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Sample records for delaware basin class

  1. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.

    2001-11-04

    The objective of this Class III project was demonstrate that reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by CO2 flood can increase production from slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, focused on Geraldine Ford and East Ford fields, which are Delaware Mountain Group fields that produce from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The demonstration phase of the project was a CO2 flood conducted in East Ford field, which is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit.

  2. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Mendez, Daniel L.

    2001-05-08

    The objective of this Class 3 project was demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstone's of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover oil more economically through geologically based field development. This project was focused on East Ford field, a Delaware Mountain Group field that produced from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The field, discovered in 9160, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit. A CO2 flood was being conducted in the unit, and this flood is the Phase 2 demonstration for the project.

  3. Delaware River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, Jeffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    Assessing the quality of water in every location of the Nation would not be practical. Therefore, NAWQA investigations are conducted within 59 selected areas called study units (fig. 1). These study units encompass important river and aquifer systems in the United States and represent the diverse geographic, waterresource, land-use, and water-use characteristics of the Nation. The Delaware River Basin is one of 15 study units in which work began in 1996. Water-quality sampling in the study unit will begin in 1999. This fact sheet provides a brief overview of the NAWQA program, describes the Delaware River Basin study unit, identifies the major water-quality issues in the basin, and documents the plan of study that will be followed during the study-unit investigation.

  4. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Zirczy, Helena H.

    2000-05-24

    The objective of this Class 3 project was to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, was completed this year, and Phase 2 began. The project is focused on East Ford field, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit. A CO{sub 2} flood is being conducted in the unit, and this flood is the Phase 2 demonstration for the project.

  5. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2000-09-28

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  6. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  7. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  8. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  9. Conservation in the Delaware River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Featherstone, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) has embarked on an ambitious water conservation program to reduce the demand for water. Conservation has become an integral component of the commission`s strategy to manage water supplies in the four-state Delaware River Basin. The program includes both regulatory and educational initiatives. DRBC has adopted five conservation regulations, which pertain to source metering, service metering, leak detection and repair, water conservation performance standards for plumbing fixtures and fittings, and requirements for water conservation plans and rate structures. DRBC also sponsors information and education events, such as symposiums on selected topics and water conservation technology transfer sessions with major industrial and commercial groups.

  10. Hydrogeology of the West Branch Delaware River basin, Delaware County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, began a study of the hydrogeology of the West Branch Delaware River (Cannonsville Reservoir) watershed. There has been recent interest by energy companies in developing the natural gas reserves that are trapped within the Marcellus Shale, which is part of the Hamilton Group of Devonian age that underlies all the West Branch Delaware River Basin. Knowing the extent and thickness of stratified-drift (sand and gravel) aquifers within this basin can help State and Federal regulatory agencies evaluate any effects on these aquifers that gas-well drilling might produce. This report describes the hydrogeology of the 455-square-mile basin in the southwestern Catskill Mountain region of southeastern New York and includes a detailed surficial geologic map of the basin. Analysis of surficial geologic data indicates that the most widespread surficial geologic unit within the basin is till, which is present as deposits of ablation till in major stream valleys and as thick deposits of lodgment till that fill upland basins. Till and colluvium (remobilized till) cover about 89 percent of the West Branch Delaware River Basin, whereas stratified drift (outwash and ice-contact deposits) and alluvium account for 8.9 percent. The Cannonsville Reservoir occupies about 1.9 percent of the basin area. Large areas of outwash and ice-contact deposits occupy the West Branch Delaware River valley along its entire length. These deposits form a stratified-drift aquifer that ranges in thickness from 40 to 50 feet (ft) in the upper West Branch Delaware River valley, from 70 to 140 ft in the middle West Branch Delaware River valley, and from 60 to 70 ft in the lower West Branch Delaware River valley. The gas-bearing Marcellus Shale underlies the entire West Branch Delaware River Basin and ranges in thickness from 600 to 650 ft along the northern divide of the basin to 750 ft thick

  11. Daily Flow Model of the Delaware River Basin. Appendices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    AD-AlIO 113 CAP DRESSLER AND MCKEE INC ANNANDALE VA F/6 13/ 2 DAILY FLOW MODEL OF THE DELAWARE RIVER BASIN. APPENDICES.(U) SEP 81 DACW6178-C-0127...DELAWARE RIVER LAJ I I. I "" 01 22 02 046 APPENDICES IBOOK 2 of 2 September 1981 ..REPORT t4’+ bA6 Af- 5 ..O I Z o 1 - ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o l kN...KEY FOR SERIES OF DOCUMENTATION MAIN REPORT (Book 1 of 2 ) VOLUME I - Phase I Report for Development ot a Daily Flow Model of the Delaware River

  12. Selected streamflow data for the Delaware River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schopp, Robert D.; Gillespie, Brian D.

    1979-01-01

    Selected streamflow data for the Delaware River basin include runoff-precipitation relationships for 28 selected subbasins for the period 1941-70; low-flow frequency curves for four mainstem Delaware River sites; monthly comparative duration curves and twenty year hydrographs at Montague and Trenton, New Jersey; and flow duration tables based on observed daily streamflow for gaging stations near 21 proposed dam sites. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Ecology and restoration of the Delaware River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.K. ); Miller, E.W. . Dept. of Geography); Sage, L.E. )

    1988-01-01

    This book describes and analyzes the physical, biological and human problems that have evolved over time in the utilizations of water in the Delaware River Basin. It discusses the environmental problems of a major river basin, and provides solutions to these problems.

  14. The Delaware River Basin Landsat-Data Collection System Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, R. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. This experiment successfully demonstrated that standard U.S. Geological Survey field instrumentation could be easily interfaced with the LANDSAT-DCS and the data made to flow smoothly to water resources management agencies. The experiment was conducted in the Delaware River basin. A truly operational system could not be deployed.

  15. Chemical character of streams in the Delaware River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, Peter W.; McCarthy, Leo T.

    1963-01-01

    The water chemistry of streams in the Delaware River basin falls into eight general groups, when mapped according to the prevalent dissolved-solids content and the predominant ions normally found in the water. The approximate regions representing each of these iso-chemical quality groups are shown on the accompanying base map of the drainage basin.

  16. ACT Profile Report: State. Graduating Class 2016. Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2016

    2016-01-01

    This report provides information about the performance of Delaware's 2016 graduating seniors who took the ACT as sophomores, juniors, or seniors; and self-reported at the time of testing that they were scheduled to graduate in 2016. Beginning with the Graduating Class of 2013, all students whose scores are college reportable, both standard and…

  17. Hydrologic effects of climate change in the Delaware River basin

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, G.J., Jr.; Ayers, M.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The Thornthwaite water balance and combinations of temperature and precipitation changes representing climate change were used to estimate changes in seasonal soil-moisture and runoff in the Delaware River basin. Winter warming may cause a greater proportion of precipitation in the northern part of the basin to fall as rain, which may increase winter runoff and decrease spring and summer runoff. Estimates of total annual runoff indicate that a 5 percent increase in precipitation would be needed to counteract runoff decreases resulting from a warming of 2C; a 15 percent increase for a warming of 4C. A warming of 2 to 4C, without precipitation increases, may cause a 9 to 25 percent decrease in runoff. The general circulation model derived changes in annual runoff ranged from {minus}39 to +9 percent. Results generally agree with those obtained in studies elsewhere. The changes in runoff agree in direction but differ in magnitude. In this humid temperate climate, where precipitation is evenly distributed over the year, decreases in snow accumulation in the northern part of the basin and increases in evapotranspiration throughout the basin could change the timing of runoff and significantly reduce total annual water availability unless precipitation were to increase concurrently.

  18. Forward stratigraphic modeling of the Permian of the Delaware Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Qiucheng, Ye; Kerans, C.; Bowman, S. )

    1996-01-01

    Permian platform-to-basin strata of the Delaware Basin In west Texas and New Mexico represent one of the world's most complete, best studied, and most hydrocarbon productive records of this geologic period in the world. This superb marriage of a refined stratigraphic framework and active exploration provided impetus to develop a forward stratigraphic model of this section to better predict the distribution of reservoir and seal relationships. The approximately 30 m.y. interval modeled is composed of 2 km of platform strata and 3 km of basinal strata divided into 8 composite sequences (average 3 m.y. duration) and 45 high-frequency sequences (400 ky m.y. duration). A 130 km dip section through the basin margin Guadalupe/Deleware Mountain outcrop is inversely modeled to derive local tectonic subsidence and a sea level curve for the Permian. In this process, the highest and lowest shoreline positions of each sequence are interpreted based on facies description which are assumed to approximate the highest and lowest relative sea level. A eustatic sea level curve is calculated by restoring these shoreline positions and removing local tectonic subsidence using a polynomial fit to the derived relative sea level curve. The quantitatively constrained curve for the Permian contains 2nd, 3rd, and 4th order 180m. This quantitatively constrained accommodation history (calculated eustatic curve and subsidence history) are input into the PHIL forward modeling program. Model variables of sediment supply are depositional system are adjusted to match known outcrop relations. The resulting model is potentially capable of predicting stratigraphy elsewhere in the basin using only subsidence history data from the inverse model.

  19. Forward stratigraphic modeling of the Permian of the Delaware Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Qiucheng, Ye; Kerans, C.; Bowman, S.

    1996-12-31

    Permian platform-to-basin strata of the Delaware Basin In west Texas and New Mexico represent one of the world`s most complete, best studied, and most hydrocarbon productive records of this geologic period in the world. This superb marriage of a refined stratigraphic framework and active exploration provided impetus to develop a forward stratigraphic model of this section to better predict the distribution of reservoir and seal relationships. The approximately 30 m.y. interval modeled is composed of 2 km of platform strata and 3 km of basinal strata divided into 8 composite sequences (average 3 m.y. duration) and 45 high-frequency sequences (400 ky m.y. duration). A 130 km dip section through the basin margin Guadalupe/Deleware Mountain outcrop is inversely modeled to derive local tectonic subsidence and a sea level curve for the Permian. In this process, the highest and lowest shoreline positions of each sequence are interpreted based on facies description which are assumed to approximate the highest and lowest relative sea level. A eustatic sea level curve is calculated by restoring these shoreline positions and removing local tectonic subsidence using a polynomial fit to the derived relative sea level curve. The quantitatively constrained curve for the Permian contains 2nd, 3rd, and 4th order 180m. This quantitatively constrained accommodation history (calculated eustatic curve and subsidence history) are input into the PHIL forward modeling program. Model variables of sediment supply are depositional system are adjusted to match known outcrop relations. The resulting model is potentially capable of predicting stratigraphy elsewhere in the basin using only subsidence history data from the inverse model.

  20. 33 CFR 165.556 - Regulated Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. 165.556 Section 165.556 Navigation and..., Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. (a) Location. The following area is a regulated navigation area: All waters of the Chesapeake and Delaware (C & D) Canal within the anchorage basin at Chesapeake...

  1. Water resources: Delaware River Basin Commission's management of certain water activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Delaware River Basin serves the states of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware. Since 1975 the Commission has shifted its emphasis from constructing water resource projects to using water conservation techniques and strategies in order to meet water supply and streamflow needs. Its 1980 population growth projection for the basin was generally accurate, but data on water use are not always collected or reliable. The Commission's policies for approving permits for large users of water have become more restrictive within the past 6 years, but except for major projects, permits are approved without knowledge of their impact on streamflow in the basin.

  2. A checklist of the aquatic invertebrates of the Delaware River Basin, 1990-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bilger, Michael D.; Riva-Murray, Karen; Wall, Gretchen L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper details a compilation of aquatic-invertebrate taxa collected at 1,080 sites as part of 13 surface-water-quality studies completed by selected Federal, state, and local environmental agencies during 1990-2000, within the 32,893-km2 area of the Delaware River Basin. This checklist is intended to be a 'working list' of aquatic invertebrates that can be applied successfully to the calculation and interpretation of various biological estimators to determine the status of water quality and can be used as a foundation to document the current state of biodiversity. It is not intended as a comprehensive historical inventory of the literature or of private and public holdings. A total of 11 phyla comprising 20 classes, 46 orders, 196 families, 685 genera, and 835 species were recorded.

  3. Structural relations between Marfa, Marathon, Val Verde, and Delaware basins of west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, G.R.; Smith, K.J.

    1985-02-01

    The Marfa, Marathon, Val Verde, and Delaware basins and related uplifts formed the major structural elements of the southwestern continental margin of North America during the Paleozoic. In contrast with the relatively simple relationships where the southern Oklahoma aulacogen intersects the Ouachita orogenic belt, structural relationships in the area of these basins are very complex. Various geologic evidence points to an allochthonous Marathon basin. However, a prominent gravity anomaly is associated with the Ouachita system as it extends from western Arkansas through Oklahoma and Texas into northern Mexico. If this anomaly is the signature of the early Paleozoic continental margin, then the location of the Marathon basin with respect to this anomaly suggests lateral displacements have been only on the scale of tens of kilometers. The Delaware basin seems clearly analogous to the Anadarko basin in that it formed as a result of reactivation of a major crustal flaw (not necessarily a rift). This reactivation was a result of the Ouachita orogeny. The Marfa basin is also flanked by a linear gravity high and basement uplift. The relationship of this anomaly to the gravity high associated with the Ouachita system suggests that the Marfa basin may be more analogous to the Delaware basin that foreland basins such as the Ft. Worth and Arkoma. A prominent gravity high that extends into northern Mexico is associated with the Devil's River uplift, and the relationships between this feature, the Val Verde basin, and adjacent structures suggest major deformation on a crustal scale.

  4. Water quality trends in the Delaware River Basin (USA) from 1980 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, Gerald J; Homsey, Andrew R; Belden, Andrew C; Sanchez, Jessica Rittler

    2011-06-01

    In 1940, the tidal Delaware River was "one of the most grossly polluted areas in the United States." During the 1950s, water quality was so poor along the river at Philadelphia that zero oxygen levels prevented migration of American shad leading to near extirpation of the species. Since then, water quality in the Delaware Basin has improved with implementation of the 1961 Delaware River Basin Compact and 1970s Federal Clean Water Act Amendments. At 15 gages along the Delaware River and major tributaries between 1980 and 2005, water quality for dissolved oxygen, phosphorus, nitrogen, and sediment improved at 39%, remained constant at 51%, and degraded at 10% of the stations. Since 1980, improved water-quality stations outnumbered degraded stations by a 4 to 1 margin. Water quality remains good in the nontidal river above Trenton and, while improved, remains fair to poor for phosphorus and nitrogen in the tidal estuary near Philadelphia and in the Lehigh and Schuylkill tributaries. Water quality is good in heavily forested watersheds (>50%) and poor in highly cultivated watersheds. Water quality recovery in the Delaware Basin is coincident with implementation of environmental laws enacted in the 1960s and 1970s and is congruent with return of striped bass, shad, blue crab, and bald eagle populations.

  5. Water Quality in the Delaware River Basin, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Delaware, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, Jeffrey M.; Riva-Murray, Karen; Hickman, R. Edward; Chichester, Douglas C.; Brightbill, Robin A.; Romanok, Kristin M.; Bilger, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    This report contains the major findings of a 1998-2001 assessment of water quality in the Delaware River Basin. It is one of a series of reports by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program that present major findings in 51 major river basins and aquifer systems across the Nation. In these reports, water quality is discussed in terms of local, State, and regional issues. Conditions in a particular basin or aquifer system are compared to conditions found elsewhere and to selected national benchmarks, such as those for drinking-water quality and the protection of aquatic organisms. This report is intended for individuals working with water-resource issues in Federal, State, or local agencies, universities, public interest groups, or in the private sector. The information will be useful in addressing a number of current issues, such as the effects of agricultural and urban land use on water quality, human health, drinking water, source-water protection, hypoxia and excessive growth of algae and plants, pesticide registration, and monitoring and sampling strategies. This report is also for individuals who wish to know more about the quality of streams and ground water in areas near where they live, and how that quality compares to the quality of water in other areas across the Nation. The water-quality conditions in the Delaware River Basin summarized in this report are discussed in detail in other reports that can be accessed from http://nj.water.usgs.gov/nawqa/delr/. Detailed technical information, data and analyses, collection and analytical methodology, models, graphs, and maps that support the findings presented in this report, in addition to reports in this series from other basins, can be accessed from the national NAWQA Web site (http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa).

  6. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin)

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P.; Flanders, W.A.; Guzman, J.I.; Zirczy, H.

    1999-06-08

    The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through geologically based field development. This year the project focused on reservoir characterization of the East Ford unit, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey Sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit; it contained an estimated 19.8 million barrels (MMbbl) of original oil in place. Petrophysical characterization of the East Ford unit was accomplished by integrating core and log data and quantifying petrophysical properties from wireline logs. Most methods of petrophysical analysis that had been developed during an earlier study of the Ford Geraldine unit were successfully transferred to the East Ford unit. The approach that was used to interpret water saturation from resistivity logs, however, had to be modified because in some East Ford wells the log-calculated water saturation was too high and inconsistent with observations made during the actual production. Log-porosity to core-porosity transforms and core-porosity to core-permeability transforms were derived from the East Ford reservoir. The petrophysical data were used to map porosity, permeability, net pay, water saturation, mobil-oil saturation, and other reservoir properties.

  7. Simulated effects of climatic change on runoff and drought in the Delaware River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayers, Mark A.; Tasker, Gary D.; Wolock, David M.; McCabe, Gregory J.; Hay, Lauren E.; ,

    1990-01-01

    Various projection of climatic change were applied to watershed models of the Delaware River basin. Simulations indicate that a warming could reduce annual runoff by as much as 25 percent if current precipitation patterns continue. Simulations indicate that the largest changes in basin drought are in response to relatively small changes in precipitation. Basin drought was less sensitive to increases in temperature, reservoir capacity, ground-water pumpage during drought, and consumptive water use--in that order of importance. The effects of global warming on basin runoff and drought cannot be determined precisely, as yet, principally because of the unreliability of precipitation projections.

  8. Flood of September 18-19, 2004 in the Upper Delaware River Basin, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, Lloyd T.

    2005-01-01

    The interaction between the remnants of tropical depression Ivan and a frontal boundary in the upper Delaware River basin on September 18-19, 2004, produced 4 to more than 6 inches of rainfall over a 5-county area within a 24-hour period. Significant flooding occurred on the East Branch Delaware River and its tributaries, and the main stem of the Delaware River. The resultant flooding damaged more than 100 homes and displaced more than 1,000 people. All of the counties within the basin were declared Federal disaster areas, but flood damage in New York was most pronounced in Delaware, Orange, and Sullivan Counties. Flood damage totaled more than $10 million. Peak water-surface elevations at some study sites in the basin exceeded the 500-year flood elevation as documented in flood-insurance studies by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Flood peaks at some long-term U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations were the highest ever recorded.

  9. Distribution and generation of the overpressure system, eastern Delaware Basin, western Texas and southern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, M.; Baker, M.R.; LeMone, D.V.

    1994-09-01

    Three subsurface pressure systems have been identified in the Delaware basin: an upper normal pressure system, a middle overpressure system, and a lower normal pressure system. The overpressure system occurs in the eastern Delaware basin, covering six Texas and New Mexico counties. The depth of the overpressure system ranges from 3100 to 5400 m. The normal fluid pressure gradient is 0.0103 MPa/m in the eastern Delaware basin. The highest overpressure gradient, however, approaches 0.02 MPa/m, which is close to the lithostatic gradient of 0.0231 MPa/m. An area of excess pressure occurs within the system where the highest excess pressure reaches 60 MPa. Local underpressured areas due to production are found in the lower normal pressure system in the War-Wink field area. Overpressure in the eastern Delaware basin is mainly associated with Mississippian, Pennsylvanian, and Permian (Wolfcampian) shale sequences, which also are major source rocks in the basin. Corrected bottom-hole temperature measurements indicate that the geothermal gradient within the overpressure zone is 25.1{degrees}C/km, which is higher than the basin`s average geothermal gradient of 21{degrees}C/km. Temperatures at the top and bottom of the overpressure system are about 80 and 115{degrees}C, respectively. The oil window in the War-Wink field is coincident with the overpressure system, which implies that hydrocarbon generation and migration are active in the overpressure system. A two-stage overpressure model is proposed. Hydrocarbon maturation combined with mechanical compaction disequilibrium and clay dehydration are the initial causes for overpressure generation due to an abnormal increase of fluid volume and pore space. Subsequently, the increase in temperature due to a decrease of thermal conductivity and fluid migration within the preexisting overpressure system would reinforce further overpressuring due to the fluid thermal expansion.

  10. Reservoir Operations and Flow Modeling to Support Decision Making in the Delaware River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinodoz, H. A.

    2006-12-01

    About five percent of the US population depends on the waters from the Delaware River Basin for its water supply, including New York City and Philadelphia. Water management in the basin is governed by a compact signed in 1961 by the four basin states and the federal government. The compact created the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) and gave it broad powers to plan, regulate, and manage the development of the basin water resources. The compact also recognized a pre-existing (1954) U.S. Supreme Court Decree that grants the City of New York the right to export up to 800 million gallons per day out of the basin, provided that a prescribed minimum flow is met at Montague, New Jersey for the use of the lower-basin states. The Delaware River Basin Compact also allows the DRBC to adjust the releases and diversions under the Decree, subject to the unanimous consent of the decree parties. This mechanism has been used several times over the last 30 years, to implement and modify rules governing drought operations, instream flows, minimum flow targets, and control of salinity intrusion. In every case, decision makers have relied upon extensive modeling of alternative proposals, using a basin-wide daily flow model. Often, stakeholders have modified and used the same model to test and refine their proposals prior to consideration by the decision makers. The flow model has been modified over the years, to simulate new features and processes in a river system partially controlled by more than ten reservoirs. The flow model has proved to be an adaptable tool, able to simulate the dynamics of a complex system driven by conflicting objectives. This presentation reviews the characteristics of the daily flow model in its current form, discuss how model simulations are used to inform the decision-making process, and provide a case study of a recent modification of the system-wide drought operating plan.

  11. Records available to September 30, 1956, on use of water in the Delaware Basin Project area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kammerer, John C.

    1957-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize data on the use of water in the Delaware Basin Project area (fig. 2) and to list the principal data sources that are available in published form. The tables and bibliography will assist Geological Survey personnel assigned to the Delaware Basin Project in evaluating the scope and deficiencies of previous studies of the basin. Information is also given on the use of water by public supplies in the New York-New Jersey region comprising the New York City Metropolitan Area and in the remaining north-central and south-eastern parts of New Jersey. These regions may depend increasingly on water from the Delaware River basin for part of their public supplies. The Geological Survey has the responsibility for appraising and describing the water resources of the Nation as a guide to use, development, control, and conservation of these resources. Cooperative Federal-State water-resources investigations in the Delaware Basin States have been carried on the the Geological Survey for more than 50 years. In July 1956 the Survey began the "Delaware Basin Project," a hydrologic study of the Delaware River basin in order to: 1) Determine present status and trends in water availability, quality, and use, 2) assess and improve the adequacy of the Survey's basic water data program in the basin, 3) interpret and evaluate the water-resources data in terms of past and possible future water-use and land-use practices, and 4) disseminate promptly the results of this investigation for the benefit of all interested agencies and the general public. The Geological Survey is working closely with the U.S. Corps of Engineers and other cooperating Federal and State agencies in providing water data which will contribute to the present coordinated investigation aimed at developing a plan for long-range water development in the Delaware River basin. Estimates of quantities of water used are given for water withdrawn from streams and aquifers during calendar

  12. Hydrologic aspects of the 1998-99 drought in the Delaware River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulachok, Gary N.; Krejmas, Bruce E.; Soden, Heidi L.

    2000-01-01

    A notable drought in the Delaware River Basin during late 1998 and most of 1999 had a major effect on surface and subsurface components of the hydrologic system. The drought conditions resulted from anomalous patterns in the general atmospheric circulation that diverted Gulf and subtropical Atlantic moisture away from the basin. From September 1998 to August 1999, the accumulated precipitation deficiency was greater than 12 inches in the part of the basin above Trenton, N.J. Flows in some streams, mainly in the middle and lower parts of the basin, decreased to levels near or less than those measured during the drought of the 1960's, the most severe drought of record in the basin. On several dates in August 1999, combined storage in three New York City water-supply reservoirs in the upper Delaware River Basin decreased by more than 2 billion gallons per day. The drought had a pronounced effect on ground-water levels, as the combination of below-normal recharge and elevated rates of evapotranspiration produced abnormal water-level declines and record low water levels in much of the basin. The drought was broken in mid-September 1999 when the remnants of Tropical Storm Floyd delivered drenching rains throughout the basin.

  13. Daily Flow Model of the Delaware River Basin. Main Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    of the Catskills and adjacent mountains . In the lower portion of the basin rolling hills gradually diminish to the low areas in the Atlantic Coastal... Mountain range which runs northeasterly through the middle of the basin. The upper basin consists of the eastern slopes of the Poconos and the western slopes

  14. Permian Bone Spring formation: Sandstone play in the Delaware basin. Part I - slope

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, S.L.

    1997-08-01

    New exploration in the Permian (Leonardian) Bone Spring formation has indicated regional potential in several sandstone sections across portions of the northern Delaware basin. Significant production has been established in the first, second, and third Bone Spring sandstones, as well as in a new reservoir interval, the Avalon sandstone, above the first Bone Spring sandstone. These sandstones were deposited as submarine-fan systems within the northern Delaware basin during periods of lowered sea level. The Bone Spring as a whole consists of alternating carbonate and siliciclastic intervals representing the downdip equivalents to thick Abo-Yeso/Wichita-Clear Fork carbonate buildups along the Leonardian shelf margin. Hydrocarbon exploration in the Bone Spring has traditionally focused on debris-flow carbonate deposits restricted to the paleoslope. Submarine-fan systems, in contrast, extend a considerable distance basinward of these deposits and have been recently proven productive as much as 40-48 km south of the carbonate trend.

  15. Regional well-log correlation in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Borns, D.J.; Shaffer, S.E.

    1985-09-01

    Although well logs provide the most complete record of stratigraphy and structure in the northern Delaware Basin, regional interpretations of these logs generate problems of ambiguous lithologic signatures and on-hole anomalies. Interpretation must therefore be based on log-to-log correlation rather than on inferences from single logs. In this report, logs from 276 wells were used to make stratigraphic picks of Ochoan horizons (the Rustler, Salado, and Castile Formations) in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin. Current log correlation suggests that: (1) the Castile is characterized by lateral thickening and thinning; (2) some Castile thinnings are of Permian age; (3) irregular topography in the Guadalupian Bell Canyon Formation may produce apparent structures in the overlying Ochoan units; and (4) extensive dissolution of the Salado is not apparent in the area of the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) site. 13 refs., 37 figs.

  16. Estimated use of water in the Delaware River Basin in Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutson, Susan S.; Linsey, Kristin S.; Ludlow, Russell A.; Reyes, Betzaida; Shourds, Jennifer L.

    2016-11-07

    The Delaware River Basin (DRB) was selected as a Focus Area Study in 2011 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the USGS National Water Census. The National Water Census is a USGS research program that focuses on national water availability and use and then develops new water accounting tools and assesses water availability at both the regional and national scales. One of the water management needs that the DRB study addressed, and that was identified by stakeholder groups from the DRB, was to improve the integration of state water use and water-supply data and to provide the compiled water use information to basin users. This water use information was also used in the hydrologic modeling and ecological components of the study.Instream and offstream water use was calculated for 2010 for the DRB based on information received from Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania. Water withdrawal, interbasin transfers, return flow, and hydroelectric power generation release data were compiled for 11 categories by hydrologic subregion, basin, subbasin, and subwatershed. Data availability varied by state. Site-specific data were used whenever possible to calculate public supply, irrigation (golf courses, nurseries, sod farms, and crops), aquaculture, self-supplied industrial, commercial, mining, thermoelectric, and hydroelectric power withdrawals. Where site-specific data were not available, primarily for crop irrigation, livestock, and domestic use, various techniques were used to estimate water withdrawals.Total water withdrawals in the Delaware River Basin were calculated to be about 7,130 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) in 2010. Calculations of withdrawals by source indicate that freshwater withdrawals were about 4,130 Mgal/d (58 percent of the total) and the remaining 3,000 Mgal/d (42 percent) were from saline water. Total surface-water withdrawals were calculated to be 6,590 Mgal/d, or 92 percent of the total; about 54 percent (3,590 Mgal/d) of surface

  17. Preliminary analysis of ERTS-relayed water resources data in the Delaware River Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary analysis of ERTS-DCS data from water-resources stations in the Delaware River Basin indicates that the Data-Collection System is performing well. Data-Collections Platforms have been successfully interfaced with five stream-gaging station and three ground-water observation wells and are being interfaced with 12 water-quality monitors in the basin. Data are being relayed during four or five ERTS orbital passes per day, which is within the design specifications of the ERTS-DCS.

  18. Estimation of daily mean streamflow for ungaged stream locations in the Delaware River Basin, water years 1960–2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckey, Marla H.

    2016-06-09

    The ability to characterize baseline streamflow conditions, compare them with current conditions, and assess effects of human activities on streamflow is fundamental to water-management programs addressing water allocation, human-health issues, recreation needs, and establishment of ecological flow criteria. The U.S. Geological Survey, through the National Water Census, has developed the Delaware River Basin Streamflow Estimator Tool (DRB-SET) to estimate baseline (minimally altered) and altered (affected by regulation, diversion, mining, or other anthropogenic activities) and altered streamflow at a daily time step for ungaged stream locations in the Delaware River Basin for water years 1960–2010. Daily mean baseline streamflow is estimated by using the QPPQ method to equate streamflow expressed as a percentile from the flow-duration curve (FDC) for a particular day at an ungaged stream location with the percentile from a FDC for the same day at a hydrologically similar gaged location where streamflow is measured. Parameter-based regression equations were developed for 22 exceedance probabilities from the FDC for ungaged stream locations in the Delaware River Basin. Water use data from 2010 is used to adjust the baseline daily mean streamflow generated from the QPPQ method at ungaged stream locations in the Delaware River Basin to reflect current, or altered, conditions. To evaluate the effectiveness of the overall QPPQ method contained within DRB-SET, a comparison of observed and estimated daily mean streamflows was performed for 109 reference streamgages in and near the Delaware River Basin. The Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) values were computed as a measure of goodness of fit. The NSE values (using log10 streamflow values) ranged from 0.22 to 0.98 (median of 0.90) for 45 streamgages in the Upper Delaware River Basin and from -0.37 to 0.98 (median of 0.79) for 41 streamgages in the Lower Delaware River Basin.

  19. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin)

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew G. Cole; George B. Asquith; Jose I. Guzman; Mark D. Barton; Mohammad A. Malik; Shirley P. Dutton; Sigrid J. Clift

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of clastic reservoirs in basinal sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover more of the original oil in place by strategic infill-well placement and geologically based enhanced oil recovery. The study focused on the Ford Geraldine unit, which produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). Reservoirs in this and other Delaware Mountain Group fields have low producibility (average recovery <14 percent of the original oil in place) because of a high degree of vertical and lateral heterogeneity caused by depositional processes and post-depositional diagenetic modification. Outcrop analogs were studied to better interpret the depositional processes that formed the reservoirs at the Ford Geraldine unit and to determine the dimensions of reservoir sandstone bodies. Facies relationships and bedding architecture within a single genetic unit exposed in outcrop in Culberson County, Texas, suggest that the sandstones were deposited in a system of channels and levees with attached lobes that initially prograded basinward, aggraded, and then turned around and stepped back toward the shelf. Channel sandstones are 10 to 60 ft thick and 300 to 3,000 ft wide. The flanking levees have a wedge-shaped geometry and are composed of interbedded sandstone and siltstone; thickness varies from 3 to 20 ft and length from several hundred to several thousands of feet. The lobe sandstones are broad lens-shaped bodies; thicknesses range up to 30 ft with aspect ratios (width/thickness) of 100 to 10,000. Lobe sandstones may be interstratified with laminated siltstones.

  20. Multiple scale flood simulation in the Delaware River Basin: Hurricane Ivan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindl da Cunha, Luciana; Smith, James; Lynn, Mary

    2013-04-01

    Tropical cyclones shape the upper tail of flood peak distributions in the Delaware River Basin, as well as other major drainage basins of the eastern US. During Hurricane Ivan (Sept, 2004) peak flows ranking in the upper 10% of the peak flow distribution were observed in many sites. In this study we apply a fully-distributed, physically-based, and calibration-free hydrological model (CUENCAS) to simulate inland flooding caused by Ivan for basin scales ranging from one to thousands of square kilometers. As input to the hydrological model we use the Stage IV rainfall fields produced by The National Weather Service. Stage IV is a post-processed product based on the merging of radar and gauge rainfall data. We show that simulation uncertainties decrease as basin scales increase. Small basin hydrological simulations are strongly affected by rainfall space-time variability, hydrological response heterogeneities due to natural (infiltration and basin shape) and artificial basin properties (dams), and by input and model structural uncertainties. These small-scale heterogeneities and uncertainties are averaged out by the effect of the river network that links different areas in the basin and organizes flow transport. Consequently, good results are obtained for basins larger than 1,000 km2.

  1. Dynamic Management of Releases for the Delaware River Basin using NYC's Operations Support Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, W.; Wang, L.; Murphy, T.; Muralidhar, D.; Tarrier, B.

    2011-12-01

    The New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has initiated design of an Operations Support Tool (OST), a state-of-the-art decision support system to provide computational and predictive support for water supply operations and planning. Using an interim version of OST, DEP and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) have developed a provisional, one-year Delaware River Basin reservoir release program to succeed the existing Flexible Flow Management Program (FFMP) which expired on May 31, 2011. The FFMP grew out of the Good Faith Agreement of 1983 among the four Basin states (New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware) that established modified diversions and flow targets during drought conditions. It provided a set of release schedules as a framework for managing diversions and releases from New York City's Delaware Basin reservoirs in order to support multiple objectives, including water supply, drought mitigation, flood mitigation, tailwaters fisheries, main stem habitat, recreation, and salinity repulsion. The provisional program (OST-FFMP) defines available water based on current Upper Delaware reservoir conditions and probabilistic forecasts of reservoir inflow. Releases are then set based on a set of release schedules keyed to the water availability. Additionally, OST-FFMP attempts to provide enhanced downstream flood protection by making spill mitigation releases to keep the Delaware System reservoirs at a seasonally varying conditional storage objective. The OST-FFMP approach represents a more robust way of managing downstream releases, accounting for predicted future hydrologic conditions by making more water available for release when conditions are forecasted to be wet and protecting water supply reliability when conditions are forecasted to be dry. Further, the dynamic nature of the program allows the release decision to be adjusted as hydrologic conditions change. OST simulations predict that this

  2. The Role of Remotely Sensed and Relayed Data in the Delaware River Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The planned integration of the existing water quality monitoring and data processing systems in the Delaware River Basin with a data relay experiment proposed for the ERTS-1 is discussed. The experiment is designed to use ERTS-1 as a data relay link for a maximum of 20 hydrologic stations in the basin, including stream gaging, reservoir level, ground water level, and water quality monitoring stations. This experiment has the potential for reducing the time lag between data collection and dissemination to less than 12 hours. The experiment will also provide impetus to develop an operational system of real time data processing and dissemination to handle the large quantity of data that will be obtained from the stations in the basin. The results of this experiment will demonstrate the relative merits of satellite relay of data versus conventional means of data telemetry and will provide a basis for the development of operational satellite relay of hydrologic data.

  3. User’s guide for the Delaware River Basin Streamflow Estimator Tool (DRB-SET)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stuckey, Marla H.; Ulrich, James E.

    2016-06-09

    IntroductionThe Delaware River Basin Streamflow Estimator Tool (DRB-SET) is a tool for the simulation of streamflow at a daily time step for an ungaged stream location in the Delaware River Basin. DRB-SET was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and funded through WaterSMART as part of the National Water Census, a USGS research program on national water availability and use that develops new water accounting tools and assesses water availability at the regional and national scales. DRB-SET relates probability exceedances at a gaged location to those at an ungaged stream location. Once the ungaged stream location has been identified by the user, an appropriate streamgage is automatically selected in DRB-SET using streamflow correlation (map correlation method). Alternately, the user can manually select a different streamgage or use the closest streamgage. A report file is generated documenting the reference streamgage and ungaged stream location information, basin characteristics, any warnings, baseline (minimally altered) and altered (affected by regulation, diversion, mining, or other anthropogenic activities) daily mean streamflow, and the mean and median streamflow. The estimated daily flows for the ungaged stream location can be easily exported as a text file that can be used as input into a statistical software package to determine additional streamflow statistics, such as flow duration exceedance or streamflow frequency statistics.

  4. Dissolution of evaporites in and around the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico and west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, S.J.

    1983-03-01

    permian evaporites in the Ochoan Castile, Salado, and Rustler Formations in the Delaware Basin of southeast New Mexico and west Texas have been subjected to various degrees of dissolution (notably of halite and gypsum) through geologic time. Eastward tilting of the Delaware Basin has resulted in the exhumation and erosion of Ochoan rocks in the western part of the basin. Waters in the Capitan, Rustler, Castile, and Bell Canyon Formations have previously been proposed as agents or consequences of evaporite dissolution according to four principal models: solution-and-fill, phreatic dissolution, brine density flow, and stratabound dissolutin (along bedding planes). Several geomorphological features of positive and negative relief have previously been cited as indicators of evaporite dissolution. Brine density flow has been used to explain the selective dissolution of certain evaporite horizons during the late Cenozoic. A review of available geological data has revealed that: Halite deposition was probably not so extensive as formerly believed. Waters with potential to dissolve evaporites are in the Rustler and Capitan, but not in the Bell Canyon, Salado mine seeps, or the Castile brine reservoirs. Brine density flow has not been active in removing most of the missing halite, nor are point-source dissolution features likely to have their roots at the Bell Canyon. Major evaporite dissolution has not been confined to the late Cenozoic, but much of it took place during the Permian, Triassic, Jurassic, and Tertiary periods. The Bell Canyon Formation has been a sink for dissolution-derived brine.

  5. Flood of June 26-29, 2006, Mohawk, Delaware, and Susquehanna River Basins, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suro, Thomas P.; Firda, Gary D.; Szabo, Carolyn O.

    2009-01-01

    A stalled frontal system caused tropical moisture to be funneled northward into New York, causing severe flooding in the Mohawk, Delaware, and Susquehanna River basins during June 26-29, 2006. Rainfall totals for this multi-day event ranged from 2 to 3 inches to greater than 13 inches in southern New York. The storm and flooding claimed four lives in New York, destroyed or damaged thousands of homes and businesses, and closed hundreds of roads and highways. Thousands of people evacuated their homes as floodwaters reached new record elevations at many locations within the three basins. Twelve New York counties were declared Federal disaster areas, more than 15,500 residents applied for disaster assistance, and millions of dollars in damages resulted from the flooding. Disaster-recovery assistance for individuals and businesses adversely affected by the floods of June 2006 reached more than $227 million. The National Weather Service rainfall station at Slide Mountain recorded storm totals of more than 8 inches of rainfall, and the stations at Walton and Fishs Eddy, NY, recorded storm totals of greater than 13 inches of rainfall. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) stream-gaging stations at Mohawk River at Little Falls, West Branch Delaware River at Hale Eddy, and Susquehanna River at Vestal, NY, among others, recorded peak discharges of 35,000 ft3/s, 43,400 ft3/s, and 119,000 ft3/s respectively, with greater than 100-year recurrence intervals. The peak water-surface elevation 21.47 ft and the peak discharge 189,000 ft3/s recorded on June 28, 2006, at the Delaware River at Port Jervis stream-gaging station were the highest recorded since the flood of August 1955. At the Susquehanna River at Conklin, NY, stream-gaging station, which has been in operation since 1912, the peak water-surface elevation 25.02 ft and peak discharge 76,800 ft3/s recorded on June 28, 2006, exceeded the previous period-of-record maximums that were set during the flood of March 1936. Documented

  6. Spatial Characterization of Flood Magnitudes from Hurricane Irene (2011) over Delaware River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, P.; Smith, J. A.; Cunha, L.; Lin, N.

    2014-12-01

    Flooding from landfalling tropical cyclones can affect drainage networks over a large range of basin scales. We develop a method to characterize the spatial distribution of flood magnitudes continuously over a drainage network, with focus on flooding from landfalling tropical cyclones. We use hydrologic modeling to translate precipitation fields into a continuous representation of flood peaks over the drainage network. The CUENCAS model (Cunha 2012) is chosen because of its ability to predict flooding over various scales with minimal calibration. Taking advantage of scaling properties of flood magnitudes, a dimensionless flood index (Smith 1989, Villarini and Smith 2010) is obtained for a better representation of flood magnitudes for which the effects of basin scales are reduced. Case study analyses from Hurricane Irene are carried for the Delaware River using Stage IV radar rainfall fields. Reservoir regulation is implemented in CUENCAS since the Delaware River, like many large rivers, is strongly regulated. With limited info of dam operation and initial water level, reservoirs are represented as filters that directly reduce streamflow downstream, as a trade-off between efficiency and accuracy. Results show a correlation coefficient greater than 0.9 for all the available flood peak observations. Uncertainties are mostly from errors in rainfall fields for small watersheds, and reservoir regulation for large ones. The hydrological modeling can also be driven by simulated rainfall from historical or synthetic storms: this study fits into our long-term goal of developing a methodology to quantify the risk of inland flooding associated with landfalling tropical cyclone.

  7. Relations of surface-water quality to streamflow in the Atlantic Coastal, lower Delaware River, and Delaware Bay Basins, New Jersey, water years 1976--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hunchak-Kariouk, K.; Buxton, D.E.; Hickman, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of analyses of 18 water-quality constituents in samples collected at 28 surface-water-quality stations within the Atlantic Coastal, lower Delaware River, and Delaware Bay Basins (referred to as the study area) during water years 1976--93 (October 1, 1975, through September 30, 1993). Relations between each of the 18 constituents and streamflow at the 28 stations over the period of record were determined by testing for trends in the concentrations of constituents during low and high flows. Qualitative values of contributions from constant (point sources and ground water) and intermittent (nonpoint storm runoff) sources were estimated statistically by examining the relations between concentrations of constituents and streamflow, and load and streamflow.

  8. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, west Texas (Delaware Basin). Annual progress report, March 31, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P.; Hovorka, S.D.; Cole, A.G.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of clastic reservoirs in basinal sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover more of the original oil in place by strategic infill-well placement and geologically based field development. Reservoirs in the Delaware Mountain Group have low producibility (average recovery <14 percent of the original oil in place) because of a high degree of vertical and lateral heterogeneity caused by depositional processes and post-depositional diagenetic modification. Detailed correlations of the Ramsey sandstone reservoirs in Geraldine Ford field suggest that lateral sandstone continuity is less than interpreted by previous studies. The degree of lateral heterogeneity in the reservoir sandstones suggests that they were deposited by eolian-derived turbidites. According to the eolian-derived turbidite model, sand dunes migrated across the exposed shelf to the shelf break during sea-level lowstands and provided well sorted sand for turbidity currents or grain flows into the deep basin.

  9. Some hydrological impacts of climate change for the Delaware River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tasker, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    To gain insight into possible impacts of climate change on water availability in the Delaware River, two models are linked. The first model is a monthly water balance model that converts the temperature and precipitation values generated by a random number generator to monthly streamflow values. The monthly streamflow values are input to a second model that simulates the operation of reservoirs and diversions within the basin. The output for the two linked models consists of time series of reservoir levels and streamflow at key points in the basin. Model results for a base case, in which monthly temperature and precipitation statistics are unchanged from historical records, are compared to several changed-climate scenarios under a standard set of rules of operation.

  10. Frequency and intensity of extreme drought in the Delaware Basin, 1600-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, G. J.; Vonck, K. J.

    2011-05-01

    The frequency and severity of drought in the Delaware Basin between 1600 and 2002 are examined using the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) estimated from tree ring data and correlated with reconstructed annual low flows. In the Delaware Basin, the most severe drought in nearly a century occurred during 1995-2002 as the Brandywine River, Delaware's largest surface water supply, ran dry at its mouth and declined to the lowest flow on record since 1912. To evaluate the long-term context of the 1995-2002 droughts given a variable hydroclimate, tree ring and PDSI data were correlated to reconstruct flows along the river to 1600, the beginning of European exploration to the Delaware Bay. Reconstructed PDSI and low flows were fit using general extreme value (GEV) distributions to estimate drought frequency. Some variability is present as reconstructed low flows tend to overestimate recorded streamflow in severe dry years, a finding reported by others. Some uncertainty appears in the correlations as the coefficient of multiple determination (CRSQ) between recorded and estimated PDSI from tree ring data is 0.50-0.54, a level of variance considered to be "quite good," and the coefficient of determination (r2) between PDSI and low flow is 0.52. Given the uncertainty, PDSI and reconstructed low flow data both agree that the most extreme drought in 400 years occurred during 1635, and the drought of 1995-2000 was historically extreme with differences only in the degree of severity. On the basis of PDSI, the 2002, 1999, and 1995 droughts were the sixth, twelfth, and seventeenth most severe in 400 years with frequencies of once every 50, 33, and 16 years, respectively. Based on low flow, the 2002, 1999, and 1995 droughts were the second, fourth, and ninth most severe since 1600 with frequencies of once every 200, 100, and 50 years, respectively. The record drought of 2002 has a low probability of reoccurring in any given year (2.0% by PDSI and 0.5% by low flow), but droughts

  11. An Integrated Approach to a Complete Carbon Budget for the Delaware River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsey, R.; Jenkins, J.; Murdoch, P.; Pan, Y.; Hom, J.

    2005-12-01

    We combined integrated measurement and monitoring of vegetation, soil, and water with process and empirical models to estimate carbon stocks and dynamics of the Delaware River Basin. Agencies operating in the basin accepted the challenge of designing an integrated monitoring strategy by augmenting existing monitoring systems. Watersheds are logical conceptual units for integrating environmental information on a regional scale, because aquatic systems integrate the biogeochemistry of large areas with well-defined boundaries. Scaling is also possible within watersheds because there is a hierarchical physiography, from small catchments to whole river basins. At the largest scale of the whole river basin, we used remote sensing and data from existing sample plot networks maintained by the USDA Forest Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service. We used estimators from the FORCARB-2 carbon accounting model to estimate basin-wide change in forest carbon stocks. At the smallest scale, we added land and water measurements to existing intensive monitoring sites maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service, and estimated complete land and water carbon budgets. At an intermediate scale, we used remote sensing and intensive sampling of selected small watersheds that had contrasting conditions defined primarily by degree of residential development. At all scales, we used the PnET-CN ecosystem process model to estimate and map biomass and productivity, and the SPARROW empirical model to estimate carbon transport by water. Initial results show that the Basin is a small net carbon sink, although within the basin, southern areas are losing carbon while northern areas are gaining carbon primarily because of land-use change. To extend this work for decision support, we are developing methods to query data and models from these different scales so that estimates can be made for any watershed within the river basin. We are also evaluating the watershed

  12. Distribution and generation of the overpressure system, Eastern Delaware Basin, Western Texas and Southern New Mexico: Discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Swarbrick, R.E.

    1995-12-01

    Luo et al. (1994) discussed the distribution and possible origin of a three-fold pressure system in the eastern Delaware basin. The pressure data presented in their pressure vs. depth plots were exclusively derived from drill-stem tests (DSTs), although they contend that the overpressure is also confirmed from well log responses. The paper is weakened by incorrect sourece of pressure data from DSTs, and also by poor understanding and inadequate review of the basis for overpressure generation in sedimentary basins.

  13. Sequence stratigraphy of the Pennsylvanian Morrow Formation, northern Delaware basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bay, A.R.; Baltensperger, P.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Stratigraphic sequence analysis of the Pennsylvanian Morrow Formation is a new technique useful in predicting and understanding shifts in sand trends that can help locate Morrow gas reservoirs in the mature northern Delaware basin. Morrow sandstone reservoirs are fluvial deltaic channel fill and transgressive beach deposits that typically are 10-30 ft thick and consistently less than 1 mi wide. Detailed mapping and correlation within the systems tracts of each sequence can high-grade specific areas in the basin for exploration. Based on subsurface log correlations, the Morrow clastics and Atoka carbonates in the northern Delaware basin are interpreted as three stratigraphic sequences bounded by subregional type I unconformities. The post-Mississippian unconformity represents the oldest sequence boundary in the Morrow-to-Atoka succession and formed as the base level dropped and the shoreline shifted at least 50 mi basinward. The uplifted Pedernal Highlands supplied sediment to dip-trending lower Morrow channels that downcut into the exposed Mississippian carbonate ramp surface. The transgressive systems tract in this sequence consists of landward-stepping, wave-dominated deltaic deposit. The Morrow shale, a regionally correlatable organic-rich shale that separates the lower Morrow from the middle Morrow, represents the highstand deposits as base level that rose to a maximum. Another base level drop occurred at the end of Morrow shale deposition and resulted in dip-trending channel-fill sandstones and, stacked landward stepping transgressive beach and offshore ridge deposits oriented parallel to strike. The highstand progradational deposits of this sequence formed a terrace that supplied a shelf margin system of deltaic and slope-apron sediments during the succeeding third sequence. The shelf margin deposits are capped by highstand shelf carbonates of the upper Morrow and lower Atoka.

  14. Dissolved methane in groundwater, Upper Delaware River Basin, Pennsylvania and New York, 2007-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kappel, William M.

    2013-01-01

    The prospect of natural gas development from the Marcellus and Utica Shales has raised concerns about freshwater aquifers being vulnerable to contamination. Well owners are asking questions about subsurface methane, such as, “Does my well water have methane and is it safe to drink the water?” and “Is my well system at risk of an explosion hazard associated with a combustible gas like methane in groundwater?” This newfound awareness of methane contamination of water wells by stray gas migration is based upon studies such as Molofsky and others (2011) who document the widespread natural occurrence of methane in drinking-water wells in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania. In the same county, Osborn and others (2011) identified elevated methane concentrations in selected drinking-water wells in the vicinity of Marcellus Shale gas-development activities, although pre-development groundwater samples were not available for comparison. A compilation of dissolved methane concentrations in groundwater for New York State was published by Kappel and Nystrom (2012). Recent work documenting the occurrence and distribution of methane in groundwater was completed in southern Sullivan County, Pennsylvania (Sloto, 2013). Additional work is ongoing with respect to monitoring for stray gases in groundwater (Jackson and others, 2013). These studies and their results indicate the importance of collecting baseline or pre-development data. While such data are being collected in some areas, published data on methane in groundwater are sparse in the Upper Delaware River Basin of Pennsylvania, New York, and New Jersey. To manage drinking-water resources in areas of gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing in the Upper Delaware River Basin, the natural occurrence of methane in the tri-state aquifers needs to be documented. The purpose of this report is to present data on dissolved methane concentrations in the groundwater in the Upper Delaware River Basin. The scope is restricted to

  15. Decadal Change in Forest Carbon Stocks in the Delaware River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B.; Plante, A. F.; Pan, Y.; Johnson, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Forest carbon dynamics at different scales are controlled by different factors, which may alter the forest structure and processes. Long-term measurements of biomass and soil carbon stocks in a nested watershed DRB provide good opportunity for monitoring forest carbon dynamics at multiple scale, calibrating a regional forest process model, and exploring the carbon-water interaction. The Delaware River Basin (DRB) is an ideal watershed for forest carbon cycle research because the basin features diverse forest types and land-use history, and includes physiographic provinces representative of the eastern US. In 2001-2003, the Delaware River Basin Monitoring and Research Initiative established 66 forest plots in three intensive monitoring research sites (nested sub-watersheds in DRB) using Forest Service inventory protocols and enhanced measurements. Mean biomass carbon density was 235.7 × 93.7 Mg C ha-1 in French Creek, 193.2 × 83.9 Mg C ha-1 in Delaware Water Gap, and 264.7 × 74.4 Mg C ha-1 in Neversink River Basin. Soil carbon density (including forest floor and mineral soil to depth of 20 cm) was 80.1 Mg C ha-1, 85.4 Mg C ha-1, and 88.6 Mg C ha-1, respectively. These plots were revisited and re-measured in 2012-2013. In French Creek, where the biomass remeasurement was conducted in fall 2012, results show that, the average biomass carbon density increased by 17.9 Mg C ha-1 over the past decade. Changes in live biomass (live tree, sapling, shrub, herb etc.) and dead biomass (dead tree, coarse woody debris, litter, duff etc.) contribute equally to the total biomass change. However, in a few plots total biomass carbon density decreased by 7.6 to 43.1 Mg C ha-1 due to disturbance from logging or invasive species. Based on the preliminary result, the different effects of climatic, topographic and geological factors on carbon stocks could be detected among the small watersheds. But within a watershed, changes in biomass and soil carbon stocks may depend mainly on

  16. Sensitivity of water resources in the Delaware River basin to climate variability and change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayers, Mark A.; Wolock, David M.; McCabe, Gregory J.; Hay, Lauren E.; Tasker, Gary D.

    1993-01-01

    Because of the "greenhouse effect," projected increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels might cause global warming, which in turn could result in changes in precipitation patterns and evapotranspiration and in increases in sea level. This report describes the greenhouse effect; discusses the problems and uncertainties associated with the detection, prediction, and effects of climatic change, and presents the results of sensitivity-analysis studies of the potential effects of climate change on water resources in the Delaware River basin. On the basis of sensitivity analyses, potentially serious shortfalls of certain water resources in the basin could result if some climatic-change scenarios become true. The results of basin streamflow-model simulations in this study demonstrate the difficulty in distinguishing effects of climatic change on streamflow and water supply from effects of natural variability in current climate. The future direction of basin changes in most water resources, furthermore, cannot be determined precisely because of uncertainty in current projections of regional temperature and precipitation. This large uncertainty indicates that, for resource planning, information defining the sensitivities of water resources to a range of climate change is most relevant. The sensitivity analyses could be useful in developing contingency plans on how to evaluate and respond to changes, should they occur.

  17. Sensitivity of water resources in the Delaware River basin to climate variability and change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayers, Mark A.; Wolock, David M.; McCabe, Gregory J.; Hay, Lauren E.; Tasker, Gary D.

    1994-01-01

    Because of the greenhouse effect, projected increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels might cause global warming, which in turn could result in changes in precipitation patterns and evapotranspiration and in increases in sea level. This report describes the greenhouse effect; discusses the problems and uncertainties associated with the detection, prediction, and effects of climate change; and presents the results of sensitivity analyses of how climate change might affect water resources in the Delaware River basin. Sensitivity analyses suggest that potentially serious shortfalls of certain water resources in the basin could result if some scenarios for climate change come true . The results of model simulations of the basin streamflow demonstrate the difficulty in distinguishing the effects that climate change versus natural climate variability have on streamflow and water supply . The future direction of basin changes in most water resources, furthermore, cannot be precisely determined because of uncertainty in current projections of regional temperature and precipitation . This large uncertainty indicates that, for resource planning, information defining the sensitivities of water resources to a range of climate change is most relevant . The sensitivity analyses could be useful in developing contingency plans for evaluating and responding to changes, should they occur.

  18. Estimated ground-water availability in the Delaware River basin, 1997-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Buxton, Debra E.

    2006-01-01

    Ground-water availability using a watershed-based approach was estimated for the 147 watersheds that make up the Delaware River Basin. This study, conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC), supports the DRBC's Water Resources Plan for the Delaware River Basin. Different procedures were used to estimate ground-water availability for the region underlain by fractured rocks in the upper part of the basin and for surficial aquifers in the region underlain by unconsolidated sediments in the lower part of the basin. The methodology is similar to that used for the Delaware River Basin Commission's Ground-Water Protected Area in Pennsylvania. For all watersheds, ground-water availability was equated to average annual base flow. Ground-water availability for the 109 watersheds underlain by fractured rocks in Delaware, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania was based on lithology and physiographic province. Lithology was generalized by grouping 183 geologic units into 14 categories on the basis of rock type and physiographic province. Twenty-three index streamflow-gaging stations were selected to represent the 14 categories. A base-flow-recurrence analysis was used to determine the average annual 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, and 50-year-recurrence intervals for each index station. A GIS analysis used lithology and base flow at the index stations to determine the average annual base flow for the 109 watersheds. Average annual base flow for these watersheds ranged from 0.313 to 0.915 million gallons per day per square mile for the 2-year-recurrence interval to 0.150 to 0.505 million gallons per day per square mile for the 50-year-recurrence interval. Ground-water availability for watersheds underlain by unconsolidated surficial aquifers was based on predominant surficial geology and land use, which were determined from statistical tests to be the most significant controlling factors of base flow. Twenty-one index streamflow

  19. Estimating probabilities of reservoir storage for the upper Delaware River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hirsch, Robert M.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for estimating conditional probabilities of reservoir system storage is described and applied to the upper Delaware River Basin. The results indicate that there is a 73 percent probability that the three major New York City reservoirs (Pepacton, Cannonsville, and Neversink) would be full by June 1, 1981, and only a 9 percent probability that storage would return to the ' drought warning ' sector of the operations curve sometime in the next year. In contrast, if restrictions are lifted and there is an immediate return to normal operating policies, the probability of the reservoir system being full by June 1 is 37 percent and the probability that storage would return to the ' drought warning ' sector in the next year is 30 percent. (USGS)

  20. Pesticide compounds in streamwater in the Delaware River Basin, December 1998-August 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickman, R. Edward

    2004-01-01

    During 1998-2001, 533 samples of streamwater at 94 sites were collected in the Delaware River Basin in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Delaware as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Of these samples, 531 samples were analyzed for dissolved concentrations of 47 pesticide compounds (43 pesticides and 4 pesticide degradation products); 70 samples were analyzed for an additional 6 pesticide degradation products. Of the 47 pesticide compounds analyzed for in 531 samples, 30 were detected. The most often detected compounds were atrazine (90.2 percent of samples), metolachlor (86.1 percent), deethylatrazine (82.5 percent), and simazine (78.9 percent). Atrazine, metolachlor, and simazine are pesticides; deethylatrazine is a degradation product of atrazine. Relations between concentrations of pesticides in samples from selected streamwater sites and characteristics of the subbasins draining to these sites were evaluated to determine whether agricultural uses or nonagricultural uses appeared to be the more important sources. Concentrations of atrazine, metolachlor, and pendimethalin appear to be attributable more to agricultural uses than to nonagricultural uses; concentrations of prometon, diazinon, chlorpyrifos, tebuthiuron, trifluralin, and carbaryl appear to be attributable more to nonagricultural uses. In general, pesticide concentrations during the growing season (April-October) were greater than those during the nongrowing season (November-March). For atrazine, metolachlor, and acetochlor, the greatest concentrations generally occurred during May, June, and July. Concentrations of pesticide compounds rarely (in only 7 out of 531 samples) exceeded drinking-water standards or guidelines, indicating that, when considered individually, these compounds present little hazard to the health of the public through consumption of the streamwater. The combined effects of more than one pesticide compound in streamwater were not

  1. Advanced reservoir characterization for improved oil recovery in a New Mexico Delaware basin project

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F.D.; Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M.

    1997-08-01

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County, New Mexico is a field demonstration site in the Department of Energy Class III program. The basic problem at the Nash Draw Pool is the low recovery typically observed in similar Delaware fields. By comparing a control area using standard infill drilling techniques to a pilot area developed using advanced reservoir characterization methods, the goal of the project is to demonstrate that advanced technology can significantly improve oil recovery. During the first year of the project, four new producing wells were drilled, serving as data acquisition wells. Vertical seismic profiles and a 3-D seismic survey were acquired to assist in interwell correlations and facies prediction. Limited surface access at the Nash Draw Pool, caused by proximity of underground potash mining and surface playa lakes, limits development with conventional drilling. Combinations of vertical and horizontal wells combined with selective completions are being evaluated to optimize production performance. Based on the production response of similar Delaware fields, pressure maintenance is a likely requirement at the Nash Draw Pool. A detailed reservoir model of pilot area was developed, and enhanced recovery options, including waterflooding, lean gas, and carbon dioxide injection, are being evaluated.

  2. Water budgets for selected watersheds in the Delaware River basin, eastern Pennsylvania and western New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sloto, Ronald A.; Buxton, Debra E.

    2005-01-01

    This pilot study, done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Delaware River Basin Commission, developed annual water budgets using available data for five watersheds in the Delaware River Basin with different degrees of urbanization and different geological settings. A basin water budget and a water-use budget were developed for each watershed. The basin water budget describes inputs to the watershed (precipitation and imported water), outputs of water from the watershed (streamflow, exported water, leakage, consumed water, and evapotranspiration), and changes in ground-water and surface-water storage. The water-use budget describes water withdrawals in the watershed (ground-water and surface-water withdrawals), discharges of water in the watershed (discharge to surface water and ground water), and movement of water of water into and out of the watershed (imports, exports, and consumed water). The water-budget equations developed for this study can be applied to any watershed in the Delaware River Basin. Data used to develop the water budgets were obtained from available long-term meteorological and hydrological data-collection stations and from water-use data collected by regulatory agencies. In the Coastal Plain watersheds, net ground-water loss from unconfined to confined aquifers was determined by using ground-water-flow-model simulations. Error in the water-budget terms is caused by missing data, poor or incomplete measurements, overestimated or underestimated quantities, measurement or reporting errors, and the use of point measurements, such as precipitation and water levels, to estimate an areal quantity, particularly if the watershed is hydrologically or geologically complex or the data-collection station is outside the watershed. The complexity of the water budgets increases with increasing watershed urbanization and interbasin transfer of water. In the Wissahickon Creek watershed, for example, some ground water is discharged to streams in

  3. Modeling the Effects of Land Use and Climate Change on Streamflow in the Delaware River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, P. Y. S.; Endreny, T. A.; Kroll, C. N.; Williamson, T. N.

    2014-12-01

    Forest-cover loss and drinking-water reservoirs in the upper Delaware River Basin of New York may alter summer low streamflows, which could degrade the in-stream habitat for the endangered dwarf wedgemussel. Our project analyzes how flow statistics change with land-cover change for 30-year increments of model-simulated streamflow hydrographs for three watersheds of concern to the National Park Service: the East Branch, West Branch, and main stem of the Delaware River. We use four treatments for land cover ranging from historical high to low forest cover. We subject each land cover to adjusted GCM climate scenarios for 1600, 1900, 1940, and 2040 to isolate land cover from potential climate-change effects. Hydrographs are simulated using the Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER), a TOPMODEL-based United States Geological Survey hydrologic decision-support tool, which uses the variable-source-area concept and water budgets to generate streamflow. Model parameters for each watershed change with land-use, and capture differences in soil-physical properties that control how rainfall infiltrates, evaporates, transpires, is stored in the soil, and moves to the stream. Our results analyze flow statistics used as indicators of hydrologic alteration, and access streamflow events below the critical flow needed to provide sustainable habitat for dwarf wedgemussels. These metrics will demonstrate how changes in climate and land use might affect flow statistics. Initial results show that the 1940 WATER simulation outputs generally match observed unregulated low flows from that time period, while performance for regulated flow from the same time period and from 1600, 1900, and 2040 require model input adjustments. Our study will illustrate how increased forest cover could potentially restore in-stream habitat for the endangered dwarf wedgemussel for current and future climate conditions.

  4. The role of remotely sensed and relayed data in the Delaware River Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, R. W.

    1970-01-01

    A discussion is presented of the planned integration of the existing Delaware River Basin water quality monitoring and data processing systems with a data relay experiment proposed for the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS)-A, which will be launched in 1972. The experiment is designed to use ERTS-A as a data relay link for a maximum of 20 hydrologic stations in the basin, including streamgaging, reservoir level, ground water level,and water quality monitoring stations. This experiment has the potential for reducing the timelag between data collection and dissemination to less than 12 hours. At present there is a significant timelag between the time when the data are recorded at a monitoring site and the water resources agencies receive the data. The timelag exists because most of these instruments operate in remote locations without telementry, and the data records are removed manually, generally at a weekly frequency. For most water quality monitoring, the data do not reach water resources agencies for a period of 2 weeks to 2 months.

  5. Geohydrology of the Delaware Basin and vicinity, Texas and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, S.F.; Wells, J.G.; Stephens, K.T.

    1985-01-01

    The Delaware Basin study area includes four major aquifers: Capitan aquifer, Rustler Formation, Santa Rosa Sandstone (Dockum Group), and aquifers in the Cenozoic alluvium. Water from the Capitan aquifer is used for domestic and irrigation purposes in Eddy County, New Mexico, and for irrigation and industrial purposes in Texas. Available analyses indicate that dissolved solids concentrations range from 303 to 31,700 mg/L, chloride concentrations range from 16 to 16,689 mg/L, and fluoride concentrations range from 0.5 to 3.0 mg/L. The Rustler Formation contains water that generally is not suitable for domestic use because of its salinity. Chloride concentrations range from 15 to 210,000 mg/L, and dissolved solids concentrations range from 286 to 325,800 mg/L. Fluoride concentrations range from 0.5 to 11.4 mg/L. Water from this aquifer is used for irrigation and stock watering where it is of suitable quality. The Santa Rosa Sandstone is the principal source of groundwater in the western third of Lea County and in the eastern part of Eddy County. In parts of Texas, the Santa Rosa Sandstone and the Cenozoic alluvium are hydraulically connected and are called the Allurosa aquifer. The Santa Rosa Sandstone-Allurosa aquifer is the source of municipal supply for the cities of Barstow, Pecos, Monahans, and Kermit, Texas. Water quality is variable. For those analyses where the Santa Rosa Sandstone is a distinct entity, chloride concentrations range from 10 to 4,800 mg/L, dissolved solids concentrations range from 205 to 2,990 mg/L, and fluoride concentrations range from 0.4 to 5.0 mg/L. Water from the Cenozoic alluvium is used extensively for public water supplies, irrigation, industry, livestock watering, and rural-domestic supply throughout the Delaware Basin. The quality of water in the Cenozoic alluvium is variable. Chloride concentrations range from 5 to 7,400 mg/L, dissolved solids concentrations range from 188 to 15,000 mg/L, and fluoride concentrations range from 0

  6. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P.; Asquith, G.B.; Barton, M.D.; Cole, A.G.; Gogas, J.; Malik, M.A.; Clift, S.J.; Guzman, J.I.

    1997-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. This project involves reservoir characterization of two Late Permian slope and basin clastic reservoirs in the Delaware Basin, West Texas, followed by a field demonstration in one of the fields. The fields being investigated are Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields in Reeves and Culberson Counties, Texas. Project objectives are divided into two major phases, reservoir characterization and implementation. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project were to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of the two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field. Reservoir characterization utilized 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once reservoir characterized was completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} at the northern end of the Ford Geraldine unit was chosen for reservoir simulation. This report summarizes the results of the second year of reservoir characterization.

  7. Evaporite replacement within the Permian strata of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming and the Delaware Basin, west Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, D.S.; Scholle, P.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The Park City and Goose Egg Formations of the Big Horn Basin, Wyoming and the Seven Rivers, Yates and Tansill Formations of west Texas and New Mexico contain numerous examples of silicified and calcitized evaporites. Both areas show significant preserved interstitial evaporite, but on outcrop the discrete crystals and nodular evaporites have been extensively replaced. These replacements appear to be a multistage phenomenon. Field and petrographic evidence (matted fabrics in nodules; evaporite inclusions) indicate that silicification involved direct replacement of evaporites and probably occurred during earlier stages of burial. Calcitization, however, appears to be a much later phenomenon and involved precipitation of coarse crystals within evaporite molds. The calcites are typically free of evaporite inclusions. Isotopic analyses of these calcites give a wide range of values from [minus]6.04 to [minus]25.02 [per thousand] [delta][sup 18]O and +6.40 to [minus]25.26 [per thousand] [delta][sup 13]C, reflecting their complex diagenetic histories. In both localities, silicification of evaporites was completed by the end of hydrocarbon migration and emplacement. The extremely broad isotopic range of the calcites indicates that the calcitization occurred during a long period of progressive uplift and increased groundwater circulation associated with mid-Tertiary block faulting. The very light oxygen values within the Bighorn Basin were produced by thermochemical sulfate reduction during deepest burial of the region. Evaporite diagenesis in both the Bighorn and Delaware Basins is an ongoing process that started prior to hydrocarbon migration, continued over millions of years, and has the potential to do significant porosity change.

  8. Estimating exploration potential in mature producing area, northwest shelf of Delaware Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, N.

    1985-11-01

    The case history presented here describes an investigation of the Northwest shelf of the Delaware basin carried out in 1979 for estimating the potential of finding new reserves and a follow-up study to measure predictions against results. A total of 191 new-field wildcats had been drilled during 1974-1979 in the study area. An analysis of target zones and success ratios showed that the best chances of drilling a successful test were in the San Andres (Permian) and Silurian-Devonian. However, cumulative frequency plots of existing fields in these two intervals showed that the chance of finding a field larger than 1 million bbl (159,000 m/sup 3/) in either of these zones was relatively low. As a result of the 1979 analysis, three prospective areas representing 8% of the total study area were high graded, or rated as having a higher potential than other parts of the study area. The 1980-1983 drilling results show that the original high-graded areas contain 52% of the 21 successful San Andres tests and the only discovery in the Silurian-Devonian. However, as predicted by the analysis, all of these discoveries appear to be small. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Estimating exploration potential in mature producing area, Northwest shelf of Delaware basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, N.

    1985-11-01

    The case history presented here describes an investigation of the Northwest shelf of the Delaware basin carried out in 1979 for estimating the potential of finding new reserves and a follow-up study to measure predictions against results. A total of 191 new-field wildcats had been drilled during 1974-1979 in the study area. An analysis of target zones and success ratios showed that the best chances of drilling a successful test were in the San Andres (Permian) and SilurianDevonian. However, cumulative frequency plots of existing fields in these two intervals showed that the chance of finding a field larger than 1 million bbl (159,000 mT) in either of these zones was relatively low. As a result of the 1979 analysis, three prospective areas representing 8% of the total study area were high graded, or rated as having a higher potential than other parts of the study area. The 1980-1983 drilling results show that the original high-graded areas contain 52% of the 21 successful San Andres tests and the only discovery in the SilurianDevonian. However, as predicted by the analysis, all of these discoveries appear to be small.

  10. The use of Earth Resources Technology Satellite for relaying hydrologic data in the Delaware River basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    The earth resources data acquisition systems on ERTS are providing data from the earth's surface that have great potential for resources management. The Data Collection System is providing water resources data several times a day from widely scattered locations in the Delaware River Basin. Within the constraints of an experimental test, the data are being processed and released to water resources agencies in near-real time. The results of ERTS investigations have shown that there is a potential application for satellite-borne systems for earth resources data acquisition. It is becoming clear that the solutions to many natural resource problems can be found faster and more efficiently with the help of data acquisition systems such as those on the ERTS observatory. Under operational conditions, low cost battery-operated DCP's could provide the Geological Survey with data from a large number of field instruments. These data could be used by the Geological Survey to monitor the operational status of field instrumentation and could be used by cooperating agencies to monitor a wide range of earth resources conditions. Under operational conditions, the data flow could be in real time. The delay from time of data acquisition by ERTS to the time of data availability to data users could be reduced to seconds, rather than the present lag time of a few hours.

  11. The origin of fluids in the salt beds of the Delaware Basin, New Mexico and Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Johnson, C.M.; White, L.D.; Roedder, E.

    1986-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope analyses have been made of (1) brines from several wells in the salt deposits of the Delaware Basin, (2) inclusion fluids in halite crystals from the ERDA No. 9 site, and (3) local ground waters of meteoric origin. The isotopic compositions indicate that the brines are genetically related and that they probably originated from the evaporation of paleo-ocean waters. Although highly variable in solute contents, the brines have rather uniform isotopic compositions. The stable isotope compositions of brine from the ERDA No. 6 site (826.3 m depth) and fluid inclusions from the ERDA No. 9 site are variable but remarkably regular and show that (1) mixing with old or modern meteoric waters has occurred, the extent of mixing apparently decreasing with depth, and (2) water in the ERDA No. 6 brine may have originated from the dehydration of gypsum. Alternatively, the data may reflect simple evaporation of meteoric water on a previously dry marine flat. Stable isotope compositions of all the waters analyzed indicate that there has been fairly extensive mixing with ground water throughout the area, but that no significant circulation has occurred. The conclusions bear importantly on the suitability of these salt beds and others as repositories for nuclear waste. ?? 1986.

  12. Risk assessment of tropical cyclone rainfall flooding in the Delaware River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, P.; Lin, N.; Smith, J. A.; Emanuel, K.

    2016-12-01

    Rainfall-induced inland flooding is a leading cause of death, injury, and property damage from tropical cyclones (TCs). In the context of climate change, it has been shown that extreme precipitation from TCs is likely to increase during the 21st century. Assessing the long-term risk of inland flooding associated with landfalling TCs is therefore an important task. Standard risk assessment techniques, which are based on observations from rain gauges and stream gauges, are not broadly applicable to TC induced flooding, since TCs are rare, extreme events with very limited historical observations at any specific location. Also, rain gauges and stream gauges can hardly capture the complex spatial variation of TC rainfall and flooding. Furthermore, the utility of historically based assessments is compromised by climate change. Regional dynamical downscaling models can resolve many features of TC precipitation. In terms of risk assessment, however, it is computationally demanding to run such models to obtain long-term climatology of TC induced flooding. Here we apply a computationally efficient climatological-hydrological method to assess the risk of inland flooding associated with landfalling TCs. It includes: 1) a deterministic TC climatology modeling method to generate large numbers of synthetic TCs with physically correlated characteristics (i.e., track, intensity, size) under observed and projected climates; 2) a simple physics-based tropical cyclone rainfall model which is able to simulate rainfall fields associated with each synthetic storm; 3) a hydrologic modeling system that takes in rainfall fields to simulate flood peaks over an entire drainage basin. We will present results of this method applied to the Delaware River Basin in the mid-Atlantic US.

  13. Sensitivity of the projected hydroclimatic environment of the Delaware River basin to formulation of potential evapotranspiration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Tanja N.; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.; Milly, Paul C.D.

    2016-01-01

    The Delaware River Basin (DRB) encompasses approximately 0.4 % of the area of the United States (U.S.), but supplies water to 5 % of the population. We studied three forested tributaries to quantify the potential climate-driven change in hydrologic budget for two 25-year time periods centered on 2030 and 2060, focusing on sensitivity to the method of estimating potential evapotranspiration (PET) change. Hydrology was simulated using the Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (Williamson et al. 2015). Climate-change scenarios for four Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) global climate models (GCMs) and two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) were used to derive monthly change factors for temperature (T), precipitation (PPT), and PET according to the energy-based method of Priestley and Taylor (1972). Hydrologic simulations indicate a general increase in annual (especially winter) streamflow (Q) as early as 2030 across the DRB, with a larger increase by 2060. This increase in Q is the result of (1) higher winter PPT, which outweighs an annual actual evapotranspiration (AET) increase and (2) (for winter) a major shift away from storage of PPT as snow pack. However, when PET change is evaluated instead using the simpler T-based method of Hamon (1963), the increases in Q are small or even negative. In fact, the change of Q depends as much on PET method as on time period or RCP. This large sensitivity and associated uncertainty underscore the importance of exercising caution in the selection of a PET method for use in climate-change analyses.

  14. Charting exploration strategy in a mature producing area, Northwest Shelf of Delaware basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, N.

    1984-04-01

    In formulating strategy for mature areas, management has to consider chance factor for success, as well as the chance of finding sizeable reserves. As a case history, we describe an investigation of the Northwest Shelf of Delaware basin carried out in 1979 to locate areas having the best potential of finding new reserves. In 1983, we tabulated the activity since 1980 to compare our predictions against the drilling results. The 1979 study had shown that out of a total of almost 200 wildcats drilled during 1974-79, the largest number (63) had been drilled for San Andres (Permian) objective with a success ratio of 33%. Forty-six wells had been drilled for various Pennsylvanian objectives with a success ratio of 40%, and 25 wells had been drilled for Siluro-Devonian targets with a success ratio of 16%. However, based on wildcat success ratios and cumulative-frequency plots of field sizes, the probability of a wildcat discovering reserves larger than 1 million bbl was only 6% in San Andres, 19% in Pennsylvanian, and 7% in Siluro-Devonian. The 1979 study allowed us to high-grade three blocks representing 5% of the total 5.25 million acres. These blocks were considered to have the best potential for San Andres and Siluro-Devonian objectives. Subsequent analysis of 1980-83 drilling results shows that these blocks contain 55% of the 20 new successful San Andres tests and the only new discovery in the Siluro-Devonian. However, as predicted, all of these have been small discoveries. Such studies allow management to develop a course of action for mature areas.

  15. Occurrence and significance of magnesite in Upper Guadalupian Shelf strata, Delaware Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, R.A.; Harris, P.M.; Borer, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Magnesite (MgCO/sub 3/) occurs pervasively in a 270-ft cored interval of Upper Permian (Guadalupina) shelf deposits from the northern rim of the Delaware basin, New Mexico. The texture of magnesite in core slab, thin section, and SEM is almost identical to that of dolomite. Because the density of magnesite is close to that of anhydrite and a high associated uranium content causes large gamma-ray deflections similar to that of shale, magnesite could lead to improper evaluation of lithology and porosity from logs and ultimately results in failure to recognize potential reservoir zones. In the authors' core example, magnesite is found in tidal flat and evaporative lagoon dolomites of the Tansill and uppermost Yates Formations. The interval is overlain by Tansill anhydrite and a thick halite section of the Ochoan Salado Formation. The magensite consists of anhedral to euhedral crystals ranging in size from 1 to 4 ..mu..m. Within the dolomite intervals, magnesite occurs in three forms: (1) patches and discrete grains floating in dolomite matrix, (2) pervasive replacement of host dolomudstoen and pelodial and pisolitic dolowackestone or packstone, and (3) discrete layers interbedded with anhydrite. Mangesite rarely fills pore spaces in dolomite, but within siliciclastic beds, magnesite occurs as a first generation cement and as a replacement of former carbonate grains. Magnesite and dolomite are mutually exclusive in siliciclasted beds, and magnesite occurs only when anhydrite is abundant. Preliminary measurements of stable carbon and oxygen isotopes yield normal Permian values for deltaC/sup 13/, averaging +6.84 o/00 and slightly evaporitic values of deltaO/sup 18/, averaging +1.04; corrected Sr/sup 87//Sr/sup 86/ isotopic composition averages 0.70687.

  16. Distribution and generation of the overpressure system, Eastern Delaware Basin, West Texas and Southern New Mexico: Reply

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, M.; Baker, M.R.

    1995-12-01

    The pressure data used in Luo et al. (1994) were gather from scout tickets, which provided us the IHP (initial hydrostatic pressure), ISIP (initial shut-in pressure), FP (flowing pressure), FSIP (final shut-in pressure), and/or FHP (final hydrostatic pressure). We used FHP values, if available, and then corrected the mud weight effects according to Reid (1970) and gave a detailed description of mud density for high pore pressure zones in the Delaware basin based on a survey of mud selections for the pressured interval as reported by several major operators and independents.

  17. Groundwater quality in the Delaware and St. Lawrence River Basins, New York, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Water quality in both study areas is generally good, but concentrations of some constituents equaled or exceeded current or proposed Federal or New York State drinking-water standards. The standards exceeded are color (one sample in the St. Lawrence study area), pH (three samples in the Delaware study area), sodium (one sample in the St. Lawrence study area), total dissolved solids (one sample in the St. Lawrence study area), aluminum (one sample in the Delaware study area and one sample in the St. Lawrence study area), iron (seven samples in the St. Lawrence study area), manganese (one sample in the Delaware study area and five samples in the St. Lawrence study area), gross alpha radioactivity (one sample in the St. Lawrence study area), radon-222 (10 samples in the Delaware study area and 14 samples in the St. Lawrence study area), and bacteria (5 samples in the Delaware study area and 10 samples in the St. Lawrence study area). E. coli bacteria were detected in samples from two wells in the St. Lawrence study area. Concentrations of chloride, fluoride, sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, thallium, zinc, and uranium did not exceed existing drinking-water standards in any of the samples collected.

  18. Relations of surface-water quality to streamflow in the Atlantic Coastal, lower Delaware River, and Delaware Bay basins, New Jersey, water years 1976-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunchak-Kariouk, Kathryn; Buxton, Debra E.; Hickman, R. Edward

    1999-01-01

    Relations of water quality to streamflow were determined for 18 water-quality constituents at 28 surface-water-quality stations within the drainage area of the Atlantic Coastal, lower Delaware River, and Delaware Bay Basins for water years 1976-93. Surface-water-quality and streamflow data were evaluated for trends (through time) in constituent concentrations during high and low flows, and relations between constituent concentration and streamflow, and between constituent load and streamflow, were determined. Median concentrations were calculated for the entire period of study (water years 1976-93) and for the last 5 years of the period of study (water years 1989-93) to determine whether any large variation in concentration exists between the two periods. Medians also were used to determine the seasonal Kendall\\'s tau statistic, which was then used to evaluate trends in concentrations during high and low flows. Trends in constituent concentrations during high and low flows were evaluated to determine whether the distribution of the observations changes through time for intermittent (nonpoint storm runoff) and constant (point sources and ground water) sources, respectively. High- and low-flow trends in concentrations were determined for some constituents at 26 of the 28 water-quality stations. Seasonal effects on the relations of concentration to streamflow are evident for 10 constituents at 14 or more stations. Dissolved oxygen shows seasonal dependency at all stations. Negative slopes of relations of concentration to streamflow, which indicate a decrease in concentration at high flows, predominate over positive slopes because of dilution of instream concentrations from storm runoff. The slopes of the regression lines of load to streamflow were determined in order to show the relative contributions to the instream load from constant (point sources and ground water) and intermittent sources (storm runoff). Greater slope values indicate larger contributions from

  19. Ground-Water Quality in the Delaware River Basin, New York, 2001 and 2005-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    The Federal Clean Water Act Amendments of 1977 require that States monitor and report on the quality of ground water and surface water. To satisfy part of these requirements, the U.S. Geological Survey and New York State Department of Environmental Conservation have developed a program in which ground-water quality is assessed in 2 to 3 of New York State's 14 major basins each year. To characterize the quality of ground water in the Delaware River Basin in New York, water samples were collected from December 2005 to February 2006 from 10 wells finished in bedrock. Data from 9 samples collected from wells finished in sand and gravel in July and August 2001 for the National Water Quality Assessment Program also are included. Ground-water samples were collected and processed using standard U.S. Geological Survey procedures. Samples were analyzed for more than 230 properties and compounds, including physical properties, major ions, nutrients, trace elements, radon-222, pesticides and pesticide degradates, volatile organic compounds, and bacteria. Concentrations of most compounds were less than drinking-water standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and New York State Department of Health; many of the organic analytes were not detected in any sample. Drinking-water standards that were exceeded at some sites include those for color, turbidity, pH, aluminum, arsenic, iron, manganese, radon-222, and bacteria. pH ranged from 5.6 to 8.3; the pH of nine samples was less than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary drinking-water standard range of 6.5 to 8.5. Water in the basin is generally soft to moderately hard (hardness 120 milligrams per liter as CaCO3 or less). The cation with the highest median concentration was calcium; the anion with the highest median concentrations was bicarbonate. Nitrate was the predominant nutrient detected but no sample exceeded the 10 mg/L U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level. The

  20. Climate change effects on forests, water resources, and communities of the Delaware River Basin

    Treesearch

    Will Price; Susan Beecher

    2014-01-01

    The Delaware River provides drinking water to 5 percent of the United States, or approximately 16.2 million people living in 4 states, 42 counties, and over 800 municipalities. The more than 1.5 billion gallons withdrawn or diverted daily for drinking water is delivered by more than 140 purveyors, yet constitutes less than 20 percent of the average daily withdrawals....

  1. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P.

    1996-04-30

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. One the reservoir-characterization study of both field is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to: (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area; (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments; and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill well will be drilled and cored. Technical progress is summarized for: geophysical characterization; reservoir characterization; outcrop characterization; and producibility problem characterization.

  2. Sulfuric acid speleogenesis of Carlsbad Cavern and its relationship to hydrocarbons, Delaware basin, New Mexico and Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Sulfur-isotope data and pH-dependence of the mineral endellite support the hypothesis that Carlsbad Cavern and other caves in the Guadalupe Mountains were dissolved primarily by sulfuric acid rather than by carbonic acid. Floor gypsum deposits up to 10 m thick and native sulfur in the caves are significantly enriched in {sup 32}S; {delta}{sup 34}S values as low as {minus}25.8 {per thousand} (CDT) indicate that the cave sulfur and gypsum are the end products of microbial reactions associated with hydrocarbons. A model for a genetic connection between hydrocarbons in the basin and caves in the Guadalupe Mountains is proposed. As the Guadalupe Mountains were uplifted during the late Pliocene-Pleistocene, oil and gas moved updip in the basin. The gas reacted with sulfate anions derived from dissolution of the Castile anhydrite to form H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, and castile limestone. The hydrogen sulfide rose into the Capitan reef along joints, forereef carbonate beds, or Bell Canyon siliciclastic beds and there reacted with oxygenated groundwater to form sulfuric acid and Carlsbad Cavern. A sulfuric-acid mode of dissolution may be responsible for large-scale porosity of some Delaware basin reservoirs and for oil-field karst reservoirs in other petroleum basins of the world. 8 figs.

  3. Distribution and generation of the overpressure system, Eastern Delaware Basin, Western Texas and Southern New Mexico: Discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    Interest in the paper by Luo et al. (1994) on Delaware basin overpressure was probably as great among drilling and completion engineers as the geologic community because of the obvious implications on drilling mud and well tubular programs. However, there are some inaccuracies in the paper`s comments relating to drill-stem test (DST) interpretation, which Luo et al. used to predict formation pressures in the study area. Referring to figure 3 in the paper, the authors identify points a and e as initial and final hydrostatic pressures (IHP and FP, respectively). Luo et al. state, `...the IHP and FHP represent the true fluid pressure of the formation at the depth of the testing tool.` The IHP and FP values actually represent the pressure exerted by the column of mud of a given weight in the well bore at the depth of the gauge, rather than the true fluid pressure of the formation.

  4. Organic Compounds and Trace Elements in Fish Tissue and Bed Sediment in the Delaware River Basin, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, and Delaware, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Romanok, Kristin M.; Fischer, Jeffrey M.; Riva-Murray, Karen; Brightbill, Robin; Bilger, Michael

    2006-01-01

    As part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program activities in the Delaware River Basin (DELR), samples of fish tissue from 21 sites and samples of bed sediment from 35 sites were analyzed for a suite of organic compounds and trace elements. The sampling sites, within subbasins ranging in size from 11 to 600 square miles, were selected to represent 5 main land-use categories in the DELR -forest, low-agricultural, agricultural, urban, and mixed use. Samples of both fish tissue and bed sediment were also collected from 4 'large-river' sites that represented drainage areas ranging from 1,300 to 6,800 square miles, areas in which the land is used for a variety of purposes. One or more of the organochlorine compounds-DDT and chlordane metabolites, polychlorinated biphenyls (total PCBs), and dieldrin- were detected frequently in samples collected over a wide geographic area. One or more of these compounds were detected in fish-tissue samples from 92 percent of the sites and in bed-sediment samples from 82 percent of the sites. Concentrations of total DDT, total chlordanes, total PCBs, and dieldrin in whole white suckers and in bed sediment were significantly related to urban/industrial basin characteristics, such as percentage of urban land use and population density. Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs)-total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total phthalates, and phenols- were detected frequently in bed-sediment samples. All three types of SVOCs were detected in samples from at least one site in each land-use category. The highest detection rates and concentrations typically were in samples from sites in the urban and mixed land-use categories, as well as from the large-river sites. Concentrations of total PAHs and total phthalates in bed-sediment samples were found to be statistically related to percentages of urban land use and to population density in the drainage areas represented by the sampling sites. The samples of fish tissue and bed

  5. Role of sea-level change in deep water deposition along a carbonate shelf margin, Early and Middle Permian, Delaware Basin: implications for reservoir characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shunli; Yu, Xinghe; Li, Shengli; Giles, Katherine A.

    2015-04-01

    The architecture and sedimentary characteristics of deep water deposition can reflect influences of sea-level change on depositional processes on the shelf edge, slope, and basin floor. Outcrops of the northern slope and basin floor of the Delaware Basin in west Texas are progressively exposed due to canyon incision and road cutting. The outcrops in the Delaware Basin were measured to characterize gravity flow deposits in deep water of the basin. Subsurface data from the East Ford and Red Tank fields in the central and northeastern Delaware Basin were used to study reservoir architectures and properties. Depositional models of deep water gravity flows at different stages of sea-level change were constructed on the basis of outcrop and subsurface data. In the falling-stage system tracts, sandy debris with collapses of reef carbonates are deposited on the slope, and high-density turbidites on the slope toe and basin floor. In the low-stand system tracts, deep water fans that consist of mixed sand/mud facies on the basin floor are comprised of high- to low-density turbidites. In the transgression and high-stand system tracts, channel-levee systems and elongate lobes of mud-rich calciturbidite deposits formed as a result of sea level rise and scarcity of sandy sediment supply. For the reservoir architecture, the fan-like debris and high-density turbidites show high net-to-gross ratio of 62 %, which indicates the sandiest reservoirs for hydrocarbon accumulation. Lobe-like deep water fans with net-to-gross ratio of 57 % facilitate the formation of high quality sandy reservoirs. The channel-levee systems with muddy calciturbidites have low net-to-gross ratio of 30 %.

  6. Summary of hydrologic modeling for the Delaware River Basin using the Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Tanja N.; Lant, Jeremiah G.; Claggett, Peter; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.; Milly, Paul C.D.; Nelson, Hugh L.; Hoffman, Scott A.; Colarullo, Susan J.; Fischer, Jeffrey M.

    2015-11-18

    The Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER) is a decision support system for the nontidal part of the Delaware River Basin that provides a consistent and objective method of simulating streamflow under historical, forecasted, and managed conditions. In order to quantify the uncertainty associated with these simulations, however, streamflow and the associated hydroclimatic variables of potential evapotranspiration, actual evapotranspiration, and snow accumulation and snowmelt must be simulated and compared to long-term, daily observations from sites. This report details model development and optimization, statistical evaluation of simulations for 57 basins ranging from 2 to 930 km2 and 11.0 to 99.5 percent forested cover, and how this statistical evaluation of daily streamflow relates to simulating environmental changes and management decisions that are best examined at monthly time steps normalized over multiple decades. The decision support system provides a database of historical spatial and climatic data for simulating streamflow for 2001–11, in addition to land-cover and general circulation model forecasts that focus on 2030 and 2060. WATER integrates geospatial sampling of landscape characteristics, including topographic and soil properties, with a regionally calibrated hillslope-hydrology model, an impervious-surface model, and hydroclimatic models that were parameterized by using three hydrologic response units: forested, agricultural, and developed land cover. This integration enables the regional hydrologic modeling approach used in WATER without requiring site-specific optimization or those stationary conditions inferred when using a statistical model.

  7. Occurrence and significance of magnesite in Upper Permian (Guadalupian) Tansill and Yates Formations, Delaware Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, R.A.; Harris, P.M.; Borer, J.M. )

    1990-02-01

    Magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}) occurs pervasively in a 270-ft (82-m) cored interval of Upper Permian (Guadalupian) shelf deposits from the northern rim of the Delaware basin portion of the Permian basin, New Mexico. In their core example, magnesite is found in tidal flat/lagoon and pisolite shoal dolomites and siltstones of the Tansill and uppermost Yates formations. The interval is overlain by magnesite-bearing anhydrite and a thick halite section of the (Ochoan) Salado Formation. The basinwide extent of magnesite is unknown. Magnesite may have formed either (1) during Ochoan deposition or thereafter, after burial of the Tansill and Yates formations, from dense brines originating from the overlying Salado evaporites; or less likely, (2) syndepositionally with the Tansill and Yates sediments. Preliminary measurements of stable carbon and oxygen isotopes for magnesite yield normal Permian values for {delta}{sup 13}C averaging + 6.84% (PDB) and slightly evaporitic values for {delta}{sup 18}O averaging + 1.04% (PDB); corrected {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr isotope composition averages 0.70687. Because a high content of associated uranium in the magnesite-rich part of the core causes large gamma-ray deflections similar to those for shale, and because the density of magnesite is close to that of anhydrite, the presence of magnesite could lead to improper evaluation of lithology and porosity from logs and could ultimately result in failure to recognize potential reservoir zones. 14 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Bridging the GAPS from Space: A Research/Educational Partnership in the Upper Delaware River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown de Colstoun, E.; Robin, J.; Minelli, S.; Katsaros, M.; Peterec, I.; Sandt, K.

    2006-05-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program is currently developing scientific protocols to inventory and monitor the natural resources of 270 park units at the national level. These are aimed at providing critical tools needed by park managers for effective decision-making regarding the management and stewardship of the resources they are charged with protecting. We are currently developing a satellite-based regional land cover and land use monitoring protocol that addresses the immediate needs of the NPS I&M. This is a pilot project that examines land cover/use changes in and around the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River and Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area national parks from Landsat data for the period 1984 to 2005, in one the fastest growing regions in the country. The products resulting from the application of the protocols are then used to guide the simulation of land cover/use changes within a simple Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT) model called GAPS in order to better understand the consequences of the measured land cover/use change on the water and energy cycles of the parks and surrounding areas. The data needed for product validation and model parameterization are being acquired with the assistance of students and educators from area schools using protocols established through the GLOBE program. Through focused workshops organized in collaboration with NPS educational specialists and PA regional educational service agencies called Intermediate Units, and participation in hands-on field measurement campaigns, students and educators are learning about satellite remote sensing interpretation, land cover classification, and how to measure/monitor changes in land cover/use in their communities. Students will also assist in the model simulations using the data they acquire in the field. This partnership between the Principal Investigator, the NPS, Intermediate Units and area students and educators is

  9. Assessment of the potential effects of climate change on water resources of the Delaware River basin; work plan for 1988-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayers, M.A.; Leavesley, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    The current consensus is that some global atmospheric warming will occur as a result of increasing ' greenhouse ' gases. Water resources scientists, planners, and managers are concerned about the uncertainty associated with climatic-change effects on water supplies and what planning might be necessary to mitigate the effects. Collaborative studies between climatologists, hydrologists, biologists, and others are needed to gain this understanding. The Delaware River basin study is an interdisciplinary effort on the part of the U.S. Geological Survey that was initiated to improve understanding of the sensitivity of the basin 's water resources to the potential effects of climate change. The Delaware River basin is 12,765 sq mi in area, crosses five physiographic provinces, and supplies water for an estimated 20 million people within and outside the basin. Climate change presumably will result in changes in precipitation and temperature and could have significant effects on evapotranspiration, streamflow, and groundwater recharge. A rise in sea level is likely to accompany global warming and, depending on changes in freshwater inflows, could alter the salinity of the Estuary and increase saline-water intrusion into adjacent aquifer systems. Because the potential effects are not well understood, this report discusses how the effects of climate change on the basin 's water resources might be defined and evaluated. The study objective is to investigate the basin 's hydrologic response, under existing water management policy and infrastructure, to various scenarios of climate change. Specific objectives include defining the temporal and spatial variability of basin hydrology under existing climate conditions , developing climate-change scenarios, and evaluating the potential effects and sensitivities of basin water availability to these scenarios. The objectives will be accomplished through intensive modeling analysis of the basin 's climate, watershed, estuary, and

  10. Stratigraphic hierarchy of organic carbon rich siltstones in deep-water facies, Brushy Canyon Formation (Guadalupian), Delaware Basin, West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sageman, Bradley B.; Gardner, Michael H.; Armentrout, John M.; Murphy, Adam E.

    1998-05-01

    The first systematic test for a predictive relationship between organic carbon content and stratigraphic hierarchy in a deep-water slope to basin-floor deposit was performed. The studied section includes the Pipeline Shale, the Brushy Canyon Formation, and the lower part of the Cherry Canyon Formation of the Delaware Mountain Group, West Texas. This interval represents one large-scale, 3rd-order genetic sequence within which 4th- and 5th-order stratigraphic cycles are recognized. Samples of fine-grained facies throughout the section were collected from outcrop and analyzed for organic carbon content and hydrogen index. Degree of pyritization was also determined for a subset of the samples. The results indicate that organic enrichment is closely correlated to the stratigraphic hierarchy at the 3rd-, 4th-, and 5th-order levels. The data suggest that quantity and quality of preserved organic matter are controlled by changes in bulk sedimentation rate (dilution vs. condensation), which affect organic matter inputs to the sediment, as well as the balance between (1) burial and preservation of organic matter and (2) its degradation on the sea floor during times of sediment starvation.

  11. Evaluating methods to establish habitat suitability criteria: A case study in the upper Delaware River Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galbraith, Heather S.; Blakeslee, Carrie J.; Cole, Jeffrey C.; Talbert, Colin; Maloney, Kelly O.

    2016-01-01

    Defining habitat suitability criteria (HSC) of aquatic biota can be a key component to environmental flow science. HSC can be developed through numerous methods; however, few studies have evaluated the consistency of HSC developed by different methodologies. We directly compared HSC for depth and velocity developed by the Delphi method (expert opinion) and by two primary literature meta-analyses (literature-derived range and interquartile range) to assess whether these independent methods produce analogous criteria for multiple species (rainbow trout, brown trout, American shad, and shallow fast guild) and life stages. We further evaluated how these two independently developed HSC affect calculations of habitat availability under three alternative reservoir management scenarios in the upper Delaware River at a mesohabitat (main channel, stream margins, and flood plain), reach, and basin scale. In general, literature-derived HSC fell within the range of the Delphi HSC, with highest congruence for velocity habitat. Habitat area predicted using the Delphi HSC fell between the habitat area predicted using two literature-derived HSC, both at the basin and the site scale. Predicted habitat increased in shallow regions (stream margins and flood plain) using literature-derived HSC while Delphi-derived HSC predicted increased channel habitat. HSC generally favoured the same reservoir management scenario; however, no favoured reservoir management scenario was the most common outcome when applying the literature range HSC. The differences found in this study lend insight into how different methodologies can shape HSC and their consequences for predicted habitat and water management decisions. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Landscape characteristics affecting streams in urbanizing regions of the Delaware River Basin (New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania, U.S.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riva-Murray, K.; Riemann, R.; Murdoch, P.; Fischer, J.M.; Brightbill, R.

    2010-01-01

    Widespread and increasing urbanization has resulted in the need to assess, monitor, and understand its effects on stream water quality. Identifying relations between stream ecological condition and urban intensity indicators such as impervious surface provides important, but insufficient information to effectively address planning and management needs in such areas. In this study we investigate those specific landscape metrics which are functionally linked to indicators of stream ecological condition, and in particular, identify those characteristics that exacerbate or mitigate changes in ecological condition over and above impervious surface. The approach used addresses challenges associated with redundancy of landscape metrics, and links landscape pattern and composition to an indicator of stream ecological condition across a broad area of the eastern United States. Macroinvertebrate samples were collected during 2000-2001 from forty-two sites in the Delaware River Basin, and landscape data of high spatial and thematic resolution were obtained from photointerpretation of 1999 imagery. An ordination-derived 'biotic score' was positively correlated with assemblage tolerance, and with urban-related chemical characteristics such as chloride concentration and an index of potential pesticide toxicity. Impervious surface explained 56% of the variation in biotic score, but the variation explained increased to as high as 83% with the incorporation of a second land use, cover, or configuration metric at catchment or riparian scales. These include land use class-specific cover metrics such as percent of urban land with tree cover, forest fragmentation metrics such as aggregation index, riparian metrics such as percent tree cover, and metrics related to urban aggregation. Study results indicate that these metrics will be important to monitor in urbanizing areas in addition to impervious surface. ?? 2010 US Government.

  13. Hydrogeology of the Beaver Kill Basin in Sullivan, Delaware, and Ulster Counties, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the 299-square-mile Beaver Kill basin in the southwestern Catskill Mountains of southeastern New York is depicted in a surficial geologic map and five geologic sections, and is summarized through an analysis of low-flow statistics for the Beaver Kill and its major tributary, Willowemoc Creek. Surficial geologic data indicate that the most widespread geologic units within the basin are ablation and lodgment till. Large masses of ablation till as much as 450 feet thick were deposited as lateral embankments within the narrow Beaver Kill and Willowemoc Creek valleys and have displaced the modern stream courses by as much as 1,000 feet from the preglacial bedrock-valley axis.Low-flow statistics for the Beaver Kill and Willowemoc Creeks indicate that the base flows (discharges that are exceeded 90 percent of the time) of these two streams—0.36 and 0.39 cubic feet per square mile,respectively—are the highest of 13 Catskill Mountain streams studied. High base flows elsewhere in the glaciated northeastern United States are generally associated with large stratified-drift aquifers, however, stratified drift in these two basins accounts for only about 5 percent and 4.4 percent of their respective surface areas, respectively. The high base flows in these two basins appear to correlate with an equally high percentage of massive sandstone members of the Catskill Formation, which underlies the entire region. Ground-water seepage from these sandstone members may be responsible for the high base flows of these two streams.

  14. Hydrogeology of the Beaver Kill basin in Sullivan, Delaware, and Ulster Counties, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    The hydrogeology of the 299-square-mile Beaver Kill basin in the southwestern Catskill Mountains of southeastern New York is depicted in a surficial geologic map and five geologic sections, and is summarized through an analysis of low-flow statistics for the Beaver Kill and its major tributary, Willowemoc Creek. Surficial geologic data indicate that the most widespread geologic units within the basin are ablation and lodgment till. Large masses of ablation till as much as 450 feet thick were deposited as lateral embankments within the narrow Beaver Kill and Willowemoc Creek valleys and have displaced the modern stream courses by as much as 1,000 feet from the preglacial bedrock-valley axis. Low-flow statistics for the Beaver Kill and Willowemoc Creeks indicate that the base flows (discharges that are exceeded 90 percent of the time) of these two streams--0.36 and 0.39 cubic feet per square mile,respectively--are the highest of 13 Catskill Mountain streams studied. High base flows elsewhere in the glaciated northeastern United States are generally associated with large stratified-drift aquifers, however, stratified drift in these two basins accounts for only about 5 percent and 4.4 percent of their respective surface areas, respectively. The high base flows in these two basins appear to correlate with an equally high percentage of massive sandstone members of the Catskill Formation, which underlies the entire region. Ground-water seepage from these sandstone members may be responsible for the high base flows of these two streams.

  15. Pathogenic bacteria and microbial-source tracking markers in Brandywine Creek Basin, Pennsylvania and Delaware, 2009-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duris, Joseph W.; Reif, Andrew G.; Olson, Leif E.; Johnson, Heather E.

    2011-01-01

    The City of Wilmington, Delaware, is in the downstream part of the Brandywine Creek Basin, on the main stem of Brandywine Creek. Wilmington uses this stream, which drains a mixed-land-use area upstream, for its main drinking-water supply. Because the stream is used for drinking water, Wilmington is in need of information about the occurrence and distribution of specific fecally derived pathogenic bacteria (disease-causing bacteria) and their relations to commonly measured fecal-indicator bacteria (FIB), as well as information regarding the potential sources of the fecal pollution and pathogens in the basin. This study focused on five routinely sampled sites within the basin, one each on the West Branch and the East Branch of Brandywine Creek and at three on the main stem below the confluence of the West and East Branches. These sites were sampled monthly for 1 year. Targeted event samples were collected on two occasions during high flow and two occasions during normal flow. On the basis of this study, high flows in the Brandywine Creek Basin were related to increases in FIB densities, and in the frequency of selected pathogen and source markers, in the West Branch and main stem of Brandywine Creek, but not in the East Branch. Water exceeding the moderate fullbody-contact single-sample recreational water-quality criteria (RWQC) for Escherichia coli (E. coli) was more likely to contain selected markers for pathogenic E. coli (eaeA,stx1, and rfbO157 gene markers) and bovine fecal sources (E. hirae and LTIIa gene markers), whereas samples exceeding the enterococci RWQC were more likely to contain the same pathogenic markers but also were more likely to carry a marker indicative of human source (esp gene marker). On four sample dates, during high flow between October and March, the West Branch was the only observed potential contributor of selected pathogen and bovine source markers to the main stem of Brandywine Creek. Indeed, the stx2 marker, which indicates a highly

  16. Modeling forest carbon and nitrogen cycles based on long term carbon stock field measurement in the Delaware River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B.; Pan, Y.; McCullough, K.; Plante, A. F.; Birdsey, R.

    2015-12-01

    Process-based models are a powerful approach to test our understanding of biogeochemical processes, to extrapolate ground survey data from limited plots to the landscape scale and to simulate the effects of climate change, nitrogen deposition, elevated atmospheric CO2, increasing natural disturbances and land use change on ecological processes. However, in most studies, the models are calibrated using ground measurements from only a few sites, though they may be extrapolated to much larger areas. Estimation accuracy can be improved if the models are parameterized using long-term carbon stock data from multiple sites representative of the simulated region. In this study, vegetation biomass and soil carbon stocks, and changes in these stocks over a recent decade, were measured in 61 forested plots located in three small watersheds in the Delaware River Basin (DRB). On average, total vegetation biomass was 160.2 Mg C ha-1 and the soil carbon stock was 76.6 Mg C ha-1, measured during 2012-2014. The biomass carbon stock increased by 2.45 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 from 2001-2003 to 2012-2014. This dataset was subsequently used to parameterize the PnET-CN model at the individual plot basis, and averaged parameters among plots were then applied to generate new watershed-scale model parameters for each of the three watersheds. The parameterized model was further validated by the field measurements in each of the major forest types. The spatial distribution of forest carbon pools and fluxes in three watersheds were mapped based on the simulation results from the newly parameterized PnET-CN model. The model will also be run under different scenarios to test the effects of climate change, altered atmospheric composition, land use change, and their interactions within the three watersheds and across the whole DRB.

  17. Calcitization and silicification of evaporites in Guadalupian back-reef carbonates of the Delaware basin, west Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, D.S.; Scholle, P.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Outcrop of the Seven Rivers, Yates, and Tansill formations contain numerous examples of evaporites that have been replaced by both quartz and calcite. The original evaporites consisted of discrete horizons, scattered nodules, enterolithic layers, and individual crystal laths of gypsum and/or anhydrite within a predominantly dolomitic matrix. Based on field and petrographic observations, evaporite replacement proceeded from the exterior to the interior of the nodules. The earliest replacement was by euhedral, black megaquartz containing abundant hydrocarbon inclusions. Calcite replacement followed silicification and consists of coarse, equant, blocky spar. Isotopic analyses of these calcites form two distinct groups: the first group ranges from -10.9 to -20.1{per thousand} (average -16.4{per thousand}) {delta}{sup 13}C and -6.4 to -13.8{per thousand} (average -10.9{per thousand}) {delta}{sup 18}O; the second group ranges from +1.4 to 5.8{per thousand} (average -2.4{per thousand}) {delta}{sup 13}C and -6.2 to 14.1{per thousand} (average -9.2{per thousand}) {delta}{sup 18}O. Evaporite silicification was coeval with hydrocarbon migration as indicated by the inclusion data. Calcitization, however, was associated with mid-Tertiary block faulting that uplifted the area causing deep groundwater circulation. The isotopically very light calcites resulted from the mixing of meteoric fluids and hydrocarbon-rich pore fluids, probably during early uplift while these strata were still at significant depth. The calcites with heavier isotopic values were produced somewhat later by meteoric fluids that had little or no contact with hydrocarbons. Evaporite diagenesis in the Delaware basin is an ongoing process that started during hydrocarbon migration, continued over millions of years, and has the potential to significantly change the porosity of these units.

  18. Assessing potential impacts of a wastewater rapid infiltration basin system on groundwater quality: a delaware case study.

    PubMed

    Andres, A S; Sims, J Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Rapid infiltration basin systems (RIBS) are receiving increased interest for domestic wastewater disposal in rural areas. They rely on natural treatment processes to filter pollutants and use extremely high effluent loading rates, much greater than natural precipitation, applied to a small geographic area instead of disposal to surface water. Concerns exist today that adopting RIBS in areas with shallow groundwater and sandy soils may increase ground and surface water pollution. We conducted a field study of RIBS effects on N and P concentrations in soils and groundwater at Cape Henlopen State Park, Delaware, where a RIBS designed and operated following USEPA guidance has been used for >25 yr. Site and wastewater characteristics (water table of 8 m, Fe- and Al-oxide coatings on soils, organic-rich effluent) were favorable for denitrification and P sorption; however, we found high P saturation, reduced soil P sorption capacity, and significant total P accumulation at depths >1.5 m, factors that could lead to dissolved P leaching. Very low soil inorganic N levels suggest that wastewater N was converted rapidly to NO-N and leached from the RIBS. Extensive groundwater monitoring supported these concerns and showed rapid offsite transport of N and P at concentrations similar to the effluent. Results suggest that high hydraulic loads and preferential flow led to flow velocities that were too large, and contact times between effluent and soils that were too short, for effective N and P attenuation processes. These findings indicate the need for better site characterization and facility designs to reduce and monitor contaminant loss from RIBS in similar settings.

  19. Water resources data for Pennsylvania, water year 1994. Volume 1. Delaware river basin. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1993-30 September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Durlin, R.R.

    1995-09-01

    This report, Volume 1, includes records from the Delaware River Basin. Specifically, Volume 1 contains (1) discharge records for 81 continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations and 27 partial-record stations; (2) elevation and contents records for 12 lakes and reservoirs; and (3) water-quality records for 25 gaging stations and 52 ungaged streamsites; and (4) water-level records for 17 observation wells. The location of these sites is shown in figures 6-9. Additional water data collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program are also presented.

  20. National Dam Safety Program. Clove Lake Dam (NJ 00259) Delaware River Basin, Shimers Brook, Sussex County, New Jersey. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    A0-A103 762 NEW JERSEY DEPT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION TRENTON -ETC P/A 13/13 NATIONAL DAM SAFETY PROGRAM. CLOVE LAKE DAM (NJ 00259 DELAW ARE--ETC(U...ERLO National Dam Safety Program YIN-I Clove Lake Dam, NJO0259 4 S RIG R." OTUE Sussex County, New Jersey _______________ 7. AUTHOR(*) .CMaCgqA!yBRO...unlimited. KNational Dam Safety Programs clove - Lake Dm(NJ 00259) Delaware River Basins Shimers Brook, Sussex County, 17. DISTmIGUTION STATE[T (o

  1. Lafayette in Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Pamela T.

    1978-01-01

    A high school French class did a Bicentennial research project which resulted in a bilingual pamphlet about Lafayette in Delaware for distribution to all the French and Social Studies departments in the State. A "Lafayette Day" included a fashion show, slide show, and skit. (Author/SW)

  2. 18 CFR 415.20 - Class I projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Class I projects. 415.20 Section 415.20 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Types of Projects and Jurisdiction § 415.20 Class...

  3. 18 CFR 415.21 - Class II projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Class II projects. 415.21 Section 415.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... part, include all projects other than Class I projects, in non-tidal areas of the basin, which involve...

  4. 18 CFR 415.21 - Class II projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Class II projects. 415.21 Section 415.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... part, include all projects other than Class I projects, in non-tidal areas of the basin, which involve...

  5. 18 CFR 415.21 - Class II projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Class II projects. 415.21 Section 415.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... part, include all projects other than Class I projects, in non-tidal areas of the basin, which involve...

  6. 18 CFR 415.21 - Class II projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Class II projects. 415.21 Section 415.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... part, include all projects other than Class I projects, in non-tidal areas of the basin, which involve...

  7. 18 CFR 415.21 - Class II projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Class II projects. 415.21 Section 415.21 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION... part, include all projects other than Class I projects, in non-tidal areas of the basin, which involve...

  8. 18 CFR 415.20 - Class I projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Class I projects. 415.20 Section 415.20 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Types of Projects and Jurisdiction § 415.20 Class...

  9. 18 CFR 415.20 - Class I projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Class I projects. 415.20 Section 415.20 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Types of Projects and Jurisdiction § 415.20 Class I...

  10. 18 CFR 415.20 - Class I projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Class I projects. 415.20 Section 415.20 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Types of Projects and Jurisdiction § 415.20 Class...

  11. 18 CFR 415.20 - Class I projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Class I projects. 415.20 Section 415.20 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Types of Projects and Jurisdiction § 415.20 Class...

  12. Uncertainties in forest soil carbon and nitrogen estimates related to soil sampling methods in the Delaware River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B.; Plante, A. F.; Johnson, A. H.; Pan, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Estimating forest soil carbon and nitrogen (CN) is critical to understanding ecosystem responses to changing climate, disturbance and forest management practices. Most of the uncertainty in soil CN cycling is associated with the difficulty in characterizing soil properties in field sampling because forest soils can be rocky, inaccessible and spatially heterogeneous. A composite coring technique is broadly applied as the standard FIA soil sampling protocol. However, the accuracy of this method might be limited by soil compaction, rock obstruction and plot selection problems during sampling. In contrast, the quantitative soil pit sampling method may avoid these problems and provides direct measurements of soil mass, rock volume and CN concentration representative of a larger ground surface area. In this study, the two sampling methods were applied in 60 forest plots, randomly located in three research areas in the Delaware River Basin in the U.S. Mid-Atlantic region. In each of the plots, one quantitative soil pit was excavated and three soil cores were collected. Our results show that average soil bulk density in the top 20 cm mineral soil measured from the soil cores was consistently lower than bulk density measured by soil pits. However, the volume percentage of coarse fragments measured by the core method was also significantly lower than the pit method. Conversely, CN concentrations were greater in core samples compared to pit samples. The resulting soil carbon content (0-20 cm) was estimated to be 4.1 ± 0.4 kg m-2 in the core method compared to 4.5 ± 0.4 kg m-2 in the pit method. Lower bulk density but higher CN concentration and lower coarse fragments content from the cores have offset each other, resulting in no significant differences in CN content from the soil pit method. Deeper soil (20-40 cm), which is not accessible in the core method, accounted for 29% of the total soil carbon stock (0-40 cm) in the pit method. Our results suggest that, although soil

  13. Relation of water quality to land use in the drainage basins of six tributaries to the lower Delaware River, New Jersey, 2002-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Ronald J.; Esralew, Rachel A.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrations and loads of water-quality constituents in six streams in the lower Delaware River Basin of New Jersey were determined in a multi-year study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Two streams receive water from relatively undeveloped basins, two from largely agricultural basins, and two from heavily urbanized basins. Each stream was monitored during eight storms and at least eight times during base flow during 2002-07. Sampling was conducted during base flow before each storm, when stage was first observed to rise, and several times during the rising limb of the hydrographs. Agricultural and urban land use has resulted in statistically significant increases in loads of nitrogen and phosphorus species relative to loads in undeveloped basins. For example, during the growing season, median storm flow concentrations of total nitrogen in the two streams in agricultural areas were 6,290 and 1,760 mg/L, compared to 988 and 823 mg/L for streams in urban areas, and 719 and 333 mg/L in undeveloped areas. Although nutrient concentrations and loads were clearly related to land useurban, agricultural, and undeveloped within the drainage basins, other basin characteristics were found to be important. Residual nutrients entrapped in lake sediments from streams that received effluent from recently removed sewage-treatment plants are hypothesized to be the cause of extremely high levels of nutrient loads to one urban stream, whereas another urban stream with similar land-use percentages (but without the legacy of sewage-treatment plants) had much lower levels of nutrients. One of the two agricultural streams studied had higher nutrient loads than the other, especially for total phosphorous and organic nitrogen. This difference appears to be related to the presence (or absence) of livestock (cattle).

  14. National Dam Safety Program. Lake Como Dam (DE 00028), Delaware River Basin, Mill Creek, Kent County, Delaware. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    J J WILLIAMS DACWl1-80- O -0013 uNCLASSIFIED DAEN/NAP-53842/DEOOS2B-BO/ NL LUIIIIIIEEEE IhIIIIIIIIIIIl IIIIIIIIIIIIIu IIIIIIIIIIIIII EIEIIIIIIIII...PHILADELPHIA PA 1q106 15:5 EST IMGMCOMP S.TO REPLY BY MAILGRAM. SEE RFVERSE SIDE FOR WFSTERN UNION S lOLL FI , ADA096 0bb O * BRIEN AND GERE ENGINEERS INC...Lak -e Cowm nlasfe Dam (DE 00028), Del~iturre River Basin, Un. O classifieINdONRIN M4ill Creek, Kent County, Delare 15m SCEDLEIIAIN/ONRD Phase I

  15. Water resources data for Pennsylvania, water year 1992. Volume 1. Delaware River basin. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1991-30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    White, K.E.; White, T.E.; Druther, R.L.; Moleski, P.

    1993-09-01

    Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Pennsylvania consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; contents and elevations of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. The report, Volume 1, includes records from the Delaware River Basin. Specificially, it contains; (1) discharge records for 85 continuous record streamflow-gaging stations and 15 partial-record stations, and 5 miscellaneous streamflow sites; (2) elevation and contents records for 12 lakes and reservoirs and elevations for 1 tidal station; (3) water-quality records for 28 gaging stations and 48 ungaged streamsites; and (4) water-level records for 17 observation wells.

  16. Water resources data for pennsylvania, water year 1993. Volume 1. Delaware River basin. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1992-30 September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.; Druther, R.L.; Moleski, P.

    1994-12-01

    Water resources data for the 1993 water year for Pennsylvania consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; contents and elevations of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. The report, Volume 1, includes records from the Delaware River Basin. Specifically, Volume 1 contains (1) discharge records for 94 continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations and 25 partial-record stations; (2) elevation and contents records for 12 lakes and reservoirs; and (3) water-quality records for 33 gaging stations and 38 ungaged streamsites; and (4) water-level records for 17 observation wells. Additional water data collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program are also presented.

  17. Water resources data for Pennsylvania, water year 1991. Volume 1. Delaware river basin. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1990-30 September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kolva, J.R.; White, T.E.; Druther, R.L.; Moleski, P.

    1992-11-01

    Water-resources data for the 1991 water year for Pennsylvania consist of records of discharge and water quality of streams; contents and elevations of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. The report, Volume 1, includes records from the Delaware River basin. Specifically, it contains: (1) discharge records for 83 continuous record streamflow-gaging stations and 75 partial-record stations, 2 special study, and 5 miscellaneous streamflow sites; (2) elevation and contents records for 12 lakes and reservoirs and elevations for 1 tidal station; (3) water-quality records for 23 gaging stations, for 67 ungaged streamsites; and (4) water-level records for 17 observation wells.

  18. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Quarterly report, April 1,1996 - June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P.

    1996-07-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir- characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area, (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments, and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced-recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill wells will be drilled and cored. Progress to date is summarized for reservoir characterization.

  19. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Quarterly report, October 1 - December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir-characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area, (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments, and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced-recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill wells will be drilled and cored. Technical progress is summarized for: geophysical characterization; reservoir characterization; outcrop characterization; and recovery technology identification and analysis.

  20. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, S.P.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir- characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area, (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments, and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced-recovery program (CO{sup 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill wells will be drilled and cored. Accomplishments for this past quarter are discussed.

  1. Sulfur redox reactions: Hydrocarbons, native sulfur, Mississippi Valley-type deposits, and sulfuric acid karst in the Delaware Basin, New Mexico and Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.A.

    1995-02-01

    Hydrocarbons, native sulfur, Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits, and sulfuric acid karst in the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico, and west Texas, USA, are all genetically related through a series of sulfur redox reactions. The relationship began with hydrocarbons in the basin that reacted with sulfate ions from evaporite rock to produce isotopically light ({delta}{sup 34}S = -22 to -12) H{sub 2}S and bioepigenetic limestone (castiles). This light H{sub 2}S was then oxidized at the redox interface to produce economic native sulfur deposits ({delta}{sup 34}S = -15 to +9) in the castiles, paleokarst, and along graben-boundary faults. This isotopically light H{sub 2}S also migrated from the basin into its margins to accumulate in structural (anticlinal) and stratigraphic (Yates siltstone) traps, where it formed MVT deposits within the zone of reduction ({delta}{sup 34}S = -15 to +7). Later in time, in the zone of oxidation, this H{sub 2}S reacted with oxygenated water to produce sulfuric acid, which dissolved the caves (e.g., Carlsbad Cavern and Lechuguilla Cave, Guadalupe Mountains). Massive gypsum blocks on the floors of the caves ({delta}{sup 34}S = -25 to +4) were formed as a result of this reaction. The H{sub 2}S also produced isotopically light cave sulfur ({delta}{sup 34}S = -24 to -15), which is now slowly oxidizing to gypsum in the presence of vadose drip water. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Trends in concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls in fish tissue from selected sites in the Delaware River basin in New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania, 1969-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riva-Murray, Karen; Brightbill, Robin A.; Bilger, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    Trends in concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls in fish tissue from selected sites in the Delaware River basin in New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania, 1969-98 by Karen Riva-Murray, Robin A. Brightbill, and Michael D. Bilger U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4066 ABSTRACT Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in fish tissue collected during the 1990's from selected sites in the Delaware River Basin were compared with concentrations in fish tissue collected during 1969-88. Data collected by State and Federal agencies on concentrations in whole-body common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and white sucker (Catostomus commersoni), and edible portions of American eel (Anguilla rostrata), smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) during 1969-98 were compiled to define temporal trends in concentrations of PCBs in fish tissue from selected segments of the Delaware River, Lehigh River, Schuylkill River, and Brandywine Creek. The Delaware River in the vicinity of Trenton, New Jersey and Yardley, Pennsylvania (above the tidal influence) had the largest long-term data set among the sites considered for this study and was the only site with sufficient data for statistical analysis. A general pattern of decline in PCB concentrations during 1969-98 was apparent for this river segment. PCB concentrations in whole-body white sucker from this lower Delaware River segment declined during 1969-98 from a highest concentration of 7 micrograms per gram (?g/g, wet weight) in a sample collected during 1972 to 0.26 ?g/g (wet weight) in a sample collected during 1998. PCB concentration was negatively correlated with year (Spearman rank correlation -0.46, p < 0.08, n = 15); especially after removal of a sample from 1977 with an unusually low concentration (Spearman rank correlation -0.53, p = 0.05, n = 14). PCB concentrations in edible flesh of American eel declined during 1975-95, from a highest concentration of 3

  3. National Dam Safety Program. Rexmere Dam (Inventory Number NY 524), Delaware River Basin, Delaware County, New York, Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS-1963-A I n ’]II ii i i- REPCI DOUM~r <i ON p -RE7𔃻t INSTRUCTION~S REP,’*T.DOWA~ ON t...1___________- DeawreRve BsiDenw-.eCou .y, NYf V. PrIf.TiMHG oRG. REPORT NUMBER Inventory No. NY 524 _________ AUhUa) P .. . 1 CON h CT - R GRANT NUMEER(s) ID...Ev::~’a ser\\’at ion/ 50 WolfNU,.L 1.MONITORING AGLN..~y N11X12 & ADj.s^, W ile &fot C-fr’llng S. SCLW~JOT Y CLASS. (of tfIa r;- p ) DJpairtrient of ’-he

  4. Overview of the structural geology and tectonics of the Central Basin Platform, Delaware Basin, and Midland Basin, West Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Hoak, T.; Sundberg, K.; Ortoleva, P.

    1998-12-31

    The structural geology and tectonics of the Permian Basin were investigated using an integrated approach incorporating satellite imagery, aeromagnetics, gravity, seismic, regional subsurface mapping and published literature. The two primary emphases were on: (1) delineating the temporal and spatial evolution of the regional stress state; and (2) calculating the amount of regional shortening or contraction. Secondary objectives included delineation of basement and shallower fault zones, identification of structural style, characterization of fractured zones, analysis of surficial linear features on satellite imagery and their correlation to deeper structures. Gandu Unit, also known as Andector Field at the Ellenburger level and Goldsmith Field at Permian and younger reservoir horizons, is the primary area of interest and lies in the northern part of Ector county. The field trends northwest across the county line into Andrews County. The field(s) are located along an Ellenburger thrust anticline trap on the eastern margin of the Central Basin Platform.

  5. Mesohabitat use of threatened hemlock forests by breeding birds of the Delaware River basin in northeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, R.M.; Redell, L.A.; Bennett, R.M.; Young, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Avian biodiversity may be at risk in eastern parks and forests due to continued expansion of the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae), an exotic homopteran insect native to East Asia. To assess avian biodiversity, mesohabitat relations, and the risk of species loss with declining hemlock forests in Appalachian park lands, 80 randomly distributed fixed-radius plots were established in which territories of breeding birds were estimated on four forest-terrain types (hemlock and hardwood benches and ravines) in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. Both species richness and number of territories were higher in hardwood than hemlock forest types and in bench than ravine terrain types. Four insectivorous species, Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens), blue-headed vireo (Vireo solitarius), black-throated green warbler (Dendroica virens), and Blackburnian warbler (Dendroica fusca), showed high affinity for hemlock forest type and exhibited significantly greater numbers of territories in hemlock than hardwood sites. These species are hemlock-associated species at risk from continued hemlock decline in the Delaware River valley and similar forests of the mid-Atlantic east slope. Two of these species, the blue-headed vireo and Blackburnian warbler, appeared to specialize on ravine mesohabitats of hemlock stands, the vireo a low-to-mid canopy species, the warbler a mid-to-upper canopy forager. Unchecked expansion of the exotic adelgid and subsequent hemlock decline could negatively impact 3,600 pairs from the park and several million pairs from northeastern United States hemlock forests due to elimination of preferred habitat.

  6. Simulation of streamflow and water quality in the Brandywine Creek subbasin of the Christina River basin, Pennsylvania and Delaware, 1994-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Koerkle, Edward H.

    2003-01-01

    The Christina River Basin drains 565 mi2 (square miles) in Pennsylvania and Delaware. Water from the basin is used for recreation, drinking-water supply, and to support aquatic life. The Christina River Basin includes the major subbasins of Brandywine Creek, Red Clay Creek, White Clay Creek, and Christina River. The Brandywine Creek is the largest of the subbasins and drains an area of 327 mi2. Water quality in some parts of the Christina River Basin is impaired and does not support designated uses of the streams. A multi-agency water-quality management strategy included a modeling component to evaluate the effects of point and nonpoint-source contributions of nutrients and suspended sediment on streamwater quality. To assist in nonpoint-source evaluation, four independent models, one for each of the four main subbasins of the Christina River Basin, were developed and calibrated using the model code Hydrological Simulation Program?Fortran (HSPF). Water-quality data for model calibration were collected in each of the four main subbasins and in small subbasins predominantly covered by one land use following a nonpoint-source monitoring plan. Under this plan, stormflow and base-flow samples were collected during 1998 at six sites in the Brandywine Creek subbasin and five sites in the other subbasins. The HSPF model for the Brandywine Creek Basin simulates streamflow, suspended sediment, and the nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus. In addition, the model simulates water temperature, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, and plankton as secondary objectives needed to support the sediment and nutrient simulations. For the model, the basin was subdivided into 35 reaches draining areas that ranged from 0.6 to 18 mi2. Three of the reaches contain regulated reservoir. Eleven different pervious land uses and two impervious land uses were selected for simulation. Land-use areas were determined from 1995 land-use data. The predominant land uses in the basin are forested

  7. Structure and Dynamics of Floods in the upper Delaware River Basin: An Integrated Seasonal Forecasting System for New York City Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najibi, N.; Devineni, N.

    2016-12-01

    The National Weather Service River Forecasting System (NWS-RFS) issues 3-month lead probabilistic forecasts of streamflow for many river basins in the contiguous United States from 12 river forecasting centers. The Ensemble Streamflow Prediction system from NWS-RFS uses conceptual hydrologic models to issue streamflow forecasts based on the current soil moisture, river, and reservoir conditions by assuming that past meteorological events will recur in the future with historical probabilities. Recent investigations focusing on the teleconnection between anomalous sea surface temperature conditions and regional/continental hydroclimatology show that interannual and interdecadal variability in exogenous climatic indices modulates the regional streamflow patterns. In this work, we present a comprehensive framework to quantify the structure and dynamics of floods for the upper Delaware River Basin based on the interaction between the exogenous climate and weather patterns and antecedent flow regimes. We focus on estimating the conditional distribution of flood volume, duration, peak and timing based on large-scale climatic teleconnections (seasonal sea level pressure and pre-season sea surface temperature) and macroscale hydrological factors (start of the season's flow, seasonal rainfall duration and intensity, pre-season snow depth and cover in watershed, and concurrent rain over snow (ROS) events). Statistical techniques such as the semi-parametric k-nearest neighbor resampling, multivariate Kalman filters, and hierarchical Bayesian methods are explored as a strategy to address both model and parameter uncertainties. Ultimately proactive decision models embedded into the operating rules based on the forecasted future conditions -instead of reactive decisions based on current observed conditions- can result in risk mitigation.

  8. Strategic Reinvention: The Rodel Foundation of Delaware's Journey to Catalyzing a System of World-Class Schools. Principles for Effective Education Grantmaking. Case Study No. 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Lynn; Wisdom, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    As the summer of 2014 began, Paul Herdman, President and CEO of the Rodel Charitable Foundation of Delaware, paused to reflect on what Delaware had accomplished over the past decade in the public education realm. Academic standards had been raised across the K-12 system, and a new assessment system aligned to those standards was being implemented.…

  9. Relations of surface-water quality to streamflow in the Wallkill and upper Delaware River Basins, New Jersey and vicinity, water years 1976-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buxton, Debra E.; Hunchak-Kariouk, Kathryn; Hickman, R. Edward

    1999-01-01

    Relations of water quality to streamflow were determined for 18 water-quality constituents at 18 surface-water stations within the drainage basins of the Wallkill and upper Delaware Rivers in New Jersey and vicinity for water years 1976-93. Surface-water-quality and streamflow data were evaluated for trends (through time) in constituent concentrations during high and low flows, and relations between constituent concentration and streamflow, and between constituent load and streamflow, were determined. Median concentrations were calculated for the entire period of study (water years 1976-93) and for the last 5 years of the period of study (water years 1989-93) to determine whether any large variation in concentration exists between the two periods. Medians also were used to determine the seasonal Kendall’s tau statistic, which was then used to evaluate trends in concentrations during high and low flows. Trends in constituent concentrations during high and low flows were evaluated to determine whether the distribution of the observations changes through time for intermittent (nonpoint storm runoff) or constant (point sources and ground water) sources, respectively. Highand low-flow trends in concentrations were determined for some constituents at 15 of the 18 water-quality stations; 3 stations have insufficient data to determine trends. Seasonal effects on the relations of concentration to streamflow are evident for 16 of the 18 constituents. Negative slopes of relations of concentration to streamflow, which indicate a decrease in concentration at high flows, predominate over positive slopes because of the dilution of instream concentrations by storm runoff. The slopes of the regression lines of load to streamflow were determined in order to show the relative contributions to the instream load from constant (point sources and ground water) and intermittent (storm runoff) sources. Greater slope values indicate larger contributions from storm runoff to instream load

  10. Simulation of streamflow and water quality in the White Clay Creek subbasin of the Christina River Basin, Pennsylvania and Delaware, 1994-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Koerkle, Edward H.

    2003-01-01

    The Christina River Basin drains 565 square miles (mi2) in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware. Water from the basin is used for recreation, drinking water supply, and to support aquatic life. The Christina River Basin includes the major subbasins of Brandywine Creek, White Clay Creek, and Red Clay Creek. The White Clay Creek is the second largest of the subbasins and drains an area of 108 mi2. Water quality in some parts of the Christina River Basin is impaired and does not support designated uses of the streams. A multi-agency water-quality management strategy included a modeling component to evaluate the effects of point and nonpoint-source contributions of nutrients and suspended sediment on stream water quality. To assist in non point-source evaluation, four independent models, one for each of the three major subbasins and for the Christina River, were developed and calibrated using the model code Hydrological Simulation Program?Fortran (HSPF). Water-quality data for model calibration were collected in each of the four main subbasins and in smaller subbasins predominantly covered by one land use following a nonpoint-source monitoring plan. Under this plan, stormflow and base- flow samples were collected during 1998 at two sites in the White Clay Creek subbasin and at nine sites in the other subbasins. The HSPF model for the White Clay Creek Basin simulates streamflow, suspended sediment, and the nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus. In addition, the model simulates water temperature, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, and plankton as secondary objectives needed to support the sediment and nutrient simulations. For the model, the basin was subdivided into 17 reaches draining areas that ranged from 1.37 to 13 mi2. Ten different pervious land uses and two impervious land uses were selected for simulation. Land-use areas were determined from 1995 land-use data. The predominant land uses in the White Clay Creek Basin are agricultural, forested, residential

  11. Total mercury and methylmercury in fish fillets, water, and bed sediments from selected streams in the Delaware River basin, New Jersery, New York, and Pennsylvania, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brightbill, Robin A.; Riva-Murray, Karen; Bilger, Michael D.; Byrnes, John D.

    2004-01-01

    Within the Delaware River Basin, fish-tissue samples were analyzed for total mercury (tHg). Water and bed-sediment samples were analyzed for tHg and methylmercury (MeHg), and methylation efficiencies were calculated. This study was part of a National Mercury Pilot Program conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The Delaware River Basin was chosen because it is part of the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment Program that integrates physical, chemical, and biological sampling efforts to determine status and trends in surface-water and ground-water resources. Of the 35 sites in the study, 31 were sampled for fish. The species sampled at these sites include smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), the target species, and where smallmouth bass could not be collected, brown trout (Salmo trutta), chain pickerel (Esox niger), largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), and rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris). There were a total of 32 fish samples; 7 of these exceeded the 0.3 ?g/g (micrograms per gram) wet-weight mercury (Hg) concentration set for human health by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and 27 of these exceeded the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service criteria of 0.1 ?g/g wet weight for the protection of fish-eating birds and wildlife. Basinwide analysis of Hg in fish, water, and bed sediment showed tHg concentration in fillets correlated positively with population density, urban land cover, and impervious land surface. Negative correlations included wetland land cover, septic density, elevation, and latitude. Smallmouth bass from the urban sites had a higher median concentration of tHg than fish from agricultural, low intensity-agricultural, or forested sites. Concentrations of tHg and MeHg in water were higher in samples from the more urbanized areas of the basin and were positively correlated with urbanization and negatively correlated with forested land cover. Methylation efficiency of water was negatively correlated with urbanization. Bed

  12. Geohydrology and simulation of ground-water flow in the Red Clay Creek Basin, Chester County, Pennsylvania, and New Castle County, Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogel, K.L.; Reif, A.G.

    1993-01-01

    The 54-square-mile Red Clay Creek Basin, located in the lower Delaware River Basin, is underlain primarily by metamorphic rocks that range from Precambrian to Lower Paleozoic in age. Ground water flows through secondary openings in fractured crystalline rock and through primary openings below the water table in the overlying saprolite. Secondary porosity and permeability vary with hydrogeologic unit, topographic setting, and depth. Thirty-nine percent of the water-bearing zones are encountered within 100 feet of the land surface, and 79 percent are within 200 feet. The fractured crystalline rock and overlying saprolite act as a single aquifer under unconfined conditions. The water table is a subdued replica of the land surface. Local ground-water flow systems predominate in the basin, and natural ground-water discharge is to streams, comprising 62 to 71 percent of streamflow. Water budgets for 1988-90 for the 45-square-mile effective drainage area above the Woodale, Del., streamflow-measurement station show that annual precipitation ranged from 43.59 to 59.14 inches and averaged 49.81 inches, annual streamflow ranged from 15.35 to 26.33 inches and averaged 20.24 inches, and annual evapotranspiration ranged from 27.87 to 30.43 inches and averaged 28.98 inches. The crystalline rocks of the Red Clay Creek Basin were simulated two-dimensionally as a single aquifer under unconfined conditions. The model was calibrated for short-term steady-state conditions on November 2, 1990. Recharge was 8.32 inches per year. Values of aquifer hydraulic conductivity in hillside topographic settings ranged from 0.07 to 2.60 feet per day. Values of streambed hydraulic conductivity ranged from 0.08 to 26.0 feet per day. Prior to simulations where ground-water development was increased, the calibrated steady-state model was modified to approximate long-term average conditions in the basin. Base flow of 11.98 inches per year and a ground-water evapotranspiration rate of 2.17 inches per

  13. Delaware River Basin Commission will hold a public hearing on its proposed amendments to the comprehensive plan relating to water quality standards

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-09

    Under the proposal, suspended solids discharged to the Delaware River from municipal and industrial wastewater-treatment facilities would both have limitations of 30 and 45 mg/l. as 30 day and 7 day averages, respectively. In industrial wastewater-treatment facilities would be allowed up to 100 mg/l. as an average of samples collected during a 30 day period, provided that a reduction of at least 85% as a 30 day average is achieved. The Interstate Commission on the Delaware (INCODEL) standards for BOD of waste discharged to certain areas of the Delaware River would be deleted. The hearing will be held in Philadelphia on 1/23/80.

  14. Simulation of streamflow and water quality in the Red Clay Creek subbasin of the Christina River Basin, Pennsylvania and Delaware, 1994-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Koerkle, Edward H.

    2003-01-01

    (mi2) in Pennsylvania and Delaware and includes the major subbasins of Red Clay Creek, White Clay Creek, Brandywine Creek, and Christina River. The Red Clay Creek is the smallest of the subbasins and drains an area of 54 mi2. Streams in the Christina River Basin are used for recreation, drinking-water supply, and to support aquatic life. Water quality in some parts of the Christina River Basin is impaired and does not support designated uses of the stream. A multi-agency, waterquality management strategy included a modeling component to evaluate the effects of point and nonpointsource contributions of nutrients and suspended sediment on stream water quality. To assist in nonpointsource evaluation, four independent models, one for each of the four main subbasins of the Christina River Basin, were developed and calibrated using the model code Hydrological Simulation Program?Fortran (HSPF). Water-quality data for model calibration were collected in each of the four main subbasins and in smaller subbasins predominantly covered by one land use following a nonpoint-source monitoring plan. Under this plan, stormflow and base-flow samples were collected during 1998 at 1 site in the Red Clay Creek subbasin and at 10 sites elsewhere in the Christina River Basin. The HSPF model for the Red Clay Creek subbasin simulates streamflow, suspended sediment, and the nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus. In addition, the model simulates water temperature, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, and plankton as secondary objectives needed to support the sediment and nutrient simulations. For the model, the basin was subdivided into nine reaches draining areas that ranged from 1.7 to 10 mi2. One of the reaches contains a regulated reservoir. Ten different pervious land uses and two impervious land uses were selected for simulation. Land-use areas were determined from 1995 land-use data. The predominant land uses in the Red Clay Creek subbasin are agricultural, forested, residential

  15. User manuals for the Delaware River Basin Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (DRB–WATER) and associated WATER application utilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williamson, Tanja N.; Lant, Jeremiah G.

    2015-11-18

    The Water Availability Tool for Environmental Resources (WATER) is a decision support system (DSS) for the nontidal part of the Delaware River Basin (DRB) that provides a consistent and objective method of simulating streamflow under historical, forecasted, and managed conditions. WATER integrates geospatial sampling of landscape characteristics, including topographic and soil properties, with a regionally calibrated hillslope-hydrology model, an impervious-surface model, and hydroclimatic models that have been parameterized using three hydrologic response units—forested, agricultural, and developed land cover. It is this integration that enables the regional hydrologic-modeling approach used in WATER without requiring site-specific optimization or those stationary conditions inferred when using a statistical model. The DSS provides a “historical” database, ideal for simulating streamflow for 2001–11, in addition to land-cover forecasts that focus on 2030 and 2060. The WATER Application Utilities are provided with the DSS and apply change factors for precipitation, temperature, and potential evapotranspiration to a 1981–2011 climatic record provided with the DSS. These change factors were derived from a suite of general circulation models (GCMs) and representative concentration pathway (RCP) emission scenarios. These change factors are based on 25-year monthly averages (normals) that are centere on 2030 and 2060. The WATER Application Utilities also can be used to apply a 2010 snapshot of water use for the DRB; a factorial approach enables scenario testing of increased or decreased water use for each simulation. Finally, the WATER Application Utilities can be used to reformat streamflow time series for input to statistical or reservoir management software. 

  16. National Dam Inspection Program. Blue Mountain Lake Dam (NDI ID PA 00627, PA DER 45-34), Delaware River Basin, Unnamed Tributary of Brodhead Creek, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    mounood [ ,3Q,,s’t,lt l oo &I on .. .. .+ MCCR DELAWARE RIVER BASIN Avallability Co4e _Avail- and/tim’eor - 11As pecial8J BLUE MOUNTAIN LAKE DAM...concrete reservoir outlet pipe discharges into the spillway channel about 50 feet downstream of the embankment. The inlet gate, which is located in the...impoundment at the upstream end of the pipe , is no longer operable. b. Lncation. Blue Mountain Lake Dam is located on a branch of Ruliffs Run, about 2.5

  17. National Dam Inspection Program. Mountain Lake Dam (NDI ID Number PA-00546, DER ID Number 40-50). Delaware River Basin, Meadow Run, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    the Duncannon Member. Mountain Lake Dam is underlain by the Duncannon Member of the Catskill Formation. The Duncannon Member is predominantly a...ADAO87 936 GANNETT FLEMING CORODRY AND CARPENTER INC. HARRISBURG PA F/G 13/13 NATIONAL DAM INSPECTION PROGRAM. MOUNTAIN LAKE DAM (NDI ID NUMB--ETC(U...FLEMING CORDDRY AND GARPENTERIN4C. DACW31-80-C-00 17 8 0 8 11 1 4 9 DELAWARE RIVER BASIN MEADOW RUN, LUZERNE COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA MOUNTAIN LAKE DAM V NDI

  18. Trends in Delaware's Forests

    Treesearch

    Northeastern Research Station

    2002-01-01

    Forests protect watersheds, provide opportunities for recreation and settings for aesthetic enjoyment, serve as habitat for wildlife, and produce wood and other forest products. The forests of Delaware contribute greatly to the quality of life of the residents, making the State a better place in which to live. This brochure highlights significant trends in Delaware?s...

  19. Analysis of Flood-Magnitude and Flood-Frequency Data for Streamflow-Gaging Stations in the Delaware and North Branch Susquehanna River Basins in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roland, Mark A.; Stuckey, Marla H.

    2007-01-01

    The Delaware and North Branch Susquehanna River Basins in Pennsylvania experienced severe flooding as a result of intense rainfall during June 2006. The height of the flood waters on the rivers and tributaries approached or exceeded the peak of record at many locations. Updated flood-magnitude and flood-frequency data for streamflow-gaging stations on tributaries in the Delaware and North Branch Susquehanna River Basins were analyzed using data through the 2006 water year to determine if there were any major differences in the flood-discharge data. Flood frequencies for return intervals of 2, 5, 10, 50, 100, and 500 years (Q2, Q5, Q10, Q50, Q100, and Q500) were determined from annual maximum series (AMS) data from continuous-record gaging stations (stations) and were compared to flood discharges obtained from previously published Flood Insurance Studies (FIS) and to flood frequencies using partial-duration series (PDS) data. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed to determine any statistically significant differences between flood frequencies computed from updated AMS station data and those obtained from FIS. Percentage differences between flood frequencies computed from updated AMS station data and those obtained from FIS also were determined for the 10, 50, 100, and 500 return intervals. A Mann-Kendall trend test was performed to determine statistically significant trends in the updated AMS peak-flow data for the period of record at the 41 stations. In addition to AMS station data, PDS data were used to determine flood-frequency discharges. The AMS and PDS flood-frequency data were compared to determine any differences between the two data sets. An analysis also was performed on AMS-derived flood frequencies for four stations to evaluate the possible effects of flood-control reservoirs on peak flows. Additionally, flood frequencies for three stations were evaluated to determine possible effects of urbanization on peak flows. The results of the Wilcoxon signed

  20. Dynamic Attractors and Basin Class Capacity in Binary Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-21

    The wide repertoire of attractors and basins of attraction that appear in dynamic neural networks not only serve as models of brain activity patterns...limitations of static neural networks by use of dynamic attractors and their basins. The results show that dynamic networks have a high capacity for

  1. Ground-water quality and its relation to hydrogeology, land use, and surface-water quality in the Red Clay Creek basin, Piedmont Physiographic Province, Pennsylvania and Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.

    1996-01-01

    The Red Clay Creek Basin in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of Pennsylvania and Delaware is a 54-square-mile area underlain by a structurally complex assemblage of fractured metamorphosed sedimentary and igneous rocks that form a water-table aquifer. Ground-water-flow systems generally are local, and ground water discharges to streams. Both ground water and surface water in the basin are used for drinking-water supply. Ground-water quality and the relation between ground-water quality and hydrogeologic and land-use factors were assessed in 1993 in bedrock aquifers of the basin. A total of 82 wells were sampled from July to November 1993 using a stratified random sampling scheme that included 8 hydrogeologic and 4 land-use categories to distribute the samples evenly over the area of the basin. The eight hydrogeologic units were determined by formation or lithology. The land-use categories were (1) forested, open, and undeveloped; (2) agricultural; (3) residential; and (4) industrial and commercial. Well-water samples were analyzed for major and minor ions, nutrients, volatile organic compounds (VOC's), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCB's), and radon-222. Concentrations of some constituents exceeded maximum contaminant levels (MCL) or secondary maximum contaminant levels (SMCL) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Concentrations of nitrate were greater than the MCL of 10 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as nitrogen (N) in water from 11 (13 percent) of 82 wells sampled; the maximum concentration was 38 mg/L as N. Water from only 1 of 82 wells sampled contained VOC's or pesticides that exceeded a MCL; water from that well contained 3 mg/L chlordane and 1 mg/L of PCB's. Constituents or properties of well-water samples that exceeded SMCL's included iron, manganese, dissolved solids, pH, and corrosivity. Water from 70 (85 percent) of the 82 wells sampled contained radon-222 activities greater than the proposed MCL of

  2. Ground-water quality and its relation to hydrogeology, land use, and surface-water quality in the Red Clay Creek basin, Piedmont Physiographic Province, Pennsylvania and Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.

    1996-01-01

    The Red Clay Creek Basin in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of Pennsylvania and Delaware is a 54-square-mile area underlain by a structurally complex assemblage of fractured metamorphosed sedimentary and igneous rocks that form a water-table aquifer. Ground-water-flow systems generally are local, and ground water discharges to streams. Both ground water and surface water in the basin are used for drinking-water supply. Ground-water quality and the relation between ground-water quality and hydrogeologic and land-use factors were assessed in 1993 in bedrock aquifers of the basin. A total of 82 wells were sampled from July to November 1993 using a stratified random sampling scheme that included 8 hydrogeologic and 4 land-use categories to distribute the samples evenly over the area of the basin. The eight hydrogeologic units were determined by formation or lithology. The land-use categories were (1) forested, open, and undeveloped; (2) agricultural; (3) residential; and (4) industrial and commercial. Well-water samples were analyzed for major and minor ions, nutrients, volatile organic compounds (VOC's), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCB's), and radon-222. Concentrations of some constituents exceeded maximum contaminant levels (MCL) or secondary maximum contaminant levels (SMCL) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water. Concentrations of nitrate were greater than the MCL of 10 mg/L (milligrams per liter) as nitrogen (N) in water from 11 (13 percent) of 82 wells sampled; the maximum concentration was 38 mg/L as N. Water from only 1 of 82 wells sampled contained VOC's or pesticides that exceeded a MCL; water from that well contained 3 mg/L chlordane and 1 mg/L of PCB's. Constituents or properties of well-water samples that exceeded SMCL's included iron, manganese, dissolved solids, pH, and corrosivity. Water from 70 (85 percent) of the 82 wells sampled contained radon-222 activities greater than the proposed MCL of

  3. Forests of Delaware, 2015

    Treesearch

    Tonya Lister; Richard Widmann

    2016-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resources in Delaware based on inventories conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station. From 2004-2013, FIA employed an annual inventory with a cycle length of 5 years, measuring data on 20 percent of all sample plots each year in Delaware. Beginning...

  4. Migrant Farmworkers in Delaware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Dover.

    The Delaware Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights examined housing, employment, and health among the state's more than 1,500 migrants. Committee findings indicated: (1) there is no accurate count of migrants in the state or migrants in need of housing on a seasonal basis; (2) Delaware has pursued an aggressive policy…

  5. Migrant Farmworkers in Delaware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, Dover.

    The Delaware Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights examined housing, employment, and health among the state's more than 1,500 migrants. Committee findings indicated: (1) there is no accurate count of migrants in the state or migrants in need of housing on a seasonal basis; (2) Delaware has pursued an aggressive policy…

  6. Atrazine in Surface Water and Relation to Hydrologic Conditions Within the Delaware River Basin Pesticide Management Area, Northeast Kansas, July 1992 Through December 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, Larry M.

    1995-01-01

    Since about 1960, atrazine has been used as an effective pre- and postemergent herbicide in the production of corn and grain sorghum. Atrazine is a triazine-class herbicide and was the most frequently detected herbicide in surface water of the lower Kansas River Basin of southeast Nebraska and northeast Kansas (Stamer and Zelt, 1994). Approximately 95 percent of the atrazine applied in the United States is used in corn and grain-sorghum production, predominately in the Mississippi River Basin where about 82 percent of the Nation's corn acreage is planted (CIBA-GEIGY Corp., 1992). Until recent changes in product labeling, atrazine commonly was applied at relatively high rates to control weeds around commercial and industrial areas and along railroad right-of-ways. Crop yields have increased during the last 40 years due in part to the use of herbicides in reducing weed growth and competition for moisture and nutrients. However, concern on the part of water suppliers, health officials, and the public also has increased regarding the safe and responsible use of herbicides. One issue is whether the widespread use of atrazine may pose a potential threat to public-water supplies in areas where the herbicide is used because of its ability to easily dissolve in water and its possible effects on the health of humans and aquatic life.

  7. Delaware Occupational Teacher Education Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, John I.

    The Delaware Occupational Teacher Education Consortium is comprised of three colleges: the University of Delaware, Delaware State College, and Delaware Technical and Community College. These schools established a joint program in 1972 for preparing and certifying industrial arts, trade, and industry teachers in B.S. and M.S. degree programs. The…

  8. Geologic framework of the offshore region adjacent to Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, R.N.; Roberts, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Several multichannel, common depth point (CDP) seismic reflection profiles concentrated in the area of the entrance to Delaware Bay provide a tie between the known onshore geology of the Coastal Plain of Delaware and the offshore geology of the Baltimore Canyon Trough. The data provide a basis for understanding the geologic framework and petroleum resource potential of the area immediately offshore Delaware. Our research has focused on buried early Mesozoic rift basins and their geologic history. Assuming that the buried basins are analogous to the exposed Newark Supergroup basins of Late Triassic-Early Jurassic age, the most likely possibility for occurrence of hydrocarbon source beds in the area of the landward margin of the Baltimore Canyon Trough is presumed to be lacustrine, organic-rich shales probably present in the basins. Although buried basins mapped offshore Delaware are within reach of drilling, no holes have been drilled to date; therefore, direct knowledge of source, reservoir, and sealing beds is absent. Buried rift basins offshore Delaware show axial trends ranging from NW-SE to NNE-SSW. Seismic reflection profiles are too widely spaced to delineate basin boundaries accurately. Isopleths of two-way travel time representing basin fill suggest that, structurally, the basins are grabens and half-grabens. As shown on seismic reflection profiles, bounding faults of the basins intersect or merge with low-angle fault surfaces that cut the pre-Mesozoic basement. The rift basins appear to have formed by Mesozoic extension that resulted in reverse motion on reactivated basement thrust faults that originated from compressional tectonics during the Paleozoic. Computer-plotted structure contour maps derived from analysis of seismic reflection profiles provide information on the burial history of the rift basins. The postrift unconformity bevels the rift basins and, in the offshore area mapped, ranges from 2000 to 12,000 m below present sea level. The oldest

  9. Delaware Alternative Classifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jay

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses the species designation and taxonomies of Delaware and Algonkian and presents eight classifications of taxa by form, habitat, color, movement, sound, use, relationship, and appearance. Relevant research is also reviewed. (CLK)

  10. A predictive model for anti-degradation monitoring of the Delaware River mainstem

    EPA Science Inventory

    The non-tidal portion of the Delaware River can be considered to be in minimally disturbed condition, but there is increasing pressure on the watershed. Thus, the primary goal of this research was to develop a monitoring tool that can be used by the Delaware River Basin Commissi...

  11. National Dam Safety Program. Lake Tranquility Dam (NJ00275), Delaware River Basin, Tributary to Pequest River, Sussex County, New Jersey. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    Repair erosion of embankment caused by catch basin discharge. Repair all eroded areas caused by storm runoff or footpaths on upstream and downstream...dam. 2. Repair cracks and deteriorated concrete in the spillway structure. 3. Repair erosion of embankment caused by catch basin discharge. 4. Repair...all eroded areas caused by storm runoff or footpaths on upstream and downstream slopes. 5. Determine if the waste sluice and sluice gate are in

  12. Influence of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis L.) on fish community structure and function in headwater streams of the Delaware River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, R.M.; Bennett, R.M.; Snyder, C.D.; Young, J.A.; Smith, D.R.; Lemarie, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) forest of the eastern U.S. are in decline due to invasion by the exotic insect hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae). Aquatic biodiversity in hemlock ecosystems has not been documented; thus the true impact of the infestation cannot be assessed. We compared ichthyofaunal assemblages and trophic structure of streams draining hemlock and hardwood forests by sampling first- and second-order streams draining 14 paired hemlock and hardwood stands during base flows in July 1997 at the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Over 1400 fish of 15 species and 7 families were collected, but hemlock and hardwood streams individually harbored only one to four species. Brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) were two to three times as prevalent in hemlock than hardwood streams. Insectivorous fishes occurred in significantly higher proportion in streams of hardwood (0.90) than hemlock (0.46) stands, while piscivores occurred more often in hemlock (0.85) than hardwood (0.54) stands. Functional (trophic) diversity of fishes in hemlock and second-order streams was numerically greater than that of hardwood and first-order streams. Species composition also differed by stream order and terrain type. Biodiversity is threatened at several levels within hemlock ecosystems at risk to the hemlock woolly adelgid in eastern U.S. forests.

  13. 3.0 Foundation programs for the Delaware CEMRI framework

    Treesearch

    Peter S. Murdoch

    2008-01-01

    A complete review of all the national monitoring programs that could possibly contribute to the Delaware River Basin (DRB) CEMRI Framework is beyond the scope of this report. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment developed a Web-based annotated inventory of such monitoring programs for the mid-Atlantic region. Olsen et al. (...

  14. Delaware's forest resources, 2008

    Treesearch

    T.W. Lister; G. Gladders; B. Butler; C. Barnett; B. O' Connell

    2010-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Delaware based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to the last page of this...

  15. Delaware's forest resources, 2007

    Treesearch

    T.W. Lister; G. Gladders; W. McWilliams; D. Meneguzo; C. Barnett; B. O' Connell

    2010-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Delaware based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to the last page of this...

  16. Delaware and SREB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is a nonprofit organization that works collaboratively with Delaware and 15 other member states to improve education at every level--from pre-K to postdoctoral study--through many effective programs and initiatives. SREB's "Challenge to Lead Goals for Education", which calls for the region to…

  17. The Perceived Readiness of the Graduates of Delaware State University to Transition into the Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Cheatham, Lawita Germaine

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the perceived readiness of the graduating seniors at Delaware State University to transition from the classroom into the workforce. Delaware State University's undergraduate graduating class of 2012, 547 undergraduate seniors, were invited to participate in an online survey comprised of 23 items--derived from the…

  18. Delaware-Val Verde gas drilling busy

    SciTech Connect

    Petzet, G.A.

    1992-01-13

    Deep and not so deep exploration is under way in the southeastern Delaware and northwestern Val Verde basins in West Texas. Northern Terrell County is seeing a good agenda of Permian Wolfcamp development drilling in spite of testy gas prices. This paper reports that none of the drilling appears to be targeted to Ouachita facies along the Marathon portion of the Ouachita Overthrust, although oil production from several of those fields has been respectable. And a number of exploratory tests to 20,000 ft and deeper are under way or on tap in eastern Pecos County and Terrell County.

  19. Simulation of streamflow and water quality in the Christina River subbasin and overview of simulations in other subbasins of the Christina River Basin, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Delaware, 1994-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Koerkle, Edward H.

    2003-01-01

    The Christina River Basin drains 565 square miles (mi2) in Pennsylvania and Delaware and includes the major subbasins of Brandywine Creek, Red Clay Creek, White Clay Creek, and Christina River. The Christina River subbasin (exclusive of the Brandywine, Red Clay, and White Clay Creek subbasins) drains an area of 76 mi2. Streams in the Christina River Basin are used for recreation, drinking water supply, and support of aquatic life. Water quality in some parts of the Christina River Basin is impaired and does not support designated uses of the stream. A multi-agency water-quality management strategy included a modeling component to evaluate the effects of point- and nonpoint-source contributions of nutrients and suspended sediment on stream water quality. To assist in nonpoint-source evaluation, four independent models, one for each of the four main subbasins of the Christina River Basin, were developed and calibrated using the model code Hydrological Simulation Program?Fortran (HSPF). Waterquality data for model calibration were collected in each of the four main subbasins and in small subbasins predominantly covered by one land use following a nonpoint- source monitoring plan. Under this plan, stormflow and base-flow samples were collected during 1998 at two sites in the Christina River subbasin and nine sites elsewhere in the Christina River Basin. The HSPF model for the Christina River subbasin simulates streamflow, suspended sediment, and the nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus. In addition, the model simulates water temperature, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, and plankton as secondary objectives needed to support the sediment and nutrient simulations. For the model, the basin was subdivided into nine reaches draining areas that ranged from 3.8 to 21.9 mi2. Ten different pervious land uses and two impervious land uses were selected for simulation. Land-use areas were determined from 1995 land-use data. The predominant land uses in the Christina

  20. Delaware's Forests 2008

    Treesearch

    Tonya W. Lister; Glenn Gladders; Charles J. Barnett; Gary J. Brand; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Grant M. Domke; Douglas M. Griffith; Mark A. Hatfield; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Andrew J. Lister; Randall S. Morin; W. Keith Moser; Mark D. Nelson; Charles H. Perry; Ronald J. Piva; Rachel Riemann; Christopher W. Woodall

    2012-01-01

    The fifth full inventory of Delaware's forests reports an 8 percent decrease in the area of forest land to 352,000 acres, which cover 28 percent of the State's land area and has a volume of approximately 2,352 cubic feet per acre. Twenty-one percent of the growing-stock volume is red maple, followed by sweetgum (13 percent), and loblolly pine (12 percent)....

  1. A Decision Support Framework for Water Management inthe Upper Delaware River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bovee, Ken D.; Waddle, Terry J.; Bartholow, John; Burris, Lucy

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Delaware River Basin occupies an area of 12,765 square miles, in portions of south central New York, northeast Pennsylvania, northeast Delaware, and western New Jersey (fig. 1). The river begins as two streams in the Catskill Mountains, the East and West Branches. The two tributaries flow in a southwesterly direction until they meet at Hancock, N.Y. The length of the river from the mouth of Delaware Bay to the confluence at Hancock is 331 miles. Approximately 200 miles of the river between Hancock, N.Y., and Trenton, N.J., is nontidal.

  2. Astronomy in the Delaware Public Schools Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, H.; Martin, K.; Moyer, J.; Baldwin, J.; Bole, D.; Bouchelle, H.; Densler, S.; Gizis, J.; Matthes, M.; Mills, B.; Stubbolo, G.; Sypher, J.

    2005-12-01

    100 years ago, the Committee of Ten cast astronomy into the back rooms of K-12 education, among other things. Ten years ago, the State of Delaware approved science standards which brought astronomy back to center stage. "Earth in Space" is now one of eight strands in the state's K-12 science standards. The authors of this paper form a team of university astronomers, K-12 teachers, and dedicated workers in the state's department of education. We guide statewide efforts to transform the nice words in the standards into high-quality classroom teaching. Our most robust achievements are in middle school, where the the FOSS Planetary Systems kit has given all Delaware eighth grade students an extensive exposure to astronomy. The authors of this paper have written additional materials, most classroom-tested by us, to supplement the kit and align the contents of the 8th grade curriculum with the Delaware standards. Pilot testing of the new curricular units begins in the spring of 2006, and astronomy questions will soon appear on the state assessments. Implementation of the standards in K-5 and in high school now varies considerably from teacher to teacher. We plan to help teachers who know little or no astronomy do more in their classes. In high school, a unit on the Big Bang will be developed in conjunction with a unit on biological evolution. In K-5, astronomy activities can naturally be introduced along with the other science curriculum kits that the state has used for the past decade to produce demonstrable, statistically significant improvements in student achievement. HS will lead a small team which will develop support materials. We thank the State of Delaware, private industries, the National Science Foundations Distinguished Teaching Scholars Program (DUE-0306557), and the NASA E/PO program for support.

  3. Transportability Class of Americium in K Basin Sludge under Ambient and Hydrothermal Processing Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2006-08-01

    This report establishes the technical bases for using a ''slow uptake'' instead of a ''moderate uptake'' transportability class for americium-241 (241Am) for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP) dose consequence analysis. Slow uptake classes are used for most uranium and plutonium oxides. A moderate uptake class has been used in prior STP analyses for 241Am based on the properties of separated 241Am and its associated oxide. However, when 241Am exists as an ingrown progeny (and as a small mass fraction) within plutonium mixtures, it is appropriate to assign transportability factors of the predominant plutonium mixtures (typically slow) to the Am241. It is argued that the transportability factor for 241Am in sludge likewise should be slow because it exists as a small mass fraction as the ingrown progeny within the uranium oxide in sludge. In this report, the transportability class assignment for 241Am is underpinned with radiochemical characterization data on K Basin sludge and with studies conducted with other irradiated fuel exposed to elevated temperatures and conditions similar to the STP. Key findings and conclusions from evaluation of the characterization data and published literature are summarized here. Plutonium and 241Am make up very small fractions of the uranium within the K Basin sludge matrix. Plutonium is present at about 1 atom per 500 atoms of uranium and 241Am at about 1 atom per 19000 of uranium. Plutonium and americium are found to remain with uranium in the solid phase in all of the {approx}60 samples taken and analyzed from various sources of K Basin sludge. The uranium-specific concentrations of plutonium and americium also remain approximately constant over a uranium concentration range (in the dry sludge solids) from 0.2 to 94 wt%, a factor of {approx}460. This invariability demonstrates that 241Am does not partition from the uranium or plutonium fraction for any characterized sludge matrix. Most of the K Basin sludge characterization

  4. Preliminary report on fluid inclusions from halites in the Castile and lower Salado formations of the Delaware Basin, southeastern New Mexico. [Freezing-point depression

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, C.L.

    1985-09-01

    A suite of samples composed primarily of halite from the upper Castile and lower Salado Formations of the Permian Basin was selected from Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) core for a reconnaissance study of fluid inclusions. Volume percent of these trapped fluids averaged 0.7% to 1%. Freezing-point depressions varied widely and appeared to be unrelated to fluid-inclusion type, to sedimentary facies, or to stratigraphic depth. However, because very low freezing points were usually associated with anhydrite, a relation may exist between freezing-point data and lithology. Dissolved sulfate values were constant through the Castile, then decreased markedly with lesser depth in the lower Salado. This trend correlates very well with observed mineralogy and is consistent with an interpretation of the occurrence of secondary polyhalite as a result of gypsum or anhydrite alteration with simultaneous consumption of dissolved sulfate from the coexisting fluids. Together with the abundance and distribution of fluid inclusions in primary or ''hopper'' crystal structures, this evidence suggests that inclusions seen in these halites did not migrate any significant geographical distance since their formation. 28 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. The Condition of College & Career Readiness 2016: Delaware Key Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2016

    2016-01-01

    "The Condition of College and Career Readiness" looks at the progress of the 2016 ACT®-tested graduating class relative to college and career readiness. This state briefing begins with statistics in the following categories for Delaware: performance, STEM, career readiness, impact, behaviors that impact access and opportunity, pipeline,…

  6. Delaware Student Testing Program: A Score Results Guide for Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware State Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Delaware students must meet world-class standards if they are to be competitive and successful in a global economy. To prepare students for their future, schools must support rigorous standards and each teacher must set high expectations. Students must also commit themselves to the achievement of excellence. Any system that hopes to accomplish…

  7. Identifying baldcypress-water tupelo regeneration classes in forested wetlands of the Atchafalaya Basin, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faulkner, Stephen P.; Bhattarai, Prajwol; Allen, Yvonne C.; Barras, John A.; Constant, Glenn C.

    2009-01-01

    Baldcypress-water tupelo (cypress-tupelo) swamps are critically important coastal forested wetlands found throughout the southeastern U.S. The long-term survival and sustainability of these swamp forests is unknown due to large-scale changes in hydrologic regimes that prevent natural regeneration following logging or mortality. We used NWI wetland maps and remotely sensed hydrologic data to map cypress-tupelo communities, surface water, and the extent and location of proposed regeneration condition classes for cypress-tupelo swamps in the Atchafalaya Basin, LA. Only 6,175 ha (5.8%) of the 106,227 ha of cypress-tupelo forest in the Lower Atchafalaya Basin Floodway was classified as capable of naturally regenerating. Over 23% (24,525 ha) of the forest area was mapped as unable to regenerate either naturally or artificially. The loss and conversion of nearly 25,000 ha of cypress-tupelo forest would have significant and long-lasting impacts on ecosystem services such as wildlife habitat for birds and Louisiana black bears. Given the landscape-scale changes in surface elevations and flooding depths and durations throughout southern Louisiana, similar conditions and impacts are likely applicable to all coastal cypress-tupelo forests in Louisiana. Better data on flooding during the growing season are needed to more accurately identify and refine the location and spatial extent of the regeneration condition classes.

  8. The role of run-of-river impoundments in CO2 and CH4 emissions from floodplains of the Delaware Piedmont, Christina River Basin Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, A.; Pizzuto, J. E.; Vargas, R.

    2014-12-01

    There is strong interest in understanding how run-of-river impoundments affect streams and their floodplains. Most recent work has focused on the fate of sediment within these dammed systems both past and current, the geomorphic impacts associated with sediment, and issues associated with removing run-of-the-river dams. Here, we assess how run-of-river impoundments alter the floodplain effluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4). We sampled two pairs of floodplains on the Red Clay Creek (140 km2) located in the Christina River Basin Critical Zone Observatory. The floodplain pairs were centered on a current and a former location of a run-of-river dam (one floodplain upstream, one downstream of dam location). Each floodplain was subjected to a suite of measurements that included bi-weekly gas flux (CO2, CH4, and H2O), bi-weekly soil moisture and temperature, monthly biomass sampling, C/N ratio sampling from O and A horizons, and cores that constrain the total organic carbon and nitrogen at depth as well as provide a description of the stratigraphy. Preliminary findings show that all floodplains are sources of CH4 (0.18 - 1.12 nmol m-2s-1) and CO2 (0.42 - 3.12 µmol m-2s-1). Despite temporal variability, the upstream floodplains produce more CH4 and CO2 than downstream floodplains. Our results may suggest that run-of-the-river dams enhance release of carbon from floodplains into the atmosphere.

  9. Delaware's first serial killer.

    PubMed

    Inguito, G B; Sekula-Perlman, A; Lynch, M J; Callery, R T

    2000-11-01

    The violent murder of Shirley Ellis on November 29, 1987, marked the beginning of the strange and terrible tale of Steven Bryan Pennell's reign as the state of Delaware's first convicted serial killer. Three more bodies followed the first victim, and all had been brutally beaten and sadistically tortured. The body of a fifth woman has never been found. State and county police collaborated with the FBI to identify and hunt down their suspect, forming a task force of over 100 officers and spending about one million dollars. Through their knowledge and experience with other serial killers, the FBI was able to make an amazingly accurate psychological profile of Delaware's serial killer. After months of around-the-clock surveillance, Steven Pennell was arrested on November 29, 1988, one year to the day after the first victim was found. Pennell was found guilty in the deaths of the first two victims on November 29, 1989, and plead no contest to the murder of two others on October 30, 1991. Still maintaining his innocence, he asked for the death penalty so that he could spare his family further agony. Steven Pennell was executed by lethal injection on March 15, 1992.

  10. Delaware River and Catskill Region Hydrologic Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, M. B.; Brutsaert, W. H.; Walter, M. T.; Degaetano, A. T.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2004-12-01

    This poster presents the nationally unique opportunities for hydrology-based research in the Delaware River and Catskill Mountain (DelCat) Region. The DelCat region encompasses all of the Delaware river Basin and the New York City Catskills' source watersheds. It has been a key water resource region prior to the founding of our country. This mountain-river-estuary hydrologic system together with other watersheds in the Catskills has supported the population and economic growth of major metropolitan areas of the early United States by providing water supply, land and forests, transportation, power generation, fisheries, recreation, and pollution elimination. The presentation is an account of a forthcoming effort designed to elicit support and participation. After greatly expanding the user and research community for the DelCat observatory, we will design the facility to serve a large user base interested in studies on a wide range of basic and applied hydrologic science topics and issues. Our current plans are to define the form of the hydrologic observatory, and to forecast the nature of what hydrologic sciences can achieve in the DelCat Region.

  11. 33 CFR 165.511 - Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake & Delaware Canal, Delaware Bay, Delaware River and its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake & Delaware Canal, Delaware Bay, Delaware River and its tributaries. 165.511 Section 165.511... Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.511 Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake...

  12. 33 CFR 165.511 - Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake & Delaware Canal, Delaware Bay, Delaware River and its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake & Delaware Canal, Delaware Bay, Delaware River and its tributaries. 165.511 Section 165.511... Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.511 Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake...

  13. 33 CFR 165.511 - Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake & Delaware Canal, Delaware Bay, Delaware River and its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake & Delaware Canal, Delaware Bay, Delaware River and its tributaries. 165.511 Section 165.511... Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.511 Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake...

  14. 33 CFR 165.511 - Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake & Delaware Canal, Delaware Bay, Delaware River and its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake & Delaware Canal, Delaware Bay, Delaware River and its tributaries. 165.511 Section 165.511... Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.511 Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake...

  15. 33 CFR 165.511 - Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake & Delaware Canal, Delaware Bay, Delaware River and its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake & Delaware Canal, Delaware Bay, Delaware River and its tributaries. 165.511 Section 165.511... Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.511 Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake...

  16. Libraries in Delaware: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/delaware.html Libraries in Delaware To use the sharing features on ... Newark Christiana Care Health System Lewis B. Flinn Library 4755 Ogletown-Stanton Road / PO BOX 6001 Newark, ...

  17. Delaware River Basin Conservation Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Carper, Thomas R. [D-DE

    2011-06-23

    Senate - 07/16/2012 Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 452. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Delaware River Basin Conservation Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Carney, John C., Jr. [D-DE-At Large

    2013-02-13

    House - 02/22/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, Oceans, and Insular Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Delaware River Basin Conservation Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Carney, John C., Jr. [D-DE-At Large

    2011-06-23

    House - 07/11/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Fisheries, Wildlife, Oceans, and Insular Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. English Language Arts. Delaware Teachers' Desk Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware State Dept. of Education, Dover.

    This document represents one section of the Delaware Teachers' Desk Reference to Standards and Performance Indicators for Curriculum Planning and Unit Development produced by the Delaware Department of Education. The Desk Reference is part of the Delaware Department of Education's ongoing efforts to provide assistance and support to local school…

  1. 33 CFR 117.904 - Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Delaware River. 117.904 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Pennsylvania § 117.904 Delaware River. See § 117.716, Delaware River, listed under New Jersey. ...

  2. 33 CFR 117.716 - Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Delaware River. 117.716 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.716 Delaware River. The following requirements apply to all drawbridges across the Delaware River: (a) The draws of railroad bridges need not be...

  3. 33 CFR 117.904 - Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Delaware River. 117.904 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Pennsylvania § 117.904 Delaware River. See § 117.716, Delaware River, listed under New Jersey. ...

  4. 33 CFR 117.716 - Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Delaware River. 117.716 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.716 Delaware River. The following requirements apply to all drawbridges across the Delaware River: (a) The draws of railroad bridges need not be...

  5. 33 CFR 117.904 - Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Delaware River. 117.904 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Pennsylvania § 117.904 Delaware River. See § 117.716, Delaware River, listed under New Jersey. ...

  6. 33 CFR 117.716 - Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Delaware River. 117.716 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.716 Delaware River. The following requirements apply to all drawbridges across the Delaware River: (a) The draws of railroad bridges need not be...

  7. 33 CFR 117.904 - Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Delaware River. 117.904 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Pennsylvania § 117.904 Delaware River. See § 117.716, Delaware River, listed under New Jersey. ...

  8. 33 CFR 117.904 - Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Delaware River. 117.904 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Pennsylvania § 117.904 Delaware River. See § 117.716, Delaware River, listed under New Jersey. ...

  9. 33 CFR 117.716 - Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Delaware River. 117.716 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.716 Delaware River. The following requirements apply to all drawbridges across the Delaware River: (a) The draws of railroad bridges need not be...

  10. 33 CFR 117.716 - Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Delaware River. 117.716 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.716 Delaware River. The following requirements apply to all drawbridges across the Delaware River: (a) The draws of railroad bridges need not be...

  11. National Dam Inspection Program. Panther Lake Dam. Delaware River Basin, Freeling Run, Pike County, Pennsylvania (NDI ID Number PA-00416, DER ID Number 52-157), Panther Lake Property Owners Association. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    in Pike County within the Appalachian Plateau Physiographic Province. The most pronounced topographic feature in the area is Camelback Mountain ...which is part of the Pocono Plateau Escarpment. This escarpment has a well-defined southwestward trend from Camelback Mountain , but is irregular between...Camelback Mountain and Mt. Pocono, which lies to the north. Streams east of the escarpment drain directly to the Delaware River, while those to the

  12. National Dam Inspection Program. Glass Pond Number 2 Dam (NDI ID Number PA-00082, DER ID Number 64-8), Delaware River Basin, Tributary to Lackawaxen River, Wayne County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    Camelback Mountain , which is part of the Pocono Plateau Escarpment. The escarpment has a well-deflned, southwestward trend from Camelback Mountain ...but it is irregular between Camelback Mountain and Mt. Pocono, which lies to the north. Streams east of the escarpment drain directly to the Delaware...Formation, and seven mapped members of the Catskill Formation. These members include sandstones, siltstones, and shales of the Towamensing Member

  13. National Dam Inspection Program. Pocono Highland Dam (NDI ID Number PA- 00992, DER ID Number 45-131), Delaware River Basin, Spring Run, Monroe County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    is Camelback Mountain , which is a part of the Pocono Plateau Escarpment. The escarpment is well defined southwestward from Camelback Mountain , but is...more irregular between Camelback Mountain and Mt. Pocono, which lies to the north. Streams east of the escarpment drain directly to the Delaware...the Catskill Formation. These members include sandstones, siltstones, and shales of the Towamensing Member; sandstone, siltstone and shale of the

  14. National Dam Inspection Program. Pinetree Lake Dam NDI ID number PA-00784, DER ID number 45-244. Delaware River Basin, Dry Sawmill Run. Monroe County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    Camelback Mountain , which is part of the Pocono Plateau Escarpment. The escarpment has a well-defined southwestward trend from Camelback Mountain , but is...irregular between Camelback Mountain and Mt. Pocono, which lies to the north. Streams east of the escarpment drain directly to the Delaware River...members of the Catskill Formation. These members include sandstones, siltstones, and shales of the Towamensing member; sandstone, siltstone and shale

  15. National Dam Inspection Program. Locklin Pond Dam (NDI ID Number PA-00139, DER ID Number 64-31), Delaware River Basin, Lakeville Creek, Wayne County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    Wayne County within the Appalachian Plateau Physiographic Province. The most pronounced topographic feature in the area is Camelback Mountain , which...is part of the Pocono Plateau Escarpment. The escarpment has a well-defined southwestward trend from Camelback Mountain , but is irregular between...Camelback Mountain and Mt. Pocono, which lies to the north. Streams east of the escarpment drain directly to the Delaware River, while those to the west

  16. National Dam Inspection Program. Maple Lake Dam. Delaware River Basin, Stoffle-Denmark Creek, Pike County, Pennsylvania (NDI ID Number PA-00766, DER ID Number 52-170). Pine Ridge Community Association. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    Mountain , which is a part of the Pocono Plateau Escarpment. The escarpment is well-defined southwestward from Camelback Mountain , but is more...irregular between Camelback Mountain and Mt. Pocono, which lies to the north. Streams east of the escarpment drain directly to the Delaware River, while those...Period. These units include siltstones of the Mahantango Formation, siltstones and shales of the Trimmers Rock, and seven mapped members of the Catskill

  17. New School of Management, Delaware State University, Dover, Delaware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents features of Delaware State University's New School of Management designed to stimulate positive gains in teaching and learning. The design incorporates state of the art distance learning systems that includes a 350-seat auditorium possessing the same capability, and a commercial kitchen and dining facility for chef and hotel management…

  18. New School of Management, Delaware State University, Dover, Delaware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents features of Delaware State University's New School of Management designed to stimulate positive gains in teaching and learning. The design incorporates state of the art distance learning systems that includes a 350-seat auditorium possessing the same capability, and a commercial kitchen and dining facility for chef and hotel management…

  19. Delaware Technical & Community College's response to the critical shortage of Delaware secondary science teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Nancy S.

    This executive position paper examines the critical shortage of Delaware high school science teachers and Delaware Technical & Community College's possible role in addressing this shortage. A concise analysis of economic and political implications of the science teacher shortage is presented. The following topics were researched and evaluated: the specific science teacher needs for Delaware school districts; the science teacher education program offerings at Delaware universities and colleges; the Alternative Route to Teacher Certification (ARTC); and the state of Delaware's scholarship response to the need. Recommendations for Delaware Tech's role include the development and implementation of two new Associate of Arts of Teaching programs in physics secondary science education and chemistry secondary science education.

  20. ANALYSIS OF LANDSCAPE AND WATER QUALITY IN THE NEW YORK CATSKILL - DELAWARE WATERSHED (1973-1998)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary goal of this study is to improve risk assessment through the development of methods and tools for characterization of landscape and water resource change. Exploring the relationship between landscape pattern and water quality in the Catskill-Delaware basins will impro...

  1. Book review: Birds of Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterjohn, Bruce G.

    2001-01-01

    Located along Delaware Bay and the Atlantic coast, the state of Delaware’s significance for bird conservation has been well established for decades. The extensive tidal habitats and marshes bordering Delaware Bay host shorebird and waterbird populations of hemispheric importance, and protecting these populations has become an urgent conservation priority in recent years. Other habitats found in the state vary from barrier beaches to dry coniferous woods on the coastal plain and mesophytic communities along the Piedmont in the north, allowing a diverse avifauna to prosper within a small geographic area. Ornithologists and birders have actively studied birds within the state for more than a century, but surprisingly, no single reference has provided a complete summary of the status and distribution of the state’s birds until publication of the Birds of Delaware.Review info: Birds of Delaware. By Gene K. Hess, Richard L. West, Maurice V. Barnhill III, and Lorraine M. Fleming, 2000. ISBN: 0-8229-4069-8, 635 pp.

  2. National Dam Inspection Program. Flat Rock Dam (NDS I.D. Number PA 00896, DER I.D. Number 51-1), Delaware River Basin, Schuylkill River, Montgomery and Philadelphia Counties, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    engineering characteristics of the dam include the Water Resources Bulletin, Bulletin No. 4, "Water Resources Survey, The Schuylkill River , Pennsylvania...2.8 12.5 iii,,1.0 .0 12 .0*2 1111 L A, 1 .2 1 1 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART 10AIIONA1 0111I AAil 0 IANDAR[1, 101,3 A DELAWARE RIVER BA(IN SNOYLKILL... RIVER UIUTllUERY AND PUILADELPEIA eoNuTIES PENNSYLVANIA lOS I PA. 06816 DER IB 51-1 . t0 II PHASE I INSPECTION REPORT I NATIONAL DAM INSPECTION

  3. Report of the River Master of the Delaware River for the period December 1, 2008–November 30, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krejmas, Bruce E.; Paulachok, Gary N.; Mason, Jr., Robert R.; Owens, Marie

    2016-04-06

    A Decree of the Supreme Court of the United States, entered June 7, 1954, established the position of Delaware River Master within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In addition, the Decree authorizes diversions of water from the Delaware River Basin and requires compensating releases from certain reservoirs, owned by New York City, to be made under the supervision and direction of the River Master. The Decree stipulates that the River Master will furnish reports to the Court, not less frequently than annually. This report is the 56th Annual Report of the River Master of the Delaware River. It covers the 2009 River Master report year, the period from December 1, 2008, to November 30, 2009.During the report year, precipitation in the upper Delaware River Basin was 50.89 inches (in.) or 116 percent of the long-term average. Combined storage in Pepacton, Cannonsville, and Neversink Reservoirs remained high throughout the year and did not decline below 80 percent of combined capacity at any time. Delaware River operations during the year were conducted as stipulated by the Decree and the Flexible Flow Management Program (FFMP).Diversions from the Delaware River Basin by New York City and New Jersey were in full compliance with the Decree. Reservoir releases were made as directed by the River Master at rates designed to meet the flow objective for the Delaware River at Montague, New Jersey, on 25 days during the report year. Releases were made at conservation rates—rates designed to relieve thermal stress and protect the fishery and aquatic habitat in the tailwaters of the reservoirs—on all other days.During the report year, New York City and New Jersey complied fully with the terms of the Decree, and directives and requests of the River Master.As part of a long-term program, the quality of water in the Delaware Estuary between Trenton, New Jersey, and Reedy Island Jetty, Delaware, was monitored at various locations. Data on water temperature, specific conductance

  4. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ISLAND. REMAINS OF SEA WALL VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND AND RIGHT OF IMAGE - Fort Delaware, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  5. 1. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NORTHWEST OBLIQUE AERIAL VIEW OF FORT DELAWARE AND PEA PATCH ISLAND. REMAINS OF SEA WALL VISIBLE IN FOREGROUND AND RIGHT OF IMAGE. - Fort Delaware, Sea Wall, Pea Patch Island, Delaware City, New Castle County, DE

  6. BASINS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Better Assessment Science Integrating Point and Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) is a multipurpose environmental analysis system designed to help regional, state, and local agencies perform watershed- and water quality-based studies.

  7. University of Delaware at TREC 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    University of Delaware at TREC 2014 Ashraf Bah, Karankumar Sabhnani, Mustafa Zengin, and Ben Carterette Department of Computer and Information...Sciences, University of Delaware , Newark DE USA [ ashraf | karans | zengin | carteret ]@udel.edu Abstract This paper describes the work of the Information...Retrieval Lab at the University of Delaware (team name “udel”) on TREC 2014 tracks. We participated in five different tracks: Contextual Suggestion

  8. 18. Photocopy of print (Original in Smith's History of Delaware ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of print (Original in Smith's History of Delaware County, Pennsylvania) MAIN AND EAST ELEVATIONS - Caleb Pusey House, 15 Race Street (Landingford Plantation), Upland, Delaware County, PA

  9. Magnitude and Frequency of Floods on Nontidal Streams in Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ries, Kernell G.; Dillow, Jonathan J.A.

    2006-01-01

    area, basin storage, housing density, soil type A, and mean basin slope as explanatory variables, and have average standard errors of prediction ranging from 28 to 72 percent. Additional regression equations that incorporate drainage area and housing density as explanatory variables are presented for use in defining the effects of urbanization on peak-flow estimates throughout Delaware for the 2-year through 500-year recurrence intervals, along with suggestions for their appropriate use in predicting development-affected peak flows. Additional topics associated with the analyses performed during the study are also discussed, including: (1) the availability and description of more than 30 basin and climatic characteristics considered during the development of the regional regression equations; (2) the treatment of increasing trends in the annual peak-flow series identified at 18 gaged sites, with respect to their relations with maximum 24-hour precipitation and housing density, and their use in the regional analysis; (3) calculation of the 90-percent confidence interval associated with peak-flow estimates from the regional regression equations; and (4) a comparison of flood-frequency estimates at gages used in a previous study, highlighting the effects of various improved analytical techniques.

  10. The timber resources of Delaware

    Treesearch

    Roland H. Ferguson; Carl E. Mayer

    1974-01-01

    Under the authority of the McSweeney-McNary Forest Research Act of May 22, 1928, and subsequent amendments, the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, conducts a series of continuing forest surveys of all states to provide up-to-date information about the forest resources of the Nation. The first forest survey of Delaware was made in 1956 by the Northeastern...

  11. University of Delaware Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Michael T

    2012-09-30

    The main goal of this project funded through this DOE grant is to help in the establishment of the University of Delaware Energy Institute (UDEI) which is designed to be a long-term, on-going project. The broad mission of UDEI is to develop collaborative programs encouraging research activities in the new and emerging energy technologies and to partner with industry and government in meeting the challenges posed by the nation's pressing energy needs.

  12. Report of the River Master of the Delaware River for the period December 1, 1985, to November 30, 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, S.P.; Harkness, W.E.; Krejmas, B.E.; Vogel, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    A Decree of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1954 established the position of Delaware River Master. The Decree authorizes diversions of water from the Delaware River Basin (Figure 1) and requires compensating releases from certain reservoirs of the City of New York to be made under the supervision and direction of the River Master. Reports to the Court, not less frequently than annually, were stipulated. During the 1986 report year, December 1, 1985, to November 30, 1986, precipitation and runoff varied from below average to above average in the Delaware River Basin. For the year as a whole, precipitation was 4.3 inches above average. Runoff was near average. Operations were under a status of drought at the beginning of the report year. The drought emergency was terminated on December 18, 1985, by the Delaware River Basin Commission, and operations were returned to normal as prescribed by the Decree for the remainder of the report yr. Storage in the reservoirs increased to capacity during the winter months and all New York City Delaware River Basin reservoirs spilled throughout the year. Diversions from Delaware River Basin by New York City and New Jersey did not exceed those authorized by the terms of the Amended Decree. Releases were made as directed by the River Master at rates designed to meet the Montague flow objective on 69 days during the June to November period. Releases were made at conservation rates or at rates designed to relieve thermal stress in the streams downstream from the reservoirs at other times. The excess release quantity as defined by the Decree was not expended by end of the report year. New York City complied fully with the terms of the Decree and with the directives of the River Master during the year. (See also W89-04133) (USGS)

  13. Effect of stochastically moving border on basins of attraction in a class of piecewise smooth maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Dhrubajyoti; Banerjee, Soumitro

    2017-07-01

    Determination of the basin of attraction of an attractor plays an important role in understanding the dynamics of a system. In all the existing literature, the basin of attraction of any attractor has been described to be deterministic. In this paper we show the existence of a non-deterministic basin of attraction of an attractor. We have considered a piecewise smooth (PWS) one-dimensional map, having stochastically varying border, which is allowed to move in a small bounded region of the phase space while retaining the deterministic dynamics on each compartment of the phase space. In case of this type of systems there exists a region in the phase space with the property that orbits starting from a single point lying inside this region do not display the same property of convergence or divergence, i.e., one may converge while another may diverge. In other words, the convergence or divergence of an orbit starting from a point inside this region is a probabilistic event, and the probabilities of convergence and divergence are both non-zero. We also derive the upper and lower bounds of the corresponding probability curves. Since all physical systems contain noise, the occurrence of such non-deterministic basin of attraction is a definite possibility, if the noise affects the position of the border. This may lead to dangerous consequences, as a region of the basin of attraction of an attractor may become non-deterministic, with a non-zero probability of divergence of orbits starting inside it.

  14. 76 FR 62132 - Delaware Disaster #DE-00009

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Delaware Disaster DE-00009 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Delaware dated...

  15. The forest-land owners of Delaware

    Treesearch

    Neal P. Kingsley; James C. Finley

    1975-01-01

    A statistical-analytical report on a mail canvass of the owners of privately owned forest land in Delaware, based on a study made in conjunction with the second forest survey of Delaware by the USDA Forest Service. Statistical findings are based on responses supplied by owners to a questionnaire. Trends in forest-land ownership and the attitudes and intentions of...

  16. The timber industries of Delaware, 1985

    Treesearch

    Robert L., Jr. Nevel; Eric H. Wharton; Eric H. Wharton

    1991-01-01

    Evaluates timber output of Delaware. Results are based on a survey of the primary processing mills located in the state, and on mills in other states that used wood from Delaware. Contains statistics on industrial timber production and mill receipts, number of sawmills and lumber production, and the production and final end use of manufacturing residues. Comparisons...

  17. Nutrient Enrichment Study Data from the Upper, Middle, and Lower Sections of the Non-Tidal Delaware River, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brightbill, Robin A.; Limbeck, Robert; Silldorff, Erik; Eggleston, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    The Delaware River Basin Commission is charged with establishing water-quality objectives for the tidal and non-tidal portions of the Delaware River, which include developing nutrient standards that are scientifically defensible. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Delaware River Basin Commission and the Academy of Natural Sciences, studied the effects of nutrient enrichment in the upper, middle, and lower sections of the non-tidal Delaware River. Algal samples were collected from the natural habitat using rock scrapes and from the artificial nutrient enrichment samplers, Matlock periphytometers. The knowledge gained from this study is to be used in helping determine appropriate nutrient criteria for the Delaware River in the oligotrophic, mesotrophic, and eutrophic sections of the river and is a first step toward gathering data that can be used in selecting nutrient effect levels or criteria thresholds for aquatic-life use protection. This report describes the methods for data collection and presents the data collected as part of this study.

  18. Report of the River Master of the Delaware River for the period December 1, 2006–November 30, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krejmas, Bruce E.; Paulachok, Gary N.; Blanchard, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    A Decree of the Supreme Court of the United States, entered June 7, 1954, established the position of Delaware River Master within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In addition, the Decree authorizes diversions of water from the Delaware River Basin and requires compensating releases from certain reservoirs, owned by New York City, to be made under the supervision and direction of the River Master. The Decree stipulates that the River Master will furnish reports to the Court, not less frequently than annually. This report is the 54th Annual Report of the River Master of the Delaware River. It covers the 2007 River Master report year—the period from December 1, 2006, to November 30, 2007. During the report year, precipitation in the upper Delaware River Basin was 46.72 inches (in.) or 107 percent of the long-term average. Combined storage in Pepacton, Cannonsville, and Neversink Reservoirs was high on December 1, 2006. Reservoir storage remained high throughout the winter, declined seasonally during the summer, and began to recover in mid-October. Delaware River operations throughout the year were conducted as stipulated by the Decree. Diversions from the Delaware River Basin by New York City and New Jersey were in full compliance with the Decree. Reservoir releases were made as directed by the River Master at rates designed to meet the flow objective for the Delaware River at Montague, New Jersey, on 123 days during the report year. Releases were made at conservation rates—or rates designed to relieve thermal stress and protect the fishery and aquatic habitat in the tailwaters of the reservoirs—on all other days. During the report year, New York City and New Jersey complied fully with the terms of the Decree, and directives and requests of the River Master. As part of a long-term program, the quality of water in the Delaware Estuary between Trenton, New Jersey, and Reedy Island Jetty, Delaware, was monitored at various locations. Data on water temperature

  19. Report of the River Master of the Delaware River for the period December 1, 2007-November 30, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krejmas, Bruce E.; Paulachok, Gary N.; Blanchard, Stephen F.

    2014-01-01

    A Decree of the Supreme Court of the United States, entered June 7, 1954, established the position of Delaware River Master within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In addition, the Decree authorizes diversions of water from the Delaware River Basin and requires compensating releases from certain reservoirs, owned by New York City, to be made under the supervision and direction of the River Master. The Decree stipulates that the River Master will furnish reports to the Court, not less frequently than annually. This report is the 55th Annual Report of the River Master of the Delaware River. It covers the 2008 River Master report year, the period from December 1, 2007, to November 30, 2008. During the report year, precipitation in the upper Delaware River Basin was 49.79 inches (in.) or 114 percent of the 67 report-year average. Combined storage in Pepacton, Cannonsville, and Neversink Reservoirs remained high from December 2007 to May 2008. Reservoir storage decreased seasonally from June to late October, then increased gradually through the end of November. Delaware River operations during the year were conducted as stipulated by the Decree. Diversions from the Delaware River Basin by New York City and New Jersey were in full compliance with the Decree. Reservoir releases were made as directed by the River Master at rates designed to meet the flow objective for the Delaware River at Montague, New Jersey, on 107 days during the report year. Releases were made at conservation rates—rates designed to relieve thermal stress and protect the fishery and aquatic habitat in the tailwaters of the reservoirs—on all other days. During the report year, New York City and New Jersey complied fully with the terms of the Decree, and directives and requests of the River Master. As part of a long-term program, the quality of water in the Delaware Estuary between Trenton, New Jersey, and Reedy Island Jetty, Delaware, was monitored at various locations. Data on water temperature

  20. Report of the River Master of the Delaware River for the period December 1, 2004-November 30, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krejmas, Bruce E.; Paulachok, Gary N.; Blanchard, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    A Decree of the Supreme Court of the United States, entered in 1954, established the position of Delaware River Master within the U.S. Geological Survey. In addition, the Decree authorizes diversions of water from the Delaware River Basin and requires compensating releases from certain reservoirs, owned by New York City, to be made under the supervision and direction of the River Master. The Decree stipulates that the River Master will furnish reports to the Court, not less frequently than annually. This report is the 52nd Annual Report of the River Master of the Delaware River. It covers the 2005 River Master report year; that is, the period from December 1, 2004, to November 30, 2005. During the report year, precipitation in the upper Delaware River Basin was 7.56 in., or 117 percent of the long-term average. Combined storage in Pepacton, Cannonsville, and Neversink Reservoirs remained high from December 2004 to May 2005 and reached a record high level on April 3, 2005. Reservoir storage decreased steadily from May to early October, then increased rapidly through the end of November. Delaware River operations throughout the year were conducted as stipulated by the Decree. Diversions from the Delaware River Basin by New York City and New Jersey were in compliance with the Decree. Reservoir releases were made as directed by the River Master at rates designed to meet the flow objective for the Delaware River at Montague, New Jersey, on 120 days during the report year. Releases were made at conservation rates-or rates designed to relieve thermal stress and protect the fishery and aquatic habitat in the tailwaters of the reservoirs-on all other days. During the report year, New York City and New Jersey complied fully with the terms of the Decree, and directives and requests of the River Master. As part of a long-term program, the quality of water in the Delaware Estuary between Trenton, New Jersey, and Reedy Island Jetty, Delaware, was monitored at various locations

  1. Report of the River Master of the Delaware River for the period December 1, 2005-November 30, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krejmas, Bruce E.; Paulachok, Gary N.; Blanchard, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    A Decree of the Supreme Court of the United States, entered June 7, 1954, established the position of Delaware River Master within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In addition, the Decree authorizes diversions of water from the Delaware River Basin and requires compensating releases from certain reservoirs, owned by New York City, to be made under the supervision and direction of the River Master. The Decree stipulates that the River Master will furnish reports to the Court, not less frequently than annually. This report is the 53rd Annual Report of the River Master of the Delaware River. It covers the 2006 River Master report year-the period from December 1, 2005, to November 30, 2006. During the report year, precipitation in the upper Delaware River Basin was 55.03 inches (in.) or 126 percent of the long-term average. Combined storage in Pepacton, Cannonsville, and Neversink Reservoirs was above the long-term median level on December 1, 2005. Reservoir storage remained above long–term median levels throughout the report year. Delaware River operations during the year were conducted as stipulated by the Decree. Diversions from the Delaware River Basin by New York City and New Jersey were in full compliance with the Decree. Reservoir releases were made as directed by the River Master at rates designed to meet the flow objective for the Delaware River at Montague, New Jersey, on 27 days during the report year. Releases were made at conservation rates-or rates designed to relieve thermal stress and protect the fishery and aquatic habitat in the tailwaters of the reservoirs-on all other days. During the report year, New York City and New Jersey complied fully with the terms of the Decree, and directives and requests of the River Master. As part of a long-term program, the quality of water in the Delaware Estuary between Trenton, New Jersey, and Reedy Island Jetty, Delaware, was monitored at various locations. Data on water temperature, specific conductance

  2. Report of the River Master of the Delaware River for the Period December 1, 2002-November 30, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krejmas, Bruce E.; Paulachok, Gary N.; Blanchard, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    A Decree of the Supreme Court of the United States, entered in 1954, established the position of Delaware River Master within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In addition, the Decree authorizes diversions of water from the Delaware River Basin and requires compensating releases from certain reservoirs, owned by New York City, to be made under the supervision and direction of the River Master. The Decree stipulates that the River Master will furnish reports to the Court, not less frequently than annually. This report is the 50th Annual Report of the River Master of the Delaware River. It covers the 2003 River Master report year; that is, the period from December 1, 2002 to November 30, 2003. During the report year, precipitation in the upper Delaware River Basin was 13.40 inches (131 percent) greater than the long-term average. Combined storage in Pepacton, Cannonsville, and Neversink Reservoirs was above the long-term median on December 1, 2002. Reservoir storage increased rapidly in mid-March 2003 and all the reservoirs filled and spilled. The reservoirs remained nearly full for the remainder of the report year. Delaware River operations throughout the report year were conducted as stipulated by the Decree. Diversions from the Delaware River Basin by New York City and New Jersey were in compliance with the Decree. Reservoir releases were made as directed by the River Master at rates designed to meet the flow objective for the Delaware River at Montague, New Jersey, on 10 days during the report year. Releases were made at experimental conservation rates - or rates designed to relieve thermal stress and protect the fishery and aquatic habitat in the tailwaters of the reservoirs - on all other days. During the report year, New York City and New Jersey complied fully with the terms of the Decree, and directives and requests of the River Master. As part of a long-term program, the quality of water in the Delaware Estuary between Trenton, New Jersey, and Reedy Island

  3. Report of the River Master of the Delaware River for the Period December 1, 2003-November 30, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krejmas, Bruce E.; Paulachok, Gary N.; Blanchard, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    A Decree of the Supreme Court of the United States, entered in 1954, established the position of Delaware River Master within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In addition, the Decree authorizes diversions of water from the Delaware River Basin and requires compensating releases from certain reservoirs, owned by New York City, to be made under the supervision and direction of the River Master. The Decree stipulates that the River Master will furnish reports to the Court, not less frequently than annually. This report is the 51st Annual Report of the River Master of the Delaware River. It covers the 2004 River Master report year; that is, the period from December 1, 2003, to November 30, 2004. During the report year, precipitation in the upper Delaware River Basin was 9.03 in. (121 percent) greater than the long-term average. Combined storage in Pepacton, Cannonsville, and Neversink Reservoirs was at a record high level on December 1, 2003. Reservoir storage remained high throughout the year with at least one reservoir spilling every month of the year. Delaware River operations throughout the year were conducted as stipulated by the Decree. Diversions from the Delaware River Basin by New York City and New Jersey were in compliance with the Decree. Reservoir releases were made as directed by the River Master at rates designed to meet the flow objective for the Delaware River at Montague, New Jersey, on 30 days during the report year. Releases were made at conservation rates - or rates designed to relieve thermal stress and protect the fishery and aquatic habitat in the tailwaters of the reservoirs - on all other days. During the report year, New York City and New Jersey complied fully with the terms of the Decree, and directives and requests of the River Master. As part of a long-term program, the quality of water in the Delaware Estuary between Trenton, New Jersey, and Reedy Island Jetty, Delaware, was monitored at various locations. Data on water temperature

  4. National Dam Inspection Program. Pecks Pond Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA-00754, PennDER I.D. Number 52-15), Delaware River Basin, Bush Kill Creek, Pike County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    northeast over the Catskill Mountains and from the north over the Appalachian Plateau. The terminal moraine resulting from the southern most advance of the...see Geology Map). The sedimentological changes observed in the Catskill Formation indicate that the rate of sedimentation exceeded the rate of basin

  5. National Dam Inspection Program. Westcolang Lake Dam, NDI I.D. Number PA-00396 PennDER I.D. Number 52-4. Delaware River Basin. Westcolang Creek, Pike County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    over the Catskill Mountains and from the north over ’he Appalachian Plateau. The terminal moraine resulting from the southern most advance of the...Geology Map). The sedimentological changes observed in the Catskill Formation indicate that the rate of sedi- mentation exceeded the rate of basin

  6. National Dam Inspection Program. Lake Greeley Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA- 00752, PennDER I.D. Number 52-20), Delaware River Basin, Taylortown Creek, Pike County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    gravel than sand and some small boulders. The direction of the Wisconsin ice advance was from the northeast over the Catskill Mountains and from the north...observed in the Catskill Formation indicate that the rate of sedi- mentation exceeded the rate of basin subsidence resulting in a facies change from marine

  7. National Dam Inspection Program. North Lake Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA-00268, PennDER I.D. Number 52-180), Delaware River Basin, Branch of Hornbecks Creek, Pike County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    gravel than sand and some small boulders. The direction of the Wisconsin ice advance, was from the northeast over the Catskill Mountains and from the...observed in the Catskill Formation indicate that the rate of sedimentation exceeded the rate of basin subsidence resulting in a facies change from

  8. EPA Releases Report on Delaware Agriculture Programs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (PHILADELPHIA - August 31, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced today it has completed an evaluation of Delaware's animal agriculture regulations and programs. The assessment is one of six that the agency is conducting of state a

  9. Technique for estimating magnitude and frequency of floods in Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, R.H.; Carpenter, D.H.

    1978-01-01

    A flood-estimating method is presented which applies to drainage basins in Delaware without urban development and covers selected recurrence intervals from 2 to 100 years. The method was developed by multiple-regression techniques. The State is divided into two regions and sets of equations for calculating peak discharges based on physical basin characteristics are provided for each region. The boundary between regions generally corresponds with the division between the Piedmont and Coastal Plain provinces. In the northern region, flood-peak discharges were related to basin drainage area and storage. In the southern region, flood peaks were related to drainage area, slope, storage, forest cover, and two composite soil categories. Standard errors of estimate for the regression equations in the northern region ranged from 30 to 39 percent. For the southern region, the standard errors of estimate varied from 38 to 40 percent. Without using the two soil parameters in the southern region, the standard errors of estimate varied from 57 to 70 percent. Annual flood peaks, basin characteristics, and flood-frequency distributions are tabulated for the 60-gaged sites used in the regression analysis. At 23 of these sites, a rainfall-runoff model generated additional flood-peak data which were used in defining the flood-frequency distributions. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. National Dam Inspection Program. Lake Aleeda Dam (NDI-ID Number PA-00557) (DER-ID Number 40-219) (SCS-ID Number PA-530), Delaware River Basin Tributary to Bear Creek, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-01

    shallow syncline on the crest of North Mountain , forming the Mehoopnay coal basin. The second is the Milton Anticline, which exposes the Portage group in...Appalachian Plateau Province and are characterized by horizontal, or nearly horizontal strata. The Catskill continental group of rocks underlies those part...sandstone in the Catskill formation of Devonian Age. The Catskill formation is composed of shale, siltstone, and claystone; fine-to-medium-grained

  11. National Dam Inspection Program. Fawn Lake Dam (NDI I.D. Number PA-00822, PennDER I.D. Number 52-182). Delaware River basin, Branch of Hornbecks Creek, Pike County, Pennsylvania. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    Catskill Mountains and from the north over the Appalachian Plateau. The terminal moraine resulting from the southern most advance of the Wisconsin ice...The sedimentological changes observed in the Catskill Formation indicate that the rate of sedimentation exceeded the rate of basin subsidence...a -a MONROE CO. u NOE HEHBEDROCK SURFACE IS COVERED 4 AND SILTY CLAyS 3F VARIABLE BIusNILI THICKNESS REVISION 12-17-80 LEGEND Catskill Formation

  12. 78 FR 14060 - Television Broadcasting Services; Seaford, Delaware and Dover, Delaware

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... station WMDE(TV), Channel 5, Seaford, Delaware, requesting an amendment of the DTV Table of Allotments to... modification of WMDE(TV)'s construction permit to specify Dover, Delaware as the station's community license... Channel 5 to Dover is based on the technical specifications currently authorized for WMDE(TV), and...

  13. Application of automated multispectral analysis to Delaware's coastal vegetation mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Daiber, D.; Bartlett, D. S.; Crichton, O. W.; Fornes, A. O.

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Overlay maps of Delaware's wetlands have been prepared, showing the dominant species or group of species of vegetation present. Five such categories of vegetation were used indicating marshes dominated by: (1) salt marsh cord grass; (2) salt marsh hay and spike grass; (3) reed grass; (4) high tide bush and sea myrtle; and (5) a group of fresh water species found in impounded areas built to attract water fowl. Fifteen such maps cover Delaware's wetlands from the Pennsylvania to the Maryland borders. The mapping technique employed utilizes the General Electric multispectral data processing system. This system is a hybrid analog-digital system designed as an analysis tool to be used by an operator whose own judgment and knowledge of ground truth can be incorporated at any time into the analyzing process. The result is a high speed, cost effective method for producing enhanced photomaps showing a number of spectral classes, each enhanced spectral class being representative of a vegetative species or group of species.

  14. Report of the River Master of the Delaware River for the period December 1, 1983 - November 30, 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, F.T.; Harkness, W.E.; Baebenroth, R.W.; Speight, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    A Decree of the U.S. Supreme Court in 1954 established the position of Delaware River Master. The Decree authorizes diversions of water from the Delaware River basin and requires compensating releases from certain reservoirs of the City of New York to be made under the supervision and direction of the River Master. Reports to the Court, not less frequently than annually were stipulated. During the 1984 report year, December 1, 1983 to November 30, 1984, precipitation and runoff varied from above average to below average in the Delaware River basin. For the year as a whole, precipitation and runoff were near average. Operations were under a status of drought warning December 1, 1983; however, the above normal precipitation the first half of the year increased storage in the reservoirs to record levels by June 1, 1984. Below normal precipitation from August to November coupled with large releases to maintain the Montague flow objective and customary diversions for water supply reduced storage in the reservoirs to the drought-warning level by November 27. Diversions from the Delaware River basin by New York City and New Jersey conformed to the terms of the Amended Decree throughout the year. Releases were made as directed by the River Master at rates designed to meet the Montague flow objective on 127 days between June 23 and November 30. Releases were made at conservation rates or at rates designed to relieve thermal stress in the streams downstream from the reservoirs at other times. (USGS)

  15. The world-class Jinding Zn-Pb deposit: ore formation in an evaporite dome, Lanping Basin, Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, David L.; Song, Yu-Cai; Hou, Zeng-Qian

    2017-03-01

    The Jinding Zn-Pb sediment-hosted deposit in western Yunnan, China, is the fourth largest Zn deposit in Asia. Based on field observations of the ore textures, breccias, and the sandstone host rocks, the ores formed in a dome that was created by the diapiric migration of evaporites in the Lanping Basin during Paleogene deformation and thrust loading. Most of the ore occurs in sandstones that are interpreted to be a former evaporite glacier containing a mélange of extruded diapiric material, including breccias, fluidized sand, and evaporites that mixed with sediment from a fluvial sandstone system. A pre-ore hydrocarbon and reduced sulfur reservoir formed in the evaporite glacier that became the chemical sink for Zn and Pb in a crustal-derived metalliferous fluid. In stark contrast to previous models, the Jinding deposit does not define a unique class of ore deposits; rather, it should be classified as MVT sub-type hosted in a diapiric environment. Given that Jinding is a world-class ore body, this new interpretation elevates the exploration potential for Zn-Pb deposit in other diapir regions in the world.

  16. The world-class Jinding Zn-Pb deposit: ore formation in an evaporite dome, Lanping Basin, Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, David L.; Song, Yu-Cai; Hou, Zeng-Qian

    2016-07-01

    The Jinding Zn-Pb sediment-hosted deposit in western Yunnan, China, is the fourth largest Zn deposit in Asia. Based on field observations of the ore textures, breccias, and the sandstone host rocks, the ores formed in a dome that was created by the diapiric migration of evaporites in the Lanping Basin during Paleogene deformation and thrust loading. Most of the ore occurs in sandstones that are interpreted to be a former evaporite glacier containing a mélange of extruded diapiric material, including breccias, fluidized sand, and evaporites that mixed with sediment from a fluvial sandstone system. A pre-ore hydrocarbon and reduced sulfur reservoir formed in the evaporite glacier that became the chemical sink for Zn and Pb in a crustal-derived metalliferous fluid. In stark contrast to previous models, the Jinding deposit does not define a unique class of ore deposits; rather, it should be classified as MVT sub-type hosted in a diapiric environment. Given that Jinding is a world-class ore body, this new interpretation elevates the exploration potential for Zn-Pb deposit in other diapir regions in the world.

  17. Flood of April 2-4, 2005, Delaware River Main Stem from Port Jervis, New York, to Cinnaminson, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, Timothy J.; Protz, Amy R.

    2007-01-01

    Several conditions, including saturated soils, snowmelt, and heavy rains, caused flooding on the Delaware River on April 2-4, 2005. The event occurred 50 years after the historic 1955 Delaware River flood, and only six months after a smaller but equally notable flood on September 18-19, 2004. The Delaware River flooded for a third time in 22 months in June, 2006. The peak flows and elevations of the 2005 flood were similar to those on June 28-29, 2006. The following report describes the April 2-4, 2005, Delaware River flood, and includes the associated precipitation amounts, peak flows and elevations, and flood frequencies. A comparison of historic Delaware River floods also is presented. The appendix of the report contains detailed information for 156 high-water mark elevations obtained on the main stem of the Delaware River from Port Jervis, New York, to Cinnaminson, New Jersey, for the April 2-4, 2005 flood. The April 2005 event originated with frequent precipitation from December 2004 to March 2005 which saturated the soils in the upper Delaware River Basin. The cold winter froze some of the soils and left a snowpack at higher elevations equivalent to as much as 10 inches of water in some areas. Temperatures rose above freezing, and heavy rains averaging 1 to 3 inches on March 27, 2005, melted some of the snow, causing the Delaware River to rise; however, peak elevations were still 2 to 7 feet below flood stage. Another round of rainfall averaging 2-5 inches in the basin on April 2, 2005, melted the remaining snowpack. The combination of snowmelt and runoff from the two storms produced flood conditions along the main stem of the Delaware River. Flood frequencies of flows at selected tributaries to the Delaware River did not exceed the 35-year recurrence intervals. The Delaware River main stem peak-flow recurrence intervals ranged from 40 to 80 years; flows were approximately 20 percent less than those from the peak of record in 1955. Peak elevations exceeded

  18. Detection and Prediction of the Delaware Summertime Sea/Bay Breeze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, D. E.; Hughes, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Delaware Bay/Sea Breeze is a thermally driven coastal circulation that has significant impacts along Delaware's coastline. The passage of a sea breeze front has a cooling effect which often moderates summer heat. Pollutants can be transported by a sea breeze circulation affecting air quality. In addition, this frequently occurring local circulation is strong enough and of enough vertical and horizontal extent to effect offshore wind turbines. The potential moderation of weather, air quality, and offshore wind resource all have significant environmental and economic impacts which are important to a coastal population which has nearly doubled in the last two decades. An analysis of weather radar (NEXRAD) images is used as an initial method for detecting a sea/bay breeze front. These case study days are then used to develop an objective sea breeze detection scheme based on changes in the observed conditions at twenty-one meteorological stations run by the Delaware Environmental Observing System and the National Data Buoy Center. Three distinct classes of sea breeze circulation (classic, dew-point and weak) are derived based on location, penetration distance, temperature drop, and time of onset. In general, based on nine years of data from 2000 to 2009, sea/bay breezes along the Delaware coast are found to occur in the summer 63% of the time at coastal stations and 20% at inland stations. These same data are used to develop a local sea breeze prediction scheme for the Delaware ocean coast. Details of the return flow and structure of the sea breeze at high spatial and temporal resolution are investigated using a regional atmospheric model, WRF. Characterization of Delaware's sea/bay breezes using multiple data sources and locations creates a more complete understating of the impact of this low-level circulation on the local climate, and will be useful in understanding how things may change in the future as local land-use and global climate changes.

  19. Report of the River Master of the Delaware River for the period December 1, 1984 - November 30, 1985

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, F.T.; Harkness, W.E.; Cecil, L.D.

    1986-01-01

    A Decree of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1954 established the position of Delaware River Master. The Decree authorizes diversions of water from the Delaware River basin and requires compensating releases from certain reservoirs of the City of New York to be made under the supervision and direction of the River Master. Reports to the Court, not less frequently than annually, were stipulated. During the 1985 report year, December 1, 1984, to November 30, 1985, precipitation and runoff varied from below average to above average in the Delaware River basin. For the year as a whole, precipitation was near average. Runoff was below average. Operations were under a status of drought warning or drought from January 23, 1984, through the end of the report year. Below-normal precipitation the first half of the year resulted in decreased storage in the reservoirs to record low levels by March 1, 1985. Storage remained at record low levels from March through September. Above-normal precipitation in September and November served to break the drought and increase storage into the normal zone of the operating curves for the reservoirs. Diversions from the Delaware River basin by New York City did not exceed those authorized by the terms of the Amended Decree or those invoked by the several emergency conservation measures throughout the year. There were no diversions from the Delaware River basin by New Jersey during the year. Releases were made as directed by the River Master at rates designed to meet the Montague flow objective on 82 days between June 14 and September 28. Releases were made at conservation rates or at rates designed to relieve thermal stress in the streams downstream from the reservoirs at other times. (See also W89-04133) (USGS)

  20. 4. COBBS CREEK BRIDGE. COLWYN, DELAWARE CO., PA. Sec. 1101, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. COBBS CREEK BRIDGE. COLWYN, DELAWARE CO., PA. Sec. 1101, MP 5.73 - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between Delaware-Pennsylvania & Pennsylvania-New Jersey state lines, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. 5. ISLAND ROAD BRIDGE. COLWYN, DELAWARE CO., PA. Sec. 1101, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. ISLAND ROAD BRIDGE. COLWYN, DELAWARE CO., PA. Sec. 1101, MP 5.58. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between Delaware-Pennsylvania & Pennsylvania-New Jersey state lines, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. 78 FR 48609 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Delaware River, NJ; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ...; Delaware River, NJ'' for the operating schedule that governs the bascule span of the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge... bascule span of the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge (Route 73), across the Delaware River, mile 107.2, between the...

  3. 2. CANAL BOAT ENTERING THE DELAWARE CANAL FROM OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CANAL BOAT ENTERING THE DELAWARE CANAL FROM OF THE LEHIGH RIVER. BOATS COULD BE FERRIED ACROSS THE DELAWARE RIVER TO THE MORRIS CANAL BY A CABLE SUPPORTED TROLLEY. - Morris Canal, Phillipsburg, Warren County, NJ

  4. Report of the River Master of the Delaware River for the period December 1, 1981, to November 30, 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, Francis T.; Fish, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    The Amended Decree of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1954 established the position of Delaware River Master to administer provisions of the decree relative to diversions from the Delaware by the City of New York and the State of New Jersey , and releases from reservoirs of the City of New York designed to maintain stipulated rates of flow in the river. Reports to the Court, not less frequently than annually, with copies to the Governors and the Mayor, were stipulated. Water-supply conditions at the beginning of the year were under a status of emergency resulting from drought, which had been declared by the Delaware River Basin Commission. With the filling of the reservoirs, the emergency was lifted April 27. Runoff of Delaware River at Montague, New Jersey, was 19 percent below median during the year as compared to 28 percent below median the previous year. By November, with reservoir storage again declining, reductions in both diversions and releases were imposed. To conserve supplies, reductions were effected on November 13 limiting New York City diversions at 680 mgd and New Jersey to 85 mgd, and the required discharge at Montague was targeted at 1,655 cfs. Water quality of the Delaware River and Estuary was monitored on a continuous basis at six sites for most of the year and on a monthly basis at ten sites to accurately locate the salt front. Highest chloride concentration observed at the Chester, PA, site was 870 mg/l November 4. (USGS)

  5. 33 CFR 165.555 - Safety Zone; Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone; Delaware River. 165... Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.555 Safety Zone; Delaware River. (a) Definition. As used in this section, Captain of the Port means the Commander of Sector Delaware...

  6. 33 CFR 117.235 - Chesapeake and Delaware Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. 117.235 Section 117.235 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Delaware § 117.235 Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. The draw of the Conrail bridge, mile...

  7. Lead poisoning in Canada geese in Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagley, George E.; Locke, Louis N.; Nightingale, Gordon T.

    1967-01-01

    Trainer and Hunt (9) stated that lead poisoning of Canada geese (Branta canadensis) had been reported from three states: North Carolina, Indiana, and Wisconsin. More recently, the Mississippi Flyway Council (8) cited suspected cases of lead poisoning of Canada geese in Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia, and Maryland. Hanson and Smith (6) also cited cases in widely separated areas of the country, including Texas and Michigan. this paper reports lead poisoning among Canada geese in Delaware, and presents evidence that it is a recurring problem among wintering flocks of Canada geese along the Middle Atlantic Coast.

  8. Delaware County Regional Water Utility to Reduce Sewage Discharges to Delaware River and Local Creeks

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    PHILADELPHIA (August 17, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) today announced a settlement with the Delaware County Regional Water Quality Control Authority (DELCORA) resolving alleged Clean Water Ac

  9. Kids Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Kids Count in Delaware.

    This Kids Count fact book examines statewide trends in the well-being of Delaware's children. The statistical portrait is based on key indicators in four areas: single-parent families, births to teenage mothers, juvenile crime and violence, and education. Following brief sections on the state's demographics and economic status, the fact book…

  10. Kids Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schooley, Teresa L.; And Others

    This Kids Count report investigates statewide trends in the well-being of Delaware's children. The statistical report is based on 10 indicators of child well being: (1) births to teens; (2) low birth weight babies; (3) infant mortality; (4) child deaths, children 1-14 years; (5) teen violent deaths; (6) juvenile violent crime arrests; (7) high…

  11. Close woods utilization commonly practiced in Delaware

    Treesearch

    Wayne G. Banks

    1956-01-01

    Woods-utilization studies were recently made on randomly selected logging operations scattered throughout Delaware. As would be expected, most of the operations studied were in pine stands in the southern part of the state. They showed that very close utilization of the trees cut was the general rule.

  12. Kids Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowshen, Steven, Ed.; Greback, Robert, Ed.; Nelson, Carl, Ed.; Schooley, Teresa L., Ed.; Sturgis, Janice, Ed.

    This KIDS COUNT report details statewide trends in the well-being of Delaware's children. The statistical profile is based on 10 main indicators of child well-being: (1) births to teens; (2) low birth weight babies; (3) infant mortality; (4) child deaths, age 1-14 years; (5) teen violent deaths by accident, homicide, and suicide; (6) juvenile…

  13. U. of Delaware Abandons Sessions on Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2007-01-01

    The University of Delaware spent years refining its residence-life education program. One week of public criticism unraveled it. Late last month, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, a free-speech group, accused the university of promoting specific views on race, sexuality, and morality in a series of discussions held in dormitories.…

  14. 75 FR 18245 - Delaware Disaster # DE-00007

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Delaware Disaster DE-00007 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  15. 77 FR 71667 - Delaware Disaster #DE-00014

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Delaware Disaster DE-00014 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  16. 76 FR 63700 - Delaware Disaster #DE-00010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... [Federal Register Volume 76, Number 198 (Thursday, October 13, 2011)] [Notices] [Page 63700] [FR Doc No: 2011-26498] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12872 and 12873] Delaware Disaster DE-00010 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice...

  17. Modeling Nitrogen Cycling in Delaware Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabai, A.; Wilkin, J.

    2016-02-01

    Estuaries play a critical role in transforming the biogeochemical properties of water that originates from fluvial sources before it is ultimately discharged to the coastal ocean. Nutrient cycling and export within the Delaware Estuary affect the ecosystem functions both within Delaware Bay and on the adjacent continental shelf. A realistic coupled hydrodynamical-biogeochemical modeling framework was developed for the Delaware Bay using ROMS (Regional Ocean Modeling System; myroms.org) to quantify nitrogen fluxes and budgets. The modeling system includes inert and age tracers to identify water transport pathways. Model skill assessment used a host of in-situ physical and biogeochemical data, and satellite products. The nitrogen budget was estimated for a five-year period of 2007-2011. A large portion of the incoming nitrogen from terrestrial sources is denitrified or buried in the Bay. Positive net ecosystem production contributes to organic nitrogen export to the shelf. There is strong interannual variability in riverine nitrogen inflows, but in years with greater riverine nitrogen input most of the excess nitrogen is buried, denitrified or exported to the shelf; the net ecosystem production shows less variability. By taking advantage of a process-based biogeochemical model and an ensemble of available observed and empirical evidence, this study provides more detailed information about nitrogen fluxes in Delaware Estuary than previously established.

  18. State Teacher Policy Yearbook, 2009. Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Teacher Quality, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Delaware edition of the National Council on Teacher Quality's (NCTQ's) 2009 "State Teacher Policy Yearbook" is the third annual look at state policies impacting the teaching profession. It is hoped that this report will help focus attention on areas where state policymakers can make changes that will have a positive impact on teacher…

  19. Subgroup Achievement and Gap Trends: Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In grade 8 (the only grade in which subgroup trends were analyzed by achievement level), Delaware students showed consistent gains in math at the basic, proficient, and advanced levels for racial/ethnic subgroups, low income students, and boys and girls. There were mixed results in reading. Achievement gaps narrowed in both reading and math in…

  20. The Geology of Delaware Coastal Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert E.

    This teachers' manual provides model classroom lessons in earth science. It is specially designed to be used with John C. Kraft's A GUIDE TO THE GEOLOGY OF DELAWARE'S COASTAL ENVIRONMENT. The lessons suggest an approach for using the guide in the science classroom and in field studies. The manual can be used as a complete unit, or individual…

  1. The Geology of Delaware Coastal Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert E.

    This teachers' manual provides model classroom lessons in earth science. It is specially designed to be used with John C. Kraft's A GUIDE TO THE GEOLOGY OF DELAWARE'S COASTAL ENVIRONMENT. The lessons suggest an approach for using the guide in the science classroom and in field studies. The manual can be used as a complete unit, or individual…

  2. Forest statistics for Delaware-1972 and 1986

    Treesearch

    Thomas S. Frieswyk; Dawn M. DiGiovanni; Dawn M. DiGiovanni

    1989-01-01

    A statistical report on the third forest survey of Delaware (1986). Findings are displayed in 65 tables containing estimates of forest area, number of trees, timber volume, tree biomass, and timber products output. Data are presented at two levels: state and county.

  3. Forest statistics for Delaware: 1986 and 1999

    Treesearch

    Douglas M. Griffith; Richard H. Widmann; Richard H. Widmann

    2001-01-01

    A statistical report on the fourth forest inventory of Delaware conducted in 1999 by the Forest Inventory and Analysis Unit of the Northeastern Research Station. Statistics for forest area, numbers of trees, tree biomass, timber volume, growth, and change are displayed at the state and, where appropriate, the county level. The current inventory indicates that there are...

  4. U. of Delaware Abandons Sessions on Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2007-01-01

    The University of Delaware spent years refining its residence-life education program. One week of public criticism unraveled it. Late last month, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, a free-speech group, accused the university of promoting specific views on race, sexuality, and morality in a series of discussions held in dormitories.…

  5. Conceptual model of fluvial landforms and bed material transport in 200 year-old run-of-the-river impoundments on gravel-bed streams of the Christiana River Basin, Delaware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, A. J.; Walker, J.; Teoli, K.; Hubacz, D.; Kauffman, G. J.; Pizzuto, J. E.; O'Neal, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies imply that run-of-the-river impoundments of the mid-Atlantic region should quickly fill with sediment up to the dam crest and remain filled until dams are breached. We test these hypotheses with data from nine ~200 year-old impoundments on medium-sized (drainage basin areas of 120-230 km2), gravel-bed (D50 ~ 25 mm), pool-riffle channels. The 9 dams have an average height of 1.5 m (range 1-2 m). Impoundments have an average length of 1400 m (range 1100-1437 m), or about 940 times the average dam height. Accommodation space behind the dams is not completely filled with sediment - maximum water depths of the impoundments range from 1.3-2 m, or 1-1.3 times the average dam height. The upstream extent of impoundments can be defined by the downstream end of pool-riffle bed morphology and by a gradual increase in reach-averaged thickness of stored sandy bed material, which averages about 0.2 m in unimpounded reaches (documented by depth of refusal surveys). Upstream reaches of impoundments are also often characterized by a sloping front of gravel-sized bed material that rapidly transitions to the sand-dominated bed (D50 < 2 mm to 7 mm) that characterizes most of the impoundment. A depth to refusal survey indicates that the thickness of impounded (mostly sandy) bed material ranges from 0.4-1.3 m for one impoundment with a 1-m high dam. On all impoundments, we observed coarser bed material (D50 of 3-14 mm) accumulating into a sloping ramp just upstream of the dam that merges smoothly with the dam crest. Two landforms are well-developed below the dams - a plunge pool averaging 16 m long and a mid-channel bar. The mid-channel bar is much larger than the plunge pool (26-51 m long) and contains sediment sizes typical of bed material of unimpounded sections of the river, with surficial deposits of sand and gravel (D50 6-45 mm) overlying a gravel core (D50 - 28 mm). Large coarse-grained mid-channel bars below impoundments likely store bed material that has been

  6. EPA Regional Administrator Joins Delaware Officials to Honor States Green Ribbon Schools

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    PHILADELPHIA (April 29, 2015) Today, EPA Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin joined Delaware Senator Harris McDowell, Delaware Department of Education Secretary Mark Murphy, and Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control S

  7. Source of zircon in world-class heavy mineral placer deposits of the Cenozoic Eucla Basin, southern Australia from LA-ICPMS U-Pb geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Anthony; Keeling, John; Boyd, Doug; Belousova, Elena; Hou, Baohong

    2013-03-01

    The Eucla Basin of southern Australia is a newly recognised zircon-rich mineral sands province with mining operations underway at the world-class Jacinth-Ambrosia deposits. Detrital zircon U-Pb dating via laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry from samples distributed along the length of the Eucla Basin paleoshore system reveals the majority of zircons (c. 55%) are from c. 1300 to 1000 Ma source rocks. Many of the zircons of this age range have metamorphic textures indicating the source province(s) of these zircons underwent high-grade metamorphism during the Mesoproterozoic. A secondary provenance signature occurs at c. 1800-1600 Ma, with significant amounts of c. 1680-1600 Ma zircon. These two key age intervals, c. 1300-1000 Ma and c. 1800-1600 Ma match the major rock-forming intervals of the Albany Fraser Orogen and Musgrave Province, crystalline basement regions that crop out in the western and northern hinterland of the Eucla Basin and which are transected by extensive Early Cenozoic paleodrainage systems. The subordinant volume of Archean zircons in the paleoshoreline deposits are predominantly c. 2660 Ma or older and are most likely derived from the Yilgarn Craton. The primary source regions for the zircons thus lie to the west and north of the main sites of heavy mineral sand accumulation, located in the central and eastern portions of the paleoshoreline complex of the Eucla Basin. This is indicative of the dominant process of westerly longshore drift as the primary control on sediment movement and redistribution along much of the Eucla Basin coastline. Zircons of these ages were also likely derived from recycling sediments of Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic intracontinental basins, in particular the Officer Basin, which contains dominantly c. 1350-1000 Ma zircons, and was widely incised by the Paleogene drainage network. Monazite U-Pb data from the Jacinth Mine records an abundance of c. 1350-1160 Ma grains, supporting source areas to

  8. Assessment of sediment contaminants and toxicity in the Delaware estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, H.J.; Sauer, T.C.; Ward, T.J.; Boeri, R.L.; Nyman, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    In support of the Delaware Estuary Program`s Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan, a study was performed to assess the spatial distribution of sediment toxicity in the Delaware Estuary and investigate potential causative contaminants. Twelve stations were sampled along the Delaware River covering 55 river miles between the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal and Torresdale, PA. Four additional stations were sampled in the mid-bay portion of Delaware Bay. Ten-day sediment static acute toxicity tests with amphipods (Ampelisca abdita) were performed for all stations. Sediments were analyzed for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, priority pollutant metals, and supporting parameters. Statistical analyses revealed positive correlations between sediment toxicity and PAH, lead, copper, and mercury concentrations. The highest incidences of sediment toxicity and highest concentrations of chemical contaminants occurred in the portion of the Delaware River between River Miles 60 and 75.

  9. Enzyme activities in the Delaware Estuary affected by elevated suspended sediment load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziervogel, K.; Arnosti, C.

    2009-09-01

    Extracellular enzyme activities were compared among surface water, bottom water, and sediments of the Delaware Estuary using six fluorescently labeled, structurally distinct polysaccharides to determine the effects of suspended sediment transport on water column hydrolytic activities. Potential hydrolysis rates in surface waters were also measured for the nearby shelf. Samples were taken in December 2006, 6 months after a major flood event in the Delaware Basin that was followed by high freshwater run-off throughout the fall of 2006. All substrates were hydrolyzed in sediments and in the water column, including two (pullulan and fucoidan) that previously were not hydrolyzed in surface waters of the Delaware estuary. At the time of sampling, total particulate matter (TPM) in surface waters at the lower bay, bay mouth, and shelf ranged between 31 mg l -1 and 48 mg l -1 and were 2 to 20 times higher than previously reported. The presence of easily resuspended sediments at the lower bay and bay mouth indicated enhanced suspended sediment transport in the estuary prior to our sampling. Bottom water hydrolysis rates at the two sites affected by sediment resuspension were generally higher than those in surface waters from the same site. Most notably, fucoidan and pullulan hydrolysis rates in bay mouth bottom waters were 22.6 and 6.2 nM monomer h -1, respectively, and thus three and five times higher than surface water rates. Our data suggest that enhanced mixing processes between the sediment and the overlying water broadened the spectrum of water column hydrolases activity, improving the efficiency of enzymatic degradation of high molecular weight organic matter in the water with consequences for organic matter cycling in the Delaware estuary.

  10. 6. Northeast elevation of single bin. Delaware, Lackawanna & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Northeast elevation of single bin. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, Scranton Yards, Scrap Platform, 350 feet South of South Washington Avenue & River Street, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  11. 4. Perspective view of platform, looking northeast. Delaware, Lackawanna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Perspective view of platform, looking northeast. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, Scranton Yards, Scrap Platform, 350 feet South of South Washington Avenue & River Street, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  12. 2. Signal Tower, looking east. Delaware, Lackawanna & Western ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Signal Tower, looking east. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, Scranton Yards, Mattes Street Signal Tower, 80 feet Southwest of Railroad Alley & Cedar Avenue, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  13. 3. West elevation of Signal Tower. Delaware, Lackawanna & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. West elevation of Signal Tower. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, Scranton Yards, Mattes Street Signal Tower, 80 feet Southwest of Railroad Alley & Cedar Avenue, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  14. 2. VIEW NORTH, SOUTH ELEVATION Delaware, Lackawanna & Western ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTH, SOUTH ELEVATION - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  15. 3. VIEW WEST, EAST ELEVATION Delaware, Lackawanna & Western ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW WEST, EAST ELEVATION - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  16. 18. DETAIL, INSPECTION PIT Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL, INSPECTION PIT - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  17. 4. VIEW EAST, WEST ELEVATION Delaware, Lackawanna & Western ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW EAST, WEST ELEVATION - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  18. 1. VIEW SOUTH, NORTH ELEVATION Delaware, Lackawanna & Western ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SOUTH, NORTH ELEVATION - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  19. 12. DETAIL, TYPICAL WINDOW BAY Delaware, Lackawanna & Western ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL, TYPICAL WINDOW BAY - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  20. 19. DETAIL, OVERHEAD CATWALK Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DETAIL, OVERHEAD CATWALK - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  1. 22. DETAIL, WOOD BLOCK FLOOR Delaware, Lackawanna & Western ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DETAIL, WOOD BLOCK FLOOR - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  2. Evaluating temporal changes in stream condition in three New Jersey rive basins by using an index of biotic integrity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, Ming; Kennen, Jonathan G.; Del Corso, Ellyn

    2000-01-01

    An index of biotic integrity (!B!) modified for New Jersey streams was used to compare changes in stream condition from the 1970s to the 1990s in Delaware, Passaic, and Raritan River Basins. Stream condition was assessed at 88 sampling locations. Mean IBI scores for all basins increased from the 1970s to the 1990s, but the stream-condition category improved (from fair to good) only for the Delaware River Basin. The number of benthic insectivores and the proportion of insectivorous cyprinds increased in all three basins; however, the number of white suckers decreased significantly only in the Delaware River Basin. Results of linear-regression analysis indicate a significant correlation between the percentage of altered land in the basin and change in IBI score (1970s to 1990s) for Delaware River sites. Results of analysis of variance of the rank-transformed IBI scores for the 1970s and 1990s indicate that the three basins was equal in the 1970s. Results of a multiple-comparison test demonstrated that the 1990s IBI values for the Delaware River Basin differed significantly from those for the Passaic and Raritan River Basins. Many factors, such as the imposition of the more stringent standards on water-water and industrial discharges during the 1980s and changes in land-use practices, likely contributed to the change in the Delaware River Basin. A general increase in IBI values for the Passaic, Raritan, and Delaware River Basins over the past 25 years appears to reflect overall improvements in water quality.

  3. Metals in horseshoe crabs from Delaware Bay.

    PubMed

    Burger, J; Dixon, C; Shukla, T; Tsipoura, N; Jensen, H; Fitzgerald, M; Ramos, R; Gochfeld, M

    2003-01-01

    We examined the concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury, and selenium in the eggs, leg muscle, and apodeme (carapace musculature) in horseshoe crabs ( Limulus polyphemus) from eight places on the New Jersey and Delaware sides of Delaware Bay to determine whether there were locational differences. Although there were locational differences, the differences were not great. Further, contaminant levels were generally low. The levels of contaminants found in horseshoe crabs were well below those known to cause adverse effects in the crabs themselves or in organisms that consume them or their eggs. Contaminant levels have generally declined in the eggs of horseshoe crabs from 1993 to 2001, suggesting that contaminants are not likely to be a problem for secondary consumers or a cause of their decline.

  4. Lessons Learned from Delaware State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overton, James T.

    2008-01-01

    The unfortunate events at Delaware State University (DSU) on September 21, 2007, were a whirlwind of emotions for everyone at DSU. At 12:54 a.m. Friday morning, a gunman (one of its students) shot two students who were leaving the on-campus cafe. Tragically, the female victim died one month later as a result of her injuries. As the Chief of Police…

  5. Urban forest assessment in northern Delaware

    Treesearch

    David J. Nowak; Robert E. Hoehn; Jun Wang; Andy Lee; Vikram Krishnamurthy; Gary Schwetz

    2009-01-01

    Presents results of an analysis of the urban forest of the Wilmington, Delaware, the metropolitan corridor in New Castle County (NCC), and Rattlesnake Run sewershed in the city of Wilmington using the Urban Forest Effects (UFORE) model. This analysis reveals that there are about 882,700 trees (19.3 percent tree cover) in the NCC metro corridor and about 136,000 trees (...

  6. Lessons Learned from Delaware State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overton, James T.

    2008-01-01

    The unfortunate events at Delaware State University (DSU) on September 21, 2007, were a whirlwind of emotions for everyone at DSU. At 12:54 a.m. Friday morning, a gunman (one of its students) shot two students who were leaving the on-campus cafe. Tragically, the female victim died one month later as a result of her injuries. As the Chief of Police…

  7. Tumor Prevalence in Mummichogs from the Delaware Estuary Watershed.

    PubMed

    Pinkney, Alfred E; Harshbarger, John C

    2006-12-01

    Mummichogs Fundulus heteroclitus were collected in 2002-2004 from six locations within the Delaware Estuary watershed and examined histopathologically. The objective was to compare the prevalence of skin and liver tumors in fish from locations with a range of sediment polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) based on available data. Fish were collected from (1) three locations within the industrialized Christina River subwatershed (Hershey Run, Newport Marsh (upriver and downriver)); (2) one location in the Motiva Enterprises refinery discharge canal to the Delaware River; (3) one location in the St. Jones River; and (4) one location in Blackbird Creek. Adult mummichogs (≥70 mm; n = 21-30 fish per location) were seined and held for necropsy. No neoplastic skin lesions were diagnosed in any fish. No liver tumors were diagnosed in the St. Jones, Motiva, Newport Marsh upriver, or Newport Marsh downriver collections. One of 30 Blackbird Creek mummichogs had foci of hepatocellular alteration (a putative preneoplastic lesion) and one had hepatocellular carcinoma. There was a significant difference in hepatocellular carcinoma prevalence in Hershey Run mummichogs in 2002 (9 of 21 fish, or 43%) and in 2003 (3 of 29 fish, or 10%) compared with all other locations pooled (1 of 145 fish, or 0.7%). Hershey Run is contaminated with creosote from an adjacent Superfund site, where sediments were frequently reported to have total PAH concentrations greater than 100 mg of total PAH/kg and a maximum of 13,300 mg/kg. No other locations had reports of total PAHs higher than 11 mg/kg. In conclusion, liver neoplasia was associated with exposure to sediment containing high concentrations of PAHs derived from creosote. Studies that include tumor prevalence, biomarkers (e.g., DNA adducts and PAH metabolites in bile), and sediment and/or tissue chemistry are recommended to develop a weight of evidence for specific chemical classes.

  8. Concentrations and transport of atrazine in the Delaware River-Perry Lake system, northeast Kansas, July 1992 through September 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, Larry M.; Brewer, Lesley D.; Foley, Greg A.; Morgan, Scott C.

    1997-01-01

    About 283,000 pounds of atrazine are applied annually in the 1,100-square-mile Delaware River basin. Of this amount, an annual average of 3,500 pounds runs off into Perry Lake, a public-water supply source and main reservoir in the basin. About 90 percent of the atrazine that runs off to streams occurs between May and July. However, annual average concentrations did not exceed the maximum contaminant level in water from any of 10 stream sites or the outflow of Perry Lake for either the 1993 or 1994 crop years.

  9. Late Pleistocene drainage systems beneath Delaware Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.; Circe, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Analyses of an extensive grid of seismic-reflection profiles, along with previously published sedimentary data and geologic information from surrounding coastal areas, outline the ancestral drainage systems of the Delaware River beneath lower Delaware Bay. Major paleovalleys within these systems have southeast trends, relief of 10-35 m, widths of 1-8 km, and axial depths of 31-57 m below present sea level. The oldest drainage system was carved into Miocene sands, probably during the late Illinoian lowstand of sea level. It followed a course under the northern half of the bay, continued beneath the Cape May peninsula, and extended onto the present continental shelf. This system was buried by a transgressive sequence of fluvial, estuarine, and shallow-marine sediments during Sangamonian time. At the height of the Sangamonian sea-level transgression, littoral and nearshore processes built the Cape May peninsula southward over the northern drainage system and formed a contiguous submarine sedimentary ridge that extended partway across the present entrance to the bay. When sea level fell during late Wisconsinan time, a second drainage system was eroded beneath the southern half of the bay in response to the southerly shift of the bay mouth. This system, which continued across the shelf, was cut into Coastal Plain deposits of Miocene and younger age and included not only the trunk valley of the Delaware River but a large tributary valley formed by the convergence of secondary streams that drained the Delaware coastal area. During the Holocene rise of sea level, the southern drainage system was covered by a transgressive sequence of fluvial, estuarine, and paralic deposits that accumulated due to the passage of the estuarine circulation cell and to the landward and upward migration of coastal sedimentary environments. Some Holocene deposits have been scoured subsequently by strong tidal currents. The southward migration of the ancestral drainage systems beneath Delaware

  10. ACT Profile Report: State. Graduating Class 2010. Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report provides information about the performance of the 2010 graduating seniors who took the ACT as sophomores, juniors, or seniors; and self-reported at the time of testing that they were scheduled to graduate in 2010 and tested under standard time conditions. This report focuses on: (1) Performance: student test performance in the context…

  11. Alcoholic Beverage Buying Habits of University of Delaware Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, John P.

    1978-01-01

    Goal of study was comparing alcoholic beverage buying habits of University of Delaware students with those of students at other colleges. Random sample of 639 was drawn from 13,000 undergraduates and interviews conducted. Drinking at Delaware was similar to that at other schools. Seniors spent significantly more on alcohol than freshmen. (Author)

  12. Delaware Pushes to Meet Race to Top Promises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on how Delaware pushes to meet Race to the Top promises. The Delcastle Technical High School teachers are on the front lines of the push to deliver on promises that last year won Delaware, 10 other states, and the District of Columbia shares of the Race to the Top pie, the $4 billion competition that is driving much of the…

  13. The timber industries of New Jersey and Delaware

    Treesearch

    James T. Bones

    1973-01-01

    Results of a field canvass of all known primary wood manufacturers that operated in Delaware and New Jersey in 1970. The industrial wood statistics are compared with previous surveys and important trends in industry development are noted. Total roundwood output was down 31 percent in Delaware since 1956 and down 43 percent in New Jersey since 1955.

  14. Alcoholic Beverage Buying Habits of University of Delaware Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, John P.

    1978-01-01

    Goal of study was comparing alcoholic beverage buying habits of University of Delaware students with those of students at other colleges. Random sample of 639 was drawn from 13,000 undergraduates and interviews conducted. Drinking at Delaware was similar to that at other schools. Seniors spent significantly more on alcohol than freshmen. (Author)

  15. 33 CFR 110.67 - Delaware River, Essington, Pa.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Delaware River, Essington, Pa. 110.67 Section 110.67 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.67 Delaware River, Essington, Pa. North of...

  16. 33 CFR 110.67 - Delaware River, Essington, Pa.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Delaware River, Essington, Pa. 110.67 Section 110.67 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.67 Delaware River, Essington, Pa. North of...

  17. 33 CFR 110.67 - Delaware River, Essington, Pa.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Delaware River, Essington, Pa. 110.67 Section 110.67 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.67 Delaware River, Essington, Pa. North of...

  18. 33 CFR 110.67 - Delaware River, Essington, Pa.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Delaware River, Essington, Pa. 110.67 Section 110.67 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.67 Delaware River, Essington, Pa. North of...

  19. Institutional Liability for Fraternity Hazing: Furek v. University of Delaware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richmond, Douglas R.

    1989-01-01

    Institutional responsibility for hazing injuries was called into question in a Delaware Superior Court in the case of "Furek v. University of Delaware." In ruling in the university's favor, the court signaled that universities may move to eliminate hazing without unreasonable fear of creating institutional liability for hazing incidents.…

  20. The Early Years of Watomika (James Bouchard): Delaware and Jesuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jay

    1989-01-01

    Publishes and critiques the 1855 autobiography of Jesuit Father James Bouchard, born and raised a Delaware named Watomika. Contains information about Watomika's family, genealogy, and early years; his conversion to Christianity; and Delaware religious beliefs and practices. Examines the literary and ethnographic merits of the autobiography. (SV)

  1. Career Education Resource Bibliography: Delaware's Occupational-Vocational Education Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milford Special School District, DE.

    This bibliography lists professional books and instructional materials, concerning aspects of career education, for Delaware's Occupational-Vocational Education Model, at Milford, Delaware. Entries are arranged alphabetically by title under these categories: (1) Educational Theory, including theories relating to career development, child…

  2. 46 CFR 7.40 - Delaware Bay and tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Delaware Bay and tributaries. 7.40 Section 7.40 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.40 Delaware Bay and tributaries. A line drawn from Cape May Inlet East Jetty Light to...

  3. Delaware Pushes to Meet Race to Top Promises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on how Delaware pushes to meet Race to the Top promises. The Delcastle Technical High School teachers are on the front lines of the push to deliver on promises that last year won Delaware, 10 other states, and the District of Columbia shares of the Race to the Top pie, the $4 billion competition that is driving much of the…

  4. Report for the River Master of the Delaware River for the Period December 1, 2001-November 30, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krejmas, Bruce E.; Paulachok, Gary N.; Carswell, William J.

    2006-01-01

    A Decree of the United States Supreme Court in 1954 established the position of Delaware River Master within the U.S. Geological Survey. In addition, the Decree authorizes diversions of water from the Delaware River Basin and requires compensating releases from certain reservoirs, owned by New York City, to be made under the supervision and direction of the River Master. The Decree stipulates that the River Master will furnish reports to the Court, not less frequently than annually. This report is the 49th Annual Report of the River Master of the Delaware River. It covers the 2002 River Master report year, that is, the period from December 1, 2001, to November 30, 2002. During the report year, precipitation in the upper Delaware River Basin was 2.73 in. greater than the long-term average. Combined storage in Pepacton, Cannonsville, and Neversink Reservoirs was at a record low level on December 1, 2001. Reservoir storage increased steadily from mid-winter until late June. Storage declined steadily from early July to mid-October then increased through the end of the year. Delaware River operations were conducted at reduced levels from December 1, 2001, to May 25, 2002, when drought emergency conditions prevailed, and as prescribed by the Decree from May 26, 2002, to November 30, 2002. Diversions from the Delaware River Basin by New York City and New Jersey were in compliance with the terms of the Decree or with the reduced limits in effect during drought emergency conditions. Reservoir releases were made as directed by the River Master at rates designed to meet the flow objective for the Delaware River at Montague, New Jersey, on 101 days during the report year. Releases were made at experimental conservation rates-or rates designed to relieve thermal stress and protect the fishery and aquatic habitat in the tailwaters of the reservoirs-on all other days. During the report year, New York City and New Jersey complied fully with the terms of the Decree, and during

  5. Kids Count in Delaware, Families Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Kids Count in Delaware.

    This Kids Count Fact Book is combined with the Families Count Fact Book to provide information on statewide trends affecting children and families in Delaware. The Kids Count statistical profile is based on 11 main indicators of child well-being: (1) births to teens 15-17 years; (2) births to teens 10 to 14 years; (3) low birth weight babies; (3)…

  6. Kids Count in Delaware, Families Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Kids Count in Delaware.

    This Kids Count Fact Book is combined with the Families Count Fact Book to provide information on statewide trends affecting children and families in Delaware. The Kids Count and Families Count indicators have been combined into four new categories: health and health behaviors, educational involvement and achievement, family environment and…

  7. 78 FR 36658 - Safety Zone; Delaware River Waterfront Corp. Fireworks Display, Delaware River; Camden, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... Folder on the line associated with this rulemaking. You may also visit the Docket Management Facility in... Veronica Smith, Chief Waterways Management, Sector Delaware Bay, U.S. Coast Guard; telephone (215) 271-4851... yard radius of the fireworks launch platform in approximate position 39 57'00.67'' N, 075 07'57.77'' W...

  8. Kids Count in Delaware: Fact Book 1999 [and] Families Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Kids Count in Delaware.

    This Kids Count Fact Book is combined with the Families Count Fact Book to provide information on statewide trends affecting children and families in Delaware. The Kids Count statistical profile is based on 10 main indicators of child well-being: (1) births to teens; (2) low birth weight babies; (3) infant mortality; (4) child deaths; (5) teen…

  9. Applications of remote-sensing technology to environmental problems of Delaware and Delaware Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, D.; Klemas, V.; Philpot, W.; Rogers, R.

    1975-01-01

    Digital processing of multispectral LANDSAT data was used to develop a computerized model for predicting oil slick movement within the Delaware Bay. LANDSAT imagery was also used to monitor offshore waste disposal sites for mapping of wetlands, and charting of tidal currents.

  10. Collective Bargaining Agreement Between University Of Delaware and American Association of University Professors, University of Delaware Chapter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark.

    The collective bargaining agreement between the University of Delaware and the University of Delaware Chapter of the American Assocation of University Professors (AAUP) is presented. Items covered in this agreement include: recognition of AAUP as the bargaining representative, AAUP membership, representatives, and privileges; grievance procedure;…

  11. The Courts, the Legislature, and Delaware's Resegregation: A Report on School Segregation in Delaware, 1989-­2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niemeyer, Arielle

    2014-01-01

    Delaware's history with school desegregation is complicated and contradictory. The state both advanced and impeded the goals of "Brown v. Board of Education." After implementing desegregation plans that were ineffective by design, Delaware was ultimately placed under the first metropolitan, multi-district desegregation court order in the…

  12. Late Paleozoic structural evolution of Permian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.E.

    1984-04-01

    The southern Permian basin is underlain by the NNW-trending Central Basin disturbed belt of Wolfcamp age (Lower Permian), the deep Delaware basin to its west, and the shallower Midland basin to its eat. The disturbed belt is highly segmented with zones of left-lateral offset. Major segments from south to north are: the Puckett-Grey Ranch zone; the Fort Stockton uplift; the Monahans transverse zone; the Andector ridges and the Eunice ridge; the Hobbs transverse zone; and the Tatum ridges, which abut the broad Roosevelt uplift to the north. The disturbed belt may have originated along rift zones of either Precambrian or Cambrian age. The extent of Lower and Middle Pennsylvanian deformation is unclear; much of the Val Verde basin-Ozona arch structure may have formed then. The main Wolfcamp deformation over thrust the West Texas crustal block against the Delaware block, with local denudation of the uplifted edge and eastward-directed backthrusting into the Midland basin. Latter in the Permian, the area was the center of a subcontinental bowl of subsidence - the Permian basin proper. The disturbed belt formed a pedestal for the carbonate accumulations which created the Central Basin platform. The major pre-Permian reservoirs of the Permian basin lie in large structural and unconformity-bounded traps on uplift ridges and domes. Further work on the regional structural style may help to predict fracture trends, to assess the timing of oil migration, and to evaluate intrareservoir variations in the overlying Permian giant oil fields.

  13. Water Quality of the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River and Tributary Streams, New York and Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siemion, Jason; Murdoch, Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    Water-quality samples were collected from the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River (UPDE) and its tributaries during the period October 1, 2005, to September 30, 2007, to document existing water quality, determine relations between land use and water quality, and identify areas of water-quality concern. A tiered water-quality monitoring framework was used, with the tiers consisting of intensively sampled sites, gradient sites representing the range of land uses present in the basin, and regional stream-survey sites. Median nitrate and total phosphorous concentrations were 1.15 and 0.01 mg/L (milligrams per liter) for three sites on the mainstem Delaware River, 1.27 and 0.009 mg/L for the East Branch Delaware River, 2.04 and 0.01 mg/L for the West Branch Delaware River, and 0.68 and 0.006 mg/L for eight tributaries that represent the range of land uses resent in the basin, respectively. The percentage of agricultural land varied by basin from 0 to 30 percent and the percentage of suburbanization varied from 0 to 17 percent. There was a positive correlation between the percentage of agricultural land use in a basin and observed concentrations of acid neutralizing capacity, calcium, potassium, nitrate, and total dissolved nitrogen, whereas no correlation between the percentage of suburbanization and water quality was detected. Results of stream surveys showed that nitrate concentrations in 55 to 65 percent of the UPDE Basin exceeded the nitrate reference condition and a suggested water-quality guideline for ecological impairment in New York State (0.98 mg/L) during the spring. Many of the affected parts of the basin were more than 90 percent forested and showed signs of episodic acidification, indicating that the long-term effects of acid deposition play a role in the high nitrate levels. Nitrate concentrations in 75 percent of samples collected from agricultural sites exceeded the suggested nitrate water-quality guideline for ecological impairment

  14. Quality of Delaware River water at Trenton, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, Leo T.; Keighton, Walter B.

    1964-01-01

    Water in the Delaware River at Trenton, NJ, is a mixture of several types--water from the mountainous headwater region, water from the coal-mining regions, and water from the limestone valleys. The quantities of these types of water, in relation to the total quantity of water at Trenton, vary with changes in season and reservoir releases. The chemical quality of the water during the 17-year period 1945-61 was excellent, and the water was suitable for most uses after little or no treatment. The average concentration of dissolved solids was 86 ppm (parts per million), and 90 percent of the time it ranged from 57 to 126 ppm. Usually the pH of the water was close to 7.0 (considered to be a neutral point-neither acid nor alkaline). The hardness was less than 86 ppm 95 percent of the time. The general composition of the dissolved-solids content, in terms of equivalents, is 28 percent calcium, 14 percent magnesium, 8 percent sodium plus potassium, 43 percent bicarbonate plus sulfate, 5 percent chloride, and 2 percent nitrate. Concentrations of minerals in the river water are lowest during March, April and May (median concentration of dissolved solids 66 PPM) and are highest during August and September (median, 107 PPM). Each year an average of 880,000 tons of dissolved solids and 932,000 tons of suspended solids are carried past Trenton by the Delaware River. The greatest monthly loads of dissolved solids are in March and April, and the smallest are from July to October. Suspended-solids loads are greater when the streamflow is high but small the rest of the time. Concentration of suspended solids exceeds 100 PPM only 5 percent of the time. The headwaters in the Delaware River basin are the source of water of excellent quality. Much of this water is stored in reservoirs, and when released during August and September, it improves the quality of the water at Trenton. These releases to augment low flow have the effect of narrowing the range of concentrations of dissolved

  15. Application of ecological geological and oceanographic ERTS-1 imagery to Delaware's coastal resources planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The Author has identified the following significant results. Significant results obtained by analysis of digital ERTS-1 data are: (1) Statistical outputs indicating the reliability of discriminating eight coastal vegetation and land use classes on a given group of training sets included: (a) mean and standard deviation of response in each class chosen; (b) contribution tables indicating importance of each channel in discriminating each thematic class from the background; (c) scatter diagrams showing relationships of thematic spectral signatures in spectral space; and (d) classification table showing reliability (in percent) of identification of each thematic class. (2) Thematic color maps at a scale of 1:1,000,000 showing vegetation and land use categories for Delaware's entire coastal zone. (3) Thematic computer plots at specified smaller (i.e. 1:24,000) scales for comparison with existing map data such as U.S.G.S. topographic maps.

  16. Dover AFB Delaware. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations. Parts A-F

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-07

    SNOW X OF SMOKE DUST X OF OSS TOTALMONTH T. STORMS AD/OR RAIN &/fOR AND/OR HAIL IObs WITH FOG AND/ORt BOWIG AND/ORt WITH ORST NO. OF( ST )DRIZZLE DRIZZLE...OBSERVATIONS) 13707 DUVEF AF8 DELAWARE 4 Ago4 f!,SL 55 AR STATION STATION RA50 01055 MONTH ALL WEATHER ALL CLASS NOVAS ( ST .) ( CONDITION SPE MEAN (NT...DIRECTION AND SPEED (FROM HOURLY OBSERVATIONS) 1.3707 )0VEIc AFB 0ELAwAIRE 43-46251-72 JAN4 ALL WEATHEV, 0600-0800 Cuss x05o5 ILL ST .) SIPEED i MEAN (KNTS

  17. Report on the Comprehensive Survey of the Water Resources of the Delaware River Basin. Volume IX. Appendix P. Gross and Net Water Needs. Appendix Q. Formation of the Plan of Development. Appendix R. Water Control at Intermediate Upstream Levels. Appendix S. Salt Water Barrier.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1960-12-01

    cswini oo 11.o.no o .M I al iobn a7he vba t 1ce A N.1 od Liitn Pt ... . -..- - --dUs &43 - .9 p - PA. ~/\\~A LM4K5 i 2 1. T JERVIS EASTON .. 2 ±rr B.-4...majority of deep-draft vessels (drafts of 30 feet and over) were tankers , carrying petroleum and petroleum products to and from the major oil refineries...of the total foreign and domestic water-borne commerce of the Delaware River port area. For this reason tankers and ore carriers figure prominently in

  18. Increased Oil Production and Reserves from Improved Completion Techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah, Class I

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Craig D.; Gwynn, Wallace; Deo, Milind D.; Jarrard, Richard; Curtice, Richard; Morris, Thomas H.; Smouse, DeForrest; Tripp, Carol N.

    2000-01-20

    The objective of this project was to increase oil production and reserves by the use of improved reservoir characterization and completion techniques in the Unita Basin Utah. To accomplish this objective, a two-year geologic and engineering characterization of the Bluebell field was conducted. The study evaluated surface and subsurface data, currently used completion techniques, and common production problems. It was determined that advanced case- and open-hole logs could be effective in determining productive beds and that staged-interval (about 500 ft [150 m] per stage) and bed-scale isolation completion techniques could result in improved well performance.

  19. Water resources data, Maryland and Delaware, water year 1997, volume 2. ground-water data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smigaj, Michael J.; Saffer, Richard W.; Starsoneck, Roger J.; Tegeler, Judith L.

    1998-01-01

    The Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Maryland and Delaware each water year. These data, accumulated during many water years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the U.S. Geological Survey, the data are published annually in this report series entitled 'Water Resources Data - Maryland and Delaware.' This series of annual reports for Maryland and Delaware began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the l975 water year, the report format was changed to present, in one volume, data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels. In the 1989 water year, the report format was changed to two volumes. Both volumes contained data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels. Volume 1 contained data on the Atlantic Slope Basins (Delaware River thru Patuxent River) and Volume 2 contained data on the Monongahela and Potomac River basins. Beginning with the 1991 water year, Volume 1 contains all information on quantities of surface water and surface- water-quality data and Volume 2 contains ground-water levels and ground-water-quality data. This report is Volume 2 in our 1998 series and includes records of water levels and water quality of ground-water wells and springs. It contains records for water levels at 397 observation wells, discharge data for 6 springs, and water quality at 107 wells. Location of ground-water level wells are shown on figures 3 and 4. The location for the ground-water-quality sites are shown on figures 5

  20. Extent and frequency of floods on Delaware River in vicinity of Belvidere, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farlekas, George M.

    1966-01-01

    A stream overflowing its banks is a natural phenomenon. This natural phenomenon of flooding has occurred on the Delaware River in the past and will occur in the future. T' o resulting inundation of large areas can cause property damage, business losses and possible loss of life, and may result in emergency costs for protection, rescue, and salvage work. For optimum development of the river valley consistent with the flood risk, an evaluation of flood conditions is necessary. Basic data and the interpretation of the data on the regimen of the streams, particularly the magnitude of floods to be expected, the frequency of their occurrence, and the areas inundated, are essential for planning and development of flood-prone areas.This report presents information relative to the extent, depth, and frequency of floods on the Delaware River and its tributaries in the vicinity of Belvidere, N.J. Flooding on the tributaries detailed in the report pertains only to the effect of backwater from the Delaware River. Data are presented for several past floods with emphasis given to the floods of August 19, 1955 and May 24, 1942. In addition, information is given for a hypothetical flood based on the flood of August 19, 1955 modified by completed (since 1955) and planned flood-control works.By use of relations presented in this report the extent, depth, and frequency of flooding can be estimated for any site along the reach of the Delaware River under study. Flood data and the evaluation of the data are presented so that local and regional agencies, organizations, and individuals may have a technical basis for making decisions on the use of flood-prone areas. The Delaware River Basin Commission and the U.S. Geological Survey regard this program of flood-plain inundation studies as a positive step toward flood-damage prevention. Flood-plain inundation studies, when followed by appropriate land-use regulations, are a valuable and economical supplement to physical works for flood

  1. Water-level data for the industrial area northwest of Delaware City, Delaware, 1993-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly, C.A.; Hinaman, K.C.

    1996-01-01

    Water-level data for 171 wells and one surface-water site on Red Lion Creek in the industrial area northwest of Delaware City, Delaware, are presented for 1993 and 1994. Eight sets of synoptic ground- water-level measurements collected between April 1993 and September 1994, and locations and field notes for the 171 wells are presented. A hydrograph from December 19, 1993 through November 8, 1994 is presented for one surface-water site on Red Lion Creek in the industrial area. Hydrographs from October 15, 1993 through November 8, 1994 are presented for eight wells screened in the water- table aquifer. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers collected the synoptic ground-water-level measurements. The U.S. Geological Survey collected the continuously recorded water-level data.

  2. Integrating petroleum and sulfur data to map the Guadalupian-Ochoan (Middle to Upper Permian) Boundary of the Delaware Basis, Trans-Pecos, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dishron, Joseph B.

    2011-12-01

    The Delaware Basin of the Permian Basin is a classic intra-cratonic basin of West Texas and Southeast New Mexico. Hydrocarbon exploration and production have occurred in the region since the early 1920s, and, as a result, the formations related to these oil and gas reserves have been studied in great detail. Some formations in the Delaware Basin, however, have not been studied in such detail, and this thesis examines one, lesser-known unit that could have economic potential. The Lamar Limestone (Lamar Lime) of the Bell Canyon Formation has commonly been dismissed as a production interval; rather, it has been described as a source and seal rock for the Ramsey Sand of the lower Bell Canyon Formation. However, recent studies found that the Lamar Lime was contributing to production, and it has been described by Trentham (2006) as a potentia "mini Barnett" reservoir. The depths of these deposits are in a range that is ideal for oil accumulation. This study made use of data from wells and test holes drilled in the western Delaware Basin, Culberson County, Texas. Many oil and gas wells have been drilled in the western Delaware Basin, but they are concentrated in the north and east portions of Culberson County. In addition, sulfur wells were drilled in the area in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Analyses of the well logs of these wells and of core and outcrop studies were completed to gain a better understanding of the distribution and economic potential of the Lamar. Both datasets were combined to provide information not readily available in the oil and gas dataset. The Lamar Lime is an excellent marker bed because it underlies thick evaporites. The evaporite sequences are Ochoan in age, and, therefore, the contact of the Lamar Lime (Bell Canyon Formation) and the Castile Formation is the approximate boundary for the Guadalupian-Ochoan Series. The Castile Formation, the Salado Formation, and the Rustler Formation (from oldest to youngest) are the evaporite units that

  3. 5. Perspective view of single bin, looking north. Delaware, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Perspective view of single bin, looking north. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, Scranton Yards, Scrap Platform, 350 feet South of South Washington Avenue & River Street, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  4. 1. Elevated view of Scrap Platform, looking southwest. Delaware, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Elevated view of Scrap Platform, looking southwest. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, Scranton Yards, Scrap Platform, 350 feet South of South Washington Avenue & River Street, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  5. 2. Elevated perspective of Scrap Platform, looking south. Delaware, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Elevated perspective of Scrap Platform, looking south. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, Scranton Yards, Scrap Platform, 350 feet South of South Washington Avenue & River Street, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  6. Delaware Anatomy: With Linguistic, Social, and Medical Aspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jay

    1977-01-01

    Presents the comprehensive partonomy of anatomy in Unami Lenape or Delaware as provided by a modern Unami specialist. The primary referent is the human body, but some comparative terms referring to animals and plants are also provided. (CHK)

  7. 1. Photocopy of photograph. ORIGINAL CANAL COAL POCKETS Source: Delaware ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of photograph. ORIGINAL CANAL COAL POCKETS Source: Delaware and Hudson Railroad and Canal, by Wayne County Historical Society. - Honesdale Coal Pockets, Main & Commercial Streets, between 700 & 800 blocks, Honesdale, Wayne County, PA

  8. MISR Views Delaware Bay, Chesapeake Bay, and the Appalachian Mountains

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-06-20

    These multi-angle images of Delaware Bay, Chesapeake Bay, and the Appalachian Mountains, acquired 24 March 2000 from NASA Terra spacecraft, come from the downward-looking nadir camera on the MISR instrument onboard NASA Terra satellite.

  9. 23. CONTEXTUAL, RAIL CARS IN MU SHED Delaware, Lackawanna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CONTEXTUAL, RAIL CARS IN MU SHED - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  10. 8. VIEW EASTNORTHEAST, SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS Delaware, Lackawanna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW EAST-NORTHEAST, SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  11. 7. VIEW SOUTHEAST, NORTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS Delaware, Lackawanna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW SOUTHEAST, NORTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  12. 16. INTERIOR, NORTH INSPECTION TRACK, FACING WEST Delaware, Lackawanna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR, NORTH INSPECTION TRACK, FACING WEST - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  13. 10. VIEW SOUTHWEST, LEANTO ALONG NORTH ELEVATION Delaware, Lackawanna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW SOUTHWEST, LEAN-TO ALONG NORTH ELEVATION - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  14. 13. DETAIL, LATERAL BRACING FOR INTERIOR OVERHEAD CRANE Delaware, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL, LATERAL BRACING FOR INTERIOR OVERHEAD CRANE - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  15. 5. VIEW SOUTHWEST, NORTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS Delaware, Lackawanna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW SOUTHWEST, NORTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  16. 6. VIEW NORTHWEST, SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS Delaware, Lackawanna ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW NORTHWEST, SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Multiple Unit Light Inspection Shed, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Terminal Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  17. Delaware Anatomy: With Linguistic, Social, and Medical Aspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jay

    1977-01-01

    Presents the comprehensive partonomy of anatomy in Unami Lenape or Delaware as provided by a modern Unami specialist. The primary referent is the human body, but some comparative terms referring to animals and plants are also provided. (CHK)

  18. 77 FR 69490 - Delaware; Emergency and Related Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... determined that the emergency conditions in the State of Delaware resulting from Hurricane Sandy beginning on... Title V of the Stafford Act, to save lives and to protect property and public health and safety, and...

  19. 78 FR 59821 - Safety Zone, Delaware River; Wilmington, DE

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... safety zone during the dredging of Cherry Island Range Deepwater Point Anchorage No. 6 in the Delaware... safety zone while submerged pipeline is present through the duration of the dredging operations in Cherry...

  20. Report of the River Master of the Delaware River for the period of December 1, 1980 to November 30, 1981

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, Francis T.; Fish, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    Water supply conditions at the beginning of the year were marginal in marked contrast to those for the preceeding nine years. Discharge of the Delaware River at Montague, New Jersey, was only 72% of median as compared to 68% in excess of median the previous year. In December, with reservoir storage again declining, further reductions in both diversions and releases were imposed. With consent of all the parties, reductions were effected on December 20 limiting New York City diversions to 560 mgd, New Jersey to 65 mgd, and the required discharge at Montague was targeted at 1550 cfs. To conserve supplies, additional reductions were imposed in January when the Delaware River basin Commission formally declared a drought. New York City 's limitations was set at 520 mgd and that for New Jersey at 62 mgd. Montague flows were targeted between 1100 cfs, depending upon the location of the salt front in the estuary. Water quality of the Delaware River and Estuary was monitored on a continuous basis at eight sites for most of the year and on a monthly basis at ten sites to accurately locate the salt front. Highest concentrations observed at the Benjamin Franklin Bridge site was 133 mg/l (milligram per liter) on February 2. (USGS)

  1. Investigation Of Obesity-Related Mortality Rates In Delaware

    PubMed Central

    Wentzien, Derald E.; Bautista, Riza C.; Gross, Catherine C.

    2017-01-01

    As Delaware’s adult obesity crisis continues to be a leading public health concern, we evaluated Delaware’s 1999–2014 vital records to examine the association between obesity and mortality. We used the Delaware population death records from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) WONDER database and the Delaware Health Statistics Center (DHSC). Together with the vital records, we incorporated Microsoft Excel, SAS (Statistical Analysis System) and GIS (geographic information system) tools to analyze obesity influences from county residence, economic status, education, gender, and race. Using the 15-year (1999–2014) time span with the CDC WONDER database, we observed a statistically significant 28.7% increase in the age-adjusted Delaware obesity-related mortality rates (where obesity was a contributory factor). Furthermore, obesity influenced death counts in all three Delaware counties (New Castle, Kent, and Sussex). Kent County experienced the largest increase (66.0%), followed by New Castle County (47.4%), and Sussex County (25.2%). The DHSC mortality rates for all leading causes of death from 2000 to 2011 indicated relatively stable mortality rates for Delaware. However, using CDC WONDER data, the Delaware mortality rate for obesity as a single underlying cause in 2011 was 56.9% higher than mortality rate in 2000. PMID:28690914

  2. Ground-water levels in Delaware in 1952

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marine, I.W.

    1954-01-01

    In 1943 the towns of Lewes and Rehoboth entered into cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey in order to study salt-water encroachment in that area. Three observation wells were established, of which one, NI 3, had observations continued on the statewide program in 1952. Cooperation with the town was conducted in 1950. In December 1949 the State of Delaware, through the Agricultural Extension Service of the University of Delaware and the Highway Department, cooperated with the U.S. Geological Survey for the purpose of making of a reconnaissance study of ground water within the State. In the fall of 1950, under the cooperative agreement with the Agricultural Extension Service of the University of Delaware, 13 water-table wells were established for measurement. Beginning July 1, 1951, cooperation transferred to the Delaware Geological Survey of the University of Delaware, and measurement s continued the remainder of the year. Cooperation was also established with the Delaware Geological Survey representing the city of Newark for a detailed study of the Newark area. An additional observation well, Cb 123, was established in the course of this program.

  3. 33 CFR 162.40 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...., between Reedy Point, Delaware River, and Old Town Point Wharf, Elk River. (b) Speed. No vessel in the..., are required to travel at all times at a safe speed throughout the canal and its approaches so as to...

  4. Are historical pollution events on the Delaware River recorded as geochemical marker horizons in adjacent marsh sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, R.; Yemane, K. . Dept. of Geology Bryn Mawr Coll., PA . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    In the last two hundred years of massive population and industrial growth, the Delaware River has been subjected to several minor and major pollutions. For example, as recently as June 1989 the tanker Presidente Rivera spilled an estimated hundred thousand to million gallons of oil into the river. In the Lower Delaware Basin tides affect the river and its tributaries up to a hundred kilometers inland. The freshwater marshes adjacent to the creeks that empty into the Delaware River experience diurnal tidal sedimentation. It is thus expected that the pollutants in the waterway would be transported via the tidal channels into the adjacent wetlands. The high sedimentation rate, clay-rich sediments, accumulation of terrestrial organic matter, and the low energy environments in these marshes should ensure rapid burial which may preserve some of the contaminants transported into the marshes. To test this hypothesis the authors selected a freshwater marsh along the Raccoon Creek just south of Philadelphia in New Jersey, and collected a 2 m core from a relatively undisturbed portion of the marsh, about 15 m away from the tidal channels. The pH averages around 6.2, ranges from 5.5--6.8, but, is slightly higher in the middle part of the core. The bulk mineralogy comprises chlorite, illite, kaolinite, feldspars and quartz. Vivianite and vermiculite were observed at places lower in the core. Graminae dominates the pollen/spore taxa. The organic debris is unaltered throughout the core. The authors will measure heavy metals and toxic chemicals on < 2[mu]m clay fractions. Also pristane/phytane ratios, indicative of hydrocarbons (crude oils), will be determined on organic matter extracts. The authors will compare and correlate the results to historically documented events of chemical and petroleum spills on the Delaware River.

  5. Delaware Estuary situation reports. Emergency response: How do emergency management officials address disasters in the Delaware Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Sylves, R.T.

    1991-01-01

    From hurricanes and other natural threats to oil spills and other manmade emergencies, the Delaware Estuary has experienced a variety of disasters over the years. The toll that these events take on the estuary and those who live on its shores depends largely upon the degree of emergency preparedness, speed of response, and effectiveness of recovery operations. In Emergency Response: How Do Emergency Management Officials Address Disasters in the Delaware Estuary, the latest addition to its Delaware Estuary Situation Report series, the University of Delaware Sea Grant College Program defines emergency management; examines the roles that the Coast Guard, Army Corps of Engineers, and Environmental Protection Agency play in an emergency; and reviews how each of these federal agencies operated during an actual disaster--the 1985 Grand Eagle oil spill. The report was written by Dr. Richard T. Sylves, a professor of political science at the University of Delaware. Sylves has been studying emergency management for the past 15 years, with special emphasis on oil spill preparedness and response in the Mid-Atlantic Region. The Delaware Estuary Situation Report is 12 pages long and contains maps and photographs, as well as a detailed account of response and recovery operations undertaken during the Grand Eagle oil spill. A comparison of the 1985 Grand Eagle spill and the 1989 Presidente Rivera spill also is included.

  6. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Delaware

    SciTech Connect

    Mendon, Vrushali V.; Zhao, Mingjie; Taylor, Zachary T.; Poehlman, Eric A.

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Delaware. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2012 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Delaware.

  7. 75 FR 76036 - Charming Shoppes of Delaware, Inc. Accounts Payable, Rent, Merchandise Disbursement Divisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... Employment and Training Administration Charming Shoppes of Delaware, Inc. Accounts Payable, Rent, Merchandise... of Charming Shoppes of Delaware, Inc., including the Accounts Payable, Rent, and Merchandise... the same division, are engaged in activities related to the supply of accounts payable,...

  8. 78 FR 68026 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 99-Wilmington, Delaware, Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... Production Activity, Noramco, Inc., (Pharmaceutical Intermediate), Wilmington, Delaware The Delaware Economic... Section 400.38 of the FTZ Board's regulations. The facility is used for the production of a pharmaceutical...

  9. Flood Plain Information, Delhi New York, West Branch Delaware River and Little Delaware River.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    1,383.9 1,382.4 1,391.3 Little Delaware River Back River Road 0.15 1,346.4 1,346.9 1,352.1 College Golf Course Footbridge 0.28 1,349.4 1,350.0 1,353.2...College Golf Course Footbridge 0.36 1,353.7 1,353.6 1,356.1 Bridge by USGS Gaging Station 1.79 1,395.9 1,396.9 1,403.6 N.Y. Rte. 28 5.93 1,533.9

  10. 76 FR 42557 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Delaware; Regional Haze State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Delaware; Regional Haze State Implementation Plan AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is approving the Delaware Regional Haze Plan, a revision to the Delaware State Implementation...

  11. 77 FR 3211 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Delaware; Amendments to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... fluid catalytic cracking unit carbon monoxide (CO) boiler at the Delaware City Refinery and providing... requirement of the Clean Air Act (CAA). This action is being taken under the CAA. DATES: Written comments must...), EPA approved it into the Delaware SIP. Furthermore, in 2009, the operations at the Delaware City...

  12. 78 FR 4167 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Delaware

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... Offshore Delaware. SUMMARY: BOEM has issued a commercial wind energy lease to Bluewater Wind Delaware LLC... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Lease Issuance on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Delaware AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice...

  13. Annual Report of School Climate and Student Conduct in Delaware Schools: 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyers, Francine Simmons; Houston, Ronald L.

    This report provides information on the conduct of students in Delaware public schools during the 1999-2000 school year. The focus of the analysis is on reported incidence of serious student conduct offenses as defined by Delaware Code or as defined by Delaware State Board of Education regulations and reported incidence of student suspensions and…

  14. 33 CFR 165.T05-0511 - Safety Zone, Delaware River; Philadelphia, PA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone, Delaware River...-0511 Safety Zone, Delaware River; Philadelphia, PA. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: All waters of the Delaware River in Chester, PA, inside a boundary encompassing all waters just south...

  15. Planning Delaware's School Needs: Issues of Location, Design, and Infrastructure. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Stephanie; Edgell, David

    This report presents discussion from the 2000 Delaware Policy Forum "Planning Delaware's School Needs: Issues of Location, Design, and Infrastructure," which was held October 12, 2000, in Wyoming, Delaware. The forum brought together representatives of state agencies, including people from the Department of Transportation, the Department…

  16. TIMSS-R 1999: An Analysis of the Delaware Science Coalition Data. TIMSS-R Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwikla, Julie

    This report explores some of the critical issues that have emerged from the data collected from the Third International Mathematics and Science Study-Repeat (TIMSS-R) to inform educational decisions in the state of Delaware. Research questions include Delaware's student performance on the TIMSS-R and the Delaware Student Testing Program (DSTP),…

  17. Development of the University of Delaware Experimental Watershed Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnini, J. L.; Kauffman, G. J.; Corrozi, M.; Bower, J.

    2001-05-01

    In 2000, a team of University of Delaware undergraduate and graduate students developed the University of Delaware Experimental Watershed Project with a grant from the Delaware Water Resources Center. The University of Delaware (UD) is a land- and sea-grant institution in Newark, Delaware and is perched along the Atlantic seaboard's fall line. A critical mass of UD faculty and students in water resources and related disciplines are interested in the development of an experimental watershed on campus to provide (1) interdisciplinary undergraduate, graduate and faculty research opportunities, and (2) an outdoor education laboratory. Using GIS and field reconnaissance techniques, the three students delineated two small experimental watershed regions respectively located in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain provinces of the White Clay Creek Wild and Scenic River Valley on the UD campus. The Piedmont watershed drains 416 acres of the northern area of campus while the Coastal Plain watershed drains 896 acres including the central and southern sections of campus. The students then developed an ArcView GIS atlas integrating geology, soils, topography, land use, and impervious cover layers with a rating system for water quality and habitat characteristics to issue a "report-card" assessing each watershed's overall health. The White Clay Creek Wild and Scenic River Valley is an ideal on campus location for an outdoor education and research laboratory because of its manageable scale, the diversity of its characteristic land uses and physical environment, and above all its accessibility for students, faculty, researchers, and the public.

  18. Vending machine policies and practices in Delaware.

    PubMed

    Gemmill, Erin; Cotugna, Nancy

    2005-04-01

    Overweight has reached alarming proportions among America's youth. Although the cause of the rise in overweight rates in children and adolescents is certainly the result of the interaction of a variety of factors, the presence of vending machines in schools is one issue that has recently come to the forefront. Many states have passed or proposed legislation that limits student access to vending machines in schools or require that vending machines in schools offer healthier choices. The purposes of this study were (a) to assess the food and beverage vending machine offerings in the public school districts in the state of Delaware and (b) to determine whether there are any district vending policies in place other than the current U.S. Department of Agriculture regulations. The results of this study indicate the most commonly sold food and drink items in school vending machines are of minimal nutritional value. School administrators are most frequently in charge of the vending contract, as well as setting and enforcing vending machine policies. Suggestions are offered to assist school nurses, often the only health professional in the school, in becoming advocates for changes in school vending practices and policies that promote the health and well-being of children and adolescents.

  19. Rapid barium removal in the Delaware estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Stecher, H.A. III |; Kogut, M.B.

    1999-04-01

    Six profiles of dissolved barium covering the entire salinity range of the Delaware River and Bay estuary from March through September 1996 were collected and analyzed. The profiles are similar to one another in both shape and magnitude except for one attribute. A sudden ({le} 24 days), nearly complete (>90%) removal of dissolved Ba in midestuary occurs in mid-May followed by an 80% recovery in early June. This removal appears to be temporally and spatially coupled to the end of the spring bloom. Based on such episodic behavior, and on recent work with flocculation of diatom exudates, the authors conclude that the Ba depletion is caused by barite precipitation in the estuary during the late stages of the bloom. This would imply that lower estuary and inner coastal margin sediments associated with eutrophic estuaries receive a seasonal pulse of barite. The suddenness of this event also implies that sedimentary barite is strongly influenced by high productivity events. Comparison of the riverine Ba concentration with the effective riverine end member after desorptive barium release yields an estimated 30--40 nM Ba available from the suspended sediments as they enter the estuary. This estimate is supported by excess barium in unfiltered samples over filtered samples taken from the river and also by calculations done elsewhere.

  20. Taconic collision in SE Penna and Delaware

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, M.L.; Crawford, W.A.; Hoersch, A.L.; Srogi, L.A.; Wagner, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Taconic metamorphism and tectonism in SE Pennsylvania and northern Delaware were a result of the collision of a volcanic arc with North America. The Wilmington Complex, the infrastructure of the arc, is presently the highest structural unit. It consists of granulite facies volcanogenic sediments intruded by gabbro and a ca. 500 Ma gabbronorite-charnockite suite. Latest Precambrian-earliest Paleozoic sediments of the Glenarm series were metamorphosed to conditions above the second sillimanite isograd beneath the overthrust hot (700-800/sup 0/C) Wilmington Complex. As the edge of the continent was depressed and heated under the advancing thrust complex, basement-involved nappes of Grenville age rocks (Avondale anticline, Woodville dome) with the Glenarm sedimentary cover were thrust over still rigid autochthonous basement (West Chester Prong). On the NW flank of the orogen, Grenville age gneiss-cored massifs (Honey Brook Upland, Mine Ridge, Trenton Prong), unconformably overlain by lower Paleozoic continental shelf sediments, were involved in the thrusting but metamorphosed only to the greenschist facies. Steep anticlines developed later in the Paleozoic, contributing to the present pattern of northeast trending Grenville basement massifs mantled by overlying units.

  1. Habitat conditions and correlations of sediment quality triad indicators in Delaware Bay.

    PubMed

    Hartwell, S Ian; Hameedi, M Jawed

    2006-10-01

    This paper summarizes sampling results from NOAA's National Status and Trends (NS&T) Program for marine environmental quality in Delaware Bay. A stratified-random design was used to determine the spatial extent of sediment contamination and toxicity in Delaware Bay from offshore stations in the coastal zone, the lower estuary, the upper estuary, the fresh/salt mixing zone, and tidal fresh areas. Sediment samples were taken for chemical analyses of major classes of environmental contaminants, a suite of toxicity bioassays, and benthic macrofaunal community assessment to identify patterns of resident species. The tidal-fresh areas and portions of the mixing zone of the study area were heavily contaminated. Contaminant concentrations were frequently above the 90th percentile of EMAP Virginian Province levels. PAHs in the sediment were higher than previously documented, with a major component of PAHs being pyrogenic in origin. Bioassay results were highly variable. Toxicity and contaminant levels were correlated when aggregated into indices, but were only marginally correlated with benthic community impacts. High and low abundance stations were found in all zones. Most of the tidal fresh stations were dominated by pollution tolerant species. Species diversity and abundance were generally lowest in the fresh/salt mixing zone.

  2. Monitoring the tidal Delaware River for ambient toxicity.

    PubMed

    MacGillivray, A Ronald; Russell, David E; Brown, Steven S; Fikslin, Thomas J; Greene, Richard; Hoke, Robert A; Nally, Christopher; O'Donnell, Linda

    2011-07-01

    This study assessed ambient waters in an urbanized area of the Delaware River, to determine whether river water samples exhibited chronic lethal or sublethal toxicity when measured in laboratory experiments. Toxicity was assessed at 16 fixed stations in the main-stem river and 29 stations in tributaries of the tidal Delaware River with salinities from 0 to 15 parts per 1000 (ppt) using Pimephales promelas, Americamysis bahia, Menidia beryllina, and Ceriodaphnia dubia in 7-d tests; Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata in a 96-h test; and Hyalella azteca in a 10-d water-only test. The toxicity tests measured organism survival, growth, and reproduction. Results from testing water samples collected in 4 different y indicated that the samples from sites tested in the main-stem of the Delaware River and from the majority of its tributaries did not produce chronic toxicity. The surveys identified tributaries that warrant further assessment for toxicity. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  3. Improvements in Correctional HIV Services: A Case Study in Delaware

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Holly; O’Connell, Daniel J.; Visher, Christy A.; Martin, Steven S.; Swanson, Karen R.; Hernandez, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the experience and outcomes of the National Institute on Drug Abuse-funded Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies HIV Services and Treatment Implementation in Corrections protocol in the state of Delaware. The protocol was designed to test the effectiveness of a change team model in improving HIV services in correctional settings. In Delaware, a team was created with representatives from correctional and community agencies to work on improving linkage to HIV care for individuals released from incarceration. The team made improvements in the entire HIV service continuum: linkage to HIV care, HIV education, and HIV testing. The experiences in Delaware and the findings from this study suggest that the use of a change team model is a viable method for making organizational change in correctional settings. PMID:25788611

  4. Distribution and concentration of suspended matter in Delaware Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Philpot, W.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The problem of remote sensing of suspended matter in water was analyzed in terms of the single-scattering albedo, and a semiempirical relationship between satellite radiance measurements and the concentration of suspended matter in the water was developed. The relationship was tested using data from the 7 July 1973 LANDSAT overpass of Delaware Bay with good results. Suspended sediment concentration maps for the entire Delaware Bay were prepared using radiance values extracted from LANDSAT MSS imagery and correlating them with ground truth samples collected from boats and helicopter.

  5. Monitoring estuarine circulation and ocean waste dispersion using an integrated satellite-aircraft-drogue approach. [Delaware coast and Delaware Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Davis, G.; Wang, H.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An inexpensive, integrated drogue-aircraft-satellite approach was developed which is based on the Lagrangian technique and employs remotely tracked drogues and dyes together with satellite observation of natural tracers, such as suspended sediment. Results include current circulation studies in Delaware Bay in support of an oil slick movement model; investigations of the dispersion and movement of acid wastes dumped 40 miles off the Delaware coast; and coastal current circulation. In each case, the integrated drogue-aircraft-satellite approach compares favorably with other techniques on the basis of accuracy, cost effectiveness, and performance under severe weather conditions.

  6. Delaware Educational Assessment Program 1989 Report to the Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Kaye R.

    Results for the Spring 1989 Delaware Educational Assessment Program are presented. The assessment involved the administration of a newly normed test--the Stanford Achievement Test, Eighth Edition--to approximately 65,000 public school students in grades 1 through 8 and 11 during the period extending from April 5 through 18, 1989. Among other…

  7. Delaware and the Southern Regional Education Board, December 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This report details Delaware's participation in Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) programs and services from December 2013 through November 2014. Appropriations from member states support SREB's core operations and general services. SREB leverages the long-standing commitment of member states to attract external funding for an array of…

  8. Profile in community cooperation: Delaware big in fighting cancer.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2005-01-01

    The Delaware Cancer Treatment Program, created under an official state mandate, provides support for Delawareans diagnosed with any cancer who are without health insurance and who are ineligible for Medicaid.The multi-faceted campaign shown here includes information kits designed to help community leaders as they encourage men to be screened for prostate cancer. Also, it directly enlists physicians in this effort.

  9. 15. Photocopy of a photograph in Delaware Department of Transportation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of a photograph in Delaware Department of Transportation files, photographer unknown, about 1970 VIEW OF THE DOWNSTREAM (EAST) SIDE OF BRIDGE 808 AND THE GATES, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD THE MILL - Wagamon Pond Dam & Bridge, Spanning Broadkill River at State Road No. 197 (Mulberry Street), Milton, Sussex County, DE

  10. 16. Photocopy of a photograph in Delaware Department of Transportation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of a photograph in Delaware Department of Transportation files, photographer unknown, about 1970 VIEW OF BRIDGE 808, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD THE MILL - Wagamon Pond Dam & Bridge, Spanning Broadkill River at State Road No. 197 (Mulberry Street), Milton, Sussex County, DE

  11. Factors Influencing School Choice in a School District in Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, John J., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study is to examine the factors that influenced parents in a school district in Delaware when they selected a high school for their child. This study also sought to examine the sources of information that parents used. Also examined was the impact of socio-economic status in the high school selection process. A…

  12. Burden of Multiple Chronic Conditions in Delaware, 2011–2014

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to examine the prevalence of multiple chronic conditions (MCC) by select sociodemographic groups and determine the prevalence of most common MCC dyads and triads among Delaware adults. Combined data for 2011 through 2014 from BRFSS (n = 18,052) were analyzed to determine prevalence of MCC. Delaware adults were categorized as having 0, 1, 2, or 3 or more of the following diagnosed chronic conditions: angina, arthritis, asthma, cancer, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, myocardial infarction (heart attack), obesity, or stroke. More than 65% of Delaware adults had at least 1 of the 12 selected chronic conditions. Furthermore, 36.8% of Delaware adults had MCC. The arthritis/obesity dyad and the arthritis/high blood pressure/high cholesterol triad were the 2 most prevalent MCC combinations. The findings of this study contribute information to the field of MCC research. PMID:27880632

  13. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Delaware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Delaware. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

  14. Factors Influencing School Choice in a School District in Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, John J., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study is to examine the factors that influenced parents in a school district in Delaware when they selected a high school for their child. This study also sought to examine the sources of information that parents used. Also examined was the impact of socio-economic status in the high school selection process. A…

  15. Land clearing and wood use in Delaware, 1972

    Treesearch

    James T. Bones; Joseph E. Barnard

    1973-01-01

    Changing land use often results in removal of the existing forest cover. During a resurvey of Delaware's timber resources, a study was made to measure the losses of wood fiber that resulted from forest land clearing. It was estimated that nearly 33 million cubic feet of growing stock was destroyed on the 37,000 acres of commercial forest land that was cleared...

  16. 27 CFR 9.49 - Central Delaware Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Central Delaware Valley. 9.49 Section 9.49 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  17. 27 CFR 9.49 - Central Delaware Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Central Delaware Valley. 9.49 Section 9.49 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas §...

  18. 33 CFR 165.555 - Safety Zone; Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-4807 or via VHF marine band radio, channel 16. (b) Location. The following area is a safety zone: All... this part. (2) All Coast Guard vessels enforcing this safety zone or watch officers aboard the Dredge... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone; Delaware River....

  19. 33 CFR 165.555 - Safety Zone; Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-4807 or via VHF marine band radio, channel 16. (b) Location. The following area is a safety zone: All... this part. (2) All Coast Guard vessels enforcing this safety zone or watch officers aboard the Dredge... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zone; Delaware River....

  20. 33 CFR 165.555 - Safety Zone; Delaware River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-4807 or via VHF marine band radio, channel 16. (b) Location. The following area is a safety zone: All... this part. (2) All Coast Guard vessels enforcing this safety zone or watch officers aboard the Dredge... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone; Delaware River....

  1. Profile of State High School Exit Exam Policies. Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Delaware's high school exit exam standards and policies. Some of the categories presented include: (1) State exit exam policy; (2) Type of Test; (3) Purpose; (4) Major changes in exit exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (5) Subjects tested on exam; (6) Grade exam first…

  2. Kids Count [and] Families Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Carl, Ed.; Wilson, Nancy, Ed.

    This Kids Count report is combined with Families Count, and provides information on statewide trends affecting children and families in Delaware. The first statistical profile is based on 10 main indicators of child well-being: (1) births to teens; (2) low birth weight babies; (3) infant mortality; (4) child deaths; (5) teen deaths; (6) juvenile…

  3. Advanced Placement Program: Delaware Profile 1988-89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Carole D.

    The major objectives and benefits of the Advanced Placement Program (APP) are summarized, and data specific to Delaware are compared to national statistics about advanced placement (AP) courses in high schools. School participation in the APP is considered an indicator of academic success by educators and policy makers. The extent to which…

  4. The Delaware Department of Correction Life Skills Program. Program Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Peter

    Since 1993, the Delaware Department of Correction has offered a Life Skills Program in its four state prisons. Each year, as many as 300 inmates (of the 5,000 housed inmates) enroll in the program, and nearly 85 percent of them graduate. The 4-month program has three major components: academics, violence reduction, and applied life skills. The…

  5. Forest wildlife habitat statistics for Maryland and Delaware--1986

    Treesearch

    Robert T. Brooks; Dawn M. DiGiovanni; Dawn M. DiGiovanni

    1989-01-01

    A statistical report on the forest wildlife habitat survey of Maryland and Delaware (1986). Findings are displayed in 11 8 tables covering forest area, landscape pattern, mast potential, standing dead and cavity trees; and understory woody-stemmed vegetation. Data are presented at county and/or unit and state levels of resolution.

  6. Delaware Technical & Community College Strategic Plan, 1996-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Pamela B.

    This document provides the strategic plan for Delaware Technical and Community College for 1996-2000, reviewing trends, college goals, and outcome measures for five key areas of college operation. The first section addresses college resources, projecting a 3% average increase in funding over the next 5 years and highlighting college goals related…

  7. Accelerated drowning of the Delaware Bay coast 1800 years ago

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, C.H. III . Dept. of Geology); Pizzuto, J.E.; John, S. . Dept. of Geology); Van Pelt, J. . Dept. of Geology and Astronomy)

    1992-01-01

    Paleontological, geochemical, and lithological indicators of former marine and nonmarine conditions are correlated between 13 cores from a tidal wetland (Wolfe Glade) on the southeastern coast of Delaware Bay. The cores reveal at least 5 marsh-wide transgressive episodes which the authors interpret as representing periods of marsh drowning. One of the most significant of these episodes occurred 1,800 [+-] 200 years ago (sidereal), according to 4 radiocarbon dates which bracket the facies transition. Over 40 cores have also been obtained along the tidal Leipsic River, a tributary of Delaware Bay located over 100 km from Wolfe Glade. The sediments of the Leipsic River valley contain a transgressive episode also dated at approximately 1,800 years BP (based on 4 radiocarbon analyses). In 12 cores separated by over 4 km, the authors have observed sediments deposited in a marine subtidal environment (based on lithology, and diatom analyses) abruptly overlying fluvial sand, mud, and peat. The transgressions observed at Wolfe Glade and the Leipsic River correlate with the major transgression of the sea recognized by Meyerson (1972) in wetland deposits of the New Jersey shore of Delaware Bay. These widely separated by temporally correlative transgressive facies transition suggest the occurrence of a major regional event. Because other mechanisms (rapid subsidence, autocompaction, rapid lateral erosion by tidal streams, and reduced sediment supply) are less likely, the authors propose that these transgressions were produced by an acceleration in the rate of sea-level rise 1,800 years ago in Delaware Bay.

  8. Delaware Educational Assessment Program 1989 Report to the Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Kaye R.

    Results for the Spring 1989 Delaware Educational Assessment Program are presented. The assessment involved the administration of a newly normed test--the Stanford Achievement Test, Eighth Edition--to approximately 65,000 public school students in grades 1 through 8 and 11 during the period extending from April 5 through 18, 1989. Among other…

  9. Sex, Lies, and Residence Life: Delaware's Thought Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissel, Adam

    2009-01-01

    The University of Delaware has a zero-tolerance policy for anything remotely resembling "hate speech." As such, the school implemented a mandatory training for all 7,000-odd students in its dorms. The sessions were part of a thorough thought-reform curriculum, designed by the school's Office of Residence Life, psychologically to…

  10. Nutrient Management Certification for Delaware: Developing a Water Quality Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, David J.; Binford, Gregory D.

    2004-01-01

    Water quality is a critical environmental, social, and political issue in Delaware. In the late 1990s, a series of events related to water quality issues led to the passage of a state nutrient management law. This new law required nutrient management planning and established a state certification program for nutrient users in the agricultural and…

  11. Profile of State College Entrance Exam Policies. Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This individual profile provides information on Delaware's college entrance exam standards and polices. Some of the categories presented include: (1) College entrance exam policy; (2) Purpose; (3) Major changes in college entrance exam policy since the 2009-10 school year for financial reasons; (4) Preparation state offers to students taking…

  12. Nutrient Management Certification for Delaware: Developing a Water Quality Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, David J.; Binford, Gregory D.

    2004-01-01

    Water quality is a critical environmental, social, and political issue in Delaware. In the late 1990s, a series of events related to water quality issues led to the passage of a state nutrient management law. This new law required nutrient management planning and established a state certification program for nutrient users in the agricultural and…

  13. 33 CFR 167.174 - Off Delaware Bay: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... area. 167.174 Section 167.174 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Atlantic East Coast § 167.174 Off Delaware Bay: Precautionary area. A precautionary area is established as follows: from 38°42.80′ N, 74°58.90′ W; then northerly by...

  14. A View of RE:Learning from the Delaware Statehouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foss, Helen

    1992-01-01

    Delaware's early experience with the RE:Learning project affirms the necessity of simultaneous top-down and bottom-up reform efforts. Other critical ingredients include awareness of the critical need for change and strong incentives for bucking the status quo. Resistant teacher and administrator mindsets must also be transformed. (MLH)

  15. Internet Tools Access Administrative Data at the University of Delaware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Carl

    1995-01-01

    At the University of Delaware, World Wide Web tools are used to produce multiplatform administrative applications, including hyperreporting, mixed media, electronic forms, and kiosk services. Web applications are quickly and easily crafted to interact with administrative databases. They are particularly suited to customer outreach efforts,…

  16. Manual for School Building Commissions of the State of Delaware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware State Dept. of Public Instruction, Dover.

    This manual contains provisions of Delaware state law and recommended procedures for construction programs. Areas discussed include--(1) financing, (2) school construction formulae for space allowances, (3) proposed school building budget, (4) procedures for school building construction, (5) a check list for an accounting system, (6) purchase…

  17. Kids Voices Count: Listening to Delaware's Children Talk about Tobacco.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Kids Count in Delaware.

    This Kids Count special report examines attitudes of adolescents in Delaware toward smoking and the use of tobacco products. Data are based on interviews with middle and high school students conducted by journalism students at Glasgow High School under the supervision of their teacher, and on statewide data. The report presents statewide data and…

  18. Desegregation in Delaware Prior to Evans V. Buchanan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, George V.

    It is easy to forget the continuous, slow, often difficult path that the May 17, 1954 Brown decision of the Supreme Court has taken and the many small--and often forgotten--problems that have been faced in the past 22 years. Delaware had some warning in 1952 that desegregation might occur and what it might involve. Most school districts received…

  19. Sex, Lies, and Residence Life: Delaware's Thought Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissel, Adam

    2009-01-01

    The University of Delaware has a zero-tolerance policy for anything remotely resembling "hate speech." As such, the school implemented a mandatory training for all 7,000-odd students in its dorms. The sessions were part of a thorough thought-reform curriculum, designed by the school's Office of Residence Life, psychologically to…

  20. 33 CFR 167.174 - Off Delaware Bay: Precautionary area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... area. 167.174 Section 167.174 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Atlantic East Coast § 167.174 Off Delaware Bay: Precautionary area. A precautionary area is established as follows: from 38°42.80′ N, 74°58.90′ W; then northerly by...

  1. National Environmental/Energy Workforce Assessment for Delaware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Field Research Center Inc., Iowa City, IA.

    This report presents existing workforce levels, training programs and career potentials and develops staffing level projections (1976-1982) based on available information for the State of Delaware. The study concerns itself with the environmental pollution control areas of air, noise, potable water, pesticides, radiation, solid waste, wastewater,…

  2. National Dam Safety Program. Roxbury Dam (Inventory Number 788) Delaware River Basin, Delaware County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-21

    PAGE BFF0RE COPLTINC FOOR 7 1. REPORT NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION No 3 RECJPIJNT S CATALOG NUMBER 14. TITLE (a d Subi.) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD ...sedimentary rocks from the Devonian Era which lie almost horizontal. Glaciation and the action of streams have carved deep valleys in the flat lying

  3. Application of ecological, geological and oceanographic ERTS-1 imagery to Delaware's coastal resources management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Bartlett, D. S.; Philpot, W. D.; Davis, G. R.; Rogers, R. H.; Reed, L.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Data from twelve successful ERTS-1 passes over Delaware Bay have been analyzed with special emphasis on coastal vegetation, land use, current circulation, water turbidity and pollution dispersion. Secchi depth, suspended sediment concentration and transmissivity as measured from helicopters and boats were correlated with ERTS-1 image radiance. Multispectral signatures of acid disposal plumes, sediment plumes and slick were investigated. Ten vegetative cover and water discrimination classes were selected for mapping: (1) forest-land; (2) Phragmites communis; (3) Spartina patens and Distichlis spicata; (4) Spartina alterniflora; (5) cropland; (6) plowed cropland; (7) sand and bare sandy soil; (8) bare mud; (9) deep water; and (10) sediment-laden and shallow water. Canonical analysis predicted good classification accuracies for most categories. The actual classification accuracies were very close to the predicted values with 8 of 10 categories classified with greater than 90% accuracy indicating that representative training sets had been selected.

  4. Inventories of Delaware's coastal vegetation and land-use utilizing digital processing of ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V.; Bartlett, D.; Rogers, R.; Reed, L.

    1974-01-01

    Digital analysis of ERTS-1 imagery was used in an attempt to map and inventory the significant ecological communities of Delaware's coastal zone. Eight vegetation and land use discrimination classes were selected: (1) phragmites communis (Giant Reed grass); (2) spartina alterniflora (Salt marsh cord grass); (3) spartina patens (Salt marsh hay); (4) shallow water and exposed mud; (5) deep water (2 meters); (6) forest; (7) agriculture; and (8) exposed sand and concrete. Canonical analysis showed that classification accuracy was quite good with spartina alterniflora, exposed sand-concrete, and forested land - all discriminated with between 94% and 100% accuracy. The shallow water-mud and deep water categories were classified with accuracies of 88% and 93% respectively. Phragmites communis showed a classification accuracy of 83% with all confusion occurring with spartina patens which may be due to use of mixed stands of these species as training sets. Discrimination of spartina patens was very poor (accuracy 52%).

  5. Kids Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 2000-2001 [and] Families Count in Delaware: Fact Book, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Kids Count in Delaware.

    This Kids Count Fact Book is combined with the Families Count Fact Book to provide information on statewide trends affecting children and families in Delaware. The Kids Count statistical profile is based on 11 main indicators of child well-being: (1) births to teens 15 to 17 years; (2) births to teens 15 to 19 years; (3) low birth weight babies;…

  6. Mapping coastal vegetation, land use and environmental impact from ERTS-1. [Delaware coastal zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Digital analysis of ERTS-1 imagery was used in an attempt to map and inventory the significant ecological communities of Delaware's coastal zone. Eight vegetation and land use discrimination classes were selected: (1) Phragmites communis (giant reed grass); (2) Spartina alterniflora (salt marsh cord grass); (3) Spartina patens (salt marsh hay); (4) shallow water and exposed mud; (5) deep water (greater than 2 m); (6) forest; (7) agriculture; and (8) exposed sand and concrete. Canonical analysis showed the following classification accuracies: Spartina alterniflora, exposed sand, concrete, and forested land - 94% to 100%; shallow water - mud and deep water - 88% and 93% respectively; Phragmites communis 83%; Spartina patens - 52%. Classification accuracy for agriculture was very poor (51%). Limitations of time and available class-memory space resulted in limiting the analysis of agriculture to very gross identification of a class which actually consists of many varied signature classes. Abundant ground truth was available in the form of vegetation maps compiled from color and color infrared photographs. It is believed that with further refinement of training set selection, sufficiently accurate results can be obtained for all categories.

  7. Calibration of a streamflow-routing model for the Delaware River and its principal tributaries in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flippo, H.N.; Madden, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    The flow-routing module of the Hydrologic Simulation Program-Fortran watershed model was calibrated for 31 reaches on the Delaware River and 5 of it principal tributaries. These calibrations primarily involved the development of discharge-storage volume relations for the defined reaches. Daily discharge records for stream-gaging stations located at the upstream ends of the study reaches on the respective streams provided the primary hydrographic inputs for the routing models. Streamflow records for gaging stations at upstream locations and on other tributaries were used to estimate all other inflows for the 5-year calibration period, 1979-83. Root mean square errors of streamflows that were simulated for the downstream ends of gaged reaches ranged from 0.4 to 9.4 percent for the Delaware River, Lehigh River, Schuylkill River, and Brandywine Creek. Errors of 13 and 30 percent resulted from the streamflow simulations for the Lackawaxen and Neversink Rivers, respectively. Verification simulations for a 3-month period of extreme low flows on the Delaware River in 1966 resulted in overestimation of discharges for the Trenton, NJ, gaging station by approximately 50 percent on many days. Observed (recorded) streamflows at the Trenton gaging station during this time were exceptionally low, owing to comparatively large diversions of flow for public supplies, and into the Delaware and Raritan Canal. A flow-verification simulation for 3 months of the summer and fall of 1985, during which time minimum flows in the basin were comparable to those of 1966, resulted in a root mean square error of 3.3 percent for the Trenton gaging station. There was no diversion to the Delaware and Raritan Canal at the time. Simulated flows closely matched observed flows for upstream gaging stations on the Delaware River as well, thereby confirming the routing calibration for this stream. Information contained in this report can be used, with little modification, to develop routing modules for

  8. User's manual for the upper Delaware River riverine environmental flow decision support system (REFDSS), Version 1.1.2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbert, Colin; Maloney, Kelly O.; Holmquist-Johnson, Chris; Hanson, Leanne

    2014-01-01

    Between 2002 and 2006, the Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted field surveys, organized workshops, and performed analysis of habitat for trout and shad in the Upper Delaware River Basin. This work culminated in the development of decision support system software (the Delaware River DSS–DRDSS, Bovee and others, 2007) that works in conjunction with the Delaware River Basin Commission’s reservoir operations model, OASIS, to facilitate comparison of the habitat and water-delivery effects of alternative operating scenarios for the Basin. This original DRDSS application was developed in Microsoft Excel and is available to all interested parties through the FORT web site (http://www.fort.usgs.gov/Products/Software/DRDSS/). Initial user feedback on the original Excel-based DSS highlighted the need for a more user-friendly and powerful interface to effectively deliver the complex data and analyses encapsulated in the DSS. In order to meet this need, the USGS FORT and Northern Appalachian Research Branch (NARB) developed an entirely new graphical user interface (GUI) application. Support for this research was through the DOI WaterSmart program (http://www.doi.gov/watersmart/html/index.php) of which the USGS component is the National Water Census (http://water.usgs.gov/watercensus/WaterSMART.html). The content and methodology of the new GUI interface emulates those of the original DSS with a few exceptions listed below. Refer to Bovee and others (2007) for the original information. Significant alterations to the original DSS include: • We moved from Excel-based data storage and processing to a more powerful database back end powered by SQLite. The most notable effect of this is that the previous maximum temporal extent of 10 years has been replaced by a dynamic extent that can now cover the entire period of record for which we have data (1928–2000). • We incorporated interactive geographic information system (GIS

  9. Water Resources Study for Metropolitan Chester Creek Basin, Pennsylvania.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    Chester Creek Basin tributaries origirate in an area which is characterized Ly a gently rolling countryside with occasional low hills and ridges which run...gently rounded hills . Erosion has also affected the area along the Delaware Fiver where beds of unconsolidated or poorly consolidated sediments have...resources and these include clay, sand, and gravel, the pegmatite minerals and I"I it i 5 ’I •m m m mm stone products. From the rocks of Chester County

  10. Delaware Consortium for Undergraduate Minority Training in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    in fertilization, and it is best known for its neutral hyaluronidase activity. The human SPAM 1 gene, which is located on chromosome 7q31 , is...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06- 1 -0244 TITLE: Delaware Consortium for Undergraduate...DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per

  11. Low-flow characteristics of streams in Maryland and Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, David H.; Hayes, Donald C.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrologic information on the variability of streamflow during low-flow periods is presented. At-site data on low-flow characteristics of streamflow under natural conditions are given for 94 continuous-record gaging stations in Maryland, Delaware, and surrounding States, and for 131 low-flow partial-record gaging stations in Maryland and Delaware. Equations and transfer methods are developed to estimate low-flow characteristics at ungaged stream sites in Maryland and Delaware for average 7-, 14-, and 30-consecutive-day low-flow discharges for recurrence intervals of 2, 10, and 20 years. Estimates of the accuracy of the methods are presented. Maryland and Delaware are divided into four regions on the basis of physiography and the results of regression analyses. Equations are developed from a generalized least-squares multiple regression technique to estimate low-flow characteristics for the Eastern Shore region, the eastern-Piedmont region, and the western region. Adjustments are necessary to low-flow discharges estimated from the equation for the western region because of the effects of carbonate rocks on low flows. An equation is developed on the basis of a distance-weighted average of low-flow discharges at gaging stations to estimate low-flow characteristics for the southern region. Two methods are developed for transferring low-flow characteristics to ungaged sites on gaged streams. One method transfers low-flow characteristics to an ungaged site either upstream or downstream from a gaging station and the other method transfers the characteristics to an ungaged site between gaging stations.

  12. Exploring Marine Science through the University of Delaware's TIDE camp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, D. E.; Newton, F. A.; Veron, F.; Trembanis, A. C.; Miller, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    For the past five years, the University of Delaware has offered a two-week, residential, summer camp to rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors who are interested in marine science. The camp, named TIDE (Taking an Interest in Delaware's Estuary) camp, is designed to introduce students to the breadth of marine science while providing them with a college experience. Campers participate in a variety of academic activities which include classroom, laboratory, and field experiences, as well as numerous social activities. Two unique features of this small, focused camp is the large number of university faculty that are involved, and the ability of students to participate in ongoing research projects. At various times students have participated in fish and dolphin counts, AUV deployment, wind-wave tank experiments, coastal water and beach studies, and ROV activities. In addition, each year campers have participated in a local service project. Through communication with former TIDE participants, it is clear that this two-week, formative experience plays a large role in students choice of major when entering college.2012 Tide Camp - Salt marsh in southern Delaware 2012 Tide Camp - Field trip on a small boat

  13. Study of salt transport processes in Delaware Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Roy

    1992-01-01

    The study described here is a subset of a broader climate-related study, and is focused primarily on salinity intrusion into Delaware Bay and River. Given changes in freshwater discharge into the Delaware River as determined from the larger study, and given probable sea level rise estimates, the purpose here is to calculate the distribution of salinity within Delaware Bay and River. The approach adopted for this study is composed of two parts: an analysis of existing physical data in order to derive a basic understanding of the salt dynamics, and numerical simulation of future conditions based on this analysis. There are two important constraints in the model used: it must resolve the spatial scales important to the salt dynamics, and it must be sufficiently efficient to allow extensive sensitivity studies. This has led to the development of a 3D model that uses harmonic decomposition in time and irregular finite elements in space. All nonlinear terms are retained in the governing equations, including quadratic bottom stress, advection, and wave transport (continuity nonlinearity). These equations are coupled to the advection-diffusion equation for salt so that density gradient forcing is included in the momentum equations. Although this study is still in progress, the model has reproduced sea level variations and the 3D structure of tidal and residual currents very well. In addition, the study has addressed the effects of a 1-meter rise in mean sea level on hydrodynamics of the study area. Current work is focused on salt dynamics.

  14. Source apportionment of polychlorinated biphenyls in the tidal Delaware River.

    PubMed

    Du, Songyan; Belton, Thomas J; Rodenburg, Lisa A

    2008-06-01

    The Delaware River, similar to many surface water bodies throughout the United States, is impaired due to polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations that exceed the federal water quality standard. A total maximum daily load (TMDL) for PCBs in the Delaware was promulgated in 2003 after construction of a detailed water quality model that relied upon estimated PCB loadings from sources such as wastewater treatment plant effluents, contaminated sites, and tributaries. The purpose of this project was to corroborate this loading estimate by analyzing ambient water column data on PCB concentrations in the Delaware River via positive matrix factorization (PMF) in order to identify covarying congener patterns that are, in theory, associated with sources. The PMF program identified six factors (covarying congener patterns) that appear to be associated with sources, such as sediment resuspension, contaminated sites, and wastewater effluents and combined sewer overflows (CSOs). PCB 11 was found to be a useful tracer for CSO/ wastewater inputs despite the fact that no known dye manufacturers exist in the watershed. This analysis generally corroborates the PCB loading estimate used in the water quality model.

  15. Derivation of Delaware Bay tidal parameters from Space Shuttle photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Quanan; Yan, Xiao-Hai; Klemas, Vic

    1993-01-01

    The tide-related parameters of the Delaware Bay are derived from Space Shuttle time-series photographs. The water areas in the bay are measured from interpretation maps of the photographs with a CALCOMP 9100 digitizer and ERDAS Image Processing System. The corresponding tidal levels are calculated using the exposure time annotated on the photographs. From these data, an approximate function relating the water area to the tidal level at a reference point is determined. Based on the function, the water areas of the Delaware Bay at mean high water (MHW) and mean low water (MLW), below 0 m, and for the tidal zone are inferred. With MHW and MLW areas and the mean tidal range, we calculate the tidal influx of the Delaware Bay, which is 2.76 x 10 exp 9 cu m. The velocity of flood tide at the bay mouth is determined using the tidal flux and an integral of the velocity distribution function at the cross section between Cape Henlopen and Cape May. The result is 132 cm/s, which compares well with the data on tidal current charts.

  16. Derivation of Delaware Bay tidal parameters from space shuttle photography

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Quanan; Yan, Xiaohai; Klemas, V. )

    1993-06-01

    The tide-related parameters of the Delaware Bay are derived from space shuttle time-series photographs. The water areas in the bay are measured from interpretation maps of the photographs with a CALCOMP 9100 digitizer and ERDAS Image Processing System. The corresponding tidal levels are calculated using the exposure time annotated on the photographs. From these data, an approximate function relating the water area to the tidal level at a reference point is determined. Based on the function, the water areas of the Delaware Bay at mean high water (MHW) and mean low water (MLW), below 0 m, and for the tidal zone are inferred. With MHW and MLW areas and the mean tidal range, the authors calculate the tidal influx of the Delaware Bay, which is 2.76 x 1O[sup 9] m[sup 3]. Furthermore, the velocity of flood tide at the bay mouth is determined using the tidal flux and an integral of the velocity distribution function at the cross section between Cape Henlopen and Cape May. The result is 132 cm/s, which compares well with the data on tidal current charts.

  17. 33 CFR 165.510 - Delaware Bay and River, Salem River, Christina River and Schuylkill River-Regulated Navigation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Delaware Bay and River, Salem... Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.510 Delaware Bay and River, Salem River, Christina... Regulated Navigation Area: The navigable waters of Delaware Bay and River, Salem River, Christina River, and...

  18. 78 FR 64912 - Approval of Expansion of Subzone 99E, Delaware City Refining Company LLC, New Castle County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Approval of Expansion of Subzone 99E, Delaware City Refining Company LLC, New... application to the Board to expand Subzone 99E at the facilities of Delaware City Refining Company LLC... Subzone 99E ] at the facilities of the Delaware City Refining Company LLC, located in New Castle County...

  19. 40 CFR 81.15 - Metropolitan Philadelphia Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware). 81.15 Section 81.15 Protection of... Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware). The Metropolitan Philadelphia Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware) consists of the territorial...

  20. 40 CFR 81.15 - Metropolitan Philadelphia Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware). 81.15 Section 81.15 Protection of... Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware). The Metropolitan Philadelphia Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware) consists of the territorial...

  1. 40 CFR 81.15 - Metropolitan Philadelphia Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware). 81.15 Section 81.15 Protection of... Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware). The Metropolitan Philadelphia Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware) consists of the territorial...

  2. 40 CFR 81.15 - Metropolitan Philadelphia Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware). 81.15 Section 81.15 Protection of... Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware). The Metropolitan Philadelphia Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware) consists of the territorial...

  3. 40 CFR 81.15 - Metropolitan Philadelphia Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware). 81.15 Section 81.15 Protection of... Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware). The Metropolitan Philadelphia Interstate Air Quality Control Region (Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Delaware) consists of the territorial...

  4. Experiments in water spreading at Newark, Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boggess, Durward Haye; Rima, Donald Robert

    1962-01-01

    Two experiments in water spreading were made at Newark, Del., to evaluate the prospects of using excess storm runoff to recharge the shallow water-table aquifer which serves the community. Water was diverted from 1 of the city's 3 production wells and released into an infiltration ditch near the municipal well field. Although slightly more than 65,000 cubic feet of water (nearly 500,000 gallons ) was spread in the infiltration ditch and allowed to seep into the subsurface, there was no indication that any appreciable amount of water reached the producing aquifer. Instead, a perched zone of saturation was created by the presence of an impermeable or slightly permeable bed above the water table. So effective is this barrier to the downward movement of water that within a period of less than 1 day, the apex of the perched zone rose about 10 feet to the level of the bottom of the infiltration ditch. As more water was added, the mound of saturation spread laterally. On the basis of these experiments, it appears that the principal aquifer at Newark, Del., would not be benefited by spreading water in shallow infiltration ditches or basins. However, the absorptive capacity of the unsaturated materials which occur at a shallow depth, is sufficient to permit the disposal of large volumes of storm runoff.

  5. Delaware River Streamflow Reconstruction using Tree Rings: Exploration of Hierarchical Bayesian Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devineni, N.; Lall, U.; Cook, E.; Pederson, N.

    2011-12-01

    We present the application of a linear model in a Hierarchical Bayesian Regression (HBR) framework for reconstructing the summer seasonal averaged streamflow at five stations in the Delaware River Basin using eight newly developed regional tree ring chronologies. This technique directly provides estimates of the posterior probability distribution of each reconstructed streamflow value, considering model parameter uncertainty. The methodology also allows us to shrink the model parameters towards a common mean to incorporate the predictive ability of each tree chronology on multiple stations. We present the results from HBR analysis along with the results from traditional Point by Point Regression (PPR) analysis to demonstrate the benefits of developing the reconstructions under a Bayesian modeling framework. Further, we also present the comparative results of the model validation using various performance evaluation metrics such as reduction in error (RE) and coefficient of efficiency (CE). The reconstructed streamflow at various stations can be utilized to examine the frequency and recurrence attributes of extreme droughts in the region and their potential connections to known low frequency climate modes.

  6. Evaluation of Delaware Stars for Early Success: Year 1 Report. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Heather L.; Karoly, Lynn A.; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Tamargo, Jennifer; Setodji, Claude Messan

    2014-01-01

    Delaware was in the first group of states to receive a federal grant in 2012 to improve early care and education services and increase the number of infants, toddlers, and preschool-age children in high-quality programs. One component of the state's grant is a rigorous validation process for Delaware Stars for Early Success, a voluntary quality…

  7. Delaware Student Testing Program Item Sampler: Released Items for Science, Grades 8 and 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware State Dept. of Education, Dover.

    The Delaware Student Testing Program (DSTP) is designed to assess progress toward the Delaware Content Standards. Every year a certain number of items are removed from the test and then selected for public release. This booklet contains items released from the 2001 administration of the DSTP Science tests for grades 8 and 11. It contains examples…

  8. 77 FR 55419 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Delaware; Section 110(a)(2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... (SIP) revision submitted by the State of Delaware. The SIP revision addresses the infrastructure... enforce the 2008 lead national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS). EPA is approving this SIP revision... NAAQS. II. Summary of SIP Revision On October 17, 2011, the Delaware Department of Natural Resources...

  9. Species-specific effects of a 1994 ice storm on radial tree growth in Delaware

    Treesearch

    Matthew Smolnik; Amy Hessl; J. J. Colbert

    2006-01-01

    Ice storms are recurrent disturbances that alter forest succession and forest structure throughout North America. However, long-term effects of ice storms on tree growth are largely unknown. Following a 1994 ice storm in Delaware, the Delaware Forest Service established seventy-five study plots to sample four species of trees (southern red oak [Quercus falcate...

  10. Delaware Middle Schools Beating the Odds. Technical Report Number T2010.4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grusenmeyer, Linda; Fifield, Steve; Murphy, Aideen; Nian, Qinghua; Qian, Xiaoyu

    2010-01-01

    The investigation identified Delaware public and charter middle schools across the state which outperformed other Delaware middle schools with similar student demographic profiles. Teachers and administrators at six of these "Beating the Odds" schools and at six comparison middle schools were surveyed regarding their schools…

  11. Literacy at the Core of the Delaware World Language Immersion Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton-Archer, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Certain aspects of the implementation of language immersion programs in Delaware are unique given the state's size, demographics, and role in national education initiatives including Race to the Top, Common Core, and Smarter Balance. The Delaware experience typifies what every state, district, or even school goes through as they try to provide…

  12. 77 FR 75384 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Delaware County (Muncie...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-20

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Indiana; Delaware... request to revise the Delaware County (Muncie), Indiana 1997 8-hour ozone maintenance State Implementation... developed using EPA's Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator (MOVES) emissions model. EPA proposed approval...

  13. 33 CFR 334.120 - Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.120 Section 334.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....120 Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A circular...

  14. 33 CFR 334.120 - Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.120 Section 334.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....120 Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A circular...

  15. 33 CFR 334.120 - Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.120 Section 334.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....120 Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A circular...

  16. 33 CFR 334.120 - Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.120 Section 334.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....120 Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A circular...

  17. 33 CFR 334.120 - Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.120 Section 334.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....120 Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A circular...

  18. The Delaware Geography-Health Initiative: Lessons Learned in Designing a GIS-Based Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Peter W.; Silberman, Jordan A.

    2010-01-01

    The Delaware Geography-Health Initiative is a Web- and GIS-based set of lesson units for teaching geographic concepts and research methods within the context of the state's high school geography standards. Each unit follows a research-based, inquiry-centered model addressing questions of health because of Delaware's high incidence of cancer,…

  19. Delaware river: evidence for its former extension to wilmington submarine canyon.

    PubMed

    Twichell, D C; Knebel, H J; Folger, D W

    1977-02-04

    Seismic-reflection profiles indicate that during the Pleistocene the Delaware River flowed across the continental shelf east of Delaware Bay and emptied into Wilmington Submarine Canyon. The ancestral valley (width, 3 to 8 kilometers; relief, 10 to 30 meters) is buried, is not reflected in the surface topography, and probably predates the formation of the present canyon head.

  20. 33 CFR 100.T05-0443 - Safety Zone; Fireworks Display, Delaware River, New Hope, PA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone; Fireworks Display... Safety Zone; Fireworks Display, Delaware River, New Hope, PA. (a) Location. The safety zone will restrict vessel traffic on the Delaware River from operating within 400 yards of a fireworks barge located at...

  1. Evaluation of Delaware Stars for Early Success: Year 1 Report. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Heather L.; Karoly, Lynn A.; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Tamargo, Jennifer; Setodji, Claude Messan

    2014-01-01

    Delaware was in the first group of states to receive a federal grant in 2012 to improve early care and education services and increase the number of infants, toddlers, and preschool-age children in high-quality programs. One component of the state's grant is a rigorous validation process for Delaware Stars for Early Success, a voluntary quality…

  2. 75 FR 9426 - Delaware River and Bay Oil Spill Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Delaware River and Bay Oil Spill Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Delaware River and Bay Oil Spill Advisory Committee (DRBOSAC) will meet in Philadelphia, PA to discuss various issues to improve oil spill prevention and...

  3. 75 FR 12561 - Delaware River and Bay Oil Spill Advisory Committee; Meeting Cancelled

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard Delaware River and Bay Oil Spill Advisory Committee; Meeting Cancelled AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of cancellation of meeting. SUMMARY: The Delaware River and Bay Oil...

  4. 75 FR 18524 - Delaware River and Bay Oil Spill Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Delaware River and Bay Oil Spill Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Delaware River and Bay Oil Spill Advisory Committee (DRBOSAC) will meet in Philadelphia, PA to discuss and approve DRBOSAC's report on oil spill prevention...

  5. 75 FR 73116 - Delaware River and Bay Oil Spill Advisory Committee; Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Delaware River and Bay Oil Spill Advisory Committee; Meetings AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of advisory committee meetings. SUMMARY: The Delaware River and Bay Oil Spill Advisory Committee (DRBOSAC) will meet in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to discuss and approve DRBOSAC's report on...

  6. 33 CFR 167.173 - Off Delaware Bay: Two-Way Traffic Route.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Off Delaware Bay: Two-Way Traffic... SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY OFFSHORE TRAFFIC SEPARATION SCHEMES Description of Traffic Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Atlantic East Coast § 167.173 Off Delaware Bay: Two-Way...

  7. 33 CFR 167.173 - Off Delaware Bay: Two-Way Traffic Route.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Off Delaware Bay: Two-Way Traffic... SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY OFFSHORE TRAFFIC SEPARATION SCHEMES Description of Traffic Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Atlantic East Coast § 167.173 Off Delaware Bay: Two-Way...

  8. 33 CFR 167.173 - Off Delaware Bay: Two-Way Traffic Route.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Off Delaware Bay: Two-Way Traffic... SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY OFFSHORE TRAFFIC SEPARATION SCHEMES Description of Traffic Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Atlantic East Coast § 167.173 Off Delaware Bay: Two-Way...

  9. 33 CFR 167.173 - Off Delaware Bay: Two-Way Traffic Route.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Off Delaware Bay: Two-Way Traffic... SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY OFFSHORE TRAFFIC SEPARATION SCHEMES Description of Traffic Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Atlantic East Coast § 167.173 Off Delaware Bay: Two-Way...

  10. Delaware's Rural Assistance Council Promotes the Rural Agenda in the First State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanSciver, James H.

    The Delaware Research for Better Schools Rural Assistance Council's (RAC) mission is to develop a rural assistance agenda for the state. The Council stated four objectives: (1) identifying the most pressing needs of Delaware's rural schools and school districts; (2) developing plans, in cooperation with appropriate state organizations, for…

  11. Delaware Technical and Community College Policy Recommendations for Improved Online Courses and Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Andrew James

    2010-01-01

    Delaware Technical and Community College online courses are not properly focused to ensure instructors are effective in improving student achievement. First time online students are not given the proper tools when navigating online courses at the college. The focus at Delaware Tech should be on improving the format which students use when…

  12. The Delaware Geography-Health Initiative: Lessons Learned in Designing a GIS-Based Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Peter W.; Silberman, Jordan A.

    2010-01-01

    The Delaware Geography-Health Initiative is a Web- and GIS-based set of lesson units for teaching geographic concepts and research methods within the context of the state's high school geography standards. Each unit follows a research-based, inquiry-centered model addressing questions of health because of Delaware's high incidence of cancer,…

  13. 75 FR 54026 - Safety Zone; Red Bull Flugtag, Delaware River, Camden, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... [Docket No. USCG-2010-0728] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Red Bull Flugtag, Delaware River, Camden, NJ AGENCY... of the Delaware River during the Red Bull Flugtag event. The safety zone is necessary to protect... vessels and vessels from any debris in the water as a result from the event. Basis and Purpose Red Bull...

  14. 33 CFR 110.70 - Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, easterly of Courthouse Point, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, easterly of Courthouse Point, Md. 110.70 Section 110.70 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.70 Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, easterly of...

  15. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  16. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  17. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  18. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  19. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations. 410.1 Section 410.1 Conservation of... CODE AND ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL-PART III WATER QUALITY REGULATIONS § 410.1 Basin regulations—Water Code and Administrative Manual—Part III Water Quality Regulations. (a) The Water Code of the Delaware...

  20. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Class II

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, Thomas C.

    2000-07-28

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m{sup 3}) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  1. Quantification and probabilistic modeling of CRT obsolescence for the State of Delaware

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Kelsea A.; Schumacher, Thomas; Agbemabiese, Lawrence

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We modeled the obsolescence of cathode ray tube devices in the State of Delaware. • 411,654 CRT units or ∼16,500 metric tons have been recycled in Delaware since 2002. • The peak of the CRT obsolescence in Delaware passed by 2012. • The Delaware average CRT recycling rate between 2002 and 13 was approximately 27.5%. • CRTs will continue to infiltrate the system likely until 2033. - Abstract: The cessation of production and replacement of cathode ray tube (CRT) displays with flat screen displays have resulted in the proliferation of CRTs in the electronic waste (e-waste) recycle stream. However, due to the nature of the technology and presence of hazardous components such as lead, CRTs are the most challenging of electronic components to recycle. In the State of Delaware it is due to this challenge and the resulting expense combined with the large quantities of CRTs in the recycle stream that electronic recyclers now charge to accept Delaware’s e-waste. Therefore it is imperative that the Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) understand future quantities of CRTs entering the waste stream. This study presents the results of an assessment of CRT obsolescence in the State of Delaware. A prediction model was created utilizing publicized sales data, a variety of lifespan data as well as historic Delaware CRT collection rates. Both a deterministic and a probabilistic approach using Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) were performed to forecast rates of CRT obsolescence to be anticipated in the State of Delaware. Results indicate that the peak of CRT obsolescence in Delaware has already passed, although CRTs are anticipated to enter the waste stream likely until 2033.

  2. Flow dynamics and variability in the Delaware Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. L.; Geyer, W. R.; Ralston, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    The mechanisms control tidally varying circulations and the density gradient between fresh and salt water are investigated in a wide, convergent estuary. This study integrates field observations and numerical simulations in the Delaware River estuary, which consists of a wide lower bay (maximum width 40 km), narrowing roughly exponentially to < 5 km in the upper estuary (around 150 km from the widest part). The COAWST Modeling System is utilized to evaluate the mechanisms control salinity intrusion and stratification. The salt intrusion shows much less sensitivity to discharge variability than more prismatic estuaries, with an exponent of -1/5 to -1/7, compared to -1/3 for prismatic estuaries. Both observations and model results show that the flow can be highly stratified (Δs>10psu) even during low discharge conditions, in contrast to prior designations of the Delaware as a "well-mixed" estuary. The stratification is stronger than other estuaries with the same values of the scaling parameters in the estuarine classification scheme [Geyer and MacCready 2014]. Stratification is enhanced by outflow in the channel associated with the Eulerian return flow balancing tidal Stokes transport on the shoals, as described by Li and O'Donnell [1997]. Moreover, the Simpson Number, which is proportional to the ratio of potential energy reductions due to straining to kinetic energy dissipation, shows a threshold value of 1 that separates stratified and unstratified conditions. This suggests that longitudinal straining is the important factor and lateral processes may play a role in controlling flow structure and density gradient of the Delaware River estuary. Funded by NSF.

  3. Characteristics of Wind Generated Waves in the Delaware Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. L.; Ralston, D. K.; Geyer, W. R.; Chant, R. J.; Sommerfield, C. K.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal marshes provide important services for human uses such as fishery industry, recreation, ports and marine operations. Bombay Hook Wildlife Refuge, located along the western shore of the Delaware Estuary, has experienced substantial loss of salt marsh in recent decades. To evaluate the importance of different mechanisms which cause observed shoreline retreat, wave gauges were deployed along the dredged navigation channel and shoreline in the Delaware Estuary. A coupled wave and circulation modeling system (SWAN/ROMS) based on the most recent bathymetry (last updated 2013) is validated with waves observed during both calm and energetic conditions in November 2015. Simulation results based on different model parameterizations of whitecapping, bottom friction and the wind input source are compared. The tendency of observed wave steepness is more similar to a revised whitecapping source term [Westhuysen, 2007] than the default in SWAN model. Both model results and field data show that the generation/dissipation of waves in the Delaware estuary is determined by the local wind speed and channel depth. Whitecapping-induced energy dissipation is dominant in the channel, while dissipation due to bottom friction and depth-induced breaking become important on lateral shoals. To characterize the effects of wind fetch on waves in estuaries more generally, simulations with an idealized domain and varying wind conditions are compared and the results are expressed in terms of non-dimensional parameters. The simulations based on a 10m-depth uniform idealized channel show that the dissipation of waves is mainly controlled by whitecapping in all wind conditions. Under strong wind conditions (wind speed >10m/s) the effect of bottom friction becomes important so the simulated wave heights are no longer linearly correlated with wind speed.

  4. Disparities in multiple risk factors for cardiovascular diseases - Delaware, 2011.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sangeeta

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of multiple risk factors for Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) and to identify disparities in risk status among population subgroups in Delaware. As a secondary analysis the study will also analyze self-reported CVD prevalence overall and discuss differences in prevalence by age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, income, employment status, and county of residence. Analysis was conducted using Delaware data for 4,777 respondents from the 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Survey participants having greater than or equal to two of the following risk factors: obesity, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, current smoking, and diabetes mellitus were considered as having multiple risk factors for CVD. In 2011, the prevalence of CVD in Delaware was 8.61 percent (95 percent Confidence Interval [CI, 7.55, 9.66]). Overall, 22.51 percent (95 percent CI, 20.62-24.40) of persons reported having no risk factors, 32.30 percent (95 percent CI, 30.31-34.28) reported one risk factor, and 45.20 percent (95 percent CI, 43.18-47.21) reported multiple risk factors. Prevalence of multiple risk factors was higher for the aged, less educated, and unemployed. Disparities by gender and race were not significant. Sussex County had a higher prevalence of CVD multiple risk factors, 53.18 percent (95 percent CI, 49.47-56.89) followed by Kent County, 49.75 percent (95 percent CI, 45.92-53.58). One of the priority goals of Healthy People 2020 is to improve cardiovascular health and quality of life through prevention, detection, and treatment of risk factors for heart attack and stroke and also prevention of repeat cardiovascular events. This study indicates that in 2011 a higher proportion of the Delaware population had multiple risk factors for heart disease and stroke, particularly certain population subgroups defined by socioeconomic status. Development of effective prevention programs targeting populations with

  5. Infrared view of Chesapeake Bay showing Virginia, Maryland and Delaware

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1975-07-24

    AST-13-797 (24 July 1975) --- An infrared, near vertical view of the Chesapeake Bay area showing portions of Virginia, Maryland and Delaware, as photographed from the Apollo spacecraft in Earth orbit during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo-Soyuz Test Project mission. Richmond and Norfolk can be seen in this picture. Tidewater Virginia covers much of this view. The photograph was taken at an altitude of 217 kilometers (135 statute miles) with a 70mm Hasselblad camera using infrared Aerochrome type 2443 Ektachrome film.

  6. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Mark B.

    2002-01-16

    The overall objective of this project was to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods-can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan included developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  7. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Michael B.

    2002-02-21

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  8. Quantification and probabilistic modeling of CRT obsolescence for the State of Delaware.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Kelsea A; Schumacher, Thomas; Agbemabiese, Lawrence

    2014-11-01

    The cessation of production and replacement of cathode ray tube (CRT) displays with flat screen displays have resulted in the proliferation of CRTs in the electronic waste (e-waste) recycle stream. However, due to the nature of the technology and presence of hazardous components such as lead, CRTs are the most challenging of electronic components to recycle. In the State of Delaware it is due to this challenge and the resulting expense combined with the large quantities of CRTs in the recycle stream that electronic recyclers now charge to accept Delaware's e-waste. Therefore it is imperative that the Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) understand future quantities of CRTs entering the waste stream. This study presents the results of an assessment of CRT obsolescence in the State of Delaware. A prediction model was created utilizing publicized sales data, a variety of lifespan data as well as historic Delaware CRT collection rates. Both a deterministic and a probabilistic approach using Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) were performed to forecast rates of CRT obsolescence to be anticipated in the State of Delaware. Results indicate that the peak of CRT obsolescence in Delaware has already passed, although CRTs are anticipated to enter the waste stream likely until 2033.

  9. Evidence for an Early Cretaceous mineralizing event above the basement/sediment unconformity in the intracratonic Paris Basin: paragenetic sequence and Sm-Nd dating of the world-class Pierre-Perthuis stratabound fluorite deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gigoux, Morgane; Delpech, Guillaume; Guerrot, Catherine; Pagel, Maurice; Augé, Thierry; Négrel, Philippe; Brigaud, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    World-class stratabound fluorite deposits are spatially associated with the basement/sediment unconformity of the intracratonic Paris Basin and the Morvan Massif in Burgundy (France). The reserves are estimated to be about 5.5 Mt of fluorite within six fluorite deposits. In this study, we aim to determine the age of the major fluorite mineralization event of the Pierre-Perthuis deposit (1.4 Mt fluorite) by a combined study of the paragenetic mineral sequence and Sm-Nd dating on fluorite crystals. Fluorite occurs as isolated cubes or filling geodes in a Triassic, silicified, dolomitic formation. Three fluorite stages associated with sphalerite, pyrite, galena, barite, and quartz have been distinguished using optical, cathodoluminescence, and scanning electron microscopes. Seven crystals of the geodic fluorite stage were analyzed for their rare earth element (REE) contents and their 147Sm/144Nd and 143Nd/144Nd isotopic compositions. The normalized REE distribution displays homogeneous bell-shaped patterns for all the geodic fluorite samples with a Mid-REE enrichment over the Light-REE and Heavy-REE. The 147Sm/144Nd varies from 0.3108 to 0.5504 and the 143Nd/144Nd from 0.512313 to 0.512518. A six-point Sm-Nd isochron defines an age of 130 ± 15 Ma (initial 143Nd/144Nd = 0.512054, MSWD = 0.21). This Sm-Nd isochron provides the first age for the stratabound fluorite sediment-hosted deposit, related to an unconformity in the Paris Basin, and highlights a major Early Cretaceous fluid circulation event mainly above the basement/sediment unconformity during a flexural deformation of the Paris Basin, which relates to the rifting of the Bay of Biscay and the formation of the Ligurian Sea in the Western Europe domain.

  10. Selected Streamflow Statistics for Streamgaging Stations in Delaware, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ries, Kernell G.

    2004-01-01

    Flow-duration and low-flow frequency statistics were calculated for 15 streamgaging stations in Delaware, in cooperation with the Delaware Geological Survey. The flow-duration statistics include the 1-, 2-, 5-, 10-, 20-, 30-, 40-, 50-, 60-, 70-, 80-, 90-, 95-, 98-, and 99-percent duration discharges. The low-flow frequency statistics include the average discharges for 1, 7, 14, 30, 60, 90, and 120 days that recur, on average, once in 1.01, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 years. The statistics were computed using U.S. Geological Survey computer programs that can be downloaded from the World Wide Web at no cost. The computer programs automate standard U.S. Geological Survey methods for computing the statistics. Documentation is provided at the Web sites for the individual programs. The computed statistics are presented in tabular format on a separate page for each station, along with the station name, station number, the location, the period of record, and remarks.

  11. Bioassessment of fish communities of the upper Delaware River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Snik, Gray E.; Ross, R.M.; Bennett, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the biotic integrity of the middle-to-upper Delaware River. We sampled fish and assembled water quality data for eight stations and three habitat types (pool, riffle, and submerged aquatic vegetation [SAV]) of the Delaware River and applied an existing index of biotic integrity (IBI) recently developed for the northern mid-Atlantic slope drainages. We used Spearman's correlation to test IBI scores against measures of water quality (WQI) and cultural pollution. IBI scores were not significantly correlated with WQI, but were significantly negatively correlated with sewage load of adjacent tributaries (rs = -0.647, p = 0.08). Sites ranged from good to fair in biotic integrity. Fish assemblage composition from all three habitat types was necessary in order to accurately characterize biotic integrity. Of the three habitat types, fish assemblages from SAV habitats had the greatest positive effect on biotic integrity. Continued application of the IBI may be useful as a long-term monitoring tool as this river corridor becomes increasingly urbanized.

  12. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect

    Mark B. Murphy

    2001-10-31

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool (NDP) in southeast New Mexico is one of the nine projects selected in 1995 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for participation in the Class III Reservoir Field Demonstration Program. The goals of the DOE cost-shared Class Program are to: (1) extend economic production, (2) increase ultimate recovery, and (3) broaden information exchange and technology application. Reservoirs in the Class III Program are focused on slope basin and deep-basin clastic depositional types. Production at the NDP is from the Brushy Canyon formation, a low-permeability turbidite reservoir in the Delaware Mountain Group of Permian, Guadalupian age. A major challenge in this marginal-quality reservoir is to distinguish oil-productive pay intervals from water-saturated non-pay intervals. Because initial reservoir pressure is only slightly above bubble-point pressure, rapid oil decline rates and high gas/oil ratios are typically observed in the first year of primary production. Limited surface access, caused by the proximity of underground potash mining and surface playa lakes, prohibits development with conventional drilling. Reservoir characterization results obtained to date at the NDP show that a proposed pilot injection area appears to be compartmentalized. Because reservoir discontinuities will reduce effectiveness of a pressure maintenance project, the pilot area will be reconsidered in a more continuous part of the reservoir if such areas have sufficient reservoir pressure. Most importantly, the advanced characterization results are being used to design extended reach/horizontal wells to tap into predicted ''sweet spots'' that are inaccessible with conventional vertical wells. The activity at the NDP during the past year has included the completion of the NDP Well No.36 deviated/horizontal well and the completion of additional zones in three wells, the design of the NDP No.33 directional/horizontal well, The planning and regulatory approval for the

  13. Pseudo-outbreak of tuberculosis in poultry plant workers, Sussex County, Delaware.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dennis Y; Ridzon, Renee; Giles, Beverly; Mireles, Teresa

    2002-12-01

    Delaware is a leading US poultry-producing state, and foreign-born workers make up a significant percentage of those employed by Delaware's poultry plants. In Sussex County, Delaware, a high percentage of the poultry workers are from two countries with a high incidence of tuberculosis (TB), Mexico and Guatemala, and thus are at risk for TB infection and disease. Furthermore, their risk of TB may be increased because many of these workers live in crowded conditions and lack access to medical care.

  14. Integrated nested services: Delaware's experience treating minority substance abusers at risk for HIV or HIV positive.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Dorothy; Bincsik, Arlene K; Zebley, Christopher; Mongare, Kefa; Harrison, James; Gerardi, Kimberly E; Parcher, David W

    2010-01-01

    Treating minority substance abusers at risk of HIV or HIV positive is a critical public health issue. Delaware has achieved success in treating this population through its integrated nested services approach. Through three Center for Substance Abuse funded projects, Delaware has synthesized a number of evidence-based and best practices from the HIV medical treatment, substance abuse treatment and mental health treatment. Evaluation findings show that Project HOPE and Meeting the Challenges are having a positive impact on clients in a number of areas, including medical compliance, physical health, sobriety, employment/income and living situations. Clearly, this approach benefits all stakeholders, including the State of Delaware, local communities, staff and clients.

  15. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Mark B.

    1999-02-24

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico is a cost-shared field demonstration project in the US Department of Energy Class II Program. A major goal of the Class III Program is to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques are being used at the Nash Draw project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geologic, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description is being used as a risk reduction tool to identify ''sweet spots'' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well simulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir.

  16. Contrasting fish assemblages in free-flowing and impounded tributaries to the Upper Delaware River: Implications for conserving biodiversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Delucia, Mari-Beth; Keller, Walter D.; Schuler, George E.; Apse, Colin D.; Moberg, Tara

    2015-01-01

    The Neversink River and the Beaver Kill in southeastern New York are major tributaries to the Delaware River, the longest undammed river east of the Mississippi. While the Beaver Kill is free flowing for its entire length, the Neversink River is subdivided by the Neversink Reservoir, which likely affects the diversity of local fish assemblages and health of aquatic ecosystems. The reservoir is an important part of the New York City waster-supply system that provides drinking water to more than 9 million people. Fish population and community data from recent quantitative surveys at comparable sites in both basins were assessed to characterize the differences between free-flowing and impounded rivers and the extent of reservoir effects to improve our capacity to define ecosystems responses that two modified flow-release programs (implemented in 2007 and 2011) should produce in the Neversink River. In general, the continuum of changes in fish assemblages which normally occur between headwaters and mouth was relatively uninterrupted in the Beaver Kill, but disrupted by the mid-basin impoundment in the Neversink River. Fish assemblages were also adversely affected at several acidified sites in the upper Neversink River, but not at most sites assessed herein. The reservoir clearly excluded diadromous species from the upper sub-basin, but it also substantially reduced community richness, diversity, and biomass at several mid-basin sites immediately downstream from the impoundment. There results will aid future attempts to determine if fish assemblages respond to more natural, yet highly regulated, flow regimes in the Neversink River. More important, knowledge gained from this study can help optimize use of valuable water resources while promoting species of special concern, such as American eel (Anguilla rostrata) and conserving biodiversity in Catskill Mountain streams.

  17. Application of remotely sensed land-use information to improve estimates of streamflow characteristics, volume 8. [Maryland, Virginia, and Delaware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pluhowski, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Land use data derived from high altitude photography and satellite imagery were studied for 49 basins in Delaware, and eastern Maryland and Virginia. Applying multiple regression techniques to a network of gaging stations monitoring runoff from 39 of the basins, demonstrated that land use data from high altitude photography provided an effective means of significantly improving estimates of stream flow. Forty stream flow characteristic equations for incorporating remotely sensed land use information, were compared with a control set of equations using map derived land cover. Significant improvement was detected in six equations where level 1 data was added and in five equations where level 2 information was utilized. Only four equations were improved significantly using land use data derived from LANDSAT imagery. Significant losses in accuracy due to the use of remotely sensed land use information were detected only in estimates of flood peaks. Losses in accuracy for flood peaks were probably due to land cover changes associated with temporal differences among the primary land use data sources.

  18. Class Schedules Need Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monfette, Ronald J.

    1986-01-01

    Argues that college publications, including class schedules, must be accurate, timely, and easy to read and follow. Describes Schoolcraft College's unified format approach to publications marketing. Offers suggestions on the design, format, and distribution of class schedules. (DMM)

  19. Skylab and ERTS-1 investigations of coastal land use and water properties. [Delaware Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Bartlett, D.; Rogers, R.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 multispectral scanner and Skylab's S190A, S190B, and S192 data products were evaluated for their utility in studying current circulation, suspended sediment concentrations and pollution dispersal in Delaware Bay and in mapping coastal vegetation and land use. Imagery from the ERTS-1 MSS, S190A and S190B cameras shows considerable detail in water structure, circulation, suspended sediment distribution and within waste disposal plumes in shelf waters. These data products were also used in differentiating and mapping twelve coastal vegetation and land use classes. The spatial resolution of the S190A multispectral facility appears to be about 30 to 70 meters while that of the S190B earth terrain camera is about 10 to 30 meters. Such resolution, along with good cartographic quality, indicates a considerable potential for mapping coastal land use and monitoring water properties in estuaries and on the continental shelf. The ERTS-1 MSS has a resolution of about 70-100 meters. Moreover, its regular 18-day cycle permits observation of important changes, including the environmental impact of coastal zone development on coastal vegetation and ecology.

  20. Pennsylvania Water Utility to Reduce Sewage Discharges to Delaware River and Local Creeks

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) today announced a settlement with the Delaware County Regional Water Quality Control Authority (DELCORA) resolving alleged Clean Water Act violatio

  1. HAER PA,35SCRAN,4F (sheet 1 of 1) Delaware, Lackawanna & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HAER PA,35-SCRAN,4-F- (sheet 1 of 1) - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, Scranton Yards, Scrap Platform, 350 feet South of South Washington Avenue & River Street, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  2. EPA announces additional groundwater investigation at Delaware City PVC Superfund site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    PHILADELPHIA (Oct. 15, 2015) - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced a new investigation to determine the nature and extent of groundwater contamination at the Delaware City PVC Superfund site in New Castle County.

  3. Settlement to Improve Water Quality in Delaware River, Philadelphia-Area Creeks

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA and the U.S. Department of Justice have reached agreement with a major water utility in the greater Philadelphia area to significantly reduce sewage discharges to the Delaware River and local creeks.

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF THE DELAWARE AND MARYLAND COASTAL BAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The coastal bays of Delaware and Maryland are an important ecological and economic resource whose physical characteristics and location make them particularly vulnerable to the effects of pollutants. This project was undertaken as a collaborative effort between state and federal ...

  5. ASSESSMENT OF THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF THE DELAWARE AND MARYLAND COASTAL BAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The coastal bays of Delaware and Maryland are an important ecological and economic resource whose physical characteristics and location make them particularly vulnerable to the effects of pollutants. This project was undertaken as a collaborative effort between state and federal ...

  6. NAEP Quality Assurance Checks of the 2002 Reading Assessment Results for Delaware. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, R. Gene; Becker, D. E. (Sunny); Wise, Lauress L.

    In March 2003, the National Center for Education Statistics asked the Human Resources Research Organization to participate in a special study of 2002 reading assessment results for Delaware. This working paper summarizes the findings of that study. (AMT)

  7. 78 FR 76209 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Delaware; Attainment Plan for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ... concerns about Delaware's approach to attaining the 1997 PM 2.5 NAAQS without regulating ammonia (NH 3... Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by reference, Nitrogen dioxide, Particulate...

  8. 77 FR 39456 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Delaware; Section 110(a)(2...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ..., 89 Kings Highway, P.O. Box 1401, Dover, Delaware 19903. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Rose Quinto... from Stephen D. Page, Director, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards to the Regional...

  9. Overbank Sedimentation in the Delaware River Valley during the Last 6000 Years.

    PubMed

    Ritter, D F; Kinsey, W F; Kauffman, M E

    1973-01-26

    A thick sequence of floodplain sediments has accumulated in the Delaware River Valley by the process of overbank deposition. Textures in the sediments indicate that the sequence contains no point-bar deposits and is unbroken by periods of erosion. Fourteen radiocarbon dates show that deposition began at least 6000 years ago and has continued to the present. Because the Delaware River shifts its position laterally at a very slow rate, overbank deposition becomes dominant in the construction of its floodplain.

  10. Flood of April 2-3, 2005, Neversink River Basin, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suro, Thomas P.; Firda, Gary D.

    2006-01-01

    Heavy rain on April 2-3, 2005 produced rainfall amounts of 3 inches to almost 6 inches within a 36-hour period throughout the Delaware River basin. Major flooding occurred in the East and West Branches of the Delaware River and their tributaries, the main stem of the Delaware River and the Neversink River, a major tributary to the Delaware River. The resultant flooding damaged hundreds of homes, caused millions of dollars in damage to infrastructure in Orange and Sullivan Counties, and forced more than 1,000 residents to evacuate their homes. A total of 20 New York counties were declared Federal disaster areas. Some of the most extensive flooding occurred along the Neversink and Delaware Rivers in Orange and Sullivan Counties, New York. Disaster recovery assistance from the April 2005 flooding in New York stood at almost $35 million in 2005, at which time more than 3,400 New Yorkers had registered for Federal aid. All U.S. Geological Survey stream-gaging stations on the Neversink River below the Neversink Reservoir recorded peak water-surface elevations higher than those recorded during the September 2004 flooding. Peak water-surface elevations at some study sites on the Neversink River exceeded the 500-year flood elevation as documented in flood-insurance studies by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Flood peaks at some long-term U.S. Geological Survey stream-gaging stations were the highest ever recorded. Several U.S. Geological Survey stream-gaging stations on the Delaware River also recorded peak water-surface elevations that exceeded those recorded during the September 2004 flooding.

  11. Nitrogen metabolism of the eutrophic Delaware River ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the nitrogen cycle in the Delaware River was carried out using /sup 13/N tracers to measure rates for important transformations of nitrogen. Daily, depth-averaged /sup 15/N rates for the principal inorganic nitrogen species were consistent with rates derived from longitudinal profiles of concentration in the river. The data indicated that nitrification was a rapid, irreversible sink for NH/sub 4//sup +/, with export of the product NO/sub 3//sup -/ from the study area. Utilization of NO/sub 3//sup -/ by primary producers was negligible, owing to low irradiance levels and to high NH/sub 4//sup +/ concentrations. The oxygen sag near Philadelphia was found to result from oxygen demand in the water column, with only minor benthic influence. Reaeration provided the major oxygen input. Nitrification accounted for about 1% of the net oxygen demand near Philadelphia but as much as 25% farther downstream.

  12. Geophysical investigation of the hydrogeologic setting of Delaware's Inland Bays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lyndon Audley

    The fundamental goal of this dissertation research project was to use geophysical imaging to provide additional constraints on the hydrostratigraphic framework for ground-water discharge to the Inland Bays of Delaware. This dissertation was part of an EPA-funded Coastal Intensive Sites Network project entitled "CISNet: Nutrient Input as a Stressor and Net Nutrient Flux as an Indicator of Stress Response in Delaware's Inland Bay Ecosystem". The dissertation research was part of the ground-water component of the CISNet project. This component concentrated on the identification of sites of ground-water discharge within the bays and the relationship of this discharge to the underlying geology of the region. Extensive coring by previous investigators in the Inland Bays of Delaware has been conducted in order to understand the Quaternary history of this region. However, prior to this dissertation no attempt had been made to use shallow marine seismics to map the Inland Bays in order to better understand the influence of the subsurface geology on the hydrostratigraphic framework. In this project, an Edgetech chirp sub-bottom profiler was used in Rehoboth and Indian River Bays, the larger two of the three Inland Bays of Delaware, to obtain greater horizontal resolution than that afforded by isolated cores. Processing of the chirp data using Promax(TM) seismic software resulted in sub-decimeter scale resolution of shallow layers below the bay bottom including a high-amplitude, relatively continuous reflection that was interpreted as the Pre-Holocene/Holocene surface. At two sites, the Thorneby-Purnell property along Herring Creek, a tributary of Rehoboth Bay, and the Pete Okie property along Indian River, on-land ground penetrating radar (GPR) data were collected using a Sensors and Software GPR PulseEKKO 100 system with both 50 and 100 MHz antennas. The water table, occurring at depths on the order of 6 m beneath the surface, was imaged along GPR profiles collected at the

  13. Improving public addiction treatment through performance contracting: the Delaware experiment.

    PubMed

    McLellan, A Thomas; Kemp, Jack; Brooks, Adam; Carise, Deni

    2008-09-01

    In fiscal 2002, Delaware replaced traditional cost-reimbursement contracts with performance-based contracts for all outpatient addiction treatment programs. Incentives included 90% capacity utilization and active patient participation in treatment. One of the programs failed to meet requirements. Strategies adopted by successful programs included extended hours of operation, facility enhancements, salary incentives for counselors, and two evidence-based therapies (MI and CBT). Average capacity utilization from 2001 to 2006 went from 54% to 95%; and the average proportion of patients' meeting participation requirements went from 53% to 70%--with no notable changes in the patient population. We conclude that properly designed, program-based contract incentives are feasible to apply, welcomed by programs and may help set the financial conditions necessary to implement other evidence-based clinical efforts; toward the overall goal of improving addiction treatment.

  14. Upper Cenozoic sediments of the lower Delaware Valley and the northern Delmarva Peninsula, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owens, James Patrick; Minard, James Pierson

    1979-01-01

    The 'yellow gravels' referred to by R. D. Salisbury in 1898 and the 'Trenton gravel,' as defined by H. C. Lewis in 1880, were investigated along the inner edge of the New Jersey Coastal Plain in southern New Jersey and in the northern Delmarva Peninsula. The highest level deposits, the Beacon Hill gravel, are found on only the highest hills in the New Jersey Coastal Plain. Their distribution suggests deposition from north to south across the plain. After deposition of the Beacon Hill, probably in middle or late Miocene time, a narrow valley was formed paralleling the inner edge of the New Jersey Coastal Plain between Raritan Bay and Camden. South of Camden, the valley broadened, covering much of southern New Jersey. The deposits in this valley are largely the Bridgeton Formation as we have redefined it. A second narrow valley was entrenched through the Bridgeton between Trenton and Salem, N.J. This valley broadens and covers much of the northern Delmarva Peninsula west of the Delaware River. The fill in the valley is largely the Pensauken Formation, as we have redefined it in our report. Collectively, the Beacon Hill, the Bridgeton, and the Pensauken were originally the 'yellow gravels' of Salisbury. These deposits are all fluviatile in origin and were largely formed as a series of step like downcutting channels. The Delaware Valley between Trenton and the lower Delaware Bay region is occupied by the 'Trenton gravel,' which is below the average level of the 'yellow gravels.' Two units recognized throughout the area and informally named the Spring Lake beds and the Van Sciver Lake beds are lithologically distinct from the 'yellow gravel' formations. The lithologies of the Spring Lake beds and the Van Sciver Lake beds are much more heterogeneous than those of the older formations. These two units, particularly, contain much greater amounts of silt and clay, often in thick beds. The depositional environments associated with the two units include fluviatile, estuarine

  15. Surface currents and winds at the Delaware Bay mouth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muscarella, P. A.; Barton, N. P.; Lipphardt, B. L., Jr.; Veron, D. E.; Wong, K. C.; Kirwan, A. D., Jr.

    2011-08-01

    Knowledge of the circulation of estuaries and adjacent shelf waters has relied on hydrographic measurements, moorings, and local wind observations usually removed from the region of interest. Although these observations are certainly sufficient to identify major characteristics, they lack both spatial resolution and temporal coverage. High-resolution synoptic observations are required to identify important coastal processes at smaller scales. Long observation periods are needed to properly sample low-frequency processes that may also be important. The introduction of high-frequency (HF) radar measurements and regional wind models for coastal studies is changing this situation. Here we analyze synoptic, high-resolution surface winds and currents in the Delaware Bay mouth over an 8-month period (October 2007 through May 2008). The surface currents were measured by two HF radars while the surface winds were extracted from a data-assimilating regional wind model. To illustrate the utility of these monitoring tools we focus on two 45-day periods which previously were shown to present contrasting pictures of the circulation. One, the low-outflow period is from 1 October through 14 November 2007; the other is the high-outflow period from 3 March through 16 April 2008. The large-scale characteristics noted by previous workers are clearly corroborated. Specifically the M2 tide dominates the surface currents, and the Delaware Bay outflow plume is clearly evident in the low frequency currents. Several new aspects of the surface circulation were also identified. These include a map of the spatial variability of the M2 tide (validating an earlier model study), persistent low-frequency cross-mouth flow, and a rapid response of the surface currents to a changing wind field. However, strong wind episodes did not persist long enough to set up a sustained Ekman response.

  16. Mycobacterial infections in striped bass from Delaware Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ottinger, C.A.; Brown, J.J.; Densmore, Christine L.; Starliper, C.E.; Blazer, V.S.; Weyers, H.S.; Beauchamp, K.A.; Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; Gauthier, David T.; Vogelbein, W.K.

    2007-01-01

    Eighty striped bass Morone saxatilis were obtained from Delaware Bay using commercial gill nets set adjacent to Woodland Beach (n = 70) and Bowers Beach (n = 10) in December 2003. Fish were examined for gross lesions. Total lengths (TLs) and eviscerated weights were determined to calculate condition factors (K). Portions of spleens were aseptically harvested for bacterial culture, and portions of spleens, kidneys (anterior and posterior), livers, and gonads were obtained for histological examination. The size distribution of the striped bass was relatively homogeneous; the mean TL was about 600 mm for all samples. Mean K exceeded 0.95 in all samples and was not significantly different (P > 0.05) among samples. Significant differences in mycobacterial infection prevalence (P ??? 0.05) were observed among samples; samples obtained at Woodland Beach (WB) on December 10 (53.8%, n = 13) and December 17 (7.1%, n = 42) exhibited the most striking differences in prevalence. Mycobacterial infection intensity ranged from 1 ?? 102 to 1 ?? 107 colony-forming units per gram of spleen. Acanthocephalan infection prevalence and intensity, non-acid-fast bacterial infection prevalence, and fish sex ratio were also significantly different among the samples (P ??? 0.05). Similar to the mycobacterial infections, differences in sex ratio, acanthocephalan infection, and non-acid-fast bacterial infection were observed between the WB samples taken on December 10 and 17. However, no significant associations (P > 0.05) were observed between sex ratio or these infections and mycobacterial infection. The differences in bacterial and parasite infection prevalence and intensity and fish sex ratio in some samples indicate that these fish had a different history and that the epizootiology of mycobacterial infection in striped bass from Delaware Bay may be relatively complex. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  17. Surface Currents and Winds at the Delaware Bay Mouth

    SciTech Connect

    Muscarella, P A; Barton, N P; Lipphardt, B L; Veron, D E; Wong, K C; Kirwan, A D

    2011-04-06

    Knowledge of the circulation of estuaries and adjacent shelf waters has relied on hydrographic measurements, moorings, and local wind observations usually removed from the region of interest. Although these observations are certainly sufficient to identify major characteristics, they lack both spatial resolution and temporal coverage. High resolution synoptic observations are required to identify important coastal processes at smaller scales. Long observation periods are needed to properly sample low-frequency processes that may also be important. The introduction of high-frequency (HF) radar measurements and regional wind models for coastal studies is changing this situation. Here we analyze synoptic, high-resolution surface winds and currents in the Delaware Bay mouth over an eight-month period (October 2007 through May 2008). The surface currents were measured by two high-frequency radars while the surface winds were extracted from a data-assimilating regional wind model. To illustrate the utility of these monitoring tools we focus on two 45-day periods which previously were shown to present contrasting pictures of the circulation. One, the low-outflow period is from 1 October through 14 November 2007; the other is the high-outflow period from 3 March through 16 April 2008. The large-scale characteristics noted by previous workers are clearly corroborated. Specifically the M2 tide dominates the surface currents, and the Delaware Bay outflow plume is clearly evident in the low frequency currents. Several new aspects of the surface circulation were also identified. These include a map of the spatial variability of the M2 tide (validating an earlier model study), persistent low-frequency cross-mouth flow, and a rapid response of the surface currents to a changing wind field. However, strong wind episodes did not persist long enough to set up a sustained Ekman response.

  18. Seasonality in the Mesozooplankton Community of Delaware Bay, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickline, A.; Cohen, J.

    2016-02-01

    Zooplankton communities in temperate estuaries undergo seasonal shifts in abundance and species composition, though the physical/biological mechanisms behind these shifts vary among systems. Delaware Bay is a well-mixed estuary on the mid-Atlantic coast with predictable seasonal variation in environmental conditions and circulation. To understand factors influencing mesozooplankton community dynamics in this system, we conducted seasonal sampling at 16 stations over the estuary's salinity range in 2014-2015. Sampling paralleled the last similar investigation into Delaware Bay zooplankton, conducted in the early 1950s. Biomass, measured as dry weight and totaled for all stations, was low in late summer and high in spring and fall. Bio-volume, measured either as displacement volume or calculated from ZooScan processing to exclude detritus, also showed a similar pattern. Across seasons, the mesozooplankton community was dominated by copepods, representing over 60% of the relative abundance at each station. Acartia tonsa was the dominant calanoid species in summer and fall, with abundances up to 7,353 ind. m-3, which is similar to the 1950s. In spring, Centropages hamatus and C. typicus were dominant at densities up to 2,550 ind. m-3 throughout the estuary, which is an increase from the 1950s. Environmental data suggest the seasonal shift in dominance from neritic Centropages to estuarine Acartia could be driven by increased stratification of the estuary during periods of high river discharge in spring, creating a two-layer system with a bottom advection current fed by the coastal ocean, bringing coastal species into the estuary. As river discharge decreases, the advection current is reduced, creating a well-mixed estuary and allowing Acartia to dominante. As river discharge is ultimately determined by precipitation, which is predicted to increase during winter with climate change in this region, the phenology of mesozooplankton species dynamics could shift as well.

  19. Indicators of AEI applied to the Delaware Estuary.

    PubMed

    Barnthouse, Lawrence W; Heimbuch, Douglas G; Anthony, Vaughn C; Hilborn, Ray W; Myers, Ransom A

    2002-05-18

    We evaluated the impacts of entrainment and impingement at the Salem Generating Station on fish populations and communities in the Delaware Estuary. In the absence of an agreed-upon regulatory definition of "adverse environmental impact" (AEI), we developed three independent benchmarks of AEI based on observed or predicted changes that could threaten the sustainability of a population or the integrity of a community. Our benchmarks of AEI included: (1) disruption of the balanced indigenous community of fish in the vicinity of Salem (the "BIC" analysis); (2) a continued downward trend in the abundance of one or more susceptible fish species (the "Trends" analysis); and (3) occurrence of entrainment/impingement mortality sufficient, in combination with fishing mortality, to jeopardize the future sustainability of one or more populations (the "Stock Jeopardy" analysis). The BIC analysis utilized nearly 30 years of species presence/absence data collected in the immediate vicinity of Salem. The Trends analysis examined three independent data sets that document trends in the abundance of juvenile fish throughout the estuary over the past 20 years. The Stock Jeopardy analysis used two different assessment models to quantify potential long-term impacts of entrainment and impingement on susceptible fish populations. For one of these models, the compensatory capacities of the modeled species were quantified through meta-analysis of spawner-recruit data available for several hundred fish stocks. All three analyses indicated that the fish populations and communities of the Delaware Estuary are healthy and show no evidence of an adverse impact due to Salem. Although the specific models and analyses used at Salem are not applicable to every facility, we believe that a weight of evidence approach that evaluates multiple benchmarks of AEI using both retrospective and predictive methods is the best approach for assessing entrainment and impingement impacts at existing facilities.

  20. Lateral variability of sediment transport in the Delaware Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSweeney, Jacqueline M.; Chant, Robert J.; Sommerfield, Christopher K.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral processes contribute significantly to circulation and material transport in estuaries. The mechanisms controlling transport may vary spatially such that shallow and deep regions of an estuary contribute differently to the total transport. An observational study was conducted to explore the importance of lateral variability in sediment transport mechanisms in the Delaware Estuary. Seven moorings were deployed across the channel in the region of the estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) zone from April to August 2011. Time series of along-channel sediment transport reveal a consistent pattern of sediment export across the entire estuary during periods of high river discharge, followed by a transition to import within the channel and export on the flanks during low river flow. There is a persistent divergence of across-channel sediment fluxes on the Delaware side, where sediment from the flank is transported toward both the channel and wetland coast. Decomposition of the fluxes highlight that across-channel sediment transport is driven by mean lateral circulation, whereas along-channel transport is driven primarily by mean advection, with tidal pumping contributing to about 30% of total transport. The spatial and temporal variability of mean advection and tidal pumping were generally complementary, with both contributing to the observed sediment transport pathways. Tidal pumping, linked to tidal asymmetries in stratification and sediment resuspension, was shown to drive both ebb-driven export and flood-driven import depending on the tidal variability of stratification. The spatiotemporal patterns of sediment transport highlight the three-dimensional structure of the ETM and shed light on the variability of sediment transport mechanisms.