Science.gov

Sample records for delayed radiation injury

  1. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of brain injury after nasopharyngeal cancer radiation in early delayed reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, W-S; Li, J-J; Zhang, J-H; Hong, L; Xing, Z-B; Wang, F; Li, C-Q

    2014-08-29

    This study aimed to investigate the value of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) imaging in assessing nasopharyngeal carcinoma radiotherapy during the early delayed reaction period. Eighty cases of nasopharyngeal cancer treated with radiotherapy within the same period underwent MRS imaging before or after radiotherapy. Of the 80 cases, 47 underwent MRS imaging on the 3rd, 4th, 6th, and 12th months after radiotherapy. The trends of the primary metabolite concentration at different time points were monitored and compared with the corresponding data after radiotherapy. Repeated measures analysis of variance was performed. At the end of radiotherapy, the N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr), choline (Cho)/Cr, and NAA/Cho ratios were reduced to the lowest levels after 3 months. However, increasing trends were observed from the 4th to the 12th month. On the 12th month, stable levels were reached with statistically significant differences (F = 316.02, 53.84, 286.68; P < 0.01). MRS reflected the radiation injury-repair process in the brain of a nasopharyngeal cancer patient during early delayed reaction. This non-invasive monitoring of changes in brain tissue metabolite concentrations provides valuable information for prognosis.

  2. Combined Hydration and Antibiotics with Lisinopril to Mitigate Acute and Delayed High-dose Radiation Injuries to Multiple Organs.

    PubMed

    Fish, Brian L; Gao, Feng; Narayanan, Jayashree; Bergom, Carmen; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Cohen, Eric P; Moulder, John E; Orschell, Christie M; Medhora, Meetha

    2016-11-01

    The NIAID Radiation and Nuclear Countermeasures Program is developing medical agents to mitigate the acute and delayed effects of radiation that may occur from a radionuclear attack or accident. To date, most such medical countermeasures have been developed for single organ injuries. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been used to mitigate radiation-induced lung, skin, brain, and renal injuries in rats. ACE inhibitors have also been reported to decrease normal tissue complication in radiation oncology patients. In the current study, the authors have developed a rat partial-body irradiation (leg-out PBI) model with minimal bone marrow sparing (one leg shielded) that results in acute and late injuries to multiple organs. In this model, the ACE inhibitor lisinopril (at ~24 mg m d started orally in the drinking water at 7 d after irradiation and continued to ≥150 d) mitigated late effects in the lungs and kidneys after 12.5-Gy leg-out PBI. Also in this model, a short course of saline hydration and antibiotics mitigated acute radiation syndrome following doses as high as 13 Gy. Combining this supportive care with the lisinopril regimen mitigated overall morbidity for up to 150 d after 13-Gy leg-out PBI. Furthermore, lisinopril was an effective mitigator in the presence of the growth factor G-CSF (100 μg kg d from days 1-14), which is FDA-approved for use in a radionuclear event. In summary, by combining lisinopril (FDA-approved for other indications) with hydration and antibiotics, acute and delayed radiation injuries in multiple organs were mitigated.

  3. Delayed radiation injury to the retrobulbar optic nerves and chiasm. Clinical syndrome and treatment with hyperbaric oxygen and corticosteroids

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, D.; Bosley, T.M.; Fowble, B.; Clark, J.; Savino, P.J.; Sergott, R.C.; Schatz, N.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Thirteen patients with delayed radiation injury to the optic nerves and chiasm were treated with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) and corticosteroids. These patients experienced painless, abrupt loss of vision in one (6 patients) or both (7 patients) eyes between 4 and 35 months after receiving radiation doses of at least 4500 cGy to the region of the chiasm. Diagnostic evaluation including neuro-imaging and lumbar puncture showed no recurrent tumor and no other cause for visual loss. No patient's vision improved during treatment or follow-up lasting between 1 and 4 years. There were no serious complications of treatment.

  4. STUDIES IN WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION AND RADIATION INJURY. VOLUME II, THE INCIDENCE, NATURE AND ADJUDICATION OF WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION CLAIMS INVOLVING RADIATION EXPOSURE AND DELAYED INJURY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'TOOLE, THOMAS J.

    THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO PROVIDE A FACTUAL BACKGROUND AGAINST WHICH JUDGMENTS CAN BE MADE CONCERNING THE MAGNITUDE OF THE PROBLEM OF INJURY APPEARING SOME TIME AFTER THE EXPOSURE TO IONIZING RADIATION AND DETERMINE WHETHER EXISTING LAWS PERMIT A JUST AND EQUITABLE ADJUDICATION OF RADIATION COMPENSATION CLAIMS. THE STUDY WAS BASED UPON THE…

  5. Radioprotective Properties of Indralin in Combination with Monizol in the Treatment of Local Acute and Delayed Radiation Injuries Caused by Local Skin γ-Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Vasin, M V; Ushakov, I B; Kovtun, V Yu; Semenova, L A; Komarova, S N; Galkin, A A; Afanas'ev, R V

    2015-10-01

    Female rats were exposed to local γ-irradiation of the right hindpaw in doses of 30-50 Gy at 131-154 sGy/min dose rate. Radioprotector indralin was administered per os 15 min prior to irradiation, monizol was injected intraperitoneally 5 min after irradiation. Indralin showed marked radioprotective properties both for acute and delayed symptoms of local radiation injuries. In combination with monizol, radioprotective effect of indralin was potentiated to dose reduction factor of 1.4-1.5 both for radiation burn severity reduction and for restriction of postradiational contracture development and amputation of the irradiated limb.

  6. [Acute radiation injury].

    PubMed

    Saito, Tsutomu

    2012-03-01

    Cell death due to DNA damage by ionizing radiation causes acute radiation injury of tissues and organs. Frequency and severity of the injuries increase according to dose increase, when the dose becomes more than threshold dose. The threshold dose of acute human radiation death is 1 Gy and LD50 of human is 4 Gy. Human dies due to the cerebrovascular syndrome, the gastrointestinal syndrome or the hematopoetic syndrome, when he received more than 20 Gy, 10-20 Gy or 3-8 Gy to his total body, respectively. Any tissue or organ, including embryo and fetus, does not show the acute injury, when it received less than 100 mSv. Acute injuries are usually reversible, and late injuries are sometimes irreversible.

  7. Treatment of Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Sadanori

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Radiation exposure as a result of radiation treatment, accident, or terrorism may cause serious problems such as deficiency due to necrosis or loss of function, fibrosis, or intractable ulcers in the tissues and organs. When the skin, bone, oral mucous membrane, guts, or salivary glands are damaged by ionizing radiation, the management and treatment are very lengthy and difficult. Critical Issues: In severe and irreversible injuries, surgery remains the mainstay of treatment. Several surgical procedures, such as debridement, skin grafting, and local and free-vascularized flaps, are widely used. Recent Advances: In specific cases of major morbidity or in high-risk patients, a newly developed therapy using a patient's own stem cells is safe and effective. Adipose tissue, normally a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells, which are similar to those from the bone marrow, can be harvested, since the procedure is easy, and abundant tissue can be obtained with minimal invasiveness. Future Directions: Based on the molecular basis of radiation injuries, several prospective treatments are under development. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms focus on an individual's sensitivity to radiation in radiogenomics, and the pathology of radiation fibrosis or the effect of radiation on wound healing is being studied and will lead to new insight into the treatment of radiation injuries. Protectors and mitigators are being actively investigated in terms of the timing of administration or dose. PMID:24761339

  8. Delay equations and radiation damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicone, C.; Kopeikin, S. M.; Mashhoon, B.; Retzloff, D. G.

    2001-06-01

    Starting from delay equations that model field retardation effects, we study the origin of runaway modes that appear in the solutions of the classical equations of motion involving the radiation reaction force. When retardation effects are small, we argue that the physically significant solutions belong to the so-called slow manifold of the system and we identify this invariant manifold with the attractor in the state space of the delay equation. We demonstrate via an example that when retardation effects are no longer small, the motion could exhibit bifurcation phenomena that are not contained in the local equations of motion.

  9. Radiation Injury to the Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hits since January 2003 RADIATION INJURY TO THE BRAIN Radiation treatments affect all cells that are targeted. ... fractions, duration of therapy, and volume of [healthy brain] nervous tissue irradiated influence the likelihood of injury. ...

  10. Radiation injury of bone

    SciTech Connect

    Shimanovskaya, K.; Shiman, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the characteristics of radiation injuries arising in hitherto unaffected parts of the skeleton during the treatment of neoplasms by radiotherapy. These changes frequently accompany the beneficial effects of radiotherapy, and can easily be misunderstood in the absence of any clear idea of their character. An understanding of the mechanism and conditions of appearance of radiation injuries of the skeleton and a knowledge of their clinical and radiological features are essential for physicians and surgeons caring for patients who have been treated by using radiotherapy and for experimental scientists whose work involves such methods. The effect of irradiation is determined by the topographical relations within the irradiated object, the character of distribution of the dose, and the size of the dose. The radiation injuries of the skeleton described in the book were observed during the treatment of carcinoma of the breast, lung, esophagus, and uterus, of malignant tumors in the mouth, certain pituitary tumors, and hemangiomas of the skin in children, by means of ionizing radiation obtained from various sources. A few observations relate to patients treated for certain other diseases. The text is illustrated by roentgenograms on the basis of which the diagnoses were made and the course of the lesion was subsequently confirmed, and also by operative and histological specimens. The book also contains many schemes drawn from roentgenograms.

  11. DELAYED EFFECTS OF ACUTE RADIATION EXPOSURE IN A MURINE MODEL OF THE H-ARS: MULTIPLE-ORGAN INJURY CONSEQUENT TO <10 GY TOTAL BODY IRRADIATION

    PubMed Central

    Unthank, Joseph L.; Miller, Steven J.; Quickery, Ariel K.; Ferguson, Ethan L.; Wang, Meijing; Sampson, Carol H.; Chua, Hui Lin; DiStasi, Matthew R.; Feng, Hailin; Fisher, Alexa; Katz, Barry P.; Plett, P. Artur; Sandusky, George E.; Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Vemula, Sasidhar; Cohen, Eric P.; MacVittie, Thomas J.; Orschell, Christie M.

    2015-01-01

    The threat of radiation exposure from warfare or radiation accidents raises the need for appropriate animal models to study the acute and chronic effects of high dose rate radiation exposure. The goal of this study was to assess the late development of fibrosis in multiple organs (kidney, heart, and lung) in survivors of the C57BL/6 mouse model of the hematopoietic-acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS). Separate groups of mice for histological and functional studies were exposed to a single uniform total body dose between 8.53 and 8.72 Gy of gamma radiation from a 137Cs radiation source and studied 1–21 months later. Blood urea nitrogen levels were elevated significantly in the irradiated mice at 9 and 21 mo (from ~22 to 34 ± 3.8 and 69±6.0 mg/dl, p<0.01 vs non-irradiated controls) and correlated with glomerosclerosis (29±1.8% vs 64±9.7% of total glomeruli, p<0.01 vs non-irradiated controls). Glomerular tubularization and hypertrophy and tubular atrophy were also observed at 21 mo post-total body irradiation (TBI). An increase in interstitial, perivascular, pericardial and peri-bronchial fibrosis/collagen deposition was observed from ~9–21 mo post-TBI in kidney, heart and lung of irradiated mice relative to age-matched controls. Echocardiography suggested decreased ventricular volumes with a compensatory increase in left ventricular ejection fraction. The results indicate that significant delayed effects of acute radiation exposure occur in kidney, heart, and lung in survivors of the murine H-ARS TBI model which mirrors pathology detected in larger species and humans at higher radiation doses focused on specific organs. PMID:26425910

  12. Delayed Effects of Acute Radiation Exposure in a Murine Model of the H-ARS: Multiple-Organ Injury Consequent to <10 Gy Total Body Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Unthank, Joseph L; Miller, Steven J; Quickery, Ariel K; Ferguson, Ethan L; Wang, Meijing; Sampson, Carol H; Chua, Hui Lin; DiStasi, Matthew R; Feng, Hailin; Fisher, Alexa; Katz, Barry P; Plett, P Artur; Sandusky, George E; Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Vemula, Sasidhar; Cohen, Eric P; MacVittie, Thomas J; Orschell, Christie M

    2015-11-01

    The threat of radiation exposure from warfare or radiation accidents raises the need for appropriate animal models to study the acute and chronic effects of high dose rate radiation exposure. The goal of this study was to assess the late development of fibrosis in multiple organs (kidney, heart, and lung) in survivors of the C57BL/6 mouse model of the hematopoietic-acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS). Separate groups of mice for histological and functional studies were exposed to a single uniform total body dose between 8.53 and 8.72 Gy of gamma radiation from a Cs radiation source and studied 1-21 mo later. Blood urea nitrogen levels were elevated significantly in the irradiated mice at 9 and 21 mo (from ∼22 to 34 ± 3.8 and 69 ± 6.0 mg dL, p < 0.01 vs. non-irradiated controls) and correlated with glomerosclerosis (29 ± 1.8% vs. 64 ± 9.7% of total glomeruli, p < 0.01 vs. non-irradiated controls). Glomerular tubularization and hypertrophy and tubular atrophy were also observed at 21 mo post-total body irradiation (TBI). An increase in interstitial, perivascular, pericardial and peribronchial fibrosis/collagen deposition was observed from ∼9-21 mo post-TBI in kidney, heart, and lung of irradiated mice relative to age-matched controls. Echocardiography suggested decreased ventricular volumes with a compensatory increase in the left ventricular ejection fraction. The results indicate that significant delayed effects of acute radiation exposure occur in kidney, heart, and lung in survivors of the murine H-ARS TBI model, which mirrors pathology detected in larger species and humans at higher radiation doses focused on specific organs.

  13. Radiation-Associated Kidney Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Laura A.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Das, Shiva K.; Miften, Moyed; Li, X. Allen; Pan, Charlie; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2010-03-01

    The kidneys are the dose-limiting organs for radiotherapy to upper abdominal cancers and during total body irradiation. The incidence of radiotherapy-associated kidney injury is likely underreported owing to its long latency and because the toxicity is often attributed to more common causes of kidney injury. The pathophysiology of radiation injury is poorly understood. Its presentation can be acute and irreversible or subtle, with a gradual progressive dysfunction over years. A variety of dose and volume parameters have been associated with renal toxicity and are reviewed to provide treatment guidelines. The available predictive models are suboptimal and require validation. Mitigation of radiation nephropathy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and other compounds has been shown in animal models and, more recently, in patients.

  14. Radiation injuries after fluoroscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Mettler, Fred A; Koenig, Titus R; Wagner, Louis K; Kelsey, Charles A

    2002-10-01

    Fluoroscopically guided diagnostic and interventional procedures have become much more commonplace over the last decade. Current fluoroscopes are easily capable of producing dose rates in the range of 0.2 Gy (20 rads) per minute. The dose rate often changes dramatically with patient positioning and size. Most machines currently in use have no method to display approximate patient dose other than the rough surrogate of total fluoroscopy time. This does not include patient dose incurred during fluorography (serial imaging or cine runs), which can be considerably greater than dose during fluoroscopy. There have been over 100 cases of documented radiation skin and underlying tissue injury, a large portion of which resulted in dermal necrosis. The true number of injuries is undoubtedly much higher. The highest dose procedures are complex interventions such as those involving percutaneous angioplasties, stent placements, embolizations, and TIPS. In some cases skin doses have been in excess of 60 Gy (6000 rads). In many instances the procedures have been performed by physicians with little training in radiation effects, little appreciation of the radiation injuries that are possible or the strategies that could have been used to reduce both patient and staff doses. Almost all of the severe injuries that have occurred were avoidable.

  15. Radiation injury to the nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Gutin, P.H. ); Leibel, S.A. ); Sneline, G.E. )

    1991-01-01

    This book is designed to describe to the radiation biologist, radiation oncologist, neurologist, neurosurgeon, medical oncologist, and neuro-oncologist, the current state of knowledge about the tolerance of the nervous system to various kinds of radiation, the mechanisms of radiation injury, and how nervous system tolerance and injury are related to the more general problem of radiation damage to normal tissue of all types. The information collected here should stimulate interest in and facilitate the growing research effort into radiation injury to the nervous system.

  16. Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Philipp J.; Park, Henry S.; Knisely, Jonathan P.S.; Chiang, Veronica L.; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

  17. Advances in the management of localized radiation injuries.

    PubMed

    Müller, Kerstin; Meineke, Viktor

    2010-06-01

    Localized radiation injuries account for the vast majority of accidental radiation exposures and mainly occur due to direct handling of highly intense radioactive sources. Their clinical course and severity mainly depend on the type of radiation, radiation source, dose and dose rate, duration of exposure, dose distribution, and location and size of the area exposed. Local injuries appear as skin injuries; however, they may involve radiation damage to other organs and tissues. Local injuries evolve slowly over time and clinical signs and symptoms usually take days to weeks to manifest. Although in most cases not life threatening, their delayed effects may result in serious impairments. Standardized therapeutic protocols and evidence-based approaches for the management of local injuries do not exist yet. Local injuries should therefore be treated symptomatically. The two main approaches comprise conservative and surgical treatment. Conservative methods focus on pain control, reduction of inflammation, prevention of infection and of further vasculature insult, improvement of circulation, healing acceleration, wound cleaning, and minimizing fibrosis. Surgical treatment and plastic remodeling of anatomic structures may be required. During recent years, significant progress has been made in the management of local injuries. There is increasing evidence that injections of human mesenchymal stem cells may be a promising therapeutic approach in the treatment of cutaneous radiation reactions. A consistent follow-up of radiation patients keeping in mind the possible onset of late radiation effects will contribute to the comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of the radiation reaction which is crucial to establish evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  18. Protocol for the treatment of radiation injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, D.; Weiss, J. F.; Macvittie, T. J.; Pillai, M. V.

    Despite adequate precautionary measures and high-quality safeguard devices, many accidental radiation exposures continue to occur and may pose greater risks in the future, including radiation exposure in the space environment. The medical management of radiation casualties is of major concern to health care providers. Such medical management was addressed at The First Consensus Development Conference on the Treatment of Radiation Injuries, Washington, DC, 1989. The conference addressed the most appropriate treatment for the hematopoietic and infectious complications that accompany radiation injuries and for combined radiation and traumatic/burn injuries. Based on the evidence presented at the conference, a consensus statement was formulated by expert physicians and scientists. The recommended therapies, including a suggested algorithm incorporating these recommendations for the treatment of radiation injuries, will be discussed.

  19. Delayed facial palsy after head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Puvanendran, K; Vitharana, M; Wong, P K

    1977-01-01

    Where facial palsy follows head injury after many days, the mechanism is not clear, and there has been no detailed study on this condition. In this prospective study, an attempt is made to estimate this complication of head injury, and to study its pathogenesis, natural history, prognosis, and sequelae which differ markedly from Bell's palsy. It has a much worse prognosis and so surgical decompression should be considered early in this condition. Images PMID:301556

  20. Radiation Combined Injury: DNA Damage, Apoptosis, and Autophagy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    combined injured-mice, Bacillus and Lactobacillus were isolated within the first 8 d after radiation combined injury. The data imply that mice...Gy followed immediately by 15% total body surface skin-wound trauma. Ileal lysates were prepared 7 d after sham-treatment (Sham), wound- ing (Wound...secretion and increased risk of infection; and ( d ) delayed wound healing—often double the healing time of wounding alone. Since the mechanisms of

  1. Gastrointestinal radiation injury: Prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shadad, Abobakr K; Sullivan, Frank J; Martin, Joseph D; Egan, Laurence J

    2013-01-01

    With the recent advances in detection and treatment of cancer, there is an increasing emphasis on the efficacy and safety aspects of cancer therapy. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for a wide variety of cancers, either alone or in combination with other treatments. Ionising radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract is a frequent side effect of radiation therapy and a considerable proportion of patients suffer acute or chronic gastrointestinal symptoms as a result. These side effects often cause morbidity and may in some cases lower the efficacy of radiotherapy treatment. Radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract can be minimised by either of two strategies: technical strategies which aim to physically shift radiation dose away from the normal intestinal tissues, and biological strategies which aim to modulate the normal tissue response to ionising radiation or to increase its resistance to it. Although considerable improvement in the safety of radiotherapy treatment has been achieved through the use of modern optimised planning and delivery techniques, biological techniques may offer additional further promise. Different agents have been used to prevent or minimize the severity of gastrointestinal injury induced by ionising radiation exposure, including biological, chemical and pharmacological agents. In this review we aim to discuss various technical strategies to prevent gastrointestinal injury during cancer radiotherapy, examine the different therapeutic options for acute and chronic gastrointestinal radiation injury and outline some examples of research directions and considerations for prevention at a pre-clinical level. PMID:23345942

  2. Perforation of the terminal ileum induced by blast injury: delayed diagnosis or delayed perforation?

    PubMed

    Paran, H; Neufeld, D; Shwartz, I; Kidron, D; Susmallian, S; Mayo, A; Dayan, K; Vider, I; Sivak, G; Freund, U

    1996-03-01

    Blast injuries are rare, and although blast-induced perforations of the bowel have been described in the past, the entity of a delayed perforation caused by an evolving injury has not been reported. We report three men injured by the explosion of a terrorist bombing in open air. They suffered primary blast injuries, which resulted in isolated perforations of the terminal ileum. They were operated at different times after the blast event. The resected specimens were examined under light microscopy. One patient was operated immediately, and had three perforations in the terminal ileum. In the other two patients, abdominal complaints appeared only 24 and 48 hours later. These two patients were found to have hematomas in the wall of the terminal ileum, and small perforations therein, with almost no contamination of the peritoneal cavity. On histological examination, there were small perforations with disruption of all intestinal layers. In the vicinity of the perforations, the mucosa was necrotic and disorganized. The submucosa showed edema and vascular thrombi, and at several points mucus was shown dissecting through the muscularis propria, thus creating minute microperforations. Because of the findings in these patients, we suggest a mechanism of evolving damage to the bowel wall and delayed perforation rather than delayed diagnosis, after blast injuries. We suggest that patients exposed to a significant blast should be watched carefully for at least 48 hours.

  3. Prevention of injury from x-radiation.

    PubMed

    HOLDEN, F R; TOCHILIN, E; HINE, C H; LEWIS, L

    1951-03-01

    Despite continued advances in x-ray technology, evidence indicates that x-radiation injuries occur today to an excessive degree. These injuries have led to a progressive stiffening of standards of permissible exposure, especially in the past 15 years. Protection from radiation damage is logically based on dosimetry, preferably administered by a centralized service laboratory. The experience of two large hospitals in the control of x-radiation exposure is cited. Personnel exposed to x-radiation may be monitored by either pocket dosimeters of the ion chamber or electroscope type or by standardized film badge dosimeters. A recently developed film badge dosimeter that measures effective x-ray energy and radiation exposure in a quantitative manner is described.

  4. PREVENTION OF INJURY FROM X-RADIATION

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Francis R.; Tochilin, Eugene; Hine, Charles H.; Lewis, Leon

    1951-01-01

    Despite continued advances in x-ray technology, evidence indicates that x-radiation injuries occur today to an excessive degree. These injuries have led to a progressive stiffening of standards of permissible exposure, especially in the past 15 years. Protection from radiation damage is logically based on dosimetry, preferably administered by a centralized service laboratory. The experience of two large hospitals in the control of x-radiation exposure is cited. Personnel exposed to x-radiation may be monitored by either pocket dosimeters of the ion chamber or electroscope type or by standardized film badge dosimeters. A recently developed film badge dosimeter that measures effective x-ray energy and radiation exposure in a quantitative manner is described. PMID:14812354

  5. Surgical Reconstruction of Radiation Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Patients with cancer receive benefits from radiation therapy; however, it may have adverse effects on normal tissue such as causing radiation-induced ulcer and osteoradionecrosis. The most reliable method to treat a radiation ulcer is wide excision of the affected tissue, followed by coverage with well-vascularized tissue. As usual, radiation-induced skin ulcers are due to therapeutic irradiation for residual cancer or lymph nodes; the locations of radiation ulcers are relatively limited, including the head, neck, chest wall, lumbar, groin, and sacral areas. Thus, suitable reconstructive methods vary according to functional and aesthetic conditions. I reviewed the practices and surgical results for radiation ulcers over the past 30 years, and present the recommended surgical methods for these hard-to-heal ulcers. Recent Advances: At a minimum, flaps are required to treat radiation ulcers. Surgeons can recommend earlier debridement, followed by immediate coverage with axial-pattern musculocutaneous and fasciocutaneous flaps. Free flaps are also a useful soft tissue coverage option. The choice of flap varies with the location and size of the wounds. Critical Issues: The most crucial procedure is the complete resection of the radiation-affected area, followed by coverage with well-vascularized tissue. Future Directions: Recent developments in perforator flap techniques, which are defined as flaps with a blood supply from isolated perforating vessels of a stem artery, have allowed the surgeons to successfully resurface these difficult wounds with reduced morbidity. PMID:24761342

  6. Radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

  7. Radiation-Associated Liver Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Charlie C.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Dawson, Laura A.; Li, X. Allen; Das, Shiva K.; Miften, Moyed; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2010-03-01

    The liver is a critically important organ that has numerous functions including the production of bile, metabolism of ingested nutrients, elimination of many waste products, glycogen storage, and plasma protein synthesis. The liver is often incidentally irradiated during radiation therapy (RT) for tumors in the upper- abdomen, right lower lung, distal esophagus, or during whole abdomen or whole body RT. This article describes the endpoints, time-course, and dose-volume effect of radiation on the liver.

  8. [Oxidative metabolism in radiation injury].

    PubMed

    Kultanov, B Zh; Edil'baeva, T T; Turmukhambetova, A A; Dosmagambetova, R S

    2014-01-01

    The article represents results of studies concerning influence of ionizing radiation on experimental animals under absolutely lethal doses of 8 Gy. In single total irradiation the rats demonstrate changes in lipoperoxic cascade products and suppressed activity of anioxidant defence enzymes in generative cells--that causes metabolic disorders.

  9. Behavioral endpoints for radiation injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Hunt, W. A.; Dalton, T. B.; Kandasamy, S. B.; Harris, A. H.; Ludewig, B.

    1994-10-01

    The relative behavioral effectiveness of heavy particles was evaluated. Using the taste aversion paradigm in rats, the behavioral toxicity of most types of radiation (including 20Ne and 40Ar) was similar to that of 60Co photons. Only 56Fe and 93Nb particles and fission neutrons were significantly more effective. Using emesis in ferrets as the behavioral endpoint, 56Fe particles and neutrons were again the most effective; however, 60Co photons were significantly more effective than 18 MeV electrons. These results suggest that LET does not completely predict behavioral effectiveness. Additionally, exposing rats to 10 cGy of 56Fe particles attenuated amphetamine-induced taste aversion learning. This behavior is one of a broad class of behaviors which depends on the integrity of the dopaminergic system and suggests the possibility of alterations in these behaviors following exposure to heavy particles in a space radiation environment.

  10. Workers` compensation for radiation injury?

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, D.E.; Phoebe, T.O.; Wiedis, D.

    1993-10-01

    This article addresses the concern in the nuclear industry over the possible problem of tort actions with regard to cancer incidence among the nuclear workforce. In part there is concern due to recent studies which hint that there is uncertainty in the question of radiation effects due to low-level exposure. Given the uncertainty in such studies, and the fact that approximately 30 percent of any group of workers will show a natural incidence of cancer, there is real concern about the impact tort actions will have on the nuclear industry. The authors examine the choices facing the nuclear utilities in responding to claims of work-related cancers.

  11. Radiation dependence of inverter propagation delay from timing sampler measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.; Lin, Y.-S.

    1989-01-01

    A timing sampler consisting of 14 four-stage inverter-pair chains with different load capacitances was fabricated in 1.6-micron n-well CMOS and irradiated with cobalt-60 at 10 rad(Si)/s. For this CMOS process the measured results indicate that the rising delay increases by about 2.2 ns/Mrad(Si) and the falling delay increase is very small, i.e., less than 300 ps/Mrad(Si). The amount of radiation-induced delay depends on the size of the load capacitance. The maximum value observed for this effect was 5.65 ns/pF-Mrad(Si). Using a sensitivity analysis, the sensitivity of the rising delay to radiation can be explained by a simple timing model and the radiation sensitivity of dc MOSFET parameters. This same approach could not explain the insensitivity of the falling delay to radiation. This may be due to a failure of the timing model and/or trapping effects.

  12. Radiation injury to the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.R.; Fajardo, L.F. Gillette, S. M.

    1995-03-30

    For the RTOG Consensus Conference on Late Effects of Cancer Treatment we summarize the clinical manifestations of cardiac complications appearing months to years following incidental irradiation of the heart during treatment of thoracic neoplasms. The most common effects present as pericardial disease, however, it is becoming more clear that precocious or accelerated coronary artery disease is an important late effect, especially in patients treated with radiation before the age of 21 years. To the extent it is known, the pathophysiology of the various syndromes is described and the extensive literature on dose, volume, and fractionation factors is reviewed. Based upon our current understanding of late cardiac effects, a clinical grading system has been developed and is published elsewhere in this issue. 49 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Radiation induction of delayed recombination in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Jun; Uematsu, Norio; Shiraishi, Satomi; Toyoshima, Megumi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Niwa, Ohtsura

    2008-08-02

    Ionizing radiation is known to induce delayed chromosome and gene mutations in the descendants of the irradiated tissue culture cells. Molecular mechanisms of such delayed mutations are yet to be elucidated, since high genomic complexity of mammalian cells makes it difficult to analyze. We now tested radiation induction of delayed recombination in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe by monitoring the frequency of homologous recombination after X-irradiation. A reporter with 200 bp tandem repeats went through spontaneous recombination at a frequency of 1.0 x 10(-4), and the frequency increased dose-dependently to around 10 x 10(-4) at 500 Gy of X-irradiation. Although the repair of initial DNA damage was thought to be completed before the restart of cell division cycle, the elevation of the recombination frequency persisted for 8-10 cell generations after irradiation (delayed recombination). The delayed recombination suggests that descendants of the irradiated cells keep a memory of the initial DNA damage which upregulates recombination machinery for 8-10 generations even in the absence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Since radical scavengers were ineffective in inhibiting the delayed recombination, a memory by continuous production of DNA damaging agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) was excluded. Recombination was induced in trans in a reporter on chromosome III by a DNA DSB at a site on chromosome I, suggesting the untargeted nature of delayed recombination. Interestingly, Rad22 foci persisted in the X-irradiated population in parallel with the elevation of the recombination frequency. These results suggest that the epigenetic damage memory induced by DNA DSB upregulates untargeted and delayed recombination in S. pombe.

  14. Delayed onset massive oedema and deterioration in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kohta, Masaaki; Minami, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Kuwamura, Keiichi; Kondoh, Takeshi; Kohmura, Eiji

    2007-02-01

    A 52-year-old man fell from standing and a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed traumatic intracerebral haematoma and subarachnoid haemorrhage in the temporal cortex. He was treated without surgery and discharged. On day 30 after the accident, he had no neurological deficit. On day 37 he complained of headache and urinary incontinence, and on day 39 he was hospitalized due to progressive neurological deterioration (reduced conciousness, dilated pupils, and left hemiplegia). A CT scan revealed a diffuse low-density in the right cerebral hemisphere with marked midline shift. Emergency decompressive craniectomy and right temporal lobectomy were performed. Angiography after surgery revealed moderate vasospasm in the right middle and anterior cerebral arteries. The patient remained severely disabled. Delayed onset neurological deterioration can be caused by brain oedema and vasospasm after traumatic brain injury, despite an intervening period of improvement.

  15. Evidence for factors modulating radiation-induced G2-delay: potential application as radioprotectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheong, N.; Zeng, Z. C.; Wang, Y.; Iliakis, G.

    2001-01-01

    Manipulation of checkpoint response to DNA damage can be developed as a means for protecting astronauts from the adverse effects of unexpected, or background exposures to ionizing radiation. To achieve this goal reagents need to be developed that protect cells from radiation injury by prolonging checkpoint response, thus promoting repair. We present evidence for a low molecular weight substance excreted by cells that dramatically increases the duration of the G2-delay. This compound is termed G2-Arrest Modulating Activity (GAMA). A rat cell line (A1-5) generated by transforming rat embryo fibroblasts with a temperature sensitive form of p53 plus H-ras demonstrates a dramatic increase in radiation resistance after exposure to low LET radiation that is not associated with an increase in the efficiency of rejoining of DNA double strand breaks. Radioresistance in this cell line correlates with a dramatic increase in the duration of the G2 arrest that is modulated by a GAMA produced by actively growing cells. The properties of GAMA suggest that it is a low molecular weight heat-stable peptide. Further characterization of this substance and elucidation of its mechanism of action may allow the development of a biological response modifier with potential applications as a radioprotector. GAMA may be useful for protecting astronauts from radiation injury as preliminary evidence suggests that it is able to modulate the response of cells exposed to heavy ion radiation, similar to that encountered in outer space.

  16. Radiation-induced injury of the esophagus

    SciTech Connect

    Lepke, R.A.; Libshitz, H.I.

    1983-08-01

    Forty patients with functional or morphologic esophageal abnormalities following radiotherapy were identified. Abnormalities included abnormal motility with and without mucosal edema, stricture, ulceration and pseudodiverticulum, and fistula. Abnormal motility occurred 4 to 12 weeks following radiotherapy alone and as early as 1 week after therapy when concomitant chemotherapy had been given. Strictures developed 4 to 8 months following completion of radiotherapy. Ulceration, pseudodiverticulum, and fistula formation did not develop in a uniform time frame. Radiation-induced esophageal injury is more frequent when radiotherapy and chemotherapy are combined than it is with radiotherapy alone.

  17. Delayed effects of ionizing radiation on the ear

    SciTech Connect

    Bohne, B.A.; Marks, J.E.; Glasgow, G.P.

    1985-07-01

    The question of damage to the ear from exposure to ionizing radiation was addressed by exposing groups of chinchillas to fractioned doses of radiation (2 Gy per day) for total doses ranging from 40 to 90 Gy. In order to allow any delayed effects of radiation to become manifest, the animals were sacrificed two years after completion of treatment and their temporal bones were prepared for microscopic examination. The most pronounced effect of treatment was degeneration of sensory and supporting cells and loss of eighth nerve fibers in the organ of Corti. Damage increased with increasing dose of radiation. The degree of damage found in many of these ears was of sufficient magnitude to produce a permanent sensorineural hearing loss.

  18. Radiation hard programmable delay line for LHCb calorimeter upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauricio, J.; Gascón, D.; Vilasís, X.; Picatoste, E.; Machefert, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Duarte, O.; Beigbeder, C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a SPI-programmable clock delay chip based on a Delay Locked Loop (DLL) in order to shift the phase of the LHC clock (25 ns) in steps of 1ns, with less than 5 ps jitter and 23 ps of DNL. The delay lines will be integrated into ICECAL, the LHCb calorimeter front-end analog signal processing ASIC in the near future. The stringent noise requirements on the ASIC imply minimizing the noise contribution of digital components. This is accomplished by implementing the DLL in differential mode. To achieve the required radiation tolerance several techniques are applied: double guard rings between PMOS and NMOS transistors as well as glitch suppressors and TMR Registers. This 5.7 mm2 chip has been implemented in CMOS 0.35 μm technology.

  19. Longitudinal Assessment of Stereotypic, Proto-Injurious, and Self-Injurious Behavior Exhibited by Young Children with Developmental Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, David M.; Lindauer, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    Twelve children (CA, 12 to 32 months) with developmental delay were observed in their homes during monthly analogue functional analysis probes to document patterns of emerging self-injurious behavior. Two patterns of emerging self-injury were observed for 5 participants: (a) The topography and functional analysis pattern remained the same, but the…

  20. DNMTs are required for delayed genome instability caused by radiation

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Christine A.; Jones, George D.; Anderson, Rhona; Iyer, Pooja; Narayanan, Deepan; Sandhu, Jatinderpal; Singh, Rajinder; Talbot, Christopher J.; Tufarelli, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The ability of ionizing radiation to initiate genomic instability has been harnessed in the clinic where the localized delivery of controlled doses of radiation is used to induce cell death in tumor cells. Though very effective as a therapy, tumor relapse can occur in vivo and its appearance has been attributed to the radio-resistance of cells with stem cell-like features. The molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena are unclear but there is evidence suggesting an inverse correlation between radiation-induced genomic instability and global hypomethylation. To further investigate the relationship between DNA hypomethylation, radiosensitivity and genomic stability in stem-like cells we have studied mouse embryonic stem cells containing differing levels of DNA methylation due to the presence or absence of DNA methyltransferases. Unexpectedly, we found that global levels of methylation do not determine radiosensitivity. In particular, radiation-induced delayed genomic instability was observed at the Hprt gene locus only in wild-type cells. Furthermore, absence of Dnmt1 resulted in a 10-fold increase in de novo Hprt mutation rate, which was unaltered by radiation. Our data indicate that functional DNMTs are required for radiation-induced genomic instability, and that individual DNMTs play distinct roles in genome stability. We propose that DNMTS may contribute to the acquirement of radio-resistance in stem-like cells. PMID:22722331

  1. Integrative Metabolic Signatures for Hepatic Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Su, Gang; Meng, Fan; Liu, Laibin; Mohney, Robert; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Guha, Chandan

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) is a dose-limiting factor in curative radiation therapy (RT) for liver cancers, making early detection of radiation-associated liver injury absolutely essential for medical intervention. A metabolomic approach was used to determine metabolic signatures that could serve as biomarkers for early detection of RILD in mice. Methods Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice received 0, 10 or 50 Gy Whole Liver Irradiation (WLI) and were contrasted to mice, which received 10 Gy whole body irradiation (WBI). Liver and plasma samples were collected at 24 hours after irradiation. The samples were processed using Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. Results Twenty four hours after WLI, 407 metabolites were detected in liver samples while 347 metabolites were detected in plasma. Plasma metabolites associated with 50 Gy WLI included several amino acids, purine and pyrimidine metabolites, microbial metabolites, and most prominently bradykinin and 3-indoxyl-sulfate. Liver metabolites associated with 50 Gy WLI included pentose phosphate, purine, and pyrimidine metabolites in liver. Plasma biomarkers in common between WLI and WBI were enriched in microbial metabolites such as 3 indoxyl sulfate, indole-3-lactic acid, phenyllactic acid, pipecolic acid, hippuric acid, and markers of DNA damage such as 2-deoxyuridine. Metabolites associated with tryptophan and indoles may reflect radiation-induced gut microbiome effects. Predominant liver biomarkers in common between WBI and WLI were amino acids, sugars, TCA metabolites (fumarate), fatty acids (lineolate, n-hexadecanoic acid) and DNA damage markers (uridine). Conclusions We identified a set of metabolomic markers that may prove useful as plasma biomarkers of RILD and WBI. Pathway analysis also suggested that the unique metabolic changes observed after liver irradiation was an integrative response of the intestine, liver and kidney. PMID:26046990

  2. Phrenic Arterial Injury Presenting as Delayed Hemothorax Complicating Simple Rib Fracture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Delayed hemothorax after blunt torso injury is rare, but might be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case of delayed hemothorax bleeding from phrenic artery injury in a 24-year-old woman. The patient suffered from multiple rib fractures on the right side, a right hemopneumothorax, thoracic vertebral injury and a pelvic bone fracture after a fall from a fourth floor window. Delayed hemothorax associated with phrenic artery bleeding, caused by a stab injury from a fractured rib segment, was treated successfully by a minimally invasive thoracoscopic surgery. Here, we have shown that fracture of a lower rib or ribs might be accompanied by delayed massive hemothorax that can be rapidly identified and promptly managed by thoracoscopic means. PMID:27051252

  3. Epidermal Growth Factor Regulates Hematopoietic Regeneration Following Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Phuong L.; Himburg, Heather A.; Helms, Katherine; Russell, J. Lauren; Fixsen, Emma; Quarmyne, Mamle; Harris, Jeffrey R.; Deoliviera, Divino; Sullivan, Julie M.; Chao, Nelson J.; Kirsch, David G.; Chute, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms which regulate HSC regeneration following myelosuppressive injury are not well understood. We identified epidermal growth factor (EGF) to be highly enriched in the bone marrow (BM) serum of mice bearing deletion of Bak and Bax in Tie2+ cells (Tie2Cre;Bak1−/−;Baxfl/− mice), which displayed radioprotection of the HSC pool and 100% survival following lethal dose total body irradiation (TBI). BM HSCs from wild type mice expressed functional EGFR and systemic administration of EGF promoted the recovery of the HSC pool in vivo and the improved survival of mice following TBI. Conversely, administration of erlotinib, an EGFR antagonist, significantly decreased both HSC regeneration and mice survival following TBI. VavCre;EGFRfl/+ mice also demonstrated delayed recovery of BM stem/progenitor cells following TBI compared to VavCre;EGFR+/+ mice. Mechanistically, EGF reduced radiation-induced apoptosis of HSCs and mediated this effect via repression of the proapoptotic protein, PUMA. EGFR signaling regulates HSC regeneration following myelosuppressive injury. PMID:23377280

  4. Protective effects of batimastat against hemorrhagic injuries in delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beilei; Liu, Dan; Liu, Guoyan; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Qianqian; Zheng, Jiemin; Zhou, Yonghong; He, Qian; Zhang, Liming

    2015-12-15

    Previously, we established delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome (DJES) models and proposed that the hemorrhagic toxins in jellyfish tentacle extracts (TE) play a significant role in the liver and kidney injuries of the experimental model. Further, we also demonstrated that metalloproteinases are the central toxic components of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata (C. capillata), which may be responsible for the hemorrhagic effects. Thus, metalloproteinase inhibitors appear to be a promising therapeutic alternative for the treatment of hemorrhagic injuries in DJES. In this study, we examined the metalloproteinase activity of TE from the jellyfish C. capillata using zymography analyses. Our results confirmed that TE possessed a metalloproteinase activity, which was also sensitive to heat. Then, we tested the effect of metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat (BB-94) on TE-induced hemorrhagic injuries in DJES models. Firstly, using SR-based X-ray microangiography, we found that BB-94 significantly improved TE-induced hepatic and renal microvasculature alterations in DJES mouse model. Secondly, under synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SR-μCT), we also confirmed that BB-94 reduced TE-induced hepatic and renal microvasculature changes in DJES rat model. In addition, being consistent with the imaging results, histopathological and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated UTP end labeling (TUNEL)-like staining observations also clearly corroborated this hypothesis, as BB-94 was highly effective in neutralizing TE-induced extensive hemorrhage and necrosis in DJES rat model. Although it may require further clinical studies in the near future, the current study opens up the possibilities for the use of the metalloproteinase inhibitor, BB-94, in the treatment of multiple organ hemorrhagic injuries in DJES.

  5. UVB Radiation Delays Tribolium castaneum Metamorphosis by Influencing Ecdysteroid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sang, Wen; Yu, Lin; He, Li; Ma, Wei-Hua; Zhu, Zhi-Hui; Zhu, Fen; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Lei, Chao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation is an important environmental factor. It is generally known that UVB exhibits high genotoxicity due to causing DNA damage, potentially leading to skin carcinogenesis and aging in mammals. However, little is known about the effects of UVB on the development and metamorphosis of insects, which are the most abundant terrestrial animals. In the present study, we performed dose-response analyses of the effects UVB irradiation on Tribolium castaneum metamorphosis, assessed the function of the T. castaneum prothoracicotropic hormone gene (Trcptth), and analyzed ecdysteroid pathway gene expression profile and ecdysterone titers post-UVB irradiation. The results showed that UVB not only caused death of T. castaneum larvae, but also delayed larval-pupal metamorphosis and reduced the size and emergence rate of pupae. In addition, we verified the function of Trcptth, which is responsible for regulating metamorphosis. It was also found that the expression profiles of Trcptth as well as ecdysteroidogenesis and response genes were influenced by UVB radiation. Therefore, a disturbance pulse of ecdysteroid may be involved in delaying development under exposure to irradiation. To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating that UVB can influence the metamorphosis of insects. This study will contribute to a better understanding of the impact of UVB on signaling mechanisms in insect metamorphosis.

  6. UVB Radiation Delays Tribolium castaneum Metamorphosis by Influencing Ecdysteroid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Wen; Yu, Lin; He, Li; Ma, Wei-Hua; Zhu, Zhi-Hui; Zhu, Fen; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Lei, Chao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation is an important environmental factor. It is generally known that UVB exhibits high genotoxicity due to causing DNA damage, potentially leading to skin carcinogenesis and aging in mammals. However, little is known about the effects of UVB on the development and metamorphosis of insects, which are the most abundant terrestrial animals. In the present study, we performed dose-response analyses of the effects UVB irradiation on Tribolium castaneum metamorphosis, assessed the function of the T. castaneum prothoracicotropic hormone gene (Trcptth), and analyzed ecdysteroid pathway gene expression profile and ecdysterone titers post-UVB irradiation. The results showed that UVB not only caused death of T. castaneum larvae, but also delayed larval-pupal metamorphosis and reduced the size and emergence rate of pupae. In addition, we verified the function of Trcptth, which is responsible for regulating metamorphosis. It was also found that the expression profiles of Trcptth as well as ecdysteroidogenesis and response genes were influenced by UVB radiation. Therefore, a disturbance pulse of ecdysteroid may be involved in delaying development under exposure to irradiation. To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating that UVB can influence the metamorphosis of insects. This study will contribute to a better understanding of the impact of UVB on signaling mechanisms in insect metamorphosis. PMID:26986217

  7. Impact of an angiotensin analogue in treating thermal and combined radiation injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadhav, Sachin Suresh

    Background: In recent years there has been a growing concern regarding the use of nuclear weapons by terrorists. Such incidents in the past have shown that radiation exposure is often accompanied by other forms of trauma such as burns, wounds or infection; leading to increased mortality rates among the affected individuals. This increased risk with combined radiation injury has been attributed to the delayed wound healing observed in this injury. The Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) has emerged as a critical regulator of wound healing. Angiotensin II (A-II) and Angiotensin (1-7) [A(1-7)] have been shown to accelerate the rate of wound healing in different animal models of cutaneous injury. Nor-Leu3-Angiotensin (1-7) [Nor-Leu3-A (1-7)], an analogue of A(1-7), is more efficient than both A-II and A(1-7) in its ability to improve wound healing and is currently in phase III clinical trials for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. Aims: The three main goals of this study were to; 1) Develop a combined radiation and burn injury (CRBI) model and a radiation-induced cutaneous injury model to study the pathophysiological effects of these injuries on dermal wound healing; 2) To treat thermal and CRBI injuries using Nor-Leu 3-A (1-7) and decipher the mechanism of action of this peptide and 3) Develop an in-vitro model of CRBI using dermal cells in order to study the effect of CRBI on individual cell types involved in wound healing. Results: CRBI results in delayed and exacerbated apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation in injured skin as compared to thermal injury by itself. Radiation-induced cutaneous injury shows a radiation-dose dependent increase in inflammation as well as a chronic inflammatory response in the higher radiation exposure groups. Nor-Leu3-A (1-7) can mitigate thermal and CRBI injuries by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress and DNA damage while increasing the rate of proliferation of dermal stem cells and re-epithelialization of injured skin. The in

  8. Delayed effects of external radiation exposure: a brief history.

    PubMed

    Miller, R W

    1995-11-01

    Within months of Roentgen's discovery of X rays, severe adverse effects were reported, but not well publicized. As a result, over the next two decades, fluoroscope operators suffered lethal skin carcinomas. Later, case reports appeared concerning leukemia in radiation workers, and infants born with severe mental retardation after their mothers had been given pelvic radiotherapy early in pregnancy. Fluoroscopy and radiotherapy for benign disorders continued to be used with abandon until authoritative reports were published on the adverse effects of ionizing radiation by the U.S. NAS-NRC and the UK MRC in 1956. Meanwhile, exposure to the atomic bombs in Japan had occurred and epidemics of delayed effects began to be recognized among the survivors: cataracts (1949), leukemia (1952) and severe mental retardation among newborn infants after intrauterine exposure (1952). No statistically significant excess of germ-cell genetic effects was detected by six clinical measurements (1956), the F1 mortality (1981), cytogenetic studies (1987) or biochemical genetic studies (1988). Somatic cell effects were revealed by long-lasting chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes (1968), and somatic cell mutations were found at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes (1992). Molecular biology is a likely focus of new studies based on the function of the gene for ataxia telangiectasia (1995), a disorder in which children have severe, even lethal acute radiation reactions when given conventional doses of radiotherapy for lymphoma, to which they are prone. Also, obligate heterozygote female relatives can be studied for increased susceptibility to radiation-induced breast cancer, as suggested by clinical studies. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provide incidence data that show the extent of increases in eight common cancers and no increase in eight others (1994). The possibility of very late effects of A-bomb exposure is suggested by recent reports of increased

  9. Radiation Resistance and Injury of Yersinia enterocolitica

    PubMed Central

    El-Zawahry, Yehia A.; Rowley, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    The D values of Yersinia enterocolitica strains IP134, IP107, and WA, irradiated at 25°C in Trypticase soy broth, ranged from 9.7 to 11.8 krad. When irradiated in ground beef at 25 and −30°C, the D value of strain IP107 was 19.5 and 38.8 krad, respectively. Cells suspended in Trypticase soy broth were more sensitive to storage at −20°C than those mixed in ground beef. The percentages of inactivation and of injury (inability to form colonies in the presence of 3.0% NaCl) of cells stored in ground beef for 10 days at −20°C were 70 and 23%, respectively. Prior irradiation did not alter the cell's sensitivity to storage at −20°C, nor did storage at −20°C alter the cell's resistance to irradiation at 25°C. Added NaCl concentrations of up to 4.0% in Trypticase soy agar (TSA) (which contains 0.5% NaCl) had little effect on colony formation at 36°C of unirradiated Y. enterocolitica. With added 4.0% NaCl, 79% of the cells formed colonies at 36°C; with 5.0% NaCl added, no colonies were formed. Although 2.5% NaCl added to ground beef did not sensitize Y. enterocolitica cells to irradiation, when added to TSA it reduced the number of apparent radiation survivors. Cells uninjured by irradiation formed colonies on TSA when incubated at either 36 or 5°C. More survivors of an exposure to 60 krad were capable of recovery and forming colonies on TSA when incubated at 36°C for 1 day than at 5°C for 14 days. This difference in count was considered a manifestation of injury to certain survivors of irradiation. PMID:570017

  10. Acute Cerebrovascular Radiation Syndrome: Radiation Neurotoxicity , mechanisms of CNS radiation injury, advanced countermeasures for Radiation Protection of Central Nervous System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    Key words: Cerebrovascular Acute Radiation Syndrome (Cv ARS), Radiation Neurotoxins (RNT), Neurotransmitters, Radiation Countermeasures, Antiradiation Vaccine (ArV), Antiradiation Blocking Antibodies, Antiradiation Antidote. Psychoneuroimmunology, Neurotoxicity. ABSTRACT: To review the role of Radiation Neurotoxins in triggering, developing of radiation induced central nervous system injury. Radiation Neurotoxins - rapidly acting blood toxic lethal agent, which activated after irradiation and concentrated, circulated in interstitial fluid, lymph, blood with interactions with cell membranes, receptors and cell compartments. Radiation Neurotoxins - biological molecules with high enzymatic activity and/or specific lipids and activated or modified after irradiation. The Radiation Neurotoxins induce increased permeability of blood vessels, disruption of the blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and developing severe disorder of blood macro- and micro-circulation. Principles of Radiation Psychoneuro-immunology and Psychoneuro-allergology were applied for determination of pathological processes developed after irradiation or selective administration of Radiation Neurotoxins to radiation naïve mammals. Effects of radiation and exposure to radiation can develop severe irreversible abnormalities of Central Nervous System, brain structures and functions. Antiradiation Vaccine - most effective, advanced methods of protection, prevention, mitigation and treatment and was used for of Acute Radiation Syndromes and elaboration of new technology for immune-prophylaxis and immune-protection against ϒ, Heavy Ion, Neutron irradiation. Results of experiments suggested that blocking, antitoxic, antiradiation antibodies can significantly reduce toxicity of Radiation Toxins. New advanced technology include active immune-prophylaxis with Antiradiation Vaccine and Antiradiation therapy that included specific blocking antibodies to Radiation Neurotoxins

  11. Essential Metalloelement Chelates Facilitate Repair of Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Soderberg, Lee S. F.; Chang, Louis W.; Walker, Richard B.

    2001-01-01

    Treatment with essential metalloelement (Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn) chelates or combinations of them before and/or after radiation injury is a useful approach to overcoming radiation injury. No other agents are known to increase survival when they are used to treat after irradiation, in a radiorecovery treatment paradigm. These chelates may be useful in facilitating de novo syntheses of essential metalloelement-dependent enzymes required to repair radiation injury. Reports of radioprotection, which involves treatment before irradiation, with calcium-channel blockers, acyl Melatonin homologs, and substituted anilines, which may serve as chelating agents after biochemical modification in vivo, as well as Curcumin, which is a chelating agent, have been included in this review. These inclusions are intended to suggest additional approaches to combination treatments that may be useful in facilitating radiation recovery. These approaches to radioprotection and radiorecovery offer promise in facilitating recovery from radiation-induced injury experienced by patients undergoing radiotherapy for neoplastic disease and by individuals who experience environmental, occupational, or accidental exposure to ultraviolet, x-ray, or γ-ray radiation. Since there are no existing treatments of radiation-injury intended to facilitate tissue repair, studies of essential metalloelement chelates and combinations of them, as well as combinations of them with existing organic radioprotectants, seem worthwhile. PMID:18475999

  12. Delayed effects of external radiation exposure: A brief history

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.W.

    1995-11-01

    Within months of Roentgen`s discovery of X rays, severe adverse effects were reported, but not well publicized. As a result, over the next two decades, fluoroscope operators suffered lethal skin carcinomas. Later, case reports appeared concerning leukemia in radiation workers, and infants born with severe mental retardation after their mothers had been given pelvic radiotherapy early in pregnancy. Fluoroscopy and radiotherapy for benign disorders continued to be used with abandon until authoritative reports were published on the adverse effects of ionizing radiation by the U.S. NAS-NRC and the UK MRC in 1956. Meanwhile, exposure to the atomic bombs in Japan had occurred and epidemics of delayed effects began to be recognized among the survivors: cataracts, leukemia and severe mental retardation among newborn infants after intra-uterine exposure. No statistically significant excess of germ-cell genetic effects was detected by six clinical measurements, the F{sub 1} mortality, cytogenetic studies or biochemical genetic studies. Somatic cell effects were revealed by long-lasting chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes, and somatic cell mutations were found at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes. Molecular biology is a likely focus of new studies based on the function of the gene for ataxia telangiectasia, a disorder in which children have severe, even lethal acute radiation reactions when given conventional doses of radiotherapy for lymphoma, to which they are prone. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provide incidence data that show the extent of increases in eight common cancers and no increase in eight others. The possibility of very late effects of A-bomb exposure is suggested by recent reports of increased frequencies of hyperparathyroidism, parathyroid cancers and certain causes of death other than cancer. 88 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Gastrointestinal radiation injury: Symptoms, risk factors and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shadad, Abobakr K; Sullivan, Frank J; Martin, Joseph D; Egan, Laurence J

    2013-01-01

    Ionising radiation therapy is a common treatment modality for different types of cancer and its use is expected to increase with advances in screening and early detection of cancer. Radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract is important factor working against better utility of this important therapeutic modality. Cancer survivors can suffer a wide variety of acute and chronic symptoms following radiotherapy, which significantly reduces their quality of life as well as adding an extra burden to the cost of health care. The accurate diagnosis and treatment of intestinal radiation injury often represents a clinical challenge to practicing physicians in both gastroenterology and oncology. Despite the growing recognition of the problem and some advances in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation injury, relatively little is known about the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal radiation injury or any possible susceptibility factors that could aggravate its severity. The aims of this review are to examine the various clinical manifestations of post-radiation gastrointestinal symptoms, to discuss possible patient and treatment factors implicated in normal gastrointestinal tissue radiosensitivity and to outline different mechanisms of intestinal tissue injury. PMID:23345941

  14. Development and Characterization of VEGF165-Chitosan Nanoparticles for the Treatment of Radiation-Induced Skin Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Daojiang; Li, Shan; Wang, Shuai; Li, Xiujie; Zhu, Minsheng; Huang, Shai; Sun, Li; Zhang, Yongsheng; Liu, Yanli; Wang, Shouli

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced skin injury, which remains a serious concern in radiation therapy, is currently believed to be the result of vascular endothelial cell injury and apoptosis. Here, we established a model of acute radiation-induced skin injury and compared the effect of different vascular growth factors on skin healing by observing the changes of microcirculation and cell apoptosis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was more effective at inhibiting apoptosis and preventing injury progression than other factors. A new strategy for improving the bioavailability of vascular growth factors was developed by loading VEGF with chitosan nanoparticles. The VEGF-chitosan nanoparticles showed a protective effect on vascular endothelial cells, improved the local microcirculation, and delayed the development of radioactive skin damage. PMID:27727163

  15. Mechanisms of Hypothermia, Delayed Hyperthermia and Fever Following CNS Injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Central nervous system (CNS) damage is often associated with robust body temperature changes, such as hypothermia and delayed hyperthermia. Hypothermia is one of the most common body temperature changes to CNS insults in rodents and is often associated with improved outcome. Alth...

  16. Activation of Protease Activated Receptor 2 by Exogenous Agonist Exacerbates Early Radiation Injury in Rat Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR{sub 2}) is highly expressed throughout the gut and regulates the inflammatory, mitogenic, fibroproliferative, and nociceptive responses to injury. PAR{sub 2} is strikingly upregulated and exhibits increased activation in response to intestinal irradiation. We examined the mechanistic significance of radiation enteropathy development by assessing the effect of exogenous PAR{sub 2} activation. Methods and Materials: Rat small bowel was exposed to localized single-dose radiation (16.5 Gy). The PAR{sub 2} agonist (2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH{sub 2}) or vehicle was injected intraperitoneally daily for 3 days before irradiation (before), for 7 days after irradiation (after), or both 3 days before and 7 days after irradiation (before-after). Early and delayed radiation enteropathy was assessed at 2 and 26 weeks after irradiation using quantitative histologic examination, morphometry, and immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The PAR{sub 2} agonist did not elicit changes in the unirradiated (shielded) intestine. In contrast, in the irradiated intestine procured 2 weeks after irradiation, administration of the PAR{sub 2} agonist was associated with more severe mucosal injury and increased intestinal wall thickness in all three treatment groups (p <.05) compared with the vehicle-treated controls. The PAR{sub 2} agonist also exacerbated the radiation injury score, serosal thickening, and mucosal inflammation (p <.05) in the before and before-after groups. The short-term exogenous activation of PAR{sub 2} did not affect radiation-induced intestinal injury at 26 weeks. Conclusion: The results of the present study support a role for PAR{sub 2} activation in the pathogenesis of early radiation-induced intestinal injury. Pharmacologic PAR{sub 2} antagonists might have the potential to reduce the intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and/or as countermeasures in radiologic accidents or terrorism scenarios.

  17. Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Ameliorates Endothelial Dysfunction in Radiation-Induced Bladder Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shiwei; Qiu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Yanting; Fu, Kai; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Wu, Jinhui; Hu, Yiqiao; Zhu, Weiming; Guo, Hongqian

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on radiation-induced endothelial dysfunction and histological changes in the urinary bladder. bFGF was administrated to human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) or urinary bladder immediately after radiation. Reduced expression of thrombomodulin (TM) was indicated in the HUVEC and urinary bladder after treatment with radiation. Decreased apoptosis was observed in HUVEC treated with bFGF. Administration of bFGF increased the expression of TM in HUVEC medium, as well as in the urinary bladder at the early and delayed phases of radiation-induced bladder injury (RIBI). At the early phase, injection of bFGF increased the thickness of urothelium and reduced inflammation within the urinary bladder. At the delayed phase, bFGF was effective in reducing fibrosis within the urinary bladder. Our results indicate that endothelial dysfunction is a prominent feature of RIBI. Administration of bFGF can ameliorate radiation-induced endothelial dysfunction in urinary bladder and preserve bladder histology at early and delayed phases of RIBI. PMID:26351640

  18. Delayed olfactory ensheathing cell transplants reduce nociception after dorsal root injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ann; Lauschke, Jenny L; Gorrie, Catherine A; Cameron, Nicholas; Hayward, Ian; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Waite, Phil M E

    2011-05-01

    Injury to cervical dorsal roots mimics the deafferentation component of brachial plexus injury in humans, with intractable neuropathic pain in the deafferented limb being a common consequence. Such lesions are generally not amenable to surgical repair. The use of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) for dorsal root repair, via acute transplantation, has been successful in several studies. From a clinical point of view, delayed transplantation of OECs would provide a more realistic timeframe for repair. In this study we investigated the effect of delayed OEC transplantation on functional recovery of skilled forepaw movements and amelioration of neuropathic pain, using a C7 and C8 dorsal root injury rat model previously established in our lab. We found that OEC transplantation to the dorsal horn 1 week after root injury effectively attenuated neuropathic disturbances associated with dorsal root injury, including spontaneous pain behavior, tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. The sensory controls of complex, goal-oriented skilled reaching and ladder walking, however, were not improved by delayed OEC transplantation. We did not detect any significant influence of transplanted OECs on injury-induced central reorganisation and afferent sprouting. The anti-nociceptive effect mediated by OEC transplants may therefore be explained by alternative mechanisms such as modification of inflammation and astrogliosis. The significant effect of OEC transplants in mitigating neuropathic pain may be clinically useful in intractable pain syndromes arising from deafferentation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Understanding olfactory ensheathing glia and their prospect for nervous system repair.

  19. Experience With Wound VAC and Delayed Primary Closure of Contaminated Soft Tissue Injuries in Iraq

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    Experience With Wound VAC and Delayed Primary Closure of Contaminated Soft Tissue Injuries in Iraq Brian E. Leininger , MD, FACS, Todd E. Rasmussen...Annual Meeting, January 2006, Orlando FL (Poster). Address for reprints: Brian Leininger , MD, FACS, 2200 Bergquist Drive, Suite 1, Wilford Hall Medical

  20. Peripheral Innervation in Children With Global Developmental Delay: Biomarker for Risk for Self-Injurious Behavior?

    PubMed

    Symons, Frank J; Tervo, Raymond C; Barney, Chantel C; Damerow, John; Selim, Mona; McAdams, Brian; Foster, Shawn; Wendelschafer Crabb, Gwen; Kennedy, William

    2015-11-01

    The relation between somatosensory mechanisms and self-injury among children with neurologic impairments associated with developmental delay is not well understood. We evaluated the feasibility of procuring skin biopsies to examine epidermal nerve fiber density and reported self-injury. Following informed parental consent, epidermal skin biopsies were obtained from a distal leg site with no pre-existing skin damage from 11 children with global developmental delay (55% male; mean age = 36.8 months, 17-63 months). Visual microscopic examination and quantitative analyses showed extremely high epidermal nerve fiber density values for some children. Children with reported self-injury (5/11) had significantly (P < .02) greater density values (138.8, standard deviation = 45.5) than children without self-injury (80.5, standard deviation = 17.5). Results from this novel immunohistologic analysis of skin in very young children with neurodevelopmental delays suggest it may be a useful tool to study peripheral innervation as a possible sensory risk factor for self-injury.

  1. Effect of caffeine on radiation-induced mitotic delay: delayed expression of G/sub 2/ arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.; Zorch, M.; Leeper, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    In the presence of 5 mM caffeine, irradiated (1.5 Gy) S and G/sub 2/ cells progressed to mitosis in register and without arrest in G/sub 2/. Caffeine (5 mM) markedly reduced mitotic delay even after radiation doses up to 20 Gy. When caffeine was removed from irradiated (1.5 Gy) and caffeine-treated cells, a period of G/sub 2/ arrest followed, similar in length to that produced by radiation alone. The arrest expressed was independent of the duration of the caffeine treatment for exposures up to 3 hr. The similarity of the response to the cited effects of caffeine on S-phase delay suggests a common basis for delay induction in S and G/sub 2/ phases.

  2. Electrical delay line multiplexing for pulsed mode radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinke, Ruud; Yeom, Jung Yeol; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-04-01

    Medical imaging systems are composed of a large number of position sensitive radiation detectors to provide high resolution imaging. For example, whole-body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems are typically composed of thousands of scintillation crystal elements, which are coupled to photosensors. Thus, PET systems greatly benefit from methods to reduce the number of data acquisition channels, in order to reduce the system development cost and complexity. In this paper we present an electrical delay line multiplexing scheme that can significantly reduce the number of readout channels, while preserving the signal integrity required for good time resolution performance. We experimented with two 4 × 4 LYSO crystal arrays, with crystal elements having 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm and 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm dimensions, coupled to 16 Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-050P SiPM elements. Results show that each crystal could be accurately identified, even in the presence of scintillation light sharing and inter-crystal Compton scatter among neighboring crystal elements. The multiplexing configuration degraded the coincidence timing resolution from ∼243 ps FWHM to ∼272 ps FWHM when 16 SiPM signals were combined into a single channel for the 4 × 4 LYSO crystal array with 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm crystal element dimensions, in coincidence with a 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm LYSO crystal pixel. The method is flexible to allow multiplexing configurations across different block detectors, and is scalable to an entire ring of detectors.

  3. Electrical delay line multiplexing for pulsed mode radiation detectors.

    PubMed

    Vinke, Ruud; Yeom, Jung Yeol; Levin, Craig S

    2015-04-07

    Medical imaging systems are composed of a large number of position sensitive radiation detectors to provide high resolution imaging. For example, whole-body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems are typically composed of thousands of scintillation crystal elements, which are coupled to photosensors. Thus, PET systems greatly benefit from methods to reduce the number of data acquisition channels, in order to reduce the system development cost and complexity. In this paper we present an electrical delay line multiplexing scheme that can significantly reduce the number of readout channels, while preserving the signal integrity required for good time resolution performance. We experimented with two 4 × 4 LYSO crystal arrays, with crystal elements having 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm and 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm dimensions, coupled to 16 Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-050P SiPM elements. Results show that each crystal could be accurately identified, even in the presence of scintillation light sharing and inter-crystal Compton scatter among neighboring crystal elements. The multiplexing configuration degraded the coincidence timing resolution from ∼243 ps FWHM to ∼272 ps FWHM when 16 SiPM signals were combined into a single channel for the 4 × 4 LYSO crystal array with 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm crystal element dimensions, in coincidence with a 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm LYSO crystal pixel. The method is flexible to allow multiplexing configurations across different block detectors, and is scalable to an entire ring of detectors.

  4. Electrical delay line multiplexing for pulsed mode radiation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Vinke, Ruud; Yeom, Jung Yeol; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging systems are composed of a large number of position sensitive radiation detectors to provide high resolution imaging. For example, whole-body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems are typically composed of thousands of scintillation crystal elements, which are coupled to photosensors. Thus, PET systems greatly benefit from methods to reduce the number of data acquisition channels, in order to reduce the system development cost and complexity. In this paper we present an electrical delay line multiplexing scheme that can significantly reduce the number of readout channels, while preserving the signal integrity required for good time resolution performance. We experimented with two 4 × 4 LYSO crystal arrays, with crystal elements having 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm and 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm dimensions, coupled to 16 Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-050P SiPM elements. Results show that each crystal could be accurately identified, even in the presence of scintillation light sharing and inter-crystal Compton scatter among neighboring crystal elements. The multiplexing configuration degraded the coincidence timing resolution from ~ 243 ps FWHM to ~272 ps FWHM when 16 SiPM signals were combined into a single channel for the 4 × 4 LYSO crystal array with 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm crystal element dimensions, in coincidence with a 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm LYSO crystal pixel. The method is exible to allow multiplexing configurations across different block detectors, and is scalable to an entire ring of detectors. PMID:25768002

  5. Neuregulin-1 is neuroprotective in a rat model of organophosphate-induced delayed neuronal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yonggang; Lein, Pamela J.; Liu, Cuimei; Bruun, Donald A.; Giulivi, Cecilia; Ford, Gregory D.; Tewolde, Teclemichael; Ross-Inta, Catherine; Ford, Byron D.

    2012-07-15

    Current medical countermeasures against organophosphate (OP) nerve agents are effective in reducing mortality, but do not sufficiently protect the CNS from delayed brain damage and persistent neurological symptoms. In this study, we examined the efficacy of neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) in protecting against delayed neuronal cell death following acute intoxication with the OP diisopropylflurophosphate (DFP). Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were pretreated with pyridostigmine (0.1 mg/kg BW, i.m.) and atropine methylnitrate (20 mg/kg BW, i.m.) prior to DFP (9 mg/kg BW, i.p.) intoxication to increase survival and reduce peripheral signs of cholinergic toxicity but not prevent DFP-induced seizures or delayed neuronal injury. Pretreatment with NRG-1 did not protect against seizures in rats exposed to DFP. However, neuronal injury was significantly reduced in most brain regions by pretreatment with NRG-1 isoforms NRG-EGF (3.2 μg/kg BW, i.a) or NRG-GGF2 (48 μg/kg BW, i.a.) as determined by FluroJade-B labeling in multiple brain regions at 24 h post-DFP injection. NRG-1 also blocked apoptosis and oxidative stress-mediated protein damage in the brains of DFP-intoxicated rats. Administration of NRG-1 at 1 h after DFP injection similarly provided significant neuroprotection against delayed neuronal injury. These findings identify NRG-1 as a promising adjuvant therapy to current medical countermeasures for enhancing neuroprotection against acute OP intoxication. -- Highlights: ► NRG-1 blocked DFP induced neuronal injury. ► NRG-1 did not protect against seizures in rats exposed to DFP. ► NRG-1 blocked apoptosis and oxidative stress in the brains of DFP-intoxicated rats. ► Administration of NRG-1 at 1 h after DFP injection prevented delayed neuronal injury.

  6. Delayed Imatinib Treatment for Acute Spinal Cord Injury: Functional Recovery and Serum Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Anja; Hao, Jingxia; Wellfelt, Katrin; Josephson, Anna; Svensson, Camilla I.; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Eriksson, Ulf; Abrams, Mathew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract With no currently available drug treatment for spinal cord injury, there is a need for additional therapeutic candidates. We took the approach of repositioning existing pharmacological agents to serve as acute treatments for spinal cord injury and previously found imatinib to have positive effects on locomotor and bladder function in experimental spinal cord injury when administered immediately after the injury. However, for imatinib to have translational value, it needs to have sustained beneficial effects with delayed initiation of treatment, as well. Here, we show that imatinib improves hind limb locomotion and bladder recovery when initiation of treatment was delayed until 4 h after injury and that bladder function was improved with a delay of up to 24 h. The treatment did not induce hypersensitivity. Instead, imatinib-treated animals were generally less hypersensitive to either thermal or mechanical stimuli, compared with controls. In an effort to provide potential biomarkers, we found serum levels of three cytokines/chemokines—monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-3α, and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene (interleukin 8)—to increase over time with imatinib treatment and to be significantly higher in injured imatinib-treated animals than in controls during the early treatment period. This correlated to macrophage activation and autofluorescence in lymphoid organs. At the site of injury in the spinal cord, macrophage activation was instead reduced by imatinib treatment. Our data strengthen the case for clinical trials of imatinib by showing that initiation of treatment can be delayed and by identifying serum cytokines that may serve as candidate markers of effective imatinib doses. PMID:25914996

  7. Delayed diagnosis of an isolated posterolateral corner injury: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Patrick; DeGraauw, Christopher; Whitty, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Isolated injuries to the posterolateral corner of the knee are a rare and commonly missed injury associated with athletic trauma, motor vehicle accidents, and falls. Delayed or missed diagnoses can negatively impact patient prognosis, contributing to residual instability, chronic pain, and failure of surgical repair to other ligaments. Case Presentation: A 44-year-old male CrossFit athlete presented with a history of two non-contact hyperextension injuries to his left knee while walking on ice. The only positive finding was the Dial Test at 30 degrees of knee flexion, indicative of an isolated posterolateral corner injury. After a delay in diagnosis, the patient underwent a reconstruction of the posterolateral corner and subsequent rehabilitation. Early recognition of this injury is important as this can affect the prognosis and activities of daily living of the patient. Summary: This case will discuss the clinical presentation, diagnostic procedures, and management of an isolated posterolateral corner injury and highlight the importance of early recognition and referrals from primary contact healthcare practitioners. PMID:28065990

  8. Early radiographic changes in radiation bone injury

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, M.; Tanimoto, K.; Wada, T.

    1986-06-01

    A chronologic series of periapical radiographs was evaluated for the purpose of detecting damage to bone and tooth-supporting tissues in a patient receiving radiation therapy for a basal cell carcinoma of the mandibular gingiva. Widening of the periodontal space was one of the early radiographic changes observed. It is suggested, from the sequence of radiographic changes, that radiation-induced changed in the circulatory system of the bone might be primarily responsible for the resulting changes.

  9. Longitudinal assessment of stereotypic, proto-injurious, and self-injurious behavior exhibited by young children with developmental delays.

    PubMed

    Richman, David M; Lindauer, Steven E

    2005-11-01

    Twelve children (CA, 12 to 32 months) with developmental delay were observed in their homes during monthly analogue functional analysis probes to document patterns of emerging self-injurious behavior. Two patterns of emerging self-injury were observed for 5 participants: (a) The topography and functional analysis pattern remained the same, but the behavior eventually caused tissue damage; or (b) a new topography emerged that was similar to an established stereotypic motor behavior. Functional analysis results were inconclusive for the majority of target behaviors across participants due to undifferentiated responding across conditions. One participant exhibited two topographies that appeared to become sensitive to positive reinforcement over time. Results are discussed in terms of implications for future research on early intervention and prevention of self-injury.

  10. Effects of delayed NSAID administration after experimental eccentric contraction injury – A cellular and proteomics study

    PubMed Central

    Aldape, Michael J.; Bayer, Clifford R.; Katahira, Eva J.; Bond, Laura; Nicora, Carrie D.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Metz, Thomas O.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Stevens, Dennis L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Acute muscle injuries are exceedingly common and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely consumed to reduce the associated inflammation, swelling and pain that peak 1–2 days post-injury. While prophylactic use or early administration of NSAIDs has been shown to delay muscle regeneration and contribute to loss of muscle strength after healing, little is known about the effects of delayed NSAID use. Further, NSAID use following non-penetrating injury has been associated with increased risk and severity of infection, including that due to group A streptococcus, though the mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated the effects of delayed NSAID administration on muscle repair and sought mechanisms supporting an injury/NSAID/infection axis. Methods A murine model of eccentric contraction (EC)-induced injury of the tibialis anterior muscle was used to profile the cellular and molecular changes induced by ketorolac tromethamine administered 47 hr post injury. Results NSAID administration inhibited several important muscle regeneration processes and down-regulated multiple cytoprotective proteins known to inhibit the intrinsic pathway of programmed cell death. These activities were associated with increased caspase activity in injured muscles but were independent of any NSAID effect on macrophage influx or phenotype switching. Conclusions These findings provide new molecular evidence supporting the notion that NSAIDs have a direct negative influence on muscle repair after acute strain injury in mice and thus add to renewed concern about the safety and benefits of NSAIDS in both children and adults, in those with progressive loss of muscle mass such as the elderly or patients with cancer or AIDS, and those at risk of secondary infection after trauma or surgery. PMID:28245256

  11. Effects of Berberine Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guanghui; Zhang Yaping; Tang Jinliang; Chen Zhengtang; Hu Yide; Wei Hong; Li Dezhi; Hao Ping; Wang Donglin

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced intestinal injury is a significant clinical problem in patients undergoing abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Berberine has been used as an antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antimotility agent. The present study investigated the protective effect of berberine against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: The mice were administrated berberine or distilled water. A total of 144 mice underwent 0, 3, 6, 12, or 16 Gy single session whole-abdominal RT and 16 mice underwent 3 Gy/fraction/d for four fractions of fractionated abdominal RT. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-10, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, malonaldehyde, and apoptosis were assayed in the mice after RT. The body weight and food intake of the mice receiving fractionated RT were recorded. Another 72 mice who had undergone 12, 16, or 20 Gy abdominal RT were monitored for mortality every 12 h. Results: The body weight and food intake of the mice administered with distilled water decreased significantly compared with before RT. After the same dose of abdominal RT, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in plasma and malonalhehyde and apoptosis of the intestine were significantly greater in the control group than in the mice administered berberine (p < .05-.01). In contrast, interleukin-10 in the mice with berberine treatment was significantly greater than in the control group (p < .01). A similar result was found in the fractionated RT experiment and at different points after 16 Gy abdominal RT (p < .05-.01). Berberine treatment significantly delayed the point of death after 20 Gy, but not 16 Gy, abdominal RT (p < .01). Conclusion: Treatment with berberine can delay mortality and attenuated intestinal injury in mice undergoing whole abdominal RT. These findings could provide a useful therapeutic strategy for radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  12. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) x ultraviolet radiation (UV) interact to initiate solar injury in apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunburn or solar injury (SI) in apple is associated with high temperature, high visible light and ultraviolet radiation (UV). Fruit surface temperature (FST) thresholds for SI related disorders have been developed but there are no thresholds established for solar radiation. The objectives of the s...

  13. GRANZYME A AND B-CLUSTER DEFICIENCY DELAYS ACUTE LUNG INJURY IN PNEUMOVIRUS-INFECTED MICE

    PubMed Central

    Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.M.; Lutter, Rene; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Medema, Jan Paul; Rosenberg, Helene F.; Bos, Albert P.

    2009-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infection by the human pneumovirus respiratory syncytial virus is a frequent cause of acute lung injury in children. Severe pneumovirus disease in humans is associated with activation of the granzyme pathway by effector lymphocytes, which may promote pathology by exaggerating pro-apoptotic caspase activity and pro-inflammatory activity. The main goal of this study was to determine whether granzymes contribute to the development of acute lung injury in pneumovirus-infected mice. Granzyme-expressing mice and granzyme A, and B-cluster single and double-gene deleted mice were inoculated with the rodent pneumovirus pneumonia virus of mice strain J3666, and were studied for markers of lung inflammation and injury. Expression of granzyme A and B is detected in effector lymphocytes in mouse lungs in response to pneumovirus infection. Mice deficient for granzyme A and the granzyme B-cluster have unchanged virus titers in the lungs, but show a significantly delayed clinical response to fatal pneumovirus infection, a feature that is associated with delayed neutrophil recruitment, diminished activation of caspase-3 and reduced lung permeability. We conclude that granzyme A and B-cluster deficiency delays the acute progression of pneumovirus disease by reducing alveolar injury. PMID:20018616

  14. Riluzole improves outcome following ischemia-reperfusion injury to the spinal cord by preventing delayed paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Satkunendrarajah, K; Fehlings, M G

    2014-04-18

    The spinal cord is vulnerable to ischemic injury due to trauma, vascular malformations and correction of thoracic aortic lesions. Riluzole, a sodium channel blocker and anti-glutamate drug has been shown to be neuroprotective in a model of ischemic spinal cord injury, although the effects in clinically relevant ischemia/reperfusion models are unknown. Here, we examine the effect of riluzole following ischemia-reperfusion injury to the spinal cord. Female rats underwent high thoracic aortic balloon occlusion to produce an ischemia/reperfusion injury. Tolerance to ischemia was evaluated by varying the duration of occlusion. Riluzole (8mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 4h after injury. Locomotor function (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) scale) was assessed at 4h, 1day, and 5days post-ischemia. Spinal cords were extracted and evaluated for neuronal loss using immunohistology (choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and neuronal nuclei (NeuN)), inflammation (CD11b), astrogliosis (glial fibrillary acidic protein - GFAP) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Ischemic injury lasting between 5.5 and 6.75min resulted in delayed paraplegia, whereas longer ischemia induced immediate paraplegia. When riluzole was administered to rats that underwent 6min of occlusion, delayed paraplegia was prevented. The BBB score of riluzole-treated rats was 11.14±4.85 compared with 1.86±1.07 in control animals. Riluzole also reduced neuronal loss, infiltration of microglia/macrophages and astrogliosis in the ventral horn and intermediate zone of the gray matter. In addition, riluzole reduced apoptosis of neurons in the dorsal horn of the gray matter. Riluzole has a neuroprotective effect in a rat model of spinal cord injury/reperfusion when administered up to 4h post-injury, a clinically relevant therapeutic time window.

  15. Radiation injury to the temporal bone

    SciTech Connect

    Guida, R.A.; Finn, D.G.; Buchalter, I.H.; Brookler, K.H.; Kimmelman, C.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Osteoradionecrosis of the temporal bone is an unusual sequela of radiation therapy to the head and neck. Symptoms occur many years after the radiation is administered, and progression of the disease is insidious. Hearing loss (sensorineural, conductive, or mixed), otalgia, otorrhea, and even gross tissue extrusion herald this condition. Later, intracranial complications such as meningitis, temporal lobe or cerebellar abscess, and cranial neuropathies may occur. Reported here are five cases of this rare malady representing varying degrees of the disease process. They include a case of radiation-induced necrosis of the tympanic ring with persistent squamous debris in the external auditory canal and middle ear. Another case demonstrates the progression of radiation otitis media to mastoiditis with bony sequestration. Further progression of the disease process is seen in a third case that evolved into multiple cranial neuropathies from skull base destruction. Treatment includes systemic antibiotics, local wound care, and debridement in cases of localized tissue involvement. More extensive debridement with removal of sequestrations, abscess drainage, reconstruction with vascularized tissue from regional flaps, and mastoid obliteration may be warranted for severe cases. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has provided limited benefit.

  16. DELAYED EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON THE HUMAN CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. EARLY AND LATE DELAYED REACTIONS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    multiple sclerosis and are not associated with degenerative vascular changes. This patient probably represents an extreme of the early delayed reaction reported by Scholz in dogs. There is clinical evidence suggesting that some degree of damage of this type occurs more frequently than has been suspected. The other patient had the late delayed reaction in which there are marked degenerative vascular alternations and severe destruction of the white matter with little cortical involvement. This patient is an extreme example of the well-documented late delayed effects of

  17. Thromboxane-Mediated Injury Following Radiation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-31

    the production of TXA2. I. Free radical concentrations will be reduced by using the free radical scavengers cysteamine or reduced glutathione. The...injected with varying doses of the radiopo ectant, cysteamine . The efficacy of several doses of this radioprotectant will be evaluated and the dose of... cysteamine that significantly reduces radiation-induced mortality will be used in the free radical scavenger study. Rats will be injected with the

  18. Factors correlating with delayed trauma center admission following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Delayed admission to appropriate care has been shown increase mortality following traumatic brain injury (TBI). We investigated factors associated with delayed admission to a hospital with neurosurgical expertise in a cohort of TBI patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods A retrospective analysis of all TBI patients treated in the ICUs of Helsinki University Central Hospital was carried out from 1.1.2009 to 31.12.2010. Patients were categorized into two groups: direct admission and delayed admission. Patients in the delayed admission group were initially transported to a local hospital without neurosurgical expertise before inter-transfer to the designated hospital. Multivariate logistic regression was utilized to identify pre-hospital factors associated with delayed admission. Results Of 431 included patients 65% of patients were in the direct admission groups and 35% in the delayed admission groups (median time to admission 1:07h, IQR 0:52–1:28 vs. 4:06h, IQR 2:53–5:43, p <0.001). In multivariate analysis factors increasing the likelihood of delayed admission were (OR, 95% CI): male gender (3.82, 1.60-9.13), incident at public place compared to home (0.26, 0.11-0.61), high energy trauma (0.05, 0.01-0.28), pre-hospital physician consultation (0.15, 0.06-0.39) or presence (0.08, 0.03-0.22), hypotension (0.09, 0.01-0.93), major extra cranial injury (0.17, 0.05-0.55), abnormal pupillary light reflex (0.26, 0.09-0.73) and severe alcohol intoxication (12.44, 2.14-72.38). A significant larger proportion of patients in the delayed admission group required acute craniotomy for mass lesion when admitted to the neurosurgical hospital (57%, 21%, p< 0.001). No significant difference in 6-month mortality was noted between the groups (p= 0.814). Conclusion Delayed trauma center admission following TBI is common. Factors increasing likelihood of this were: male gender, incident at public place compared to home, low energy trauma, absence of pre

  19. Late radiation injury to muscle and peripheral nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, E.L.; Powers, B.E.; Vujaskovic, Z.

    1995-03-30

    Late radiation injury to muscles and peripheral nerves is infrequently observed. However, the success of radiation oncology has led to longer patient survival, providing a greater opportunity for late effects to develop, increase in severity and, possibly, impact the quality of life of the patient. In addition, when radiation therapy is combined with surgery and/or chemotherapy, the risk of late complications is likely to increase. It is clear that the incidence of complications involving muscles and nerves increases with time following radiation. The influence of volume has yet to be determined; however, an increased volume is likely to increase the risk of injury to muscles and nerves. Experimental and clinical studies have indicated that the {alpha}/{beta} ratio for muscle is approximately 4 Gy and, possibly, 2 Gy for peripheral nerve, indicating the great influence of fractionation on response of these tissues. This is of concern for intraoperative radiation therapy, and for high dose rate brachytherapy. This review of clinical and experimental data discusses the response of muscle and nerves late after radiation therapy. A grading system has been proposed and endpoints suggested. 36 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Risk factors for and results of late or delayed amputation following combat-related extremity injuries.

    PubMed

    Helgeson, Melvin D; Potter, Benjamin K; Burns, Travis C; Hayda, Roman A; Gajewski, Donald A

    2010-09-07

    We studied patients with combat-related injuries that required delayed amputation at least 4 months after the initial injury due to dysfunction, persistent pain, and patient desires. Late amputations were performed 22 times in 22 patients (21 men, 1 woman) since 2003. Fourteen patients underwent transtibial amputation, 5 transfemoral amputations, 1 knee disarticulation, and 2 transradial amputations. The primary indications for late amputation were neurologic dysfunction in 6 patients, persistent or recurrent infection in 6, neurogenic pain in 3, non-neurogenic pain in 5, and a globally poor functional result in 2. Sixteen of 22 patients reported multiple indications for electing to undergo amputation, with an average of 2.1 specific indications per patient. At final clinical follow-up an average of 13 months after amputation, all patients reported subjectively improved function and reported that they would undergo amputation again under similar circumstances. When medically and functionally practicable, every effort is given to limb salvage following severe combat-related extremity injuries. There is no single risk factor that increases the likelihood of delayed amputation, but the combination of complex pain symptoms with neurologic dysfunction appears to increase the risk, particularly if the initial insult is a severe hindfoot injury or distal tibia fracture. With appropriately selected and counseled patients, elective late amputation results in a high degree of patient satisfaction and subjectively improved function.

  1. Parecoxib Reduces Systemic Inflammation and Acute Lung Injury in Burned Animals with Delayed Fluid Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Si Jack; Wu, Jian; Lu, Jia; Moochhala, Shabbir M.

    2014-01-01

    Burn injuries result in the release of proinflammatory mediators causing both local and systemic inflammation. Multiple organ dysfunctions secondary to systemic inflammation after severe burn contribute to adverse outcome, with the lungs being the first organ to fail. In this study, we evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of Parecoxib, a parenteral COX-2 inhibitor, in a delayed fluid resuscitation burned rat model. Anaesthetized Sprague Dawley rats were inflicted with 45% total body surface area full-thickness scald burns and subsequently subjected to delayed resuscitation with Hartmann's solution. Parecoxib (0.1, 1.0, and 10 mg/kg) was delivered intramuscularly 20 min after injury followed by 12 h interval and the rats were sacrificed at 6 h, 24 h, and 48 h. Burn rats developed elevated blood cytokines, transaminase, creatinine, and increased lung MPO levels. Animals treated with 1 mg/kg Parecoxib showed significantly reduced plasma level of CINC-1, IL-6, PGEM, and lung MPO. Treatment of 1 mg/kg Parecoxib is shown to mitigate systemic and lung inflammation without significantly affecting other organs. At present, no specific therapeutic agent is available to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response secondary to burn injury. The results suggest that Parecoxib may have the potential to be used both as an analgesic and ameliorate the effects of lung injury following burn. PMID:24579056

  2. Partial Kluver-Bucy syndrome as a delayed manifestation of head injury.

    PubMed

    Bhat, P S; Pardal, P K; Das, R C

    2009-07-01

    After traumatic brain injury (TBI), the most disabling problems are generally related to neuropsychiatric sequelae, including personality change and cognitive impairment, rather than neurophysical sequelae. Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS) is a rare neurobehavioral condition, first described in 1937 as an experimental neurobehavioral syndrome in monkeys with bitemporal brain lesions. The syndrome in man was subsequently observed to be transient or permanent in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders and after traumatic, nontraumatic and infectious brain injury. However, partial KBS may occur in the absence of the classic bilateral temporal lesion, though rare. Pharmacological treatment of post-TBI neuropsychiatric sequelae consists of symptomatic, functional and hypothetical approaches. Specific pharmacological treatment consists of antipsychotics, anti-kindling anticonvulsants or a combination thereof. A case of partial KBS presenting as delayed manifestation of traumatic brain injury that improved with carbamazapine and antipsychotics is presented.

  3. Reduction in radiation-induced brain injury by use of pentobarbital or lidocaine protection

    SciTech Connect

    Oldfield, E.H.; Friedman, R.; Kinsella, T.; Moquin, R.; Olson, J.J.; Orr, K.; DeLuca, A.M. )

    1990-05-01

    To determine if barbiturates would protect brain at high doses of radiation, survival rates in rats that received whole-brain x-irradiation during pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia were compared with those of control animals that received no medication and of animals anesthetized with ketamine. The animals were shielded so that respiratory and digestive tissues would not be damaged by the radiation. Survival rates in rats that received whole-brain irradiation as a single 7500-rad dose under pentobarbital- or lidocaine-induced anesthesia was increased from between from 0% and 20% to between 45% and 69% over the 40 days of observation compared with the other two groups (p less than 0.007). Ketamine anesthesia provided no protection. There were no notable differential effects upon non-neural tissues, suggesting that pentobarbital afforded protection through modulation of ambient neural activity during radiation exposure. Neural suppression during high-dose cranial irradiation protects brain from acute and early delayed radiation injury. Further development and application of this knowledge may reduce the incidence of radiation toxicity of the central nervous system (CNS) and may permit the safe use of otherwise unsafe doses of radiation in patients with CNS neoplasms.

  4. Cytokines in therapy of radiation injury

    SciTech Connect

    Neta, R.; Oppenheim, J.J.

    1988-09-01

    Repeated injections or infusion of hematopoietic growth factors, such as interleukin-3 (IL-3), granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), or granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), accelerate restoration of hematopoiesis in animals compromised by sublethal doses of cytotoxic drugs or irradiation. Previous work by the investigators has shown that IL-1 induced circulating CSF in normal mice and, when used after sublethal irradiation, accelerated the recovery of endogenous splenic colonies. Therefore, IL-1, as well as IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), G-CSF, and GM-CSF, were evaluated as potential therapeutic agents in irradiated C3H-HeN mice. A single intraperitoneal injection, administered within three hours after a lethal dose (LD)95/30 of irradiation that would kill 95% of mice within 30 days, protected in a dose-dependent manner up to 100% of mice from radiation-induced death due to hematopoietic syndrome. Significant therapeutic effects were also achieved with a single dose of IFN-gamma or of TNF. In contrast, GM-CSF and G-CSF, administered shortly after irradiation, had no effect in the doses used on mice survival.

  5. Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Wen-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Wang, Rui-Zhi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. RESULTS: Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus ≥60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, no grade 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P = 0.0001<0.01). CONCLUSION: Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose ≥60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. PMID:15849822

  6. IL-13 is a therapeutic target in radiation lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Su I.; Horton, Jason A.; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R.; White, Ayla O.; Chung, Eun Joo; Hudak, Kathryn E.; Scroggins, Bradley T.; Arron, Joseph R.; Wynn, Thomas A.; Citrin, Deborah E.

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a potentially lethal late adverse event of thoracic irradiation. Prior research indicates that unrestrained TGF-β1 and/or type 2 cytokine-driven immune responses promote fibrosis following radiation injury, but the full spectrum of factors governing this pathology remains unclear. Interleukin 13 (IL-13) is a key factor in fibrotic disease associated with helminth infection, but it is unclear whether it plays a similar role in radiation-induced lung fibrosis. Using a mouse model, we tested the hypothesis that IL-13 drives the progression of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Irradiated lungs from wild-type c57BL/6NcR mice accumulated alternatively-activated macrophages, displayed elevated levels of IL-13, and extensive fibrosis, whereas IL-13 deficient mice were resistant to these changes. Furthermore, plasma from irradiated wild-type mice showed a transient increase in the IL-13 saturated fraction of the circulating decoy receptor IL-13Rα2. Finally, we determined that therapeutic neutralization of IL-13, during the period of IL-13Rα2 saturation was sufficient to protect mice from lung fibrosis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IL-13 is a major regulator of radiation-induced lung injury and demonstrates that strategies focusing on IL-13 may be useful in screening for timely delivery of anti-IL-13 therapeutics. PMID:28004808

  7. Delayed Presentation of Sciatic Nerve Injury after Total Hip Arthroplasty: Neurosurgical Considerations, Diagnosis, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Linda W.; Veeravagu, Anand; Azad, Tej D.; Harraher, Ciara; Ratliff, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Background  Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an established treatment for end-stage arthritis, congenital deformity, and trauma with good long-term clinical and functional outcomes. Delayed sciatic nerve injury is a rare complication after THA that requires prompt diagnosis and management. Methods  We present a case of sciatic nerve motor and sensory deficit in a 52-year-old patient 2 years after index left THA. Electromyography (EMG) results and imaging with radiographs and CT of the affected hip demonstrated an aberrant acetabular cup screw in the posterior-inferior quadrant adjacent to the sciatic nerve. Case Description  The patient underwent surgical exploration that revealed injury to the peroneal division of the sciatic nerve due to direct injury from screw impingement. A literature review identified 11 patients with late-onset neuropathy after THA. Ten patients underwent surgical exploration and pain often resolved after surgery with 56% of patients recovering sensory function and 25% experiencing full recovery of motor function. Conclusions  Delayed neuropathy of the sciatic nerve is a rare complication after THA that is most often due to hardware irritation, component failure, or wear-related pseudotumor formation. Operative intervention is often pursued to explore and directly visualize the nerve with limited results in the literature showing modest relief of pain and sensory symptoms and poor restoration of motor function. PMID:27602309

  8. Development of A Novel Murine Model of Combined Radiation and Peripheral Tissue Trauma Injuries.

    PubMed

    Antonic, Vlado; Jackson, Isabel L; Ganga, Gurung; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2017-02-01

    Detonation of a 10-kiloton nuclear bomb in an urban setting would result in >1 million casualties, the majority of which would present with combined injuries. Combined injuries, such as peripheral tissue trauma and radiation exposure, trigger inflammatory events that lead to multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) and death, with gastrointestinal (GI) and pulmonary involvement playing crucial roles. The objective of this study was to develop an animal model of combined injuries, peripheral tissue trauma (TBX animal model) combined with total body irradiation with 5% bone marrow shielding (TBI/BM5) to investigate if peripheral tissue trauma contributes to reduced survival. Male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to TBX10%, irradiation (TBI/BM5), or combined injuries (TBX10% + TBI/BM5). Experiments were conducted to evaluate mortality at day 7 after TBI/BM5. Serial euthanasia was performed at day 1, 3 and 6 or 7 after TBI/BM5 to evaluate the time course of pathophysiologic processes in combined injuries. Functional tests were performed to assess pulmonary function and GI motility. Postmortem samples of lungs and jejunum were collected to assess tissue damage. Results indicated higher lethality and shorter survival in the TBX10% +T BI/BM5 group than in the TBX10% or TBI/BM5 groups (day 1 vs. day 7 and 6, respectively). TBI/BM5 alone had no effects on the lungs but significantly impaired GI function at day 6. As expected, in the animals that received severe trauma (TBX10%), we observed impairment in lung function and delay in GI transit in the first 3 days, effects that decreased at later time points. Trauma combined with radiation (TBX10% + TBI/BM5) significantly augmented impairment of the lung and GI function in comparison to TBX10% and TBI/BM5 groups at 24 h. Histologic evaluation indicated that combined injuries caused greater tissue damage in the intestines in TBX10% + TBI/BM5 group when compared to other groups. We describe here the first combined tissue trauma/radiation

  9. The Role of Proinflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-18 in Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Mang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Massive radiation-induced inflammatory factors released from injured cells may cause innate and acquired immune reactions that can further result in stress response signal activity-induced local and systemic damage. IL‐1 family members IL‐1β, IL‐18, and IL‐33 play key roles in inflammatory and immune responses and have been recognized to have significant influences on the pathogenesis of diseases. IL‐1β, IL‐18, and IL‐33 share similarities of cytokine biology, but differences exist in signaling pathways. A key component of the inflammatory reaction is the inflammasome, which is a caspase‐1‐containing multiprotein oligomer. Pathological stimuli such as radiation can induce inflammasome and caspase‐1 activation, and subsequently cause maturation (activation) of pro-forms of IL‐1 and IL‐18 upon caspase‐1 cleavage. This caspase‐1 dependent and IL‐1 and IL‐18 associated cell damage is defined as pyroptosis. Activated IL‐1 and IL‐18 as proinflammatory cytokines drive pathology at different immune and inflammatory disorders through Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling. While the mechanisms of IL‐1β-induced pathophysiology of diseases have been well studied, IL‐18 has received less attention. The author recently reported that gamma radiation highly increased IL‐1β, IL‐18 and IL‐33 expression in mouse thymus, spleen and/or bone marrow cells; also circulating IL‐18 can be used as a radiation biomarker to track radiation injury in mice, minipigs, and nonhuman primates. This mini-review focuses on the role of IL‐18 in response to gamma radiation-induced injury. PMID:27356067

  10. Regulation of early and delayed radiation responses in rat small intestine by capsaicin-sensitive nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Zheng Huaien; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Ou Xuemei; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Mast cells protect against the early manifestations of intestinal radiation toxicity, but promote chronic intestinal wall fibrosis. Intestinal sensory nerves are closely associated with mast cells, both anatomically and functionally, and serve an important role in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis. This study examined the effect of sensory nerve ablation on the intestinal radiation response in an established rat model. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent sensory nerve ablation with capsaicin or sham ablation. Two weeks later, a localized segment of ileum was X-irradiated or sham irradiated. Structural, cellular, and molecular changes were examined 2 weeks (early injury) and 26 weeks (chronic injury) after irradiation. The mast cell dependence of the effect of sensory nerve ablation on intestinal radiation injury was assessed using c-kit mutant (Ws/Ws) mast cell-deficient rats. Results: Capsaicin treatment caused a baseline reduction in mucosal mast cell density, crypt cell proliferation, and expression of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, two neuropeptides released by sensory neurons. Sensory nerve ablation strikingly exacerbated early intestinal radiation toxicity (loss of mucosal surface area, inflammation, intestinal wall thickening), but attenuated the development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis (collagen I accumulation and transforming growth factor {beta} immunoreactivity). In mast cell-deficient rats, capsaicin treatment exacerbated postradiation epithelial injury (loss of mucosal surface area), but none of the other aspects of radiation injury were affected by capsaicin treatment. Conclusions: Ablation of capsaicin-sensitive enteric neurons exacerbates early intestinal radiation toxicity, but attenuates development of chronic fibroproliferative changes. The effect of capsaicin treatment on the intestinal radiation response is partly mast cell dependent.

  11. Understanding the Pathophysiology and Challenges of Development of Medical Countermeasures for Radiation-Induced Vascular/Endothelial Cell Injuries: Report of a NIAID Workshop, August 20, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Satyamitra, Merriline M.; DiCarlo, Andrea L.; Taliaferro, Lanyn

    2016-01-01

    After the events of September 11, 2001, a decade of research on the development of medical countermeasures (MCMs) to treat victims of a radiological incident has yielded two FDA-approved agents to mitigate acute radiation syndrome. These licensed agents specifically target the mitigation of radiation-induced neutropenia and infection potential, while the ramifications of the exposure event in a public health emergency incident could include the entire body, causing additional acute and/or delayed organ/tissue injuries. Anecdotal data as well as recent findings from both radiation accident survivors and animal experiments implicate radiation-induced injury or dysfunction of the vascular endothelium leading to tissue and organ injuries. There are significant gaps in our understanding of the disease processes and progression, as well as the optimum approaches to develop medical countermeasures to mitigate radiation vascular injury. To address this issue, the Radiation and Nuclear Countermeasures Program of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) organized a one-day workshop to examine the current state of the science in radiation-induced vascular injuries and organ dysfunction, the natural history of the pathophysiology and the product development maturity of potential medical countermeasures to treat these injuries. Meeting presentations were followed by a NIAID-led open discussion among academic investigators, industry researchers and government agency representatives. This article provides a summary of these presentations and subsequent discussion from the workshop. PMID:27387859

  12. Delayed hepatobiliary injury in a decompression sickness patient after scuba diving: case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Duck; Lee, Sang Hwan; Eom, Huisu; Kang, Young Joong

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first case of liver injury in a 51-year-old man following a dive to a depth of 40 meters. He presented with typical neurological symptoms affecting the lower limbs. Five days later, he experienced delayed abdominal pain, followed by rapidly progressive liver and adjacent organ injury due to air emboli in the intrahepatic portal vein. He received supportive care and hyperbaric therapy with a U.S. Navy Treatment Table 6 and recovered. Decompression sickness is a disease of protean manifestations. More information about venous gas emboli may be useful for better assessing decompression sickness. In this case, radiologic evaluation of the abdomen and the presentation of air bubbles in the portal vein in computed tomography played an essential role in diagnosing induced venous gas emboli in the liver and adjacent organs.

  13. Combined Injury: Radiation in Combination with Trauma, Infectious Disease, or Chemical Exposures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    radiation are highly likely. At Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 60% to 70% of radiation victims sustained traumatic injury. In the 1986 Chernobyl reactor inci...victims sustained traumatic injuries in addition to radiation exposure. In the 1986 Chernobyl re- actor incident, 10% of the 237 accident victims received

  14. Management of ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses, Part 3: Radiobiology and health effects of ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Doran M; Livingston, Gordon K; Sugarman, Stephen L; Parillo, Steven J; Glassman, Erik S

    2014-07-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure can induce profound changes in intracellular components, potentially leading to diverse health effects in exposed individuals. Any cellular component can be damaged by radiation, but some components affect cellular viability more profoundly than others. The ionization caused by radiation lasts longer than the initial inciting incident, continuing as 1 ionization incident causes another. In some cases, damage to DNA can lead to cellular death at mitosis. In other cases, activation of the genetic machinery can lead to a genetic cascade potentially leading to mutations or cell death by apoptosis. In the third of 5 articles on the management of injuries and illnesses caused by ionizing radiation, the authors provide a clinically relevant overview of the pathophysiologic process associated with potential exposure to ionizing radiation.

  15. Sprouting of axonal collaterals after spinal cord injury is prevented by delayed axonal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Collyer, E; Catenaccio, A; Lemaitre, D; Diaz, P; Valenzuela, V; Bronfman, F; Court, F A

    2014-11-01

    After an incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI), partial recovery of locomotion is accomplished with time. Previous studies have established a functional link between extension of axon collaterals from spared spinal tracts and locomotor recovery after SCI, but the tissular signals triggering collateral sprouting have not been identified. Here, we investigated whether axonal degeneration after SCI contributes to the sprouting of collaterals from axons spared after injury. To this end, we evaluated collateral sprouting from BDA-labeled uninjured corticospinal axons after spinal cord hemisection (SCI(H)) in wild type (WT) mouse and Wld(S) mouse strains, which shows a significant delay in Wallerian degeneration after injury. After SCI(H), spared fibers of WT mice extend collateral sprouts to both intact and denervated sides of the spinal cord distant from the injury site. On the contrary, in the Wld(S) mice collateral sprouting from spared fibers was greatly reduced after SCI(H). Consistent with a role for collateral sprouting in functional recovery after SCI, locomotor recovery after SCI(H) was impaired in Wld(S) mice compared to WT animals. In conclusion, our results identify axonal degeneration as one of the triggers for collateral sprouting from the contralesional uninjured fibers after an SCI(H). These results open the path for identifying molecular signals associated with tissular changes after SCI that promotes collateral sprouting and functional recovery.

  16. Infant nerve injury induces delayed microglial polarization to the M1 phenotype, and exercise reduces delayed neuropathic pain by modulating microglial activity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xingrui; Chen, Yongmei; Fu, Bao; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Mazhong

    2017-02-27

    Neuropathic pain is absent in infants and emergent years after injury. Adult spinal cord microglia play a key role in initiating neuropathic pain, and modulation of microglia is a potential target for treating neuropathic pain. In this study, we evaluated the role of microglia after infant peripheral nerve injury and the effect of exercise on the delayed-onset neuropathic pain. Rat pups received spared nerve injury, and behavior tests were performed to evaluate their pain threshold. qPCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot were used for M1 and M2 marker expression analysis. In contrast to the microglial polarization to the M1 phenotype observed in the adult spinal cord, in infant nerve injury, microglial polarization immediately shifted to the M2 phenotype. In adolescence, microglia polarized to the M1 phenotype, which was concomitant with the emergence of neuropathic pain. Exercise shifted spinal cord microglia polarization to the M2 phenotype and reduced neuropathic pain. In addition, IL-10 increased and TNF-α decreased after exercise, and intrathecal injection of the IL-10 antibody reduced the exercise-induced analgesia. Our study found that infant nerve injury induced delayed spinal cord microglia polarization to the M1 phenotype and that exercise was effective in the treatment of delayed adolescent neuropathic pain via the modulation of microglial polarization.

  17. Extracellular Vesicles and Vascular Injury: New Insights for Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Flamant, Stéphane; Tamarat, Radia

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews our current knowledge about cell-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs), including microparticles and exosomes, and their emergence as mediators of a new important mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. Particular emphasis has been given to the increasing involvement of EVs in the field of radiation-induced vascular injury. Although EVs have been considered for a long time as cell “dust”, they in fact precisely reflect the physiological state of the cells. The role of microparticles and exosomes in mediating vascular dysfunction suggests that they may represent novel pathways in short- or long-distance paracrine intercellular signaling in vascular environment. In this article, the mechanisms involved in the biogenesis of microparticles and exosomes, their composition and participation in the pathogenesis of vascular dysfunction are discussed. Furthermore, this article highlights the concept of EVs as potent vectors of biological information and protagonists of an intercellular communication network. Special emphasis is made on EV-mediated microRNA transfer and on the principal consequences of such signal exchange on vascular injury and radiation-induced non-targeted effect. The recent progress in elucidating the biology of EVs has provided new insights for the field of radiation, advancing their use as diagnostic biomarkers or in therapeutic interventions. PMID:27459703

  18. Delayed diagnosis of cholestatic drug-induced liver injury treated with corticosteroid for adrenal insufficiency secondary to miliary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Schneier, A; Schiano, T; Liu, S J; Machado, O N

    2015-08-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in a patient with multiple comorbidities is often challenging to diagnose because liver injury can be attributed to multiple disease processes. Delayed treatment of DILI could have fatal consequences and, therefore, understanding the features and risks of DILI is crucial. We report a unique case of a patient who was admitted for severe sepsis of unknown etiology. This patient was later found to have miliary tuberculosis (TB) with associated adrenal insufficiency, complicated by acute cholestatic liver injury. Liver injury fully improved after initiation of corticosteroid for the treatment of adrenal insufficiency. The most likely pathophysiology of acute liver injury was DILI, given the clinical course of liver injury and the liver biopsy result of non-caseating granulomas. Although five different antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, vancomycin, imipenem/cilastatin, and cefepime were provided, the timing of liver injury and pharmacology of each drug imply that ciprofloxacin was the most likely antibiotic causing DILI, given the pharmacology of each antibiotics. This case is unique because miliary TB was complicated by adrenal insufficiency and drug-induced cholestatic liver injury, but acute liver injury was fully reversed after corticosteroid treatment. This implies an immune-mediated etiology of DILI, especially ciprofloxacin-induced cholestatic liver injury. DILI is challenging to diagnose in the setting of multiple comorbidities. Therefore, it is crucial that clinicians are to be aware of signs and symptoms of DILI, in that delayed diagnose and treatment may have fatal consequences.

  19. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S.; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K.; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Ullrich, Robert L.; Petrache, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to 137Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u 56Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u 28Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy 56Fe or 28Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  20. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions.

  1. Influence of PUVA and UVB radiation on delayed hypersensitivity in the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Morison, W.L.; Parrish, J.A.; Woehler, M.E.; Krugler, J.I.; Bloch, K.J.

    1981-06-01

    Exposure of guinea pigs to UVA (320--400 nm) radiation following administration of 8-methoxypsoralen by gavage (referred to by the acronym, PUVA) or exposure to UVB (290--320 nm) radiation, produced suppression of the cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity reaction at the site of exposure to radiation and at distant nonexposed sites. In these experiments, the animals were immunized by injection of dinitrophenyl-bovine gamma-globulin (DNP-BGG) in complete Freund's adjuvant and delayed hypersensitivity responses were provoked by intradermal injections of DNP-BGG, DNP and BGG on the flanks. Exposure to erythemogenic doses of either PUVA or UVB radiation for 7 days prior to immunization and for the 7 days between immunization and challenge (total period of radiation: 14 days) produced inhibiton of responses to each of the test substances. In addition, treatment with erythemogenic doses of PUVA either for 7 days prior to immunization or during the interval between immunization and challenge with DNP-BGG, inhibited the delayed hypersensitivity responses at the site of irradiation and at a nonexposed site. These findings suggest that in vivo exposure to nonionizing radiation leads to both local and systemic alteration of certain immune responses.

  2. An uncommon clinical feature of IAN injury after third molar removal: a delayed paresthesia case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Borgonovo, Andrea; Bianchi, Albino; Marchetti, Andrea; Censi, Rachele; Maiorana, Carlo

    2012-05-01

    After an inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury, the onset of altered sensation usually begins immediately after surgery. However, it sometimes begins after several days, which is referred to as delayed paresthesia. The authors considered three different etiologies that likely produce inflammation along the nerve trunk and cause delayed paresthesia: compression of the clot, fibrous reorganization of the clot, and nerve trauma caused by bone fragments during clot organization. The aim of this article was to evaluate the etiology of IAN delayed paresthesia, analyze the literature, present a case series related to three different causes of this pathology, and compare delayed paresthesia with the classic immediate symptomatic paresthesia.

  3. Development of a novel mouse model of amodiaquine-induced liver injury with a delayed onset.

    PubMed

    Metushi, Imir G; Cai, Ping; Dervovic, Dzana; Liu, Feng; Lobach, Alexandra; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Uetrecht, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Amodiaquine (AQ) treatment is associated with a high incidence of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) and agranulocytosis. Evidence suggests that AQ-induced IDILI is immune mediated. A significant impediment to mechanistic studies of IDILI is the lack of valid animal models. This study reports the first animal model of IDILI with characteristics similar to mild IDILI in humans. Treatment of female C57BL/6 mice with AQ led to liver injury with delayed onset, which resolved despite continued treatment. Covalent binding of AQ was detected in the liver, which was greater in female than in male mice, and higher in the liver than in other organs. Covalent binding in the liver was maximal by Day 3, which did not explain the delayed onset of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation. However, coincident with the elevated serum ALT, infiltration of liver and splenic mononuclear cells and activation of CD8 T-cells within the liver were identified. By Week 7, when ALT levels had returned close to normal, down-regulation of several inflammatory cytokines and up-regulation of PD-1 on T-cells suggested induction of immune tolerance. Treatment of Rag1(-/-) mice with AQ resulted in higher ALT activities than C57BL/6 mice, which suggested that the adaptive immune response was responsible for immune tolerance. In contrast, depletion of NK cells significantly attenuated the increase in ALT, which implied a role for NK cells in mild AQ-induced IDILI. This is the first example of a delayed-onset animal model of IDILI that appears to be immune-mediated.

  4. Influence of the circadian rhythm in cell division on radiation-induced mitotic delay in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, N.H.

    1982-01-01

    Mitotic delay is described as a classical response to radiation; however, circadian rhythmicity in cell division in vivo has not been considered by many authors. The present study investigated the relation between fluctuations reported as mitotic delay and recovery in vivo and circadian oscillations in mitotic index in mouse corneal epithelium. One aspect involved single doses (approximately 600 rad) given to mice at different circadian stages. The normal circadian rhythm in cell division was never obliterated. Inhibition of mitosis was evident but unpredictable, ranging from 6 to 15 hr after irradiation. Recovery was evident only during the daily increase in mitotic index of controls. The classical interpretation of recovery from mitotic delay may be in an in vitro phenomenon not reflecting in vivo responses, which are apparently strongly circadian stage dependent. The second portion of the study demonstrated a dose-response effect on length of mitotic delay and, to a lesser extent, degree of recovery.

  5. Delayed regaining of gait ability in a patient with brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Little is known about delay in regaining gait ability at a chronic stage after brain injury. In this study, we report on a single patient who regained the gait ability during 2 months of intensive rehabilitation starting 2 years after a brain injury. Methods and results: A 40-year-old male patient diagnosed with viral encephalitis underwent comprehensive rehabilitation until 2 years after onset. However, he could not even sit independently and presented with severe physical deconditioning and severe ataxia. To understand his neurological state, 4 neural tracts related to gait function were reconstructed, and based on the state of these neural tracts, we decided that the patient had the neurological potential to walk independently. Therefore, we assumed that the main reasons for gait inability in this patient were severe physical deconditioning and truncal ataxia. Consequently, the patient underwent the following intensive rehabilitative therapy: administration of drugs for control of ataxia (topiramate, clonazepam, and propranolol) and movement therapy for physical conditioning and gait training. As a result, after 2 months of rehabilitation, he was able to walk independently on an even floor, with improvement of severe physical deconditioning and truncal ataxia. Conclusion: We described the rehabilitation program in a single patient who regained the gait ability during 2 months of intensive rehabilitation starting 2 years after a brain injury. PMID:27661035

  6. Glycyrrhetinic acid alleviates radiation-induced lung injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinmei; Zhang, Weijian; Zhang, Lurong; Zhang, Jiemin; Chen, Xiuying; Yang, Meichun; Chen, Ting; Hong, Jinsheng

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common complication of thoracic radiotherapy, but efficacious therapy for RILI is lacking. This study ascertained whether glycyrrhetinic acid (GA; a functional hydrolyzed product of glycyrrhizic acid, which is extracted from herb licorice) can protect against RILI and investigated its relationship to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1/Smads signaling pathway. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: a control group, a GA group and two irradiation (IR) groups. IR groups were exposed to a single fraction of X-rays (12 Gy) to the thorax and administered normal saline (IR + NS group) or GA (IR + GA group). Two days and 17 days after irradiation, histologic analyses were performed to assess the degree of lung injury, and the expression of TGF-β1, Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7 was recorded. GA administration mitigated the histologic changes of lung injury 2 days and 17 days after irradiation. Protein and mRNA expression of TGF-β1, Smad2 and Smad3, and the mRNA level of Smad7, in lung tissue were significantly elevated after irradiation. GA decreased expression of TGF-β1, Smad2 and Smad3 in lung tissue, but did not increase Smad7 expression. GA can protect against early-stage RILI. This protective effect may be associated with inhibition of the TGF-β1/Smads signaling pathway. PMID:27672101

  7. Radiation injury is a potentially serious complication to fluoroscopically-guided complex interventions

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, LK

    2007-01-01

    Radiation-induced injury to skin is an infrequent but potentially serious complication to complex fluoroscopically-guided interventional procedures. Due to a lack of experience with such injuries, the medical community has found fluoroscopically-induced injuries difficult to diagnose. Injuries have occurred globally in many countries. Serious injuries most frequently occur on the back but have also occurred on the neck, buttocks and anterior of the chest. Severities of injuries range from skin rashes and epilation to necrosis of the skin and its underlying structures. This article reviews the characteristics of these injuries and some actions that can be taken to reduce their likelihood or seriousness. PMID:21614271

  8. Popliteal artery injuries in an urban trauma center with a rural catchment area: do delays in definitive treatment affect amputation?

    PubMed

    Simmons, Jon D; Gunter, Joseph W; Schmieg, Robert E; Manley, Justin D; Rushton, Fred W; Porter, John M; Mitchell, Marc E

    2011-11-01

    Extended length of time from injury to definitive vascular repair is considered to be a predictor of amputation in patients with popliteal artery injuries. In an urban trauma center with a rural catchment area, logistical issues frequently result in treatment delays, which may affect limb salvage after vascular trauma. We examined how known risk factors for amputation after popliteal trauma are affected in a more rural environment, where patients often experience delays in definitive surgical treatment. All adult patients admitted to the Level I trauma center, the University of Mississippi Medical Center, with a popliteal artery injury between January 2000 and December of 2007 were identified. Demographic information management and outcome data were collected. Body mass index, mangled extremity severity score (MESS), Guistilo open fracture score, injury severity score, and time from injury to vascular repair were examined. Fifty-one patients with popliteal artery injuries (53% blunt and 47% penetrating) were identified, all undergoing operative repair. There were nine amputations (17.6%) and one death. Patients requiring amputation had a higher MESS, 7.8 versus 5.3 (P < 0.01), and length of stay, 43 versus 15 days (P < 0.01), compared with those with successful limb salvage. Body mass index, injury severity score, Guistilo open fracture score, or time from injury to repair were not different between the two groups. Patients with a blunt mechanism of injury had a slightly higher amputation rate compared with those with penetrating trauma, 25.9 per cent versus 8.3 per cent (P = non significant). MESS, though not perfect, is the best predictor of amputation in patients with popliteal artery injuries. Morbid obesity is not a significant predictor for amputation in patients with popliteal artery injuries. Time from injury to repair of greater than 6 hours was not predictive of amputation. This study further demonstrates that a single scoring system should be used with

  9. Application of Multivariate Modeling for Radiation Injury Assessment: A Proof of Concept (Radiation Injury Algorithms)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    amylase , C - reactive protein (CRP), and hematological blood-cell counts measured at 1 - 4 d post-radiation exposure. A recent study by Moroni [19...known to manifest in the prodromal and/or late ARS phases (Flt3 ligand, Citrulline, C-reactive protein, serum amylase IL-6) may contribute to our...Salter, I. H. Levine, W. E. Jackson, M. B. Grace, P. G. S. Prasanna, D. J. Sandgren, and G .D. Ledney, ― Amylase and blood cell-count hematological

  10. Management of ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses, part 4: acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Doran M; Iddins, Carol J; Parrillo, Steven J; Glassman, Erik S; Goans, Ronald E

    2014-09-01

    To provide proper medical care for patients after a radiation incident, it is necessary to make the correct diagnosis in a timely manner and to ascertain the relative magnitude of the incident. The present article addresses the clinical diagnosis and management of high-dose radiation injuries and illnesses in the first 24 to 72 hours after a radiologic or nuclear incident. To evaluate the magnitude of a high-dose incident, it is important for the health physicist, physician, and radiobiologist to work together and to assess many variables, including medical history and physical examination results; the timing of prodromal signs and symptoms (eg, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, transient incapacitation, hypotension, and other signs and symptoms suggestive of high-level exposure); and the incident history, including system geometry, source-patient distance, and the suspected radiation dose distribution.

  11. Biomarkers of delayed graft function as a form of acute kidney injury in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Malyszko, Jolanta; Lukaszyk, Ewelina; Glowinska, Irena; Durlik, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation ensures distinct advantages for patients with end-stage kidney disease. However, in some cases early complications can lead to allograft dysfunction and consequently graft loss. One of the most common early complications after kidney transplantation is delayed graft function (DGF). Unfortunately there is no effective treatment for DGF, however early diagnosis of DGF and therapeutic intervention (eg modification of immunosuppression) may improve outcome. Therefore, markers of acute kidney injury are required. Creatinine is a poor biomarker for kidney injury due principally to its inability to help diagnose early acute renal failure and complete inability to help differentiate among its various causes. Different urinary and serum proteins have been intensively investigated as possible biomarkers in this setting. There are promising candidate biomarkers with the ability to detect DGF. We focused on emerging biomarkers of DGF with NGAL is being the most studied followed by KIM-1, L-FABP, IL-18, and others. However, large randomized studies are needed to establish the value of new, promising biomarkers, in DGF diagnosis, prognosis and its cost-effectiveness. PMID:26175216

  12. Delayed treatment with ADAMTS13 ameliorates cerebral ischemic injury without hemorrhagic complication.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takafumi; Irie, Keiichi; Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Sano, Kazunori; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Yamashita, Yuta; Satho, Tomomitsu; Fujioka, Masayuki; Muroi, Carl; Matsuo, Koichi; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Futagami, Kojiro; Mishima, Kenichi

    2015-10-22

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke. However, delayed tPA treatment increases the risk of cerebral hemorrhage and can result in exacerbation of nerve injury. ADAMTS13, a von Willebrand factor (VWF) cleaving protease, has a protective effect against ischemic brain injury and may reduce bleeding risk by cleaving VWF. We examined whether ADAMTS13 has a longer therapeutic time window in ischemic stroke than tPA in mice subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). ADAMTS13 (0.1mg/kg) or tPA (10mg/kg) was administered i.v., immediately after reperfusion of after 2-h or 4-h MCAO for comparison of the therapeutic time windows in ischemic stroke. Infarct volume, hemorrhagic volume, plasma high-mobility group box1 (HMGB1) levels and cerebral blood flow were measured 24h after MCAO. Both ADAMTS13 and tPA improved the infarct volume without hemorrhagic complications in 2-h MCAO mice. On the other hand, ADAMTS13 reduced the infarct volume and plasma HMGB1 levels, and improved cerebral blood flow without hemorrhagic complications in 4-h MCAO mice, but tPA was not effective and these animals showed massive intracerebral hemorrhage. These results indicated that ADAMTS13 has a longer therapeutic time window in ischemic stroke than tPA, and ADAMTS13 may be useful as a new therapeutic agent for ischemic stroke.

  13. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Injury Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Lijian; Luo, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) as the result of nuclear accidents or terrorist attacks is a significant threat and a major medical concern. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) injury is the primary cause of death after accidental or intentional exposure to a moderate or high dose of IR. Protecting HSCs from IR should be a primary goal in the development of novel medical countermeasures against radiation. Recent Advances: Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanisms by which IR causes HSC damage. The mechanisms include (i) induction of HSC apoptosis via the p53-Puma pathway; (ii) promotion of HSC differentiation via the activation of the G-CSF/Stat3/BATF-dependent differentiation checkpoint; (iii) induction of HSC senescence via the ROS-p38 pathway; and (iv) damage to the HSC niche. Critical Issues: Induction of apoptosis in HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells is primarily responsible for IR-induced acute bone marrow (BM) injury. Long-term BM suppression caused by IR is mainly attributable to the induction of HSC senescence. However, the promotion of HSC differentiation and damage to the HSC niche can contribute to both the acute and long-term effects of IR on the hematopoietic system. Future Directions: In this review, we have summarized a number of recent findings that provide new insights into the mechanisms whereby IR damages HSCs. These findings will provide new opportunities for developing a mechanism-based strategy to prevent and/or mitigate IR-induced BM suppression. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1447–1462. PMID:24124731

  14. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening

    SciTech Connect

    Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Chow, S. )

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  15. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening.

    PubMed

    Kimme-Smith, C; Bassett, L W; Gold, R H; Chow, S

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  16. Laminin 332 Deposition is Diminished in Irradiated Skin in an Animal Model of Combined Radiation and Wound Skin Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jourdan, M. M.; Lopez, A.; Olasz, E. B.; Duncan, N. E.; Demara, M.; Kittipongdaja, W.; Fish, B. L.; Mäder, M.; Schock, A.; Morrow, N. V.; Semenenko, V. A.; Baker, J. E.; Moulder, J. E.; Lazarova, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Skin exposure to ionizing radiation affects the normal wound healing process and greatly impacts the prognosis of affected individuals. We investigated the effect of ionizing radiation on wound healing in a rat model of combined radiation and wound skin injury. Using a soft X-ray beam, a single dose of ionizing radiation (10–40 Gy) was delivered to the skin without significant exposure to internal organs. At 1 h postirradiation, two skin wounds were made on the back of each rat. Control and experimental animals were euthanized at 3, 7, 14, 21 and 30 days postirradiation. The wound areas were measured, and tissue samples were evaluated for laminin 332 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 expression. Our results clearly demonstrate that radiation exposure significantly delayed wound healing in a dose-related manner. Evaluation of irradiated and wounded skin showed decreased deposition of laminin 332 protein in the epidermal basement membrane together with an elevated expression of all three laminin 332 genes within 3 days postirradiation. The elevated laminin 332 gene expression was paralleled by an elevated gene and protein expression of MMP2, suggesting that the reduced amount of laminin 332 in irradiated skin is due to an imbalance between laminin 332 secretion and its accelerated processing by elevated tissue metalloproteinases. Western blot analysis of cultured rat keratinocytes showed decreased laminin 332 deposition by irradiated cells, and incubation of irradiated keratinocytes with MMP inhibitor significantly increased the amount of deposited laminin 332. Furthermore, irradiated keratinocytes exhibited a longer time to close an artificial wound, and this delay was partially corrected by seeding keratinocytes on laminin 332-coated plates. These data strongly suggest that laminin 332 deposition is inhibited by ionizing radiation and, in combination with slower keratinocyte migration, can contribute to the delayed wound healing of irradiated skin. PMID

  17. Radiation injury in rat lung. IV. Modification by d-penicillamine

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.F.; Molteni, A.; Ts'ao, C.; Solliday, N.H.

    1984-05-01

    To determine whether d-penicillamine, known to reduce fibrosis in irradiated rat lung, also ameliorates radiation injury in the pulmonary endothelium, the authors measured angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, plasminogen activator (PLA) activity, and prostacyclin (PGI/sub 2/) production in the lungs of penicillamine-treated and untreated rats from 2 weeks to 6 months after a single dose of 25 Gy of /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays to the right hemithorax. Both ACE and PLA activity in the irradiated right lung of untreated rats decreased dramatically between the 1st and 2nd months after exposure, then reached a plateau through 6 months at approximately 25 and 50% of the normal level, respectively. For the first 2 months after irradiation, penicillamine-treated animals exhibited significantly higher activites of both ACE and PLA than did untreated rats. From 3 to 6 months after irradiation, however, the only significant drug effect on these enzymes was a 25% increase in PLA activity at 6 months. PGI/sub 2/ production by the irradiated lung of untreated rats increased continuously, and at 6 months was approximately 10 times higher than normal. Penicillamine significantly reduced this hypersecretion, and at 6 months after irradiation, PGI/sub 2/ production by the lungs of drug-treated rats was only half that of untreated animals. Thus the antifibrotic agent d-penicillamine delays the onset of radiation-induced enzyme dysfunction in the pulmonary endothelium.

  18. Delayed radiation necrosis of the central nervous system in patients irradiated for pituitary tumours.

    PubMed

    Grattan-Smith, P J; Morris, J G; Langlands, A O

    1992-10-01

    Four cases of delayed radiation necrosis involving the CNS were found in a group of 46 patients irradiated for pituitary tumours over a six year period. This occurred in three of 11 patients with Cushing's disease representing an incidence of 27% in this group. There were no cases among 11 patients with acromegaly or among seven with prolactinomas. One case (6%) was found in the 17 patients with chromophobe adenomas. Standard doses of radiation were delivered to these patients and the findings support suggestions that the metabolic disturbances of Cushing's disease may reduce tolerance to radiation. Our results and a literature review indicate that if radiotherapy is used to treat Cushing's disease, the total dose should be less than 50 Gy at 2 Gy per day fractionation.

  19. Use of biomarkers for assessing radiation injury and efficacy of countermeasures

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay K; Newman, Victoria L; Romaine, Patricia LP; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Pollard, Harvey B

    2016-01-01

    Several candidate drugs for acute radiation syndrome (ARS) have been identified that have low toxicity and significant radioprotective and radiomitigative efficacy. Inasmuch as exposing healthy human volunteers to injurious levels of radiation is unethical, development and approval of new radiation countermeasures for ARS are therefore presently based on animal studies and Phase I safety study in healthy volunteers. The Animal Efficacy Rule, which underlies the Food and Drug Administration approval pathway, requires a sound understanding of the mechanisms of injury, drug efficacy, and efficacy biomarkers. In this context, it is important to identify biomarkers for radiation injury and drug efficacy that can extrapolate animal efficacy results, and can be used to convert drug doses deduced from animal studies to those that can be efficacious when used in humans. Here, we summarize the progress of studies to identify candidate biomarkers for the extent of radiation injury and for evaluation of countermeasure efficacy. PMID:26568096

  20. Use of biomarkers for assessing radiation injury and efficacy of countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay K; Newman, Victoria L; Romaine, Patricia Lp; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Pollard, Harvey B

    2016-01-01

    Several candidate drugs for acute radiation syndrome (ARS) have been identified that have low toxicity and significant radioprotective and radiomitigative efficacy. Inasmuch as exposing healthy human volunteers to injurious levels of radiation is unethical, development and approval of new radiation countermeasures for ARS are therefore presently based on animal studies and Phase I safety study in healthy volunteers. The Animal Efficacy Rule, which underlies the Food and Drug Administration approval pathway, requires a sound understanding of the mechanisms of injury, drug efficacy, and efficacy biomarkers. In this context, it is important to identify biomarkers for radiation injury and drug efficacy that can extrapolate animal efficacy results, and can be used to convert drug doses deduced from animal studies to those that can be efficacious when used in humans. Here, we summarize the progress of studies to identify candidate biomarkers for the extent of radiation injury and for evaluation of countermeasure efficacy.

  1. Delayed protective effect of telmisartan on lung ischemia/reperfusion injury in valve replacement operations

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongfeng; Zhang, Daguo; Xiang, Daokang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the delayed protective effect of telmisartan on lung ischemic/reperfusion injury in patients undergoing heart valve replacement operations. In total, 180 patients diagnosed with rheumatic valve diseases were randomly divided into the telmisartan (T), captopril (C) and placebo (P) groups. In the telmisartan group, the patients were pretreated with telmisartan (1 mg/kg/day), at the time period 96–48 h before the operation, whereas in the C group, the patients were treated with captopril (1 mg/kg/day) at the time period 96–48 h prior to the operation control group. Each drug treatment group included a corresponding placebo treatment. The variables pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and A-aDO2 were measured prior to CPB and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 h after CPB. Pulmonary neutrophil (PMN) count in the left and right atrium blood as well as SOD malondialdehyde (MDA), NO, angiotensin II (AngII) value in the left atrium blood, were measured 30 min prior to and after CPB. The PVR parameters of the telmisartan and captopril groups were significantly lower than those of the placebo group (P<0.05). The A-aDO2 values in the telmisartan and captopril groups were significantly lower than those in the placebo group at 1, 3 and 6 h following CPB treatment. The difference between the right and left atrium blood PMN was significantly lower in the telmisartan and captopril intervention groups compared to that in the placebo group 30 min following CPB treatment. The left atrium blood SOD and NO values were significantly higher, whereas the MDA value was significantly lower in the telmisartan group compared to the control group 30 min following CPB treatment. As for AngII, there was no difference between the C and T groups, compared with the P group. In the two groups 30 min after treatment with CPB, 24 patients experienced varying degrees of cough, with the telmisartan group showing a significant difference (P<0.05). The hospitalization time was

  2. Delayed administration of darbepoetin or erythropoietin protects against ischemic acute renal injury and failure.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D W; Pat, B; Vesey, D A; Guan, Z; Endre, Z; Gobe, G C

    2006-05-01

    Administration of human recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) at time of acute ischemic renal injury (IRI) inhibits apoptosis, enhances tubular epithelial regeneration, and promotes renal functional recovery. The present study aimed to determine whether darbepoetin-alfa (DPO) exhibits comparable renoprotection to that afforded by EPO, whether pro or antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins are involved, and whether delayed administration of EPO or DPO 6 h following IRI ameliorates renal dysfunction. The model of IRI involved bilateral renal artery occlusion for 45 min in rats (N = 4 per group), followed by reperfusion for 1-7 days. Controls were sham-operated. Rats were treated at time of ischemia or sham operation (T0), or post-treated (6 h after the onset of reperfusion, T6) with EPO (5000 IU/kg), DPO (25 mug/kg), or appropriate vehicle by intraperitoneal injection. Renal function, structure, and immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bax were analyzed. DPO or EPO at T0 significantly abrogated renal dysfunction in IRI animals (serum creatinine for IRI 0.17 +/- 0.05 mmol/l vs DPO-IRI 0.08 +/- 0.03 mmol/l vs EPO-IRI 0.04 +/- 0.01 mmol/l, P = 0.01). Delayed administration of DPO or EPO (T6) also significantly abrogated subsequent renal dysfunction (serum creatinine for IRI 0.17 +/- 0.05 mmol/l vs DPO-IRI 0.06 +/- 0.01 mmol/l vs EPO-IRI 0.03 +/- 0.03 mmol/l, P = 0.01). There was also significantly decreased tissue injury (apoptosis, P < 0.05), decreased proapoptotic Bax, and increased regenerative capacity, especially in the outer stripe of the outer medulla, with DPO or EPO at T0 or T6. These results reaffirm the potential clinical application of DPO and EPO as novel renoprotective agents for patients at risk of ischemic acute renal failure or after having sustained an ischemic renal insult.

  3. Radiation-induced division delay in Chinese hamster ovary fibroblast and carcinoma cells: dose effect and ploidy. [X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Kimler, B.F.; Leeper, D.B.; Schneiderman, M.H.

    1981-02-01

    The mitotic selection procedure for cell cycle analysis was utilized to investigate the G/sub 2/ transition point for and the duration of radiation-induced division delay in diploid and tetraploid Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) fibroblasts and in Chinese hamster ovarian carcinoma cells. The location of the radiation-induced division delay transition point was dose independent at high doses and located approximately 42 min before division. At lower doses only an estimate of the point of blockade was possible; but the G/sub 2/ transition point appeared to be earlier in the cell cycle. The duration of radiation-induced division delay was dose dependent. This response is consistent with a sensitive population of cells in late G/sub 2/ that define the location of the transition point and the length of division delay. There was no difference observed in the dose response for radiation-induced division delay between the pseudotetraploid cell line of CHO and the pseudodiploid parent strain. However, in the cell line derived from a spontaneous Chinese hamster ovarian carcinoma the division delay was 39 +- 4 min/Gy. Therefore, radiation-induced division delay is independent of chromosome ploidy, but can show intraspecies cell line specificity.

  4. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: I. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    A long-standing dogma in the radiation sciences is that energy from radiation must be deposited in the cell nucleus to elicit a biological effect. A number of non-targeted, delayed effects of ionizing radiation have been described that challenge this dogma and pose new challenges to evaluating potential hazards associated with radiation exposure. These effects include induced genomic instability and non-targeted bystander effects. The in vitro evidence for non-targeted effects in radiation biology will be reviewed, but the question as to how one extrapolates from these in vitro observations to the risk of radiation-induced adverse health effects such as cancer remains open.

  5. Inhibition of Intestinal Epithelial Apoptosis Improves Survival in a Murine Model of Radiation Combined Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Enjae; Perrone, Erin E.; Brahmamdan, Pavan; McDonough, Jacquelyn S.; Leathersich, Ann M.; Dominguez, Jessica A.; Clark, Andrew T.; Fox, Amy C.; Dunne, W. Michael; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2013-01-01

    World conditions place large populations at risk from ionizing radiation (IR) from detonation of dirty bombs or nuclear devices. In a subgroup of patients, ionizing radiation exposure would be followed by a secondary infection. The effects of radiation combined injury are potentially more lethal than either insult in isolation. The purpose of this study was to determine mechanisms of mortality and possible therapeutic targets in radiation combined injury. Mice were exposed to IR with 2.5 Gray (Gy) followed four days later by intratracheal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). While either IR or MRSA alone yielded 100% survival, animals with radiation combined injury had 53% survival (p = 0.01). Compared to IR or MRSA alone, mice with radiation combined injury had increased gut apoptosis, local and systemic bacterial burden, decreased splenic CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, B cells, NK cells, and dendritic cells, and increased BAL and systemic IL-6 and G-CSF. In contrast, radiation combined injury did not alter lymphocyte apoptosis, pulmonary injury, or intestinal proliferation compared to IR or MRSA alone. In light of the synergistic increase in gut apoptosis following radiation combined injury, transgenic mice that overexpress Bcl-2 in their intestine and wild type mice were subjected to IR followed by MRSA. Bcl-2 mice had decreased gut apoptosis and improved survival compared to WT mice (92% vs. 42%; p<0.01). These data demonstrate that radiation combined injury results in significantly higher mortality than could be predicted based upon either IR or MRSA infection alone, and that preventing gut apoptosis may be a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24204769

  6. Biophysical modelling of early and delayed radiation damage at chromosome level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, S.; Eidelman, Y.

    Exposure by ionising radiation increases cancer risk in human population Cancer is thought to originate from an altered expression of certain number of specific genes It is now widely recognised that chromosome aberrations CA are involved in stable change in expression of genes by gain or loss of their functions Thus CA can contribute to initiation or progression of cancer Therefore understanding mechanisms of CA formation in the course of cancer development might be valuable tool for quantification and prognosis of different stages of radiation carcinogenesis Early CA are defined as aberrations induced in first post-irradiation mitotic cycle The present work describes the original biophysical technique for early CA modelling It includes the following simulation steps the ionising particle track structure the structural organisation of all chromosomes in G 0 G 1 cell nucleus spatial distribution of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks dsb within chromosomes dsb rejoining and misrejoining modelling cell cycle taking into account mitotic delay which results in complex time dependence of aberrant cells in first mitosis The results on prediction of dose-response curves for simple and complex CA measured in cells undergoing first division cycle are presented in comparison with recent experimental data There is increasing evidence that CA are also observed in descendents of irradiated cells many generations after direct DNA damage These delayed CA or chromosome instability CI are thought to be a manifestation of genome

  7. Delayed thalamic astrocytosis and disrupted sleep-wake patterns in a preclinical model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Anupam; Macolino, Christine; Elliott, Melanie B; Chin, Jeannie

    2014-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) involves diffuse axonal injury and induces subtle but persistent changes in brain tissue and function and poses challenges for early detection of neurological injury. The present study uses an automated behavioral analysis system to assess alterations in rodent behavior in the subacute phase in a preclinical mouse model of TBI, controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. In the first few weeks following CCI, mice demonstrated normal exploratory behaviors and other typical home-cage behaviors. However, beginning 4 weeks post-injury, CCI mice developed disruptions in sleep-wake patterns, including an increased number of awakenings from sleep. Such impaired sleep maintenance was accompanied by an increased latency to reach peak sleep in CCI mice. These sleep disruptions implicate involvement of the thalamocortical network, the activity of which must be tightly regulated to control sleep maintenance. After injury, there was an increase in reactive microglia in thalamic regions as well as delayed reactive astrocytosis that was evident in the thalamic reticular nucleus, which preceded the development of sleep disruptions. These data suggest that cortical injury may trigger inflammatory responses in deeper neuroanatomical structures, including the thalamic reticular nucleus. Such engagement of the thalamus may perturb the thalamocortical network that regulates sleep/awake patterns and contribute to sleep disruptions observed in this model as well as those documented in patients with TBI.

  8. Delayed breast implant reconstruction: is radiation therapy associated with capsular contracture or reoperations?

    PubMed

    Hvilsom, Gitte Bjørn; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Lipworth, Loren; McLaughlin, Joseph; Elberg, Jens Jørgen; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg; Friis, Søren

    2012-03-01

    We evaluated the association between radiation therapy and severe capsular contracture or reoperation after 717 delayed breast implant reconstruction procedures (288 1- and 429 2-stage procedures) identified in the prospective database of the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast during the period between 1999 and 2006. A history of radiation therapy was associated with increased risk of severe capsular contracture for 1- and 2-stage procedures, with adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of 3.3 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9-12.4) and 7.2 (95% CI: 2.4-21.4), respectively. Similarly, a history of radiation therapy was associated with a non-significantly increased risk of reoperation after both 1-stage (HR = 1.4; 95% CI: 0.7-2.5) and 2-stage (HR = 1.6; 95% CI: 0.9-3.1) procedures. Reconstruction failure was highest (13.2%) in the 2-stage procedures with a history of radiation therapy. Breast reconstruction approaches other than implants should be seriously considered among women who have received radiation therapy.

  9. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Lung Injury with EUK-207 and Genistein: Effects in Adolescent Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, J.; Jelveh, S.; Zaidi, A.; Doctrow, S. R.; Hill, R. P.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of civilian populations to radiation due to accident, war or terrorist act is an increasing concern. The lung is one of the more radiosensitive organs that may be affected in people receiving partial-body irradiation and radiation injury in lung is thought to be associated with the development of a prolonged inflammatory response. Here we examined how effectively damage to the lung can be mitigated by administration of drugs initiated at different times after radiation exposure and examined response in adolescent animals for comparison with the young adult animals that we had studied previously. We studied the mitigation efficacy of the isoflavone genistein (50 mg/kg) and the salen-Mn superoxide dismutase-catalase mimetic EUK-207 (8 mg/kg), both of which have been reported to scavenge reactive oxygen species and reduce activity of the NFkB pathway. The drugs were given by subcutaneous injection to 6- to 7-week-old Fisher rats daily starting either immediately or 2 weeks after irradiation with 12 Gy to the whole thorax. The treatment was stopped at 28 weeks post irradiation and the animals were assessed for levels of inflammatory cytokines, activated macrophages, oxidative damage and fibrosis at 48 weeks post irradiation. We demonstrated that both genistein and EUK-207 delayed and suppressed the increased breathing rate associated with pneumonitis. These agents also reduced levels of oxidative damage (50–100%), levels of TGF-β1 expression (75–100%), activated macrophages (20–60%) and fibrosis (60–80%). The adolescent rats developed pneumonitis earlier following irradiation of the lung than did the adult rats leading to greater severe morbidity requiring euthanasia (~37% in adolescents vs. ~10% in young adults) but the extent of the mitigation of the damage was similar or slightly greater. PMID:23237541

  10. [Experimental model of severe local radiation injuries of the skin after X-rays].

    PubMed

    Kotenko, K V; Moroz, B B; Nasonova, T A; Dobrynina, O A; LIpengolz, A A; Gimadova, T I; Deshevoy, Yu B; Lebedev, V G; Lyrschikova, A V; Eremin, I I

    2013-01-01

    The experimental model of severe local radiation injuries skin under the influence of a relatively soft X-rays on a modified device RAP 100-10 produced by "Diagnostica-M" (Russia) was proposed. The model can be used as pre-clinical studies in small experimental animals in order to improve the treatment of local radiation injuries, especially in the conditions of application of cellular therapy.

  11. Inflammation and chronic oxidative stress in radiation-induced late normal tissue injury: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiling; Robbins, Mike E C

    2009-01-01

    The threat of radiation-induced late normal tissue injury limits the dose of radiation that can be delivered safely to cancer patients presenting with solid tumors. Tissue dysfunction and failure, associated with atrophy, fibrosis and/or necrosis, as well as vascular injury, have been reported in late responding normal tissues, including the central nervous system, gut, kidney, liver, lung, and skin. The precise mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced late normal tissue injury have not been fully elucidated. It has been proposed recently that the radiation-induced late effects are caused, in part, by chronic oxidative stress and inflammation. Increased production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to lipid peroxidation, oxidation of DNA and proteins, as well as activation of pro-inflammatory factors has been observed in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we will present direct and indirect evidence to support this hypothesis. To improve the long-term survival and quality of life for radiotherapy patients, new approaches have been examined in preclinical models for their efficacy in preventing or mitigating the radiation-induced chronic normal tissue injury. We and others have tested drugs that can either attenuate inflammation or reduce chronic oxidative stress in animal models of late radiation-induced normal tissue injury. The effectiveness of renin-angiotensin system blockers, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, and antioxidants/antioxidant enzymes in preventing or mitigating the severity of radiation-induced late effects indicates that radiation-induced chronic injury can be prevented and/or treated. This provides a rationale for the design and development of anti-inflammatory-based interventional approaches for the treatment of radiation-induced late normal tissue injury.

  12. Delayed intervention with transplants and neurotrophic factors supports recovery of forelimb function after cervical spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lynskey, James V; Sandhu, Faheem A; Sandhu, Faheen A; Dai, Hai-Ning; Dai, Hail-Ning; McAtee, Marietta; Slotkin, Jonathan R; Slotkin, Jon R; MacArthur, Linda; Bregman, Barbara S

    2006-05-01

    The adult central nervous system is capable of considerable anatomical reorganization and functional recovery after injury. Functional outcomes, however, vary greatly, depending upon size and location of injury, type and timing of intervention, and type of recovery and plasticity evaluated. The present study was undertaken to assess the recovery of skilled and unskilled forelimb function in adult rats after a C5/C6 spinal cord over-hemisection and delayed intervention with fetal spinal cord transplants and neurotrophins. Recovery of forelimb function was evaluated during both target reaching (a skilled behavior) and vertical exploration (an unskilled behavior). Anatomical tracing and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the growth of descending raphespinal, corticospinal, and rubrospinal fibers at the injury site, tracts that normally confer forelimb function. Delayed intervention with transplants and either brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) restored skilled left forelimb reaching to pre-injury levels. Animals showed recovery of normal reaching movements rather than compensation with abnormal movements. Transplants and NT-3 also improved right forelimb use during an unskilled vertical exploration, but not skilled right reaching. Intervention with fetal transplant tissue supported the growth of descending serotonergic, corticospinal, and rubrospinal fibers into the transplant at the lesion site. The addition of neurotrophins, however, did not significantly increase axonal growth at the lesion site. These studies suggest that the recovery of skilled and unskilled forelimb use is possible after a large cervical spinal cord injury following delayed intervention with fetal spinal cord and neurotrophins. Plasticity of both spared and axotomized descending pathways likely contributes to the functional recovery observed.

  13. Radiation Injury After a Nuclear Detonation: Medical Consequences and the Need for Scarce Resources Allocation

    PubMed Central

    DiCarlo, Andrea L.; Maher, Carmen; Hick, John L.; Hanfling, Dan; Dainiak, Nicholas; Chao, Nelson; Bader, Judith L.; Coleman, C. Norman; Weinstock, David M.

    2013-01-01

    A 10-kiloton (kT) nuclear detonation within a US city could expose hundreds of thousands of people to radiation. The Scarce Resources for a Nuclear Detonation Project was undertaken to guide community planning and response in the aftermath of a nuclear detonation, when demand will greatly exceed available resources. This article reviews the pertinent literature on radiation injuries from human exposures and animal models to provide a foundation for the triage and management approaches outlined in this special issue. Whole-body doses >2 Gy can produce clinically significant acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which classically involves the hematologic, gastrointestinal, cutaneous, and cardiovascular/central nervous systems. The severity and presentation of ARS are affected by several factors, including radiation dose and dose rate, interindividual variability in radiation response, type of radiation (eg, gamma alone, gamma plus neutrons), partial-body shielding, and possibly age, sex, and certain preexisting medical conditions. The combination of radiation with trauma, burns, or both (ie, combined injury) confers a worse prognosis than the same dose of radiation alone. Supportive care measures, including fluid support, antibiotics, and possibly myeloid cytokines (eg, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor), can improve the prognosis for some irradiated casualties. Finally, expert guidance and surge capacity for casualties with ARS are available from the Radiation Emergency Medical Management Web site and the Radiation Injury Treatment Network. PMID:21402810

  14. Radiation injury after a nuclear detonation: medical consequences and the need for scarce resources allocation.

    PubMed

    DiCarlo, Andrea L; Maher, Carmen; Hick, John L; Hanfling, Dan; Dainiak, Nicholas; Chao, Nelson; Bader, Judith L; Coleman, C Norman; Weinstock, David M

    2011-03-01

    A 10-kiloton (kT) nuclear detonation within a US city could expose hundreds of thousands of people to radiation. The Scarce Resources for a Nuclear Detonation Project was undertaken to guide community planning and response in the aftermath of a nuclear detonation, when demand will greatly exceed available resources. This article reviews the pertinent literature on radiation injuries from human exposures and animal models to provide a foundation for the triage and management approaches outlined in this special issue. Whole-body doses >2 Gy can produce clinically significant acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which classically involves the hematologic, gastrointestinal, cutaneous, and cardiovascular/central nervous systems. The severity and presentation of ARS are affected by several factors, including radiation dose and dose rate, interindividual variability in radiation response, type of radiation (eg, gamma alone, gamma plus neutrons), partial-body shielding, and possibly age, sex, and certain preexisting medical conditions. The combination of radiation with trauma, burns, or both (ie, combined injury) confers a worse prognosis than the same dose of radiation alone. Supportive care measures, including fluid support, antibiotics, and possibly myeloid cytokines (eg, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor), can improve the prognosis for some irradiated casualties. Finally, expert guidance and surge capacity for casualties with ARS are available from the Radiation Emergency Medical Management Web site and the Radiation Injury Treatment Network.

  15. Three-phase radionuclide bone scanning in evaluation of local radiation injury. A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Mettler, F.A. Jr.; Monsein, L.; Davis, M.; Rosenberg, R.; Kelsey, C.; Listrom, M.

    1987-10-01

    The management of local radiation injuries is influenced by the degree of vascular compromise within the skin and underlying tissues. Other authors have used thermography and angiography in assessing the blood flow to radiation damaged tissues. This report describes the use of radionuclide imaging in the evaluation of a patient who developed necrosis of his distal digits following a radiation accident. In addition to determining the vascular status of the hands, imaging helped indicate an appropriate level for amputation.

  16. Delayed repair of radiation induced clustered DNA damage: Friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, Laura J.; O’Neill, Peter; Lomax, Martine E.

    2011-01-01

    A signature of ionizing radiation exposure is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites, defined as two or more lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA by passage of a single radiation track. Clustered damage is made up of double strand breaks (DSB) with associated base lesions or abasic (AP) sites, and non-DSB clusters comprised of base lesions, AP sites and single strand breaks. This review will concentrate on the experimental findings of the processing of non-DSB clustered damaged sites. It has been shown that non-DSB clustered damaged sites compromise the base excision repair pathway leading to the lifetime extension of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions, thus the likelihood that the lesions persist to replication and induce mutation is increased. In addition certain non-DSB clustered damaged sites are processed within the cell to form additional DSB. The use of E. coli to demonstrate that clustering of DNA lesions is the major cause of the detrimental consequences of ionizing radiation is also discussed. The delayed repair of non-DSB clustered damaged sites in humans can be seen as a “friend”, leading to cell killing in tumour cells or as a “foe”, resulting in the formation of mutations and genetic instability in normal tissue. PMID:21130102

  17. Delayed Workforce Entry and High Emigration Rates for Recent Canadian Radiation Oncology Graduates

    SciTech Connect

    Loewen, Shaun K.; Halperin, Ross; Lefresne, Shilo; Trotter, Theresa; Stuckless, Teri; Brundage, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the employment status and location of recent Canadian radiation oncology (RO) graduates and to identify current workforce entry trends. Methods and Materials: A fill-in-the-blank spreadsheet was distributed to all RO program directors in December 2013 and June 2014, requesting the employment status and location of their graduates over the last 3 years. Visa trainee graduates were excluded. Results: Response rate from program directors was 100% for both survey administrations. Of 101 graduates identified, 99 (98%) had known employment status and location. In the December survey, 5 2013 graduates (16%), 17 2012 graduates (59%), and 18 2011 graduates (75%) had permanent staff employment. Six months later, 5 2014 graduates (29%), 15 2013 graduates (48%), 24 2012 graduates (83%), and 21 2011 graduates (88%) had secured staff positions. Fellowships and temporary locums were common for those without staff employment. The proportion of graduates with staff positions abroad increased from 22% to 26% 6 months later. Conclusions: Workforce entry for most RO graduates was delayed but showed steady improvement with longer time after graduation. High emigration rates for jobs abroad signify domestic employment challenges for newly certified, Canadian-trained radiation oncologists. Coordination on a national level is required to address and regulate radiation oncologist supply and demand disequilibrium in Canada.

  18. In vivo evidence for an endothelium-dependent mechanism in radiation-induced normal tissue injury

    PubMed Central

    Rannou, Emilie; François, Agnès; Toullec, Aurore; Guipaud, Olivier; Buard, Valérie; Tarlet, Georges; Mintet, Elodie; Jaillet, Cyprien; Iruela-Arispe, Maria Luisa; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism involved in side effects of radiation therapy, and especially the role of the endothelium remains unclear. Previous results showed that plasminogen activator inhibitor-type 1 (PAI-1) contributes to radiation-induced intestinal injury and suggested that this role could be driven by an endothelium-dependent mechanism. We investigated whether endothelial-specific PAI-1 deletion could affect radiation-induced intestinal injury. We created a mouse model with a specific deletion of PAI-1 in the endothelium (PAI-1KOendo) by a Cre-LoxP system. In a model of radiation enteropathy, survival and intestinal radiation injury were followed as well as intestinal gene transcriptional profile and inflammatory cells intestinal infiltration. Irradiated PAI-1KOendo mice exhibited increased survival, reduced acute enteritis severity and attenuated late fibrosis compared with irradiated PAI-1flx/flx mice. Double E-cadherin/TUNEL labeling confirmed a reduced epithelial cell apoptosis in irradiated PAI-1KOendo. High-throughput gene expression combined with bioinformatic analyses revealed a putative involvement of macrophages. We observed a decrease in CD68+cells in irradiated intestinal tissues from PAI-1KOendo mice as well as modifications associated with M1/M2 polarization. This work shows that PAI-1 plays a role in radiation-induced intestinal injury by an endothelium-dependent mechanism and demonstrates in vivo that the endothelium is directly involved in the progression of radiation-induced enteritis. PMID:26510580

  19. Pathophysiological Responses in Rat and Mouse Models of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lianhong; Yang, Jianhua; Li, Guoqian; Li, Yi; Wu, Rong; Cheng, Jinping; Tang, Yamei

    2017-03-01

    The brain is the major dose-limiting organ in patients undergoing radiotherapy for assorted conditions. Radiation-induced brain injury is common and mainly occurs in patients receiving radiotherapy for malignant head and neck tumors, arteriovenous malformations, or lung cancer-derived brain metastases. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms of radiation-induced brain injury are largely unknown. Although many treatment strategies are employed for affected individuals, the effects remain suboptimal. Accordingly, animal models are extremely important for elucidating pathogenic radiation-associated mechanisms and for developing more efficacious therapies. So far, models employing various animal species with different radiation dosages and fractions have been introduced to investigate the prevention, mechanisms, early detection, and management of radiation-induced brain injury. However, these models all have limitations, and none are widely accepted. This review summarizes the animal models currently set forth for studies of radiation-induced brain injury, especially rat and mouse, as well as radiation dosages, dose fractionation, and secondary pathophysiological responses.

  20. New strategies for the prevention of radiation injury: possible implications for countering radiation hazards of long-term space travel.

    PubMed

    Seed, Thomas; Kumar, Sree; Whitnall, Mark; Srinivasan, Venkataraman; Singh, Vijay; Elliott, Thomas; Landauer, Michael; Miller, Alexandra; Chang, Cheng-Min; Inal, Cyndi; Deen, Jason; Gehlhaus, Martin; Jackson, William; Hilyard, Edward; Pendergrass, James; Toles, Raymond; Villa, Vilmar; Miner, Venita; Stewart, Michael; Benjack, James; Danilenko, Dimitry; Farrell, Ckatherine

    2002-12-01

    New strategies for the prevention of radiation injuries are currently being explored with the ultimate aim of developing globally radioprotective, nontoxic pharmacologics. The prophylactic treatments under review encompass such diverse pharmacologic classes as novel immunomodulators, nutritional antioxidants, and cytokines. An immunomodulator that shows promise is 5-androstenediol (AED), a well-tolerated, long-acting androstene steroid with broad-spectrum radioprotective attributes that include not only protection against acute tissue injury, but also reduced susceptibility to infectious agents, as well as reduced rates of neoplastic transformation. Other potentially useful radioprotectants currently under study include the nutraceutical vitamin E and analogs, a chemically-engineered cytokine, interleukin-1beta, and a sustained-release formulation of an aminothiol, amifostine. Results suggest that a new paradigm is evolving for the prophylaxes of radiation injuries, based on use of newly identified, nontoxic, broad-spectrum prophylactic agents whose protective action may be leveraged by subsequent postexposure use of cytokines with organ-specific reparative functions.

  1. The Therapeutic Effectiveness of Delayed Fetal Spinal Cord Tissue Transplantation on Respiratory Function Following Mid-Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ching; Lai, Sih-Rong; Shao, Yu-Han; Chen, Chun-Lin; Lee, Kun-Ze

    2017-01-17

    Respiratory impairment due to damage of the spinal respiratory motoneurons and interruption of the descending drives from brainstem premotor neurons to spinal respiratory motoneurons is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality following cervical spinal cord injury. The present study was designed to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of delayed transplantation of fetal spinal cord (FSC) tissue on respiratory function in rats with mid-cervical spinal cord injury. Embryonic day-14 rat FSC tissue was transplanted into a C4 spinal cord hemilesion cavity in adult male rats at 1 week postinjury. The histological results showed that FSC-derived grafts can survive, fill the lesion cavity, and differentiate into neurons and astrocytes at 8 weeks post-transplantation. Some FSC-derived graft neurons exhibited specific neurochemical markers of neurotransmitter (e.g., serotonin, noradrenalin, or acetylcholine). Moreover, a robust expression of glutamatergic and γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic fibers was observed within FSC-derived grafts. Retrograde tracing results indicated that there was a connection between FSC-derived grafts and host phrenic nucleus. Neurophysiological recording of the phrenic nerve demonstrated that phrenic burst amplitude ipsilateral to the lesion was significantly greater in injured animals that received FSC transplantation than in those that received buffer transplantation under high respiratory drives. These results suggest that delayed FSC transplantation may have the potential to repair the injured spinal cord and promote respiratory functional recovery after mid-cervical spinal cord injury.

  2. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: II. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vivo, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize the evidence for non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation in vivo. Currently, human health risks associated with radiation exposures are based primarily on the assumption that the detrimental effects of radiation occur in irradiated cells. Over the years a number of non-targeted effects of radiation exposure in vivo have been described that challenge this concept. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effects, clastogenic factors produced in plasma from irradiated individuals that can cause chromosomal damage when cultured with nonirradiated cells, and transgenerational effects of parental irradiation that can manifest in the progeny. These effects pose new challenges to evaluating the risk(s) associated with radiation exposure and understanding radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  3. Time-dependent study of radiation trapping by time-delayed two-photon absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Molander, W.; Belsley, M.; Streater, A.; Burnett, K.

    1983-10-01

    The transport of resonance radiation through an optically thick vapor of Sr atoms is studied. A pulsed dye laser tuned to the 461 nm resonance line excites a narrow (approx. 60 ..mu..m diam) column of Sr atoms along the axis of a cylindrical oven containing Sr vapor and Ar buffer gas. After a delay of less than or equal to 80 ns, a second dye laser excites the atom from the first excited state (5s5p) to a higher excited state (5s7s). The fluorescence from this latter transition is monitored as the second laser is translated parallel to the first. Since the excited state-excited state fluorescence is not trapped the result is a plot of density of atoms in the 5s5p state as a function of position from the originally excited volume. The results are discussed qualitatively.

  4. Dynamic Response of Acoustic Delay Line for Beam Lines of Synchrotron Radiation Lithography System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Eijiro

    1998-12-01

    Protecting against the sudden rupture of a beryllium window foilhas been a concern in synchrotron radiation lithography. This paperpresents a design study of a new acoustic delay line (ADL) for beamline protection. The ADL consists of a stationary outer tube and amovable inner tube. Between the outer tube and the inner tube, aseries of partitions consisting of stationary and floating platesfunctions as a buffer against invading gas. The inner tube connectsthe floating plates and the beryllium window and maintains aninternal narrow light path by moving synchronously with the scanningmirror.BLVAC, a computer program, has been developed to assist in the design and to simulate the dynamic response. The calculation results provide us with satisfactory design parameters to ensure that the closing time of the shut-off valve is within 30 milliseconds.

  5. Serum microRNAs are early indicators of survival after radiation-induced hematopoietic injury

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Sanket S.; Fendler, Wojciech; Watson, Jacqueline; Hamilton, Abigail; Pan, Yunfeng; Gaudiano, Emily; Moskwa, Patryk; Bhanja, Payel; Saha, Subhrajit; Guha, Chandan; Parmar, Kalindi; Chowdhury, Dipanjan

    2015-01-01

    Accidental radiation exposure is a threat to human health that necessitates effective clinical planning and diagnosis. Minimally invasive biomarkers that can predict long-term radiation injury are urgently needed for optimal management after a radiation accident. We have identified serum microRNA (miRNA) signatures that indicate long-term impact of total body irradiation (TBI) in mice when measured within 24 hours of exposure. Impact of TBI on the hematopoietic system was systematically assessed to determine a correlation of residual hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with increasing doses of radiation. Serum miRNA signatures distinguished untreated mice from animals exposed to radiation and correlated with the impact of radiation on HSCs. Mice exposed to sublethal (6.5 Gy) and lethal (8 Gy) doses of radiation were indistinguishable for 3 to 4 weeks after exposure. A serum miRNA signature detectable 24 hours after radiation exposure consistently segregated these two cohorts. Furthermore, using either a radioprotective agent before, or radiation mitigation after, lethal radiation, we determined that the serum miRNA signature correlated with the impact of radiation on animal health rather than the radiation dose. Last, using humanized mice that had been engrafted with human CD34+ HSCs, we determined that the serum miRNA signature indicated radiation-induced injury to the human bone marrow cells. Our data suggest that serum miRNAs can serve as functional dosimeters of radiation, representing a potential breakthrough in early assessment of radiation-induced hematopoietic damage and timely use of medical countermeasures to mitigate the long-term impact of radiation. PMID:25972001

  6. Neurogenic differentiation factor NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Du, Aonan; Xu, Jing; Ma, Yanchao; Cao, Han; Yang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Chen, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, especially the small intestine, is particularly sensitive to radiation, and is prone to radiation-induced injury as a result. Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is an evolutionarily-conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor. NeuroD contains a protein transduction domain (PTD), which allows it to be exogenously delivered across the membrane of mammalian cells, whereupon its transcription activity can be unleashed. Whether NeuroD has therapeutic effects for radiation-induced injury remains unclear. In the present study, we prepared a NeuroD-EGFP recombinant protein, and explored its protective effects on the survival and intestinal damage induced by ionizing radiation. Our results showed that NeuroD-EGFP could be transduced into small intestine epithelial cells and tissues. NeuroD-EGFP administration significantly increased overall survival of mice exposed to lethal total body irradiation (TBI). This recombinant NeuroD also reduced radiation-induced intestinal mucosal injury and apoptosis, and improved crypt survival. Expression profiling of NeuroD-EGFP-treated mice revealed upregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), a known inhibitor of apoptosis in mammalian cells. In conclusion, NeuroD confers protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury, and provides a novel therapeutic clinical option for the prevention of intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and the treatment of victims of incidental exposure. PMID:27436572

  7. Delayed Partial Liquid Ventilation Shows no Efficacy in the Treatment of Smoke Inhalation Injury in Swine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    Windows (Statsoft, 1993). RESULTS All animals appeared to receive a similar degree of injury, as measured by the percent carboxyhemoglobin ( group I...glutathione concentrations. These measurements were in- dexed to total protein content of the specimens to control for the confounding presence of the...software (Becton Dickinson). Statistical analysis. Ventilatory parameters and serum injury and inflammatory markers were assessed by repeated measures

  8. The biological effect of prolonged radiation and ways of selecting new anti-radiation drugs effective in this kind of radiation injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogozkin, V. D.; Chertkov, K. S.; Nikolov, I.

    1974-01-01

    The basic characteristics of prolonged radiation - increased tolerance of radiation injury - are attributed to cellular kinetics; as dose rate is reduced, the population rate is not disturbed, particularly that of stem cells which makes it possible for the organism to tolerate higher radiation loads. It is concluded that this effect makes approved radio protectors, whose effect contains an established cytostatic component, unsuitable for prolonged radiation. It is better to correct the stem pool formation process by either accelerating the proliferation of cells or limiting the effect of stimuli causing cells to lose colony forming properties.

  9. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in Radiation-Induced Rectal Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Jeff M.; Gay, Hiram; Jackson, Andrew; Tucker, Susan L.; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2010-03-01

    The available dose/volume/outcome data for rectal injury were reviewed. The volume of rectum receiving >=60Gy is consistently associated with the risk of Grade >=2 rectal toxicity or rectal bleeding. Parameters for the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal tissue complication probability model from four clinical series are remarkably consistent, suggesting that high doses are predominant in determining the risk of toxicity. The best overall estimates (95% confidence interval) of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model parameters are n = 0.09 (0.04-0.14); m = 0.13 (0.10-0.17); and TD{sub 50} = 76.9 (73.7-80.1) Gy. Most of the models of late radiation toxicity come from three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy dose-escalation studies of early-stage prostate cancer. It is possible that intensity-modulated radiotherapy or proton beam dose distributions require modification of these models because of the inherent differences in low and intermediate dose distributions.

  10. Mensenchymal stem cells can delay radiation-induced crypt death: impact on intestinal CD44(+) fragments.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng-Yu; Jin, Xing; Jiang, Yi-Yao; Wang, Li-Xian; Liu, Yong-Jun; Wang, Jin

    2016-05-01

    Intestinal stem cells are primitive cells found within the intestinal epithelium that play a central role in maintaining epithelial homeostasis through self-renewal and commitment into functional epithelial cells. Several markers are available to identify intestinal stem cells, such as Lgr5, CD24 and EphB2, which can be used to sort intestinal stem cells from mammalian gut. Here, we identify and isolate intestinal stem cells from C57BL/6 mice by using a cell surface antigen, CD44. In vitro, some CD44(+) crypt cells are capable of forming "villus-crypt"-like structures (organoids). A subset strongly positive for CD44 expresses high levels of intestinal stem-cell-related genes, including Lgr5, Bmi1, Hopx, Lrig1, Ascl2, Smoc2 and Rnf43. Cells from this subset are more capable of developing into organoids in vitro, compared with the subset weakly positive for CD44. However, the organoids are sensitive to ionizing irradiation. We investigate the specific roles of mesenchymal stem cells in protecting organoids against radiation-induced crypt death. When co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells, the crypt domains of irradiated organoids possess more proliferative cells and fewer apoptotic cells than those not co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells. Cd44v6 continues to be expressed in the crypt domains of irradiated organoids co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells. Our results indicate specific roles of mesenchymal stem cells in delaying radiation-induced crypt death in vitro.

  11. Relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid can suppress radiation-induced cellular senescence in mammalian fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Kashino, Genro; Mori, Hiromu; Watanabe, Masami

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence is thought to be caused by nuclear DNA damage that cannot be repaired. However, here we found that radiation induces delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress after irradiation. We investigated whether the relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid would suppress the radiation-induced cellular senescence in Syrian golden hamster embryo (SHE) cells. We observed that the level of oxidative stress was drastically increased soon after irradiation, then declined to the level in non-irradiated cells, and increased again with a peak on day 3 after irradiation. We found that the inductions of cellular senescence after X-irradiation were reduced along with suppression of the delayed induction of oxidative stress by treatment with ascorbic acid, but not when oxidative stress occurred immediately after irradiation. Moreover, treatment of ascorbic acid inhibited p53 accumulation at 3 days after irradiation. Our data suggested a delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress levels plays an important role in the process of radiation-induced cellular senescence by p53 accumulation.

  12. PAI-1-Dependent Endothelial Cell Death Determines Severity of Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Abderrahmani, Rym; François, Agnes; Buard, Valerie; Tarlet, Georges; Blirando, Karl; Hneino, Mohammad; Vaurijoux, Aurelie; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Milliat, Fabien

    2012-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity still remains a dose-limiting factor in clinical radiation therapy. Recently, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (SERPINE1/PAI-1) was reported as an essential mediator of late radiation-induced intestinal injury. However, it is not clear whether PAI-1 plays a role in acute radiation-induced intestinal damage and we hypothesized that PAI-1 may play a role in the endothelium radiosensitivity. In vivo, in a model of radiation enteropathy in PAI-1 −/− mice, apoptosis of radiosensitive compartments, epithelial and microvascular endothelium was quantified. In vitro, the role of PAI-1 in the radiation-induced endothelial cells (ECs) death was investigated. The level of apoptotic ECs is lower in PAI-1 −/− compared with Wt mice after irradiation. This is associated with a conserved microvascular density and consequently with a better mucosal integrity in PAI-1 −/− mice. In vitro, irradiation rapidly stimulates PAI-1 expression in ECs and radiation sensitivity is increased in ECs that stably overexpress PAI-1, whereas PAI-1 knockdown increases EC survival after irradiation. Moreover, ECs prepared from PAI-1 −/− mice are more resistant to radiation-induced cell death than Wt ECs and this is associated with activation of the Akt pathway. This study demonstrates that PAI-1 plays a key role in radiation-induced EC death in the intestine and suggests that this contributes strongly to the progression of radiation-induced intestinal injury. PMID:22563394

  13. A Nonhuman Primate Model of Human Radiation-Induced Venocclusive Liver Disease and Hepatocyte Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yannam, Govardhana Rao; Han, Bing; Setoyama, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Ito, Ryotaro; Brooks, Jenna M.; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Galambos, Csaba; Fong, Jason V.; Deutsch, Melvin; Quader, Mubina A.; Yamanouchi, Kosho; Kabarriti, Rafi; Mehta, Keyur; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; and others

    2014-02-01

    Background: Human liver has an unusual sensitivity to radiation that limits its use in cancer therapy or in preconditioning for hepatocyte transplantation. Because the characteristic veno-occlusive lesions of radiation-induced liver disease do not occur in rodents, there has been no experimental model to investigate the limits of safe radiation therapy or explore the pathogenesis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease. Methods and Materials: We performed a dose-escalation study in a primate, the cynomolgus monkey, using hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in 13 animals. Results: At doses ≥40 Gy, animals developed a systemic syndrome resembling human radiation-induced liver disease, consisting of decreased albumin, elevated alkaline phosphatase, loss of appetite, ascites, and normal bilirubin. Higher radiation doses were lethal, causing severe disease that required euthanasia approximately 10 weeks after radiation. Even at lower doses in which radiation-induced liver disease was mild or nonexistent, latent and significant injury to hepatocytes was demonstrated by asialoglycoprotein-mediated functional imaging. These monkeys developed hepatic failure with encephalopathy when they received parenteral nutrition containing high concentrations of glucose. Histologically, livers showed central obstruction via an unusual intimal swelling that progressed to central fibrosis. Conclusions: The cynomolgus monkey, as the first animal model of human veno-occlusive radiation-induced liver disease, provides a resource for characterizing the early changes and pathogenesis of venocclusion, for establishing nonlethal therapeutic dosages, and for examining experimental therapies to minimize radiation injury.

  14. Optical Spectroscopy and Multivariate Analysis for Biodosimetry and Monitoring of Radiation Injury to the Skin

    SciTech Connect

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Curry, Terry L.; Luders, Teresa; Thrall, Karla D.; Peterson, James M.

    2012-08-01

    In the event of an intentional or accidental release of ionizing radiation in a densely populated area, timely assessment and triage of the general population for the radiation exposure is critical. In particular, a significant number of the victims may sustain cutaneous radiation injury, which increases the mortality and worsens the overall prognosis of the victims suffered from combined thermal/mechanical and radiation trauma. Diagnosis of the cutaneous radiation injury is challenging, and established methods largely rely on visual manifestations, presence of the skin contamination, and a high degree of recall by the victim. Availability of a high throughput non-invasive in vivo biodosimetry tool for assessment of the radiation exposure of the skin is of particular importance for the timely diagnosis of the cutaneous injury. In the reported investigation, we have tested the potential of an optical reflectance spectroscopy for the evaluation of the radiation injury to the skin. This is technically attractive because optical spectroscopy relies on well-established and routinely used for various applications instrumentation, one example being pulse oximetry which uses selected wavelengths for the quantification of the blood oxygenation. Our method relies on a broad spectral region ranging from the locally absorbed, shallow-penetrating ultraviolet and visible (250 to 800 nm) to more deeply penetrating near-Infrared (800 – 1600 nm) light for the monitoring of multiple physiological changes in the skin upon irradiation. Chemometrics is a multivariate methodology that allows the information from entire spectral region to be used to generate predictive regression models. In this report we demonstrate that simple spectroscopic method, such as the optical reflectance spectroscopy, in combination with multivariate data analysis, offers the promise of rapid and non-invasive in vivo diagnosis and monitoring of the cutaneous radiation exposure, and is able accurately predict

  15. Minimizing Radiation-induced Skin Injury in Interventional Radiology Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-11-01

    skin reaction to radiation; has threshold dose of 2 Gy and resembles a sunburn; subsides by 48 hours after exposure and is frequently not noticed by...position rota- tion and supplemental beam filtration. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 1996; 17:41–49. 9. Mahesh M. Fluoroscopy: patient radia- tion exposure ...Donald L. Miller, MD Stephen Balter, PhD Patrick T. Noonan, MD Jeffrey D. Georgia, MD Index terms: Fluoroscopy, technology Radiations, exposure to

  16. Oxidative Stress Mediates Radiation Lung Injury by Inducing Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yu; Zhang Xiuwu; Rabbani, Zahid N.; Jackson, Isabel L.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Apoptosis in irradiated normal lung tissue has been observed several weeks after radiation. However, the signaling pathway propagating cell death after radiation remains unknown. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 15 Gy to the whole thorax. Pro-apoptotic signaling was evaluated 6 weeks after radiation with or without administration of AEOL10150, a potent catalytic scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Results: Apoptosis was observed primarily in type I and type II pneumocytes and endothelium. Apoptosis correlated with increased PTEN expression, inhibition of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling, and increased p53 and Bax protein levels. Transforming growth factor-{beta}1, Nox4, and oxidative stress were also increased 6 weeks after radiation. Therapeutic administration of AEOL10150 suppressed pro-apoptotic signaling and dramatically reduced the number of apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Increased PTEN signaling after radiation results in apoptosis of lung parenchymal cells. We hypothesize that upregulation of PTEN is influenced by Nox4-derived oxidative stress. To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight the role of PTEN in radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity.

  17. Time delays in the nonthermal radiation of solar flares according to observations of the CORONAS-F satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsap, Yu. T.; Stepanov, A. V.; Kashapova, L. K.; Myagkova, I. N.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Kopylova, Yu. G.; Goldvarg, T. B.

    2016-07-01

    In 2001-2003, the X-ray and microwave observations of ten solar flares of M- and X-classes were carried out by the CORONAS-F orbital station, the RSTN Sun service, and Nobeyama radio polarimeters. Based on these observations, a correlation analysis of time profiles of nonthermal radiation was performed. On average, hard X-ray radiation outstrips the microwave radiation in 9 events, i.e., time delays are positive. The appearance of negative delays is associated with effective scattering of accelerated electrons in pitch angles, where the length of the free path of a particle is less than the half-length of a flare loop. The additional indications are obtained in favor of the need to account for the effect of magnetic mirrors on the dynamics of energetic particles in the coronal arches.

  18. Intestinal Microbiota-Derived Metabolomic Blood Plasma Markers for Prior Radiation Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ó Broin, Pilib; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Saha, Subhrajit; Hartil, Kirsten; Chen, Emily I.; Goldman, Devorah; Fleming, William Harv; Kurland, Irwin J.; Guha, Chandan; Golden, Aaron

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Assessing whole-body radiation injury and absorbed dose is essential for remediation efforts following accidental or deliberate exposure in medical, industrial, military, or terrorist incidents. We hypothesize that variations in specific metabolite concentrations extracted from blood plasma would correlate with whole-body radiation injury and dose. Methods and Materials: Groups of C57BL/6 mice (n=12 per group) were exposed to 0, 2, 4, 8, and 10.4 Gy of whole-body gamma radiation. At 24 hours after treatment, all animals were euthanized, and both plasma and liver biopsy samples were obtained, the latter being used to identify a distinct hepatic radiation injury response within plasma. A semiquantitative, untargeted metabolite/lipid profile was developed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, which identified 354 biochemical compounds. A second set of C57BL/6 mice (n=6 per group) were used to assess a subset of identified plasma markers beyond 24 hours. Results: We identified a cohort of 37 biochemical compounds in plasma that yielded the optimal separation of the irradiated sample groups, with the most correlated metabolites associated with pyrimidine (positively correlated) and tryptophan (negatively correlated) metabolism. The latter were predominantly associated with indole compounds, and there was evidence that these were also correlated between liver and plasma. No evidence of saturation as a function of dose was observed, as has been noted for studies involving metabolite analysis of urine. Conclusions: Plasma profiling of specific metabolites related to pyrimidine and tryptophan pathways can be used to differentiate whole-body radiation injury and dose response. As the tryptophan-associated indole compounds have their origin in the intestinal microbiome and subsequently the liver, these metabolites particularly represent an attractive marker for radiation injury within blood plasma.

  19. Radiation injury and acute death in Armadillidium vulgare (terrestrial isopod, Crustacea) subjected to ionizing radiation. [/sup 137/Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsuchi, Y.; Egami, N.

    1981-01-01

    From whole- and partial-body irradiation experiments with adult Armadillidium vulgare, the following conclusions were drawn: the LD/sub 50/-30 days for this animal when subjected to ..gamma.. radiation at 25 +- 2/sup 0/C was about 30 kR. Radiosensitivity of the animal changed during the molt cycle. Ionizing radiation increased mortality at ecdysis and during intermolt stages. Anatomical and histological observations indicated that (1) gastrointestinal injury as the major cause of acute death does not apply to this animal because the intestine is not a cell-proliferative organ: (2) the epidermis may be the critical target organ.

  20. Toll-like receptor 4 as a possible therapeutic target for delayed brain injuries after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Takeshi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a well-recognized consequence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 may be an important therapeutic target for post-SAH neuroinflammation. Of the TLR family members, TLR4 is expressed in various cell types in the central nervous system, and is unique in that it can signal through both the myeloid differentiation primary-response protein 88-dependent and the toll receptor associated activator of interferon-dependent cascades to coordinate the maximal inflammatory response. TLR4 can be activated by many endogenous ligands having damage-associated molecular patterns including heme and fibrinogen at the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, and the resultant inflammatory reaction and thereby tissue damages may furthermore activate TLR4. It is widely accepted that the excreted products of TLR4 signaling alter neuronal functions. Previous studies have focused on the pathway through nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling among TLR4 signaling pathways as to the development of early brain injury (EBI) such as neuronal apoptosis and blood-brain barrier disruption, and cerebral vasospasm. However, many findings suggest that both pathways via NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases may be involved in EBI and cerebral vasospasm development. To overcome EBI and cerebral vasospasm is important to improve outcomes after SAH, because both EBI and vasopasm are responsible for delayed brain injuries or delayed cerebral ischemia, the most important preventable cause of poor outcomes after SAH. Increasing evidence has shown that TLR4 signaling plays an important role in SAH-induced brain injuries. Better understanding of the roles of TLR4 signaling in SAH will facilitate development of new treatments.

  1. Future directions in therapy of whole body radiation injury

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    Clinicians have long known that marked granulocytopenia predisposed patients to bacterial infections either from pathogens or commensal organisms with which an individual usually lives in harmony. Evidence that infection was of major importance derives from several observations: (a) clinical observations of bacterial infection in human beings exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in reactor accidents, and in large animals dying from radiation exposure, (b) correlative studies on mortality rate, time of death, and incidence of positive culture in animals, (c) challenge of irradiated animals with normally non-virulent organisms, (d) studies of germ free mice and rats, and (e) studies of the effectiveness of antibiotics in reducing mortality rate. General knowledge and sound experimental data on animals and man clearly demonstrated that the sequelae of pancytopenia (bacterial infection, thrombopenic hemorrhage, and anemia) are the lethal factors. A lot of research was required to demonstrate that there were no mysterious radiations toxins, that hyperheparinemia was not a cause of radiation hemorrhage and that radiation hemorrhage could be prevented by fresh platelet transfusions.

  2. A Gamma-Knife-Enabled Mouse Model of Cerebral Single-Hemisphere Delayed Radiation Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Liya; Engelbach, John A.; Cates, Jeremy; Perez-Torres, Carlos J.; Gao, Feng; Thotala, Dinesh; Drzymala, Robert E.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Rich, Keith M.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Ackerman, Joseph J. H.; Garbow, Joel R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a Gamma Knife-based mouse model of late time-to-onset, cerebral radiation necrosis (RN) with serial evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. Methods and Materials Mice were irradiated with the Leksell Gamma Knife® (GK) PerfexionTM (Elekta AB; Stockholm, Sweden) with total single-hemispheric radiation doses (TRD) of 45- to 60-Gy, delivered in one to three fractions. RN was measured using T2-weighted MR images, while confirmation of tissue damage was assessed histologically by hematoxylin & eosin, trichrome, and PTAH staining. Results MRI measurements demonstrate that TRD is a more important determinant of both time-to-onset and progression of RN than fractionation. The development of RN is significantly slower in mice irradiated with 45-Gy than 50- or 60-Gy, where RN development is similar. Irradiated mouse brains demonstrate all of the pathologic features observed clinically in patients with confirmed RN. A semi-quantitative (0 to 3) histologic grading system, capturing both the extent and severity of injury, is described and illustrated. Tissue damage, as assessed by a histologic score, correlates well with total necrotic volume measured by MRI (correlation coefficient = 0.948, with p<0.0001), and with post-irradiation time (correlation coefficient = 0.508, with p<0.0001). Conclusions Following GK irradiation, mice develop late time-to-onset cerebral RN histology mirroring clinical observations. MR imaging provides reliable quantification of the necrotic volume that correlates well with histologic score. This mouse model of RN will provide a platform for mechanism of action studies, the identification of imaging biomarkers of RN, and the development of clinical studies for improved mitigation and neuroprotection. PMID:26440791

  3. Delaying histone deacetylase response to injury accelerates conversion into repair Schwann cells and nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Brügger, Valérie; Duman, Mert; Bochud, Maëlle; Münger, Emmanuelle; Heller, Manfred; Ruff, Sophie; Jacob, Claire

    2017-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) regenerates after injury. However, regeneration is often compromised in the case of large lesions, and the speed of axon reconnection to their target is critical for successful functional recovery. After injury, mature Schwann cells (SCs) convert into repair cells that foster axonal regrowth, and redifferentiate to rebuild myelin. These processes require the regulation of several transcription factors, but the driving mechanisms remain partially understood. Here we identify an early response to nerve injury controlled by histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2), which coordinates the action of other chromatin-remodelling enzymes to induce the upregulation of Oct6, a key transcription factor for SC development. Inactivating this mechanism using mouse genetics allows earlier conversion into repair cells and leads to faster axonal regrowth, but impairs remyelination. Consistently, short-term HDAC1/2 inhibitor treatment early after lesion accelerates functional recovery and enhances regeneration, thereby identifying a new therapeutic strategy to improve PNS regeneration after lesion. PMID:28139683

  4. Blockade of Kv1.3 channels ameliorates radiation-induced brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Lu, Kui; Li, Zichen; Zhao, Yaodong; Wang, Yiping; Hu, Bin; Xu, Pengfei; Shi, Xiaolei; Zhou, Bin; Pennington, Michael; Chandy, K. George; Tang, Yamei

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumors affecting the head, neck, and brain account for significant morbidity and mortality. The curative efficacy of radiotherapy for these tumors is well established, but radiation carries a significant risk of neurologic injury. So far, neuroprotective therapies for radiation-induced brain injury are still limited. In this study we demonstrate that Stichodactyla helianthus (ShK)–170, a specific inhibitor of the voltage-gated potassium (Kv)1.3 channel, protected mice from radiation-induced brain injury. Methods Mice were treated with ShK-170 for 3 days immediately after brain irradiation. Radiation-induced brain injury was assessed by MRI scans and a Morris water maze. Pathophysiological change of the brain was measured by immunofluorescence. Gene and protein expressions of Kv1.3 and inflammatory factors were measured by quantitative real-time PCR, reverse transcription PCR, ELISA assay, and western blot analyses. Kv currents were recorded in the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. Results Radiation increased Kv1.3 mRNA and protein expression in microglia. Genetic silencing of Kv1.3 by specific short interference RNAs or pharmacological blockade with ShK-170 suppressed radiation-induced production of the proinflammatory factors interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, and tumor necrosis factor–α by microglia. ShK-170 also inhibited neurotoxicity mediated by radiation-activated microglia and promoted neurogenesis by increasing the proliferation of neural progenitor cells. Conclusions The therapeutic effect of ShK-170 is mediated by suppression of microglial activation and microglia-mediated neurotoxicity and enhanced neurorestoration by promoting proliferation of neural progenitor cells. PMID:24305723

  5. Detection of microvasculature alterations by synchrotron radiation in murine with delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beilei; Zhang, Bo; Huo, Hua; Wang, Tao; Wang, Qianqian; Wu, Yuanlin; Xiao, Liang; Ren, Yuqi; Zhang, Liming

    2014-04-01

    Using the tentacle extract (TE) from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata, we have previously established a delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome (DJES) model, which is meaningful for clinical interventions against jellyfish stings. However, the mechanism of DJES still remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to explore its potential mechanism by detecting TE-induced microvasculature alterations in vivo and ex vivo. Using a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, we, for the first time, directly observed the blood vessel alterations induced by jellyfish venom in vivo and ex vivo. Firstly, microvasculature imaging of whole-body mouse in vivo indicated that the small blood vessel branches in the liver and kidney in the TE-treated group, seemed much thinner than those in the control group. Secondly, 3D imaging of kidney ex vivo showed that the kidneys in the TE-treated group had incomplete vascular trees where distal vessel branches were partly missing and disorderly disturbed. Finally, histopathological analysis found that obvious morphological changes, especially hemorrhagic effects, were also present in the TE-treated kidney. Thus, TE-induced microvasculature changes might be one of the important mechanisms of multiple organ dysfunctions in DJES. In addition, the methods we employed here will probably facilitate further studies on developing effective intervention strategies against DJES.

  6. In Vitro Studies on Space Radiation-Induced Delayed Genetic Responses: Shielding Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadhim, Munira A.; Green, Lora M.; Gridley, Daila S.; Murray, Deborah K.; Tran, Da Thao; Andres, Melba; Pocock, Debbie; Macdonald, Denise; Goodhead, Dudley T.; Moyers, Michael F.

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the radiation risks involved in spaceflight is of considerable importance, especially with the long-term occupation of ISS and the planned crewed exploration missions. Several independent causes may contribute to the overall risk to astronauts exposed to the complex space environment, such as exposure to GCR as well as SPES. Protons and high-Z energetic particles comprise the GCR spectrum and may exert considerable biological effects even at low fluence. There are also considerable uncertainties associated with secondary particle effects (e.g. HZE fragments, neutrons etc.). The interaction of protons and high-LET particles with biological materials at all levels of biological organization needs to be investigated fully in order to establish a scientific basis for risk assessment. The results of these types of investigation will foster the development of appropriately directed countermeasures. In this study, we compared the biological responses to proton irradiation presented to the target cells as a monoenergetic beam of particles of complex composition delivered to cells outside or inside a tissue phantom head placed in the United States EVA space suit helmet. Measurements of chromosome aberrations, apoptosis, and the induction of key proteins were made in bone marrow from CBA/CaJ and C57BL/6 mice at early and late times post exposure to radiation at 0, 0.5, 1 and 2 Gy while inside or outside of the helmet. The data showed that proton irradiation induced transmissible chromosomal/genomic instability in haematopoietic stem cells in both strains of mice under both irradiation conditions and especially at low doses. Although differences were noted between the mouse strains in the degree and kinetics of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion, there were no significant differences observed in the level of the induced instability under either radiation condition, or for both strains of mice. Consequently, when

  7. Development and Characterization of a High Throughput Screen to investigate the delayed Effects of Radiations Commonly Encountered in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, W. F.

    Astronauts based on the space station or on long-term space missions will be exposed to high Z radiations in the cosmic environment In order to evaluate the potentially deleterious effects of exposure to radiations commonly encountered in space we have developed and characterized a high throughput assay to detect mutation deletion events and or hyperrecombination in the progeny of exposed cells This assay is based on a plasmid vector containing a green fluorescence protein reporter construct We have shown that after stable transfection of the vector into human or hamster cells this construct can identify mutations specifically base changes and deletions as well as recombination events e g gene conversion or homologous recombination occurring as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation Our focus has been on those events occurring in the progeny of an irradiated cell that are potentially associated with radiation induced genomic instability rather than the more conventional assays that evaluate the direct immediate effects of radiation exposure Considerable time has been spent automating analysis of surviving colonies as a function of time after irradiation in order to determine when delayed instability is induced and the consequences of this delayed instability The assay is now automated permitting the evaluation of potentially rare events associated with low dose low dose rate radiations commonly encountered in space

  8. Alpha-tocopherol succinate- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors mitigate radiation combined injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay K.; Wise, Stephen Y.; Fatanmi, Oluseyi O.; Beattie, Lindsay A.; Ducey, Elizabeth J.; Seed, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of alpha-tocopherol succinate (TS)- and AMD3100-mobilized progenitors in mitigating combined injury associated with acute radiation exposure in combination with secondary physical wounding. CD2F1 mice were exposed to high doses of cobalt-60 gamma-radiation and then transfused intravenously with 5 million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from TS- and AMD3100-injected mice after irradiation. Within 1 h after irradiation, mice were exposed to secondary wounding. Mice were observed for 30 d after irradiation and cytokine analysis was conducted by multiplex Luminex assay at various time-points after irradiation and wounding. Our results initially demonstrated that transfusion of TS-mobilized progenitors from normal mice enhanced survival of acutely irradiated mice exposed 24 h prior to transfusion to supralethal doses (11.5–12.5 Gy) of 60Co gamma-radiation. Subsequently, comparable transfusions of TS-mobilized progenitors were shown to significantly mitigate severe combined injuries in acutely irradiated mice. TS administered 24 h before irradiation was able to protect mice against combined injury as well. Cytokine results demonstrated that wounding modulates irradiation-induced cytokines. This study further supports the conclusion that the infusion of TS-mobilized progenitor-containing PBMCs acts as a bridging therapy in radiation-combined-injury mice. We suggest that this novel bridging therapeutic approach involving the infusion of TS-mobilized hematopoietic progenitors following acute radiation exposure or combined injury might be applicable to humans. PMID:23814114

  9. Pyruvate metabolism: A therapeutic opportunity in radiation-induced skin injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Hyun; Kang, Jeong Wook; Lee, Dong Won; Oh, Sang Ho; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Eun-Jung; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-05-08

    Ionizing radiation is used to treat a range of cancers. Despite recent technological progress, radiation therapy can damage the skin at the administration site. The specific molecular mechanisms involved in this effect have not been fully characterized. In this study, the effects of pyruvate, on radiation-induced skin injury were investigated, including the role of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDK2) signaling pathway. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a wide range of gene expression differences between the control and irradiated mice, including reduced expression of PDK2. This was confirmed using Q-PCR. Cell culture studies demonstrated that PDK2 overexpression and a high cellular pyruvate concentration inhibited radiation-induced cytokine expression. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated radiation-induced skin thickening and gene expression changes. Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness and inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings indicated that regulation of the pyruvate metabolic pathway could provide an effective approach to the control of radiation-induced skin damage. - Highlights: • The effects of radiation on skin thickness in mice. • Next generation sequencing revealed that radiation inhibited pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 expression. • PDK2 inhibited irradiation-induced cytokine gene expression. • Oral pyruvate treatment markedly downregulated radiation-induced changes in skin thickness.

  10. Palmitoylethanolamide regulates development of intestinal radiation injury in a mast cell dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junru; Zheng, Junying; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Wang, Wen; Garg, Sarita; Prather, Paul L.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Mast cells and neuroimmune interactions regulate the severity of intestinal radiation mucositis, a dose-limiting toxicity during radiation therapy of abdominal malignancies. Aims Because endocannabinoids regulate intestinal inflammation, we investigated the effect of the cannabimimetic, palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), in a mast competent (+/+) and mast cell deficient (Ws/Ws) rat model. Methods Rats underwent localized, fractionated intestinal irradiation and received daily injections with vehicle or PEA from 1 day before until 2 weeks after radiation. Intestinal injury was assessed non-invasively by luminol bioluminescence, and, at 2 weeks, by histology, morphometry, and immunohistochemical analysis, gene expression analysis, and pathway analysis. Results Compared to +/+ rats, Ws/Ws rats sustained more intestinal structural injury (p=0.01), mucosal damage (p=0.02), neutrophil infiltration (p=0.0003), and collagen deposition (p=0.004). PEA reduced structural radiation injury (p=0.02), intestinal wall thickness (p=0.03), collagen deposition (p=0.03), and intestinal inflammation (p=0.02) in Ws/Ws rats, but not in +/+ rats. PEA inhibited mast cell-derived cellular immune response and anti-inflammatory IL-6 and IL-10 signaling, and activated the prothrombin pathway in +/+ rats. In contrast, while PEA suppressed non-mast cell derived immune responses, it increased anti-inflammatory IL-10 and IL-6 signaling and decreased activation of the prothrombin pathway in Ws/Ws rats. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the absence of mast cells exacerbate radiation enteropathy by mechanisms that likely involve the coagulation system, anti-inflammatory cytokine signaling, and the innate immune system; and that these mechanisms are regulated by PEA in a mast cell-dependent manner. The endocannabinoid system should be explored as target for mitigating intestinal radiation injury. PMID:24848354

  11. Variable ultrasound trigger delay for improved magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougenot, Charles; Waspe, Adam; Looi, Thomas; Drake, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) allows the quantification of microscopic displacements induced by ultrasound pulses, which are proportional to the local acoustic intensity. This study describes a new method to acquire MR-ARFI maps, which reduces the measurement noise in the quantification of displacement as well as improving its robustness in the presence of motion. Two MR-ARFI sequences were compared in this study. The first sequence ‘variable MSG’ involves switching the polarity of the motion sensitive gradient (MSG) between odd and even image frames. The second sequence named ‘static MSG’ involves a variable ultrasound trigger delay to sonicate during the first or second MSG for odd and even image frames, respectively. As previously published, the data acquired with a variable MSG required the use of reference data acquired prior to any sonication to process displacement maps. In contrary, data acquired with a static MSG were converted to displacement maps without using reference data acquired prior to the sonication. Displacement maps acquired with both sequences were compared by performing sonications for three different conditions: in a polyacrylamide phantom, in the leg muscle of a freely breathing pig and in the leg muscle of pig under apnea. The comparison of images acquired at even image frames and odd image frames indicates that the sequence with a static MSG provides a significantly better steady state (p  <  0.001 based on a Student’s t-test) than the images acquired with a variable MSG. In addition no reference data prior to sonication were required to process displacement maps for data acquired with a static MSG. The absence of reference data prior to sonication provided a 41% reduction of the spatial distribution of noise (p  <  0.001 based on a Student’s t-test) and reduced the sensitivity to motion for displacements acquired with a static MSG. No significant differences were expected and

  12. Mitigation of Lung Injury after Accidental Exposure to Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, J.; Jelveh, S.; Calveley, V.; Zaidi, A.; Doctrow, S. R.; Hill, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    There is a serious need to develop effective mitigators against accidental radiation exposures. In radiation accidents, many people may receive nonuniform whole-body or partial-body irradiation. The lung is one of the more radiosensitive organs, demonstrating pneumonitis and fibrosis that are believed to develop at least partially because of radiation-induced chronic inflammation. Here we addressed the crucial questions of how damage to the lung can be mitigated and whether the response is affected by irradiation to the rest of the body. We examined the widely used dietary supplement genistein given at two dietary levels (750 or 3750 mg/kg) to Fischer rats irradiated with 12 Gy to the lung or 8 Gy to the lung + 4 Gy to the whole body excluding the head and tail (whole torso). We found that genistein had promising mitigating effects on oxidative damage, pneumonitis and fibrosis even at late times (36 weeks) when drug treatment was initiated 1 week after irradiation and stopped at 28 weeks postirradiation. The higher dose of genistein showed no greater beneficial effect. Combined lung and whole-torso irradiation caused more lung-related severe morbidity resulting in euthanasia of the animals than lung irradiation alone. PMID:22013884

  13. DIETARY FLAXSEED PREVENTS RADIATION-INDUCED OXIDATIVE LUNG DAMAGE, INFLAMMATION AND FIBROSIS IN A MOUSE MODEL OF THORACIC RADIATION INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James C.; Krochak, Ryan; Blouin, Aaron; Kanterakis, Stathis; Chatterjee, Shampa; Arguiri, Evguenia; Vachani, Anil; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Cengel, Keith A.; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo

    2009-01-01

    Flaxseed (FS) has high contents of omega-3 fatty acids and lignans with antioxidant properties. Its use in preventing thoracic X-ray radiation therapy (XRT)-induced pneumonopathy has never been evaluated. We evaluated FS supplementation given to mice given before and post-XRT. FS-derived lignans, known for their direct antioxidant properties, were evaluated in abrogating ROS generation in cultured endothelial cells following gamma radiation exposure. Mice were fed 10% FS or isocaloric control diet for three weeks and given 13.5 Gy thoracic XRT. Lungs were evaluated at 24 hours for markers of radiation-induced injury, three weeks for acute lung damage (lipid peroxidation, lung edema and inflammation), and at four months for late lung damage (inflammation and fibrosis). FS-Lignans blunted ROS generation in vitro, resulting from radiation in a dose-dependent manner. FS-fed mice had reduced expression of lung injury biomarkers (Bax, p21, and TGF-beta1) at 24 hours following XRT and reduced oxidative lung damage as measured by malondialdehyde (MDA) levels at 3 weeks following XRT. In addition, FS-fed mice had decreased lung fibrosis as determined by hydroxyproline content and decreased inflammatory cell influx into lungs at 4 months post XRT. Importantly, when Lewis Lung carcinoma cells were injected systemically in mice, FS dietary supplementation did not appear to protect lung tumors from responding to thoracic XRT. Dietary FS is protective against pulmonary fibrosis, inflammation and oxidative lung damage in a murine model. Moreover, in this model, tumor radioprotection was not observed. FS lignans exhibited potent radiation-induced ROS scavenging action. Taken together, these data suggest that dietary flaxseed may be clinically useful as an agent to increase the therapeutic index of thoracic XRT by increasing the radiation tolerance of lung tissues. PMID:18981722

  14. A Rare Case of Rivaroxaban Causing Delayed Symptomatic Hepatocellular Injury and Hyperbilirubinemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Patrick; Musleh, Mustafa; Pallivi, Rao; Grilliot, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Importance. As Rivaroxaban has increased in popularity, it has been accompanied with a growing body of evidence displaying its ability to cause drug induced liver injury (DILI). Observation. A 74-year-old Caucasian female developed Rivaroxaban DILI two weeks after finishing a 14-day course. The patient was symptomatic and jaundiced with elevated transaminases and hyperbilirubinemia with normal lab values two months priorly. Liver biopsies showed mixed inflammatory infiltrate of lymphocytes, neutrophils and eosinophils, rare necrotic hepatocytes, and canalicular and intrahepatocellular cholestasis, all of which are consistent with DILI. Conclusion and Relevance. We present this case to add to the growing evidence that Rivaroxaban can be associated with severe, symptomatic liver injury and to ensure physicians are aware of these possible side effects of novel anticoagulants with their increasing use. PMID:28250999

  15. Optically-switched submillimeter-wave oscillator and radiator having a switch-to-switch propagation delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael G. (Inventor); Maserjian, Joseph (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A submillimeter wave-generating integrated circuit includes an array of N photoconductive switches biased across a common voltage source and an optical path difference from a common optical pulse of repetition rate f sub 0 providing a different optical delay to each of the switches. In one embodiment, each incoming pulse is applied to successive ones of the N switches with successive delays. The N switches are spaced apart with a suitable switch-to-switch spacing so as to generate at the output load or antenna radiation of a submillimeter wave frequency f on the order of N f sub 0. Preferably, the optical pulse has a repetition rate of at least 10 GHz and N is of the order of 100, so that the circuit generates radiation of frequency of the order of or greater than 1 Terahertz.

  16. The Therapeutic Effect of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Radiation-Induced Bladder Injury

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Shiwei; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Fu, Kai; Guo, Hongqian

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs) against radiation-induced bladder injury (RIBI). Female rats were divided into 4 groups: (a) controls, consisting of nontreated rats; (b) radiation-treated rats; (c) radiation-treated rats receiving AdMSCs; and (d) radiation-treated rats receiving AdMSCs conditioned medium. AdMSCs or AdMSCs conditioned medium was injected into the muscular layer of bladder 24 h after radiation. Twelve weeks after radiation, urinary bladder tissue was collected for histological assessment and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) after metabolic cage investigation. At the 1 w, 4 w, and 8 w time points following cells injection, 3 randomly selected rats in RC group and AdMSCs group were sacrificed to track injected AdMSCs. Metabolic cage investigation revealed that AdMSCs showed protective effect for radiation-induced bladder dysfunction. The histological and ELISA results indicated that the fibrosis and inflammation within the bladder were ameliorated by AdMSCs. AdMSCs conditioned medium showed similar effects in preventing radiation-induced bladder dysfunction. In addition, histological data indicated a time-dependent decrease in the number of AdMSCs in the bladder following injection. AdMSCs prevented radiation induced bladder dysfunction and histological changes. Paracrine effect might be involved in the protective effects of AdMSCs for RIBI. PMID:27051426

  17. Blood brain barrier dysfunction and delayed neurological deficits in mild traumatic brain injury induced by blast shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Ashok K.; Mishra, Vikas; Kodali, Maheedhar; Hattiangady, Bharathi

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs) is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting from exposure to BSWs appears to be the dysfunction or disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Studies in animal models suggest that exposure to relatively milder BSWs (123 kPa) initially induces free radical generating enzymes in and around brain capillaries, which enhances oxidative stress resulting in loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins, edema formation, and leakiness of BBB with disruption or loss of its components pericytes and astrocyte end-feet. On the other hand, exposure to more intense BSWs (145–323 kPa) causes acute disruption of the BBB with vascular lesions in the brain. Both of these scenarios lead to apoptosis of endothelial and neural cells and neuroinflammation in and around capillaries, which may progress into chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and/or a variety of neurological impairments, depending on brain regions that are afflicted with such lesions. This review discusses studies that examined alterations in the brain milieu causing dysfunction or disruption of the BBB and neuroinflammation following exposure to different intensities of BSWs. Furthermore, potential of early intervention strategies capable of easing oxidative stress, repairing the BBB or blocking inflammation for minimizing delayed neurological deficits resulting from exposure to BSWs is conferred. PMID:25165433

  18. EGCG, a tea polyphenol, as a potential mitigator of hematopoietic radiation injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Mrinalini; Dixit, Bhakti; Parvez, Suhel; Agrawala, Paban K

    2017-04-01

    Agents capable of providing protection, mitigation or therapy against radiation injuries have long been of interest of radiation biologists owing to the ever expanding application of radiation in our day to day life despite the well reported ill effects of exposure. The current study investigates radiomitigating potential of EGCG (epigallocatechin gallate), a tea polyphenol with known DNMT inhibitory property, in C57 Bl/6 mice model. Treatment with 0.1833mg/kg body weight EGCG, 1.5h post-irradiation to lethally whole body irradiated mice rendered 45% survival for 30days and also helped restoring the body weight of the animals. An early recovery of various hematological parameters was observed in EGCG treated animals compared to radiation alone group. Significant recovery in the number of bone marrow colony forming cells was observed in EGCG treated irradiated animals. EGCG reduced cytogenetic damage to bone marrow cells in radiation exposed mice significantly as studied by micronucleus assay without any significant affect on cell cycle distribution of the bone marrow cells. ELISA assay with bone marrow cell lysates showed EGCG as an inhibitor of HDAC activity and DNase accessibility assay showed EGCG treatment increased the accessibility of chromatin to the enzyme. The results suggest EGCG provides mitigation against radiation injury to the hemopoietic system of mice and also inhibits HDAC enzyme activity. However, further studies are required to understand its mechanism of action.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells stimulate intestinal stem cells to repair radiation-induced intestinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Wei; Guo, Mengzheng; Han, Zhibo; Wang, Yan; Yang, Ping; Xu, Chang; Wang, Qin; Du, Liqing; Li, Qian; Zhao, Hui; Fan, Feiyue; Liu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The loss of stem cells residing in the base of the intestinal crypt has a key role in radiation-induced intestinal injury. In particular, Lgr5+ intestinal stem cells (ISCs) are indispensable for intestinal regeneration following exposure to radiation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have previously been shown to improve intestinal epithelial repair in a mouse model of radiation injury, and, therefore, it was hypothesized that this protective effect is related to Lgr5+ ISCs. In this study, it was found that, following exposure to radiation, transplantation of MSCs improved the survival of the mice, ameliorated intestinal injury and increased the number of regenerating crypts. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in Lgr5+ ISCs and their daughter cells, including Ki67+ transient amplifying cells, Vil1+ enterocytes and lysozyme+ Paneth cells, in response to treatment with MSCs. Crypts isolated from mice treated with MSCs formed a higher number of and larger enteroids than those from the PBS group. MSC transplantation also reduced the number of apoptotic cells within the small intestine at 6 h post-radiation. Interestingly, Wnt3a and active β-catenin protein levels were increased in the small intestines of MSC-treated mice. In addition, intravenous delivery of recombinant mouse Wnt3a after radiation reduced damage in the small intestine and was radioprotective, although not to the same degree as MSC treatment. Our results show that MSCs support the growth of endogenous Lgr5+ ISCs, thus promoting repair of the small intestine following exposure to radiation. The molecular mechanism of action mediating this was found to be related to increased activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:27685631

  20. Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baulch, Janet

    2013-09-11

    This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and unstable clones. These

  1. Pulmonary Injury after Combined Exposures to Low-Dose Low-LET Radiation and Fungal Spores

    PubMed Central

    Marples, B.; Downing, L.; Sawarynski, K. E.; Finkelstein, J. N.; Williams, J. P.; Martinez, A. A.; Wilson, G. D.; Sims, M. D.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to infectious microbes is a likely confounder after a nuclear terrorism event. In combination with radiation, morbidity and mortality from an infection may increase significantly. Pulmonary damage after low-dose low-LET irradiation is characterized by an initial diffuse alveolar inflammation. By contrast, inhaled fungal spores produce localized damage around pulmonary bronchioles. In the present study, we assessed lung injury in C57BL/6 mice after combined exposures to whole-body X radiation and inhaled fungal spores. Either animals were exposed to Aspergillus spores and immediately irradiated with 2 Gy, or the inoculation and irradiation were separated by 8 weeks. Pulmonary injury was assessed at 24 and 48 h and 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 weeks later using standard H&E-stained sections and compared with sham-treated age-matched controls. Immunohistochemistry for invasive inflammatory cells (macrophages, neutrophils and B and T lymphocytes) was performed. A semi-quantitative assessment of pulmonary injury was made using three distinct parameters: local infiltration of inflammatory cells, diffuse inflammation, and thickening and distortion of alveolar architecture. Radiation-induced changes in lung architecture were most evident during the first 2 weeks postexposure. Fungal changes were seen over the first 4 weeks. Simultaneous combined exposures significantly increased the duration of acute pulmonary damage up to 24 weeks (P < 0.01). In contrast, administration of the fungus 8 weeks after irradiation did not produce enhanced levels of acute pulmonary damage. These data imply that the inhalation of fungal spores at the time of a radiation exposure alters the susceptibility of the lungs to radiation-induced injury. PMID:21275606

  2. High-Precision Time Delay Control with Continuous Phase Shifter for Pump-Probe Experiments Using Synchrotron Radiation Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Ohshima, Takashi; Moritomo, Yutaka; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Takata, Masaki

    2010-06-23

    Brilliant pulsed x-ray synchrotron radiation (SR) is useful for pump-probe experiment such as time-resolved x-ray diffraction, x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray spectroscopy. For laser pump-SR x-ray probe experiments, short pulsed lasers are generally synchronized to the SR master oscillator controlling the voltage for acceleration of electron bunches in an accelerator, and the interval between the laser and the SR pulses is changed around the time scale of target phenomenon. Ideal delay control produces any time delay as keeping the time-precision and pointing-stability of optical pulses at a sample position. We constructed the time delay control module using a continuous phase shifter of radio frequency signal and a frequency divider, which can produce the delayed trigger pulses to the laser without degradation of the time precision and the pointing stability. A picoseconds time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment was demonstrated at SPring-8 storage ring for fast lattice response by femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation, and suggested the possibility of accurate sound velocity measurement. A delay control unit operating with subpicosecond precision has also been designed for femtosecond pump-probe experiments using a free electron laser at SPring-8 campus.

  3. STUDIES IN WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION AND RADIATION INJURY. VOLUME III, A REPORT ON IONIZING RADIATION RECORD KEEPING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atomic Energy Commission, Washington, DC.

    THE SUCCESSFUL OPERATION OF THE PERMISSIBLE LEVEL CONCEPT OF RADIATION CONTROL NECESSARILY ENTAILS A COMPREHENSIVE SYSTEM UNDER WHICH EXPOSURE MUST BE RECORDED AND EMPLOYEES NOTIFIED OF THEIR EXPOSURE HISTORY. IN AN INVESTIGATION OF RECORD KEEPING NECESSARY TO PROCESS RADIATION CLAIMS, QUESTIONNAIRES OR LETTERS WERE RECEIVED FROM 45 STATE AGENCIES…

  4. Central Nervous System Injury – A Newly Observed Bystander Effect of Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Feiock, Caitlin; Yagi, Masashi; Maidman, Adam; Rendahl, Aaron; Hui, Susanta; Seelig, Davis

    2016-01-01

    The unintended side effects of cancer treatment are increasing recognized. Among these is a syndrome of long-term neurocognitive dysfunction called cancer/chemotherapy related cognitive impairment. To date, all studies examining the cognitive impact of cancer treatment have emphasized chemotherapy. Radiation-induced bystander effects have been described in cell culture and, to a limited extent, in rodent model systems. The purpose of this study was to examine, for the first time, the impact of non-brain directed radiation therapy on the brain in order to elucidate its potential relationship with cancer/chemotherapy related cognitive impairment. To address this objective, female BALB/c mice received either a single 16 gray fraction of ionizing radiation to the right hind limb or three doses of methotrexate, once per week for three consecutive weeks. Mice were sacrificed either 3 or 30 days post-treatment and brain injury was determined via quantification of activated astrocytes and microglia. To characterize the effects of non-brain directed radiation on brain glucose metabolism, mice were evaluated by fluorodeoxygluocose positron emission tomography. A single fraction of 16 gray radiation resulted in global decreases in brain glucose metabolism, a significant increase in the number of activated astrocytes and microglia, and increased TNF-α expression, all of which lasted up to 30 days post-treatment. This inflammatory response following radiation therapy was statistically indistinguishable from the neuroinflammation observed following methotrexate administration. In conclusion, non-brain directed radiation was sufficient to cause significant brain bystander injury as reflected by multifocal hypometabolism and persistent neuroinflammation. These findings suggest that radiation induces significant brain bystander effects distant from the irradiated cells and tissues. These effects may contribute to the development of cognitive dysfunction in treated human cancer

  5. Protective effects of seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils against radiation-induced acute intestinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jing; Wang, Lan; Lu, Yan; Ji, Yue; Wang, Yaqing; Dong, Ke; Kong, Xiangqing; Sun, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome, including nausea, diarrhea and dehydration, contributes to morbidity and mortality after medical or industrial radiation exposure. No safe and effective radiation countermeasure has been approved for clinical therapy. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential protective effects of seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils against radiation-induced acute intestinal injury. C57/BL6 mice were orally administered seabuckthorn pulp oil, seed oil and control olive oil once per day for 7 days before exposure to total-body X-ray irradiation of 7.5 Gy. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used for the measurement of apoptotic cells and proteins, inflammation factors and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Seabuckthorn oil pretreatment increased the post-radiation survival rate and reduced the damage area of the small intestine villi. Both the pulp and seed oil treatment significantly decreased the apoptotic cell numbers and cleaved caspase 3 expression. Seabuckthorn oil downregulated the mRNA level of inflammatory factors, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-8. Both the pulp and seed oils elevated the level of phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and reduced the levels of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38. Palmitoleic acid (PLA) and alpha linolenic acid (ALA) are the predominant components of pulp oil and seed oil, respectively. Pretreatment with PLA and ALA increased the post-radiation survival time. In conclusion, seabuckthorn pulp and seed oils protect against mouse intestinal injury from high-dose radiation by reducing cell apoptosis and inflammation. ALA and PLA are promising natural radiation countermeasure candidates. PMID:27422938

  6. Protective effects of alpha lipoic acid on radiation-induced salivary gland injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Kim, Kyung Mi; Jung, Myeong Hee; Jung, Jung Hwa; Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Park, Jung Je; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiation therapy is a treatment for patients with head and neck (HN) cancer. However, radiation exposure to the HN often induces salivary gland (SG) dysfunction. We investigated the effect of α-lipoic acid (ALA) on radiation-induced SG injury in rats. Results ALA preserved acinoductal integrity and acinar cell secretary function following irradiation. These results are related to the mechanisms by which ALA inhibits oxidative stress by inhibiting gp91 mRNA and 8-OHdG expression and apoptosis of acinar cells and ductal cells by inactivating MAPKs in the early period and expression of inflammation-related factors including NF-κB, IκB-α, and TGF-β1 and fibrosis in late irradiated SG. ALA effects began in the acute phase and persisted for at least 56 days after irradiation. Materials and Methods Rats were assigned to followings: control, ALA only (100 mg/kg, i.p.), irradiated, and ALA administered 24 h and 30 min prior to irradiation. The neck area including the SG was evenly irradiated with 2 Gy per minute (total dose, 18 Gy) using a photon 6-MV linear accelerator. Rats were killed at 4, 7, 28, and 56 days after radiation. Conclusions Our results show that ALA could be used to ameliorate radiation-induced SG injury in patients with HN cancer. PMID:27072584

  7. An immunohistochemical panel to assess ultraviolet radiation-associated oxidative skin injury.

    PubMed

    Mamalis, Andrew; Fiadorchanka, Natallia; Adams, Lauren; Serravallo, Melissa; Heilman, Edward; Siegel, Daniel; Brody, Neil; Jagdeo, Jared

    2014-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation results in a significant loss in years of healthy life, approximately 1.5 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), and is associated with greater than 60,000 deaths annually worldwide that are attributed to melanoma and other skin cancers. Currently, there are no standardized biomarkers or assay panels to assess oxidative stress skin injury patterns in human skin exposed to ionizing radiation. Using biopsy specimens from chronic solar UV-exposed and UV-protected skin, we demonstrate that UV radiation-induced oxidative skin injury can be evaluated by an immunohistochemical panel that stains 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) to assess DNA adducts, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) to assess lipid peroxidation, and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) to assess protein damage. We believe this panel contains the necessary cellular biomarkers to evaluate topical agents, such as sunscreens and anti-oxidants that are designed to prevent oxidative skin damage and may reduce UV-associated skin aging, carcinogenesis, and inflammatory skin diseases. We envision that this panel will become an important tool for researchers developing topical agents to protect against UV radiation and other oxidants and ultimately lead to reductions in lost years of healthy life, DALYs, and annual deaths associated with UV radiation.

  8. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Effects of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Balentova, Sona; Adamkov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of primary brain tumors and metastases. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to the central nervous system. Radiation-induced brain injury can damage neuronal, glial and vascular compartments of the brain and may lead to molecular, cellular and functional changes. Given its central role in memory and adult neurogenesis, the majority of studies have focused on the hippocampus. These findings suggested that hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment of patients. However, multiple rodent studies have shown that this problem is more complex. As the radiation-induced cognitive impairment reflects hippocampal and non-hippocampal compartments, it is of critical importance to investigate molecular, cellular and functional modifications in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. We here provide a literature overview, including our previously published results, in order to support the translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice, and improve the physical and mental status of patients with brain tumors. PMID:26610477

  9. Inhibition of CDK4/6 protects against radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Liang; Leibowitz, Brian J.; Wang, Xinwei; Epperly, Michael; Greenberger, Joel; Zhang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy causes dose-limiting toxicity and long-term complications in rapidly renewing tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract. Currently, there is no FDA-approved agent for the prevention or treatment of radiation-induced intestinal injury. In this study, we have shown that PD 0332991 (PD), an FDA-approved selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6), prevents radiation-induced lethal intestinal injury in mice. Treating mice with PD or a structurally distinct CDK4/6 inhibitor prior to radiation blocked proliferation and crypt apoptosis and improved crypt regeneration. PD treatment also enhanced LGR5+ stem cell survival and regeneration after radiation. PD was an on-target inhibitor of RB phosphorylation and blocked G1/S transition in the intestinal crypts. PD treatment strongly but reversibly inhibited radiation-induced p53 activation, which blocked p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis–dependent (PUMA-dependent) apoptosis without affecting p21-dependent suppression of DNA damage accumulation, with a repair bias toward nonhomologous end joining. Further, deletion of PUMA synergized with PD treatment for even greater intestinal radioprotection. Our results demonstrate that the cell cycle critically regulates the DNA damage response and survival of intestinal stem cells and support the concept that pharmacological quiescence is a potentially highly effective and selective strategy for intestinal radioprotection. PMID:27701148

  10. Keratinocyte growth factor protects mice from chemotherapy and radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury and mortality.

    PubMed

    Farrell, C L; Bready, J V; Rex, K L; Chen, J N; DiPalma, C R; Whitcomb, K L; Yin, S; Hill, D C; Wiemann, B; Starnes, C O; Havill, A M; Lu, Z N; Aukerman, S L; Pierce, G F; Thomason, A; Potten, C S; Ulich, T R; Lacey, D L

    1998-03-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells including those of the gastrointestinal tract. Although chemotherapeutics and radiation exposure kill rapidly proliferating tumor cells, rapidly dividing normal cells of the host's gastrointestinal tract are also frequently damaged, leading to the clinical condition broadly termed "mucositis." In this report, recombinant human KGF used as a pretreatment in several mouse models of chemotherapy and/or radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury significantly improved mouse survival. Using multiple-dose 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, and radiation in combination and total body radiation alone models, KGF increased survival by 55% or greater. In the models that used chemotherapy with or without radiation, KGF significantly ameliorated weight loss after injury and accelerated weight gain during recovery. The basis of these systemic benefits appears to be due in part to the trophic effects of the growth factor on the intestinal epithelium because KGF pretreatment caused an increase in measures of mucosal thickness (villus height and crypt depth) that persisted during the course of 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Treatment with KGF also afforded a 3.5-fold improvement in crypt survival in the small intestine, suggesting that KGF also has a direct effect on the crypt stem cells. These data indicate that KGF may be therapeutically useful to lessen the intestinal side effects of current cancer therapy regimens.

  11. Pine polyphenols from Pinus koraiensis prevent injuries induced by gamma radiation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Xu, Yier; Sun, Guicai

    2016-01-01

    Pine polyphenols (PPs) are bioactive dietary constituents that enhance health and help prevent diseases through antioxidants. Antioxidants reduce the level of oxidative damages caused by ionizing radiation (IR). The main purpose of this paper is to study the protective effect of PPs on peripheral blood, liver and spleen injuries in mice induced by IR. ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) male mice were administered orally with PPs (200 mg/kg b.wt.) once daily for 14 consecutive days prior to 7 Gy γ-radiations. PPs showed strong antioxidant activities. PPs significantly increased white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets counts. PPs also significantly reduced lipid peroxidation and increased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidases, and the level of glutathione. PPs reduced the spleen morphologic injury. In addition, PPs inhibited mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathways in splenocytes induced by IR. These results indicate that PPs are radioprotective promising reagents. PMID:27069807

  12. Management of ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses, part 2: nontherapeutic radiologic/nuclear incidents.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Doran M; Parillo, Steven J; Glassman, Erik S; Sugarman, Stephen L

    2014-05-01

    In the second of 5 articles on the management of injuries and illnesses caused by ionizing radiation, the authors discuss nontherapeutic radiologic/nuclear incidents: use of a radiologic exposure device, use of a radiologic dispersal device, nuclear power plant safety failure, and detonation of an improvised nuclear device. The present article focuses on how such incidents--whether involving deliberate or accidental methods of radiation exposure--produce casualties and how physicians need to understand the pathologic process of injuries caused by these incidents. To identify the diagnoses associated with nontherapeutic exposure in time to improve morbidity and mortality, physicians must maintain a high index of suspicion when faced with a specific constellation of symptoms. In some scenarios, the sheer number of uninjured, unaffected persons who might present to health care institutions or professionals may be overwhelming. Public health and safety issues may seriously disrupt the ability to respond to and recover from a radiologic and nuclear incident, especially a nuclear detonation.

  13. Pine polyphenols from Pinus koraiensis prevent injuries induced by gamma radiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wang, Zhenyu; Xu, Yier; Sun, Guicai

    2016-01-01

    Pine polyphenols (PPs) are bioactive dietary constituents that enhance health and help prevent diseases through antioxidants. Antioxidants reduce the level of oxidative damages caused by ionizing radiation (IR). The main purpose of this paper is to study the protective effect of PPs on peripheral blood, liver and spleen injuries in mice induced by IR. ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) male mice were administered orally with PPs (200 mg/kg b.wt.) once daily for 14 consecutive days prior to 7 Gy γ-radiations. PPs showed strong antioxidant activities. PPs significantly increased white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets counts. PPs also significantly reduced lipid peroxidation and increased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidases, and the level of glutathione. PPs reduced the spleen morphologic injury. In addition, PPs inhibited mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathways in splenocytes induced by IR. These results indicate that PPs are radioprotective promising reagents.

  14. Role of GADD45a in murine models of radiation- and bleomycin-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Biji; Takekoshi, Daisuke; Sammani, Saad; Epshtein, Yulia; Sharma, Rajesh; Smith, Brett D; Mitra, Sumegha; Desai, Ankit A; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Garcia, Joe G N; Jacobson, Jeffrey R

    2015-12-15

    We previously reported protective effects of GADD45a (growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 45 alpha) in murine ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) via effects on Akt-mediated endothelial cell signaling. In the present study we investigated the role of GADD45a in separate murine models of radiation- and bleomycin-induced lung injury. Initial studies of wild-type mice subjected to single-dose thoracic radiation (10 Gy) confirmed a significant increase in lung GADD45a expression within 24 h and persistent at 6 wk. Mice deficient in GADD45a (GADD45a(-/-)) demonstrated increased susceptibility to radiation-induced lung injury (RILI, 10 Gy) evidenced by increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid total cell counts, protein and albumin levels, and levels of inflammatory cytokines compared with RILI-challenged wild-type animals at 2 and 4 wk. Furthermore, GADD45a(-/-) mice had decreased total and phosphorylated lung Akt levels both at baseline and 6 wk after RILI challenge relative to wild-type mice while increased RILI susceptibility was observed in both Akt(+/-) mice and mice treated with an Akt inhibitor beginning 1 wk prior to irradiation. Additionally, overexpression of a constitutively active Akt1 transgene reversed RILI-susceptibility in GADD45a(-/-) mice. In separate studies, lung fibrotic changes 2 wk after treatment with bleomycin (0.25 U/kg IT) was significantly increased in GADD45a(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice assessed by lung collagen content and histology. These data implicate GADD45a as an important modulator of lung inflammatory responses across different injury models and highlight GADD45a-mediated signaling as a novel target in inflammatory lung injury clinically.

  15. Role of GADD45a in murine models of radiation- and bleomycin-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Biji; Takekoshi, Daisuke; Sammani, Saad; Epshtein, Yulia; Sharma, Rajesh; Smith, Brett D.; Mitra, Sumegha; Desai, Ankit A.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported protective effects of GADD45a (growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 45 alpha) in murine ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) via effects on Akt-mediated endothelial cell signaling. In the present study we investigated the role of GADD45a in separate murine models of radiation- and bleomycin-induced lung injury. Initial studies of wild-type mice subjected to single-dose thoracic radiation (10 Gy) confirmed a significant increase in lung GADD45a expression within 24 h and persistent at 6 wk. Mice deficient in GADD45a (GADD45a−/−) demonstrated increased susceptibility to radiation-induced lung injury (RILI, 10 Gy) evidenced by increased bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid total cell counts, protein and albumin levels, and levels of inflammatory cytokines compared with RILI-challenged wild-type animals at 2 and 4 wk. Furthermore, GADD45a−/− mice had decreased total and phosphorylated lung Akt levels both at baseline and 6 wk after RILI challenge relative to wild-type mice while increased RILI susceptibility was observed in both Akt+/− mice and mice treated with an Akt inhibitor beginning 1 wk prior to irradiation. Additionally, overexpression of a constitutively active Akt1 transgene reversed RILI-susceptibility in GADD45a−/− mice. In separate studies, lung fibrotic changes 2 wk after treatment with bleomycin (0.25 U/kg IT) was significantly increased in GADD45a−/− mice compared with wild-type mice assessed by lung collagen content and histology. These data implicate GADD45a as an important modulator of lung inflammatory responses across different injury models and highlight GADD45a-mediated signaling as a novel target in inflammatory lung injury clinically. PMID:26498248

  16. Early delayed amputation: a paradigm shift in the limb-salvage time line for patients with major upper-limb injury.

    PubMed

    Burdette, Todd E; Long, Sarah A; Ho, Oscar; Demas, Chris; Bell, John-Erik; Rosen, Joseph M

    2009-01-01

    Patients with major injuries to the upper limbs sometimes fail to achieve successful limb salvage. During the attempt to fashion a functional limb, multiple painful procedures may be ventured. Despite the best efforts of surgeons and therapists, a nonfunctioning or painful upper limb may remain in place for many months or years before late delayed amputation and progression to productive rehabilitation occur. We present three patient cases that illustrate failed upper-limb salvage. In each case, patients expressed a desire for amputation at 6 months after their injury. To reduce the pain and suffering that patients with failed limb salvage endure, we propose a paradigm shift in the limb-salvage time line. We suggest that patients be evaluated for early delayed amputation 6 months after their injury.

  17. [Research advances in medical imaging for radiation-induced liver injury].

    PubMed

    Dong, Tian-ming; An, Ning-yu

    2013-12-01

    The applications of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy(3-DCRT)in the abdomen has been associated with the increased incidence of radiation-induced liver injury(RILI). Timely and appropriate evaluation of RILI is particularly important for the design and modification of clinical management of tumors. This article reviews the pathological and serological features of RILI, focusing on in the application of medical imaging.

  18. [The future of hyperbaric oxygen therapy: added value in the treatment of late radiation injury?].

    PubMed

    van Geel, A N Bert; Poortmans, Philip; Koppert, Linetta B

    2015-01-01

    There is some evidence for the benefit of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in late radiation tissue injury (LRTI) affecting the head, neck and lower bowel, but there is little evidence for or against the benefit in other tissues (e.g. the breast) affected by LRTI. There is a need for large prospective trials including quality-of-life and cost-effectiveness studies, because hyperbaric oxygen therapy is becoming more popular.

  19. Delayed postoperative radiation therapy in local control of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth

    PubMed Central

    Amar, Ali; Chedid, Helma Maria; Curioni, Otávio Alberto; Dedivitis, Rogério Aparecido; Rapoport, Abrão; Cernea, Claudio Roberto; Brandão, Lenine Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of time between surgery and postoperative radiation therapy on local recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth. Methods A total of 154 patients treated between 1996 and 2007 were selected considering local recurrence rate and time of the adjuvant radiotherapy. Results Local recurrence was diagnosed in 54 (35%) patients. Radiation therapy reduced the rate of local recurrences, although with no statistical significance. The time between surgery and initiation of postoperative radiotherapy did not significantly influence the risk of local recurrence in patients referred to adjuvant treatment (p=0.49). Conclusion In the presence of risk factors for local recurrence, a short delay in starting the adjuvant radiation therapy does not contraindicate its performance. PMID:25628200

  20. The influence of infrared radiation on short-term ultraviolet-radiation-induced injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Kaidbey, K.H.; Witkowski, T.A.; Kligman, A.M.

    1982-05-01

    Because heat has been reported to influence adversely short- and long-term ultraviolet (UV)-radiation-induced skin damage in animals, we investigated the short-term effects of infrared radiation on sunburn and on phototoxic reactions to topical methoxsalen and anthracene in human volunteers. Prior heating of the skin caused suppression of the phototoxic response to methoxsalen as evidenced by an increase in the threshold erythema dose. Heat administered either before or after exposure to UV radiation had no detectable influence on sunburn erythema or on phototoxic reactions provoked by anthracene.

  1. Protection of normal tissue against late radiation injury by WR-2721. [/sup 60/Co; rats

    SciTech Connect

    Utley, J.F.; Quinn, C.A.; White, F.C.; Seaver, N.A.; Bloor, C.M.

    1981-02-01

    The ability of WR-2721 to protect against late radiation damage has been studied in skin, muscle, and vascular tissues of rats. Animals treated with and without WR-2721 received irradiation to the left hind limb; representative groups were killed at intervals ranging from 72 h to 6 months. Comparison of all drug-treated and non-drug-treated animals showed significant protection (P = less than or equal to 0.05). The time pattern of injury in non-drug-treated rats was biphasic, with significant damage occurring at 72 h and 1 week, returning to normal between 1 and 3 months, but showing significant late damage at 6 months (P = less than or equal to 0.001). Again, this injury pattern did not appear in WR-2721-treated rats. Thus the ability of WR-2721 to protect against acute and chronic radiation injury in vessels, skin, and muscle indicates that an increased therapeutic gain can be expected when this drug is used in clinical radiation therapy.

  2. Application of Multivariate Modeling for Radiation Injury Assessment: A Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Bolduc, David L.; Villa, Vilmar; Sandgren, David J.; Ledney, G. David; Blakely, William F.; Bünger, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Multivariate radiation injury estimation algorithms were formulated for estimating severe hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS) injury (i.e., response category three or RC3) in a rhesus monkey total-body irradiation (TBI) model. Classical CBC and serum chemistry blood parameters were examined prior to irradiation (d 0) and on d 7, 10, 14, 21, and 25 after irradiation involving 24 nonhuman primates (NHP) (Macaca mulatta) given 6.5-Gy 60Co Υ-rays (0.4 Gy min−1) TBI. A correlation matrix was formulated with the RC3 severity level designated as the “dependent variable” and independent variables down selected based on their radioresponsiveness and relatively low multicollinearity using stepwise-linear regression analyses. Final candidate independent variables included CBC counts (absolute number of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and platelets) in formulating the “CBC” RC3 estimation algorithm. Additionally, the formulation of a diagnostic CBC and serum chemistry “CBC-SCHEM” RC3 algorithm expanded upon the CBC algorithm model with the addition of hematocrit and the serum enzyme levels of aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase. Both algorithms estimated RC3 with over 90% predictive power. Only the CBC-SCHEM RC3 algorithm, however, met the critical three assumptions of linear least squares demonstrating slightly greater precision for radiation injury estimation, but with significantly decreased prediction error indicating increased statistical robustness. PMID:25165485

  3. Ionizing radiation accelerates Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission, which involves delayed mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in normal human fibroblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report first time that ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial dynamic changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced mitochondrial fission was caused by Drp1 localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that radiation causes delayed ROS from mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down regulation of Drp1 rescued mitochondrial dysfunction after radiation exposure. -- Abstract: Ionizing radiation is known to increase intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through mitochondrial dysfunction. Although it has been as a basis of radiation-induced genetic instability, the mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction remains unclear. Here we studied the dynamics of mitochondrial structure in normal human fibroblast like cells exposed to ionizing radiation. Delayed mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-} production was peaked 3 days after irradiation, which was coupled with accelerated mitochondrial fission. We found that radiation exposure accumulated dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria. Knocking down of Drp1 expression prevented radiation induced acceleration of mitochondrial fission. Furthermore, knockdown of Drp1 significantly suppressed delayed production of mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-}. Since the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which was induced by radiation was prevented in cells knocking down of Drp1 expression, indicating that the excessive mitochondrial fission was involved in delayed mitochondrial dysfunction after irradiation.

  4. Scenario of a dirty bomb in an urban environment and acute management of radiation poisoning and injuries.

    PubMed

    Chin, F K C

    2007-10-01

    In the new security environment, there is a clear and present danger of terrorists using non-conventional weapons to inflict maximum psychological and economic damage on their targets. This article examines two scenarios of radiation contamination and injury, one accidental in nature leading to environmental contamination, and another of deliberate intent resulting in injury and death. This article also discusses the management of injury from radiological dispersion devices or dirty bombs, with emphasis on the immediate aftermath as well as strategy recommendations.

  5. Accelerated senescence in skin in a murine model of radiation-induced multi-organ injury.

    PubMed

    McCart, Elizabeth A; Thangapazham, Rajesh L; Lombardini, Eric D; Mog, Steven R; Panganiban, Ronald Allan M; Dickson, Kelley M; Mansur, Rihab A; Nagy, Vitaly; Kim, Sung-Yop; Selwyn, Reed; Landauer, Michael R; Darling, Thomas N; Day, Regina M

    2017-03-18

    Accidental high-dose radiation exposures can lead to multi-organ injuries, including radiation dermatitis. The types of cellular damage leading to radiation dermatitis are not completely understood. To identify the cellular mechanisms that underlie radiation-induced skin injury in vivo, we evaluated the time-course of cellular effects of radiation (14, 16 or 17 Gy X-rays; 0.5 Gy/min) in the skin of C57BL/6 mice. Irradiation of 14 Gy induced mild inflammation, observed histologically, but no visible hair loss or erythema. However, 16 or 17 Gy radiation induced dry desquamation, erythema and mild ulceration, detectable within 14 days post-irradiation. Histological evaluation revealed inflammation with mast cell infiltration within 14 days. Fibrosis occurred 80 days following 17 Gy irradiation, with collagen deposition, admixed with neutrophilic dermatitis, and necrotic debris. We found that in cultures of normal human keratinocytes, exposure to 17.9 Gy irradiation caused the upregulation of p21/waf1, a marker of senescence. Using western blot analysis of 17.9 Gy-irradiated mice skin samples, we also detected a marker of accelerated senescence (p21/waf1) 7 days post-irradiation, and a marker of cellular apoptosis (activated caspase-3) at 30 days, both preceding histological evidence of inflammatory infiltrates. Immunohistochemistry revealed reduced epithelial stem cells from hair follicles 14-30 days post-irradiation. Furthermore, p21/waf1 expression was increased in the region of the hair follicle stem cells at 14 days post 17 Gy irradiation. These data indicate that radiation induces accelerated cellular senescence in the region of the stem cell population of the skin.

  6. Assessment of Cell-Cycle Arrest Biomarkers to Predict Early and Delayed Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Max; Larsson, Anders; Venge, Per; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Mårtensson, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess urinary tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 ([TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7]), urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), and urinary cystatin-C as acute kidney injury predictors (AKI) exploring the association of nonrenal factors with elevated biomarker levels. Methods. We studied 94 patients with urine collected within 48 hours of ICU admission and no AKI at sampling. AKI was defined by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Predictive performance was assessed by the area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve. Associations between biomarkers and clinical factors were assessed by multivariate linear regression. Results. Overall, 19 patients (20%) developed AKI within 48 hours. [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], NGAL, or cystatin-C admission levels did not differ between patients without AKI and patients developing AKI. [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], NGAL, and cystatin-C were poor AKI predictors (ROC areas 0.34–0.51). Diabetes was independently associated with higher [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7] levels (P = 0.02) but AKI was not (P = 0.24). Sepsis was independently associated with higher NGAL (P < 0.001) and cystatin-C (P = 0.003) levels. Conclusions. Urinary [TIMP-2]·[IGFBP7], NGAL, and cystatin-C should be used cautiously as AKI predictors in general ICU patients since urine levels of these biomarkers are affected by factors other than AKI and their performance can be poor. PMID:25866432

  7. Good outcome after delayed surgery for orbitocranial non-missile penetrating brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Caporlingua, Alessandro; Caporlingua, Federico; Lenzi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Nonmissile orbitocranial penetrating brain injuries are uncommonly dealt with in a civilian context. Surgical management is controversial, due to the lack of widely accepted guidelines. A 52-year-old man was hit in his left eye by a metallic foreign body (FB). Head computed tomography (CT) scan showed a left subcortical parietal FB with a considerable hemorrhagic trail originating from the left orbital roof. Surgical treatment was staged; an exenteratio oculi and a left parietal craniotomy to extract the FB under intraoperative CT guidance were performed at post trauma day third and sixth, respectively. A postoperative infectious complication was treated conservatively. The patient retained a right hemiparesis (3/5) and was transferred to rehabilitation in good clinical conditions at day 49th. He had suspended antiepilectic therapy at that time. A case-by-case tailored approach is mandatory to achieve the best outcome in such a heterogeneous nosological entity. Case reporting is crucial to further understand its mechanism and dynamics. PMID:27366265

  8. Delayed traumatic intracranial haemorrhage and progressive traumatic brain injury in a major referral centre based in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Toh Charng; Haspani, Mohd Saffari Mohd; Adnan, Johari Siregar; Naing, Nyi Nyi

    2008-10-01

    A repeat Computer Tomographic (CT) brain after 24-48 hours from the 1(st) scanning is usually practiced in most hospitals in South East Asia where intracranial pressure monitoring (ICP) is routinely not done. This interval for repeat CT would be shortened if there was a deterioration in Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Most of the time the prognosis of any intervention may be too late especially in hospitals with high patient-to-doctor ratio causing high mortality and morbidity. The purpose of this study was to determine the important predictors for early detection of Delayed Traumatic Intracranial Haemorrhage (DTICH) and Progressive Traumatic Brain Injury (PTBI) before deterioration of GCS occurred, as well as the most ideal timing of repeated CT brain for patients admitted in Malaysian hospitals. A total of 81 patients were included in this study over a period of six months. The CT scan brain was studied by comparing the first and second CT brain to diagnose the presence of DTICH/PTBI. The predictors tested were categorised into patient factors, CT brain findings and laboratory investigations. The mean age was 33.1 ± 15.7 years with a male preponderance of 6.36:1. Among them, 81.5% were patients from road traffic accidents with Glasgow Coma Scale ranging from 4 - 15 (median of 12) upon admission. The mean time interval delay between trauma and first CT brain was 179.8 ± 121.3 minutes for the PTBI group. The DTICH group, 9.9% of the patients were found to have new intracranial clots. Significant predictors detected were different referral hospitals (p=0.02), total GCS status (p=0.026), motor component of GCS (p=0.043), haemoglobin level (p<0.001), platelet count (p=0.011) and time interval between trauma and first CT brain (p=0.022). In the PTBI group, 42.0% of the patients were found to have new changes (new clot occurrence, old clot expansion and oedema) in the repeat CT brain. Univariate statistical analysis revealed that age (p=0.03), race (p=0.035), types of

  9. Computerized tomography versus perfusion lung scanning in canine radiation lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, I.H.; Logus, J.W.; El-Khatib, E.; Battista, J.J.; Ferri, H.; Lentle, B.C.; Man, G.C.; Man, S.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Computerized tomographic (CT) measurements of lung density were obtained before and serially after thoracic irradiation in dogs to detect the alterations caused by radiation therapy. Fourteen mongrel dogs were given either 2000 cGy (Group A, 10 dogs, right lower zone irradiation), 1000 cGy (Group B, 2 dogs, right lower zone irradiation), or 500 cGy (Group C, 2 dogs, right lung irradiation) in one fraction. Once before and bi-weekly after irradiation, the anesthetized dogs had thoracic CT scans. CT numbers for the irradiated area were compared to their preirradiation control values. Macro-aggregated albumin (MAA) perfusion lung scans were also obtained before and at weekly intervals after irradiation and were evaluated visually and quantitatively for abnormalities. When both these tests were abnormal, or at the end of the scheduled study, the dogs were sacrificed to confirm radiation lung injury histologically. Our results showed that CT numbers (as a measure of tissue density) were higher with higher doses of radiation. Among all the techniques used, only the quantitative assessment of macro-aggregated albumin perfusion scan detected abnormalities in all the dogs given 2000 cGy. Their abnormalities correlated well with the presence of radiation lung damage histologically, however, the applicability of these methods in the detection of early injury has to be further evaluated.

  10. Autophagy confers DNA damage repair pathways to protect the hematopoietic system from nuclear radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weiwei; Yuan, Na; Wang, Zhen; Cao, Yan; Fang, Yixuan; Li, Xin; Xu, Fei; Song, Lin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Han; Yan, Lili; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is essentially a metabolic process, but its in vivo role in nuclear radioprotection remains unexplored. We observed that ex vivo autophagy activation reversed the proliferation inhibition, apoptosis, and DNA damage in irradiated hematopoietic cells. In vivo autophagy activation improved bone marrow cellularity following nuclear radiation exposure. In contrast, defective autophagy in the hematopoietic conditional mouse model worsened the hematopoietic injury, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and DNA damage caused by nuclear radiation exposure. Strikingly, in vivo defective autophagy caused an absence or reduction in regulatory proteins critical to both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA damage repair pathways, as well as a failure to induce these proteins in response to nuclear radiation. In contrast, in vivo autophagy activation increased most of these proteins in hematopoietic cells. DNA damage assays confirmed the role of in vivo autophagy in the resolution of double-stranded DNA breaks in total bone marrow cells as well as bone marrow stem and progenitor cells upon whole body irradiation. Hence, autophagy protects the hematopoietic system against nuclear radiation injury by conferring and intensifying the HR and NHEJ DNA damage repair pathways and by removing ROS and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:26197097

  11. Pathogenetic validation of the use of biological protective agents and early treatment in cases of radiation injury simulating radiation effects under space flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogozkin, V. D.; Varteres, V.; Sabo, L.; Groza, N.; Nikolov, I.

    1974-01-01

    In considering a radiation safety system for space flights, the various measures to protect man against radiation include drug prophylaxis. At the present time a great deal of experimental material has been accumulated on the prevention and treatment of radiation injuries. Antiradiation effectiveness has been established for sulfur- and nitrogen-containing substances, auxins, cyanides, polynucleotides, mucopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, aminosaccharides, synthetic polymers, vitamins, hormones, amino acids and other compounds which can be divided into two basic groups - biological and chemical protective agents.

  12. Directional delivery of RSPO1 by mesenchymal stem cells ameliorates radiation-induced intestinal injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Ju, Songwen; Lu, Ting; Xu, Yongfang; Zheng, Xiaocui; Wang, Haiyan; Ge, Yan; Ju, Songguang

    2017-02-16

    Radiation-induced intestinal injury (RIII) commonly occurs in patients who received radiotherapy for pelvic or abdominal cancer, or who suffered from whole-body irradiation during a nuclear accident. RIII can lead to intestinal disorders and even death given its integrity damage that results from intestinal stem cell (ISC) loss. Recovery from RIII relies on the intensity of supportive treatment, which can attenuate lethal infection and give surviving stem cells an opportunity to regenerate. It has been reported that RSPO1 is a cytokine with potent and specific proliferative effects on intestinal crypt cells. MSCs have multiple RIII-healing effects, including anti-inflammatory and anti-irradiation injury properties, due to its negative immune regulation and its homing ability to the damaged intestinal epithelia. To combine the comprehensive anti-injury potential of MSCs, and the potent ability of RSPO1 as a mitogenic factor for ISCs, we constructed RSPO1-modified C3H10 T1/2 cells and expected that RSPO1, the ISC-proliferative cytokine, could be delivered to the site of injury in a targeted manner. In this study, we transferred C3H10/RSPO1 intravenously via the retro-orbital sinus into mice suffering from abdominal irradiation at lethal dosages. Our findings demonstrated that C3H10/RSPO1 cells are able to directionally migrate to the injury site; enhance ISC survival, proliferation, and differentiation; and effectively repair the radiation-damaged intestinal epithelial cells. This study suggests that the directional delivery of RSPO1 by MSCs is a promising strategy to ameliorate, and even cure, RIII.

  13. Ramipril-induced delayed myocardial protection against free radical injury involves bradykinin B2 receptor-NO pathway and protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhu-Qiu; Chen, Xiu

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether ramipril induces delayed myocardial protection against free radical injuries ex vivo and to determine the possible role of the bradykinin B2–nitric oxide (NO) pathway, prostaglandins(PGs) and protein synthesis in this delayed adaptive response.Rats were pretreated with ramipril (10 or 50 μg kg−1, i.v.) and hearts were isolated after 24, 48 and 72 h. Langendorff hearts were subjected to 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-induced injury.Left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and its maximal increase velocity (+dP/dtmax), coronary flow (CF), heart rate (HR), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in coronary effluent and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in the myocardium were measured.The results showed that in the DPPH control group, 20 min after free radical-induced injury, LVDP, +dP/dtmax, CF, HR declined, whereas TBARS and LDH increased significantly. The above cardiac function parameters were significantly improved in RAM-pretreated rats after 24 and 48 h.Pretreatment with HOE 140, the selective bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, NG-nitro-L-arginine, the NO synthase inhibitor, and actinomycin D, the RNA transcription inhibitor, prior to ramipril injection abolished the beneficial effects of ramipril at 24 h while indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, pretreatment had no effect on ramipril-induced delayed protection.In conclusion, ramipril induces delayed myocardial protection against free radical injury in the rat heart. This delayed protection was sustained for 48 h, is associated with the bradykinin B2 receptor–NO pathway and depends on protein but not prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:9806340

  14. Prevention of ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression by sunscreen in Candida albicans-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, QUAN; LI, RUNXIANG; ZHAO, XIAOXIA; LIANG, BIHUA; MA, SHAOYIN; LI, ZHENJIE; ZHU, HUILAN

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced immunosuppression leading to skin cancer has received increased attention in previous years. The present study aimed to investigate the immunoprotection offered by Anthelios sunscreen in a mouse model of Candida albicans-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity. Anthelios sunscreen was applied to the skin on the dorsal skin of BALB/c mice treated with a sub-erythema dose of solar-simulated radiation. Delayed-type hypersensitivity was induced by immunization with Candida albicans. Changes in the skin thickness of the foot pads were measured, and immunosuppression rates were also evaluated. The expression levels of CD207, CD80 and CD86 in the Langerhans cells were semi-quantitatively detected using Western blotting and immunohistochemical assays. The delayed-type hypersensitivity mouse model was successfully established. The minimal erythema doses of UVA and UVB exposure to the mice were 2,000 and 145 mJ/cm2, respectively. The immunosuppression rates in the sunscreen group and non-sunscreen group were 24.39 and 65.85%, respectively (P<0.01). The results of the Western blotting and immunohistochemistry showed that the expression levels of CD207 (P<0.01), CD80 (P<0.05) and CD86 (P<0.01) were higher in the sunscreen group, compared with those in the non-sunscreen group. UV exposure reduced Candida albicans antigen-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity. Anthelios sunscreen was found to protect the skin from immunosuppression through the activation of epidermal Langerhans cells. PMID:27175551

  15. Management of late radiation-induced rectal injury after treatment of carcinoma of the uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Allen-Mersh, T.G.; Wilson, E.J.; Hope-Stone, H.F.; Mann, C.V.

    1987-06-01

    Sixty-one of 1418 (4.3 per cent) patients treated with radiation for carcinoma of the uterus from 1963 to 1983 had significant radiation-induced complications of the intestine develop which required a surgical opinion considering further management. Ninety-three per cent of these complications involved the rectum. Florid proctitis resolved within two years of onset in 33 per cent of the patients who were managed conservatively while 22 per cent of the patients died of disseminated disease within the same time period. Surgical treatment was eventually necessary in 39 per cent of the patients who were initially treated conservatively for radiation induced proctitis. Rectal excision with coloanal sleeve anastomosis produced a satisfactory result in eight of 11 patients with severe radiation injury involving the rectum. The incidence of radiation-induced and malignant rectovaginal fistula were similar (1 per cent), but disease-induced symptoms tended to occur earlier after primary treatment (a median of eight months) compared with radiation-induced symptoms (a median of 16 months).

  16. p53-dependent delayed effects of radiation vary according to time of irradiation of p53 + / - mice.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that in p53 (+ / -) mice that had been given a whole-body dose of 3 Gy at 8 weeks of age, p53-dependent delayed effects of radiation, as manifested in T-cell receptor (TCR) variant fractions (VF) instability in mouse splenocytes, were biphasic, namely, induction of TCR-VF mutation reappeared at 44 weeks. The manifestation of the delayed effects and the measures of biological markers varied according to the timing of irradiation. We also reported that the decrease in function of the p53 gene was related to the effects of a delayed mutation. In the present study, we investigated the functions and mutations of the p53 gene in old age for p53 (+ / -) mice following irradiation at various ages. p53 (+ / -) mice were given a whole-body dose of 3 Gy at 8, 28 or 40 weeks of age. There were significant differences for all variables tested at 8 weeks of age. This was similarly the case for mice irradiated at 28 weeks of age, in which there were also significant differences in TCR VF and the percentage of apoptosis. In mice irradiated at 40 weeks of age, there were significant differences for all considered variables except for the p53 allele. We demonstrated that the different patterns of delayed mutation of the p53 gene at 56 weeks of age depended on the age at which mice had undergone 3-Gy whole-body irradiation. Our conclusions are limited to variation in p53-dependent delayed effects according to the time of irradiation.

  17. Delayed voluntary exercise does not enhance cognitive performance after hippocampal injury: an investigation of differentially distributed exercise protocols

    PubMed Central

    Wogensen, Elise; Gram, Marie Gajhede; Sommer, Jens Bak; Vilsen, Christina Rytter; Mogensen, Jesper; Malá, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary exercise has previously been shown to enhance cognitive recovery after acquired brain injury (ABI). The present study evaluated effects of two differentially distributed protocols of delayed, voluntary exercise on cognitive recovery using an allocentric place learning task in an 8-arm radial maze. Fifty-four Wistar rats were subjected to either bilateral transection of the fimbria-fornix (FF) or to sham surgery. Twenty-one days postinjury, the animals started exercising in running wheels either for 14 consecutive days (FF/exercise daily [ExD], sham/ExD) or every other day for 14 days (FF/exercise every second day [ExS], sham/ExS). Additional groups were given no exercise treatment (FF/not exercise [NE], sham/NE). Regardless of how exercise was distributed, we found no cognitively enhancing effects of exercise in the brain injured animals. Design and protocol factors possibly affecting the efficacy of post-ABI exercise are discussed. PMID:27807517

  18. Genistein prevents ultraviolet B radiation-induced nitrosative skin injury and promotes cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Terra, V A; Souza-Neto, F P; Frade, M A C; Ramalho, L N Z; Andrade, T A M; Pasta, A A C; Conchon, A C; Guedes, F A; Luiz, R C; Cecchini, R; Cecchini, A L

    2015-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) levels increase considerably after 24h of exposure of skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, which leads to nitrosative skin injury. In addition, increased NO levels after exposure to UVB radiation are associated with inhibition of cell proliferation. Compared to the UV-control group, UV-genistein at 10 mg/kg (UV-GEN10) group showed tissue protection, decreased lipid peroxide and nitrotyrosine formation, and low CAT activity. Furthermore, NO levels and iNOS labeling remained high. In this group, the reduction in lipid peroxides and nitrotyrosine was accompanied by upregulation of cell proliferation factors (Ki67 and PCNA), which indicated that prevention of nitrosative skin injury promoted cell proliferation and DNA repair. Genistein also prevented nitrosative events, inhibited ONOO(-) formation, which leads to tissue protection and cell proliferation. The UV-GEN15 group did not result in a greater protective effect compared to that with UV-GEN10 group. In the UV-GEN15 group, histological examination of the epidermis showed morphological alterations without efficient protection against lipid peroxide formation, as well as inhibition of Ki67 and PCNA, and VEGF labeling, which suggested inhibition of cell proliferation. These results help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the photoprotective effect of genistein and reveal the importance of UVB radiation-induced nitrosative damage.

  19. Ionizing radiation-induced metabolic oxidative stress and prolonged cell injury

    PubMed Central

    Azzam, Edouard I.; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul; Pain, Debkumar

    2013-01-01

    Cellular exposure to ionizing radiation leads to oxidizing events that alter atomic structure through direct interactions of radiation with target macromolecules or via products of water radiolysis. Further, the oxidative damage may spread from the targeted to neighboring, non-targeted bystander cells through redox-modulated intercellular communication mechanisms. To cope with the induced stress and the changes in the redox environment, organisms elicit transient responses at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels to counteract toxic effects of radiation. Metabolic pathways are induced during and shortly after the exposure. Depending on radiation dose, dose-rate and quality, these protective mechanisms may or may not be sufficient to cope with the stress. When the harmful effects exceed those of homeostatic biochemical processes, induced biological changes persist and may be propagated to progeny cells. Physiological levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species play critical roles in many cellular functions. In irradiated cells, levels of these reactive species may be increased due to perturbations in oxidative metabolism and chronic inflammatory responses, thereby contributing to the long-term effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on genomic stability. Here, in addition to immediate biological effects of water radiolysis on DNA damage, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in the delayed outcomes of ionization radiation. Defects in mitochondrial functions lead to accelerated aging and numerous pathological conditions. Different types of radiation vary in their linear energy transfer (LET) properties, and we discuss their effects on various aspects of mitochondrial physiology. These include short and long-term in vitro and in vivo effects on mitochondrial DNA, mitochondrial protein import and metabolic and antioxidant enzymes. PMID:22182453

  20. Selenoprotein P Inhibits Radiation-Induced Late Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Normal Cell Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Eckers, Jaimee C.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Xiao, Wusheng; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Goswami, Prabhat C.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation is a common mode of cancer therapy whose outcome is often limited because of normal tissue toxicity. We have shown previously that the accumulation of radiation-induced late reactive oxygen species (ROS) precedes cell death, suggesting that metabolic oxidative stress could regulate cellular radiation response. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether selenoprotein P (SEPP1), a major supplier of selenium to tissues and an antioxidant, regulates late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated normal human fibroblasts (NHFs). Methods and Materials: Flow cytometry analysis of cell viability, cell cycle phase distribution, and dihydroethidium oxidation, along with clonogenic assays, were used to measure oxidative stress and toxicity. Human antioxidant mechanisms array and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to measure gene expression during late ROS accumulation in irradiated NHFs. Sodium selenite addition and SEPP1 overexpression were used to determine the causality of SEPP1 regulating late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated NHFs. Results: Irradiated NHFs showed late ROS accumulation (4.5-fold increase from control; P<.05) that occurs after activation of the cell cycle checkpoint pathways and precedes cell death. The mRNA levels of CuZn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxiredoxin 3, and thioredoxin reductase 1 increased approximately 2- to 3-fold, whereas mRNA levels of cold shock domain containing E1 and SEPP1 increased more than 6-fold (P<.05). The addition of sodium selenite before the radiation treatment suppressed toxicity (45%; P<.05). SEPP1 overexpression suppressed radiation-induced late ROS accumulation (35%; P<.05) and protected NHFs from radiation-induced toxicity (58%; P<.05). Conclusion: SEPP1 mitigates radiation-induced late ROS accumulation and normal cell injury.

  1. Upregulation and nuclear translocation of testicular ghrelin protects differentiating spermatogonia from ionizing radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, W; Zeng, Y; Zhao, J; Zhu, C-J; Hou, W-G; Zhang, S

    2014-01-01

    Proper control of apoptotic signaling is important for maintenance of testicular homeostasis after ionizing radiation (IR). Herein, we challenged the hypothesis that ghrelin, a pleiotropic modulator, is potentially involved in IR-induced germ cell injury. Lower body exposure to 2 Gy of IR induced a notable increase of ghrelin expression in the nuclear of differentiating spermatogonia at defined stages, with an impairment in the Leydig cells (LCs)-expressing ghrelin. Unexpectedly, inhibition of the ghrelin pathway by intraperitoneal injection of a specific GHS-R1α antagonist enhanced spermatogonia elimination by apoptosis during the early recovery following IR, and thereafter resulted in impaired male fertility, suggesting that the anti-apoptotic effects of evoked ghrelin, although transient along testicular IR injury, have a profound influence on the post-injury recovery. In addition, inhibition of ghrelin signaling resulted in a significant increase in the intratesticular testosterone (T) level at the end of 21 days after IR, which should stimulate the spermatogenic recovery from surviving spermatogonia to a certain extent during the late stage. We further demonstrated that the upregulation and nuclear trafficking of ghrelin, elaborately regulated by IR-elicited antioxidant system in spermatogonia, may act through a p53-dependent mechanism. The elicitation of ghrelin expression by IR stress, the regulation of ghrelin expression by IR-induced oxidative stress and the interaction between p53 and ghrelin signaling during IR injury were confirmed in cultured spermatogonia. Hence, our results represent the first evidence in support of a radioprotective role of ghrelin in the differentiating spermatogonia. The acutely, delicate regulation of local-produced ghrelin appears to be a fine-tune mechanism modulating the balance between testicular homeostasis and early IR injury. PMID:24853426

  2. Upregulation and nuclear translocation of testicular ghrelin protects differentiating spermatogonia from ionizing radiation injury.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Zeng, Y; Zhao, J; Zhu, C-J; Hou, W-G; Zhang, S

    2014-05-22

    Proper control of apoptotic signaling is important for maintenance of testicular homeostasis after ionizing radiation (IR). Herein, we challenged the hypothesis that ghrelin, a pleiotropic modulator, is potentially involved in IR-induced germ cell injury. Lower body exposure to 2 Gy of IR induced a notable increase of ghrelin expression in the nuclear of differentiating spermatogonia at defined stages, with an impairment in the Leydig cells (LCs)-expressing ghrelin. Unexpectedly, inhibition of the ghrelin pathway by intraperitoneal injection of a specific GHS-R1α antagonist enhanced spermatogonia elimination by apoptosis during the early recovery following IR, and thereafter resulted in impaired male fertility, suggesting that the anti-apoptotic effects of evoked ghrelin, although transient along testicular IR injury, have a profound influence on the post-injury recovery. In addition, inhibition of ghrelin signaling resulted in a significant increase in the intratesticular testosterone (T) level at the end of 21 days after IR, which should stimulate the spermatogenic recovery from surviving spermatogonia to a certain extent during the late stage. We further demonstrated that the upregulation and nuclear trafficking of ghrelin, elaborately regulated by IR-elicited antioxidant system in spermatogonia, may act through a p53-dependent mechanism. The elicitation of ghrelin expression by IR stress, the regulation of ghrelin expression by IR-induced oxidative stress and the interaction between p53 and ghrelin signaling during IR injury were confirmed in cultured spermatogonia. Hence, our results represent the first evidence in support of a radioprotective role of ghrelin in the differentiating spermatogonia. The acutely, delicate regulation of local-produced ghrelin appears to be a fine-tune mechanism modulating the balance between testicular homeostasis and early IR injury.

  3. The burning issues of motor vehicle radiator scald injuries revisited – a fresh review and changing prevention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, J.N.; Tan, A.; Frew, Q.; Dziewulski, P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary A preventable subgroup of burn injuries is scalds sustained from motor vehicle radiators. This study was to determine changes in trends in epidemiology of such injuries and to discuss whether current and other prevention efforts proposed previously require reinforcement. We conducted a retrospective study (February 2007-August 2015) of all motor vehicle-related burn referrals to our regional burns service. 68 cases of motor vehicle radiator burns were identified. Male to female ratio was 65:3. Mean age was 35.1 (range = 9-71). Most cases occurred in the summer months (22/68 = 32.4%). 65 cases (95.6%) involved car radiators. 66% of injuries resulted from actively removing the pressure cap of an overheated radiator in the motor vehicle. Mean total burn surface area (%TBSA) was 2.1% (range = 0.5- 11%). The depths of burn injuries were mostly superficial partial thickness. Face, chest and upper limbs were the most common sites of injury. Mean healing time was 14.2 days (range = 4-60). Following the introduction of safety measures by vehicle manufacturers, motor vehicle radiator burns in this era are mostly minor injuries and can be potentially managed conservatively as an outpatient. This contrasts with findings from previous studies over a decade ago of larger, more significant injuries requiring admission and surgery. Whilst manufacturers have installed safety measures into the design of radiator caps, our findings suggest that re-educating the public to allow a period of cooling prior to opening caps should be reinforced. PMID:28289357

  4. The burning issues of motor vehicle radiator scald injuries revisited - a fresh review and changing prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Patel, J N; Tan, A; Frew, Q; Dziewulski, P

    2016-12-31

    A preventable subgroup of burn injuries is scalds sustained from motor vehicle radiators. This study was to determine changes in trends in epidemiology of such injuries and to discuss whether current and other prevention efforts proposed previously require reinforcement. We conducted a retrospective study (February 2007-August 2015) of all motor vehicle-related burn referrals to our regional burns service. 68 cases of motor vehicle radiator burns were identified. Male to female ratio was 65:3. Mean age was 35.1 (range = 9-71). Most cases occurred in the summer months (22/68 = 32.4%). 65 cases (95.6%) involved car radiators. 66% of injuries resulted from actively removing the pressure cap of an overheated radiator in the motor vehicle. Mean total burn surface area (%TBSA) was 2.1% (range = 0.5- 11%). The depths of burn injuries were mostly superficial partial thickness. Face, chest and upper limbs were the most common sites of injury. Mean healing time was 14.2 days (range = 4-60). Following the introduction of safety measures by vehicle manufacturers, motor vehicle radiator burns in this era are mostly minor injuries and can be potentially managed conservatively as an outpatient. This contrasts with findings from previous studies over a decade ago of larger, more significant injuries requiring admission and surgery. Whilst manufacturers have installed safety measures into the design of radiator caps, our findings suggest that re-educating the public to allow a period of cooling prior to opening caps should be reinforced.

  5. Dclk1 Deletion in Tuft Cells Results in Impaired Epithelial Repair After Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Weygant, Nathaniel; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stanley A.; Li, Linheng; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2013-01-01

    The role of Dclk1+ tuft cells in the replacement of intestinal epithelia and reestablishing the epithelial barrier after severe genotoxic insult is completely unknown. Successful restoration requires precise coordination between the cells within each crypt subunit. While the mechanisms that control this response remain largely uncertain, the radiation model remains an exceptional surrogate for stem cell-associated crypt loss. Following the creation of Dclk1-intestinal-epithelial-deficient Villin-Cre;Dclk1flox/flox mice, widespread gene expression changes were detected in isolated intestinal epithelia during homeostasis. While the number of surviving crypts were unaffected, Villin-Cre;Dclk1flox/flox mice failed to maintain tight junctions and died at ~5d, where Dclk1flox/flox mice lived until day 10 following radiation injury. These findings suggest that Dclk1 plays a functional role critical in the epithelial restorative response. PMID:24123696

  6. Alpha Lipoic Acid Attenuates Radiation-Induced Thyroid Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jung Hwa; Jung, Jaehoon; Kim, Soo Kyoung; Woo, Seung Hoon; Kang, Ki Mun; Jeong, Bae-Kwon; Jung, Myeong Hee; Kim, Jin Hyun; Hahm, Jong Ryeal

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the thyroid to radiation during radiotherapy of the head and neck is often unavoidable. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effect of α-lipoic acid (ALA) on radiation-induced thyroid injury in rats. Rats were randomly assigned to four groups: healthy controls (CTL), irradiated (RT), received ALA before irradiation (ALA + RT), and received ALA only (ALA, 100 mg/kg, i.p.). ALA was treated at 24 h and 30 minutes prior to irradiation. The neck area including the thyroid gland was evenly irradiated with 2 Gy per minute (total dose of 18 Gy) using a photon 6-MV linear accelerator. Greater numbers of abnormal and unusually small follicles in the irradiated thyroid tissues were observed compared to the controls and the ALA group on days 4 and 7 after irradiation. However, all pathologies were decreased by ALA pretreatment. The quantity of small follicles in the irradiated rats was greater on day 7 than day 4 after irradiation. However, in the ALA-treated irradiated rats, the numbers of small and medium follicles were significantly decreased to a similar degree as in the control and ALA-only groups. The PAS-positive density of the colloid in RT group was decreased significantly compared with all other groups and reversed by ALA pretreatment. The high activity index in the irradiated rats was lowered by ALA treatment. TGF-ß1 immunoreactivity was enhanced in irradiated rats and was more severe on the day 7 after radiation exposure than on day 4. Expression of TGF-ß1 was reduced in the thyroid that had undergone ALA pretreatment. Levels of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1ß and IL-6) did not differ significantly between the all groups. This study provides that pretreatment with ALA decreased the severity of radiation-induced thyroid injury by reducing inflammation and fibrotic infiltration and lowering the activity index. Thus, ALA could be used to ameliorate radiation-induced thyroid injury. PMID:25401725

  7. Quercetin liposomes protect against radiation-induced pulmonary injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Xue, Jian-Xing; Li, Xing; Ao, Rui; Lu, You

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, the hypothesis that quercetin liposomes are able to effectively protect against radiation-induced pulmonary injury in a murine model was tested. C57BL/6J mice receiving whole-thorax radiotherapy (16 Gy) were randomly divided into three groups: control, radiation therapy plus saline (RT+NS) and RT plus quercetin (RT+QU). At 1, 4, 8 and 24 weeks post-irradiation, lung injury was assessed by measuring oxidative damage and the extent of acute pneumonitis and late fibrosis. In the lung tissues from the RT+NS group, the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly elevated and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activities were significantly reduced; the total cell counts and inflammatory cell proportions in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 concentrations and the hydroxyproline (HP) content were significantly increased. Quercetin liposome administration significantly reduced the MDA content and increased SOD and GSH-PX activities in the lung tissues, and reduced the total cell counts and inflammatory cell proportions in the BALF, plasma TNF-α and TGF-β1 concentrations and the HP content in the lung tissues. A histological examination revealed suppression of the inflammatory response and reduced TGF-β1 expression and fibrosis scores. Radiation-induced oxidative damage ranged from pneumonitis to lung fibrosis. Quercetin liposomes were shown to protect against radiation-induced acute pneumonitis and late fibrosis, potentially by reducing oxidative damage.

  8. Quercetin liposomes protect against radiation-induced pulmonary injury in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    LIU, HAO; XUE, JIAN-XING; LI, XING; AO, RUI; LU, YOU

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the hypothesis that quercetin liposomes are able to effectively protect against radiation-induced pulmonary injury in a murine model was tested. C57BL/6J mice receiving whole-thorax radiotherapy (16 Gy) were randomly divided into three groups: control, radiation therapy plus saline (RT+NS) and RT plus quercetin (RT+QU). At 1, 4, 8 and 24 weeks post-irradiation, lung injury was assessed by measuring oxidative damage and the extent of acute pneumonitis and late fibrosis. In the lung tissues from the RT+NS group, the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly elevated and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activities were significantly reduced; the total cell counts and inflammatory cell proportions in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 concentrations and the hydroxyproline (HP) content were significantly increased. Quercetin liposome administration significantly reduced the MDA content and increased SOD and GSH-PX activities in the lung tissues, and reduced the total cell counts and inflammatory cell proportions in the BALF, plasma TNF-α and TGF-β1 concentrations and the HP content in the lung tissues. A histological examination revealed suppression of the inflammatory response and reduced TGF-β1 expression and fibrosis scores. Radiation-induced oxidative damage ranged from pneumonitis to lung fibrosis. Quercetin liposomes were shown to protect against radiation-induced acute pneumonitis and late fibrosis, potentially by reducing oxidative damage. PMID:24137346

  9. Radiation-induced genomic instability: delayed mutagenic and cytogenetic effects of X rays and alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Little, J B; Nagasawa, H; Pfenning, T; Vetrovs, H

    1997-10-01

    The frequency of mutations at the Hprt locus was measured in clonal populations of Chinese hamster ovary cells derived from single cells surviving exposure to 0-12 Gy of X rays or 2 Gy of alpha particles. Approximately 8-9% of 446 clonal populations examined 23 population doublings after irradiation showed high frequencies of late-arising mutations as indicated by mutant fractions 10(2)-10(4)-fold above background. The frequency with which such clones occurred was similar for alpha-particle irradiation and X irradiation, with no apparent dose dependence for X irradiation over the range of 4-12 Gy. The molecular structure of Hprt mutations was determined by analysis by multiplex polymerase chain reaction of all nine exons. Of mutations induced directly after exposure to X rays, 75% involved partial or total gene deletions. Only 19-23% of late-arising (delayed) mutations were associated with deletions, the preponderance of these being partial deletions involving one or two exons. This spectrum was very similar to that for spontaneously arising mutations. To determine whether delayed mutations were non-clonal, the spectrum of exons deleted was examined among 29 mutants with partial deletions derived from a single clonal population. The results indicated that at least 15 of these mutants arose independently. To examine the relationship between the occurrence of delayed mutations and chromosomal instability, 60 Hprt mutant subclones isolated from a clonal population showing a high frequency of delayed mutations were serially cultivated in vitro. Of these, 14 showed a slow-growth phenotype with a high frequency of polyploid cells (10-38%) and a markedly enhanced frequency of non-clonal chromosomal rearrangements including both chromosome-type and chromatid-type aberrations. These clones also showed a 3- to 30-fold increase in the frequency of ouabain-resistant mutations; no ouabain-resistant mutants were induced directly by X irradiation. These results suggest that among

  10. Delayed Exercise Is Ineffective at Reversing Aberrant Nociceptive Afferent Plasticity or Neuropathic Pain After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Detloff, Megan Ryan; Quiros-Molina, Daniel; Javia, Amy S; Daggubati, Lekhaj; Nehlsen, Anthony D; Naqvi, Ali; Ninan, Vinu; Vannix, Kirsten N; McMullen, Mary-Katharine; Amin, Sheena; Ganzer, Patrick D; Houlé, John D

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI) that correlates with sensory fiber sprouting. Recent data indicate that exercise initiated early after SCI prevents the development of allodynia and modulated nociceptive afferent plasticity. This study determined if delaying exercise intervention until pain is detected would similarly ameliorate established SCI-induced pain. Adult, female Sprague-Dawley rats with a C5 unilateral contusion were separated into SCI allodynic and SCI non-allodynic cohorts at 14 or 28 days postinjury when half of each group began exercising on automated running wheels. Allodynia, assessed by von Frey testing, was not ameliorated by exercise. Furthermore, rats that began exercise with no allodynia developed paw hypersensitivity within 2 weeks. At the initiation of exercise, the SCI Allodynia group displayed marked overlap of peptidergic and non-peptidergic nociceptive afferents in the C7 and L5 dorsal horn, while the SCI No Allodynia group had scant overlap. At the end of 5 weeks of exercise both the SCI Allodynia and SCI No Allodynia groups had extensive overlap of the 2 c-fiber types. Our findings show that exercise therapy initiated at early stages of allodynia is ineffective at attenuating neuropathic pain, but rather that it induces allodynia-aberrant afferent plasticity in previously pain-free rats. These data, combined with our previous results, suggest that there is a critical therapeutic window when exercise therapy may be effective at treating SCI-induced allodynia and that there are postinjury periods when exercise can be deleterious.

  11. Improved recovery and delayed cytokine induction after closed head injury in mice with central overexpression of the secreted isoform of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Tehranian, Roya; Andell-Jonsson, Siv; Beni, Sara M; Yatsiv, Ido; Shohami, Esther; Bartfai, Tamas; Lundkvist, Johan; Iverfeldt, Kerstin

    2002-08-01

    The acute inflammatory response following traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been shown to play an important role in the development of secondary tissue damage. The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha), are induced early after brain injury and have been implicated in the delayed damage. The IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) has been shown to modulate the proinflammatory cytokine cascade by blocking the binding of IL-1 to its signaling receptor. In this study, we investigated the effect of transgenic overexpression of IL-1ra on the cytokine expression and neurological damage in a closed head injury (CHI) model of TBI. The neurological recovery, as analyzed by neurological severity score (NSS), was significantly higher in transgenic mice overexpressing the human secreted form of IL-1ra in astrocytes, directed by the murine glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter, as compared to wild-type mice. Analysis of tissue levels of cytokines by ELISA showed increased levels of TNFalpha in the cerebral cortex from the wild type mice 1 h after injury. After 4 h significant increases in the levels of IL-1beta and IL-6 were observed in the wild type mice. In the transgenic mice, on the other hand, no effect on TNFalpha levels was observed and no significant increases in IL-1beta and IL-6 levels could be detected until 6 h after injury. Thus, it can be concluded that blockage of IL-1 signaling by elevated levels of IL-1ra has a neuroprotective effect, in agreement with previous reports, and that central overexpression of IL-1ra results in delayed proinflammatory cytokine induction and improved neurological recovery after traumatic brain injury.

  12. Effects of Pharmacological Inhibition and Genetic Deficiency of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Abderrahmani, Rym; Francois, Agnes; Buard, Valerie; Benderitter, Marc; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Crandall, David L.; Milliat, Fabien

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate effects of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) genetic deficiency and pharmacological PAI-1 inhibition with PAI-039 in a mouse model of radiation-induced enteropathy. Methods and Materials: Wild-type (Wt) and PAI-1{sup -/-} knockout mice received a single dose of 19 Gy to an exteriorized localized intestinal segment. Sham and irradiated Wt mice were treated orally with 1 mg/g of PAI-039. Histological modifications were quantified using a radiation injury score. Moreover, intestinal gene expression was monitored by real-time PCR. Results: At 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 abolished the radiation-induced increase in the plasma active form of PAI-1 and limited the radiation-induced gene expression of transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1), CTGF, PAI-1, and COL1A2. Moreover, PAI-039 conferred temporary protection against early lethality. PAI-039 treatment limited the radiation-induced increase of CTGF and PAI-1 at 2 weeks after irradiation but had no effect at 6 weeks. Radiation injuries were less severe in PAI-1{sup -/-} mice than in Wt mice, and despite the beneficial effect, 3 days after irradiation, PAI-039 had no effects on microscopic radiation injuries compared to untreated Wt mice. Conclusions: A genetic deficiency of PAI-1 is associated with amelioration of late radiation enteropathy. Pharmacological inhibition of PAI-1 by PAI-039 positively impacts the early, acute phase increase in plasma PAI-1 and the associated radiation-induced gene expression of inflammatory/extracellular matrix proteins. Since PAI-039 has been shown to inhibit the active form of PAI-1, as opposed to the complete loss of PAI-1 in the knockout animals, these data suggest that a PAI-1 inhibitor could be beneficial in treating radiation-induced tissue injury in acute settings where PAI-1 is elevated.

  13. The ultrastructure of radiation injury in rat lung: modification by D-penicillamine. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Port, C.D.; Ward, W.F.

    1982-10-01

    The present study compared the ultrastructure of radiation injury in the lungs of penicillamine-treated and untreated male rats sacrificed 3, 6, 9, or 12 months after a single exposure of 25 Gy of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays to the right hemithorax. All morphological components of the irradiated lungs exhibited injury typical of pneumonitis progressing to interstitial fibrosis. In addition to these well-documented responses, several less common ultrastructural changes were noted, including capillary recanalization; focal disappearance of interstitial collagen fibers, initially perivascularly, then throughout some septa; and a low-grade but significant cellular reaction in the shielded left lung. Radiation reactions in the lungs of penicillamine-treated rats were qualitatively similar to those of untreated animals, but differed in the degree of change: collagen deposition was less extensive and less highly organized into fibers, capillary recanalization and disappearance of interstitial collagen were more common, and arterial wall thickening was reduced in the drug-treated rats. Thus the beneficial effect of penicillamine on the histopathology of irradiated rat lung does not appear to be attributable to unique ultrastructural phenomena. Rather, penicillamine treatment produces a generalized inhibition of pathologic events such as collagen accumulation and arterial wall thickening, and acceleration of restorative processes such as revascularization and collagen degradation.

  14. Spatiotemporal pattern of neuronal injury induced by DFP in rats: A model for delayed neuronal cell death following acute OP intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yonggang; Lein, Pamela J.; Liu Cuimei; Bruun, Donald A.; Tewolde, Teclemichael; Ford, Gregory; Ford, Byron D.

    2011-06-15

    Organophosphate (OP) neurotoxins cause acute cholinergic toxicity and seizures resulting in delayed brain damage and persistent neurological symptoms. Testing novel strategies for protecting against delayed effects of acute OP intoxication has been hampered by the lack of appropriate animal models. In this study, we characterize the spatiotemporal pattern of cellular injury after acute intoxication with the OP diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received pyridostigmine (0.1 mg/kg, im) and atropine methylnitrate (20 mg/kg, im) prior to DFP (9 mg/kg, ip) administration. All DFP-treated animals exhibited moderate to severe seizures within minutes after DFP injection but survived up to 72 h. AChE activity was significantly depressed in the cortex, hippocampus, subcortical brain tissue and cerebellum at 1 h post-DFP injection and this inhibition persisted for up to 72 h. Analysis of neuronal injury by Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) labeling revealed delayed neuronal cell death in the hippocampus, cortex, amygdala and thalamus, but not the cerebellum, starting at 4 h and persisting until 72 h after DFP treatment, although temporal profiles varied between brain regions. At 24 h post-DFP injection, the pattern of FJB labeling corresponded to TUNEL staining in most brain regions, and FJB-positive cells displayed reduced NeuN immunoreactivity but were not immunopositive for astrocytic (GFAP), oligodendroglial (O4) or macrophage/microglial (ED1) markers, demonstrating that DFP causes a region-specific delayed neuronal injury mediated in part by apoptosis. These findings indicate the feasibility of this model for testing neuroprotective strategies, and provide insight regarding therapeutic windows for effective pharmacological intervention following acute OP intoxication. - Research Highlights: > DFP induced neuronal FJB labeling starting at 4-8 h after treatment > The pattern of DFP-induced FJB labeling closely corresponded to TUNEL staining > FJB

  15. [Effects of blood serum from rats with combined radiation-thermal injury on the bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells growth].

    PubMed

    Ran, Xin-Ze; Su, Yong-Ping; Zheng, Huai-En; Guo, Chao-Hua; Liu, Du-Hu; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Ai, Guo-Ping

    2005-02-01

    To observe the effects of blood serum from rats with radiation injury, thermal injury and combined radiation-thermal lesions on growth of hematopoietic progenitor cells and the change of their serum cytokine levels, total body irradiation of rats was performed with 12 Gy gamma ray from a (60)Co source, and 30% total body surface area III degree thermal lesion on the back was inflicted with a 5 kW bromotungsten lamp. The blood serum from these animals was collected at 3, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after injury. Then the blood serum was added to the culture medium of erythrocyte progenitor cells (CFU-E, BFU-E) or granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (CFU-GM) at final concentration of 10 microg/ml. The results showed that the colony number of CFU-E, BFU-E and CFU-GM formed after addition of the blood serum from rats with thermal or combined radiation-thermal injury was significantly higher than that from normal rats at 3, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after injury and reached its peak value at 24 hours after injury (342.8, 261.6 and 228.4% respectively from burned rats, 252.4, 205.1 and 174.2% respectively from rats with combined radiation-thermal injury as compared with that of normal rats). However, a few CFU-E, BFU-E or CFU-GM formation was found after addition of the blood serum from irradiated rats. At the same time, the level of TNF alpha and IL-6 in serum of burn group and combined radiation-thermal injury group was markedly higher than that of normal group, even more higher than that of irradiation injury group (P < 0.01). It is concluded that the blood serum from rats with thermal lesion or combined radiation-thermal injury improves the growth of erythrocyte and granulocyte progenitor cells. On the contrary, the blood serum from the irradiated rats shows the inhibiting effects, definitely related to their serum cytokines changes.

  16. Protective Effect of Lycium ruthenicum Murr. Against Radiation Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yabin; Chen, Fan; Yao, Xingchen; Zhu, Junbo; Wang, Cai; Zhang, Juanling; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    The protective effect of Lycium ruthenicum Murr. against radiation injury was examined in mice. Kunming mice were randomly divided into a control group, model group, positive drug group and L. ruthenicum high dose (8 g/kg), L. ruthenicum middle dose (4 g/kg), L. ruthenicum low dose (2 g/kg) treatment groups, for which doses were administered the third day, seventh day and 14th day after irradiation. L. ruthenicum extract was administered orally to the mice in the three treatment groups and normal saline was administered orally to the mice in the control group and model group for 14 days. The positive group was treated with amifostine (WR-2721) at 30 min before irradiation. Except for the control group, the groups of mice received a 5 Gy quantity of X-radiation evenly over their whole body at one time. Body weight, hemogram, thymus and spleen index, DNA, caspase-3, caspase-6, and P53 contents were observed at the third day, seventh day, and 14th day after irradiation. L. ruthenicum could significantly increase the total red blood cell count, hemoglobin count and DNA contents (p < 0.05). The spleen index recovered significantly by the third day and 14th day after irradiation (p < 0.05). L. ruthenicum low dose group showed a significant reduction in caspase-3 and caspase-6 of serum in mice at the third day, seventh day, and 14th day after irradiation and L. ruthenicum middle dose group experienced a reduction in caspase-6 of serum in mice by the seventh day after irradiation. L. ruthenicum could decrease the expression of P53. The results showed that L. ruthenicum had protective effects against radiation injury in mice. PMID:26193298

  17. Cyclic nucleotide responses and radiation-induced mitotic delay in Physarum polycephalum

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, J.W.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1984-02-01

    The response of the plasmodial levels of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in Physarum polycephalum to several putative phosphodiesterase inhibitors and to ionizing radiation has been measured. Isobutylmethylxanthine (2 mM) induces a rapid transient threefold elevation of cyclic AMP alone, with maximum response in about 10 min and return to the base line in about 30 min. Theophylline (2 mM) induces a rapid, sustained twofold elevation of cyclic GMP only. Caffeine (2mM) and Ro-20-1724 (18 ..mu..M) both elicit a rapid transient rise in cyclic AMP, resembling the isobutylmethylxanthine response, and a slow transient elevation of the cyclic GMP level. Of particular interest is the rapid threefold transient elevation of the cyclic AMP, but not of the cyclic GMP, level by ..gamma.. radiation.

  18. Modelling radiation-induced cell death and tumour re-oxygenation: local versus global and instant versus delayed cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Aguiar, Pablo; Espinoza, Ignacio; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-02-01

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to radiation, due to the oxygen dependence of radiosensitivity, is well known and must be taken into account to accurately calculate the radiation induced cell death. A proper modelling of the response of tumours to radiation requires deriving the distribution of oxygen at a microscopic scale. This usually involves solving the reaction-diffusion equation in tumour voxels using a vascularization distribution model. Moreover, re-oxygenation arises during the course of radiotherapy, one reason being the increase of available oxygen caused by cell killing, which can turn hypoxic tumours into oxic. In this work we study the effect of cell death kinetics in tumour oxygenation modelling, analysing how it affects the timing of re-oxygenation, surviving fraction and tumour control. Two models of cell death are compared, an instantaneous cell killing, mimicking early apoptosis, and a delayed cell death scenario in which cells can die shortly after being damaged, as well as long after irradiation. For each of these scenarios, the decrease in oxygen consumption due to cell death can be computed globally (macroscopic voxel average) or locally (microscopic). A re-oxygenation model already used in the literature, the so called full re-oxygenation, is also considered. The impact of cell death kinetics and re-oxygenation on tumour responses is illustrated for two radiotherapy fractionation schemes: a conventional schedule, and a hypofractionated treatment. The results show large differences in the doses needed to achieve 50% tumour control for the investigated cell death models. Moreover, the models affect the tumour responses differently depending on the treatment schedule. This corroborates the complex nature of re-oxygenation, showing the need to take into account the kinetics of cell death in radiation response models.

  19. Modelling radiation-induced cell death and tumour re-oxygenation: local versus global and instant versus delayed cell death.

    PubMed

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Aguiar, Pablo; Espinoza, Ignacio; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-02-07

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to radiation, due to the oxygen dependence of radiosensitivity, is well known and must be taken into account to accurately calculate the radiation induced cell death. A proper modelling of the response of tumours to radiation requires deriving the distribution of oxygen at a microscopic scale. This usually involves solving the reaction-diffusion equation in tumour voxels using a vascularization distribution model. Moreover, re-oxygenation arises during the course of radiotherapy, one reason being the increase of available oxygen caused by cell killing, which can turn hypoxic tumours into oxic. In this work we study the effect of cell death kinetics in tumour oxygenation modelling, analysing how it affects the timing of re-oxygenation, surviving fraction and tumour control. Two models of cell death are compared, an instantaneous cell killing, mimicking early apoptosis, and a delayed cell death scenario in which cells can die shortly after being damaged, as well as long after irradiation. For each of these scenarios, the decrease in oxygen consumption due to cell death can be computed globally (macroscopic voxel average) or locally (microscopic). A re-oxygenation model already used in the literature, the so called full re-oxygenation, is also considered. The impact of cell death kinetics and re-oxygenation on tumour responses is illustrated for two radiotherapy fractionation schemes: a conventional schedule, and a hypofractionated treatment. The results show large differences in the doses needed to achieve 50% tumour control for the investigated cell death models. Moreover, the models affect the tumour responses differently depending on the treatment schedule. This corroborates the complex nature of re-oxygenation, showing the need to take into account the kinetics of cell death in radiation response models.

  20. Loss of p21 increases sensitivity to ionizing radiation and delays the onset of lymphoma in atm-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. Alan; Elson, Ari; Leder, Philip

    1997-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by growth retardation, cerebellar ataxia, oculocutaneous telangiectasias, and a high incidence of lymphomas and leukemias. In addition, AT patients are sensitive to ionizing radiation. Atm-deficient mice recapitulate most of the AT phenotype. p21cip1/waf1 (p21 hereafter), an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, has been implicated in cellular senescence and response to γ-radiation-induced DNA damage. To study the role of p21 in ATM-mediated signal transduction pathways, we examined the combined effect of the genetic loss of atm and p21 on growth control, radiation sensitivity, and tumorigenesis. As might have been expected, our data provide evidence that p21 modifies the in vitro senescent response seen in AT fibroblasts. Further, it is a downstream effector of ATM-mediated growth control. In addition, however, we find that loss of p21 in the context of an atm-deficient mouse leads to a delay in thymic lymphomagenesis and an increase in acute radiation sensitivity in vivo (the latter principally because of effects on the gut epithelium). Modification of these two crucial aspects of the ATM phenotype can be related to an apparent increase in spontaneous apoptosis seen in tumor cells and in the irradiated intestinal epithelium of mice doubly null for atm and p21. Thus, loss of p21 seems to contribute to tumor suppression by a mechanism that operates via a sensitized apoptotic response. These results have implications for cancer therapy in general and AT patients in particular. PMID:9405657

  1. Detection and early phase assessment of radiation-induced lung injury in mice using micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shigeyoshi; Murase, Kenya

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important therapeutic modality for thoracic malignancies. However, radiation-induced pulmonary injuries such as radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis are major dose-limiting factors. Previous research shows that micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) can detect radiation-induced lung injuries a few months following irradiation, but studies to assess the early response of lung tissue are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine if micro-CT could be used to detect and assess early-phase radiation-induced lung injury in mice. Twenty-one animals were divided into three groups: normal (n = 7), one day after x-ray exposure (n = 7), and at four days after x-ray exposure (n = 7). The x-ray-exposed groups received a single dose of 20 Gy, to the whole lung. Histology showed enlargements of the air space (Lm: mean chord length) following irradiation. 40.5 ± 3.8 µm and 60.0 ± 6.9 µm were observed after one and four days, respectively, compared to 26.5 ± 3.1 µm in normal mice. Three-dimensional micro-CT images were constructed and histograms of radiodensity - Hounsfield Units (HU) - were used to assess changes in mouse lungs. Radiation-induced lung injury was observed in irradiated mice, by the use of two parameters which were defined as shifts in peak HU between -200 to -800 HU (Peak(HU)) and increase in the number of pixels at -1000 HU (Number(-1000)). These parameters were correlated with histological changes. The results demonstrate that micro-CT can be used for the early detection and assessment of structural and histopathological changes resulting from radiation-induced lung injury in mice. Micro-CT has the advantage, over traditional histological techniques, of allowing longitudinal studies of lung disease progression and assessment of the entire lung, while reducing the number of animals required for such studies.

  2. Radiation injury of the developing immune system in the beagle dog

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.K.

    1982-01-01

    Fetal lymphoid organs of the beagle dog were studied to determine if the developing immune system displays an age-dependent sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Pregnant beagle dams received abdominal /sup 60/Co gamma exposures to 200R or were sham irradiated at one of three ages in gestation; 35, 40, or 45 days postcoitus. The mean calculated dose to each fetus was 1.5 Gy. Half the fetuses in each litter were harvested by hysterotomy at five days and half at ten days postirradiation (PI). The volumes of the thymus lobules and lobular cortices were significantly reduced at five and ten days PI as compared to age matched controls. Radiation damage in the developing immune system was expressed in the lymphocyte populations of fetal lymphoid organs and in thymus epithelium. Damage was qualitatively and quantitatively more severe following irradiation earlier in gestation, confirming that the developing immune system displays an age-dependent sensitivity. Prenatal radiation injury to the developing lymphoid system could compromise postnatal immunologic function and could alter immunoregulation.

  3. Protective effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester against acute radiation-induced hepatic injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chu, JianJun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Jin, Liugen; Chen, Junliang; Du, Bin; Pang, Qingfeng

    2015-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenyl ester (CAPE) is a potent anti-inflammatory agent and it can eliminate the free radicals. The current study was intended to evaluate the protective effect of CAPE against the acute radiation-induced liver damage in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally administered with CAPE (30 mg/kg) for 3 consecutive days before exposing them to a single dose of 30 Gy of β-ray irradiation to upper abdomen. We found that pretreatment with CAPE significantly decreased the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione. Histological evaluation further confirmed the protection of CAPE against radiation-induced hepatotoxicity. TUNEL assay showed that CAPE pretreatment inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis. Moreover, CAPE inhibited the nuclear transport of NF-κB p65 subunit, decreased the level of tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Taken together, these results suggest that pretreatment with CAPE offers protection against radiation-induced hepatic injury.

  4. The role of alveolar epithelium in radiation-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Celine; Nagarajan, Devipriya; Tian, Jian; Leal, Sofia Walder; Wheeler, Kenneth; Munley, Michael; Blackstock, William; Zhao, Weiling

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonitis and fibrosis are major lung complications of irradiating thoracic malignancies. In the current study, we determined the effect of thoracic irradiation on the lungs of FVB/N mice. Survival data showed a dose-dependent increase in morbidity following thoracic irradiation with single (11-13 Gy) and fractionated doses (24-36 Gy) of (137)Cs γ-rays. Histological examination showed a thickening of vessel walls, accumulation of inflammatory cells, collagen deposition, and regional fibrosis in the lungs 14 weeks after a single 12 Gy dose and a fractionated 30 Gy dose; this damage was also seen 5 months after a fractionated 24 Gy dose. After both single and fractionated doses, i] aquaporin-5 was markedly decreased, ii] E-cadherin was reduced and iii] prosurfactant Protein C (pro-SP-c), the number of pro-SP-c(+) cells and vimentin expression were increased in the lungs. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed co-localization of pro-SP-c and α-smooth muscle actin in the alveoli after a single dose of 12 Gy. These data suggest that, i] the FVB/N mouse strain is sensitive to thoracic radiation ii] aquaporin-5, E-cadherin, and pro-SP-c may serve as sensitive indicators of radiation-induced lung injury; and iii] the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition may play an important role in the development of radiation-induced lung fibrosis.

  5. High-frequency electromagnetic radiation injury to the upper extremity: local and systemic effects.

    PubMed

    Ciano, M; Burlin, J R; Pardoe, R; Mills, R L; Hentz, V R

    1981-08-01

    Industrial use of radiofrequency and microwave energy sources (nonionizing, high-frequency electromagnetic radiation) is a growing and widespread phenomenon, with projected risks of exposure to more than 20 million workers in the United States. A description of the nature of this form of electromagnetic energy is given, with emphasis on the variability of energy absorption by humans. The current state of biological research is reviewed, and a summary of the known effects of radiofrequency and microwave radiation exposure on animals and humans provided. These known effects appear to be principally thermal, similar to conventional electrical burn injuries, but with some unique systemic expression. Derangements of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, endocrine, hematological, ophthalmological, and behavioral functions are well described in animal experimentation. Two patients are presented--one a young woman exposed to a high-density radiofrequency field in an industrial setting, leading to necrosis of the entire hand and wrist as well as to a constellation of systemic effects, and one an older woman exposed to excessive microwave radiation from a malfunctioning microwave oven, leading to chronic hand pain and paresthesias resembling median nerve entrapment at the carpus. The prevalence of potential exposure in certain industries is noted and recommendations for follow-up care of workers exposed to this form of trauma are delineated.

  6. Succinylcholine-induced hyperkalemia in the rat following radiation injury to muscle. [60Co

    SciTech Connect

    Cairoli, V.J.; Ivankovich, A.D.; Vucicevic, D.; Patel, K.

    1982-02-01

    During anesthetic preparation of a patient who had received routine radiation therapy of sarcoma of the leg, cardiac collapse occurred following succinylcholine (SCh) administration. Experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that radiation injury to muscle might cause increased sensitivity to SCh similar to that reported in patients with muscle trauma, severe burns, and lesions causing muscle denervation. Venous plasma potassium levels and arterial blood gas tensions were measured in rats after they were given SCh (3 mg/kg) at various times following 60Co irradiation of the hind legs. Nonirradiated rats responded to SCh with a slight but statistically significant increase in plasma K+. Rats subjected to high levels of radiation (10,000 to 20,000 R) and given SCh 4 to 7 days later responded in the same way as the control rats. Plasma K+ levels in rats exposed to a fractionated irradiated dosage (25000 R given twice with a 1-week interval) followed by SCh 1 week later were similar to those in the control group, but when SCh was given 2 weeks later (3 weeks after initial irradiation) there was a marked elevation of plasma K+, from 3.6 to 7.7 meq/L, a statistically significant increase.

  7. Succinylcholine-induced hyperkalemia in the rat following radiation injury to muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Cairoli, V.J.; Ivankovich, A.D.; Vucicevic, D.; Patel, K.

    1982-02-01

    During anesthetic preparation of a patient who had received routine radiation therapy for sarcoma of the leg, cardiac collapse occurred following succinylcholine (SCh) administration. Experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that radiation injury to muscle might cause increased sensitivity to SCh similar to that reported in patients with muscle trauma, severe burns, and lesions causing muscle denervation. Venous plasma potassium levels and arterial blood gas tensions were measured in rats after they were given SCh (3 mg/kg) at various times following /sup 60/Co irradiation of the hind legs. Nonirradiated rats responded to SCh with a slight but statistically significant increase in plasma K+. Rats subjected to high levels of radiation (10,000 to 20,000 R) and given SCh 4 to 7 days later responded in the same way as the control rats. Plasma K+ levels in rats exposed to a fractionated irradiated dosage (2500 R given twice with a 1-week interval) followed by SCh 1 week later were similar to those in the control group, but when SCh was given 2 weeks later (3 weeks after initial irradiation) there was a marked elevation of plasma K+, from 3.6 to 7.7 meq/L, a statistically significant increase.

  8. Six-year follow-up of a case of radiation injury following treatment for medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Brown, I S; Felton, R H; Key, L L; Elster, A D; Hickling, W

    1992-04-01

    Recent reports in the literature have documented long-term sequelae of radiation treatment in children, the most notable of which are diminished endocrine functioning and decline in intellectual ability. A case is presented in which both these long-term effects were seen 7 years after radiation treatment for medulloblastoma. Growth hormone and thyroid hormone deficiencies were identified and treated. Full-Scale IQ dropped from the 79th percentile to the 3rd percentile, and neuropsychological functioning ranged from normal to impaired. However, magnetic resonance imaging reveals few direct imaging correlates of J.M.'s neuropsychological deficits. If identified, hormone deficiencies in such patients can be successfully treated; intellectual deficits may present more of a management problem. In this case, cognitive deficits have contributed to considerable difficulty in school; however, with special classes and modifications, the patient is making progress. Our findings indicate that the long-term outcome for children with radiation injury may be improved significantly with hormone therapy and appropriate academic intervention, and argue strongly for systematic, sequential follow-up of such children so that appropriate intervention can be implemented and continued as necessary.

  9. High-frequency electromagnetic radiation injury to the upper extremity: local and systemic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ciano, M.; Burlin, J.R.; Pardoe, R.; Mills, R.L.; Hentz, V.R.

    1981-01-01

    Industrial use of radiofrequency and microwave energy sources (nonionizing, high-frequency electromagnetic radiation) is a growing and widespread phenomenon, with projected risks of exposure to more than 20 million workers in the United States. A description of the nature of this form of electromagnetic energy is given, with emphasis on the variability of energy absorption by humans. The current state of biological research is reviewed, and a summary of the known effects of radiofrequency and microwave radiation exposure on animals and humans provided. These known effects appear to be principally thermal, similar to conventional electrical burn injuries, but with some unique systemic expression. Derangements of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, endocrine, hematological, ophthalmological, and behavioral functions are well described in animal experimentation. Two patients are presented--one a young woman exposed to a high-density radiofrequency field in an industrial setting, leading to necrosis of the entire hand and wrist as well as to a constellation of systemic effects, and one an older woman exposed to excessive microwave radiation from a malfunctioning microwave oven, leading to chronic hand pain and paresthesias resembling median nerve entrapment at the carpus. The prevalence of potential exposure in certain industries is noted and recommendations for follow-up care of workers exposed to this form of trauma are delineated.

  10. Orazipone, a locally acting immunomodulator, ameliorates intestinal radiation injury: A preclinical study in a novel rat model

    SciTech Connect

    Boerma, Marjan; Wang, Junru; Richter, Konrad K.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Intestinal radiation injury (radiation enteropathy) is relevant to cancer treatment, as well as to radiation accidents and radiation terrorism scenarios. This study assessed the protective efficacy of orazipone, a locally-acting small molecule immunomodulator. Methods and Materials: Male rats were orchiectomized, a 4-cm segment of small bowel was sutured to the inside of the scrotum, a proximal anteperistaltic ileostomy was created for intraluminal drug administration, and intestinal continuity was re-established by end-to-side anastomosis. After three weeks postoperative recovery, the intestine in the 'scrotal hernia' was exposed locally to single-dose or fractionated X-radiation. Orazipone (30 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was administered daily through the ileostomy, either during and after irradiation, or only after irradiation. Structural, cellular, and molecular aspects of intestinal radiation toxicity were assessed two weeks after irradiation. Results: Orazipone significantly ameliorated histologic injury and transforming growth factor-{beta} immunoreactivity levels, both after single-dose and fractionated irradiation. Intestinal wall thickness was significantly reduced after single-dose and nonsignificantly after fractionated irradiation. Mucosal surface area and numbers of mast cells were partially restored by orazipone after single-dose irradiation. Conclusions: This work (1) demonstrates the utility of the ileostomy rat model for intraluminal administration of response modifiers in single-dose and fractionated radiation studies; (2) shows that mucosal immunomodulation during and/or after irradiation ameliorates intestinal toxicity; and (3) highlights important differences between single-dose and fractionated radiation regimens.

  11. Protective effect of genistein on radiation-induced intestinal injury in tumor bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation therapy is the most widely used treatment for cancer, but it causes the side effect of mucositis due to intestinal damage. We examined the protective effect of genistein in tumor-bearing mice after abdominal irradiation by evaluation of apoptosis and intestinal morphological changes. Methods Mouse colon cancer CT26 cells were subcutaneously injected at the flank of BALB/c mice to generate tumors. The tumor-bearing mice were treated with abdominal radiation at 5 and 10 Gy, and with genistein at 200 mg/kg body weight per day for 1 d before radiation. The changes in intestinal histology were evaluated 12 h and 3.5 d after irradiation. To assess the effect of the combination treatment on the cancer growth, the tumor volume was determined at sacrifice before tumor overgrowth occurred. Results Genistein significantly decreased the number of apoptotic nuclei compared with that in the irradiation group 12 h after 5 Gy irradiation. Evaluation of histological changes showed that genistein ameliorated intestinal morphological changes such as decreased crypt survival, villus shortening, and increased length of the basal lamina 3.5 d after 10 Gy irradiation. Moreover, the genistein-treated group exhibited more Ki-67-positive proliferating cells in the jejunum than the irradiated control group, and crypt depths were greater in the genistein-treated group than in the irradiated control group. The mean weight of the CT26 tumors was reduced in the group treated with genistein and radiation compared with the control group. Conclusion Genistein had a protective effect on intestinal damage induced by irradiation and delayed tumor growth. These results suggest that genistein is a useful candidate for preventing radiotherapy-induced intestinal damage in cancer patients. PMID:23672582

  12. Diffusion tensor imaging of occult injury of optic radiation following optic neuritis in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiafeng; Zhu, Lijun; Li, He; Lu, Ziwen; Chen, Xin; Fang, Shaokuan

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is easily detected by routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, it is not possible to detect early or occult lesions in MS by routine MRI, and this may explain the inconsistency between the severity of the lesions found by MRI and the degree of clinical disability of patients with MS. The present study included 10 patients with relapsing-remitting MS and 10 healthy volunteers. Each patient underwent routine 3.0 T MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). Optic nerve and optic radiation were analyzed by DTI and DTT. The fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), λ//, and λ┴ values were measured. In the 10 patients with MS, 7 optic nerves were affected, and 13 optic nerves were not affected. Cranial MRI showed that optic nerve thickening and hyperintensity occurred in 2 patients with MS. In the directionally encoded color maps, a hypointensive green signal in the optic nerve was observed in 3 patients with MS. The FA values were significantly lower and the MD, λ//, and λ┴ values were significantly higher in the affected and unaffected optic nerves and optic radiations in patients with MS in comparison with controls (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in these values between the affected and unaffected optic nerves and optic radiation in patients with MS (P>0.05). Diffusion tensor imaging is sensitive in the detection of occult injury of the optic nerve and optic radiation following optic neuritis. Diffusion tensor imaging may be a useful tool for the early diagnosis, treatment and management of MS. PMID:27703508

  13. Intrarectal application of amifostine for the prevention of radiation-induced rectal injury.

    PubMed

    Ben-Josef, Edgar; Han, Sue; Tobi, Martin; Vargas, Barbara J; Stamos, Beth; Kelly, Laura; Biggar, Sandra; Kaplan, Irving

    2002-01-01

    Clinically symptomatic late injury to the rectal wall occurs in about one third of patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation. Reducing the physical dose to the anterior rectal wall without a similar reduction in the posterior peripheral zone is difficult because of the proximity of these structures. Based on our previous observations that intrarectal application of amifostine resulted in very high concentrations of amifostine and its active metabolite WR-1065 in the rectal wall of Copenhagen rats, the authors initiated a phase I clinical trial in 1998. Twenty-nine patients with localized prostate cancer were accrued. Eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed adenocarcinoma, a Karnofsky performance status of > or =70, and no pelvic lymphadenopathy or distant metastases. The total dose to the prostate was 70.2 Gy (20 patients) and 73.8 Gy (9 patients). Therapy was delivered using a 4-field axial technique and 3-dimensional conformal planning. Amifostine was administered intrarectally as an aqueous solution 30 minutes before irradiation on the first 15 days of therapy. Amifostine dose was escalated, in cohorts, from 500 mg to 2,500 mg. Toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scale. All patients completed therapy with no amifostine-related toxicity at any dose level. The application was feasible and well tolerated. With a median follow-up time of 21 months, 9 patients (33%) had rectal bleeding (8 grade 1, 1 grade 2). Four patients (14%) had symptoms suggestive of radiation injury, which proved to be secondary to nonrelated processes. These included preexisting nonspecific proctitis (1 patient), diverticular disease of the sigmoid colon, rectal polyp (1 patient), and ulcerative colitis (1 patient). Symptoms developed significantly more often in patients receiving 500 to 1,000 mg than in patients receiving 1,500 to 2,500 mg amifostine (7 of 14 [50%] versus 2 of 13 [15%]; P =.0325, 1-sided

  14. Gravitational time delay in orthogonally polarized radiation passing by the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, M.

    1979-01-01

    Two parallel investigations into the degree, if any, to which orthogonally polarized rays are deflected differently on passing through the gravitational field of the sun were previously conducted. The first involved very long and intermediate length baseline radio interferometry. The second was initially based on observations of radiation transmitted by the Pioneer 6 spacecraft, on passing behind the sun in 1968. This work was extended by using Helios-A and Helios-B spacecraft. It was calculated that the differential deflection between orthogonally polarized components is less than one part in 10 to the 7th power of the total gravitational deflection, or less than about 10 to the -7th power arc sec, in total.

  15. Radioprotective potential of Lagenaria siceraria extract against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Dhara; Goel, Harish Chandra; Chauhan, Sonal

    2016-12-01

    The cucurbits (prebiotics) were investigated as novel agents for radio-modification against gastrointestinal injury. The cell-cycle fractions and DNA damage were monitored in HCT-15 cells. A cucurbit extract was added to culture medium 2 h before irradiation (6 Gy) and was substituted by fresh medium at 4 h post-irradiation. The whole extract of the fruits of Lagenaria siceraria, Luffa cylindrica, or Cucurbita pepo extract enhanced G2 fractions (42%, 34%, and 37%, respectively) as compared with control (20%) and irradiated control (31%). With cucurbits, the comet tail length remained shorter (L. siceraria, 28 μm; L. cylindrica, 34.2 μm; C. pepo, 36.75 μm) than irradiated control (41.75 μm). For in vivo studies, L. siceraria extract (2 mg/kg body weight) was administered orally to mice at 2 h before and 4 and 24 h after whole-body irradiation (10 Gy). L. siceraria treatment restored the glutathione contents to 48.8 μmol/gm as compared with control (27.6 μmol/gm) and irradiated control (19.6 μmol/gm). Irradiation reduced the villi height from 379 to 350 μm and width from 54 to 27 μm. L. siceraria administration countered the radiation effects (length, 366 μm; width, 30 μm, respectively) and improved the villi morphology and tight junction integrity. This study reveals the therapeutic potential of cucurbits against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury.

  16. Delayed increases in microvascular pathology after experimental traumatic brain injury are associated with prolonged inflammation, blood-brain barrier disruption, and progressive white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Glushakova, Olena Y; Johnson, Danny; Hayes, Ronald L

    2014-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant risk factor for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and Parkinson's disease (PD). Cerebral microbleeds, focal inflammation, and white matter damage are associated with many neurological and neurodegenerative disorders including CTE, AD, PD, vascular dementia, stroke, and TBI. This study evaluates microvascular abnormalities observed at acute and chronic stages following TBI in rats, and examines pathological processes associated with these abnormalities. TBI in adult rats was induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI) of two magnitudes. Brain pathology was assessed in white matter of the corpus callosum for 24 h to 3 months following injury using immunohistochemistry (IHC). TBI resulted in focal microbleeds that were related to the magnitude of injury. At the lower magnitude of injury, microbleeds gradually increased over the 3 month duration of the study. IHC revealed TBI-induced focal abnormalities including blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage (IgG), endothelial damage (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 [ICAM-1]), activation of reactive microglia (ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 [Iba1]), gliosis (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP]) and macrophage-mediated inflammation (cluster of differentiation 68 [CD68]), all showing different temporal profiles. At chronic stages (up to 3 months), apparent myelin loss (Luxol fast blue) and scattered deposition of microbleeds were observed. Microbleeds were surrounded by glial scars and co-localized with CD68 and IgG puncta stainings, suggesting that localized BBB breakdown and inflammation were associated with vascular damage. Our results indicate that evolving white matter degeneration following experimental TBI is associated with significantly delayed microvascular damage and focal microbleeds that are temporally and regionally associated with development of punctate BBB breakdown and progressive inflammatory responses. Increased

  17. Clonal analysis of delayed karyotypic abnormalities and gene mutations in radiation-induced genetic instability.

    PubMed Central

    Grosovsky, A J; Parks, K K; Giver, C R; Nelson, S L

    1996-01-01

    Many tumors exhibit extensive chromosomal instability, but karyotypic alterations will be significant in carcinogenesis only by influencing specific oncogenes or tumor suppressor loci within the affected chromosomal segments. In this investigation, the specificity of chromosomal rearrangements attributable to radiation-induced genomic instability is detailed, and a qualitative and quantitative correspondence with mutagenesis is demonstrated. Chromosomal abnormalities preferentially occurred near the site of prior rearrangements, resulting in complex abnormalities, or near the centromere, resulting in deletion or translocation of the entire chromosome arm, but no case of an interstitial chromosomal deletion was observed. Evidence for chromosomal instability in the progeny of irradiated cells also included clonal karyotypic heterogeneity. The persistence of instability was demonstrated for at least 80 generations by elevated mutation rates at the heterozygous, autosomal marker locus tk. Among those TK- mutants that showed a loss of heterozygosity, a statistically significant increase in mutation rate was observed only for those in which the loss of heterozygosity encompasses the telomeric region. This mutational specificity corresponds with the prevalence of terminal deletions, additions, and translocations, and the absence of interstitial deletions, in karyotypic analysis. Surprisingly, the elevated rate of TK- mutations is also partially attributable to intragenic base substitutions and small deletions, and DNA sequence analysis of some of these mutations is presented. Complex chromosomal abnormalities appear to be the most significant indicators of a high rate of persistent genetic instability which correlates with increased rates of both intragenic and chromosomal-scale mutations at tk. PMID:8887655

  18. Mitigation of radiation-induced hematopoietic injury by the polyphenolic acetate 7, 8-diacetoxy-4-methylthiocoumarin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Venkateswaran, Kavya; Shrivastava, Anju; Agrawala, Paban K.; Prasad, Ashok; Kalra, Namita; Pandey, Parvat R.; Manda, Kailash; Raj, Hanumantharao G.; Parmar, Virinder S.; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S.

    2016-01-01

    Protection of the hematopoietic system from radiation damage, and/or mitigation of hematopoietic injury are the two major strategies for developing medical countermeasure agents (MCM) to combat radiation-induced lethality. In the present study, we investigated the potential of 7, 8-diacetoxy-4-methylthiocoumarin (DAMTC) to ameliorate radiation-induced hematopoietic damage and the associated mortality following total body irradiation (TBI) in C57BL/6 mice. Administration of DAMTC 24 hours post TBI alleviated TBI-induced myelo-suppression and pancytopenia, by augmenting lymphocytes and WBCs in the peripheral blood of mice, while bone marrow (BM) cellularity was restored through enhanced proliferation of the stem cells. It stimulated multi-lineage expansion and differentiation of myeloid progenitors in the BM and induced proliferation of splenic progenitors thereby, facilitating hematopoietic re-population. DAMTC reduced the radiation-induced apoptotic and mitotic death in the hematopoietic compartment. Recruitment of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages in spleen contributed to the immune-protection linked to the mitigation of hematopoietic injury. Recovery of the hematopoietic compartment correlated well with mitigation of mortality at a lethal dose of 9 Gy, leading to 80% animal survival. Present study establishes the potential of DAMTC to mitigate radiation-induced injury to the hematopoietic system by stimulating the re-population of stem cells from multiple lineages. PMID:27849061

  19. Mitigation of radiation-induced hematopoietic injury by the polyphenolic acetate 7, 8-diacetoxy-4-methylthiocoumarin in mice.

    PubMed

    Venkateswaran, Kavya; Shrivastava, Anju; Agrawala, Paban K; Prasad, Ashok; Kalra, Namita; Pandey, Parvat R; Manda, Kailash; Raj, Hanumantharao G; Parmar, Virinder S; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S

    2016-11-16

    Protection of the hematopoietic system from radiation damage, and/or mitigation of hematopoietic injury are the two major strategies for developing medical countermeasure agents (MCM) to combat radiation-induced lethality. In the present study, we investigated the potential of 7, 8-diacetoxy-4-methylthiocoumarin (DAMTC) to ameliorate radiation-induced hematopoietic damage and the associated mortality following total body irradiation (TBI) in C57BL/6 mice. Administration of DAMTC 24 hours post TBI alleviated TBI-induced myelo-suppression and pancytopenia, by augmenting lymphocytes and WBCs in the peripheral blood of mice, while bone marrow (BM) cellularity was restored through enhanced proliferation of the stem cells. It stimulated multi-lineage expansion and differentiation of myeloid progenitors in the BM and induced proliferation of splenic progenitors thereby, facilitating hematopoietic re-population. DAMTC reduced the radiation-induced apoptotic and mitotic death in the hematopoietic compartment. Recruitment of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages in spleen contributed to the immune-protection linked to the mitigation of hematopoietic injury. Recovery of the hematopoietic compartment correlated well with mitigation of mortality at a lethal dose of 9 Gy, leading to 80% animal survival. Present study establishes the potential of DAMTC to mitigate radiation-induced injury to the hematopoietic system by stimulating the re-population of stem cells from multiple lineages.

  20. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Normal-Appearing White Matter as Biomarker for Radiation-Induced Late Delayed Cognitive Decline

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Christopher H.; Nagesh, Vijaya; Sundgren, Pia C.; Buchtel, Henry; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Junck, Larry; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina I.; Cao, Yue

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether early assessment of cerebral white matter degradation can predict late delayed cognitive decline after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Ten patients undergoing conformal fractionated brain RT participated in a prospective diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study. Magnetic resonance imaging studies were acquired before RT, at 3 and 6 weeks during RT, and 10, 30, and 78 weeks after starting RT. The diffusivity variables in the parahippocampal cingulum bundle and temporal lobe white matter were computed. A quality-of-life survey and neurocognitive function tests were administered before and after RT at the magnetic resonance imaging follow-up visits. Results: In both structures, longitudinal diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line }) decreased and perpendicular diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Up-Tack }) increased after RT, with early changes correlating to later changes (p < .05). The radiation dose correlated with an increase in cingulum {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 weeks, and patients with >50% of cingula volume receiving >12 Gy had a greater increase in {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 and 6 weeks (p < .05). The post-RT changes in verbal recall scores correlated linearly with the late changes in cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} (30 weeks, p < .02). Using receiver operating characteristic curves, early cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} changes predicted for post-RT changes in verbal recall scores (3 and 6 weeks, p < .05). The neurocognitive test scores correlated significantly with the quality-of-life survey results. Conclusions: The correlation between early diffusivity changes in the parahippocampal cingulum and the late decline in verbal recall suggests that diffusion tensor imaging might be useful as a biomarker for predicting late delayed cognitive decline.

  1. SDF-1 dynamically mediates megakaryocyte niche occupancy and thrombopoiesis at steady state and following radiation injury.

    PubMed

    Niswander, Lisa M; Fegan, Katherine H; Kingsley, Paul D; McGrath, Kathleen E; Palis, James

    2014-07-10

    Megakaryocyte (MK) development in the bone marrow progresses spatially from the endosteal niche, which promotes MK progenitor proliferation, to the sinusoidal vascular niche, the site of terminal maturation and thrombopoiesis. The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), signaling through CXCR4, is implicated in the maturational chemotaxis of MKs toward sinusoidal vessels. Here, we demonstrate that both IV administration of SDF-1 and stabilization of endogenous SDF-1 acutely increase MK-vasculature association and thrombopoiesis with no change in MK number. In the setting of radiation injury, we find dynamic fluctuations in marrow SDF-1 distribution that spatially and temporally correlate with variations in MK niche occupancy. Stabilization of altered SDF-1 gradients directly affects MK location. Importantly, these SDF-1-mediated changes have functional consequences for platelet production, as the movement of MKs away from the vasculature decreases circulating platelets, while MK association with the vasculature increases circulating platelets. Finally, we demonstrate that manipulation of SDF-1 gradients can improve radiation-induced thrombocytopenia in a manner additive with earlier TPO treatment. Taken together, our data support the concept that SDF-1 regulates the spatial distribution of MKs in the marrow and consequently circulating platelet numbers. This knowledge of the microenvironmental regulation of the MK lineage could lead to improved therapeutic strategies for thrombocytopenia.

  2. Radiation injury in rat lung: I. Prostacyclin (PGI/sub 2/) production, arterial perfusion, and ultrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Ts'ao, C.; Ward, W.F.; Port, C.D.

    1983-11-01

    Pulmonary prostacyclin (PGI/sub 2/) production, arterial perfusion, and ultrastructure were correlated in rats sacrificed from 1 day to 6 months after a single exposure of 25 Gy of gamma rays to the right hemithorax. PGI/sub 2/ production by the irradiated lung decreased to approximately half the normal value 1 day after irradiation (P < 0.05), then increased steadily throughout the study. By 6 months postirradiation, the right lung produced two to three times as much PGI/sub 2/ as did either shielded left lung or sham-irradiated lungs (P < 0.05). Perfusion scans revealed hyperemia of the right lung from 1 to 14 days after irradiation. From its peak at 14 days postirradiation, however, perfusion of the irradiated lung decreased steadily, then reached a plateau from 3 to 6 months at less than half that in the shielded left lung. Electron micrographs of the right lung revealed perivascular edema from 1 to 30 days after irradiation. The right lung then exhibited changes typical of radiation pneumonitis followed by progressive interstitial fibrosis. Platelet aggregates were not observed at any time. Thus, decreased PGI/sub 2/ production is an immediate but transient response of the lung to radiation injury. Then from 2 to 6 months after irradiation, the fibrotic, hypoperfused lung produces increasing amounts of the potent vasodilator and antithrombotic agent, PGI/sub 2/. Pulmonary PGI/sub 2/ production and arterial perfusion are inversely correlated for at least 6 months after hemithoracic irradiation.

  3. Recent progress in defining mechanisms and potential targets for prevention of normal tissue injury after radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Anscher, Mitchell S. . E-mail: anscher@radonc.duke.edu; Chen, Liguang; Rabbani, Zahid; Kang Song; Larrier, Nicole; Huang Hong; Samulski, Thaddeus V.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Brizel, David M.; Folz, Rodney J.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2005-05-01

    The ability to optimize treatments for cancer on the basis of relative risks for normal tissue injury has important implications in oncology, because higher doses of radiation might, in some diseases, improve both local control and survival. To achieve this goal, a thorough understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for radiation-induced toxicity will be essential. Recent research has demonstrated that ionizing radiation triggers a series of genetic and molecular events, which might lead to chronic persistent alterations in the microenvironment and an aberrant wound-healing response. Disrupted epithelial-stromal cell communication might also be important. With the application of a better understanding of fundamental biology to clinical practice, new approaches to treating and preventing normal tissue injury can focus on correcting these disturbed molecular processes.

  4. Ciguatoxin reduces regenerative capacity of axotomized peripheral neurons and delays functional recovery in pre-exposed mice after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Au, Ngan Pan Bennett; Kumar, Gajendra; Asthana, Pallavi; Tin, Chung; Mak, Yim Ling; Chan, Leo Lai; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing; Ma, Chi Him Eddie

    2016-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) results from consumption of tropical reef fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs). Pacific (P)-CTX-1 is among the most potent known CTXs and the predominant source of CFP in the endemic region responsible for the majority of neurological symptoms in patients. Chronic and persistent neurological symptoms occur in some CFP patients, which often result in incomplete functional recovery for years. However, the direct effects of exposure to CTXs remain largely unknown. In present study, we exposed mice to CTX purified from ciguatera fish sourced from the Pacific region. P-CTX-1 was detected in peripheral nerves within hours and persisted for two months after exposure. P-CTX-1 inhibited axonal regrowth from axotomized peripheral neurons in culture. P-CTX-1 exposure reduced motor function in mice within the first two weeks of exposure before returning to baseline levels. These pre-exposed animals exhibited delayed sensory and motor functional recovery, and irreversible motor deficits after peripheral nerve injury in which formation of functional synapses was impaired. These findings are consistent with reduced muscle function, as assessed by electromyography recordings. Our study provides strong evidence that the persistence of P-CTX-1 in peripheral nerves reduces the intrinsic growth capacity of peripheral neurons, resulting in delayed functional recovery after injury. PMID:27229176

  5. Ciguatoxin reduces regenerative capacity of axotomized peripheral neurons and delays functional recovery in pre-exposed mice after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Au, Ngan Pan Bennett; Kumar, Gajendra; Asthana, Pallavi; Tin, Chung; Mak, Yim Ling; Chan, Leo Lai; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing; Ma, Chi Him Eddie

    2016-05-27

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) results from consumption of tropical reef fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs). Pacific (P)-CTX-1 is among the most potent known CTXs and the predominant source of CFP in the endemic region responsible for the majority of neurological symptoms in patients. Chronic and persistent neurological symptoms occur in some CFP patients, which often result in incomplete functional recovery for years. However, the direct effects of exposure to CTXs remain largely unknown. In present study, we exposed mice to CTX purified from ciguatera fish sourced from the Pacific region. P-CTX-1 was detected in peripheral nerves within hours and persisted for two months after exposure. P-CTX-1 inhibited axonal regrowth from axotomized peripheral neurons in culture. P-CTX-1 exposure reduced motor function in mice within the first two weeks of exposure before returning to baseline levels. These pre-exposed animals exhibited delayed sensory and motor functional recovery, and irreversible motor deficits after peripheral nerve injury in which formation of functional synapses was impaired. These findings are consistent with reduced muscle function, as assessed by electromyography recordings. Our study provides strong evidence that the persistence of P-CTX-1 in peripheral nerves reduces the intrinsic growth capacity of peripheral neurons, resulting in delayed functional recovery after injury.

  6. Inhibition of Notch signaling reduces the number of surviving Dclk1+ reserve crypt epithelial stem cells following radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Dongfeng; May, Randal; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Weygant, Nathaniel; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Ali, Naushad; Li, Linheng; Barrett, Terrence

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported that doublecortin-like kinase 1 (Dclk1) is a putative intestinal stem cell (ISC) marker. In this report, we evaluated the use of Dclk1 as a marker of surviving ISCs in response to treatment with high-dose total body irradiation (TBI). Both apoptotic and mitotic Dclk1+ cells were observed 24 h post-TBI associated with a corresponding loss of intestinal crypts observed at 84 h post-TBI. Although the Notch signaling pathway plays an important role in regulating proliferation and lineage commitment within the intestine, its role in ISC function in response to severe genotoxic injury is not yet fully understood. We employed the microcolony assay to functionally assess the effects of Notch inhibition with difluorophenacetyl-l-alanyl-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) on intestinal crypt stem cell survival following severe (>8 Gy) radiation injury. Following treatment with DAPT, we observed a nearly 50% reduction in the number of surviving Dclk1+ crypt epithelial cells at 24 h after TBI and similar reduction in the number of surviving small intestinal crypts at 84 h. These data indicate that inhibition of Notch signaling decreases ISC survival following radiation injury, suggesting that the Notch signaling pathway plays an important role in ISC-mediated crypt regeneration. These results also suggest that crypt epithelial cell Dclk1 expression can be used as one potential marker to evaluate the early survival of ISCs following severe radiation injury. PMID:24368703

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium prevents radiation-induced liver injury by inhibiting inflammation and protecting sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Xing; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Sun, Jing; Zeng, Hai-Ying; Huang, Yan-; Zhang, Zhen-Yu

    2015-07-01

    Current management of radiation-induced liver injury is limited. Sinusoidal endothelial cell (SEC) apoptosis and inflammation are considered to be initiating events in hepatic damage. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory actions during hepatic irradiation, acting via paracrine mechanisms. This study aims to examine whether MSC-derived bioactive components are protective against radiation-induced liver injury in rats. MSC-conditioned medium (MSC-CM) was generated from rat bone marrow-derived MSCs. The effect of MSC-CM on the viability of irradiated SECs was examined by flow cytometric analysis. Activation of the Akt and ERK pathways was analyzed by western blot. MSC-CM was also delivered to Sprague-Dawley rats immediately before receiving liver irradiation, followed by testing for pathological features, changes in serum hyaluronic acid, ALT, and inflammatory cytokine levels, and liver cell apoptosis. MSC-CM enhanced the viability of irradiated SECs in vitro and induced Akt and ERK phosphorylation in these cells. Infusion of MSC-CM immediately before liver irradiation provided a significant anti-apoptotic effect on SECs and improved the histopathological features of injury in the irradiated liver. MSC-CM also reduced the secretion and expression of inflammatory cytokines and increased the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. MSC-derived bioactive components could be a novel therapeutic approach for treating radiation-induced liver injury.

  8. A preclinical rodent model of acute radiation-induced lung injury after ablative focal irradiation reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhen-Yu; Lee, Hae-June; Choi, Won Hoon; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Eun, Sung Ho; Lee, Jung Il; Park, Kwangwoo; Lee, Ji Min; Cho, Jaeho

    2014-07-01

    In a previous study, we established an image-guided small-animal micro-irradiation system mimicking clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The goal of this study was to develop a rodent model of acute phase lung injury after ablative irradiation. A radiation dose of 90 Gy was focally delivered to the left lung of C57BL/6 mice using a small animal stereotactic irradiator. At days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 14 after irradiation, the lungs were perfused with formalin for fixation and paraffin sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson's trichrome. At days 7 and 14 after irradiation, micro-computed tomography (CT) images of the lung were taken and lung functional measurements were performed with a flexiVent™ system. Gross morphological injury was evident 9 days after irradiation of normal lung tissues and dynamic sequential events occurring during the acute phase were validated by histopathological analysis. CT images of the mouse lungs indicated partial obstruction located in the peripheral area of the left lung. Significant alteration in inspiratory capacity and tissue damping were detected on day 14 after irradiation. An animal model of radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) in the acute phase reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy was established and validated with histopathological and functional analysis. This model enhances our understanding of the dynamic sequential events occurring in the acute phase of radiation-induced lung injury induced by ablative dose focal volume irradiation.

  9. Time-dependent inhibition of pan-inflammatory cytokines mitigates radiation-induced skin injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Jenrow, Kenneth A; Brown, Stephen L; Kolozsvary, Andrew J J; Lapanowski, Karen; Kim, Jae Ho

    2014-09-01

    Radiation injury to skin poses substantial morbidity risks in the curative treatment of cancers and is also of concern in the context of radiological attack or nuclear accident scenarios. Late effects can be severe and are frequently characterized by subcutaneous fibrosis and morbidity. These experiments presented here assess the potential of MW01-2-151SRM (MW-151), a novel small-molecule inhibitor of microglial activation and associated proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, as a mitigator of radiation-induced skin injury. Groups of C57BL/6 mice received focal irradiation of the right hind leg at a dose of 30 Gy. Therapy was initiated either on day 3, day 7 or day 14 postirradiation and maintained subsequently for 21 days by intraperitoneal injections administered three times per week. The primary end point was skin injury, which was assessed three times a week for at least 60 days postirradiation and scored using a semi-quantitative scale. Secondary end points measured at selected times included histology (primarily H&E) and immunofluorescence labeling of various macrophage (F4-80) and inflammatory (TGF-β, TNF-α, MMP9) markers. Relative to untreated controls, mitigation of radiation-induced skin injury in mice receiving MW-151 was highly dependent on the timing of therapy initiation. Initiation on day 3 postirradiation had no discernable effect, whereas mitigating effects were maximal following initiation on day 7 and present to a lesser degree following initiation on day 14. The response to MW-151 therapy in individual animals was essentially all-or-none and the relative benefits associated with the timing of therapy initiation primarily reflected differences in the number of responders. These data support the hypothesis that proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines play complex roles in orchestrating the response to radiation-induced skin injury and suggest that there is a critical period during which they initiate the pathogenesis resulting in late

  10. Overview of use of G-CSF and GM-CSF in the treatment of acute radiation injury.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Glen

    2014-06-01

    Depression of hematopoietic elements due to significant levels of whole-body or partial-body irradiation due to radiation-induced suppression of mitosis in the stem and progenitor cells can result in life-threatening injury. Successful administration of intensive care of patients experiencing acute radiation sickness (ARS; also called acute radiation syndrome) is dependent upon the ability to stimulate the recovery of surviving hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), assuming the non-hematopoietic injuries are also survivable with treatment. To date, there have been a number of studies involving radiation accidents where patients were treated with cytokines. Although the data overall seem to indicate that the period of neutropenia is shortened and survival prolonged, so far there is no statistically significant proof that cytokine administration actually decreases mortality in radiation-injured humans. Some studies have shown no improved survival when used in a mouse model; however, studies in canines and primates have shown improved survival. CSF therapy is considered a valuable adjunct to treatment with antibiotics and strict hygiene controls in certain irradiated patients. It appears that these drugs do shorten the periods of neutropenia in irradiated patients and must be considered part of the therapeutic armamentarium in the treatment of ARS in a mass casualty situation. Based on review of the human experience with G-CSF and GM-CSF, as well as some animal studies, current consensus opinions support the prompt administration of these materials to patients suffering significant bone marrow depression from exposure to ionizing radiation.

  11. Amelioration of radiation-induced skin injury by HIV-TAT-mediated protein transduction of RP-1 from Rana pleurade.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyu; Wang, Wenjie; Peng, Ying; Gu, Qing; Luo, Judong; Zhou, Jundong; Wu, Jinchang; Hou, Yinglong; Cao, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) can damage DNA and most other biological macromolecules in skin and radiation-induced skin injury is a serious concern for radiation therapy. Skin possesses an extremely efficient antioxidant system, which is conferred by two systems: antioxidant enzymes and small molecules that can scavenge ROS by donating electrons. Amphibian skin is a multifunctional organ, which protects against dangers of various oxidative stresses. Recently, a small peptide called RP-1 was isolated from the skin secretions of Rana pleurade, which shows strong antioxidant activity. However, this RP-1 peptide is limited because its inability to across the cell membrane. Protein transduction domains (PTDs) have demonstrated high efficiency for facilitating the internalization of both homologous and heterogeneous proteins into cells. This study aims to elucidate the protective effects of a HIV-TAT (TAT) PTD-coupled RP-1 fusion protein (TAT-RP1) on radiation-induced skin injury in vitro and in vivo. The synthesized fusion TAT-RP1 peptide can be incorporated into human keratinocyte HaCaT cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner without cytotoxicity. We then evaluated the protective role of TAT-RP1 against ionizing radiation. TAT-RP1 supplementation increased anti-superoxide anion ability of HaCaT cells and decreased HaCaT cell radiosensitivity to irradiation. Moreover, TAT-RP1 was able to penetrate the skin of rats, entering epidermis as well as the dermis of the subcutaneous layer in skin tissue. Topical spread of TAT-RP1 promoted the amelioration of radiation-induced skin damage in rats. These results suggest that TAT-RP1 has potential as a protein therapy for radiation-induced skin injury.

  12. Process benchmarking appraisal of surgical decompression of spinal cord following traumatic cervical spinal cord injury: opportunities to reduce delays in surgical management.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Julio C; Tung, Kayee; Fehlings, Michael G

    2013-03-15

    Prior pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate that early decompression of the spinal cord (≤ 24 h post-trauma) may have benefits regarding clinical outcomes and neurological recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). This study examines the benchmarking of management of patients with acute traumatic cervical SCI in order to determine the potential barriers and ideal timelines for each step to early surgical decompression. We reviewed patient charts and the Surgical Trial in Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study (STASCIS) forms regarding the time and reasons for delay of each step in the management of patients with SCI. The reasons for delays were classified into: 1) health care-related ("extrinsic") factors and 2) patient-related ("intrinsic") factors. The cases were grouped into patients who underwent early surgical decompression of spinal cord (early-surgery group) and individuals who underwent later decompression (later-surgery group). Whereas both groups showed comparable time periods related to intrinsic factors, patients in the early surgery group had a significantly shorter time period associated with extrinsic factors when compared with the later surgery group. Both groups were comparable regarding pre-hospital time, time in a second general hospital prior to transfer to a spine center, and time in the trauma emergency department. Patients in the early surgery group had a significantly shorter waiting time, shorter waiting time for assessment by a spine surgeon, and a shorter waiting time for a surgical decision than did the later surgery group. Our benchmarking analysis suggests that health-related factors are key determinants of the timing from SCI to spinal cord decompression. Time in the general hospital and time of waiting for a surgical decision were the most important causes of delay of surgical spinal cord decompression. Early surgery is possible in the vast majority of the cases.

  13. Effect of prophylactic hyperbaric oxygen treatment for radiation-induced brain injury after stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ohguri, Takayuki . E-mail: ogurieye@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Imada, Hajime; Kohshi, Kiyotaka; Kakeda, Shingo; Ohnari, Norihiro; Morioka, Tomoaki; Nakano, Keita; Konda, Nobuhide; Korogi, Yukunori

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prophylactic effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy for radiation-induced brain injury in patients with brain metastasis treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: The data of 78 patients presenting with 101 brain metastases treated with SRS between October 1994 and September 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 32 patients with 47 brain metastases were treated with prophylactic HBO (HBO group), which included all 21 patients who underwent subsequent or prior radiotherapy and 11 patients with common predictors of longer survival, such as inactive extracranial tumors and younger age. The other 46 patients with 54 brain metastases did not undergo HBO (non-HBO group). Radiation-induced brain injuries were divided into two categories, white matter injury (WMI) and radiation necrosis (RN), on the basis of imaging findings. Results: Radiation-induced brain injury occurred in 5 lesions (11%) in the HBO group (2 WMIs and 3 RNs) and in 11 (20%) in the non-HBO group (9 WMIs and 2 RNs). The WMI was less frequent for the HBO group than for the non-HBO group (p = 0.05), although multivariate analysis by logistic regression showed that WMI was not significantly correlated with HBO (p = 0.07). The 1-year actuarial probability of WMI was significantly better for the HBO group (2%) than for the non-HBO group (36%) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The present study showed a potential value of prophylactic HBO for Radiation-induced WMIs, which justifies further evaluation to confirm its definite benefit.

  14. A radiation-induced acute apoptosis involving TP53 and BAX precedes the delayed apoptosis and neoplastic transformation of CGL1 human hybrid cells.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Marc S; Mayhugh, Brendan M; McDowell, Berry; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Smith, Martin L; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Spandau, Dan F; Lewis, Davina A

    2005-06-01

    Exposing CGL1 (HeLa x fibroblast) hybrid cells to 7 Gy of X rays results in the onset of a delayed apoptosis in the progeny of the cells 10 to 12 cell divisions postirradiation that correlates with the emergence of neoplastically transformed foci. The delayed apoptosis begins around day 8 postirradiation and lasts for 11 days. We now demonstrate that the delayed apoptosis is also characterized by the appearance of approximately 50-kb apoptotic DNA fragments and caspase 3 activation postirradiation. In addition, we confirm that stabilization of TP53 and transactivation of pro-apoptosis BAX also occurs during the delayed apoptosis and show that anti-apoptosis BCL-X(L) is down-regulated. To test whether the delayed apoptosis was due to a nonfunctional acute TP53 damage response in CGL1 cells, studies of acute apoptosis were completed. After irradiation, CGL1 cells underwent an acute wave of apoptosis that involves TP53 stabilization, transactivation of BAX gene expression, and a rapid caspase activation that ends by 96 h postirradiation. In addition, the acute onset of apoptosis correlates with transactivation of a standard wild-type TP53-responsive reporter (pG13-CAT) in CGL1 cells after radiation exposure. We propose that the onset of the delayed apoptosis is not the result of a nonfunctional acute TP53 damage response pathway but rather is a consequence of X-ray-induced genomic instability arising in the distant progeny of the irradiated cells.

  15. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid analogue mitigates kidney injury in a rat model of radiation nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Hye Khan, Md Abdul; Fish, Brian; Wahl, Geneva; Sharma, Amit; Falck, John R; Paudyal, Mahesh P; Moulder, John E; Imig, John D; Cohen, Eric P

    2016-04-01

    Arachidonic acid is metabolized to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) by CYP epoxygenases, and EETs are kidney protective in multiple pathologies. We determined the ability of an EET analogue, EET-A, to mitigate experimental radiation nephropathy. The kidney expression of the EET producing enzyme CYP2C11 was lower in rats that received total body irradiation (TBI rat) compared with non-irradiated control. At 12 weeks after TBI, the rats had higher systolic blood pressure and impaired renal afferent arteriolar function compared with control, and EET-A or captopril mitigated these abnormalities. The TBI rats had 3-fold higher blood urea nitrogen (BUN) compared with control, and EET-A or captopril decreased BUN by 40-60%. The urine albumin/creatinine ratio was increased 94-fold in TBI rats, and EET-A or captopril attenuated that increase by 60-90%. In TBI rats, nephrinuria was elevated 30-fold and EET-A or captopril decreased it by 50-90%. Renal interstitial fibrosis, tubular and glomerular injury were present in the TBI rats, and each was decreased by EET-A or captopril. We further demonstrated elevated renal parenchymal apoptosis in TBI rats, which was mitigated by EET-A or captopril. Additional studies revealed that captopril or EET-A mitigated renal apoptosis by acting on the p53/Fas/FasL (Fas ligand) apoptotic pathway. The present study demonstrates a novel EET analogue-based strategy for mitigation of experimental radiation nephropathy by improving renal afferent arteriolar function and by decreasing renal apoptosis.

  16. Delayed Diagnosis, Leprosy Reactions, and Nerve Injury Among Individuals With Hansen's Disease Seen at a United States Clinic.

    PubMed

    Leon, Kristoffer E; Jacob, Jesse T; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Kozarsky, Phyllis E; Wu, Henry M; Fairley, Jessica K

    2016-03-01

    Background.  Hansen's disease (HD), or leprosy, is uncommon in the United States. We sought to describe the characteristics of patients with HD in a US clinic, including an assessment of delays in diagnosis and HD reactions, which have both been associated with nerve damage. Methods.  A retrospective chart review was conducted on patients seen at an HD clinic in the southern United States between January 1, 2002 and January 31, 2014. Demographic and clinical characteristics were summarized, including delays in diagnosis, frequency of reactions, and other complications including peripheral neuropathy. Results.  Thirty patients were seen during the study time period. The majority of patients were male (73%) and had multibacillary disease (70%). Brazil, Mexico, and the United States were the most frequent of the 14 countries of origin. Hansen's disease "reactions", severe inflammatory complications, were identified among 75% of patients, and nerve damage was present at diagnosis in 36% of patients. The median length of time between symptom onset and diagnosis was long at 12 months (range, 1-96), but no single factor was associated with a delay in diagnosis. Conclusions.  The diagnosis of HD was frequently delayed among patients referred to our US clinic. The high frequency of reactions and neuropathy at diagnosis suggests that further efforts at timely diagnosis and management of this often unrecognized disease is needed to prevent the long-term sequelae associated with irreversible nerve damage.

  17. Delayed Diagnosis, Leprosy Reactions, and Nerve Injury Among Individuals With Hansen's Disease Seen at a United States Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Kristoffer E.; Jacob, Jesse T.; Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Kozarsky, Phyllis E.; Wu, Henry M.; Fairley, Jessica K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hansen's disease (HD), or leprosy, is uncommon in the United States. We sought to describe the characteristics of patients with HD in a US clinic, including an assessment of delays in diagnosis and HD reactions, which have both been associated with nerve damage. Methods. A retrospective chart review was conducted on patients seen at an HD clinic in the southern United States between January 1, 2002 and January 31, 2014. Demographic and clinical characteristics were summarized, including delays in diagnosis, frequency of reactions, and other complications including peripheral neuropathy. Results. Thirty patients were seen during the study time period. The majority of patients were male (73%) and had multibacillary disease (70%). Brazil, Mexico, and the United States were the most frequent of the 14 countries of origin. Hansen's disease “reactions”, severe inflammatory complications, were identified among 75% of patients, and nerve damage was present at diagnosis in 36% of patients. The median length of time between symptom onset and diagnosis was long at 12 months (range, 1–96), but no single factor was associated with a delay in diagnosis. Conclusions. The diagnosis of HD was frequently delayed among patients referred to our US clinic. The high frequency of reactions and neuropathy at diagnosis suggests that further efforts at timely diagnosis and management of this often unrecognized disease is needed to prevent the long-term sequelae associated with irreversible nerve damage. PMID:27186586

  18. The Protective Effects of 5-Methoxytryptamine-α-lipoic Acid on Ionizing Radiation-Induced Hematopoietic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Deguan; Tian, Zhenyuan; Tang, Weisheng; Zhang, Junling; Lu, Lu; Sun, Zhaojin; Zhou, Zewei; Fan, Feiyue

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidants are prospective radioprotectors because of their ability to scavenge radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). The hematopoietic system is widely studied in radiation research because of its high radiosensitivity. In the present study, we describe the beneficial effects of 5-methoxytryptamine-α-lipoic acid (MLA), which was synthesized from melatonin and α-lipoic acid, against radiation-induced hematopoietic injury. MLA administration significantly enhanced the survival rate of mice after 7.2 Gy total body irradiation. The results showed that MLA not only markedly increased the numbers and clonogenic potential of hematopoietic cells but also decreased DNA damage, as determined by flow cytometric analysis of histone H2AX phosphorylation. In addition, MLA decreased the levels of ROS in hematopoietic cells by inhibiting NOX4 expression. These data demonstrate that MLA prevents radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome by increasing the number and function of and by inhibiting DNA damage and ROS production in hematopoietic cells. These data suggest MLA is beneficial for the protection of radiation injuries. PMID:27314327

  19. Adverse event reporting and developments in radiation biology after normal tissue injury: International Atomic Energy Agency consultation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yuhchyau . E-mail: Yuhchyau_chen@urmc.rochester.edu; Trotti, Andy; Coleman, C. Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Mirimanoff, Rene O.; Hay, John; O'Brien, Peter C.; El-Gueddari, Brahim; Salvajoli, Joao V.; Jeremic, Branislav

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Recent research has enhanced our understanding of radiation injury at the molecular-cellular and tissue levels; significant strides have occurred in standardization of adverse event reporting in clinical trials. In response, the International Atomic Energy Agency, through its Division of Human Health and its section for Applied Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy, organized a consultation meeting in Atlanta (October 2, 2004) to discuss developments in radiobiology, normal tissue reactions, and adverse event reporting. Methods and Materials: Representatives from cooperative groups of African Radiation Oncology Group, Curriculo Radioterapeutica Ibero Latino Americana, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, and Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group held the meeting discussion. Results: Representatives of major radiotherapy groups/organizations and prominent leaders in radiotherapy discussed current understanding of normal tissue radiobiologic effects, the design and implementation of future clinical and translational projects for normal tissue injury, and the standardization of adverse-event reporting worldwide. Conclusions: The consensus was to adopt NCI comprehensive adverse event reporting terminology and grading system (CTCAE v3.0) as the new standard for all cooperative group trials. Future plans included the implementation of coordinated research projects focusing on normal tissue biomarkers and data collection methods.

  20. A MALDI-MSI approach to the characterization of radiation-induced lung injury and medical countermeasure development

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Claire L.; Jones, Jace W.; Barrow, Kory; Kieta, Kaitlyn; Taylor-Howell, Cheryl; Kearney, Sean; Smith, Cassandra P.; Gibbs, Allison; Farese, Ann M.; MacVittie, Thomas J.; Kane, Maureen A.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury is highly complex and characterized by multiple pathologies, which occur over time, and sporadically throughout the lung. This complexity makes biomarker investigations and medical countermeasure screenings challenging. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) has the ability to spatially resolve differences in molecular profiles within the lung following radiation exposure and can aid in biomarker identification and pharmaceutical efficacy investigations. MALDI-MSI was applied to the investigation of a whole-thorax lung irradiation model in non-human primates (NHP) for lipidomic analysis and medical countermeasure distribution. PMID:26425906

  1. Delayed radiation-induced inflammation accompanying a marked carbohydrate antigen 19-9 elevation in a patient with resected pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Cardinal, Jon S.; Jacobson, Geraldine M.

    2016-01-01

    Although carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 is a useful tumor marker for pancreatic cancer, it can also become elevated from a variety of benign and malignant conditions. Herein we describe an unusual presentation of elevated CA 19-9 in an asymptomatic patient who had previously undergone adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy for resected early stage pancreatic cancer. The rise in CA 19-9 might be due to delayed radiation-induced inflammation related to previous intra-abdominal radiation therapy with or without radiation recall induced by gemcitabine. After treatment with corticosteroids the CA 19-9 level decreased to normal, and the patient has not developed any evidence of recurrent cancer to date. PMID:27306770

  2. Corneal injury thresholds for exposures to 1.54-μm radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCally, Russell L.; Bonney-Ray, Jennifer; Bargeron, C. Brent

    2003-06-01

    Corneal epithelial injury thresholds have been determined for exposures to 1.54 μm infrared radiation having durations from 1 to 100 sec and beam diameters from 0.5 to 7 mm. For 1 sec exposures, measured thresholds range from 12 W/cm2 (5 mm diameter beamá) to 67 W/cm2 (0.5 mm diameter). For 2 sec exposures, they range from 9 W/cm2 (7mm diameter) to 57 W/cm2 (0.5 mm diameter). For 10 sec exposures, they range from 3.7 W/cm2 (7mm diameter) to 33 W/cm2 (0.5 mm diameter). For 100 sec exposures, they are 1.4 W/cm2 (7mm diameter) and 3.7 W/cm2 (2mm diameter). The dependence of the measured thresholds on laser beam diameter provides strong evidence supporting a critical temperature damage model. These measured thresholds are greater than 10 times the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) in ANSI Z-136.5-2000.

  3. Acute or Delayed Treatment with Anatabine Improves Spatial Memory and Reduces Pathological Sequelae at Late Time-Points after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Scott; Mouzon, Benoit; Paris, Daniel; Aponte, Destinee; Abdullah, Laila; Stewart, William; Mullan, Michael; Crawford, Fiona

    2017-01-20

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has chronic and long-term consequences for which there are currently no approved pharmacological treatments. We have previously characterized the chronic neurobehavioral and pathological sequelae of a mouse model of repetitive mild TBI (r-mTBI) through to 2 years post-TBI. Despite the mild nature of the initial insult, secondary injury processes are initiated that involve neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative pathways persisting and progressing for weeks and months post-injury and providing a potential window of opportunity for therapeutic intervention. In this study we examined the efficacy of a novel anti-inflammatory compound, anatabine, in modifying outcome after TBI. Our model of r-mTBI involves a series of five mild impacts (midline impact at 5 m/sec, 1 mm strike depth, 200 msec dwell time) with an interval of 48 h. Anatabine treatment was administered starting 30 min after injury and was delivered continuously through drinking water. At 6 months after TBI, anatabine treatment improved spatial memory in injured mice. Nine months after TBI, a cohort of mice was euthanized for pathological analysis that revealed reductions in astroglial (glial fibrillary acid protein, GFAP) and microglial (ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1, IBA1) responses in treated, injured animals. Treatments for the remaining mice were then crossed-over to assess the effects of late treatment administration and the effects of treatment termination. Nine months following crossover the remaining mice showed no effect of injury on their spatial memory, and whereas pathological analysis showed improvements in mice that had received delayed treatment, corpus callosum IBA1 increased in post-crossover placebo r-mTBI mice. These data demonstrate efficacy of both early and late initiation of treatment with anatabine in improving long term behavioral and pathology outcomes after mild TBI. Future studies will characterize the treatment window, the time

  4. Distinction Between Recurrent Glioma and Radiation Injury Using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Combination With Diffusion-Weighted Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Q.-S. . E-mail: nanwushan@yahoo.com; Li, C.-F.; Liu Hong; Zhen, J.-H.; Feng, D.-C.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the diagnostic effectiveness of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy with diffusion-weighted imaging on the evaluation of the recurrent contrast-enhancing areas at the site of treated gliomas. Methods and Materials: In 55 patients who had new contrast-enhancing lesions in the vicinity of the previously resected and irradiated high-grade gliomas, two-dimensional MR spectroscopy and diffusion-weighted imaging were performed. Spectral data for N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), lipid (Lip), and lactate (Lac) were analyzed in conjunction with the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in all patients. Diagnosis of these lesions was assigned by means of follow-up or histopathology. Results: The Cho/NAA and Cho/Cr ratios were significantly higher in recurrent tumor than in regions of radiation injury (p < 0.01). The ADC value and ADC ratios (ADC of contrast-enhancing lesion to matching structure in the contralateral hemisphere) were significantly higher in radiation injury regions than in recurrent tumor (p < 0.01). With MR spectroscopic data, two variables (Cho/NAA and Cho/Cr ratios) were shown to differentiate recurrent glioma from radiation injury, and 85.5% of total subjects were correctly classified into groups. However, with discriminant analysis of MR spectroscopy imaging plus diffusion-weighted imaging, three variables (Cho/NAA, Cho/Cr, and ADC ratio) were identified and 96.4% of total subjects were correctly classified. There was a significant difference between the diagnostic accuracy of the two discriminant analyses (Chi-square = 3.96, p = 0.046). Conclusion: Using discriminant analysis, this study found that MR spectroscopy in combination with ADC ratio, rather than ADC value, can improve the ability to differentiate recurrent glioma and radiation injury.

  5. The role of telomere length modulation in delayed chromosome instability induced by ionizing radiation in human primary fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Berardinelli, Francesco; Antoccia, Antonio; Buonsante, Rossella; Gerardi, Silvia; Cherubini, Roberto; De Nadal, Viviana; Tanzarella, Caterina; Sgura, Antonella

    2013-04-01

    Telomere integrity is important for chromosome stability. The main objective of our study was to investigate the relationship between telomere length modulation and mitotic chromosome segregation induced by ionizing radiation in human primary fibroblasts. We used X-rays and low-energy protons because of their ability to induce different telomeric responses. Samples irradiated with 4 Gy were fixed at different times up to 6 days from exposure and telomere length, anaphase abnormalities, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed. We observed that X-rays induced telomere shortening in cells harvested at 96 hrs, whereas protons induced a significant increase in telomere length at short as well as at long harvesting times (24 and 96 hrs). Consistent with this, the analysis of anaphase bridges at 96 hrs showed a fourfold increase in X-ray- compared with proton-irradiated samples, suggesting a correlation between telomere length/dysfunction and chromosome missegregation. In line with these findings, the frequency of dicentrics and rings decreased with time for protons whereas it remained stable after X-rays irradiation. Telomeric FISH staining on anaphases revealed a higher percentage of bridges with telomere signals in X-ray-treated samples than that observed after proton irradiation, thus suggesting that the aberrations observed after X-ray irradiation originated from telomere attrition and consequent chromosome end-to-end fusion. This study shows that, beside an expected "early" chromosome instability induced shortly after irradiation, a delayed one occurs as a result of alterations in telomere metabolism and that this mechanism may play an important role in genomic stability.

  6. Dose-dependency and reversibility of radiation-induced injury in cardiac explant-derived cells of mice

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lan; Yan, Chen; Urata, Yoshishige; Hasan, Al Shaimaa; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Zhang, Shouhua; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the dose-dependency and reversibility of radiation-induced injury in cardiac explant-derived cells (CDCs), a mixed cell population grown from heart tissues. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 0, 10, 50 and 250 mGy γ-rays for 7 days and atrial tissues were collected for experiments 24 hours after last exposure. The number of CDCs was significantly decreased by daily exposure to over 250 mGy. Interestingly, daily exposure to over 50 mGy significantly decreased the c-kit expression and telomerase activity, increased 53BP1 foci in the nuclei of CDCs. However, CD90 expression and growth factors production in CDCs were not significantly changed even after daily exposure to 250 mGy. We further evaluated the reversibility of radiation-induced injury in CDCs at 1 week and 3 weeks after a single exposure to 3 Gy γ-rays. The number and growth factors production of CDCs were soon recovered at 1 week. However, the increased expression of CD90 were retained at 1 week, but recovered at 3 weeks. Moreover, the decreased expression of c-kit, impaired telomerase activity, and increased 53BP1 foci were poorly recovered even at 3 weeks. These data may help us to find the most sensitive and reliable bio-parameter(s) for evaluating radiation-induced injury in CDCs. PMID:28098222

  7. Radiation-induced inflammatory markers of brain injury are modulated by PPARdelta activation in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnegg, Caroline Isabel

    As a result of improvements in cancer therapy and health care, the population of long-term cancer survivors is growing. For these approximately 12 million long-term cancer survivors, brain metastases are a significant risk. Fractionated partial or whole-brain irradiation (fWBI) is often required to treat both primary and metastatic brain cancer. Radiation-induced normal tissue injury, including progressive cognitive impairment, however, can significantly affect the well-being of the approximately 200,000 patients who receive these treatments each year. Recent reports indicate that radiation-induced brain injury is associated with chronic inflammatory and oxidative stress responses, as well as increased microglial activation in the brain. Anti-inflammatory drugs may, therefore, be a beneficial therapy to mitigate radiation-induced brain injury. We hypothesized that activation of peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor delta (PPARō) would prevent or ameliorate radiation-induced brain injury, including cognitive impairment, in part, by alleviating inflammatory responses in microglia. For our in vitro studies, we hypothesized that PPARō activation would prevent the radiation-induced inflammatory response in microglia following irradiation. Incubating BV-2 murine microglial cells with the (PPAR)ō agonist, L-165041, prevented the radiation-induced increase in: i) intracellular ROS generation, ii) Cox-2 and MCP-1 expression, and iii) IL-1β and TNF-α message levels. This occured, in part, through PPARō-mediated modulation of stress activated kinases and proinflammatory transcription factors. PPARō inhibited NF-κB via transrepression by physically interacting with the p65 subunit, and prevented activation of the PKCα/MEK1/2/ERK1/2/AP-1 pathway by inhibiting the radiation-induced increase in intracellular ROS generation. These data support the hypothesis that PPARō activation can modulate the radiation-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory

  8. Acute care alternate-level-of-care days due to delayed discharge for traumatic and non-traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Amy, Chen; Zagorski, Brandon; Chan, Vincy; Parsons, Daria; Vander Laan, Rika; Colantonio, Angela

    2012-05-01

    Alternate-level-of-care (ALC) days represent hospital beds that are taken up by patients who would more appropriately be cared for in other settings. ALC days have been found to be costly and may result in worse functional outcomes, reduced motor skills and longer lengths of stay in rehabilitation. This study examines the factors that are associated with acute care ALC days among patients with acquired brain injury (ABI). We used the Discharge Abstract Database to identify patients with ABI using International Classification of Disease-10 codes. From fiscal years 2007/08 to 2009/10, 17.5% of patients with traumatic and 14% of patients with non-traumatic brain injury had at least one ALC day. Significant predictors include having a psychiatric co-morbidity, increasing age and length of stay in acute care. These findings can inform planning for care of people with ABI in a publicly funded healthcare system.

  9. Ataxia Telangiectasia–Mutated Gene Polymorphisms and Acute Normal Tissue Injuries in Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Lihua; Cui, Jingkun; Tang, Fengjiao; Cong, Xiaofeng; Han, Fujun

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: Studies of the association between ataxia telangiectasia–mutated (ATM) gene polymorphisms and acute radiation injuries are often small in sample size, and the results are inconsistent. We conducted the first meta-analysis to provide a systematic review of published findings. Methods and Materials: Publications were identified by searching PubMed up to April 25, 2014. Primary meta-analysis was performed for all acute radiation injuries, and subgroup meta-analyses were based on clinical endpoint. The influence of sample size and radiation injury incidence on genetic effects was estimated in sensitivity analyses. Power calculations were also conducted. Results: The meta-analysis was conducted on the ATM polymorphism rs1801516, including 5 studies with 1588 participants. For all studies, the cut-off for differentiating cases from controls was grade 2 acute radiation injuries. The primary meta-analysis showed a significant association with overall acute radiation injuries (allelic model: odds ratio = 1.33, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.71). Subgroup analyses detected an association between the rs1801516 polymorphism and a significant increase in urinary and lower gastrointestinal injuries and an increase in skin injury that was not statistically significant. There was no between-study heterogeneity in any meta-analyses. In the sensitivity analyses, small studies did not show larger effects than large studies. In addition, studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries showed larger effects than studies with low incidence. Power calculations revealed that the statistical power of the primary meta-analysis was borderline, whereas there was adequate power for the subgroup analysis of studies with high incidence of acute radiation injuries. Conclusions: Our meta-analysis showed a consistency of the results from the overall and subgroup analyses. We also showed that the genetic effect of the rs1801516 polymorphism on acute radiation injuries was

  10. Boron neutron capture therapy using mixed epithermal and thermal neutron beams in patients with malignant glioma-correlation between radiation dose and radiation injury and clinical outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Kageji, Teruyoshi . E-mail: kageji@clin.med.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Nagahiro, Shinji; Matsuzaki, Kazuhito; Mizobuchi, Yoshifumi; Toi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Kumada, Hiroaki

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To clarify the correlation between the radiation dose and clinical outcome of sodium borocaptate-based intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy in patients with malignant glioma. Methods and Materials: The first protocol (P1998, n = 8) prescribed a maximal gross tumor volume (GTV) dose of 15 Gy. In 2001, a dose-escalated protocol was introduced (P2001, n 11), which prescribed a maximal vascular volume dose of 15 Gy or, alternatively, a clinical target volume (CTV) dose of 18 Gy. Results: The GTV and CTV doses in P2001 were 1.1-1.3 times greater than those in P1998. The maximal vascular volume dose of those with acute radiation injury was 15.8 Gy. The mean GTV and CTV dose in long-term survivors with glioblastoma was 26.4 and 16.5 Gy, respectively. A statistically significant correlation between the GTV dose and median survival time was found. In the 11 glioblastoma patients in P2001, the median survival time was 19.5 months and 1- and 2-year survival rate was 60.6% and 37.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Dose escalation contributed to the improvement in clinical outcome. To avoid radiation injury, the maximal vascular volume dose should be <12 Gy. For long-term survival in patients with glioblastoma after boron neutron capture therapy, the optimal mean dose of the GTV and CTV was 26 and 16 Gy, respectively.

  11. Determinants of alternate-level-of-care delayed discharge among acute care survivors of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stock, David; Cowie, Cassandra; Chan, Vincy; Colantonio, Angela; Wodchis, Walter P.; Alter, David; Cullen, Nora

    2016-01-01

    Background: Delayed discharge, captured as alternate-level-of-care days, represents inefficient use of high-demand acute care resources and results in potentially poorer patient outcomes. We performed a study to determine the extent of alternate-level-of-care days among patients who survived hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in inpatient hospital care in Ontario and to identify predictors of alternate-level-of-care use in this population. Methods: A population-based cohort of acute care survivors of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury aged 20 years or more from 2002/03 through 2011/12 was identified. We used 2 case definitions, the more specific identifying patients with a most responsible diagnosis of "anoxic brain damage," and the more sensitive capturing additional likely causative conditions as the most responsible diagnosis. Multivariable zero-inflated negative binomial regression was used to estimate independent effects on the relative incidence of alternate-level-of-care days. Results: We identified 491 patients using the specific case definition and 669 patients using the extended case definition. After deaths were excluded, 232 patients (47.2%) and 278 patients (41.6%), respectively, had at least 1 alternate-level-of-care day (median 20 and 19 d, respectively). In both cohorts, decreasing age, no special care unit hours and acute care episode earlier in the study period were predictive of increased alternate-level-of-care days relative to length of stay. Discharge disposition and psychiatric/behavioural comorbidity were most predictive of having any alternate-level-of-care days. Interpretation: Patients with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury had a greater proportion of alternate-level-of-care days than has been reported for patients with other types of acquired brain injury. This finding suggests that substantial barriers to appropriate discharge exist for this population. Predictors of increased alternate-level-of-care days were also shown to be unique. Further study

  12. Delayed Methylene Blue Improves Lesion Volume, Multi-Parametric Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measurements, and Behavioral Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Talley Watts, Lora; Long, Justin Alexander; Boggs, Robert Cole; Manga, Hemanth; Huang, Shiliang; Shen, Qiang; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-01-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a primary cause of death and disability in both civilian and military populations worldwide. There is a critical need for the development of neuroprotective agents that can circumvent damage and provide functional recovery. We previously showed that methylene blue (MB), a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-grandfathered drug with energy-enhancing and antioxidant properties, given 1 and 3 h post-TBI, had neuroprotective effects in rats. This study aimed to further investigate the neuroprotection of delayed MB treatment (24 h postinjury) post-TBI as measured by lesion volume and functional outcomes. Comparisons were made with vehicle and acute MB treatment. Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging and behavioral studies were performed at 1 and 3 h and 2, 7, and 14 days after an impact to the primary forelimb somatosensory cortex. We found that delaying MB treatment 24 h postinjury still minimized lesion volume and functional deficits, compared to vehicle-treated animals. The data further support the potential for MB as a neuroprotective treatment, especially when medical teatment is not readily available. MB has an excellent safety profile and is clinically approved for other indications. MB clinical trials on TBI can thus be readily explored.

  13. Translational Treatment Paradigm for Managing Non-Unions Secondary to Radiation Injury Utilizing Adipose Derived Stem Cells and Angiogenic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Donneys, Alexis; Blough, Jordan T.; Nelson, Noah S.; Perosky, Joseph E.; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Kang, Stephen Y.; Felice, Peter A.; Figueredo, Christian; Peterson, Jonathan R.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Levi, Benjamin; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bony non-unions arising in the aftermath of collateral radiation injury are commonly managed with vascularized free tissue transfers. Unfortunately, these procedures are invasive and fraught with attendant morbidities. This study investigates a novel, alternative treatment paradigm utilizing adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) combined with angiogenic deferoxamine (DFO) in the rat mandible. Methods Rats were exposed to a bioequivalent dose of radiation and mandibular osteotomy. Those exhibiting non-unions were subsequently treated with surgical debridement alone or debridement plus combination therapy. Radiographic and biomechanical outcomes were assessed after healing. Results Significant increases in biomechanical strength and radiographic metrics were observed in response to combination therapy (p<0.05). Importantly, combined therapy enabled a 65% reduction in persisting non-unions when compared to debridement alone. Conclusions We support the continued investigation of this promising combination therapy in its potential translation for the management of radiation-induced bony pathology. PMID:25917284

  14. Cimetidine enhances delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and serum interleukin (IL)-2, -10, -12, and IL-17 levels after burn injury in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Jafarzadeh, A; Nemati, M; Rezayati, M T; Ebrahimi, M; Hassan, Z M

    2013-01-01

    The immunosuppression that occurs after burn injury causes an increase in susceptibility to infection. The aim was to investigate time-related alterations in various cytokines following thermal injury and to modulate cytokines by use of an immunomodulant, cimetidine. Male Balb/c mice were anesthetized and given a 10% total body surface area full-thickness burn by submerging in 90°C water for 9 s. Time-dependent changes in delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and serum levels of the cytokines IL-2, IL-10, IL-12, IL-17 and TGFβ were then assessed at various post-burn day (PBD) timepoints. Effects of 10 mg cimetidine/kg on DTH responses and cytokine levels were evaluated up to PBD 14. In comparison to healthy non-burned control mice, levels of IL-2 and IL-17 significantly decreased at PBD 3, 5, 10, and 14, those of IL-10 at PBD 1, 3, 5, and 10, and those of IL-12 at PBD 1, 3, 5, 10, and 14. Administration of cimetidine significantly augmented the levels of IL-2 (at PBD 3, 5, and 10), IL-10 (at PBD 1 and 5), IL-12 (at PBD 3, 5, 10, and 14), and IL-17 (at PBD 3 and 14) as compared to those in burned counterparts who did not receive drug. In comparison to healthy mice, biphasic alterations were observed regarding TGFβ levels; values were significant decreased and increased at PBD 3 and PBD 14, respectively. Cimetidine significantly diminished the elevated TGFβ levels at PBD 14. Cimetidine also significantly augmented DTH responses at PBD 5, 10, and 14 as compared to responses in non-drug-treated burned hosts. Taken together, the results here showed significant time-dependent changes in serum cytokines levels after burn injury and that cimetidine was able to significantly augment IL-2, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-17 levels as well as DTH responses that are normally suppressed following thermal trauma.

  15. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Prevention, Diagnosis and Management of Early and Delayed-onset Ocular Injuries Due to Mustard Gas Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Safi, Sare; Javadi, Mohammad Ali; Jafarinasab, Mohammad Reza; Feizi, Sepehr; Moghadam, Mohammadreza Sedighi; Jadidi, Khosrow; Babaei, Mahmoud; Shirvani, Armin; Baradaran-Rafii, Alireza; Mohammad-Rabei, Hossein; Ziaei, Hossein; Ghassemi-Broumand, Mohammad; Baher, Siamak Delfaza; Naderi, Mostafa; Panahi-Bazaz, Mahmoodreza; Zarei-Ghanavati, Siamak; Hanjani, Shahriar; Ghasemi, Hassan; Salouti, Ramin; Pakbin, Mojgan; Kheiri, Bahareh

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To develop clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for prevention, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of ocular injuries caused by exposure to mustard gas. Methods: The clinical questions were designed by the guideline team. Websites and databases including National Guidelines Clearinghouse, National Institute for Clinical Excellence, Cochrane, and PubMed were searched to find related CPGs and explore possible answers to the clinical questions. Since there were no relevant CPGs in the literature, related articles in Persian and English languages were extracted. Each article along with its level of evidence was summarized. Additionally, hand search was performed by looking the reference list of each article. Consequently, recommendations were developed considering the clinical benefits and side effects of each therapeutic modality. The recommendations were re-evaluated in terms of customization criteria. All recommendations along with the related evidence were scored from 1 to 9 by experts from all medical universities of Iran. The level of agreement among the experts was evaluated by analyzing the given scores. Results: The agreement was achieved for all recommendations. The experts suggested a number of minor modifications which were applied to the recommendations. Finally, CPGs were developed with 98 recommendations under three major domains including prevention of injury, diagnosis and management of the acute and delayed-onset mustard gas ocular injuries. Conclusion: Considering the lack of CPGs for the prevention, diagnosis, and management of mustard gas-induced keratitis, these recommendations would be useful to prevent the serious ocular complications of mustard gas and standardize eye care services to the affected individuals. PMID:28299009

  16. Attenuation of working memory and spatial acquisition deficits after a delayed and chronic bromocriptine treatment regimen in rats subjected to traumatic brain injury by controlled cortical impact.

    PubMed

    Kline, Anthony E; Massucci, Jaime L; Marion, Donald W; Dixon, C Edward

    2002-04-01

    Cognitive impairments are pervasive and persistent sequelae of human traumatic brain injury (TBI). In vivo models of TBI, such as the controlled cortical impact (CCI) and fluid percussion (FP), are utilized extensively to produce deficits reminiscent of those seen clinically with the hope that empirical study will lead to viable therapeutic interventions. Both CCI and FP produce spatial learning acquisition deficits, but only the latter has been reported to impair working memory in rats tested in the Morris water maze (MWM). We hypothesized that a CCI injury would impair working memory similarly to that produced by FP, and that delayed and chronic treatment with the D2 receptor agonist bromocriptine would attenuate both working memory and spatial learning acquisition deficits. To test these hypotheses, isoflurane-anesthetized adult male rats received either a CCI (2.7 mm deformation, 4 m/sec) or sham injury, and 24 h later were administered bromocriptine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle, with continued daily injections until all behavioral assessments were completed. Motor function was assessed on beam balance and beam walking tasks on postoperative days 1-5 and cognitive function was evaluated in the MWM on days 11-15 for working memory (experiment 1) and on days 14-18 for spatial learning acquisition (experiment 2). Histological examination (hippocampal CA1 and CA3 cell loss/survival and cortical lesion volume) was conducted 4 weeks after surgery. All injured groups exhibited initial impairments in motor function, working memory, and spatial learning acquisition. Bromocriptine did not affect motor function, but did ameliorate working memory and significantly attenuated spatial acquisition deficits relative to the injured vehicle-treated controls. Additionally, the injured bromocriptine-treated group exhibited significantly more morphologically intact CA3 neurons than the injured vehicle-treated group (55.60 +/- 3.10% vs. 38.34 +/- 7.78% [p = 0.03]). No significant

  17. Pharmacological induction of transforming growth factor-beta1 in rat models enhances radiation injury in the intestine and the heart.

    PubMed

    Boerma, Marjan; Wang, Junru; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Herbert, Jean-Marc; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer is dose limited by radiation injury in normal tissues such as the intestine and the heart. To identify the mechanistic involvement of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) in intestinal and cardiac radiation injury, we studied the influence of pharmacological induction of TGF-β1 with xaliproden (SR 57746A) in rat models of radiation enteropathy and radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD). Because it was uncertain to what extent TGF-β induction may enhance radiation injury in heart and intestine, animals were exposed to irradiation schedules that cause mild to moderate (acute) radiation injury. In the radiation enteropathy model, male Sprague-Dawley rats received local irradiation of a 4-cm loop of rat ileum with 7 once-daily fractions of 5.6 Gy, and intestinal injury was assessed at 2 weeks and 12 weeks after irradiation. In the RIHD model, male Sprague-Dawley rats received local heart irradiation with a single dose of 18 Gy and were followed for 6 months after irradiation. Rats were treated orally with xaliproden starting 3 days before irradiation until the end of the experiments. Treatment with xaliproden increased circulating TGF-β1 levels by 300% and significantly induced expression of TGF-β1 and TGF-β1 target genes in the irradiated intestine and heart. Various radiation-induced structural changes in the intestine at 2 and 12 weeks were significantly enhanced with TGF-β1 induction. Similarly, in the RIHD model induction of TGF-β1 augmented radiation-induced changes in cardiac function and myocardial fibrosis. These results lend further support for the direct involvement of TGF-β1 in biological mechanisms of radiation-induced adverse remodeling in the intestine and the heart.

  18. Medical Countermeasures for Radiation Exposure and Related Injuries: Characterization of Medicines, FDA-Approval Status and Inclusion into the Strategic National Stockpile.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay K; Romaine, Patricia L P; Seed, Thomas M

    2015-06-01

    World events over the past decade have highlighted the threat of nuclear terrorism as well as an urgent need to develop radiation countermeasures for acute radiation exposures and subsequent bodily injuries. An increased probability of radiological or nuclear incidents due to detonation of nuclear weapons by terrorists, sabotage of nuclear facilities, dispersal and exposure to radioactive materials, and accidents provides the basis for such enhanced radiation exposure risks for civilian populations. Although the search for suitable radiation countermeasures for radiation-associated injuries was initiated more than half a century ago, no safe and effective radiation countermeasure for the most severe of these injuries, namely acute radiation syndrome (ARS), has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The dearth of FDA-approved radiation countermeasures has prompted intensified research for a new generation of radiation countermeasures. In this communication, the authors have listed and reviewed the status of radiation countermeasures that are currently available for use, or those that might be used for exceptional nuclear/radiological contingencies, plus a limited few medicines that show early promise but still remain experimental in nature and unauthorized for human use by the FDA.

  19. Medical Countermeasures for Radiation Exposure and Related Injuries: Characterization of Medicines, FDA-Approval Status and Inclusion into the Strategic National Stockpile

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay K.; Romaine, Patricia L.P.; Seed, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract World events over the past decade have highlighted the threat of nuclear terrorism as well as an urgent need to develop radiation countermeasures for acute radiation exposures and subsequent bodily injuries. An increased probability of radiological or nuclear incidents due to detonation of nuclear weapons by terrorists, sabotage of nuclear facilities, dispersal and exposure to radioactive materials, and accidents provides the basis for such enhanced radiation exposure risks for civilian populations. Although the search for suitable radiation countermeasures for radiation-associated injuries was initiated more than half a century ago, no safe and effective radiation countermeasure for the most severe of these injuries, namely acute radiation syndrome (ARS), has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The dearth of FDA-approved radiation countermeasures has prompted intensified research for a new generation of radiation countermeasures. In this communication, the authors have listed and reviewed the status of radiation countermeasures that are currently available for use, or those that might be used for exceptional nuclear/radiological contingencies, plus a limited few medicines that show early promise but still remain experimental in nature and unauthorized for human use by the FDA. PMID:25905522

  20. Qualitative effect on mRNAs of injury-associated proteins by cell phone like radiation in rat facial nerves.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ji-Geng; Agresti, Michael; Zhang, Lin-Ling; Yan, Yuhui; Matloub, Hani S

    2009-01-01

    Rats were exposed to cell phone radiation for 6 hours per day for 18 weeks. The buccal and mandibular branches of the facial nerve were evaluated for this study. The mRNA levels of four proteins that are usually up regulated when an injury has occurred were investigated; included were Calcium ATP-ase, Endothelin, Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule, and Neural Growth Factor. These isolated mRNAs were subjected to RT-PCR and all four were up regulated. The mandibular nerve showed a higher and broader level of up regulation than the buccal nerve. All four mRNA up regulations for the mandibular nerve and two for the buccal nerve were also statistically significant. These specific injury-related findings were mild. As the use of these cell phones continues, there most likely will be permanent damage to these tissues over the years and the likelihood of tumors, cancers, and system failures will potentially increase.

  1. Detecting Radiation-Induced Injury Using Rapid 3D Variogram Analysis of CT Images of Rat Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Richard E.; Murphy, Mark K.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Carson, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To investigate the ability of variogram analysis of octree-decomposed CT images and volume change maps to detect radiation-induced damage in rat lungs. Materials and Methods The lungs of female Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to one of five absorbed doses (0, 6, 9, 12, or 15 Gy) of gamma radiation from a Co-60 source. At 6 months post-exposure, pulmonary function tests were performed and 4DCT images were acquired using a respiratory-gated microCT scanner. Volume change maps were then calculated from the 4DCT images. Octree decomposition was performed on CT images and volume change maps, and variogram analysis was applied to the decomposed images. Correlations of measured parameters with dose were evaluated. Results The effects of irradiation were not detectable from measured parameters, indicating only mild lung damage. Additionally, there were no significant correlations of pulmonary function results or CT densitometry with radiation dose. However, the variogram analysis did detect a significant correlation with dose in both the CT images (r=−0.57, p=0.003) and the volume change maps (r=−0.53, p=0.008). Conclusion This is the first study to utilize variogram analysis of lung images to assess pulmonary damage in a model of radiation injury. Results show that this approach is more sensitive to detecting radiation damage than conventional measures such as pulmonary function tests or CT densitometry. PMID:24029058

  2. The delayed pulmonary syndrome following acute high-dose irradiation: a rhesus macaque model.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Michael; Bennett, Alexander; Farese, Ann M; Harper, Jamie; Ward, Amanda; Taylor-Howell, Cheryl; Cui, Wanchang; Gibbs, Allison; Lasio, Giovanni; Jackson, William; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Several radiation dose- and time-dependent tissue sequelae develop following acute high-dose radiation exposure. One of the recognized delayed effects of such exposures is lung injury, characterized by respiratory failure as a result of pneumonitis that may subsequently develop into lung fibrosis. Since this pulmonary subsyndrome may be associated with high morbidity and mortality, comprehensive treatment following high-dose irradiation will ideally include treatments that mitigate both the acute hematologic and gastrointestinal subsyndromes as well as the delayed pulmonary syndrome. Currently, there are no drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration to counteract the effects of acute radiation exposure. Moreover, there are no relevant large animal models of radiation-induced lung injury that permit efficacy testing of new generation medical countermeasures in combination with medical management protocols under the FDA animal rule criteria. Herein is described a nonhuman primate model of delayed lung injury resulting from whole thorax lung irradiation. Rhesus macaques were exposed to 6 MV photon radiation over a dose range of 9.0-12.0 Gy and medical management administered according to a standardized treatment protocol. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality at 180 d. A comparative multiparameter analysis is provided, focusing on the lethal dose response relationship characterized by a lethal dose50/180 of 10.27 Gy [9.88, 10.66] and slope of 1.112 probits per linear dose. Latency, incidence, and severity of lung injury were evaluated through clinical and radiographic parameters including respiratory rate, saturation of peripheral oxygen, corticosteroid requirements, and serial computed tomography. Gross anatomical and histological analyses were performed to assess radiation-induced injury. The model defines the dose response relationship and time course of the delayed pulmonary sequelae and consequent morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it may provide

  3. Analysis of Clinical and Dosimetric Factors Influencing Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuiyun; Gu, Feiying; Lin, Gang; Sun, Xiaojiang; Wang, Yuezhen; Wang, Zhun; Lin, Qingren; Weng, Denghu; Xu, Yaping; Mao, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation of thoracic radiation can improve the local tumor control and surivival, and is in the meantime limited by the occurrence of radiation-induced lung injury (RILI). This study investigated the clinical and dosimetric factors influencing RILI in lung-cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy for better radiation planning. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was carried out on 161 patients with non-small-cell or small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC and SCLC, respectively), who underwent chemoradiotherapy between April 2010 and May 2011 with a median follow-up time of 545 days (range: 39-1453). Chemotherapy regimens were based on the histological type (squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, or SCLC), and radiotherapy was delivered in 1.8-3.0 Gy (median, 2.0 Gy) fractions, once daily, to a total of 39-66 Gy (median, 60 Gy). Univariate analysis was performed to analyze clinical and dosimetric factors associated with RILI. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression identified independent risk factors correlated to RILI. Results: The incidence of symptomatic RILI (≥grade 2) was 31.7%. Univariate analysis showed that V5, V20, and mean lung dose (MLD) were significantly associated with RILI incidence (P=0.029, 0.048, and 0.041, respectively). The association was not statistically significant for histological type (NSCLC vs. SCLC, P = 0.092) or radiation technology (IMRT vs. 3D-CRT, P = 0.095). Multivariate analysis identified MLD as an independent risk factor for symptomatic RILI (OR=1.249, 95%CI=1.055-1.48, P= 0.01). The incidence of bilateral RILI in cases where the tumor was located unilaterally was 22.7% (32/141) and all dosimetric-parameter values were not significantly different (P>0.05) for bilateral versus ipsilateral injury, except grade-1 (low) RILI (P < 0.05). The RILI grade was higher in cases of ipsilateral lung injury than in bilateral cases (Mann-Whitney U test, z=8.216, P< 0.001). Conclusion: The dosimetric parameter

  4. ZRBA1, a Mixed EGFR/DNA Targeting Molecule, Potentiates Radiation Response Through Delayed DNA Damage Repair Process in a Triple Negative Breast Cancer Model

    SciTech Connect

    Heravi, Mitra; Kumala, Slawomir; Rachid, Zakaria; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J.; Radzioch, Danuta; Muanza, Thierry M.

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: ZRBA1 is a combi-molecule designed to induce DNA alkylating lesions and to block epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) TK domain. Inasmuch as ZRBA1 downregulates the EGFR TK-mediated antisurvival signaling and induces DNA damage, we postulated that it might be a radiosensitizer. The aim of this study was to further investigate the potentiating effect of ZRBA1 in combination with radiation and to elucidate the possible mechanisms of interaction between these 2 treatment modalities. Methods and Materials: The triple negative human breast MDA-MB-468 cancer cell line and mouse mammary cancer 4T1 cell line were used in this study. Clonogenic assay, Western blot analysis, and DNA damage analysis were performed at multiple time points after treatment. To confirm our in vitro findings, in vivo tumor growth delay assay was performed. Results: Our results show that a combination of ZRBA1 and radiation increases the radiation sensitivity of both cell lines significantly with a dose enhancement factor of 1.56, induces significant numbers of DNA strand breaks, prolongs higher DNA damage up to 24 hours after treatment, and significantly increases tumor growth delay in a syngeneic mouse model. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the higher efficacy of this combination could be partially due to increased DNA damage and delayed DNA repair process and to the inhibition of EGFR. The encouraging results of this combination demonstrated a significant improvement in treatment efficiency and therefore could be applicable in early clinical trial settings.

  5. Neutrophil Accumulation in the Small Intestine Contributes to Local Tissue Destruction Following Combined Radiation and Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Stewart R; Chen, Michael M; Palmer, Jessica L; Wang, Lu; Ramirez, Luis; Plackett, Timothy P; Gamelli, Richard L; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    Objective The threat of nuclear disaster makes combined radiation and thermal burn injury (CRI) a relevant topic when discussing modern trauma, as burn injuries are likely to occur with detonation of a conventional nuclear weapon. Previous studies in a murine model have shown that there is a breakdown of the gut epithelium and subsequent bacterial translocation into mesenteric lymph nodes after CRI. This study examines the early innate immune response of the small intestine following CRI. Methods Using a previously established murine model of 5 - 5.5Gy total body irradiation combined with 15% total body surface area burn, the injury response of the small intestine was examined at 24, 48 and 72hr by visual assessment, myeloperoxidase and cytokine measurement. Results At 24hr, intestinal damage as measured by villus blunting, crypt debris and decreased mitosis, was apparent in all injury groups but the derangements persisted out to 72hr only with CRI. The prolonged intestinal damage in CRI was accompanied by a 2-fold (p<0.05) elevation in myeloperoxidase activity over sham animals at 48hr and persisted as a 3-fold (p<0.05) elevation at 72hr post-injury. Corresponding levels of KC were 8-fold (p<0.05) higher than sham at 48hr with persistent elevation at 72hr. Conclusions An enhanced innate immune response, partially mediated by the influx of neutrophils into the gastrointestinal tract is contributing to the hyperinflammatory state seen following CRI. Attenuation of the local gastrointestinal inflammatory response may play a major role in managing victims following nuclear disaster. PMID:25501789

  6. Delayed Treatment with a Small Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor (PEDF) Peptide Prevents the Progression of Diabetic Renal Injury.

    PubMed

    Awad, Alaa S; You, Hanning; Gao, Ting; Gvritishvili, Anzor; Cooper, Timothy K; Tombran-Tink, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Our recent publication showed that a small bioactive pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) peptide (P78-PEDF) prevents the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). However, its effects on the progression of established DN were not clear. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of P78-PEDF in the progression of DN and to compare the effects of P78-PEDF and an ACE inhibitor (ACEi), a standard of care in DN. Experiments were conducted in Ins2(Akita) mice treated with P78-PEDF or captopril starting at 6 wks of age for 12 wks (early treatment) or starting at 12 wks of age for 6 wks (late treatment). We first established the optimal dose of the P78-PEDF peptide to ameliorate DN in Ins2(Akita) mouse for a 6 wk study period and found that the peptide was effective at 0.1- 0.5 µg/g/day. We next showed that early or late treatment with P78-PEDF resulted in protection from DN as indicated by reduced albuminuria, kidney macrophage recruitment, histological changes, inflammatory cytokines and fibrotic markers (kidney TNF-α, fibronectin, VEGFA and EGFR), and restored nephrin expression compared with vehicle-treated Ins2(Akita) mice. Interestingly, only early but not late treatment with captopril was as effective as P78-PEDF in reducing most DN complications, despite its lack of effect on nephrin, VEGFA and EGFR expression. These findings highlight the importance of P78-PEDF peptide as a potential therapeutic modality in both the development and progression of diabetic renal injury.

  7. Combined effects of radiation and trauma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messerschmidt, Otfried

    Injuries, caused by both whole-body irradiation and wounds or burns, have been relatively little studied. Possibly because many investigators think that these injuries are just modified radiation-induced diseases for which the same treatment principles are valid. Other authors had the impression that, for instance, the radiation burn trauma is a new kind of disease which differs significantly from either radiation syndrome alone or from burn disease. There are many experimental data on animals which suggest that the pathology of combined injuries differs significantly from that of radiation-induced disease or of thermal or mechanical traumas. Wounds or burns which, in general, do not cause septicaemia could become entrance ports for bacteria when animals are exposed to whole-body irradiation. Thrombocytopenia is the reason for hemorrhages in wounds. The susceptibility to shock is increased considerably in combined injuries and the formation of callus in the bone fractures is significantly delayed. The healing of wounds and burns in the initial phase of the radiation syndrome does not always differ from healing in the non-irradiated organism. However, a few days or weeks later very serious wound infections and hemorrhages can occur. The additional injuries almost always worsen the development and prognosis of radiation-induced disease. The recommended treatment for combined injuries will differ in many respects from the treatment of wounds and burns or the radiation syndrome.

  8. Radiation injury of the lung after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer: a timeline and pattern of CT changes.

    PubMed

    Linda, Anna; Trovo, Marco; Bradley, Jeffrey D

    2011-07-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a new radiotherapy treatment method that has been applied to the treatment of Stage I lung cancers in medically inoperable patients, with excellent clinical results. SBRT allows the delivery of a very high radiation dose to the target volume, while minimizing the dose to the adjacent normal tissues. As a consequence, CT findings after SBRT have different appearance, geographic extent and progression timeline compared to those following conventional radiation therapy for lung cancer. In particular, SBRT-induced changes are limited to the "shell" of normal tissue outside the tumor and have a complex shape. When SBRT-induced CT changes have a consolidation/mass-like appearance, the differentiation from tumor recurrence can be very difficult. An understanding of SBRT technique as it relates to the development of SBRT-induced lung injury and familiarity with the full spectrum of CT manifestations are important to facilitate diagnosis and management of lung cancer patients treated with this newly emerging radiotherapy method.

  9. Macrophage-derived extracellular vesicle-packaged WNTs rescue intestinal stem cells and enhance survival after radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Subhrajit; Aranda, Evelyn; Hayakawa, Yoku; Bhanja, Payel; Atay, Safinur; Brodin, N Patrik; Li, Jiufeng; Asfaha, Samuel; Liu, Laibin; Tailor, Yagnesh; Zhang, Jinghang; Godwin, Andrew K.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Wang, Timothy C.; Guha, Chandan; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2016-01-01

    WNT/β-catenin signalling is crucial for intestinal homoeostasis. The intestinal epithelium and stroma are the major source of WNT ligands but their origin and role in intestinal stem cell (ISC) and epithelial repair remains unknown. Macrophages are a major constituent of the intestinal stroma. Here, we analyse the role of macrophage-derived WNT in intestinal repair in mice by inhibiting their release using a macrophage-restricted ablation of Porcupine, a gene essential for WNT synthesis. Such Porcn-depleted mice have normal intestinal morphology but are hypersensitive to radiation injury in the intestine compared with wild-type (WT) littermates. Porcn-null mice are rescued from radiation lethality by treatment with WT but not Porcn-null bone marrow macrophage-conditioned medium (CM). Depletion of extracellular vesicles (EV) from the macrophage CM removes WNT function and its ability to rescue ISCs from radiation lethality. Therefore macrophage-derived EV-packaged WNTs are essential for regenerative response of intestine against radiation. PMID:27734833

  10. Radiation-Induced Microvascular Injury as a Mechanism of Salivary Gland Hypofunction and Potential Target for Radioprotectors

    PubMed Central

    Mizrachi, Aviram; Cotrim, Ana P.; Katabi, Nora; Mitchell, James B.; Verheij, Marcel; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is commonly used to treat patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). One of the major side effects of radiotherapy is injury to the salivary glands (SG), which is thought to be mediated by microvascular dysfunction leading to permanent xerostomia. The goal of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of radiation-induced microvasculature damage and its impact on SG function. We measured bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) apoptosis and ceramide production in response to 5 Gy irradiation, either alone or with reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers. We then investigated the effect of a single 15 Gy radiation dose on murine SG function. BAECs exposed to 5 Gy underwent apoptosis with increased ceramide production, both prevented by ROS scavengers. Among the 15 Gy irradiated mice, there was considerable weight loss, alopecia and SG hypofunction manifested by reduced saliva production and lower lysozyme levels. All of these effects, except for the lysozyme levels, were prevented by pretreatment with ROS scavengers. Microvessel density was significantly lower in the SG of irradiated mice compared to the control group, and this effect was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with Tempol. This study demonstrates that radiation-induced SG hypofunction is to a large extent mediated by microvascular dysfunction involving ceramide and ROS generation. These findings strongly suggest that ROS scavengers may serve as potential radioprotectors of SG function in patients undergoing radiotherapy for HNSCC. PMID:27459704

  11. Delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Che, Xiangming; Li, Xuqi; Qiu, Guanglin; He, Shicai; Fan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDHs) are sometimes difficult to identify at an early stage and can consequently result in diagnostic delays with life-threatening outcomes. It is the aim of this case study to highlight the difficulties encountered with the earlier detection of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias. Methods: Clinical data of patients who received treatment for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernias in registers of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University from 1998 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six patients were included in this study. Left hemidiaphragm was affected in all of them. Most of the patients had a history of traffic accident and 1 a stab-penetrating injury. The interval from injury to developing symptoms ranged from 2 to 11 years (median 5 years). The hernial contents included the stomach, omentum, small intestine, and colon. Diaphragmatic injury was missed in all of them during the initial managements. All patients received operations once the diagnosis of delayed TDH was confirmed, and no postoperative mortality was detected. Conclusions: Delayed TDHs are not common, but can lead to serious consequences once occurred. Early detection of diaphragmatic injuries is crucial. Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion for injuries of the diaphragm in cases with abdominal or lower chest traumas, especially in the initial surgical explorations. We emphasize the need for radiographical follow-up to detect diaphragmatic injuries at an earlier stage. PMID:27512848

  12. Prevention and Treatment of Functional and Structural Radiation Injury in the Rat Heart by Pentoxifylline and Alpha-Tocopherol

    SciTech Connect

    Boerma, Marjan Roberto, Kerrey A.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a severe side effect of thoracic radiotherapy. This study examined the effects of pentoxifylline (PTX) and {alpha}-tocopherol on cardiac injury in a rat model of RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats received fractionated local heart irradiation with a daily dose of 9 Gy for 5 days and were observed for 6 months after irradiation. Rats were treated with a combination of PTX, 100 mg/kg/day, and {alpha}-tocopherol (20 IU/kg/day) and received these compounds either from 1 week before until 6 months after irradiation or starting 3 months after irradiation, a time point at which histopathologic changes become apparent in our model of RIHD. Results: Radiation-induced increases in left ventricular diastolic pressure (in mm Hg: 35 {+-} 6 after sham-irradiation, 82 {+-} 11 after irradiation) were significantly reduced by PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol (early treatment: 48 {+-} 7; late treatment: 53 {+-} 6). PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol significantly reduced deposition of collagen types I (radiation only: 3.5 {+-} 0.2 {mu}m{sup 2} per 100 {mu}m{sup 2}; early treatment: 2.7 {+-} 0.8; late treatment: 2.2 {+-} 0.2) and III (radiation only: 13.9 {+-} 0.8; early treatment: 11.0 {+-} 1.2; late treatment: 10.6 {+-} 0.8). On the other hand, radiation-induced alterations in heart/body weight ratios, myocardial degeneration, left ventricular mast cell densities, and most echocardiographic parameters were not significantly altered by PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol. Conclusions: Treatment with PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol may have beneficial effects on radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular function, both when started before irradiation and when started later during the process of RIHD.

  13. Anti-high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) antibody attenuates delayed cerebral vasospasm and brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Haruma, Jun; Teshigawara, Kiyoshi; Hishikawa, Tomohito; Wang, Dengli; Liu, Keyue; Wake, Hidenori; Mori, Shuji; Takahashi, Hideo Kohka; Sugiu, Kenji; Date, Isao; Nishibori, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Although delayed cerebral vasospasm (DCV) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is closely related to the progression of brain damage, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying its development. High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) plays an important role as an initial inflammatory mediator in SAH. In this study, an SAH rat model was employed to evaluate the effects of anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) on DCV after SAH. A vasoconstriction of the basilar artery (BA) associated with a reduction of nuclear HMGB1 and its translocation in vascular smooth muscle cells were observed in SAH rats, and anti-HMGB1 mAb administration significantly suppressed these effects. Up-regulations of inflammation-related molecules and vasoconstriction-mediating receptors in the BA of SAH rats were inhibited by anti-HMGB1 mAb treatment. Anti-HMGB1 mAb attenuated the enhanced vasocontractile response to thrombin of the isolated BA from SAH rats and prevented activation of cerebrocortical microglia. Moreover, locomotor activity and weight loss recovery were also enhanced by anti-HMGB1 mAb administration. The vasocontractile response of the BA under SAH may be induced by events that are downstream of responses to HMGB1-induced inflammation and inhibited by anti-HMGB1 mAb. Anti-HMGB1 mAb treatment may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for DCV and early brain injury after SAH. PMID:27883038

  14. Comparative proteomic profiling and possible toxicological mechanism of acute injury induced by carbon ion radiation in pubertal mice testes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong

    2016-07-01

    We investigated potential mechanisms of acute injury in pubertal mice testes after exposure to carbon ion radiation (CIR). Serum testosterone was measured following whole-body irradiation with a 2Gy carbon ion beam. Comparative proteomic profiling and Western blotting were applied to identify potential biomarkers and measure protein expression, and terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) was performed to detect apoptotic cells. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were used to investigate protein localization. Serum testosterone was lowest at 24h after CIR, and 10 differentially expressed proteins were identified at this time point that included eIF4E, an important regulator of initiation that combines with mTOR and 4EBP1 to control protein synthesis via the mTOR signalling pathway during proliferation and apoptosis. Protein expression and localization studies confirmed their association with acute injury following exposure to CIR. These three proteins may be useful molecular markers for detecting abnormal spermatogenesis following exposure to environmental and cosmic radiation

  15. High-dose selenium for the mitigation of radiation injury: a pilot study in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Fritz; Muir, Sarah A; Cohen, Eric P; North, Paula E; Fish, Brian L; Irving, Amy A; Mäder, Marylou; Moulder, John E

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in an animal model the safety and efficacy of dietary supplementation with high doses of selenium for the mitigation of the type of radiation injury that might be sustained during a nuclear accident or an act of radiological terrorism. Age-matched male rats were exposed to 10 Gy (single dose) of total-body irradiation (TBI) followed by a syngeneic bone marrow transplant, then randomized to standard drinking water or drinking water supplemented with sodium selenite or seleno-l-methionine. At 21 weeks after TBI, most rats on standard drinking water had severe renal failure with a mean blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level of 124 +/- 29 mg/dl (geometric mean +/- SE) whereas rats on selenium-supplemented drinking water (100 microg/day) had a mean BUN level of 67 +/- 12 mg/dl. The mitigating effect of selenium was confirmed by histopathological analyses. None of the animals on high-dose selenium showed signs of selenium toxicity. Our results suggest that dietary supplementation with high-dose selenium may provide a safe, effective and practical way to mitigate radiation injury to kidneys.

  16. Comparative proteomic profiling and possible toxicological mechanism of acute injury induced by carbon ion radiation in pubertal mice testes.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Hong; Di, Cuixia; Xie, Yi; Zhou, Xin; Yan, Jiawei; Zhao, Qiuyue

    2015-12-01

    We investigated potential mechanisms of acute injury in pubertal mice testes after exposure to carbon ion radiation (CIR). Serum testosterone was measured following whole-body irradiation with a 2Gy carbon ion beam. Comparative proteomic profiling and Western blotting were applied to identify potential biomarkers and measure protein expression, and terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) was performed to detect apoptotic cells. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were used to investigate protein localization. Serum testosterone was lowest at 24h after CIR, and 10 differentially expressed proteins were identified at this time point that included eIF4E, an important regulator of initiation that combines with mTOR and 4EBP1 to control protein synthesis via the mTOR signaling pathway during proliferation and apoptosis. Protein expression and localization studies confirmed their association with acute injury following exposure to CIR. These three proteins may be useful molecular markers for detecting abnormal spermatogenesis following exposure to environmental and therapeutic radiation.

  17. Consecutive CT-guided core needle tissue biopsy of lung lesions in the same dog at different phases of radiation-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhongyuan; Deng, Sisi; Liang, Zhiwen; Wang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    This project aimed to set up a Beagle dog model of radiation-induced lung injury in order to supply fresh lung tissue samples in the different injury phases for gene and protein research. Three dogs received 18 Gy X-ray irradiation in one fraction, another three dogs received 8 Gy in each of three fractions at weekly intervals, and one control dog was not irradiated. Acute pneumonitis was observed during the first 3 months after radiation, and chronic lung fibrosis was found during the next 4–12 months in all the dogs exposed to radiation. CT-guided core needle lung lesion biopsies were extracted from each dog five times over the course of 1 year. The dogs remained healthy after each biopsy, and 50–100 mg fresh lung lesion tissues were collected in each operation. The incidence of pneumothorax and hemoptysis was 20% and 2.8%, respectively, in the 35 tissue biopsies. A successful and stable radiation-induced lung injury dog model was established. Lung lesion tissue samples from dogs in acute stage, recovery stage and fibrosis stage were found to be sufficient to support cytology, genomics and proteomics research. This model safely supplied fresh tissue samples that would allow future researchers to more easily explore and develop treatments for radiation-induced lung injury. PMID:27422930

  18. WE-D-BRE-01: A Sr-90 Irradiation Device for the Study of Cutaneous Radiation Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Dorand, JE; Bourland, JD; Burnett, LR; Tytell, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To determine dosimetric character for a custom-built Sr-90 beta irradiator designed for the study of Cutaneous Radiation Injury (CRI) in a porcine animal model. In the event of a radiological accident or terrorist event, Sr-90, a fission by-product, will likely be produced. CRI is a main concern due to the low energy and superficial penetration in tissue of beta particles from Sr-90. Seven 100 mCi plaque Sr-90 radiation sources within a custom-built irradiation device create a 40 mm diameter region of radiation-induced skin injury as part of a larger project to study the efficacy of a topical keratin-based product in CRI healing. Methods: A custom-built mobile irradiation device was designed and implemented for in vivo irradiations. Gafchromic™ EBT3 radiochromic film and a PTW Markus chamber type 23343 were utilized for dosimetric characterization of the beta fluence at the surface produced by this device. Films were used to assess 2-dimensional dose distribution and percent depth dose characteristics of the radiation field. Ion chamber measurements provided dose rate data within the field. Results: The radiation field produced by the irradiation device is homogeneous with high uniformity (∼5%) and symmetry (∼3%) with a steep dose fall-off with depth from the surface. Dose rates were determined to be 3.8 Gy/min and 3.3 Gy/min for film and ion chamber measurements, respectively. A dose rate of 3.4 Gy/min was used to calculate irradiation times for in vivo irradiations. Conclusion: The custom-built irradiation device enables the use of seven Sr-90 beta sources in an array to deliver a 40 mm diameter area of homogeneous skin dose with a dose rate that is useful for research purposes and clinically relevant for the induction of CRI. Doses of 36 and 42 Gy successfully produce Grade III CRI and are used in the study of the efficacy of KeraStat™. This project has been funded in whole or in part with Federal funds from the Biomedical Advanced Research and

  19. Nanoencapsulation of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E acetate protects against UVB radiation-induced skin injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, Natháli S; Barbieri, Allanna V; Camponogara, Camila; Mattiazzi, Juliane; Brum, Evelyne S; Marchiori, Marila C L; Oliveira, Sara M; Cruz, Letícia

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of producing semisolid formulations based on nanocapsule suspensions containing the association of the coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E acetate by adding gellan gum (2%) to the suspensions. Furthermore, we studied their application as an alternative for the treatment of inflammation induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. For this, an animal model of injury induced by UVB-radiation was employed. All semisolids presented pH close to 5.5, drug content above 95% and mean diameter on the nanometric range, after redispersion in water. Besides, the semisolids presented non-Newtonian flow with pseudoplastic behavior and suitable spreadability factor values. The results also showed that the semisolid containing coenzyme Q10-loaded nanocapsules with higher vitamin E acetate concentration reduced in 73±8% the UVB radiation-induced ear edema. Moreover, all formulations tested were able to reduce inflammation parameters evaluated through MPO activity and histological procedure on injured tissue and the semisolids containing the nanoencapsulated coenzyme Q10 reduced oxidative parameters assessment through the non-protein thiols levels and lipid peroxidation. This way, the semisolids based on nanocapsules may be considered a promising approach for the treatment and prevention of skin inflammation diseases.

  20. Delayed massive soft tissue uptake of Tc-99m MDP after radiation therapy for cancer of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, R.T.; Steuart, R.D.

    1995-09-01

    A patient with a history of breast cancer and known lung metastases was referred for a bone scan to investigate the cause of severe neck and right shoulder pain. The bone scan showed massive uptake of the radiopharmaceutical in the soft tissue surrounding the right shoulder. A review of the patient`s history indicated that the patient had undergone radiation therapy to the right upper thorax and breast area 14 months previously and an acute radiation dermatitis of the proximal right arm and shoulder had developed. This had long since resolved. Physical examination and plain radiographs of the right shoulder and humerus failed to demonstrated any abnormality. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Modulation of Mortality by Tissue Trauma and Sepsis in Mice after Radiation Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    at Hiroshima, Nagasaki, and Chernobyl underscore the need for useful animal models to (a) evaluate the combined effects of radiation and tissue trauma...States, and Chernobyl , U.S.S.R.) and from abandoned medical radiation devices (Juarez, Mexico, and Goiania, Brazil). Th ;nceased risk to human health as...well as the loss of life in Chernobyl and Goiania have had sobering influences upon the world. 202 92-19333 92 o J1 I l ~l ,,TIIII,1 .\\hodtatlon Of

  2. Apoptosis and injuries of heavy ion beam and x-ray radiation on malignant melanoma cell.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jin; Li, Sha; Zhang, Chao; Gao, Dong-Wei; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Hong; Jin, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Yang

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the influence of high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ion ((12)C(6+)) and low LET X-ray radiation on apoptosis and related proteins of malignant melanoma on tumor-bearing mice under the same physical dosage. C57BL/6 J mice were burdened by tumors and randomized into three groups. These mice received heavy ion ((12)C(6+)) and X-ray radiation under the same physical dosage, respectively; their weight and tumor volumes were measured every three days post-radiation. After 30 days, these mice were sacrificed. Then, median survival time was calculated and tumors on mice were proliferated. In addition, immunohistochemistry was carried out for apoptosis-related proteins to reflect the expression level. After tumor-bearing mice were radiated to heavy ion, median survival time improved and tumor volume significantly decreased in conjunction with the upregulated expression of pro-apoptosis factors, Bax and cytochrome C, and the downregulated expression of apoptosis-profilin (Bcl-2, Survivin) and proliferation-related proteins (proliferating cell nuclear antigen). The results indicated that radiation can promote the apoptosis of malignant melanoma cells and inhibit their proliferation. This case was more suitable for heavy ion ((12)C(6+)). High LET heavy ion ((12)C(6+)) radiation could significantly improve the killing ability for malignant melanoma cells by inducing apoptosis in tumor cells and inhibiting their proliferation. These results demonstrated that heavy ion ((12)C(6+)) presented special advantages in terms of treating malignant melanoma.

  3. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Change in the type of bifurcation resulting in periodic oscillations in delayed feedback diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napartovich, A. P.; Sukharev, A. G.

    2008-10-01

    The appearance of oscillating regimes in a delayed feedback diode laser is studied analytically and numerically. Based on the Lang—Kobayashi model, the transition of the usual oscillation mechanism, related to the transition through the Hopf bifurcation, to hard excitation of the spike regime is studied. The change in the regime of the instability development has a nature of a phase transition. An explicit expression is derived for the frequency of small harmonic oscillations appearing during the transition through the Andronov—Hopf bifurcation. The boundary between two different regimes of the development of laser power oscillations is determined in the parameter space.

  4. boc-Aspartyl(OMe)-fluoromethylketone attenuates mitochondrial release of cytochrome c and delays brain tissue loss after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robert S B; Nathaniel, Paula D; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Dixon, C Edward; Alber, Sean M; Watkins, Simon C; Melick, John A; Kochanek, Patrick M; Graham, Steven H

    2007-02-01

    The pathobiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) includes activation of multiple caspases followed by cell death with a spectrum of apoptotic phenotypes. There are initiator (e.g. caspase-2, -8, and -9) and effector (e.g. caspase-3 and -7) caspases. Recently, caspase-2 and -8 have been shown to regulate cell death via provoking cytochrome c release from the mitochondria upstream of caspase-9. Here, we show that an intracerebral injection of the pan-caspase inhibitor boc-Aspartyl(OMe)-fluoromethylketone (BAF; 1 micromol) 1 min after TBI in rats reduces caspase-3-like activity, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) and tissue damage, and cytochrome c release in ipsilateral cortex at 24 h versus vehicle. To investigate whether either caspase-2 and/or caspase-8 activation may contribute to cytochrome release, the effect of BAF treatment on caspase-2 and caspase-8 proteolysis was also examined. boc-aspartyl(OMe)-fluoromethylketone treatment inhibited proteolysis of caspase-2 but not caspase-8 24 h after TBI in rats versus vehicle. However, BAF with or without nerve growth factor (12.5 ng/h x 14 days intracerebrally via osmotic pump) did not result in differences in motor function, Morris water maze performance, hippocampal neuron survival, nor contusion volume at 14 days. These data suggest that BAF treatment reduces acute cell death after TBI by inhibiting mitochondrial release of cytochrome c, possibly via a mechanism involving initiator caspases; however, BAF appears to delay cell death, rather than result in permanent protection.

  5. Complications of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dalinka, M.K.; Mazzeo, V.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The skeletal effects of radiation are dependent upon many variables, but the pathologic features are consistent. Radiation may cause immediate or delayed cell death, cellular injury with recovery, arrest of cellular division, or abnormal repair with neoplasia. Radiation necrosis and radiation-induced neoplasm still occur despite the use of supervoltage therapy. Complications of radiotherapy are well known and have led to more judicious use of this therapeutic modality. With few exceptions, benign bone tumors are no longer treated with irradiation. Radiation necrosis may be difficult to differentiate from sarcoma arising in irradiated bone. They both occur within the field of irradiation. Radiation necrosis often has a long latent period which is, of course, the rule in radiation-induced neoplasia. A soft tissue mass favors the diagnosis of neoplasia, while its absence suggests radiation necrosis. Lack of pain favors necrosis. Calcification may occur in radiation necrosis and does not indicate neoplasia. A lack of progression on serial roentgenograms also favors radiation necrosis. 76 references.

  6. Radiation-Induced Testicular Injury and Its Amelioration by Tinospora cordifolia (An Indian Medicinal Plant) Extract

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Priyanka; Parmar, Jyoti; Sharma, Priyanka; Verma, Preeti; Goyal, P. K.

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this investigation is to determine the deleterious effects of sub lethal gamma radiation on testes and their possible inhibition by Tinospora cordifolia extract (TCE). For this purpose, one group of male Swiss albino mice was exposed to 7.5 Gy gamma radiation to serve as the irradiated control, while the other group received TCE (75 mg/kg b. wt./day) orally for 5 consecutive days half an hr before irradiation to serve as experimental. Exposure of animals to 7.5 Gy gamma radiation resulted into significant decrease in body weight, tissue weight, testes- body weight ratio and tubular diameter up to 15 days of irradiation. Cent percent mortality was recorded by day 17th in irradiated control, whereas all animals survived in experimental group. TCE pretreatment rendered significant increase in body weight, tissue weight, testes- body weight ratio and tubular diameter at various intervals as compared to irradiated group. Radiation induced histological lesions in testicular architecture were observed more severe in irradiated control then the experimental. TCE administration before irradiation significantly ameliorated radiation induced elevation in lipid peroxidation and decline in glutathione concentration in testes. These observations indicate the radio- protective potential of Tinospora cordifolia root extract in testicular constituents against gamma irradiation in mice. PMID:21350610

  7. Effect of alpha-lipoic acid on radiation-induced small intestine injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Bae Kwon; Song, Jin Ho; Jeong, Hojin; Choi, Hoon Sik; Jung, Jung Hwa; Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Woo, Seung Hoon; Jung, Myeong Hee; Choi, Bong-Hoi; Kim, Jin Hyun; Kang, Ki Mun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiation therapy is a highly effective treatment for patients with solid tumors. However, it can cause damage and inflammation in normal tissues. Here, we investigated the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) as radioprotection agent for the small intestine in a mouse model. Materials and Methods Whole abdomen was evenly irradiated with total a dose of 15 Gy. Mice were treated with either ALA (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection [i.p.]) or saline (equal volume, i.p.) the prior to radiation as 100 mg/kg/day for 3 days. Body weight, food intake, histopathology, and biochemical parameters were evaluated. Results Significant differences in body weight and food intake were observed between the radiation (RT) and ALA + RT groups. Moreover, the number of crypt cells was higher in the ALA + RT group. Inflammation was decreased and recovery time was shortened in the ALA + RT group compared with the RT group. The levels of inflammation-related factors (i.e., phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B and matrix metalloproteinase-9) and mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased in the ALA + RT group compared with those in the RT group. Conclusions ALA treatment prior to radiation decreases the severity and duration of radiation-induced enteritis by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell death. PMID:26943777

  8. Rhubarb extract has a protective role against radiation-induced brain injury and neuronal cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kui; Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Wenjun; Zhou, Min; Tang, Yamei; Peng, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Oxidative stress caused by ionizing radiation is involved in neuronal damage in a number of disorders, including trauma, stroke, Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Ionizing radiation can lead to the formation of free radicals, which cause neuronal apoptosis and have important roles in the development of some types of chronic brain disease. The present study evaluated the effects of varying concentrations (2, 5 and 10 µg/ml) of ethanolic rhubarb extract on the neuronal damage caused by irradiation in primary neuronal cultures obtained from the cortices of rat embryos aged 20 days. Brain damage was induced with a single dose of γ-irradiation that induced DNA fragmentation, increased lactate dehydrogenase release in neuronal cells and acted as a trigger for microglial cell proliferation. Treatment with rhubarb extract significantly decreased radiation-induced lactate dehydrogenase release and DNA fragmentation, which are important in the process of cell apoptosis. The rhubarb extract exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of lactate dehydrogenase release and neuronal cell apoptosis that were induced by the administration of ionizing radiation. The effect of a 10 µg/ml dose of rhubarb extract on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by radiation was also investigated. This dose led to significant inhibition of ROS generation. In conclusion, the present study showed a protective role of rhubarb extract against irradiation-induced apoptotic neuronal cell death and ROS generation.

  9. Intestinal tuft cells regulate the ATM mediated DNA Damage response via Dclk1 dependent mechanism for crypt restitution following radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; May, Randal; Weygant, Nathaniel; Qu, Dongfeng; Berry, William L.; Sureban, Sripathi M.; Ali, Naushad; Rao, Chinthalapally; Huycke, Mark; Bronze, Michael S.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2016-01-01

    Crypt epithelial survival and regeneration after injury require highly coordinated complex interplay between resident stem cells and diverse cell types. The function of Dclk1 expressing tuft cells regulating intestinal epithelial DNA damage response for cell survival/self-renewal after radiation-induced injury is unclear. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) were isolated and purified and utilized for experimental analysis. We found that small intestinal crypts of VillinCre;Dclk1f/f mice were hypoplastic and more apoptotic 24 h post-total body irradiation, a time when stem cell survival is p53-independent. Injury-induced ATM mediated DNA damage response, pro-survival genes, stem cell markers, and self-renewal ability for survival and restitution were reduced in the isolated intestinal epithelial cells. An even greater reduction in these signaling pathways was observed 3.5 days post-TBI, when peak crypt regeneration occurs. We found that interaction with Dclk1 is critical for ATM and COX2 activation in response to injury. We determined that Dclk1 expressing tuft cells regulate the whole intestinal epithelial cells following injury through paracrine mechanism. These findings suggest that intestinal tuft cells play an important role in regulating the ATM mediated DNA damage response, for epithelial cell survival/self-renewal via a Dclk1 dependent mechanism, and these processes are indispensable for restitution and function after severe radiation-induced injury. PMID:27876863

  10. Potential protection of green tea polyphenols against 1800 MHz electromagnetic radiation-induced injury on rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei-Li; Wen, Jian-Qiang; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2011-10-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) are harmful to public health, but the certain anti-irradiation mechanism is not clear yet. The present study was performed to investigate the possible protective effects of green tea polyphenols against electromagnetic radiation-induced injury in the cultured rat cortical neurons. In this study, green tea polyphenols were used in the cultured cortical neurons exposed to 1800 MHz EMFs by the mobile phone. We found that the mobile phone irradiation for 24 h induced marked neuronal cell death in the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) and TUNEL (TdT mediated biotin-dUTP nicked-end labeling) assay, and protective effects of green tea polyphenols on the injured cortical neurons were demonstrated by testing the content of Bcl-2 Assaciated X protein (Bax) in the immunoprecipitation assay and Western blot assay. In our study results, the mobile phone irradiation-induced increases in the content of active Bax were inhibited significantly by green tea polyphenols, while the contents of total Bax had no marked changes after the treatment of green tea polyphenols. Our results suggested a neuroprotective effect of green tea polyphenols against the mobile phone irradiation-induced injury on the cultured rat cortical neurons.

  11. Inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase delays the onset of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis through the negative regulation of sphingosine kinase-1 expression[S

    PubMed Central

    Gorshkova, Irina; Zhou, Tong; Mathew, Biji; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Takekoshi, Daisuke; Bhattacharya, Palash; Smith, Brett; Aydogan, Bulent; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.

    2012-01-01

    The enforcement of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling network protects from radiation-induced pneumonitis. We now demonstrate that, in contrast to early postirradiation period, late postirradiation sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) and sphingoid base-1-phosphates are associated with radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (RIF). Using the mouse model, we demonstrate that RIF is characterized by a marked upregulation of S1P and dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate (DHS1P) levels in the lung tissue and in circulation accompanied by increased lung SphK1 expression and activity. Inhibition of sphingolipid de novo biosynthesis by targeting serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) with myriocin reduced radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and delayed the onset of RIF as evidenced by increased animal lifespan and decreased expression of markers of fibrogenesis, such as collagen and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), in the lung. Long-term inhibition of SPT also decreased radiation-induced SphK activity in the lung and the levels of S1P-DHS1P in the lung tissue and in circulation. In vitro, inhibition or silencing of serine palmitoyltransferase attenuated transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β)-induced upregulation of α-SMA through the negative regulation of SphK1 expression in normal human lung fibroblasts. These data demonstrate a novel role for SPT in regulating TGF-β signaling and fibrogenesis that is linked to the regulation of SphK1 expression and S1P-DHS1P formation. PMID:22615416

  12. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA injury and damage detection in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Borrego-Soto, Gissela; Ortiz-López, Rocío; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Radiotherapy is frequently used in patients with breast cancer, but some patients may be more susceptible to ionizing radiation, and increased exposure to radiation sources may be associated to radiation adverse events. This susceptibility may be related to deficiencies in DNA repair mechanisms that are activated after cell-radiation, which causes DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks. Some of these genetic susceptibilities in DNA-repair mechanisms are implicated in the etiology of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (pathologic mutations in the BRCA 1 and 2 genes), but other less penetrant variants in genes involved in sporadic breast cancer have been described. These same genetic susceptibilities may be involved in negative radiotherapeutic outcomes. For these reasons, it is necessary to implement methods for detecting patients who are susceptible to radiotherapy-related adverse events. This review discusses mechanisms of DNA damage and repair, genes related to these functions, and the diagnosis methods designed and under research for detection of breast cancer patients with increased radiosensitivity. PMID:26692152

  13. Mitigation and Treatment of Radiation-Induced Thoracic Injury With a Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor, Celecoxib

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Nancy R.; Valdecanas, David; Liao Zhongxing; Milas, Luka; Thames, Howard D.; Mason, Kathy A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To test whether a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) could reduce mortality resulting from radiation-induced pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: Celecoxib was given to mice twice daily for 40 consecutive days starting on the day of local thoracic irradiation (LTI) or 40 or 80 days later. C3Hf/KamLaw mice were observed for morbidity, and time to death was determined. Results were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Timing of celecoxib relative to LTI determined efficacy. A significant reduction in time to death was achieved only when celecoxib was started 80 days after LTI, corresponding to the time when pneumonitis is expressed. For these mice the reduction in mortality was quantified as a hazard ratio for mortality of treated vs untreated of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.24-0.53), thus significantly less than 1.0. Correspondingly, the median lethal dose for treated mice (12.9 Gy; 95% CI 12.55-13.25 Gy) was significantly (P=.026) higher than for untreated mice (12.4 Gy; 95% CI 12.2-12.65 Gy). Conclusions: Celecoxib significantly reduced lung toxicity when administered months after LTI when the deleterious effects of radiation were expressed. The schedule-dependent reduction in fatal pneumonitis suggests that celecoxib could be clinically useful by reintroduction of treatment months after completion of radiation therapy. These findings may be important for designing clinical trials using cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors to treat radiation-induced lung toxicity as a complement to concurrent radiation therapy of lung cancers.

  14. Delayed ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    Ejaculatory incompetence; Sex - delayed ejaculation; Retarded ejaculation; Anejaculation; Infertility - delayed ejaculation ... include: Religious background that makes the person view sex as sinful Lack of attraction for a partner ...

  15. Role of Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 in Radiation-Induced Brain Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.-L.; Tu Ba; Li Yuqing; Wong, C. Shun

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To determine the role of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the pathogenesis of brain injury after irradiation (IR). Methods and Materials: We assessed the expression of ICAM-1 in mouse brain after cranial IR and determined the histopathologic and behavioral changes in mice that were either wildtype (+/+) or knockout (-/-) of the ICAM-1 gene after IR. Results: There was an early dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression after IR. Increased ICAM-1 immunoreactivity was observed in endothelia and glia of ICAM-1+/+ mice up to 8 months after IR. ICAM-1-/- mice showed no expression. ICAM-1+/+ and ICAM-1-/- mice showed similar vascular abnormalities at 2 months after 10-17 Gy, and there was evidence for demyelination and inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis at 8 months after 10 Gy. After 10 Gy, irradiated ICAM-1+/+ and ICAM-1-/- mice showed similar behavioral changes at 2-6 months in open field, light-dark chamber, and T-maze compared with age-matched genotype controls. Conclusion: There is early and late upregulation of ICAM-1 in the vasculature and glia of mouse brain after IR. ICAM-1, however, does not have a causative role in the histopathologic injury and behavioral dysfunction after moderate single doses of cranial IR.

  16. Some cell kinetic effects of combined injury with ionizing radiation and cyclophosphamide on mouse bladder urothelium.

    PubMed

    Reitan, J B

    1985-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide was given intraperitoneally to groups of eight female mice 48 h after local electron irradiation to the bladder with 0, 10 and 20 Gy respectively. The reactions in the urothelium were monitored by histology, incorporation of tritiated thymidine and flow cytometry. A wave of increased thymidine incorporation combined with an increase in the proportion of diploid S-phase cells was seen in the unirradiated bladders 24 h after the drug treatment, followed by normalization after 1 week. This response was significantly less pronounced in the irradiated animals. In the unirradiated animals a similar wave characterized by an increased proportion of octaploid cells was also seen, but this wave occurred later in the irradiated animals. Severe injury was observed in the rectum of the 20 Gy-irradiated animals. Irradiation prior to drug treatment led to only small effects, but a decreased ability for regenerative DNA synthesis after drug injury seems to persist. This affects both proliferation and the building up of polyploidy.

  17. Misoprostol in the intestinal lumen protects against radiation injury of the mucosa of the small bowel

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, J.P.; Bonsack, M.E.; Felemovicius, I. )

    1994-03-01

    Systemically administered misoprostol, a PGE analog, has been shown to be an intestinal radioprotector. The purpose of this study was to determine if administration of misoprostol into the intestinal lumen can also reduce the severity of acute radiation enteritis. The rat small bowel was operatively exteriorized and segmented by means of suture ties. The remainder of the intestine and the rat were shielded in a lead box. Misoprostol was introduced into the lumen in various doses. After 30 min exposure to misoprostol, the isolated, exteriorized, segmented bowel was subjected to 11 Gy X irradiation. Five days later the animals were sacrificed and the intestines harvested for evaluation. Surviving crypt numbers per circumference and mucosal height were the criteria used for quantification of damage. Mucosa exposed to misoprostol at the time of radiation delivery showed significantly increased crypt numbers and mucosal height compared to adjacent saline-filled intestine. 24 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Dietary Pectin Increases Intestinal Crypt Stem Cell Survival following Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sureban, Sripathi M.; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Weygant, Nathaniel; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stan A.; Ding, Kai; Umar, Shahid; Schlosser, Michael J.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal damage is a devastating adverse effect of radiation therapy. We have recently reported that expression of Dclk1, a Tuft cell and tumor stem cell (TSC) marker, 24h after high dose total-body gamma-IR (TBI) can be used as a surrogate marker for crypt survival. Dietary pectin has been demonstrated to possess chemopreventive properties, whereas its radioprotective property has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of dietary pectin on ionizing radiation (IR)-induced intestinal stem cell (ISC) deletion, crypt and overall survival following lethal TBI. C57BL/6 mice received a 6% pectin diet and 0.5% pectin drinking water (pre-IR mice received pectin one week before TBI until death; post-IR mice received pectin after TBI until death). Animals were exposed to TBI (14 Gy) and euthanized at 24 and 84h post-IR to assess ISC deletion and crypt survival respectively. Animals were also subjected to overall survival studies following TBI. In pre-IR treatment group, we observed a three-fold increase in ISC/crypt survival, a two-fold increase in Dclk1+ stem cells, increased overall survival (median 10d vs. 7d), and increased expression of Dclk1, Msi1, Lgr5, Bmi1, and Notch1 (in small intestine) post-TBI in pectin treated mice compared to controls. We also observed increased survival of mice treated with pectin (post-IR) compared to controls. Dietary pectin is a radioprotective agent; prevents IR-induced deletion of potential reserve ISCs; facilitates crypt regeneration; and ultimately promotes overall survival. Given the anti-cancer activity of pectin, our data support a potential role for dietary pectin as an agent that can be administered to patients receiving radiation therapy to protect against radiation-induces mucositis. PMID:26270561

  19. Dietary Pectin Increases Intestinal Crypt Stem Cell Survival following Radiation Injury.

    PubMed

    Sureban, Sripathi M; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Weygant, Nathaniel; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stan A; Ding, Kai; Umar, Shahid; Schlosser, Michael J; Houchen, Courtney W

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal damage is a devastating adverse effect of radiation therapy. We have recently reported that expression of Dclk1, a Tuft cell and tumor stem cell (TSC) marker, 24h after high dose total-body gamma-IR (TBI) can be used as a surrogate marker for crypt survival. Dietary pectin has been demonstrated to possess chemopreventive properties, whereas its radioprotective property has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of dietary pectin on ionizing radiation (IR)-induced intestinal stem cell (ISC) deletion, crypt and overall survival following lethal TBI. C57BL/6 mice received a 6% pectin diet and 0.5% pectin drinking water (pre-IR mice received pectin one week before TBI until death; post-IR mice received pectin after TBI until death). Animals were exposed to TBI (14 Gy) and euthanized at 24 and 84h post-IR to assess ISC deletion and crypt survival respectively. Animals were also subjected to overall survival studies following TBI. In pre-IR treatment group, we observed a three-fold increase in ISC/crypt survival, a two-fold increase in Dclk1+ stem cells, increased overall survival (median 10d vs. 7d), and increased expression of Dclk1, Msi1, Lgr5, Bmi1, and Notch1 (in small intestine) post-TBI in pectin treated mice compared to controls. We also observed increased survival of mice treated with pectin (post-IR) compared to controls. Dietary pectin is a radioprotective agent; prevents IR-induced deletion of potential reserve ISCs; facilitates crypt regeneration; and ultimately promotes overall survival. Given the anti-cancer activity of pectin, our data support a potential role for dietary pectin as an agent that can be administered to patients receiving radiation therapy to protect against radiation-induces mucositis.

  20. Radiation injuries to the bowel associated with the treatment of carcinoma of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Palmer, J A; Bush, R S

    1976-10-01

    Advances in radiation techniques and increased dosage have improved the cure rate of patients with cancer of the cervix to 65 percent. Associated with this increased dosage (betatron, 5,250 r and intracavitary 137-cesium, 4,000 r at point A) has been a serious complication incidence of 10 percent. Major intestinal complications usually become manifest within an 8 to 24 month period following radiation. Few are associated with tumor and the majority are amenable to surgical correction. Rectosigmoid stenosis is a common and frequently unrecognized complication. The 8 to 12 cm. segment of rectosigmoid, with its rigid wall and narrowed lumen, can be recognized on barium examination. The symptoms are those on incomplete obstruction and deterioration, frequently confused with tumor progression. Thirty-one patients have been treated by resection and low anterior anastomosis with relief of symptoms. Rectosigmoid stenosis progressing to necrosis, perforation, or fistula (an additional 29 patients) is treated best by the Hartmann operation as a first stage. This procedure has been less complicated than either colostomy alone or resection and anastomosis. Fifteen patients with low level rectovaginal fistula or stenosis were treated by defunctioning sigmoid colostomy. A loop transverse colostomy was unsatisfactory. Ileorectovaginal fistulas occurred in an additional six patients. Preoperative investigation should establish the presence or absence of an ileal component in all fistulas. Radiation ileitis is rare as an isolated finding but frequently is associated with severe rectosigmoid damage. Surgical treatment is seldom necessary but, if indicated (ten patients), resection appears to be preferable to bypass.

  1. Dual Manganese-Enhanced and Delayed Gadolinium-Enhanced MRI Detects Myocardial Border Zone Injury in a Pig Ischemia-Reperfusion Model

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Rajesh; Chung, Jaehoon; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Hahn-Windgassen, Annett; Matsuura, Yuka; Bennett, Mihoko V.; Lyons, Jennifer K.; Teramoto, Tomohiko; Robbins, Robert C.; McConnell, Michael V.; Yeung, Alan C.; Brinton, Todd J.; Harnish, Phillip P.; Yang, Phillip C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Delayed gadolinium (Gd) enhancement MRI (DEMRI) identifies non-viable myocardium, but is non-specific and may overestimate nonviable territory. Manganese (Mn2+)-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) denotes specific Mn2+ uptake into viable cardiomyocytes. We performed a dual-contrast myocardial assessment in a porcine ischemia-reperfusion (IR) model to test the hypothesis that combined DEMRI and MEMRI will identify viable infarct border zone (BZ) myocardium in vivo. Methods and Results Sixty-minute LAD ischemia-reperfusion injury (IR) was induced in 13 adult swine. Twenty-one days post-IR, 3T cardiac MRI was performed. MEMRI was obtained after injection (0.7 cc/kg) of Mn2+ contrast agent (EVP1001-1, Eagle Vision Pharmaceutical Corp.). DEMRI was then acquired after 0.2mmol/kg Gd injection. Left ventricular (LV) mass, infarct, and function were analyzed. Subtraction of MEMRI defect from DEMRI signal identified injured border zone myocardium. Explanted hearts were analyzed by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) stain and tissue electron microscopy (TEM) to compare infarct, BZ, and remote myocardium. Average LV ejection fraction was reduced (30±7%). MEMRI and DEMRI infarct volumes correlated with TTC (MEMRI: r=0.78; DEMRI: r=0.75; p<0.004). MEMRI infarct volume percentage was significantly lower than DEMRI (14±4%* vs. 23±4%; *p<0.05). BZ MEMRI SNR was intermediate to remote and core infarct SNR (7.5±2.8* vs. 13.2±3.4 and 2.9±1.6; *p<0.0001), and DEMRI BZ SNR tended to be intermediate to remote and core infarct (8.4±5.4 vs. 3.3±0.6 and 14.3±6.6; p>0.05). TEM analysis exhibited preserved cell structure in BZ cardiomyocytes despite transmural DEMRI enhancement. Conclusions Dual-contrast MEMRI-DEMRI detects BZ viability within DEMRI infarct zones. This approach may identify injured, at-risk myocardium in ischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:21719779

  2. Prospects for management of gastrointestinal injury associated with the acute radiation syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Walker, R.I.

    1988-08-01

    The effect of total-body ionizing radiation on the digestive tract is dose-dependent and time-dependent. At low doses (1.5 Gy), one observes only a short prodromal syndrome consisting of nausea, vomiting, and gastric suppression. At doses greater than 6 Gy, the prodromal syndrome is more marked, and it is followed after a 2-5-day remission period by a subacute syndrome, characterized by diarrhea and hematochezia. This gastrointestinal syndrome is superimposed onto a radiation-induced bone marrow suppression. The combination of intestinal and hemopoietic syndromes results in dehydration, anemia, and infection, leading eventually to irreversible shock and death. The treatment of prodromal symptoms is based on the administration of antiemetics and gastrokinetics, although an effective treatment devoid of side effects is not yet available for human therapy. The treatment of the gastrointestinal subacute syndrome remains difficult and unsuccessful after exposure to total body doses greater than 8-10 Gy. Supportive therapy to prevent infection and dehydration may be effective if restoration or repopulation of the intestinal and bone marrow stem cells does occur. In addition, bone marrow transplantation may improve the prospect of treating the hemopoietic syndrome, although the experience gained in Chernobyl suggests that this treatment is difficult to apply in the case of nuclear accidents. Administration of radioprotectants before irradiation decreases damage to healthy cells, while not protecting cancerous tissues. In the future, stimulation of gastrointestinal and hemopoietic progenitor cells may be possible using cell growth regulators, but much remains to be done to improve the treatment of radiation damage to the gastrointestinal tract. 77 references.

  3. Prospects for management of gastrointestinal injury associated with the acute radiation syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Walker, R.I.

    1988-08-01

    The effect of total-body ionizing radiation on the digestive tract is dose-dependent and time-dependent. At low doses (1.5 Gy), one observes only a short prodromal syndrome consisting of nausea, vomiting, and gastric suppression. At doses>6 Gy, the prodromal syndrome is more marked, and it is followed after a 2-5-day remission period by a subacute syndrome, characterized by diarrhea and hematochezia. This gastrointestinal syndrome is superimposed onto a radiation-induced bone marrow suppression. The combination of intestinal and hemopoietic syndromes results in dehydration, anemia, and infection, leading eventually to irreversible shock and death. The treatment of prodromal symptoms is based on the administration of antiemetics and gastrokinetics, although an effective treatment devoid of side effects is not yet available for human therapy. The treatment of the gastrointestinal subacute syndrome remains difficult and unsuccessful after exposure to total-body doses >8-10 Gy. Supportive therapy to prevent infection and dehydration may be effective if restoration or repopulation of the intestinal and bone marrow stem cells does occur. In addition, bone marrow transplantation may improve the prospect of treating the hemopoietic syndrome, although the experience gained in Chernobyl suggests that this treatment is difficult to apply in the case of nuclear accidents. Administration of radioprotectants before irradiation decreases damage to healthy cells, while not protecting cancerous tissues. In the future, stimulation of gastrointestinal and hemopoietic progenitor cells may be possible using cell growth regulators, but much remains to be done to improve the treatment of radiation damage to the gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Transplantation of Endothelial Cells to Mitigate Acute and Chronic Radiation Injury to Vital Organs.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Shahin; Ginsberg, Michael; Scandura, Joseph; Butler, Jason M; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-08-01

    Current therapeutic approaches for treatment of exposure to radiation involve the use of antioxidants, chelating agents, recombinant growth factors and transplantation of stem cells (e.g., hematopoietic stem cell transplantation). However, exposure to high-dose radiation is associated with severe damage to the vasculature of vital organs, often leading to impaired healing, tissue necrosis, thrombosis and defective regeneration caused by aberrant fibrosis. It is very unlikely that infusion of protective chemicals will reverse severe damage to the vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The role of irradiated vasculature in mediating acute and chronic radiation syndromes has not been fully appreciated or well studied. New approaches are necessary to replace and reconstitute ECs in organs that are irreversibly damaged by radiation. We have set forth the novel concept that ECs provide paracrine signals, also known as angiocrine signals, which not only promote healing of irradiated tissue but also direct organ regeneration without provoking fibrosis. We have developed innovative technologies that enable manufacturing and banking of human GMP-grade ECs. These ECs can be transplanted intravenously to home to and engraft to injured tissues where they augment organ repair, while preventing maladaptive fibrosis. In the past, therapeutic transplantation of ECs was not possible due to a shortage of availability of suitable donor cell sources and preclinical models, a lack of understanding of the immune privilege of ECs, and inadequate methodologies for expansion and banking of engraftable ECs. Recent advances made by our group as well as other laboratories have breached the most significant of these obstacles with the development of technologies to manufacture clinical-scale quantities of GMP-grade and human ECs in culture, including genetically diverse reprogrammed human amniotic cells into vascular ECs (rAC-VECs) or human pluripotent stem cells into vascular ECs (iVECs). This

  5. Transplantation of Endothelial Cells to Mitigate Acute and Chronic Radiation Injury to Vital Organs

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Shahin; Ginsberg, Michael; Scandura, Joseph; Butler, Jason M.; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Current therapeutic approaches for treatment of exposure to radiation involve the use of antioxidants, chelating agents, recombinant growth factors and transplantation of stem cells (e.g., hematopoietic stem cell transplantation). However, exposure to high-dose radiation is associated with severe damage to the vasculature of vital organs, often leading to impaired healing, tissue necrosis, thrombosis and defective regeneration caused by aberrant fibrosis. It is very unlikely that infusion of protective chemicals will reverse severe damage to the vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The role of irradiated vasculature in mediating acute and chronic radiation syndromes has not been fully appreciated or well studied. New approaches are necessary to replace and reconstitute ECs in organs that are irreversibly damaged by radiation. We have set forth the novel concept that ECs provide paracrine signals, also known as angiocrine signals, which not only promote healing of irradiated tissue but also direct organ regeneration without provoking fibrosis. We have developed innovative technologies that enable manufacturing and banking of human GMP-grade ECs. These ECs can be transplanted intravenously to home to and engraft to injured tissues where they augment organ repair, while preventing maladaptive fibrosis. In the past, therapeutic transplantation of ECs was not possible due to a shortage of availability of suitable donor cell sources and preclinical models, a lack of understanding of the immune privilege of ECs, and inadequate methodologies for expansion and banking of engraftable ECs. Recent advances made by our group as well as other laboratories have breached the most significant of these obstacles with the development of technologies to manufacture clinical-scale quantities of GMP-grade and human ECs in culture, including genetically diverse reprogrammed human amniotic cells into vascular ECs (rAC-VECs) or human pluripotent stem cells into vascular ECs (iVECs). This

  6. Action spectrum and mechanisms of UV radiation-induced injury in lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Kochevar, I.E.

    1985-07-01

    Photosensitivity associated with lupus erythematosus (LE) is well established. The photobiologic basis for this abnormal response to ultraviolet radiation, however, has not been determined. This paper summarizes the criteria for elucidating possible photobiologic mechanisms and reviews the literature relevant to the mechanism of photosensitivity in LE. In patients with LE, photosensitivity to wavelengths shorter than 320 nm has been demonstrated; wavelengths longer than 320 nm have not been adequately evaluated. DNA is a possible chromophore for photosensitivity below 320 nm. UV irradiation of skin produces thymine photodimers in DNA. UV-irradiated DNA is more antigenic than native DNA and the antigenicity of UV-irradiated DNA has been proposed, but not proven, to be involved in the development of clinical lesions. UV irradiation of mice previously injected with anti-UV-DNA antibodies produces Ig deposition and complement fixation that appears to be similar to the changes seen in lupus lesions. Antibodies to UV-irradiated DNA occur in the serum of LE patients although a correlation between antibody titers and photosensitivity was not observed. Defective repair of UV-induced DNA damage does not appear to be a mechanism for the photosensitivity in LE. Other mechanisms must also be considered. The chromophore for photosensitivity induced by wavelengths longer than 320 nm has not been investigated in vivo. In vitro studies indicate that 360-400 nm radiation activates a photosensitizing compound in the lymphocytes and serum of LE patients and causes chromosomal aberrations and cell death. The mechanism appears to involve superoxide anion.

  7. The use of isodose levels to interpret radiation induced lung injury: a quantitative analysis of computed tomography changes

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, Miriam A.; Sheu, Ren Dih; Knoll, Abraham D.; Kerns, Sarah L.; Lo, Yeh-Chi; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer are often found to have radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) surrounding the treated tumor. We investigated whether treatment isodose levels could predict RILI. Methods Thirty-seven lung lesions in 32 patients were treated with SBRT and received post-treatment follow up (FU) computed tomography (CT). Each CT was fused with the original simulation CT and treatment isodose levels were overlaid. The RILI surrounding the treated lesion was contoured. The RILI extension index [fibrosis extension index (FEI)] was defined as the volume of RILI extending outside a given isodose level relative to the total volume of RILI and was expressed as a percentage. Results Univariate analysis revealed that the planning target volume (PTV) was positively correlated with RILI volume at FU: correlation coefficient (CC) =0.628 and P<0.0001 at 1st FU; CE =0.401 and P=0.021 at 2nd FU; CE =0.265 and P=0.306 at 3rd FU. FEI −40 Gy at 1st FU was significantly positively correlated with FEI −40 Gy at subsequent FU’s (CC =0.689 and P=6.5×10−5 comparing 1st and 2nd FU; 0.901 and P=0.020 comparing 2nd and 3rd FU. Ninety-six percent of the RILI was found within the 20 Gy isodose line. Sixty-five percent of patients were found to have a decrease in RILI on the second 2nd CT. Conclusions We have shown that RILI evolves over time and 1st CT correlates well with subsequent CTs. Ninety-six percent of the RILI can be found to occur within the 20 Gy isodose lines, which may prove beneficial to radiologists attempting to distinguish recurrence vs. RILI. PMID:26981453

  8. The potential benefits of nicaraven to protect against radiation-induced injury in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with relative low dose exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Haytham; Galal, Omima; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Guo, Chang-Ying; Luo, Lan; Abdelrahim, Eman; Ono, Yusuke; Mostafa, Emtethal; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Nicaraven mitigated the radiation-induced reduction of c-kit{sup +} stem cells. • Nicaraven enhanced the function of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. • Complex mechanisms involved in the protection of nicaraven to radiation injury. - Abstract: Nicaraven, a hydroxyl radical-specific scavenger has been demonstrated to attenuate radiation injury in hematopoietic stem cells with 5 Gy γ-ray exposures. We explored the effect and related mechanisms of nicaraven for protecting radiation injury induced by sequential exposures to a relatively lower dose γ-ray. C57BL/6 mice were given nicaraven or placebo within 30 min before exposure to 50 mGy γ-ray daily for 30 days in sequences (cumulative dose of 1.5 Gy). Mice were victimized 24 h after the last radiation exposure, and the number, function and oxidative stress of hematopoietic stem cells were quantitatively estimated. We also compared the gene expression in these purified stem cells from mice received nicaraven and placebo treatment. Nicaraven increased the number of c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood, with a recovery rate around 60–90% of age-matched non-irradiated healthy mice. The potency of colony forming from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells as indicator of function was completely protected with nicaraven treatment. Furthermore, nicaraven treatment changed the expression of many genes associated to DNA repair, inflammatory response, and immunomodulation in c-kit{sup +} stem/progenitor cells. Nicaraven effectively protected against damages of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells induced by sequential exposures to a relatively low dose radiation, via complex mechanisms.

  9. Detection of radiation induced lung injury in rats using dynamic hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Matthew S.; Ouriadov, Alexei; Hegarty, Elaine; Thind, Kundan; Wong, Eugene; Hope, Andrew; Santyr, Giles E.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Radiation induced lung injury (RILI) is a common side effect for patients undergoing thoracic radiation therapy (RT). RILI can lead to temporary or permanent loss of lung function and in extreme cases, death. Combining functional lung imaging information with conventional radiation treatment plans may lead to more desirable treatment plans that reduce lung toxicity and improve the quality of life for lung cancer survivors. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the lung following inhalation of hyperpolarized{sup 129}Xe may provide a useful nonionizing approach for probing changes in lung function and structure associated with RILI before, during, or after RT (early and late time-points). Methods: In this study, dynamic{sup 129}Xe MR spectroscopy was used to measure whole-lung gas transfer time constants for lung tissue and red blood cells (RBC), respectively (T{sub Tr-tissue} and T{sub Tr-RBC}) in groups of rats at two weeks and six weeks following 14 Gy whole-lung exposure to radiation from a {sup 60}Co source. A separate group of six healthy age-matched rats served as a control group. Results: T{sub Tr-tissue} values at two weeks post-irradiation (51.6 ± 6.8 ms) were found to be significantly elevated (p < 0.05) with respect to the healthy control group (37.2 ± 4.8 ms). T{sub Tr-RBC} did not show any significant changes between groups. T{sub Tr-tissue} was strongly correlated with T{sub Tr-RBC} in the control group (r = 0.9601 p < 0.05) and uncorrelated in the irradiated groups. Measurements of arterial partial pressure of oxygen obtained by arterial blood sampling were found to be significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in the two-week group (54.2 ± 12.3 mm Hg) compared to those from a representative control group (85.0 ± 10.0 mm Hg). Histology of a separate group of similarly irradiated animals confirmed the presence of inflammation due to radiation exposure with alveolar wall thicknesses that were significantly different (p < 0.05). At six weeks post

  10. [Mild head injury in children and adults: Diagnostic challenges in the emergency department].

    PubMed

    Leidel, B A; Lindner, T; Wolf, S; Bogner, V; Steinbeck, A; Börner, N; Peiser, C; Audebert, H J; Biberthaler, P; Kanz, K-G

    2015-06-01

    Mild head injuries are one of the most frequent reasons for attending emergency departments and are particularly challenging in different ways. While clinically important injuries are infrequent, delayed or missed injuries may lead to fatal consequences. The initial mostly inconspicuous appearance may not reflect the degree of intracranial injury and computed tomography (CT) is necessary to rule out covert injuries. Furthermore, infants and young children with a lack of or rudimentary cognitive and language development are challenging, especially for those examiners not familiar with pediatric care. Established check lists of clinical risk factors for children and adults regarding traumatic brain injuries allow specific and rational decision-making for cranial CT imaging. Clinically important intracranial injuries can be reliably detected and unnecessary radiation exposure avoided at the same time.

  11. Ventilation/Perfusion Positron Emission Tomography—Based Assessment of Radiation Injury to Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Siva, Shankar; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Kron, Tomas; Bressel, Mathias; Callahan, Jason; MacManus, Michael P.; Shaw, Mark; Plumridge, Nikki; Hicks, Rodney J.; Steinfort, Daniel; Ball, David L.; Hofman, Michael S.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate {sup 68}Ga-ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) as a novel imaging modality for assessment of perfusion, ventilation, and lung density changes in the context of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In a prospective clinical trial, 20 patients underwent 4-dimensional (4D)-V/Q PET/CT before, midway through, and 3 months after definitive lung RT. Eligible patients were prescribed 60 Gy in 30 fractions with or without concurrent chemotherapy. Functional images were registered to the RT planning 4D-CT, and isodose volumes were averaged into 10-Gy bins. Within each dose bin, relative loss in standardized uptake value (SUV) was recorded for ventilation and perfusion, and loss in air-filled fraction was recorded to assess RT-induced lung fibrosis. A dose-effect relationship was described using both linear and 2-parameter logistic fit models, and goodness of fit was assessed with Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Results: A total of 179 imaging datasets were available for analysis (1 scan was unrecoverable). An almost perfectly linear negative dose-response relationship was observed for perfusion and air-filled fraction (r{sup 2}=0.99, P<.01), with ventilation strongly negatively linear (r{sup 2}=0.95, P<.01). Logistic models did not provide a better fit as evaluated by AIC. Perfusion, ventilation, and the air-filled fraction decreased 0.75 ± 0.03%, 0.71 ± 0.06%, and 0.49 ± 0.02%/Gy, respectively. Within high-dose regions, higher baseline perfusion SUV was associated with greater rate of loss. At 50 Gy and 60 Gy, the rate of loss was 1.35% (P=.07) and 1.73% (P=.05) per SUV, respectively. Of 8/20 patients with peritumoral reperfusion/reventilation during treatment, 7/8 did not sustain this effect after treatment. Conclusions: Radiation-induced regional lung functional deficits occur in a dose-dependent manner and can be estimated by simple linear models with 4D-V/Q PET

  12. SU-E-J-247: Time Evolution of Radiation-Induced Lung Injury After Stereotactic Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grassberger, C; Sharp, G; Fintelmann, F; Paganetti, H; Willers, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative metrics to assess patient-specific radiation-induced lung injury have the potential to guide individualization of therapy and be early indicators of recurrence. Here we investigate computed tomography (CT) density changes in normal lung after stereotactic Proton Therapy. Methods: Participants in a phase-I clinical trial for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with protons are analyzed on a rolling basis. The dataset includes 9 patients with 34 CT images to date. Follow-up images are registered to the planning CT using deformable image registration and the change in CT density is correlated to the dose to examine the time-evolution of Hounsfield Unit (HU) changes after large doses of proton radiation. Results: The lung density observed on the follow-up images increases significantly with dose for all dose levels above 5 Gy(RBE) (p<0.001) for 8/9 patients. The change per unit dose [HU/Gy] varies significantly among the patients, from 0.1 (for the one patient without significant correlation) to 5.7 ΔHU/Gy(RBE). The current population average of ΔHU/Gy(RBE) is 2.1, i.e. a 1 Gy(RBE) increase in dose leads on average to a 2.1 HU increase in CT density. The slope of the dose-response curve is constant for all timepoints investigated (from 3–24+ months). Additionally a pronounced non-linearity in the dose response curve is noted for long follow-up times (>18 months). Conclusion: CT density changes have a robust correlation with proton dose, quantitatively similar to photon dose, and may allow estimation of a patient’s intrinsic radiosensitivity after proton therapy. The stability of the correlation with time however diverges from what is known about CT response after photon irradiation. This could have important implications for clinical decision-making during proton therapy for lung cancer, especially for scheduling of follow-up CT/PET imaging and diagnosis of recurrence.

  13. Viva Delay.

    PubMed

    Yahaghi, Hossein; Sorooshian, Shahryar; Yahaghi, Javad

    2016-06-28

    The time delay between submission of a thesis and Viva Voce is intolerable for students. This letter tries to draw the readers' attention to the effect of choosing the right examiner, in order to reduce the Viva Voce delay.

  14. A delayed and chronic treatment regimen with the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT after cortical impact injury facilitates motor recovery and acquisition of spatial learning

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jeffrey P.; Hoffman, Ann N.; Zafonte, Ross D.; Kline, Anthony E.

    2008-01-01

    An early (i.e., 15 min) single systemic administration of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT enhances behavioral recovery after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, acute administration of pharmacotherapies after TBI may be clinically challenging and thus the present study sought to investigate the potential efficacy of a delayed and chronic 8-OH-DPAT treatment regimen. Forty-eight isoflurane-anesthetized adult male rats received either a controlled cortical impact or sham injury and beginning 24 hrs later were administered 8-OH-DPAT (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg) or saline vehicle (1.0 mL/kg) intraperitoneally once daily until all behavioral assessments were completed. Neurobehavior was assessed by motor and cognitive tests on post-operative days 1–5 and 14–19, respectively. The lower dose of 8-OH-DPAT (0.1 mg/kg) enhanced motor performance, acquisition of spatial learning, and memory retention vs. both the higher dose (0.5 mg/kg) and vehicle treatment (p < 0.05). These data replicate previous findings from our laboratory showing that 8-OH-DPAT improves neurobehavior after TBI, and extend those results by demonstrating that the benefits can be achieved even when treatment is withheld for 24 hrs. A delayed and chronic treatment regimen may be more clinically feasible. PMID:18638506

  15. Radiation injury in the human kidney: A prospective analysis using specific scintigraphic and biochemical endpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Dewit, L.; Anninga, J.K.; Hoefnagel, C.A.; Nooijen, W.J. )

    1990-10-01

    Renal function was prospectively analyzed in 26 evaluable patients, irradiated to various doses on their kidneys for neoplastic disease. Glomerular function was assessed by 99mTc-DTPA renography, creatinine clearance, and serum beta 2-microglobulin, whereas tubular function was monitored by 99mTc-DMSA scintigraphy, urine beta 2-microglobulin, urine N-acetyl glucosaminidase, and alanine aminopeptidase and a urine concentration test. In the patients given the highest irradiation dose to the entire left kidney, that is, 40 Gy in 5 1/2 weeks, glomerular and tubular functional impairment, as assessed scintigraphically, progressed at a rate of 2.0 +/- 1.0% (+/- 1 SD) and 2.0 +/- 0.5% per month, respectively, down to 30-40% after 3 to 5 years. The overall glomerular function, as assessed by creatinine clearance, decreased by only 20%. In the patients irradiated unilaterally on the upper pole to 40 Gy in 4 weeks, glomerular and tubular function in the left kidney deteriorated at 0.75 +/- 0.33% and 0.75 +/- 0.20% per month in the first 2 years, down to 75-80% at 5 years. This smaller reduction was due to shielding of a part of the left kidney. No changes were observed, thus far, after bilateral whole kidney irradiation to 17-18 Gy in 3 1/2 weeks. The concentration capacity of the kidney after total volume irradiation was not impaired. There was a trend for an increase in diastolic blood pressure in 3 out of 5 patients given the high dose irradiation to the entire left kidney and in 2 out of 7 patients irradiated on the upper pole of the left kidney. The progressive nature of the radiation nephropathy stresses the need for long term follow-up to determine more accurately the tolerance dose of the human kidney for irradiation.

  16. Role of migratory inhibition factor in age-related susceptibility to radiation lung injury via NF-E2-related factor-2 and antioxidant regulation.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Biji; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Siegler, Jessica H; Moitra, Jaideep; Blasco, Michael; Xie, Lishi; Unzueta, Crystal; Zhou, Tong; Evenoski, Carrie; Al-Sakka, Mohammed; Sharma, Rajesh; Huey, Ben; Bulent, Aydogan; Smith, Brett; Jayaraman, Sundararajan; Reddy, Narsa M; Reddy, Shekhar P; Fingerle-Rowson, Günter; Bucala, Richard; Dudek, Steven M; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Garcia, Joe G N

    2013-08-01

    Microvascular injury and increased vascular leakage are prominent features of radiation-induced lung injury (RILI), and often follow cancer-associated thoracic irradiation. Our previous studies demonstrated that polymorphisms in the gene (MIF) encoding macrophage migratory inhibition factor (MIF), a multifunctional pleiotropic cytokine, confer susceptibility to acute inflammatory lung injury and increased vascular permeability, particularly in senescent mice. In this study, we exposed wild-type and genetically engineered mif(-/-) mice to 20 Gy single-fraction thoracic radiation to investigate the age-related role of MIF in murine RILI (mice were aged 8 wk, 8 mo, or 16 mo). Relative to 8-week-old mice, decreased MIF was observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue of 8- to 16-month-old wild-type mice. In addition, radiated 8- to 16-month-old mif(-/-) mice exhibited significantly decreased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid total antioxidant concentrations with progressive age-related decreases in the nuclear expression of NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor involved in antioxidant gene up-regulation in response to reactive oxygen species. This was accompanied by decreases in both protein concentrations (NQO1, GCLC, and heme oxygenase-1) and mRNA concentrations (Gpx1, Prdx1, and Txn1) of Nrf2-influenced antioxidant gene targets. In addition, MIF-silenced (short, interfering RNA) human lung endothelial cells failed to express Nrf2 after oxidative (H2O2) challenge, an effect reversed by recombinant MIF administration. However, treatment with an antioxidant (glutathione reduced ester), but not an Nrf2 substrate (N-acetyl cysteine), protected aged mif(-/-) mice from RILI. These findings implicate an important role for MIF in radiation-induced changes in lung-cell antioxidant concentrations via Nrf2, and suggest that MIF may contribute to age-related susceptibility to thoracic radiation.

  17. Small Molecular Inhibitor of Transforming Growth Factor-{beta} Protects Against Development of Radiation-Induced Lung Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Anscher, Mitchell S. Thrasher, Bradley; Zgonjanin, Larisa; Rabbani, Zahid N.; Corbley, Michael J.; Fu Kai; Sun Lihong; Lee, W.-C.; Ling, Leona E.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether an anti-transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) type 1 receptor inhibitor (SM16) can prevent radiation-induced lung injury. Methods and Materials: One fraction of 28 Gy or sham radiotherapy (RT) was administered to the right hemithorax of Sprague-Dawley rats. SM16 was administered in the rat chow (0.07 g/kg or 0.15 g/kg) beginning 7 days before RT. The rats were divided into eight groups: group 1, control chow; group 2, SM16, 0.07 g/kg; group 3, SM16, 0.15 g/kg; group 4, RT plus control chow; group 5, RT plus SM16, 0.07 g/kg; group 6, RT plus SM16, 0.15 g/kg; group 7, RT plus 3 weeks of SM16 0.07 g/kg followed by control chow; and group 8, RT plus 3 weeks of SM16 0.15 g/kg followed by control chow. The breathing frequencies, presence of inflammation/fibrosis, activation of macrophages, and expression/activation of TGF-{beta} were assessed. Results: The breathing frequencies in the RT plus SM16 0.15 g/kg were significantly lower than the RT plus control chow from Weeks 10-22 (p <0.05). The breathing frequencies in the RT plus SM16 0.07 g/kg group were significantly lower only at Weeks 10, 14, and 20. At 26 weeks after RT, the RT plus SM16 0.15 g/kg group experienced a significant decrease in lung fibrosis (p = 0.016), inflammatory response (p = 0.006), and TGF-{beta}1 activity (p = 0.011). No significant reduction was found in these measures of lung injury in the group that received SM16 0.7g/kg nor for the short-course (3 weeks) SM16 at either dose level. Conclusion: SM16 at a dose of 0.15 g/kg reduced functional lung damage, morphologic changes, inflammatory response, and activation of TGF-{beta} at 26 weeks after RT. The data suggest a dose response and also suggest the superiority of long-term vs. short-term dosing.

  18. Delayed neutralization of interleukin 6 reduces organ injury, selectively suppresses inflammatory mediator, and partially normalizes immune dysfunction following trauma and hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jinxiang; Korff, Sebastian; Ayoob, Faez; Vodovotz, Yoram; Billiar, Timothy R

    2014-09-01

    An excessive and uncontrolled systemic inflammatory response is associated with organ failure, immunodepression, and increased susceptibility to nosocomial infection following trauma. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) plays a particularly prominent role in the host immune response after trauma with hemorrhage. However, as a result of its pleiotropic functions, the effect of IL-6 in trauma and hemorrhage is still controversial. It remains unclear whether suppression of IL-6 after hemorrhagic shock and trauma will attenuate organ injury and immunosuppression. In this study, C57BL/6 mice were treated with anti-mouse IL-6 monoclonal antibody immediately prior to resuscitation in an experimental model combining hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. Interleukin 6 levels and signaling were transiently suppressed following administrations of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody following hemorrhagic shock and lower-extremity injury. This resulted in reduced lung and liver injury, as well as suppression in the levels of key inflammatory mediators including IL-10, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and macrophage inhibitory protein 1α at both 6 and 24 h. Furthermore, the shift to TH2 cytokine production and suppressed lymphocyte response were partly prevented. These results demonstrate that IL-6 is not only a biomarker but also an important driver of injury-induced inflammation and immune suppression in mice. Rapid measurement of IL-6 levels in the early phase of postinjury care could be used to guide IL-6-based interventions.

  19. Imaging of sports-related hip and groin injuries.

    PubMed

    Lischuk, Andrew W; Dorantes, Thomas M; Wong, William; Haims, Andrew H

    2010-05-01

    A normally functioning hip joint is imperative for athletes who use their lower extremities with running, jumping, or kicking activities. Sports-related injuries of the hip and groin are far less frequent than injuries to the more distal aspect of the extremity, accounting for less than 10% of lower extremity injuries. Despite the lower incidence, hip and groin injuries can lead to significant clinical and diagnostic challenges related to the complex anatomy and biomechanical considerations of this region. Loads up to 8 times normal body weight have been documented in the joint in common daily activities, such as jogging, with significantly greater force expected during competitive athletics. Additionally, treatment for hip and groin injuries can obviate the participation of medical and surgical specialties, with a multidisciplinary approach frequently required. Delay in diagnosis and triage of these injuries may cause loss of time from competition and, potentially, early onset of degenerative changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hip has proven to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of sports-related hip and groin injuries in the setting of negative radiographs. With its exquisite soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capabilities, and lack of ionizing radiation, MRI is unmatched in the noninvasive diagnosis of intra-articular and extra-articular pathology, as well as intraosseous processes. This review focuses on MRI of common athletic injuries of the hip and groin, including acetabular labral tears, femoral acetabular impingement syndrome, muscle injuries around the hip and groin (including athletic pubalgia), and athletic osseous injuries.

  20. Imaging of Sports-Related Hip and Groin Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Lischuk, Andrew W.; Dorantes, Thomas M.; Wong, William; Haims, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    A normally functioning hip joint is imperative for athletes who use their lower extremities with running, jumping, or kicking activities. Sports-related injuries of the hip and groin are far less frequent than injuries to the more distal aspect of the extremity, accounting for less than 10% of lower extremity injuries. Despite the lower incidence, hip and groin injuries can lead to significant clinical and diagnostic challenges related to the complex anatomy and biomechanical considerations of this region. Loads up to 8 times normal body weight have been documented in the joint in common daily activities, such as jogging, with significantly greater force expected during competitive athletics. Additionally, treatment for hip and groin injuries can obviate the participation of medical and surgical specialties, with a multidisciplinary approach frequently required. Delay in diagnosis and triage of these injuries may cause loss of time from competition and, potentially, early onset of degenerative changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hip has proven to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of sports-related hip and groin injuries in the setting of negative radiographs. With its exquisite soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capabilities, and lack of ionizing radiation, MRI is unmatched in the noninvasive diagnosis of intra-articular and extra-articular pathology, as well as intraosseous processes. This review focuses on MRI of common athletic injuries of the hip and groin, including acetabular labral tears, femoral acetabular impingement syndrome, muscle injuries around the hip and groin (including athletic pubalgia), and athletic osseous injuries. PMID:23015946

  1. Radiation

    NASA Video Gallery

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  2. Dose Optimization Study of AEOL 10150 as a Mitigator of Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in CBA/J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Murigi, Francis N.; Mohindra, Pranshu; Hung, Chiwei; Salimi, Shabnam; Goetz, Wilfried; Pavlovic, Radmila; Jackson, Isabel L.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    AEOL 10150 is a catalytic metalloporphyrin superoxide dismutase mimic being developed as a medical countermeasure for radiation-induced lung injury (RILI). The efficacy of AEOL 10150 against RILI through a reduction of oxidative stress, hypoxia and pro-apoptotic signals has been previously reported. The goal of this study was to determine the most effective dose of AEOL 10150 (daily subcutaneous injections, day 1–28) in improving 180-day survival in CBA/J mice after whole-thorax lung irradiation (WTLI) to a dose of 14.6 Gy. Functional and histopathological assessments were performed as secondary end points. Estimated 180-day survival improved from 10% in WTLI alone to 40% with WTLI-AEOL 10150 at 25 mg/kg (P = 0.065) and to 30% at 40 mg/kg (P = 0.023). No significant improvement was seen at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg or at doses between 25 and 40 mg/kg. AEOL 10150 treatment at 25 mg/kg lowered the respiratory function parameter of enhanced pause (Penh) significantly, especially at week 16 and 18 (P = 0.044 and P = 0.025, respectively) compared to vehicle and other doses. Pulmonary edema/congestion were also significantly reduced at the time of necropsy among mice treated with 25 and 40 mg/kg AEOL 10150 compared to WTLI alone (P < 0.02). In conclusion, treatment with AEOL 10150 at a dose of 25 mg/kg/day for a total of 28 days starting 24 h after WTLI in CBA/J mice was found to be the optimal dose with improvement in survival and lung function. Future studies will be required to determine the optimal duration and therapeutic window for drug delivery at this dose. PMID:26414508

  3. [Delayed puberty].

    PubMed

    Edouard, T; Tauber, M

    2010-02-01

    Delayed puberty is defined in girls by the absence of breast development beyond 13 years old and in boys by the absence of testicular enlargement (< 4 ml) beyond 14 years old. Simple investigations lead to the diagnosis of central or peripheral hypogonadism and constitutional delay of puberty. In girls, delayed puberty is rare and often organic, and then Turner syndrome should be systematically suspected. In boys, delayed puberty is often constitutional and functional. Treatment is etiologic when possible, hormonal replacement therapy (oestrogen in girls and testosterone in boys) and psychological management.

  4. CT appearance of radiation injury of the lung and clinical symptoms after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancers: Are patients with pulmonary emphysema also candidates for SBRT for lung cancers?

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Tomoki . E-mail: tkkimura@med.kawawa-u.ac.jp; Matsuura, Kanji; Murakami, Yuji; Hashimoto, Yasutoshi; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Wadasaki, Koichi; Hirokawa, Yutaka; Ito, Katsuhide; Okawa, Motoomi

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the computed tomographic (CT) appearance of radiation injury to the lung and clinical symptoms after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and evaluate the difference by the presence of pulmonary emphysema (PE) for small lung cancers. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 45 patients with 52 primary or metastatic lung cancers were enrolled. We evaluated the CT appearance of acute radiation pneumonitis (within 6 months) and radiation fibrosis (after 6 months) after SBRT. Clinical symptoms were evaluated by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. We also evaluated the relationship between CT appearance, clinical symptoms, and PE. Results: CT appearance of acute radiation pneumonitis was classified as follows: (1) diffuse consolidation, 38.5%; (2) patchy consolidation and ground-glass opacities (GGO), 15.4%; (3) diffuse GGO, 11.5%; (4) patchy GGO, 2.0%; (5) no evidence of increasing density, 32.6%. CT appearance of radiation fibrosis was classified as follows: (1) modified conventional pattern, 61.5%; (2) mass-like pattern, 17.3%; (3) scar-like pattern, 21.2%. Patients who were diagnosed with more than Grade 2 pneumonitis showed significantly less no evidence of increased density pattern and scar-like pattern than any other pattern (p = 0.0314, 0.0297, respectively). Significantly, most of these patients with no evidence of increased density pattern and scar-like pattern had PE (p = 0.00038, 0.00044, respectively). Conclusion: Computed tomographic appearance after SBRT was classified into five patterns of acute radiation pneumonitis and three patterns of radiation fibrosis. Our results suggest that SBRT can be also safely performed even in patients with PE.

  5. A Hemoglobin Based Oxygen Carrier, Bovine Polymerized Hemoglobin (HBOC-201) versus Hetastarch (HEX) in an Uncontrolled Liver Injury Hemorrhagic Shock Swine Model with Delayed Evacuation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    A Hemoglobin Based Oxygen Carrier, Bovine Polymerized Hemoglobin (HBOC-201) versus Hetastarch (HEX) in an Uncontrolled Liver Injury Hemorrhagic Shock...Transcutaneous tis- sue oxygenation was restored more rap- idly in HBOC-201 pigs, there was a trend to lower lactic acid, and base deficit was less...lactic acidosis and base deficit (BD) abnormalities, indicating on-going hypoperfusion.2–4 As these abnormalities measured upon hospital arrival

  6. Delayed Administration of Pyroglutamate Helix B Surface Peptide (pHBSP), a Novel Nonerythropoietic Analog of Erythropoietin, Attenuates Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nimesh S A; Kerr-Peterson, Hannah L; Brines, Michael; Collino, Massimo; Rogazzo, Mara; Fantozzi, Roberto; Wood, Elizabeth G; Johnson, Florence L; Yaqoob, Muhammad M; Cerami, Anthony; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    In preclinical studies, erythropoietin (EPO) reduces ischemia-reperfusion–associated tissue injury (for example, stroke, myocardial infarction, acute kidney injury, hemorrhagic shock and liver ischemia). It has been proposed that the erythropoietic effects of EPO are mediated by the classic EPO receptor homodimer, whereas the tissue-protective effects are mediated by a hetero-complex between the EPO receptor monomer and the β-common receptor (termed “tissue-protective receptor”). Here, we investigate the effects of a novel, selective-ligand of the tissue-protective receptor (pyroglutamate helix B surface peptide [pHBSP]) in a rodent model of acute kidney injury/dysfunction. Administration of pHBSP (10 μg/kg intraperitoneally [i.p.] 6 h into reperfusion) or EPO (1,000 IU/kg i.p. 4 h into reperfusion) to rats subjected to 30 min ischemia and 48 h reperfusion resulted in significant attenuation of renal and tubular dysfunction. Both pHBSP and EPO enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt (activation) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (inhibition) in the rat kidney after ischemia-reperfusion, resulting in prevention of the activation of nuclear factor-κB (reduction in nuclear translocation of p65). Interestingly, the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase was enhanced by EPO and, to a much lesser extent, by pHBSP, suggesting that the signaling pathways activated by EPO and pHBSP may not be identical. PMID:22415011

  7. Psychological Disorders, Cognitive Dysfunction and Quality of Life in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients with Radiation-Induced Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yamei; Luo, Donghua; Rong, Xiaoming; Shi, Xiaolei; Peng, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate factors affecting psychology, cognitive function and quality of life (QOL) of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with radiation-induced brain injury (RI). Methods and Materials 46 recurrence-free NPC patients with RI and 46 matched control patients without RI were recruited in our study. Subjective and objective symptoms of RI were evaluated with the LENT/SOMA systems. Psychological assessment was measured with Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS). Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was carried out in these patients for assessing their cognitive function. QOL was evaluated by means of WHOQOL BREF. Results Of the patients with RI, 39(84.8%) had depression and 40(87.0%) had anxiety. The patients with RI got higher scores both in SDS and SAS than those without RI (SDS, 63.48±8.11vs. 58.67±7.52, p = 0.008; SAS, 67.36±10.41vs. 60.34±9.76, p = 0.005). Score in MoCA of patients with RI was significantly lower than that of patients without RI (21.32±2.45vs. 25.98±1.73, p<0.001). SAS was positive correlated with post-radiotherapy interval. Both SAS and SDS had a significantly positive correlation with the rank of SOMA, while MoCA had a significantly negative correlation with SOMA. Chemotherapy was a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction. In addition, patients with RI got significantly lower scores in physical health (16.50±11.05 vs. 35.02±10.43, p<0.001), psychological health (17.70±10.33 vs. 39.48±12.00, p<0.001) and social relationship (48.00±18.65 vs. 67.15±19.70, p<0.001) compared with those in patients without RI. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that anxiety and cognitive impairment were significant predictors of global QOL. Conclusions NPC patients with RI exhibit negative emotions, impaired cognitive function and QOL. The severity of clinical symptoms of RI plays an important role in both emotions and cognitive function. Anxiety and cognitive impairment are associated with

  8. Detecting Radiation-Induced Injury Using Rapid 3D Variogram Analysis of CT Images of Rat Lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Rick E.; Murphy, Mark K.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Carson, James P.

    2013-10-01

    A new heterogeneity analysis approach to discern radiation-induced lung damage was tested on CT images of irradiated rats. The method, combining octree decomposition with variogram analysis, demonstrated a significant correlation with radiation exposure levels, whereas conventional measurements and pulmonary function tests did not. The results suggest the new approach may be highly sensitive for assessing even subtle radiation-induced changes

  9. [Evaluation of the risk of delayed adverse effects of chronic combined exposure to radiation and chemical factors with the purpose to ensure safety in orbital and exploration space missions].

    PubMed

    Shafirkin, A V; Mukhamedieva, L N; Tatarkin, S V; Barantseva, M Iu

    2012-01-01

    The work had the aim to anatomize the existing issues with providing safety in extended orbital and exploration missions for ensuing estimation of actual values of the total radiation risk for the crew, and risks of other delayed effects of simultaneous exposure to ionizing radiation and chemical pollutants in cabin air, and a number of other stressful factors inevitable in space flight. The flow of chronic experiments for separate and combined studies with reproduction of air makeup and radiation doses in actual orbital and predicted exploration missions is outlined. To set safety limits, new approaches should be applied to the description of gradual norm degradation to pathologies in addition to several generalized quantitative indices of adaptation and straining of the regulatory systems, as well as of effectiveness of the compensatory body reserve against separate and combined exposure.

  10. Topical application of {beta}-radiation to reduce intimal hyperplasia after carotid artery balloon injury in rabbit A possible application for brachytherapy in vascular surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, David; Stevens, Scott L.; Skillern, C.S.; Wellons, Eric D.; Robinson, Keith; Matsuura, John H.; Gannon, Brian J

    2002-03-01

    Purpose: Endovascular brachytherapy for the prevention of intimal hyperplasia (IH) and restenosis after balloon/stent angioplasty has proven effective both in animal preparations and clinical trials. A variety of {beta}-emitting isotopes and catheter-based devices have been developed for the delivery of low-dose radiation in clinical coronary and peripheral trials. No platform, however, has yet been developed for brachytherapy in concert with vascular surgical operations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the vascular histopathologic response following balloon injury to rabbit carotid arteries with and without topically applied low-dose {beta}-radiation. Methods: The {beta}-emitting isotope strontium-90 (Sr-90) was conjugated onto the matrix of polypropylene (PLYP) mesh. Rabbit carotid arteries were balloon-injured with a no. 2 embolectomy catheter. Six carotid arteries were wrapped with nonradioactive PLYP mesh (controls) and Sr-90 ({approx}90 {mu}Ci) PLYP mesh in order to deliver low-dose radiation to the vessel wall from the external (adventitial) surface. Tissue was harvested at 6 weeks and processed for histologic examination. Results: There was consistent blockade of fibrocellular neointima formation with virtually no neointima present in all treated segments, compared to moderate neointima formation in controls. Medial thinning and smooth muscle cell (SMC) necrosis were also associated with topical brachytherapy. Conclusion: {beta}-Radiation applied by an externally wrapped PLYP mesh labeled with Sr-90 markedly suppressed neointima formation in an animal vascular surgical injury model. Further studies, however, are necessary to determine a suitable isotope and dosage for clinical application.

  11. Cell cycle delay in murine pre-osteoblasts is more pronounced after exposure to high-LET compared to low-LET radiation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yueyuan; Hellweg, Christine E; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Reitz, Günther; Lau, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Space radiation contains a complex mixture of particles comprised primarily of protons and high-energy heavy ions. Radiation risk is considered one of the major health risks for astronauts who embark on both orbital and interplanetary space missions. Ionizing radiation dose-dependently kills cells, damages genetic material, and disturbs cell differentiation and function. The immediate response to ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage is stimulation of DNA repair machinery and activation of cell cycle regulatory checkpoints. To date, little is known about cell cycle regulation after exposure to space-relevant radiation, especially regarding bone-forming osteoblasts. Here, we assessed cell cycle regulation in the osteoblastic cell line OCT-1 after exposure to various types of space-relevant radiation. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ionizing radiation was investigated regarding the biological endpoint of cellular survival ability. Cell cycle progression was examined following radiation exposure resulting in different RBE values calculated for a cellular survival level of 1 %. Our findings indicate that radiation with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 150 keV/μm was most effective in inducing reproductive cell killing by causing cell cycle arrest. Expression analyses indicated that cells exposed to ionizing radiation exhibited significantly up-regulated p21(CDKN1A) gene expression. In conclusion, our findings suggest that cell cycle regulation is more sensitive to high-LET radiation than cell survival, which is not solely regulated through elevated CDKN1A expression.

  12. Experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury, a leading cause of death and disability, is a result of an outside force causing mechanical disruption of brain tissue and delayed pathogenic events which collectively exacerbate the injury. These pathogenic injury processes are poorly understood and accordingly no effective neuroprotective treatment is available so far. Experimental models are essential for further clarification of the highly complex pathology of traumatic brain injury towards the development of novel treatments. Among the rodent models of traumatic brain injury the most commonly used are the weight-drop, the fluid percussion, and the cortical contusion injury models. As the entire spectrum of events that might occur in traumatic brain injury cannot be covered by one single rodent model, the design and choice of a specific model represents a major challenge for neuroscientists. This review summarizes and evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of the currently available rodent models for traumatic brain injury. PMID:20707892

  13. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Educated Macrophages Are a Distinct High IL-6-Producing Subset that Confer Protection in Graft-versus-Host-Disease and Radiation Injury Models.

    PubMed

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Moffitt, Andrea B; Kim, Jaehyup; Kink, John A; Bloom, Debra D; Love, Cassandra; Dave, Sandeep; Hematti, Peiman; Capitini, Christian M

    2017-02-28

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have immunosuppressive and tissue repair properties, but clinical trials using MSCs to prevent or treat graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) have shown mixed results. Macrophages (MØs) are important regulators of immunity and can promote tissue regeneration and remodeling. We have previously shown that MSCs can educate MØs toward a unique anti-inflammatory immunophenotype (MSC-educated macrophages [MEMs]); however, their implications for in vivo models of inflammation have not been studied yet. We now show that in comparison with MØs, MEMs have increased expression of the inhibitory molecules PD-L1, PD-L2, in addition to markers of alternatively activated macrophages: CD206 and CD163. RNA-Seq analysis of MEMs, as compared with MØs, show a distinct gene expression profile that positively correlates with multiple pathways important in tissue repair. MEMs also show increased expression of IL-6, transforming growth factor-β, arginase-1, CD73, and decreased expression of IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor-α. We show that IL-6 secretion is controlled in part by the cyclo-oxygenase-2, arginase, and JAK1/STAT1 pathway. When tested in vivo, we show that human MEMs significantly enhance survival from lethal GVHD and improve survival of mice from radiation injury. We show these effects could be mediated in part through suppression of human T cell proliferation and may have attenuated host tissue injury in part by enhancing murine fibroblast proliferation. MEMs are a unique MØ subset with therapeutic potential for the management of GVHD and/or protection from radiation-induced injury.

  14. Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Cognitive and Histological Deficits Are Attenuated by Delayed and Chronic Treatment with the 5-HT1A-Receptor Agonist Buspirone

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Adam S.; Sozda, Christopher N.; Cheng, Jeffrey P.; Hoffman, Ann N.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential efficacy of the serotonin1A (5-HT1A) receptor agonist buspirone (BUS) on behavioral and histological outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Ninety-six isoflurane-anesthetized adult male rats were randomized to receive either a controlled cortical impact or sham injury, and then assigned to six TBI and six sham groups receiving one of five doses of BUS (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.3, or 0.5 mg/kg) or saline vehicle (VEH, 1.0 mL/kg). Treatments began 24 h after surgery and were administered intraperitoneally once daily for 3 weeks. Motor function (beam-balance/beam-walk tests) and spatial learning/memory (Morris water maze) were assessed on post-operative days 1–5 and 14–19, respectively. Morphologically intact CA1/CA3 cells and cortical lesion volume were quantified at 3 weeks. No differences were observed among the BUS and VEH sham groups in any end-point measure and thus the data were pooled. Regarding the TBI groups, repeated-measures ANOVAs revealed that the 0.3 mg/kg dose of BUS enhanced cognitive performance relative to VEH and the other BUS doses (p<0.05), but did not significantly impact motor function. Moreover, the same dose conferred selective histological protection as evidenced by smaller cortical lesions, but not greater CA1/CA3 cell survival. No significant behavioral or histological differences were observed among the other BUS doses versus VEH. These data indicate that BUS has a narrow therapeutic dose response, and that 0.3 mg/kg is optimal for enhancing spatial learning and memory in this model of TBI. BUS may have potential as a novel pharmacotherapy for clinical TBI. PMID:22416854

  15. Contingencies promote delay tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ghaemmaghami, Mahshid; Hanley, Gregory P; Jessel, Joshua

    2016-09-01

    The effectiveness of functional communication training as treatment for problem behavior depends on the extent to which treatment can be extended to typical environments that include unavoidable and unpredictable reinforcement delays. Time-based progressive delay (TBPD) often results in the loss of acquired communication responses and the resurgence of problem behavior, whereas contingency-based progressive delay (CBPD) appears to be effective for increasing tolerance for delayed reinforcement. No direct comparison of TBPD and CBPD has, however, been conducted. We used single-subject designs to compare the relative efficacy of TBPD and CBPD. Four individuals who engaged in problem behavior (e.g., aggression, vocal and motor disruptions, self-injury) participated. Results were consistent across all participants, and showed lower rates of problem behavior and collateral responses during CBPD than during TBPD. The generality of CBPD treatment effects, including optimal rates of communication and compliance with demands, was demonstrated across a small but heterogeneous group of participants, reinforcement contingencies, and contexts.

  16. Long-term administration of a small molecular weight catalytic metalloporphyrin antioxidant, AEOL 10150, protects lungs from radiation-induced injury

    SciTech Connect

    Rabbani, Zahid N.; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Huang Jie; Day, Brian J.; Alexander, Elaine; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko . E-mail: vujas@radonc.duke.edu

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether administration of a catalytic antioxidant, Mn(III) tetrakis(N,N'-diethylimidazolium-2-yl) porphyrin, AEOL 10150, with superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic properties, reduces the severity of radiation-induced injury to the lung from single-dose irradiation (RT) of 28 Gy. Methods and Materials: Rats were randomly divided into four different dose groups (0, 1, 10, and 30 mg/kg/day of AEOL 10150), receiving either short-term (1 week) or long-term (10 weeks) drug administration via osmotic pumps. Rats received single-dose irradiation (RT) of 28 Gy to the right hemithorax. Breathing rates, body weights, blood samples, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess lung damage. Results: There was no significant difference in any of the study endpoints between the irradiated controls and the three groups receiving RT and short-term administration of AEOL 10150. For the long-term administration, functional determinants of lung damage 20 weeks postradiation were significantly worse for RT + phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and RT + 1 mg/kg/day of AEOL 10150 as compared with the irradiated groups treated with higher doses of AEOL 10150 (10 or 30 mg/kg/day). Lung histology at 20 weeks revealed a significant decrease in structural damage and collagen deposition in rats receiving 10 or 30 mg/kg/day after radiation in comparison to the RT + PBS and 1 mg/kg/day groups. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated a significant reduction in macrophage accumulation, oxidative stress, and hypoxia in rats receiving AEOL 10150 (10 or 30 mg/kg/day) after lung irradiation compared with the RT + PBS and 1 mg/kg/day groups. Conclusions: The chronic administration of a novel catalytic antioxidant, AEOL 10150, demonstrates a significant protective effect from radiation-induced lung injury. AEOL 10150 has its primary impact on the cascade of events after irradiation, and adding the drug before irradiation and its short-term administration have no significant

  17. Delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Traggiai, Cristina; Stanhope, Richard

    2002-03-01

    Puberty is the acquisition of secondary sexual characteristics associated with a growth spurt and resulting in the attainment of reproductive function. Delayed puberty is diagnosed when there is no breast development by 13.4 years of age in a girl and no testicular enlargement by 14.0 years in a boy. The aetiologies are: (i) pubertal delay, either with constitutional delay of growth and puberty or secondary to chronic illness, and (ii) pubertal failure, with hypogonadotrophic (defect in the hypothalamo-pituitary region) or hypergonadotrophic (secondary to gonadal failure) hypogonadism, or both (secondary to radio/chemotherapy). The investigation includes: history, auxological data and pubertal development examination. Boys usually require treatment and, if they do not respond, investigation. In girls it is appropriate to measure the thyroid function and karyotype first and, if necessary, to offer treatment. If they present with dysmorphic features, or positive familial history, an assessment is required before treatment.

  18. Design of a prototype split-and-delay unit for XFEL pulses, and their evaluation by synchrotron radiation X-rays.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Jun'ya; Ohwada, Kenji; Ishino, Masahiko; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro; Ando, Masami; Namikawa, Kazumichi

    2017-01-01

    A prototype split-and-delay unit (SDU) for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses is proposed based on the Graeff-Bonse four-Bragg-reflection interferometer by installing 12.5° slopes. The SDU can continuously provide a delay time from approximately -20 to 40 ps with a resolution of less than 26 fs. Because the SDU was constructed from a monolithic silicon crystal, alignment is straightforward. The obtained thoroughputs of the SDU reached 0.7% at 7.46 keV and 0.02% at 14.92 keV. The tunability of the delay time using the proposed SDU was demonstrated by finding the interference effects of the split X-rays, and the time resolution of the proposed SDU was evaluated using the width of the interference pattern recorded on the X-ray charge-coupled device camera by changing the energy, i.e. longitudinal coherence length, of the incident X-rays. It is expected that the proposed SDU will be applicable to XFEL experiments using delay times from tens of femtoseconds to tens of picoseconds, e.g. intensity correlation measurements.

  19. Delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Since puberty is a long ongoing developmental process with significant individual and population differences in timing, the definition of delayed puberty for a given individual needs to rest on simple, though arbitrary criteria based on epidemiological data. Although several genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal maturation cascade have been characterized recently from familial or sporadic cases of primitive isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, many genes regulating puberty onset remain undetermined. In case of delayed puberty and/or primary amenorrhea, a complete clinical examination including a detailed past history will evaluate the development of secondary sex characteristics, verify the association with a growth delay and look for specific indicative features pertaining to the etiological diagnosis. This clinical check-up completed if necessary with biological, ultrasonographic, radiological and genetic investigations will try to determine which girls will have a permanent sexual infantilism of gonadal, hypophyseal or hypothalamic origin, which girls will undergo spontaneous but delayed puberty and which girls have primary amenorrhea with developed secondary sex characteristics. Therapeutic attitude will have to integrate etiological factors, statural prognosis, bone mass preservation and psychological factors.

  20. [Diagnosis and treatment of cervicothoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Tatarinova, E V; Pogodina, A N; Abakumov, M M

    2014-01-01

    It analyzed the diagnosis and treatment results of 123 patients with cervicothoracic injuries for 21 years. The frequency of cervicothoracic injuries among all patients with cervical injuries was 5.7%. Preoperative and postoperative diagnosis included radial and endoscopic methods. The complications rate was 43.6%. The most severe complications were observed in patients with delayed diagnosis of trachea and esophagus injuries.

  1. Radiation Proctopathy

    PubMed Central

    Grodsky, Marc B.; Sidani, Shafik M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a widely utilized treatment modality for pelvic malignancies, including prostate cancer, rectal cancer, and cervical cancer. Given its fixed position in the pelvis, the rectum is at a high risk for injury secondary to ionizing radiation. Despite advances made in radiation science, up to 75% of the patients will suffer from acute radiation proctitis and up to 20% may experience chronic symptoms. Symptoms can be variable and include diarrhea, bleeding, incontinence, and fistulization. A multitude of treatment options exist. This article summarizes the latest knowledge relating to radiation proctopathy focusing on the vast array of treatment options. PMID:26034407

  2. Paeoniflorin protects human EA.hy926 endothelial cells against gamma-radiation induced oxidative injury by activating the NF-E2-related factor 2/heme oxygenase-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Zhu, Xiaoyun; Qi, Xin; Che, Juanjuan; Cao, Bangwei

    2013-04-26

    Pulmonary endothelial cells have been demonstrated to have a critical role in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced lung injury. Our preliminary experiments indicated that paeoniflorin protected human EA.hy926 endothelial cells from radiation-induced oxidative injury. This study was designed to confirm the protective effect of paeoniflorin against radiation-induced endothelial cellular damage and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Preincubation of EA.hy926 cells with paeoniflorin before γ-radiation resulted in significant inhibition of apoptosis, a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and enhanced cell viability. In particular, we showed that paeoniflorin significantly reduced the formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, and enhanced production of the endogenous antioxidants, glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in EA.hy926 cells. Treatment of these cells with paeoniflorin significantly induced HO-1 expression. Moreover, paeoniflorin promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2 related factor-2 (Nrf-2). The paeoniflorin-induced HO-1 expression was abrogated by Nrf2 siRNA. Furthermore, inhibition of HO-1 with zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZNPP) significantly reversed the protective effect of paeoniflorin against radiation-induced damage in EA.hy926 cells. Our findings confirmed that paeoniflorin protected EA.hy926 cells against radiation-induced injury through the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

  3. [Management of ureteral injuries].

    PubMed

    Benoit, L; Spie, R; Favoulet, P; Cheynel, N; Kretz, B; Gouy, S; Dubruille, T; Fraisse, J; Cuisenier, J

    2005-09-01

    Ureteral injury is a rare but potential serious complication that can occur during a variety of general surgical procedures. Knowledge of the course of the ureter is the first step toward preventing ureteral injuries. While some injuries are noticed intraoperatively, most are missed and present later with pain, sepsis, urinary drainage or renal loss. The choice of treatment is based on the location, type and extend of ureteral injury. For injuries recognized during open surgery, when involving the distal 5 cm of the ureter, an antireflux ureterocystostomy such as the Politano-Leadbetter procedure or a vesicopsoas hitch can be performed. For the middle ureter, an ureteroureterostomy is satisfactory and for the proximal ureter, most injuries can be managed by transureteroureterostomy. In complex situations intestinal interposition, autotransplantation or even nephrectomy can be considered. The majority of patients with delayed diagnosed ureteral injuries should be managed by an initial endo-urologic approach.

  4. Modulation of glutathione and antioxidant enzymes by Ocimum sanctum and its role in protection against radiation injury.

    PubMed

    Devi, P U; Ganasoundari, A

    1999-03-01

    Aqueous extract (OE) of the leaves of Ocimum sanctum, the Indian holy basil, has been found to protect mouse against radiation lethality and chromosome damage and to possess significant antioxidant activity in vitro. Therefore a study was conducted to see if OE protects against radiation induced lipid peroxidation in liver and to determine the role, if any, of the inherent antioxidant system in radioprotection by OE. Adult Swiss mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 10 mg/kg of OE for 5 consecutive days and exposed to 4.5 Gy of gamma radiation 30 min after the last injection. Glutathione (GSH) and the antioxidant enzymes glutathione transferase (GST), reductase (GSRx), peroxidase (GSPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), as well as lipid peroxide (LPx) activity were estimated in the liver at 15 min, 30 min, 1, 2, 4 and 8 hr post-treatment. LPx was also studied after treatment with a single dose of 50 mg/kg of OE with/without irradiation. OE itself increased the GSH and enzymes significantly above normal levels whereas radiation significantly reduced all the values. The maximum decline was at 30-60 min for GSH and related enzymes and at 2 hr for SOD. Pretreatment with the extract checked the radiation induced depletion of GSH and all the enzymes and maintained their levels within or above the control range. Radiation significantly increased the lipid peroxidation rate, reaching a maximum value at 2 hr after exposure (approximately 3.5 times that of control). OE pretreatment significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced the lipid peroxidation and accelerated recovery to normal levels. The results indicate that Ocimum extract protects against radiation induced lipid peroxidation and that GSH and the antioxidant enzymes appear to have an important role in the protection.

  5. Experimental-clinical validation of the use of amitetravit, ATP and autologous bone marrow in radiation injuries caused by prolonged radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atamanova, O. M.; Vodyakova, L. M.; Gvozdeva, N. I.; Davydova, S. A.; Ignasheva, L. P.; Rogozkin, V. D.; Sbitneva, M. F.; Ostroumova, L. M.; Tikhomirova, M. V.; Fedotenkov, A. G.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental clinical studies show that early pathogenetic treatment against the effects of prolonged radiation includes amitetravit as a means of increasing natural radio resistance, ATP as protective therapeutic agent, and automyelotransplantation for early pathogenetic treatment. The high effectiveness of the combined use of ATP and amitetravit in tests on dogs indicates an ability to prevent primary damages to genetic structures and accelerated processes of reparation in the first stages of radiopathological processes.

  6. Genetic Markers of Host Resistance and/or Susceptibility to the Lethal Effects of Radiation and Combined Radiation-Burn Injuries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Proteus vulgaris (Pv), which occurred in 100% of all cultured animals. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) could be identified, however, where present, by...necropsy and microbiological studies in each animal succumbing to the effects of ionizing radiation. 0 % .- % S- V Z _ .-- SECTION 2 MATERIALS AND METHODS...from commercial breeding sources, including Microbiological Associates (Walkersville, Md.), Camm Research (Wayne, N.J.), the Charles River Labora

  7. Protective effects of β-glucan against oxidative injury induced by 2.45-GHz electromagnetic radiation in the skin tissue of rats.

    PubMed

    Ceyhan, Ali Murat; Akkaya, Vahide Baysal; Güleçol, Şeyma Celik; Ceyhan, Betül Mermi; Özgüner, Fehmi; Chen, WenChieh

    2012-09-01

    In recent times, there is widespread use of 2.45-GHz irradiation-emitting devices in industrial, medical, military and domestic application. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of 2.45-GHz electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on the oxidant and antioxidant status of skin and to examine the possible protective effects of β-glucans against the oxidative injury. Thirty-two male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into four equal groups: control; sham exposed; EMR; and EMR + β-glucan. A 2.45-GHz EMR emitted device from the experimental exposure was applied to the EMR group and EMR + β-glucan group for 60 min daily, respectively, for 4 weeks. β-glucan was administered via gavage at a dose of 50 mg/kg/day before each exposure to radiation in the treatment group. The activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT), as well as the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in tissue homogenates of the skin. Exposure to 2.45-GHz EMR caused a significant increase in MDA levels and CAT activity, while the activities of SOD and GSH-Px decreased in skin tissues. Systemic β-glucan significantly reversed the elevation of MDA levels and the reduction of SOD activities. β-glucan treatment also slightly enhanced the activity of CAT and prevented the depletion of GSH-Px activity caused by EMR, but not statistically significantly. The present study demonstrated the role of oxidative mechanisms in EMR-induced skin tissue damages and that β-glucan could ameliorate oxidative skin injury via its antioxidant properties.

  8. Late radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tract in the H2 and H5 EORTC Hodgkin's disease trials: emphasis on the role of exploratory laparotomy and fractionation.

    PubMed

    Cosset, J M; Henry-Amar, M; Burgers, J M; Noordijk, E M; Van der Werf-Messing, B; Meerwaldt, J H; van der Schueren, E

    1988-09-01

    Out of 516 patients who entered in the two successive EORTC trials H2 and H5 for supra-diaphragmatic stages I and II Hodgkin's disease (HD), and who received an infra-diaphragmatic irradiation, 36 (7%) developed late radiation injuries of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Twenty-five patients presented with ulcers (stomach or duodenum), 2 with severe gastritis, 6 with small bowel obstruction or perforation and 3 patients had both an ulcer and bowel obstruction. A previous laparotomy played an important role. While the complication rate was 2.7% without any previous abdominal surgery, it was 11.5% after laparotomy (p less than 0.001). Fractionation was also found to be of importance in the occurrence of complications: three different weekly schedules were used -5 x 2 Gy, 4 x 2.5 Gy and 3 x 3.3 Gy; the GIT complication rates were 4, 9 and 22%, respectively (p less than 0.001). When combining laparotomy and fractionation, we found that the patients who were treated using 5 weekly fractions of 2 Gy without any prior laparotomy had a very low rate of late digestive complications (1%), whereas the patients who received 3 weekly fractions of 3.3 Gy after laparotomy presented a 39% complication rate. The other subgroups of patients were at an intermediate risk (from 5 to 13%) of late digestive injuries. Since most patients received 40 Gy with only very small variations, the influence of the radiation dose could not be investigated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Iatrogenic Hepatopancreaticobiliary Injuries: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vachhani, Prasanti G.; Copelan, Alexander; Remer, Erick M.; Kapoor, Baljendra

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic hepatopancreaticobiliary injuries occur after various types of surgical and nonsurgical procedures. Symptomatically, these injuries may lead to a variety of clinical presentations, including tachycardia and hypotension from hemobilia or hemorrhage. Iatrogenic injuries may be identified during the intervention, immediately afterwards, or have a delayed presentation. These injuries are categorized into nonvascular and vascular injuries. Nonvascular injuries include biliary injuries such as biliary leak or stricture, pancreatic injury, and the development of fluid collections such as abscesses. Vascular injuries include pseudoaneurysms, arteriovenous fistulas, dissection, and perforation. Imaging studies such as ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and digital subtraction angiography are critical for proper diagnosis of these conditions. In this article, we describe the clinical and imaging presentations of these iatrogenic injuries and the armamentarium of minimally invasive procedures (percutaneous drainage catheter placement, balloon dilatation, stenting, and coil embolization) that are useful in their management. PMID:26038625

  10. Lumbar corpectomy for correction of degenerative scoliosis from osteoradionecrosis reveals a delayed complication of lumbar myxopapillary ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Palejwala, Sheri K; Lawson, Kevin A; Kent, Sean L; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Dumont, Travis M

    2016-08-01

    Osteoradionecrosis is a known complication following radiation therapy, presenting most commonly in the cervical spine as a delayed consequence of radiation that is often necessary in the management of head and neck cancers. In contrast, osteoradionecrosis has rarely been described in the lumbar spine. Here we describe, to our knowledge, the first reported case of lumbar spine osteoradionecrosis, after adjuvant radiation for a primary spinal cord tumor, leading to progressive degenerative scoliosis which required subsequent operative management. Established guidelines recommend that mature bone can tolerate a dose of up to 6000 cGy without injury. However, once bone has been exposed to radiation over this level progressive soft tissue changes may lead to devascularization, leaving the bone vulnerable to osteonecrosis, specifically when manipulated. Radiation necrosis can be progressive and lead to eventual mechanical instability requiring debridement and surgical fixation. In the setting of the lumbar spine, osseous necrosis can lead to biomechanical instability, deformity, pain, and neurologic deficit.

  11. Delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Edward O; Lee, Peter A

    2002-02-01

    Normal puberty is a time of life and a process of development that results in full adult maturity of growth, sexual development, and psychosocial achievement. Delayed puberty describes the clinical condition in which the pubertal events start late (usually > +2.5 SD later than the mean) or are attenuated in progression. The differential diagnosis includes syndromes of low gonadotropin production, usually constitutional delay of growth and maturation associated with chronic disease, but also an array of gene-mediated disorders, and syndromes of primary gonadal dysfunction with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, including Turner and Klinefelter syndromes, and a group of acquired and genetic abnormalities. Diagnostic assessment and varied therapeutic modalities are discussed. The issues of androgen or estrogen therapy are important to assess, and growth hormone treatment remains a difficult dilemma.

  12. Primary liver injury and delayed resolution of liver stiffness after alcohol detoxification in heavy drinkers with the PNPLA3 variant I148M

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Vanessa; Peccerella, Teresa; Lackner, Carolin; Yagmur, Eray; Seitz, Helmut-Karl; Longerich, Thomas; Mueller, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    variants. The OR to develop cirrhosis corrected for age, gender and body mass index was 1.295 (95%CI: 0.787-2.131) for CG + GG carriers. CONCLUSION In heavy drinkers, PNPLA3 GG primarily correlates with ballooning/steatohepatitis but not steatosis resulting in a delayed inflammation-associated resolution of LS. Consequently, sustained ballooning-associated LS elevation seems to be a potential risk factor for fibrosis progression in PNPLA3 GG carriers. PMID:28050235

  13. Toward Distinguishing Recurrent Tumor From Radiation Necrosis: DWI and MTC in a Gamma Knife–Irradiated Mouse Glioma Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Torres, Carlos J.; Engelbach, John A.; Cates, Jeremy; Thotala, Dinesh; Yuan, Liya; Schmidt, Robert E.; Rich, Keith M.; Drzymala, Robert E.; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.; Garbow, Joel R.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Accurate noninvasive diagnosis is vital for effective treatment planning. Presently, standard anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is incapable of differentiating recurring tumor from delayed radiation injury, as both lesions are hyperintense in both postcontrast T1- and T2-weighted images. Further studies are therefore necessary to identify an MRI paradigm that can differentially diagnose these pathologies. Mouse glioma and radiation injury models provide a powerful platform for this purpose. Methods and Materials: Two MRI contrasts that are widely used in the clinic were chosen for application to a glioma/radiation-injury model: diffusion weighted imaging, from which the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is obtained, and magnetization transfer contrast, from which the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) is obtained. These metrics were evaluated longitudinally, first in each lesion type alone–glioma versus irradiation – and then in a combined irradiated glioma model. Results: MTR was found to be consistently decreased in all lesions compared to nonlesion brain tissue (contralateral hemisphere), with limited specificity between lesion types. In contrast, ADC, though less sensitive to the presence of pathology, was increased in radiation injury and decreased in tumors. In the irradiated glioma model, ADC also increased immediately after irradiation, but decreased as the tumor regrew. Conclusions: ADC is a better metric than MTR for differentiating glioma from radiation injury. However, MTR was more sensitive to both tumor and radiation injury than ADC, suggesting a possible role in detecting lesions that do not enhance strongly on T1-weighted images.

  14. The Pathophysiology of Combined Radiation Injuries: A Review and Analysis of the Literature on Non-Human Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    21 when RIO is given first probably was the result of greatly reduced number of granu - locytes and macrophages caused by earlier radiation-induced bone...macrophage colony stimulating factor. GRANULOCYTES. White blood cells containing neutrophil, basophil or eosinophil granules in the cytoplasm. GRAY (Gy). Unit

  15. Surgical considerations in the management of combined radiation blast injury casualties caused by a radiological dirty bomb.

    PubMed

    Williams, Geraint; O'Malley, Michael

    2010-09-01

    The capacity for surgical teams to respond appropriately to the consequences caused by the detonation of a radiological dirty bomb will be determined by prior knowledge, familiarity and training for this type unique terrorist event. This paper will focus on the surgical aspects of this scenario with particular emphasis on the management of combined trauma-radiological injury. The paper also describes some of the more serious explosion-contamination incidents from nuclear industrial sources, summarises learning points and parallels taken from these scenarios in relation to subject of a radiological dirty bomb and describes the likely radioactive substances involved.

  16. Development of a minipig model for lung injury induced by a single high-dose radiation exposure and evaluation with thoracic computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Geol; Park, Sunhoo; Bae, Chang-Hwan; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Lee, Dal Nim; Myung, Jae Kyung; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Jin, Young-Woo; Lee, Seung-Sook; Shim, Sehwan

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) due to nuclear or radiological exposure remains difficult to treat because of insufficient clinical data. The goal of this study was to establish an appropriate and efficient minipig model and introduce a thoracic computed tomography (CT)-based method to measure the progression of RILI. Göttingen minipigs were allocated to control and irradiation groups. The most obvious changes in the CT images after irradiation were peribronchial opacification, interlobular septal thickening, and lung volume loss. Hounsfield units (HU) in the irradiation group reached a maximum level at 6 weeks and decreased thereafter, but remained higher than those of the control group. Both lung area and cardiac right lateral shift showed significant changes at 22 weeks post irradiation. The white blood cell (WBC) count, a marker of pneumonitis, increased and reached a maximum at 6 weeks in both peripheral blood and bronchial alveolar lavage fluid. Microscopic findings at 22 weeks post irradiation were characterized by widening of the interlobular septum, with dense fibrosis and an increase in the radiation dose–dependent fibrotic score. Our results also showed that WBC counts and microscopic findings were positively correlated with the three CT parameters. In conclusion, the minipig model can provide useful clinical data regarding RILI caused by the adverse effects of high-dose radiotherapy. Peribronchial opacification, interlobular septal thickening, and lung volume loss are three quantifiable CT parameters that can be used as a simple method for monitoring the progression of RILI. PMID:26712795

  17. Animal Studies of Residual Hematopoietic and Immune System Injury from Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Radiation and Heavy Metals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    accidents and industrial accidents (e.g., Chernobyl ) who receive high doses of radiation over a relatively short period of time, there are thousands of...several years after exposure may have been terminated. Examples of such groups include those affected by the fallout near Chernobyl , those living near...cohorts (e.g., Chernobyl victims) particular damage from low dose irradiation, especially membrane damage and mismatched DNA repair. Dosimetric Problems

  18. Diverse delayed effects in human lymphoblastoid cells surviving exposure to high-LET (56)Fe particles or low-LET (137)Cs gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; Horng, M. F.; Ricanati, M.; Diaz-Insua, M.; Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    To obtain information on the origin of radiation-induced genomic instability, we characterized a total of 166 clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles or (137)Cs gamma radiation, isolated approximately 36 generations after exposure, along with their respective control clones. Cytogenetic aberrations, growth alterations, responses to a second irradiation, and mutant frequencies at the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and thymidine kinase loci were determined. A greater percentage of clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles exhibited instability (defined as clones showing one or more outlying characteristics) than in the case of those that survived gamma irradiation. The phenotypes of the unstable clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles were also qualitatively different from those of the clones that survived gamma irradiation. A greater percentage (20%) of the unstable clones that survived gamma irradiation than those that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles (4%) showed an altered response to the second irradiation, while an increase in the percentage of clones that had an outlying frequency of ouabain-resistant and thymidine kinase mutants was more evident in the clones exposed to (56)Fe particles than in those exposed to gamma rays. Growth alterations and increases in dicentric chromosomes were found only in clones with more than one alteration. These results underscore the complex nature of genomic instability and the likelihood that radiation-induced genomic instability arises from different original events.

  19. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  20. Nanoencapsulation of rice bran oil increases its protective effects against UVB radiation-induced skin injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Lucas Almeida; da Silva, Cássia Regina; de Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Cabreira, Thaíssa Nunes; de Bona da Silva, Cristiane; Ferreira, Juliano; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver

    2015-06-01

    Excessive UV-B radiation by sunlight produces inflammatory and oxidative damage of skin, which can lead to sunburn, photoaging, and cancer. This study evaluated whether nanoencapsulation improves the protective effects of rice bran oil against UVB radiation-induced skin damage in mice. Lipid-core nanocapsules containing rice bran oil were prepared, and had mean size around 200 nm, negative zeta potential (∼-9 mV), and low polydispersity index (<0.20). In order to allow application on the skin, a hydrogel containing the nanoencapsulated rice bran oil was prepared. This formulation was able to prevent ear edema induced by UVB irradiation by 60 ± 9%, when compared with a hydrogel containing LNC prepared with a mixture of medium chain triglycerides instead of rice bran oil. Protein carbonylation levels (biomarker of oxidative stress) and NF-κB nuclear translocation (biomarker of pro-inflammatory and carcinogenesis response) were reduced (81% and 87%, respectively) in animals treated with the hydrogel containing the nanoencapsulated rice bran oil. These in vivo results demonstrate the beneficial effects of nanoencapsulation to improve the protective properties of rice bran oil on skin damage caused by UVB exposure.

  1. Vascular Access Port Implantation and Serial Blood Sampling in a Gottingen Minipig (Sus scrofa domestica) Model of Acute Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, Maria; Coolbaugh, Thea V; Mitchell, Jennifer M; Lombardini, Eric; Moccia, Krinon D; Shelton, Larry J; Nagy, Vitaly; Whitnall, Mark H

    2011-01-01

    Threats of nuclear and other radiologic exposures have been increasing, but no countermeasure for acute radiation syndrome has been approved by regulatory authorities. Because of their similarity to humans in regard to physiology and anatomy, we are characterizing Gottingen minipigs as a model to aid the development of radiation countermeasures. Irradiated minipigs exhibit immunosuppression, severe thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and acute inflammation. These complications render serial acquisition of blood samples problematic. Vascular access ports (VAP) facilitate serial sampling, but their use often is complicated by infections and fibrin deposition. We demonstrate here the successful use of VAP for multiple blood samplings in irradiated minipigs. Device design and limited postoperative prophylactic antimicrobial therapy before irradiation were key to obtaining serial sampling, reducing swelling, and eliminating infection and skin necrosis at the implantation site. Modifications of previous protocols included the use of polydioxanone sutures instead of silk; eliminating chronic port access; single-use, sterile, antireflux prefilled syringes for flushing; strict aseptic weekly maintenance of the device, and acclimating animals to reduce stress. VAP remained functional in 19 of 20 irradiated animals for as long as 3 mo. The remaining VAP failed due to a small leak in the catheter, leading to clot formation. VAP-related sepsis occurred in 2 minipigs. Blood sampling did not cause detectable stress in nonanesthetized sham-irradiated animals, according to leukograms and clinical signs. PMID:21333166

  2. SU-C-BRA-07: Virtual Bronchoscopy-Guided IMRT Planning for Mapping and Avoiding Radiation Injury to the Airway Tree in Lung SAbR

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, A; Modiri, A; Bland, R; Yan, Y; Ahn, C; Timmerman, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Post-treatment radiation injury to central and peripheral airways is a potentially important, yet under-investigated determinant of toxicity in lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SAbR). We integrate virtual bronchoscopy technology into the radiotherapy planning process to spatially map and quantify the radiosensitivity of bronchial segments, and propose novel IMRT planning that limits airway dose through non-isotropic intermediate- and low-dose spillage. Methods: Pre- and ∼8.5 months post-SAbR diagnostic-quality CT scans were retrospectively collected from six NSCLC patients (50–60Gy in 3–5 fractions). From each scan, ∼5 branching levels of the bronchial tree were segmented using LungPoint, a virtual bronchoscopic navigation system. The pre-SAbR CT and the segmented bronchial tree were imported into the Eclipse treatment planning system and deformably registered to the planning CT. The five-fraction equivalent dose from the clinically-delivered plan was calculated for each segment using the Universal Survival Curve model. The pre- and post-SAbR CTs were used to evaluate radiation-induced segmental collapse. Two of six patients exhibited significant segmental collapse with associated atelectasis and fibrosis, and were re-planned using IMRT. Results: Multivariate stepwise logistic regression over six patients (81 segments) showed that D0.01cc (minimum point dose within the 0.01cc receiving highest dose) was a significant independent factor associated with collapse (odds-ratio=1.17, p=0.010). The D0.01cc threshold for collapse was 57Gy, above which, collapse rate was 45%. In the two patients exhibiting segmental collapse, 22 out of 32 segments showed D0.01cc >57Gy. IMRT re-planning reduced D0.01cc below 57Gy in 15 of the 22 segments (68%) while simultaneously achieving the original clinical plan objectives for PTV coverage and OAR-sparing. Conclusion: Our results indicate that the administration of lung SAbR can Result in significant injury to

  3. Protective effect of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) on radiation-induced intestinal injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Joong Sun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Jong Choon; Park, Hae-Ran; Jung, Uhee; Jang, Jong Sik; Jo, Sung Kee

    2009-12-01

    The protective properties of an herbal preparation (HemoHIM) against intestinal damage were examined by evaluating its effects on jejunal crypt survival, morphological changes, and apoptosis in gamma-irradiated mice. The mice were whole-body irradiated with 12 Gy for the examination of jejunal crypt survival and any morphological changes and with 2 Gy for the detection of apoptosis and Ki-67 labeling. Irradiation was conducted using (60)Co gamma-rays. HemoHIM treatment was administered intraperitonially at a dosage of 50 mg/kg of body weight at 36 and 12 hours pre-irradiation and 30 minutes post-irradiation or orally at a dosage of 250 mg/kg of body weight/day for 7 or 11 days before necropsy. The HemoHIM-treated group displayed a significant increase in survival of jejunal crypts, when compared to the irradiation controls. HemoHIM treatment decreased intestinal morphological changes such as crypt depth, villus height, mucosal length, and basal lamina length of 10 enterocytes after irradiation. Furthermore, the administration of HemoHIM protected intestinal cells from irradiation-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that HemoHIM may be therapeutically useful to reduce intestinal injury following irradiation.

  4. Imaging Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal, Bone Marrow Injury and Recovery Kinetics Using 18F-FDG PET

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tien T.; Rendon, David A.; Zawaski, Janice A.; Afshar, Solmaz F.; Kaffes, Caterina K.; Sabek, Omaima M.

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using 18F-Fluro-deoxy-glucose (18F-FDG) is a useful tool to detect regions of inflammation in patients. We utilized this imaging technique to investigate the kinetics of gastrointestinal recovery after radiation exposure and the role of bone marrow in the recovery process. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were either sham irradiated, irradiated with their upper half body shielded (UHBS) at a dose of 7.5 Gy, or whole body irradiated (WBI) with 4 or 7.5 Gy. Animals were imaged using 18F-FDG PET/CT at 5, 10 and 35 days post-radiation exposure. The gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow were analyzed for 18F-FDG uptake. Tissue was collected at all-time points for histological analysis. Following 7.5 Gy irradiation, there was a significant increase in inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract as indicated by the significantly higher 18F-FDG uptake compared to sham. UHBS animals had a significantly higher activity compared to 7.5 Gy WBI at 5 days post-exposure. Animals that received 4 Gy WBI did not show any significant increase in uptake compared to sham. Analysis of the bone marrow showed a significant decrease of uptake in the 7.5 Gy animals 5 days post-irradiation, albeit not observed in the 4 Gy group. Interestingly, as the metabolic activity of the gastrointestinal tract returned to sham levels in UHBS animals it was accompanied by an increase in metabolic activity in the bone marrow. At 35 days post-exposure both gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow 18F-FDG uptake returned to sham levels. 18F-FDG imaging is a tool that can be used to study the inflammatory response of the gastrointestinal tract and changes in bone marrow metabolism caused by radiation exposure. The recovery of the gastrointestinal tract coincides with an increase in bone marrow metabolism in partially shielded animals. These findings further demonstrate the relationship between the gastrointestinal syndrome and bone marrow recovery, and that this interaction can be studied

  5. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 2. 7. Thermal radiation injury

    SciTech Connect

    Pearse, H.E.; Kingsley, H.D.; Schilling, J.A.; Hogg; Blakney, R.M.

    1985-09-01

    Information concerning the flash burn resulting from an atomic bomb explosion was necessary to understand the lesion, its systematic effects, and prevention and treatment of these effects. In order to reproduce similar sources in the laboratory, it was essential to know the characteristics of the energy producing the biological effect. In order to obtain this information, anesthetized experimental animals were placed in shielded positions at varying distances from bomb zero to cover a wide range of thermal-radiation intensities. Small areas of each animal's skin were exposed through aperture plates which were designed to analyze burn production as a function of time, intensity, and spectrum. Protection of the animal by fabrics covering the skin was also evaluated. Following exposure, animals were retrieved from the exposure stations and transported to a laboratory for analysis of the burn lesions by description, color photography, and microscopic study of biopsy materials.

  6. The Delayed Effects of Acute Radiation Syndrome: Evidence of Long-Term Functional Changes in the Clonogenic Cells of the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Booth, Catherine; Tudor, Gregory L; Katz, Barry P; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Long term or residual damage post-irradiation has been described for many tissues. In hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), this is only revealed when the HSC are stressed and required to regenerate and repopulate a myeloablated host. Such an assay cannot be used to assess the recovery potential of previously irradiated intestinal stem cells (ISC) due to their incompatibility with transplantation. The best approximation to the HSC assay is the crypt microcolony assay, also based on clonogen survival. In the current study, the regenerative capacity of intestinal clonogenic cells in mice that had survived 13 Gy irradiation (with 5% bone marrow shielding to allow survival through the hematopoietic syndrome) and were then aged for 200 d was compared to previously unirradiated age-matched controls. Interestingly, at 200 d following 13 Gy, there remained a statistically significant reduction in crypts present in the various small intestinal regions (illustrating that the gastrointestinal epithelium had not fully recovered despite the 200-d interval). However, upon re-irradiation on day 196, those mice previously irradiated had improved crypt survival and regeneration compared to the age-matched controls. This was evident in all regions of the small intestine following 11-13 Gy re-exposure. Thus, there were either more clonogens per crypt within those previously irradiated and/or those that were present were more radioresistant (possibly because a subpopulation was more quiescent). This is contrary to the popular belief that previously irradiated animals may have an impaired/delayed regenerative response and be more radiosensitive.

  7. Corneal epithelial injury thresholds for multiple-pulse exposures to erbium fiber laser radiation at 1.54 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCally, Russell L.

    2005-04-01

    Corneal epithelial damage thresholds for exposures to sequences of pulses of 1.54 μm infrared radiation produced by an Er fiber laser were investigated. Thresholds were determined for sequences of 8 to 128 pulses at a repetition frequency of 10 Hz and 8 to 256 pulses at 20 Hz. The duration of the individual pulses was 0.025 sec and the 1/e diameter of the laser beam was 0.1 cm. The results show that threshold damage is correlated by an empirical power law of the form Hth = CN-β, where Hth is the threshold radiant exposure per pulse, and N is the number of pulses. The constant C is different for the 10 Hz and 20 Hz exposures and, for both cases, is greater than the estimated threshold for a single 0.025 sec pulse. Thus the empirical power law breaks down for small numbers of pulses (viz., N< 8), where it overestimates the damage thresholds. Temperature calculations for the threshold exposure conditions show that a critical temperature model also correlates the multiple-pulse injury thresholds.

  8. Radiation Enteropathy – Pathogenesis, Treatment, and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Denham, James W.; Andreyev, H. Jervoise N.

    2015-01-01

    There has been only modest change in cancer incidence and mortality during the past several decades, but the number of cancer survivors has almost tripled during the same period. With an increasing cohort of cancer survivors, efforts to prevent, diagnose, and manage side effects of cancer therapy in general and, specifically those of radiation therapy have intensified. Many cancer survivors have undergone radiation therapy of tumors in the pelvis or abdomen, thus rendering the bowel at risk for injury. In fact, the current prevalence of patients with long term radiation-induced intestinal side effects exceeds that of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease combined. Significant progress toward reducing toxicity of radiation therapy has been made by the introduction of so-called dose-sculpting treatment techniques, which allow more precise delivery of the radiation beam. Moreover, new insight into the underlying pathophysiology have resulted in an improved understanding of mechanisms of radiation-induced bowel toxicity and in development of new diagnostic strategies and management opportunities. This article discusses the pathogenesis of early and delayed radiation-induced bowel toxicity, reviews current management options, and outlines priorities for future research. The gastroenterologist by adding insight into molecular and cellular mechanisms of related bowel disorders can substantially strengthen these efforts. PMID:24686268

  9. UAVs and Control Delays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Transport Delay itI tl2 s2+(tl +t2tI2)s+ 1 Delay Figure 17 A Matlab Simulink model used to compare a simple delayed system , in this case an integrator...23 3 Control of tim e-delay system s...discuss the various sources of delays, leading to an assessment of typical delays to be expected in a few example systems . Sources of delay that will

  10. Complications of missed or untreated Lisfranc injuries.

    PubMed

    Philbin, Terry; Rosenberg, Gary; Sferra, James J

    2003-03-01

    Injuries to the Lisfranc complex are fairly common. Delayed treatment or missed diagnosis of these injuries can lead to significant complications. Non-operative treatment and salvage surgery can help to relieve sequelae that are associated with tarsometatarsal arthritis following traumatic injury.

  11. Electrophysiologic evidence of subclinical injury to the posterior columns of the human spinal cord after therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, L.J.; Donaldson, S.S.; Gupta, P.R.; Bosley, M.D.

    1982-12-15

    Spinal somatosensory conduction velocity (SSCV) was indirectly estimated from cerebral evoked potentials in 15 adults who had received therapeutic radiation (RT) (2000-4380 rad) to the thoracic spinal cord during treatment for lung cancer, and in 15 age-matched normal controls. Thirteen of the patients had also received 4400-5500 rad to the supraclavicular fossae. One-way impulse conduction time in the arm, estimated from F-wave latency, was prolonged in the patients as compared to controls but conduction time in the leg was similar in the two groups. SSCV was significantly slower in the patient group whereas supraspinal latency (cervical cord to cortex) was identical. SSCV in the patient group was not related to total RT dose but was correlated with both treatment time and number of fractions. These findings suggest that RT may produce subclinical spinal cord dysfunction even at conventional dosage schedules, and that it may be possible physiologically to monitor the myelopathic effects of RT in individual patients.

  12. Metformin and low dose radiation modulates cisplatin-induced oxidative injury in rat via PPAR-γ and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Heba H; El Kiki, Shereen M; Galal, Shereen M

    2017-02-15

    Cisplatin (CIS) is a chemotherapeutic agent used for therapy of many tumors and has been limited by its toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-kappa B(NFkB) in the pathogenesis of hepatic damage induced by CIS, and investigated the modulatory effect of metformin (MET) and/or low dose gamma radiation (LDR) on CIS-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. CIS(7.5 mg/kg, i.p.) hepatotoxicity was evidenced by alteration of serum hepatic indices (ALT and AST) accompanied with decreased hepatic PPAR-γ, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and reduced glutathione (GSH) content, whereas the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), total nitrate/nitrite (NOx) and NFkB significantly increased as well as MAPK activity compared with the control, MET and LDR groups. Furthermore, CIS induces apoptosis as indicated by an elevation of hepatic caspase-3. Treatment with MET (150 mg/kg, orally for 14 days) and/or LDR (0.5 Gy), prior to CIS alleviates CIS-induced hepatic damage by mitigating oxidative/ nitrosative stress and PPAR-γ activity reduction, hepatic caspase-3 elevation, and inhibition of NFκB, and MAPK activity levels.

  13. Electrophysiologic evidence of subclinical injury to the posterior columns of the human spinal cord after therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, L.J.; Donaldson, S.S.; Gupta, P.R.; Bosley, T.M.

    1982-12-15

    Spinal somatosensory conduction velocity (SSCV) was indirectly estimated from cerebral evoked potentials in 15 adults who had received therapeutic radiation (RT) (2000-4380 rad) to the thoracic spinal cord during treatment for lung cancer, and in 15 age-matched normal controls. Thirteen of the patients had also received 4400-5500 rad to the supraclavicular fossae. One-way impulse conduction time in the arm, estimated from F-wave latency, was prolonged in the patients as compared to controls (12.0 +/- 1.2 versus 10.4 +/- 1.0 msec; P less than 0.001) but conduction time in the leg was similar in the two groups (22.4 +/- 2.4 versus 22.0 +/- 2.5 msec; P less than 0.1). SSCV was significantly slower in the patient group (37.9 +/- 13.9 versus 54.5 +/- 12.9 m/sec; P less than 0.001) whereas supraspinal latency (cervical cord to cortex) was identical (5.5 +/- 0.9 versus 5.5 +/- 0.8 msec; P less than 0.1). SSCV in the patient group was not related to total RT dose (r . 0.15; P . 0.2), but was correlated with both treatment time and number of fractions (r . 0.49 and 0.43; P . 0.003 and 0.007, respectively). These findings suggest that RT may produce subclinical spinal cord dysfunction even at conventional dosage schedules, and that it may be possible physiologically to monitor the myelopathic effects of RT in individual patients.

  14. Back Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... extending from your neck to your pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, ... back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains ...

  15. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  16. Time delay and distance measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B. (Inventor); Sun, Xiaoli (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for measuring time delay and distance may include providing an electromagnetic radiation carrier frequency and modulating one or more of amplitude, phase, frequency, polarization, and pointing angle of the carrier frequency with a return to zero (RZ) pseudo random noise (PN) code. The RZ PN code may have a constant bit period and a pulse duration that is less than the bit period. A receiver may detect the electromagnetic radiation and calculate the scattering profile versus time (or range) by computing a cross correlation function between the recorded received signal and a three-state RZ PN code kernel in the receiver. The method also may be used for pulse delay time (i.e., PPM) communications.

  17. Delayed childbearing.

    PubMed

    Francis, H H

    1985-06-01

    In many Western nations, including England and Wales, Sweden, and the US, there is a current trend towards delayed childbearing because of women's pursuit of a career, later marriage, a longer interval between marriage and the 1st birth, and the increasing number of divorcees having children in a 2nd marriage. Wives of men in social classes I and II in England and Wales are, on average, having their 1st child at 27.9 years, 1.6 years later than in 1973, and in social classes IV and V, 1.0 years later than in 1973, at a mean age of 23.7 years. Consequently, the total period fertility rate for British women aged 30-34 years, 35-39 years, and 40 and over increased by 4%, 2%, and 4%, respectively, between 1982-83, in contrast to reductions of 2% and 3%, respectively, in the 15-19 year and 20-24 year age groups, with the 25-29-year-olds remaining static. The average maternal mortality for all parties in England and Wales during 1976-78 was 106/million for adolescents, 70.4/million for 20-24 year-olds, and 1162/million for those aged 40 years and older. The specific obstetric and allied conditions which increase with age are the hypertensive diseases of pregnancy, hemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, abortion, cardiac disease, caesarean section, ruptured uterus, and amniotic fluid embolism. The Swedish Medical Birth Registry of all live births and perinatal deaths since 1973 has shown that the risk of late fetal death is significantly greater in women aged 30-39 years than in those of the same parity and gravidity aged 20-24 years. The risk of giving birth to low birth weight babies preterm and at term and of premature labor are similarly increased. The early neonatal death rate also was increased for primigravidas and nulliparas in the 30-39 year age group but not in parous women. This is, in part, due to the rise in incidence of fetal abnormalities with advancing maternal age because of chromosomal and nonchromosomal anomalies. These also appear to be the cause of the

  18. Ghrelin accelerates wound healing through GHS-R1a-mediated MAPK-NF-κB/GR signaling pathways in combined radiation and burn injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cong; Huang, Jiawei; Li, Hong; Yang, Zhangyou; Zeng, Yiping; Liu, Jing; Hao, Yuhui; Li, Rong

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of ghrelin on wound healing was assessed using a rat model of combined radiation and burn injury (CRBI). Rat ghrelin, anti-rat tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α polyclonal antibody (PcAb), or selective antagonists of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) 1a (SB203580, SP600125, and [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6, respectively), were administered for seven consecutive days. Levels of various signaling molecules were assessed in isolated rat peritoneal macrophages. The results showed that serum ghrelin levels and levels of macrophage glucocorticoid receptor (GR) decreased, while phosphorylation of p38MAPK, JNK, and p65 nuclear factor (NF) κB increased. Ghrelin inhibited the serum induction of proinflammatory mediators, especially TNF-α, and promoted wound healing in a dose-dependent manner. Ghrelin treatment decreased phosphorylation of p38MAPK, JNK, and p65NF-κB, and increased GR levels in the presence of GHS-R1a. SB203580 or co-administration of SB203580 and SP600125 decreased TNF-α level, which may have contributed to the inactivation of p65NF-κB and increase in GR expression, as confirmed by western blotting. In conclusion, ghrelin enhances wound recovery in CRBI rats, possibly by decreasing the induction of TNF-α or other proinflammatory mediators that are involved in the regulation of GHS-R1a-mediated MAPK-NF-κB/GR signaling pathways. PMID:27271793

  19. Ghrelin accelerates wound healing through GHS-R1a-mediated MAPK-NF-κB/GR signaling pathways in combined radiation and burn injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Huang, Jiawei; Li, Hong; Yang, Zhangyou; Zeng, Yiping; Liu, Jing; Hao, Yuhui; Li, Rong

    2016-06-07

    The therapeutic effect of ghrelin on wound healing was assessed using a rat model of combined radiation and burn injury (CRBI). Rat ghrelin, anti-rat tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α polyclonal antibody (PcAb), or selective antagonists of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) 1a (SB203580, SP600125, and [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6, respectively), were administered for seven consecutive days. Levels of various signaling molecules were assessed in isolated rat peritoneal macrophages. The results showed that serum ghrelin levels and levels of macrophage glucocorticoid receptor (GR) decreased, while phosphorylation of p38MAPK, JNK, and p65 nuclear factor (NF) κB increased. Ghrelin inhibited the serum induction of proinflammatory mediators, especially TNF-α, and promoted wound healing in a dose-dependent manner. Ghrelin treatment decreased phosphorylation of p38MAPK, JNK, and p65NF-κB, and increased GR levels in the presence of GHS-R1a. SB203580 or co-administration of SB203580 and SP600125 decreased TNF-α level, which may have contributed to the inactivation of p65NF-κB and increase in GR expression, as confirmed by western blotting. In conclusion, ghrelin enhances wound recovery in CRBI rats, possibly by decreasing the induction of TNF-α or other proinflammatory mediators that are involved in the regulation of GHS-R1a-mediated MAPK-NF-κB/GR signaling pathways.

  20. Biophysics and medical effects of enhanced radiation weapons.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Glen I

    2012-08-01

    Enhanced radiation weapons (ERW) are fission-fusion devices where the massive numbers of neutrons generated during the fusion process are intentionally allowed to escape rather than be confined to increase yield (and fallout products). As a result, the energy partition of the weapon output shifts from blast and thermal energies toward prompt radiation. The neutron/gamma output ratio is also increased. Neutrons emitted from ERW are of higher energy than the Eave of neutrons from fission weapons. These factors affect the patterns of injury distribution; delay wound healing in combined injuries; reduce the therapeutic efficacy of medical countermeasures; and increase the dose to radiation-only casualties, thus potentiating the likelihood of encountering radiation-induced incapacitation. The risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis is also increased. Radiation exposure to first responders from activation products is increased over that expected from a fission weapon of similar yield. However, the zone of dangerous fallout is significantly reduced in area. At least four nations have developed the potential to produce such weapons. Although the probability of detonation of an ERW in the near future is very small, it is nonzero, and clinicians and medical planners should be aware of the medical effects of ERW.

  1. Radiation accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Saenger, E.L.

    1986-09-01

    It is essential that emergency physicians understand ways to manage patients contaminated by radioactive materials and/or exposed to external radiation sources. Contamination accidents require careful surveys to identify the metabolic pathway of the radionuclides to guide prognosis and treatment. The level of treatment required will depend on careful surveys and meticulous decontamination. There is no specific therapy for the acute radiation syndrome. Prophylactic antibodies are desirable. For severely exposed patients treatment is similar to the supportive care given to patients undergoing organ transplantation. For high-dose extremity injury, no methods have been developed to reverse the fibrosing endarteritis that eventually leads to tissue death so frequently found with this type of injury. Although the Three Mile Island episode of March 1979 created tremendous public concern, there were no radiation injuries. The contamination outside the reactor building and the release of radioiodine were negligible. The accidental fuel element meltdown at Chernobyl, USSR, resulted in many cases of acute radiation syndrome. More than 100,000 people were exposed to high levels of radioactive fallout. The general principles outlined here are applicable to accidents of that degree of severity.

  2. Thrombopoietin Receptor Agonist Mitigates Hematopoietic Radiation Syndrome and Improves Survival after Whole-Body Ionizing Irradiation Followed by Wound Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Min; Liao, Pei-Jun; Elliott, Thomas B.

    2017-01-01

    Ionizing radiation combined with trauma tissue injury (combined injury, CI) results in greater mortality and H-ARS than radiation alone (radiation injury, RI), which includes thrombocytopenia. The aim of this study was to determine whether increases in numbers of thrombocytes would improve survival and mitigate H-ARS after CI. We observed in mice that WBC and platelets remained very low in surviving RI animals that were given 9.5 Gy 60Co-γ-photon radiation, whereas only lymphocytes and basophils remained low in surviving CI mice that were irradiated and then given skin wounds. Numbers of RBC and platelets, hemoglobin concentrations, and hematocrit values remained low in surviving RI and CI mice. CI induced 30-day mortality higher than RI. Radiation delayed wound healing by approximately 14 days. Treatment with a thrombopoietin receptor agonist, Alxn4100TPO, after CI improved survival, mitigated body-weight loss, and reduced water consumption. Though this therapy delayed wound-healing rate more than in vehicle groups, it greatly increased numbers of platelets in sham, wounded, RI, and CI mice; it significantly mitigated decreases in WBC, spleen weights, and splenocytes in CI mice and decreases in RBC, hemoglobin, hematocrit values, and splenocytes and splenomegaly in RI mice. The results suggest that Alxn4100TPO is effective in mitigating CI.

  3. Radiation dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, R.B.; Lynch, J.B.

    1987-04-01

    Even in this era of modern radiotherapy, injuries associated with the medical and industrial use of radiation devices will continue to pose a difficult problem for the reconstructive surgeon. It must be borne in mind that the single most serious hazard to surgery in irradiated tissue is the lodgement of bacteria in tissue rendered avascular by the radiation and the secondary necrosis from the infection itself. The basic principles of wound management must be augmented by thorough knowledge of the use of well-vascularized muscle and musculocutaneous flap to provide adequate, blood-rich, soft-tissue coverage.

  4. [Delayed post effort muscle soreness].

    PubMed

    Coudreuse, J M; Dupont, P; Nicol, C

    2004-08-01

    Muscle intolerance to exercise may result from different processes. Diagnosis involves confirming first the source of pain, then potential pathological myalgia. Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS), commonly referred as tiredness, occurs frequently in sport. DOMS usually develops 12-48 h after intensive and/or unusual eccentric muscle action. Symptoms usually involve the quadriceps muscle group but may also affect the hamstring and triceps surae groups. The muscles are sensitive to palpation, contraction and passive stretch. Acidosis, muscle spasm and microlesions in both connective and muscle tissues may explain the symptoms. However, inflammation appears to be the most common explanation. Interestingly, there is strong evidence that the progression of the exercise-induced muscle injury proceeds no further in the absence of inflammation. Even though unpleasant, DOMS should not be considered as an indicator of muscle damage but, rather, a sign of the regenerative process, which is well known to contribute to the increased muscle mass. DOMS can be associated with decreased proprioception and range of motion, as well as maximal force and activation. DOMS disappears 2-10 days before complete functional recovery. This painless period is ripe for additional joint injuries. Similarly, if some treatments are well known to attenuate DOMS, none has been demonstrated to accelerate either structural or functional recovery. In terms of the role of the inflammatory process, these treatments might even delay overall recovery.

  5. Knee Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... injuries. Try weightlifting to strengthen your muscles and stretching, Pilates, and yoga to improve your flexibility because ... lead to injuries and inflammation from overuse. Regular stretching can help. After an injury or surgery has ...

  6. Eye Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  7. Sports Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  8. Sternal fractures and delayed cardiac tamponade due to a severe blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huai-min; Chen, Qiu-lin; Zhang, Er-yong; Hu, Jia

    2016-04-01

    Sternal fractures caused by blunt chest trauma are associated with an increased incidence of cardiac injury. Reports of the incidence of cardiac injury associated with sternal fracture range from 18% to 62%. Delayed cardiac tamponade is a rare phenomenon that appears days or weeks after injury. Moreover, after nonpenetrating chest trauma, cardiac tamponade is very rare and occurs in less than 1 of 1000. This case describes a patient who had delayed cardiac tamponade 17 days after a severe blunt chest trauma.

  9. Delayed treatment of hemoglobin neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Regan, Raymond F; Rogers, Bret

    2003-01-01

    Hemoglobin is an oxidative neurotoxin that may contribute to cell injury after CNS trauma and hemorrhagic stroke. Prior studies have demonstrated that concomitant treatment with iron-chelating antioxidants prevents its neurotoxicity. However, the efficacy of these agents when applied hours after hemoglobin has not been determined, and is the subject of the present investigation. Consistent with prior observations, an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, detected by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin oxidation, was observed when mixed neuronal/astrocyte cultures prepared from mouse cortex were exposed to hemoglobin alone. However, this oxidative stress developed slowly. A significant increase in the dichlorofluorescein signal compared with control, untreated cultures was not observed until four hours after addition of hemoglobin, and was followed by loss of membrane integrity and propidium iodide staining. Treating cultures with the 21-aminosteroid U74500A or the ferric iron chelator deferoxamine four hours after initiating hemoglobin treatment markedly attenuated reactive oxygen species production within 2 h. Continuous exposure to 5 micro M hemoglobin for 24 h resulted in death of about three-quarters of neurons, without injuring astrocytes. Most neuronal loss was prevented by concomitant treatment with U74500A; its effect was not significantly attenuated if treatment was delayed for 2-4 h, and it still prevented over half of neuronal death if treatment was delayed for 8 h. Similar neuroprotection was produced by delayed treatment with deferoxamine or the lipid-soluble iron chelator phenanthroline. None of these agents had any effect on neuronal death when added to cultures 12 h after hemoglobin. These results suggest that hemoglobin is a potent but slowly-acting neurotoxin. The delayed onset of hemoglobin neurotoxicity may make it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention.

  10. Radiation proteomics: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Leszczynski, Dariusz

    2014-03-01

    Acute biological effects caused by the exposure to high doses of radiation, either ionizing or nonionizing, are relatively well-known but the delayed effects, occurring decades after exposure, are difficult to predict. The knowledge of the acute and delayed effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation (e.g. bystander effect) or nonionizing radiation (e.g. radiation emitted by wireless communication devices) is not yet reliably established. Often the acute effects of low doses are small and difficult to discover and replicate in scientific studies. Chronic effects of prolonged exposures to low-dose radiation for decades are virtually unknown and often not possible to predict on the basis of the knowledge gained from acute exposures to high doses of radiation. Physiological significance of the biological effects induced by low doses of radiation is not known. The same lack of predictability of outcomes applies to the delayed effects of high-dose radiation exposures. Proteomics, supplemented with other "omics" techniques, might be the best way forward to find out the target molecules of radiation, the biomarkers of radiation exposure and the physiological and health significance of the acute and delayed biological effects caused by the exposures to high- and low-dose radiation. However, the currently available database of radiation effects on proteomes is far too small to be useful in formulation of new hypotheses concerning health consequences of radiation exposures.

  11. A microstrip detector with delay line readout

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, A.F. , BP 220, 38043 Grenoble CNPq Riekel, C.; Wattecamps, P. , BP 220, 38043 Grenoble )

    1992-01-01

    Principal limitations of position sensitive gasfilled detectors for x-ray synchrotron radiation applications are the counting rate and the positional resolution. Improvements in both areas are expected with microstrip technology. First results of a linear position sensitive microstrip detector with delay line readout are shown, and the possibility to achieve two-dimensional localization is evaluated.

  12. Mitigating the risk of radiation-induced cancers: limitations and paradigms in drug development.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Stephen S; Jorgensen, Timothy J; Kennedy, Ann R; Boice, John D; Shapiro, Alla; Hu, Tom C-C; Moyer, Brian R; Grace, Marcy B; Kelloff, Gary J; Fenech, Michael; Prasanna, Pataje G S; Coleman, C Norman

    2014-06-01

    The United States radiation medical countermeasures (MCM) programme for radiological and nuclear incidents has been focusing on developing mitigators for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS) and delayed effects of acute radiation exposure (DEARE), and biodosimetry technologies to provide radiation dose assessments for guiding treatment. Because a nuclear accident or terrorist incident could potentially expose a large number of people to low to moderate doses of ionising radiation, and thus increase their excess lifetime cancer risk, there is an interest in developing mitigators for this purpose. This article discusses the current status, issues, and challenges regarding development of mitigators against radiation-induced cancers. The challenges of developing mitigators for ARS include: the long latency between exposure and cancer manifestation, limitations of animal models, potential side effects of the mitigator itself, potential need for long-term use, the complexity of human trials to demonstrate effectiveness, and statistical power constraints for measuring health risks (and reduction of health risks after mitigation) following relatively low radiation doses (<0.75 Gy). Nevertheless, progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms resulting in radiation injury, along with parallel progress in dose assessment technologies, make this an opportune, if not critical, time to invest in research strategies that result in the development of agents to lower the risk of radiation-induced cancers for populations that survive a significant radiation exposure incident.

  13. Inhibition of Protease-activated Receptor 1 Ameliorates Intestinal Radiation Mucositis in a Preclinical Rat Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Junru; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Chintala, Madhu; Fink, Louis M.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine, using a specific small-molecule inhibitor of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling, whether the beneficial effect of thrombin inhibition on radiation enteropathy development is due to inhibition of blood clotting or to cellular (PAR1-mediated) thrombin effects. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent fractionated X-irradiation (5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 9) of a 4-cm small-bowel segment. Early radiation toxicity was evaluated in rats receiving PAR1 inhibitor (SCH602539, 0, 10, or 15 mg/kg/d) from 1 day before to 2 weeks after the end of irradiation. The effect of PAR1 inhibition on development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis was evaluated in animals receiving SCH602539 (0, 15, or 30 mg/kg/d) until 2 weeks after irradiation, or continuously until termination of the experiment 26 weeks after irradiation. Results: Blockade of PAR1 ameliorated early intestinal toxicity, with reduced overall intestinal radiation injury (P=.002), number of myeloperoxidase-positive (P=.03) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive (P=.04) cells, and collagen III accumulation (P=.005). In contrast, there was no difference in delayed radiation enteropathy in either the 2- or 26-week administration groups. Conclusion: Pharmacological blockade of PAR1 seems to reduce early radiation mucositis but does not affect the level of delayed intestinal radiation fibrosis. Early radiation enteropathy is related to activation of cellular thrombin receptors, whereas platelet activation or fibrin formation may play a greater role in the development of delayed toxicity. Because of the favorable side-effect profile, PAR1 blockade should be further explored as a method to ameliorate acute intestinal radiation toxicity in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer and to protect first responders and rescue personnel in radiologic/nuclear emergencies.

  14. New Approaches to Radiation Protection

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Eliot M.; Day, Regina; Singh, Vijay K.

    2015-01-01

    Radioprotectors are compounds that protect against radiation injury when given prior to radiation exposure. Mitigators can protect against radiation injury when given after exposure but before symptoms appear. Radioprotectors and mitigators can potentially improve the outcomes of radiotherapy for cancer treatment by allowing higher doses of radiation and/or reduced damage to normal tissues. Such compounds can also potentially counteract the effects of accidental exposure to radiation or deliberate exposure (e.g., nuclear reactor meltdown, dirty bomb, or nuclear bomb explosion); hence they are called radiation countermeasures. Here, we will review the general principles of radiation injury and protection and describe selected examples of radioprotectors/mitigators ranging from small-molecules to proteins to cell-based treatments. We will emphasize agents that are in more advanced stages of development. PMID:25653923

  15. Delayed sequelae of pituitary irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, K.H.; Lyman, J.T.; Lawrence, J.H.; Tobias, C.A.; Born, J.L.; Fabrikant, J.I.

    1984-01-01

    Since 1958, 781 patients at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have received helium-particle stereotactic radiosurgery to the adenohypophysis. Autopsy findings in 15 of these patients are reported. Ten patients received pituitary radiation (average dose, 116 Gy in six fractions) for progressive neovascularization retinopathy due to diabetes mellitus. Evidence of a time-dependent course of progressive fibrosis in their pituitary glands was found. Five patients were treated for eosinophilic adenomas. Although they had lower average doses of radiation (56 Gy in six fractions), their pituitary glands showed cystic cavitation of the adenomas. The adenomas thus appeared more radiosensitive than the normal pars anterior, which, in turn, was more radiosensitive than the adjacent neurohypophysis. No significant radiation changes were found in the surrounding brain or cranial nerves. The endocrine organs under pituitary control showed varying degrees of atrophy, and clinical tests revealed progressive hypofunction. It was concluded that charged-particle therapy produced a sharply delineated focal ral tests revealed progressive hypofunction. It was concluded that charged-particle therapy produced a sharply delineated focal radiation lesion confined to the pituitary gland but did not cause injury to the critical structures of the surrounding central nervous system.

  16. Snowboard injuries.

    PubMed

    Pino, E C; Colville, M R

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective survey of 267 snowboarders was undertaken to determine the population at risk and types and mechanisms of injuries sustained in this sport. Snowboarders are young (average age, 21 years), male (greater than 90%), view themselves in average or above average physical condition (96%), and have varied sports interests. One hundred ten injuries that resulted in a physician visit were reported. Ligament sprains, fractures, and contusions were the most frequent types of injury. Fifty percent of all injuries occurred in the lower extremities, with ankle injuries being the most common. Snowboard riders using equipment with increased ankle support seem to be more protected from lower extremity injuries. The lower extremity injuries were concentrated in the forward limb of the snowboarder, where the rider's weight is disproportionately distributed. Differences in the mechanism and spectrum of injury between snowboarding and skiing injuries were noted, including: impact rather than torsion as the major mechanism of injury, a significant lack of thumb injuries, comparative increase in ankle injuries, a decrease in knee injuries, and a higher percentage of upper extremity injuries.

  17. The prolonged gastrointestinal syndrome in rhesus macaques: the relationship between gastrointestinal, hematopoietic, and delayed multi-organ sequelae following acute, potentially lethal, partial-body irradiation.

    PubMed

    MacVittie, Thomas J; Bennett, Alexander; Booth, Catherine; Garofalo, Michael; Tudor, Gregory; Ward, Amanda; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Gelfond, Daniel; McFarland, Emylee; Jackson, William; Lu, Wei; Farese, Ann M

    2012-10-01

    The dose response relationship for the acute gastrointestinal syndrome following total-body irradiation prevents analysis of the full recovery and damage to the gastrointestinal system, since all animals succumb to the subsequent 100% lethal hematopoietic syndrome. A partial-body irradiation model with 5% bone marrow sparing was established to investigate the prolonged effects of high-dose radiation on the gastrointestinal system, as well as the concomitant hematopoietic syndrome and other multi-organ injury including the lung. Herein, cellular and clinical parameters link acute and delayed coincident sequelae to radiation dose and time course post-exposure. Male rhesus Macaca mulatta were exposed to partial-body irradiation with 5% bone marrow (tibiae, ankles, feet) sparing using 6 MV linear accelerator photons at a dose rate of 0.80 Gy min(-1) to midline tissue (thorax) doses in the exposure range of 9.0 to 12.5 Gy. Following irradiation, all animals were monitored for multiple organ-specific parameters for 180 d. Animals were administered medical management including administration of intravenous fluids, antiemetics, prophylactic antibiotics, blood transfusions, antidiarrheals, supplemental nutrition, and analgesics. The primary endpoint was survival at 15, 60, or 180 d post-exposure. Secondary endpoints included evaluation of dehydration, diarrhea, hematologic parameters, respiratory distress, histology of small and large intestine, lung radiographs, and mean survival time of decedents. Dose- and time-dependent mortality defined several organ-specific sequelae, with LD50/15 of 11.95 Gy, LD50/60 of 11.01 Gy, and LD50/180 of 9.73 Gy for respective acute gastrointestinal, combined hematopoietic and gastrointestinal, and multi-organ delayed injury to include the lung. This model allows analysis of concomitant multi-organ sequelae, thus providing a link between acute and delayed radiation effects. Specific and multi-organ medical countermeasures can be assessed for

  18. Delayed recombination and standard rulers

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Galli, Silvia; Silk, Joseph I.; Verde, Licia

    2009-02-15

    Measurements of baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in galaxy surveys have been recognized as a powerful tool for constraining dark energy. However, this method relies on the knowledge of the size of the acoustic horizon at recombination derived from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. This estimate is typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme; additional radiation sources can delay recombination altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from CMB and BAO data. In this paper we quantify the effect of delayed recombination on the determination of dark energy parameters from future BAO surveys such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph. We find the impact to be small but still not negligible. In particular, if recombination is nonstandard (to a level still allowed by CMB data), but this is ignored, future surveys may incorrectly suggest the presence of a redshift-dependent dark energy component. On the other hand, in the case of delayed recombination, adding to the analysis one extra parameter describing deviations from standard recombination does not significantly degrade the error bars on dark energy parameters and yields unbiased estimates. This is due to the CMB-BAO complementarity.

  19. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  20. Leaf UV optical properties of rumex patientia l. and rumex obtusifolius l. in regard to a protective mechanism against solar UV-B radiation injury

    SciTech Connect

    Robberecht, R.; Caldwell, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    Effective UV attenuation in the outer leaf layers may represent an important protective mechanism against potentially damaging solar UV-B radiation. Epidermal optical properties for Rumex patientia and Rumex obtusifolius were examined on field-collected and greenhouse-grown plants. Rumex patientia, a relatively UV-B sensitive plant, has substantially higher epidermal UV transmittance than Rumex obtusifolius, which indicated that the UV-B flux at the mesophyll layer for Rumex obtusifolius by 27% after exposure to solar UV-B radiation. Flavonoid extract absorbance also increased in whole leaves of both species after solar UV-B radiation. The epidermis is not only an effective filter for UV-B radiation, but is wavelength selective, and shows a degree of plasticity in this attenuation.

  1. Snowboarding injuries.

    PubMed

    Sachtleben, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    Snowboarding has gained immense popularity during the past 30 years and continues to appeal to many young participants. Injury patterns and characteristics of injuries seen commonly in snowboarders have rapidly evolved during this time. Risk factors have emerged, and various methods of reducing injuries to snowboarders have been investigated. It is important that medical providers are knowledgeable about this growing sport and are prepared to adequately evaluate and treat snowboarding injuries. This article will review the issues and discuss diagnostic and treatment principles regarding injuries seen commonly in snowboarders. Injury prevention should be emphasized, particularly with young riders and beginners.

  2. CGI delay compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    Computer-generated graphics in real-time helicopter simulation produces objectionable scene-presentation time delays. In the flight simulation laboratory at Ames Research Center, it has been determined that these delays have an adverse influence on pilot performance during aggressive tasks such as nap-of-the-earth (NOE) maneuvers. Using contemporary equipment, computer-generated image (CGI) time delays are an unavoidable consequence of the operations required for scene generation. However, providing that magnitide distortions at higher frequencies are tolerable, delay compensation is possible over a restricted frequency range. This range, assumed to have an upper limit of perhaps 10 or 15 rad/sec, conforms approximately to the bandwidth associated with helicopter handling qualities research. A compensation algorithm is introduced here and evaluated in terms of tradeoffs in frequency responses. The algorithm has a discrete basis and accommodates both a large, constant transport delay interval and a periodic delay interval, as associated with asynchronous operations.

  3. Utilization of cytogenetic biomarkers as a tool for assessment of radiation injury and evaluation of radiomodulatory effects of various medicinal plants - a review.

    PubMed

    Samarth, Ravindra M; Samarth, Meenakshi; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Systematic biological measurement of "cytogenetic endpoints" has helped phenomenally in assessment of risks associated with radiation exposure. There has been a surge in recent times for the usage of radioactive materials in health care, agriculture, industrial, and nuclear power sectors. The likelihood of radiation exposure from accidental or occupational means is always higher in an overburdened ecosystem that is continuously challenged to meet the population demands. Risks associated with radiation exposure in this era of modern industrial growth are minimal as international regulations for maintaining the safety standards are stringent and strictly adhered to, however, a recent disaster like "Fukushima" impels us to think beyond. The major objective of radiobiology is the development of an orally effective radio-modifier that provides protection from radiation exposure. Once available for mass usage, these compounds will not only be useful for providing selective protection against accidental and occupational radiation exposure but also help to permit use of higher doses of radiation during treatment of various malignancies curtailing unwarranted adverse effects imposed on normal tissues. Bio-active compounds isolated from natural sources enriched with antioxidants possess unique immune-modulating properties, thus providing a double edged benefit over synthetic radioprotectors. We aim to provide here a comprehensive overview of the various agents originating from plant sources that portrayed promising radioprotection in various experimental models with special emphasis on studies that used cytogenetic biomarkers. The agents will include crude extracts of various medicinal plants, purified fractions, and herbal preparations.

  4. Utilization of cytogenetic biomarkers as a tool for assessment of radiation injury and evaluation of radiomodulatory effects of various medicinal plants – a review

    PubMed Central

    Samarth, Ravindra M; Samarth, Meenakshi; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Systematic biological measurement of “cytogenetic endpoints” has helped phenomenally in assessment of risks associated with radiation exposure. There has been a surge in recent times for the usage of radioactive materials in health care, agriculture, industrial, and nuclear power sectors. The likelihood of radiation exposure from accidental or occupational means is always higher in an overburdened ecosystem that is continuously challenged to meet the population demands. Risks associated with radiation exposure in this era of modern industrial growth are minimal as international regulations for maintaining the safety standards are stringent and strictly adhered to, however, a recent disaster like “Fukushima” impels us to think beyond. The major objective of radiobiology is the development of an orally effective radio-modifier that provides protection from radiation exposure. Once available for mass usage, these compounds will not only be useful for providing selective protection against accidental and occupational radiation exposure but also help to permit use of higher doses of radiation during treatment of various malignancies curtailing unwarranted adverse effects imposed on normal tissues. Bio-active compounds isolated from natural sources enriched with antioxidants possess unique immune-modulating properties, thus providing a double edged benefit over synthetic radioprotectors. We aim to provide here a comprehensive overview of the various agents originating from plant sources that portrayed promising radioprotection in various experimental models with special emphasis on studies that used cytogenetic biomarkers. The agents will include crude extracts of various medicinal plants, purified fractions, and herbal preparations. PMID:26451089

  5. Environmentally Benign Pyrotechnic Delays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    jay.poret@us.army.mil † School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA ABSTRACT Pyrotechnic delays are used in...benign formulations are described. The delay time of the new system is easily tunable. These compositions will consistently function in aluminum ...tunable. These compositions will consistently function in aluminum housings which is generally difficult for delay compositions due to extreme thermal

  6. Delayed Orgasm and Anorgasmia

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Lawrence C.; Mulhall, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Delayed orgasm/anorgasmia defined as the persistent or recurrent difficulty, delay in, or absence of attaining orgasm after sufficient sexual stimulation, which causes personal distress. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia are associated with significant sexual dissatisfaction. A focused medical history can shed light on the potential etiologies; which include: medications, penile sensation loss, endocrinopathies, penile hyperstimulation and psychological etiologies, amongst others. Unfortunately, there are no excellent pharmacotherapies for delayed orgasm/anorgasmia, and treatment revolves largely around addressing potential causative factors and psychotherapy. PMID:26439762

  7. Delayed emergence after anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tzabazis, Alexander; Miller, Christopher; Dobrow, Marc F; Zheng, Karl; Brock-Utne, John G

    2015-06-01

    In most instances, delayed emergence from anesthesia is attributed to residual anesthetic or analgesic medications. However, delayed emergence can be secondary to unusual causes and present diagnostic dilemmas. Data from clinical studies is scarce and most available published material is comprised of case reports. In this review, we summarize and discuss less common and difficult to diagnose reasons for delayed emergence and present cases from our own experience or reference published case reports/case series. The goal is to draw attention to less common reasons for delayed emergence, identify patient populations that are potentially at risk and to help anesthesiologists identifying a possible cause why their patient is slow to wake up.

  8. VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Clemensen, R.E.

    1959-11-01

    An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

  9. Delayed puberty and amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Barbara; Bradshaw, Karen D

    2003-11-01

    The ability to diagnose and manage disorders that cause delayed puberty requires a thorough understanding of the physical and hormonal events of puberty. Wide variation exists within normal pubertal maturation, but most adolescent girls in the United States have begun to mature by the age of 13. Delayed puberty, a rare condition in girls, occurs in only approximately 2.5% of the population. Constitutional delay, genetic defects, or hypothalamic-pituitary disorders are common causes. Amenorrhea, often found as a symptom of delayed puberty, may be due to congenital genital tract anomalies, ovarian failure, or chronic anovulation with estrogen presence or with estrogen absence.

  10. Evidence from Animal Models: Is a Restricted or Conventional Intestinal Microbiota Composition Predisposing to Risk for High-LET Radiation Injury?

    PubMed

    Maier, Irene; Schiestl, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal microbiota affect cell responses to ionizing radiation at the molecular level and can be linked to the development of the immune system, controlled cell death or apoptosis. We have developed a microbiota mouse model and report here that high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induced the repair of chromosomal DNA lesions more efficiently in conventional than in restricted intestinal microbiota mice. Based on different phylotype densities after whole-body irradiation, bacterial indicator phylotypes were found to be more abundant in restricted in microbiota than in conventional microbiota. Genotoxic phenotypes of irradiated restricted and conventional microbiota mice were compared with ataxia telangiectasia-deficient restricted and conventional microbiota mice, respectively. Those indicator phylotypes, including Bacteroides (Gram-negative bacterium cTPY-13), Barnesiella intestinihominis and others, which were identified in nonirradiated restricted microbiota mice, increase in radiation-exposed conventional microbiota along with a reduction of persistent DNA double-strand breaks in blood lymphocytes. The dynamic change of phylotype abundances elucidated a feedback mechanism and effect of intestinal microbiota composition on the adaptive response to high-LET radiation. Several other bacterial phylotypes ( Helicobacter hepaticus , Helicobacter spp and others) were found to be more abundant in conventional than restricted microbiota. In this commentary, mouse models used in cancer research and radiotherapy for the study on the effects of intestinal microbiota composition on normal tissue radiation response are characterized and discussed. Highlights of this commentary: 1. Restricted microbiota phylotypes were correlated with persistent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and were found to orchestrate onco-protective controlled cell death after radiation; 2. Restricted microbiota composition reduced proinflammatory extracellular-stimulated immune responses, but

  11. Corneal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... as sand or dust Ultraviolet injuries: Caused by sunlight, sun lamps, snow or water reflections, or arc- ... a corneal injury if you: Are exposed to sunlight or artificial ultraviolet light for long periods of ...

  12. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can inhale that can cause acute internal injuries. Particles in the air from fires and toxic ... and lung diseases worse. Symptoms of acute inhalation injuries may include Coughing and phlegm A scratchy throat ...

  13. ACL Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury ... Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury ...

  14. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... scalp internal head injuries, which may involve the skull, the blood vessels within the skull, or the brain Fortunately, most childhood falls or ... knock the brain into the side of the skull or tear blood vessels. Some internal head injuries ...

  15. Urethral Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Related Injuries (Video) Rotator Cuff Injury (News) Violent Video Games May Not 'Desensitize' Players, Brain Scans ... Comfort Am I Correct? More Videos News HealthDay Violent Video Games May Not 'Desensitize' Players, Brain Scans ...

  16. Delayed amputation in lower limb trauma: an analysis of factors leading to delayed amputation.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, P

    1999-03-01

    An in-depth analysis of the course of events leading to 49 delayed amputation of the lower extremity in 47 patients with open lower limb fractures is presented. Seventeen amputations were performed within one month mainly for vascular reasons. Eleven were between one month and one year, due to persistent sepsis and 21 amputations were performed more than a year after the original injury for infected non-union. Below-knee amputation was done in 32 limbs, above-knee amputation in 13 limbs and Symes' amputation in 4 limbs. The delay in timing of the amputation was analysed with respect to the nature of the injury, the primary treatment and the Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS). The MESS score was computed for all injuries and a score of 7 or more predicted an early amputation. We suggest that in all severe lower limb injuries, particularly in Type III C fractures with associated neurological injury, the benefits of an early amputation be considered as an alternative to a limb salvage procedure.

  17. MR imaging findings in delayed reversible myelopathy from lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Cynthia B; Goyal, Mayank; Bourque, Pierre R

    2004-05-01

    Delayed spinal cord injury following high-voltage electrical injury is a rare but well-documented phenomenon. The MR imaging features of this entity, however, have not been well documented. We report the MR imaging findings in a case of delayed sensory and motor deficits following a lightning strike. MR imaging revealed hyperintense signal within the cord on T2-weighted and STIR images extending from C1 to C3. Axial images localized the hyperintense signal to the posterolateral region of the spinal cord bilaterally. Follow-up MR imaging 6 weeks later demonstrated resolution of abnormal cord signal intensity.

  18. Cycling injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    Bicycle-related injuries have increased as cycling has become more popular. Most injuries to recreational riders are associated with overuse or improper fit of the bicycle. Injuries to racers often result from high speeds, which predispose riders to muscle strains, collisions, and falls. Cyclists contact bicycles at the pedals, seat, and handlebars. Each is associated with particular cycling injuries. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8471908

  19. Orienteering injuries

    PubMed Central

    Folan, Jean M.

    1982-01-01

    At the Irish National Orienteering Championships in 1981 a survey of the injuries occurring over the two days of competition was carried out. Of 285 individual competitors there was a percentage injury rate of 5.26%. The article discusses the injuries and aspects of safety in orienteering. Imagesp236-ap237-ap237-bp238-ap239-ap240-a PMID:7159815

  20. Immediate versus delayed primary nerve repair in the rabbit sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Piskin, Ahmet; Altunkaynak, Berrin Zühal; Çιtlak, Atilla; Sezgin, Hicabi; Yazιcι, Ozgür; Kaplan, Süleyman

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that peripheral nerve injury should be treated immediately in the clinic, but in some instances, repair can be delayed. This study investigated the effects of immediate versus delayed (3 days after injury) neurorrhaphy on repair of transected sciatic nerve in New Zealand rabbits using stereological, histomorphological and biomechanical methods. At 8 weeks after immediate and delayed neurorrhaphy, axon number and area in the sciatic nerve, myelin sheath and epineurium thickness, Schwann cell morphology, and the mechanical property of nerve fibers did not differ obviously. These results indicate that delayed neurorrhaphy do not produce any deleterious effect on sciatic nerve repair. PMID:25206663

  1. Digital time delay

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  2. Time Delay Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    investigate the possibility of exploiting the properties of a detected Low Probability of Intercept (LPI) signal waveform to estimate time delay, and by...ratios, namely 10 dB and less. We also examine the minimum time –delay estimate error – the Cramer–Rao bound. The results indicate that the method

  3. Waterbike injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, R S; Caiach, S

    1991-01-01

    Jet skiing is a rapidly growing sport. The craft incorporate safety features and the manufacturers issue detailed safety instructions. Racing is conducted with adequate attention to clothing, safety and insurance. However, casual use is widespread and is sometimes irresponsible. Serious injuries to riders are uncommon: dental and knee injuries are described. A case of renal contusion and a head injury were caused by other riders and two potentially fatal injuries illustrate the risk for other water users. The number of injuries associated with the use of personal watercraft is likely to increase and may be influenced by appropriate organization or regulation. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1810620

  4. Bicycling injuries.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Marc R

    2013-01-01

    Bicycling injuries can be classified into bicycle contact, traumatic, and overuse injuries. Despite the popularity of cycling, there are few scientific studies regarding injuries. Epidemiological studies are difficult to compare due to different methodologies and the diverse population of cyclists studied. There are only three studies conducted on top level professionals. Ninety-four percent of professionals in 1 year have experienced at least one overuse injury. Most overuse injuries are mild with limited time off the bike. The most common site of overuse injury is the knee, and the most common site of traumatic injury is the shoulder, with the clavicle having the most common fracture. Many overuse and bicycle contact ailments are relieved with simple bike adjustments.

  5. Deoxyribonucleoprotein structure and radiation injury - Cellular radiosensitivity is determined by LET-infinity-dependent DNA damage in hydrated deoxyribonucleoproteins and the extent of its repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lett, J. T.; Peters, E. L.

    1992-01-01

    Until recently, OH radicals formed in bulk nuclear water were believed to be the major causes of DNA damage that results in cell death, especially for sparsely ionizing radiations. That hypothesis has now been challenged, if not refuted. Lethal genomic DNA damage is determined mainly by energy deposition in deoxyribonucleoproteins, and their hydration shells, and charge (energy) transfer processes within those structures.

  6. A Combination of Podophyllotoxin and Rutin Attenuates Radiation Induced Gastrointestinal Injury by Negatively Regulating NF-κB/p53 Signaling in Lethally Irradiated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kalita, Bhargab; Ranjan, Rajiv; Singh, Abhinav; Yashavarddhan, M. H.; Bajaj, Sania; Gupta, Manju Lata

    2016-01-01

    Development of an effective radio protector to minimise radiation-inflicted damages have largely failed owing to inherent toxicity of most of the agents examined so far. This study is centred towards delivering protection to lethally irradiated mice by pre-administration of a safe formulation G-003M (combination of podophyllotoxin and rutin) majorly through regulation of inflammatory and cell death pathways in mice. Single intramuscular dose of G-003M injected 60 min prior to 9 Gy exposure rescued 89% of whole body lethally irradiated C57BL/6J mice. Studies have revealed reduction in radiation induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) generation, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels and intestinal apoptosis in G-003M pre-treated mice intestine. Restricted nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and subsequent downregulation of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS; EC 1.14.13.39) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) levels demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effect that G-003M exerts. Support to early hematopoietic recovery was exhibited through G-003M mediated induction of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin (IL-6) levels in lethally irradiated mice. Considerable attenuation in radiation induced morphological damage to the intestinal villi, crypts and mucosal layers was observed in G-003M pre-treated mice. Additionally, our formulation did not reduce the sensitivity of tumor tissue to radiation. Altogether, these results suggest that G-003M ameliorates the deleterious effects of radiation exposure by minimising ROS and NO generation and effectively regulating inflammatory and cell death pathways. Mechanism of protection elucidated in the current study demonstrates that G-003M can be used as a safe and effective radio protective agent in radiotherapy for human application. PMID:28036347

  7. RF radiation from lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation from lightning in the RF band from 3-300 MHz were monitored. Radiation in this frequency range is of interest as a potential vehicle for monitoring severe storms and for studying the lightning itself. Simultaneous measurements were made of RF radiation and fast and slow field changes. Continuous analogue recordings with a system having 300 kHz of bandwidth were made together with digital records of selected events (principally return strokes) at greater temporal resolution. The data reveal patterns in the RF radiation for the entire flash which are characteristic of flash type and independent of the frequency of observation. Individual events within the flash also have characteristic RF patterns. Strong radiation occurs during the first return strokes, but delayed about 20 micron sec with respect to the begining of the return stroke; whereas, RF radiation from subsequent return strokes tends to be associated with cloud processes preceding the flash with comparatively little radiation occurring during the return stroke itself.

  8. Injury - kidney and ureter

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney damage; Toxic injury of the kidney; Kidney injury; Traumatic injury of the kidney; Fractured kidney; Inflammatory injury of the kidney; Bruised kidney; Ureteral injury; Pre-renal failure - injury, ...

  9. Control of spatially patterned synchrony with multisite delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, C.; Omel‘Chenko, O.; Popovych, O. V.; Maistrenko, Y.; Tass, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    We present an analytical study describing a method for the control of spatiotemporal patterns of synchrony in networks of coupled oscillators. Delayed feedback applied through a small number of electrodes effectively induces spatiotemporal dynamics at minimal stimulation intensities. Different arrangements of the delays cause different spatial patterns of synchrony, comparable to central pattern generators (CPGs), i.e., interacting clusters of oscillatory neurons producing patterned output, e.g., for motor control. Multisite delayed feedback stimulation might be used to restore CPG activity in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury or gait ignition disorders.

  10. High-pressure injection injuries.

    PubMed

    Neal, N C; Burke, F D

    1991-11-01

    A retrospective review of the 11 patients attending the Hand Unit at the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary over the last 5 years with high-pressure injection injuries is presented. The machines and materials that cause these injuries are outlined and the methods of treatment and rehabilitation are described in detail. The study demonstrates the morbidity of high-pressure injection injuries, particularly those inflicted by paint spray guns, and highlights a frequent delay between injury and decompression of the injured part. We wish to emphasize the importance of early diagnosis, referral, exploration and rehabilitation to ensure an optimal outcome, and to point out that failure to refer early is becoming an increasing focus of negligence claims.

  11. Simple method of measuring delay time in manufacturing delay lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Yukio; Mikoda, Masanari

    1982-07-01

    A simple method for measuring delay time in an operational frequency range is required in manufacturing delay lines used for video tape recorders and television receiver sets. This paper describes a simple method of measuring and adjusting the delay time of such delay lines. The delay time is obtained by measuring a phase difference ϑ between the signals at the input and output transducers of the delay line with frequencies under test. The delay time is more precisely obtained by measuring the ϑ at a constant frequency within the bandwidth of the delay line. A delay-time tolerance of a polished glass medium at 3.58 MHz was found to be within 100 ns. The delay time was found to be shortened by 30 ns by attaching the medium on polishing powder and oil. Also shown is a simple method for adjusting the delay time by polishing a delay medium while measuring the phase difference.

  12. Management of syndesmosis injuries in the elite athlete.

    PubMed

    Mak, May Fong; Gartner, Louise; Pearce, Christopher J

    2013-06-01

    This article reviews the basics and evidence base thus far on syndesmosis injuries, focusing on its management in the elite sporting population. A syndesmosis injury or "high ankle sprain" is a significant injury, especially in the elite athlete. Among all ankle sprains, the syndesmotic injury is most predictive of persistent symptoms in the athletic population. Late diagnosis of unstable syndesmosis injuries leads to a poor outcome and delayed return to sports. A high index of suspicion and an understanding of the mechanism of injury is required to ensure an early diagnosis. Incomplete/inaccurate reduction leads to a poor outcome.

  13. Blast injury research models

    PubMed Central

    Kirkman, E.; Watts, S.; Cooper, G.

    2011-01-01

    Blast injuries are an increasing problem in both military and civilian practice. Primary blast injury to the lungs (blast lung) is found in a clinically significant proportion of casualties from explosions even in an open environment, and in a high proportion of severely injured casualties following explosions in confined spaces. Blast casualties also commonly suffer secondary and tertiary blast injuries resulting in significant blood loss. The presence of hypoxaemia owing to blast lung complicates the process of fluid resuscitation. Consequently, prolonged hypotensive resuscitation was found to be incompatible with survival after combined blast lung and haemorrhage. This article describes studies addressing new forward resuscitation strategies involving a hybrid blood pressure profile (initially hypotensive followed later by normotensive resuscitation) and the use of supplemental oxygen to increase survival and reduce physiological deterioration during prolonged resuscitation. Surprisingly, hypertonic saline dextran was found to be inferior to normal saline after combined blast injury and haemorrhage. New strategies have therefore been developed to address the needs of blast-injured casualties and are likely to be particularly useful under circumstances of enforced delayed evacuation to surgical care. PMID:21149352

  14. Intestinal injury mechanisms after blunt abdominal impact.

    PubMed

    Cripps, N P; Cooper, G J

    1997-03-01

    Intestinal injury is frequent after non-penetrating abdominal trauma, particularly after modern, high-energy transfer impacts. Under these circumstances, delay in the diagnosis of perforation is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality. This study establishes patterns of intestinal injury after blunt trauma by non-penetrating projectiles and examines relationships between injury distribution and abdominal wall motion. Projectile impacts of variable momentum were produced in 31 anaesthetised pigs to cause abdominal wall motion of varying magnitude and velocity. No small bowel injury was observed at initial impact velocity of less than 40 m/s despite gross abdominal compression. At higher velocity, injury to the small bowel was frequent, irrespective of the degree of abdominal compression (P = 0.00044). Large bowel injury was observed at all impact velocities and at all degrees of abdominal compression. This study confirms the potential for intestinal injury in high velocity, low momentum impacts which do not greatly compress the abdominal cavity and demonstrates apparent differences in injury mechanisms for the small bowel and colon. Familiarity with injury mechanisms may reduce delays in the diagnosis of intestinal perforation in both military and civilian situations.

  15. High-dose mode of mortality in Tribolium: A model system for study of radiation injury and repair in non-proliferative tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chihing Christina.

    1989-01-01

    With appropriate doses of ionizing radiation, both the acute, or lethal-midlethal, dose-independent pattern of mortality, and the hyperacute, dose-dependent pattern, were demonstrated within a single insect genus (Tribolium). This demonstration provides resolution of apparently contradictory reports of insect radiation responses in terms of doses required to cause lethality and those based on survival time as a function of dose. A dose-dependent mortality pattern was elicited in adult Tribolium receiving high doses, viz., 300 Gy or greater; its time course was complete in 10 days, before the dose-independent pattern of mortality began. Visual observations of heavily-irradiated Tribolium suggested neural and/or neuromuscular damage, as had been previously proposed by others for lethally-irradiated wasps, flies, and mosquitoes. Results of experiments using fractionated high doses supported the suggestion that the hyperacute or high-dose mode of death is the result of damage to nonproliferative tissues. Relative resistance of a strain to the hyperacute or high-dose mode of death was not correlated with resistance to the midlethal mode, which is believed to be the result of damage to the proliferative cells of the midgut. Using the high-dose mode of death as a model of radiation damage to nonproliferative tissues, the effects of age, and of a moderate priming dose were assessed. Beetles showed age-related increase in sensitivity to the high-dose mode of death, suggesting a decline in capacity to repair radiation damage to postmitotic tissue. This correlated with a decrease (50%) in the amount of repair reflected in the sparing effect of dose-fractionation (SDF) between the age of 1 to 3 months. The age related increase in radiosensitivity was reduced by a moderate priming dose (40 or 65 Gy) given at a young age.

  16. Effect of Transplantation of Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Platelets Rich Plasma on Experimental Model of Radiation Induced Oral Mucosal Injury in Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    El Kholy, Samar; El Rouby, Dalia; Rashed, Laila; Shouman, Tarek

    2017-01-01

    Normal tissue damage following radiotherapy is still a major problem in cancer treatment. Therefore, the current work aimed at exploring the possible role of systemically injected bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and/or locally injected platelet rich plasma (PRP) in ameliorating the side effects of ionizing radiation on the rat's tongue. Twelve rats served as control group (N) and 48 rats received a single radiation dose of 13 Gy to the head and neck region; then, they were equally divided into 4 experimental groups: irradiated only (C), irradiated + MSCs (S), irradiated + (PRP) (P), and combined group (PS). Animal scarification occurred in 3 and 7 days after radiation. Then, tongues were dissected and examined histologically and for expression of bcl-2 by RT-PCR. Histological examination of the treated groups (S), (P), and (PS) revealed an obvious improvement in the histological structure of the tongue, compared to group (C), in addition to upregulated expression of bcl-2, indicating decreased apoptotic activity. Conclusion. BM-MSCs and PRP have shown positive effect in minimizing the epithelial atrophy of normal oral mucosa after regional radiotherapy, which was emphasized by decreasing apoptotic activity in these tissues. Nevertheless, combined use of BM-MSCs and PRP did not reveal the assumed synergetic effect in oral tissue protection. PMID:28337218

  17. Choice and reinforcement delay

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, G.D.; Marr, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies of choice between two delayed reinforcers have indicated that the relative immediacy of the reinforcer is a major determinant of the relative frequency of responding. Parallel studies of choice between two interresponse times have found exceptions to this generality. The present study looked at the choice by pigeons between two delays, one of which was always four times longer than the other, but whose absolute durations were varied across conditions. The results indicated that choice is not uniquely determined by the relative immediacy of reinforcement, but that absolute delays are also involved. Models for concurrent chained schedules appear to be more applicable to the present data than the matching relation; however, these too failed to predict choice for long delays.

  18. Time delay spectrum conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Norman R.

    1980-01-01

    A device for delaying specified frequencies of a multiple frequency laser beam. The device separates the multiple frequency beam into a series of spatially separated single frequency beams. The propagation distance of the single frequency beam is subsequently altered to provide the desired delay for each specific frequency. Focusing reflectors can be utilized to provide a simple but nonadjustable system or, flat reflectors with collimating and focusing optics can be utilized to provide an adjustable system.

  19. Dynamics of wound healing signaling as a potential therapeutic target for radiation-induced tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yih-Lin; Pui, Newman N M

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate (PB) has beneficial effects on radiation-induced injury by modulating the expression of DNA repair and wound healing genes. Hamsters received a radiosurgical dose of radiation (40 Gy) to the cheek and were treated with varying PB dosing regimens. Gross alteration of the irradiated cheeks, eating function, histological changes, and gene expression during the course of wound healing were compared between treatment groups. Pathological analysis showed decreased radiation-induced mucositis, facilitated epithelial cell growth, and preventing ulcerative wound formation, after short-term PB treatment, but not after vehicle or sustained PB. The radiation-induced wound healing gene expression profile exhibited a sequential transition from the inflammatory and DNA repair phases to the tissue remodeling phase in the vehicle group. Sustained PB treatment resulted in a prolonged wound healing gene expression profile and delayed the wound healing process. Short-term PB shortened the duration of inflammatory cytokine expression, triggered repeated pulsed expression of cell cycle and DNA repair-regulating genes, and promoted earlier oscillatory expression of tissue remodeling genes. Distinct gene expression patterns between sustained and short-term treatment suggest dynamic profiling of wound healing gene expression can be an important part of a biological therapeutic strategy to mitigate radiation-related tissue injury.

  20. Fracture of skull base with delayed multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Altan; Gurelik, Mustafa; Gumus, Cesur; Kunt, Tanfer

    2005-07-01

    This report describes a pediatric case of delayed glossopharyngeal nerve, vagus nerve, and facial nerve palsies after a head injury. Computed tomography scan of the skull base revealed the fracture of the petrous part of the temporal bone, and the fracture involved the tip of petrous pyramid, in front of the jugular foramen. The anatomical features, mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment are discussed.