Indium Tin Oxide) and copper mesh. The resulting films were characterized by using a spectrofluorometer. Analysis of the emission spectrum, indicate that DR1 molecules in the film oriented perpendicular to the substrate and arranged in parallel order (H-aggregate). As an effect, the peak of the emission spectrum appears stronger along with the increase of electric field strength.

  13. Study of photoluminescence properties of thin films DR1

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Ulya, Naily

    2015-09-30

    Fabrication of thin films DR1 have been carried out by the EFA-PDF (Electric Field-Assisted Physical Vapor Deposition) method to obtain films with parallel dipole arrangement. Molecular deposition process is performed by applying an electric field that is placed between the substrate ITO (Indium Tin Oxide) and copper mesh. The resulting films were characterized by using a spectrofluorometer. Analysis of the emission spectrum, indicate that DR1 molecules in the film oriented perpendicular to the substrate and arranged in parallel order (H-aggregate). As an effect, the peak of the emission spectrum appears stronger along with the increase of electric field strength.

  14. STATISTICAL STUDY OF 2XMMi-DR3/SDSS-DR8 CROSS-CORRELATION SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanxia; Zhou Xinlin; Zhao Yongheng; Wu Xuebing

    2013-02-01

    Cross-correlating the XMM-Newton 2XMMi-DR3 catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8, we obtain one of the largest X-ray/optical catalogs and explore the distribution of various classes of X-ray emitters in the multidimensional photometric parameter space. Quasars and galaxies occupy different zones while stars scatter in them. However, X-ray active stars have a certain distributing rule according to spectral types. The earlier the type of stars, the stronger its X-ray emitting. X-ray active stars have a similar distribution to most stars in the g - r versus r - i diagram. Based on the identified samples with SDSS spectral classification, a random forest algorithm for automatic classification is performed. The result shows that the classification accuracy of quasars and galaxies adds up to more than 93.0% while that of X-ray emitting stars only amounts to 45.3%. In other words, it is easy to separate quasars and galaxies, but it is difficult to discriminate X-ray active stars from quasars and galaxies. If we want to improve the accuracy of automatic classification, it is necessary to increase the number of X-ray emitting stars, since the majority of X-ray emitting sources are quasars and galaxies. The results obtained here will be used for the optical spectral survey performed by the Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also named the Guo Shou Jing Telescope), which is a Chinese national scientific research facility operated by the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. Statistical Study of 2XMMi-DR3/SDSS-DR8 Cross-correlation Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhou, Xin-Lin; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2013-02-01

    Cross-correlating the XMM-Newton 2XMMi-DR3 catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8, we obtain one of the largest X-ray/optical catalogs and explore the distribution of various classes of X-ray emitters in the multidimensional photometric parameter space. Quasars and galaxies occupy different zones while stars scatter in them. However, X-ray active stars have a certain distributing rule according to spectral types. The earlier the type of stars, the stronger its X-ray emitting. X-ray active stars have a similar distribution to most stars in the g - r versus r - i diagram. Based on the identified samples with SDSS spectral classification, a random forest algorithm for automatic classification is performed. The result shows that the classification accuracy of quasars and galaxies adds up to more than 93.0% while that of X-ray emitting stars only amounts to 45.3%. In other words, it is easy to separate quasars and galaxies, but it is difficult to discriminate X-ray active stars from quasars and galaxies. If we want to improve the accuracy of automatic classification, it is necessary to increase the number of X-ray emitting stars, since the majority of X-ray emitting sources are quasars and galaxies. The results obtained here will be used for the optical spectral survey performed by the Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, also named the Guo Shou Jing Telescope), which is a Chinese national scientific research facility operated by the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. Understanding hospitality.

    PubMed

    Patten, C S

    1994-03-01

    Bridging patient/"customer" issues and business aspects can be aided through developing a specific nursing basis for hospitality. The ancient practice of hospitality has evolved into three distinct levels: public, personal and therapeutic. Understanding these levels is helpful in integrating various dimensions of guest relations programs in hospitals into a more comprehensive vision. Hospitality issues must become a greater part of today's nursing management.

  17. Genomic evaluation of HLA-DR3+ haplotypes associated with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeraj; Kaur, Gurvinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Kanga, Uma; Mehra, Narinder K

    2013-04-01

    We have defined three sets of HLA-DR3(+) haplotypes that provide maximum risk of type 1 disease development in Indians: (1) a diverse array of B8-DR3 haplotypes, (2) A33-B58-DR3 haplotype, and (3) A2-B50-DR3 occurring most predominantly in this population. Further analysis has revealed extensive diversity in B8-DR3 haplotypes, particularly at the HLA-A locus, in contrast to the single fixed HLA-A1-B8-DR3 haplotype (generally referred to as AH8.1) reported in Caucasians. However, the classical AH8.1 haplotype was rare and differed from the Caucasian counterpart at multiple loci. In our study, HLA-A26-B8-DR3 (AH8.2) was the most common B8-DR3 haplotype constituting >50% of the total B8-DR3 haplotypes. Further, A2-B8-DR3 contributed the maximum risk (RR = 48.7) of type 1 diabetes, followed by A2-B50-DR3 (RR = 9.4), A33-B58-DR3 (RR = 6.6), A24-B8-DR3 (RR = 4.5), and A26-B8-DR3 (RR = 4.2). Despite several differences, the disease-associated haplotypes in Indian and Caucasian populations share a frozen DR3-DQ2 block, suggesting a common ancestor from which multiple haplotypes evolved independently. © 2013 The New York Academy of Sciences.

  18. The development of a specialty: an interview with Dr. Mark C. Rogers, a pioneering pediatric intensivist.

    PubMed

    Mai, Christine L; Firth, Paul G; Ahmed, Zulfiqar; Rodriguez, Samuel; Yaster, Myron

    2014-09-01

    Dr. Mark C. Rogers (1942-), Professor of Anesthesiology, Critical Care Medicine, and Pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University, was recruited by the Department of Pediatrics at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1977 to become the first director of its pediatric intensive care unit. After the dean of the medical school appointed him to chair the Department of Anesthesia in 1979, Rogers changed the course and culture of the department. He renamed it the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, and developed a long-term strategy of excellence in clinical care, research, and education. However, throughout this period, he never lost his connection to pediatric intensive care. He has made numerous contributions to pediatric critical care medicine through research and his authoritative textbook, Rogers' Textbook of Pediatric Intensive Care. He established a training programme that has produced a plethora of leaders, helped develop the pediatric critical care board examination, and initiated the first World Congress of Pediatric Intensive Care. Based on a series of interviews with Dr. Rogers, this article reviews his influential career and the impact he made on developing pediatric critical care as a specialty. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Dr. David Sawyer, Mickey Mouse and Dr. David Brown attend a ceremony at Ronald McNair Middle School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. David Sawyer (left), Superintendent of the Brevard County School District, Mickey Mouse, and Dr. David Brown, a NASA astronaut, attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair held in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. During the tribute, Walt Disney World presented a portrait of McNair to the school, which had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut. McNair was one of a crew of seven who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

  20. Dr. David Sawyer, Mickey Mouse and Dr. David Brown attend a ceremony at Ronald McNair Middle School

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. David Sawyer (left), Superintendent of the Brevard County School District, Mickey Mouse, and Dr. David Brown, a NASA astronaut, attend a tribute to NASA astronaut Ronald McNair held in the gymnasium of Ronald McNair Magnet School in Cocoa, Fla. During the tribute, Walt Disney World presented a portrait of McNair to the school, which had previously been renamed for the fallen astronaut. McNair was one of a crew of seven who lost their lives during an accident following launch of the Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986.

  1. Group Achievement Award: The SCUBA team; George Darwin Lecturer: Dr Neil Gehrels; Harold Jeffreys Lecturer: Dr Emma Bunce; Honorary Fellow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    The Group Achievement Award goes to the SCUBA team of W K Gear, W S Holland, E I Robson, C R Cunningham, J F Lightfoot, T Jenness, R J Ivison, J A Stevens, P A R Ade, M J Griffin, W D Duncan, J A Murphy and D A Naylor. The 2009 George Darwin Lecturer is Dr Neil Gehrels, Chief of the Astroparticle Physics Laboratory at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The 2009 Harold Jeffreys Lecturer is Dr Emma Bunce of the University of Leicester.

  2. Dr. Seuss's Sound Words: Playing with Phonics and Spelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Traci

    Boom! Br-r-ring! Cluck! Moo!--exciting sounds are everywhere. Whether visiting online sites that play sounds or taking a "sound hike," ask your students to notice the sounds they hear, then write their own book, using sound words, based on Dr. Seuss's "Mr. Brown Can MOO! Can You?" During the three 45-minute sessions, grade K-2…

  3. Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats and Numeracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Anne

    2006-01-01

    In education, the term "metacognition" describes thinking about thinking. Within mathematics, the term "metacomputation" describes thinking about computational methods and tools. This article shows how Dr. Edward de Bono's Six Thinking Hats can be used to demonstrate metacognition and metacomputation in the primary classroom. The article suggests…

  4. The Effects of Dr. Oz on Health Behaviors and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouch, Elizabeth; Dickes, Lori A.; Davis, Amanda; Zarandy, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Consumption of social media has quickly evolved into a primary source of health information for many consumers. This seems to be particularly true for individuals seeking to modify chronic health conditions like weight loss, obesity, and obesity-related diseases. Purpose: This study explores whether watching Dr. Oz weight loss episodes…

  5. 6. View of DR 3 antenna typical backstay concrete stanchion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View of DR 3 antenna typical back-stay concrete stanchion showing embedded anchors and structural steel leg with pin attachment. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. 28. View of data test area for DR data take ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. View of data test area for DR data take off set operators panel and cabinet at second floor of transmitter building no. 102 in MIP area. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. Oxygen and Metastasis: A Conversation with Dr. Nick Restifo

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Nick Restifo, a senior investigator in NCI’s Center for Cancer Research, discusses his recently published study finding that Oxygen, a molecule necessary for life, paradoxically aids cancer metastasis to the lung by impairing cancer-killing immune cells.

  8. Trial by Newspaper: The Strange Case of Dr. Karl Muck.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Sheldon S.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the case of Dr. Karl Muck, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra who was accused of espionage in 1917. Suggests that the espionage charge was a fiction created by newspapers, beginning with "The Providence Journal." Concludes that Muck admitted to being a spy rather than reveal the name of the woman with whom he had an…

  9. The No-Nonsense Education of Dr. Lloyd Hackley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Issues in Higher Education, 1996

    1996-01-01

    In an interview, Lloyd Hackney, Chairman of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), responds to questions about black higher education and the role of HBCUs, including HBCUs' public image, the effects of Dr. Hackney's own educational experience on his views, the Clinton Administration's actions,…

  10. Dr. John Mather and the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Nobel Laureate and James Webb Space Telescope project scientist Dr. John Mather takes a selfie with the telescope. May 4, 2016 was a rare day for JWST, as it briefly faced the cleanroom observation window. The telescope was eventually rotated face-down in prep for the installation of the flight instruments. Credit: Meredith Gibb

  11. MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE PIPE TRUSS BRIDGE (NO LONGER EXTANT) SPANNING DEEP CREEK, SHACKELFORD COUNTY, TEXAS, CONSTRUCTED BY FLINN-MOYER COMPANY IN 1896. BARREL VIEW. - Clear Fork of Brazos River Suspension Bridge, Spanning Clear Fork of Brazos River at County Route 179, Albany, Shackelford County, TX

  12. MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE PIPE TRUSS BRIDGE (NO LONGER EXTANT) SPANNING DEEP CREEK, SHACKELFORD COUNTY, TEXAS, CONSTRUCTED BY FLINN-MOYER COMPANY IN 1896. 3/4 VIEW FROM ABOVE. - Clear Fork of Brazos River Suspension Bridge, Spanning Clear Fork of Brazos River at County Route 179, Albany, Shackelford County, TX

  13. MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE PIPE TRUSS BRIDGE (NO LONGER EXTANT) SPANNING DEEP CREEK, SHACKELFORD COUNTY, TEXAS, CONSTRUCTED BY FLINN-MOYER COMPANY IN 1896. ELEVATION VIEW. - Clear Fork of Brazos River Suspension Bridge, Spanning Clear Fork of Brazos River at County Route 179, Albany, Shackelford County, TX

  14. MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MODEL FROM COLLECTION OF DR. TIMOTHY L. FLINN, OF HOWE PIPE TRUSS BRIDGE (NO LONGER EXTANT) SPANNING DEEP CREEK, SHACKELFORD COUNTY, TEXAS, CONSTRUCTED BY FLINN-MOYER COMPANY IN 1896. 3/4 VIEW. - Clear Fork of Brazos River Suspension Bridge, Spanning Clear Fork of Brazos River at County Route 179, Albany, Shackelford County, TX

  15. Bullying Among Teenage Girls: An Interview with Dr. Harriet Mosatche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prevention Researcher, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Harriet Mosatche is an advice columnist on a web site for teen girls, as well as the Senior Director of Research and Programs at the Girl Scouts of the USA. Because of these dual roles, she has a unique perspective on the bullying issue. In this interview she answers a number of questions about bullying among teenage girls, including how boys…

  16. Dr Skateboard's Action Science: Teaching Physics in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, William H.

    2009-01-01

    In order to create student interest and promote new connections to the understanding of fundamental physics concepts, there is a need for new approaches and methods that are both contemporary and relevant. Dr Skateboard's Action Science, a curriculum supplement comprising video instruction and classroom activities, is an example that focuses on…

  17. Professor Oberth and Dr. von Braun at ARS Banquet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun holds the coveted Hermarn Oberth award presented to him by Professor Oberth during the banquet hosted by the Alabama Section of the American Rocket Society (ARS), on October 19, 1961. The Oberth award was given for outstanding technical contributions to the field of astronautics or for the promotion and advancement of astronautical sciences.

  18. Focus on Fitness: Q&A with Dr. Greene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Dr. Greene answers the following question in this brief article focusing on fitness: Everyone knows that children need plenty of exercise to stay healthy--But what does "fitness" really involve for young children? Following this discussion, the topics presented include: snack of the month; nutrition fact; and activities, "Move to the Music" and…

  19. The Effects of Dr. Oz on Health Behaviors and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouch, Elizabeth; Dickes, Lori A.; Davis, Amanda; Zarandy, Joy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Consumption of social media has quickly evolved into a primary source of health information for many consumers. This seems to be particularly true for individuals seeking to modify chronic health conditions like weight loss, obesity, and obesity-related diseases. Purpose: This study explores whether watching Dr. Oz weight loss episodes…

  20. Improving College Students English Learning with Dr. Eye Android Mid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Ju Yin; Che, Pei-Chun

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates college students' English language learning through use of Dr. Eye Android handheld mobile Internet device (MID). Compared to related studies, students' English learning using MIDs has not been evaluated and fully understood in the field of higher education. Quantitatively, the researchers used TOEIC pretest and posttest to…

  1. 39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. View of checkout indicator computer console for DR beams, TR chains, and special checkout target control located in CSMR in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  2. Dr. Chad E. Finn, 2013 Wilder Medal Recipient

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dr. Chad Finn took over the leadership of the USDA-ARS small fruit breeding program in Corvallis, Oregon in 1993 after three years working as an extension horticulturist in the Department of Horticulture at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Since taking over this program he has developed what is...

  3. 7. View of DR 3 antenna typical front stay concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View of DR 3 antenna typical front stay concrete showing embedment anchors, foundation steel base plate, vertical member with small diameter turnbuckles, antenna assembly in background, and story board for scale. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. 2. View of southerly DR 1 antenna looking north 25 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of southerly DR 1 antenna looking north 25 degrees west and and showing radar scanner building no. 105 east face through antenna. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  5. 3. View of middle DR 2 antenna looking north 30 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of middle DR 2 antenna looking north 30 degrees west and showing radar scanner building no. 105 east face through antenna. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. Dr. Kenneth Sudduth: A giant pioneering precision agriculture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dr. Ken Sudduth is nationally and internationally recognized for his precision agriculture research and leadership, especially in the areas of soil sensing and assessment of spatial variability for site-specific management. His many noteworthy contributions include novel techniques and methodology f...

  7. A Living Example of Lifelong Learning: Prof. Dr. Necmettin Tozlu

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gürbüz, Fatih; Töman, Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to propound the views, thoughts and suggestions of Prof. Dr. Necmettin Tozlu related to lifelong learning. He is an academician and a doyen in education and philosophy fields who teaches in many universities of our country training students in the four corners of the country and is awarded by the Writers Union of…

  8. Dr. von Braun With a Model of a Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    Dr. von Braun stands beside a model of the upper stage (Earth-returnable stage) of the three-stage launch vehicle built for the series of the motion picture productions of space flight produced by Walt Disney in the mid-1950's.

  9. Working To Make a Difference: Interview with Dr. James Alatis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Marilyn

    2002-01-01

    This interview with Dr. James Alatis, dean emeritus in the School of Languages and Linguistics of Georgetown University, covers among other things his influence in the founding of the Teacher of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) organization, how the organization has changed since its founding, his current goals for TESOL, his…

  10. Trial by Newspaper: The Strange Case of Dr. Karl Muck.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Sheldon S.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the case of Dr. Karl Muck, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra who was accused of espionage in 1917. Suggests that the espionage charge was a fiction created by newspapers, beginning with "The Providence Journal." Concludes that Muck admitted to being a spy rather than reveal the name of the woman with whom he had an…

  11. Keeping the Dream Alive. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassells, Linda; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents activities for teaching elementary students about Dr. Martin Luther King's life, the civil rights movement, and King's accomplishments. Suggestions include shoebox dioramas, acronym games, oral histories, multicultural awareness activities, pledge cards, community service projects, special commemorative ceremonies, and a book of dreams.…

  12. A Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Curriculum: Playing the Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemens, Sydney Gurewitz

    1988-01-01

    Discusses curriculum for young children centered around the beliefs and teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. His works are interpreted in a human rights context in which children find their voice in the peaceable resolution of everyday conflicts. Describes the Child of the Day program. (Author/RWB)

  13. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Washington State Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia, WA. Div. of Instructional Programs and Services.

    The Washington State Resource Guide on Martin Luther King, Jr., supplies a wide variety of materials for use with all grade levels in classroom and assembly presentations in public schools. The goal is for every child enrolled in Washington State schools to learn about Dr. King during the days of January 15 to January 17. Resolutions supporting an…

  14. Dr. Martin Luther King: A Unit for Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Kelli

    1986-01-01

    Presents a unit consisting of 4 lessons which focus on Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s childhood, his adult life and family, his civil rights work, and the national holiday which commemorates his birthday. Each lesson features specific objectives, learning activities, and instructional guidelines for the teacher. (TRS)

  15. Dr Skateboard's Action Science: Teaching Physics in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, William H.

    2009-01-01

    In order to create student interest and promote new connections to the understanding of fundamental physics concepts, there is a need for new approaches and methods that are both contemporary and relevant. Dr Skateboard's Action Science, a curriculum supplement comprising video instruction and classroom activities, is an example that focuses on…

  16. Dr. von Braun With a Model of a Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    Dr. von Braun stands beside a model of the upper stage (Earth-returnable stage) of the three-stage launch vehicle built for the series of the motion picture productions of space flight produced by Walt Disney in the mid-1950's.

  17. The life and legacy of Dr. Lee Baldwin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper outlines the life and legacy of the late Dr. Ransom L. Baldwin, V. The purpose was to highlight the impact his teaching and research had on the international energy and protein metabolism communities at their fourth international conference. The paper will be presented at the outset of ...

  18. Another Use for Dr. Seuss: Reading for Social Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Janice J.; Baker, Pamela Hudson

    2012-01-01

    Time is limited. Teachers often struggle to address the diverse needs of learners in their classrooms, especially when faced with academic and social skills concerns. Finding effective ways to teach social skills in the context of academic instruction makes sense. Books by Dr. Seuss provide a variety of high-interest stories that can be used to…

  19. Gifted Kids, Social Issues, and the Works of Dr. Seuss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granada, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Gifted students often share a sense of justice and a concern for the welfare of mankind and the planet. This humanitarian feeling may sometimes be overlooked, given today's academic focus. The author has taken an in-depth look at the works of Theodor Geisel, popularly known as Dr. Seuss, and moved beyond his whimsical illustrations and wordplay to…

  20. 18. View from DR 2 antenna looking south 45 degrees ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View from DR 2 antenna looking south 45 degrees west to backside transmitter building 101 and in left foreground showing site well system building. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  1. Focus on Fitness: Q&A with Dr. Greene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Dr. Greene answers the following question in this brief article focusing on fitness: Everyone knows that children need plenty of exercise to stay healthy--But what does "fitness" really involve for young children? Following this discussion, the topics presented include: snack of the month; nutrition fact; and activities, "Move to the Music" and…

  2. Dynamic Star Formation in the Massive DR21 Filament

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Motte, F.; Simon, R.; Hennebelle, P.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-08-25

    The formation of massive stars is a highly complex process in which it is unclear whether the star-forming gas is in global gravitational collapse or an equilibrium state supported by turbulence and/or magnetic fields. By studying one of the most massive and dense star-forming regions in the Galaxy at a distance of less than 3 kpc, i.e. the filament containing the well-known sources DR21 and DR21(OH), we attempt to obtain observational evidence to help us to discriminate between these two views. We use molecular line data from our {sup 13}CO 1 {yields} 0, CS 2 {yields} 1, and N{sub 2}H{sup +} 1 {yields} 0 survey of the Cygnus X region obtained with the FCRAO and CO, CS, HCO{sup +}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO data obtained with the IRAM 30m telescope. We observe a complex velocity field and velocity dispersion in the DR21 filament in which regions of the highest column-density, i.e., dense cores, have a lower velocity dispersion than the surrounding gas and velocity gradients that are not (only) due to rotation. Infall signatures in optically thick line profiles of HCO{sup +} and {sup 12}CO are observed along and across the whole DR21 filament. By modelling the observed spectra, we obtain a typical infall speed of {approx}0.6 km s{sup -1} and mass accretion rates of the order of a few 10{sup -3} M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1} for the two main clumps constituting the filament. These massive clumps (4900 and 3300 M{sub {circle_dot}} at densities of around 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} within 1 pc diameter) are both gravitationally contracting. The more massive of the clumps, DR21(OH), is connected to a sub-filament, apparently 'falling' onto the clump. This filament runs parallel to the magnetic field. Conclusions. All observed kinematic features in the DR21 filament (velocity field, velocity dispersion, and infall), its filamentary morphology, and the existence of (a) sub-filament(s) can be explained if the DR21 filament was formed by the convergence of flows on large

  3. [The practice of medicine at the end of the Second Empire: according to a book, appearing in 1865, by Dr. Camille Delvaille, physician in Bayonne].

    PubMed

    Marx, P

    1999-01-01

    Dr Camille Delvaille (1835-1904) was a physician in Bayonne. He wrote many books about scientific problems and social medicine; he was one of the first to suggest medical control at school. In a book, written in 1865, he studied everyday practice in France. He complained against the "Officiers de Sante" who exercised medicine mainly in the countryside but were not doctors and had followed very short medical studies. Dr Delvaille deplored that it meant two kinds of cares: doctors for top people and Officiers de Sante for poor patients. In fact, the end of the Officiat de Sante occured only in 1892. Dr Delvaille studied also some problems related to medical demography; he purposed for our country a law cutting down foreign practice in France. Then, he put forward nomination of Professors or hospital's physicians through an examination instead of routine cooptation. Some of his minds are ahead and were applied later.

  4. DR with a DSLR: Digital Radiography with a Digital Single-Lens Reflex camera

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Helen; Durko, Heather L.; Moore, Stephen K.; Moore, Jared; Miller, Brian W.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Pradhan, Sunil; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2010-01-01

    An inexpensive, portable digital radiography (DR) detector system for use in remote regions has been built and evaluated. The system utilizes a large-format digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera to capture the image from a standard fluorescent screen. The large sensor area allows relatively small demagnification factors and hence minimizes the light loss. The system has been used for initial phantom tests in urban hospitals and Himalayan clinics in Nepal, and it has been evaluated in the laboratory at the University of Arizona by additional phantom studies. Typical phantom images are presented in this paper, and a simplified discussion of the detective quantum efficiency of the detector is given. PMID:21516238

  5. [Dr. Joseph Chazanowicz (1844-1919) and the National Library in Jerusalem].

    PubMed

    Ohry, Avi

    2014-01-01

    Dr. Joseph Chazanowicz (1844-1919), was a Russian physician, and founder of the Jewish National Library in JerusaLem. After completing his studies at the Jewish school and at the gymnasium of Grodno, Chazanowicz went to Königsberg, Germany to study medicine and finished his studies in 1872. Returning to Russia, he began to practice at Byelostok's Jewish hospital. Chazanowicz founded the Hovevei Ziyyon ["Lovers of Zion"] society and also the Linat Ha-Zedek ("Hospice for the Poor")--caring for the poor. In 1890 he visited Palestine and conceived the idea of founding a library in Jerusalem, together with the B'nai B'rith organization. In 1896 he sent his large collection of books, amounting to nearly 10,000 volumes, to Jerusalem as the beginning of the Abarbanel library. The enlargement of this library and the collection of funds to erect a special building for it became the life-work of Chazanowicz.

  6. Adapting the neurology area of the Gustavo Fricke Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankelen, A.; González, S.; Aguirre, L.

    2007-11-01

    Within the framework of the subject Clinical Engineering taught at Hospital Dr. Gustavo Fricke of Viña del Mar Chile, we were assigned to undertake a detailed study on the quality of the electrical power main supply of the Neurology Department, on account of reported malfunctioning of some equipment used in this unit. The study results indicated that the problems occurred only in a device for auditory evoked potentials device and, contrary to what was expected, the problem was unrelated to the quality of the electrical main supply. It was also found that the cause for the problem was electromagnetic interference (EMI) emitted from the system's very own components. To solve the problem, we built a Faraday Cage for the signal-processing unit and increased the separating distance among the various system components. This approach enhanced system performance and significantly improved the recorded signals of patients. The solution adopted from this experience was suggested to others health care centers of our country that had been experiencing similar difficulties with the same type of medical equipment.

  7. Six new DR52-associated DRB1 alleles, three of DR8, two of DR11, and one of DR6, reflect a variety of mechanisms which generate polymorphism in the MHC.

    PubMed

    Smith, A G; Nelson, J L; Regen, L; Guthrie, L A; Donadi, E; Mickelson, E M; Hansen, J A

    1996-08-01

    We have sequenced DNA from six new DR52-associated DRB1 alleles initially detected by PCR/SSOP analysis. Three DR8 associated alleles differed from previously known alleles by single nucleotide substitutions. DRB1*0807 and DRB1*0811 both vary from DRB1*08021 at codon 57 resulting in two different amino acids at this residue. DRB1*0807 was identified in samples of Brazilian origin while *0811 was identified among samples from the Tlingit Native American population of Southeast Alaska. DRB1*0814, identified in a family of Chinese origin, differed from DRB1*08032 at codon 12 at both the nucleotide and the amino acid level. In addition, two alleles of DR11, DRB1*1113 and *1119, were each detected in Caucasian individuals. DRB1*1113 differs from other DR11 alleles at codons 37, 67, 70 and 74, while DRB1*1119 differs from *1101 by a single nucleotide substitution at codon 67. Finally, DRB1*1418 was detected in a sample from an Asian or Pacific Islander and shares sequences with several other DR52-associated DRB1 alleles. These six DRB1 alleles appear to have been generated by either gene conversion events, DRB1*1113 and *1418, or by point mutations, DRB1*0814, *0807, *0811 and *1119, although the single nucleotide substitutions found in the latter three alleles are also present in at least one other DRB1 allele and, therefore, could have been the product of gene conversions.

  8. Dr Louis T. Wright and the NAACP: pioneers in hospital racial integration.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, P P

    2000-01-01

    Louis Tompkins Wright, the son of a man born into slavery, was an outstanding African American surgeon who devoted his life to the racial integration of health care in the United States. Despite the fact that both his father and stepfather were physicians, despite his innate intellectual gifts and disciplined character, Wright experienced discrimination throughout his life and career. This experience led him to fight for the rights of African Americans, both health care professionals and patients. In addition to making numerous contributions in the fields of surgery and infectious disease, Wright held leadership positions in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People for more than 20 years, leaving a legacy of equity for African Americans in medical education and in health care. PMID:10846505

  9. 244 Nasal Poliposis and Allergic Disease. Dr. Salvador Allende Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Ada Castillo

    2012-01-01

    Background The edematous irritation of the corium of the pituitary mucosa wakes it suffers a degeneration that causes what is known as nasal polyposis, hypertrophy of the nasal mucosa as a result of a chronic inflamatory process. It is said that its formation is due to infectious processes, vascular changes as local disorders of the immunity of the nasal mucosa. However many concide in including the allergic factors as the cause of the nasal polypos and they give a special interest to the constitutional factor inside the genesis of them. The investigation had as objectives to know the relationship that there is between the nasal polyposis and the allergic diseases, as well as to study some parameters of the humoral and celular immunity in our patients. Methods 15 patients diagnosed wiht nasal polyposis were taken from the otorhinolaryngologists and they were sent to the allergic department to be evaluated. Patient's charts of all of thems were made and they were indicated some studies such as eosinophil global count, nasal exudate,sample radiographic study of paranasal sinus, serology, hemogram, glycemia and minimal clotting test, study of the humoral immunity and making determination of IgE, IgA, IgG, IgM. The celular immunity was also studied by making a determination of active and expontaneous Roseta test. And a life evaluation was made too by means of the hypersensitivity retard tests. Results High figures of elevated IgE were obtained in a 67 % of the patients studied. A control group was made for the Igs determination and the Roseta test. No significant difference was found in the Roseta test. Conclusions The elevation of the IgE in the patients studied makes us infer that there is an evident relation ship between these 2 pathologies. There is no evidence. That shows that there is an alteration of the celular immunity in the sample of the patients with nasal polyposis that were studied.

  10. Dr Louis T. Wright and the NAACP: pioneers in hospital racial integration.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, P P

    2000-06-01

    Louis Tompkins Wright, the son of a man born into slavery, was an outstanding African American surgeon who devoted his life to the racial integration of health care in the United States. Despite the fact that both his father and stepfather were physicians, despite his innate intellectual gifts and disciplined character, Wright experienced discrimination throughout his life and career. This experience led him to fight for the rights of African Americans, both health care professionals and patients. In addition to making numerous contributions in the fields of surgery and infectious disease, Wright held leadership positions in the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People for more than 20 years, leaving a legacy of equity for African Americans in medical education and in health care.

  11. [Extreme maternal morbidity in the Hospital General Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso, Oaxaca Health Services].

    PubMed

    Calvo-Aguilar, Omar; Morales-García, Victor Edilberto; Fabián-Fabián, Jaime

    2010-12-01

    Obstetric Morbidity Extreme (OME) is a promising addition to the investigation of maternal deaths and is used for the evaluation and improvement of maternal health services is defined as a severe obstetric complication that threatens the life of the pregnant woman and requires urgent medical intervention to prevent death of the mother. To identify association between diseases and obstetric morbidity Extreme. Transversal review analytical records. We searched for codes related to conditions that could cause extreme obstetric morbidity and the indirect causes that might cause it. The prevalence of OME 21 per 1000 newborns, diseases with greater association were eclampsia, liver failure and preeclampsia yielded the highest OR and statistical significance, the association of OME derived from surgery despite having a high prevalence in the analysis showed no association, in the same way if other variables showed association but had no significance and confidence intervals are below the unit that is the case of renal failure, metabolic failure and blood transfusion. The OME is caused by group entities specific disease (FLASOG) in most cases such as preeclampsia, eclampsia and obstetric hemorrhage.

  12. Determining the variability in O(2) saturation measurements in devices of the "Dr. Guillermo Rawson" hospital.

    PubMed

    Munoz Zapata, F J; Pulenta, L; Bustamante, P A; Avila Perona, E M

    2015-08-01

    Measurement of oxygen saturation is a noninvasive monitoring method that has had a major impact on patient care in both emergency and ambulatory situations. It is an important parameter in neonatology field, especially in newborn preterm births, and in anesthetic and surgical procedures.

  13. [Hospitals' evolution through the ages].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    The predecessor institutions of modern hospitals--Byzantine nosocómeion, European hospitale and Islamic maristan--were dissimilar both in their patients and their aims. The first charitable organizations in West Europe (Rome) and in the East (Cesarea in Cappadocia) were rather hospices. After the collapse of the Western Roman Empire (476 A.D.), some monastic centers were prepared to provide medical assistance to religious and secular patients. Since the XI and XII Centuries in all of Christian Europe the charitable institutions, designated as hospitale, multiplied. Among the Italian ones, the Roman Santo Spirito (Holy Ghost) Hospital, built in the 1201-1204 period, reached a preeminet position. This one soon became the most important of the entire Christendom (archihospital), with a lot of affiliated hospitals in Europe and later in America. The first American hospital, Saint Nicholas Hospital, opened on December 29, 1503 in Santo Domingo, obtained in 1541 its affiliation to the Santo Spirito archihospital. Regarding continental America, the first health centers were established in Mexico: the Immaculate Conception Hospital and the Saint Lazarus Hospital, both established by Hernán Cortés. For its part, clinical teaching was systematized at the Saint Francis Hospital in Padua and by there moved to Leyden. In Mexico, the chair of medical clinics or practical medicine was established in 1806 at the Saint Andrew Hospital. During the XX century, Dr. Ignacio Chávez was the driving force behind the creation of the modern Mexican Health Institutes. These ones are dedicated to the treatment of poor patients, as well as to medical teaching and research.

  14. HLA-DR1 and rheumatoid arthritis in Israeli Jews: sequencing reveals that DRB1*0102 is the predominant HLA-DR1 subtype.

    PubMed

    de Vries, N; Rønningen, K S; Tilanus, M G; Bouwens-Rombouts, A; Segal, R; Egeland, T; Thorsby, E; van de Putte, L B; Brautbar, C

    1993-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with the HLA-DR4 cellular subtypes Dw4 and Dw14 in Caucasians, with Dw15 in Japanese, and possibly with HLA-DR1 in Israeli Jews. Sequencing studies in Caucasians have shown that these molecules share a common amino acid sequence in the third hypervariable region of the DR molecule (AA 67-74: LLEQRRAA or LLEQKRAA), suggesting that this sequence is primarily associated with RA. An important argument in favor of this shared-epitope hypothesis has been the reported association between DR1 and RA in Israeli Jews. However, a later report did not confirm this association, and cellular typing showed that Israeli DR1 consists of three or more subtypes, suggesting that new subtypes might be present. Since no sequencing data on Israeli HLA-DR1 genes have been reported, we sequenced the first domain (AA 10-91) of the DRB1 gene in 12 DR1-positive Israeli RA patients, 5 healthy controls and a homozygous typing cell (HTC), defining the major Jewish cellular HLA-DR1 subtype. DRB1*0102 (DR1 Dw20) was found in 8 RA patients, 3 controls and the HTC "LVA". DRB1*0101 (DR1 Dw1) was found in 4 RA patients and 2 controls. No other DR1 subtypes were encountered. In all 20 DR1 haplotypes, the DRB1*0101 or 0102 allele was associated with DQA1*0101 and DQB1*0501, being identical to the Caucasian DR1 haplotypes. Thus, at the sequence level, we found no basis for the reported extensive cellular heterogeneity of DR1 in the Israeli population.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Functional polymorphism of each of the two HLA-DR beta chain loci demonstrated with antigen-specific DR3- and DRw52-restricted T cell clones

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    HLA-DR3- and HLA-DRw52-associated functional polymorphism was investigated with selected tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific T cell clones. We have shown earlier that HLA-DR antigens are encoded by two distinct loci, DR beta I and DR beta III. The alloantigenic determinant(s) defined by the serological HLA-DR3 specificity map to the former, while the supratypic HLA-DRw52 determinants map to DR beta III. Furthermore, we have recently recognized by DNA sequencing three alleles of HLA- DRw52 at locus DR beta III, referred to as 52 a, b, and c. Our objective was to correlate the pattern of T cell restriction with the gene products of individual DR beta chain loci and with the three newly described alleles of locus DR beta III. Among the selected T cell clones, 5 reacted exclusively when TT was presented by HLA-DR3+ APCs (TT-DR3-APC). In contrast, two T cell clones were stimulated by TT- DRw52-APC. More specifically, these two T cell clones (Clones 10 and 16) were stimulated by different subsets of TT-DRw52-APC. Clone 16 responded to some DR3 and TT-DRw6-APC, while clone 10 was stimulated by other TT-DR3 and TT-DRw6, and all TT-DR5-APC. This same pattern of DRw52 restriction was found in panel, as well as in family studies. Because this suggested a correlation with the pattern of DRw52 polymorphism observed earlier by DNA sequencing and oligonucleotide hybridization, the APC used in these experiments were typed for the 52 a, b, and c alleles of locus DR beta III by allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. This distribution overlapped exactly with the stimulation pattern defined by the T cell clones. Clone 16 responded to TT-52a-APC, clone 10 to TT-52b-APC, and both clones to a TT-52c-APC. The response of the T cell clones was inhibited differentially by mAbs to DR. Raising TT concentration, or increasing HLA-class II expression with INF-gamma both affected the magnitude of response of the TT- specific clones but did not modify their specificities. These results demonstrate that

  16. Type 1 diabetes risk for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR3 haplotypes depends on genotypic context: association of DPB1 and HLA class I loci among DR3- and DR4-matched Italian patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Noble, Janelle A; Martin, Adelle; Valdes, Ana M; Lane, Julie A; Galgani, Andrea; Petrone, Antonio; Lorini, Renata; Pozzilli, Paolo; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Erlich, Henry A

    2008-01-01

    Patients with high-risk human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR-DQ genotypes for type 1 diabetes (T1D) were compared with HLA-matched controls to evaluate T1D risk for other HLA loci, including HLA-A, -B, -Cw, and DPB1. Patients (n = 133) with high-risk genotypes (DR3/DR3, DR3/DR4, DR4/DR4) were selected from the Lazio (Rome) region of Italy. Screening of more than 9000 patients from the Lazio region and northern Italy yielded 162 controls with high-T1D-risk haplotypes. Although the overall distributions did not differ significantly, allele frequency differences were discovered between the controls from Lazio and controls from northern Italy for some alleles previously determined to affect T1D risk, such as A*3002, DPB1*0301, and DPB1*0402. Therefore, Lazio patient data were compared both with the Lazio subset of controls (n = 53) and with the entire group of controls for association analyses. Significant allele frequency differences between patients and DR-DQ-matched controls existed for specific alleles at all loci. Data for the DR3/DR3 subset of patients and controls demonstrated an increase of Cw*0702 in patients. Compared with controls, reduced patient frequencies were seen for several alleles, including A*0101, B*0801, and Cw*0701, all on the highly conserved, extended DR3 haplotype known as 8.1 in DR3/DR3, but not DR3/DR4, subgroup. DPB1*0101, often reported on 8.1 haplotypes, was also less frequent in DR3/DR3 patients than controls. Analysis of family-based data from the HBDI repository was consistent with the observed results from the Italian patients, indicating the presence of a T1D-protective locus at or near A*0101 and a second T1D-protective locus at or near DPB1*0101. These data indicate that T1D risk conferred by the 8.1 haplotype is genotype dependent.

  17. Sampling From the Proteome to the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR (HLA-DR) Ligandome Proceeds Via High Specificity.

    PubMed

    Mommen, Geert P M; Marino, Fabio; Meiring, Hugo D; Poelen, Martien C M; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A M; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R; van Els, Cécile A C M

    2016-04-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the complex nature of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II ligandome is of utmost importance to understand the basis for CD4(+)T cell mediated immunity and tolerance. Here, we implemented important improvements in the analysis of the repertoire of HLA-DR-presented peptides, using hybrid mass spectrometry-based peptide fragmentation techniques on a ligandome sample isolated from matured human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The reported data set constitutes nearly 14 thousand unique high-confident peptides,i.e.the largest single inventory of human DC derived HLA-DR ligands to date. From a technical viewpoint the most prominent finding is that no single peptide fragmentation technique could elucidate the majority of HLA-DR ligands, because of the wide range of physical chemical properties displayed by the HLA-DR ligandome. Our in-depth profiling allowed us to reveal a strikingly poor correlation between the source proteins identified in the HLA class II ligandome and the DC cellular proteome. Important selective sieving from the sampled proteome to the ligandome was evidenced by specificity in the sequences of the core regions both at their N- and C- termini, hence not only reflecting binding motifs but also dominant protease activity associated to the endolysosomal compartments. Moreover, we demonstrate that the HLA-DR ligandome reflects a surface representation of cell-compartments specific for biological events linked to the maturation of monocytes into antigen presenting cells. Our results present new perspectives into the complex nature of the HLA class II system and will aid future immunological studies in characterizing the full breadth of potential CD4(+)T cell epitopes relevant in health and disease.

  18. Sampling From the Proteome to the Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR (HLA-DR) Ligandome Proceeds Via High Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Mommen, Geert P. M.; Marino, Fabio; Meiring, Hugo D.; Poelen, Martien C. M.; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A. M.; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J. R.; van Els, Cécile A. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the complex nature of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II ligandome is of utmost importance to understand the basis for CD4+ T cell mediated immunity and tolerance. Here, we implemented important improvements in the analysis of the repertoire of HLA-DR-presented peptides, using hybrid mass spectrometry-based peptide fragmentation techniques on a ligandome sample isolated from matured human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The reported data set constitutes nearly 14 thousand unique high-confident peptides, i.e. the largest single inventory of human DC derived HLA-DR ligands to date. From a technical viewpoint the most prominent finding is that no single peptide fragmentation technique could elucidate the majority of HLA-DR ligands, because of the wide range of physical chemical properties displayed by the HLA-DR ligandome. Our in-depth profiling allowed us to reveal a strikingly poor correlation between the source proteins identified in the HLA class II ligandome and the DC cellular proteome. Important selective sieving from the sampled proteome to the ligandome was evidenced by specificity in the sequences of the core regions both at their N- and C- termini, hence not only reflecting binding motifs but also dominant protease activity associated to the endolysosomal compartments. Moreover, we demonstrate that the HLA-DR ligandome reflects a surface representation of cell-compartments specific for biological events linked to the maturation of monocytes into antigen presenting cells. Our results present new perspectives into the complex nature of the HLA class II system and will aid future immunological studies in characterizing the full breadth of potential CD4+ T cell epitopes relevant in health and disease. PMID:26764012

  19. Strong association between microsatellites and an HLA-B, DR haplotype (B18-DR3): Implication for microsatellite evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Crouau-Roy, B.; Bouzekri, N.; Clayton, J.

    1996-09-01

    The HLA haplotype B18-DR3 has a widespread geographical distribution, but has its greatest frequencies in Southern Europe, probably vestigial of the earliest populations of this region, particularly in the Pays Basque and Sardinia. This haplotype is of medical significance, being that most implicated as a factor of risk in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this study, the closely linked microsatellite markers (TNFa,b,c) in the region of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) genes have been used in an attempt to subtype this haplotype in the two populations and/or in healthy and diabetic populations. A total of 79 HLA-B18-DR3 haplotypes were analyzed: 54 in Basques (12 from healthy individuals and 42 from diabetics or their first-degree relatives) and 25 in Sardinians (13 from healthy and 13 from diabetic individuals). The TNF haplotype a1-b5-c2 is completely associated with B18-DR3 in both populations. The homogeneity of the B18-DR3 haplotype in two ethnically pure populations implies stability in evolution, which suggest that the mutation rate of these microsatellite markers must be less than is usually assumed (i.e., {approximately} 5x10{sup {minus}6} per site per generation). Such markers should be powerful tools for studying genetic drift and admixture of populations, but it remains to be established whether this stability is a rule for all microsatellites in HLA haplotypes or whether or whether it is restricted to some microsatellites and/or some HLA haplotypes. The population genetics of those microsatellites associated with HLA B18-DR3 was also studied in a random sample of the Basque population. 44 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. [Red Cross hospital in Krapina, during the First world war from 1914 to 1918].

    PubMed

    Fures, Rajko; Habek, Dubravko; Kozina, Drago

    2016-08-01

    Red Cross Hospital in Krapina, during the First World War, was active from 1914 to 1918. Hospital led by Dr. Mirko Crkvenac, oriented humanist. The hospital is operated thanks to the help of municipalities and citizens. The hospital staff concern is for civilian and military victims of the First World War. Dr. Crkvenac, with the support of the City of Krapina and Mayor Vilibald Sluga, he succeeds to the organization and operation of the hospital to an enviable level. Across the Austro-Hungarian Empire and Croatian, Hospitals Red Cross, had a significant role in caring for the wounded, injured and sick soldiers and civilians. Red Cross Hospital in Krapina, is an example of a well-organized hospital in the toughest conditions. Such an organization was not simple in its implementation, and left the valuable lessons and experience.

  1. Social contract of academic medical centres to the community: Dr Howard Atwood Kelly (1858-1943), a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Allen, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Academic medical centres have traditionally been bastions of teaching and research. Outreach to the community at large and involvement in community affairs have sometimes been lacking in the overall mission and activities of academic medical centres. This paper provides an historical perspective first on the numerous achievements of a physician and surgeon and then on the topic of involvement in community affairs by reviewing the many contributions of America's pioneer gynaecological surgeon and one of the four physician founders of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine in 1889 - Dr Howard Atwood Kelly.

  2. Dr Percy Charles Edward d'Erf Wheeler (1859-1944): a notable medical missionary of the Holy Land.

    PubMed

    Perry, Yaron; Lev, Efraim

    2008-05-01

    Dr Percy Charles Edward d'Erf Wheeler, a medical missionary of the London Society for Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews, spent 24 years (1885-1909) as head of the English medical institution in Jerusalem. Wheeler dedicated the years he served in Palestine to promote the medical condition of the Jews as a means of missionary work. The most significant of his achievements was his leading role in the founding of the new British Hospital for the Jews in Jerusalem, the flagship of the British presence in Palestine, to be inaugurated in 1897.

  3. Hospital diversification.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2005-01-01

    Hospital diversification and its impact on the operating ratio are studied for 168 hospitals during the period from 1999 to 2004. Diversification and the operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as being jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield a better financial position, and the better operating ratio allows the institution the wherewithal to diversify. The impact of external government planning and hospital competition are also measured. An institution lifecycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger. Management's attitude concerning risk and reward is considered.

  4. Dr. Howard Jones, Jr. (1910-2015): In Memoriam

    PubMed Central

    Oehninger, S.; Kruger, T.F.

    2015-01-01

    We honor the life of Howard W. Jones, Jr., MD, 104, a pioneer and visionary in reproductive medicine, a dedicated mentor, internationally renowned gynecological surgeon, and the father of in vitro fertilization IVF) in the United States. Dr. Jones founded the Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine, in Norfolk, Virginia, at Eastern Virginia Medical School, in 1983. Today, IVF has grown exponentially not only in its direct application but also in the development of newer techniques would have been unimaginable a couple of decades ago. Throughout the years Dr. Howard has been a teacher and a mentor to many around the world. To us he also was a friend, a supporter at the time of difficult decisions, someone who would inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning and untangling some of the complexities of the field, even of the human condition. His leadership, vision, knowledge, enthusiasm and inquisitive mind will be missed.

  5. DR Experiments in the 60 years since the Bates paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    2011-07-01

    About 60 years have passed since David Bates in a 1950 Physical Review Letter to the Editor first clarified the dissociative recombination mechanism (DR) of molecular ions and provided the conceptual basis for the process that plays an important role in the ionospheres of Earth and other planets, the interstellar medium, and electrical discharges. His visionary (and characteristically "terse") thumbnail sketch of the DR mechanism only hinted at the subtleties that have kept atomic theorists and experimentalists busy for many years. In my talk, I will focus on experiments on N2+ recombination, beginning with plasma afterglows, and then move on to the "after"-afterglow period that is now dominated by the powerful storage-ring methods.

  6. Redox pioneer: Professor Wulf Dröge.

    PubMed

    Kinscherf, Ralf

    2011-06-01

    Dr. Wulf Dröge is recognized here as a redox pioneer because he has published as first author an article on antioxidant/redox biology that has been cited more than 2000 times and over 10 articles that have been cited more than 100 times. One of the key discoveries (1987) was the stimulatory effect of superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide on lymphocyte functions, which triggered a series of studies on the role of reactive oxygen species, glutathione, and its precursor cysteine in physiological and pathological processes. He discovered abnormally low cysteine and glutathione levels in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients and the age-related decline in the postabsorptive plasma cysteine concentration, which is believed to cause age-related oxidative stress. He developed a theoretical concept of the mechanism of aging and death, which is outlined in his books Avoiding the First Cause of Death and Challenging the Limits of the Human Lifespan.

  7. Star Formation in the DR21 Region (B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated mosaic

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is an exceptionally bright source of radio emission called DR21. Visible light images reveal no trace of what is happening in this region because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    The upper image is a large-scale mosaic assembled from individual photographs obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon. The mosaic is a composite of images obtained at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of 10,000 light-years.

    Protruding out from DR21 toward the bottom left of the image is a gaseous outflow (green), containing both carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen. Data from the Spitzer spectrograph, which breaks light into its constituent individual wavelengths, indicate the presence of hot steam formed as the outflow heats the surrounding molecular gas. Outflows are physical signatures of processes that create supersonic beams, or jets, of gas. They are usually accompanied by discs of material around the new star, which likely contain the materials from which future planetary systems are formed. Additional newborn stars

  8. Dr. Garry Latham studies seismometer tracings from the moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-22

    S69-39587 (20 July 1969) --- Dr. Garry Latham (left) with the Lamont Geological Observatory, studies seismometer tracings in the Mission Control Center's (MCC) ALSEP control room. The electronic data was coming from the Passive Seismic Experiments Package (PSEP) which the Apollo 11 astronauts had just deployed on the surface of the moon. Dr. Lamont is the principal investigator for the PSEP, a component of the Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP). PSEP uses three long-period seismometers and one short-period vertical seismometer for measuring meteoroid impacts and moonquakes. Such data will be useful in determining the interior structure of the moon; for example, does the moon have a core and mantle like Earth? Here, the flapping of the PSEP's solar panels is picked up and registered as a tracing. The PSEP was sensitive enough to pick up the footsteps of astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., as they walked on the moon.

  9. Star Formation in the DR21 Region (B)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated mosaic

    Hidden behind a shroud of dust in the constellation Cygnus is an exceptionally bright source of radio emission called DR21. Visible light images reveal no trace of what is happening in this region because of heavy dust obscuration. In fact, visible light is attenuated in DR21 by a factor of more than 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (ten thousand trillion heptillion).

    New images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope allow us to peek behind the cosmic veil and pinpoint one of the most massive natal stars yet seen in our Milky Way galaxy. The never-before-seen star is 100,000 times as bright as the Sun. Also revealed for the first time is a powerful outflow of hot gas emanating from this star and bursting through a giant molecular cloud.

    The upper image is a large-scale mosaic assembled from individual photographs obtained with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) aboard Spitzer. The image covers an area about two times that of a full moon. The mosaic is a composite of images obtained at mid-infrared wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red). The brightest infrared cloud near the top center corresponds to DR21, which presumably contains a cluster of newly forming stars at a distance of 10,000 light-years.

    Protruding out from DR21 toward the bottom left of the image is a gaseous outflow (green), containing both carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen. Data from the Spitzer spectrograph, which breaks light into its constituent individual wavelengths, indicate the presence of hot steam formed as the outflow heats the surrounding molecular gas. Outflows are physical signatures of processes that create supersonic beams, or jets, of gas. They are usually accompanied by discs of material around the new star, which likely contain the materials from which future planetary systems are formed. Additional newborn stars

  10. [Historical exploration of Acapulco hospitals, Guerrero, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Salcedo-Alvarez, Rey Arturo

    2006-01-01

    This study attempts to recount the history of the main hospitals of the port of Acapulco from colonial times until the end of the 20th century. The Augustine friars began hospital care at the end of the first part of the 16th century. Later, Bernardino Alvarez (1514?-1584), with the support of the Spanish crown, founded the first formal hospital in Acapulco called Hospital de Nuestra Señora de la Consolación (Our Lady of Consolation Hospital). During the 16th and 17th centuries, the sick were attended by friars, and by the end of the 19th century there were physicians and surgeons. From the end of the Independence War until the end of the 19th century, the port did not have any true hospital. The first degreed physicians and surgeons arrived and resided in Acapulco in 1920. In 1938, the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital) began providing services. It was replaced by the Hospital General de Acapulco (General Hospital of Acapulco). At the fourth decade of the past century the Cruz Roja (Red Cross) was created. In 1957 the hospital services of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS, Mexican Institute of Social Security), which was founded in 1963, was inaugurated with the Unidad Medico/Social (Medical and Social Unit) of the IMSS in Acapulco. This began the journey of modernity in Acapulco. In 1992, Hospital Regional Vicente Guerrero (Regional Hospital Vicente Guerrero) of the IMSS, initiated its services. In 1960, medical services for civil workers and their families were housed in the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital). Shortly afterwards, the Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE, Security and Social Services Institute for State Employees) had their own hospital. During the 20th century, Acapulco has added other hospital services to care for members of the navy and armed forces, as well as for those persons with financial resources for private care.

  11. ORAC-DR: A generic data reduction pipeline infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenness, Tim; Economou, Frossie

    2015-03-01

    ORAC-DR is a general purpose data reduction pipeline system designed to be instrument and observatory agnostic. The pipeline works with instruments as varied as infrared integral field units, imaging arrays and spectrographs, and sub-millimeter heterodyne arrays and continuum cameras. This paper describes the architecture of the pipeline system and the implementation of the core infrastructure. We finish by discussing the lessons learned since the initial deployment of the pipeline system in the late 1990s.

  12. Dr. John Stack and other NASA Langley Research Center Visitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Front Row, left to right: Mrs. Elsa Hoare and Major Philip L. Teed - staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England: Dr. Barnes Wallis - Chief of Aeronautical Research, Vicers-Armstrong, Ltd., Weybridge, England. Back Row, left to right: Norman W. Boorer and Cecil W. Hayes - Staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England; John R. Christie - Ministry of Supply, London, England; Philip A. Hufton - Chief Supt., Royal Aircraft Establishment, Bedford, England; Lindsey I. Turner, Jr. - Langley Research Center. Photographed November 13, 1958.

  13. Of Brain and Bone: The Unusual Case of Dr. A

    PubMed Central

    Narvid, J; Gorno-Tempini, ML; Slavotinek, A; DeArmond, SJ; Cha, YH; Miller, BL; Rankin, K.P

    2009-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical syndrome characterized by progressive decline in social conduct and a focal pattern of frontal and temporal lobe damage. Its biological basis is still poorly understood but the focality of the brain degeneration provides a powerful model to study the cognitive and anatomical basis of social cognition. Here, we present Dr. A, a patient with a rare hereditary bone disease (hereditary multiple exostoses) and FTD (pathologically characterized as Pick’s disease), who presented with a profound behavioral disturbance characterized by acquired sociopathy. We conducted a detailed genetic, pathological, neuroimaging and cognitive study, including a battery of tests designed to investigate Dr. A’s abilities to understand emotional cues and to infer mental states and intentions to others (theory of mind). Dr. A’s genetic profile suggests the possibility that a mutation causing hereditary multiple exostoses, Ext2, may play a role in the pattern of neurodegeneration in frontotemporal dementia since knockout mice deficient in the Ext gene family member, Ext1, show severe CNS defects including loss of olfactory bulbs and abnormally small cerebral cortex. Dr. A showed significant impairment in emotion comprehension, second order theory of mind, attribution of intentions, and empathy despite preserved general cognitive abilities. Voxel-based morphometry on structural MRI images showed significant atrophy in the medial and right orbital frontal and anterior temporal regions with sparing of dorsolateral frontal cortex. This case demonstrates that social and emotional dysfunction in FTD can dissociate from preserved performance on classic executive functioning tasks. The specific pattern of anatomical damage shown by VBM emphasizes the importance of the network including the superior medial frontal gyrus as well as temporal polar areas, in regulation of social cognition and theory of mind. This case provides new evidence regarding the

  14. Dr. von Braun In Front of a Display of Missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    In this photo, Director of the US Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) Development Operations Division, Dr. Wernher von Braun, is standing before a display of Army missiles celebrating ABMA's Fourth Open House. The missiles in the background include (left to right) a satellite on a Juno II shroud with a Nike Ajax pointing left in front of a Jupiter missile. The Lacrosse is in front of the Juno II. The Nike Hercules points skyward in front of the Juno II and the Redstone.

  15. 21. Dr. Harrison E. Stroud poses in front of his ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Dr. Harrison E. Stroud poses in front of his newly completed building at the northeast corner of Central Avenue and the alley north of Washington Street in about 1900 or 1901. In 1901, the building seen here was enlarged by the construction of an addition of similar design immediately to the north (left). Virtually the entire west elevation of the initial building is depicted in this view. Credit ADLAPR. - Stroud Building, 31-33 North Central Avenue, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility closure plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Hanford Site, located northwest of the city of Richland, Washington, houses reactors, chemical-separation systems, and related facilities used for the production of special nuclear materials, and activities associated with nuclear energy development. The 105-DR Large Sodium Fire Facility (LSFF), which was in operation from about 1972 to 1986, was a research laboratory that occupied the former ventilation supply room on the southwest side of the 105-DR Reactor facility. The LSFF was established to provide a means of investigating fire and safety aspects associated with large sodium or other metal alkali fires in the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) facilities. The 105-DR Reactor facility was designed and built in the 1950`s and is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The building housed the 105-DR defense reactor, which was shut down in 1964. The LSFF was initially used only for engineering-scale alkali metal reaction studies. In addition, the Fusion Safety Support Studies program sponsored intermediate-size safety reaction tests in the LSFF with lithium and lithium lead compounds. The facility has also been used to store and treat alkali metal waste, therefore the LSFF is subject to the regulatory requirements for the storage and treatment of dangerous waste. Closure will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610. This closure plan presents a description of the facility, the history of waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the LSFF as an Alkali Metal Treatment Facility. No future use of the LSFF is expected.

  17. Dr John Hall (1575-1635) and Shakespeare's medicine.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2006-11-01

    The name of Dr John Hall is familiar to students of Shakespeare but less well known to medical biographers. He was born in 1575 and studied at Queen's College, Cambridge, but had no English medical degree. He was not a member of the Royal College of Physicians (founded in 1518). Around 1600, he established himself in Stratford. In June 1607 Hall married Susanna, Shakespeare's elder daughter. He died in 1635, an eminent Stratford physician and herbalist.

  18. 8. View of DR 3 antenna showing lower front connector, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View of DR 3 antenna showing lower front connector, third from left vertical member at first level above foundation level, showing small diameter turnbuckle stays, vertical member with flange connection, and various struts and connectors with antenna assembly in background. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  19. 4. View of northerly DR 3 antenna looking north 35 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of northerly DR 3 antenna looking north 35 degrees west and showing radar scanner building no. 106 east face through antenna and partial view of satcom communication dome (attached to radar transmitter building 102) in left side of photograph. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  20. Dr. John H. Hopps Jr. Research Scholars Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-20

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0262 John H. Hopps Jr. Research Scholars Program Rahmelle Thompson MOREHOUSE COLLEGE INC. Final Report 10/20/2014 DISTRIBUTION A...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) MOREHOUSE COLLEGE INC. 830 WESTVIEW DR SW ATLANTA, GA 30314-3773 US 8.  PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...Defense Research Scholars Program Morehouse College Hopps Defense Scholars

  1. VEHICLE ASSEMBLY BUILDING [VAB] & TOPPING OFF CEREMONIES SPEAKER DR. DEBUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. Kurt H. Debus, KSC's first director, was a major speaker at the ceremonies ''topping off'' the Vehicle Assembly Building on April 14, 1965. A crawler-transporter is at the right. At the time of its completion, the 129 million cubic foot structure was the largest building in the world. Originally designed and built to accommodate the Saturn V/Apollo used in Project Apollo, the VAB was later modified for its role in the Space Shuttle program.

  2. Dr. von Braun In Front of a Display of Missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    In this photo, Director of the US Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) Development Operations Division, Dr. Wernher von Braun, is standing before a display of Army missiles celebrating ABMA's Fourth Open House. The missiles in the background include (left to right) a satellite on a Juno II shroud with a Nike Ajax pointing left in front of a Jupiter missile. The Lacrosse is in front of the Juno II. The Nike Hercules points skyward in front of the Juno II and the Redstone.

  3. A famous Turkish dermatologist, Dr. Hulusi Behçet.

    PubMed

    UStün, Cagatay

    2002-01-01

    Dr. Hulusi Behçet (1889-1948) is a famous Turkish dermatologist. He was born in Istanbul on February 20, 1889. His father was Ahmet Behçet and his mother Ayqse Behçet was also Ahmet's cousin. After the Turkish Republic was established and the "Family Name Law" was accepted, his father Ahmet Behçet, who was among the friends of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, the founder of Turkish Republic, received private permission to use his father's name Behçet. Dr. Hulusi Behçet pursued his education at Gülhane Military Medical Academy. After he had become a medical doctor, he specialized in dermatology and venereal disease at Gülhane Military Medical Academy and he completed his specialization in 1914. His first observations on Behçet's Disease started with a patient he met between 1924-1925. Dr. Behçet followed the symptoms of three patients whom he had had for years, then he decided that they were the symptoms of a new disease (1936). He published these cases in the Archives of Dermatology and Veneral Disease. He died from a sudden heart attack on March 8, 1948. Today, this disease is universally called Behçet's Disease in medical literature.

  4. Dr. Lytle Adams' incendiary "bat bomb" of World War II.

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2004-11-01

    On December 7, 1941, a 60-year old dentist from Irwin, Pennsylvania, Dr. Lytle S. Adams, was driving home from a vacation at Carlsbad Caverns in New Mexico. Hours earlier, he had been gripped with amazement as he witnessed millions of bats exiting the caves of Carlsbad. Listening to his car radio on his return trip, he was shocked to hear that Japan had just attacked Pearl Harbor. Dr. Adams, outraged over this travesty, began to mentally construct a plan for U.S. retaliation. As his thoughts returned to the countless bats that had awed him, he formed a tentative plan: millions of these small, flying mammals could be connected to tiny, time-fused incendiary bombs, and then released to land on the flimsily constructed structures which dotted the cities of Japan. Within a few minutes, the bombs would explode and enflame the entire urban areas. He postulated that these immeasurable numbers of fires, spreading their devastation over such vast areas within Japanese cities would result in the enemy's speedy surrender. This article documents the futile efforts of Dr. Adams, his team and the U.S. government to develop and employ an effective, incendiary bat bomb. The recently developed atom bomb, a far more deadly weapon was used in its place.

  5. The Final Kepler Planet Candidate Catalog (DR25)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Jeffrey; Thompson, Susan E.; Kepler Team

    2017-06-01

    We present Kepler's final planet candidate catalog, which is based on the Q1--Q17 DR25 data release and was created to allow for accurate calculations of planetary occurrence rates. We discuss improvements made to our fully automated candidate vetting procedure, which yields specific categories of false positives and a disposition score value to indicate decision confidence. We present the use of light curve inversion and scrambling, in addition to our continued use of pixel-level transit injection, to produce artificial planet candidates and false positives. Since these simulated data sets were subjected to the same automated vetting procedure as the real data set, we are able to measure both the completeness and reliability of the catalog. The DR25 catalog, source code, and a multitude of completeness and reliability data products are available at the Exoplanet Archive (http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu). The DR25 light curves and pixel-level data are available at MAST (http://archive.stsci.edu/kepler).

  6. DrMUST: Automating the Anomaly Investigation First-Cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Heras, Jose-Antonio; Yeung, Kar Lam; Donati, Alessandro; Sousa, Bruno; Keil, Norbert

    2009-09-01

    Whenever a flight control team is faced with an anomaly they need to understand what its effects are and try to identify its cause. Understanding the effects may lead to actions to minimize them; understanding the cause allows in some cases to avoid it from happening again in the future.The anomaly investigation current approach is based on the knowledge, experience and intuition from engineers. They hypothesise which parameters could be involved in the anomaly and then perform the analysis to prove or discard their hypothesis.DrMUST's approach consists of automatically finding the involved parameters for the engineer, even those that had not yet been considered. It uses speech recognition techniques to identify nominal anomalies and a novel approach to perform correlation analysis based on statistical features. DrMUST can be used not only to support anomaly investigation but also in performing characterizations, model tuning and finding similar patterns in telemetry.This paper describes what DrMUST is, how it works and its evaluation with Venus Express in three different scenarios. Finally, the flight control team provides its operational assessment.

  7. [Surgical work of Dr. Vladan Djordjević].

    PubMed

    Colović, Radoje

    2008-01-01

    Dr. Vladan Djordjević was the first surgeon in Serbia in today's meaning of that word. After graduating medicine in Vienna 1869, he spent two years specialising surgery at the First Vienna University Surgical Clinic led by Professor Theodor Billroth, including almost a year as a war surgeon at the Prussian military service during the Prussian-French war (1870/71). After returning to Serbia, Dr. Vladan Djordjević dealt with general medical and surgical practice. Different commitments and his own interests gradually distracted him from medicine and surgery, so that he gave them up in 1884. In spite of short practice in surgery, Dr. Vladan Djordjević gave an important contribution to surgery in Serbia. Close to 200 surgical procedures, of which we have evidence, constituted an important event for surgery in Serbia where these procedures had not been performed before him. Although a number of surgical procedures he performed was not high, they were important, not only were they the first operations in Serbia, but also they were often serious, sometimes complex and performed under very modest circumstances, but usually with good success. They belong not only to the general surgery, but to a number of surgical specialities, such as ophtalmology, maxillofacial surgery, otorhinolaringology, urology, orthopedic and trauma surgery, gynecology and obstetrics, thoracic surgery and neurosurgery.

  8. Dr. Lindberg's Legacy : Charting A New Course | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... more. Don also created the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). NCBI has been a focal point ... with Dr. Lindberg (right) and National Center for Biotechnology Information Director Dr. David Lipman (center) at a ...

  9. Dr. Wernher Von Braun leads a tour of the S-IC checkout area.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Eberhard Rees, Charles Schultze, James Webb, Elmer Staats, Comptroller General of the United States, and Dr. Wernher Von Braun tour the S-IC checkout area in the Marshall Space Flight Center quality lab.

  10. Identification of death receptors DR4 and DR5 in HTB-12 astrocytoma cell lines and determination of TRAIL sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Riddick, Elenia; Evans, Shavonda; Rousch, Jeffrey; Gwebu, Ephraim; Banerjee, Hirendra Nath

    2013-12-01

    Astrocytomas are tumors which arise from astrocytes, cells that form the blood-brain barrier. There are very few drugs that successfully treat brain tumors. In this study, the cytotoxic effects on the HTB-12 astrocytoma cell line by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) were studied. The presence of the TRAIL receptors, Death receptor 4 (DR4) and Death receptor 5 (DR5), were detected in HTB-12 cells by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Cytotoxicity assay by Trypan Blue Exclusion Method showed effective cell killing by TRAIL treatment. Thus, the presence of death receptors and TRAIL efficacy raises the therapeutic potential for this type of brain tumor.

  11. HLA-DR9 and DR14 are associated with the allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity in hematologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Woo; Kim, Ju-Young; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Cho, Sang-Heon; Park, Seon-Yang; Kang, Hye-Ryun

    2014-06-01

    Allopurinol, a widely used urate-lowering agent, is a leading cause of severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs), especially in patients with HLA-B*58:01. Despite its routine use for the prevention of tumor lysis-related hyperuricemia prior to chemotherapy, the risk of allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity has not been investigated in patients with hematologic malignancies. This retrospective cohort study was conducted to investigate the incidence and risk factors of allopurinol-induced hypersensitivity in patients at least 18 years of age with hematologic malignancies. We reviewed 463 patients who had ever taken allopurinol for the prevention of hyperuricemia prior to chemotherapy and had undergone serologic HLA typing as a pre-transplant evaluation from January 2000 to May 2010. Thirteen (2.8%) patients experienced maculopapular eruptions (MPE) and none experienced SCARs. Among subtypes of underlying hematologic malignancies, percentage of chronic myeloid leukemia was significantly higher in the allopurinol hypersensitivity group compared with the tolerant group (23.1% (3/13) vs. 5.9% (26/440), P = 0.044). According to HLA subtypes, the incidence of allopurinol-induced MPE was 4.0% in HLA-B58 (+) patients (2/50) and 2.7% in HLA-B58 (-) patients (11/403) but this difference was statistically insignificant. In contrast to HLA-B58, the frequencies of DR9 and DR14 were significantly higher in the allopurinol-induced MPE group compared with the allopurinol tolerant group (38.5% (5/13) vs. 13.6% (53/443), P = 0.019, and 38.5% (5/13) vs. 15.6% (41/440), P = 0.038, respectively). In conclusion, HLA-DR9 and DR14, but not HLA-B58, are associated with hypersensitivity reaction by allopurinol when administered in patients with hematologic malignancy prior to chemotherapy.

  12. Enhancing Price Response Programs through Auto-DR: California's 2007 Implementation Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccote, Sila; Wikler, Greg; Chiu, Albert; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Hennage, Dan; Thomas, Chuck

    2007-12-18

    This paper describes automated demand response (Auto-DR) activities, an innovative effort in California to ensure that DR programs produce effective and sustainable impacts. Through the application of automation and communication technologies coupled with well-designed incentives and DR programs such as Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP), Auto-DR is opening up the opportunity for many different types of buildings to effectively participate in DR programs. We present the results of Auto-DR implementation efforts by the three California investor-owned utilities for the Summer of 2007. The presentation emphasizes Pacific Gas and Electric Company's (PG&E) Auto-DR efforts, which represents the largest in the state. PG&E's goal was to recruit, install, test and operate 15 megawatts of Auto-DR system capability. We describe the unique delivery approaches, including optimizing the utility incentive structures designed to foster an Auto-DR service provider community. We also show how PG&E's Critical Peak Pricing (CPP) and Demand Bidding (DBP) options were called and executed under the automation platform. Finally, we show the results of the Auto-DR systems installed and operational during 2007, which surpassed PG&E's Auto-DR goals. Auto-DR is being implemented by a multi-disciplinary team including the California Investor Owned Utilities (IOUs), energy consultants, energy management control system vendors, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the California Energy Commission (CEC).

  13. Dr. Jacob Cohen presents the H. Julian Allen award to Anthony Colaprete.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-16

    Dr. Jacob Cohen Director Office of Chief Scientist with Dr. Anthony Colaprete recipient of the H. Julian Allen Award In recognition as co-author of the outstanding scientific paper entitled "Detection of Water in the LCROSS Ejecta Pluma." Shown here Dr. Jacob Cohen presents the H. Julian Allen award to Anthony Colaprete.

  14. Dr. Wernher Von Braun greeting dignitaries at the Redstone Arsenal airfield.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George E. Mueller, center, associate administrator for manned space flight, is flanked by Dr. Wernher Von Braun, left, and Dr. Eberhard Rees at the Redstone Arsenal airstrip. the associate adminstrator was making his annual staff visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  15. Dr. Wernher Von Braun greeting dignitaries at the Redstone Arsenal airfield.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. George E. Mueller, center, associate administrator for manned space flight, is flanked by Dr. Wernher Von Braun, left, and Dr. Eberhard Rees at the Redstone Arsenal airstrip. the associate adminstrator was making his annual staff visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LAMOST DR2 white dwarfs (Guo+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Zhao, J.; Tziamtzis, A.; Liu, J.; Li, L.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2016-07-01

    LAMOST DR1 released 2204860 spectra, which included 717660 objects from the pilot survey, observed from 2011 October to 2012 June and 1487200 objects from the regular survey from 2012 September to 2013 June. DR2, which included DR1, released 1588 746 new spectra during the second year in 2014. (4 data files).

  17. Diffusely adherent Escherichia coli strains expressing Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC): hitherto unrecognized pathogens.

    PubMed

    Le Bouguénec, Chantal; Servin, Alain L

    2006-03-01

    Diffusely adherent Escherichia coli (DAEC) strains are currently considered to constitute a putative sixth group of diarrheagenic E. coli. However, on the basis of their diffuse adherence to HEp-2 and HeLa cells, the detection of afa/dra/daa-related operons encoding this adherence phenotype, and the mobilization of decay-accelerating factor, both commensal and pathogenic strains can be classified as Afa/Dr DAEC isolates. Furthermore, strains associated with diarrheal diseases and strains causing extra-intestinal infections can also be identified as Afa/Dr DAEC strains. Although several cell signaling events that occur after epithelial cells have been infected by Afa/Dr DAEC have been reported, the pathophysiological processes that allow intestinal and extra-intestinal infections to develop are not fully understood. This review focuses on the genetic organization of the afa/dra/daa-related operons and on the virulence factors that trigger cellular responses, some of which are deleterious for the host cells. Finally, this review suggests future lines of research that could help to elucidate these questions.

  18. Human immune responsiveness to Lolium perenne pollen allergen Lol p III (rye III) is associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5.

    PubMed

    Ansari, A A; Freidhoff, L R; Meyers, D A; Bias, W B; Marsh, D G

    1989-05-01

    A well-characterized allergen of Lolium perenne (perennial rye grass) pollen, Lol p III, has been used as a model antigen to study the genetic control of the human immune response. Associations between HLA type and IgE or IgG antibody (Ab) responsiveness to Lol p III were studied in two groups of skin-test-positive Caucasoid adults (N = 135 and 67). We found by nonparametric and parametric analyses that immune responsiveness to Lol p III was significantly associated with HLA-DR3 and DR5. No association was found between any DQ type and immune responsiveness to Lol p III. Geometric mean IgE or IgG Ab levels to Lol p III were not different between B8+, DR3+ subjects and B8-, DR3+ subjects, showing that HLA-B8 had no influence on the association. Lol p III IgG Ab data obtained on subjects after grass antigen immunotherapy showed that 100% of DR3 subjects and 100% of DR5 subjects were Ab+. A comparison of all the available protein sequences of DRB gene products showed that the first hypervariable region of DR3 and DR5 (and DRw6), and no other region, contains the sequence Glu9-Tyr-Ser-Thr-Ser13. Our observations are consistent with the possibility that immune responsiveness to the allergen Lol p III is associated with this amino acid sequence in the first hypervariable region of the DR beta 1 polypeptide chain.

  19. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols.

  20. Statistical analysis of cross-correlation sample of 3XMM-DR4 with SDSS-DR10 and UKIDSS-DR9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Wu, Xue-Bing; Tian, Hai-Jun

    2014-05-01

    We match the XMM-Newton 3XMMi-DR4 catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 10 and the United Kingdom Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Data Release 9. Based on this X-ray/optical/infrared catalog, we probe the distribution of various types of X-ray emitters in the multidimensional parameter space. It is found that quasars, galaxies and stars have some kind distribution rule, especially for stars. The result shows that only using the X-ray/optical features, stars are difficult to discriminate from galaxies and quasars, the added information from infrared band is very helpful to improve the classification result of any classifier. Comparing the classification accuracy of random forests with that of rotation forests, rotation forests show better performance.

  1. Reminiscence of Dr. Emanuel Luxardo (1848-1905) and the family of Miho Klaić (1829-1896).

    PubMed

    Marinovic, Ivo

    2008-01-01

    This article is a reminiscence of four distinctive public figures who were related by family and who played key roles in the development of public health in Dalmatia in the second half of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. Dr Emanuel Luxardo (1848-1905) was a prominent physician and an able manager of the Dubrovnik and Zadar hospitals. In spite of his Italian origin, he championed the Croatian national reformation in Dalmatia. His father-in-law Miho Klaić (1829- 1896), as one of the most prominent Dalmatian politicians and champions of the national reformation movement, greatly contributed to the building of new hospitals in Zadar (1882), Sibenik (1883), and Dubrovnik (1888). The older of his two sons, Petar (1862-1910) was a lawyer and very active in the Dalmatian parliament, while the younger son Ljubo (1871-?) was a successful surgeon in Zadar and Split.

  2. New ultracool subdwarfs identified in large-scale surveys using Virtual Observatory tools. I. UKIDSS LAS DR5 vs. SDSS DR7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodieu, N.; Espinoza Contreras, M.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Solano, E.; Aberasturi, M.; Martín, E. L.

    2012-06-01

    Aims: The aim of the project is to improve our knowledge of the low-mass and low-metallicity population to investigate the influence of metallicity on the stellar (and substellar) mass function. Methods: We present the results of a photometric and proper motion search aimed at discovering ultracool subdwarfs in large-scale surveys. We employed and combined the Fifth Data Release (DR5) of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 complemented with ancillary data from the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), the DEep Near-Infrared Survey (DENIS) and the SuperCOSMOS Sky Surveys (SSS). Results: The SDSS DR7 vs. UKIDSS LAS DR5 search returned a total of 32 ultracool subdwarf candidates, only two of which are recognised as a subdwarf in the literature. Twenty-seven candidates, including the two known ones, were followed-up spectroscopically in the optical between 600 and 1000 nm, thus covering strong spectral features indicative of low metallicity (e.g., CaH), 21 with the Very Large Telescope, one with the Nordic Optical Telescope, and five were extracted from the Sloan spectroscopic database to assess (or refute) their low-metal content. We confirm 20 candidates as subdwarfs, extreme subdwarfs, or ultra-subdwarfs with spectral types later than M5; this represents a success rate of ≥ 60%. Among those 20 new subdwarfs, we identify two early-L subdwarfs that are very likely located within 100 pc, which we propose as templates for future searches because they are the first examples of their subclass. Another seven sources are solar-metallicity M dwarfs with spectral types between M4 and M7 without Hα emission, suggesting that they are old M dwarfs. The remaining five candidates do not have spectroscopic follow-up yet; only one remains as a bona-fide ultracool subdwarf after revision of their proper motions. We assigned spectral types based on the current classification schemes and, when

  3. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise.

  4. Enhancing Anti-Breast Cancer Immunity by Blocking Death Receptor DR5

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    encoding full length human DR5, phDR5∆ encoding human DR5 with a premature termination signal in the death domain (aa.1-338) and phDR5ECTM encoding the...by Blocking Death Receptor DR5 PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Wei-Zen Wei, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Wayne State University...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 Sep 2008 – 31 Aug 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Enhancing Anti-Breast Cancer Immunity by Blocking Death

  5. Dr. Stanko Sielski (1891-1958): Physician, scientist, humanist.

    PubMed

    Tahirović, Husref

    2015-01-01

    This work presents the results of research into the life and work of Dr. Stanko Sielski, related to his professional, scientific and humanitarian work. He was born in Gračanica, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH) in 1891, to a family of Polish origins. He attended high school in Travnik and completed his studies of medicine in Vienna in 1919. During the First World War he served on the frontlines with the Austro- Hungarian army. He began his service as a doctor in Konjic, Prozor and Glamoč, and then worked in Varcar Vakuf, Zenica, Travnik, Bihać, Banja Luka, Sarajevo and Tuzla. At that time in BH living conditions were very bad, the level of education of the people insufficient, there were many epidemics of infectious diseases, and the mortality of the population was high. Dr. Stanko Sielski made a significant contribution to treating the sick, preventing various diseases and the health education of the people. In the realm of the history of medicine in BA, he researched the life and work of doctors from previous generations, the work of medical institutions, old medical manuscripts written in Arabic, Persian and Turkish, folk beliefs about the origins and treatment of a variety of illnesses, and the role of herbal medicine and amulets in treating the sick. In addition, he undertook research in the fields of archaeology, ethnology and sociology. He published the results of his research in scholarly journals. In the Second World War he saved the lives of many Jewish doctors and their families from persecution in concentration camps, and as a result in 2014 he was posthumously declared "Righteous Among the Nations". Dr. Stanko Sielski, alongside his work as a doctor, was also involved in a variety of scientific research and publication work, which contributed to the preservation and a better understanding of the material and spiritual heritage of BH. Copyright © 2015 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  6. [The SS dentist Dr. Willy Frank. A biography].

    PubMed

    Huber, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    In his role as leading SS dentist in the concentration camp Auschwitz-Birkenau Dr. Willy Frank was involved in the worst crimes of World War II: In the early summer of 1944 the so called "Hungarian Action" commenced. It planned the extermination of around 450 000 Hungarian Jews within only a few months. Some twenty years later he was sentenced during the Frankfurt Auschwitz Trials to seven years of imprisonment on grounds of his participation in the selection and gassing of the Jews. Before that he had been able to resume his professional worksince 1947 unchecked.

  7. Mediastinal pathology and the contributions of Dr. Juan Rosai.

    PubMed

    Wick, Mark R

    2016-09-01

    Dr. Juan Rosai is one of the most prolific contributors to the literature on mediastinal pathology, and he has added steadily to that body of work over a 50-year period. Rosai has written several landmark articles in this topical area, including articles on thymic epithelial lesions, mediastinal neuroendocrine tumors, mediastinal lymphoma and other hematopoietic lesions, thymolipoma, thymoliposarcoma, mediastinal solitary fibrous tumor, intrathymic langerhans-cell histiocytosis, mediastinal germ cell neoplasms, and multilocular thymic cyst. This review recounts his role as one of the principal figures in the surgical pathology of mediastinal diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. LUNAR RECEIVING LABORATORY (LRL) - CLARK, ROBERT, DR. - JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-11-05

    S73-36161 (November 1973) --- In the Radiation Counting Laboratory sixty feet underground at JSC, Dr. Robert S. Clark prepares to load pieces of iridium foil -- sandwiched between plastic sheets -- into the laboratory's radiation detector. The iridium foil strips were worn by the crew of the second Skylab flight in personal radiation dosimeters throughout their 59 1/2 days in space. Inside the radiation detector assembly surrounded by 28 tons of lead shielding, the sample will be tested to determine the total neutron dose to which the astronauts were exposed during their long stay aboard the space station. Photo credit: NASA

  9. Dr. von Braun on the Mobility Test Article (MTA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    In this June 1966 photograph, Marshall Space Flight Center Director Dr. Wernher von Braun test-drives the Mobility Test Article (MTA), a developmental vehicle built by the Bendix Corporation to test lunar mobility vehicle concepts. The data provided by the MTA helped in designing the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), developed under the direction of the MSFC. The LRV was designed to allow Apollo astronauts a greater range of mobility during lunar exploration missions. The LRVs were deployed during the last three Apollo missions; Apollo 15, Apollo 16, and Apollo 17.

  10. Dr. von Braun Driving the Mobility Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    In this June, 1966 photograph, Marshall Space Flight Center Director, Dr. Wernher von Braun test drives the Mobility Test Article (MTA), a developmental vehicle built by the Bendix Corporation to test lunar mobility concepts. The data provided by the MTA helped in designing the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), developed under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV was designed to allow Apollo astronauts a greater range during lunar exploration missions and served its purpose during the last three Apollo lunar missions in 1971 and 1972.

  11. LUNAR RECEIVING LABORATORY (LRL) - CLARK, ROBERT, DR. - JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-11-05

    S73-36162 (November 1973) --- Dr. Robert S. Clark changes magnetic tape on the Radiation Counting Laboratory's mini-computer. The computer calculates the total content of radioactive isotopes in the lunar materials. Some 120 different samples from the six landings on the moon have been studied by the lab's gamma spectrometer, which generates 65,000 individual data points of each sample. Measurements of radioactive isotopes reveal how long they have been near the surface, and also reflect how much the rocks have been eroded by micrometeorites. Photo credit: NASA

  12. STS-72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Looking elated at the prospect of his upcoming spaceflight, STS- 72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry dons his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with assistance from a suit technician. The trip into space will be the first for Barry, a medical doctor who also has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. He and five fellow crew members will soon depart for Launch Pad 39, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour is undergoing final preparations for liftoff during an approximately 49-minute window opening at about 4:18 am EST, January 11.

  13. STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker is assisted by a suit technician as she dons her launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. Her third spaceflight will be an historic one for Baker, a medical doctor, as she oversees the series of scientific investigations that will be conducted during the first docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir. Baker and six fellow crew members -- four Americans and two Russian cosmonauts -- will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff during a 10- minute launch window opening at 3:32 p.m. EDT.

  14. Dr. Christopher Kraft looks over packaged 'parasol' in bldg 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Dr. Christopher C. Kraft J. (left), JSC Director, and George A Post, JSC Crew Systems Division, look over the packaged 'parasol' during fabrication and checkout of the umbrella-like mechanical device in the Technical Services shop in bldg 10 at JSC. The 'parasol' is designed to fit into the T027 experiment photometer canister. The canopy portion of the 'parasol' measures 24 feet by 22 feet. The 'parasol' is one of several sunscreen possibilities being considered for use in shading the overheated Skylab 1 Orbital Workshop.

  15. Dr Robert Proust: a gynaecologist's contribution to world literature.

    PubMed

    de Costa, Caroline

    2013-09-01

    Dr Robert Proust, though overshadowed in history by his more famous brother, the novelist Marcel Proust, was an eminent and innovative French surgeon who achieved recognition largely as a gynaecologist, but also was an accomplished urologist and general surgeon. He was the author of a textbook, The surgery of the female genital tract, that was very successful in his lifetime and ran to six editions. He was always very supportive of his brother's writing, and after Marcel's premature death Robert edited and arranged for publication of the final three volumes of his novel À la recherche du temps perdu, which has been called the greatest novel of the twentieth century.

  16. 89. View of DR 2 antenna (structure no. 736) at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    89. View of DR 2 antenna (structure no. 736) at 65 percent completion showing erection process. Antenna system designed and factory construction by D.S. Kennedy & Company., Comasset, MA, 1958. Note scanner radar building in background. Official photograph BMEWS Project by unknown photographer, 11 July, 1960, Photographic Services, Riverton, NJ, BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-824. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  17. Progress in inflammatory neuropathy -the legacy of Dr Jack Griffin.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Eva L; Hughes, Richard A C; Willison, Hugh J

    2015-11-01

    The past quarter of a century has brought incredible advances in our understanding of inflammatory neuropathies, and the insights into Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) began in the 1990s with the seminal work of Dr Jack Griffin and his colleagues. In this essay, we provide a tribute to Jack, and review the recent progress in a field that he termed his personal favourite. In particular, we discuss the new developments in our understanding and diagnosis of inflammatory neuropathies, the recent emergence of the node of Ranvier and the paranode as sites of intensive investigation, and the mechanistic evidence that is providing a platform for therapeutic development studies.

  18. STS-72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Looking elated at the prospect of his upcoming spaceflight, STS- 72 Mission Specialist Dr. Daniel T. Barry dons his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building with assistance from a suit technician. The trip into space will be the first for Barry, a medical doctor who also has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering. He and five fellow crew members will soon depart for Launch Pad 39, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour is undergoing final preparations for liftoff during an approximately 49-minute window opening at about 4:18 am EST, January 11.

  19. STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    STS-71 Payload Commander Dr. Ellen S. Baker is assisted by a suit technician as she dons her launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. Her third spaceflight will be an historic one for Baker, a medical doctor, as she oversees the series of scientific investigations that will be conducted during the first docking of the U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir. Baker and six fellow crew members -- four Americans and two Russian cosmonauts -- will shortly depart for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff during a 10- minute launch window opening at 3:32 p.m. EDT.

  20. Dr. Christopher Kraft looks over packaged "parasol" in bldg 10

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-05-23

    S73-26394 (23 May 1973) --- Dr. Christopher C. Kraft Jr. (left), JSC Director, and George A. Post, JSC Crew Systems Division, look over the packaged "parasol" during fabrication and checkout of the umbrella-like mechanical device in the Technical Services shop in building 10 at Johnson Space Center. The "parasol" is designed to fit into the T027 experiment photometer canister. The canopy portion of the "parasol" measures 24 feet by 22 feet. The "parasol" is one of several sunscreen possibilities being considered for use in shading the overheated Skylab 1 Orbital Workshop. Photo credit: NASA

  1. Dr. Gotthold Steiner (1886-1961): versatile nematologist.

    PubMed

    Esser, R P

    1996-01-01

    Swiss-born Dr. Gotthold Steiner was a pioneer in formulating the discipline of nematology. He worked with the American nematologist NA Cobb and together they were responsible for acceptance of the concept of nematode phytoparasites. Steiner had special expertise in anatomy, morphology, phytonematology, marine nematodes, nutrition, mermithids, and selected invertebrate taxa. He authored 191 scientific papers, established the ubiquitous phytoparasitic genus Helicotylenchus, described the pinewood nematode, and did significant work with three important economic pests, Ditylenchus dipsaci, Heterodera rostochiensis, and H. schachtii. He was responsible for introducing training programs in nematology in USDA laboratories.

  2. The portrait of Dr Edward Harrison MD (1766-1838).

    PubMed

    Bovine, Gary

    2010-08-01

    The portrait of the London and Horncastle Physician Edward Harrison, painted and displayed in 1823, was editorially criticized by one of the medical journals of the time. After Harrison died the portrait remained in the family estate until 1938, after which it was presented to the National Gallery of Ireland. The image of Dr Harrison had never been displayed in any of his medical writings, nor in any other medical historical works, until 2008. This paper provides some history of the criticism of the portrait, similar to the historical vignette of the portraiture of William Harvey and outlines the detective work to track down the location of the portrait.

  3. A conversation with Dr Michael Fordham. Interview by James Astor.

    PubMed

    Fordham, Michael

    2005-02-01

    In this interview in Dr Fordham's 83rd year he describes how he started to work with children, and how Mrs Jung was supportive. He talks about the initial suspicion this interest generated in the wider Jungian community. He refers to his acceptance of and interest in the psychotic elements in child analysis and his transference-based approach to working with these elements. He reflects on his own birth, his work with evacuee children in hostels during the war years and the politics of supervision. He describes the core Jungian concepts which underpinned his work and the theoretical differences from the Kleinian and Anna Freudian positions.

  4. My friend Dr Knox: a pupil writes about the anatomist.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A

    2005-12-01

    Thomas Giordani Wright, a medical apprentice in Newcastle upon Tyne, attended Dr Robert Knox's anatomy classes in Edinburgh between November 1825 and April 1826, only two years before Burke and Hare began murdering people and selling the bodies of their victims to Knox's anatomy school. In March 1829, soon after the crimes came to light and Burke had been found guilty of murder and executed, Wright commented on the case in his diary, describing the practices in the dissection rooms and giving his views on Robert Knox, the teacher who had become his friend.

  5. Dr. von Braun and Army Ballistics Missile Agency (ABMA) Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    This photograph of Dr. von Braun, shown here to the left of General Bruce Medaris, was taken in the fall of 1959, immediately prior to Medaris' retirement from the Army. At the time, von Braun and his associates worked for the Army Ballistics Missile Agency in Huntsville, Alabama. Those in the photograph have been identified as Ernst Stuhlinger, Frederick von Saurma, Fritz Mueller, Hermarn Weidner, E.W. Neubert (partially hidden), W.A. Mrazek, Karl Heimburg, Arthur Rudolph, Otto Hoberg, von Braun, Oswald Lange, Medaris, Helmut Hoelzer, Hans Maus, E.D. Geissler, Hans Heuter, and George Constan.

  6. ORAC-DR: Pipelining With Other People's Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Frossie; Bridger, Alan; Wright, Gillian S.; Jenness, Tim; Currie, Malcolm J.; Adamson, Andy

    As part of the UKIRT ORAC project, we have developed a pipeline (orac-dr) for driving on-line data reduction using existing astronomical packages as algorithm engines and display tools. The design is modular and extensible on several levels, allowing it to be easily adapted to a wide variety of instruments. Here we briefly review the design, discuss the robustness and speed of execution issues inherent in such pipelines, and address what constitutes a desirable (in terms of ``buy-in'' effort) engine or tool.

  7. DR Resources for Energy and Ancillary Services in the West (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, M.; Kiliccote, S.

    2014-04-01

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility however, DR in grid models is limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the co-optimization of DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model of the Colorado "test system". We assume each DR resource can provide energy services by either shedding load or shifting its use between different times, as well as operating reserves: frequency regulation, contingency reserve, and flexibility (or ramping) reserve. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves.

  8. The Chicago Board of Education Desegregation Policies and Practices [1975-1985]: A Historical Examination of the Administrations of Superintendents Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and Dr. Ruth Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study will be to examine the policies and practices of two distinguished superintendents of the Chicago Public Schools: Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and the first African American female Superintendent Dr. Ruth Love. Hannon's four year administration extended from 1975 through 1979. Love's administration encompassed the years 1980…

  9. Clinical and molecular studies in full trisomy 22: Further delineation of the phenotype and review of the literature. Reply to Dr. Robinson and Dr. Kalousek

    SciTech Connect

    Bacino, C.A.; Graham, J.M. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    This {open_quotes}Letter to the Editor{close_quotes} responds to the comments by Dr. Robinson and Dr. Kalousek regarding the implications of meiotic versus somatic chromosomal aberrations. The survival time of the patient may depend on the detection of mosicism; the discussion of the existence of full trisomy 22 remains controversial. 2 refs.

  10. The Chicago Board of Education Desegregation Policies and Practices [1975-1985]: A Historical Examination of the Administrations of Superintendents Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and Dr. Ruth Love

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study will be to examine the policies and practices of two distinguished superintendents of the Chicago Public Schools: Dr. Joseph P. Hannon and the first African American female Superintendent Dr. Ruth Love. Hannon's four year administration extended from 1975 through 1979. Love's administration encompassed the years 1980…

  11. Historical vignette: Dr Charles Robson; pioneer Canadian pediatric anesthetist.

    PubMed

    Steward, David J

    2012-03-01

    Charles Robson (Figure 1) was born in New Westminster, British Columbia (now a suburb of Vancouver), in 1884 and graduated in medicine from McGill University in Montreal in 1913. Having interned and with some anesthesia training at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, he was sent overseas to work in a Canadian Army Hospital where he founded a school to train military anesthetists. Returning to Canada in 1919, he joined the staff of the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto as chief anesthetist, a position he held until 1951 (1). During most of this time, he was the sole full-time anesthetist at the hospital; administration of anesthesia at this hospital was not limited to staff anesthetists until 1950 (1).

  12. Census of Blue Stars in SDSS DR8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scibelli, Samantha; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Yanny, Brian

    2014-12-01

    We present a census of the 12,060 spectra of blue objects ((g - r)0 < -0.25) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). As part of the data release, all of the spectra were cross-correlated with 48 template spectra of stars, galaxies, and QSOs to determine the best match. We compared the blue spectra by eye to the templates assigned in SDSS DR8. 10,856 of the objects matched their assigned template, 170 could not be classified due to low signal-to-noise ratio, and 1034 were given new classifications. We identify 7458 DA white dwarfs, 1145 DB white dwarfs, 273 rarer white dwarfs (including carbon, DZ, DQ, and magnetic), 294 subdwarf O stars, 648 subdwarf B stars, 679 blue horizontal branch stars, 1026 blue stragglers, 13 cataclysmic variables, 129 white dwarf-M dwarf binaries, 36 objects with spectra similar to DO white dwarfs, 179, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), and 10 galaxies. We provide two tables of these objects, sample spectra that match the templates, figures showing all of the spectra that were grouped by eye, and diagnostic plots that show the positions, colors, apparent magnitudes, proper motions, etc., for each classification. Future surveys will be able to use templates similar to stars in each of the classes we identify to automatically classify blue stars, including rare types.

  13. CENSUS OF BLUE STARS IN SDSS DR8

    SciTech Connect

    Scibelli, Samantha; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Yanny, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a census of the 12,060 spectra of blue objects ((g – r){sub 0} < –0.25) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). As part of the data release, all of the spectra were cross-correlated with 48 template spectra of stars, galaxies, and QSOs to determine the best match. We compared the blue spectra by eye to the templates assigned in SDSS DR8. 10,856 of the objects matched their assigned template, 170 could not be classified due to low signal-to-noise ratio, and 1034 were given new classifications. We identify 7458 DA white dwarfs, 1145 DB white dwarfs, 273 rarer white dwarfs (including carbon, DZ, DQ, and magnetic), 294 subdwarf O stars, 648 subdwarf B stars, 679 blue horizontal branch stars, 1026 blue stragglers, 13 cataclysmic variables, 129 white dwarf-M dwarf binaries, 36 objects with spectra similar to DO white dwarfs, 179, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), and 10 galaxies. We provide two tables of these objects, sample spectra that match the templates, figures showing all of the spectra that were grouped by eye, and diagnostic plots that show the positions, colors, apparent magnitudes, proper motions, etc., for each classification. Future surveys will be able to use templates similar to stars in each of the classes we identify to automatically classify blue stars, including rare types.

  14. PREFACE: Eighth International Conference on Dissociative Recombination (DR2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guberman, Steven L.; Orel, Ann E.

    2011-07-01

    In dissociative recombination (DR), a molecular ion captures an electron and falls apart. One might initially conclude that this process is relatively simple. However, a review of the DR literature over the past 60 years, since the pioneering papers of Sir David Bates [1], shows that the study of DR has proved to be highly challenging for both theorists and experimentalists. Both this challenge and the ubiquitous importance of the process have made its study rewarding, endlessly interesting, and full of surprises. DR is fundamentally the interaction of an electronic continuum with a vibrational continuum often connected by quasibound intermediate states. Autoionization in the first continuum competes with dissociation in the second. DR occurs at the total energy of an ion plus a free electron and is in the same region as vibrationally excited Rydberg states and other neutral superexcited states. All these states interact with each other prior to dissociation, forming a complex that controls the quantum yields of products. The complexity of the process has required both innovation and ingenuity on the part of both theorists and experimentalists. Over the years, it has become apparent that in order to compare theoretical and experimental results, the experiments must identify the electronic, vibrational and for low mass ions, the rotational state. The traditional disagreement between theoretical and experimental results has been due, in part, to the sensitivity of DR cross sections and rate constants to the state of the recombining ion. Great progress has been made in recent years in both flowing afterglow and storage ring experiments aimed at reducing this uncertainty. The latest advances and insights in theory and experiment were the topics of the Eighth International Conference on Dissociative Recombination held at the Granlibakken Lodge at Lake, Tahoe, California, 16-20 August 2010. The conference was part of a series of conferences on DR that started at Chateau

  15. CENSUS OF BLUE STARS IN SDSS DR8

    SciTech Connect

    Scibelli, Samantha; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Yanny, Brian

    2014-12-02

    In this work, we present a census of the 12,060 spectra of blue objects ($(g-r)_0<-0.25$) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). As part of the data release, all of the spectra were cross-correlated with 48 template spectra of stars, galaxies and QSOs to determine the best match. We compared the blue spectra by eye to the templates assigned in SDSS DR8. 10,856 of the objects matched their assigned template, 170 could not be classified due to low signal-to-noise (S/N), and 1034 were given new classifications. We identify 7458 DA white dwarfs, 1145 DB white dwarfs, 273 rarer white dwarfs (including carbon, DZ, DQ, and magnetic), 294 subdwarf O stars, 648 subdwarf B stars, 679 blue horizontal branch stars, 1026 blue stragglers, 13 cataclysmic variables, 129 white dwarf - M dwarf binaries, 36 objects with spectra similar to DO white dwarfs, 179 QSOs, and 10 galaxies. We provide two tables of these objects, sample spectra that match the templates, figures showing all of the spectra that were grouped by eye, and diagnostic plots that show the positions, colors, apparent magnitudes, proper motions, etc. for each classification. In conclusion, future surveys will be able to use templates similar to stars in each of the classes we identify to classify blue stars, including rare types, automatically.

  16. CENSUS OF BLUE STARS IN SDSS DR8

    DOE PAGES

    Scibelli, Samantha; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; ...

    2014-12-02

    In this work, we present a census of the 12,060 spectra of blue objects (more » $$(g-r)_0<-0.25$$) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8 (DR8). As part of the data release, all of the spectra were cross-correlated with 48 template spectra of stars, galaxies and QSOs to determine the best match. We compared the blue spectra by eye to the templates assigned in SDSS DR8. 10,856 of the objects matched their assigned template, 170 could not be classified due to low signal-to-noise (S/N), and 1034 were given new classifications. We identify 7458 DA white dwarfs, 1145 DB white dwarfs, 273 rarer white dwarfs (including carbon, DZ, DQ, and magnetic), 294 subdwarf O stars, 648 subdwarf B stars, 679 blue horizontal branch stars, 1026 blue stragglers, 13 cataclysmic variables, 129 white dwarf - M dwarf binaries, 36 objects with spectra similar to DO white dwarfs, 179 QSOs, and 10 galaxies. We provide two tables of these objects, sample spectra that match the templates, figures showing all of the spectra that were grouped by eye, and diagnostic plots that show the positions, colors, apparent magnitudes, proper motions, etc. for each classification. In conclusion, future surveys will be able to use templates similar to stars in each of the classes we identify to classify blue stars, including rare types, automatically.« less

  17. M-giant star candidates identified in LAMOST DR 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jing; Lépine, Sébastien; Li, Jing; Chen, Li; Hou, Jin-Liang; Yang, Ming; Li, Guang-Wei; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yong-Hui

    2015-08-01

    We perform a discrimination procedure with the spectral index diagram of TiO5 and CaH2+CaH3 to separate M giants from M dwarfs. Using the M giant spectra identified from LAMOST DR1 with high signal-to-noise ratio, we have successfully assembled a set of M giant templates, which show more reliable spectral features. Combining with the M dwarf/subdwarf templates in Zhong et al., we present an extended library of M-type templates which includes not only M dwarfs with a well-defined temperature and metallicity grid but also M giants with subtypes from M0 to M6. Then, the template-fitting algorithm is used to automatically identify and classify M giant stars from LAMOST DR1. The resulting catalog of M giant stars is cross-matched with 2MASS JHKs and WISE W1/W2 infrared photometry. In addition, we calculated the heliocentric radial velocity of all M giant stars by using the cross-correlation method with the template spectrum in a zero-velocity rest frame. Using the relationship between the absolute infrared magnitude MJ and our classified spectroscopic subtype, we derived the spectroscopic distance of M giants with uncertainties of about 40%. A catalog of 8639 M giants is provided. As an additional result of this analysis, we also present a catalog of 101 690 M dwarfs/subdwarfs which are processed by our classification pipeline.

  18. Ibuprofen enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis through DR5 upregulation.

    PubMed

    Todo, Momoko; Horinaka, Mano; Tomosugi, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Ryoichi; Ikawa, Haruna; Sowa, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Hideki; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Otsuji, Eigo; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2013-11-01

    Numerous human chemoprevention studies have demonstrated that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) possess chemopreventive effects against a variety of malignant tumors. However, there have been many clinical studies on aspirin, but not ibuprofen, even though ibuprofen is one of the most clinically and safely used NSAIDs showing potent anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover, we reported that many chemopreventive agents enhance the apoptosis-inducing effects of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), which is known to be crucial for cancer prevention. We, therefore, investigated whether ibuprofen enhances the cytocidal effect of TRAIL and found that ibuprofen markedly stimulated the apoptosis-inducing efficacy of TRAIL against human colon cancer HCT116 cells. As detected by western blot analysis and real-time RT-PCR, ibuprofen upregulated the expression of death receptor 5 (DR5), a TRAIL receptor. TRAIL-induced apoptosis enhanced by ibuprofen was effectively decreased by a caspase inhibitor and dominant-negative DR5. Noteworthy, co-treatment of ibuprofen with TRAIL did not enhance apoptosis in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). These results demonstrated that ibuprofen and TRAIL synergistically induced apoptosis in human colon cancer HCT116 cells but not in normal PBMCs, raising the possibility that ibuprofen may be promising as a safe chemopreventive agent against colon cancer.

  19. Predominance of DR3 in Somali children with type 1 diabetes in the twin cities, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Sunni, Muna; Noble, Janelle A; Yu, Liping; Mahamed, Zahra; Lane, Julie A; Dhunkal, Abdirahman M; Bellin, Melena D; Nathan, Brandon; Kyllo, Jennifer; Abuzzahab, M Jennifer; Gottlieb, Peter A; Babu, Sunanda; Armstrong, Taylor; Moran, Antoinette

    2017-03-01

    Minnesota is home to the largest Somali population in USA, and pediatric diabetes teams are seeing increasing numbers of Somali children with diabetes. To assess the immune basis of diabetes in Somali children in the Twin Cities, Minnesota. A total of 31 Somali children ≤19 yr were treated for type 1 diabetes (T1D) at the University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital and Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota underwent analysis of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles (n = 30) and diabetes autoantibodies [glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65), islet antigen 2 (IA-2), zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8); n = 31]. HLA alleles were analyzed in 49 Somalis without diabetes (controls). Anti-transglutaminase autoantibodies (TGA) for celiac disease were also measured. In Somali children with T1D aged 13.5 ± 5 yr (35% female, disease duration 6.5 ± 3.6 yr), the most common HLA allele was DRB1*03:01 (93%, compared with 45% of Somali controls), followed by DRB1*13:02 (27%). There was a relatively low frequency of DR4 (13%). Controls showed a similar pattern. All 31 participants were positive for at least one diabetes autoantibody. Insulin antibodies were positive in 84% (all were on insulin). Excluding insulin antibodies, 23 (74%) subjects tested positive for at least one other diabetes autoantibody; 32% had 1 autoantibody, 32% had 2 autoantibodies, and 10% had 3 autoantibodies. GAD65 autoantibodies were found in 56% of subjects, IA-2 in 29%, and ZnT8 in 26%. Four (13%) were TGA positive. The autoantibody and HLA profiles of Somali children with diabetes are consistent with autoimmune diabetes. Their HLA profile is unique with an exceptionally high prevalence of DRB1*03:01 allele and relative paucity of DR4 alleles compared with African Americans with T1D. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Pathogenesis of human diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC): current insights and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Servin, Alain L

    2014-10-01

    The pathogenicity and clinical pertinence of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli expressing the Afa/Dr adhesins (Afa/Dr DAEC) in urinary tract infections (UTIs) and pregnancy complications are well established. In contrast, the implication of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC in diarrhea is still under debate. These strains are age dependently involved in diarrhea in children, are apparently not involved in diarrhea in adults, and can also be asymptomatic intestinal microbiota strains in children and adult. This comprehensive review analyzes the epidemiology and diagnosis and highlights recent progress which has improved the understanding of Afa/Dr DAEC pathogenesis. Here, I summarize the roles of Afa/Dr DAEC virulence factors, including Afa/Dr adhesins, flagella, Sat toxin, and pks island products, in the development of specific mechanisms of pathogenicity. In intestinal epithelial polarized cells, the Afa/Dr adhesins trigger cell membrane receptor clustering and activation of the linked cell signaling pathways, promote structural and functional cell lesions and injuries in intestinal barrier, induce proinflammatory responses, create angiogenesis, instigate epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like events, and lead to pks-dependent DNA damage. UTI-associated Afa/Dr DAEC strains, following adhesin-membrane receptor cell interactions and activation of associated lipid raft-dependent cell signaling pathways, internalize in a microtubule-dependent manner within urinary tract epithelial cells, develop a particular intracellular lifestyle, and trigger a toxin-dependent cell detachment. In response to Afa/Dr DAEC infection, the host epithelial cells generate antibacterial defense responses. Finally, I discuss a hypothetical role of intestinal Afa/Dr DAEC strains that can act as "silent pathogens" with the capacity to emerge as "pathobionts" for the development of inflammatory bowel disease and intestinal carcinogenesis.