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Sample records for delayed radiation necrosis

  1. Delayed cerebral radiation necrosis.

    PubMed

    Morris, J G; Grattan-Smith, P; Panegyres, P K; O'Neill, P; Soo, Y S; Langlands, A O

    1994-02-01

    The clinical features and long-term outcome of seven patients with delayed cerebral radiation necrosis (DCRN) are described. Radiotherapy had been given for pituitary tumour (1), astrocytoma (2), pinealoma (2), craniopharyngioma (1) and parotid carcinoma (1). The mean latency to onset of the first neurological symptoms was 22 months (range 6-40 months), and mean duration of follow-up was 86 months (range 60-126). Three patients died at a mean of 84 months after radiotherapy (range 62-98). A fourth patient probably died from metastatic disease. Three patients remain alive, albeit severely disabled, after 5-10 years. The illness typically ran a stepwise course, with fits and stroke-like episodes occurring against a background of progressive dementia and somnolence. CT and MRI scans showed progressive ventricular dilatation associated with cerebral atrophy and diffuse or focal changes in the white matter. Four patients had had two or more neurosurgical procedures after the radiotherapy. In only one of the seven patients was the diagnosis made at presentation. DCRN produces a distinctive clinical picture, yet remains a poorly recognized complication of cranial irradiation.

  2. Delayed radiation necrosis of the central nervous system in patients irradiated for pituitary tumours.

    PubMed

    Grattan-Smith, P J; Morris, J G; Langlands, A O

    1992-10-01

    Four cases of delayed radiation necrosis involving the CNS were found in a group of 46 patients irradiated for pituitary tumours over a six year period. This occurred in three of 11 patients with Cushing's disease representing an incidence of 27% in this group. There were no cases among 11 patients with acromegaly or among seven with prolactinomas. One case (6%) was found in the 17 patients with chromophobe adenomas. Standard doses of radiation were delivered to these patients and the findings support suggestions that the metabolic disturbances of Cushing's disease may reduce tolerance to radiation. Our results and a literature review indicate that if radiotherapy is used to treat Cushing's disease, the total dose should be less than 50 Gy at 2 Gy per day fractionation.

  3. Differentiation of Recurrent Glioblastoma from Delayed Radiation Necrosis by Using Voxel-based Multiparametric Analysis of MR Imaging Data.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ra Gyoung; Kim, Ho Sung; Koh, Myeong Ju; Shim, Woo Hyun; Jung, Seung Chai; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Jeong Hoon

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To assess a volume-weighted voxel-based multiparametric (MP) clustering method as an imaging biomarker to differentiate recurrent glioblastoma from delayed radiation necrosis. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived the informed consent requirement. Seventy-five patients with pathologic analysis-confirmed recurrent glioblastoma (n = 42) or radiation necrosis (n = 33) who presented with enlarged contrast material-enhanced lesions at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging after they completed concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy were enrolled. The diagnostic performance of the total MP cluster score was determined by using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) with cross-validation and compared with those of single parameter measurements (10% histogram cutoffs of apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC10] or 90% histogram cutoffs of normalized cerebral blood volume and initial time-signal intensity AUC). Results Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that an AUC for differentiating recurrent glioblastoma from delayed radiation necrosis was highest in the total MP cluster score and lowest for ADC10 for both readers. The total MP cluster score had significantly better diagnostic accuracy than any single parameter (corrected P = .001-.039 for reader 1; corrected P = .005-.041 for reader 2). The total MP cluster score was the best predictor of recurrent glioblastoma (cross-validated AUCs, 0.942-0.946 for both readers), with a sensitivity of 95.2% for reader 1 and 97.6% for reader 2. Conclusion Quantitative analysis with volume-weighted voxel-based MP clustering appears to be superior to the use of single imaging parameters to differentiate recurrent glioblastoma from delayed radiation necrosis. (©) RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  4. A Gamma-Knife-Enabled Mouse Model of Cerebral Single-Hemisphere Delayed Radiation Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoyu; Yuan, Liya; Engelbach, John A.; Cates, Jeremy; Perez-Torres, Carlos J.; Gao, Feng; Thotala, Dinesh; Drzymala, Robert E.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Rich, Keith M.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Ackerman, Joseph J. H.; Garbow, Joel R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a Gamma Knife-based mouse model of late time-to-onset, cerebral radiation necrosis (RN) with serial evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. Methods and Materials Mice were irradiated with the Leksell Gamma Knife® (GK) PerfexionTM (Elekta AB; Stockholm, Sweden) with total single-hemispheric radiation doses (TRD) of 45- to 60-Gy, delivered in one to three fractions. RN was measured using T2-weighted MR images, while confirmation of tissue damage was assessed histologically by hematoxylin & eosin, trichrome, and PTAH staining. Results MRI measurements demonstrate that TRD is a more important determinant of both time-to-onset and progression of RN than fractionation. The development of RN is significantly slower in mice irradiated with 45-Gy than 50- or 60-Gy, where RN development is similar. Irradiated mouse brains demonstrate all of the pathologic features observed clinically in patients with confirmed RN. A semi-quantitative (0 to 3) histologic grading system, capturing both the extent and severity of injury, is described and illustrated. Tissue damage, as assessed by a histologic score, correlates well with total necrotic volume measured by MRI (correlation coefficient = 0.948, with p<0.0001), and with post-irradiation time (correlation coefficient = 0.508, with p<0.0001). Conclusions Following GK irradiation, mice develop late time-to-onset cerebral RN histology mirroring clinical observations. MR imaging provides reliable quantification of the necrotic volume that correlates well with histologic score. This mouse model of RN will provide a platform for mechanism of action studies, the identification of imaging biomarkers of RN, and the development of clinical studies for improved mitigation and neuroprotection. PMID:26440791

  5. Prevention of necrosis of adjacent expanded flaps by surgical delay.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hainan; Xie, Yun; Xie, Feng; Gu, Bin; Liu, Kai; Zan, Tao; Li, QingFeng

    2014-11-01

    Although expanded flaps have been shown to survive longer than unexpanded flaps, flap necrosis still occurs, particularly when a deep back cut has been made. Overcautious design can avoid necrosis but leads to inefficient usage of the expanded flap. In this study, we tested a surgical delay method to prevent partial necrosis and maximize the use of the expanded flap. Ten patients with 13 expanders were included in this series. The surgical delay was performed 2 weeks before the final flap transfer. The survival of the delayed flaps was compared with that in previous cases without surgical delay. All 13 expanded flaps exhibited complete survival, which was significantly better than the 27.5% partial flap necrosis observed in nondelayed cases. Surgical delay can decrease the risk of necrosis in an expanded flap caused by a back cut and can thus maximize flap use.

  6. Necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Necrosis is the death of body tissue. It occurs when too little blood flows to the tissue. This can be from injury, radiation, or chemicals. Necrosis cannot be reversed. When large ...

  7. Ketoconazole attenuates radiation-induction of tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D.E.; Virudachalam, S.; Kufe, D.W.; Weichselbaum, R.R.

    1994-07-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that inhibitors of phospholipase A2 attenuate ionizing radiation-induced arachidonic acid production, protein kinase C activation, and prevent subsequent induction of the tumor necrosis factor gene. Because arachidonic acid contributes to radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor expression, the authors analyzed the effects of agents which alter arachidonate metabolism on the regulation of this gene. Phospholipase A2 inhibitors quinicrine, bromphenyl bromide, and pentoxyfylline or the inhibitor of lipoxygenase (ketoconazole) or the inhibitor of cycloxygenase (indomethacine) were added to cell culture 1 h prior to irradiation. Radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor gene expression was attenuated by each of the phospholipase A2 inhibitors (quinicrine, bromphenylbromide, and pentoxyfylline). Furthermore, ketoconazole attenuated X ray induced tumor necrosis factor gene expression. Conversely, indomethacin enhanced tumor necrosis factor expression following irradiation. The finding that radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor gene expression was attenuated by ketoconazole suggests that the lipoxygenase pathway participates in signal transduction preceding tumor necrosis factor induction. Enhancement of tumor necrosis factor expression by indomethacin following irradiation suggests that prostaglandins produced by cyclooxygenase act as negative regulators of tumor necrosis factor expression. Inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor induction ameliorate acute and subacute sequelae of radiotherapy. The authors propose therefore, that ketoconazole may reduce acute radiation sequelae such as mucositis and esophagitis through a reduction in tumor necrosis factor induction or inhibition of phospholipase A2 in addition to its antifungal activity. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Evaluation of radiation necrosis and malignant glioma in rat models using diffusion tensor MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Silun; Chen, Yifei; Lal, Bachchu; Ford, Eric; Tryggestad, Erik; Armour, Michael; Yan, Kun; Laterra, John; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2011-01-01

    Standard MRI cannot distinguish between radiation necrosis and tumor progression; however, this distinction is critical in the assessment of tumor response to therapy. In this study, one delayed radiation necrosis model (dose, 40 Gy; radiation field, 10 × 10 mm2; n = 13) and two orthotopic glioma models in rats (9L gliosarcoma, n = 8; human glioma xenografts, n = 5) were compared using multiple DTI indices. A visible isotropic apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) pattern was observed in the lesion due to radiation necrosis, which consisted of a hypointense central zone and a hyperintense peripheral zone. There were significantly lower ADC, parallel diffusivity, and perpendicular diffusivity in the necrotic central zone than in the peripheral zone (all p < 0.001). When radiation-induced necrosis was compared with viable tumor, radiation necrosis had significantly lower ADC than 9L gliosarcoma and human glioma xenografts (both p < 0.01) in the central zone, and significantly lower FA than 9L gliosarcoma (p = 0.005) and human glioma xenografts (p = 0.012) in the peripheral zone. Histological analysis revealed parenchymal coagulative necrosis in the central zone, and damaged vessels and reactive astrogliosis in the peripheral zone. These data suggest that qualitative and quantitative analysis of the DTI maps can provide useful information by which to distinguish between radiation necrosis and viable glioma. PMID:21948114

  9. Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of radiation necrosis in the brain.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Nonoguchi, Noasuke; Furuse, Motomasa; Yoritsune, Erina; Miyata, Tomo; Kawabata, Shinji; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    New radiation modalities have made it possible to prolong the survival of individuals with malignant brain tumors, but symptomatic radiation necrosis becomes a serious problem that can negatively affect a patient's quality of life through severe and lifelong effects. Here we review the relevant literature and introduce our original concept of the pathophysiology of brain radiation necrosis following the treatment of brain, head, and neck tumors. Regarding the pathophysiology of radiation necrosis, we introduce two major hypotheses: glial cell damage or vascular damage. For the differential diagnosis of radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence, we focus on the role of positron emission tomography. Finally, in accord with our hypothesis regarding the pathophysiology, we describe the promising effects of the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody bevacizumab on symptomatic radiation necrosis in the brain.

  10. Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Radiation Necrosis in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Nonoguchi, Noasuke; Furuse, Motomasa; Yoritsune, Erina; Miyata, Tomo; Kawabata, Shinji; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    New radiation modalities have made it possible to prolong the survival of individuals with malignant brain tumors, but symptomatic radiation necrosis becomes a serious problem that can negatively affect a patient’s quality of life through severe and lifelong effects. Here we review the relevant literature and introduce our original concept of the pathophysiology of brain radiation necrosis following the treatment of brain, head, and neck tumors. Regarding the pathophysiology of radiation necrosis, we introduce two major hypotheses: glial cell damage or vascular damage. For the differential diagnosis of radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence, we focus on the role of positron emission tomography. Finally, in accord with our hypothesis regarding the pathophysiology, we describe the promising effects of the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody bevacizumab on symptomatic radiation necrosis in the brain.

  11. Response-driven Imaging Biomarkers for Predicting Radiation Necrosis of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Chapman, Christopher H.; Chenevert, Thomas; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Tsien, Christina I.; Cao, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Radiation necrosis is an uncommon but severe adverse effect of brain radiation therapy. Current predictive models based on radiation dose have limited accuracy. We aimed to identify early individual response biomarkers based upon diffusion tensor (DT) imaging and incorporated them into a response model for prediction of radiation necrosis. Methods and Materials Twenty-nine patients with glioblastoma received six weeks of intensity modulated radiation therapy (RT) and concurrent temozolamide. Patients underwent DT-MRI scans before treatment, at three weeks during RT, and one, three, and six months after RT. Cases with radiation necrosis were classified based on generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) of whole brain and DT index early changes in the corpus callosum and its substructures. Significant covariates were used to develop normal tissue complication probability models using binary logistic regression. Results Seven patients developed radiation necrosis. Percentage changes of radial diffusivity (RD) in the splenium at three weeks during RT and at six months after RT differed significantly between the patients with and without necrosis (p=0.05 and p=0.01). Percentage change of RD at three weeks during RT in the 30 Gy dose-volume of the splenium and brain gEUD combined yielded the best-fit logistic regression model. Conclusions Our findings indicate that early individual response during the course of RT, assessed by radial diffusivity, has the potential to aid in predicting delayed radiation necrosis, which could provide guidance in dose-escalation trials. PMID:24778364

  12. Response-driven imaging biomarkers for predicting radiation necrosis of the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazem Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Chapman, Christopher H.; Chenevert, Thomas; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Tsien, Christina I.; Cao, Yue

    2014-05-01

    Radiation necrosis is an uncommon but severe adverse effect of brain radiation therapy (RT). Current predictive models based on radiation dose have limited accuracy. We aimed to identify early individual response biomarkers based upon diffusion tensor (DT) imaging and incorporated them into a response model for prediction of radiation necrosis. Twenty-nine patients with glioblastoma received six weeks of intensity modulated RT and concurrent temozolomide. Patients underwent DT-MRI scans before treatment, at three weeks during RT, and one, three, and six months after RT. Cases with radiation necrosis were classified based on generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) of whole brain and DT index early changes in the corpus callosum and its substructures. Significant covariates were used to develop normal tissue complication probability models using binary logistic regression. Seven patients developed radiation necrosis. Percentage changes of radial diffusivity (RD) in the splenium at three weeks during RT and at six months after RT differed significantly between the patients with and without necrosis (p = 0.05 and p = 0.01). Percentage change of RD at three weeks during RT in the 30 Gy dose-volume of the splenium and brain gEUD combined yielded the best-fit logistic regression model. Our findings indicate that early individual response during the course of RT, assessed by radial diffusivity, has the potential to aid the prediction of delayed radiation necrosis, which could provide guidance in dose-escalation trials.

  13. Cerebral radiation necrosis: diagnostic challenge and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Eisele, S C; Dietrich, J

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral radiation is an indispensable cornerstone in the treatment of many primary and metastatic brain tumors. However, besides its desired therapeutic effect on tumor cells, a significant proportion of patients will experience neurotoxic side effects as the consequence of radiotherapy. Radiation necrosis can result in progressive neurological symptoms and radiographic changes. To differentiate radiation necrosis from progressive tumor based on imaging can pose a diagnostic challenge because the MRI characteristics may be similar in both situations. Therefore, surgical biopsy and pathological confirmation is sometimes necessary to guide further management. Effective treatment options for cerebral radiation necrosis exist and should be offered to symptomatic patients. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular processes underlying the development of radiation necrosis is necessary to prevent and minimize radiation-associated morbidity and to improve treatment strategies.

  14. Delayed recurrence of acute retinal necrosis (ARN): A case series.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Christopher P; Levison, Ashleigh L; Lowder, Careen Y; Martin, Daniel F; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2016-07-01

    To report five cases of acute retinal necrosis (ARN) that reactivated in the same eye or presented in the contralateral eye between two and nineteen years after the initial episode of acute retinal necrosis. Five patients with a previous history of ARN developed recurrent ARN infection following a lengthy latency period. In all five patients who initially presented with unilateral disease, four developed infection in the contralateral eye and one developed recurrent infection in the ipsilateral eye. Latency periods ranged from two to nineteen years, and final visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/30 to no light perception. Each patient was treated with antiviral medication for both the initial infection and for subsequent reactivations, but was not on long-term prophylaxis at the time of recurrent disease. Although rare, delayed onset reactivation of ARN can occur in either the same eye or contralateral eye despite adequate treatment. While contralateral spread of initial infection is fairly common, these reactivations rarely occur more than six weeks after initial infection. Currently there are no guidelines for use of prophylactic antiviral medication to prevent late recurrence of ARN. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Challenges With the Diagnosis and Treatment of Cerebral Radiation Necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Samuel T.; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S.; Barnett, Gene H.; Stevens, Glen H.J.; Murphy, Erin S.; Stockham, Abigail L.; Shiue, Kevin; Suh, John H.

    2013-11-01

    The incidence of radiation necrosis has increased secondary to greater use of combined modality therapy for brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery. Given that its characteristics on standard imaging are no different that tumor recurrence, it is difficult to diagnose without use of more sophisticated imaging and nuclear medicine scans, although the accuracy of such scans is controversial. Historically, treatment had been limited to steroids, hyperbaric oxygen, anticoagulants, and surgical resection. A recent prospective randomized study has confirmed the efficacy of bevacizumab in treating radiation necrosis. Novel therapies include using focused interstitial laser thermal therapy. This article will review the diagnosis and treatment of radiation necrosis.

  16. Delayed Radiation-Induced Vasculitic Leukoencephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Philipp J.; Park, Henry S.; Knisely, Jonathan P.S.; Chiang, Veronica L.; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, single-fraction, high-dosed focused radiation therapy such as that administered by Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used increasingly for the treatment of metastatic brain cancer. Radiation therapy to the brain can cause delayed leukoencephalopathy, which carries its own significant morbidity and mortality. While radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy is known to be clinically different from that following fractionated radiation, pathological differences are not well characterized. In this study, we aimed to integrate novel radiographic and histopathologic observations to gain a conceptual understanding of radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy. Methods and Materials: We examined resected tissues of 10 patients treated at Yale New Haven Hospital between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, for brain metastases that had been previously treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery, who subsequently required surgical management of a symptomatic regrowing lesion. None of the patients showed pathological evidence of tumor recurrence. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging data for each of the 10 patients were then studied retrospectively. Results: We provide evidence to show that radiosurgery-induced leukoencephalopathy may present as an advancing process that extends beyond the original high-dose radiation field. Neuropathologic examination of the resected tissue revealed traditionally known leukoencephalopathic changes including demyelination, coagulation necrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Unexpectedly, small and medium-sized vessels revealed transmural T-cell infiltration indicative of active vasculitis. Conclusions: We propose that the presence of a vasculitic component in association with radiation-induced leukoencephalopathy may facilitate the progressive nature of the condition. It may also explain the resemblance of delayed leukoencephalopathy with recurring tumor on virtually all imaging modalities used for posttreatment follow-up.

  17. Effect of bevacizumab on radiation necrosis of the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Javier; Kumar, Ashok J.; Conrad, Charles A.; Levin, Victor A. . E-mail: vlevin@mdanderson.org

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Because blocking vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from reaching leaky capillaries is a logical strategy for the treatment of radiation necrosis, we reasoned that bevacizumab might be an effective treatment of radiation necrosis. Patients and Methods: Fifteen patients with malignant brain tumors were treated with bevacizumab or bevacizumab combination for their tumor on either a 5 mg/kg/2-week or 7.5 mg/kg/3-week schedule. Radiation necrosis was diagnosed in 8 of these patients on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and biopsy. MRI studies were obtained before treatment and at 6-week to 8-week intervals. Results: Of the 8 patients with radiation necrosis, posttreatment MRI performed an average of 8.1 weeks after the start of bevacizumab therapy showed a reduction in all 8 patients in both the MRI fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) abnormalities and T1-weighted post-Gd-contrast abnormalities. The average area change in the T1-weighted post-Gd-contrast abnormalities was 48% ({+-}22 SD), and the average change in the FLAIR images was 60% ({+-}18 SD). The average reduction in daily dexamethasone requirements was 8.6 mg ({+-}3.6). Conclusion: Bevacizumab, alone and in combination with other agents, can reduce radiation necrosis by decreasing capillary leakage and the associated brain edema. Our findings will need to be confirmed in a randomized trial to determine the optimal duration of treatment.

  18. Relationship between dental disease and radiation necrosis of the mandible

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, C.G.; Daly, T.E.; Zimmerman, S.O.

    1980-02-01

    Preirradiation panoramic radiographs of forty-six dentate patients were examined for the presence of significant dental disease. Evidence of a positive association between dental disease present before radiation therapy and subsequent necrosis of the mandible was found leading to a recommendation that significant disease be eradicated before irradiation of oral tissues. Considerable suffering results from bone necrosis, which can be reduced by careful and rational dental diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Radiation necrosis after treatment of solitary intracranial metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, N.; Galicich, J.H.; Deck, M.D.; Tomita, T.

    1981-03-01

    During the period from July 1977 to June 1980, 75 patients underwent the surgical excision of solitary brain metastases, and 61 of these patients received whole brain radiation. Three patients developed chronic radiation necrosis. In the 3 patients with necrosis, computed tomography suggested recurrent tumor; the histological diagnosis of necrosis only was obtained at operation in 2 of these patients and by autopsy in the third. Radiation damage resulted in the death of 1 patient, a chronic vegetative state in another, and severe neurological deficit in the third. An additional 4 patients had neurological complications probably related to radiation therapy. As the survival of such patients is prolonged by aggressive treatment, the incidence of radiation-induced complications is likely to increase. The optimal dose of radiation necessary to destroy microscopic foci of tumor after the surgical resection of a single brain metastasis is unknown. Because of the significant incidence of damage after radiation as currently delivered, studies using graded, lower doses are indicated.

  20. A GSK-3β Inhibitor Protects Against Radiation Necrosis in Mouse Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xiaoyu; Perez-Torres, Carlos J.; Thotala, Dinesh; Engelbach, John A.; Yuan, Liya; Cates, Jeremy; Gao, Feng; Drzymala, Robert E.; Rich, Keith M.; Schmidt, Robert E.; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Garbow, Joel R.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To quantify the effectiveness of SB415286, a specific inhibitor of GSK-3β, as a neuroprotectant against radiation-induced central nervous system (brain) necrosis in a mouse model. Methods and Materials: Cohorts of mice were treated with SB415286 or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) prior to irradiation with a single 45-Gy fraction targeted to the left hemisphere (brain) using a gamma knife machine. The onset and progression of radiation necrosis (RN) were monitored longitudinally by noninvasive in vivo small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) beginning 13 weeks postirradiation. MRI-derived necrotic volumes for SB415286- and DMSO-treated mice were compared. MRI results were supported by correlative histology. Results: Mice treated with SB415286 showed significant protection from radiation-induced necrosis, as determined by in vivo MRI with histologic validation. MRI-derived necrotic volumes were significantly smaller at all postirradiation time points in SB415286-treated animals. Although the irradiated hemispheres of the DMSO-treated mice demonstrated many of the classic histologic features of RN, including fibrinoid vascular necrosis, vascular telangiectasia, hemorrhage, and tissue loss, the irradiated hemispheres of the SB415286-treated mice consistently showed only minimal tissue damage. These studies confirmed that treatment with a GSK-3β inhibitor dramatically reduced delayed time-to-onset necrosis in irradiated brain. Conclusions: The unilateral cerebral hemispheric stereotactic radiation surgery mouse model in concert with longitudinal MRI monitoring provided a powerful platform for studying the onset and progression of RN and for developing and testing new neuroprotectants. Effectiveness of SB415286 as a neuroprotectant against necrosis motivates potential clinical trials of it or other GSK-3β inhibitors.

  1. Radiation necrosis of the mandible: a 10 year study. Part II. Dental factors; onset, duration and management of necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, C.G.; Herson, J.; Daly, T.E.; Zimmerman, S.

    1980-05-01

    In a review of patients receiving radiation for cancer in the oral region the rate of radiation necrosis of the mandible was found to be similar for patients who had dental extractions before radiation therapy and for the remainder of the dentate population. It was suggested that diseased teeth should be removed prior to irradiation and sufficient healing time should be allowed. Teeth should not be extracted after irradiation. Dental prostheses can be provided for most irradiated patients if adequate care is exercised. The probability of necrosis commencing was highest three to twelve months after the start of therapy; it diminished gradually after that period. The duration of necrosis was depicted as an exponential curve with a constant probability of necrosis termination at each time point after onset. In 46.8% of the patients in study II (1971-1975), the necrosis was healed by conservative means. This was a significant increase over study I (1966-1969), and a complementary reduction in the necessity for surgical intervention was also found.

  2. Bevacizumab for the Treatment of Gammaknife Radiosurgery-Induced Brain Radiation Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yifang; Zheng, Chutian; Feng, Yiping; Xu, Qingsheng

    2017-09-01

    Radiation necrosis is one of the complications of Gammaknife radiosurgery. The traditional treatment of radiation necrosis carries a high risk of failure, Bevacizumab is an antiangiogenic monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor, a known mediator of cerebral edema. It can be used to successfully treat brain radiation necrosis. Two patients with a history of small cell lung cancer presented with metastatic disease to the brain. They underwent Gammaknife radiosurgery to brain metastases. Several months later, magnetic resonance imaging showed radiation necrosis with significant surrounding edema. The patients had a poor response to treatment with dexamethasone. They were eventually treated with bevacizumab (5 mg/kg every 2 weeks, 7.5 mg/kg every 3 weeks, respectively), and the treatment resulted in significant clinical and radiographic improvement. Bevacizumab can be successfully used to treat radiation necrosis induced by Gammaknife radiosurgery in patients with cerebral metastases. It is of particular benefit in patients with poor reaction to corticosteroids and other medications.

  3. Methods to Differentiate Radiation Necrosis and Recurrent Disease in Gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewell, Lars

    2007-03-01

    Given the difficulty in differentiating Radiation Induced Necrosis (RIN) and recurrent disease in glioma patients using conventional techniques (CT scans, MRI scans), researchers have looked for different imaging modalities. Among these different modalities are Diffusion Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DWMRI) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS). In DWMRI, an Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) is calculated for a Region Of Interest (ROI), and then monitored over time (longitudinally). In the brain, different anatomical features can complicate the interpretation of ADCs. In particular, the density and spatial variation of the cerebral spinal fluid filled fissures known as sulci can influence how a change in an ADC is explained. We have used the covariance of pixel intensity in T1 weighted MRI scans to study how intra-patient and inter-patient sulci density varies, and will present these results. MRS uses the shift in the MR signal due to the local chemical environment to determine the concentration of brain metabolites like choline and creatin. The ratio of metabolites such as these has been shown to have the power to discriminate between RIN and recurrent disease in glioma patients. At our institution, we have initiated a protocol whereby we will use DWMRI and MRS to study how best to utilize these complimentary forms of imaging.

  4. Acute Retinal Necrosis Presenting in Developmentally-delayed Patients with Neonatal Encephalitis: A Case Series and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Kingsley; Lu, Jonathan; Thinda, Sumeer; Schwab, Ivan; Morse, Lawrence S; Park, Susanna S; Moshiri, Ala

    2016-05-18

    We report three cases of patients with developmental-delay from neonatal herpetic encephalitis and/or meningitis who presented years later with acute retinal necrosis due to herpes simplex virus. The diagnosis was delayed in all cases due to the patients' inability to verbalize their ocular complaints and cooperate with eye examinations. This case series documents the clinical course, pathophysiologic mechanism, and treatment of acute retinal necrosis in this patient population. Clinicians should understand the importance of prudent consideration of acute retinal necrosis in patients with a history of neonatal herpetic encephalitis and/or meningitis presenting with a red eye.

  5. The effect of radiation dose on the onset and progression of radiation-induced brain necrosis in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Brad A; Ma, Htet S W; Hansen, Katherine S; Perks, Julian; Kent, Michael S; Fragoso, Ruben C; Marcu, Laura

    2017-07-01

    To provide a comprehensive understanding of how the selection of radiation dose affects the temporal and spatial progression of radiation-induced necrosis in the rat model. Necrosis was induced with a single fraction of radiation exposure, at doses ranging between 20 and 60 Gy, to the right hemisphere of 8-week-old Fischer rats from a linear accelerator. The development and progression of necrosis in the rats was monitored and quantified every other week with T1- and T2-weighted gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI studies. The time to onset of necrosis was found to be dose-dependent, but after the initial onset, the necrosis progression rate and total volume generated was constant across different doses ranging between 30 and 60 Gy. Radiation doses less than 30 Gy did not develop necrosis within 33 weeks after treatment, indicating a dose threshold existing between 20 and 30 Gy. The highest dose used in this study led to the shortest time to onset of radiation-induced necrosis, while producing comparable disease progression dynamics after the onset. Therefore, for the radiation-induced necrosis rat model using a linear accelerator, the most optimum results were generated from a dose of 60 Gy.

  6. Radiation necrosis in the brain: imaging features and differentiation from tumor recurrence.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ritu; Vattoth, Surjith; Jacob, Rojymon; Manzil, Fathima Fijula Palot; O'Malley, Janis P; Borghei, Peyman; Patel, Bhavik N; Curé, Joel K

    2012-01-01

    Radiation necrosis in the brain commonly occurs in three distinct clinical scenarios, namely, radiation therapy for head and neck malignancy or intracranial extraaxial tumor, stereotactic radiation therapy (including radiosurgery) for brain metastasis, and radiation therapy for primary brain tumors. Knowledge of the radiation treatment plan, amount of brain tissue included in the radiation port, type of radiation, location of the primary malignancy, and amount of time elapsed since radiation therapy is extremely important in determining whether the imaging abnormality represents radiation necrosis or recurrent tumor. Conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of these two entities overlap considerably, and even at histopathologic analysis, tumor mixed with radiation necrosis is a common finding. Advanced imaging modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging and perfusion MR imaging (with calculation of certain specific parameters such as apparent diffusion coefficient ratios, relative peak height, and percentage of signal recovery), MR spectroscopy, and positron emission tomography can be useful in differentiating between recurrent tumor and radiation necrosis. In everyday practice, the visual assessment of diffusion-weighted and perfusion images may also be helpful by favoring one diagnosis over the other, with restricted diffusion and an elevated relative cerebral blood volume being seen much more frequently in recurrent tumor than in radiation necrosis.

  7. Bevacizumab as Therapy for Radiation Necrosis in Four Children With Pontine Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Arthur K.; Macy, Margaret E.; Foreman, Nicholas K.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Diffuse pontine gliomas are a pediatric brain tumor that is fatal in nearly all patients. Given the poor prognosis for patients with this tumor, their quality of life is very important. Radiation therapy provides some palliation, but can result in radiation necrosis and associated neurologic decline. The typical treatment for this necrosis is steroid therapy. Although the steroids are effective, they have numerous side effects that can often significantly compromise quality of life. Bevacizumab, an antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor, has been suggested as a treatment for radiation necrosis. We report on our initial experience with bevacizumab therapy for radiation necrosis in pediatric pontine gliomas. Materials and Methods: Four children with pontine gliomas treated at the Children's Hospital in Denver and the University of Colorado Denver developed evidence of radiation necrosis both clinically and on imaging. Those 4 children then received bevacizumab as a treatment for the radiation necrosis. We reviewed the clinical outcome and imaging findings. Results: After bevacizumab therapy, 3 children had significant clinical improvement and were able to discontinue steroid use. One child continued to decline, and, in retrospect, had disease progression, not radiation necrosis. In all cases, bevacizumab was well tolerated. Conclusions: In children with pontine gliomas, bevacizumab may provide both therapeutic benefit and diagnostic information. More formal evaluation of bevacizumab in these children is needed.

  8. Delayed Avascular Necrosis and Fragmentation of the Lunate Following Perilunate Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Benjamin; Kakar, Sanjeev

    2015-06-01

    Perilunate and perilunate fracture dislocations are high-energy injuries with the wrist loaded in extension, ulnar deviation, and intercarpal supination. The force vector travels from a radial to a ulnar direction and can result in complex carpal instability. The diagnosis is often delayed, which can result in suboptimal outcomes. Nonoperative management can produce inferior results, with patients experiencing pain and weakness. Therefore, early treatment with open reduction and internal fixation is recommended to assess the osteochondral and ligamentous disruption and to achieve anatomic reduction of the carpus. Despite this, these patients can develop radiographic degenerative joint disease, which can be seen in up to 90% of cases. This can be due to difficulty in holding and maintaining carpal reduction. Increased radiodensity of the lunate following these injuries has been observed but is believed to be a transient phenomenon without risk of progression to avascular necrosis. This may be due to the blood supply of the lunate, which has varied patterns of intraosseous and extraosseous vascularity. The authors report a patient who developed avascular necrosis and delayed lunate fragmentation following a May-field Type IV perilunate dislocation. This finding highlights the importance of long-term follow-up with these patients.

  9. Alectinib induced CNS radiation necrosis in an ALK+NSCLC patient with a remote (7 years) history of brain radiation.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Weitz, Michael; Jalas, John R; Kelly, Daniel F; Wong, Vanessa; Azada, Michele C; Quines, Oliver; Klempner, Samuel J

    2016-06-01

    Alectinib is a second generation ALK inhibitor that has significant clinical activity in central nervous system (CNS) metastases in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Pseudoprogression (PsP) due to radiation necrosis during alecitnib treatment of central nervous system (CNS) metastases from ALK-rearranged NSCLC as been reported. Hence, distinguishing radiation-related PsP from alectinib-induced radiographic changes is important to avoid erroneous early trial discontinuation and abandonment of an effective treatment. However, it remains difficult to assess casuality of radiation necrosis is related to recent direct radiation or induced by alectinib treatment or both. It is also unknown how long from previous radiation can alectinib still induce radiation necrosis. Here we reported a crizotinib-refractory ALK-positive NSCLC patient who develop radiation necrosis in one of his metastatic CNS lesions after approximately 12 months of alectinib treatment who otherwise had on-going CNS response on alectinib. His most recent radiation to his CNS metastases was 7 years prior to the start of alectinib. This case illustrates that in the setting of pror CNS radiation, given the significant clinical activity of alectinib in CNS metastases in ALK-positive NSCLC patients the risk of CNS radiation necrosis remains long after previous radiation to the CNS metastases has been completed and can occur after durable response of treatment.

  10. [Brain radiation necrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy of the resection cavity for intracranial metastases: analysis of the literature from four cases].

    PubMed

    Doré, M; Lefebvre, L; Delpon, G; Thillays, F

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy after resection of brain metastasis is an alternative to whole brain radiotherapy. A high dose per fraction is associated with a risk of radiation necrosis. We present four cases of confirmed histological radiation necrosis. Differentiating recurrent tumour from radiation necrosis in this scenario is challenging. An enhancing area in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a "cut bell pepper" appearance may suggest radiation necrosis. Advanced imaging modalities such as perfusion MR imaging and positron emission tomography can be useful. Dosimetric predictors of the occurrence of radiation necrosis after stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy are poorly understood and require prospective studies on larger cohorts.

  11. Dose–Volume Relationships Associated With Temporal Lobe Radiation Necrosis After Skull Base Proton Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Mark W.; Linton, Okechukwu R.; Calley, Cynthia S.J.

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: We evaluated patient and treatment parameters correlated with development of temporal lobe radiation necrosis. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of a cohort of 66 patients treated for skull base chordoma, chondrosarcoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, or sinonasal malignancies between 2005 and 2012, who had at least 6 months of clinical and radiographic follow-up. The median radiation dose was 75.6 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]). Analyzed factors included gender, age, hypertension, diabetes, smoking status, use of chemotherapy, and the absolute dose:volume data for both the right and left temporal lobes, considered separately. A generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression analysis evaluated potential predictors of radiation necrosis, and the median effective concentration (EC50) model estimated dose–volume parameters associated with radiation necrosis. Results: Median follow-up time was 31 months (range 6-96 months) and was 34 months in patients who were alive. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of overall survival at 3 years was 84.9%. The 3-year estimate of any grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis was 12.4%, and for grade 2 or higher radiation necrosis was 5.7%. On multivariate GEE, only dose–volume relationships were associated with the risk of radiation necrosis. In the EC50 model, all dose levels from 10 to 70 Gy (RBE) were highly correlated with radiation necrosis, with a 15% 3-year risk of any-grade temporal lobe radiation necrosis when the absolute volume of a temporal lobe receiving 60 Gy (RBE) (aV60) exceeded 5.5 cm{sup 3}, or aV70 > 1.7 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Dose–volume parameters are highly correlated with the risk of developing temporal lobe radiation necrosis. In this study the risk of radiation necrosis increased sharply when the temporal lobe aV60 exceeded 5.5 cm{sup 3} or aV70 > 1.7 cm{sup 3}. Treatment planning goals should include constraints on the volume of temporal lobes receiving

  12. Shock wave therapy as a treatment of nonunions, avascular necrosis, and delayed healing of stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Furia, John P; Rompe, Jan D; Cacchio, Angelo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-12-01

    Shock wave therapy (SWT) stimulates angiogenesis and osteogenesis. SWT is commonly used to treat soft tissue musculoskeletal conditions such as fasciopathies and tendinopathies. Recent basic science and clinical data suggest that SWT can also be used to treat disorders of bone. Nonunions, avascular necrosis, and delayed healing of stress fractures have all been successfully treated with SWT. Success rates with SWT are equal to those with standard surgical treatment, but SWT has the advantage of decreased morbidity. The procedure is safe, well tolerated, yields few complications, and, typically, can be performed on an outpatient basis. SWT is a viable noninvasive alternative to stimulate healing of bone. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Systematic review of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis.

    PubMed

    Borab, Zachary; Mirmanesh, Michael D; Gantz, Madeleine; Cusano, Alessandro; Pu, Lee L Q

    2017-04-01

    Every year, 1.2 million cancer patients receive radiation therapy in the United States. Late radiation tissue injury occurs in an estimated 5-15% of these patients. Tissue injury can include skin necrosis, which can lead to chronic nonhealing wounds. Despite many treatments available to help heal skin necrosis such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy, no clinical guidelines exist and evidence is lacking. The purpose of this review is to identify and comprehensively summarize studies published to date to evaluate the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis. Adhering to PRISMA guidelines, a systematic review of currently published articles was performed, evaluating the use of hyperbaric oxygen to treat skin necrosis. Eight articles were identified, including one observational cohort, five case series, and two case reports. The articles describe changes in symptoms and alteration in wound healing of radiation-induced skin necrosis after treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a safe intervention with promising outcomes; however, additional evidence is needed to endorse its application as a relevant therapy in the treatment of radiation-induced skin necrosis.

  14. Radiation necrosis causing failure of automatic ventilation during sleep with central sleep apnea

    SciTech Connect

    Udwadia, Z.F.; Athale, S.; Misra, V.P.; Wadia, N.H.

    1987-09-01

    A patient operated upon for a midline cerebellar hemangioblastoma developed failure of automatic respiration during sleep, together with central sleep apnea syndrome, approximately two years after receiving radiation therapy to the brain. Clinical and CT scan findings were compatible with a diagnosis of radiation necrosis as the cause of his abnormal respiratory control.

  15. Semiquantitative analysis using thallium-201 SPECT for differential diagnosis between tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis after gamma knife surgery for malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Shigeo; Shuto, Takashi; Takase, Hajime; Ohtake, Makoto; Tomura, Nagatsuki; Tanaka, Takahiro; Sonoda, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Semiquantitative analysis of thallium-201 chloride single photon emission computed tomography (201Tl SPECT) was evaluated for the discrimination between recurrent brain tumor and delayed radiation necrosis after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas. The medical records were reviewed of 75 patients, including 48 patients with metastatic brain tumor and 27 patients with high-grade glioma who underwent GKS in our institution, and had suspected tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis on follow-up neuroimaging and deteriorating clinical status after GKS. Analysis of 201Tl SPECT data used the early ratio (ER) and the delayed ratio (DR) calculated as tumor/normal average counts on the early and delayed images, and the retention index (RI) as the ratio of DR to ER. A total of 107 tumors were analyzed with 201Tl SPECT. Nineteen lesions were removed surgically and histological diagnoses established, and the other lesions were evaluated with follow-up clinical and neuroimaging examinations after GKS. The final diagnosis was considered to be recurrent tumor in 65 lesions and radiation necrosis in 42 lesions. Semiquantitative analysis demonstrated significant differences in DR (P=.002) and RI (P<.0001), but not in ER (P=.372), between the tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis groups, and no significant differences between metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas in all indices (P=.926 for ER, P=.263 for DR, and P=.826 for RI). Receiver operating characteristics analysis indicated that RI was the most informative index with the optimum threshold of 0.775, which provided 82.8% sensitivity, 83.7% specificity, and 82.8% accuracy. Semiquantitative analysis of 201Tl SPECT provides useful information for the differentiation between tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis in metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas after GKS, and the RI may be the most valuable index for this purpose. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. Semiquantitative Analysis Using Thallium-201 SPECT for Differential Diagnosis Between Tumor Recurrence and Radiation Necrosis After Gamma Knife Surgery for Malignant Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, Shigeo; Shuto, Takashi; Takase, Hajime; Ohtake, Makoto; Tomura, Nagatsuki; Tanaka, Takahiro; Sonoda, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Semiquantitative analysis of thallium-201 chloride single photon emission computed tomography ({sup 201}Tl SPECT) was evaluated for the discrimination between recurrent brain tumor and delayed radiation necrosis after gamma knife surgery (GKS) for metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The medical records were reviewed of 75 patients, including 48 patients with metastatic brain tumor and 27 patients with high-grade glioma who underwent GKS in our institution, and had suspected tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis on follow-up neuroimaging and deteriorating clinical status after GKS. Analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT data used the early ratio (ER) and the delayed ratio (DR) calculated as tumor/normal average counts on the early and delayed images, and the retention index (RI) as the ratio of DR to ER. Results: A total of 107 tumors were analyzed with {sup 201}Tl SPECT. Nineteen lesions were removed surgically and histological diagnoses established, and the other lesions were evaluated with follow-up clinical and neuroimaging examinations after GKS. The final diagnosis was considered to be recurrent tumor in 65 lesions and radiation necrosis in 42 lesions. Semiquantitative analysis demonstrated significant differences in DR (P=.002) and RI (P<.0001), but not in ER (P=.372), between the tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis groups, and no significant differences between metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas in all indices (P=.926 for ER, P=.263 for DR, and P=.826 for RI). Receiver operating characteristics analysis indicated that RI was the most informative index with the optimum threshold of 0.775, which provided 82.8% sensitivity, 83.7% specificity, and 82.8% accuracy. Conclusions: Semiquantitative analysis of {sup 201}Tl SPECT provides useful information for the differentiation between tumor recurrence and radiation necrosis in metastatic brain tumors and high-grade gliomas after GKS, and the RI may be the most

  17. Radiation necrosis of the pons after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    DeSalvo, Matthew N

    2012-07-01

    We report a case of radiation necrosis in an unusual location, the pons, in a patient who had received chemoradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) over one year prior to presentation. This patient presented with subacute onset of ataxic hemiparesis and slurred speech. Initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies showed two 1-2 cm peripherally contrast-enhancing lesions in the pons with extensive surrounding edema. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) played a key role in narrowing the differential diagnosis to radiation necrosis. The patient underwent biweekly bevacizumab therapy and has remained clinically stable with radiologic improvement of his lesion. In addition to this case, we present an overview of the use of advanced neuroimaging in distinguishing radiation necrosis of the central nervous system (CNS) from other entities as well as the role of bevacizumab in treatment.

  18. Brain necrosis after fractionated radiation therapy: Is the halftime for repair longer than we thought?

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Edward T.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To derive a radiobiological model that enables the estimation of brain necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy rates for a variety of fractionation schemes, and to compare repair effects between brain and spinal cord. Methods: Sigmoidal dose response relationships for brain radiation necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy are derived from clinical data using nonlinear regression. Three different repair models are considered and the repair halftimes are included as regression parameters. Results: For radiation necrosis, a repair halftime of 38.1 (range 6.9-76) h is found with monoexponential repair, while for spinal cord myelopathy, a repair halftime of 4.1 (range 0-8) h is found. The best-fit alpha beta ratio is 0.96 (range 0.24-1.73)Conclusions: A radiobiological model that includes repair corrections can describe the clinical data for a variety of fraction sizes, fractionation schedules, and total doses. Modeling suggests a relatively long repair halftime for brain necrosis. This study suggests that the repair halftime for late radiation effects in the brain may be longer than is currently thought. If confirmed in future studies, this may lead to a re-evaluation of radiation fractionation schedules for some CNS diseases, particularly for those diseases where fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy is used.

  19. The Diagnosis and Treatment of Pseudoprogression, Radiation Necrosis and Brain Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Parvez, Kashif; Parvez, Aatif; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is an important modality used in the treatment of patients with brain metastatic disease and malignant gliomas. Post-treatment surveillance often involves serial magnetic resonance imaging. A challenge faced by clinicians is in the diagnosis and management of a suspicious gadolinium-enhancing lesion found on imaging. The suspicious lesion may represent post-treatment radiation effects (PTRE) such as pseudoprogression, radiation necrosis or tumor recurrence. Significant progress has been made in diagnostic imaging modalities to assist in differentiating these entities. Surgical and medical interventions have also been developed to treat PTRE. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic imaging modalities and provide an algorithm for the management of pseudoprogression, radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence. PMID:24995696

  20. Inertia, gravitation, and radiation time delays

    SciTech Connect

    Graneau, P.

    1987-05-01

    This note explains how an instantaneous action-at-a-distance theory gives rise to time delays between a cause in one location and its effect at another. The key to this is a suitable law of induction which itself does not produce the time delay, but contains the cause in the form of a time derivative. The many-body solution process for an array of simultaneous induction equations then reveals retardation between cause and effect without the transport of energy at finite velocity. It is suggested that a suitable law of induction of inertia applied to an object in the solar system and the many-body universe may furnish the quantitative connection between inertia and Newtonian gravitation.

  1. Increased tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA after cellular exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Hallahan, D E; Spriggs, D R; Beckett, M A; Kufe, D W; Weichselbaum, R R

    1989-01-01

    We report that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA is increased after treatment with x-rays in certain human sarcoma cells. An increase in TNF-alpha mRNA is accompanied by the increased production of TNF-alpha protein. TNF-alpha enhances radiation lethality in both TNF-alpha-producing and -nonproducing tumor cells. These data suggest that, in addition to the direct cytotoxic effects of x-rays, production of TNF-alpha may add to radiation lethality through autocrine and paracrine mechanisms. Combinations of TNF-alpha and therapeutic radiation may be useful in clinical cancer therapy. Images PMID:2602359

  2. A prediction model of radiation-induced necrosis for intracranial radiosurgery based on target volume.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bo; Wen, Ning; Chetty, Indrin J; Huang, Yimei; Brown, Stephen L; Snyder, Karen C; Siddiqui, Farzan; Movsas, Benjamin; Siddiqui, M Salim

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to extend the observation that the 12 Gy-radiosurgical-volume (V12Gy) correlates with the incidence of radiation necrosis in patients with intracranial tumors treated with radiosurgery by using target volume to predict V12Gy. V12Gy based on the target volume was used to predict the radiation necrosis probability (P) directly. Also investigated was the reduction in radiation necrosis rates (ΔP) as a result of optimizing the prescription isodose lines for linac-based SRS. Twenty concentric spherical targets and 22 patients with brain tumors were retrospectively studied. For each case, a standard clinical plan and an optimized plan with prescription isodose lines based on gradient index were created. V12Gy were extracted from both plans to analyze the correlation between V12Gy and target volume. The necrosis probability P as a function of V12Gy was evaluated. To account for variation in prescription, the relation between V12Gy and prescription was also investigated. A prediction model for radiation-induced necrosis was presented based on the retrospective study. The model directly relates the typical prescribed dose and the target volume to the radionecrosis probability; V12Gy increased linearly with the target volume (R(2)  > 0.99). The linear correlation was then integrated into a logistic model to predict P directly from the target volume. The change in V12Gy as a function of prescription was modeled using a single parameter, s (=-1.15). Relatively large ΔP was observed for target volumes between 7 and 28 cm(3) with the maximum reduction (8-9%) occurring at approximately 18 cm(3) . Based on the model results, optimizing the prescription isodose line for target volumes between 7 and 28 cm(3) results in a significant reduction in necrosis probability. V12Gy based on the target volume could provide clinicians a predictor of radiation necrosis at the contouring stage thus facilitating treatment decisions. © 2017 American Association of

  3. Radiation dependence of inverter propagation delay from timing sampler measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.; Lin, Y.-S.

    1989-01-01

    A timing sampler consisting of 14 four-stage inverter-pair chains with different load capacitances was fabricated in 1.6-micron n-well CMOS and irradiated with cobalt-60 at 10 rad(Si)/s. For this CMOS process the measured results indicate that the rising delay increases by about 2.2 ns/Mrad(Si) and the falling delay increase is very small, i.e., less than 300 ps/Mrad(Si). The amount of radiation-induced delay depends on the size of the load capacitance. The maximum value observed for this effect was 5.65 ns/pF-Mrad(Si). Using a sensitivity analysis, the sensitivity of the rising delay to radiation can be explained by a simple timing model and the radiation sensitivity of dc MOSFET parameters. This same approach could not explain the insensitivity of the falling delay to radiation. This may be due to a failure of the timing model and/or trapping effects.

  4. Novel biomarker identification using metabolomic profiling to differentiate radiation necrosis and recurrent tumor following Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Alex Y; Turban, Jack L; Damisah, Eyiyemisi C; Li, Jie; Alomari, Ahmed K; Eid, Tore; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Chiang, Veronica L

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Following an initial response of brain metastases to Gamma Knife radiosurgery, regrowth of the enhancing lesion as detected on MRI may represent either radiation necrosis (a treatment-related inflammatory change) or recurrent tumor. Differentiation of radiation necrosis from tumor is vital for management decision making but remains difficult by imaging alone. In this study, gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF) was used to identify differential metabolite profiles of the 2 tissue types obtained by surgical biopsy to find potential targets for noninvasive imaging. METHODS Specimens of pure radiation necrosis and pure tumor obtained from patient brain biopsies were flash-frozen and validated histologically. These formalin-free tissue samples were then analyzed using GC-TOF. The metabolite profiles of radiation necrosis and tumor samples were compared using multivariate and univariate statistical analysis. Statistical significance was defined as p ≤ 0.05. RESULTS For the metabolic profiling, GC-TOF was performed on 7 samples of radiation necrosis and 7 samples of tumor. Of the 141 metabolites identified, 17 (12.1%) were found to be statistically significantly different between comparison groups. Of these metabolites, 6 were increased in tumor, and 11 were increased in radiation necrosis. An unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis found that tumor had elevated levels of metabolites associated with energy metabolism, whereas radiation necrosis had elevated levels of metabolites that were fatty acids and antioxidants/cofactors. CONCLUSIONS To the authors' knowledge, this is the first tissue-based metabolomics study of radiation necrosis and tumor. Radiation necrosis and recurrent tumor following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for brain metastases have unique metabolite profiles that may be targeted in the future to develop noninvasive metabolic imaging techniques.

  5. Delayed radiation encephalopathy after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer: A CT study of 45 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.Q.; Guan, Y.H.; Zhao, L.Z.; Xie, S.X.; Guo, Z.; Liang, Z.H. )

    1991-03-01

    The CT features of 45 cases of delayed radiation encephalopathy (including radiation necrosis) following radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma are reported. The brain lesions were uni- or bilateral and involved mainly the white matter and subsequently the gray matter of the lower portion of the brain included within the portals of irradiation and its vicinity. The lesions were edematous and hypodense on CT and showed postcontrast enhancement in 50% of the cases. Within the period of follow-up (1-5 years), the lesions showed remissions and exacerbations and in some cases stabilized. In addition, there was progressive cerebral atrophy, manifesting itself mainly as dilatation of the temporal horns, the neighboring cisterns, and sylvian fissures. In some cases that were followed for a long time, the cerebral lesions showed either foci of calcification or encephalomalacia and/or porencephaly.

  6. Tumor necrosis factor alpha selectively sensitizes human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells to heat and radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, G.H.; McHugh, T.; Weber, R.; Goeddel, D.V. )

    1991-05-15

    We report here that infection of the human T-cell line HUT-78 with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) increases its sensitivity to heat and radiation toxicity. A possible explanation for this result may be the reduced expression of manganous superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in HIV-infected cells compared to uninfected cells. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) further sensitizes HIV-infected cells but not uninfected cells to heat and radiation. This is consistent with the ability of TNF-alpha to induce the expression of MnSOD in uninfected but not in HIV-infected cells. HIV-infected HUT-78 cell lines engineered to overexpress MnSOD are more resistant to heat and radiation than HIV-infected cells that do not overexpress MnSOD. However, treatment with TNF-alpha still sensitizes these cells to heat and radiation.

  7. Radiation induction of delayed recombination in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Jun; Uematsu, Norio; Shiraishi, Satomi; Toyoshima, Megumi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Niwa, Ohtsura

    2008-08-02

    Ionizing radiation is known to induce delayed chromosome and gene mutations in the descendants of the irradiated tissue culture cells. Molecular mechanisms of such delayed mutations are yet to be elucidated, since high genomic complexity of mammalian cells makes it difficult to analyze. We now tested radiation induction of delayed recombination in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe by monitoring the frequency of homologous recombination after X-irradiation. A reporter with 200 bp tandem repeats went through spontaneous recombination at a frequency of 1.0 x 10(-4), and the frequency increased dose-dependently to around 10 x 10(-4) at 500 Gy of X-irradiation. Although the repair of initial DNA damage was thought to be completed before the restart of cell division cycle, the elevation of the recombination frequency persisted for 8-10 cell generations after irradiation (delayed recombination). The delayed recombination suggests that descendants of the irradiated cells keep a memory of the initial DNA damage which upregulates recombination machinery for 8-10 generations even in the absence of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Since radical scavengers were ineffective in inhibiting the delayed recombination, a memory by continuous production of DNA damaging agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) was excluded. Recombination was induced in trans in a reporter on chromosome III by a DNA DSB at a site on chromosome I, suggesting the untargeted nature of delayed recombination. Interestingly, Rad22 foci persisted in the X-irradiated population in parallel with the elevation of the recombination frequency. These results suggest that the epigenetic damage memory induced by DNA DSB upregulates untargeted and delayed recombination in S. pombe.

  8. Unexpected radiation laryngeal necrosis after carbon ion therapy using conventional dose fractionation for laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Demizu, Yusuke; Fujii, Osamu; Nagano, Fumiko; Terashima, Kazuki; Jin, Dongcun; Mima, Masayuki; Oda, Naoharu; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Takeda, Makiko; Ito, Kazuyuki; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Okimoto, Tomoaki

    2015-11-01

    Carbon ion therapy is a type of radiotherapy that can deliver high-dose radiation to a tumor while minimizing the dose delivered to organs at risk. Moreover, carbon ions are classified as high linear energy transfer radiation and are expected to be effective for even photon-resistant tumors. A 73-year-old man with glottic squamous cell carcinoma, T3N0M0, refused laryngectomy and received carbon ion therapy of 70 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) in 35 fractions. Three months after the therapy, the patient had an upper airway inflammation, and then laryngeal edema and pain occurred. Five months after the therapy, the airway stenosis was severe and computed tomography showed lack of the left arytenoid cartilage and exacerbation of laryngeal necrosis. Despite the treatment, 5 and a half months after the therapy, the laryngeal edema and necrosis had become even worse and the surrounding mucosa was edematous and pale. Six months after the therapy, pharyngolaryngoesophagectomy and reconstruction with free jejunal autograft were performed. The surgical specimen pathologically showed massive necrosis and no residual tumor. Three years after the carbon ion therapy, he is alive without recurrence. The first reported laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma case treated with carbon ion therapy resulted in an unexpected radiation laryngeal necrosis. Tissue damage caused by carbon ion therapy may be difficult to repair even for radioresistant cartilage; therefore, hollow organs reinforced by cartilage, such as the larynx, may be vulnerable to carbon ion therapy. Caution should be exercised when treating tumors in or adjacent to such organs with carbon ion therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Buttock Necrosis after Uterine Artery Embolization for Delayed Hysterectomy in Placenta Percreta

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Delboy, Annette; Burke, William M.; Tergas, Ana I.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Morbidly adherent placenta (MAP) is increasing in incidence and is commonly associated with maternal hemorrhage and cesarean hysterectomy. Uterine artery embolization (UAE) may be utilized in the conservative management of placenta percreta to potentially reduce blood loss. The incidence of complications from UAE in the conservative management of placenta percreta is poorly described. To our knowledge, we present the first reported case of buttock necrosis in this setting. Case. A 39-year-old gravida nine para two with placenta percreta who underwent conservative management with UAE complicated by right buttock necrosis. Conclusion. While UAE may potentially decrease blood loss, it is not without risk. More studies must be performed in order to quantify those risks and determine the clinical utility of UAE. PMID:28050294

  10. O2 -sensitive MRI distinguishes brain tumor versus radiation necrosis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Beeman, Scott C; Shui, Ying-Bo; Perez-Torres, Carlos J; Engelbach, John A; Ackerman, Joseph J H; Garbow, Joel R

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the relationship between the (1) H longitudinal relaxation rate constant, R1 , and oxygen (O2 ) concentration (relaxivity, r1 ) in tissue and to quantify O2 -driven changes in R1 (ΔR1 ) during a breathing gas challenge in normal brain, radiation-induced lesions, and tumor lesions. R1 data were collected in control-state mice (n = 4) during three different breathing gas (and thus tissue O2 ) conditions. In parallel experiments, pO2 was measured in the thalamus of control-state mice (n = 4) under the same breathing gas conditions using an O2 -sensitive microprobe. The relaxivity of tissue O2 was calculated using the R1 and pO2 data. R1 data were collected in control-state (n = 4) mice, a glioma model (n = 7), and a radiation necrosis model (n = 6) during two breathing gas (thus tissue O2 ) conditions. R1 and ΔR1 were calculated for each cohort. O2 r1 in the brain was 9 × 10(-4)  ± 3 × 10(-4) mm Hg(-1) · s(-1) at 4.7T. R1 and ΔR1 measurements distinguished radiation necrosis from tumor (P< 0.03 and P< 0.01, respectively). The relaxivity of O2 in the brain is determined. R1 and ΔR1 measurements differentiate tumor lesions from radiation necrosis lesions in the mouse models. These pathologies are difficult to distinguish by traditional imaging techniques; O2 -driven changes in R1 holds promise in this regard. Magn Reson Med 75:2442-2447, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Assessment of MRI parameters as imaging biomarkers for radiation necrosis in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Silun; Tryggestad, Erik; Zhou, Tingting; Armour, Michael; Wen, Zhibo; Fu, De-Xue; Ford, Eric; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Radiation necrosis is a major complication of radiation therapy. We explore the features of radiation-induced brain necrosis in the rat, using multiple MRI approaches, including T1, T2, apparent diffusion constant (ADC), cerebral blood flow (CBF), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), and amide proton transfer (APT) of endogenous mobile proteins and peptides. Methods and Materials Adult rats (Fischer 344; n = 15) were irradiated with a single, well-collimated X-ray beam (40 Gy; 10 × 10 mm2) in the left brain hemisphere. MRI was acquired on a 4.7 T animal scanner at ~25 weeks post-radiation. The MRI signals of necrotic cores and peri-necrotic regions were assessed with a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Histological evaluation was accomplished with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Results ADC and CBF MRI could separate peri-necrotic and contralateral normal brain tissue (p < 0.01 and < 0.05, respectively), while T1, T2, MTR, and APT could not. MRI signal intensities were significantly lower in the necrotic core than in normal brain for CBF (p < 0.001) and APT (p < 0.01), while insignificantly higher or lower for T1, T2, MTR, and ADC. Histological results demonstrated coagulative necrosis within the necrotic core, and reactive astrogliosis and vascular damage within the peri-necrotic region. Conclusion ADC and CBF are promising imaging biomarkers for identifying peri-necrotic regions, while CBF and APT are promising for identifying necrotic cores. PMID:22483739

  12. Reenlargement of radiation necrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastasis from lung cancer during bevacizumab treatment.

    PubMed

    Furuuchi, Koji; Nishiyama, Akihiro; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Yokoyama, Toshihide; Ishida, Tadashi

    2017-03-01

    We describe a 55-year-old man who received stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for the treatment of brain metastasis from lung adenocarcinoma. Fourteen months after SRT, right-sided hemiparesis developed, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed progression of perifocal edema and an enhanced lesion. Cerebral radiation necrosis was diagnosed, and treatment with bevacizumab was initiated. The lesion clearly responded to bevacizumab therapy, but reenlarged 8 months later and was surgically resected. Histopathological analysis of the resected specimen revealed large areas of necrosis; however, viable tumor cells were detected in the necrotic areas. Reenlargement of the necrotic lesion was attributed to the recurrence of lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Delayed effects of ionizing radiation on the ear

    SciTech Connect

    Bohne, B.A.; Marks, J.E.; Glasgow, G.P.

    1985-07-01

    The question of damage to the ear from exposure to ionizing radiation was addressed by exposing groups of chinchillas to fractioned doses of radiation (2 Gy per day) for total doses ranging from 40 to 90 Gy. In order to allow any delayed effects of radiation to become manifest, the animals were sacrificed two years after completion of treatment and their temporal bones were prepared for microscopic examination. The most pronounced effect of treatment was degeneration of sensory and supporting cells and loss of eighth nerve fibers in the organ of Corti. Damage increased with increasing dose of radiation. The degree of damage found in many of these ears was of sufficient magnitude to produce a permanent sensorineural hearing loss.

  14. Radiation hard programmable delay line for LHCb calorimeter upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauricio, J.; Gascón, D.; Vilasís, X.; Picatoste, E.; Machefert, F.; Lefrancois, J.; Duarte, O.; Beigbeder, C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a SPI-programmable clock delay chip based on a Delay Locked Loop (DLL) in order to shift the phase of the LHC clock (25 ns) in steps of 1ns, with less than 5 ps jitter and 23 ps of DNL. The delay lines will be integrated into ICECAL, the LHCb calorimeter front-end analog signal processing ASIC in the near future. The stringent noise requirements on the ASIC imply minimizing the noise contribution of digital components. This is accomplished by implementing the DLL in differential mode. To achieve the required radiation tolerance several techniques are applied: double guard rings between PMOS and NMOS transistors as well as glitch suppressors and TMR Registers. This 5.7 mm2 chip has been implemented in CMOS 0.35 μm technology.

  15. Assessment of MRI Parameters as Imaging Biomarkers for Radiation Necrosis in the Rat Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Silun; Tryggestad, Erik; Zhou Tingting; Armour, Michael; Wen Zhibo; Fu Dexue; Ford, Eric; Zijl, Peter C.M. van; Zhou Jinyuan

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation necrosis is a major complication of radiation therapy. We explore the features of radiation-induced brain necrosis in the rat, using multiple MRI approaches, including T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, apparent diffusion constant (ADC), cerebral blood flow (CBF), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), and amide proton transfer (APT) of endogenous mobile proteins and peptides. Methods and Materials: Adult rats (Fischer 344; n = 15) were irradiated with a single, well-collimated X-ray beam (40 Gy; 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 mm{sup 2}) in the left brain hemisphere. MRI was acquired on a 4.7-T animal scanner at {approx}25 weeks' postradiation. The MRI signals of necrotic cores and perinecrotic regions were assessed with a one-way analysis of variance. Histological evaluation was accomplished with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results: ADC and CBF MRI could separate perinecrotic and contralateral normal brain tissue (p < 0.01 and < 0.05, respectively), whereas T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, MTR, and APT could not. MRI signal intensities were significantly lower in the necrotic core than in normal brain for CBF (p < 0.001) and APT (p < 0.01) and insignificantly higher or lower for T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, MTR, and ADC. Histological results demonstrated coagulative necrosis within the necrotic core and reactive astrogliosis and vascular damage within the perinecrotic region. Conclusion: ADC and CBF are promising imaging biomarkers for identifying perinecrotic regions, whereas CBF and APT are promising for identifying necrotic cores.

  16. DNMTs are required for delayed genome instability caused by radiation

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Christine A.; Jones, George D.; Anderson, Rhona; Iyer, Pooja; Narayanan, Deepan; Sandhu, Jatinderpal; Singh, Rajinder; Talbot, Christopher J.; Tufarelli, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The ability of ionizing radiation to initiate genomic instability has been harnessed in the clinic where the localized delivery of controlled doses of radiation is used to induce cell death in tumor cells. Though very effective as a therapy, tumor relapse can occur in vivo and its appearance has been attributed to the radio-resistance of cells with stem cell-like features. The molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena are unclear but there is evidence suggesting an inverse correlation between radiation-induced genomic instability and global hypomethylation. To further investigate the relationship between DNA hypomethylation, radiosensitivity and genomic stability in stem-like cells we have studied mouse embryonic stem cells containing differing levels of DNA methylation due to the presence or absence of DNA methyltransferases. Unexpectedly, we found that global levels of methylation do not determine radiosensitivity. In particular, radiation-induced delayed genomic instability was observed at the Hprt gene locus only in wild-type cells. Furthermore, absence of Dnmt1 resulted in a 10-fold increase in de novo Hprt mutation rate, which was unaltered by radiation. Our data indicate that functional DNMTs are required for radiation-induced genomic instability, and that individual DNMTs play distinct roles in genome stability. We propose that DNMTS may contribute to the acquirement of radio-resistance in stem-like cells. PMID:22722331

  17. Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Bevacizumab Therapy for Radiation Necrosis of the Central Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Victor A.; Bidaut, Luc; Hou, Ping; Kumar, Ashok J.; Wefel, Jeffrey S.; Bekele, B. Nebiyou; Prabhu, Sujit; Loghin, Monica; Gilbert, Mark R.; Jackson, Edward F.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To conduct a controlled trial of bevacizumab for the treatment of symptomatic radiation necrosis of the brain. Methods and Materials: A total of 14 patients were entered into a placebo-controlled randomized double-blind study of bevacizumab for the treatment of central nervous system radiation necrosis. All patients were required to have radiographic or biopsy proof of central nervous system radiation necrosis and progressive neurologic symptoms or signs. Eligible patients had undergone irradiation for head-and-neck carcinoma, meningioma, or low- to mid-grade glioma. Patients were randomized to receive intravenous saline or bevacizumab at 3-week intervals. The magnetic resonance imaging findings 3 weeks after the second treatment and clinical signs and symptoms defined the response or progression. Results: The volumes of necrosis estimated on T{sub 2}-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and T{sub 1}-weighted gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging scans demonstrated that although no patient receiving placebo responded (0 of 7), all bevacizumab-treated patients did so (5 of 5 randomized and 7 of 7 crossover) with decreases in T{sub 2}-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery and T{sub 1}-weighted gadolinium-enhanced volumes and a decrease in endothelial transfer constant. All bevacizumab-treated patients-and none of the placebo-treated patients-showed improvement in neurologic symptoms or signs. At a median of 10 months after the last dose of bevacizumab in patients receiving all four study doses, only 2 patients had experienced a recurrence of magnetic resonance imaging changes consistent with progressive radiation necrosis; one patient received a single additional dose of bevacizumab and the other patient received two doses. Conclusion: The Class I evidence of bevacizumab efficacy from the present study in the treatment of central nervous system radiation necrosis justifies consideration of this treatment option for people with

  18. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression is mediated by protein kinase C following activation by ionizing radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Hallahan, D. E.; Virudachalam, S.; Sherman, M. L.; Huberman, E.; Kufe, D. W.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Univ. of Chicago; Dana-Farber Cancer Inst.; Univ. of Chicago

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production following X-irradiation has been implicated in the biological response to ionizing radiation. Protein kinase C (PKC) is suggested to participate in TNF transcriptional induction and X-ray-mediated gene expression. We therefore studied radiation-mediated TNF expression in HL-60 cells with diminished PKC activity produced by either pretreatment with protein kinase inhibitors or prolonged 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment. Both treatments resulted in attenuation of radiation-mediated TNF induction. Consistent with these results, we found no detectable induction of TNF expression following X-irradiation in the HL-60 variant deficient in PKC-mediated signal transduction. The rapid activation of PKC following {gamma}-irradiation was established using an in vitro assay measuring phosphorylation of a PKC specific substrate. A 4.5-fold increase in PKC activity occurred 15 to 30 s following irradiation, which declined to baseline at 60 s. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of phosphoproteins extracted from irradiated cells demonstrated in vivo phosphorylation of the PKC specific substrate Mr 80,000 protein at 45 s following X-irradiation. These findings indicate that signal transduction via the PKC pathway is required for the induction of TNF gene expression by ionizing radiation.

  19. UVB Radiation Delays Tribolium castaneum Metamorphosis by Influencing Ecdysteroid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sang, Wen; Yu, Lin; He, Li; Ma, Wei-Hua; Zhu, Zhi-Hui; Zhu, Fen; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Lei, Chao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation is an important environmental factor. It is generally known that UVB exhibits high genotoxicity due to causing DNA damage, potentially leading to skin carcinogenesis and aging in mammals. However, little is known about the effects of UVB on the development and metamorphosis of insects, which are the most abundant terrestrial animals. In the present study, we performed dose-response analyses of the effects UVB irradiation on Tribolium castaneum metamorphosis, assessed the function of the T. castaneum prothoracicotropic hormone gene (Trcptth), and analyzed ecdysteroid pathway gene expression profile and ecdysterone titers post-UVB irradiation. The results showed that UVB not only caused death of T. castaneum larvae, but also delayed larval-pupal metamorphosis and reduced the size and emergence rate of pupae. In addition, we verified the function of Trcptth, which is responsible for regulating metamorphosis. It was also found that the expression profiles of Trcptth as well as ecdysteroidogenesis and response genes were influenced by UVB radiation. Therefore, a disturbance pulse of ecdysteroid may be involved in delaying development under exposure to irradiation. To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating that UVB can influence the metamorphosis of insects. This study will contribute to a better understanding of the impact of UVB on signaling mechanisms in insect metamorphosis.

  20. UVB Radiation Delays Tribolium castaneum Metamorphosis by Influencing Ecdysteroid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Wen; Yu, Lin; He, Li; Ma, Wei-Hua; Zhu, Zhi-Hui; Zhu, Fen; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Lei, Chao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation is an important environmental factor. It is generally known that UVB exhibits high genotoxicity due to causing DNA damage, potentially leading to skin carcinogenesis and aging in mammals. However, little is known about the effects of UVB on the development and metamorphosis of insects, which are the most abundant terrestrial animals. In the present study, we performed dose-response analyses of the effects UVB irradiation on Tribolium castaneum metamorphosis, assessed the function of the T. castaneum prothoracicotropic hormone gene (Trcptth), and analyzed ecdysteroid pathway gene expression profile and ecdysterone titers post-UVB irradiation. The results showed that UVB not only caused death of T. castaneum larvae, but also delayed larval-pupal metamorphosis and reduced the size and emergence rate of pupae. In addition, we verified the function of Trcptth, which is responsible for regulating metamorphosis. It was also found that the expression profiles of Trcptth as well as ecdysteroidogenesis and response genes were influenced by UVB radiation. Therefore, a disturbance pulse of ecdysteroid may be involved in delaying development under exposure to irradiation. To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating that UVB can influence the metamorphosis of insects. This study will contribute to a better understanding of the impact of UVB on signaling mechanisms in insect metamorphosis. PMID:26986217

  1. Hematological and pathological features of massive hepatic necrosis in two radiated tortoises (Astrochelys radiata)

    PubMed Central

    KIDO, Nobuhide; ITAGAKI, Iori; KIRYU, Daisuke; OMIYA, Tomoko; ONO, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Two radiated tortoises (Astrochelys radiata) exhibited anorexia and hypokinesia. In both cases, hematological and serum biochemical examinations revealed high alkaline phosphatase levels, moderately high aspartate aminotransferase levels and white blood cell counts approximately within the normal range. Despite being treated, the tortoises died 9 and 43 days after the first clinical examination. Gross pathological examinations revealed that the livers of both animals were extremely swollen and contained pale yellow necrotic tissue. Histopathological assessment revealed that the livers contained a massive area of hepatic necrosis surrounded by migration of macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. In one of the cases, severe fibrosis was observed. The present study provides reference information for similar cases in the future. PMID:27746414

  2. Delay-Line Three-Dimensional Position Sensitive Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Manhee

    High-resistivity silicon(Si) in large volumes and with good charge carrier transport properties has been produced and achieved success as a radiation detector material over the past few years due to its relatively low cost as well as the availability of well-established processing technologies. One application of that technology is in the fabrication of various position-sensing topologies from which the incident radiation's direction can be determined. We have succeeded in developing the modeling tools for investigating different position-sensing schemes and used those tools to examine both amplitude-based and time-based methods, an assessment that indicates that fine position-sensing can be achieved with simpler readout designs than are conventionally deployed. This realization can make ubiquitous and inexpensive deployment of special nuclear materials (SNM) detecting technology becomes more feasible because if one can deploy position-sensitive semiconductor detectors with only one or two contacts per side. For this purpose, we have described the delay-line radiation detector and its optimized fabrication. The semiconductor physics were simulated, the results from which guided the fabrication of the guard ring structure and the detector electrode, both of which included metal-field-plates. The measured improvement in the leakage current was confirmed with the fabricated devices, and the structures successfully suppressed soft-breakdown. We also demonstrated that fabricating an asymmetric strip-line structure successfully minimizing the pulse shaping and increases the distance through which one can propagate the information of the deposited charge distribution. With fabricated delay-line detectors we can acquire alpha spectra (Am-241) and gamma spectra (Ba-133, Co-57 and Cd-109). The delay-line detectors can therefore be used to extract the charge information from both ion and gamma-ray interactions. Furthermore, standard charge-sensitive circuits yield high SNR

  3. Differentiation of Recurrent Glioblastoma Multiforme from Radiation Necrosis after External Beam Radiation Therapy with Dynamic Susceptibility-weighted Contrast-enhanced Perfusion MR Imaging1

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Ramon F.; Chang, Jamie S.; Segal, Mark R.; Parsa, Andrew T.; McDermott, Michael W.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Cha, Soonmee

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether cerebral blood volume (CBV), peak height (PH), and percentage of signal intensity recovery (PSR) measurements derived from the results of T2*-weighted dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast material–enhanced (DSC) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) can be used to distinguish recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) from radiation necrosis. Materials and Methods: Fifty-seven patients were enrolled in this HIPAA-compliant institutional review board–approved retrospective study after they received a diagnosis of GBM, underwent EBRT, and were examined with DSC MR imaging, which revealed progressive contrast enhancement within the radiation field. A definitive diagnosis was established at subsequent surgical resection or clinicoradiologic follow-up. Regions of interest were retrospectively drawn around the entire contrast-enhanced region. This created T2*-weighted signal intensity–time curves that produced three cerebral hemodynamic MR imaging measurements: CBV, PH, and PSR. Welch t tests were used to compare measurements between groups. Results: Mean, maximum, and minimum relative PH and relative CBV were significantly higher (P < .01) in patients with recurrent GBM than in patients with radiation necrosis. Mean, maximum, and minimum relative PSR values were significantly lower (P < .05) in patients with recurrent GBM than in patients with radiation necrosis. Conclusion: These findings suggest that DSC perfusion MR imaging may be used to differentiate recurrent GBM from EBRT-induced radiation necrosis. © RSNA, 2009 PMID:19789240

  4. Radiation Necrosis Secondary to Trigeminal Nerve TomoTherapy: A Cautionary Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Montoure, Andrew; Zaidi, Hasan; Sheehy, John P; Shetter, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    New radiation delivery modalities have recently challenged Gamma Knife surgery as the historic gold standard in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). TomoTherapy, a relative newcomer, has been approved by the U.S. FDA for various intracranial pathologies but is currently off label for the treatment of TN. A 73-year-old female presented with gait instability, intermittent headaches, and confusion. She was treated with TomoTherapy for refractory TN at an outside facility, which failed to reduce her symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a lesion in the right mesial temporal lobe. A standard right anterior temporal lobectomy was performed and the final pathological report was notable for necrosis, gliosis, and edema consistent with a remote radiation injury. The patient improved postoperatively, but at her two-year follow up, she continued to have persistent bilateral TN and new onset seizures. Imaging revealed no new mass in the resection field. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an evolving field with broadening indications, which makes it ever more important for physicians to be aware of differences between various SRS modalities. This case report highlights a cautionary example, and emphasizes the need for a more systematic evaluation of novel SRS methods before clinical application. PMID:26180667

  5. Delayed effects of external radiation exposure: a brief history.

    PubMed

    Miller, R W

    1995-11-01

    Within months of Roentgen's discovery of X rays, severe adverse effects were reported, but not well publicized. As a result, over the next two decades, fluoroscope operators suffered lethal skin carcinomas. Later, case reports appeared concerning leukemia in radiation workers, and infants born with severe mental retardation after their mothers had been given pelvic radiotherapy early in pregnancy. Fluoroscopy and radiotherapy for benign disorders continued to be used with abandon until authoritative reports were published on the adverse effects of ionizing radiation by the U.S. NAS-NRC and the UK MRC in 1956. Meanwhile, exposure to the atomic bombs in Japan had occurred and epidemics of delayed effects began to be recognized among the survivors: cataracts (1949), leukemia (1952) and severe mental retardation among newborn infants after intrauterine exposure (1952). No statistically significant excess of germ-cell genetic effects was detected by six clinical measurements (1956), the F1 mortality (1981), cytogenetic studies (1987) or biochemical genetic studies (1988). Somatic cell effects were revealed by long-lasting chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes (1968), and somatic cell mutations were found at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes (1992). Molecular biology is a likely focus of new studies based on the function of the gene for ataxia telangiectasia (1995), a disorder in which children have severe, even lethal acute radiation reactions when given conventional doses of radiotherapy for lymphoma, to which they are prone. Also, obligate heterozygote female relatives can be studied for increased susceptibility to radiation-induced breast cancer, as suggested by clinical studies. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provide incidence data that show the extent of increases in eight common cancers and no increase in eight others (1994). The possibility of very late effects of A-bomb exposure is suggested by recent reports of increased

  6. Comparison of Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Imaging in Differentiating Recurrent Brain Neoplasm From Radiation Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Masch, William R; Wang, Page I; Chenevert, Thomas L; Junck, Larry; Tsien, Christina; Heth, Jason A; Sundgren, Pia C

    2016-05-01

    To compare differences in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and dynamic susceptibility-weighted contrast-enhanced (DSC) magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion imaging characteristics of recurrent neoplasm and radiation necrosis in patients with brain tumors previously treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery and chemotherapy. Patients with a history of brain neoplasm previously treated with radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy and surgery who developed a new enhancing lesion on posttreatment surveillance MRI were enrolled. DSC perfusion MRI and DTI were performed. Region of interest cursors were manually drawn in the contrast-enhancing lesions, in the perilesional white matter edema, and in the contralateral normal-appearing frontal lobe white matter. DTI and DSC perfusion MR indices were compared in recurrent tumor versus radiation necrosis. Twenty-two patients with 24 lesions were included. Sixteen (67%) lesions were placed into the recurrent neoplasm group and eight (33%) lesions were placed into the radiation necrosis group using biopsy results as the gold standard in all but three patients. Mean apparent diffusion coefficient values, mean parallel eigenvalues, and mean perpendicular eigenvalues in the contrast-enhancing lesion were significantly lower, and relative cerebral blood volume was significantly higher for the recurrent neoplasm group compared to the radiation necrosis group (P < 0.01, P = 0.03, P < 0.01, and P < 0.01, respectively). The combined assessment of DTI and DSC MR perfusion properties of new contrast-enhancing lesions is helpful in distinguishing recurrent neoplasm from radiation necrosis in patients with a history of brain neoplasm previously treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery and chemotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose and F-18 Fluorothymidine Positron Emission Tomography in Differentiating Radiation Necrosis from Recurrent Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Enslow, Michael S.; Zollinger, Lauren V.; Morton, Kathryn A.; Kadrmas, Dan J.; Butterfield, Regan I.; Christian, Paul E.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Heilbrun, Marta E.; Jensen, Randy L.; Hoffman, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Report The objective was to compare F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and F-18 fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET) in differentiating radiation necrosis from recurrent glioma. Materials and methods Visual and quantitative analyses were derived from static FDG PET and static and dynamic FLT PET in 15 patients with suspected recurrence of treated ≥ grade II glioma with a new focus of Gd-contrast enhancement on MRI. For FDG PET, SUVmax and the ratio of lesion SUVmax to the SUVmean of contralateral white matter were measured. For FLT PET, SUVmax and Patlak-derived metabolic flux parameter Kimax were measured for the same locus. A 5-point visual confidence scale was applied to FDG PET and FLT PET. ROC analysis was applied to visual and quantitative results. Differences between recurrent tumor and radiation necrosis were tested by Kruskal-Wallis analysis. Based on follow-up Gd-MRI imaging, lesion-specific recurrent tumor was defined as a definitive increase in size of the lesion, and radiation necrosis as stability or regression. Results For FDG SUVmax, FDG ratio lesion:white matter and FLT Kimax, there was a significant difference between mean values for recurrent tumor and radiation necrosis. Recurrent tumor was best identified by FDG ratio of lesion:contralateral normal white matter (AUC 0.98, CI 0.91–1.00, sens. 100%, spec. 75% for an optimized cut-off value of 1.82). Conclusion Both quantitative and visual determinations allow accurate differentiation between recurrent glioma and radiation necrosis by both FDG and FLT PET. In this small series, FLT PET offers no advantage over FDG PET. PMID:22889774

  8. Comparison of Delayed and Immediate Tissue Expander Breast Reconstruction in the Setting of Postmastectomy Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Seth, Akhil K; Silver, Hayley R; Hirsch, Elliot M; Kim, John Y S; Fine, Neil A

    2015-11-01

    Despite the continued demand for immediate prosthetic breast reconstruction, some suggest that delayed reconstruction may reduce complications. However, with limited comparative data available, the extent of this benefit is unclear, particularly in the setting of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). This study evaluates outcomes after mastectomy and delayed tissue expander reconstruction (DTER) or immediate tissue expander reconstruction (ITER). A retrospective review of 893 consecutive patients (1201 breasts) who underwent mastectomy with DTER or ITER at one institution during a 10-year period was performed. Relevant patient factors, including the use of PMRT and complication rates, were recorded. Complications were categorized by type and end-outcome, including nonoperative (no further surgery), operative (further surgery except explantation), and explantation. Statistics were done using Student t test and Fisher exact test. There were no differences in clinical risk factors between ITER (n = 1127 breasts) and DTER (n = 74 breasts) patients. Delayed tissue expander reconstruction breasts had lower rates of mastectomy flap necrosis (P = 0.003), and nonoperative (P = 0.01) and operative (P = 0.001) complications relative to ITER. In ITER breasts, PMRT increased operative complications (P = 0.02) and explantation (P = 0.0005), resulting in a decrease in overall, 2-stage success rate (P < 0.0001). In contrast, there were no differences in outcomes between PMRT and non-PMRT DTER breasts. This comparative study, the largest to date, suggests that DTER is a viable reconstructive alternative that may minimize certain complications over ITER, including in patients needing PMRT. However, unlike with ITER, surgeons can evaluate patients' potential for success with DTER based on skin flap appearance after both mastectomy and PMRT (when present). As a result, the benefits of DTER may also be due to a careful patient selection process preoperatively. The choice of DTER

  9. Delayed effects of external radiation exposure: A brief history

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.W.

    1995-11-01

    Within months of Roentgen`s discovery of X rays, severe adverse effects were reported, but not well publicized. As a result, over the next two decades, fluoroscope operators suffered lethal skin carcinomas. Later, case reports appeared concerning leukemia in radiation workers, and infants born with severe mental retardation after their mothers had been given pelvic radiotherapy early in pregnancy. Fluoroscopy and radiotherapy for benign disorders continued to be used with abandon until authoritative reports were published on the adverse effects of ionizing radiation by the U.S. NAS-NRC and the UK MRC in 1956. Meanwhile, exposure to the atomic bombs in Japan had occurred and epidemics of delayed effects began to be recognized among the survivors: cataracts, leukemia and severe mental retardation among newborn infants after intra-uterine exposure. No statistically significant excess of germ-cell genetic effects was detected by six clinical measurements, the F{sub 1} mortality, cytogenetic studies or biochemical genetic studies. Somatic cell effects were revealed by long-lasting chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes, and somatic cell mutations were found at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes. Molecular biology is a likely focus of new studies based on the function of the gene for ataxia telangiectasia, a disorder in which children have severe, even lethal acute radiation reactions when given conventional doses of radiotherapy for lymphoma, to which they are prone. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provide incidence data that show the extent of increases in eight common cancers and no increase in eight others. The possibility of very late effects of A-bomb exposure is suggested by recent reports of increased frequencies of hyperparathyroidism, parathyroid cancers and certain causes of death other than cancer. 88 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Management approach for recurrent brain metastases following upfront radiosurgery may affect risk of subsequent radiation necrosis.

    PubMed

    Rae, Ali; Gorovets, Daniel; Rava, Paul; Ebner, Daniel; Cielo, Deus; Kinsella, Timothy J; DiPetrillo, Thomas A; Hepel, Jaroslaw T

    2016-01-01

    Many patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone as initial treatment require 1 or more subsequent salvage therapies. This study aimed to determine if commonly used salvage strategies are associated with differing risks of radiation necrosis (RN). All patients treated with upfront SRS alone for brain metastases at our institution were retrospectively analyzed. Salvage treatment details were obtained for brain failures. Patients who underwent repeat SRS to the same lesion were excluded. RN was determined based on pathological confirmation or advanced brain imaging consistent with RN in a symptomatic patient. Patients were grouped according to salvage treatment and rates of RN were compared via Fisher's exact tests. Of 284 patients treated with upfront SRS alone, 132 received salvage therapy and 44 received multiple salvage treatments. This included 31 repeat SRS alone, 58 whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) alone, 28 SRS and WBRT, 7 surgery alone, and 8 surgery with adjuvant radiation. With a median follow-up of 10 months, the rate of RN among all patients was 3.17% (9/284), salvaged patients 4.55% (6/132), and never salvaged patients 1.97% (3/152). Receiving salvage therapy did not significantly increase RN risk (P = .31). Of the patients requiring salvage treatments, the highest RN rate was among patients that had both salvage SRS and WBRT (delivered as separate salvage therapies) (6/28, 21.42%). RN rate in this group was significantly higher than in those treated with repeat SRS alone (0/31), WBRT alone (0/58), surgery alone (0/7), and surgery with adjuvant radiation (0/8). Comparing salvage WBRT doses <30 Gy versus ≥30 Gy revealed no effect of dose on RN rate. Additionally, among patients who received multiple SRS treatments, number of treated lesions was not predictive of RN incidence. Our results suggest that initial management approach for recurrent brain metastasis after upfront SRS does not affect the rate of RN. However, the risk of RN

  11. Bidirectional role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in coronary microembolization: progressive contractile dysfunction versus delayed protection against infarction.

    PubMed

    Skyschally, Andreas; Gres, Petra; Hoffmann, Simone; Haude, Michael; Erbel, Raimund; Schulz, Rainer; Heusch, Gerd

    2007-01-05

    In patients with unstable angina, plaque rupture and coronary microembolization (ME) can precede complete coronary artery occlusion and impending infarction. ME-induced microinfarcts initiate an inflammatory reaction with increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression, resulting in progressive contractile dysfunction. However, TNF-alpha is not only a negative inotrope but can also protect the myocardium against infarction. In anesthetized pigs, we studied whether ME protects against infarction when TNF-alpha expression is increased. ME (group1; n=7) was induced by intracoronary infusion of microspheres (42 microm; 3000 per mL/min inflow). Controls (group 2; n=8) received saline. Groups 3 and 4 (n=4 each) were pretreated with ovine TNF-alpha antibodies (25 mg/kg body weight) 30 minutes before ME or placebo, respectively. Ischemia (90 minutes) was induced 6 hours after ME when TNF-alpha was increased (66+/-21 pg/g wet weight; mean+/-SEM) or after placebo (TNF-alpha, 21+/-10 pg/g; P<0.05). Infarct size (percentage area at risk) was determined after 2 hours of reperfusion (triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining). ME decreased systolic wall thickening progressively over 6 hours (group 1 versus group 2, 65+/-4% versus 90+/-1%; percentage of baseline; P<0.05). TNF-alpha antibodies attenuated the progressive decrease in systolic wall thickening following ME (group 3, 77+/-5% of baseline; P<0.05 versus group 1) with no effect in controls (group 4; 90+/-8% of baseline). With ME, infarct size was decreased to 18+/-4% versus 33+/-4% in group 2 (P<0.05). The infarct size reduction was abolished by TNF-alpha antibodies (group 3 versus group 4, 29+/-3% versus 35+/-5%). In ME, TNF-alpha is responsible for both progressive contractile dysfunction and delayed protection against infarction.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor beta and ultraviolet radiation are potent regulators of human keratinocyte ICAM-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Krutmann, J.; Koeck, A.S.; Schauer, E.; Parlow, F.; Moeller, A.K.; Kapp, A.; Foerster, E.S.; Schoepf, E.L.; Luger, T.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions as a ligand of leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), as well as a receptor for human picorna virus, and its regulation thus affects various immunologic and inflammatory reactions. The weak, constitutive ICAM-1 expression on human keratinocytes (KC) can be up-regulated by cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha). In order to further examine the regulation of KC ICAM-1 expression, normal human KC or epidermoid carcinoma cells (KB) were incubated with different cytokines and/or exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Subsequently, ICAM-1 expression was monitored cytofluorometrically using a monoclonal anti-ICAM-1 antibody. Stimulation of cells with recombinant human (rh) interleukin (IL) 1 alpha, rhIL-4, rhIL-5, rhIL-6, rh granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), rh interferon alpha (rhIFN alpha), and rh transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) did not increase ICAM-1 surface expression. In contrast, rhTNF beta significantly up-regulated ICAM-1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the combination of rhTNF beta with rhIFN gamma increased the percentage of ICAM-1-positive KC synergistically. This stimulatory effect of rhTNF beta was further confirmed by the demonstration that rhTNF beta was capable of markedly enhancing ICAM-1 mRNA expression in KC. Finally, exposure of KC in vitro to sublethal doses of UV radiation (0-100 J/m2) prior to cytokine (rhIFN tau, rhTNF alpha, rhTNF beta) stimulation inhibited ICAM-1 up-regulation in a dose-dependent fashion. These studies identify TNF beta and UV light as potent regulators of KC ICAM-1 expression, which may influence both attachment and detachment of leukocytes and possibly viruses to KC.

  13. BM-10SYSTEMIC TREATMENT AND RADIATION NECROSIS FOLLOWING GKSRS IN THE TREATMENT OF BRAIN METASTASES

    PubMed Central

    Colaco, Rovel; Martin, Pierre; Bond, James; Bindra, Ranjit; Contessa, Joseph; Kluger, Harriet; Yu, James; Chiang, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Based on anecdotal evidence from our institution, we sought to investigate the hypothesis that systemic therapy, and in particular newer immune therapy agents (IT) would increase the risk of developing radiation necrosis (RN) following stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with Gamma Knife (GK) for brain metastases (BM). METHODS: All patients undergoing GK at our institution between 2006 and 2012 were reviewed. 189 patients were identified of whom 183 survived more than 6 months. Details including type of systemic therapy (cytotoxic chemotherapy (CT), targeted therapy (TT) and immune therapy (IT) were recorded. Timing of ST in relation to GK was also recorded (before, during, less than 6 months and more than 6 months post GK). Logisitic regression was used to calculate the odds of developing RN by type of ST. RESULTS: Median follow up was 11.7 months. 42 patients (23%) developed RN of which 13 received IT alone. On univariate analysis, IT alone was associated with an increased risk of developing RN compared to CT alone (OR-2.44 [95%CI 1.02-5.79], p= 0.044) ) Multivariate analysis showed a trend towards an increased risk of RN with any IT (OR 1.9 {95%CI 0.91-3.99], p = 0.09) while receving any CT was found to be protective against RN (OR 0.39 [95% CI 0.19-0.79}, p = 0.009). CONCLUSION: Use of immune based therapies in patients receiving SRS for BM was associated with an increased risk of RN. Further investigation is needed to characterize these changes including to determine whether the increased rate of RN is due to a pro inflammatory effect of immune therapy or an interaction with radiation.

  14. Bevacizumab for the Treatment of Radiation-Induced Cerebral Necrosis: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Delishaj, Durim; Ursino, Stefano; Pasqualetti, Francesco; Cristaudo, Agostino; Cosottini, Mirco; Fabrini, Maria Grazia; Paiar, Fabiola

    2017-01-01

    Radiation necrosis (RN) of brain tissue is a serious late complication of brain irradiation and recently bevacizumab has been suggested as treatment option of RN. There is a lack of data in the literature regarding the effectiveness of bevacizumab for the treatment of RN. The purpose of this review was to perform a comprehensive analysis of all reported cases using bevacizumab for the treatment of brain RN. In September 2016, we performed a comprehensive literature search of the following electronic databases: PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus and Cochrane Library. The research for the review was conducted using a combination of the keywords “radiation necrosis”, “radiotherapy” and “bevacizumab” alongside the fields comprising article title, abstract and keywords. Randomized trials, non-randomized trials, prospective studies, retrospective studies and single case reports were included in the review. Our research generated 21 studies and 125 cases where bevacizumab had been used for the treatment of RN. The median follow-up was 8 months and the most frequent bevacizumab dose used was 7.5 mg/kg for 2 weeks with a median of four cycles. Low-dose bevacizumab resulted in effectiveness with improvement in both clinical and radiographic response. The median decrease in T1 contrast enhancement and in T2/FLAIR signal abnormality was 64% and 60%, respectively. A reduction in steroidal therapy was observed in majority of patients treated. Based on the data of our review, bevacizumab appears to be a promising agent for the treatment of brain RN. Future prospective studies are required to evaluate the role of bevacizumab in RN and to define the optimal scheduling, dosage and duration of therapy. PMID:28270886

  15. Diffusion Weighted MRI and MRS to Differentiate Radiation Necrosis and Recurrent Disease in Gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewell, Lars

    2006-03-01

    A difficulty encountered in the diagnosis of patients with gliomas is the differentiation between recurrent disease and Radiation Induced Necrosis (RIN). Both can appear as ‘enhancing lesions’ on a typical T2 weighted MRI scan. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) and Diffusion Weighted MRI (DWMRI) have the potential to be helpful regarding this differentiation. MRS has the ability to measure the concentration of brain metabolites, such as Choline, Creatin and N- Acetyl Aspartate, the ratios of which have been shown to discriminate between RIN and recurrent disease. DWMRI has been linked via a rise in the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) to successful treatment of disease. Using both of these complimentary non-invasive imaging modalities, we intend to initiate an imaging protocol whereby we will study how best to combine metabolite ratios and ADC values to obtain the most useful information in the least amount of scan time. We will look for correlations over time between ADC values, and MRS, among different sized voxels.

  16. Texture descriptors to distinguish radiation necrosis from recurrent brain tumors on multi-parametric MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pallavi; Prasanna, Prateek; Rogers, Lisa; Wolansky, Leo; Badve, Chaitra; Sloan, Andrew; Cohen, Mark; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    Di erentiating radiation necrosis (a radiation induced treatment e ect) from recurrent brain tumors (rBT) is currently one of the most clinically challenging problems in care and management of brain tumor (BT) patients. Both radiation necrosis (RN), and rBT exhibit similar morphological appearance on standard MRI making non-invasive diagnosis extremely challenging for clinicians, with surgical intervention being the only course for obtaining de nitive ground truth". Recent studies have reported that the underlying biological pathways de n- ing RN and rBT are fundamentally di erent. This strongly suggests that there might be phenotypic di erences and hence cues on multi-parametric MRI, that can distinguish between the two pathologies. One challenge is that these di erences, if they exist, might be too subtle to distinguish by the human observer. In this work, we explore the utility of computer extracted texture descriptors on multi-parametric MRI (MP-MRI) to provide alternate representations of MRI that may be capable of accentuating subtle micro-architectural di erences between RN and rBT for primary and metastatic (MET) BT patients. We further explore the utility of texture descriptors in identifying the MRI protocol (from amongst T1-w, T2-w and FLAIR) that best distinguishes RN and rBT across two independent cohorts of primary and MET patients. A set of 119 texture descriptors (co-occurrence matrix homogeneity, neighboring gray-level dependence matrix, multi-scale Gaussian derivatives, Law features, and histogram of gradient orientations (HoG)) for modeling di erent macro and micro-scale morphologic changes within the treated lesion area for each MRI protocol were extracted. Principal component analysis based variable importance projection (PCA-VIP), a feature selection method previously developed in our group, was employed to identify the importance of every texture descriptor in distinguishing RN and rBT on MP-MRI. PCA-VIP employs regression analysis to provide

  17. Clinical Outcomes of 174 Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients With Radiation-Induced Temporal Lobe Necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Tai-Chung; Wong, Frank C.S.; Leung, To-Wai; Ng, S.H.; Tung, Stewart Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively study the clinical outcomes of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis (TLN) treated with steroids, surgery, or observation only. Methods and Patients: We performed a retrospective analysis of 174 consecutive patients diagnosed with TLN between 1990 and 2008. Before 1998, symptomatic patients were treated with oral steroids, while asymptomatic patients were treated conservatively. After 1998, most symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with a large volume of necrosis were treated by intravenously pulsed-steroid therapy with a standardized protocol. We examined factors affecting grade 4 complication-free survival and overall survival. Outcomes of the three treatment groups, those receiving conservative treatment, those receiving oral steroid, and those receiving intravenous pulse steroid, were compared. Results: The mean follow-up time was 115 months. Rates of grade 4 complication-free survival at 2 years and at 5 years after diagnosis of TLN were 72.2% and 54.1%, respectively. The 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 57.5% and 35.4%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that being symptomatic at diagnosis (relative risk [RR], 4.5; p = 0.0001), re-irradiation of the nasopharynx (NP) (RR, 1.56; p = 0.008), salvage brachytherapy to the NP (RR, 1.75; p = 0.012), and a short latency period before the diagnosis of TLN (RR, 0.96, p < 0.0001) were independent prognosticators of poor grade 4 complication-free survival. Patients with all four factors had a 100% risk of developing grade 4 complications within 5 years; whereas if no factor was present, the risk was 12.5%. Intravenous pulse steroid therapy was associated with a higher clinical response rate compared with conventional steroid therapy (p < 0.0001); however, it did not affect complication-free survival in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: TLN patients with good prognosticators could be observed without active treatment. Although

  18. Combination of Gold Nanoparticle-Conjugated Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Radiation Therapy Results in a Synergistic Antitumor Response in Murine Carcinoma Models.

    PubMed

    Koonce, Nathan A; Quick, Charles M; Hardee, Matthew E; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Dent, Judith A; Paciotti, Giulio F; Nedosekin, Dmitry; Dings, Ruud P M; Griffin, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Although remarkable preclinical antitumor effects have been shown for tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) alone and combined with radiation, its clinical use has been hindered by systemic dose-limiting toxicities. We investigated the physiological and antitumor effects of radiation therapy combined with the novel nanomedicine CYT-6091, a 27-nm average-diameter polyethylene glycol-TNF-coated gold nanoparticle, which recently passed through phase 1 trials. The physiologic and antitumor effects of single and fractionated radiation combined with CYT-6091 were studied in the murine 4T1 breast carcinoma and SCCVII head and neck tumor squamous cell carcinoma models. In the 4T1 murine breast tumor model, we observed a significant reduction in the tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) 24 hours after CYT-6091 alone and combined with a radiation dose of 12 Gy (P<.05 vs control). In contrast, radiation alone (12 Gy) had a negligible effect on the IFP. In the SCCVII head and neck tumor model, the baseline IFP was not markedly elevated, and little additional change occurred in the IFP after single-dose radiation or combined therapy (P>.05 vs control) despite extensive vascular damage observed. The IFP reduction in the 4T1 model was also associated with marked vascular damage and extravasation of red blood cells into the tumor interstitium. A sustained reduction in tumor cell density was observed in the combined therapy group compared with all other groups (P<.05). Finally, we observed a more than twofold delay in tumor growth when CYT-6091 was combined with a single 20-Gy radiation dose-notably, irrespective of the treatment sequence. Moreover, when hypofractionated radiation (12 Gy × 3) was applied with CYT-6091 treatment, a more than five-fold growth delay was observed in the combined treatment group of both tumor models and determined to be synergistic. Our results have demonstrated that TNF-labeled gold nanoparticles combined with single or fractionated high-dose radiation

  19. Electrical delay line multiplexing for pulsed mode radiation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Vinke, Ruud; Yeom, Jung Yeol; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Medical imaging systems are composed of a large number of position sensitive radiation detectors to provide high resolution imaging. For example, whole-body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems are typically composed of thousands of scintillation crystal elements, which are coupled to photosensors. Thus, PET systems greatly benefit from methods to reduce the number of data acquisition channels, in order to reduce the system development cost and complexity. In this paper we present an electrical delay line multiplexing scheme that can significantly reduce the number of readout channels, while preserving the signal integrity required for good time resolution performance. We experimented with two 4 × 4 LYSO crystal arrays, with crystal elements having 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm and 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm dimensions, coupled to 16 Hamamatsu MPPC S10931-050P SiPM elements. Results show that each crystal could be accurately identified, even in the presence of scintillation light sharing and inter-crystal Compton scatter among neighboring crystal elements. The multiplexing configuration degraded the coincidence timing resolution from ~ 243 ps FWHM to ~272 ps FWHM when 16 SiPM signals were combined into a single channel for the 4 × 4 LYSO crystal array with 3 mm × 3 mm × 20 mm crystal element dimensions, in coincidence with a 3 mm × 3 mm × 5 mm LYSO crystal pixel. The method is exible to allow multiplexing configurations across different block detectors, and is scalable to an entire ring of detectors. PMID:25768002

  20. Effect of caffeine on radiation-induced mitotic delay: delayed expression of G/sub 2/ arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.; Zorch, M.; Leeper, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    In the presence of 5 mM caffeine, irradiated (1.5 Gy) S and G/sub 2/ cells progressed to mitosis in register and without arrest in G/sub 2/. Caffeine (5 mM) markedly reduced mitotic delay even after radiation doses up to 20 Gy. When caffeine was removed from irradiated (1.5 Gy) and caffeine-treated cells, a period of G/sub 2/ arrest followed, similar in length to that produced by radiation alone. The arrest expressed was independent of the duration of the caffeine treatment for exposures up to 3 hr. The similarity of the response to the cited effects of caffeine on S-phase delay suggests a common basis for delay induction in S and G/sub 2/ phases.

  1. Combined effect of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and ionizing radiation in breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Prasad, Uttara; Shankar, Sunita; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Shanaiah, Murthy; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Ross, Brian D.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz

    2000-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a potent endogenous activator of the cell death pathway and functions by activating the cell surface death receptors 4 and 5 (DR4 and DR5). TRAIL is nontoxic in vivo and preferentially kills neoplastically transformed cells over normal cells by an undefined mechanism. Radiotherapy is a common treatment for breast cancer as well as many other cancers. Here we demonstrate that ionizing radiation can sensitize breast carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. This synergistic effect is p53-dependent and may be the result of radiation-induced up-regulation of the TRAIL-receptor DR5. Importantly, TRAIL and ionizing radiation have a synergistic effect in the regression of established breast cancer xenografts. Changes in tumor cellularity and extracellular space were monitored in vivo by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (diffusion MRI), a noninvasive technique to produce quantitative images of the apparent mobility of water within a tissue. Increased water mobility was observed in combined TRAIL- and radiation-treated tumors but not in tumors treated with TRAIL or radiation alone. Histological analysis confirmed the loss of cellularity and increased numbers of apoptotic cells in TRAIL- and radiation-treated tumors. Taken together, our results provide support for combining radiation with TRAIL to improve tumor eradication and suggest that efficacy of apoptosis-inducing cancer therapies may be monitored noninvasively, using diffusion MRI. PMID:10677530

  2. Delayed intracranial hypertension and cerebellar tonsillar necrosis associated with a depressed occipital skull fracture compressing the superior sagittal sinus. Case report.

    PubMed

    Vender, John R; Bierbrauer, Karin

    2005-11-01

    Depressed skull fractures overlying the major venous sinus are often managed nonoperatively because of the high associated risks of surgery in these locations. In the presence of clinical and radiographic evidence of sinus occlusion, however, surgical therapy may be necessary. The authors present the case of a 9-year-old boy with a depressed skull fracture overlying the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus. After initial conservative treatment, delayed signs of intracranial hypertension and a symptomatic tonsillar herniation with tonsillar necrosis developed. Possible causes as well as diagnostic and treatment options are reviewed.

  3. DELAYED EFFECTS OF RADIATION ON THE HUMAN CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. EARLY AND LATE DELAYED REACTIONS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    multiple sclerosis and are not associated with degenerative vascular changes. This patient probably represents an extreme of the early delayed reaction reported by Scholz in dogs. There is clinical evidence suggesting that some degree of damage of this type occurs more frequently than has been suspected. The other patient had the late delayed reaction in which there are marked degenerative vascular alternations and severe destruction of the white matter with little cortical involvement. This patient is an extreme example of the well-documented late delayed effects of

  4. Temporal Cerebral Microbleeds Are Associated With Radiation Necrosis and Cognitive Dysfunction in Patients Treated for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qingyu; Lin, Focai; Rong, Xiaoming; Yang, Wuyang; Li, Yi; Cai, Zhaoxi; Xu, Pengfei; Xu, Yongteng; Tang, Yamei

    2016-04-01

    Radiation therapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) may be complicated with radiation-induced brain necrosis (RN), resulting in deteriorated cognitive function. However, the underlying mechanism of this phenomenon remains unclear. This study attempts to elucidate the association between cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) and radiation necrosis and cognitive dysfunction in NPC patients treated with radiation therapy. This cross-sectional study included 106 NPC patients who were exposed to radiation therapy (78 patients with RN and 28 without RN). Sixty-six patients without discernable intracranial pathology were included as the control group. CMBs were confirmed using susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Cognitive function was accessed using Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Patients with a total score below 26 were defined as cognitively dysfunction. Seventy-seven patients (98.7%) in the RN group and 12 patients (42.9%) in the non-RN group had at least 1 CMB. In contrast, only 14 patients (21.2%) in the control group had CMBs. In patients with a history of radiation therapy, CMBs most commonly presented in temporal lobes (76.4%) followed by cerebellum (23.7%). Patients with RN had more temporal CMBs than those in the non-RN group (37.7 ± 51.9 vs 3.8 ± 12.6, respectively; P<.001). The number of temporal lobe CMBs was predictive for larger volume of brain necrosis (P<.001) in multivariate linear regression analysis. Although cognitive impairment was diagnosed in 55.1% of RN patients, only 7.1% of non-RN patients sustained cognitive impairment (P<.001). After adjusting for age, sex, education, period after radiation therapy, CMBs in other lobes, and RN volume, the number of temporal CMBs remained an independent risk factor for cognitive dysfunction (odds ratio [OR]: 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-1.04; P=.003). CMBs is a common radiological manifestation in NPC patients with RN. The number of temporal CMBs is independently associated

  5. In Vitro Studies on Space Radiation-Induced Delayed Genetic Responses: Shielding Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadhim, Munira A.; Green, Lora M.; Gridley, Daila S.; Murray, Deborah K.; Tran, Da Thao; Andres, Melba; Pocock, Debbie; Macdonald, Denise; Goodhead, Dudley T.; Moyers, Michael F.

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the radiation risks involved in spaceflight is of considerable importance, especially with the long-term occupation of ISS and the planned crewed exploration missions. Several independent causes may contribute to the overall risk to astronauts exposed to the complex space environment, such as exposure to GCR as well as SPES. Protons and high-Z energetic particles comprise the GCR spectrum and may exert considerable biological effects even at low fluence. There are also considerable uncertainties associated with secondary particle effects (e.g. HZE fragments, neutrons etc.). The interaction of protons and high-LET particles with biological materials at all levels of biological organization needs to be investigated fully in order to establish a scientific basis for risk assessment. The results of these types of investigation will foster the development of appropriately directed countermeasures. In this study, we compared the biological responses to proton irradiation presented to the target cells as a monoenergetic beam of particles of complex composition delivered to cells outside or inside a tissue phantom head placed in the United States EVA space suit helmet. Measurements of chromosome aberrations, apoptosis, and the induction of key proteins were made in bone marrow from CBA/CaJ and C57BL/6 mice at early and late times post exposure to radiation at 0, 0.5, 1 and 2 Gy while inside or outside of the helmet. The data showed that proton irradiation induced transmissible chromosomal/genomic instability in haematopoietic stem cells in both strains of mice under both irradiation conditions and especially at low doses. Although differences were noted between the mouse strains in the degree and kinetics of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion, there were no significant differences observed in the level of the induced instability under either radiation condition, or for both strains of mice. Consequently, when

  6. SU-E-T-549: Modeling Relative Biological Effectiveness of Protons for Radiation Induced Brain Necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkovic, D; Peeler, C; Grosshans, D; Titt, U; Taleei, R; Mohan, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a model of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons as a function of dose and linear energy transfer (LET) for induction of brain necrosis using clinical data. Methods: In this study, treatment planning information was exported from a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) and used to construct a detailed Monte Carlo model of the patient and the beam delivery system. The physical proton dose and LET were computed in each voxel of the patient volume using Monte Carlo particle transport. A follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study registered to the treatment planning CT was used to determine the region of the necrosis in the brain volume. Both, the whole brain and the necrosis volumes were segmented from the computed tomography (CT) dataset using the contours drawn by a physician and the corresponding voxels were binned with respect to dose and LET. The brain necrosis probability was computed as a function of dose and LET by dividing the total volume of all necrosis voxels with a given dose and LET with the corresponding total brain volume resulting in a set of NTCP-like curves (probability as a function of dose parameterized by LET). Results: The resulting model shows dependence on both dose and LET indicating the weakness of the constant RBE model for describing the brain toxicity. To the best of our knowledge the constant RBE model is currently used in all clinical applications which may Result in increased rate of brain toxicities in patients treated with protons. Conclusion: Further studies are needed to develop more accurate brain toxicity models for patients treated with protons and other heavy ions.

  7. Differentiating Radiation-Induced Necrosis from Recurrent Brain Tumor Using MR Perfusion and Spectroscopy: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ming-Tsung; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Tsai, Yi-Shan; Chen, Ying-Chen; Wang, Chien-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This meta-analysis examined roles of several metabolites in differentiating recurrent tumor from necrosis in patients with brain tumors using MR perfusion and spectroscopy. Methods Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar were searched for studies using perfusion MRI and/or MR spectroscopy published up to March 4, 2015 which differentiated between recurrent tumor vs. necrosis in patients with primary brain tumors or brain metastasis. Only two-armed, prospective or retrospective studies were included. A meta-analysis was performed on the difference in relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), ratios of choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and/or choline/N-acetyl aspartate (Cho/NAA) between participants undergoing MRI evaluation. A χ2-based test of homogeneity was performed using Cochran’s Q statistic and I2. Results Of 397 patients in 13 studies who were analyzed, the majority had tumor recurrence. As there was evidence of heterogeneity among 10 of the studies which used rCBV for evaluation (Q statistic = 31.634, I2 = 97.11%, P < 0.0001) a random-effects analysis was applied. The pooled difference in means (2.18, 95%CI = 0.85 to 3.50) indicated that the average rCBV in a contrast-enhancing lesion was significantly higher in tumor recurrence compared with radiation injury (P = 0.001). Based on a fixed-effect model of analysis encompassing the six studies which used Cho/Cr ratios for evaluation (Q statistic = 8.388, I2 = 40.39%, P = 0.137), the pooled difference in means (0.77, 95%CI = 0.57 to 0.98) of the average Cho/Cr ratio was significantly higher in tumor recurrence than in tumor necrosis (P = 0.001). There was significant difference in ratios of Cho to NAA between recurrent tumor and necrosis (1.02, 95%CI = 0.03 to 2.00, P = 0.044). Conclusions MR spectroscopy and MR perfusion using Cho/NAA and Cho/Cr ratios and rCBV may increase the accuracy of differentiating necrosis from recurrent tumor in patients with primary brain tumors or metastases. PMID:26741961

  8. Delayed Numerical Chromosome Aberrations in Human Fibroblasts by Low Dose of Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yoon Hee; Kim, Su Young; Woo, Hae Dong; Kim, Yang Jee; Ha, Sung Whan; Chung, Hai Won

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability refers to a type of damage transmitted over many generations following irradiation. This delayed impact of radiation exposure may pose a high risk to human health and increases concern over the dose limit of radiation exposure for both the public and radiation workers. Therefore, the development of additional biomarkers is still needed for the detection of delayed responses following low doses of radiation exposure. In this study, we examined the effect of X-irradiation on delayed induction of numerical chromosomal aberrations in normal human fibroblasts irradiated with 20, 50 and 100 cGy of X-rays using the micronucleus-centromere assay. Frequencies of centromere negative- and positive-micronuclei, and aneuploidy of chromosome 1 and 4 were analyzed in the surviving cells at 28, 88 and 240 h after X-irradiation. X-irradiation increased the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in a dose-dependent manner in the cells at all measured time-points, but no significant differences in MN frequency among cell passages were observed. Aneuploid frequency of chromosomes 1 and 4 increased with radiation doses, and a significantly higher frequency of aneuploidy was observed in the surviving cells analyzed at 240 h compared to 28 h. These results indicate that low-dose of X-irradiation can induce delayed aneuploidy of chromosomes 1 and 4 in normal fibroblasts. PMID:26633443

  9. Toward Distinguishing Recurrent Tumor From Radiation Necrosis: DWI and MTC in a Gamma Knife–Irradiated Mouse Glioma Model

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Torres, Carlos J.; Engelbach, John A.; Cates, Jeremy; Thotala, Dinesh; Yuan, Liya; Schmidt, Robert E.; Rich, Keith M.; Drzymala, Robert E.; Ackerman, Joseph J.H.; Garbow, Joel R.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Accurate noninvasive diagnosis is vital for effective treatment planning. Presently, standard anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is incapable of differentiating recurring tumor from delayed radiation injury, as both lesions are hyperintense in both postcontrast T1- and T2-weighted images. Further studies are therefore necessary to identify an MRI paradigm that can differentially diagnose these pathologies. Mouse glioma and radiation injury models provide a powerful platform for this purpose. Methods and Materials: Two MRI contrasts that are widely used in the clinic were chosen for application to a glioma/radiation-injury model: diffusion weighted imaging, from which the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is obtained, and magnetization transfer contrast, from which the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) is obtained. These metrics were evaluated longitudinally, first in each lesion type alone–glioma versus irradiation – and then in a combined irradiated glioma model. Results: MTR was found to be consistently decreased in all lesions compared to nonlesion brain tissue (contralateral hemisphere), with limited specificity between lesion types. In contrast, ADC, though less sensitive to the presence of pathology, was increased in radiation injury and decreased in tumors. In the irradiated glioma model, ADC also increased immediately after irradiation, but decreased as the tumor regrew. Conclusions: ADC is a better metric than MTR for differentiating glioma from radiation injury. However, MTR was more sensitive to both tumor and radiation injury than ADC, suggesting a possible role in detecting lesions that do not enhance strongly on T1-weighted images.

  10. Delayed response to cold stress is characterized by successive metabolic shifts culminating in apple fruit peel necrosis.

    PubMed

    Gapper, Nigel E; Hertog, Maarten L A T M; Lee, Jinwook; Buchanan, David A; Leisso, Rachel S; Fei, Zhangjun; Qu, Guiqin; Giovannoni, James J; Johnston, Jason W; Schaffer, Robert J; Nicolaï, Bart M; Mattheis, James P; Watkins, Christopher B; Rudell, David R

    2017-04-21

    Superficial scald is a physiological disorder of apple fruit characterized by sunken, necrotic lesions appearing after prolonged cold storage, although initial injury occurs much earlier in the storage period. To determine the degree to which the transition to cell death is an active process and specific metabolism involved, untargeted metabolic and transcriptomic profiling was used to follow metabolism of peel tissue over 180 d of cold storage. The metabolome and transcriptome of peel destined to develop scald began to diverge from peel where scald was controlled using antioxidant (diphenylamine; DPA) or rendered insensitive to ethylene using 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) beginning between 30 and 60 days of storage. Overall metabolic and transcriptomic shifts, representing multiple pathways and processes, occurred alongside α-farnesene oxidation and, later, methanol production alongside symptom development. Results indicate this form of peel necrosis is a product of an active metabolic transition involving multiple pathways triggered by chilling temperatures at cold storage inception rather than physical injury. Among multiple other pathways, enhanced methanol and methyl ester levels alongside upregulated pectin methylesterases are unique to peel that is developing scald symptoms similar to injury resulting from mechanical stress and herbivory in other plants.

  11. Influence of PUVA and UVB radiation on delayed hypersensitivity in the guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Morison, W.L.; Parrish, J.A.; Woehler, M.E.; Krugler, J.I.; Bloch, K.J.

    1981-06-01

    Exposure of guinea pigs to UVA (320--400 nm) radiation following administration of 8-methoxypsoralen by gavage (referred to by the acronym, PUVA) or exposure to UVB (290--320 nm) radiation, produced suppression of the cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity reaction at the site of exposure to radiation and at distant nonexposed sites. In these experiments, the animals were immunized by injection of dinitrophenyl-bovine gamma-globulin (DNP-BGG) in complete Freund's adjuvant and delayed hypersensitivity responses were provoked by intradermal injections of DNP-BGG, DNP and BGG on the flanks. Exposure to erythemogenic doses of either PUVA or UVB radiation for 7 days prior to immunization and for the 7 days between immunization and challenge (total period of radiation: 14 days) produced inhibiton of responses to each of the test substances. In addition, treatment with erythemogenic doses of PUVA either for 7 days prior to immunization or during the interval between immunization and challenge with DNP-BGG, inhibited the delayed hypersensitivity responses at the site of irradiation and at a nonexposed site. These findings suggest that in vivo exposure to nonionizing radiation leads to both local and systemic alteration of certain immune responses.

  12. Replication-induced DNA damage after PARP inhibition causes G2 delay, and cell line-dependent apoptosis, necrosis and multinucleation

    PubMed Central

    Dale Rein, Idun; Solberg Landsverk, Kirsti; Micci, Francesca; Patzke, Sebastian; Stokke, Trond

    2015-01-01

    PARP inhibitors have been approved for treatment of tumors with mutations in or loss of BRCA1/2. The molecular mechanisms and particularly the cellular phenotypes resulting in synthetic lethality are not well understood and varying clinical responses have been observed. We have investigated the dose- and time-dependency of cell growth, cell death and cell cycle traverse of 4 malignant lymphocyte cell lines treated with the PARP inhibitor Olaparib. PARP inhibition induced a severe growth inhibition in this cell line panel and increased the levels of phosphorylated H2AX-associated DNA damage in S phase. Repair of the remaining replication related damage caused a G2 phase delay before entry into mitosis. The G2 delay, and the growth inhibition, was more pronounced in the absence of functional ATM. Further, Olaparib treated Reh and Granta-519 cells died by apoptosis, while U698 and JVM-2 cells proceeded through mitosis with aberrant chromosomes, skipped cytokinesis, and eventually died by necrosis. The TP53-deficient U698 cells went through several rounds of DNA replication and mitosis without cytokinesis, ending up as multinucleated cells with DNA contents of up to 16c before dying. In summary, we report here for the first time cell cycle-resolved DNA damage induction, and cell line-dependent differences in the mode of cell death caused by PARP inhibition. PMID:26312527

  13. Complications of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dalinka, M.K.; Mazzeo, V.P. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The skeletal effects of radiation are dependent upon many variables, but the pathologic features are consistent. Radiation may cause immediate or delayed cell death, cellular injury with recovery, arrest of cellular division, or abnormal repair with neoplasia. Radiation necrosis and radiation-induced neoplasm still occur despite the use of supervoltage therapy. Complications of radiotherapy are well known and have led to more judicious use of this therapeutic modality. With few exceptions, benign bone tumors are no longer treated with irradiation. Radiation necrosis may be difficult to differentiate from sarcoma arising in irradiated bone. They both occur within the field of irradiation. Radiation necrosis often has a long latent period which is, of course, the rule in radiation-induced neoplasia. A soft tissue mass favors the diagnosis of neoplasia, while its absence suggests radiation necrosis. Lack of pain favors necrosis. Calcification may occur in radiation necrosis and does not indicate neoplasia. A lack of progression on serial roentgenograms also favors radiation necrosis. 76 references.

  14. [Apoptosis and necrosis of lymphocytes induced by UV-radiation in the presence of autological plasma].

    PubMed

    Artiukhov, V G; Zemchenkova, O V; Basharina, O V; Riazantsev, S V; Pashkov, M V

    2014-01-01

    The influence of UV-light (240-390 nm) in doses 151-3020 J/m2 on the nature of the death of lymphocytes cells of donor's blood (using markers of apoptotic and necrotic death of cells) and on the level of expression of the marker of apoptotic pre-preparation--CD95-receptor has been investigated. We have shown that UV-radiation increases expression of CD95-receptors which is caused mainly by de novo synthesis of the receptors. It has been revealed that during daily incubation of photo-modified lymphocytes (151 and 755 J/m2) without autological blood cell death occurs by receptor-involved apoptosis. Exposure to high doses of radiation (1510 and 3020 J/m2) causes massive necrotic death of immunocytes. The use of autologous blood plasma during incubation of photo-modified lymphocytes allows decreasing the number of both apoptotic and necrotic cells.

  15. Influence of the circadian rhythm in cell division on radiation-induced mitotic delay in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, N.H.

    1982-01-01

    Mitotic delay is described as a classical response to radiation; however, circadian rhythmicity in cell division in vivo has not been considered by many authors. The present study investigated the relation between fluctuations reported as mitotic delay and recovery in vivo and circadian oscillations in mitotic index in mouse corneal epithelium. One aspect involved single doses (approximately 600 rad) given to mice at different circadian stages. The normal circadian rhythm in cell division was never obliterated. Inhibition of mitosis was evident but unpredictable, ranging from 6 to 15 hr after irradiation. Recovery was evident only during the daily increase in mitotic index of controls. The classical interpretation of recovery from mitotic delay may be in an in vitro phenomenon not reflecting in vivo responses, which are apparently strongly circadian stage dependent. The second portion of the study demonstrated a dose-response effect on length of mitotic delay and, to a lesser extent, degree of recovery.

  16. Diffusion Kurtosis as an in vivo Imaging Marker of Early Radiation-Induced Changes in Radiation-Induced Temporal Lobe Necrosis in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Liyan, Lu; Si, Wang; Qian, Wang; Yuhui, Shao; Xiaoer, Wei; Yuehua, Li; Wenbin, Li

    2017-04-26

    Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), an extension of the popular diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) model, has been applied in clinical studies of brain tissue changes. We explored the value of DKI for the early detection of radiation-induced changes in temporal lobe necrosis (TLN) after radiotherapy (RT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). A total of 400 patients with NPC were retrospectively enrolled; all participants underwent MRI scans 0-7 days before RT, at 4 weeks during RT, and 1 month after completing RT. DKI-derived kurtosis parameters (mean kurtosis [MK], axial kurtosis [Ka], radial kurtosis [Kr]), and DKI-derived diffusion parameters (fractional anisotropy [FA], mean diffusivity [MD], axial diffusivity [λa], radial diffusivity [λr]) were assessed in temporal lobe white matter. Analysis was performed for 20 patients with temporal lobe necrosis following long-term follow-up. No brain abnormalities were visible on conventional MRI in any patient at 4 weeks during RT and 1 month after RT. Of all DKI-derived parameters, MK was significantly lower at 1 month after RT than before RT (P < 0.05). This study indicates DKI can detect the early presence of relatively subtle RT-induced brain abnormalities before TLN in patients with NPC and may provide a sensitive imaging technique for temporal white matter microstructural abnormalities that are silent on conventional modalities but precede TLN after RT.

  17. Mastectomy skin necrosis after microsurgical breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Christina R; Koolen, Pieter G; Anderson, Katarina E; Paul, Marek A; Tobias, Adam M; Lin, Samuel J; Lee, Bernard T

    2015-10-01

    Mastectomy skin necrosis represents a significant clinical morbidity after immediate breast reconstruction. In addition to aesthetic deformity, necrosis of the native mastectomy skin may require debridement, additional reconstruction, or prolonged wound care and potentially delay oncologic treatment. This study aims to evaluate patient and procedural characteristics to identify predictors of mastectomy skin necrosis after microsurgical breast reconstruction. A retrospective review was performed of all immediate microsurgical breast reconstructions performed at a single academic center. Patient records were queried for age, diabetes, active smoking, previous breast surgery, preoperative radiation, preoperative chemotherapy, body mass index, mastectomy type, mastectomy weight, flap type, autologous flap type, and postoperative mastectomy skin flap necrosis. There were 746 immediate autologous microsurgical flaps performed by three plastic surgeons at our institution during the study period. The incidence of mastectomy skin flap necrosis was 13.4%. Univariate analysis revealed a significantly higher incidence of mastectomy skin necrosis in patients with higher mastectomy weight (P < 0.001), higher autologous flap weight (P < 0.001), higher body mass index (0.002), and diabetes (P = 0.021). No significant association was found for age, smoking, prior breast surgery, preoperative chemotherapy or radiation, or mastectomy type. Multivariate analysis demonstrated statistically significant associations between mastectomy skin necrosis and both increasing mastectomy weight (odds ratio 1.348 per quartile increase, P = 0.009) and diabetes (odds ratio 2.356, P = 0.011). Increasing mastectomy weight and coexisting diabetes are significantly associated with postoperative mastectomy skin necrosis after microsurgical reconstruction. These characteristics should be considered during patient counseling, procedure selection, operative planning, and intraoperative tissue

  18. Immediate and delayed potentiating effects of tumor necrosis factor-α on TRPV1 sensitivity of rat vagal pulmonary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chun-Chun; Lin, You Shuei; Lin, Ruei-Lung; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2017-08-01

    We studied acute effects of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) on the sensitivity of isolated rat vagal pulmonary sensory neurons. Our results showed the following. First, a brief pretreatment with a low dose of TNFα (1.44 nM, 9 min) enhanced the sensitivity of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors in these neurons in two distinct phases: the inward current evoked by capsaicin was amplified (Δ = 247%) immediately following the TNFα pretreatment, which gradually declined toward control and then increased again reaching another peak (Δ = 384%) after 60-90 min. Second, the immediate phase of this potentiating effect of TNFα was completely abolished by a pretreatment with a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, NS-398, whereas the delayed potentiation was only partially attenuated. Third, in sharp contrast, TNFα did not generate any potentiating effect on the responses to non-TRPV1 chemical activators of these neurons. Fourth, the selectivity of the TNFα action on TRPV1 was further illustrated by the responses to acid (pH 6.0); TNFα did not affect the rapid transient current mediated by acid-sensing ion channels but significantly augmented the slow sustained current mediated by TRPV1 in the same neurons. Fifth, in anesthetized rats, a similar pattern of acute sensitizing effects of TNFα on pulmonary C-fiber afferents and the involvement of COX-2 were also clearly shown. In conclusion, a brief pretreatment with TNFα induced both immediate and delayed potentiating effects on the TRPV1 sensitivity in pulmonary sensory neurons, and the production of COX-2 arachidonic acid metabolites plays a major role in the immediate sensitizing effect of TNFα. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. WR-1065, the active metabolite of amifostine, mitigates radiation-induced delayed genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Dziegielewski, Jaroslaw; Baulch, Janet E; Goetz, Wilfried; Coleman, Mitchell C; Spitz, Douglas R; Murley, Jeffrey S; Grdina, David J; Morgan, William F

    2008-12-15

    Compounds that can protect cells from the effects of radiation are important for clinical use, in the event of an accidental or terrorist-generated radiation event, and for astronauts traveling in space. One of the major concerns regarding the use of radio-protective agents is that they may protect cells initially, but predispose surviving cells to increased genomic instability later. In this study we used WR-1065, the active metabolite of amifostine, to determine how protection from direct effects of high- and low-LET radiation exposure influences genomic stability. When added 30 min before irradiation and in high concentrations, WR-1065 protected cells from immediate radiation-induced effects as well as from delayed genomic instability. Lower, nontoxic concentrations of WR-1065 did not protect cells from death; however, it was effective in significantly decreasing delayed genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells. The observed increase in manganese superoxide dismutase protein levels and activity may provide an explanation for this effect. These results confirm that WR-1065 is protective against both low- and high-LET radiation-induced genomic instability in surviving cells.

  20. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) blocks apoptosis and promotes ionizing radiation-induced necrosis of freshly-isolated normal mouse spleen cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, John S; Asmis, Reto; Tapp, Andrea A; Nelson, Brandy; Chu, Yanxia; Glass, Judith; Moneyhon, Micheal; Brown, Stephen A

    2010-06-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a pro-oxidant that kills cells by both apoptotic and necrotic mechanisms. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) is a thiol-containing compound that may act either as a pro- or anti-oxidant depending on the experimental conditions. This study was designed to determine whether PDTC would reduce or enhance IR-induced cell death of freshly-isolated normal mouse B6/129 spleen cells (NMSC). We determined the effect of increasing doses of IR, PDTC alone and PDTC followed by IR on the viability of NMSC. Annexin V and propidium iodide (Annexin V/PI) staining demonstrated a dose and time-dependent relationship in which PDTC enhanced the percentage of IR-induced apoptotic/necrotic NMSC. Trypan blue dye inclusion confirmed that a loss of membrane integrity was occurring 1 h after incubation with PDTC plus IR. Reduction in the glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratio and GSH demonstrated that both IR (8.5 Gy) and PDTC acted as pro-oxidants, but their mechanisms of action differed: In contrast to IR, which promoted p53 activation and caspase 3/7-mediated apoptosis, PDTC inhibited IR-induced p53 and caspase 3/7 activity. However, PDTC increased H(2)O(2) formation and necrosis, resulting in an overall increase in IR-induced cell death. Catalase prevented the PDTC-induced increase in IR cytotoxicity implicating the generation of H(2)O(2) as a major factor in this mechanism. These results demonstrate that in NMSC PDTC acts as pro-oxidant and enhances IR-induced cell cytotoxicity by increasing H(2)O(2)formation and thiol oxidation. As such, they strongly suggest that the use of PDTC as an adjunct to reduce radiation toxicity should be avoided.

  1. The incidence of radiation necrosis following stereotactic radiotherapy for melanoma brain metastases: the potential impact of immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kaidar-Person, Orit; Zagar, Timothy M; Deal, Allison; Moschos, Stergios J; Ewend, Matthew G; Sasaki-Adams, Deanna; Lee, Carrie B; Collichio, Frances A; Fried, David; Marks, Lawrence B; Chera, Bhishamjit S

    2017-07-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is the standard treatment for patients with limited number of brain metastases. In the past few years, newer immunotherapies (immune checkpoint inhibitors) have been proven to prolong survival in patients with metastatic melanoma. The safety of the combination of SRT and immunotherapy for brain metastases is unknown. We retrospectively identified patients with melanoma brain metastases treated with SRT between 2007 and 2015. Patients who did not have at least 3 months of follow-up with imaging after SRT were excluded from the analysis. Outcomes were compared between patients who were treated with or without immunotherapy. A total of 58 patients were included; of these, 29 were treated with SRT and immunotherapy. MAPK inhibitors (BRAF, MEK inhibitors) were used more often in the immunotherapy group (nine vs. two patients). There was a higher incidence of intracranial complications in patients treated with immunotherapy and SRT. Eight patients had radiation necrosis; all occurred in patients who were treated with immunotherapy. Nine patients had hemorrhage, of which seven occurred in patients who were treated with immunotherapy (P=0.08). However, patients treated with immunotherapy and SRT had a significant overall survival advantage compared with SRT without immunotherapy (15 vs. 6 months, P=0.0013). Patients treated with SRT and immunotherapy have a higher incidence/risk of intracranial complications, but a longer overall survival.

  2. Epidermal Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Activation and Ultraviolet B Radiation Result in Synergistic Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Production

    PubMed Central

    Wolverton, Jay E.; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Yao, Yongxue; Zhang, Qiwei; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) is a potent stimulator of epidermal cytokine production which has been implicated in photoaggravated dermatoses. In addition to cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), UVB generates bioactive lipids including platelet-activating factor (PAF). Our previous studies have demonstrated that UVB-mediated production of keratinocyte TNF-α is in part due to PAF. The current studies use a human PAF-receptor (PAF-R) negative epithelial cell line transduced with PAF-Rs and PAF–R-deficient mice to demonstrate that activation of the epidermal PAF-R along with UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of TNF-α. It should be noted that PAF-R effects are mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) agonist phorbol myristic acetate, and are inhibited by pharmacological antagonists of the PKC gamma isoenzyme. These studies suggest that concomitant PAF-R activation and UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of the cytokine TNF-α which is mediated in part via PKC. These studies provide a novel potential mechanism for photosensitivity responses. PMID:19769579

  3. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening

    SciTech Connect

    Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Chow, S. )

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  4. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening.

    PubMed

    Kimme-Smith, C; Bassett, L W; Gold, R H; Chow, S

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  5. Evidence for factors modulating radiation-induced G2-delay: potential application as radioprotectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheong, N.; Zeng, Z. C.; Wang, Y.; Iliakis, G.

    2001-01-01

    Manipulation of checkpoint response to DNA damage can be developed as a means for protecting astronauts from the adverse effects of unexpected, or background exposures to ionizing radiation. To achieve this goal reagents need to be developed that protect cells from radiation injury by prolonging checkpoint response, thus promoting repair. We present evidence for a low molecular weight substance excreted by cells that dramatically increases the duration of the G2-delay. This compound is termed G2-Arrest Modulating Activity (GAMA). A rat cell line (A1-5) generated by transforming rat embryo fibroblasts with a temperature sensitive form of p53 plus H-ras demonstrates a dramatic increase in radiation resistance after exposure to low LET radiation that is not associated with an increase in the efficiency of rejoining of DNA double strand breaks. Radioresistance in this cell line correlates with a dramatic increase in the duration of the G2 arrest that is modulated by a GAMA produced by actively growing cells. The properties of GAMA suggest that it is a low molecular weight heat-stable peptide. Further characterization of this substance and elucidation of its mechanism of action may allow the development of a biological response modifier with potential applications as a radioprotector. GAMA may be useful for protecting astronauts from radiation injury as preliminary evidence suggests that it is able to modulate the response of cells exposed to heavy ion radiation, similar to that encountered in outer space.

  6. Evidence for factors modulating radiation-induced G2-delay: potential application as radioprotectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheong, N.; Zeng, Z. C.; Wang, Y.; Iliakis, G.

    2001-01-01

    Manipulation of checkpoint response to DNA damage can be developed as a means for protecting astronauts from the adverse effects of unexpected, or background exposures to ionizing radiation. To achieve this goal reagents need to be developed that protect cells from radiation injury by prolonging checkpoint response, thus promoting repair. We present evidence for a low molecular weight substance excreted by cells that dramatically increases the duration of the G2-delay. This compound is termed G2-Arrest Modulating Activity (GAMA). A rat cell line (A1-5) generated by transforming rat embryo fibroblasts with a temperature sensitive form of p53 plus H-ras demonstrates a dramatic increase in radiation resistance after exposure to low LET radiation that is not associated with an increase in the efficiency of rejoining of DNA double strand breaks. Radioresistance in this cell line correlates with a dramatic increase in the duration of the G2 arrest that is modulated by a GAMA produced by actively growing cells. The properties of GAMA suggest that it is a low molecular weight heat-stable peptide. Further characterization of this substance and elucidation of its mechanism of action may allow the development of a biological response modifier with potential applications as a radioprotector. GAMA may be useful for protecting astronauts from radiation injury as preliminary evidence suggests that it is able to modulate the response of cells exposed to heavy ion radiation, similar to that encountered in outer space.

  7. Glioma Recurrence Versus Radiation Necrosis: Single-Session Multiparametric Approach Using Simultaneous O-(2-18F-Fluoroethyl)-L-Tyrosine PET/MRI.

    PubMed

    Jena, Amarnath; Taneja, Sangeeta; Gambhir, Aashish; Mishra, Anil Kumar; Dʼsouza, Maria Mathew; Verma, Sapna Manocha; Hazari, Puja Panwar; Negi, Pradeep; Jhadav, Ganesh Krishna Rao; Sogani, Shanti Kumar

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential of hybrid gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced F-fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine (F-FET) PET/MRI in distinguishing recurrence from radiation necrosis using simultaneously acquired multiple structural and functional parameters. Twenty-six patients (5 female and 21 male patients; mean ± SD age, 51.58 ± 15.97 years) with single or multiple contrast-enhancing brain lesions (n = 32) on MRI after surgery and radiation therapy were evaluated with simultaneously acquired Gd-enhanced F-FET PET/MRI. They were then followed up with resurgery and histopathological diagnosis (n = 9) and/or clinical/MRI- or PET/MRI-based imaging follow-up (n = 17). PET/MR images were analyzed using manually drawn regions of interest over areas of maximal contrast enhancement and/or FET uptake. Maximum target-to-background ratio (TBRmax), mean target-to-background ratio (TBRmean), and choline-to-creatine (Cho/Cr) ratios as well as normalized mean relative cerebral blood volume (rCBVmean) and mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmean) were determined. The accuracy of each parameter individually and in various possible combinations for differentiating recurrence versus radiation necrosis was evaluated using 2-tailed independent samples Student t test, multivariate analysis of variance, and multivariate receiver operating characteristic analysis. Positive histopathological finding and long-term imaging/clinical follow-up suggestive of disease progression served as criterion standard. Of 26 patients, 19 were classified as recurrence, with 7 patients showing radiation necrosis. Individually, TBRmax, TBRmean, ADCmean, and Cho/Cr ratios as well as normalized rCBVmean was significant in differentiating recurrence from radiation necrosis, with an accuracy of 93.8% for TBRmax, 87.5% for TBRmean, 81.3% for ADCmean, 96.9% for Cho/Cr ratio, and 90.6% for normalized rCBVmean. The accuracy of both normalized rCBVmean and ADCmean was improved in combination with TBRmax or Cho

  8. Results of a questionnaire regarding practice patterns for the diagnosis and treatment of intracranial radiation necrosis after SRS.

    PubMed

    Stockham, Abigail L; Ahluwalia, Manmeet; Reddy, Chandana A; Suh, John H; Kumar, Aryavarta; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Barnett, Gene H; Murphy, Erin S; Chao, Samuel T

    2013-12-01

    Although stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an effective treatment option for patients with brain tumors, its increased use has raised concern for increased incidence of radiation necrosis (RN). No established standard or guidelines exists regarding non-invasive techniques to diagnose or treat RN. This study was conducted to assess current patterns of evaluation and treatment of RN among physicians who treat intracranial malignancies. A questionnaire consisting of 20 questions was sent to 3,041 members of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and the Society for Neurologic Oncology (SNO). Questions addressed demographics, utilization of SRS, perceptions regarding RN diagnosis treatment, approach to steroid-refractory RN, and management of two clinical scenarios using Kwiksurvey© software. The survey response rate was 8.74 % (266/3,041). Most respondents practice in an academic and/or university setting (62 %) at a facility that performs SRS (94 %) with a variety of systems. The number of annual cases performed at the participant's institution varied from <50 to >400, with a wide degree of variability. Most respondents practice at an institution that performs 50-100 cases/year (28 %). The most common range of symptomatic RN seen in clinical practice was 1-5 % (61 %). Most respondents reported that asymptomatic RN occurs in 6-10 % (33 %). Favored non-invasive diagnostic mechanisms were clinical evaluation (37 %) and MRI (19 %). In response to a clinical scenario depicting an asymptomatic patient post-SRS for brain metastasis with an enlarging lesion and edema at the treatment site, most respondents felt the image represented RN or a combination of RN and tumor progression. Most (58 %) favored short-term follow-up with repeat MRI. Ninety-three percent of the respondents initiated steroids as a first-line approach if patient was to develop symptoms. Steroids were the preferred first therapy in symptomatic patients on initial follow-up (81 %). In steroid

  9. Radiation-induced division delay in Chinese hamster ovary fibroblast and carcinoma cells: dose effect and ploidy. [X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Kimler, B.F.; Leeper, D.B.; Schneiderman, M.H.

    1981-02-01

    The mitotic selection procedure for cell cycle analysis was utilized to investigate the G/sub 2/ transition point for and the duration of radiation-induced division delay in diploid and tetraploid Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) fibroblasts and in Chinese hamster ovarian carcinoma cells. The location of the radiation-induced division delay transition point was dose independent at high doses and located approximately 42 min before division. At lower doses only an estimate of the point of blockade was possible; but the G/sub 2/ transition point appeared to be earlier in the cell cycle. The duration of radiation-induced division delay was dose dependent. This response is consistent with a sensitive population of cells in late G/sub 2/ that define the location of the transition point and the length of division delay. There was no difference observed in the dose response for radiation-induced division delay between the pseudotetraploid cell line of CHO and the pseudodiploid parent strain. However, in the cell line derived from a spontaneous Chinese hamster ovarian carcinoma the division delay was 39 +- 4 min/Gy. Therefore, radiation-induced division delay is independent of chromosome ploidy, but can show intraspecies cell line specificity.

  10. Fat necrosis.

    PubMed

    Canteli, B; Saez, F; de los Ríos, A; Alvarez, C

    1996-04-01

    We report the MR appearance of a case of subcutaneous fat necrosis, which is a previously unreported etiology for knee mass. The role of MR imaging in differentiating fat necrosis from other causes of soft tissue masses is discussed. We conclude that MR characteristics of subcutaneous fat necrosis are typical and allow its differentiation from other types of soft tissue lesions.

  11. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: I. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    A long-standing dogma in the radiation sciences is that energy from radiation must be deposited in the cell nucleus to elicit a biological effect. A number of non-targeted, delayed effects of ionizing radiation have been described that challenge this dogma and pose new challenges to evaluating potential hazards associated with radiation exposure. These effects include induced genomic instability and non-targeted bystander effects. The in vitro evidence for non-targeted effects in radiation biology will be reviewed, but the question as to how one extrapolates from these in vitro observations to the risk of radiation-induced adverse health effects such as cancer remains open.

  12. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: I. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    A long-standing dogma in the radiation sciences is that energy from radiation must be deposited in the cell nucleus to elicit a biological effect. A number of non-targeted, delayed effects of ionizing radiation have been described that challenge this dogma and pose new challenges to evaluating potential hazards associated with radiation exposure. These effects include induced genomic instability and non-targeted bystander effects. The in vitro evidence for non-targeted effects in radiation biology will be reviewed, but the question as to how one extrapolates from these in vitro observations to the risk of radiation-induced adverse health effects such as cancer remains open.

  13. Biophysical modelling of early and delayed radiation damage at chromosome level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, S.; Eidelman, Y.

    Exposure by ionising radiation increases cancer risk in human population Cancer is thought to originate from an altered expression of certain number of specific genes It is now widely recognised that chromosome aberrations CA are involved in stable change in expression of genes by gain or loss of their functions Thus CA can contribute to initiation or progression of cancer Therefore understanding mechanisms of CA formation in the course of cancer development might be valuable tool for quantification and prognosis of different stages of radiation carcinogenesis Early CA are defined as aberrations induced in first post-irradiation mitotic cycle The present work describes the original biophysical technique for early CA modelling It includes the following simulation steps the ionising particle track structure the structural organisation of all chromosomes in G 0 G 1 cell nucleus spatial distribution of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks dsb within chromosomes dsb rejoining and misrejoining modelling cell cycle taking into account mitotic delay which results in complex time dependence of aberrant cells in first mitosis The results on prediction of dose-response curves for simple and complex CA measured in cells undergoing first division cycle are presented in comparison with recent experimental data There is increasing evidence that CA are also observed in descendents of irradiated cells many generations after direct DNA damage These delayed CA or chromosome instability CI are thought to be a manifestation of genome

  14. Delayed breast implant reconstruction: is radiation therapy associated with capsular contracture or reoperations?

    PubMed

    Hvilsom, Gitte Bjørn; Hölmich, Lisbet Rosenkrantz; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Lipworth, Loren; McLaughlin, Joseph; Elberg, Jens Jørgen; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg; Friis, Søren

    2012-03-01

    We evaluated the association between radiation therapy and severe capsular contracture or reoperation after 717 delayed breast implant reconstruction procedures (288 1- and 429 2-stage procedures) identified in the prospective database of the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast during the period between 1999 and 2006. A history of radiation therapy was associated with increased risk of severe capsular contracture for 1- and 2-stage procedures, with adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of 3.3 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9-12.4) and 7.2 (95% CI: 2.4-21.4), respectively. Similarly, a history of radiation therapy was associated with a non-significantly increased risk of reoperation after both 1-stage (HR = 1.4; 95% CI: 0.7-2.5) and 2-stage (HR = 1.6; 95% CI: 0.9-3.1) procedures. Reconstruction failure was highest (13.2%) in the 2-stage procedures with a history of radiation therapy. Breast reconstruction approaches other than implants should be seriously considered among women who have received radiation therapy.

  15. Successful Mitigation of Delayed Intestinal Radiation Injury Using Pravastatin is not Associated with Acute Injury Improvement or Tumor Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Haydont, Valerie; Bourhis, Jean; Vozenin-Brotons, Marie-Catherine |. E-mail: vozenin@igr.fr

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether pravastatin mitigates delayed radiation-induced enteropathy in rats, by focusing on the effects of pravastatin on acute cell death and fibrosis according to connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression and collagen inhibition. Methods and Materials: Mitigation of delayed radiation-induced enteropathy was investigated in rats using pravastatin administered in drinking water (30 mg/kg/day) 3 days before and 14 days after irradiation. The ileum was irradiated locally after surgical exteriorization (X-rays, 19 Gy). Acute apoptosis, acute and late histologic alterations, and late CTGF and collagen deposition were monitored by semiquantitative immunohistochemistry and colorimetric staining (6 h, 3 days, 14 days, 15 weeks, and 26 weeks after irradiation). Pravastatin antitumor action was studied in HT-29, HeLa, and PC-3 cells by clonogenic cell survival assays and tumor growth delay experiments. Results: Pravastatin improved delayed radiation enteropathy in rats, whereas its benefit in acute and subacute injury remained limited (6 h, 3 days, and 14 days after irradiation). Delayed structural improvement was associated with decreased CTGF and collagen deposition but seemed unrelated to acute damage. Indeed, the early apoptotic index increased, and severe subacute structural damage occurred. Pravastatin elicited a differential effect, protecting normal intestine but not tumors from radiation injury. Conclusion: Pravastatin provides effective protection against delayed radiation enteropathy without interfering with the primary antitumor action of radiotherapy, suggesting that clinical transfer is feasible.

  16. Favorable Prognosis in Patients With High-Grade Glioma With Radiation Necrosis: The University of Colorado Reoperation Series

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Olsen, Christine; Franklin, Wilbur; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B.K.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Lillehei, Kevin; Waziri, Allen; Damek, Denise M.; Chen, Changhu

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To analyze the pathology, outcomes, and prognostic factors in patients with high-grade glioma undergoing reoperation after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with World Health Organization Grade 3-4 glioma underwent reoperation after prior RT. The median dose of prior RT was 60 Gy, and 84% received chemotherapy as part of their initial treatment. Estimation of the percentage of necrosis and recurrent tumor in each reoperation specimen was performed. Pathology was classified as RT necrosis if {>=}80% of the specimen was necrotic and as tumor recurrence if {>=}20% was tumor. Predictors of survival were analyzed using log-rank comparisons and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: The median interval between the completion of RT and reoperation was 6.7 months (range, 1-59 months). Pathologic analysis showed RT necrosis in 27% and recurrence in 73% of cases. Thirteen patients required a reoperation for uncontrolled symptoms. Among them, 1 patient (8%) had pathology showing RT necrosis, and 12 (92%) had tumor recurrence. Median survival after reoperation was longer for patients with RT necrosis (21.8 months vs. 7.0 months, p = 0.047). In 7 patients with Grade 4 tumors treated with temozolomide-based chemoradiation with RT necrosis, median survival from diagnosis and reoperation were 30.2 months and 21.8 months, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with RT necrosis at reoperation have improved survival compared with patients with tumor recurrence. Future efforts to intensify local therapy and increase local tumor control in patients with high-grade glioma seem warranted.

  17. Detection of radiation-induced brain necrosis in live rats using label-free time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, Brad A.; Ma, Htet S. W.; Sridharan, Shamira; Hansen, Katherine; Klich, Melanie; Perks, Julian; Kent, Michael; Kim, Kyoungmi; Fragoso, Ruben; Marcu, Laura

    2017-02-01

    Differentiating radiation-induced necrosis from recurrent tumor in the brain remains a significant challenge to the neurosurgeon. Clinical imaging modalities are not able to reliably discriminate the two tissue types, making biopsy location selection and surgical management difficult. Label-free fluorescence lifetime techniques have previously been shown to be able to delineate human brain tumor from healthy tissues. Thus, fluorescence lifetime techniques represent a potential means to discriminate the two tissues in real-time during surgery. This study aims to characterize the endogenous fluorescence lifetime signatures from radiation induced brain necrosis in a tumor-free rat model. Fischer rats received a single fraction of 60 Gy of radiation to the right hemisphere using a linear accelerator. Animals underwent a terminal live surgery after gross necrosis had developed, as verified with MRI. During surgery, healthy and necrotic brain tissue was measured with a fiber optic needle connected to a multispectral fluorescence lifetime system. Measurements of the necrotic tissue showed a 48% decrease in intensity and 20% increase in lifetimes relative to healthy tissue. Using a support vector machine classifier and leave-one-out validation technique, the necrotic tissue was correctly classified with 94% sensitivity and 97% specificity. Spectral contribution analysis also confirmed that the primary source of fluorescence contrast lies within the redox and bound-unbound population shifts of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. A clinical trial is presently underway to measure these tissue types in humans. These results show for the first time that radiation-induced necrotic tissue in the brain contains significantly different metabolic signatures that are detectable with label-free fluorescence lifetime techniques.

  18. Mitigation of Radiation Induced Pulmonary Vascular Injury by Delayed Treatment with Captopril

    PubMed Central

    MOLTHEN, Robert C.; WU, Qingping; FISH, Brian L.; MOULDER, John E.; JACOBS, Elizabeth R.; MEDHORA, Meetha M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective A single dose of 10 Gy radiation to the thorax of rats results in decreased total lung angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, pulmonary artery distensibility and distal vascular density while increasing pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at 2-months post-exposure. In this study we evaluate the potential of a renin-angiotensin system (RAS) modulator, the ACE inhibitor captopril, to mitigate this pulmonary vascular damage. Methods Rats exposed to 10 Gy thorax only irradiation and age-matched controls were studied 2-months after exposure, during the development of radiation pneumonitis. Rats were treated, either immediately or 2-weeks after radiation exposure, with 2 doses of the ACE inhibitor, captopril, dissolved in their drinking water. To determine pulmonary vascular responses, we measured pulmonary hemodynamics, lung ACE activity, pulmonary arterial distensibility, and peripheral vessel density. Results Captopril, given at a vasoactive but not a lower dose, mitigated radiation-induced pulmonary vascular injury. More importantly these beneficial effects were observed even if drug therapy was delayed for up to two weeks after exposure. Conclusions Captopril resulted in a reduction in pulmonary vascular injury that supports its use as a radiomitigator after an unexpected radiological event such as a nuclear accident. PMID:22882664

  19. Radiation-induced delayed cell death in a hypomorphic Artemis cell line.

    PubMed

    Evans, Paul M; Woodbine, Lisa; Riballo, Enriquetta; Gennery, Andrew R; Hubank, Michael; Jeggo, Penny A

    2006-04-15

    Null mutations in Artemis confer a condition described as RS-SCID, in which patients display radiosensitivity combined with severe combined immunodeficiency. Here, we characterize the defect in Artemis in a patient who displayed progressive combined immunodeficiency (CID) and elevated lymphocyte apoptosis. The patient is a compound heterozygote with novel mutations in both alleles, resulting in Artemis proteins with either L70 deletion or G126D substitution. Both mutational changes impact upon Artemis function and a fibroblast cell line derived from the patient (F96-224) has greatly reduced Artemis protein. In contrast to Artemis null cell lines, which fail to repair a subset of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation, F96-224 cells show slow but residual DSB rejoining. Despite showing intermediate cellular and clinical features, F96-224 cells are as radiosensitive as Artemis null cell lines. We developed a FACS-based assay to examine cell division and cellular characteristics for 10 days following exposure to ionizing radiation (2 and 4 Gy). This analysis demonstrated that F96-224 cells show delayed cell death when compared with rapid growth arrest of an Artemis null cell line, and the emergence of a cycling population shown by a control line. F96-224 cells also display elevated chromosome aberrations when compared with control cells. F96-224 therefore represents a novel phenotype for a hypomorphic cell line. We suggest that delayed cell death contributes to the progressive CID phenotype of the Artemis patient.

  20. Delayed repair of radiation induced clustered DNA damage: Friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, Laura J.; O’Neill, Peter; Lomax, Martine E.

    2011-01-01

    A signature of ionizing radiation exposure is the induction of DNA clustered damaged sites, defined as two or more lesions within one to two helical turns of DNA by passage of a single radiation track. Clustered damage is made up of double strand breaks (DSB) with associated base lesions or abasic (AP) sites, and non-DSB clusters comprised of base lesions, AP sites and single strand breaks. This review will concentrate on the experimental findings of the processing of non-DSB clustered damaged sites. It has been shown that non-DSB clustered damaged sites compromise the base excision repair pathway leading to the lifetime extension of the lesions within the cluster, compared to isolated lesions, thus the likelihood that the lesions persist to replication and induce mutation is increased. In addition certain non-DSB clustered damaged sites are processed within the cell to form additional DSB. The use of E. coli to demonstrate that clustering of DNA lesions is the major cause of the detrimental consequences of ionizing radiation is also discussed. The delayed repair of non-DSB clustered damaged sites in humans can be seen as a “friend”, leading to cell killing in tumour cells or as a “foe”, resulting in the formation of mutations and genetic instability in normal tissue. PMID:21130102

  1. Delayed Workforce Entry and High Emigration Rates for Recent Canadian Radiation Oncology Graduates.

    PubMed

    Loewen, Shaun K; Halperin, Ross; Lefresne, Shilo; Trotter, Theresa; Stuckless, Teri; Brundage, Michael

    2015-10-01

    To determine the employment status and location of recent Canadian radiation oncology (RO) graduates and to identify current workforce entry trends. A fill-in-the-blank spreadsheet was distributed to all RO program directors in December 2013 and June 2014, requesting the employment status and location of their graduates over the last 3 years. Visa trainee graduates were excluded. Response rate from program directors was 100% for both survey administrations. Of 101 graduates identified, 99 (98%) had known employment status and location. In the December survey, 5 2013 graduates (16%), 17 2012 graduates (59%), and 18 2011 graduates (75%) had permanent staff employment. Six months later, 5 2014 graduates (29%), 15 2013 graduates (48%), 24 2012 graduates (83%), and 21 2011 graduates (88%) had secured staff positions. Fellowships and temporary locums were common for those without staff employment. The proportion of graduates with staff positions abroad increased from 22% to 26% 6 months later. Workforce entry for most RO graduates was delayed but showed steady improvement with longer time after graduation. High emigration rates for jobs abroad signify domestic employment challenges for newly certified, Canadian-trained radiation oncologists. Coordination on a national level is required to address and regulate radiation oncologist supply and demand disequilibrium in Canada. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Delayed Workforce Entry and High Emigration Rates for Recent Canadian Radiation Oncology Graduates

    SciTech Connect

    Loewen, Shaun K.; Halperin, Ross; Lefresne, Shilo; Trotter, Theresa; Stuckless, Teri; Brundage, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the employment status and location of recent Canadian radiation oncology (RO) graduates and to identify current workforce entry trends. Methods and Materials: A fill-in-the-blank spreadsheet was distributed to all RO program directors in December 2013 and June 2014, requesting the employment status and location of their graduates over the last 3 years. Visa trainee graduates were excluded. Results: Response rate from program directors was 100% for both survey administrations. Of 101 graduates identified, 99 (98%) had known employment status and location. In the December survey, 5 2013 graduates (16%), 17 2012 graduates (59%), and 18 2011 graduates (75%) had permanent staff employment. Six months later, 5 2014 graduates (29%), 15 2013 graduates (48%), 24 2012 graduates (83%), and 21 2011 graduates (88%) had secured staff positions. Fellowships and temporary locums were common for those without staff employment. The proportion of graduates with staff positions abroad increased from 22% to 26% 6 months later. Conclusions: Workforce entry for most RO graduates was delayed but showed steady improvement with longer time after graduation. High emigration rates for jobs abroad signify domestic employment challenges for newly certified, Canadian-trained radiation oncologists. Coordination on a national level is required to address and regulate radiation oncologist supply and demand disequilibrium in Canada.

  3. Targeted delayed scanning at CT urography: a worthwhile use of radiation?

    PubMed

    Hack, Kalesha; Pinto, Patricia A; Gollub, Marc J

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether ureteral segments not filled with contrast material at computed tomographic (CT) urography ever contain tumor detectable only by filling these segments with contrast material. In this institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant retrospective study, with waiver of informed consent, databases were searched for all patients who underwent heminephroureterectomy or ureteroscopy between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2009, with available CT urography findings in the 12 months prior to surgery or biopsy and patients who had undergone at least two CT urography procedures with a minimum 5-year follow-up between studies. One of two radiologists blinded to results of pathologic examination recorded location of unfilled segments, time of scan, subsequent filling, and pathologic or 5-year follow-up CT urography results. Tumors were considered missed in an unfilled segment if tumor was found at pathologic examination or follow-up CT urography in the same one-third of the ureter and there were no secondary signs of a mass with other index CT urography sequences. Estimated radiation dose for additional delayed sequences was calculated with a 32-cm phantom. In 59 male and 33 female patients (mean age, 66 years) undergoing heminephroureterectomy, 27 tumors were present in 41 partially nonopacified ureters in 20 patients. Six tumors were present in nonopacified segments (one multifocal, none bilateral); all were identifiable by means of secondary signs present with earlier sequences. Among 182 lesions biopsied at ureteroscopy in 124 male and 53 female patients (mean age, 69 years), 28 tumors were present in nonopacified segments in 25 patients (four multifocal, none bilateral), all with secondary imaging signs detectable without delayed scanning. In 64 male and 29 female patients (mean age, 69 years) who underwent 5-year follow-up CT urography, three new tumors were revealed in three patients; none occurred in the unfilled ureter at index CT urography

  4. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation delays photosynthetic recovery in Arctic kelp zoospores.

    PubMed

    Roleda, Michael Y; Hanelt, Dieter; Wiencke, Christian

    2006-06-01

    Seasonal reproduction in some Arctic Laminariales coincides with increased UV-B radiation due to stratospheric ozone depletion and relatively high water temperatures during polar spring. To find out the capacity to cope with different spectral irradiance, the kinetics of photosynthetic recovery was investigated in zoospores of four Arctic species of the order Laminariales, the kelps Saccorhiza dermatodea, Alaria esculenta, Laminaria digitata, and Laminaria saccharina. The physiology of light harvesting, changes in photosynthetic efficiency and kinetics of photosynthetic recovery were measured by in vivo fluorescence changes of Photosystem II (PSII). Saturation irradiance of freshly released spores showed minimal I ( k ) values (photon fluence rate where initial slope intersects horizontal asymptote of the curve) values ranging from 13 to 18 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1) among species collected at different depths, confirming that spores are low-light adapted. Exposure to different radiation spectra consisting of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), PAR+UV-A radiation (UV-A; 320-400 nm), and PAR+ UV-A+UV-B radiation (UV-B; 280-320 nm) showed that the cumulative effects of increasing PAR fluence and the additional effect of UV-A and UV-B radiations on photoinhibition of photosynthesis are species specific. After long exposures, Laminaria saccharina was more sensitive to the different light treatments than the other three species investigated. Kinetics of recovery in zoospores showed a fast phase in S. dermatodea, which indicates a reduction of the photoprotective process while a slow phase in L. saccharina indicates recovery from severe photodamage. This first attempt to study photoinhibition and kinetics of recovery in zoospores showed that zoospores are the stage in the life history of seaweeds most susceptible to light stress and that ultraviolet radiation (UVR) effectively delays photosynthetic recovery. The viability of spores is important on

  5. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: II. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vivo, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize the evidence for non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation in vivo. Currently, human health risks associated with radiation exposures are based primarily on the assumption that the detrimental effects of radiation occur in irradiated cells. Over the years a number of non-targeted effects of radiation exposure in vivo have been described that challenge this concept. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effects, clastogenic factors produced in plasma from irradiated individuals that can cause chromosomal damage when cultured with nonirradiated cells, and transgenerational effects of parental irradiation that can manifest in the progeny. These effects pose new challenges to evaluating the risk(s) associated with radiation exposure and understanding radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  6. Time-dependent study of radiation trapping by time-delayed two-photon absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Molander, W.; Belsley, M.; Streater, A.; Burnett, K.

    1983-10-01

    The transport of resonance radiation through an optically thick vapor of Sr atoms is studied. A pulsed dye laser tuned to the 461 nm resonance line excites a narrow (approx. 60 ..mu..m diam) column of Sr atoms along the axis of a cylindrical oven containing Sr vapor and Ar buffer gas. After a delay of less than or equal to 80 ns, a second dye laser excites the atom from the first excited state (5s5p) to a higher excited state (5s7s). The fluorescence from this latter transition is monitored as the second laser is translated parallel to the first. Since the excited state-excited state fluorescence is not trapped the result is a plot of density of atoms in the 5s5p state as a function of position from the originally excited volume. The results are discussed qualitatively.

  7. Dynamic Response of Acoustic Delay Line for Beam Lines of Synchrotron Radiation Lithography System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, Eijiro

    1998-12-01

    Protecting against the sudden rupture of a beryllium window foilhas been a concern in synchrotron radiation lithography. This paperpresents a design study of a new acoustic delay line (ADL) for beamline protection. The ADL consists of a stationary outer tube and amovable inner tube. Between the outer tube and the inner tube, aseries of partitions consisting of stationary and floating platesfunctions as a buffer against invading gas. The inner tube connectsthe floating plates and the beryllium window and maintains aninternal narrow light path by moving synchronously with the scanningmirror.BLVAC, a computer program, has been developed to assist in the design and to simulate the dynamic response. The calculation results provide us with satisfactory design parameters to ensure that the closing time of the shut-off valve is within 30 milliseconds.

  8. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of brain injury after nasopharyngeal cancer radiation in early delayed reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, W-S; Li, J-J; Zhang, J-H; Hong, L; Xing, Z-B; Wang, F; Li, C-Q

    2014-08-29

    This study aimed to investigate the value of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) imaging in assessing nasopharyngeal carcinoma radiotherapy during the early delayed reaction period. Eighty cases of nasopharyngeal cancer treated with radiotherapy within the same period underwent MRS imaging before or after radiotherapy. Of the 80 cases, 47 underwent MRS imaging on the 3rd, 4th, 6th, and 12th months after radiotherapy. The trends of the primary metabolite concentration at different time points were monitored and compared with the corresponding data after radiotherapy. Repeated measures analysis of variance was performed. At the end of radiotherapy, the N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr), choline (Cho)/Cr, and NAA/Cho ratios were reduced to the lowest levels after 3 months. However, increasing trends were observed from the 4th to the 12th month. On the 12th month, stable levels were reached with statistically significant differences (F = 316.02, 53.84, 286.68; P < 0.01). MRS reflected the radiation injury-repair process in the brain of a nasopharyngeal cancer patient during early delayed reaction. This non-invasive monitoring of changes in brain tissue metabolite concentrations provides valuable information for prognosis.

  9. Asymptomatic Evolution and Regression of Temporal Lobe Necrosis After Adjuvant Radiation for Skin Cancer: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bahl, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Temporal Lobe Necrosis (TLN) is not an expected complication of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) for skin cancers and has become uncommon otherwise in daily practice due to improved RT planning and modern delivery techniques. TLN is a great mimic and can be mistaken for disease recurrence, metastasis to the brain, or high grade primary brain tumor. This case report demonstrates the importance of diagnosing the entity, its natural evolution, and dosimetric correlation with published constraints.​ It emphasizes the importance of thorough clinical examination on follow-up and review of previous radiation plan when encountered with challenging differentials. We also provide a review of clinical presentations, imaging modalities, and management options for patients with suspected TLN. PMID:27226935

  10. Mensenchymal stem cells can delay radiation-induced crypt death: impact on intestinal CD44(+) fragments.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng-Yu; Jin, Xing; Jiang, Yi-Yao; Wang, Li-Xian; Liu, Yong-Jun; Wang, Jin

    2016-05-01

    Intestinal stem cells are primitive cells found within the intestinal epithelium that play a central role in maintaining epithelial homeostasis through self-renewal and commitment into functional epithelial cells. Several markers are available to identify intestinal stem cells, such as Lgr5, CD24 and EphB2, which can be used to sort intestinal stem cells from mammalian gut. Here, we identify and isolate intestinal stem cells from C57BL/6 mice by using a cell surface antigen, CD44. In vitro, some CD44(+) crypt cells are capable of forming "villus-crypt"-like structures (organoids). A subset strongly positive for CD44 expresses high levels of intestinal stem-cell-related genes, including Lgr5, Bmi1, Hopx, Lrig1, Ascl2, Smoc2 and Rnf43. Cells from this subset are more capable of developing into organoids in vitro, compared with the subset weakly positive for CD44. However, the organoids are sensitive to ionizing irradiation. We investigate the specific roles of mesenchymal stem cells in protecting organoids against radiation-induced crypt death. When co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells, the crypt domains of irradiated organoids possess more proliferative cells and fewer apoptotic cells than those not co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells. Cd44v6 continues to be expressed in the crypt domains of irradiated organoids co-cultured with mesenchymal stem cells. Our results indicate specific roles of mesenchymal stem cells in delaying radiation-induced crypt death in vitro.

  11. Collision in the inferior olive: hypertrophic olivary degeneration complicated by radiation necrosis in brainstem primitive neuroendocrine tumor.

    PubMed

    Litkowski, Patricia; Young, Robert J; Wolden, Suzanne L; Souweidane, Mark M; Haque, Sofia; Gilheeney, Stephen W

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) is caused by disruption of the triangle of Guillain and Mollaret. We describe a child with a primitive neuroendocrine tumor who developed an expansile nonenhancing lesion in the olive after surgery and radiation therapy. Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography showed disruption of the central tegmental tract consistent with HOD. Subsequent transient enhancement of the olive was consistent with early radiation injury. Knowledge of coexisting complications such as HOD and radiation injury is essential for proper management.

  12. Penile necrosis requiring penectomy complicating recto-urethral fistula post prostate cancer external beam radiation and brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Kinahan, John; Pai, Howard; Martens, Mildred; Gray, Jason; Biberdorf, Darren; Mihailovic, Alex; McAuley, Iain

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a well-recognized treatment for unfavourable risk localized prostate cancer. Radiation induced recto-urethral fistulae are known rare complications particularly from brachytherapy. We report a case of a recto-urethral fistula 7 years post-external beam radiation and I-125 brachytherapy, which was complicated by a severe polymicrobial soft tissue infection. This infection required penectomy and pelvic exenteration with diverting colostomy, Indiana pouch urinary diversion and gracilis myo-cutaneuos flap closure of the perineum.

  13. Relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid can suppress radiation-induced cellular senescence in mammalian fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Kashino, Genro; Mori, Hiromu; Watanabe, Masami

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence is thought to be caused by nuclear DNA damage that cannot be repaired. However, here we found that radiation induces delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress after irradiation. We investigated whether the relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid would suppress the radiation-induced cellular senescence in Syrian golden hamster embryo (SHE) cells. We observed that the level of oxidative stress was drastically increased soon after irradiation, then declined to the level in non-irradiated cells, and increased again with a peak on day 3 after irradiation. We found that the inductions of cellular senescence after X-irradiation were reduced along with suppression of the delayed induction of oxidative stress by treatment with ascorbic acid, but not when oxidative stress occurred immediately after irradiation. Moreover, treatment of ascorbic acid inhibited p53 accumulation at 3 days after irradiation. Our data suggested a delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress levels plays an important role in the process of radiation-induced cellular senescence by p53 accumulation.

  14. Relative cerebral blood volume is a potential biomarker in late delayed radiation-induced brain injury.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ying; Huang, Haiwei; Guo, Junjie; Zhou, Dongxiao

    2017-08-10

    To assess whether relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) can provide information to reliably evaluate the stages of late delayed radiation-induced brain injury. Forty patients diagnosed with late delayed radiation-induced brain injury were enrolled. The patients were examined using a 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system equipped with an 8-channel head coil. An echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence was used in perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI). The location of 1H-MR spectroscopy scanning was acquired by a point-resolved spectroscopy sequence. Lesions of the temporal lobe were divided into one of two groups according to rCBV value: rCBV<1 (low rCBV [group 1; n = 45]); and rCBV>1 (elevated rCBV [group 2; n = 14]). PWI and MRS parameters, as well as morphological lesion types, in these two groups were compared. Morphological severity was assessed independently and agreed on by two imaging specialists (J.L. and H.X.S., with 16 and 24 years' experience, respectively). If necessary, a third imaging professor (Z.M.H.) with 30 years' experience resolved disagreement(s). Standards for evaluating morphological lesion types were based on previously published criteria. After testing the skewness of data, the Mann-Whitney U-test or Student's t-test was used, as appropriate. rCBV, relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and relative mean transit time (rMTT) in group 2 (n = 14) were significantly higher than in group 1 (n = 45) (rCBV: 1.21 ± 0.38 vs. 0.72 ± 0.32, respectively; P < 0.001; rCBF: 1.13 ± 0.02 vs. 0.74 ± 0.04, respectively; P < 0.001; rMTT: 1.10 ± 0.26 vs. 0.96 ± 0.20, P < 0.001). The levels of choline-containing compounds (CHO) / creatine (Cr) and CHO/N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in group 1 were significantly greater than in group 2 (CHO/Cr: 1.89 ± 1.83 vs. 1.22 ± 1.31, respectively; P = 0.016; CHO/NAA: 1.85 ± 3.50 vs. 1.17 ± 0.75, respectively; P = 0.022). More severe morphological lesions were

  15. Time delays in the nonthermal radiation of solar flares according to observations of the CORONAS-F satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsap, Yu. T.; Stepanov, A. V.; Kashapova, L. K.; Myagkova, I. N.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Kopylova, Yu. G.; Goldvarg, T. B.

    2016-07-01

    In 2001-2003, the X-ray and microwave observations of ten solar flares of M- and X-classes were carried out by the CORONAS-F orbital station, the RSTN Sun service, and Nobeyama radio polarimeters. Based on these observations, a correlation analysis of time profiles of nonthermal radiation was performed. On average, hard X-ray radiation outstrips the microwave radiation in 9 events, i.e., time delays are positive. The appearance of negative delays is associated with effective scattering of accelerated electrons in pitch angles, where the length of the free path of a particle is less than the half-length of a flare loop. The additional indications are obtained in favor of the need to account for the effect of magnetic mirrors on the dynamics of energetic particles in the coronal arches.

  16. Detection of microvasculature alterations by synchrotron radiation in murine with delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beilei; Zhang, Bo; Huo, Hua; Wang, Tao; Wang, Qianqian; Wu, Yuanlin; Xiao, Liang; Ren, Yuqi; Zhang, Liming

    2014-04-01

    Using the tentacle extract (TE) from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata, we have previously established a delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome (DJES) model, which is meaningful for clinical interventions against jellyfish stings. However, the mechanism of DJES still remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to explore its potential mechanism by detecting TE-induced microvasculature alterations in vivo and ex vivo. Using a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility, we, for the first time, directly observed the blood vessel alterations induced by jellyfish venom in vivo and ex vivo. Firstly, microvasculature imaging of whole-body mouse in vivo indicated that the small blood vessel branches in the liver and kidney in the TE-treated group, seemed much thinner than those in the control group. Secondly, 3D imaging of kidney ex vivo showed that the kidneys in the TE-treated group had incomplete vascular trees where distal vessel branches were partly missing and disorderly disturbed. Finally, histopathological analysis found that obvious morphological changes, especially hemorrhagic effects, were also present in the TE-treated kidney. Thus, TE-induced microvasculature changes might be one of the important mechanisms of multiple organ dysfunctions in DJES. In addition, the methods we employed here will probably facilitate further studies on developing effective intervention strategies against DJES. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Coherent nature of the radiation emitted in delayed luminescence of leaves

    PubMed

    Bajpai

    1999-06-07

    After exposure to light, a living system emits a photon signal of characteristic shape. The signal has a small decay region and a long tail region. The flux of photons in the decay region changes by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude, but remains almost constant in the tail region. The decaying part is attributed to delayed luminescence and the constant part to ultra-weak luminescence. Biophoton emission is the common name given to both kinds of luminescence, and photons emitted are called biophotons. The decay character of the biophoton signal is not exponential, which is suggestive of a coherent signal. We sought to establish the coherent nature by measuring the conditional probability of zero photon detection in a small interval Delta. Our measurements establish the coherent nature of biophotons emitted by different leaves at various temperatures in the range 15-50 degrees C. Our set up could measure the conditional probability for Deltaradiation of a light emitting diode along with a leaf for Delta in the range 10 &mgr;s-100 &mgr

  18. Development and Characterization of a High Throughput Screen to investigate the delayed Effects of Radiations Commonly Encountered in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, W. F.

    Astronauts based on the space station or on long-term space missions will be exposed to high Z radiations in the cosmic environment In order to evaluate the potentially deleterious effects of exposure to radiations commonly encountered in space we have developed and characterized a high throughput assay to detect mutation deletion events and or hyperrecombination in the progeny of exposed cells This assay is based on a plasmid vector containing a green fluorescence protein reporter construct We have shown that after stable transfection of the vector into human or hamster cells this construct can identify mutations specifically base changes and deletions as well as recombination events e g gene conversion or homologous recombination occurring as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation Our focus has been on those events occurring in the progeny of an irradiated cell that are potentially associated with radiation induced genomic instability rather than the more conventional assays that evaluate the direct immediate effects of radiation exposure Considerable time has been spent automating analysis of surviving colonies as a function of time after irradiation in order to determine when delayed instability is induced and the consequences of this delayed instability The assay is now automated permitting the evaluation of potentially rare events associated with low dose low dose rate radiations commonly encountered in space

  19. Delayed Administration of WP1066, an STAT3 Inhibitor, Ameliorates Radiation-Induced Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiahua; Yuan, Xiaopeng; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Kaishuo; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Haowen; Liu, Fenju

    2016-02-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of WP1066, a specific inhibitor of STAT3 signaling, on radiation-induced lung injury in mice. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to a single thoracic irradiation of 15 Gy X-ray and WP1066 was administrated through intraperitoneal injection. The early and delayed treatment groups were treated with WP1066 during the first 2 weeks and the second 2 weeks, respectively. The therapeutic effects of WP1066 were evaluated by survival analysis, histological examination, and measurement of inflammatory parameters and collagen deposition. The activation of STAT3 pathway was also estimated by immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. Delayed treatment of WP1066, but not early treatment, prolonged survival time and prevented the development of radiation pneumonitis and the subsequent lung fibrosis in mice. WP1066 treatment also significantly suppressed the activation of STAT3 signaling in the irradiated lung tissues. The activation of STAT3 pathway might play an important part in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced lung injury. The protective effects of delayed treatment of WP1066 suggested STAT3 signaling could be a therapeutic target for radiation pneumonitis.

  20. Variable ultrasound trigger delay for improved magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougenot, Charles; Waspe, Adam; Looi, Thomas; Drake, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) allows the quantification of microscopic displacements induced by ultrasound pulses, which are proportional to the local acoustic intensity. This study describes a new method to acquire MR-ARFI maps, which reduces the measurement noise in the quantification of displacement as well as improving its robustness in the presence of motion. Two MR-ARFI sequences were compared in this study. The first sequence ‘variable MSG’ involves switching the polarity of the motion sensitive gradient (MSG) between odd and even image frames. The second sequence named ‘static MSG’ involves a variable ultrasound trigger delay to sonicate during the first or second MSG for odd and even image frames, respectively. As previously published, the data acquired with a variable MSG required the use of reference data acquired prior to any sonication to process displacement maps. In contrary, data acquired with a static MSG were converted to displacement maps without using reference data acquired prior to the sonication. Displacement maps acquired with both sequences were compared by performing sonications for three different conditions: in a polyacrylamide phantom, in the leg muscle of a freely breathing pig and in the leg muscle of pig under apnea. The comparison of images acquired at even image frames and odd image frames indicates that the sequence with a static MSG provides a significantly better steady state (p  <  0.001 based on a Student’s t-test) than the images acquired with a variable MSG. In addition no reference data prior to sonication were required to process displacement maps for data acquired with a static MSG. The absence of reference data prior to sonication provided a 41% reduction of the spatial distribution of noise (p  <  0.001 based on a Student’s t-test) and reduced the sensitivity to motion for displacements acquired with a static MSG. No significant differences were expected and

  1. Delayed radiation injury to the retrobulbar optic nerves and chiasm. Clinical syndrome and treatment with hyperbaric oxygen and corticosteroids

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, D.; Bosley, T.M.; Fowble, B.; Clark, J.; Savino, P.J.; Sergott, R.C.; Schatz, N.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Thirteen patients with delayed radiation injury to the optic nerves and chiasm were treated with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) and corticosteroids. These patients experienced painless, abrupt loss of vision in one (6 patients) or both (7 patients) eyes between 4 and 35 months after receiving radiation doses of at least 4500 cGy to the region of the chiasm. Diagnostic evaluation including neuro-imaging and lumbar puncture showed no recurrent tumor and no other cause for visual loss. No patient's vision improved during treatment or follow-up lasting between 1 and 4 years. There were no serious complications of treatment.

  2. Optically-switched submillimeter-wave oscillator and radiator having a switch-to-switch propagation delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael G. (Inventor); Maserjian, Joseph (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A submillimeter wave-generating integrated circuit includes an array of N photoconductive switches biased across a common voltage source and an optical path difference from a common optical pulse of repetition rate f sub 0 providing a different optical delay to each of the switches. In one embodiment, each incoming pulse is applied to successive ones of the N switches with successive delays. The N switches are spaced apart with a suitable switch-to-switch spacing so as to generate at the output load or antenna radiation of a submillimeter wave frequency f on the order of N f sub 0. Preferably, the optical pulse has a repetition rate of at least 10 GHz and N is of the order of 100, so that the circuit generates radiation of frequency of the order of or greater than 1 Terahertz.

  3. Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baulch, Janet

    2013-09-11

    This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and unstable clones. These

  4. Effect of Dosimetric Factors on Occurrence and Volume of Temporal Lobe Necrosis Following Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Case-Control Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xin; Ou, Xiaomin; Xu, Tingting; Wang, Xiaosheng; Shen, Chunying; Ding, Jianhui; Hu, Chaosu

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To determine dosimetric risk factors for the occurrence of temporal lobe necrosis (TLN) among nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and to investigate the impact of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters on the volume of TLN lesions (V-N). Methods and Materials: Forty-three NPC patients who had developed TLN following IMRT and 43 control subjects free of TLN were retrospectively assessed. DVH parameters included maximum dose (Dmax), minimum dose (Dmin), mean dose (Dmean), absolute volumes receiving specific dose (Vds) from 20 to 76 Gy (V20-V76), and doses covering certain volumes (Dvs) from 0.25 to 6.0 cm{sup 3} (D0.25-D6.0). V-Ns were quantified with axial magnetic resonance images. Results: DVH parameters were ubiquitously higher in temporal lobes with necrosis than in healthy temporal lobes. Increased Vds and Dvs were significantly associated with higher risk of TLN occurrence (P<.05). In particular, Vds at a dose of ≥70 Gy were found with the highest odds ratios. A common increasing trend was detected between V-N and DVH parameters through trend tests (P for trend of <.05). Linear regression analysis showed that V45 had the strongest predictive power for V-N (adjusted R{sup 2} = 0.305, P<.0001). V45 of <15.1 cm{sup 3} was relatively safe as the dose constraint for preventing large TLN lesions with V-N of >5 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Dosimetric parameters are significantly associated with TLN occurrence and the extent of temporal lobe injury. To better manage TLN, it would be important to avoid both focal high dose and moderate dose delivered to a large area in TLs.

  5. High-Precision Time Delay Control with Continuous Phase Shifter for Pump-Probe Experiments Using Synchrotron Radiation Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Ohshima, Takashi; Moritomo, Yutaka; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Takata, Masaki

    2010-06-23

    Brilliant pulsed x-ray synchrotron radiation (SR) is useful for pump-probe experiment such as time-resolved x-ray diffraction, x-ray absorption fine structure, and x-ray spectroscopy. For laser pump-SR x-ray probe experiments, short pulsed lasers are generally synchronized to the SR master oscillator controlling the voltage for acceleration of electron bunches in an accelerator, and the interval between the laser and the SR pulses is changed around the time scale of target phenomenon. Ideal delay control produces any time delay as keeping the time-precision and pointing-stability of optical pulses at a sample position. We constructed the time delay control module using a continuous phase shifter of radio frequency signal and a frequency divider, which can produce the delayed trigger pulses to the laser without degradation of the time precision and the pointing stability. A picoseconds time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment was demonstrated at SPring-8 storage ring for fast lattice response by femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation, and suggested the possibility of accurate sound velocity measurement. A delay control unit operating with subpicosecond precision has also been designed for femtosecond pump-probe experiments using a free electron laser at SPring-8 campus.

  6. [PET scan and NMR spectroscopy for the differential diagnosis between brain radiation necrosis and tumour recurrence after stereotactic irradiation of brain metastases: Place in the decision tree].

    PubMed

    Menoux, I; Noël, G; Namer, I; Antoni, D

    2017-08-01

    After stereotactic radiation therapy for brain metastases, one of the complications is radionecrosis. Differential diagnosis with tumour recurrence can be helped by different methods of imaging, although histology remains the gold standard. According to the treatment centres, practice diverges. The objective of this single-centre retrospective study was to define the power of MRI, PET scan and NMR spectroscopy to establish a decision tree. This study included patients who underwent stereotactic radiation therapy for brain metastases, and required, during follow-up, both a PET scan and NMR spectroscopy in order to differentiate a radiation necrosis and tumour recurrence. From 2010 to 2015, 25 patients were consistent with these criteria. Conventional MRI technique, with the T1/T2 mismatch criterion, had a specificity of 75% and a sensitivity of only 44%. A lesion quotient greater than 0.3 diagnosed a recurrence with a sensitivity of 92%. PET scan combined the best sensitivity and specificity, respectively of 92% and 69%. Whatever the thresholds used in NMR spectroscopy for choline/N-acetylaspartate and choline/creatin ratios, the power of this imaging modality did not exceed that of PET scan. The criteria described in conventional MRI cannot by themselves establish the differential diagnosis. In first intention in case of doubt, PET scan should be done, combining the best sensitivity and specificity, whereas NMR spectroscopy used in combination does not improve these factors. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Ionizing radiation accelerates Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission, which involves delayed mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in normal human fibroblast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-11-04

    Ionizing radiation is known to increase intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through mitochondrial dysfunction. Although it has been as a basis of radiation-induced genetic instability, the mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction remains unclear. Here we studied the dynamics of mitochondrial structure in normal human fibroblast like cells exposed to ionizing radiation. Delayed mitochondrial O(2)(-) production was peaked 3 days after irradiation, which was coupled with accelerated mitochondrial fission. We found that radiation exposure accumulated dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria. Knocking down of Drp1 expression prevented radiation induced acceleration of mitochondrial fission. Furthermore, knockdown of Drp1 significantly suppressed delayed production of mitochondrial O(2)(-). Since the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which was induced by radiation was prevented in cells knocking down of Drp1 expression, indicating that the excessive mitochondrial fission was involved in delayed mitochondrial dysfunction after irradiation.

  8. Late Consequential Surgical Bed Soft Tissue Necrosis in Advanced Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated With Transoral Robotic Surgery and Postoperative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, J. Nicholas; Lin, Alexander; Gamerman, Victoria; Mitra, Nandita; Grover, Surbhi; McMenamin, Erin M.; Weinstein, Gregory S.; O'Malley, Bert W.; Cohen, Roger B.; Orisamolu, Abimbola; Ahn, Peter H.; Quon, Harry

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: A subset of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OP-SCC) managed with transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) developed soft tissue necrosis (STN) in the surgical bed months after completion of PORT. We investigated the frequency and risk factors. Materials and Methods: This retrospective analysis included 170 consecutive OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT between 2006 and 2012, with >6 months' of follow-up. STN was defined as ulceration of the surgical bed >6 weeks after completion of PORT, requiring opioids, biopsy, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Results: A total of 47 of 170 patients (28%) had a diagnosis of STN. Tonsillar patients were more susceptible than base-of-tongue (BOT) patients, 39% (41 of 104) versus 9% (6 of 66), respectively. For patients with STN, median tumor size was 3.0 cm (range 1.0-5.6 cm), and depth of resection was 2.2 cm (range 1.0-5.1 cm). Median radiation dose and dose of fraction to the surgical bed were 6600 cGy and 220 cGy, respectively. Thirty-one patients (66%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Median time to STN was 2.5 months after PORT. All patients had resolution of STN after a median of 3.7 months. Multivariate analysis identified tonsillar primary (odds ratio [OR] 4.73, P=.01), depth of resection (OR 3.12, P=.001), total radiation dose to the resection bed (OR 1.51 per Gy, P<.01), and grade 3 acute mucositis (OR 3.47, P=.02) as risk factors for STN. Beginning May 2011, after implementing aggressive avoidance of delivering >2 Gy/day to the resection bed mucosa, only 8% (2 of 26 patients) experienced STN (all grade 2). Conclusions: A subset of OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT are at risk for developing late consequential surgical bed STN. Risk factors include tonsillar location, depth of resection, radiation dose to the surgical bed, and severe mucositis. STN risk is significantly decreased with carefully avoiding a radiation dosage of >2 Gy/day to the

  9. Late consequential surgical bed soft tissue necrosis in advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas treated with transoral robotic surgery and postoperative radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lukens, J Nicholas; Lin, Alexander; Gamerman, Victoria; Mitra, Nandita; Grover, Surbhi; McMenamin, Erin M; Weinstein, Gregory S; O'Malley, Bert W; Cohen, Roger B; Orisamolu, Abimbola; Ahn, Peter H; Quon, Harry

    2014-08-01

    A subset of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OP-SCC) managed with transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) developed soft tissue necrosis (STN) in the surgical bed months after completion of PORT. We investigated the frequency and risk factors. This retrospective analysis included 170 consecutive OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT between 2006 and 2012, with >6 months' of follow-up. STN was defined as ulceration of the surgical bed >6 weeks after completion of PORT, requiring opioids, biopsy, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy. A total of 47 of 170 patients (28%) had a diagnosis of STN. Tonsillar patients were more susceptible than base-of-tongue (BOT) patients, 39% (41 of 104) versus 9% (6 of 66), respectively. For patients with STN, median tumor size was 3.0 cm (range 1.0-5.6 cm), and depth of resection was 2.2 cm (range 1.0-5.1 cm). Median radiation dose and dose of fraction to the surgical bed were 6600 cGy and 220 cGy, respectively. Thirty-one patients (66%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Median time to STN was 2.5 months after PORT. All patients had resolution of STN after a median of 3.7 months. Multivariate analysis identified tonsillar primary (odds ratio [OR] 4.73, P=.01), depth of resection (OR 3.12, P=.001), total radiation dose to the resection bed (OR 1.51 per Gy, P<.01), and grade 3 acute mucositis (OR 3.47, P=.02) as risk factors for STN. Beginning May 2011, after implementing aggressive avoidance of delivering >2 Gy/day to the resection bed mucosa, only 8% (2 of 26 patients) experienced STN (all grade 2). A subset of OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT are at risk for developing late consequential surgical bed STN. Risk factors include tonsillar location, depth of resection, radiation dose to the surgical bed, and severe mucositis. STN risk is significantly decreased with carefully avoiding a radiation dosage of >2 Gy/day to the surgical bed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All

  10. Delayed postoperative radiation therapy in local control of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth

    PubMed Central

    Amar, Ali; Chedid, Helma Maria; Curioni, Otávio Alberto; Dedivitis, Rogério Aparecido; Rapoport, Abrão; Cernea, Claudio Roberto; Brandão, Lenine Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of time between surgery and postoperative radiation therapy on local recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth. Methods A total of 154 patients treated between 1996 and 2007 were selected considering local recurrence rate and time of the adjuvant radiotherapy. Results Local recurrence was diagnosed in 54 (35%) patients. Radiation therapy reduced the rate of local recurrences, although with no statistical significance. The time between surgery and initiation of postoperative radiotherapy did not significantly influence the risk of local recurrence in patients referred to adjuvant treatment (p=0.49). Conclusion In the presence of risk factors for local recurrence, a short delay in starting the adjuvant radiation therapy does not contraindicate its performance. PMID:25628200

  11. Combined Hydration and Antibiotics with Lisinopril to Mitigate Acute and Delayed High-dose Radiation Injuries to Multiple Organs.

    PubMed

    Fish, Brian L; Gao, Feng; Narayanan, Jayashree; Bergom, Carmen; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Cohen, Eric P; Moulder, John E; Orschell, Christie M; Medhora, Meetha

    2016-11-01

    The NIAID Radiation and Nuclear Countermeasures Program is developing medical agents to mitigate the acute and delayed effects of radiation that may occur from a radionuclear attack or accident. To date, most such medical countermeasures have been developed for single organ injuries. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have been used to mitigate radiation-induced lung, skin, brain, and renal injuries in rats. ACE inhibitors have also been reported to decrease normal tissue complication in radiation oncology patients. In the current study, the authors have developed a rat partial-body irradiation (leg-out PBI) model with minimal bone marrow sparing (one leg shielded) that results in acute and late injuries to multiple organs. In this model, the ACE inhibitor lisinopril (at ~24 mg m d started orally in the drinking water at 7 d after irradiation and continued to ≥150 d) mitigated late effects in the lungs and kidneys after 12.5-Gy leg-out PBI. Also in this model, a short course of saline hydration and antibiotics mitigated acute radiation syndrome following doses as high as 13 Gy. Combining this supportive care with the lisinopril regimen mitigated overall morbidity for up to 150 d after 13-Gy leg-out PBI. Furthermore, lisinopril was an effective mitigator in the presence of the growth factor G-CSF (100 μg kg d from days 1-14), which is FDA-approved for use in a radionuclear event. In summary, by combining lisinopril (FDA-approved for other indications) with hydration and antibiotics, acute and delayed radiation injuries in multiple organs were mitigated.

  12. Ionizing radiation accelerates Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission, which involves delayed mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in normal human fibroblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report first time that ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial dynamic changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced mitochondrial fission was caused by Drp1 localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that radiation causes delayed ROS from mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down regulation of Drp1 rescued mitochondrial dysfunction after radiation exposure. -- Abstract: Ionizing radiation is known to increase intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through mitochondrial dysfunction. Although it has been as a basis of radiation-induced genetic instability, the mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction remains unclear. Here we studied the dynamics of mitochondrial structure in normal human fibroblast like cells exposed to ionizing radiation. Delayed mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-} production was peaked 3 days after irradiation, which was coupled with accelerated mitochondrial fission. We found that radiation exposure accumulated dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria. Knocking down of Drp1 expression prevented radiation induced acceleration of mitochondrial fission. Furthermore, knockdown of Drp1 significantly suppressed delayed production of mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-}. Since the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which was induced by radiation was prevented in cells knocking down of Drp1 expression, indicating that the excessive mitochondrial fission was involved in delayed mitochondrial dysfunction after irradiation.

  13. Innovative Hypofractionated Stereotactic Regimen Achieves Excellent Local Control with No Radiation Necrosis: Promising Results in the Management of Patients with Small Recurrent Inoperable GBM

    PubMed Central

    Pannullo, Susan C.; Minkowitz, Shlomo; Taube, Shoshana; Chang, Jenghwa; Parashar, Bhupesh; Christos, Paul; Wernicke, A.Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Management of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains a challenge. Several institutions reported that a single fraction of ≥ 20 Gy for small tumor burden results in excellent local control; however, this is at the expense of a high incidence of radiation necrosis (RN). Therefore, we developed a hypofractionation pattern of 33 Gy/3 fractions, which is a radiobiological equivalent of 20 Gy, with the aim to lower the incidence of RN. We reviewed records of 21 patients with recurrent GBM treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (HFSRT) to their 22 respective lesions. Sixty Gy fractioned external beam radiotherapy was performed as first-line treatment. Median time from primary irradiation to HFSRT was 9.6 months (range: 3.1 – 68.1 months). In HFSRT, a median dose of 33 Gy in 11 Gy fractions was delivered to the 80% isodose line that encompassed the target volume. The median tumor volume was 1.07 cm3 (range: 0.11 – 16.64 cm3). The median follow-up time after HFSRT was 9.3 months (range: 1.7 – 33.6 months). Twenty-one of 23 lesions treated (91.3%) achieved local control while 2/23 (8.7%) progressed. Median time to progression outside of the treated site was 5.2 months (range: 2.2 – 9.6 months). Progression was treated with salvage chemotherapy. Five of 21 patients (23.8%) were alive at the end of this follow-up; two patients remain disease-free. The remaining 16/21 patients (76.2%) died of disease. Treatment was well tolerated by all patients with no acute CTC/RTOG > Grade 2. There was 0% incidence of RN. A prospective trial will be underway to validate these promising results. PMID:27096136

  14. Can brain thallium 201 SPECT substitute for F-18-FDG PET in detecting recurrent brain tumor in the presence of radiation necrosis; correlation with biopsy/surgery results

    SciTech Connect

    Antar, M.A.; Barnett, G.H.; McIntyre, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    F-18-FDG PET man has been largely successful in differentiating between radiation necrosis and recurrent brain tumors. Because of the expense and unavailability of PET scanners in most clinical centers, Tl-201 SPECT scan may offer an alternative. Therefore, we have evaluated both techniques in 18 patients (13 men and 5 women) whose ages range from 28 to 74 year old. Eleven patients had glioblastoma multiformi and 4 patients high grade astrocytoma and 3 patient meningiosarcoma. All patients received radiation therapy (5500-6000 Rad) and 13 patients received also chemotherapy. PET scan was performed 40-60 min. after 5-10 mCi of F-18 FDG (i.v.) and SPECT 30 min. after 4.6 mCi of Tl-201 chloride (i.v.). Severe FDG hypometabolism was evident in the irradiated regions, in all patients. Evidence of tumor recurrence was seen in 15 patients by both FDG PET and Thallium 201 SPECT. The ratio of peak pixel uptake of suspected tumor to that of normal cortex for FDG ranged from 0.67 to 1.5 with a mean of 1.02. The ratio of peak pixel uptake of thallium 201 in the suspected lesion to that of the contralateral scalp area ranges from 0.8 to 1.9 with mean of 1.1. There was concordance between the findings of PET and SPECT in 16/18 patients. However, the volume of involvement differs in these patients; most likely secondary to different mechanisms of uptake and both studies may complement each other. Subsequent biopsy/surgery in 11 patients confirmed tumor recurrence in 10 out of 11 patients. The findings suggest that thallium 201 brain SPECT scan can provide similar (but not identical) information regarding brain tumor recurrence in these patients.

  15. 1090 nm infrared radiation at close to threshold dose induces cataract with a time delay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhaohua; Schulmeister, Karl; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Kronschläger, Martin; Söderberg, Per G

    2015-03-01

    To investigate whether infrared radiation (IRR)-induced cataract is instant or is associated with a time delay between the exposure and the onset of lens light scattering after an exposure to just above threshold dose. Six-weeks-old albino Sprague-Dawley female rats were unilaterally exposed to 197 W/cm2 IRR at 1090 nm within the dilated pupil. In the first experiment, the animals were exposed with four exposure times of 5, 8, 13 and 20 second, respectively. At 24 hr after exposure, the light scattering in both exposed and contralateral not exposed lenses was measured. Based on the first experiment, four postexposure time groups were exposed unilaterally to 1090 nm IRR of 197 W/cm2 for 8 second. At 6, 18, 55 and 168 hr after exposure, the light scattering in both lenses was measured. A 197 W/cm2 IRR-induced light scattering in the lens with exposures of at least 8 second. Further, after exposure to IRR of 197 W/cm2 for 8 second, the light-scattering increase in the lens was delayed approximately 16 hr after the exposure. There is a time delay between the exposure and the onset of cataract after exposure to close to threshold dose implicating that either near IRR cataract is photochemical or there is a time delay in the biological expression of thermally induced damage. © 2014 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Quantum phaseshifts and Wigner-Smith time delays in the photoionization versus radiative recombination of Ar valence electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Dixit, Gopal; Madjet, Mohamed; Chakraborty, Himadri

    2014-05-01

    Using a methodology of time-dependent local density approximation (TDLDA) with the Leeuwen and Baerends exchange-correlation functional, the quantum phases of the amplitudes of photoionization (PI) and its inverse process of radiative recombination (RR) for various dipole channels of Ar have been calculated. Energy differentials of the phases, the so called Wigner-Smith time delays, for processes involving valence 3p and 3s electrons are considered. TDLDA 3p recombination phases are found to concur well with the recent experiment. Effects of electron correlations have been studied and diagnosed in the framework of dynamical coupling between degenerate configurations. Differences in the phase and delay structures between PI and RR are found in general with dramatic distinctions at resonances and Cooper minima in particular. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation.

  17. Prevention of ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression by sunscreen in Candida albicans-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, QUAN; LI, RUNXIANG; ZHAO, XIAOXIA; LIANG, BIHUA; MA, SHAOYIN; LI, ZHENJIE; ZHU, HUILAN

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced immunosuppression leading to skin cancer has received increased attention in previous years. The present study aimed to investigate the immunoprotection offered by Anthelios sunscreen in a mouse model of Candida albicans-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity. Anthelios sunscreen was applied to the skin on the dorsal skin of BALB/c mice treated with a sub-erythema dose of solar-simulated radiation. Delayed-type hypersensitivity was induced by immunization with Candida albicans. Changes in the skin thickness of the foot pads were measured, and immunosuppression rates were also evaluated. The expression levels of CD207, CD80 and CD86 in the Langerhans cells were semi-quantitatively detected using Western blotting and immunohistochemical assays. The delayed-type hypersensitivity mouse model was successfully established. The minimal erythema doses of UVA and UVB exposure to the mice were 2,000 and 145 mJ/cm2, respectively. The immunosuppression rates in the sunscreen group and non-sunscreen group were 24.39 and 65.85%, respectively (P<0.01). The results of the Western blotting and immunohistochemistry showed that the expression levels of CD207 (P<0.01), CD80 (P<0.05) and CD86 (P<0.01) were higher in the sunscreen group, compared with those in the non-sunscreen group. UV exposure reduced Candida albicans antigen-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity. Anthelios sunscreen was found to protect the skin from immunosuppression through the activation of epidermal Langerhans cells. PMID:27175551

  18. Position-dependent radiative transfer as a tool for studying Anderson localization: Delay time, time-reversal and coherent backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tiggelen, B. A.; Skipetrov, S. E.; Page, J. H.

    2017-05-01

    Previous work has established that the localized regime of wave transport in open media is characterized by a position-dependent diffusion coefficient. In this work we study how the concept of position-dependent diffusion affects the delay time, the transverse confinement, the coherent backscattering, and the time reversal of waves. Definitions of energy transport velocity of localized waves are proposed. We start with a phenomenological model of radiative transfer and then present a novel perturbational approach based on the self-consistent theory of localization. The latter allows us to obtain results relevant for realistic experiments in disordered quasi-1D wave guides and 3D slabs.

  19. The Necrosis-Avid Small Molecule HQ4-DTPA as a Multimodal Imaging Agent for Monitoring Radiation Therapy-Induced Tumor Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Stammes, Marieke A; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; Scollard, Deborah A; Kulbatski, Iris; Medeiros, Philip J; Sinisi, Riccardo; Dubikovskaya, Elena A; Snoeks, Thomas J A; van Beek, Ermond R; Chan, Alan B; Löwik, Clemens W G M; DaCosta, Ralph S

    2016-01-01

    Most effective antitumor therapies induce tumor cell death. Non-invasive, rapid and accurate quantitative imaging of cell death is essential for monitoring early response to antitumor therapies. To facilitate this, we previously developed a biocompatible necrosis-avid near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging probe, HQ4, which was radiolabeled with (111)Indium-chloride ((111)In-Cl3) via the chelate diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), to enable clinical translation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the application of HQ4-DTPA for monitoring tumor cell death induced by radiation therapy. Apart from its NIRF and radioactive properties, HQ4-DTPA was also tested as a photoacoustic imaging probe to evaluate its performance as a multimodal contrast agent for superficial and deep tissue imaging. Radiation-induced tumor cell death was examined in a xenograft mouse model of human breast cancer (MCF-7). Tumors were irradiated with three fractions of 9 Gy each. HQ4-DTPA was injected intravenously after the last irradiation, NIRF and photoacoustic imaging of the tumors were performed at 12, 20, and 40 h after injection. Changes in probe accumulation in the tumors were measured in vivo, and ex vivo histological analysis of excised tumors was performed at experimental endpoints. In addition, biodistribution of radiolabeled [(111)In]DTPA-HQ4 was assessed using hybrid single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) at the same time points. In vivo NIRF imaging demonstrated a significant difference in probe accumulation between control and irradiated tumors at all time points after injection. A similar trend was observed using in vivo photoacoustic imaging, which was validated by ex vivo tissue fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging. Serial quantitative radioactivity measurements of probe biodistribution further demonstrated increased probe accumulation in irradiated tumors. HQ4-DTPA has high specificity for dead cells in vivo

  20. p53-dependent delayed effects of radiation vary according to time of irradiation of p53 + / - mice.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that in p53 (+ / -) mice that had been given a whole-body dose of 3 Gy at 8 weeks of age, p53-dependent delayed effects of radiation, as manifested in T-cell receptor (TCR) variant fractions (VF) instability in mouse splenocytes, were biphasic, namely, induction of TCR-VF mutation reappeared at 44 weeks. The manifestation of the delayed effects and the measures of biological markers varied according to the timing of irradiation. We also reported that the decrease in function of the p53 gene was related to the effects of a delayed mutation. In the present study, we investigated the functions and mutations of the p53 gene in old age for p53 (+ / -) mice following irradiation at various ages. p53 (+ / -) mice were given a whole-body dose of 3 Gy at 8, 28 or 40 weeks of age. There were significant differences for all variables tested at 8 weeks of age. This was similarly the case for mice irradiated at 28 weeks of age, in which there were also significant differences in TCR VF and the percentage of apoptosis. In mice irradiated at 40 weeks of age, there were significant differences for all considered variables except for the p53 allele. We demonstrated that the different patterns of delayed mutation of the p53 gene at 56 weeks of age depended on the age at which mice had undergone 3-Gy whole-body irradiation. Our conclusions are limited to variation in p53-dependent delayed effects according to the time of irradiation.

  1. Interleukin-1β Can Reduce Manifestations of Delayed Effects of Prolonged Exposure to Low-Intensity γ-Radiation.

    PubMed

    Vorobyeva, N Yu; Grekhova, A K; Trubitsina, K Yu; Pchelka, A V; Rozhdestevenskiy, L M; Osipov, A N

    2016-02-01

    We showed that injection of IL-1β (Betaleukin) in a dose of 3 μg/kg 22 h before prolonged (21 h) exposure to low-intensity (10 mGy/min) γ-radiation in a dose of 12.6 Gy reduced the number of double-strand DNA breaks in murine spleen cells to the control level in 4 months after exposure and the number of double-strand DNA breaks induced by additional acute irradiation in a dose of 6 Gy. The results suggest that IL-1β can improve the efficiency of systems reducing the number of double-strand DNA breaks in murine spleen cells at delayed terms after exposure to prolonged low-intensity radiation.

  2. Repeated delayed onset cerebellar radiation injuries after linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Ujifuku, Kenta; Matsuo, Takayuki; Toyoda, Keisuke; Baba, Shiro; Okunaga, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Yukishige; Kamada, Kensaku; Morikawa, Minoru; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Izumi; Hayashi, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    A 63-year-old woman presented with right hearing disturbance and vertigo. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed the presence of right vestibular schwannoma (VS). Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was performed with a tumor marginal dose of 14 Gy using two isocenters. She was followed up clinically and neuroradiologically using three-dimensional spoiled gradient-echo MR imaging. She experienced temporal neurological deterioration due to peritumoral edema in her right cerebellar peduncle and pons for a few months beginning 1.5 years after SRS, when she experienced transient right facial dysesthesia and hearing deterioration. Ten years after SRS, the patient presented with sudden onset of vertigo, gait disturbance, diplopia, dysarthria, and nausea. MR imaging demonstrated a new lesion in the right cerebellar peduncle, which was diagnosed as radiation-induced stroke. The patient was followed up conservatively and her symptoms disappeared within a few months. Multiple delayed onset radiation injuries are possible sequelae of SRS for VS.

  3. Hiroshima and Nagasaki initial radiations: delayed neutron contributions and comparison of calculated and measured cobalt activations

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1985-03-01

    Calculated estimates of neutron doses received by atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki have not included contributions from delayed neutrons emitted by fission products in the debris cloud, although the possibility of a significant contribution from this source has been suggested. In the present work, an established model accounting for gamma-ray kermas from these fission products is adapted to provide the desired neutron kerma estimates. Adaptations include use of explicit time dependence of neutron emitters, properly folded with the time-dependent phenomenology of the explosion itself, and detailed air-over-ground neutron transport with a source having an energy spectrum characteristic of these delayed neutrons. Results show that delayed neutrons are indeed negligible contributors to atomic-bomb survivor dosimetry, as well as to neutron activations at Hiroshima. About half the activation at Nagasaki, however, is due to the delayed component. Calculated activation of cobalt, a revision of previous estimates, is compared to measured values at Hiroshima and at Nagasaki. The causes of the substantial discrepancies are discussed and compared to previously reported discrepancies for sulfur activation. Additional investigation is recommended.

  4. Regulation of early and delayed radiation responses in rat small intestine by capsaicin-sensitive nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Zheng Huaien; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Ou Xuemei; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Mast cells protect against the early manifestations of intestinal radiation toxicity, but promote chronic intestinal wall fibrosis. Intestinal sensory nerves are closely associated with mast cells, both anatomically and functionally, and serve an important role in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis. This study examined the effect of sensory nerve ablation on the intestinal radiation response in an established rat model. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent sensory nerve ablation with capsaicin or sham ablation. Two weeks later, a localized segment of ileum was X-irradiated or sham irradiated. Structural, cellular, and molecular changes were examined 2 weeks (early injury) and 26 weeks (chronic injury) after irradiation. The mast cell dependence of the effect of sensory nerve ablation on intestinal radiation injury was assessed using c-kit mutant (Ws/Ws) mast cell-deficient rats. Results: Capsaicin treatment caused a baseline reduction in mucosal mast cell density, crypt cell proliferation, and expression of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, two neuropeptides released by sensory neurons. Sensory nerve ablation strikingly exacerbated early intestinal radiation toxicity (loss of mucosal surface area, inflammation, intestinal wall thickening), but attenuated the development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis (collagen I accumulation and transforming growth factor {beta} immunoreactivity). In mast cell-deficient rats, capsaicin treatment exacerbated postradiation epithelial injury (loss of mucosal surface area), but none of the other aspects of radiation injury were affected by capsaicin treatment. Conclusions: Ablation of capsaicin-sensitive enteric neurons exacerbates early intestinal radiation toxicity, but attenuates development of chronic fibroproliferative changes. The effect of capsaicin treatment on the intestinal radiation response is partly mast cell dependent.

  5. Ultraviolet radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha, which is linked to the development of cutaneous SCC, modulates differential epidermal microRNAs expression.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ashok; Willems, Estelle; Singh, Anupama; Hafeez, Bilal Bin; Ong, Irene M; Mehta, Suresh L; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2016-04-05

    Chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is linked to the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), a non-melanoma form of skin cancer that can metastasize. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is linked to UVR-induced development of SCC. To find clues about the mechanisms by which TNFα may promote UVR-induced development of SCC, we investigated changes in the expression profiling of microRNAs (miRNA), a novel class of short noncoding RNAs, which affects translation and stability of mRNAs. In this experiment, TNFα knockout (TNFα KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates were exposed to acute UVR (2.0 kJ/m2) and the expression profiling of epidermal miRNA was determined 4hr post UVR exposure. TNFα deletion in untreated WT mice resulted in differential expression (log fold change>1) of seventeen miRNA. UVR exposure in WT mice induced differential expression of 22 miRNA. However, UVR exposure in TNFα KO mice altered only two miRNAs. Four miRNA, were differentially expressed between WT+UVR and TNFα KO+UVR groups. Differentially expressed selected miRNAs were further validated using real time PCR. Few of the differentially expressed miRNAs (miR-31-5p, miR-196a-5p, miR-127-3p, miR-206-3p, miR-411-5p, miR-709, and miR-322-5p) were also observed in UVR-induced SCC. Finally, bio-informatics analysis using DIANA, MIRANDA, Target Scan, and miRDB algorithms revealed a link with major UVR-induced pathways (MAPK, PI3K-Akt, transcriptional mis-regulation, Wnt, and TGF-beta).

  6. Ultraviolet radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha, which is linked to the development of cutaneous SCC, modulates differential epidermal microRNAs expression

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashok; Willems, Estelle; Singh, Anupama; Hafeez, Bilal Bin; Ong, Irene M.; Mehta, Suresh L.; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is linked to the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), a non-melanoma form of skin cancer that can metastasize. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is linked to UVR-induced development of SCC. To find clues about the mechanisms by which TNFα may promote UVR-induced development of SCC, we investigated changes in the expression profiling of microRNAs (miRNA), a novel class of short noncoding RNAs, which affects translation and stability of mRNAs. In this experiment, TNFα knockout (TNFα KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates were exposed to acute UVR (2.0 kJ/m2) and the expression profiling of epidermal miRNA was determined 4hr post UVR exposure. TNFα deletion in untreated WT mice resulted in differential expression (log fold change>1) of seventeen miRNA. UVR exposure in WT mice induced differential expression of 22 miRNA. However, UVR exposure in TNFα KO mice altered only two miRNAs. Four miRNA, were differentially expressed between WT+UVR and TNFα KO+UVR groups. Differentially expressed selected miRNAs were further validated using real time PCR. Few of the differentially expressed miRNAs (miR-31-5p, miR-196a-5p, miR-127-3p, miR-206-3p, miR-411-5p, miR-709, and miR-322-5p) were also observed in UVR-induced SCC. Finally, bio-informatics analysis using DIANA, MIRANDA, Target Scan, and miRDB algorithms revealed a link with major UVR-induced pathways (MAPK, PI3K-Akt, transcriptional mis-regulation, Wnt, and TGF-beta). PMID:26918454

  7. Radiation necrosis of the optic chiasm, optic tract, hypothalamus, and upper pons after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma, detected by gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, O.; Yamaguchi, N.; Yamashima, T.; Yamashita, J. )

    1990-10-01

    A 26-year-old woman was treated for a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma by surgery and radiotherapy (5860 rads). Fourteen months later, she developed right hemiparesis and dysarthria. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan using gadolinium contrast showed a small, enhanced lesion in the upper pons. Seven months later, she had a sudden onset of loss of vision, and radiation optic neuropathy was diagnosed. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scan showed widespread gadolinium-enhanced lesions in the optic chiasm, optic tract, and hypothalamus. Magnetic resonance imaging is indispensable for the early diagnosis of radiation necrosis, which is not visualized by radiography or computed tomography.

  8. Radiation-induced genomic instability: delayed mutagenic and cytogenetic effects of X rays and alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Little, J B; Nagasawa, H; Pfenning, T; Vetrovs, H

    1997-10-01

    The frequency of mutations at the Hprt locus was measured in clonal populations of Chinese hamster ovary cells derived from single cells surviving exposure to 0-12 Gy of X rays or 2 Gy of alpha particles. Approximately 8-9% of 446 clonal populations examined 23 population doublings after irradiation showed high frequencies of late-arising mutations as indicated by mutant fractions 10(2)-10(4)-fold above background. The frequency with which such clones occurred was similar for alpha-particle irradiation and X irradiation, with no apparent dose dependence for X irradiation over the range of 4-12 Gy. The molecular structure of Hprt mutations was determined by analysis by multiplex polymerase chain reaction of all nine exons. Of mutations induced directly after exposure to X rays, 75% involved partial or total gene deletions. Only 19-23% of late-arising (delayed) mutations were associated with deletions, the preponderance of these being partial deletions involving one or two exons. This spectrum was very similar to that for spontaneously arising mutations. To determine whether delayed mutations were non-clonal, the spectrum of exons deleted was examined among 29 mutants with partial deletions derived from a single clonal population. The results indicated that at least 15 of these mutants arose independently. To examine the relationship between the occurrence of delayed mutations and chromosomal instability, 60 Hprt mutant subclones isolated from a clonal population showing a high frequency of delayed mutations were serially cultivated in vitro. Of these, 14 showed a slow-growth phenotype with a high frequency of polyploid cells (10-38%) and a markedly enhanced frequency of non-clonal chromosomal rearrangements including both chromosome-type and chromatid-type aberrations. These clones also showed a 3- to 30-fold increase in the frequency of ouabain-resistant mutations; no ouabain-resistant mutants were induced directly by X irradiation. These results suggest that among

  9. Cyclic nucleotide responses and radiation-induced mitotic delay in Physarum polycephalum

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, J.W.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1984-02-01

    The response of the plasmodial levels of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in Physarum polycephalum to several putative phosphodiesterase inhibitors and to ionizing radiation has been measured. Isobutylmethylxanthine (2 mM) induces a rapid transient threefold elevation of cyclic AMP alone, with maximum response in about 10 min and return to the base line in about 30 min. Theophylline (2 mM) induces a rapid, sustained twofold elevation of cyclic GMP only. Caffeine (2mM) and Ro-20-1724 (18 ..mu..M) both elicit a rapid transient rise in cyclic AMP, resembling the isobutylmethylxanthine response, and a slow transient elevation of the cyclic GMP level. Of particular interest is the rapid threefold transient elevation of the cyclic AMP, but not of the cyclic GMP, level by ..gamma.. radiation.

  10. Cyclic nucleotide responses and radiation-induced mitotic delay in Physarum polycephalum

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, J.W.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1984-02-01

    The response of the plasmodial levels of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in Physarum polycephalum to several putative phosphodiesterase inhibitors and to ionizing radiation has been measured. Isobutylmethylxanthine (2 mM) induces a rapid transient threefold elevation of cyclic AMP alone, with maximum response in about 10 min and return to the base line in about 30 min. Theophylline (2 mM) induces a rapid, sustained twofold elevation of cyclic GMP only. Caffeine (2mM) and Ro-20-1724 (18 ..mu..M) both elicit a rapid transient rise in cyclic AMP, resembling the isobutylmethylxanthine response, and a slow transient elevation of the cyclic GMP level. Of particular interest is the rapid threefold transient elevation of the cyclic AMP, but not of the cyclic GMP, level by ..gamma.. radiation.

  11. Modelling radiation-induced cell death and tumour re-oxygenation: local versus global and instant versus delayed cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Aguiar, Pablo; Espinoza, Ignacio; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-02-01

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to radiation, due to the oxygen dependence of radiosensitivity, is well known and must be taken into account to accurately calculate the radiation induced cell death. A proper modelling of the response of tumours to radiation requires deriving the distribution of oxygen at a microscopic scale. This usually involves solving the reaction-diffusion equation in tumour voxels using a vascularization distribution model. Moreover, re-oxygenation arises during the course of radiotherapy, one reason being the increase of available oxygen caused by cell killing, which can turn hypoxic tumours into oxic. In this work we study the effect of cell death kinetics in tumour oxygenation modelling, analysing how it affects the timing of re-oxygenation, surviving fraction and tumour control. Two models of cell death are compared, an instantaneous cell killing, mimicking early apoptosis, and a delayed cell death scenario in which cells can die shortly after being damaged, as well as long after irradiation. For each of these scenarios, the decrease in oxygen consumption due to cell death can be computed globally (macroscopic voxel average) or locally (microscopic). A re-oxygenation model already used in the literature, the so called full re-oxygenation, is also considered. The impact of cell death kinetics and re-oxygenation on tumour responses is illustrated for two radiotherapy fractionation schemes: a conventional schedule, and a hypofractionated treatment. The results show large differences in the doses needed to achieve 50% tumour control for the investigated cell death models. Moreover, the models affect the tumour responses differently depending on the treatment schedule. This corroborates the complex nature of re-oxygenation, showing the need to take into account the kinetics of cell death in radiation response models.

  12. Loss of p21 increases sensitivity to ionizing radiation and delays the onset of lymphoma in atm-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. Alan; Elson, Ari; Leder, Philip

    1997-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by growth retardation, cerebellar ataxia, oculocutaneous telangiectasias, and a high incidence of lymphomas and leukemias. In addition, AT patients are sensitive to ionizing radiation. Atm-deficient mice recapitulate most of the AT phenotype. p21cip1/waf1 (p21 hereafter), an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, has been implicated in cellular senescence and response to γ-radiation-induced DNA damage. To study the role of p21 in ATM-mediated signal transduction pathways, we examined the combined effect of the genetic loss of atm and p21 on growth control, radiation sensitivity, and tumorigenesis. As might have been expected, our data provide evidence that p21 modifies the in vitro senescent response seen in AT fibroblasts. Further, it is a downstream effector of ATM-mediated growth control. In addition, however, we find that loss of p21 in the context of an atm-deficient mouse leads to a delay in thymic lymphomagenesis and an increase in acute radiation sensitivity in vivo (the latter principally because of effects on the gut epithelium). Modification of these two crucial aspects of the ATM phenotype can be related to an apparent increase in spontaneous apoptosis seen in tumor cells and in the irradiated intestinal epithelium of mice doubly null for atm and p21. Thus, loss of p21 seems to contribute to tumor suppression by a mechanism that operates via a sensitized apoptotic response. These results have implications for cancer therapy in general and AT patients in particular. PMID:9405657

  13. Modelling radiation-induced cell death and tumour re-oxygenation: local versus global and instant versus delayed cell death.

    PubMed

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Aguiar, Pablo; Espinoza, Ignacio; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-02-07

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to radiation, due to the oxygen dependence of radiosensitivity, is well known and must be taken into account to accurately calculate the radiation induced cell death. A proper modelling of the response of tumours to radiation requires deriving the distribution of oxygen at a microscopic scale. This usually involves solving the reaction-diffusion equation in tumour voxels using a vascularization distribution model. Moreover, re-oxygenation arises during the course of radiotherapy, one reason being the increase of available oxygen caused by cell killing, which can turn hypoxic tumours into oxic. In this work we study the effect of cell death kinetics in tumour oxygenation modelling, analysing how it affects the timing of re-oxygenation, surviving fraction and tumour control. Two models of cell death are compared, an instantaneous cell killing, mimicking early apoptosis, and a delayed cell death scenario in which cells can die shortly after being damaged, as well as long after irradiation. For each of these scenarios, the decrease in oxygen consumption due to cell death can be computed globally (macroscopic voxel average) or locally (microscopic). A re-oxygenation model already used in the literature, the so called full re-oxygenation, is also considered. The impact of cell death kinetics and re-oxygenation on tumour responses is illustrated for two radiotherapy fractionation schemes: a conventional schedule, and a hypofractionated treatment. The results show large differences in the doses needed to achieve 50% tumour control for the investigated cell death models. Moreover, the models affect the tumour responses differently depending on the treatment schedule. This corroborates the complex nature of re-oxygenation, showing the need to take into account the kinetics of cell death in radiation response models.

  14. Deflection of polarised radiation - Relative phase delay technique. [photon geodesic motion variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennison, B.; Melnick, G.; Harwit, M.; Sato, T.; Stelzried, C. T.; Jauncey, D.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses the geodesic motion of photons, considering particularly whether oppositely polarized photons fall at the same rate. It is assumed that orthogonally polarized photons would be equally deflected by the gravitational field of a nonrotating mass. Upon the introduction of rotation, the angular momentum of the deflecting source couples to the photon spin through gravitational field action. Thus there arise separate trajectories for orthogonal polarizations. Searching for changes in polarization in a deflected beam is accomplished by a relative phase delay technique. If the beam is split into orthogonal linear polarization, final polarization is elliptical. Experiments have been performed on searching for ellipticity developments in the linearly polarized carrier waves from Helios 1 and 2, and the results are presented.

  15. Mathematics of Radiation Propagation in Planetary Atmospheres: Absorption, Refraction, Time Delay, Occultation, and Abel Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.

    Forward integration calculation of air mass, refraction, and time delay requires care even for very smooth model atmospheres. The literature abounds in examples of injudicious approximations, assumptions, transformations, variable substitutions, and failures to verify that the formulas work with unlimited accuracy for simple cases and also survive challenges from mathematically pathological but physically realizable cases. A few years ago we addressed the problem of evaluation of the Chapman function for attenuation along a straight line path in an exponential atmosphere. In this presentation we will describe issues and approaches for integration over light paths curved by refraction. The inverse problem, determining the altitude profile of mass density (index of refraction) or the concentration of an individual chemical species (absorption), from occultation data, also has its mathematically interesting (i.e., difficult) aspects. Now we automatically have noise and thus statistical analysis is just as important as calculus and numerical analysis. Here we will describe a new approach of least-squares fitting occultation data to an expansion over compact basis functions. This approach, which avoids numerical differentiation and singular integrals, was originally developed to analyze laboratory imaging data.Forward integration calculation of air mass, refraction, and time delay requires care even for very smooth model atmospheres. The literature abounds in examples of injudicious approximations, assumptions, transformations, variable substitutions, and failures to verify that the formulas work with unlimited accuracy for simple cases and also survive challenges from mathematically pathological but physically realizable cases. A few years ago we addressed the problem of evaluation of the Chapman function for attenuation along a straight line path in an exponential atmosphere. In this presentation we will describe issues and approaches for integration over light paths

  16. Gravitational time delay in orthogonally polarized radiation passing by the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwit, M.

    1979-01-01

    Two parallel investigations into the degree, if any, to which orthogonally polarized rays are deflected differently on passing through the gravitational field of the sun were previously conducted. The first involved very long and intermediate length baseline radio interferometry. The second was initially based on observations of radiation transmitted by the Pioneer 6 spacecraft, on passing behind the sun in 1968. This work was extended by using Helios-A and Helios-B spacecraft. It was calculated that the differential deflection between orthogonally polarized components is less than one part in 10 to the 7th power of the total gravitational deflection, or less than about 10 to the -7th power arc sec, in total.

  17. Protective effect of geranylgeranylacetone against radiation-induced delayed effects on human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Isoir, Muriel; Roque, Telma; Squiban, Claire; Milliat, Fabien; Mondon, Philippe; Mas-Chamberlin, Claire; Benderitter, Marc; Guipaud, Olivier; Tamarat, Radia

    2013-02-01

    Skin exposure to ionizing radiation affects the normal wound healing process. We investigated the beneficial effects of a pharmacological treatment with geranylgeranylacetone (GGA) on keratinocytes using in vitro scratch wound injury assay in nonirradiated and irradiated conditions. Irradiation affected the wound closure of keratinocytes 24 h after scratch injury, whereas re-epithelialization was markedly accelerated after GGA treatment when compared to nontreated keratinocytes. We demonstrated that GGA treatment increased migration of human epidermal keratinocytes and this migratory property was not related to RhoA signaling. Interestingly, Western blot analysis revealed that GGA treatment down-regulated caspase 3 active form expression and up-regulated the activated phenotype by inducing both keratin 6 (K6) expression and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release without modification of the differentiate phenotype. Finally, the proteomic profiling was performed on keratinocytes, showing that global protein changes occurred after irradiation of keratinocytes treated or untreated with GGA.

  18. Gamma radiation and magnetic field mediated delay in effect of accelerated ageing of soybean.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mahesh; Singh, Bhupinder; Ahuja, Sumedha; Dahuja, Anil; Anand, Anjali

    2015-08-01

    Soybean seeds were exposed to gamma radiation (0.5, 1, 3 and 5 kGy), static magnetic field (50, 100 and 200 mT) and a combination of gamma radiation and magnetic energy (0.5 kGy + 200 mT and 5 kGy + 50 mT) and stored at room temperature for six months. These seeds were later subjected to accelerated ageing treatment at 42 °C temperature and 95-100 % relative humidity and were compared for various physical and biochemical characteristics between the untreated and the energized treatments. Energy treatment protected the quality of stored seeds in terms of its protein and oil content . Accelerated aging conditions, however, affected the oil and protein quantity and quality of seed negatively. Antioxidant enzymes exhibited a decline in their activity during aging while the LOX activity, which reflects the rate of lipid peroxidation, in general, increased during the aging. Gamma irradiated (3 and 5 kGy) and magnetic field treated seeds (100 and 200 mT) maintained a higher catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activity which may help in efficient scavenging of deleterious free radical produced during the aging. Aging caused peroxidative changes to lipids, which could be contributed to the loss of oil quality. Among the electromagnetic energy treatments, a dose of 1-5 kGy of gamma and 100 mT, 200 mT magnetic field effectively slowed the rate of biochemical degradation and loss of cellular integrity in seeds stored under conditions of accelerated aging and thus, protected the deterioration of seed quality. Energy combination treatments did not yield any additional protection advantage.

  19. Clonal analysis of delayed karyotypic abnormalities and gene mutations in radiation-induced genetic instability.

    PubMed Central

    Grosovsky, A J; Parks, K K; Giver, C R; Nelson, S L

    1996-01-01

    Many tumors exhibit extensive chromosomal instability, but karyotypic alterations will be significant in carcinogenesis only by influencing specific oncogenes or tumor suppressor loci within the affected chromosomal segments. In this investigation, the specificity of chromosomal rearrangements attributable to radiation-induced genomic instability is detailed, and a qualitative and quantitative correspondence with mutagenesis is demonstrated. Chromosomal abnormalities preferentially occurred near the site of prior rearrangements, resulting in complex abnormalities, or near the centromere, resulting in deletion or translocation of the entire chromosome arm, but no case of an interstitial chromosomal deletion was observed. Evidence for chromosomal instability in the progeny of irradiated cells also included clonal karyotypic heterogeneity. The persistence of instability was demonstrated for at least 80 generations by elevated mutation rates at the heterozygous, autosomal marker locus tk. Among those TK- mutants that showed a loss of heterozygosity, a statistically significant increase in mutation rate was observed only for those in which the loss of heterozygosity encompasses the telomeric region. This mutational specificity corresponds with the prevalence of terminal deletions, additions, and translocations, and the absence of interstitial deletions, in karyotypic analysis. Surprisingly, the elevated rate of TK- mutations is also partially attributable to intragenic base substitutions and small deletions, and DNA sequence analysis of some of these mutations is presented. Complex chromosomal abnormalities appear to be the most significant indicators of a high rate of persistent genetic instability which correlates with increased rates of both intragenic and chromosomal-scale mutations at tk. PMID:8887655

  20. Pathology of radiation myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Burns, R. J.; Jones, A. N.; Robertson, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    After nothing the rarity of papers describing the pathology of delayed radiation necrosis of the spinal cord, the clinical and pathological findings from four cases are presented. The main pathological features are asymmetric demyelination of the lateral columns and to a lesser degree the posterior and anterior columns of white matter, with coagulative necrosis at the level of irradiation which affected the grey matter to a lesser degree. There is ascending and descending secondary tract degeneration, and poor glial response in the lesions themselves. Vascular changes, mainly hyalilne thickening of arteriolar walls, are present, but not in degree sufficient to explain the primary lesion. The discussion of the pathogenesis of the myelopathy weighs the merits of a primary vascular lesion against those of a primary effect of the radiation on neural tissue. The latter is favoured. Images PMID:4647860

  1. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Normal-Appearing White Matter as Biomarker for Radiation-Induced Late Delayed Cognitive Decline

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Christopher H.; Nagesh, Vijaya; Sundgren, Pia C.; Buchtel, Henry; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Junck, Larry; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Tsien, Christina I.; Cao, Yue

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether early assessment of cerebral white matter degradation can predict late delayed cognitive decline after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Ten patients undergoing conformal fractionated brain RT participated in a prospective diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging study. Magnetic resonance imaging studies were acquired before RT, at 3 and 6 weeks during RT, and 10, 30, and 78 weeks after starting RT. The diffusivity variables in the parahippocampal cingulum bundle and temporal lobe white matter were computed. A quality-of-life survey and neurocognitive function tests were administered before and after RT at the magnetic resonance imaging follow-up visits. Results: In both structures, longitudinal diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line }) decreased and perpendicular diffusivity ({lambda}{sub Up-Tack }) increased after RT, with early changes correlating to later changes (p < .05). The radiation dose correlated with an increase in cingulum {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 weeks, and patients with >50% of cingula volume receiving >12 Gy had a greater increase in {lambda}{sub Up-Tack} at 3 and 6 weeks (p < .05). The post-RT changes in verbal recall scores correlated linearly with the late changes in cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} (30 weeks, p < .02). Using receiver operating characteristic curves, early cingulum {lambda}{sub Double-Vertical-Line} changes predicted for post-RT changes in verbal recall scores (3 and 6 weeks, p < .05). The neurocognitive test scores correlated significantly with the quality-of-life survey results. Conclusions: The correlation between early diffusivity changes in the parahippocampal cingulum and the late decline in verbal recall suggests that diffusion tensor imaging might be useful as a biomarker for predicting late delayed cognitive decline.

  2. A radiation-induced acute apoptosis involving TP53 and BAX precedes the delayed apoptosis and neoplastic transformation of CGL1 human hybrid cells.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Marc S; Mayhugh, Brendan M; McDowell, Berry; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Smith, Martin L; Dynlacht, Joseph R; Spandau, Dan F; Lewis, Davina A

    2005-06-01

    Exposing CGL1 (HeLa x fibroblast) hybrid cells to 7 Gy of X rays results in the onset of a delayed apoptosis in the progeny of the cells 10 to 12 cell divisions postirradiation that correlates with the emergence of neoplastically transformed foci. The delayed apoptosis begins around day 8 postirradiation and lasts for 11 days. We now demonstrate that the delayed apoptosis is also characterized by the appearance of approximately 50-kb apoptotic DNA fragments and caspase 3 activation postirradiation. In addition, we confirm that stabilization of TP53 and transactivation of pro-apoptosis BAX also occurs during the delayed apoptosis and show that anti-apoptosis BCL-X(L) is down-regulated. To test whether the delayed apoptosis was due to a nonfunctional acute TP53 damage response in CGL1 cells, studies of acute apoptosis were completed. After irradiation, CGL1 cells underwent an acute wave of apoptosis that involves TP53 stabilization, transactivation of BAX gene expression, and a rapid caspase activation that ends by 96 h postirradiation. In addition, the acute onset of apoptosis correlates with transactivation of a standard wild-type TP53-responsive reporter (pG13-CAT) in CGL1 cells after radiation exposure. We propose that the onset of the delayed apoptosis is not the result of a nonfunctional acute TP53 damage response pathway but rather is a consequence of X-ray-induced genomic instability arising in the distant progeny of the irradiated cells.

  3. Delayed radiation-induced inflammation accompanying a marked carbohydrate antigen 19-9 elevation in a patient with resected pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mattes, Malcolm D.; Cardinal, Jon S.; Jacobson, Geraldine M.

    2016-01-01

    Although carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 is a useful tumor marker for pancreatic cancer, it can also become elevated from a variety of benign and malignant conditions. Herein we describe an unusual presentation of elevated CA 19-9 in an asymptomatic patient who had previously undergone adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy for resected early stage pancreatic cancer. The rise in CA 19-9 might be due to delayed radiation-induced inflammation related to previous intra-abdominal radiation therapy with or without radiation recall induced by gemcitabine. After treatment with corticosteroids the CA 19-9 level decreased to normal, and the patient has not developed any evidence of recurrent cancer to date. PMID:27306770

  4. Single-Fraction Versus Multifraction (3 × 9 Gy) Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Large (>2 cm) Brain Metastases: A Comparative Analysis of Local Control and Risk of Radiation-Induced Brain Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Scaringi, Claudia; Paolini, Sergio; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Romano, Andrea; Cicone, Francesco; Osti, Mattia; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi; Esposito, Vincenzo

    2016-07-15

    To investigate the local control and radiation-induced brain necrosis in patients with brain metastases >2 cm in size who received single-fraction or multifraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS); factors associated with clinical outcomes and the development of brain radionecrosis were assessed. Two hundred eighty-nine consecutive patients with brain metastases >2.0 cm who received SRS as primary treatment at Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome Sapienza, Rome, Italy, were analyzed. Cumulative incidence analysis was used to compare local control and radiation-induced brain necrosis between groups from the time of SRS. To achieve a balanced distribution of baseline covariates between treatment groups, a propensity score analysis was used. The 1-year cumulative local control rates were 77% in the single-fraction SRS (SF-SRS) group and 91% in the multifraction SRS (MF-SRS) group (P=.01). Recurrences occurred in 25 and 11 patients who received SF-SRS or MF-SRS (P=.03), respectively. Thirty-one patients (20%) undergoing SF-SRS and 11 (8%) subjected to MF-SRS experienced brain radionecrosis (P=.004); the 1-year cumulative incidence rate of radionecrosis was 18% and 9% (P=.01), respectively. Significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of local control and risk of radionecrosis were maintained after propensity score adjustment. Multifraction SRS at a dose of 27 Gy in 3 daily fractions seems to be an effective treatment modality for large brain metastases, associated with better local control and a reduced risk of radiation-induced radionecrosis as compared with SF-SRS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Radioprotective Properties of Indralin in Combination with Monizol in the Treatment of Local Acute and Delayed Radiation Injuries Caused by Local Skin γ-Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Vasin, M V; Ushakov, I B; Kovtun, V Yu; Semenova, L A; Komarova, S N; Galkin, A A; Afanas'ev, R V

    2015-10-01

    Female rats were exposed to local γ-irradiation of the right hindpaw in doses of 30-50 Gy at 131-154 sGy/min dose rate. Radioprotector indralin was administered per os 15 min prior to irradiation, monizol was injected intraperitoneally 5 min after irradiation. Indralin showed marked radioprotective properties both for acute and delayed symptoms of local radiation injuries. In combination with monizol, radioprotective effect of indralin was potentiated to dose reduction factor of 1.4-1.5 both for radiation burn severity reduction and for restriction of postradiational contracture development and amputation of the irradiated limb.

  6. Delayed leukoencephalopathy of non-small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases underwent whole brain radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaoling; Huang, Biao; Feng, Jieying; Yang, Wanqun; Liu, Hongjun

    2015-10-01

    To explore the incidence, MR imaging findings, dynamic developing process of delayed leukoencephalopathy (DLE) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with brain metastases patients who undergone whole brain radiation (WBRT) therapy, we retrospectively reviewed 48 NSCLC patients who underwent WBRT for brain metastases from January 2010 through June 2015 and had evaluable magnetic resonance imaging after treatment. The DLE were graded using a scale to evaluate T2-FLAIR (fluid attenuated image recovery) images: grade 1 = little or no white matter hyperintensity, grade 2 = limited periventricular hyperintensity and grade 3 = diffuse white matter hyperintensity. 48 NSCLC patients with brain metastases were enrolled. The median age of these patients was 55.7 years (range 33-75 years). The median follow-up was 12 months. The characteristic MR imaging of DLE in those patients was bilaterally diffuse white matter T2 hyperintensity around the periventricular areas without enhancement, sparing from U-fiber, callosum and gray matter structure. The incidence of DLE developed 6.25% (3/48), 30.00% (12/40), 48.39% (15/31), 61.90% (13/21), 85.71% (6/7), 100% (3/3) in those patients who were followed up for 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 36 months, respectively. Through increased understanding of it, it may be possible to help clinicians develop further therapeutic strategies to maximize benefit while limiting potential long term toxicities. These data supplement existing reports regarding the late effects of WBRT in NSCLC patients with brain metastasis.

  7. The role of telomere length modulation in delayed chromosome instability induced by ionizing radiation in human primary fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Berardinelli, Francesco; Antoccia, Antonio; Buonsante, Rossella; Gerardi, Silvia; Cherubini, Roberto; De Nadal, Viviana; Tanzarella, Caterina; Sgura, Antonella

    2013-04-01

    Telomere integrity is important for chromosome stability. The main objective of our study was to investigate the relationship between telomere length modulation and mitotic chromosome segregation induced by ionizing radiation in human primary fibroblasts. We used X-rays and low-energy protons because of their ability to induce different telomeric responses. Samples irradiated with 4 Gy were fixed at different times up to 6 days from exposure and telomere length, anaphase abnormalities, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed. We observed that X-rays induced telomere shortening in cells harvested at 96 hrs, whereas protons induced a significant increase in telomere length at short as well as at long harvesting times (24 and 96 hrs). Consistent with this, the analysis of anaphase bridges at 96 hrs showed a fourfold increase in X-ray- compared with proton-irradiated samples, suggesting a correlation between telomere length/dysfunction and chromosome missegregation. In line with these findings, the frequency of dicentrics and rings decreased with time for protons whereas it remained stable after X-rays irradiation. Telomeric FISH staining on anaphases revealed a higher percentage of bridges with telomere signals in X-ray-treated samples than that observed after proton irradiation, thus suggesting that the aberrations observed after X-ray irradiation originated from telomere attrition and consequent chromosome end-to-end fusion. This study shows that, beside an expected "early" chromosome instability induced shortly after irradiation, a delayed one occurs as a result of alterations in telomere metabolism and that this mechanism may play an important role in genomic stability.

  8. ZRBA1, a Mixed EGFR/DNA Targeting Molecule, Potentiates Radiation Response Through Delayed DNA Damage Repair Process in a Triple Negative Breast Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Heravi, Mitra; Kumala, Slawomir; Rachid, Zakaria; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J; Radzioch, Danuta; Muanza, Thierry M

    2015-06-01

    ZRBA1 is a combi-molecule designed to induce DNA alkylating lesions and to block epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) TK domain. Inasmuch as ZRBA1 downregulates the EGFR TK-mediated antisurvival signaling and induces DNA damage, we postulated that it might be a radiosensitizer. The aim of this study was to further investigate the potentiating effect of ZRBA1 in combination with radiation and to elucidate the possible mechanisms of interaction between these 2 treatment modalities. The triple negative human breast MDA-MB-468 cancer cell line and mouse mammary cancer 4T1 cell line were used in this study. Clonogenic assay, Western blot analysis, and DNA damage analysis were performed at multiple time points after treatment. To confirm our in vitro findings, in vivo tumor growth delay assay was performed. Our results show that a combination of ZRBA1 and radiation increases the radiation sensitivity of both cell lines significantly with a dose enhancement factor of 1.56, induces significant numbers of DNA strand breaks, prolongs higher DNA damage up to 24 hours after treatment, and significantly increases tumor growth delay in a syngeneic mouse model. Our data suggest that the higher efficacy of this combination could be partially due to increased DNA damage and delayed DNA repair process and to the inhibition of EGFR. The encouraging results of this combination demonstrated a significant improvement in treatment efficiency and therefore could be applicable in early clinical trial settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lumbar corpectomy for correction of degenerative scoliosis from osteoradionecrosis reveals a delayed complication of lumbar myxopapillary ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Palejwala, Sheri K; Lawson, Kevin A; Kent, Sean L; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Dumont, Travis M

    2016-08-01

    Osteoradionecrosis is a known complication following radiation therapy, presenting most commonly in the cervical spine as a delayed consequence of radiation that is often necessary in the management of head and neck cancers. In contrast, osteoradionecrosis has rarely been described in the lumbar spine. Here we describe, to our knowledge, the first reported case of lumbar spine osteoradionecrosis, after adjuvant radiation for a primary spinal cord tumor, leading to progressive degenerative scoliosis which required subsequent operative management. Established guidelines recommend that mature bone can tolerate a dose of up to 6000 cGy without injury. However, once bone has been exposed to radiation over this level progressive soft tissue changes may lead to devascularization, leaving the bone vulnerable to osteonecrosis, specifically when manipulated. Radiation necrosis can be progressive and lead to eventual mechanical instability requiring debridement and surgical fixation. In the setting of the lumbar spine, osseous necrosis can lead to biomechanical instability, deformity, pain, and neurologic deficit.

  10. Delayed Effects of Acute Radiation Exposure in a Murine Model of the H-ARS: Multiple-Organ Injury Consequent to <10 Gy Total Body Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Unthank, Joseph L; Miller, Steven J; Quickery, Ariel K; Ferguson, Ethan L; Wang, Meijing; Sampson, Carol H; Chua, Hui Lin; DiStasi, Matthew R; Feng, Hailin; Fisher, Alexa; Katz, Barry P; Plett, P Artur; Sandusky, George E; Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Vemula, Sasidhar; Cohen, Eric P; MacVittie, Thomas J; Orschell, Christie M

    2015-11-01

    The threat of radiation exposure from warfare or radiation accidents raises the need for appropriate animal models to study the acute and chronic effects of high dose rate radiation exposure. The goal of this study was to assess the late development of fibrosis in multiple organs (kidney, heart, and lung) in survivors of the C57BL/6 mouse model of the hematopoietic-acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS). Separate groups of mice for histological and functional studies were exposed to a single uniform total body dose between 8.53 and 8.72 Gy of gamma radiation from a Cs radiation source and studied 1-21 mo later. Blood urea nitrogen levels were elevated significantly in the irradiated mice at 9 and 21 mo (from ∼22 to 34 ± 3.8 and 69 ± 6.0 mg dL, p < 0.01 vs. non-irradiated controls) and correlated with glomerosclerosis (29 ± 1.8% vs. 64 ± 9.7% of total glomeruli, p < 0.01 vs. non-irradiated controls). Glomerular tubularization and hypertrophy and tubular atrophy were also observed at 21 mo post-total body irradiation (TBI). An increase in interstitial, perivascular, pericardial and peribronchial fibrosis/collagen deposition was observed from ∼9-21 mo post-TBI in kidney, heart, and lung of irradiated mice relative to age-matched controls. Echocardiography suggested decreased ventricular volumes with a compensatory increase in the left ventricular ejection fraction. The results indicate that significant delayed effects of acute radiation exposure occur in kidney, heart, and lung in survivors of the murine H-ARS TBI model, which mirrors pathology detected in larger species and humans at higher radiation doses focused on specific organs.

  11. DELAYED EFFECTS OF ACUTE RADIATION EXPOSURE IN A MURINE MODEL OF THE H-ARS: MULTIPLE-ORGAN INJURY CONSEQUENT TO <10 GY TOTAL BODY IRRADIATION

    PubMed Central

    Unthank, Joseph L.; Miller, Steven J.; Quickery, Ariel K.; Ferguson, Ethan L.; Wang, Meijing; Sampson, Carol H.; Chua, Hui Lin; DiStasi, Matthew R.; Feng, Hailin; Fisher, Alexa; Katz, Barry P.; Plett, P. Artur; Sandusky, George E.; Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Vemula, Sasidhar; Cohen, Eric P.; MacVittie, Thomas J.; Orschell, Christie M.

    2015-01-01

    The threat of radiation exposure from warfare or radiation accidents raises the need for appropriate animal models to study the acute and chronic effects of high dose rate radiation exposure. The goal of this study was to assess the late development of fibrosis in multiple organs (kidney, heart, and lung) in survivors of the C57BL/6 mouse model of the hematopoietic-acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS). Separate groups of mice for histological and functional studies were exposed to a single uniform total body dose between 8.53 and 8.72 Gy of gamma radiation from a 137Cs radiation source and studied 1–21 months later. Blood urea nitrogen levels were elevated significantly in the irradiated mice at 9 and 21 mo (from ~22 to 34 ± 3.8 and 69±6.0 mg/dl, p<0.01 vs non-irradiated controls) and correlated with glomerosclerosis (29±1.8% vs 64±9.7% of total glomeruli, p<0.01 vs non-irradiated controls). Glomerular tubularization and hypertrophy and tubular atrophy were also observed at 21 mo post-total body irradiation (TBI). An increase in interstitial, perivascular, pericardial and peri-bronchial fibrosis/collagen deposition was observed from ~9–21 mo post-TBI in kidney, heart and lung of irradiated mice relative to age-matched controls. Echocardiography suggested decreased ventricular volumes with a compensatory increase in left ventricular ejection fraction. The results indicate that significant delayed effects of acute radiation exposure occur in kidney, heart, and lung in survivors of the murine H-ARS TBI model which mirrors pathology detected in larger species and humans at higher radiation doses focused on specific organs. PMID:26425910

  12. Glioma residual or recurrence versus radiation necrosis: accuracy of pentavalent technetium-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid [Tc-99m (V) DMSA] brain SPECT compared to proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS): initial results.

    PubMed

    Amin, Amr; Moustafa, Hosna; Ahmed, Ebaa; El-Toukhy, Mohamed

    2012-02-01

    We compared pentavalent technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (Tc-99m (V) DMSA) brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) for the detection of residual or recurrent gliomas after surgery and radiotherapy. A total of 24 glioma patients, previously operated upon and treated with radiotherapy, were studied. SPECT was acquired 2-3 h post-administration of 555-740 MBq of Tc-99m (V) DMSA. Lesion to normal (L/N) delayed uptake ratio was calculated as: mean counts of tumor ROI (L)/mean counts of normal mirror symmetric ROI (N). (1)H-MRS was performed using a 1.5-T scanner equipped with a spectroscopy package. SPECT and (1)H-MRS results were compared with pathology or follow-up neuroimaging studies. SPECT and (1)H-MRS showed concordant residue or recurrence in 9/24 (37.5%) patients. Both were true negative in 6/24 (25%) patients. SPECT and (1)H-MRS disagreed in 9 recurrences [7/9 (77.8%) and 2/9 (22.2%) were true positive by SPECT and (1)H-MRS, respectively]. Sensitivity of SPECT and (1)H-MRS in detecting recurrence was 88.8 and 61.1% with accuracies of 91.6 and 70.8%, respectively. A positive association between the delayed L/N ratio and tumor grade was found; the higher the grade, the higher is the L/N ratio (r = 0.62, P = 0.001). Tc-99m (V) DMSA brain SPECT is more accurate compared to (1)H-MRS for the detection of tumor residual tissues or recurrence in glioma patients with previous radiotherapy. It allows early and non-invasive differentiation of residual tumor or recurrence from irradiation necrosis.

  13. ZRBA1, a Mixed EGFR/DNA Targeting Molecule, Potentiates Radiation Response Through Delayed DNA Damage Repair Process in a Triple Negative Breast Cancer Model

    SciTech Connect

    Heravi, Mitra; Kumala, Slawomir; Rachid, Zakaria; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J.; Radzioch, Danuta; Muanza, Thierry M.

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: ZRBA1 is a combi-molecule designed to induce DNA alkylating lesions and to block epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) TK domain. Inasmuch as ZRBA1 downregulates the EGFR TK-mediated antisurvival signaling and induces DNA damage, we postulated that it might be a radiosensitizer. The aim of this study was to further investigate the potentiating effect of ZRBA1 in combination with radiation and to elucidate the possible mechanisms of interaction between these 2 treatment modalities. Methods and Materials: The triple negative human breast MDA-MB-468 cancer cell line and mouse mammary cancer 4T1 cell line were used in this study. Clonogenic assay, Western blot analysis, and DNA damage analysis were performed at multiple time points after treatment. To confirm our in vitro findings, in vivo tumor growth delay assay was performed. Results: Our results show that a combination of ZRBA1 and radiation increases the radiation sensitivity of both cell lines significantly with a dose enhancement factor of 1.56, induces significant numbers of DNA strand breaks, prolongs higher DNA damage up to 24 hours after treatment, and significantly increases tumor growth delay in a syngeneic mouse model. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the higher efficacy of this combination could be partially due to increased DNA damage and delayed DNA repair process and to the inhibition of EGFR. The encouraging results of this combination demonstrated a significant improvement in treatment efficiency and therefore could be applicable in early clinical trial settings.

  14. STUDIES IN WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION AND RADIATION INJURY. VOLUME II, THE INCIDENCE, NATURE AND ADJUDICATION OF WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION CLAIMS INVOLVING RADIATION EXPOSURE AND DELAYED INJURY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'TOOLE, THOMAS J.

    THE PURPOSE OF THE STUDY WAS TO PROVIDE A FACTUAL BACKGROUND AGAINST WHICH JUDGMENTS CAN BE MADE CONCERNING THE MAGNITUDE OF THE PROBLEM OF INJURY APPEARING SOME TIME AFTER THE EXPOSURE TO IONIZING RADIATION AND DETERMINE WHETHER EXISTING LAWS PERMIT A JUST AND EQUITABLE ADJUDICATION OF RADIATION COMPENSATION CLAIMS. THE STUDY WAS BASED UPON THE…

  15. Renal papillary necrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney infection (pyelonephritis) Kidney transplant rejection Sickle cell anemia , a common cause of renal papillary necrosis in ... Controlling diabetes or sickle cell anemia may reduce your risk. To ... provider's instructions when using medicines, including over- ...

  16. [Avascular necrosis of the femoral head].

    PubMed

    Porubský, Peter; Trč, Tomáš; Havlas, Vojtěch; Smetana, Pavel

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head in adults is not common, but not too rare diseases. In orthopedic practice, it is one of the diseases that are causing implantation of hip replacement at a relatively early age. In the early detection and initiation of therapy can delay the implantation of prosthesis for several years, which is certainly more convenient for the patient and beneficial. This article is intended to acquaint the reader with the basic diagnostic procedures and therapy.

  17. Combined effects of X rays, Ro 03-8799, and hyperthermia on growth, necrosis, and cell proliferation in a mouse tumor

    SciTech Connect

    George, K.C.; Streffer, C.; Pelzer, T.

    1989-04-01

    A mouse adenocarcinoma was treated with 20 Gy X rays, hyperthermia (30 minutes at 43 degrees C), Ro-03-8799, or a combination of two or three of these agents. Combined treatments increase growth delay in the tumor and this was greatest with the combination of all three modalities. Extensive amounts of necrosis were observed after the combined treatments. This effect was most pronounced after treatment modalities including hyperthermia. On the other hand, the radiation-induced micronucleus formation was more enhanced by the sensitizer than by hyperthermia. After X irradiation and combined treatments with X rays a G2-block was observed in DNA-histograms. Tetraploid cells appeared in large amounts that started DNA synthesis followed by necrosis. From these tumors it was impossible to obtain regular DNA-histograms. Tumor regression is a combined result of reduced cell renewal, increased cytogenetic damage, and development of necrosis.

  18. Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the chest wall: impact of initial versus delayed resection on tumor margins, survival, and use of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Shamberger, Robert C; LaQuaglia, Michael P; Gebhardt, Mark C; Neff, James R; Tarbell, Nancy J; Marcus, Karen C; Sailer, Scott L; Womer, Richard B; Miser, James S; Dickman, Paul S; Perlman, Elizabeth J; Devidas, Meenakshi; Linda, Stephen B; Krailo, Mark D; Grier, Holcombe E; Granowetter, Linda

    2003-10-01

    To establish outcome and optimal timing of local control for patients with nonmetastatic Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (ES/PNET) of the chest wall. Patients < or =30 years of age with ES/PNET of the chest wall were entered in 2 consecutive protocols. Therapy included multiagent chemotherapy; local control was achieved by resection, radiotherapy, or both. We compared completeness of resection and disease-free survival in patients undergoing initial surgical resection versus those treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by resection, radiotherapy, or both. Patients with a positive surgical margin received radiotherapy. Ninety-eight (11.3%) of 869 patients had primary tumors of the chest wall. Median follow-up was 3.47 years and 5-year event-free survival was 56% for the chest wall lesions. Ten of 20 (50%) initial resections resulted in negative margins compared with 41 of 53 (77%) negative margins with delayed resections after chemotherapy (P = 0.043). Event-free survival did not differ by timing of surgery (P = 0.69) or type of local control (P = 0.17). Initial chemotherapy decreased the percentage of patients needing radiation therapy. Seventeen of 24 patients (70.8%) with initial surgery received radiotherapy compared with 34 of 71 patients (47.9%) who started with chemotherapy (P = 0.061). If a delayed operation was performed, excluding those patients who received only radiotherapy for local control, only 25 of 62 patients needed radiotherapy (40.3%; P = 0.016). The likelihood of complete tumor resection with a negative microscopic margin and consequent avoidance of external beam radiation and its potential complications is increased with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and delayed resection of chest wall ES/PNET.

  19. [Intraabdominal fat necrosis].

    PubMed

    Aguilar-García, J J; Alcaide-León, P; Vargas-Serrano, B

    2012-01-01

    The processes that course with intraabdominal fat necrosis often manifest with acute or subacute abdominal pain; these clinical findings can be caused by various conditions, including epiploic appendagitis, omental infarction, encapsulated fat necrosis, mesenteric panniculitis, appendicitis, diverticulitis, and certain neoplasms. In this context, although the anatomic location of the pain and accompanying symptomatology can help orient the diagnosis, there is a risk of unnecessary surgery. Imaging tests like ultrasonography and especially computed tomography are essential for diagnosing intraabdominal fat necrosis. Radiologists must be familiar with the characteristic findings for all the conditions that can cause acute or subacute abdominal pain to ensure appropriate management and prevent unnecessary surgery. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Delayed massive soft tissue uptake of Tc-99m MDP after radiation therapy for cancer of the breast

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, R.T.; Steuart, R.D.

    1995-09-01

    A patient with a history of breast cancer and known lung metastases was referred for a bone scan to investigate the cause of severe neck and right shoulder pain. The bone scan showed massive uptake of the radiopharmaceutical in the soft tissue surrounding the right shoulder. A review of the patient`s history indicated that the patient had undergone radiation therapy to the right upper thorax and breast area 14 months previously and an acute radiation dermatitis of the proximal right arm and shoulder had developed. This had long since resolved. Physical examination and plain radiographs of the right shoulder and humerus failed to demonstrated any abnormality. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  1. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Change in the type of bifurcation resulting in periodic oscillations in delayed feedback diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napartovich, A. P.; Sukharev, A. G.

    2008-10-01

    The appearance of oscillating regimes in a delayed feedback diode laser is studied analytically and numerically. Based on the Lang—Kobayashi model, the transition of the usual oscillation mechanism, related to the transition through the Hopf bifurcation, to hard excitation of the spike regime is studied. The change in the regime of the instability development has a nature of a phase transition. An explicit expression is derived for the frequency of small harmonic oscillations appearing during the transition through the Andronov—Hopf bifurcation. The boundary between two different regimes of the development of laser power oscillations is determined in the parameter space.

  2. Concomitant evaluation of efficiency, acute and delayed toxicities of combined treatment of radiation and CDDP on an in vivo model

    SciTech Connect

    Julia, A.M.; Canal, P.; Berg, D.; Bachaud, J.M.; Daly, N.J.; Bugat, R. )

    1991-02-01

    The efficiency, acute and delayed toxicities of different radio-chemotherapeutic combinations were assessed on an in vivo model (Krebs II ascitic carcinoma grafted to female Swiss mice). Mice were given whole abdomen irradiation (WAI) 2.5 to 10 Gy as a single dose (WAI). CDDP was given intraperitoneally at 0.5 to 4 mg/kg dose level, 12 hr before or after WAI. There was a relationship between dose of CDDP and increase of life span (ILS) of mice. However, WAI did not increase the life span. When a single dose of 2 mg/kg CDDP was given prior to a 2.5 Gy WAI, the ILS reached 47%. By contrast, it was only 37% when treatment sequence was reversed. When the WAI dose level was increased to 5 Gy, the ILS was not increased. The jejunal crypt cell number, determined 3 days after the last treatment, was not modified, regardless of the treatment sequence. There was no delayed renal toxicity. The study on the Krebs II ascites model confirms the tumor cell therapeutic potentiation without exacerbation of normal tissue damage.

  3. Inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase delays the onset of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis through the negative regulation of sphingosine kinase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Gorshkova, Irina; Zhou, Tong; Mathew, Biji; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Takekoshi, Daisuke; Bhattacharya, Palash; Smith, Brett; Aydogan, Bulent; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Garcia, Joe G N; Berdyshev, Evgeny V

    2012-08-01

    The enforcement of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling network protects from radiation-induced pneumonitis. We now demonstrate that, in contrast to early postirradiation period, late postirradiation sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) and sphingoid base-1-phosphates are associated with radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (RIF). Using the mouse model, we demonstrate that RIF is characterized by a marked upregulation of S1P and dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate (DHS1P) levels in the lung tissue and in circulation accompanied by increased lung SphK1 expression and activity. Inhibition of sphingolipid de novo biosynthesis by targeting serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) with myriocin reduced radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and delayed the onset of RIF as evidenced by increased animal lifespan and decreased expression of markers of fibrogenesis, such as collagen and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), in the lung. Long-term inhibition of SPT also decreased radiation-induced SphK activity in the lung and the levels of S1P-DHS1P in the lung tissue and in circulation. In vitro, inhibition or silencing of serine palmitoyltransferase attenuated transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β)-induced upregulation of α-SMA through the negative regulation of SphK1 expression in normal human lung fibroblasts. These data demonstrate a novel role for SPT in regulating TGF-β signaling and fibrogenesis that is linked to the regulation of SphK1 expression and S1P-DHS1P formation.

  4. Inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase delays the onset of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis through the negative regulation of sphingosine kinase-1 expression[S

    PubMed Central

    Gorshkova, Irina; Zhou, Tong; Mathew, Biji; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Takekoshi, Daisuke; Bhattacharya, Palash; Smith, Brett; Aydogan, Bulent; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.

    2012-01-01

    The enforcement of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling network protects from radiation-induced pneumonitis. We now demonstrate that, in contrast to early postirradiation period, late postirradiation sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) and sphingoid base-1-phosphates are associated with radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis (RIF). Using the mouse model, we demonstrate that RIF is characterized by a marked upregulation of S1P and dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate (DHS1P) levels in the lung tissue and in circulation accompanied by increased lung SphK1 expression and activity. Inhibition of sphingolipid de novo biosynthesis by targeting serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) with myriocin reduced radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and delayed the onset of RIF as evidenced by increased animal lifespan and decreased expression of markers of fibrogenesis, such as collagen and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), in the lung. Long-term inhibition of SPT also decreased radiation-induced SphK activity in the lung and the levels of S1P-DHS1P in the lung tissue and in circulation. In vitro, inhibition or silencing of serine palmitoyltransferase attenuated transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β)-induced upregulation of α-SMA through the negative regulation of SphK1 expression in normal human lung fibroblasts. These data demonstrate a novel role for SPT in regulating TGF-β signaling and fibrogenesis that is linked to the regulation of SphK1 expression and S1P-DHS1P formation. PMID:22615416

  5. Treatment of the rat R-1 rhabdomyosarcoma with methotrexate and radiation; effects of timing on cell survival and tumour growth delay.

    PubMed

    Kipp, J B; Kal, H B; van Gennip, A H; van Berkel, A H

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of radiation (10 Gy 300-kV X-rays) and methotrexate (MTX; 3 x 10 mg/kg at 3.5-h intervals) was investigated with respect to effects on cell survival and tumour regrowth of the transplantable rat R-1 rhabdomyosarcoma. The treatment with MTX alone caused acceptable toxicity and no lethality. On day 3 after treatment with MTX alone a maximum decrease in the fraction of clonogenic cells was observed, which is in accordance with data on MTX concentrations in tumour tissue, indicating that MTX is active in the tumour for at least 3 days after injection. The clonogenic capacity after combined treatments, i.e. MTX before or after radiation, was assessed 3 days after the MTX administration. The fractions of clonogenic cells determined after combined therapy with intervals of up to 4 days were not significantly different from those expected on the basis of simple addition of the effects from individual treatments. However, the excess growth delay was positive at specific intervals (6-8 days after X-rays plus MTX and 5-6 days after MTX plus X-rays), whereas negative excess delays were observed when the two treatments were separated by less than 3 days. It is concluded that expectations with respect to clinical application of the combination must be modest in view of the short duration of favourable intervals and the observed absence of synergistic effects with respect to cell killing. The discrepancy between the two assays indicates that erroneous conclusions can be obtained if one endpoint only is assessed.

  6. Fat Necrosis and Oil Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fat Necrosis and Oil Cysts in the Breast Mastitis Duct Ectasia Other Non-cancerous Breast Conditions Breast ... Fat Necrosis and Oil Cysts in the Breast Mastitis Duct Ectasia Other Non-cancerous Breast Conditions Back ...

  7. Tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wen-Ming

    2013-01-28

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a critical cytokine, which contributes to both physiological and pathological processes. This mini-review will briefly touch the history of TNF discovery, its family members and its biological and pathological functions. Then, it will focus on new findings on the molecular mechanisms of how TNF triggers activation of the NF-κB and AP-1 pathways, which are critical for expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as the MLKL cascade, which is critical for the generation of ROS in response to TNF. Finally, this review will briefly summarize recent advances in understanding TNF-induced cell survival, apoptosis and necrosis (also called necroptosis). Understanding new findings and emerging concepts will impact future research on the molecular mechanisms of TNF signaling in immune disorders and cancer-related inflammation.

  8. Death by necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Syntichaki, Popi; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2002-01-01

    Cells suffer necrotic death when exposed to extreme environmental conditions, adverse and excessive stimuli, or when deleterious mutations are encoded in their genetic material. Unlike apoptosis, which involves a highly regulated and elaborate network of biochemical events and cascades, necrosis has been considered generally to be a chaotic decadence process that effects the inexorable demise of cells otherwise not destined to die. This grim prospect is now slowly being overturned, mostly by exciting new findings in two simple model organisms, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster. Despite the wide spectrum of necrosis-initiating conditions, evidence is accumulating that execution of necrotic or neurodegenerative cell death may be carried out by a finite common set of mechanisms. PMID:12101090

  9. Management of Carotid Blowout from Radiation Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Gleysteen, John; Clayburgh, Daniel; Cohen, James

    2016-06-01

    Although the incidence of carotid blowout has decreased with the advent of better reconstructive techniques, it remains a real risk after major head and neck surgery, especially in an irradiated field. A systematic, multidisciplinary approach incorporating appropriate history and physical examination, adequate resuscitation, diagnostic computed tomography, and diagnostic and therapeutic angiography can manage most of these patients in a safe and effective manner. Surgery has a limited role in acute management, although surgical techniques are useful both for prevention of this problem and for wound management after carotid blowout. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Necrosis in yeast.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Büttner, Sabrina; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Madeo, Frank

    2010-03-01

    Necrosis was long regarded as an accidental cell death process resulting from overwhelming cellular injury such as chemical or physical disruption of the plasma membrane. Such a definition, however, proved to be inapplicable to many necrotic scenarios. The discovery that genetic manipulation of several proteins either protected or enhanced necrotic cell death argued in favor of a regulated and hence programmed process, as it is the case for apoptosis. For more than a decade, yeast has served as a model for apoptosis research; recently, evidence accumulated that it also harbors a necrotic program. Here, we summarize the current knowledge about factors that control necrotic cell death in yeast. Mitochondria, aging and a low pH are positive regulators of this process while cellular polyamines (e.g. spermidine) and endonuclease G as well as homeostatic organelles like the vacuole or peroxisomes are potent inhibitors of necrosis. Physiological necrosis may stimulate intercellular signaling via the release of necrotic factors that promote viability of healthy cells and, thus, assure survival of the clone. Together, the data obtained in yeast argue for the existence of a necrotic program, which controls longevity and whose physiological function may thus be aging.

  11. Delayed ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    Ejaculatory incompetence; Sex - delayed ejaculation; Retarded ejaculation; Anejaculation; Infertility - delayed ejaculation ... include: Religious background that makes the person view sex as sinful Lack of attraction for a partner ...

  12. Kinetic Modeling and Graphical Analysis of 18F-Fluoromethylcholine (FCho), 18F-Fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) and 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET for the Fiscrimination between High-Grade Glioma and Radiation Necrosis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lybaert, Kelly; Moerman, Lieselotte; Descamps, Benedicte; Deblaere, Karel; Boterberg, Tom; Kalala, Jean-Pierre; Van den Broecke, Caroline; De Vos, Filip; Vanhove, Christian; Goethals, Ingeborg

    2016-01-01

    Background Discrimination between glioblastoma (GB) and radiation necrosis (RN) post-irradiation remains challenging but has a large impact on further treatment and prognosis. In this study, the uptake mechanisms of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), 18F-fluoroethyltyrosine (18F-FET) and 18F-fluoromethylcholine (18F-FCho) positron emission tomography (PET) tracers were investigated in a F98 GB and RN rat model applying kinetic modeling (KM) and graphical analysis (GA) to clarify our previous results. Methods Dynamic 18F-FDG (GB n = 6 and RN n = 5), 18F-FET (GB n = 5 and RN n = 5) and 18F-FCho PET (GB n = 5 and RN n = 5) were acquired with continuous arterial blood sampling. Arterial input function (AIF) corrections, KM and GA were performed. Results The influx rate (Ki) of 18F-FDG uptake described by a 2-compartmental model (CM) or using Patlak GA, showed more trapping (k3) in GB (0.07 min-1) compared to RN (0.04 min-1) (p = 0.017). K1 of 18F-FET was significantly higher in GB (0.06 ml/ccm/min) compared to RN (0.02 ml/ccm/min), quantified using a 1-CM and Logan GA (p = 0.036). 18F-FCho was rapidly oxidized complicating data interpretation. Using a 1-CM and Logan GA no clear differences were found to discriminate GB from RN. Conclusions Based on our results we concluded that using KM and GA both 18F-FDG and 18F-FET were able to discriminate GB from RN. Using a 2-CM model more trapping of 18F-FDG was found in GB compared to RN. Secondly, the influx of 18F-FET was higher in GB compared to RN using a 1-CM model. Important correlations were found between SUV and kinetic or graphical measures for 18F-FDG and 18F-FET. 18F-FCho PET did not allow discrimination between GB and RN. PMID:27559736

  13. Comparison between nonspecific and necrosis-avid gadolinium contrast agents in vascular disrupting agent-induced necrosis of rodent tumors at 3.0T.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaijun; Miranda Cona, Marlein; Chen, Feng; Li, Junjie; Yu, Jie; Feng, Yuanbo; Peeters, Ronald; De Keyzer, Frederik; Marchal, Guy; Ni, Yicheng

    2011-09-01

    : To compare a commercial contrast agent (CA) Dotarem and a necrosis-avid CA (NACA) for their ability to evaluate the therapeutic necrosis with a vascular disrupting agent (VDA) on magnetic resonance imaging in rodent liver tumors to determine which could better correlate with the histopathologic outcome. : After the VDA treatment, 16 rats with 32 liver rhabdomyosarcomas were randomized into Dotarem and NACA groups (n = 8 per group) for both interindividual and intraindividual comparisons. T2-weighted imaging, T1-weighted imaging (T1WI), contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging (CE-T1WI), and diffusion-weighted imaging were performed at baseline, after VDA treatment and CA injections. The enhancing efficacy of CAs at immediate and delayed enhancement on CE-T1WI in viable tumor and necrosis was compared. Tumor necrosis ratios calculated from NACA and Dotarem were compared and correlated with gold-standard histopathology. : On the immediate CE-T1WI, viable tumor was enhanced by either CA. On the delayed CE-T1WI at 30 minutes, both CAs failed to demarcate viable tumor from necrosis. At 24 hours post-NACA, the necrosis was clearly distinguished from viable tumor and thus derived necrosis ratio matched that from histopathology (P = 0.99); necrosis ratio from Dotarem was significantly lower than that from NACA and histopathology (P < 0.05, both), with a higher correlation of NACA than that of Dotarem with histopathology (r = 0.99 vs. r = 0.82). : NACA better evaluated VDA-induced tumor necrosis than nonspecific CA on T1WI in tumor models of rat liver. NACA showed a closer correlation with histopathology than nonspecific CA for the delineation of true necrosis. Delayed enhancement on T1WI with nonspecific CA is not suitable for the assessment of VDA-induced tumor necrosis.

  14. Radiation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  15. Arthroscopic assessment of avascular necrosis.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory I; Durrant, Adam W

    2011-08-01

    Avascular necrosis of the lunate is a process that is not well understood. The cause is uncertain, but a common theory persists that it is caused by disruption of the vascular supply to the lunate. This article discusses an approach to assessment that respects the articular cartilage and places at the front of the decision-making process the pathoanatomic components of the articular cartilage. It primarily respects the articular cartilage in the patient with avascular necrosis. This approach was developed for avascular necrosis of the lunate, but in principle applies to other joints with avascular necrosis as well.

  16. Viva Delay.

    PubMed

    Yahaghi, Hossein; Sorooshian, Shahryar; Yahaghi, Javad

    2016-06-28

    The time delay between submission of a thesis and Viva Voce is intolerable for students. This letter tries to draw the readers' attention to the effect of choosing the right examiner, in order to reduce the Viva Voce delay.

  17. Avascular necrosis in HIV.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Puja; Nelson, Mark; Brand, Alexander; Boag, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is an emerging complication of HIV infection. The incidence of AVN in HIV patients is greater than the general population. Although the incidence has increased in the HAART era, the aetiology remains unclear. We report our experience of AVN from our tertiary referral HIV centre and evaluate risk factors for its development. Review of MRI reports of HIV-positive patients between 2007 and 2010 identified 22 patients with AVN (19 men, 3 women). Case notes and electronic records were reviewed. Twenty-two patients developed AVN, among 6,487 HIV patients attending our centre (0.34% incidence; 95% CI, 0.2-0.48%). 68% of patients had multi-joint involvement. The median nadir CD4 count was 52 cells/μL. 73% of patients had more than two risk factors including HAART (91%), protease inhibitors (68%), hypercholesterolaemia (59%), corticosteroids (55%), hypertriglyceridaemia (45%), smoking (45%), alcohol (27%) and CD4 <200 cells/μL (23%). 9% were idiopathic. AVN is an important musculoskeletal manifestation of HIV and may be multi-focal with multi-factorial aetiology. Preventative strategies should focus on risk factor modification. When investigating joint pain in HIV-infected patients, clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for AVN. Unexplained AVN, particularly if multi-focal, should prompt consideration of HIV testing.

  18. Radiation enteritis and radiation scoliosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, M.; Eng, K.; Engler, G.L.

    1980-09-01

    Any patient with radiation scoliosis should be suspected of having a visceral lesion as well. Chronic radiation enteritis may be manifested by intestinal obstruction, fistulas, perforation, and hemorrhage. Intestinal obstruction is the most common complication, and must be differentiated from postoperative cast or from spinal-traction syndrome. Obstruction that does not respond promptly to conservative measures must be treated surgically. Irradiated bowel is ischemic, and necrosis with spontaneous perforation can only be avoided with early diagnosis and surgical intervention.

  19. Isolated Limb Perfusion with Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and Melphalan for Locally Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Three Time Periods at Risk for Amputation

    PubMed Central

    van Ginkel, Robert J.; Thijssens, Katja M. J.; Pras, Elisabeth; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Suurmeijer, Albert J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term limb salvage rate and overall survival after isolated limb perfusion (ILP) with tumor necrosis factor alpha and melphalan for locally advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods From 1991 to 2003, 73 patients (36 men, 37 women, median age 54 [range 14–80] years) with biopsy-proven STS underwent 77 perfusions followed by delayed surgical resection, with or without adjuvant radiation. Limb salvage and overall survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results A total of 21 amputations (28%) were performed. Overall 1, 5, and 10 years’ limb salvage was 80.1% ± 4.8%, 68.2% ± 6.5%, and 60.6% ± 9.2%, respectively. We found that the risk of amputation was linked to three time periods. The first was within a year after perfusion, mainly as a result of massive necrosis of the tumor and overlying skin, resulting in soft tissue deficit or recurrent disease (n = 17). The second was within 5 years, with two amputations performed for late local recurrence. The third occurred 10 years after perfusion, with two amputations performed for critical leg ischemia. Another two patients developed a pathological fracture of the femur due to radiation osteonecrosis. These four patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. Overall, 1, 5, and 10 years’ survival was 82.9% ± 9.2%, 58.7% ± 13.1%, and 42.5% ± 18.2%, respectively. Conclusions ILP treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha and melphalan followed by delayed surgical resection and adjuvant radiation treatment is an effective limb salvage treatment regimen for locally advanced STS. However, we observed late morbidity, with two amputations performed for critical leg ischemia and two pathological fractures of the femur in patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy. PMID:17253101

  20. [Delayed puberty].

    PubMed

    Edouard, T; Tauber, M

    2010-02-01

    Delayed puberty is defined in girls by the absence of breast development beyond 13 years old and in boys by the absence of testicular enlargement (< 4 ml) beyond 14 years old. Simple investigations lead to the diagnosis of central or peripheral hypogonadism and constitutional delay of puberty. In girls, delayed puberty is rare and often organic, and then Turner syndrome should be systematically suspected. In boys, delayed puberty is often constitutional and functional. Treatment is etiologic when possible, hormonal replacement therapy (oestrogen in girls and testosterone in boys) and psychological management.

  1. [Evaluation of the risk of delayed adverse effects of chronic combined exposure to radiation and chemical factors with the purpose to ensure safety in orbital and exploration space missions].

    PubMed

    Shafirkin, A V; Mukhamedieva, L N; Tatarkin, S V; Barantseva, M Iu

    2012-01-01

    The work had the aim to anatomize the existing issues with providing safety in extended orbital and exploration missions for ensuing estimation of actual values of the total radiation risk for the crew, and risks of other delayed effects of simultaneous exposure to ionizing radiation and chemical pollutants in cabin air, and a number of other stressful factors inevitable in space flight. The flow of chronic experiments for separate and combined studies with reproduction of air makeup and radiation doses in actual orbital and predicted exploration missions is outlined. To set safety limits, new approaches should be applied to the description of gradual norm degradation to pathologies in addition to several generalized quantitative indices of adaptation and straining of the regulatory systems, as well as of effectiveness of the compensatory body reserve against separate and combined exposure.

  2. Acute fatal acetaminophen overdose without liver necrosis.

    PubMed

    Singer, Peter P; Jones, Graham R; Bannach, Bernard G; Denmark, Lloyd

    2007-07-01

    Two unusual cases of suicidal overdose of acetaminophen (paracetamol) without the usual extensive centrilobular necrosis of the liver are reported. Both cases were subjected to comprehensive drug screening by immunoassay, and a combination of gas chromatography with mass spectrometry, nitrogen detection, and electron capture detection. Acetaminophen was detected in both cases. No other drugs were detected in case #1, and only a small amount of olanzapine (<0.1 mg/L) was detected in case #2. No anatomical cause of death was identified in either case. If untreated, the normal outcome of a large acetaminophen overdose would be massive hepatic necrosis with delayed death and low blood and tissue acetaminophen concentrations. In contrast, particularly high postmortem acetaminophen concentrations were measured in both our cases with little hepatic tissue damage. For case #1, femoral blood acetaminophen 1280 mg/L, vitreous 878 mg/L, and liver 729 mg/kg; in case #2, cardiac blood 1220 mg/L, vitreous 779 mg/L, liver 3260 mg/kg, and gastric 11,500 mg/500 g. Acetaminophen was measured using high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (254 nm) using 3-hydroxyacetanilide as the internal standard. The very high concentrations of acetaminophen is these cases but relatively little hepatic damage suggests an alternative, possibly cardiac, mechanism of death.

  3. Mastectomy skin flap necrosis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Stuart A; Jeevaratnam, Johann A; Agrawal, Avi; Cutress, Ramsey I

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Mastectomy skin flap necrosis (MSFN) has a reported incidence of 5%–30% in the literature. It is often a significant and underappreciated problem. The aim of this article was to review the associated challenges and possible solutions. Methods A MEDLINE search was performed using the search term “mastectomy skin flap necrosis”. Titles and abstracts from peer-reviewed publications were screened for relevance. Results MSFN is a common complication and may present as partial- or full-thickness necrosis. Predictive patient risk factors include smoking, diabetes, obesity, radiotherapy, previous scars and severe medical comorbidity. MSFN leads to a number of challenges, including wound management problems, delays to adjuvant therapy, esthetic compromise, implant extrusion, patient distress and financial loss. Careful preoperative planning and meticulous surgical technique may reduce the incidence of MSFN. A number of intraoperative techniques are available to try and predict skin flaps at risk of MSFN. MSFN may be managed operatively or nonoperatively. Early intervention may reduce the morbidity of MSFN in selected cases. Topical nitroglycerin ointment may be beneficial in reducing MSFN following immediate reconstruction, but the evidence base is still limited. Conclusion MSFN can result in considerable challenges for the patient and the health care service. This review discusses the management options for this problem. PMID:28331365

  4. [Is the Hawkins sign able to predict necrosis in fractures of the neck of the astragalus?].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Paz, S; Muñoz-Vives, J M; Froufe-Siota, M Á

    2013-01-01

    To assess if the Hawkins sign can predict whether or not astragalus fractures of the neck will develop avascular necrosis. It is also assessed whether the occurrence of this complication is related to the displacement of the fracture, soft tissue injury, or delay in the reduction or surgery. The results were compared with those found in the literature. A retrospective study was conducted on 23 talar neck fractures recorded over a a period of thirteen years. The following variables were analysed: displacement of the fracture, soft tissue injury, delay and type of treatment, complications, observation of the Hawkins sign, and functional outcome. There were 7 type I Hawkins fractures, 11 type II, and 4 type III and 1 type IV. Four cases developed avascular necrosis (2 Hawkins type II and 2 type III). Hawkins sign was observed in 12 cases, of which none developed necrosis. Four cases with negative Hawkins sign developed necrosis. No statistically significant differences were found when comparing the development of avascular necrosis with the displacement of the fracture, soft tissue injury, or delay in treatment. Differences were found when comparing the development of avascular necrosis with the Hawkins sign (P=.03). A positive Hawkins sign rules out that the fractured talus has developed avascular necrosis, but its absence does not confirm it. © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell cycle delay in murine pre-osteoblasts is more pronounced after exposure to high-LET compared to low-LET radiation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yueyuan; Hellweg, Christine E; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Reitz, Günther; Lau, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Space radiation contains a complex mixture of particles comprised primarily of protons and high-energy heavy ions. Radiation risk is considered one of the major health risks for astronauts who embark on both orbital and interplanetary space missions. Ionizing radiation dose-dependently kills cells, damages genetic material, and disturbs cell differentiation and function. The immediate response to ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage is stimulation of DNA repair machinery and activation of cell cycle regulatory checkpoints. To date, little is known about cell cycle regulation after exposure to space-relevant radiation, especially regarding bone-forming osteoblasts. Here, we assessed cell cycle regulation in the osteoblastic cell line OCT-1 after exposure to various types of space-relevant radiation. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ionizing radiation was investigated regarding the biological endpoint of cellular survival ability. Cell cycle progression was examined following radiation exposure resulting in different RBE values calculated for a cellular survival level of 1 %. Our findings indicate that radiation with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 150 keV/μm was most effective in inducing reproductive cell killing by causing cell cycle arrest. Expression analyses indicated that cells exposed to ionizing radiation exhibited significantly up-regulated p21(CDKN1A) gene expression. In conclusion, our findings suggest that cell cycle regulation is more sensitive to high-LET radiation than cell survival, which is not solely regulated through elevated CDKN1A expression.

  6. Models of CNS radiation damage during space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopewell, J. W.

    1994-10-01

    The primary structural and functional arrangement of the different cell types within the CNS are reviewed. This was undertaken with a view to providing a better understanding of the complex interrelationships that may contribute to the pathogenesis of lesions in this tissue after exposure to ionizing radiation. The spectrum of possible CNS radiation-induced syndromes are discussed although not all have an immediate relevance to exposure during space flight. The specific characteristics of the lesions observed would appear to be dose related. Very high doses may produce an acute CNS syndrome that can cause death. Of the delayed lesions, selective coagulation necrosis of white matter and a later appearing vascular microangiopathy, have been reported in patients after cancer therapy doses. Lower doses, perhaps very low doses, may produce a delayed generalised CNS atrophy; this effect and the probability of the induction of CNS tumors could potentially have the greatest significance for space flight.

  7. Radiation damage to the brain: neuropsychiatric aspects

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T.; Vahora, S.

    1986-11-01

    Although radiation necrosis of the brain is a recognized complication of irradiation of the central nervous system, the psychiatric aspects of this phenomenon are less well defined. Two cases of radiation necrosis in which psychiatric symptoms were a prominent part of the clinical picture are presented. Factors that determine the evolution and clinical presentation of radiation necrosis are reviewed. In particular, the role of the consultation psychiatrist in the diagnosis and management of such patients is discussed.

  8. Spontaneous Necrosis of Choroidal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Thareja, Shalini; Rashid, Alia; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical presentations and pathological features of spontaneously necrotic choroidal melanomas. Methods The clinical and histological features of patients who underwent enucleation for uveal melanoma from 1989 to 2012 at Emory University and were found to have spontaneously necrotic choroidal melanomas were retrospectively analyzed. Results A total of 6 cases were identified. All cases had 90-100% tumor necrosis and also exhibited marked ischemic necrosis of the iris and ciliary body; 5 of 6 cases exhibited marked ischemic necrosis of the retina. The tumor consisted of melanoma ghost cells often surrounded by a zone of pigmented macrophages. Thrombi were not found in any of the cases. All of the tumors in our cases were centered around the equatorial choroid and 2 extended into the ciliary body. One of the cases exhibited a wedge-shaped infarct in a lateral aspect of the tumor. In most of the cases, microscopic areas of intact tumor cells were present in the peripheries of the tumors. Conclusions Spontaneous necrosis may occur in uveal melanoma. We believe that this occurs secondary to tumor hypoxia in the center of the tumor, followed by secondary inflammation, generalized ischemia and finally complete tumor necrosis. PMID:27175363

  9. Warfarin-Induced Skin Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Papanas, Nikolaos; Karadimas, Efthimios; Polychronidis, Alexandros

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin-induced skin necrosis is an infrequent complication occurring in individuals under warfarin treatment who have a thrombophilic history or after administration of large loading doses of warfarin particularly without simultaneous initial use of heparin. A 62-year-old lady developed skin necrosis 4 days after initiating warfarin therapy of 5 mg daily without initial co-administration of heparin. The patient had a normal clotting profile. Skin necrosis progressed to eschar formation after cessation of warfarin and heparinization stopped expanding. Warfarin was reintroduced at 2 mg daily, initially together with low molecular weight heparin. Autolytic debridement of the necrotic tissue was followed by healing of the cutaneous deficit by secondary intention. Prompt diagnosis and discontinuation of warfarin are crucial for the prognosis. PMID:24648693

  10. Therapy for acute retinal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tatsushi; Spencer, Doran B; Mochizuki, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    Acute retinal necrosis is a progressive necrotizing retinopathy caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella zoster virus (VZV). The mainstay of its treatment is antiviral therapy against these pathogenic organisms, such as intravenous acyclovir or oral valacyclovir. Systemic and topical corticosteroids together with antiviral therapy are used as an anti-inflammatory treatment to minimize damages to the optic nerve and retinal blood vessels. Because the majority of severe cases of the disease show occlusive retinal vasculitis, a low dosage of aspirin is used as anti-thrombotic treatment. Vitreo-retinal surgery is useful to repair rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, one of the main late-stage complications. Moreover, recent articles have reported some encouraging results of prophylactic vitrectomy before rhegmatogenous retinal detachment occurs. The efficacy of laser photocoagulation to prevent the development or extension of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is controversial. Despite these treatments, the visual prognosis of acute retinal necrosis is still poor, in particular VZV-induced acute retinal necrosis.

  11. [Nephrocalcinosis and subcutaneous fat necrosis].

    PubMed

    Gomes, Cláudia; Lobo, Luísa; Azevedo, António Siborro; Simão, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn is an uncommon, transient and self-healing panniculits. This entity generally follows an uncomplicated course, however there are rare and important complications. The authors present a case of a newborn with subcutaneous fat necrosis complicated by hypercalcemia and nephrocalcinosis. The pathogenesis of hypercalcemia is not fully understood and the nephrocalcinosis can evolve to chronic kidney disease. Clinicians should be aware of subcutaneous fat necrosis as a possible risk factor for hypercalcemia and patients should have serial serum and urinary calcium determinations for up to 6 months after the appearance of the skin lesions. The early diagnosis and prompt treatment of hypercalcemia are essential to prevent severe complications.

  12. [Striated and delayed nephrography].

    PubMed

    Marlois, O; Padovani, J; Faure, F; Devred, P; Grangier, M L; Panuel, M

    1985-10-01

    About a case of striated and delayed nephrogram seen on a diabetic child, authors come back to the different etiologies. Among them, the tubular precipitation of Tamm-Horsfall protein seems to be given like on the right possibilities. Whatever is its etiology, the mechanism of striated appearance is always the same, being founded on the radiated disposal of the collecting ducts and on a tubular stasis beeing with iodine concentration.

  13. Avascular necrosis of carpal bones.

    PubMed

    Golimbu, C N; Firooznia, H; Rafii, M

    1995-05-01

    MR imaging is extremely well suited to detection of early phases of avascular necrosis, permitting diagnosis before collapse of the carpal bones has occurred. The sensitivity of this imaging modality allows differentiation of subtle changes in the bone marrow signal. This is used as criteria for a new stage classification of Kienböck's disease based on MR imaging appearance. The prognosis of scaphoid fractures and estimation of likelihood of avascular necrosis of the proximal fragment can be inferred by using gadolinium enhancement to evaluate the bone marrow vascularity.

  14. Glans Necrosis Following Penile Prosthesis Implantation: Prevention and Treatment Suggestions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Steven K; Mora-Estaves, Cesar; Egydio, Paulo; Ralph, David; Habous, Mohamad; Love, Christopher; Shamsodini, Ahmad; Valenzuela, Robert; Yafi, Faysal A

    2017-09-01

    To examine possible etiology and treatment outcomes in 21 patients with glans necrosis following penile prosthesis implantation. Glans necrosis typically presented with a dusky glans on the first postoperative day following prosthesis implantation. The blood supply to the glans penis consists of the dorsal arteries and the terminal branches of the spongiosal arteries. Using the cohort in our study, we compiled preoperative comorbidities and adjunctive surgical maneuvers that might compromise glans vascularity, leading to glans necrosis. Preoperative risk factors were arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease (90%), diabetes mellitus (81%), smoking (81%), previous prosthesis explantation (57%), and previous radiation therapy (48%). The most prevalent intraoperative and postoperative factor was subcoronal incision for reasons as simple as coincident circumcision or as complex as for penile degloving (86%). Other factors detected were penile wrapping with an occlusive elastic bandage (62%), use of a sliding technique for penile lengthening (33%), and coincident distal urethral injury repair (29%). Seventeen patients (81%) managed expectantly with preservation of implanted prosthesis sustained significant glandular loss. Four patients managed with immediate prosthesis removal healed without sequelae. Patients with preoperative risk factors undergoing penile prosthesis implantation should avoid high-risk adjunctive surgical maneuvers. Upon development of signs of glans necrosis postoperatively, in the setting of these high-risk factors, immediate implant removal may prevent subsequent glans necrosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Inflammatory duodenal necrosis complicating gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Dina; Lee, Geraint J.; Upadhyaya, Manasvi; Drake, David

    2016-01-01

    Babies with gastroschisis have an increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) that can lead to short bowel syndrome, a long-term parenteral nutrition requirement, and its associated complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of recurrent duodenal ischemia and necrosis associated with gastroschisis in the absence of NEC totalis. PMID:27695214

  16. Imaging of cavitary necrosis in complicated childhood pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hodina, M; Hanquinet, S; Cotting, J; Schnyder, P; Gudinchet, F

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this study was to illustrate the chest radiographs (CR) and CT imaging features and sequential findings of cavitary necrosis in complicated childhood pneumonia. Among 30 children admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit for persistent or progressive pneumonia, respiratory distress or sepsis despite adequate antibiotic therapy, a study group of 9 children (5 girls and 4 boys; mean age 4 years) who had the radiographic features and CT criteria for cavitary necrosis complicated pneumonia was identified. The pathogens identified were Streptococcus pneumoniae( n=4), Aspergillus( n=2), Legionella( n=1), and Staphylococcus aureus( n=1). Sequential CR and CT scans were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up CR and CT were evaluated for persistent abnormalities. Chest radiographs showed consolidations in 8 of the 9 patients. On CT examination, cavitary necrosis was localized to 1 lobe in 2 patients and 7 patients showed multilobar or bilateral areas of cavitary necrosis. In 3 patients of 9, the cavitary necrosis was initially shown on CT and visualization by CR was delayed by a time span varying from 5 to 9 days. In all patients with cavities, a mean number of five cavities were seen on antero-posterior CR, contrasting with the multiple cavities seen on CT. Parapneumonic effusions were shown by CR in 3 patients and in 5 patients by CT. Bronchopleural fistulae were demonstrated by CT alone ( n=3). No purulent pericarditis was demonstrated. The CT scan displayed persistent residual pneumatoceles of the left lower lobe in 2 patients. Computed tomography is able to define a more specific pattern of abnormalities than conventional CR in children with necrotizing pneumonia and allows an earlier diagnosis of this rapidly progressing condition. Lung necrosis and cavitation may also be associated with Aspergillus or Legionella pneumonia in the pediatric population.

  17. Design of a prototype split-and-delay unit for XFEL pulses, and their evaluation by synchrotron radiation X-rays.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Jun'ya; Ohwada, Kenji; Ishino, Masahiko; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro; Ando, Masami; Namikawa, Kazumichi

    2017-01-01

    A prototype split-and-delay unit (SDU) for X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses is proposed based on the Graeff-Bonse four-Bragg-reflection interferometer by installing 12.5° slopes. The SDU can continuously provide a delay time from approximately -20 to 40 ps with a resolution of less than 26 fs. Because the SDU was constructed from a monolithic silicon crystal, alignment is straightforward. The obtained thoroughputs of the SDU reached 0.7% at 7.46 keV and 0.02% at 14.92 keV. The tunability of the delay time using the proposed SDU was demonstrated by finding the interference effects of the split X-rays, and the time resolution of the proposed SDU was evaluated using the width of the interference pattern recorded on the X-ray charge-coupled device camera by changing the energy, i.e. longitudinal coherence length, of the incident X-rays. It is expected that the proposed SDU will be applicable to XFEL experiments using delay times from tens of femtoseconds to tens of picoseconds, e.g. intensity correlation measurements.

  18. Delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Traggiai, Cristina; Stanhope, Richard

    2002-03-01

    Puberty is the acquisition of secondary sexual characteristics associated with a growth spurt and resulting in the attainment of reproductive function. Delayed puberty is diagnosed when there is no breast development by 13.4 years of age in a girl and no testicular enlargement by 14.0 years in a boy. The aetiologies are: (i) pubertal delay, either with constitutional delay of growth and puberty or secondary to chronic illness, and (ii) pubertal failure, with hypogonadotrophic (defect in the hypothalamo-pituitary region) or hypergonadotrophic (secondary to gonadal failure) hypogonadism, or both (secondary to radio/chemotherapy). The investigation includes: history, auxological data and pubertal development examination. Boys usually require treatment and, if they do not respond, investigation. In girls it is appropriate to measure the thyroid function and karyotype first and, if necessary, to offer treatment. If they present with dysmorphic features, or positive familial history, an assessment is required before treatment.

  19. Death receptor pathways mediate targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiations in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Luce, Audrey; Courtin, Aurélie; Levalois, Céline; Altmeyer-Morel, Sandrine; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Lebeau, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    Delayed cell death by mitotic catastrophe is a frequent mode of solid tumor cell death after γ-irradiation, a widely used treatment of cancer. Whereas the mechanisms that underlie the early γ-irradiation-induced cell death are well documented, those that drive the delayed cell death are largely unknown. Here we show that the Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α death receptor pathways mediate the delayed cell death observed after γ-irradiation of breast cancer cells. Early after irradiation, we observe the increased expression of Fas, TRAIL-R and TNF-R that first sensitizes cells to apoptosis. Later, the increased expression of FasL, TRAIL and TNF-α permit the apoptosis engagement linked to mitotic catastrophe. Treatments with TNF-α, TRAIL or anti-Fas antibody, early after radiation exposure, induce apoptosis, whereas the neutralization of the three death receptors pathways impairs the delayed cell death. We also show for the first time that irradiated breast cancer cells excrete soluble forms of the three ligands that can induce the death of sensitive bystander cells. Overall, these results define the molecular basis of the delayed cell death of irradiated cancer cells and identify the death receptors pathways as crucial actors in apoptosis induced by targeted as well as non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. PMID:19126655

  20. [Cutaneous radiation syndrome after accidental skin exposure to ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Peter, R U

    2013-12-01

    Accidental exposure of the human skin to single doses of ionizing radiation greater than 3 Gy results in a distinct clinical picture, which is characterized by a transient and faint erythema after a few hours, then followed by severe erythema, blistering and necrosis. Depending on severity of damage, the latter generally occurs 10-30 days after exposure, but in severe cases may appear within 48 hrs. Between three and 24 months after exposure, epidermal atrophy combined with progressive dermal and subcutaneous fibrosis is the predominant clinical feature. Even years and decades after exposure, atrophy of epidermis, sweat and sebaceous glands; telangiectases; and dermal and subcutaneous fibrosis may be found and even continue to progress. For this distinct pattern of deterministic effects following cutaneous accidental radiation exposure the term "cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS)" was coined in 1993 and has been accepted by all international authorities including IAEA and WHO since 2000. In contrast to the classical concept that inhibition of epidermal stem cell proliferation accounts for the clinical symptomatology, research of the last three decades has demonstrated the additional crucial role of inflammatory processes in the etiology of both acute and chronic sequelae of the CRS. Therefore, therapeutic approaches should include topical and systemic anti-inflammatory measures at the earliest conceivable point, and should be maintained throughout the acute and subacute stages, as this reduces the need for surgical intervention, once necrosis has occurred. If surgical intervention is planned, it should be executed with a conservative approach; no safety margins are needed. Antifibrotic measures in the chronic stage should address the chronic inflammatory nature of this process, in which over-expression TGF beta-1 may be a target for therapeutic intervention. Life-long follow-up often is required for management of delayed effects and for early detection of secondary

  1. Fat necrosis in deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps: an ultrasound-based review of 202 cases.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Wouter J; Nanhekhan, Lloyd; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Fabré, Gerd; Vandevoort, Marc

    2009-12-01

    In autologous breast reconstruction after mastectomy, fat necrosis is a rather common complication that may lead to secondary corrective surgery. The understanding of fat necrosis until now has been limited because previous studies were based exclusively on physical examination and used diverse definitions. The authors retrospectively reviewed the incidence of fat necrosis and the correlation of several risk factors in 202 deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flaps for breast reconstruction. The incidence of fat necrosis was based on both physical examination and ultrasound imaging. The following risk factors were studied: age, smoking, body mass index, timing of reconstruction, and timing and extent of radiation therapy fields. Physical examination revealed a palpable mass or nodule in 14 percent of the DIEP flaps (28 of 202). Ultrasound examination added another 21 percent of DIEP flaps (42 of 202) with a firm area of scar tissue (diameter >or=5 mm). The overall ultrasound incidence of fat necrosis in this study was 35 percent (71 of 202). Although the overall ultrasound incidence of fat necrosis was very high, only 7 percent of the DIEP flaps (15 of 202) needed to undergo an extra surgical procedure for removal of this area. In contrast to previous studies, none of the risk factors studied was statistically significant for the occurrence of fat necrosis. These results suggest that there is no significant association between previously suspected risk factors and fat necrosis. The overall incidence of fat necrosis, however, is much higher than previously accepted, even though the need for corrective surgery is limited.

  2. Delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Fenichel, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Since puberty is a long ongoing developmental process with significant individual and population differences in timing, the definition of delayed puberty for a given individual needs to rest on simple, though arbitrary criteria based on epidemiological data. Although several genes involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal maturation cascade have been characterized recently from familial or sporadic cases of primitive isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, many genes regulating puberty onset remain undetermined. In case of delayed puberty and/or primary amenorrhea, a complete clinical examination including a detailed past history will evaluate the development of secondary sex characteristics, verify the association with a growth delay and look for specific indicative features pertaining to the etiological diagnosis. This clinical check-up completed if necessary with biological, ultrasonographic, radiological and genetic investigations will try to determine which girls will have a permanent sexual infantilism of gonadal, hypophyseal or hypothalamic origin, which girls will undergo spontaneous but delayed puberty and which girls have primary amenorrhea with developed secondary sex characteristics. Therapeutic attitude will have to integrate etiological factors, statural prognosis, bone mass preservation and psychological factors.

  3. Minimally invasive treatment of infected pancreatic necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cebulski, Włodzimierz; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz W.

    2014-01-01

    Infected pancreatic necrosis is a challenging complication that worsens prognosis in acute pancreatitis. For years, open necrosectomy has been the mainstay treatment option in infected pancreatic necrosis, although surgical debridement still results in high morbidity and mortality rates. Recently, many reports on minimally invasive treatment in infected pancreatic necrosis have been published. This paper presents a review of minimally invasive techniques and attempts to define their role in the management of infected pancreatic necrosis. PMID:25653725

  4. Radiation dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, R.B.; Lynch, J.B.

    1987-04-01

    Even in this era of modern radiotherapy, injuries associated with the medical and industrial use of radiation devices will continue to pose a difficult problem for the reconstructive surgeon. It must be borne in mind that the single most serious hazard to surgery in irradiated tissue is the lodgement of bacteria in tissue rendered avascular by the radiation and the secondary necrosis from the infection itself. The basic principles of wound management must be augmented by thorough knowledge of the use of well-vascularized muscle and musculocutaneous flap to provide adequate, blood-rich, soft-tissue coverage.

  5. Delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Edward O; Lee, Peter A

    2002-02-01

    Normal puberty is a time of life and a process of development that results in full adult maturity of growth, sexual development, and psychosocial achievement. Delayed puberty describes the clinical condition in which the pubertal events start late (usually > +2.5 SD later than the mean) or are attenuated in progression. The differential diagnosis includes syndromes of low gonadotropin production, usually constitutional delay of growth and maturation associated with chronic disease, but also an array of gene-mediated disorders, and syndromes of primary gonadal dysfunction with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, including Turner and Klinefelter syndromes, and a group of acquired and genetic abnormalities. Diagnostic assessment and varied therapeutic modalities are discussed. The issues of androgen or estrogen therapy are important to assess, and growth hormone treatment remains a difficult dilemma.

  6. [Skin necrosis: report of eleven cases].

    PubMed

    Molgó, Montserrat N; Arriagada, Camila E; Salomone, Claudia B; Vera, Cristián K; Giesen, Laura F; Solar, Antonieta G; González, Sergio B

    2014-01-01

    Skin necrosis must be considered as a syndrome, because it is a clinical manifestation of different diseases. An early diagnosis is very important to choose the appropriate treatment. Therefore, its causes should be suspected and confirmed quickly. We report eleven patients with skin necrosis seen at our Department, caused by different etiologies: Warfarin-induced skin necrosis, loxoscelism, diabetic microangiopathy, ecthyma gangrenosum, disseminated intravascular coagulation, necrotizing vasculitis, paraneoplastic extensive necrotizing vasculitis, livedoid vasculopathy, necrotizing fasciitis, necrosis secondary to the use of vasoactive drugs and necrosis secondary to the use of cocaine. We also report the results of our literature review on the subject.

  7. Targeting of regulated necrosis in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Martin-Sanchez, Diego; Poveda, Jonay; Fontecha-Barriuso, Miguel; Ruiz-Andres, Olga; Sanchez-Niño, María Dolores; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ortiz, Alberto; Sanz, Ana Belén

    2017-06-21

    The term acute tubular necrosis was thought to represent a misnomer derived from morphological studies of human necropsies and necrosis was thought to represent an unregulated passive form of cell death which was not amenable to therapeutic manipulation. Recent advances have improved our understanding of cell death in acute kidney injury. First, apoptosis results in cell loss, but does not trigger an inflammatory response. However, clumsy attempts at interfering with apoptosis (e.g. certain caspase inhibitors) may trigger necrosis and, thus, inflammation-mediated kidney injury. Second, and most revolutionary, the concept of regulated necrosis emerged. Several modalities of regulated necrosis were described, such as necroptosis, ferroptosis, pyroptosis and mitochondria permeability transition regulated necrosis. Similar to apoptosis, regulated necrosis is modulated by specific molecules that behave as therapeutic targets. Contrary to apoptosis, regulated necrosis may be extremely pro-inflammatory and, importantly for kidney transplantation, immunogenic. Furthermore, regulated necrosis may trigger synchronized necrosis, in which all cells within a given tubule die in a synchronized manner. We now review the different modalities of regulated necrosis, the evidence for a role in diverse forms of kidney injury and the new opportunities for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Diverse delayed effects in human lymphoblastoid cells surviving exposure to high-LET (56)Fe particles or low-LET (137)Cs gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; Horng, M. F.; Ricanati, M.; Diaz-Insua, M.; Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    To obtain information on the origin of radiation-induced genomic instability, we characterized a total of 166 clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles or (137)Cs gamma radiation, isolated approximately 36 generations after exposure, along with their respective control clones. Cytogenetic aberrations, growth alterations, responses to a second irradiation, and mutant frequencies at the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and thymidine kinase loci were determined. A greater percentage of clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles exhibited instability (defined as clones showing one or more outlying characteristics) than in the case of those that survived gamma irradiation. The phenotypes of the unstable clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles were also qualitatively different from those of the clones that survived gamma irradiation. A greater percentage (20%) of the unstable clones that survived gamma irradiation than those that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles (4%) showed an altered response to the second irradiation, while an increase in the percentage of clones that had an outlying frequency of ouabain-resistant and thymidine kinase mutants was more evident in the clones exposed to (56)Fe particles than in those exposed to gamma rays. Growth alterations and increases in dicentric chromosomes were found only in clones with more than one alteration. These results underscore the complex nature of genomic instability and the likelihood that radiation-induced genomic instability arises from different original events.

  9. Diverse delayed effects in human lymphoblastoid cells surviving exposure to high-LET (56)Fe particles or low-LET (137)Cs gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; Horng, M. F.; Ricanati, M.; Diaz-Insua, M.; Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    To obtain information on the origin of radiation-induced genomic instability, we characterized a total of 166 clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles or (137)Cs gamma radiation, isolated approximately 36 generations after exposure, along with their respective control clones. Cytogenetic aberrations, growth alterations, responses to a second irradiation, and mutant frequencies at the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and thymidine kinase loci were determined. A greater percentage of clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles exhibited instability (defined as clones showing one or more outlying characteristics) than in the case of those that survived gamma irradiation. The phenotypes of the unstable clones that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles were also qualitatively different from those of the clones that survived gamma irradiation. A greater percentage (20%) of the unstable clones that survived gamma irradiation than those that survived exposure to (56)Fe particles (4%) showed an altered response to the second irradiation, while an increase in the percentage of clones that had an outlying frequency of ouabain-resistant and thymidine kinase mutants was more evident in the clones exposed to (56)Fe particles than in those exposed to gamma rays. Growth alterations and increases in dicentric chromosomes were found only in clones with more than one alteration. These results underscore the complex nature of genomic instability and the likelihood that radiation-induced genomic instability arises from different original events.

  10. Acute oesophageal necrosis (black oesophagus).

    PubMed

    Galtés, Ignasi; Gallego, María Ángeles; Esgueva, Raquel; Martin-Fumadó, Carles

    2016-03-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to hospital after being found unconscious in his home. He had a history of alcoholism, multiple drug addictions, and type I diabetes mellitus. At admission, he had hyperglycaemia (550 mg/dL) with glucosuria and ketone bodies in the urine, along with septic shock refractory to bilateral alveolar infiltrates and severe respiratory failure. The patient died 24 hours post admission due to multiple organ failure, with diabetic ketoacidosis decompensated by possible respiratory infection in a patient with polytoxicomania. The autopsy confirmed the presence of acute bilateral bronchopneumonia, chronic pancreatitis, severe hepatic steatosis, and generalized congestive changes. At the oesophagus, acute oesophageal necrosis was evident.

  11. Delayed effects of neutron irradiation on central nervous system microvasculature in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, J.H.; McGregor, J.M.; Clendenon, N.R.; Gordon, W.A.; Yates, A.J.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Barth, R.F.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Pathologic examination of a series of 14 patients with malignant gliomas treated with BNCT showed well demarcated zones of radiation damage characterized by coagulation necrosis. Beam attenuation was correlated with edema, loss of parenchymal elements, demyelination, leukocytosis, and peripheral gliosis. Vascular disturbances consisted of endothelial swelling, medial and adventitial proliferation, fibrin impregnation, frequent thrombosis, and perivascular inflammation. Radiation changes appeared to be acute and delayed. The outcome of the patients in this series was not significantly different from the natural course of the disease, even though two of the patients had no residual tumor detected at the time of autopsy. The intensity of the vascular changes raised a suspicion that boron may have sequestered in vessel walls, resulting in selectively high doses of radiation to these structures (Asbury et al., 1972), or that there may have been high blood concentrations of boron at the time of treatment. The potential limiting effects of a vascular ischemic reaction in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) prompted the following study to investigate the delayed response of microvascular structures in a rat model currently being used for pre-clinical investigations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Laminar cortical necrosis in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2009-10-01

    Laminar cortical necrosis, defined as focal or diffuse necrosis of one or more cortical lamina, represents an increasingly recognized neuropathological endpoint of vascular, endocrine, immunologic, metabolic, or toxic conditions, of which mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are the third most frequent after cerebral ischemia and hypoxia. To investigate the prevalence of laminar cortical necrosis in MIDs, types of MIDs associated with laminar cortical necrosis, and the morphological characteristics on imaging and autopsy. Medline literature review for the terms "laminar cortical necrosis", "cortical signal change", "mitochondrial" and all acronyms of syndromatic MIDs. Among 139 hits for "laminar cortical necrosis", 10 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria (7%). Among the ten hits five were case series and the other five single case reports. The syndromic MID most frequently associated with laminar cortical necrosis is the MELAS syndrome, but was also described in a single patient each with Leigh syndrome, mitochondrial depletion syndrome, and mitochondrial spinocerebellar ataxia. The morphological and pathohistological features of laminar cortical necrosis in MIDs were not at variance from those in non-mitochondrial disorders. In MIDs laminar cortical necrosis represents the histopathological and imaging endpoint of a stroke-like lesion. Though laminar cortical necrosis may have a wide pathophysiological background the histological and imaging characteristics do not vary between the different underlying conditions.

  13. Delaying obsolescence.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Rob

    2015-04-01

    This paper argues that those who emphasise that designers and engineers need to plan for obsolescence are too conservative. Rather, in addition to planning for obsolescence, designers and engineers should also think carefully about what they could do in order delay obsolescence. They should so this by thinking about the design itself, thinking of ways in which products could be useful and appealing for longer before becoming obsolete, as well thinking about the wider context in terms of the marketing of products, and also the social and legal. The paper also considers objections that these suggestions are unrealistically idealistic, failing to recognise the economic realities. I respond to these objections appealing to research in advertising, psychology, cognitive linguistics, philosophy, history, and economics, as well as drawing on the Statement of Ethical Principles developed by the Royal Academy of Engineering and the Engineering Council.

  14. [Bilateral papillary necrosis during indinavir treatment].

    PubMed

    Iba-Ba, Josaphat; Yombi, Jean Cyr; Danse, Etienne; Van Beers, Benoît; Vandercam, Bernard

    2008-06-01

    Papillary necrosis results from ischemia of the renal medulla and papillae, induced by a variety of mechanisms. Papillary necrosis is a rare adverse effect of continuous protease-inhibitor therapy with indinavir. We describe the case of a patient who developed bilateral papillary necrosis. It was reversible after treatment interruption and increased hydration. This case shows the need to monitor kidney markers in patients under continuous treatment with indinavir.

  15. Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus: Chapter 2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leong, Jo-Ann; Kurath, Gael

    2017-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a Rhabdovirus that causes significant disease in Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and rainbow and steelhead trout (O. mykiss). IHNV causes necrosis of the haematopoietic tissues, and consequently it was named infectious haematopoietic necrosis. This virus is waterborne and may transmit horizontally and vertically through virus associated with seminal and ovarian fluids. The clinical signs of disease and diagnosis; pathology; pathophysiology; and control strategies against IHNV are discussed.

  16. The Delayed Effects of Acute Radiation Syndrome: Evidence of Long-Term Functional Changes in the Clonogenic Cells of the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Booth, Catherine; Tudor, Gregory L; Katz, Barry P; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Long term or residual damage post-irradiation has been described for many tissues. In hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), this is only revealed when the HSC are stressed and required to regenerate and repopulate a myeloablated host. Such an assay cannot be used to assess the recovery potential of previously irradiated intestinal stem cells (ISC) due to their incompatibility with transplantation. The best approximation to the HSC assay is the crypt microcolony assay, also based on clonogen survival. In the current study, the regenerative capacity of intestinal clonogenic cells in mice that had survived 13 Gy irradiation (with 5% bone marrow shielding to allow survival through the hematopoietic syndrome) and were then aged for 200 d was compared to previously unirradiated age-matched controls. Interestingly, at 200 d following 13 Gy, there remained a statistically significant reduction in crypts present in the various small intestinal regions (illustrating that the gastrointestinal epithelium had not fully recovered despite the 200-d interval). However, upon re-irradiation on day 196, those mice previously irradiated had improved crypt survival and regeneration compared to the age-matched controls. This was evident in all regions of the small intestine following 11-13 Gy re-exposure. Thus, there were either more clonogens per crypt within those previously irradiated and/or those that were present were more radioresistant (possibly because a subpopulation was more quiescent). This is contrary to the popular belief that previously irradiated animals may have an impaired/delayed regenerative response and be more radiosensitive.

  17. Cerebral necrosis after 25Gy radiotherapy in childhood followed 28 years later by 54Gy radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Koot, Radboud W; Stalpers, Lukas J A; Aronica, Eleonora; Andries Bosch, D

    2007-09-01

    The development of brain necrosis is life-long risk of repeat radiation therapy, even after a long time interval and a moderate radiation dose. We report on a 34-year-old patient who had prophylactic cranial irradiation with 25Gy and adjuvant chemotherapy in childhood for leukaemia and in adulthood, 28 years later, therapeutic radiotherapy with 54Gy for an atypical (WHO grade II) meningioma. About 2 years later he developed a contrast-enhancing lesion on MRI-scan that was indicative of a tumor according to a thallium-201 ((201)Tl) SPECT scan. Histopathology of the operated contrast-enhancing lesion showed extensive radionecrosis. Radiation necrosis is a small but serious risk after repeat radiation therapy, even after a very long-term interval, the delivery of small fractions and an average cumulative total dose. Patients undergoing repeat radiotherapy therefore need to be followed life-long for potential late radiation toxicity.

  18. Phosphorus Necrosis of the Jaw: A Present-day Study

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, J. P. W.; Baron, R.; Buckland, D. H.; Cooke, M. A.; Craig, J. D.; Duffield, D. P.; Grosart, A. W.; Parkes, P. W. J.; Porter, A.

    1962-01-01

    A historical note on the aetiology of phossy jaw shows that present-day knowledge is little greater than it was a century ago. The varied clinical course of the disease is described together with a report of 10 classical cases not previously reported. Six cases, not amounting to true necrosis but in which healing after dental extraction was delayed, and described, and mention is made of the noticeable differences in the oral state and appearances of tartar of healthy workmen exposed to phosphorus compared with healthy workmen not exposed. But no systematic differences of any kind were found in the incidence of general infections, fractures of bones, haematological findings, and biochemical studies of blood and urine in two groups of healthy men most exposed and least exposed to phosphorous in the same factory. An intensive study in hospital of a case of classical necrosis showed no departure from normal, except delayed healing following bone biopsy from the iliac crest, and a reversed polymorphonuclear/lymphocyte ratio. In the discussion the time of onset of necrosis after first exposure to phosphorus, clinical and radiological diagnosis, the organisms present, personal susceptibility, the appearance of the sequestra, and regeneration of bone are considered. An up-to-date note on prevention of the disease is given, although this has met with only partial success. Some persons are highly susceptible and, whilst complete protection is impossible in the light of our present knowledge, early diagnosis and modern treatment have robbed the disease of its terrible manifestations of Victorian times and turned it into a minor, although often uncomfortable complaint, with little or no resulting disability. Images PMID:14449812

  19. SPY Elite's Ability to Predict Nipple Necrosis in Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy and Immediate Tissue Expander Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Venturi, Mark L; Mesbahi, Ali N; Copeland-Halperin, Libby R; Suh, Victoria Y; Yemc, Louisa

    2017-05-01

    Nipple-sparing techniques have improved the aesthetics of reconstruction following mastectomy, but nipple necrosis complicates up to 37% of procedures, distressing patients, delaying adjuvant therapy, and compromising outcomes. No method reliably detects nipple necrosis better than clinical assessment of tissue perfusion. We prospectively assessed the accuracy of intraoperative indocyanine green laser angiography to predict nipple necrosis. Twenty consecutive women undergoing immediate tissue expander breast reconstruction following 32 nipple-sparing mastectomies underwent indocyanine green fluorescence imaging to assess nipple perfusion immediately before and after intraoperative tissue expansion. Imaging findings were correlated with postoperative nipple viability. Among the 32 nipple-sparing mastectomies (8 unilateral, 12 bilateral) in 20 women (mean age, 48 years), partial or full-thickness necrotic changes developed in 3 breasts of 2 patients (10%). Imaging identified impaired perfusion and predicted necrosis in these cases. In this initial series, intraoperative indocyanine green laser angiography correctly identified patients who developed nipple necrosis during mastectomy and tissue expander breast reconstruction.

  20. Hamlet's delay.

    PubMed

    Dendy, E B

    2001-01-01

    This paper raises a question about Freud's understanding of Hamlet and offers a fresh psychoanalytic perspective on the play, emphasizing the psychological use made of Hamlet by the audience. It suggests Hamlet and Claudius both serve as sacrificial objects, scapegoats, for the audience, embodying, through a mechanism of both identification and disidentification, the fulfillment, punishment, and renunciation of the audience's forbidden (i.e. Oedipal) wishes. The play is thus seen to represent unconsciously a rite of sacrifice in which both Claudius and Hamlet, both the father and the son, are led, albeit circuitously, to the slaughter. The need for delay on the part of Hamlet is thus seen to arise not merely from Hamlet's psychology, whatever the audience may project onto it, but ultimately from the function (both sadistic and defensive) that the sacrificial spectacle, the play as a whole, serves for the audience. The paper also speculates somewhat on the role of tragic heroes and heroines in general, and points to the unconscious collusion that permits author and audience to make use of them. Finally, in an addendum, the paper discusses the work of René Girard, a nonpsychoanalytic thinker whose ideas nonetheless are somewhat similar to those presented here.

  1. Thermal inactivation of infectious hematopoietic necrosis and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gosting, L.; Gould, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A plaque assay was used to follow the inactivation kinetics of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in cell culture media at various temperatures. Inactivation of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in a visceral organ slurry was compared with that in culture media.

  2. Back to the roots of regulated necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, our knowledge of how cells die by regulated pathways of necrosis has increased tremendously. In this issue, Distéfano et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201605110) provide yet another milestone in our understanding of regulated necrosis as they identify a ferroptosis-like cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:28108525

  3. Renal papillary necrosis: an update.

    PubMed

    Eknoyan, G; Qunibi, W Y; Grissom, R T; Tuma, S N; Ayus, J C

    1982-03-01

    The clinical and diagnostic features of renal papillary necrosis (RPN) of 27 patients were studied. Diabetes mellitus was the most frequent (56%) condition associated with RPN. Analgesic abuse, sickle hemoglobinopathy and urinary tract obstruction were present in 4 patients each; in 6 of these 12 patients these conditions were present as a coexistent disease with diabetes mellitus. There was evidence of an acute or chronic infection of the urinary tract in 18 patients, as a coexistent condition with another underlying disease that itself can cause RPN in 14 patients and as the only cause of RPN in another 4. Thus, the presence of more than one diagnostic condition which might be implicated in the causation of RPN was present in 15 patients or 55% of the cases in this series. When infection was excluded, six patients or 22% of the cases had two coexisting diseases, each of which has been implicated as a cause of RPN. This observation underlines the multifactorial nature of this entity and might explain why RPN is not encountered more frequently in each of the various primary diseases with which it has been associated. The average age of the patients at the time of diagnosis was 53 years for women and 56 years for men. Only six of the patients were younger than 40 years, and three of these had sickle hemoglobinopathy. The diagnosis of RPN was based on x-ray findings in eight patients, on the histologic examination of papillary tissue in urine in one, and on autopsy findings in the rest. Papillary necrosis was bilateral in three-fourths of the cases. The clinical picture varied. Most of the patients (67%) presented with chills and fever. Flank pain and dysuria were present in 11 patients (41%). As a rule oliguria was rare and progressive uremia was uncommon. In cases diagnosed at post-mortem, the patients had succumbed to infection or to a primary severe extrarenal disorder with the possibility of RPN having been entertained clinically in only half these cases prior

  4. UAVs and Control Delays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Transport Delay itI tl2 s2+(tl +t2tI2)s+ 1 Delay Figure 17 A Matlab Simulink model used to compare a simple delayed system , in this case an integrator...23 3 Control of tim e-delay system s...discuss the various sources of delays, leading to an assessment of typical delays to be expected in a few example systems . Sources of delay that will

  5. Effect of combined radiation injury on cell death and inflammation in skin.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Sachin S; Meeks, Christopher J; Mordwinkin, Nicholas M; Espinoza, Theresa B; Louie, Stan G; diZerega, Gere S; Rodgers, Kathleen E

    2015-07-01

    In the event of a nuclear disaster, the individuals proximal to the source of radiation will be exposed to combined radiation injury. As irradiation delays cutaneous repair, the purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of combined radiation and burn injury (CRBI) on apoptosis and inflammation at the site of skin injury. Male C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to no injury, thermal injury only, radiation only (1 and 6 Gy) and CRBI (1 and 6 Gy) and euthanized at various times after for skin collection. TUNEL staining revealed that the CRBI 6 Gy group had a delayed and increased apoptotic response. This correlated with decreased recovery of live cells as compared to the other injuries. Similar response was observed when cleaved-caspase-3 immunohistochemical staining was compared between CRBI 6 Gy and thermal injury. TNFR1, caspase 8, Bax and IL-6 mRNA expression revealed that the higher CRBI group had delayed increase in mRNA expression as compared to thermal injury alone. RIPK1 mRNA expression and necrotic cell counts were delayed in the CRBI 6 Gy group to day 5. TNF-α and NFκB expression peaked in the CRBI 6 Gy group at day 1 and was much higher than the other injuries. Also, inflammatory cell counts in the CRBI 6 Gy group were lower at early time points as compared to thermal injury by itself. These data suggest that CRBI delays and exacerbates apoptosis and inflammation in skin as well as increases necrosis thus resulting in delayed wound healing.

  6. The surgically delayed unipedicled TRAM flap for breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hudson, D A

    1996-03-01

    Surgical delay is one method of enhancing the vascularity of the lower abdominal transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap. The outcome of 7 patients who underwent surgical delay (by ligating both superficial and deep inferior epigastric vessels bilaterally) a week prior to definitive TRAM flap elevation is described. Three patients were smokers, 3 were obese, and 1 was an asthmatic on medication. A satisfactory aesthetic result was achieved in all patients and the complications that occurred were minor. Two patients developed minor skin necrosis due to inadequate trimming of zone 4 on the contralateral side to the pedicle and there were 3 cases of fat necrosis, which occurred below Scarpa's fascia. Surgical delay is a useful technique of breast reconstruction. It allows the flap to be centered safely in the lower abdomen. In the high-risk patient, delay may prevent the need for microsurgery or the sacrifice of both recti.

  7. Time delay and distance measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B. (Inventor); Sun, Xiaoli (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for measuring time delay and distance may include providing an electromagnetic radiation carrier frequency and modulating one or more of amplitude, phase, frequency, polarization, and pointing angle of the carrier frequency with a return to zero (RZ) pseudo random noise (PN) code. The RZ PN code may have a constant bit period and a pulse duration that is less than the bit period. A receiver may detect the electromagnetic radiation and calculate the scattering profile versus time (or range) by computing a cross correlation function between the recorded received signal and a three-state RZ PN code kernel in the receiver. The method also may be used for pulse delay time (i.e., PPM) communications.

  8. Delayed childbearing.

    PubMed

    Francis, H H

    1985-06-01

    In many Western nations, including England and Wales, Sweden, and the US, there is a current trend towards delayed childbearing because of women's pursuit of a career, later marriage, a longer interval between marriage and the 1st birth, and the increasing number of divorcees having children in a 2nd marriage. Wives of men in social classes I and II in England and Wales are, on average, having their 1st child at 27.9 years, 1.6 years later than in 1973, and in social classes IV and V, 1.0 years later than in 1973, at a mean age of 23.7 years. Consequently, the total period fertility rate for British women aged 30-34 years, 35-39 years, and 40 and over increased by 4%, 2%, and 4%, respectively, between 1982-83, in contrast to reductions of 2% and 3%, respectively, in the 15-19 year and 20-24 year age groups, with the 25-29-year-olds remaining static. The average maternal mortality for all parties in England and Wales during 1976-78 was 106/million for adolescents, 70.4/million for 20-24 year-olds, and 1162/million for those aged 40 years and older. The specific obstetric and allied conditions which increase with age are the hypertensive diseases of pregnancy, hemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, abortion, cardiac disease, caesarean section, ruptured uterus, and amniotic fluid embolism. The Swedish Medical Birth Registry of all live births and perinatal deaths since 1973 has shown that the risk of late fetal death is significantly greater in women aged 30-39 years than in those of the same parity and gravidity aged 20-24 years. The risk of giving birth to low birth weight babies preterm and at term and of premature labor are similarly increased. The early neonatal death rate also was increased for primigravidas and nulliparas in the 30-39 year age group but not in parous women. This is, in part, due to the rise in incidence of fetal abnormalities with advancing maternal age because of chromosomal and nonchromosomal anomalies. These also appear to be the cause of the

  9. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-12-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved.

  10. Post-pancreatitis Fat Necrosis Mimicking Carcinomatosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua P; Arnoletti, J Pablo; Varadarajulu, Shyam; Morgan, Desiree E

    2008-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis can result in retroperitoneal fat necrosis, typically occurring in the peripancreatic region, with extension into the transverse mesocolon, omentum and mesenteric root. When evaluated with contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT), acute peripancreatic post necrotic collections typically become lower in attenuation over time, and often appear as homogeneous fluid collections. Saponification as a complication of fat necrosis in patients with acute pancreatitis is a well recognized clinical entity. While retroperitonal fat necrosis is commonly seen on CECT, saponification is not a prominent imaging feature. We present a case of acute pancreatitis complicated by extensive saponification of fat throughout the retroperitoneum and peritoneal lining, mimicking carcinomatosis.

  11. Experimental Papillary Necrosis of the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Solez, K.; Miller, M.; Quarles, P. A.; Finer, P. M.; Heptinstall, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    To test the thesis that vasoconstriction plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of papillary necrosis caused by bromoethylamine hydrobromide (BEA), medullary plasma flow was determined in rats treated with BEA. Medullary blood flow was normal ½ to 1 hour after BEA treatment, and was actually elevated 6 hours after BEA. There was no increase in plasma levels of prostaglandins A and E, which would have been expected if there had been medullary ischemia. Pretreatment with reserpine, which inhibited the development of papillary necrosis, had little effect on medullary plasma flow. These observations do not support the notion that vasoconstriction is the mechanism by which BEA causes papillary necrosis. PMID:4472110

  12. Combination of Anti-IGF-1R Antibody A12 and Ionizing Radiation in Upper Respiratory Tract Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Riesterer, Oliver; Yang Qiuan; Raju, Uma; Torres, Mylin; Molkentine, David; Patel, Nalini; Valdecanas, David; Milas, Luka; Ang, K. Kian

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The IGF1/IGF-1R signaling pathway has emerged as a potential determinant of radiation resistance in human cancer cell lines. Therefore we investigated the potency of monoclonal anti-IGF-1R antibody, A12, to enhance radiation response in upper respiratory tract cancers. Methods and Materials: Cell lines were assessed for IGF-1R expression and IGF1-dependent response to A12 or radiation using viability and clonogenic cancer cell survival assays. In vivo response of tumor xenografts to 10 or 20 Gy and A12 (0.25-2 mg x 3) was assessed using growth delay assays. Combined treatment effects were also analyzed by immunohistochemical assays for tumor cell proliferation, apoptosis, necrosis, and vascular endothelial growth factor expression at Days 1 and 6 after start of treatment. Results: A12 enhanced the radiosensitivity of HN5 and FaDu head-and-neck carcinomas in vitro (p < 0.05) and amplified the radioresponse of FaDu xenografts in a dose-dependent manner, with enhancement factors ranging from 1.2 to 1.8 (p < 0.01). Immunohistochemical analysis of FaDu xenografts demonstrated that A12 inhibited tumor cell proliferation (p < 0.05) and vascular endothelial growth factor expression. When A12 was combined with radiation, this resulted in apoptosis induction that persisted until 6 days from the start of treatment and in increased necrosis at Day 1 (p < 0.01, respectively). Combined treatment with A12 and radiation resulted in additive or subadditive growth delay in H460 or A549 xenografts, respectively. Conclusions: The results of this study strengthen the evidence for investigating how anti-IGF-1R strategies can be integrated into radiation and radiation-cetuximab regimen in the treatment of cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract cancers.

  13. Cortical necrosis in a renal transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Blumhardt, R.; Growcock, G.; Lasher, J.C.

    1983-07-01

    The /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA renogram is a well extabished noninvasive method for evaluating and following transplanted kidneys. The examination is useful in distinguishing rejection from acute tubular necrosis as well as demonstrating several less common complications such as vascular occlusion, urinary extravasation, obstruction, and lymphocele. A previously unreported condition involving a transplant kidney (i.e., renal cortical necrosis) is described which was diagnosed with renal scintigraphy in combination with sonography.

  14. Back to the roots of regulated necrosis.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Vladimir; Linkermann, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, our knowledge of how cells die by regulated pathways of necrosis has increased tremendously. In this issue, Distéfano et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201605110) provide yet another milestone in our understanding of regulated necrosis as they identify a ferroptosis-like cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana. © 2017 Todorov and Linkermann.

  15. Intracellular serpins, firewalls and tissue necrosis.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Stefan J; Lomas, David A

    2008-02-01

    Luke and colleagues have recently attributed a new role to a member of the serpin superfamily of serine proteinase inhibitors. They have used Caenorhabditis elegans to show that an intracellular serpin is crucial for maintaining lysosomal integrity. We examine the role of this firewall in preventing necrosis and attempt to integrate this with current theories of stress-induced protein degradation. We discuss how mutant serpins cause disease either through polymerization or now, perhaps, by unleashing necrosis.

  16. [The effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha on hepatic necrosis in viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Si, C; Lang, Z

    1996-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) on hepatocyte necrosis in viral hepatitis, TNF alpha with or without D-galactosamine (D-Gal) was injected into the abdominal cavity of rats. No effect was observed after injection of TNF alpha alone. After injection of TNF alpha with D-Gal, the total bilirubin level in rat blood increased and hepatocyte necrosis appeared (P < 0.05). Moreover, anti-TNF alpha McAb blocked the effect of hepatocyte necrosis produced by D-Gal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). 130 samples of hepatic tissue were stained with anti-TNF alpha McAb by using ABC immunohistochemistry method. It was found that more severe the hepatocyte necrosis, more the positive cells expressing TNF alpha. There were more TNF alpha positive cells in the tissue of severe hepatitis. These results suggested that TNF alpha is a mediator in hepatocyte necrosis.

  17. Cocktail therapy for hip necrosis in SARS patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, To; Wang, Ching-Jen; Hsu, Shan-Lin; Chou, Wen-Yi; Lin, Po-Chun; Huang, Chung-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    There are no treatment guidelines for hip necrosis in severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) patients. A new regimen of cocktail therapy that consists of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) and oral alendronate was utilized in four patients with eight hips. This study evaluated the outcomes of cocktail therapy with a 4-year followup. There were 3 women and 1 man with an average age of 26 +/- 3.8 years. Each hip was treated with 6000 impulses of ESWT at 0.62 mJ/mm2 energy flux density in a single session. Each patient received HBO treatment for 100 sessions and oral alendronate for one year. The evaluations included pain score and Harris hip score, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the affected hips. At the 4-year follow-up, significant improvements in pain score and Harris hip score were observed in all cases (p < 0.001). All patients returned to work as healthcare providers. None required surgical intervention including hip replacement. MRI showed a trend of reduction in bone marrow edema and the size of the lesion, but no changes in the stage of the lesion. Cocktail therapy seems promising in delaying the disease progression of SARS-associated femoral head necrosis in the short-term.

  18. Long-Term Impact of Radiation on the Stem Cell and Oligodendrocyte Precursors in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotakos, Georgia; Alshamy, George; Chan, Bill; Abrams, Rory; Greenberg, Edward; Saxena, Amit; Bradbury, Michelle; Edgar, Mark; Gutin, Philip; Tabar, Viviane

    2007-01-01

    Background The cellular basis of long term radiation damage in the brain is not fully understood. Methods and Findings We administered a dose of 25Gy to adult rat brains while shielding the olfactory bulbs. Quantitative analyses were serially performed on different brain regions over 15 months. Our data reveal an immediate and permanent suppression of SVZ proliferation and neurogenesis. The olfactory bulb demonstrates a transient but remarkable SVZ-independent ability for compensation and maintenance of the calretinin interneuron population. The oligodendrocyte compartment exhibits a complex pattern of limited proliferation of NG2 progenitors but steady loss of the oligodendroglial antigen O4. As of nine months post radiation, diffuse demyelination starts in all irradiated brains. Counts of capillary segments and length demonstrate significant loss one day post radiation but swift and persistent recovery of the vasculature up to 15 months post XRT. MRI imaging confirms loss of volume of the corpus callosum and early signs of demyelination at 12 months. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrates progressive degradation of myelin sheaths with axonal preservation. Areas of focal necrosis appear beyond 15 months and are preceded by widespread demyelination. Human white matter specimens obtained post-radiation confirm early loss of oligodendrocyte progenitors and delayed onset of myelin sheath fragmentation with preserved capillaries. Conclusions This study demonstrates that long term radiation injury is associated with irreversible damage to the neural stem cell compartment in the rodent SVZ and loss of oligodendrocyte precursor cells in both rodent and human brain. Delayed onset demyelination precedes focal necrosis and is likely due to the loss of oligodendrocyte precursors and the inability of the stem cell compartment to compensate for this loss. PMID:17622341

  19. Renal Papillary Necrosis: Role of Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Vaidehi K.

    2016-01-01

    Renal Papillary Necrosis (RPN) is idefined as Ischemic necrobiosis of the papilla in the medulla of the kidneys. Variety of etiological factors are recognized which cause papillary necrosis, such as analgesic nephropathy, diabetes mellitus, urinary obstruction and sickle cell haemoglobinopathy. The early diagnosis of RPN is important to improve prognosis and reduce morbidity. Radiological Imaging offers early diagnosis and can guide prompt treatment of papillary necrosis and can minimize a decline in renal function. Here we report three cases of RPN with typical imaging findings. One of them was diabetic and hypertensive female with recurrent Urinary tract Infections and other was a male with no known co-morbidity. Both of them were diagnosed to have renal papillary necrosis on CT scan and were managed operatively and conservatively, respectively. Third case was a healthy female being investigated to be renal donor for her son. Here RPN was an incidental finding and was treated conservatively. Thus CT scan could detect it pre-operatively and complications due to transplantation of a kidney with papillary necrosis were avoided. So, we want to emphasize the importance of Radiology, particularly CT scanning in detection of RPN and to guide early and prompt treatment. PMID:26894147

  20. Acute Biological Effects of Simulating the Whole-Body Radiation Dose Distribution from a Solar Particle Event Using a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jolaine M.; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Yee, Stephanie S.; Seykora, John T.; Maks, Casey; Ware, Jeffrey H.; Litt, Harold I.; Reetz, Jennifer A.; McDonough, James; Weissman, Drew; Kennedy, Ann R.; Cengel, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    In a solar particle event (SPE), an unshielded astronaut would receive proton radiation with an energy profile that produces a highly inhomogeneous dose distribution (skin receiving a greater dose than internal organs). The novel concept of using megavoltage electron-beam radiation to more accurately reproduce both the total dose and the dose distribution of SPE protons and make meaningful RBE comparisons between protons and conventional radiation has been described previously. Here, Yucatan minipigs were used to determine the effects of a superficial, SPE-like proton dose distribution using megavoltage electrons. In these experiments, dose-dependent increases in skin pigmentation, ulceration, keratinocyte necrosis and pigment incontinence were observed. Five of 18 animals (one each exposed to 7.5 Gy and 12.5 Gy radiation and three exposed to 25 Gy radiation) developed symptomatic, radiation-associated pneumonopathy approximately 90 days postirradiation. The three animals from the highest dose group showed evidence of mycoplasmal pneumonia along with radiation pneumonitis. Moreover, delayed-type hypersensitivity was found to be altered, suggesting that superficial irradiation of the skin with ionizing radiation might cause immune dysfunction or dysregulation. In conclusion, using total doses, patterns of dose distribution, and dose rates that are compatible with potential astronaut exposure to SPE radiation, animals experienced significant toxicities that were qualitatively different from toxicities previously reported in pigs for homogeneously delivered radiation at similar doses. PMID:21859326

  1. Acute biological effects of simulating the whole-body radiation dose distribution from a solar particle event using a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jolaine M; Sanzari, Jenine K; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Yee, Stephanie S; Seykora, John T; Maks, Casey; Ware, Jeffrey H; Litt, Harold I; Reetz, Jennifer A; McDonough, James; Weissman, Drew; Kennedy, Ann R; Cengel, Keith A

    2011-11-01

    In a solar particle event (SPE), an unshielded astronaut would receive proton radiation with an energy profile that produces a highly inhomogeneous dose distribution (skin receiving a greater dose than internal organs). The novel concept of using megavoltage electron-beam radiation to more accurately reproduce both the total dose and the dose distribution of SPE protons and make meaningful RBE comparisons between protons and conventional radiation has been described previously. Here, Yucatan minipigs were used to determine the effects of a superficial, SPE-like proton dose distribution using megavoltage electrons. In these experiments, dose-dependent increases in skin pigmentation, ulceration, keratinocyte necrosis and pigment incontinence were observed. Five of 18 animals (one each exposed to 7.5 Gy and 12.5 Gy radiation and three exposed to 25 Gy radiation) developed symptomatic, radiation-associated pneumonopathy approximately 90 days postirradiation. The three animals from the highest dose group showed evidence of mycoplasmal pneumonia along with radiation pneumonitis. Moreover, delayed-type hypersensitivity was found to be altered, suggesting that superficial irradiation of the skin with ionizing radiation might cause immune dysfunction or dysregulation. In conclusion, using total doses, patterns of dose distribution, and dose rates that are compatible with potential astronaut exposure to SPE radiation, animals experienced significant toxicities that were qualitatively different from toxicities previously reported in pigs for homogeneously delivered radiation at similar doses.

  2. Radiation proteomics: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Leszczynski, Dariusz

    2014-03-01

    Acute biological effects caused by the exposure to high doses of radiation, either ionizing or nonionizing, are relatively well-known but the delayed effects, occurring decades after exposure, are difficult to predict. The knowledge of the acute and delayed effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation (e.g. bystander effect) or nonionizing radiation (e.g. radiation emitted by wireless communication devices) is not yet reliably established. Often the acute effects of low doses are small and difficult to discover and replicate in scientific studies. Chronic effects of prolonged exposures to low-dose radiation for decades are virtually unknown and often not possible to predict on the basis of the knowledge gained from acute exposures to high doses of radiation. Physiological significance of the biological effects induced by low doses of radiation is not known. The same lack of predictability of outcomes applies to the delayed effects of high-dose radiation exposures. Proteomics, supplemented with other "omics" techniques, might be the best way forward to find out the target molecules of radiation, the biomarkers of radiation exposure and the physiological and health significance of the acute and delayed biological effects caused by the exposures to high- and low-dose radiation. However, the currently available database of radiation effects on proteomes is far too small to be useful in formulation of new hypotheses concerning health consequences of radiation exposures.

  3. [Eyelid necrosis caused by an hymenopteran insect bite].

    PubMed

    Offret, H; Porras, J; Labetoulle, M; Offret, O; Fabre, M

    2008-11-01

    We report a case report of extensive eyelid necrosis caused by an insect bite. A 39-year-old man had suffered ocular trauma from a hymenopteran insect in Tunisia. The patient presented with eyelid necrosis. Eyelid necrosis mechanisms following insect bites are discussed and other causes of eyelid necrosis are presented. Eyelid necrosis, often caused by vasoconstrictive medications or animal venoms, notably hymenopteran insect bites, can result in substantial eyelid injury.

  4. Aloe emodin inhibits the cytotoxic action of tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed

    Harhaji, Ljubica; Mijatovic, Sanja; Maksimovic-Ivanic, Danijela; Popadic, Dusan; Isakovic, Aleksandra; Todorovic-Markovic, Biljana; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2007-07-30

    We demonstrate the capacity of an herbal anthraquinone aloe emodin to reduce the cytotoxicity of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) towards L929 mouse fibrosarcoma and U251 human glioma cell lines. Aloe emodin inhibited both TNF-induced cell necrosis and apoptosis, but it did not reduce cell death induced by UV radiation or hydrogen peroxide. Aloe emodin inhibited both basal and TNF-triggered activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and a selective blockade of ERK activation mimicked the cytoprotective action of the drug. On the other hand, aloe emodin did not affect TNF-induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or generation of reactive oxygen species. The combination of aloe emodin and TNF caused an intracellular appearance of acidified autophagic vesicles, and the inhibition of autophagy with bafilomycin or 3-methyladenine efficiently blocked the cytoprotective action of aloe emodin. These data indicate that aloe emodin could prevent TNF-triggered cell death through mechanisms involving induction of autophagy and blockade of ERK activation.

  5. Differentiation of recurrent spinal ependymoma from postradiation treatment necrosis through multiparametric PET-MR and perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Hojjati, Mojgan; Garg, Vasant; Badve, Chaitra A; Abboud, Salim E; Sloan, Andrew E; Wolansky, Leo J

    A 67-year-old male presented with papilledema and back pain localized to the T10 level. Initial workup revealed multifocal spinal ependymoma which was resected and treated with external beam radiotherapy. Nine years after treatment, the patient had a relapse of back pain, and MRI was inconclusive in distinguishing posttreatment radiation necrosis from recurrent tumor. We present the first described report with the utilization of multiparametric positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging and perfusion MRI to distinguish recurrent spinal ependymoma from radiation necrosis.

  6. Radiation myelopathy in over-irradiated patients: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, E R; De Gregorio, M A; Mateo, P; Escó, R; Bascón, N; Morales, F; Bellosta, R; López, P; Gimeno, M; Roca, M; Villavieja, J L

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this work is to report the MRI findings in patients with radiation myelopathy due to accidental local over-irradiation syndrome. Eight patients (seven males and one female) were suffering from over-irradiation syndrome as a result of treatments from a malfunctioning linear electron accelerator. The mean accidental estimated dose was 136 Gy delivered to the "open-neck" (seven cases) and to the thoracic wall (one case), during a mean of 5.4 sessions (range 1-9 sessions). Paresthesia and weakness in the upper extremities were the earliest symptoms (87.5 %), with evolution to paralysis in all patients. No patient is alive (mean survival time 64 days). In all cases MRI was negative for neurologic lesions in the acute phase ( < 90 days from irradiation; Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system). Late signs of radiation myelitis manifested as high-intensity signals on T2-weighted images in three patients, and as Gd-DTPA enhancement of T1-weighted images in one case. Autopsies performed on four patients who died in acute phase showed morphologic alterations in white matter: edema in 75 %, and necrosis and glial reaction as well as obliterative vasculitis in all cases. In cases of over-irradiation, MRI may be normal in acute phase even if the patients have severe neurologic deficit, as positive MRI findings appear only in delayed radiation myelitis.

  7. Pharmacological doses of daily ascorbate protect tumors from radiation damage after a single dose of radiation in an intracranial mouse glioma model.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Carole; Fabre, Marie-Sophie; Collis, Sarah V; Castro, M Leticia; Field, Cameron S; Schleich, Nanette; McConnell, Melanie J; Herst, Patries M

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological ascorbate is currently used as an anti-cancer treatment, potentially in combination with radiation therapy, by integrative medicine practitioners. In the acidic, metal-rich tumor environment, ascorbate acts as a pro-oxidant, with a mode of action similar to that of ionizing radiation; both treatments kill cells predominantly by free radical-mediated DNA damage. The brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is very resistant to radiation; radiosensitizing GBM cells will improve survival of GBM patients. Here, we demonstrate that a single fraction (6 Gy) of radiation combined with a 1 h exposure to ascorbate (5 mM) sensitized murine glioma GL261 cells to radiation in survival and colony-forming assays in vitro. In addition, we report the effect of a single fraction (4.5 Gy) of whole brain radiation combined with daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (1 mg/kg) in an intracranial GL261 glioma mouse model. Tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: one group received a single dose of 4.5 Gy to the brain 8 days after tumor implantation, a second group received daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (day 8-45) after implantation, a third group received both treatments and a fourth control group received no treatment. While radiation delayed tumor progression, intraperitoneal ascorbate alone had no effect on tumor progression. Tumor progression was faster in tumor-bearing mice treated with radiation and daily ascorbate than in those treated with radiation alone. Histological analysis showed less necrosis in tumors treated with both radiation and ascorbate, consistent with a radio-protective effect of ascorbate in vivo. Discrepancies between our in vitro and in vivo results may be explained by differences in the tumor microenvironment, which determines whether ascorbate remains outside the cell, acting as a pro-oxidant, or whether it enters the cells and acts as an anti-oxidant.

  8. Delayed puberty in girls

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones. These changes normally begin to appear in girls between ages 8 to 14 years old. With delayed puberty, these changes either don't occur, or if they do, they don't progress normally. Delayed puberty is more common in boys than in girls. Causes In most cases of delayed puberty, growth ...

  9. Colonic ischemic necrosis following therapeutic embolization.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, S S; Satchidanand, S; Wesp, E H

    1981-01-01

    Transcatheter embolization of the middle colic artery for diverticular bleeding was followed by ischemic necrosis in the transverse colon at the site of previous anastomosis and stricture formation. This is a potential complication of intra-arterial embolization for colonic bleeding.

  10. [Acral necrosis as a complication of urosepsis].

    PubMed

    Blarer, J; Pfister, D; Jandali, A R; Gutzeit, A; John, H; Horstmann, M

    2014-06-01

    Sepsis is the third most common cause of death in Germany. Every fourth patient with sepsis has urosepsis. Even if substantial therapeutic progress has been made, sepsis remains a severe condition with high morbidity and mortality that requires rapid interdisciplinary measures. Besides life-threatening complications, acral necrosis as presented here can occur as a result of disseminated intravascular coagulation and severe microcirculatory disorders.

  11. Infectious pancreatic necrosis: its detection and identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, K.

    1965-01-01

    Ultimate control of infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) in hatcheries depends largely upon learning where the virus occurs. To detect the presence of virus either susceptible fish or susceptible fish cell cultures may be used as test systems. In modern virology, it is generally agreed that cell cultures are more convenient, are usually a much more sensitive test system, and allow more rapid determinations.

  12. Snapshot in surgery: intraperitoneal encapsulated fat necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Han Boon; Arab, Nahlah; Teo, Lynette; Lieske, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A 66-year-old man with rectal cancer was found to have an incidental ring-like lesion in the left rectovesical pouch. Histology revealed an encapsulated fat necrosis. Intraperitoneal encapsulated fat necroses are postulated to be a result of infarcted epiploic appendages resulting in a free-floating lesion. PMID:25767714

  13. Excitotoxins in neuronal apoptosis and necrosis.

    PubMed

    Nicotera, P; Lipton, S A

    1999-06-01

    Neuronal loss is common to many neurodegenerative diseases. Although necrosis is a common histopathologic feature observed in neuropathologic conditions, evidence is increasing that apoptosis can significantly contribute to neuronal demise. The prevalence of either type of cell death, apoptosis or necrosis, and the relevance for the progression of disease is still unclear. The debate on the occurrence and prevalence of one or the other type of death in pathologic conditions such as stroke or neurotoxic injury may in part be resolved by the proposal that different types of cell death within a tissue reflect either partial or complete execution of a common death program. Apoptosis is an active process of cell destruction, characterized morphologically by cell shrinkage, chromatin aggregation with extensive genomic fragmentation, and nuclear pyknosis. In contrast, necrosis is characterized by cell swelling, linked to rapid energy loss, and generalized disruption of ionic and internal homeostasis. This swiftly leads to membrane lysis, release of intracellular constituents that evoke a local inflammatory reaction, edema, and injury to the surrounding tissue. During the past few years, our laboratories have studied the signals and mechanisms responsible for induction or prevention of apoptosis/necrosis in neuronal injury and this is the subject of this review.

  14. Oligodendroglial degeneration in distemper: apoptosis or necrosis?

    PubMed

    Schobesberger, M; Zurbriggen, A; Summerfield, A; Vandevelde, M; Griot, C

    1999-03-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes a multifocal demyelinating disease in dogs. It was previously shown that the initial demyelinating lesions are directly virus induced since a correlation between the occurrence of demyelination and CDV replication in white matter cells was observed. During the course of infection oligodendrocytes undergo distinct morphological alterations, partly due to a restricted CDV infection of these cells, and eventually disappear from the lesions. This phenomenon has been described in vivo as well as in vitro. However, the reason for the morphological alterations and the following oligodendroglial depletion remained unclear. Since virus infection can induce cell death, it was investigated whether apoptosis or necrosis plays a role in the pathogenesis of demyelination in canine distemper. In brain tissue sections from dogs with acute distemper apoptotic cells were not detected within the demyelinating lesions using morphological and biochemical cell death criteria. In chronic distemper, apoptotic cells - presumably inflammatory cells - were seen within the perivascular cuffs. These in vivo findings were correlated to the in vitro situation using CDV-infected primary dog brain cell cultures as well as Vero cells. Infection with culture-adapted CDV lead to massive necrosis but not to apoptosis. After infection with virulent CDV neither apoptosis nor necrosis was a predominant feature in either culture system. These findings suggest that virus-induced demyelination in canine distemper is not the direct consequence of apoptosis or necrosis. It is speculated that another mechanism must be responsible for the observed morphological alterations of oligodendrocytes, ultimately leading to demyelination.

  15. Hepatic necrosis following halothane anesthesia in goats.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, T D; Raffe, M R; Cox, V S; Stevens, D L; O'Leary, T P

    1986-12-15

    One goat anesthetized with thiamylal sodium, xylazine, and halothane for repair of an abominal hernia, and 7 of 29 goats similarly anesthetized for an experiment unrelated to considerations of anesthesia, developed signs of hepatic failure within 24 hours of anesthesia. Affected goats had high values for serum aspartate transaminase and serum total bilirubin by 12 to 24 hours after induction of anesthesia. Necropsy of the 8 affected goats revealed centrilobular to massive hepatic necrosis (8 of 8), brain lesions consistent with hepatic encephalopathy (3 of 4), and acute renal tubular necrosis (6 of 6). Two unaffected goats had no hepatic necrosis. Causes of hepatic necrosis other than those related to anesthesia (eg, infectious agents, toxins) were ruled out by lack of supporting necropsy findings or were considered unlikely because of lack of opportunity for exposure. Hepatic lesions in these goats closely resembled those described in human beings with halothane-associated hepatic injury, although in both species these lesions are nonspecific at the gross and light microscopic levels. The pathogenesis of halothane-associated hepatic injury in goats, as in human beings, remains to be determined.

  16. A microstrip detector with delay line readout

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, A.F. , BP 220, 38043 Grenoble CNPq Riekel, C.; Wattecamps, P. , BP 220, 38043 Grenoble )

    1992-01-01

    Principal limitations of position sensitive gasfilled detectors for x-ray synchrotron radiation applications are the counting rate and the positional resolution. Improvements in both areas are expected with microstrip technology. First results of a linear position sensitive microstrip detector with delay line readout are shown, and the possibility to achieve two-dimensional localization is evaluated.

  17. Experimental hepatic necrosis: Studies on coagulation abnormalities, plasma clearance, and organ distribution of 125I-labelled fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Rake, M. O.; Flute, P. T.; Pannell, G.; Shilkin, K. B.; Williams, Roger

    1973-01-01

    Studies in the rat with hepatic necrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride showed that the abnormalities in one-stage coagulation tests and the increased catabolism of fibrinogen were similar to those found in man with acute viral or drug-induced hepatic necrosis. Determination of the distribution of the radioactive label shows that excessive deposition was maximal in the liver but also occurred in the spleen. The appearance is delayed by heparin but accelerated by tranexamic acid. ImagesFig 1Fig 2 PMID:4729927

  18. Postprimary Tuberculosis and Macrophage Necrosis: Is There a Big ConNECtion?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adult or postprimary tuberculosis (TB) accounts for most TB cases. Its hallmark is pulmonary cavitation, which occurs as a result of necrosis in the lung in individuals with tuberculous pneumonia. Postprimary TB has previously been known to be associated with vascular thrombosis and delayed-type hypersensitivity, but their roles in pulmonary cavitation are unclear. A necrosis-associated extracellular cluster (NEC) refers to a cluster of drug-tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis attached to lysed host materials and is proposed to contribute to granulomatous TB. Here we suggest that NECs, perhaps due to big size, produce a distinct host response leading to postprimary TB. We propose that vascular thrombosis and pneumonia arise from NEC and that these processes are promoted by inflammatory cytokines produced from cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity, such as interleukin-17 and gamma interferon, eventually triggering necrosis in the lung and causing cavitation. According to this view, targeting NEC represents a necessary strategy to control adult TB. PMID:26758178

  19. Neurotoxicity of human neural cells induced by space radiation: in vitro risk assessment and countermeasure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, P.; Vazquez, M.; Kim, A.

    As the duration of space missions increases the potential for neurological damage to astronauts resulting from exposure to radiation also increases To explore the cytotoxic effects of low and high LET radiation on cells of the central nervous system we utilized a model in vitro system consisting of a human neuronal progenitor cell line NT2 and its terminally differentiated derivative hNT neurons We found that exposure to numerous forms of ionizing radiation induced cell detachment necrosis and apoptosis in time dose and LET dependent manners From the slopes of the dose-response curves we calculated RBE values for each form of heavy ion radiation A sequential field of 1 GeV n protons and iron ions induced apoptosis to a greater extent than either ion alone and the time between hits was also an important determining factor In addition cycling neuronal progenitor cells underwent a dramatic G2 phase specific cell cycle delay within 6 hours following exposure to either low or high LET radiation The molecular effects of HZE radiation were also investigated with an emphasis on the cell stress response protein p53 Heavy ion radiation induced expression of p53 in a time and dose dependent manner in both neuronal progenitor and mature neuronal cells Furthermore several post-translational modifications to the p53 protein were detected 2 hours after exposure to gamma rays Experiments incorporating pifithrin- alpha a small molecule inhibitor of p53 suggest that induction of both apoptosis and the cell cycle delay in human NT2 cells is

  20. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  1. Delayed recombination and standard rulers

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Galli, Silvia; Silk, Joseph I.; Verde, Licia

    2009-02-15

    Measurements of baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) in galaxy surveys have been recognized as a powerful tool for constraining dark energy. However, this method relies on the knowledge of the size of the acoustic horizon at recombination derived from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. This estimate is typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme; additional radiation sources can delay recombination altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from CMB and BAO data. In this paper we quantify the effect of delayed recombination on the determination of dark energy parameters from future BAO surveys such as the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and the Wide-Field Multi-Object Spectrograph. We find the impact to be small but still not negligible. In particular, if recombination is nonstandard (to a level still allowed by CMB data), but this is ignored, future surveys may incorrectly suggest the presence of a redshift-dependent dark energy component. On the other hand, in the case of delayed recombination, adding to the analysis one extra parameter describing deviations from standard recombination does not significantly degrade the error bars on dark energy parameters and yields unbiased estimates. This is due to the CMB-BAO complementarity.

  2. Massive delayed vaginal hemorrhage after laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Holloran-Schwartz, M Brigid; Potter, Shannon J; Kao, Ming-Shian

    2012-01-01

    Background. A known complication of supracervical hysterectomy is cyclical bleeding from the retained cervix when functioning endometrial tissue is not totally removed. We present a rare case of delayed postoperative vaginal hemorrhage after supracervical hysterectomy. Case. A 44-year-old woman presented on postoperative day 15 after laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy with massive vaginal hemorrhage requiring emergent re-operation. Her bleeding was controlled with vaginally placed sutures. Ultrasound confirmed no intraperitoneal free fluid. The etiology was thought to be induced by postoperative tissue necrosis from cautery applied to the endocervical canal during the original surgery. Conclusion. Delayed vaginal hemorrhage from a retained cervix is a rare complication of laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy. Caution should be exercised when cauterizing the endocervical canal as induced tissue necrosis may increase the risk of postoperative bleeding.

  3. Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Repiso-Jiménez, J B; Márquez, J; Sotillo, I; García-Bravo, B; Camacho, F

    1999-05-01

    Subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn (SFN) is an uncommon disease that affects newborns who have suffered from tissue hypoxia during or following delivery. This disease appears during the first weeks of life. It consists of indurate, erythematous or purple-erythematous nodules and plaques in the skin. Histology of a biopsy specimen shows granulomatous necrosis in the subcutis with radial crystals in lipocytes and giant cells. Spontaneous resolution in a few weeks is usual, but the mobilization of calcium from the necrosed subcutis together with the action of some hormones may cause hypercalcemia and certain serious complications. A newborn female child developed SFN after dystocic delivery causing cerebral frontal lobe hemorrhage. The skin nodules resolved spontaneously in a few weeks and no complications were observed 1 year later.

  4. Imaging Manifestations of Mediastinal Fat Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Malay Y.; Martínez-Jiménez, Santiago; Rosado-de-Christenson, Melissa L.; Watson, Kenneth R.; Walker, Christopher M.; Kunin, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Mediastinal fat necrosis (MFN) or epipericardial fat necrosis, as it is commonly referred to in the literature, is a rare self-limiting cause of chest pain of unclear etiology. MFN affects previously healthy individuals who present with acute pleuritic chest pain. Characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings include a fat attenuation lesion with intrinsic and surrounding increased attenuation stranding. There is often associated thickening of the adjacent pericardium and/or pleural effusions. We present two cases of MFN manifesting as ovoid fat attenuation lesions demarcated by a soft tissue attenuation rim with intrinsic and surrounding soft tissue attenuation stranding and review the clinical and pathologic features of these lesions. Knowledge of the clinical presentation of patients with MFN and familiarity with the characteristic imaging findings of these lesions should allow radiologists to prospectively establish the correct diagnosis and suggest conservative management and follow-up. PMID:24369521

  5. Giant cell arteritis presenting as scalp necrosis.

    PubMed

    Maidana, Daniel E; Muñoz, Silvia; Acebes, Xènia; Llatjós, Roger; Jucglà, Anna; Alvarez, Alba

    2011-07-07

    The differential of scalp ulceration in older patients should include several causes, such as herpes zoster, irritant contact dermatitis, ulcerated skin tumors, postirradiation ulcers, microbial infections, pyoderma gangrenosum, and giant cell arteritis. Scalp necrosis associated with giant cell arteritis was first described in the 1940s. The presence of this dermatological sign within giant cell arteritis represents a severity marker of this disease, with a higher mean age at diagnosis, an elevated risk of vision loss and tongue gangrene, as well as overall higher mortality rates, in comparison to patients not presenting this manifestation. Even though scalp necrosis due to giant cell arteritis is exceptional, a high level of suspicion must be held for this clinical finding, in order to initiate prompt and proper treatment and avoid blindness.

  6. Photobiomodulation therapy: management of mucosal necrosis of the oropharynx in previously treated head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Joel B; Song, Paul Y; Ho, Allen S; Larian, Babak; Asher, Arash; Bensadoun, Rene-Jean

    2017-04-01

    Necrosis of the oral mucosa following head and neck cancer radiation therapy presents considerable clinical management challenges. We report three cases of symptomatic persisting oral ulcerations where the addition of photobiomodulation therapy resulted in a rapid resolution of the oral lesions and in patient symptoms. These cases suggest that photobiomodulation may represent an adjunct to care of these difficult to manage complications in oncology.

  7. CGI delay compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    Computer-generated graphics in real-time helicopter simulation produces objectionable scene-presentation time delays. In the flight simulation laboratory at Ames Research Center, it has been determined that these delays have an adverse influence on pilot performance during aggressive tasks such as nap-of-the-earth (NOE) maneuvers. Using contemporary equipment, computer-generated image (CGI) time delays are an unavoidable consequence of the operations required for scene generation. However, providing that magnitide distortions at higher frequencies are tolerable, delay compensation is possible over a restricted frequency range. This range, assumed to have an upper limit of perhaps 10 or 15 rad/sec, conforms approximately to the bandwidth associated with helicopter handling qualities research. A compensation algorithm is introduced here and evaluated in terms of tradeoffs in frequency responses. The algorithm has a discrete basis and accommodates both a large, constant transport delay interval and a periodic delay interval, as associated with asynchronous operations.

  8. Tissue necrosis following extravasation of acyclovir in an adolescent: A case report.

    PubMed

    Neocleous, Charalambos; Andonopoulou, Eleni; Adramerina, Alkistis; Pegkou, Antigoni; Savelieva, Olga; Georgiadou, Petroula; Drikos, Ioannis

    2017-05-01

    Extravasation of intravenously infused vesicant solutions is a common problem in medical practice, which can lead to severe and progressive tissue dysfunction, ranging from persistent tissue oedema and fibrosis to delayed tissue necrosis. Acyclovir is a known vesicant medication administrated in paediatric patients, which appears to irritate venous and soft tissue if extravasated. We present the first case involving the extravasation of intravenously infused acyclovir in a female adolescent patient, which caused tissue necrosis and left behind a residual scar lesion. Nursing and medical staff should be aware of the potential dermatological side effects of intravenously infused acyclovir and other medications, even a long time after infusion, and the possible lack of initial local symptoms and signs. Early recognition of extravasation and prompt management are critical in preventing further morbidity, and optimizing outcomes. Copyright © 2017 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  9. Environmentally Benign Pyrotechnic Delays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    jay.poret@us.army.mil † School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA ABSTRACT Pyrotechnic delays are used in...benign formulations are described. The delay time of the new system is easily tunable. These compositions will consistently function in aluminum ...tunable. These compositions will consistently function in aluminum housings which is generally difficult for delay compositions due to extreme thermal

  10. Peripheral fat necrosis after penetrating pancreatic trauma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Adams, D B

    1993-11-01

    Peripheral fat necrosis (PFN), a rare complication of pancreatitis, has been reported previously in association with blunt pancreatic trauma. A patient who developed peripheral fat necrosis after penetrating pancreatic trauma and needed bilateral above-the-knee amputations to treat complications of lower extremity fat necrosis is reported.

  11. RF radiation from lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation from lightning in the RF band from 3-300 MHz were monitored. Radiation in this frequency range is of interest as a potential vehicle for monitoring severe storms and for studying the lightning itself. Simultaneous measurements were made of RF radiation and fast and slow field changes. Continuous analogue recordings with a system having 300 kHz of bandwidth were made together with digital records of selected events (principally return strokes) at greater temporal resolution. The data reveal patterns in the RF radiation for the entire flash which are characteristic of flash type and independent of the frequency of observation. Individual events within the flash also have characteristic RF patterns. Strong radiation occurs during the first return strokes, but delayed about 20 micron sec with respect to the begining of the return stroke; whereas, RF radiation from subsequent return strokes tends to be associated with cloud processes preceding the flash with comparatively little radiation occurring during the return stroke itself.

  12. Delayed puberty and amenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Barbara; Bradshaw, Karen D

    2003-11-01

    The ability to diagnose and manage disorders that cause delayed puberty requires a thorough understanding of the physical and hormonal events of puberty. Wide variation exists within normal pubertal maturation, but most adolescent girls in the United States have begun to mature by the age of 13. Delayed puberty, a rare condition in girls, occurs in only approximately 2.5% of the population. Constitutional delay, genetic defects, or hypothalamic-pituitary disorders are common causes. Amenorrhea, often found as a symptom of delayed puberty, may be due to congenital genital tract anomalies, ovarian failure, or chronic anovulation with estrogen presence or with estrogen absence.

  13. Delayed Orgasm and Anorgasmia

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Lawrence C.; Mulhall, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Delayed orgasm/anorgasmia defined as the persistent or recurrent difficulty, delay in, or absence of attaining orgasm after sufficient sexual stimulation, which causes personal distress. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia are associated with significant sexual dissatisfaction. A focused medical history can shed light on the potential etiologies; which include: medications, penile sensation loss, endocrinopathies, penile hyperstimulation and psychological etiologies, amongst others. Unfortunately, there are no excellent pharmacotherapies for delayed orgasm/anorgasmia, and treatment revolves largely around addressing potential causative factors and psychotherapy. PMID:26439762

  14. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Lawrence C; Mulhall, John P

    2015-11-01

    Delayed orgasm/anorgasmia defined as the persistent or recurrent difficulty, delay in, or absence of attaining orgasm after sufficient sexual stimulation, which causes personal distress. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia are associated with significant sexual dissatisfaction. A focused medical history can shed light on the potential etiologies, which include medications, penile sensation loss, endocrinopathies, penile hyperstimulation, and psychological etiologies. Unfortunately, there are no excellent pharmacotherapies for delayed orgasm/anorgasmia, and treatment revolves largely around addressing potential causative factors and psychotherapy. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Delayed emergence after anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tzabazis, Alexander; Miller, Christopher; Dobrow, Marc F; Zheng, Karl; Brock-Utne, John G

    2015-06-01

    In most instances, delayed emergence from anesthesia is attributed to residual anesthetic or analgesic medications. However, delayed emergence can be secondary to unusual causes and present diagnostic dilemmas. Data from clinical studies is scarce and most available published material is comprised of case reports. In this review, we summarize and discuss less common and difficult to diagnose reasons for delayed emergence and present cases from our own experience or reference published case reports/case series. The goal is to draw attention to less common reasons for delayed emergence, identify patient populations that are potentially at risk and to help anesthesiologists identifying a possible cause why their patient is slow to wake up.

  16. VARIABLE TIME DELAY MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Clemensen, R.E.

    1959-11-01

    An electrically variable time delay line is described which may be readily controlled simuitaneously with variable impedance matching means coupied thereto such that reflections are prevented. Broadly, the delay line includes a signal winding about a magnetic core whose permeability is electrically variable. Inasmuch as the inductance of the line varies directly with the permeability, the time delay and characteristic impedance of the line both vary as the square root of the permeability. Consequently, impedance matching means may be varied similariy and simultaneously w:th the electrically variable permeability to match the line impedance over the entire range of time delay whereby reflections are prevented.

  17. Effects of Berberine Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guanghui; Zhang Yaping; Tang Jinliang; Chen Zhengtang; Hu Yide; Wei Hong; Li Dezhi; Hao Ping; Wang Donglin

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced intestinal injury is a significant clinical problem in patients undergoing abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Berberine has been used as an antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antimotility agent. The present study investigated the protective effect of berberine against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: The mice were administrated berberine or distilled water. A total of 144 mice underwent 0, 3, 6, 12, or 16 Gy single session whole-abdominal RT and 16 mice underwent 3 Gy/fraction/d for four fractions of fractionated abdominal RT. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-10, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, malonaldehyde, and apoptosis were assayed in the mice after RT. The body weight and food intake of the mice receiving fractionated RT were recorded. Another 72 mice who had undergone 12, 16, or 20 Gy abdominal RT were monitored for mortality every 12 h. Results: The body weight and food intake of the mice administered with distilled water decreased significantly compared with before RT. After the same dose of abdominal RT, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in plasma and malonalhehyde and apoptosis of the intestine were significantly greater in the control group than in the mice administered berberine (p < .05-.01). In contrast, interleukin-10 in the mice with berberine treatment was significantly greater than in the control group (p < .01). A similar result was found in the fractionated RT experiment and at different points after 16 Gy abdominal RT (p < .05-.01). Berberine treatment significantly delayed the point of death after 20 Gy, but not 16 Gy, abdominal RT (p < .01). Conclusion: Treatment with berberine can delay mortality and attenuated intestinal injury in mice undergoing whole abdominal RT. These findings could provide a useful therapeutic strategy for radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  18. A fifteen year experience with open drainage for infected pancreatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Bradley, E L

    1993-09-01

    Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiologic factors of acute pancreatitis, combined with several recent technologic breakthroughs, have led to the establishment of infected pancreatic necrosis as the most common, the most severe and the most lethal of the infectious complications of acute pancreatitis. In this report, a single institutional experience in the surgical management of infected pancreatic necrosis during a 15 year period is chronicled. Using open drainage with scheduled abdominal re-explorations, the overall mortality rate was 15 percent in 71 consecutive patients with infected pancreatic necrosis. In the most recent 25 instances, sequential re-explorations were performed until retroperitoneal granulation occurred, at which time the abdomen was closed over lesser sac lavage catheters. Compared with the original 46 patients permitted to heal entirely by secondary intention, patients undergoing delayed secondary closure and lavage had a significant decrease during the hospitalization period (48.8 versus 30.1 days; p < 0.05), without a significant change in the mortality rate. In the most recent patients, dynamic pancreatography and fine needle aspiration bacteriologic factors were accurate in the preoperative prediction of pancreatic necrosis and microbial infection in 95 and 97 percent of the patients, respectively. Preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography demonstrated leakage of contrast material from necrotic pancreatic ducts in seven of eight patients, while postoperative pancreatograms revealed abrupt truncation or other abnormalities in 11 of 13 patients. These observations establish that necrotizing pancreatitis involves pancreatic parenchyma as well as peripancreatic adipose tissue. Open drainage with contingent secondary closure and high volume lavage deserves a place in the management of patients with extensive infected pancreatic necrosis.

  19. Digital time delay

    DOEpatents

    Martin, A.D.

    1986-05-09

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay provides a first output signal at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits latch the high resolution data to form a first synchronizing data set. A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an internal which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD to generate a second set of synchronizing data which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data for presentation to logic circuits. The logic circuits further delay the internal output signal with the internal pulses. The final delayed output signal thereafter enables the output pulse generator to produce the desired output pulse at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse.

  20. Time Delay Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    investigate the possibility of exploiting the properties of a detected Low Probability of Intercept (LPI) signal waveform to estimate time delay, and by...ratios, namely 10 dB and less. We also examine the minimum time –delay estimate error – the Cramer–Rao bound. The results indicate that the method

  1. Until Death Do Us Part: Necrosis and Oxidation Promote the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Ramin; Kaltenmeier, Christof; Lotze, Michael T.; Bergmann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tumor proliferation is concomitant with autophagy, limited apoptosis, and resultant necrosis. Necrosis is associated with the release of damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs), which act as ‘danger signals’, recruiting inflammatory cells, inducing immune responses, and promoting wound healing. Most of the current treatment strategies for cancer (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy) promote DAMP release following therapy-induced tumor death by necroptosis and necrosis. Myeloid cells (monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and granulocytes), as well as mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) belong to the early immigrants in response to unscheduled cell death, initiating and modulating the subsequent inflammatory response. Responding to DAMPs, MSCs, and DCs promote an immunosuppressive milieu, while eosinophils induce oxidative conditions limiting the biologic activity of DAMPs over time and distance. Regulatory T cells are strongly affected by pattern recognition receptor signaling in the tumor microenvironment and limit immune reactivity coordinately with myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Means to ‘aerobically’ oxidize DAMPs provide a novel strategy for limiting tumor progression. The present article summarizes our current understanding of the impact of necrosis on the tumor microenvironment and the influence of oxidative conditions found within this setting. PMID:27226794

  2. Apoptosis and Necrosis in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Guicciardi, Maria Eugenia; Malhi, Harmeet; Mott, Justin L.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Because of its unique function and anatomical location, the liver is exposed to a multitude of toxins and xenobiotics, including medications and alcohol, as well as to infection by hepatotropic viruses, and therefore, is highly susceptible to tissue injury. Cell death in the liver occurs mainly by apoptosis or necrosis, with apoptosis also being the physiologic route to eliminate damaged or infected cells and to maintain tissue homeostasis. Liver cells, especially hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, are particularly susceptible to death receptor-mediated apoptosis, given the ubiquitous expression of the death receptors in the organ. In a quite unique way, death receptor-induced apoptosis in these cells is mediated by both mitochondrial and lysosomal permeabilization. Signaling between the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria promotes hepatocyte apoptosis in response to excessive free fatty acid generation during the metabolic syndrome. These cell death pathways are partially regulated by microRNAs. Necrosis in the liver is generally associated with acute injury (i.e., ischemia/reperfusion injury) and has been long considered an unregulated process. Recently, a new form of “programmed” necrosis (named necroptosis) has been described: the role of necroptosis in the liver has yet to be explored. However, the minimal expression of a key player in this process in the liver suggests this form of cell death may be uncommon in liver diseases. Because apoptosis is a key feature of so many diseases of the liver, therapeutic modulation of liver cell death holds promise. An updated overview of these concepts is given in this article. PMID:23720337

  3. Cystic avascular necrosis of the triquetrum.

    PubMed

    Albtoush, Omar M; Esmadi, Mohammad; Al-Omari, Mamoon H

    2013-01-01

    Carpal bones are rarely affected by avascular necrosis (AVN) in the absence of fractures. The lunate is the most frequently affected carpal bone, followed by the scaphoid and the capitate. The triquetrum is rarely affected by AVN. We report a case of multiple cystic changes in the triquetrum in a patient with a history of trauma. He was treated by below elbow Colles plaster cast for 3 months, with no improvement. Cystic changes resulted from irreversible AVN of the triquetrum. This is the first case to be reported in the literature with cystic AVN changes in the triquetrum.

  4. Treatment of Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Akita, Sadanori

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Radiation exposure as a result of radiation treatment, accident, or terrorism may cause serious problems such as deficiency due to necrosis or loss of function, fibrosis, or intractable ulcers in the tissues and organs. When the skin, bone, oral mucous membrane, guts, or salivary glands are damaged by ionizing radiation, the management and treatment are very lengthy and difficult. Critical Issues: In severe and irreversible injuries, surgery remains the mainstay of treatment. Several surgical procedures, such as debridement, skin grafting, and local and free-vascularized flaps, are widely used. Recent Advances: In specific cases of major morbidity or in high-risk patients, a newly developed therapy using a patient's own stem cells is safe and effective. Adipose tissue, normally a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells, which are similar to those from the bone marrow, can be harvested, since the procedure is easy, and abundant tissue can be obtained with minimal invasiveness. Future Directions: Based on the molecular basis of radiation injuries, several prospective treatments are under development. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms focus on an individual's sensitivity to radiation in radiogenomics, and the pathology of radiation fibrosis or the effect of radiation on wound healing is being studied and will lead to new insight into the treatment of radiation injuries. Protectors and mitigators are being actively investigated in terms of the timing of administration or dose. PMID:24761339

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPE68 and Rv2626c genes contribute to the host cell necrosis and bacterial escape from macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Danelishvili, Lia; Everman, Jamie; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages are the main line of innate immune response against M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. However, these cells serve as the major intracellular niche for Mtb enhancing its survival, replication and, later on, cell-to-cell spread. Mtb-associated cytotoxicity of macrophages has been well documented, but limited information exists about mechanisms by which the pathogen induces cell necrosis. To identify virulence factors involved in the induction of necrosis, we screened 5,000 transposon mutants of Mtb for clones that failed to promote the host cell necrosis in a similar manner as the wild-type bacterium. Five Mtb mutants were identified as potential candidates inducing significantly lower levels of THP-1 cell damage in contrast to the H37Rv wild-type infection. Reduced levels of the cell damage by necrosis deficient mutants (NDMs) were also associated with delayed damage of mitochondrial membrane permeability when compared with the wild-type infection over time. Two knockout mutants of the Rv3873 gene, encoding a cell wall PPE68 protein of RD1 region, were identified out of 5 NDMs. Further investigation lead to the observation that PPE68 protein interacts and exports several unknown or known surface/secreted proteins, among them Rv2626c is associated with the host cell necrosis. When the Rv2626c gene is deleted from the genome of Mtb, the bacterium displays significantly less necrosis in THP-1 cells and, conversely, the overexpression of Rv2626c promotes the host cell necrosis at early time points of infections in contrast to the wild-type strain. PMID:26605666

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPE68 and Rv2626c genes contribute to the host cell necrosis and bacterial escape from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Danelishvili, Lia; Everman, Jamie; Bermudez, Luiz E

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages are the main line of innate immune response against M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. However, these cells serve as the major intracellular niche for Mtb enhancing its survival, replication and, later on, cell-to-cell spread. Mtb-associated cytotoxicity of macrophages has been well documented, but limited information exists about mechanisms by which the pathogen induces cell necrosis. To identify virulence factors involved in the induction of necrosis, we screened 5,000 transposon mutants of Mtb for clones that failed to promote the host cell necrosis in a similar manner as the wild-type bacterium. Five Mtb mutants were identified as potential candidates inducing significantly lower levels of THP-1 cell damage in contrast to the H37Rv wild-type infection. Reduced levels of the cell damage by necrosis deficient mutants (NDMs) were also associated with delayed damage of mitochondrial membrane permeability when compared with the wild-type infection over time. Two knockout mutants of the Rv3873 gene, encoding a cell wall PPE68 protein of RD1 region, were identified out of 5 NDMs. Further investigation lead to the observation that PPE68 protein interacts and exports several unknown or known surface/secreted proteins, among them Rv2626c is associated with the host cell necrosis. When the Rv2626c gene is deleted from the genome of Mtb, the bacterium displays significantly less necrosis in THP-1 cells and, conversely, the overexpression of Rv2626c promotes the host cell necrosis at early time points of infections in contrast to the wild-type strain.

  7. RADIATION WAVE DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Wouters, L.F.

    1960-08-30

    Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

  8. Simple method of measuring delay time in manufacturing delay lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Yukio; Mikoda, Masanari

    1982-07-01

    A simple method for measuring delay time in an operational frequency range is required in manufacturing delay lines used for video tape recorders and television receiver sets. This paper describes a simple method of measuring and adjusting the delay time of such delay lines. The delay time is obtained by measuring a phase difference ϑ between the signals at the input and output transducers of the delay line with frequencies under test. The delay time is more precisely obtained by measuring the ϑ at a constant frequency within the bandwidth of the delay line. A delay-time tolerance of a polished glass medium at 3.58 MHz was found to be within 100 ns. The delay time was found to be shortened by 30 ns by attaching the medium on polishing powder and oil. Also shown is a simple method for adjusting the delay time by polishing a delay medium while measuring the phase difference.

  9. Epipericardial fat necrosis: an underdiagnosed condition

    PubMed Central

    Costa, A N; Bachion, G H; Apanavicius, A; Filho, J R P; Kairalla, R A; Lynch, D A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Epipericardial fat necrosis (EFN) is an uncommon benign and self-limited condition that leads patients to the emergency department (ED) owing to the onset of acute pleuritic chest pain. The aim of this study was to describe the cases of this disease in our institution and to illustrate the associated clinical and radiological findings. Methods: We reviewed 3604 chest scans referred by the ED from November 2011 to July 2013. Patients diagnosed with epipericardial necrosis had their medical records and original tomography reports analysed. Results: Chest pain was the primary complaint in 426 patients; 11 of them had definitive EFN findings characterized by a round soft-tissue attenuation lesion with a varying degree of strands. All patients presented with pleuritic chest pain on the same side as the lesion. Pericardial thickening, pleural effusion and mild atelectasis were the associated tomography findings. Cardiac enzyme and D-dimer tests performed during the episode were normal in all cases. 27% of the cases only were correctly diagnosed with EFN at the time of presentation. Conclusion: EFN is a benign inflammatory condition frequently overlooked in the ED by physicians and radiologists but is an important factor in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute chest pain. Advances in knowledge: The article adds clinically and radiologically useful information about the condition and displays the importance of making the correct diagnosis to avoid unnecessary examinations. PMID:24707937

  10. Mechanisms of Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Dean W.; James, Laura P.

    2010-01-01

    Although considered safe at therapeutic doses, at higher doses, acetaminophen produces a centrilobular hepatic necrosis that can be fatal. Acetaminophen poisoning accounts for approximately one-half of all cases of acute liver failure in the United States and Great Britain today. The mechanism occurs by a complex sequence of events. These events include: (1) CYP metabolism to a reactive metabolite which depletes glutathione and covalently binds to proteins; (2) loss of glutathione with an increased formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in hepatocytes undergoing necrotic changes; (3) increased oxidative stress, associated with alterations in calcium homeostasis and initiation of signal transduction responses, causing mitochondrial permeability transition; (4) mitochondrial permeability transition occurring with additional oxidative stress, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and loss of the ability of the mitochondria to synthesize ATP; and (5) loss of ATP which leads to necrosis. Associated with these essential events there appear to be a number of inflammatory mediators such as certain cytokines and chemokines that can modify the toxicity. Some have been shown to alter oxidative stress, but the relationship of these modulators to other critical mechanistic events has not been well delineated. In addition, existing data support the involvement of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors in the initiation of regenerative processes leading to the reestablishment of hepatic structure and function. PMID:20020268

  11. Necrosis Avidity: A Newly Discovered Feature of Hypericin and its Preclinical Applications in Necrosis Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Binghu; Wang, Jichen; Ni, Yicheng; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Hypericin has been widely studied as a potent photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy in both preclinical and clinical settings. Recently, hypericin has also been discovered to have a specific avidity for necrotic tissue. This affinity is also observed in a series of radiolabeled derivatives of hypericin, including [123I]iodohypericin, [124I]iodohypericin, and [131I]iodohypericin. Hypericin, along with other necrosis-avid contrast agents, has been investigated for use in noninvasively targeting necrotic tissues in numerous disorders. Potential clinical applications of hypericin include the identification of acute myocardial infarction, evaluation of tissue viability, assessment of therapeutic responses to treatments, and interventional procedures for solid tumors. The mechanisms of necrosis avidity in hypericin remain to be fully elucidated, although several hypotheses have been suggested. In particular, it has been proposed that the necrosis avidity of hypericin is compound specific; for instance, cholesterol, phosphatidylserine, or phosphatidylethanolamine components in the phospholipid bilayer of cellular membranes may be the major targets for its observed selectivity. Further investigations are needed to identify the specific binding moiety that is responsible for the necrosis avidity of hypericin. PMID:24052807

  12. Speech and Language Delay

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults)Being a twinAutism (a developmental disorder)Elective mutism (the child just doesn’t want to talk) ... palsy, developmental disability, Early Language Milestone Scale, elective mutism, expressive language disorder, hearing loss, language delay, psychosocial ...

  13. Choice and reinforcement delay

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, G.D.; Marr, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies of choice between two delayed reinforcers have indicated that the relative immediacy of the reinforcer is a major determinant of the relative frequency of responding. Parallel studies of choice between two interresponse times have found exceptions to this generality. The present study looked at the choice by pigeons between two delays, one of which was always four times longer than the other, but whose absolute durations were varied across conditions. The results indicated that choice is not uniquely determined by the relative immediacy of reinforcement, but that absolute delays are also involved. Models for concurrent chained schedules appear to be more applicable to the present data than the matching relation; however, these too failed to predict choice for long delays.

  14. Delayed puberty in boys

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 139. Curry SA, Biancuzzo RM. ... FF, ed. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:348-350. Haddad NG, Eugster EA. Delayed ...

  15. Protective effects of ulinastatin and methylprednisolone against radiation-induced lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Du, Yu-Jun; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Guo-Xing; Sun, Ni; Li, Xiu-Jiang

    2016-09-01

    The effectiveness of ulinastatin and methylprednisolone in treating pathological changes in mice with radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) was evaluated. Forty C57BL/6 female mice received whole-chest radiation (1.5 Gy/min for 12 min) and were randomly allocated into Group R (single radiation, n = 10), Group U (ulinastatin treatment, n = 10), Group M (methylprednisolone treatment, n = 10), or Group UM (ulinastatin and methylprednisolone treatment, n = 10). Another 10 untreated mice served as controls (Group C). Pathological changes in lung tissue, pulmonary interstitial area density (PIAD) and expression levels of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in lung tissue, serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined. Alleviation of pathological changes in lung tissue was observed in Groups U, M and UM. Treatment with ulinastatin, methylprednisolone or both effectively delayed the development of fibrosis at 12 weeks after radiation. Ulinastatin, methylprednisolone or both could alleviate the radiation-induced increase in the PIAD (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Treatment with ulinastatin, methylprednisolone or both significantly reduced the expression of TNF-α, but not TGF-β1, at 9 weeks after radiation compared with Group R (P < 0.01). Ulinastatin and /: or methylprednisolone effectively decreased the level of TNF-α in lung tissue after RILI and inhibited both the inflammatory response and the development of fibrosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  16. Time delay spectrum conditioner

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Norman R.

    1980-01-01

    A device for delaying specified frequencies of a multiple frequency laser beam. The device separates the multiple frequency beam into a series of spatially separated single frequency beams. The propagation distance of the single frequency beam is subsequently altered to provide the desired delay for each specific frequency. Focusing reflectors can be utilized to provide a simple but nonadjustable system or, flat reflectors with collimating and focusing optics can be utilized to provide an adjustable system.

  17. Phyllanthus emblica L. fruit extract induces chromosomal instability and suppresses necrosis in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xihan; Ni, Juan; Liu, Xuemin; Xue, Jinglun; Wang, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Phyllanthus emblica L. (PE) is an edible fruit indigenous to Southeast Asia. It has been considered as a potent functional food due to its numerous pharmacological applications, such as anti-oxidant, antimicrobial, anti-diabetic and protection for multiple organs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a water extract of PE fruit on genomic damage and cell death in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line COLO320 using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay. Cells were exposed to RPMI-1640 medium containing 0, 20, 40, 80, or 160 μg/mL PE for 24, 48, 72, or 96 hours. The results showed that PE induced a significant decrease in necrosis (p < 0.001) and nuclear division index (NDI) (p < 0.001) in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and there was a highly significant correlation between the reduction of necrosis and NDI (r = 0.820, p < 0.001). Dose- and time-dependent increases (p < 0.001) in the frequency of chromosomal instability (CIN) were observed after PE exposure, and the frequency of CIN was negatively correlated with NDI (r = - 0.640, p < 0.001). PE also significantly increased apoptosis (p < 0.001), and there was a significant correlation of apoptosis with CIN (r = 0.566, p < 0.001). In conclusion, PE suppresses necrosis and delays mitotic progression, which results in massive CIN followed by apoptosis in COLO320 cells.

  18. Resolvin D2 prevents secondary thrombosis and necrosis in a mouse burn wound model.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Stefan; Patel, Suraj J; Sarin, Dhruv; Irimia, Daniel; Yarmush, Martin L; Berthiaume, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Deep partial thickness burns are subject to delayed necrosis of initially viable tissues surrounding the primary zone of thermally induced coagulation, which results in an expansion of the burn wound, both in area and depth, within 48 hours postburn. Neutrophil sequestration and activation leading to microvascular damage is thought to mediate this secondary tissue damage. Resolvins, a class of endogenous mediators derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, have been shown to regulate the resolution of inflammation. We hypothesized that exogenous resolvins could mitigate the deleterious impact of the inflammatory response in burn wounds. Using two different mouse burn injury models involving significant partial thickness injuries, we found that a systemically administered single dose of resolvin D2 (RvD2) as low as 25 pg/g bw given within an interval of up to 4 hours postburn effectively prevented thrombosis of the deep dermal vascular network and subsequent dermal necrosis. By preserving the microvascular network, RvD2 enhanced neutrophil access to the dermis, but prevented neutrophil-mediated damage through other anti-inflammatory actions, including inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and neutrophil platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1. In a clinical context, RvD2 may be therapeutically useful by reducing the need for surgical debridement and the area requiring skin grafting. © 2012 by the Wound Healing Society.

  19. Resolvin D2 prevents secondary thrombosis and necrosis in a mouse burn wound model

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, Stefan; Patel, Suraj J; Sarin, Dhruv; Irimia, Daniel; Yarmush, Martin L.; Berthiaume, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Deep partial thickness burns are subject to delayed necrosis of initially viable tissues surrounding the primary zone of thermally induced coagulation, which results in an expansion of the burn wound, both in area and depth, within 48 hours postburn. Neutrophil sequestration and activation leading to microvascular damage is thought to mediate this secondary tissue damage. Resolvins, a class of endogenous mediators derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, have been shown to regulate the resolution of inflammation. We hypothesized that exogenous resolvins could mitigate the deleterious impact of the inflammatory response in burn wounds. Using two different mouse burn injury models involving significant partial thickness injuries, we found that a systemically administered single dose of resolvin D2 (RvD2) as low as 25 pg/g bw given within an interval of up to 4 hours postburn effectively prevented thrombosis of the deep dermal vascular network and subsequent dermal necrosis. By preserving the microvascular network, RvD2 enhanced neutrophil access to the dermis, but prevented neutrophil-mediated damage through other anti-inflammatory actions, including inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and neutrophil platelet–endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1. In a clinical context, RvD2 may be therapeutically useful by reducing the need for surgical debridement and the area requiring skin grafting. PMID:23110665

  20. Avascular necrosis of bone complicating corticosteroid replacement therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, P L; Corbett, M

    1983-01-01

    Two patients who developed widespread severe avascular necrosis of bone while on steroid replacement therapy are described. One, a diabetic, underwent yttrium-90 pituitary ablation for retinopathy and developed avascular necrosis within 18 months of starting prednisolone. The other, who had Addison's disease, developed avascular necrosis within 14 months of starting cortisol replacement therapy. Both cases came to bilateral total hip replacement. Images PMID:6859959

  1. Transient gene therapy to treat cutaneous radiation syndrome: development in a minipig model.

    PubMed

    Riccobono, Diane; Forcheron, Fabien; Agay, Diane; Scherthan, Harry; Meineke, Viktor; Drouet, Michel

    2014-06-01

    Cutaneous radiation syndrome is the delayed consequence of localized skin exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation. Adipocyte derived stem cells injection may improve tissue regeneration through secreted factors. Thus mesenchymal stem cells secretome optimization, using transient transfection, may represent a new strategy to treat this syndrome. Sonic hedgehog, a secreted protein involved in cell proliferation and angiogenesis, has been chosen as a first candidate. Here preliminary results are reported of the therapeutic potential of transient gene therapy to cure cutaneous radiation syndrome in a minipig model. Adipocyte derived stem cells were transiently transfected by electroporation with a plasmid coding for Sonic Hedgehog. Göttingen minipigs were locally irradiated using a (60)Co gamma source at the dose of 50 Gy and received Phosphate Buffer Salin (controls: n = 8), stem cells (50 × 10⁶ each time, n = 5) or transfected stem cells (25±7 × 10⁶ each time, n = 1). All controls exhibited a homogeneous clinical evolution of cutaneous radiation syndrome with final necrosis (day 91). In stem cell injected minipigs, an ultimate wound healing was observed in four out of five grafted animals (day 130 ± 28, complete in two of them) (historical results). The Sonic hedgehog animal, albeit injected with a lower number of transfected stem cells, presented a very similar evolution of skin healing without necrosis or uncontrolble pain. Globally this preliminary report suggests that local injection of Sonic Hedgehog transfected adipocyte derived stem cells may improve wound healing. Thus work is ongoing to evaluate this therapeutic strategy on a larger number of animals.

  2. Definition of bone necrosis by the pathologist

    PubMed Central

    Fondi, Cristina; Franchi, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is a common disorder that may go clinically unrecognized or may result in the collapse of the architecture of bone, determining severe anatomic alterations of the involved site. Osteonecrosis is not a specific disease entity, but rather the result of a number of conditions ultimately leading to an impairment of blood supply to the bone tissue, although there is evidence that modifications of bone remodelling activity and weakening of bone structure with formation of microfractures are implicated as well. According to the site involved and to the factors promoting its development, the morbid anatomy and histopathology of osteonecrosis show a different appearance. This review discusses the main skeletal manifestations of osteonecrosis, including subarticular avascular necrosis of the femoral head and of the knee, as well as osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:22460748

  3. Systemic skeletal muscle necrosis induced by crotoxin.

    PubMed

    Salvini, T F; Amaral, A C; Miyabara, E H; Turri, J A; Danella, P M; Selistre de Araújo, H S

    2001-08-01

    Systemic skeletal muscle necrosis induced by crotoxin, the major component of the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus, was investigated. Mice received an intramuscular injection of crotoxin (0.35mg/kg body weight) into the right tibialis anterior (TA) muscles, which were evaluated 3h, 24h and 3 days later. Control mice were injected with saline. Right and left TAs, gastrocnemius, soleus and right masseter and longissimus dorsi were removed and frozen. Histological sections were stained with Toluidine Blue or incubated for acidic phosphatase reaction. Three and 24h after the injection, signals of muscle fiber injury were found: (a) in the injected TA muscles; (b) in both right and contralateral soleus and red gastrocnemius; and (c) in the masseter muscles. Contralateral TA, longissimus dorsi and white gastrocnemius muscles were not injured. In conclusion, crotoxin induced a systemic and selective muscle injury in muscles or muscle regions composed by oxidative muscle fibers.

  4. Concomitant avascular necrosis of the scaphoid and lunate.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Praveen; Sharma, Chetna; Sabapathy, S Raja

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous avascular necrosis of multiple carpal bones is rare. Concomitant avascular necrosis of scaphoid and lunate has been reported only once. We report one more case of this rare condition which can be a cause of wrist pain. Steroid intake is a known risk factor for avascular necrosis but in our case the patient had been taking herbal medicines for joint pain the composition of which was not known. Probably the presence of steroid in these medicines was the cause of avascular necrosis in this case.

  5. Principals Of Radiation Toxicology: Important Aspects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava; Jones, Jeffrey

    . 1990, 2012] Moderate and high doses of radiation induces necrosis of radiosensitive cells with the subsequent formation of radiation toxins and their induced acute inflammatory processes. Radiation necrosis is the most substantial and most severe form of radiation induced injury, and when widespread, has grave therapeutic implications. [D. Popov et al. 1990, 2012,Claudio A. et al. 2002, Robertson J. et al. 2002, ] Relatively small doses of Radiation Toxins induce apoptosis and high doses of Radiation Toxins induce necrosis. [Rastogi P. et al. 2009, D. Popov et al. 1990, 2012,] Threshold of Toxic Effects occurs and can be defined. [D. Popov et al. 2012, ] Radiation Toxins affects Somatic cells and Germ Cells. Radiation Toxins can induce teratogenic processes. Specific Toxicity of Radiation Toxins can affects developing fetus. Material and Methods, Results: http://www.intechopen.com/books/current-topics-in-ionizing-radiation-research/radiation-toxins-molecular-mechanisms-of-toxicity-and-radiomimetic-properties- Conclusion: Radiation is a physical agent - induce activation of some secretory proteins with high enzymatic activity. This proteins called as Radiation Toxins can produce specific for radiation biological and toxic effects after administration to radiation naive mammals. [V. Maliev et al. 2007, D. Popov et al. 1990, 2012] Radiation Toxins are teratogenic and oncogenic. Radiation Toxins effects depend on Administered Dose and Radiation effects depend on Exposure Dose and Absorbed Dose. The levels of Radiation Toxins correlates with Radiation Exposure.

  6. Cystine Deprivation Triggers Programmed Necrosis in VHL-Deficient Renal Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaohu; Wu, Jianli; Ding, Chien-Kuang; Lu, Min; Keenan, Melissa M; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Lin, Chih-An; Wang, Charles C; George, Daniel; Hsu, David S; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2016-04-01

    Oncogenic transformation may reprogram tumor metabolism and render cancer cells addicted to extracellular nutrients. Deprivation of these nutrients may therefore represent a therapeutic opportunity, but predicting which nutrients cancer cells become addicted remains difficult. Here, we performed a nutrigenetic screen to determine the phenotypes of isogenic pairs of clear cell renal cancer cells (ccRCC), with or without VHL, upon the deprivation of individual amino acids. We found that cystine deprivation triggered rapid programmed necrosis in VHL-deficient cell lines and primary ccRCC tumor cells, but not in VHL-restored counterparts. Blocking cystine uptake significantly delayed xenograft growth of ccRCC. Importantly, cystine deprivation triggered similar metabolic changes regardless of VHL status, suggesting that metabolic responses alone are not sufficient to explain the observed distinct fates of VHL-deficient and restored cells. Instead, we found that increased levels of TNFα associated with VHL loss forced VHL-deficient cells to rely on intact RIPK1 to inhibit apoptosis. However, the preexisting elevation in TNFα expression rendered VHL-deficient cells susceptible to necrosis triggered by cystine deprivation. We further determined that reciprocal amplification of the Src-p38 (MAPK14)-Noxa (PMAIP1) signaling and TNFα-RIP1/3 (RIPK1/RIPK3)-MLKL necrosis pathways potentiated cystine-deprived necrosis. Together, our findings reveal that cystine deprivation in VHL-deficient RCCs presents an attractive therapeutic opportunity that may bypass the apoptosis-evading mechanisms characteristic of drug-resistant tumor cells. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1892-903. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Cystine deprivation triggers programmed necrosis in VHL-deficient renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaohu; Wu, Jianli; Ding, Chien-Kuang; Lu, Min; Keenan, Melissa M.; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Lin, Chih-An; Wang, Charles C.; George, Daniel; Hsu, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic transformation may reprogram tumor metabolism and render cancer cells addicted to extracellular nutrients. Deprivation of these nutrients may therefore represent a therapeutic opportunity, but predicting which nutrients cancer cells become addicted to remains difficult. Here, we performed a nutrigenetic screen to determine the phenotypes of isogenic pairs of clear-cell renal cancer cells (ccRCC), with or without VHL, upon the deprivation of individual amino acids. We found that cystine deprivation triggered rapid programmed necrosis in VHL-deficient cell lines and primary ccRCC tumor cells, but not in VHL-restored counterparts. Blocking cystine uptake significantly delayed xenograft growth of ccRCC. Importantly, cystine deprivation triggered similar metabolic changes regardless of VHL status, suggesting that metabolic responses alone are not sufficient to explain the observed distinct fates of VHL-deficient and restored cells. Instead, we found that increased levels of TNFα (TNF) associated with VHL loss forced VHL-deficient cells to rely on intact RIPK1 to inhibit apoptosis. However, the pre-existing elevation in TNFα expression rendered VHL-deficient cells susceptible to necrosis triggered by cystine deprivation. We further determined that reciprocal amplification of the Src-p38 (MAPK14)-Noxa (PMAIP1) signaling and TNFα-RIP1/3 (RALBP1/RIPK3)-MLKL necrosis pathways potentiated cystine deprived-necrosis. Together, our findings reveal that cystine deprivation in VHL-deficient RCCs presents an attractive therapeutic opportunity that may bypass the apoptosis-evading mechanisms characteristic of drug-resistant tumor cells. PMID:26833124

  8. Downhole delay assembly for blasting with series delay

    DOEpatents

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1982-01-01

    A downhole delay assembly is provided which can be placed into a blasthole for initiation of explosive in the blasthole. The downhole delay assembly includes at least two detonating time delay devices in series in order to effect a time delay of longer than about 200 milliseconds in a round of explosions. The downhole delay assembly provides a protective housing to prevent detonation of explosive in the blasthole in response to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device. There is further provided a connection between the first and second time delay devices. The connection is responsive to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device and initiates the second detonating time delay device. A plurality of such downhole delay assemblies are placed downhole in unfragmented formation and are initiated simultaneously for providing a round of explosive expansions. The explosive expansions can be used to form an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles.

  9. Prediction of delayed subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, K.

    A predictive model of delayed subsidence is discussed. A numerical implementation is tested on one of the best-described study areas, Allegheny County in Pennsylvania. In planning insurance of restitution measures, a predictive model is of value in estimating the magnitude of the problem and the size of long-term budgetary commitments. Contrary to active subsidence, which occurs concurrently with mining operations, or is completed within a few days following coal extraction, delayed subsidence may take many years to appear at the surface after coal mines are abandoned. There are two principal morphological types of delayed subsidence: troughs, which are shallow depressions, and sinks, which are steep-sided crown pits. Both types are damaging to surface structures, and a variety of methods were introduced to deal with the problem, ranging from subsidence insurance to site restitution.

  10. [Radiation-induced modification of human somatic cell chromosome sensitivity to the testing mutagenic exposure of bleomycin in vitro in lung cancer patients in delayed terms following Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Pilinskaia, M A; Dybskiĭ, S S; Dybskaia, E B; Shvaĭko, L I

    2012-01-01

    By using modified "G2-bleomycin sensitivity assay" above background level of cytogenetic effect considered as a marker of hidden chromosome instability (HCI) has been investigated in 3 groups--liquidators of Chernobyl accident (occupational group 1), patients with lung cancer who denied conscious contact--with ionizing radiation (group of comparison), liquidators with lung cancer (occupational group 2). Significant interindividual variations of cytogenetic effects induced with bleomycin and the lack of positive correlation between background and above background frequencies of chromosome aberrations have been shown in all observed groups. It had been established that occupational group 2 was the most burdened group by expression of the above background cytogenetic effect and, accordingly, number of persons with HCI. The data obtained permit to suggest the existence of the association between radiation-induced increase of individual sensitivity to testing mutagenic exposure and the realization of cancer in persons exposed to ionizing radiation. The results show acceptability of "G2-bleomycin sensitivity assay" under the cytogenetic examination of irradiated contingents for determining HCI as one of informative markers of predisposition to oncopathology.

  11. Peripancreatic fat necrosis worsens acute pancreatitis independent of pancreatic necrosis via unsaturated fatty acids increased in human pancreatic necrosis collections

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Durgampudi, Chandra; Trivedi, Ram N; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Crowell, Michael D; Pannala, Rahul; Lee, Kenneth; Brand, Randall; Chennat, Jennifer; Slivka, Adam; Papachristou, Georgios I; Khalid, Asif; Whitcomb, David C; DeLany, James P; Cline, Rachel A; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Murad, Faris M; Yadav, Dhiraj; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Peripancreatic fat necrosis occurs frequently in necrotising pancreatitis. Distinguishing markers from mediators of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is important since targeting mediators may improve outcomes. We evaluated potential agents in human pancreatic necrotic collections (NCs), pseudocysts (PCs) and pancreatic cystic neoplasms and used pancreatic acini, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and an acute pancreatitis (AP) model to determine SAP mediators. Methods We measured acinar and PBMC injury induced by agents increased in NCs and PCs. Outcomes of caerulein pancreatitis were studied in lean rats coadministered interleukin (IL)-1β and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene, triolein alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat. Results NCs had higher fatty acids, IL-8 and IL-1β versus other fluids. Lipolysis of unsaturated triglyceride and resulting unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) oleic and linoleic acids induced necro-apoptosis at less than half the concentration in NCs but other agents did not do so at more than two times these concentrations. Cytokine coadministration resulted in higher pancreatic and lung inflammation than caerulein alone, but only triolein coadministration caused peripancreatic fat stranding, higher cytokines, UFAs, multisystem organ failure (MSOF) and mortality in 97% animals, which were prevented by orlistat. Conclusions UFAs, IL-1β and IL-8 are elevated in NCs. However, UFAs generated via peripancreatic fat lipolysis causes worse inflammation and MSOF, converting mild AP to SAP. PMID:25500204

  12. Induction of delayed wound healing by irradiation with optional mechanical compression in swine.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woonhyeok; Oh, Daemyung; Kwon, Sunyoung; Kim, Jinhee; Son, Daegu

    2016-11-01

    A chronic wound or non-healing wound is one that fails to heal for at least 30 days after injury. This study was designed to create delayed wound healing induced by irradiation and mechanical compression using silicone block. Two female pigs received a single fraction of 20 Gy with 6-MeV electrons to a 22 × 60 cm field on the dorsal body skin 7 weeks before experimentation. A 30 × 30 mm sized wounds were created with preservation of muscle fascia on the dorsum. In groups of six, wounds were designated to be control (C) or test areas of irradiation only (T0), irradiation with silicone blocks for 1 week (T1), irradiation with silicone blocks for 2 weeks (T2), and irradiation with silicone blocks for 3 weeks (T3). Wound contraction, bacterial culture, and histological analysis were performed at 1-week intervals for 4 weeks. Control wounds displayed complete re-epithelialization at Weeks 4; however, all experimental groups (T0, T1, T2, and T3 groups) showed necrosis and delayed healing at Week 4. The number of bacterial strains in control wounds differed significantly from values recorded for all experimental groups from Weeks 1-3 (p < 0.05). However, in comparing the various test wounds (T0, T1, T2, and T3 groups), the numbers of strains did not differ significantly from Weeks 1-4. In the histological analysis, the control wound showed a peak influx of acute and chronic inflammatory cell and diminished inflammation thereafter. However, all experimental groups showed no peak in inflammatory score and prolonged chronic inflammation. In conclusion, radiation exposure alone, which triggers intense inflammation and extensive recruitment of inflammatory cells, proved sufficient to prevent re-epithelialization of skin at 30 days. Insertion of silicone blocks had limited effects on promoting delayed wound healing. Consequently, we now recommend using irradiation alone to simulate delayed wound healing in an experimental setting. Copyright © 2016 Tissue Viability

  13. Linking surface-fire behavior, stem heating, and tissue necrosis

    Treesearch

    A.S. Bova; M.B. Dickinson; M.B. Dickinson

    2005-01-01

    Data from 69 experimental, small-plot fires are used to describe relationships among fire intensity, barksurface heat flux, and depth of necrosis in stem tissue for red maple (Acer rubrum L.) and chestnut oak (Quercus prinus L.j. A tetrazolium staining technique was used to determine the depth of necrosis in tree boles subjected to fires with intensities of 20 to 2000...

  14. Pseudotumoral encapsulated fat necrosis with diffuse pseudomembranous degeneration.

    PubMed

    Felipo, F; Vaquero, M; del Agua, C

    2004-09-01

    An extraordinary case of encapsulated fat necrosis characterized by its large size, diffuse formation of pseudomembranes, and tendency to recur after excision is reported. A 67-year-old Caucasian woman suffering from morbid obesity was admitted for diagnosis and surgical treatment of a soft tissue mass showing a longest diameter of 14 cm and lying adjacently to the scar from previous appendicectomy. Histopathologic features were consistent with a nodular-cystic encapsulated fat necrosis with diffuse pseudomembranous transformation. Eight months after surgery, a new larger mass (longest diameter of 18 cm) sharing identical histopathologic features appeared in the same location. Encapsulated fat necrosis is a well-defined entity even though several names have been proposed for this condition, including mobile encapsulated lipoma, encapsulated necrosis, or nodular-cystic fat necrosis. Its pathogenesis seems to be related to ischemic changes secondary to previous trauma. It may occasionally show degenerative changes, including dystrophic calcifications and presence of pseudomembranes. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of encapsulated fat necrosis presenting as lesions of such size and showing diffuse formation of pseudomembranes; these particular features made diagnosis difficult and led to consideration of a wide range of potential diagnostic possibilities. This case expands the clinico-pathologic spectrum of membranocystic fat necrosis, including the potential ability of this subcutaneous fatty tissue abnormality to recur after surgical excision. Felipo F, Vaquero M, del Agua C. Pseudotumoral encapsulated fat necrosis with diffuse pseudomembranous degeneration.

  15. Black esophagus (acute esophageal necrosis) after spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Román Fernández, A; López Álvarez, A; Fossati Puertas, S; Areán González, I; Varela García, O; Viaño López, P M

    2014-01-01

    Acute esophagic necrosis or black esophagus is an uncommon clinical entity that owes its name to the endoscopic view of the necrotic esophageal mucosa. It is always related with a critical medical condition and usually has an ischemic etiology. We report the first case of acute esophageal necrosis after a spinal anesthetic for partial hip joint arthroplasty. We discuss the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms.

  16. Avascular necrosis of multiple carpal bones. A case report.

    PubMed

    De Smet, L

    1999-01-01

    A case of a 66-year-old female patient with hyperlipaemia, corticosteroid osteoporosis and chronic obstructive lung disease with avascular necrosis of the proximal row of the carpus and hamate is described. No other sites of avascular bone necrosis were found. A proximal row carpectomy was performed with an excellent outcome.

  17. [Myocellular necrosis by cathecolamines in pheochromocytoma (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Thiene, G; Valente, M; Cecchetto, A; Giordano, R; Pennelli, N

    1975-01-01

    A case of myocellular necrosis by cathecholamines in a patient presenting pheocromocytoma is reported. Death was due to cerbral apoplexy. The histological findings are quite specific and show myofibrillar degeneration with substitution of the normal striation by coarse sarcomeric transversal bands. The possible role of necrosis by catecholamines in sudden deaths and non-coronary myocardiosclerosis is emphasized.

  18. Delayed Contrast Extravasation MRI for Depicting Tumor and Non-Tumoral Tissues in Primary and Metastatic Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zach, Leor; Guez, David; Last, David; Daniels, Dianne; Grober, Yuval; Nissim, Ouzi; Hoffmann, Chen; Nass, Dvora; Talianski, Alisa; Spiegelmann, Roberto; Cohen, Zvi R.; Mardor, Yael

    2012-01-01

    The current standard of care for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is resection followed by radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. Recent studies suggest that nearly half of the patients with early radiological deterioration post treatment do not suffer from tumor recurrence but from pseudoprogression. Similarly, a significant number of patients with brain metastases suffer from radiation necrosis following radiation treatments. Conventional MRI is currently unable to differentiate tumor progression from treatment-induced effects. The ability to clearly differentiate tumor from non-tumoral tissues is crucial for appropriate patient management. Ten patients with primary brain tumors and 10 patients with brain metastases were scanned by delayed contrast extravasation MRI prior to surgery. Enhancement subtraction maps calculated from high resolution MR images acquired up to 75 min after contrast administration were used for obtaining stereotactic biopsies. Histological assessment was then compared with the pre-surgical calculated maps. In addition, the application of our maps for prediction of progression was studied in a small cohort of 13 newly diagnosed GBM patients undergoing standard chemoradiation and followed up to 19.7 months post therapy. The maps showed two primary enhancement populations: the slow population where contrast clearance from the tissue was slower than contrast accumulation and the fast population where clearance was faster than accumulation. Comparison with histology confirmed the fast population to consist of morphologically active tumor and the slow population to consist of non-tumoral tissues. Our maps demonstrated significant correlation with perfusion-weighted MR data acquired simultaneously, although contradicting examples were shown. Preliminary results suggest that early changes in the fast volumes may serve as a predictor for time to progression. These preliminary results suggest that our high resolution

  19. Prognostic significance of differentiating necrosis from fluid collection on endoscopic ultrasound in patients with presumed isolated extrapancreatic necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder S.; Chhabra, Puneet; Sharma, Ravi; Sharma, Vishal; Gupta, Rajesh; Bhasin, Deepak K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Extrapancreatic necrosis is diagnosed on computed tomography (CT) as extrapancreatic changes that are more than fat stranding; both fluid collections and necrosis would have a similar appearance. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic significance of differentiating peripancreatic necrosis from fluid collection on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in patients with presumed isolated extrapancreatic necrosis. Methods We carried out a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 36 patients (25 males; age range 19-65 years) with acute pancreatitis (AP) and isolated extrapancreatic necrosis. On EUS, peripancreatic anechoic areas were labeled as peripancreatic fluid collections and peripancreatic heterogeneously echotextured areas as peripancreatic necrosis. Results The etiology of AP was alcohol in 16 (44.4%) patients, gallstone disease in 13 (36.1%), and other in 7 (19.4%). On EUS, 25 (69.4%) patients had peripancreatic necrosis and 11 (30.6%) patients had peripancreatic fluid collections. Compared with patients who had peripancreatic fluid collections, patients with peripancreatic necrosis had a significantly higher frequency of pleural effusion (88% vs. 55%; P=0.04), organ failure (OF) (68% vs. 27%; P=0.03), and persistent OF (48% vs. 9%; P=0.03). The patients with peripancreatic necrosis also had a higher frequency of ascites (20% vs. 9%), need for intervention (20% vs. nil), surgery (8% vs. nil) and mortality (8% vs. nil), but these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusion Isolated extrapancreatic necrosis on contrast-enhanced CT comprises a heterogeneous group, with patients who show peripancreatic fluid collections on EUS having a less severe disease course compared to patients with peripancreatic necrosis. PMID:28243045

  20. Prognostic significance of differentiating necrosis from fluid collection on endoscopic ultrasound in patients with presumed isolated extrapancreatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Rana, Surinder S; Chhabra, Puneet; Sharma, Ravi; Sharma, Vishal; Gupta, Rajesh; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2017-01-01

    Extrapancreatic necrosis is diagnosed on computed tomography (CT) as extrapancreatic changes that are more than fat stranding; both fluid collections and necrosis would have a similar appearance. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic significance of differentiating peripancreatic necrosis from fluid collection on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in patients with presumed isolated extrapancreatic necrosis. We carried out a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 36 patients (25 males; age range 19-65 years) with acute pancreatitis (AP) and isolated extrapancreatic necrosis. On EUS, peripancreatic anechoic areas were labeled as peripancreatic fluid collections and peripancreatic heterogeneously echotextured areas as peripancreatic necrosis. The etiology of AP was alcohol in 16 (44.4%) patients, gallstone disease in 13 (36.1%), and other in 7 (19.4%). On EUS, 25 (69.4%) patients had peripancreatic necrosis and 11 (30.6%) patients had peripancreatic fluid collections. Compared with patients who had peripancreatic fluid collections, patients with peripancreatic necrosis had a significantly higher frequency of pleural effusion (88% vs. 55%; P=0.04), organ failure (OF) (68% vs. 27%; P=0.03), and persistent OF (48% vs. 9%; P=0.03). The patients with peripancreatic necrosis also had a higher frequency of ascites (20% vs. 9%), need for intervention (20% vs. nil), surgery (8% vs. nil) and mortality (8% vs. nil), but these differences were not statistically significant. Isolated extrapancreatic necrosis on contrast-enhanced CT comprises a heterogeneous group, with patients who show peripancreatic fluid collections on EUS having a less severe disease course compared to patients with peripancreatic necrosis.

  1. Changes in the Quantitative Composition of the Population in Delayed Periods After γ-Radiation Exposure of the Cells in Various Phases of S Period of the First Mitotic Cycle.

    PubMed

    Shabalkin, I P; Grigor'eva, E Yu; Gudkova, M V; Stukalov, Yu V; Mas'ko, A S

    2016-10-01

    Using the autoradiographic method, we studied the kinetics of DNA synthesis over the mitotic cycle in mouse corneal epithelium cells in delayed periods after γ-irradiation in different points of the S phase of the first mitotic cycle. The index labeled cells during 1-3 periods of DNA synthesis most adequately reflects quantitative changes in the cell population composition after cell exposure during the first S period. The relative number of labeled S phase cells in the second mitotic cycle in experiments where the cells were irradiated in the S1 phase of the first S period was 4-fold lower than in experiments where the cells were exposed during S2 phase. This effect is determined by inhibition of the transcription factors activation. It seems that two territorially different sites of the genome controlling the regulatory stimuli and involved in modification of the quantitative composition of the population are responsible for changes in its quantitative balance.

  2. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography of Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Chemoembolisation Using Drug-Eluting Beads: A Pilot Study Focused on Sustained Tumor Necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Moschouris, Hippocrates; Malagari, Katerina; Papadaki, Marina Georgiou; Kornezos, Ioannis Matsaidonis, Dimitrios

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and the sustained antitumor effect of drug-eluting beads used for transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE) of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Ten patients with solitary, unresectable HCC underwent CEUS before, 2 days after, and 35 to 40 days after TACE using a standard dose (4 ml) of drug-eluting beads (DC Beads; Biocompatibles, Surrey, UK) preloaded with doxorubicin (25 mg doxorubicin/ml hydrated beads). For CEUS, a second-generation contrast agent (SonoVue, Bracco, Milan, Italy) and a low mechanical-index technique were used. A part of the tumor was characterized as necrotic if it showed complete lack of enhancement. The percentage of necrosis was calculated at the sonographic section that depicted the largest diameter of the tumor. Differences in the extent of early (2 days after TACE) and delayed (35 to 40 days after TACE) necrosis were quantitatively and subjectively assessed. Early post-TACE tumor necrosis ranged from 21% to 70% (mean 43.5% {+-} 19%). There was a statistically significant (p = 0.0012, paired Student t test) higher percentage of delayed tumor necrosis, which ranged from 24% to 88% (mean 52.3% {+-} 20.3%). Subjective evaluation showed a delayed obvious increase of the necrotic areas in 5 patients. In 2 patients, tumor vessels that initially remained patent disappeared on the delayed follow-up. A part of tumor necrosis after chemoembolisation of HCC with DEB seems to take place later than 2 days after TACE. CEUS may provide evidence for the sustained antitumor effect of DEB-TACE. Nevertheless, the ideal time for the imaging evaluation of tumor response remains to be defined.

  3. Skin Necrosis from Intra-articular Hyaluronic Acid Injection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Whan B; Alhusayen, Raed O

    2015-01-01

    Tissue necrosis is a rare yet potentially serious complication of intra-articular (IA) hyaluronic acid (HA) injections for treatment of knee osteoarthritis. To report a case of a patient with cutaneous necrosis after IA HA injection for treatment of knee osteoarthritis, presenting as a livedoid violaceous patch on the right knee. We report a case of cutaneous necrosis as a rare complication of IA HA injection for treatment of knee osteoarthritis. A literature review was undertaken of similar cases. Use of HA IA injections in the treatment of osteoarthritis can result in similar skin necrosis at uncommon anatomic locations corresponding to the site of HA injection. Although tissue necrosis is a rare complication, physicians need to be aware of this possibility as a complication of HA IA injections in the treatment of osteoarthritis and should be mindful of potential treatment options to manage this adverse event. © 2014 Canadian Dermatology Association.

  4. Clinical predictors of tissue necrosis following rattlesnake envenomation.

    PubMed

    Heise, C William; Ruha, Anne-Michelle; Padilla-Jones, Angela; Truitt Hayek, Carrie; Gerkin, Richard D

    2017-09-08

    Rattlesnake envenomation (RSE) causes edema, hemotoxicity and tissue necrosis. Necrosis may result in permanent disability. To study patient-related factors associated with tissue necrosis after Crotalus envenomation. Prospective cohort study of patients admitted to the Medical Toxicology service with diagnosis of RSE between April 2011 and November 2014. Inclusion criteria were age ≥18 years and upper extremity (UE) envenomation site. Primary outcome was tissue necrosis, including dermonecrosis, manifesting as bullae. Secondary outcome was amputation. 77 subjects, age 18 to 88 years, met inclusion criteria. Rattlesnake species was unknown in most cases. All received Fab antivenom. 62 (82%) had a digital envenomation. 31 (40.3%) had necrosis. Necrotic area ranged from 0.1 cm(2) to 14 cm(2). Procedural interventions, (superficial debridement, dermotomy, surgical exploration, and operative debridement of devitalized tissue) occurred in 25 (32.5%). Five (6.5%) underwent dermotomy and 6 (7.8%) operative debridement. No amputations were performed. Patients with cyanosis on presentation had increased risk of developing necrosis (11/12; RR 2.98 95% CI 1.99-4.46). Ecchymosis on presentation was also associated with increased risk of necrosis (24/32; RR 4.04 95% CI 2.08-7.86). Patients with social or regular ethanol use were more likely to develop necrosis than those without (28/53; RR 4.23 95% CI 1.42-12.6). Regular cocaine use was associated with increased risk of operative debridement (4/6; RR 9.13 95% CI 2.33-35.8). A nonsignificant risk of operative debridement occurred with tobacco use (RR 1.14 95%CI 0.99-1.31 p = 0.09). Time to antivenom did not correlate with risk of necrosis. UE RSE patients who presented with cyanosis, ecchymosis or history of ethanol use were at increased risk of developing necrosis. Cocaine use was associated with increased risk of operative debridement.

  5. 'No delays achiever'.

    PubMed

    2007-05-01

    The latest version of the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement's 'no delays achiever', a web based tool created to help NHS organisations achieve the 18-week target for GP referrals to first treatment, is available at www.nodelaysachiever.nhs.uk.

  6. Contingencies promote delay tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ghaemmaghami, Mahshid; Hanley, Gregory P; Jessel, Joshua

    2016-09-01

    The effectiveness of functional communication training as treatment for problem behavior depends on the extent to which treatment can be extended to typical environments that include unavoidable and unpredictable reinforcement delays. Time-based progressive delay (TBPD) often results in the loss of acquired communication responses and the resurgence of problem behavior, whereas contingency-based progressive delay (CBPD) appears to be effective for increasing tolerance for delayed reinforcement. No direct comparison of TBPD and CBPD has, however, been conducted. We used single-subject designs to compare the relative efficacy of TBPD and CBPD. Four individuals who engaged in problem behavior (e.g., aggression, vocal and motor disruptions, self-injury) participated. Results were consistent across all participants, and showed lower rates of problem behavior and collateral responses during CBPD than during TBPD. The generality of CBPD treatment effects, including optimal rates of communication and compliance with demands, was demonstrated across a small but heterogeneous group of participants, reinforcement contingencies, and contexts.

  7. Delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Che, Xiangming; Li, Xuqi; Qiu, Guanglin; He, Shicai; Fan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDHs) are sometimes difficult to identify at an early stage and can consequently result in diagnostic delays with life-threatening outcomes. It is the aim of this case study to highlight the difficulties encountered with the earlier detection of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias. Methods: Clinical data of patients who received treatment for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernias in registers of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University from 1998 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six patients were included in this study. Left hemidiaphragm was affected in all of them. Most of the patients had a history of traffic accident and 1 a stab-penetrating injury. The interval from injury to developing symptoms ranged from 2 to 11 years (median 5 years). The hernial contents included the stomach, omentum, small intestine, and colon. Diaphragmatic injury was missed in all of them during the initial managements. All patients received operations once the diagnosis of delayed TDH was confirmed, and no postoperative mortality was detected. Conclusions: Delayed TDHs are not common, but can lead to serious consequences once occurred. Early detection of diaphragmatic injuries is crucial. Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion for injuries of the diaphragm in cases with abdominal or lower chest traumas, especially in the initial surgical explorations. We emphasize the need for radiographical follow-up to detect diaphragmatic injuries at an earlier stage. PMID:27512848

  8. Inactivated infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) vaccines.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E; Clouthier, S; Shewmaker, W; Weighall, A; LaPatra, S

    2008-10-01

    The inactivation dynamics of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) by b-propiolactone (BPL), binary ethylenimine (BEI), formaldehyde or heat and the antigenic and immunogenic properties of the inactivated vaccines were evaluated. Chemical treatment of IHNV with 2.7 mm BPL, 1.5 mm BEI or 50 mm formaldehyde abolished virus infectivity within 48 h whereas heat treatment at 50 or 100 degrees C rendered the virus innocuous within 30 min. The inactivated IHNV vaccines were recognized by rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, IHNV-specific antibodies and were differentially recognized by antigenic site I or antigenic site II IHNV glycoprotein-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The BPL inactivated whole virus vaccine was highly efficacious in vaccinated rainbow trout challenged by waterborne exposure to IHNV 7, 28, 42 or 56 days (15 degrees C) after immunization. The formaldehyde inactivated whole virus vaccine was efficacious 7 or 11 days after vaccination of rainbow trout but performed inconsistently when tested at later time points. The other vaccines tested were not efficacious.

  9. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in femoral head necrosis.

    PubMed

    Camporesi, Enrico M; Vezzani, Giuliano; Bosco, Gerardo; Mangar, Devanand; Bernasek, Thomas L

    2010-09-01

    We evaluated hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy on a cohort of patients with femoral head necrosis (FHN). This double-blind, randomized, controlled, prospective study included 20 patients with unilateral FHN. All were Ficat stage II, treated with either compressed oxygen (HBO) or compressed air (HBA). Each patient received 30 treatments of HBO or HBA for 6 weeks. Range of motion, stabilometry, and pain were assessed at the beginning of the study and after 10, 20, and 30 treatments by a blinded physician. After the initial 6-week treatment, the blind was broken; and all HBA patients were offered HBO treatment. At this point, the study becomes observational. Pretreatment, 12-month. and 7 year-follow-up magnetic resonance images were obtained. Statistical comparisons were obtained with nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test. Significant pain improvement for HBO was demonstrated after 20 treatments. Range of motion improved significantly during HBO for all parameters between 20 and 30 treatments. All patients remain substantially pain-free 7 years later: none required hip arthroplasty. Substantial radiographic healing of the osteonecrosis was observed in 7 of 9 hips. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy appears to be a viable treatment modality in patients with Ficat II FHN. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Immunization with viral antigens: infectious haematopoietic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Winton, J R

    1997-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmonids, especially among juvenile fish where losses can be high. For over 20 years, researchers have tested a variety of preparations for control of IHN. Early vaccines consisted of killed virus and were effective when delivered by injection, but too costly to be practical on a large scale. Attenuated vaccines were developed by serial passage in cell culture and by monoclonal antibody selection. These offered excellent protection and were cost-effective, but residual virulence and uncertainty about their effects on other aquatic species made them poor candidates for licensing. Subunit vaccines using part of the IHNV glycoprotein gene cloned into E. coli or into an attenuated strain of A. salmonicida have been tested, appeared safe and were inexpensive. These vaccines were reported to provide some protection when delivered by immersion. Information on the location of antigenic sites on the glycoprotein led to trials using synthetic peptides, but these did not seem to be economically viable. Recently, plasmid vectors encoding the glycoprotein gene under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter were developed for genetic immunization. The constructs were highly protective when delivered by injection, but a more practical delivery system is needed. Thus, while several vaccine strategies have been tried in order to stimulate specific immunity against IHN, more research is needed to develop a commercially viable product for control of this important disease.

  11. Stimulation of neutrophils by tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanoff, S.J.; Vadas, M.A.; Harlan, J.M.; Sparks, L.H.; Gamble, J.R.; Agosti, J.M.; Waltersdorph, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was shown to be a weak direct stimulus of the neutrophil respiratory burst and degranulation. The stimulation, as measured by iodination, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production, and lysozyme release, was considerably increased by the presence of unopsonized zymosan in the reaction mixture, an effect which was associated with the increased ingestion of the zymosan. TNF does not act as an opsonin but, rather, reacts with the neutrophil to increase its phagocytic activity. TNF-dependent phagocytosis, as measured indirectly by iodination, is inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (Mab) 60.1 and 60.3, which recognize different epitopes on the C3bi receptor/adherence-promoting surface glycoprotein of neutrophils. Other neutrophil stimulants, namely N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristic acetate, also increase iodination in the presence of zymosan; as with TNF, the effect of these stimulants is inhibited by Mab 60.1 and 60.3, whereas, in contrast to that of TNF, their stimulation of iodination is unaffected by an Mab directed against TNF. TNF may be a natural stimulant of neutrophils which promotes adherence to endothelial cells and to particles, leading to increased phagocytosis, respiratory burst activity, and degranulation.

  12. Immunization with viral antigens: Infectious haematopoietic necrosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmonids, especially among juvenile fish where losses can be high. For over 20 years, researchers have tested a variety of preparations for control of IHN. Early vaccines consisted of killed virus and were effective when delivered by injection, but too costly to be practical on a large scale. Attenuated vaccines were developed by serial passage in cell culture and by monoclonal antibody selection. These offered excellent protection and were cost-effective, but residual virulence and uncertainty about their effects on other aquatic species made them poor candidates for licensing. Subunit vaccines using part of the IHNV glycoprotein gene cloned into E. coli or into an attenuated strain of A. salmonicida have been tested, appeared safe and were inexpensive. These vaccines were reported to provide some protection when delivered by immersion. Information on the location of antigenic sites on the glycoprotein led to trials using synthetic peptides, but these did not seem to be economically viable. Recently, plasmid vectors encoding the glycoprotein gene under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter were developed for genetic immunization. The constructs were highly protective when delivered by injection, but a more practical delivery system is needed. Thus, while several vaccine strategies have been tried in order to stimulate specific immunity against IHN, more research is needed to develop a commercially viable product for control of this important disease.

  13. Immunization with viral antigens: Infectious haematopoietic necrosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, J.R.; Midtlyng, Paul J.; Brown, F.

    1997-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) is one of the most important viral diseases of salmonids, especially among juvenile fish where losses can be high. For over 20 years, researchers have tested a variety of preparations for control of IHN. Early vaccines consisted of killed virus and were effective when delivered by injection, but too costly to be practical on a large scale. Attenuated vaccines were developed by serial passage in cell culture and by monoclonal antibody selection. These offered excellent protection and were cost-effective, but residual virulence and uncertainty about their effects on other aquatic species made them poor candidates for licensing. Subunit vaccines using part of the IHNV glycoprotein gene cloned into E. coli or into an attenuated strain of A. salmonicida have been tested, appeared safe and were inexpensive. These vaccines were reported to provide some protection when delivered by immersion. Information on the location of antigenic sites on the glycoprotein led to trials using synthetic peptides, but these did not seem to be economically viable. Recently, plasmid vectors encoding the glycoprotein gene under control of a cytomegalovirus promoter were developed for genetic immunization. The constructs were highly protective when delivered by injection, but a more practical delivery system is needed. Thus, while several vaccine strategies have been tried in order to stimulate specific immunity against IHN, more research is needed to develop a commercially viable product for control of this important disease.

  14. Acute Bladder Necrosis after Pelvic Arterial Embolization for Pelvic Trauma: Lessons Learned from Two Cases of Immediate Postembolization Bladder Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Osterberg, E. Charles; Elliott, Sean P.; Hittelman, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of acute bladder injury with bladder neck necrosis identified during the initial operative evaluation and within the early postprocedural period in patients with significant pelvic trauma requiring pelvic vascular embolization. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bladder neck necrosis found during the initial intraoperative surgical evaluation or early postoperative setting. PMID:27656309

  15. Radiation Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Radiation Protection Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Radiation Protection Document Library View and download EPA radiation ...

  16. Interferometric Propagation Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Radar interferometry based on (near) exact repeat passes has lately been used by many groups of scientists, worldwide, to achieve state of the art measurements of topography, glacier and ice stream motion, earthquake displacements, oil field subsidence, lava flows, crop-induced surface decorrelation, and other effects. Variations of tropospheric and ionospheric propagation delays limit the accuracy of all such measurements. We are investigating the extent of this limitation, using data from the Shuttle radar flight, SIR-C, which is sensitive to the troposphere, and the Earth Resources Satellites, ERS-1/2, which are sensitive to both the troposphere and the ionosphere. We are presently gathering statistics of the delay variations over selected, diverse areas to determine the best accuracy possible for repeat track interferometry. The phases of an interferogram depend on both the topography of the scene and variations in propagation delay. The delay variations can be caused by movement of elements in the scene, by changes in tropospheric water vapor and by changes of the charge concentrations in the ionosphere. We plan to separate these causes by using the data from a third satellite visit (three-pass interferometry). The figure gives the geometry of the three-pass observations. The page of the figure is taken to be perpendicular to the spacecraft orbits. The three observational locations are marked on the figure, giving baselines B-12 and B-13, separated by the angle alpha. These parameters are almost constant over the whole scene. However, each pixel has an individual look angle, theta, which is related to the topography, rho is the slant range. A possible spurious time delay is shown. Additional information is contained in the original.

  17. Delayed fluorescence in photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Goltsev, Vasilij; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Chernev, Petko; Strasser, Reto J

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a very efficient photochemical process. Nevertheless, plants emit some of the absorbed energy as light quanta. This luminescence is emitted, predominantly, by excited chlorophyll a molecules in the light-harvesting antenna, associated with Photosystem II (PS II) reaction centers. The emission that occurs before the utilization of the excitation energy in the primary photochemical reaction is called prompt fluorescence. Light emission can also be observed from repopulated excited chlorophylls as a result of recombination of the charge pairs. In this case, some time-dependent redox reactions occur before the excitation of the chlorophyll. This delays the light emission and provides the name for this phenomenon-delayed fluorescence (DF), or delayed light emission (DLE). The DF intensity is a decreasing polyphasic function of the time after illumination, which reflects the kinetics of electron transport reactions both on the (electron) donor and the (electron) acceptor sides of PS II. Two main experimental approaches are used for DF measurements: (a) recording of the DF decay in the dark after a single turnover flash or after continuous light excitation and (b) recording of the DF intensity during light adaptation of the photosynthesizing samples (induction curves), following a period of darkness. In this paper we review historical data on DF research and recent advances in the understanding of the relation between the delayed fluorescence and specific reactions in PS II. An experimental method for simultaneous recording of the induction transients of prompt and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence and decay curves of DF in the millisecond time domain is discussed.

  18. Interferometric Propagation Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Radar interferometry based on (near) exact repeat passes has lately been used by many groups of scientists, worldwide, to achieve state of the art measurements of topography, glacier and ice stream motion, earthquake displacements, oil field subsidence, lava flows, crop-induced surface decorrelation, and other effects. Variations of tropospheric and ionospheric propagation delays limit the accuracy of all such measurements. We are investigating the extent of this limitation, using data from the Shuttle radar flight, SIR-C, which is sensitive to the troposphere, and the Earth Resources Satellites, ERS-1/2, which are sensitive to both the troposphere and the ionosphere. We are presently gathering statistics of the delay variations over selected, diverse areas to determine the best accuracy possible for repeat track interferometry. The phases of an interferogram depend on both the topography of the scene and variations in propagation delay. The delay variations can be caused by movement of elements in the scene, by changes in tropospheric water vapor and by changes of the charge concentrations in the ionosphere. We plan to separate these causes by using the data from a third satellite visit (three-pass interferometry). The figure gives the geometry of the three-pass observations. The page of the figure is taken to be perpendicular to the spacecraft orbits. The three observational locations are marked on the figure, giving baselines B-12 and B-13, separated by the angle alpha. These parameters are almost constant over the whole scene. However, each pixel has an individual look angle, theta, which is related to the topography, rho is the slant range. A possible spurious time delay is shown. Additional information is contained in the original.

  19. Renal papillary necrosis in patients with sickle cell disease: How to recognize this 'forgotten' diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Henderickx, Michaël M E L; Brits, Tim; De Baets, Karen; Seghers, Mattias; Maes, Philip; Trouet, Dominique; De Wachter, Stefan; De Win, Gunter

    2017-06-01

    Renal papillary necrosis is not commonly seen in daily practice, but can have severe consequences when it is not diagnosed in time. It is known to be associated with sickle cell hemoglobinopathies; however a wide range of etiologies are possible, and it is therefore not the first diagnosis clinicians consider in patients with sickle cell disease who present with hematuria. A literature search was performed to summarize the current knowledge about renal papillary necrosis associated with sickle cell disease. These findings are illustrated with a case of a 9-year old girl with sickle cell disease who was referred with painless gross hematuria. Typical radiologic signs for renal papillary necrosis are necrotic cavities that fill with contrast, small collections of contrast peripheral to the calyces in the papillary region (ball-on-tee sign), calcification of the papillary defect, filling defects, hydronephrosis, blunted papillary tip, clefts in the renal medulla filled with contrast, hyperattenuated medullary calcifications, non-enhanced lesions surrounded by rings of excreted contrast, and clubbed calyces. This study focuses on the pathophysiology of renal papillary necrosis associated with sickle cell disease, the possible symptoms, as well as the diagnostic steps, with a special interest in particular presentation on old (retrograde pyelography) and new (computed tomography) gold standard in radiologic imaging, and the management for this pathology. This study aims to remind clinicians of this "forgotten" diagnosis and what signs to look for in pediatric patients with sickle cell disease who present with hematuria. In pediatric cases radiation protection is important, therefore knowing what radiologic signs can be found on retrograde pyelography can lead to early identification of this pathology without having to proceed to computed tomography. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of adipocyte-derived stem cells in treatment of cutaneous radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Riccobono, Diane; Agay, Diane; Scherthan, Harry; Forcheron, Fabien; Vivier, Mylène; Ballester, Bruno; Meineke, Viktor; Drouet, Michel

    2012-08-01

    Cutaneous radiation syndrome caused by local high dose irradiation is characterized by delayed outcome and incomplete healing. Recent therapeutic management of accidentally irradiated burn patients has suggested the benefit of local cellular therapy using mesenchymal stem cell grafting. According to the proposed strategy of early treatment, large amounts of stem cells would be necessary in the days following exposure and hospitalization, which would require allogeneic stem cells banking. In this context, the authors compared the benefit of local autologous and allogeneic adipocyte-derived stem cell injection in a large animal model. Minipigs were locally irradiated using a 60Co gamma source at a dose of 50 Gy and divided into three groups. Two groups were grafted with autologous (n = 5) or allogeneic (n = 5) adipocyte-derived stem cells four times after the radiation exposure, whereas the control group received the vehicle without cells (n = 8). A clinical score was elaborated to compare the efficiency of the three treatments. All controls exhibited local inflammatory injuries leading to a persistent painful necrosis, thus mimicking the clinical evolution in human victims. In the autologous adipocyte-derived stem cells group, skin healing without necrosis or uncontrollable pain was observed. In contrast, the clinical outcome was not significantly different in the adipocyte-derived stem cell allogeneic group when compared with controls. This study suggests that autologous adipocyte-derived stem cell grafting improves cutaneous radiation syndrome wound healing, whereas allogeneic adipocyte derived stem cells do not. Further studies will establish whether manipulation of allogeneic stem cells will improve their therapeutic potential.

  1. Great Toe Necrosis Predicts an Unfavorable Limb Salvage Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Ichioka, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Summary: The initial location of necrosis may affect the limb salvage rate. This study of 130 patients with chronic toe ulcers or gangrene was performed to assess whether the location of initial necrosis in the toes affected limb salvage prognosis. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to whether the initial necrosis was in the great toe or in other toes. Limb salvage prognosis was determined retrospectively. In the great toe group, the rates of total toe loss and major amputation were 50.0% and 24.4%, respectively. When the initial necrosis was in other toes, these rates were 27.3% and 9.3%, respectively. Great toe necrosis is associated with significantly higher rates of total toe loss (odds ratio = 3.10; P = 0.003; 95% confidence interval, 1.43−6.68) and major amputation (odds ratio = 3.66; P = 0.007; 95% confidence interval, 1.37−9.79). The great toe is supplied by 3 source arteries, whereas the lesser toes are fed by 1 or 2 arteries. Therefore, necrosis initiating from the great toe may reflect the presence of severe vascular disorders. The great toe is also anatomically connected to much of the foot via the tendons. Infection is more likely to spread along these tendons, which may reduce limb prognosis. Thus, the initial location of necrosis may be predictive of limb prognosis. PMID:25426399

  2. [Torsion and necrosis of epiploic appendices of the large bowel].

    PubMed

    Timofeev, M E; Fedorov, E D; Krechetova, A P; Shapoval'iants, S G

    2014-01-01

    The features of the clinical symptoms was studied, the possibility of laparoscopy in modern diagnosis and treatment of epiploic appendices torsion and necrosis of the large bowel was assessed in the article. It was done the retrospective analysis of the medical records of 87 patients with a diagnosis of epiploic appendices torsion and necrosis of the large bowel. The patients had laparoscopic operations in our hospital in the period from January 1995 to December 2012. The clinical picture, laboratory and instrumental datas in cases of epiploic appendices torsion and necrosis were scarce and nonspecific. An abdominal pain preferentially localized in the lower divisions was the main symptom (97.7%). The instrumental methods did not allow to diagnose the torsion and necrosis of epiploic appendices in the majority of cases and all these techniques were used for the differential diagnosis with other diseases. The assumption of the presence of appendices torsion and necrosis occured just in 34.5% of cases before the operation. Diagnosis of epiploic appendices torsion and necrosis present significant difficulties on prehospital and preoperative stages. The diagnostic laparoscopy is the method of choice in unclear situations and it allows to diagnose the torsion and necrosis of epiploic appendices in 96.6% of cases. Successful surgical treatment by using laparoscopic approach is possible in 90.8% of cases.

  3. Delayed type IV muscle flap in a feline model.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Ned; Craven, Cameron; Phillips, Linda G

    2006-03-01

    The concept of delaying a skin flap is well established and has been implemented into plastic surgery practice for years. Some investigators have delayed musculocutaneous flaps to improve the perforator inflow. To our knowledge, the concept of delaying a muscle flap had previously never been tested in a model with segmental pedicles. Five cats each underwent 3 sequential operations providing them with a sartorius muscle whose blood supply was a single distal pedicle. The opposite leg was used as a control. Our delayed type IV muscle flap demonstrated perfusion to the proximal tip of the sartorius muscle without necrosis or loss of muscle mass (P < 0.0001). The control showed no evidence of perfusion beyond the distal portion of the muscle when infused through the distal pedicle. The delayed flap can survive on a distal blood supply that would not be adequate in a single-stage procedure. This flap has an increased arc of rotation that may provide solutions to difficult reconstructive problems in the groin, lower abdomen, genitalia, knee, proximal leg, and might be suitable as a free flap.

  4. Tumor necrosis factor interaction with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, De-Hao; Elzey, Sherrie; Delrio, Frank W.; Keene, Athena M.; Tyner, Katherine M.; Clogston, Jeffrey D.; Maccuspie, Robert I.; Guha, Suvajyoti; Zachariah, Michael R.; Hackley, Vincent A.

    2012-05-01

    We report on a systematic investigation of molecular conjugation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) protein onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and the subsequent binding behavior to its antibody (anti-TNF). We employ a combination of physical and spectroscopic characterization methods, including electrospray-differential mobility analysis, dynamic light scattering, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The native TNF used in this study exists in the active homotrimer configuration prior to conjugation. After binding to AuNPs, the maximum surface density of TNF is (0.09 +/- 0.02) nm-2 with a binding constant of 3 × 106 (mol L-1)-1. Dodecyl sulfate ions induce desorption of monomeric TNF from the AuNP surface, indicating a relatively weak intermolecular binding within the AuNP-bound TNF trimers. Anti-TNF binds to both TNF-conjugated and citrate-stabilized AuNPs, showing that non-specific binding is significant. Based on the number of anti-TNF molecules adsorbed, a substantially higher binding affinity was observed for the TNF-conjugated surface. The inclusion of thiolated polyethylene glycol (SH-PEG) on the AuNPs inhibits the binding of anti-TNF, and the amount of inhibition is related to the number ratio of surface bound SH-PEG to TNF and the way in which the ligands are introduced. This study highlights the challenges in quantitatively characterizing complex hybrid nanoscale conjugates, and provides insight on TNF-AuNP formation and activity.We report on a systematic investigation of molecular conjugation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) protein onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and the subsequent binding behavior to its antibody (anti-TNF). We employ a combination of physical and spectroscopic characterization methods, including electrospray-differential mobility analysis, dynamic light scattering, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

  5. Radiation sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine the amount of radiation exposure from nuclear accidents, the best signs of the severity of the ... doses of radiation, such as radiation from a nuclear power plant accident Exposure to excessive radiation for medical treatments

  6. Radiation enteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation enteropathy; Radiation-induced small bowel injury; Post-radiation enteritis ... Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or radioactive seeds to kill cancer cells. The therapy ...

  7. Plaquing procedure for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, J.A.; Mulcahy, D.

    1980-01-01

    A single overlay plaque assay was designed and evaluated for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus. Epithelioma papillosum carpio cells were grown in normal atmosphere with tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane- or HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid)-buffered media. Plaques were larger and formed more quickly on 1- to 3-day-old cell monolayers than on older monolayers. Cell culture medium with a 10% addition of fetal calf serum (MEM 10) or without serum (MEM 0) were the most efficient virus diluents. Dilution with phosphate-buffered saline, saline, normal broth, or deionized water reduced plaque numbers. Variations in the pH (7.0 to 8.0) of a MEM 0 diluent did not affect plaque numbers. Increasing the volume of viral inoculum above 0.15 ml (15- by 60-mm plate) decreased plaquing efficiency. Significantly more plaques occurred under gum tragacanth and methylcellulose than under agar or agarose overlays. Varying the pH (6.8 to 7.4) of methylcellulose overlays did not significantly change plaque numbers. More plaques formed under the thicker overlays of both methylcellulose and gum tragacanth. Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and HEPES performed equally well, buffering either medium or overlay. Plaque numbers were reduced when cells were rinsed after virus adsorption or less than 1 h was allowed for adsorption. Variation in adsorption time between 60 and 180 min did not change plaque numbers. The mean plaque formation time was 7 days at 16 degrees C. The viral dose response was linear when the standardized assay was used.

  8. Management of Necrotizing Fasciitis and Fecal Peritonitis following Ostomy Necrosis and Detachment by Using NPT and Flexi-Seal

    PubMed Central

    Yetışır, Fahri; Şarer, Akgün Ebru; Acar, H. Zafer

    2015-01-01

    Management of necrotizing fasciitis and severe faecal peritonitis following ostomy in elderly patient with comorbid disease is challenging. We would like to report management of frozen Open Abdomen (OA) with colonic fistula following ostomy necrosis and detachment in an elderly patient with comorbid disease and malignancy. 78-year-old woman with high stage rectum carcinoma was admitted to emergency department and underwent operation for severe peritonitis and sigmoid colonic perforation. Loop sigmoidostomy was performed. At postoperative 15th day, she was transferred to our clinic with necrotizing fasciitis and severe faecal peritonitis due to ostomy necrosis and detachment. Enteric effluent was removed from the OA wound by using the Flexi-Seal Fecal Management System (FMS) (ConvaTec) and pesser tube in deeply located colonic fistula in conjunction with Negative Pressure Therapy (NPT). Maturation of ostomy was facilitated by using second NPT on ostomy side. After source control, delayed abdominal closure was achieved by skin flap approximation. PMID:26448894

  9. Tongue Necrosis as an Initial Manifestation of Giant Cell Arteritis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Jose R.; Vernon, Natalia; Ghaffari, Gisoo

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic vasculitis of medium and large arteries that mainly affects the external carotid artery. It is a diagnosis of the elderly that typically presents as low-grade fever, temporal tenderness, claudication of the jaw, and in some patients vision loss. In cases where GCA presents with atypical manifestations, the diagnosis may be more difficult, causing a delay in both diagnosis and treatment and ultimately leading to irreversible complications. In this paper, we present an atypical presentation of GCA with symptoms of neck swelling and lingual pain in an elderly female. These symptoms progressed to bilateral necrosis and eventual dislodgement of the tongue. Lingual necrosis is a severe potential complication in GCA. In patients presenting with lingual swelling, pain, and discoloration, GCA should be suspected and prompt therapy should be initiated to avoid irreversible complications. PMID:25802790

  10. Tongue necrosis as an initial manifestation of giant cell arteritis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Jose R; Vernon, Natalia; Ghaffari, Gisoo

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is a systemic vasculitis of medium and large arteries that mainly affects the external carotid artery. It is a diagnosis of the elderly that typically presents as low-grade fever, temporal tenderness, claudication of the jaw, and in some patients vision loss. In cases where GCA presents with atypical manifestations, the diagnosis may be more difficult, causing a delay in both diagnosis and treatment and ultimately leading to irreversible complications. In this paper, we present an atypical presentation of GCA with symptoms of neck swelling and lingual pain in an elderly female. These symptoms progressed to bilateral necrosis and eventual dislodgement of the tongue. Lingual necrosis is a severe potential complication in GCA. In patients presenting with lingual swelling, pain, and discoloration, GCA should be suspected and prompt therapy should be initiated to avoid irreversible complications.

  11. [Diagnosis of delayed puberty].

    PubMed

    Busiah, K; Belien, V; Dallot, N; Fila, M; Guilbert, J; Harroche, A; Leger, J

    2007-09-01

    Puberty is the phenomenon that conducts once to reproductive maturation. Delayed puberty (DP) is defined by the absence of testicular development in boys beyond 14 years old (or a testicular volume lower than 4 ml) and by the absence of breast development in girls beyond 13 years old. DP occurs in approximatively 3% of cases. Most cases are functional DP, with a large amount of constitutional delay of puberty. Others etiologies are hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism like Kallmann syndrome, or hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism. Turner syndrome is a diagnostic one should not forget by its frequency. Treatment is hormonal replacement therapy and of the etiology. During the last decade, many genes have been identified and elucidated the etiological diagnosis of some hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism syndrome. Further studies are required in collaboration with molecular biologists to better understand the mechanism of hypothalamic pituitary gonadal axis abnormalities and of the neuroendocrine physiology of the onset of puberty.

  12. Radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists. PMID:2040250

  13. Mandibular bone necrosis after use of paraformaldehyde-containing paste

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-hwan; Choi, Yoorina

    2016-01-01

    Paraformaldehyde has been used in the past as a pulpotomy agent. However, it has a severe cytotoxic effect and may cause alveolar bone necrosis. Depulpin, a devitalizing agent containing 49% paraformaldehyde, is no longer used frequently due to its severe side effects. In the two cases described in the present study, Depulpin was used as a devitalizing agent during root canal treatment. It caused a gradual loss of sensibility in adjacent teeth, gingival necrosis, and osteomyelitis. This case report demonstrates the serious side effects of using a paraformaldehyde-containing paste as a devitalizing agent for pulp, particularly mandibular bone necrosis. PMID:27847756

  14. Glatiramer acetate-induced lobular panniculitis and skin necrosis.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Casey E; Litchfield, John; Youngberg, George; Leicht, Stuart S; Krishnaswamy, Guha

    2015-03-01

    Glatiramer acetate (GA) is a drug that commonly is used for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Although it typically is known as a safe and effective therapy, a number of adverse effects associated with GA have been reported in the literature. Local injection-site reactions (LISRs) and mild systemic symptoms are among the most commonly described adverse effects. A review of the literature revealed limited reports of panniculitis as an adverse effect of GA injection and even fewer describing associated skin necrosis. We report a case of GA-induced panniculitis and skin necrosis and discuss the occurrence of panniculitis, necrosis, and lipoatrophy following GA injections.

  15. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head presenting as trochanteric bursitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, B F

    1990-01-01

    Five patients are described with avascular necrosis of the femoral head who presented with ipsilateral trochanteric bursitis, in the absence of clearcut hip joint disease. Avascular necrosis was indicated by magnetic resonance imaging. It is suggested that clinical trochanteric bursitis, especially when refractory to local corticosteroid treatment, may be the initial sign of hip disease. In the patient with risk factor(s) for avascular necrosis that diagnosis should be considered and evaluated with appropriate studies, such as magnetic resonance imaging, to prevent weight bearing at an early stage and permit possible surgical decompression in the hope of postponing or obviating the need for total hip replacement. PMID:2241294

  16. Breast lipoma with central fat necrosis: case report

    PubMed Central

    Bouroumane, Mohamed Reda; Khalil, Reda; Khalil, Hind; Jalal, Hicham

    2016-01-01

    Fat necrosis of the breast is a benign non-suppurative inflammatory process of adipose tissue that most commonly occurs as the result of minor breast trauma. We present a case of a 40-years-old female with fat necrosis in a breast lipoma. She presented with an overlapping mass on the lateral quadrants. Mammography showed Well delineated radiolucent mass with peripheral “egg-shell” calcifications, that appeared an hypoechoic mass with posterior shadowing on ultrasonography. A history of accidental trauma raises the suspicion of fat necrosis. Pathology is necessary when radiological findings simulate malignancy.

  17. Cervical necrosis after chemoradiation for cervical cancer: case series and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the management of cervical necrosis (CN) following radiotherapy (RT) and the impact of smoking status. This rare complication mimics a neoplastic recurrence, and causes concern among attending physicians. Methods Between July 2008 and March 2013, 5 women on 285 with localized cervical cancer had a CN following RT. Patients were treated with concomitant chemoradiation. The medical records were reviewed to abstract demographic and clinical information until March 2013. Results 1.75% (95% confidence interval: 0.23 to 3.28%) developed CN. All patients were smokers with a mean of 19.5 pack-years (range: 7.5-45 pack-years). All patients were treated with weekly Cisplatin chemotherapy and external beam radiation to the pelvis, 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Four patients received an extra boost with a median dose of 7.2 Gy (range: 5.4-10 Gy). All patients had intracavitary brachytherapy (range: 27.9 to 30 Gy). Clinical presentation was similar for all the cases: vaginal discharge associated with pain. Mean time for time post-radiation therapy to necrosis was 9.3 months (range: 2.2-20.5 months). Standard workup was done to exclude cancer recurrence: biopsies and radiologic imaging. Conservative treatment was performed with excellent results. Resolution of the necrosis was complete after a few months (range: 1 to 4 months). Median follow-up until March 2013 was 19 months. All the patients were alive with no clinical evidence of disease. Conclusions This study, the largest to date, shows that conservative management of CN after RT is effective, and should be attempted. This complication is more common in smokers, and counseling intervention should result in fewer complications of CN. PMID:24053332

  18. Theoretical Delay Time Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelemans, Gijs; Toonen, Silvia; Bours, Madelon

    2013-01-01

    We briefly discuss the method of population synthesis to calculate theoretical delay time distributions of Type Ia supernova progenitors. We also compare the results of different research groups and conclude that, although one of the main differences in the results for single degenerate progenitors is the retention efficiency with which accreted hydrogen is added to the white dwarf core, this alone cannot explain all the differences.

  19. Delayed visual maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, G F; Hungerford, J; Jones, R B

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen blind babies who were considered to be showing the characteristics of delayed visual maturation were studied prospectively. The diagnosis was made on clinical grounds, and the criteria for this are discussed. All of these infants developed visual responses between 4 and 6 months of age and had normal or near normal visual acuities by 1 year of age. Long term follow up, however, has shown neurological abnormalities in some of these children. PMID:6200080

  20. Delayed coking process

    SciTech Connect

    Shigley, J.K.; Roussel, K.M.; Harris, S.D.

    1991-07-02

    This patent describes improvement in a delayed premium coking process in which an aromatic mineral oil feedstock is heated to elevated temperature and introduced continuously to a coking drum under delayed coking conditions wherein the heated feedstock soaks in its contained heat to convert the feedstock to cracked vapors and premium coke at lower than normal coking temperatures in the range of about 780{degrees} F. to about 895{degrees} F. and in which the introduction of feedstock to the coking drum is discontinued after the coking drum is filled to a desired level. The improvement comprises: introducing additional aromatic mineral oil capable of forming coke admixed with a non-coking material to the coking drum under delayed coking conditions for a sufficient period of time to convert unconverted liquid material to coke wherein the concentration of aromatic mineral oil in the admixture is from 5 to 90 percent, and thereafter subjecting the contents of the coke drum to a heat soak at a temperature greater than the initial coking temperature whereby a premium coke having improved CTE and reduced fluff is obtained.

  1. Delay discounting by pathological gamblers.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Mark R; Marley, Janice; Jacobs, Eric A

    2003-01-01

    Discounting of delayed rewards by pathological gamblers was compared to discounting of delayed rewards by matched control nongambling participants. All participants completed a hypothetical choice task in which they made repeated choices between dollars 1,000 available after a delay and an equal or lesser amount of money available immediately. The delay to the large amount of money was varied from 1 week to 10 years across conditions. Indifference points between immediate money and delayed money were identified at each delay condition by varying the amount of immediate money across choice trials. For the majority of participants, indifference points decreased monotonically across delays. Overall, gamblers discounted the delayed rewards more steeply than did control participants. PMID:14768665

  2. Radiation characterization summary :

    SciTech Connect

    Parma, Edward J.,; Quirk, Thomas J.; Lippert, Lance L.; Griffin, Patrick J; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, Spencer Michael

    2013-04-01

    This document presents the facility-recommended characterization of the neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the 44-inch-long lead-boron bucket in the central cavity on the 32-inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environment is ACRR-LB44-CC-32-cl. The neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray energy spectra are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma-ray flux profiles within the experiment area of the bucket. Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse and steady-state operations are presented with conversion examples.

  3. MCNP6 enhancements of delayed-particle production

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, G. W.

    2012-07-01

    Over the last decade, there has been an increased interest in the production of delayed-particle signatures from neutron and photon interactions with matter. To address this interest, various radiation transport codes have developed a wide range of delayed-particle physics packages. With the recent merger of the Monte Carlo transport codes MCNP5 and MCNPX, MCNP6 inherited the comprehensive model-based delayed-particle production capabilities developed in MCNPX over the last few years. An integral part of this capability consists of the depletion code CINDER90 which was incorporated into MCNPX in 2004. During this last year, significant improvements have been made to the MCNP6 physics and algorithms associated with delayed-particle production, including the development of a delayed-beta capability, an algorithm enhancement for the delayed-neutron treatment, and a database enhancement for delayed-gamma emission. The delayed-beta feature represents an important component in modeling background signals produced by active interrogation sources. Combined, these improvements provide MCNP6 with a flexible state-of-the-art physics package for generating high-fidelity signatures from fission and activation. This paper provides details of these enhancements and presents results for a variety of fission and activation examples. (authors)

  4. Pharmacological Doses of Daily Ascorbate Protect Tumors from Radiation Damage after a Single Dose of Radiation in an Intracranial Mouse Glioma Model

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Carole; Fabre, Marie-Sophie; Collis, Sarah V.; Castro, M. Leticia; Field, Cameron S.; Schleich, Nanette; McConnell, Melanie J.; Herst, Patries M.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological ascorbate is currently used as an anti-cancer treatment, potentially in combination with radiation therapy, by integrative medicine practitioners. In the acidic, metal-rich tumor environment, ascorbate acts as a pro-oxidant, with a mode of action similar to that of ionizing radiation; both treatments kill cells predominantly by free radical-mediated DNA damage. The brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is very resistant to radiation; radiosensitizing GBM cells will improve survival of GBM patients. Here, we demonstrate that a single fraction (6 Gy) of radiation combined with a 1 h exposure to ascorbate (5 mM) sensitized murine glioma GL261 cells to radiation in survival and colony-forming assays in vitro. In addition, we report the effect of a single fraction (4.5 Gy) of whole brain radiation combined with daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (1 mg/kg) in an intracranial GL261 glioma mouse model. Tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: one group received a single dose of 4.5 Gy to the brain 8 days after tumor implantation, a second group received daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (day 8–45) after implantation, a third group received both treatments and a fourth control group received no treatment. While radiation delayed tumor progression, intraperitoneal ascorbate alone had no effect on tumor progression. Tumor progression was faster in tumor-bearing mice treated with radiation and daily ascorbate than in those treated with radiation alone. Histological analysis showed less necrosis in tumors treated with both radiation and ascorbate, consistent with a radio-protective effect of ascorbate in vivo. Discrepancies between our in vitro and in vivo results may be explained by differences in the tumor microenvironment, which determines whether ascorbate remains outside the cell, acting as a pro-oxidant, or whether it enters the cells and acts as an anti-oxidant. PMID:25566497

  5. Renal papillary necrosis and pyelonephritis accompanying fenoprofen therapy.

    PubMed

    Husserl, F E; Lange, R K; Kantrow, C M

    1979-10-26

    Renal papillary necrosis occurred after fenoprofen calcium administration in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and urinary tract infection. Possible mechanisms of renal damage may be hypersensitivity, decreased blood flow, and decreased production of a prostaglandin E-like substance.

  6. Toe Necrosis, Etiologies and Management, a Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Abdelfatah Abou; Newman, Mackenzie; Simman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Toe necrosis may have vast different etiologies. These include ischemia, embolus, and others. (1) The most common etiology is ischemia. It is a reduction in blood supply to a viable tissue that can lead to susceptibility to infection and tissue death. Peripheral ischemia, which is rooted in the lower limbs, is a major risk factor for toe necrosis because the basal metabolic requirements of tissue are not being sufficiently met. As a result, pain, ulcers, and gangrene commonly occur. (2) Other causes of direct and indirect toe necrosis and related lower limb gangrene include mechanical trauma, infectious, pharmacological sensitivity, cancer, blue toe syndrome, and other granulomatous diseases, such as Churg-Strauss syndrome. We present a case series of toes necrosis which resulted from different etiologies and their management. PMID:26199887

  7. Recommendations from the INHAND Apoptosis/Necrosis Working Group.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Susan A; Dixon, Darlene; Hailey, James R; Harada, Takanori; Herbert, Ronald A; Maronpot, Robert R; Nolte, Thomas; Rehg, Jerold E; Rittinghausen, Susanne; Rosol, Thomas J; Satoh, Hiroshi; Vidal, Justin D; Willard-Mack, Cynthia L; Creasy, Dianne M

    2016-02-01

    Historically, there has been confusion relating to the diagnostic nomenclature for individual cell death. Toxicologic pathologists have generally used the terms "single cell necrosis" and "apoptosis" interchangeably. Increased research on the mechanisms of cell death in recent years has led to the understanding that apoptosis and necrosis involve different cellular pathways and that these differences can have important implications when considering overall mechanisms of toxicity, and, for these reasons, the separate terms of apoptosis and necrosis should be used whenever differentiation is possible. However, it is also recognized that differentiation of the precise pathway of cell death may not be important, necessary, or possible in routine toxicity studies and so a more general term to indicate cell death is warranted in these situations. Morphological distinction between these two forms of cell death can sometimes be straightforward but can also be challenging. This article provides a brief discussion of the cellular mechanisms and morphological features of apoptosis and necrosis as well as guidance on when the pathologist should use these terms. It provides recommended nomenclature along with diagnostic criteria (in hematoxylin and eosin [H&E]-stained sections) for the most common forms of cell death (apoptosis and necrosis). This document is intended to serve as current guidance for the nomenclature of cell death for the International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria Organ Working Groups and the toxicologic pathology community at large. The specific recommendations are:Use necrosis and apoptosis as separate diagnostic terms.Use modifiers to denote the distribution of necrosis (e.g., necrosis, single cell; necrosis, focal; necrosis, diffuse; etc.).Use the combined term apoptosis/single cell necrosis whenThere is no requirement or need to split the processes, orWhen the nature of cell death cannot be determined with certainty, orWhen both

  8. Programmable Differential Delay Circuit With Fine Delay Adjustment

    DOEpatents

    DeRyckere, John F.; Jenkins, Philip Nord; Cornett, Frank Nolan

    2002-07-09

    Circuitry that provides additional delay to early arriving signals such that all data signals arrive at a receiving latch with same path delay. The delay of a forwarded clock reference is also controlled such that the capturing clock edge will be optimally positioned near quadrature (depending on latch setup/hold requirements). The circuitry continuously adapts to data and clock path delay changes and digital filtering of phase measurements reduce errors brought on by jittering data edges. The circuitry utilizes only the minimum amount of delay necessary to achieve objective thereby limiting any unintended jitter. Particularly, this programmable differential delay circuit with fine delay adjustment is designed to allow the skew between ASICS to be minimized. This includes skew between data bits, between data bits and clocks as well as minimizing the overall skew in a channel between ASICS.

  9. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head in patients treated for leukaemia. Assessment of the need for a diagnostic protocol.

    PubMed

    Alguacil Pinel, J; Vila Vives, P; Salom Taverner, M

    To evaluate the incidence of avascular necrosis of the hip in leukaemia patients treated in our hospital with high doses of corticosteroids in order to evaluate the necessity for an early detection protocol. Observational-descriptive and retrospective study from 2005 to 2016 of 253 patients diagnosed with paediatric leukaemia. Patients with musculoskeletal pathology were identified and patients with avascular necrosis were analysed. A total of 26 patients (10%) had musculoskeletal symptoms. Three patients with avascular necrosis (1.2%) were analysed. One girl, 7 years old, was treated conservatively with traction - suspension and discharge. Two boys, an 11 and a 15.4 year-old,who developed graft-versus-host disease secondary to bone marrow transplantation, and whose treatment included high doses of corticosteroids, developed avascular necrosis of the hip. One was treated with bisphosphonates and forage and the other ended up with a total hip arthroplasty. The occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms during the treatment of leukaemia is different according to the bibliographic series (0.43 -12.6%). Some authors observe an increased risk in female patients between the ages of 10 and 17. A retrospective study reveals that there is a delay of 3.9 months in the diagnosis of CAP since the onset of pain. Other authors relate NAV to loading joints, age and high doses of corticosteroids. Based on the low incidence of avascular necrosis of the hip in our 14-year-old population treated for leukaemia, the creation of diagnostic protocols seems not to be necessary. However, close monitoring of patients with potential risk factors recognized in the literature, is advisable. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Gastric Necrosis due to Acute Massive Gastric Dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Pergel, Ahmet; Yucel, Ahmet Fikret; Sahin, Dursun Ali; Ozer, Ender

    2013-01-01

    Gastric necrosis due to acute massive gastric dilatation is relatively rare. Vascular reasons, herniation, volvulus, acute gastric dilatation, anorexia, and bulimia nervosa play a role in the etiology of the disease. Early diagnosis and treatment are highly important as the associated morbidity and mortality rates are high. In this case report, we present a case of gastric necrosis due to acute gastric dilatation accompanied with the relevant literature. PMID:23983714

  11. Avascular necrosis of the 1st metatarsal head.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, M; Bialik, V; Eidelman, M; Katzman, A

    2008-10-01

    Idiopathic avascular necrosis of first metatarsophalangeal head in child is unique condition not described in literature in past exlude one case. It seems to be part of avascular bone necrosis syndromes, like Freiberg disease, Sever disease etc. and the same principles of treatment are appropriate in AVN of 1st MTT head. We describe the case of bilateral AVN of 1st MTT head treated conservatively with complete cure.

  12. [The asterisk sign and adult ischemic femur head necrosis].

    PubMed

    Dihlmann, W; Heller, M

    1985-04-01

    The asterisk sign is a stellate density, which is seen normally in the femoral head on computed tomography. It is due to the demonstration of the trabeculae in the femoral head. In adult ischaemic necrosis of the femoral head, there are characteristic changes in the asterisk sign at an early stage, even before there is collapse of the head. The changes are described and the indications for performing CT of the hip for diagnosing adult ischaemic necrosis are discussed.

  13. Coexisting avascular necrosis of the scaphoid and lunate.

    PubMed

    Park, Il-Jung; Lee, Sang-Uk; Kim, Hyoung-Min

    2010-11-01

    Reports of coexisting avascular necrosis of more than one carpal bone are rare. We report coexisting avascular necrosis of the scaphoid and lunate in a 56-year-old woman with no history of using steroids or injury. We treated her with a radioscapholunate fusion with two angled 2.4 mm distal radius plates to stabilise the locking plate. At her 12-month follow up there was no evidence of non-union.

  14. Renal cortical necrosis: A rare complication of Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Bansal, N; Jhorawat, R; Kimmatkar, P D; Malhotra, V

    2014-11-01

    A young female with Plasmodium vivax malaria presented with anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, thrombocytopenia, and advanced renal failure. She remained anuric for more than 3 weeks. Kidney biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of acute cortical necrosis. During follow-up, she became dialysis independent, but remained in stage 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) at 3 month. P. vivax is supposed to be benign in nature, but can lead to rare and severe complication like renal cortical necrosis and progress to CKD.

  15. Abdominal compartment syndrome after endovascular repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm leads to acute intestinal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiyang; Zhao, Jichun; Huang, Bin; Yuan, Ding; Yang, Yi; Ma, Yukui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) after endovascular repair (EVAR) of rupture abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) is a rare emergency situation, which has a high mortality. However, the progression of ACS is rapid and the diagnosis is usually been delayed, which increase the difficulties in treatment and affect the prognosis. We describe a case of a sever complication (acute intestinal necrosis) resulting from ACS after endovascular repair of rAAA. Clinical Finding: An elderly man, 81 years old, complained a sudden lower abdominal and back pain without any predisposing cause. He had a history of hypertension for 20 years without any regular anti-hypertensive therapy. Physical Examination revealed that the blood pressure was 89/54 mmHg, pulse was 120/min, oxygen saturation was 91%. The abdominal ultrasound and the CTA (computed tomography angiography) scan revealed a rAAA. Emergency EVAR under general anesthesia was performed for this patient. Diagnosis: Fourteen hours after endovascular repair, sudden decreased of blood pressure (70/50 mmHg) and oxygen saturation (70%) was observed. ACS or bleeding of retroperitoneal space was diagnosed. Interventions: Abdominal laparotomy was immediately performed. ACS was verified and a severe complication (acute intestinal necrosis) was observed, intestinal resection was performed for this patient. Outcomes: Unfortunately, this patient died after operation because of multi-organ failure in a very short period, which is very rare regarding to this condition. Surgical pathology, diagnosis and management were discussed. Conclusion: ACS was occurred with a severe complication (acute intestinal necrosis) in a very short period, which is very rare regarding to this condition after EVAR, it reminds us the severe result of ACS and more methods to prevent it happened after surgical management. PMID:27893667

  16. An intracellular matrix metalloproteinase-2 isoform induces tubular regulated necrosis: implications for acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Ceron, Carla S; Baligand, Celine; Joshi, Sunil; Wanga, Shaynah; Cowley, Patrick M; Walker, Joy P; Song, Sang Heon; Mahimkar, Rajeev; Baker, Anthony J; Raffai, Robert L; Wang, Zhen J; Lovett, David H

    2017-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) causes severe morbidity, mortality, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Mortality is particularly marked in the elderly and with preexisting CKD. Oxidative stress is a common theme in models of AKI induced by ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury. We recently characterized an intracellular isoform of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) induced by oxidative stress-mediated activation of an alternate promoter in the first intron of the MMP-2 gene. This generates an NH2-terminal truncated MMP-2 (NTT-MMP-2) isoform that is intracellular and associated with mitochondria. The NTT-MMP-2 isoform is expressed in kidneys of 14-mo-old mice and in a mouse model of coronary atherosclerosis and heart failure with CKD. We recently determined that NTT-MMP-2 is induced in human renal transplants with delayed graft function and correlated with tubular cell necrosis. To determine mechanism(s) of action, we generated proximal tubule cell-specific NTT-MMP-2 transgenic mice. Although morphologically normal at the light microscopic level at 4 mo, ultrastructural studies revealed foci of tubular epithelial cell necrosis, the mitochondrial permeability transition, and mitophagy. To determine whether NTT-MMP-2 expression enhances sensitivity to I-R injury, we performed unilateral I-R to induce mild tubular injury in wild-type mice. In contrast, expression of the NTT-MMP-2 isoform resulted in a dramatic increase in tubular cell necrosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. NTT-MMP-2 mice had enhanced expression of innate immunity genes and release of danger-associated molecular pattern molecules. We conclude that NTT-MMP-2 "primes" the kidney to enhanced susceptibility to I-R injury via induction of mitochondrial dysfunction. NTT-MMP-2 may be a novel AKI treatment target.

  17. Delay Choice vs. Delay Maintenance: Different Measures of Delayed Gratification in Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus apella)

    PubMed Central

    Addessi, Elsa; Paglieri, Fabio; Beran, Michael J.; Evans, Theodore A.; Macchitella, Luigi; De Petrillo, Francesca; Focaroli, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Delaying gratification involves two components: (i) delay choice (selecting a delayed reward over an immediate one), and (ii) delay maintenance (sustaining the decision to delay gratification even if the immediate reward is available during the delay). In primates, two tasks most commonly have explored these components, the Intertemporal choice task and the Accumulation task. It is unclear whether these tasks provide equivalent measures of delay of gratification. Here, we compared the performance of the same capuchin monkeys, belonging to two study populations, between these tasks. We found only limited evidence of a significant correlation in performance. Consequently, in contrast to what is often assumed, our data provide only partial support to the hypothesis that these tasks provide equivalent measures of delay of gratification. PMID:23544770

  18. Intestinal Necrosis due to Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate (Kayexalate) in Sorbitol

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, C. E.; Saha, S.; Chu, G.; Resnick, M. B.; Moss, S. F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS, Kayexalate) has been implicated in the development of intestinal necrosis. Sorbitol, added as a cathartic agent, may be primarily responsible. Previous studies have documented bowel necrosis primarily in postoperative, dialysis, and transplant patients. We sought to identify additional clinical characteristics among patients with probable SPS-induced intestinal necrosis. Methods Rhode Island Hospital surgical pathology records were reviewed to identify all gastrointestinal specimens reported as containing SPS crystals from December 1998 to June 2007. Patient demographics, medical comorbidities, and hospital courses of histologically verified cases of intestinal necrosis were extracted from the medical records. Results Twenty-nine patients with reports of SPS crystals were identified. Nine cases were excluded as incidental findings with normal mucosa. Nine patients were excluded as their symptoms began before SPS administration or because an alternate etiology for bowel ischemia was identified. Eleven patients had confirmed intestinal necrosis and a temporal relationship with SPS administration suggestive of SPS-induced necrosis. Only 2 patients were postoperative, and only 4 had end-stage renal disease (ESRD). All patients had documented hyperkalemia, received oral SPS, and developed symptoms of intestinal injury between 3 hours and 11 days after SPS administration. Four patients died. Conclusion Intestinal ischemia is a recognized risk of SPS in sorbitol. Our series highlights that patients may be susceptible even in the absence of ESRD, surgical intervention, or significant comorbidity. PMID:19373153

  19. Intestinal necrosis due to sodium polystyrene sulfonate (Kayexalate) in sorbitol.

    PubMed

    McGowan, C E; Saha, S; Chu, G; Resnick, M B; Moss, S F

    2009-05-01

    Sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS, Kayexalate) has been implicated in the development of intestinal necrosis. Sorbitol, added as a cathartic agent, may be primarily responsible. Previous studies have documented bowel necrosis primarily in postoperative, dialysis, and transplant patients. We sought to identify additional clinical characteristics among patients with probable SPS-induced intestinal necrosis. Rhode Island Hospital surgical pathology records were reviewed to identify all gastrointestinal specimens reported as containing SPS crystals from December 1998 to June 2007. Patient demographics, medical comorbidities, and hospital courses of histologically verified cases of intestinal necrosis were extracted from the medical records. Twenty-nine patients with reports of SPS crystals were identified. Nine cases were excluded as incidental findings with normal mucosa. Nine patients were excluded as their symptoms began before SPS administration or because an alternate etiology for bowel ischemia was identified. Eleven patients had confirmed intestinal necrosis and a temporal relationship with SPS administration suggestive of SPS-induced necrosis. Only 2 patients were postoperative, and only 4 had end-stage renal disease (ESRD). All patients had documented hyperkalemia, received oral SPS, and developed symptoms of intestinal injury between 3 hours and 11 days after SPS administration. Four patients died. Intestinal ischemia is a recognized risk of SPS in sorbitol. Our series highlights that patients may be susceptible even in the absence of ESRD, surgical intervention, or significant comorbidity.

  20. Serum transaminase levels after experimental paracetamol-induced hepatic necrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, M F; Fulker, M J; Walker, B E; Kelleher, J; Losowsky, M S

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between serum transaminase levels and the extent of paracetamol-induced liver necrosis has been investigated in the rat. Three methods of histological quantitation were used to assess of necrosis--arbitrary grading, point counting, and the image-analysis computer. Highly significant correlations were obtained between the three methods and all were found to be reproducible. A close correlation was found between the extent of hepatic necrosis and the serum ASAT and ALAT 24 hours after a large dose (4 g/kg) of paracetamol. Likewise, the mean grade of necrosis correlated reasonably well with the serum enzyme levels in the recovery phase at 36 and 72 hours, although the transaminase level for a given degree of necrosis was considerably lower at 72 hours than at 24 hours. These findings suggest that serum transaminase levels gives a reliable indication of the severity of hepatic necrosis if the time of ingestion of the paracetamol is known and taken into account. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:1205274

  1. Adaptive Phase Delay Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    There are several experimental setups involving rotating machinery that require some form of synchronization. The adaptive phase delay generator (APDG) the Bencic-1000 is a flexible instrument that allows the user to generate pulses synchronized to the rising edge of a tachometer signal from any piece of rotating machinery. These synchronized pulses can vary by the delay angle, pulse width, number of pulses per period, number of skipped pulses, and total number of pulses. Due to the design of the pulse generator, any and all of these parameters can be changed independently, yielding an unparalleled level of versatility. There are two user interfaces to the APDG. The first is a LabVIEW program that has the advantage of displaying all of the pulse parameters and input signal data within one neatly organized window on the PC monitor. Furthermore, the LabVIEW interface plots the rpm of the two input signal channels in real time. The second user interface is a handheld portable device that goes anywhere a computer is not accessible. It consists of a liquid-crystal display and keypad, which enable the user to control the unit by scrolling through a host of command menus and parameter listings. The APDG combines all of the desired synchronization control into one unit. The experimenter can adjust the delay, pulse width, pulse count, number of skipped pulses, and produce a specified number of pulses per revolution. Each of these parameters can be changed independently, providing an unparalleled level of versatility when synchronizing hardware to a host of rotating machinery. The APDG allows experimenters to set up quickly and generate a host of synchronizing configurations using a simple user interface, which hopefully leads to faster results.

  2. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    DOEpatents

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  3. Delayed reinforcement of operant behavior.

    PubMed

    Lattal, Kennon A

    2010-01-01

    The experimental analysis of delay of reinforcement is considered from the perspective of three questions that seem basic not only to understanding delay of reinforcement, but, also, by implication, the contributions of temporal relations between events to operant behavior. The first question is whether effects of the temporal relation between responses and reinforcers can be isolated from other features of the environment that often accompany delays, such as stimuli or changes in the temporal distribution or rate of reinforcement. The second question is that of the effects of delays on operant behavior. Beyond the common denominator of a temporal separation between reinforcers and the responses that produce them, delay of reinforcement procedures differ from one another along several dimensions, making delay effects circumstance dependent. The final question is one of interpreting delay of reinforcement effects. It centers on the role of the response-reinforcer temporal relation in the context of other, concurrently operating behavioral processes.

  4. DELAYED REINFORCEMENT OF OPERANT BEHAVIOR

    PubMed Central

    Lattal, Kennon A

    2010-01-01

    The experimental analysis of delay of reinforcement is considered from the perspective of three questions that seem basic not only to understanding delay of reinforcement, but, also, by implication, the contributions of temporal relations between events to operant behavior. The first question is whether effects of the temporal relation between responses and reinforcers can be isolated from other features of the environment that often accompany delays, such as stimuli or changes in the temporal distribution or rate of reinforcement. The second question is that of the effects of delays on operant behavior. Beyond the common denominator of a temporal separation between reinforcers and the responses that produce them, delay of reinforcement procedures differ from one another along several dimensions, making delay effects circumstance dependent. The final question is one of interpreting delay of reinforcement effects. It centers on the role of the response–reinforcer temporal relation in the context of other, concurrently operating behavioral processes. PMID:20676272

  5. Radiation reaction reconsidered (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhl, Hartmut

    2017-05-01

    Starting from first principles the physics of radiation reaction for strong laser fields interacting with electrons and positrons is revisited. With the help of a Wigner formulation of QED a derivation of a system of molecular dynamical (MD) equations of motion with a new radiation reaction term and spin is given. The new equations obtained are delay equations which promise to be void of the problems encountered with the LAD theory.

  6. Epidemiology of delayed ejaculation

    PubMed Central

    Di Sante, Stefania; Mollaioli, Daniele; Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Ciocca, Giacomo; Limoncin, Erika; Carosa, Eleonora; Lenzi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A large body of literature on diminished ejaculatory disorders has been generated without the use of a clear diagnostic definition. Many studies have not distinguished between the orgasm and ejaculation disorders leading to doubtful results. Delayed ejaculation (DE) is one of the diminished ejaculatory disorders, which range from varying delays in ejaculatory latency to a complete inability to ejaculate. The present review is aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on the definition and epidemiology of diminished ejaculatory disorders. We focus on the acquired diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and specific drug regimens that may cause an iatrogenic form of ejaculatory disorder. In addition, the impact of aging is discussed since the prevalence of DE appears to be moderately but positively related to age. Finally, we also focus on the importance of the hormonal milieu on male ejaculation. To date, evidence on the endocrine control of ejaculation is derived from small clinical trials, but the evidence suggests that hormones modulate the ejaculatory process by altering its overall latency. PMID:27652226

  7. Epidemiology of delayed ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Di Sante, Stefania; Mollaioli, Daniele; Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Ciocca, Giacomo; Limoncin, Erika; Carosa, Eleonora; Lenzi, Andrea; Jannini, Emmanuele A

    2016-08-01

    A large body of literature on diminished ejaculatory disorders has been generated without the use of a clear diagnostic definition. Many studies have not distinguished between the orgasm and ejaculation disorders leading to doubtful results. Delayed ejaculation (DE) is one of the diminished ejaculatory disorders, which range from varying delays in ejaculatory latency to a complete inability to ejaculate. The present review is aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on the definition and epidemiology of diminished ejaculatory disorders. We focus on the acquired diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and specific drug regimens that may cause an iatrogenic form of ejaculatory disorder. In addition, the impact of aging is discussed since the prevalence of DE appears to be moderately but positively related to age. Finally, we also focus on the importance of the hormonal milieu on male ejaculation. To date, evidence on the endocrine control of ejaculation is derived from small clinical trials, but the evidence suggests that hormones modulate the ejaculatory process by altering its overall latency.

  8. Myocardial delayed-enhancement CT: initial experience in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2017-05-23

    Clinical utility of myocardial delayed enhancement CT has not been reported in children and young adults. To describe initial experience of myocardial delayed enhancement CT regarding image quality, radiation dose and identification of myocardial lesions in children and young adults. Between August 2013 and November 2016, 29 consecutive children and young adults (median age 16 months) with suspected coronary artery or myocardial abnormality underwent arterial- and delayed-phase cardiac CT at our institution. We measured CT densities in normal myocardium, left ventricular cavity, and arterial and delayed hypo-enhancing and delayed hyperenhancing myocardial lesions. We then compared the extent of delayed hyperenhancing lesions with delayed-enhancement MRI or thallium single-photon emission CT. Normal myocardium and left ventricular cavity showed significantly higher CT numbers on arterial-phase CT than on delayed-phase CT (t-test, P<0.0001). Contrast-to-noise ratios of the arterial and delayed hypo-enhancing and delayed hyperenhancing lesions on CT were 26.7, 17.6 and 18.7, respectively. Delayed-phase CT findings were equivalent to those of delayed-enhancement MRI in all cases (7/7) and to those of thallium single-photon emission CT in 70% (7/10). Myocardial delayed-enhancement CT can be added to evaluate myocardial lesions in select children and young adults with suspected coronary artery or myocardial abnormality.

  9. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Teens > Radiation Therapy Print A ... how to cope with side effects. What Is Radiation Therapy? Cancer is a disease that causes cells ...

  10. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Teens > Radiation Therapy A A ... how to cope with side effects. What Is Radiation Therapy? Cancer is a disease that causes cells ...

  11. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from ... half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, ...

  12. Management of massive mastectomy skin flap necrosis following autologous breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan M; Hill, Lauren M; Gatti, Margaret E; Nahabedian, Maurice Y

    2012-08-01

    The optimal management of severe mastectomy skin flap necrosis continues to remain a challenge. Following autologous reconstruction, small or minor areas of ischemia/tissue necrosis can result in multiple office visits, increased expenses due to dressing supplies and nursing care, and revisional operations. The purpose of this study is to describe outcomes of a common management strategy for surgeons when confronted with a patient with extensive mastectomy skin flap necrosis. Between 1997 and 2010, autologous breast reconstructions were performed in 805 women and 1076 breasts. Of these, 12 patients (15 breasts) were identified who met the criteria for massive skin flap loss (>30%). Patient photographs and wound measurements were used to estimate areas of necrosis. All patients were managed initially with local wound care followed by delayed scar excision. Wound closure was ultimately achieved in all patients. Of the patients, 40% were active smokers in the perioperative period. The average patient age was 49.6 (range, 28-59) years with a body mass index of 30.9. The average mastectomy weight was 959.5 g (range, 223-1520). In-office soft-tissue debridement and local wound care was performed until wound closure was complete, which took place at a mean of 120 days (range, 30-300) after initial surgery. The average patient had a mean of 10 office visits before scar revision. There was an average of 1.7 types of dressing changes needed before wound closure. Topical wound therapy included moisturizing gels, wet-to-dry dressing, and antibiotic ointment. Oral antibiotic therapy was used in 60% of patients. Late scar revision was performed in 87% of the patients at an average of 8.9 months (range, 1-14) after initial surgery. After the initial flap surgery, no patient required skin grafting or hospitalization. Early conservative management followed by late scar revision produced excellent results in patients with massive mastectomy skin flap loss. The outcomes described may

  13. Multipotent mesenchymal stem cell grafting to treat cutaneous radiation syndrome: development of a new minipig model.

    PubMed

    Agay, Diane; Scherthan, Harry; Forcheron, Fabien; Grenier, Nancy; Hérodin, Francis; Meineke, Viktor; Drouet, Michel

    2010-10-01

    Cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) is the delayed consequence of localized skin exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation. Recent grafting of three ionizing radiation-burned patients has suggested the benefit of local bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) injection in favor of wound healing and pain control. Here, we have developed a new minipig model of severe CRS to study underlying mechanisms of this cell therapy approach. Göttingen minipigs were locally irradiated using a (60)Co gamma source as follows: ungrafted 50 and 60 Gy (n = 4) and grafted 50 and 60 Gy (n = 3). Bone marrow MSCs were cultured in minimum essential medium with 10% fetal calf serum and basic fibroblast growth factor (2 ng.mL(-1)). Autologous MSCs were intradermally injected twice or three times from days 27 to 96 (range, 99-128.5 × 10(6) MSCs per injection). All animals exhibited a clinical evolution similar to humans after a latency phase of several weeks, including early erythema, hair loss, and dry/moist desquamation followed by necrosis during 81 to 222 days post-ionizing radiation. Skin damage in higher exposed animals appeared slightly earlier. Immunohistology revealed severe skin damage in all animals and rhabdomyolysis in the muscle tissue below the entry area, with the latter being more severe in controls. In grafted animals, MSCs led to local accumulation of lymphocytes at the dermis/subcutis border and improved vascularization. This study establishes a new minipig model that is close to human and allows development of stem cell therapy strategies that can be applied in treatment of human radiation burns. Copyright © 2010 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Small delay approximation of stochastic delay differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillouzic, Steve; L'heureux, Ivan; Longtin, André

    1999-04-01

    Delay differential equations evolve in an infinite-dimensional phase space. In this paper, we consider the effect of external fluctuations (noise) on delay differential equations involving one variable, thus leading to univariate stochastic delay differential equations (SDDE's). For small delays, a univariate nondelayed stochastic differential equation approximating such a SDDE is presented. Another approximation, complementary to the first, is also obtained using an average of the SDDE's drift term over the delayed dynamical variable, which defines a conditional average drift. This second approximation is characterized by the fact that the diffusion term is identical to that of the original SDDE. For small delays, our approach yields a steady-state probability density and a conditional average drift which are in close agreement with numerical simulations of the original SDDE. We illustrate this scheme with the delayed linear Langevin equation and a stochastic version of the delayed logistic equation. The technique can be used with any type of noise, and is easily generalized to multiple delays.

  15. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1984-08-07

    Polybismaleimides prepared by delayed curing of bis-imides having the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the --(CH.sub.2).sub.n -- group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine.

  16. Soviet delays raise prices

    SciTech Connect

    Young, I.

    1992-01-15

    The breakup of the Soviet Union is causing massive disruptions to methanol exports. The changeover to a Commonwealth of independent States has created logistical problems which have led some shipments of Russian methanol to be cancelled and delayed other deliveries by up to two weeks. In recent years the Soviet Union has exported 700,000 m.t./year-900,000 m.t./year of methanol, mainly to Western Europe. The product is made at 750,000-m.t./year plants at Tomsk and Gubakha in Russia and transported by rail for shipment from the ports of Ventspils, Latvia, on the Baltic Sea and Yuzhnyy in Ukraine, on the Black Sea. The exports were handled by state export agency Soyuzagrochim, mainly under contract to West European traders and consumers in areas like Scandinavia and France.

  17. Ischemic necrosis following clubfoot surgery: the purple hallux sign.

    PubMed

    David, R Hootnick; Packard, David S; Levinsohn, E Mark; Berkowitz, Scott A; Aronsson, David D; Crider, Russell J

    2004-09-01

    Ischemic necrosis, which develops rarely after clubfoot surgery, may have a vascular etiology, since many idiopathic and neurogenic clubfeet have congenital deficiency of the anterior tibial and dorsalis pedis arteries. Dorsalis pedis deficiency is demonstrated more frequently in those clubfeet showing greater deformity. Substantial hypoplasia of the profunda femoris and posterior and anterior tibial arteries was evident in the affected limb of a patient in this series who underwent postoperative arteriography. Herein, we report massive necrosis in seven limbs of six patients after clubfoot surgery and have combined this series with seven previously published cases. Additional cases support our hypothesis that arterial deficiencies put some postoperative clubfeet at risk of perioperative ischemic necrosis. Necrosis occurs in those regions supplied by the congenitally diminished anterior tibial and dorsalis pedis arteries. Knowing that children with congenital vascular deficiency are at risk for ischemic necrosis, surgeons should be alert to the subtle, early signs of ischemia and be prepared to prevent or ameliorate the consequences of this condition. Since hypoperfusion in these postoperative feet is a surgical emergency, we propose clinical guidelines for treatment for this phenomenon, which we have named the purple hallux sign.

  18. Apoptosis, oncosis, and necrosis. An overview of cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Majno, G.; Joris, I.

    1995-01-01

    The historical development of the cell death concept is reviewed, with special attention to the origin of the terms necrosis, coagulation necrosis, autolysis, physiological cell death, programmed cell death, chromatolysis (the first name of apoptosis in 1914), karyorhexis, karyolysis, and cell suicide, of which there are three forms: by lysosomes, by free radicals, and by a genetic mechanism (apoptosis). Some of the typical features of apoptosis are discussed, such as budding (as opposed to blebbing and zeiosis) and the inflammatory response. For cell death not by apoptosis the most satisfactory term is accidental cell death. Necrosis is commonly used but it is not appropriate, because it does not indicate a form of cell death but refers to changes secondary to cell death by any mechanism, including apoptosis. Abundant data are available on one form of accidental cell death, namely ischemic cell death, which can be considered an entity of its own, caused by failure of the ionic pumps of the plasma membrane. Because ischemic cell death (in known models) is accompanied by swelling, the name oncosis is proposed for this condition. The term oncosis (derived from ónkos, meaning swelling) was proposed in 1910 by von Reckling-hausen precisely to mean cell death with swelling. Oncosis leads to necrosis with karyolysis and stands in contrast to apoptosis, which leads to necrosis with karyorhexis and cell shrinkage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7856735

  19. The Extracellular Matrix Regulates Granuloma Necrosis in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Al Shammari, Basim; Shiomi, Takayuki; Tezera, Liku; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Workman, Victoria; Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Mauri, Francesco; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Robertson, Brian D; D'Armiento, Jeanine; Friedland, Jon S; Elkington, Paul T

    2015-08-01

    A central tenet of tuberculosis pathogenesis is that caseous necrosis leads to extracellular matrix destruction and bacterial transmission. We reconsider the underlying mechanism of tuberculosis pathology and demonstrate that collagen destruction may be a critical initial event, causing caseous necrosis as opposed to resulting from it. In human tuberculosis granulomas, regions of extracellular matrix destruction map to areas of caseous necrosis. In mice, transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase 1 causes caseous necrosis, the pathological hallmark of human tuberculosis. Collagen destruction is the principal pathological difference between humanised mice and wild-type mice with tuberculosis, whereas the release of proinflammatory cytokines does not differ, demonstrating that collagen breakdown may lead to cell death and caseation. To investigate this hypothesis, we developed a 3-dimensional cell culture model of tuberculosis granuloma formation, using bioelectrospray technology. Collagen improved survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells analyzed on the basis of a lactate dehydrogenase release assay, propidium iodide staining, and measurement of the total number of viable cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that collagen destruction is an initial event in tuberculosis immunopathology, leading to caseous necrosis and compromising the immune response, revealing a previously unappreciated role for the extracellular matrix in regulating the host-pathogen interaction. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Radiation techniques for acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) remains an effective treatment in patients with acromegaly refractory to medical and/or surgical interventions, with durable tumor control and biochemical remission; however, there are still concerns about delayed biochemical effect and potential late toxicity of radiation treatment, especially high rates of hypopituitarism. Stereotactic radiotherapy has been developed as a more accurate technique of irradiation with more precise tumour localization and consequently a reduction in the volume of normal tissue, particularly the brain, irradiated to high radiation doses. Radiation can be delivered in a single fraction by stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or as fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in which smaller doses are delivered over 5-6 weeks in 25-30 treatments. A review of the recent literature suggests that pituitary irradiation is an effective treatment for acromegaly. Stereotactic techniques for GH-secreting pituitary tumors are discussed with the aim to define the efficacy and potential adverse effects of each of these techniques. PMID:22136376

  1. Delayed fixation of displaced bilateral, atraumatic, femoral neck fractures in a patient with pregnancy related osteomalacia.

    PubMed

    Docker, Charles; Starks, Ian; Wade, Roger; Wynn-Jones, Charles

    2011-06-01

    We present the case of a woman diagnosed with simultaneous displaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures following the birth of her second child. No traumatic event was identified. Diagnosis was delayed as the cause of her pain was thought to be non-skeletal in origin. Radiological and serological investigations were diagnostic of osteomalacia. Surgical fixation of her fractures was further delayed due to profound hypocalcaemia. Despite the delays, fixation with bilateral dynamic hip screws resulted in union with no evidence of avascular necrosis at 2 years follow-up. We believe this to be the first report of atraumatic bilateral femoral neck fractures and it shows that a good result can be achieved even in the presence of delayed fixation.

  2. Radiation exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.H. )

    1990-01-01

    This book deals with radiation laws, the phenomena of radiation exchange, the quantification of radiation, and the mechanisms whereby radiation is attenuated in passing through the earth's atmosphere. Applications of radiation exchange are discussed, such as the measurement of the effective radiating temperature of the ozonosphere. Also presented is the development of the concept of atmospheric windows and atmospheric transmittance. Radiation exchange experiments between Earth and space are presented and their interpretations given. The book fives detailed, step-by-step procedures for carrying out the radiometric calibration of an infrared prism spectrometer and a radiation thermopile.

  3. Atmospheric radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Harshvardhan, M.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies of atmospheric radiative processes are summarized for the period 1987-1990. Topics discussed include radiation modeling; clouds and radiation; radiative effects in dynamics and climate; radiation budget and aerosol effects; and gaseous absorption, particulate scattering and surface reflection. It is concluded that the key developments of the period are a defining of the radiative forcing to the climate system by trace gases and clouds, the recognition that cloud microphysics and morphology need to be incorporated not only into radiation models but also climate models, and the isolation of a few important unsolved theoretical problems in atmospheric radiation.

  4. Complicated and delayed diagnosis of tuberculous peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Bolognesi, Massimo; Bolognesi, Diletta

    2013-01-01

    Background Peritoneal tuberculosis is very rare in European countries. However, its incidence is increasing due to the continued immigration of people from endemic areas affected by tuberculosis. Case Report: The authors report a case of tuberculous peritonitis in a 46-year-old male patient from North Africa. The presenting symptoms of the disease were hiccups, dyspepsia, anorexia, and weight loss. Physical examination revealed an abdominal distension that suggested the presence of ascites. Subsequent investigations of ultrasound and computed tomography of the abdomen revealed the presence of massive ascites. A diagnostic laparoscopy went on to highlight a macro micronodular degeneration of the peritoneum. Histological examination showed the presence of epithelioid granulomas with typical Langhans cells with areas of caseous necrosis. The diagnosis of tuberculous peritonitis was then made, and the ascites quickly disappeared in response to the anti-mycobacterial therapy. The patient remained free of symptoms after 6 months of clinical follow-up. Conclusions: In this case the clinical diagnosis was complicated and delayed due to clinicians’ suboptimal knowledge of and experience with this disease. This case demonstrates why laparoscopy with peritoneal biopsy should be the gold standard in any clinical suspicion. PMID:23826447

  5. Acute phlegmonous gastritis complicated by delayed perforation.

    PubMed

    Min, Sun Young; Kim, Yong Ho; Park, Won Seo

    2014-03-28

    Here, we report on a case of acute phlegmonous gastritis (PG) complicated by delayed perforation. A 51-year-old woman presented with severe abdominal pain and septic shock symptoms. A computed tomography scan showed diffuse thickening of the gastric wall and distention with peritoneal fluid. Although we did not find definite evidence of free air on the computed tomography (CT) scan, the patient's clinical condition suggested diffuse peritonitis requiring surgical intervention. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a thickened gastric wall with suppurative intraperitoneal fluid in which Streptococcus pyogenes grew. There was no evidence of gastric or duodenal perforation. No further operation was performed at that time. The patient was conservatively treated with antibiotics and proton pump inhibitor, and her condition improved. However, she experienced abdominal and flank pain again on postoperative day 10. CT and esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a large gastric ulcer with perforation. Unfortunately, although the CT showed further improvement in the thickening of the stomach and the mucosal defect, the patient's condition did not recover until a week later, and an esophagogastroduodenoscopy taken on postoperative day 30 showed suspected gastric submucosal dissection. We performed total gastrectomy as a second operation, and the patient recovered without major complications. A pathological examination revealed a multifocal ulceration and necrosis from the mucosa to the serosa with perforation.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S. )

    1990-10-15

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence.

  7. Bone marrow necrosis complicating post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder: resolution with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Davide; Ramponi, Antonio; Franceschetti, Silvia; Stratta, Piero; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2008-05-01

    Bone marrow necrosis is a rare cause of bone marrow failure. Malignancy is the most frequent cause of bone marrow necrosis. Among malignancies, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) accounts for 10% of cases of bone marrow necrosis. Virtually all reported cases of NHL-associated bone marrow necrosis have developed in immunocompetent hosts. We report on a case of bone marrow necrosis complicating post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) and resolving after rituximab monotherapy. This case report provides the first evidence of (i) bone marrow necrosis as a complication of PTLD; (ii) rapid resolution of NHL-associated bone marrow necrosis after rituximab treatment.

  8. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hung-chi Lihn

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed.

  9. Chrysophanol induces necrosis through the production of ROS and alteration of ATP levels in J5 human liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chi-Cheng; Yang, Jai-Sing; Huang, An-Cheng; Hsia, Te-Chun; Chou, Su-Tze; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Lee, Tsung-Han; Wood, W. G.; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2011-01-01

    Anthraquinone compounds have been shown to induce apoptosis in different cancer cell types. Effects of chrysophanol, an anthraquinone compound, on cancer cell death have not been well-studied. The goal of this study was to examine if chrysophanol had cytotoxic effects and if such effects involved apoptosis or necrosis in J5 human liver cancer cells. Chrysophanol induced necrosis in J5 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Non-apoptotic cell death was induced by chrysophanol in J5 cells and was characterized by caspase independence, delayed externalization of phosphatidylserine and plasma membrane disruption. Blockage of apoptotic induction by a general caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) failed to protect cells against chrysophanol-induced cell death. The levels of ROS production and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were also determined to assess the effects of chrysophanol. However, reductions in ATP levels and increases in LDH activity indicated that chrysophanol stimulated necrotic cell death. In summary, human liver cancer cells treated with chrysophanol exhibited a cellular pattern associated with necrosis and not apoptosis. PMID:20169580

  10. Modeling delay in genetic networks: From delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josić, Krešimir; Ott, William

    2014-01-01

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay. PMID:24880267

  11. Modeling delay in genetic networks: From delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Ott, William; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josić, Krešimir

    2014-05-28

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay.

  12. Impaired neuromuscular transmission and skeletal muscle fiber necrosis in mice lacking Na/Ca exchanger 3

    PubMed Central

    Sokolow, Sophie; Manto, Mario; Gailly, Philippe; Molgó, Jordi; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Herchuelz, Andre; Schurmans, Stéphane

    2004-01-01

    We produced and analyzed mice deficient for Na/Ca exchanger 3 (NCX3), a protein that mediates cellular Ca2+ efflux (forward mode) or Ca2+ influx (reverse mode) and thus controls intracellular Ca2+ concentration. NCX3-deficient mice (Ncx3–/–) present a skeletal muscle fiber necrosis and a defective neuromuscular transmission, reflecting the absence of NCX3 in the sarcolemma of the muscle fibers and at the neuromuscular junction. The defective neuromuscular transmission is characterized by the presence of electromyographic abnormalities, including low compound muscle action potential amplitude, a decremental response at low-frequency nerve stimulation, an incremental response, and a prominent postexercise facilitation at high-frequency nerve stimulation, as well as neuromuscular blocks. The analysis of quantal transmitter release in Ncx3–/– neuromuscular junctions revealed an important facilitation superimposed on the depression of synaptic responses and an elevated delayed release during high-frequency nerve stimulation. It is suggested that Ca2+ entering nerve terminals is cleared relatively slowly in the absence of NCX3, thereby enhancing residual Ca2+ and evoked and delayed quantal transmitter release during repetitive nerve stimulation. Our findings indicate that NCX3 plays an important role in vivo in the control of Ca2+ concentrations in the skeletal muscle fibers and at the neuromuscular junction. PMID:14722618

  13. PRECISION TIME-DELAY CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1959-03-17

    A tine-delay circuit which produces a delay time in d. The circuit a capacitor, an te back resistance, connected serially with the anode of the diode going to ground. At the start of the time delay a negative stepfunction is applied to the series circuit and initiates a half-cycle transient oscillatory voltage terminated by a transient oscillatory voltage of substantially higher frequency. The output of the delay circuit is taken at the junction of the inductor and diode where a sudden voltage rise appears after the initiation of the higher frequency transient oscillations.

  14. Time Delay of CGM Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Schmelzeisen-Redeker, Günther; Schoemaker, Michael; Kirchsteiger, Harald; Freckmann, Guido; Heinemann, Lutz; del Re, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is a powerful tool to support the optimization of glucose control of patients with diabetes. However, CGM systems measure glucose in interstitial fluid but not in blood. Rapid changes in one compartment are not accompanied by similar changes in the other, but follow with some delay. Such time delays hamper detection of, for example, hypoglycemic events. Our aim is to discuss the causes and extent of time delays and approaches to compensate for these. Methods: CGM data were obtained in a clinical study with 37 patients with a prototype glucose sensor. The study was divided into 5 phases over 2 years. In all, 8 patients participated in 2 phases separated by 8 months. A total number of 108 CGM data sets including raw signals were used for data analysis and were processed by statistical methods to obtain estimates of the time delay. Results: Overall mean (SD) time delay of the raw signals with respect to blood glucose was 9.5 (3.7) min, median was 9 min (interquartile range 4 min). Analysis of time delays observed in the same patients separated by 8 months suggests a patient dependent delay. No significant correlation was observed between delay and anamnestic or anthropometric data. The use of a prediction algorithm reduced the delay by 4 minutes on average. Conclusions: Prediction algorithms should be used to provide real-time CGM readings more consistent with simultaneous measurements by SMBG. Patient specificity may play an important role in improving prediction quality. PMID:26243773

  15. Statistical analysis of the electrical breakdown time delay distributions in krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Maluckov, Cedomir A.; Karamarkovic, Jugoslav P.; Radovic, Miodrag K.; Pejovic, Momcilo M.

    2006-08-15

    The statistical analysis of the experimentally observed electrical breakdown time delay distributions in the krypton-filled diode tube at 2.6 mbar is presented. The experimental distributions are obtained on the basis of 1000 successive and independent measurements. The theoretical electrical breakdown time delay distribution is evaluated as the convolution of the statistical time delay with exponential, and discharge formative time with Gaussian distribution. The distribution parameters are estimated by the stochastic modelling of the time delay distributions, and by comparing them with the experimental distributions for different relaxation times, voltages, and intensities of UV radiation. The transition of distribution shapes, from Gaussian-type to the exponential-like, is investigated by calculating the corresponding skewness and excess kurtosis parameters. It is shown that the mathematical model based on the convolution of two random variable distributions describes experimentally obtained time delay distributions and the separation of the total breakdown time delay to the statistical and formative time delay.

  16. Idiopathic avascular necrosis of the scaphoid. A case report.

    PubMed

    Martini, G; Valenti, R; Giovani, S; Nuti, R

    1995-06-01

    Avascular necrosis of the carpal scaphoid is a common disorder after a trauma, i.e. a fracture or mild and repetitive injury. Sometime it can be associated with a systemic disease or chronic steroid intake. Rarely avascular necrosis is found in the absence of a known etiology and so termed "idiopathic". We report a case of idiopathic avascular necrosis of the scaphoid. A painful wrist of six months' duration was observed in a 62-year-old housewife. No history of trauma or steroid administration could be elicited. X-ray showed an osteolytic area with irregular edges surrounded by a ring of osteosclerosis at the proximal pole of the left scaphoid. This datum was confirmed by the magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. Synovial fat necrosis associated with ischemic pancreatic disease.

    PubMed

    Smukler, N M; Schumacher, H R; Pascual, E; Brown, S; Ryan, W E; Sadeghian, M R

    1979-05-01

    A 59-year-old man with ischemic pancreatic disease, polyarthritis, and cutaneous nodules has shown histopathologic findings indicative of disseminated fat necrosis in a percutaneous biopsy specimen from the right knee. The histopathologic findings in the synovium included necrotic fat cells, distorted fat cells and adjacent lymphocytes, lipid laden histiocytes, and giant cells. In prior histopathologic studies of the joint involvement associated with this disorder, fat cell necrosis has been found only in the periarticular tissues, and the synovium has appeared normal or showed nonspecific inflammation. However, the present study shows that the synovial membrane may also be the site of fat necrosis and an associated inflammatory reaction; thus patients with this disorder may manifest arthritis in addition to periarthritis.

  18. Cannabinoids act as necrosis-inducing factors in Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Shoyama, Yoshinari; Sugawa, Chitomi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2008-12-01

    Cannabis sativa is well known to produce unique secondary metabolites called cannabinoids. We recently discovered that Cannabis leaves induce cell death by secreting tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) into leaf tissues. Examinations using isolated Cannabis mitochondria demonstrated that THCA causes mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) though opening of MPT pores, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction (the important feature of necrosis). Although Ca(2+) is known to cause opening of animal MPT pores, THCA directly opened Cannabis MPT pores in the absence of Ca(2+). Based on these results, we conclude that THCA has the ability to induce necrosis though MPT in Cannabis leaves, independently of Ca(2+). We confirmed that other cannabinoids (cannabidiolic acid and cannabigerolic acid) also have MPT-inducing activity similar to that of THCA. Moreover, mitochondria of plants which do not produce cannabinoids were shown to induce MPT by THCA treatment, thus suggesting that many higher plants may have systems to cause THCA-dependent necrosis.

  19. Flap Necrosis after Palatoplasty in Patients with Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Rossell-Perry, Percy

    2015-01-01

    Palatal necrosis after palatoplasty in patients with cleft palate is a rare but significant problem encountered by any cleft surgeon. Few studies have addressed this disastrous complication and the prevalence of this problem remains unknown. Failure of a palatal flap may be attributed to different factors like kinking or section of the pedicle, anatomical variations, tension, vascular thrombosis, type of cleft, used surgical technique, surgeon's experience, infection, and malnutrition. Palatal flap necrosis can be prevented through identification of the risk factors and a careful surgical planning should be done before any palatoplasty. Management of severe fistulas observed as a consequence of palatal flap necrosis is a big challenge for any cleft surgeon. Different techniques as facial artery flaps, tongue flaps, and microvascular flaps have been described with this purpose. This review article discusses the current status of this serious complication in patients with cleft palate. PMID:26273624

  20. Tongue necrosis as first symptom of giant cell arteritis (GCA).

    PubMed

    Brodmann, M; Dorr, A; Hafner, F; Gary, T; Pilger, E

    2009-06-01

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) is the most common systemic vasculitis affecting people over the age of 50 years, especially in the western world. Nevertheless, the initial diagnosis can be tricky, as some of the patients present at first time with a real unusual initial manifestation. One of these can be tongue necrosis, which is according to the literature in accordance with scalp necrosis, the rarest initial manifestation form of GCA. We describe two patients who presented with tongue necrosis as initial symptom of GCA. The diagnosis was made by the American College of Rheumatology criteria, biopsy and duplex sonography of their temporal arteries. A typical halo was seen as a sign of intimal edema. The patients were put on corticosteroids immediately after diagnosis was proven and their symptoms improved quickly.

  1. Newest clinical trial results with antitumor necrosis factor and nonantitumor necrosis factor biologics for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Millán, Iris; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2013-05-01

    To highlight recent evidence from the clinical trials of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and non anti-TNF biologics for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) focused on comparative clinical efficacy including safety outcomes and medication discontinuation. Patients with RA are sometimes able to attain low disease activity or remission since the introduction of biologic therapy for RA. Biologics like anti-TNF, anti-interleukin-6 (IL-6), anti-CD20 and those that modulate T-cell co-stimulation have consistently shown good efficacy in patients with RA. Preliminary data from comparative efficacy studies to evaluate the potential differences between anti-TNF and non anti-TNF biologics have shown little differences among these. There is ongoing work in comparative efficacy to answer this question further. Biologic therapy in RA has significantly changed the course of RA in the last decade. Recently published clinical trials have been focused on comparative efficacy, cardiovascular safety of biologics and potential anti-TNF therapy discontinuation in patients with RA.

  2. Tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1 as mediators of endotoxin-induced beneficial effects

    SciTech Connect

    Urbaschek, R.; Urbaschek, B.

    1987-09-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides or endotoxins are known to induce tumor necrosis; enhanced nonspecific resistance to bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections and to radiation sickness; and tolerance to lethal doses of endotoxin. These beneficial effects are achieved by pretreatment with minute amounts of endotoxin. Recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 1 (IL-1) are among the mediators capable of invoking radioprotection or resistance to the consequences of cecal ligation and puncture. Both cytokines are potent inducers of serum colony-stimulating factor (CSF) in C3H/HeJ mice (low responders to endotoxin). The number of splenic granulocyte-macrophage precursors was found to increase 5 days after injection of TNF in these mice. Although with IL-1 no increase in the number of granulocyte-macrophage colonies occurred in culture in the presence of serum CSF, a marked stimulation was observed when TNF was added. This stimulation of myelopoiesis observed in vivo and in vitro may be related to the radioprotective effect of TNF. The data presented suggest that TNF and IL-1 released after injection of endotoxin participate in the mediation of endotoxin-induced enhancement of nonspecific resistance and stimulation of hematopoiesis. 76 references.

  3. Application of ray-traced tropospheric slant delays to geodetic VLBI analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, Armin; Böhm, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    The correction of tropospheric influences via so-called path delays is critical for the analysis of observations from space geodetic techniques like the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). In standard VLBI analysis, the a priori slant path delays are determined using the concept of zenith delays, mapping functions and gradients. The a priori use of ray-traced delays, i.e., tropospheric slant path delays determined with the technique of ray-tracing through the meteorological data of numerical weather models (NWM), serves as an alternative way of correcting the influences of the troposphere on the VLBI observations within the analysis. In the presented research, the application of ray-traced delays to the VLBI analysis of sessions in a time span of 16.5 years is investigated. Ray-traced delays have been determined with program RADIATE (see Hofmeister in Ph.D. thesis, Department of Geodesy and Geophysics, Faculty of Mathematics and Geoinformation, Technische Universität Wien. http://resolver.obvsg.at/urn:nbn:at:at-ubtuw:1-3444, 2016) utilizing meteorological data provided by NWM of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). In comparison with a standard VLBI analysis, which includes the tropospheric gradient estimation, the application of the ray-traced delays to an analysis, which uses the same parameterization except for the a priori slant path delay handling and the used wet mapping factors for the zenith wet delay (ZWD) estimation, improves the baseline length repeatability (BLR) at 55.9% of the baselines at sub-mm level. If no tropospheric gradients are estimated within the compared analyses, 90.6% of all baselines benefit from the application of the ray-traced delays, which leads to an average improvement of the BLR of 1 mm. The effects of the ray-traced delays on the terrestrial reference frame are also investigated. A separate assessment of the RADIATE ray-traced delays is carried out by comparison to the ray-traced delays from the

  4. Application of ray-traced tropospheric slant delays to geodetic VLBI analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmeister, Armin; Böhm, Johannes

    2017-08-01

    The correction of tropospheric influences via so-called path delays is critical for the analysis of observations from space geodetic techniques like the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). In standard VLBI analysis, the a priori slant path delays are determined using the concept of zenith delays, mapping functions and gradients. The a priori use of ray-traced delays, i.e., tropospheric slant path delays determined with the technique of ray-tracing through the meteorological data of numerical weather models (NWM), serves as an alternative way of correcting the influences of the troposphere on the VLBI observations within the analysis. In the presented research, the application of ray-traced delays to the VLBI analysis of sessions in a time span of 16.5 years is investigated. Ray-traced delays have been determined with program RADIATE (see Hofmeister in Ph.D. thesis, Department of Geodesy and Geophysics, Faculty of Mathematics and Geoinformation, Technische Universität Wien. http://resolver.obvsg.at/urn:nbn:at:at-ubtuw:1-3444, 2016) utilizing meteorological data provided by NWM of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). In comparison with a standard VLBI analysis, which includes the tropospheric gradient estimation, the application of the ray-traced delays to an analysis, which uses the same parameterization except for the a priori slant path delay handling and the used wet mapping factors for the zenith wet delay (ZWD) estimation, improves the baseline length repeatability (BLR) at 55.9% of the baselines at sub-mm level. If no tropospheric gradients are estimated within the compared analyses, 90.6% of all baselines benefit from the application of the ray-traced delays, which leads to an average improvement of the BLR of 1 mm. The effects of the ray-traced delays on the terrestrial reference frame are also investigated. A separate assessment of the RADIATE ray-traced delays is carried out by comparison to the ray-traced delays from the

  5. Pelvic radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation of the pelvis - discharge; Cancer treatment - pelvic radiation; Prostate cancer - pelvic radiation; Ovarian cancer - pelvic radiation; Cervical cancer - pelvic radiation; Uterine cancer - pelvic radiation; Rectal cancer - ...

  6. Protective effects of batimastat against hemorrhagic injuries in delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beilei; Liu, Dan; Liu, Guoyan; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Qianqian; Zheng, Jiemin; Zhou, Yonghong; He, Qian; Zhang, Liming

    2015-12-15

    Previously, we established delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome (DJES) models and proposed that the hemorrhagic toxins in jellyfish tentacle extracts (TE) play a significant role in the liver and kidney injuries of the experimental model. Further, we also demonstrated that metalloproteinases are the central toxic components of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata (C. capillata), which may be responsible for the hemorrhagic effects. Thus, metalloproteinase inhibitors appear to be a promising therapeutic alternative for the treatment of hemorrhagic injuries in DJES. In this study, we examined the metalloproteinase activity of TE from the jellyfish C. capillata using zymography analyses. Our results confirmed that TE possessed a metalloproteinase activity, which was also sensitive to heat. Then, we tested the effect of metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat (BB-94) on TE-induced hemorrhagic injuries in DJES models. Firstly, using SR-based X-ray microangiography, we found that BB-94 significantly improved TE-induced hepatic and renal microvasculature alterations in DJES mouse model. Secondly, under synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SR-μCT), we also confirmed that BB-94 reduced TE-induced hepatic and renal microvasculature changes in DJES rat model. In addition, being consistent with the imaging results, histopathological and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated UTP end labeling (TUNEL)-like staining observations also clearly corroborated this hypothesis, as BB-94 was highly effective in neutralizing TE-induced extensive hemorrhage and necrosis in DJES rat model. Although it may require further clinical studies in the near future, the current study opens up the possibilities for the use of the metalloproteinase inhibitor, BB-94, in the treatment of multiple organ hemorrhagic injuries in DJES.

  7. Sartorius muscle "twist" rotation flap: an answer to flap necrosis.

    PubMed

    Khalil, I M; Sudarsky, L

    1987-07-01

    Coverage of the femoral vessels with viable muscle flap after vascular reconstruction in the presence of infection is essential to prevent serious complications. Necrosis of the muscle flap as a result of interruption of its vascular pedicle can lead to complications that jeopardize the patient's life and limb. Our simple technique prevents such complications by preserving the muscle blood supply. We have used this method routinely during the past 6 years in patients with groin sepsis and did not encounter any case of muscle necrosis.

  8. A new geographic and host record for infectious pancreatic necrosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parisot, T.J.; Yasutake, W.T.; Bressler, V.

    1963-01-01

    The occurrence of infectious pancreatic necrosis in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), and cutthroat trout (Salmo clarki) has been experimentally authenticated for the first time in the western United States. The cutthroat trout represents a new host. Brook trout fin tissue culture inoculated with bacteria-free filtrate from the diseased fish tissue showed marked degenerative changes after 24 hours. Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), kokanee (O. nerka), and silver salmon (O. kisutch) were not susceptible to the virus when inoculated. Histologically, extensive pancreatic necrosis was observed in the original and experimental materials, but striated muscle hyalinization was detected only in the original material.

  9. Indium-111 WBC scan in acute toxic centrilobular hepatic necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R.M.; Dhekne, R.D.; Moore, W.H. )

    1989-12-01

    In this case of prolonged fever and abnormal liver functions, dual tracer scintigraphy with In-111 WBCs and Tc-99m SC led to a biopsy-proven diagnosis of severe acute toxic hepatitis (hepatocellular necrosis). Correlation of the Tc-99m SC scan findings with those previously reported for pseudotumors of the liver is discussed. A pseudonormal scan pattern is described for the In-111 WBC scintigraphy. Discordance between In-111 WBC and Tc-99m SC scintigraphy in this clinical setting should raise the possibility of hepatic necrosis as a diagnostic alternative to hepatic abscess.

  10. Possible Mechanism of Liver Necrosis Caused by Aromatic Organic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, Bernard B.; Reid, Watson D.; Cho, Arthur K.; Sipes, Glenn; Krishna, Gopal; Gillette, James R.

    1971-01-01

    Treatment of rats with phenobarbital, which stimulates the activity of the drug-metabolizing enzymes in the liver, potentiates hepatic necrosis elicited by bromobenzene and a number of other chemically inert halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. Radioautographic studies indicate that [14C]bromobenzene is covalently bound at the sites of necrosis. From these results, it is inferred that the hepatotoxic effects of the halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons are mediated by chemically active metabolites formed in hepatocytes. In accord with this view, a number of aromatic halogenated hydrocarbons are converted by microsomes in vitro to active intermediates which form covalent complexes with glutathione (GSH). Images PMID:4395686

  11. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Segal, Barbara; Rhodus, Nelson L; Patel, Ketan

    2008-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disorder characterized by inflammation involving large and small joints. Systemic manifestations as well as involvement of paraoral tissues contribute to morbidity. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central role in RA by amplifying inflammation in multiple pathways that lead to joint destruction. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors were first licensed for clinical use in 1998; 3 have been approved for the treatment of RA: Iinfliximab, etanercept, and adalimumab. The purpose of this paper is to review the pathogenesis of RA, the state of the art of therapy, and the most current information on the safety and efficacy of TNF inhibitors for treatment of RA.

  12. Radiation Basics

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Radiation can come from unstable atoms or it can be produced by machines. There are two kinds of radiation; ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. Learn about alpha, beta, gamma and x-ray radiation, as well the different types of doses.

  13. Cooling of radiative quantum dot excitons by THz-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxberg, Fredrik; Tulkki, Jukka; Yusa, Go; Sakaki, Hiroyuki

    2007-04-01

    Yusa et al. reported an anomalous cooling of radiative quantum dot (QD) excitons by THz-radiation in [Proc. 24th ICPS, 1083 (1998)] We have analyzed this experiment using continuum elasticity, multi-band kṡp and spin-resolved Monte-Carlo methods. We show that the unexpected discovery is related to hole relaxation via piezo-electric potential minima, induced in the QD sample by InP stressor islands. The THz-radiation gives rise to a drift of dark excitons from the piezo-electric minima to radiative states in the deformation potential minimum. This increases the QD ground state luminescence at the expense of the luminescence from higher QD states. We reproduce also the delayed flash of QD ground state luminescences when a THz-radiation pulse hits the sample even ˜ 1 s after switching off the carrier generation.

  14. Delay Adjusted Incidence

    Cancer.gov

    This Infographic shows the National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Thyroid: 5.3*,Liver & IBD: 3.6*, Melanoma: 2.3*, Kidney: 2.0*, Myeloma: 1.9*, Pancreas: 1.2*, Leukemia: 0.9*, Oral Cavity: 0.5, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: 0.3*, Esophagus: -0.1, Brain & ONS: -0.2*, Bladder: -0.6*, All Sites: -1.1*, Stomach: -1.7*, Larynx: -1.9*, Prostate: -2.1*, Lung & Bronchus: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -3/0*. For Women, Thyroid: 5.8*, Liver & IBD: 2.9*, Myeloma: 1.8*, Kidney: 1.6*, Melanoma: 1.5, Corpus & Uterus: 1.3*, Pancreas: 1.1*, Leukemia: 0.6*, Brain & ONS: 0, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -0.1, All Sites: -0.1, Breast: -0.3, Stomach: -0.7*, Oral Cavity: -0.7*, Bladder: -0.9*, Ovary: -0.9*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.0*, Cervix: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -2.7*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). Rates were adjusted for reporting delay in the registry. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  15. Delay Adjusted Incidence Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This Infographic shows the National Cancer Institute SEER Incidence Trends. The graphs show the Average Annual Percent Change (AAPC) 2002-2011. For Men, Thyroid: 5.3*,Liver & IBD: 3.6*, Melanoma: 2.3*, Kidney: 2.0*, Myeloma: 1.9*, Pancreas: 1.2*, Leukemia: 0.9*, Oral Cavity: 0.5, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: 0.3*, Esophagus: -0.1, Brain & ONS: -0.2*, Bladder: -0.6*, All Sites: -1.1*, Stomach: -1.7*, Larynx: -1.9*, Prostate: -2.1*, Lung & Bronchus: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -3/0*. For Women, Thyroid: 5.8*, Liver & IBD: 2.9*, Myeloma: 1.8*, Kidney: 1.6*, Melanoma: 1.5, Corpus & Uterus: 1.3*, Pancreas: 1.1*, Leukemia: 0.6*, Brain & ONS: 0, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: -0.1, All Sites: -0.1, Breast: -0.3, Stomach: -0.7*, Oral Cavity: -0.7*, Bladder: -0.9*, Ovary: -0.9*, Lung & Bronchus: -1.0*, Cervix: -2.4*, and Colon & Rectum: -2.7*. * AAPC is significantly different from zero (p<.05). Rates were adjusted for reporting delay in the registry. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  16. Geometric time delay interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vallisneri, Michele

    2005-08-15

    The space-based gravitational-wave observatory LISA, a NASA-ESA mission to be launched after 2012, will achieve its optimal sensitivity using time delay interferometry (TDI), a LISA-specific technique needed to cancel the otherwise overwhelming laser noise in the interspacecraft phase measurements. The TDI observables of the Michelson and Sagnac types have been interpreted physically as the virtual measurements of a synthesized interferometer. In this paper, I present Geometric TDI, a new and intuitive approach to extend this interpretation to all TDI observables. Unlike the standard algebraic formalism, Geometric TDI provides a combinatorial algorithm to explore exhaustively the space of second-generation TDI observables (i.e., those that cancel laser noise in LISA-like interferometers with time-dependent arm lengths). Using this algorithm, I survey the space of second-generation TDI observables of length (i.e., number of component phase measurements) up to 24, and I identify alternative, improved forms of the standard second-generation TDI observables. The alternative forms have improved high-frequency gravitational-wave sensitivity in realistic noise conditions (because they have fewer nulls in the gravitational-wave and noise response functions), and are less susceptible to instrumental gaps and glitches (because their component phase measurements span shorter time periods)

  17. Delayed unlatching mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M.

    2015-05-19

    In various embodiments an apparatus is presented for securing a structure such as a door, window, hatch, or gate that moves between an open and a closed position relative to a fixed structure to provide or deny access to a compartment, a room, an outdoor area, or a facility. Various embodiments provide a delay in opening the closure of sufficient duration to frustrate a rapid activation that might be desired by a person who is attempting to pass through the closure for some illicit purpose. Typically, hydraulics are used to activate the apparatus and no electrical energy or electronic signals are employed. In one embodiment, a plurality of actuations of a hand lever operates a hydraulic pump that moves a locking bolt from a first position in which a locking bolt is engaged with a recess in the fixed structure (preventing opening of a gate) to a second position in which the locking bolt is disengaged from the recess to permit opening of the gate.

  18. Acute necrosis after Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannoma leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kapitza, Sandra; Pangalu, Athina; Horstmann, Gerhard A; van Eck, Albert T; Regli, Luca; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a rare acute complication after Gamma Knife therapy (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in a single patient. A 52-year-old woman presented with vertigo, facial weakness and hearing loss emerging 48hours following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Neurological examination 6days after symptom onset showed right-sided facial palsy, spontaneous left-beating nystagmus and pathologic head-impulse testing to the right. Pure-tone audiogram revealed right-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A diagnosis of acute vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy was made. Brain MRI demonstrated focal contrast sparing within the schwannoma, likely related to acute radiation necrosis. Acute multiple cranial neuropathies of the cerebellopontine angle after Gamma Knife treatment should raise suspicion of acute tissue damage within the schwannoma and should result in urgent MRI. Treatment with steroids may be considered based on accompanying swelling and edema. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Calibrating for Ionospheric Phase Delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1985-01-01

    Technique determines ionospheric phase delay on real-time universally applicable basis in terms of electrons per meter squared by coherently modulating two L-band carrier frequencies received from two Global Positioning System satelites. Two pseudorandom number sequences cross-correlated to derive delay time.

  20. Delayed Auditory Feedback and Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfordresher, Peter Q.; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that timing of rhythm production is disrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF), and that disruption varies with delay length. We tested the hypothesis that disruption depends on the state of the movement trajectory at the onset of DAF. Participants tapped isochronous rhythms at a rate specified by a metronome while hearing DAF…

  1. High resolution digital delay timer

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  2. Imitation dynamics with time delay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Chang; Yu, Jie-Ru; Kurokawa, Shun; Tao, Yi

    2017-02-28

    Based on the classic imitation dynamics (Hofbauer and Sigmund, 1998, Evolutionary Games and Population Dynamics, Cambridge University Press), the imitation dynamics with time delay is investigated, where the probability that an individual will imitate its opponent's own strategy is assumed to depend on the comparison between the past expected payoff of this individual's own strategy and the past expected payoff of its opponent's own strategy, i.e. there is a time delay effect. For the two-phenotype model, we show that if the system has an interior equilibrium and this interior equilibrium is stable when there is no time delay, then there must be a critical value of time delay such that the system tends to a stable periodic solution when the time delay is larger than the critical value. On the other hand, for three-phenotype (rock-scissors-paper) model, the numerical analysis shows that for the stable periodic solution induced by the time delay, the amplitude and the period will increase with the increase of the time delay. These results should help to understand the evolution of behavior based on the imitation dynamics with time delay.

  3. Delayed Reinforcement of Operant Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lattal, Kennon A.

    2010-01-01

    The experimental analysis of delay of reinforcement is considered from the perspective of three questions that seem basic not only to understanding delay of reinforcement but also, by implication, the contributions of temporal relations between events to operant behavior. The first question is whether effects of the temporal relation between…

  4. Registration Delay and Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siefken, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Tracking the difference between the time a first-year student is allowed to register for a course and the time he or she does register for a course (a student's registration delay), we notice a negative correlation between registration delay and final grade in a course. The difference between a student who registers within the first two minutes…

  5. Project delay analysis of HRSG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvianita; Novega, A. S.; Rosyid, D. M.; Suntoyo

    2017-08-01

    Completion of HRSG (Heat Recovery Steam Generator) fabrication project sometimes is not sufficient with the targeted time written on the contract. The delay on fabrication process can cause some disadvantages for fabricator, including forfeit payment, delay on HRSG construction process up until HRSG trials delay. In this paper, the author is using semi quantitative on HRSG pressure part fabrication delay with configuration plant 1 GT (Gas Turbine) + 1 HRSG + 1 STG (Steam Turbine Generator) using bow-tie analysis method. Bow-tie analysis method is a combination from FTA (Fault tree analysis) and ETA (Event tree analysis) to develop the risk matrix of HRSG. The result from FTA analysis is use as a threat for preventive measure. The result from ETA analysis is use as impact from fabrication delay.

  6. Autologous adipocyte derived stem cells favour healing in a minipig model of cutaneous radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Forcheron, Fabien; Agay, Diane; Scherthan, Harry; Riccobono, Diane; Herodin, Francis; Meineke, Viktor; Drouet, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) is the delayed consequence of localized skin exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation. Here we examined for the first time in a large animal model the therapeutic potential of autologous adipose tissue-derived stroma cells (ASCs). For experiments, Göttingen minipigs were locally gamma irradiated using a (60)Co source at the dose of 50 Gy and grafted (n = 5) or not (n = 8). ASCs were cultured in MEM-alpha with 10% fetal calf serum and basic fibroblast growth factor (2 ng.mL(-1)) and post irradiation were intradermally injected on days 25, 46, 67 and finally between days 95 and 115 (50 × 10(6) ASCs each time) into the exposed area. All controls exhibited a clinical evolution with final necrosis (day 91). In grafted pigs an ultimate wound healing was observed in four out of five grafted animals (day 130 +/- 28). Immunohistological analysis of cytokeratin expression showed a complete epidermis recovery. Grafted ASCs accumulated at the dermis/subcutis barrier in which they attracted numerous immune cells, and even an increased vasculature in one pig. Globally this study suggests that local injection of ASCs may represent a useful strategy to mitigate CRS.

  7. Autologous Adipocyte Derived Stem Cells Favour Healing in a Minipig Model of Cutaneous Radiation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Forcheron, Fabien; Agay, Diane; Scherthan, Harry; Riccobono, Diane; Herodin, Francis; Meineke, Viktor; Drouet, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous radiation syndrome (CRS) is the delayed consequence of localized skin exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation. Here we examined for the first time in a large animal model the therapeutic potential of autologous adipose tissue-derived stroma cells (ASCs). For experiments, Göttingen minipigs were locally gamma irradiated using a 60Co source at the dose of 50 Gy and grafted (n = 5) or not (n = 8). ASCs were cultured in MEM-alpha with 10% fetal calf serum and basic fibroblast growth factor (2 ng.mL−1) and post irradiation were intradermally injected on days 25, 46, 67 and finally between days 95 and 115 (50×106 ASCs each time) into the exposed area. All controls exhibited a clinical evolution with final necrosis (day 91). In grafted pigs an ultimate wound healing was observed in four out of five grafted animals (day 130 +/− 28). Immunohistological analysis of cytokeratin expression showed a complete epidermis recovery. Grafted ASCs accumulated at the dermis/subcutis barrier in which they attracted numerous immune cells, and even an increased vasculature in one pig. Globally this study suggests that local injection of ASCs may represent a useful strategy to mitigate CRS. PMID:22348120

  8. Comparison of Types of Cell Death: Apoptosis and Necrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Francis; Zuzel, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    Cell death is an essential factor in many biological processes including development. Discusses two types of cell death: (1) necrosis (induced by sodium azide); and (2) apoptosis (induced by sodium chromate). Illustrates key features that differ between these two types of cells death including loss of membrane integrity and internucleosomal DNA…

  9. Licensed DNA Vaccines against Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV).

    PubMed

    Alonso, Marta; Leong, Jo-Ann C

    2013-04-01

    This article reviews some of the recent patents on DNA vaccines against fish viruses, in particular against the novirhabdovirus infectious hematopoitic necrosis virus (IHNV). Although very effective in protecting fish against IHNV, only one DNA vaccine has been approved to date for use in Canada. In Europe and in US, its commercialization is restricted due to safety concerns.

  10. Intrastromal corneal ring segments and corneal anterior stromal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Bourges, Jean-Louis; Trong, Thong Than; Ellies, Pierre; Briat, Benoit; Renard, Gilles

    2003-06-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) refractive intracorneal ring segments (ICRS) can be removed for a refractive miscorrection or for early complications after implantation. We report the first case of a woman who experienced anterior stromal necrosis 5 years after an ICRS surgical procedure.

  11. Inhibition of Prostaglandin D Synthase Suppresses Muscular Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohri, Ikuko; Aritake, Kosuke; Taniguchi, Hidetoshi; Sato, Yo; Kamauchi, Shinya; Nagata, Nanae; Maruyama, Toshihiko; Taniike, Masako; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2009-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a fatal muscle wasting disease that is characterized by a deficiency in the protein dystrophin. Previously, we reported that the expression of hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase (HPGDS) appeared in necrotic muscle fibers from patients with either Duchenne muscular dystrophy or polymyositis. HPGDS is responsible for the production of the inflammatory mediator, prostaglandin D2. In this paper, we validated the hypothesis that HPGDS has a role in the etiology of muscular necrosis. We investigated the expression of HPGDS/ prostaglandin D2 signaling using two different mouse models of muscle necrosis, that is, bupivacaine-induced muscle necrosis and the mdx mouse, which has a genetic muscular dystrophy. We treated each mouse model with the HPGDS-specific inhibitor, HQL-79, and measured both necrotic muscle volume and selected cytokine mRNA levels. We confirmed that HPGDS expression was induced in necrotic muscle fibers in both bupivacaine-injected muscle and mdx mice. After administration of HQL-79, necrotic muscle volume was significantly decreased in both mouse models. Additionally, mRNA levels of both CD11b and transforming growth factor β1 were significantly lower in HQL-79-treated mdx mice than in vehicle-treated animals. We also demonstrated that HQL-79 suppressed prostaglandin D2 production and improved muscle strength in the mdx mouse. Our results show that HPGDS augments inflammation, which is followed by muscle injury. Furthermore, the inhibition of HPGDS ameliorates muscle necrosis even in cases of genetic muscular dystrophy. PMID:19359520

  12. Phloem Necrosis of American Elm in the Mississippi Delta

    Treesearch

    T. H. Filer

    1966-01-01

    Phloem necrosis in elms, caused by the virus Morsus ulmi Holmes, has been found at Rolling Fork, Mississippi, 60 miles northwest of Jackson and 47 miles north of Vicksburg, in the Delta hardwoods area. It was first reported in Mississippi in 1941, when it was found at Jackson, and it appeared in the northeastern part of the State in 1945.

  13. Comparison of Types of Cell Death: Apoptosis and Necrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Francis; Zuzel, Katherine

    2003-01-01

    Cell death is an essential factor in many biological processes including development. Discusses two types of cell death: (1) necrosis (induced by sodium azide); and (2) apoptosis (induced by sodium chromate). Illustrates key features that differ between these two types of cells death including loss of membrane integrity and internucleosomal DNA…

  14. Gastric necrosis and perforation in a patient with Asperger's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Georgina; D'Souza, Nigel; Thomas, Rhys; Brar, Ranjeet

    2017-09-27

    Acute gastric necrosis is a very rare but potentially fatal condition which has been reported in patients with abnormal eating behaviours.We describe the case of a 24-year-old female with a background of Asperger's syndrome, who presented with abdominal pain and gross distension. She underwent an emergency exploratory laparotomy and was found to have a massively distended, necrotic stomach. A total gastrectomy was performed with interval reconstruction planned. This case reports the surgical management of a rarely seen condition and highlights the importance of recognising gastric necrosis and its causes, which include patients with abnormal eating behaviours, the majority of whom are young females. This is the first report highlighting gastric necrosis in a patient with Asperger's syndrome and coincides with a growing recognition of the association between eating disorders and the autistic spectrum. It is also a rare example of patient survival following total gastric necrosis with perforation. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for ischemic femoral head necrosis.

    PubMed

    Song, H-J; Lan, B-Sh; Cheng, B; Zhang, K-F; Yan, H-W; Wang, W-Zh; Gao, Z-Q

    2010-06-01

    Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) is a highly mutilating disease. There is no effective way to treat femoral head ischemia. This study was designed to show the curative effects of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation to induce vascular regeneration and improve ischemic femoral head necrosis in rabbits. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits underwent ischemic femoral head necrosis in both hindlimbs using liquid-nitrogen refrigeration. One cohort of rats was intraperitoneally injected with granulocyte-specific colony-stimulating factor (250 microg/kg/d), and control animals received equivalent saline solution. The right side was used as the transplantation group and the left as the control. After separation of peripheral blood, a stem cell suspension was poured into the right femoral artery and saline solution into the left femoral artery. At 4 weeks after peripheral stem cell transplantation, standing ability and activity of the the transplanted right hindlimb were remarkably improved, but there were no obvious changes in the control limbs. The experimental rabbits underwent arteriography of bilateral femoral heads, which indicated increased and thickened blood supply to the transplanted right hindlimb compared with the left control. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation improved ischemic femoral head necrosis.

  16. Avascular necrosis of the hip in multiple epiphyseal dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, W.G.; Bassett, G.S.; Mandell, G.A.; Scott, C.I. Jr. )

    1989-11-01

    We observed radiographic changes of avascular necrosis (AVN) of the capital femoral epiphysis in 9 hips of 11 patients with multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). Plain roentgenography, bone scintigraphy, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies all revealed characteristic asymmetric changes in the presence of AVN superimposed on dysplastic femoral heads.

  17. Antibiotic Injections Control Elm Phloem Necrosis in the Urban Ecosystem

    Treesearch

    T. H. Filer

    1976-01-01

    When nine American and cedar elms showing symptoms of elm phloem necrosis were given repeated injections of tetracycline antibiotics for several years, all treated trees recovered and appeared healthy by 1976. All but one of the untreated checks died. Of 10 severely infected American elms treated only during the summer of 1972, seven died and the other three showed...

  18. Delayed Geodynamo in Hadean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkani-Hamed, J.

    2014-12-01

    Paleointensity measurements of Archean rocks reveal a strong geodynamo at ~3.45 Ga, while excess nitrogen content of lunar soil samples implies no geodynamo at ~3.9 Ga. Here I propose that initiation of a strong geodynamo is delayed due to accretion style of Earth, involving collision and merging of a few dozen Moon to Mars size planetary embryos. Two accretion scenarios consisting of 25 and 50 embryos are investigated. The collision of an embryo heats the proto-Earth's core differentially and the rotating low-viscosity core stably stratifies, creating a spherically symmetric and radially increasing temperature distribution. Convection starts in the outer core after each impact but is destroyed by the next impact. The iron core of an impacting embryo descends in the mantle and merges to the proto-Earth's core. Both adiabatic and non-adiabatic merging cases are studied. A major part of the gravitational energy released due to core merging is used to lift up the upper portion of the core to emplace the impactor core material at the neutrally buoyant level in the proto-Earth's core. The remaining energy is converted to heat. In the adiabatic case the merging embryo's core retains all of the remaining energy, while in the non-adiabatic merging 50% of the remaining energy is shared with the outer part of the proto-Earth's core where the embryo's core descends. The two merging models result in significantly different temperature distributions in the core at the end of accretion. After the accretion, the convecting shell in the outer core grows monotonically and generates geodynamo gradually. It takes about 50-100 Myr for the convecting shell to generate a strong dipole field at the surface, 50,000 to 100,000 nT, in the presence of a large stably stratified liquid inner core when the convecting outer core thickness exceeds about one half the radius of the Earth's core.

  19. Local Effects of Delayed Food

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Michael; Baum, William M

    2007-01-01

    Five pigeons were trained on a procedure in which seven concurrent variable-interval schedules arranged seven different food–rate ratios in random sequence in each session. Each of these components lasted for 10 response-produced food deliveries, and components were separated by 10-s blackouts. We varied delays to food (signaled by blackout) between the two response alternatives in an experiment with three phases: In Phase 1, the delay on one alternative was 0 s, and the other was varied between 0 and 8 s; in Phase 2, both delays were equal and were varied from 0 to 4 s; in Phase 3, the two delays summed to 8 s, and each was varied from 1 to 7 s. The results showed that increasing delay affected local choice, measured by a pulse in preference, in the same way as decreasing magnitude, but we found also that increasing the delay at the other alternative increased local preference. This result casts doubt on the traditional view that a reinforcer strengthens a response depending only on the reinforcer's value discounted by any response–reinforcer delay. The results suggest that food guides, rather than strengthens, behavior. PMID:17465314

  20. Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts receive the highest occupational radiation exposure. Effective protections are needed to ensure the safety of astronauts on long duration space missions. Increased cancer morbidity or mortality risk in astronauts may be caused by occupational radiation exposure. Acute and late radiation damage to the central nervous system (CNS) may lead to changes in motor function and behavior, or neurological disorders. Radiation exposure may result in degenerative tissue diseases (non-cancer or non-CNS) such as cardiac, circulatory, or digestive diseases, as well as cataracts. Acute radiation syndromes may occur due to occupational radiation exposure.