Science.gov

Sample records for delivery system targets

  1. [Site-specific drug delivery systems. I. Colon targeted delivery].

    PubMed

    Szente, Virág; Zelkó, Romána

    2007-01-01

    Colon specific drug delivery has gained increased importance not just for the delivery of the drugs for the treatment of local diseases associated with the colon like Chron's disease, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, cancer or infections, but also for the potential it holds for the systemic delivery of proteins (e.g. insulin) and therapeutic peptides. These systems enable the protection of healthy tissues from the side effects of drugs and the drug intake of targeted cells, as well. The formulation of colon specific drug delivery systems is of great impact in the case of diseases having circadian rhythm (midnight gerd). Such circadian rhythm release drug delivery systems are designed to provide a plasma concentration--time profile, which varies according to physiological need at different times during the dosing period, i.e., mimicking the circadian rhythm and severity/manifestation of gastric acid secretion (and/or midnight gerd). In general four primary approaches have been proposed for colon targeted delivery namely pH-dependent systems, time dependent systems, colonic microflora activated systems and prodrugs.

  2. Perspectives on Dual Targeting Delivery Systems for Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huile

    2017-03-01

    Brain tumor remains one of the most serious threats to human beings. Different from peripheral tumors, drug delivery to brain tumor is largely restricted by the blood brain barrier (BBB). To fully conquer this barrier and specifically deliver drugs to brain tumor, dual targeting delivery systems were explored, which are functionalized with two active targeting ligands: one to the BBB and the other to the brain tumor. The development of dual targeting delivery system is still in its early stage, and attentions need to be paid to issues and concerns that remain unresolved in future studies.

  3. Targeted Delivery Systems for Molecular Therapy in Skeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; Li, Fangfei; Wang, Luyao; Li, Defang; Guo, Baosheng; He, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Feng; Liang, Chao; Liu, Biao; Badshah, Shaikh Atik; He, Bing; Lu, Jun; Lu, Cheng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in the integral components of bone, including bone matrix, bone mineral and bone cells, give rise to complex disturbances of skeletal development, growth and homeostasis. Non-specific drug delivery using high-dose systemic administration may decrease therapeutic efficacy of drugs and increase the risk of toxic effects in non-skeletal tissues, which remain clinical challenges in the treatment of skeletal disorders. Thus, targeted delivery systems are urgently needed to achieve higher drug delivery efficiency, improve therapeutic efficacy in the targeted cells/tissues, and minimize toxicities in non-targeted cells/tissues. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the application of different targeting moieties and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in skeletal disorders, and also discuss the advantages, challenges and perspectives in their clinical translation. PMID:27011176

  4. Bioengineered Silk Gene Delivery System for Nuclear Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Yigit, Sezin; Tokareva, Olena; Varone, Antonio; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Gene delivery research has gained momentum with the use of lipophilic vectors that mimic viral systems to increase transfection efficiency. However, maintaining cell viability with these systems remains a major challenge. Therefore biocompatible and nontoxic biopolymers that are designed by combining non-immunological viral mimicking components with suitable carriers have been explored to address these limitations. In the present study recombinant DNA technology was used to design a multi-functional gene delivery system for nuclear targeting, while also supporting cell viability. Spider dragline silk recombinant proteins were modified with DNA condensing units and the proton sponge endosomal escape pathway was utilized for enhanced delivery. Short-term transfection efficiency in a COS-7 cell line (adherent kidney cells isolated from African green monkey) was enhanced compared to lipofectamine and polyethyleneimine (PEI), as was cell viability with these recombinant bio-polyplexes. Endosomal escape and consequent nuclear targeting were shown with fluorescence microscopy. PMID:24889658

  5. Systems approaches to design of targeted therapeutic delivery.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Jacob W; Brenner, Jacob S; Greineder, Colin F; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery aims to improve therapeutic effects and enable mechanisms that are not feasible for untargeted agents (e.g., due to impermeable biological barriers). To achieve targeting, a drug or its carrier should possess properties providing specific accumulation from circulation at the desired site. There are several examples of systems-inspired approaches that have been applied to achieve this goal. First, proteomics analysis of plasma membrane fraction of the vascular endothelium has identified a series of target molecules and their ligands (e.g., antibodies) that deliver conjugated cargoes to well-defined vascular cells and subcellular compartments. Second, selection of ligands binding to cells of interest using phage display libraries in vitro and in vivo has provided peptides and polypeptides that bind to normal and pathologically altered cells. Finally, large-scale high-throughput combinatorial synthesis and selection of lipid- and polymer-based nanocarriers varying their chemical components has yielded a series of carriers accumulating in diverse organs and delivering RNA interference agents to diverse cells. Together, these approaches offer a basis for systems-based design and selection of targets, targeting molecules, and targeting vehicles. Current studies focus on expanding the arsenal of these and alternative targeting strategies, devising drug delivery systems capitalizing on these strategies and evaluation of their benefit/risk ratio in adequate animal models of human diseases. These efforts, combined with better understanding of mechanisms and unintended consequences of these targeted interventions, need to be ultimately translated into industrial development and the clinical domain.

  6. Ex vivo investigation of magnetically targeted drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Fukui, S.; Fujimoto, S.; Mishima, F.; Takeda, S.; Izumi, Y.; Ohtani, S.; Fujitani, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2007-03-01

    In conventional systemic drug delivery the drug is administered by intravenous injection; it then travels to the heart from where it is pumped to all regions of the body. When the drug is aimed at a small target region, this method is extremely inefficient and leads to require much larger doses than those being necessary. In order to overcome this problem a number of targeted drug delivery methods are developed. One of these, magnetically targeted drug delivery system (MT-DDS) will be a promising way, which involves binding a drug to small biocompatible magnetic particles, injecting these into the blood stream and using a high gradient magnetic field to pull them out of suspension in the target region. In the present paper, we describe an ex vivo experimental work. It is also reported that navigation and accumulation test of the magnetic particles in the Y-shaped glass tube was performed in order to examine the threshold of the magnetic force for accumulation. It is found that accumulation of the magnetic particles was succeeded in the blood vessel when a permanent magnet was placed at the vicinity of the blood vessel. This result indicates the feasibility of the magnetically drug targeting in the blood vessel.

  7. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems Targeting to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanshan; Meng, Ying; Li, Chengyi; Qian, Min; Huang, Rongqin

    2015-01-01

    Glioma has been considered to be the most frequent primary tumor within the central nervous system (CNS). The complexity of glioma, especially the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), makes the survival and prognosis of glioma remain poor even after a standard treatment based on surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for the development of some novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, receptor-mediated drug delivery is a specific pattern taking advantage of differential expression of receptors between tumors and normal tissues. The strategy can actively transport drugs, such as small molecular drugs, gene medicines, and therapeutic proteins to glioma while minimizing adverse reactions. This review will summarize recent progress on receptor-mediated drug delivery systems targeting to glioma, and conclude the challenges and prospects of receptor-mediated glioma-targeted therapy for future applications.

  8. New targets and delivery systems for antifungal therapy.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T J; Viviani, M A; Arathoon, E; Chiou, C; Ghannoum, M; Groll, A H; Odds, F C

    2000-01-01

    Development of new approaches for treatment of invasive fungal infections encompasses new delivery systems for approved and investigational compounds, as well as exploiting the cell membrane, cell wall and virulence factors as putative antifungal targets. Novel delivery systems consisting of cyclodextrins, cochleates, nanoparticles/nanospheres and long circulating ('stealth') liposomes, substantially modulate the pharmacokinetics of existing compounds, and may also be useful to enhance the delivery of antifungal agents to sites of infection. Further insights into the structure-activity relationship of the antifungal triazoles that target the biosynthesis of ergosterol in the fungal cell membrane have led to the development of highly potent broad spectrum agents, including posaconazole, ravuconazole and voriconazole. Similarly, a novel generation of cell-wall active semisynthetic echinocandin 1,3 beta-glucan inhibitors (caspofungin, FK463, and VER-002) has entered clinical development. These agents have potent and broad-spectrum activity against Candida spp, and potentially useful activity against Aspergillus spp. and Pneumocystis carinii. The ongoing convergence of the fields of molecular pathogenesis, antifungal pharmacology and vaccine development will afford the opportunity to develop novel targets to complement the existing antifungal armamentarium.

  9. Systems approaches to design of targeted therapeutic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Myerson, Jacob W.; Brenner, Jacob S.; Greineder, Colin F.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery aims to improve therapeutic effects and enable mechanisms that are not feasible for untargeted agents (e.g., due to impermeable biological barriers). To achieve targeting, a drug or its carrier should possess properties providing specific accumulation from circulation at the desired site. There are several examples of systems-inspired approaches that have been applied to achieve this goal. First, proteomics analysis of plasma membrane fraction of the vascular endothelium has identified a series of target molecules and their ligands (e.g., antibodies) that deliver conjugated cargoes to well-defined vascular cells and subcellular compartments. Second, selection of ligands binding to cells of interest using phage display libraries in vitro and in vivo has provided peptides and polypeptides that bind to normal and pathologically altered cells. Finally, large-scale high-throughput combinatorial synthesis and selection of lipid- and polymer-based nanocarriers varying their chemical components has yielded a series of carriers accumulating in diverse organs and delivering RNA interference agents to diverse cells. Together, these approaches offer a basis for systems-based design and selection of targets, targeting molecules, and targeting vehicles. Current studies focus on expanding the arsenal of these and alternative targeting strategies, devising drug delivery systems capitalizing on these strategies and evaluation of their benefit/risk ratio in adequate animal models of human diseases. These efforts, combined with better understanding of mechanisms and unintended consequences of these targeted interventions, need to be ultimately translated into industrial development and the clinical domain. PMID:25946066

  10. Targeted multidrug delivery system to overcome chemoresistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuan; Soroush, Fariborz; Tong, Zhaohui; Kiani, Mohammad F; Wang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy has been widely used in breast cancer patients to reduce tumor size. However, most anticancer agents cannot differentiate between cancerous and normal cells, resulting in severe systemic toxicity. In addition, acquired drug resistance during the chemotherapy treatment further decreases treatment efficacy. With the proper treatment strategy, nanodrug carriers, such as liposomes/immunoliposomes, may be able to reduce undesired side effects of chemotherapy, to overcome the acquired multidrug resistance, and to further improve the treatment efficacy. In this study, a novel combinational targeted drug delivery system was developed by encapsulating antiangiogenesis drug bevacizumab into liposomes and encapsulating chemotherapy drug doxorubicin (DOX) into immunoliposomes where the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) antibody was used as a targeting ligand. This novel combinational system was tested in vitro using a HER2 positive and multidrug resistant breast cancer cell line (BT-474/MDR), and in vivo using a xenograft mouse tumor model. In vitro cell culture experiments show that immunoliposome delivery led to a high cell nucleus accumulation of DOX, whereas free DOX was observed mostly near the cell membrane and in cytoplasm due to the action of P-gp. Combining liposomal bevacizumab with immunoliposomal DOX achieved the best tumor growth inhibition and the lowest toxicity. Tumor size decreased steadily within a 60-day observation period indicating a potential synergistic effect between DOX and bevacizumab through the targeted delivery. Our findings clearly indicate that tumor growth was significantly delayed in the combinational liposomal drug delivery group. This novel combinational therapy has great potential for the treatment of patients with HER2/MDR double positive breast cancer. PMID:28176940

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles as targeted delivery systems in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Prijic, Sara; Sersa, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Background Many different types of nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles being just a category among them, offer exciting opportunities for technologies at the interfaces between chemistry, physics and biology. Some magnetic nanoparticles have already been utilized in clinical practice as contrast enhancing agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, their physicochemical properties are constantly being improved upon also for other biological applications, such as magnetically-guided delivery systems for different therapeutics. By exposure of magnetic nanoparticles with attached therapeutics to an external magnetic field with appropriate characteristics, they are concentrated and retained at the preferred site which enables the targeted delivery of therapeutics to the desired spot. Conclusions The idea of binding chemotherapeutics to magnetic nanoparticles has been around for 30 years, however, no magnetic nanoparticles as delivery systems have yet been approved for clinical practice. Recently, binding of nucleic acids to magnetic nanoparticles has been demonstrated as a successful non-viral transfection method of different cell lines in vitro. With the optimization of this method called magnetofection, it will hopefully become another form of gene delivery for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22933928

  12. 'Smart' non-viral delivery systems for targeted delivery of RNAi to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Joanne M; Hibbitts, Alan; Barlow, James; Kelly, Ciara; Sivadas, Neeraj; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of RNAi offers a potentially exciting new therapeutic paradigm for respiratory diseases. However, effective delivery remains a key requirement for their translation into the clinic and has been a major factor in the limited clinical success seen to date. Inhalation offers tissue-specific targeting of the RNAi to treat respiratory diseases and a diminished risk of off-target effects. In order to deliver RNAi directly to the respiratory tract via inhalation, 'smart' non-viral carriers are required to protect the RNAi during delivery/aerosolization and enhance cell-specific uptake to target cells. Here, we review the state-of-the-art in therapeutic aerosol bioengineering, and specifically non-viral siRNA delivery platforms, for delivery via inhalation. This includes developments in inhaler device engineering and particle engineering, including manufacturing methods and excipients used in therapeutic aerosol bioengineering that underpin the development of smart, cell type-specific delivery systems to target siRNA to respiratory epithelial cells and/or alveolar macrophages.

  13. Nanosized Drug Delivery Systems in Gastrointestinal Targeting: Interactions with Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Karavolos, Michail; Holban, Alina

    2016-01-01

    The new age of nanotechnology has signaled a stream of entrepreneurial possibilities in various areas, form industry to medicine. Drug delivery has benefited the most by introducing nanostructured systems in the transport and controlled release of therapeutic molecules at targeted sites associated with a particular disease. As many nanosized particles reach the gastrointestinal tract by various means, their interactions with the molecular components of this highly active niche are intensively investigated. The well-characterized antimicrobial activities of numerous nanoparticles are currently being considered as a reliable and efficient alternative to the eminent world crisis in antimicrobial drug discovery. The interactions of nanosystems present in the gastrointestinal route with host microbiota is unavoidable; hence, a major research initiative is needed to explore the mechanisms and effects of these nanomaterials on microbiota and the impact that microbiota may have in the outcome of therapies entailing drug delivery nanosystems through the gastrointestinal route. These coordinated studies will provide novel techniques to replace or act synergistically with current technologies and help develop new treatments for major diseases via the discovery of unique antimicrobial molecules. PMID:27690060

  14. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles in target drug delivery system: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Charu; Nagaich, Upendra; Pal, Ashok Kumar; Gulati, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Due to lack of specification and solubility of drug molecules, patients have to take high doses of the drug to achieve the desired therapeutic effects for the treatment of diseases. To solve these problems, there are various drug carriers present in the pharmaceuticals, which can used to deliver therapeutic agents to the target site in the body. Mesoporous silica materials become known as a promising candidate that can overcome above problems and produce effects in a controllable and sustainable manner. In particular, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are widely used as a delivery reagent because silica possesses favorable chemical properties, thermal stability, and biocompatibility. The unique mesoporous structure of silica facilitates effective loading of drugs and their subsequent controlled release of the target site. The properties of mesoporous, including pore size, high drug loading, and porosity as well as the surface properties, can be altered depending on additives used to prepare MSNs. Active surface enables functionalization to changed surface properties and link therapeutic molecules. They are used as widely in the field of diagnosis, target drug delivery, bio-sensing, cellular uptake, etc., in the bio-medical field. This review aims to present the state of knowledge of silica containing mesoporous nanoparticles and specific application in various biomedical fields. PMID:26258053

  15. Novel targeted bladder drug-delivery systems: a review

    PubMed Central

    Zacchè, Martino Maria; Srikrishna, Sushma; Cardozo, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The objective of pharmaceutics is the development of drugs with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. Prolonged exposure of the diseased tissue to the drug is of crucial importance. Drug-delivery systems (DDSs) have been introduced to control rate, time, and place of release. Drugs can easily reach the bladder through a catheter, while systemically administered agents may undergo extensive metabolism. Continuous urine filling and subsequent washout hinder intravesical drug delivery (IDD). Moreover, the low permeability of the urothelium, also described as the bladder permeability barrier, poses a major challenge in the development of the IDD. DDSs increase bioavailability of drugs, therefore improving therapeutic effect and patient compliance. This review focuses on novel DDSs to treat bladder conditions such as overactive bladder, interstitial cystitis, bladder cancer, and recurrent urinary tract infections. The rationale and strategies for both systemic and local delivery methods are discussed, with emphasis on new formulations of well-known drugs (oxybutynin), nanocarriers, polymeric hydrogels, intravesical devices, encapsulated DDSs, and gene therapy. We give an overview of current and future prospects of DDSs for bladder disorders, including nanotechnology and gene therapy. PMID:26649286

  16. Novel targeted bladder drug-delivery systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Zacchè, Martino Maria; Srikrishna, Sushma; Cardozo, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The objective of pharmaceutics is the development of drugs with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. Prolonged exposure of the diseased tissue to the drug is of crucial importance. Drug-delivery systems (DDSs) have been introduced to control rate, time, and place of release. Drugs can easily reach the bladder through a catheter, while systemically administered agents may undergo extensive metabolism. Continuous urine filling and subsequent washout hinder intravesical drug delivery (IDD). Moreover, the low permeability of the urothelium, also described as the bladder permeability barrier, poses a major challenge in the development of the IDD. DDSs increase bioavailability of drugs, therefore improving therapeutic effect and patient compliance. This review focuses on novel DDSs to treat bladder conditions such as overactive bladder, interstitial cystitis, bladder cancer, and recurrent urinary tract infections. The rationale and strategies for both systemic and local delivery methods are discussed, with emphasis on new formulations of well-known drugs (oxybutynin), nanocarriers, polymeric hydrogels, intravesical devices, encapsulated DDSs, and gene therapy. We give an overview of current and future prospects of DDSs for bladder disorders, including nanotechnology and gene therapy.

  17. A novel double-targeted nondrug delivery system for targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Shupei; Zhao, Yufang; Geng, Shuai; Li, Yong; Hou, Xiaolu; Liu, Yi; Lin, Feng-Huei; Yao, Lifen; Tian, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    Instead of killing cancer stem cells (CSCs), the conventional chemotherapy used for cancer treatment promotes the enrichment of CSCs, which are responsible for tumor growth, metastasis, and recurrence. However, most therapeutic agents are only able to kill a small proportion of CSCs by targeting one or two cell surface markers or dysregulated CSC pathways, which are usually shared with normal stem cells (NSCs). In this study, we developed a novel nondrug delivery system for the dual targeting of CSCs by conjugating hyaluronic acid (HA) and grafting the doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) monoclonal antibody to the surface of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)–poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs), which can specifically target CD44 receptors and the DCLK1 surface marker – the latter was shown to possess the capacity to distinguish between CSCSs and NSCs. The size and morphology of these NPs were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This was followed by studies of NP encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release properties. Then, the cytotoxicity of the NPs was tested via Cell Counting Kit-8 assay. Finally, the 4T1 CSCs were obtained from the alginate-based platform, which we developed as an in vitro tumor model. Tumor-bearing nude mice were used as in vivo models to systematically detect the ability of NPs to target CSCs. Our results showed that the DCLK1–HA–PEG–PLGA NPs exhibited a targeting effect toward CSCs both in vitro and in vivo. These findings have important implications for the rational design of drug delivery systems that target CSCs with high efficacy. PMID:27994463

  18. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Li, Fangfei; Li, Defang; Liang, Chao; Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; He, Bing; Atik Badshah, Shaikh; Lu, Cheng; He, Xiaojuan; Guo, Baosheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems. PMID:26473828

  19. Alveolar targeting of aerosol pentamidine. Toward a rational delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Simonds, A.K.; Newman, S.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Talaee, N.; Lee, C.A.; Clarke, S.W. )

    1990-04-01

    Nebulizer systems that deposit a high proportion of aerosolized pentamidine on large airways are likely to be associated with marked adverse side effects, which may lead to premature cessation of treatment. We have measured alveolar deposition and large airway-related side effects (e.g., cough, breathlessness, and effect on pulmonary function) after aerosolization of 150 mg pentamidine isethionate labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-Sn-colloid. Nine patients with AIDS were studied using three nebulizer systems producing different droplet size profiles: the Acorn System 22, Respirgard II, and Respirgard II with the inspiratory baffle removed. Alveolar deposition was greatest and side effects least with the nebulizer producing the smallest droplet size profile (Respirgard II), whereas large airway-related side effects were prominent and alveolar deposition lowest with the nebulizer producing the largest droplet size (Acorn System 22). Values for alveolar deposition and adverse airway effects were intermediate using the Respirgard with inspiratory baffle removed, thus indicating the importance of the baffle valve in determining droplet size. Addition of a similar baffle valve to the Acorn System 22 produced a marked improvement in droplet size profile. Selection of a nebulizer that produces an optimal droplet size range offers the advantage of enhancing alveolar targeting of aerosolized pentamidine while reducing large airway-related side effects.

  20. ICS-283: a system for targeted intravenous delivery of siRNA.

    PubMed

    Schiffelers, Raymond M; Storm, Gert

    2006-05-01

    ICS-283 was developed within Intradigm Corporation as a system that is designed for the systemic delivery of therapeutic small interfering (siRNA) to sites of pathological angiogenesis. The non-viral siRNA delivery system is based on synthetic nanoparticles, known as Targe (Intradigm Corporation), which functions as a broad-platform technology to deliver siRNA to specific target cells in diseased tissues. The system is constructed to incorporate different functionalities that address critical needs for successful nucleic acid delivery. The TargeTran synthetic vector is a self-assembling, layered nanoparticle that protects and targets siRNA to specific cell types in pathological tissues. At present, ICS-283 is the only antiangiogenic siRNA delivery system that is designed for intravenous administration to treat angiogenesis-driven diseases.

  1. Mitochondrion: A Promising Target for Nanoparticle-Based Vaccine Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ru; Umeano, Afoma C.; Francis, Lily; Sharma, Nivita; Tundup, Smanla; Dhar, Shanta

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most popular technologies in disease prevention and eradication. It is promising to improve immunization efficiency by using vectors and/or adjuvant delivery systems. Nanoparticle (NP)-based delivery systems have attracted increasing interest due to enhancement of antigen uptake via prevention of vaccine degradation in the biological environment and the intrinsic immune-stimulatory properties of the materials. Mitochondria play paramount roles in cell life and death and are promising targets for vaccine delivery systems to effectively induce immune responses. In this review, we focus on NPs-based delivery systems with surfaces that can be manipulated by using mitochondria targeting moieties for intervention in health and disease. PMID:27258316

  2. Colon Targeted Drug Delivery Systems: A Review on Primary and Novel Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Anil K.; Philip, Betty

    2010-01-01

    The colon is a site where both local and systemic delivery of drugs can take place. Local delivery allows topical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. However, treatment can be made effective if the drugs can be targeted directly into the colon, thereby reducing the systemic side effects. This review, mainly compares the primary approaches for CDDS (Colon Specific Drug Delivery) namely prodrugs, pH and time dependent systems, and microbially triggered systems, which achieved limited success and had limitations as compared with newer CDDS namely pressure controlled colonic delivery capsules, CODESTM, and osmotic controlled drug delivery which are unique in terms of achieving in vivo site specificity, and feasibility of manufacturing process. PMID:22125706

  3. Conceptual design report for the University of Rochester cryogenic target delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Fagaly, R.L.; Alexander, N.B.; Bourque, R.F.; Dahms, C.F.; Lindgren, J.R.; Miller, W.J. ); Bittner, D.N.; Hendricks, C.D. )

    1993-05-01

    The upgrade of the Omega laser at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) will result in a need for large targets filled with D[sub 2] or Dt and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. This mandates a cryogenic target delivery system capable of filling, layering, characterizing and delivering cryogenic targets to the Omega Upgrade target chamber. The program goal is to design, construct, and test the entire target delivery system by June 1996. When completed (including an operational demonstration), the system will be shipped to Rochester for reassembly and commissioning in time for the Omega Upgrade cryogenic campaign, scheduled to start in 1998. General Atomics has been assigned the task of developing the conceptual design for the cryogenic target delivery system. Design and fabrication activities will be closely coordinated with the University of Rochester, Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), drawing upon their knowledge base in fuel layering and cryogenic characterization. The development of a target delivery system for Omega could also benefit experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the other ICF Laboratories in that the same technologies could be applied to NOVA, the National Ignition Facility or the future Laboratory Microfusion Facility.

  4. Conceptual design report for the University of Rochester cryogenic target delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Fagaly, R.L.; Alexander, N.B.; Bourque, R.F.; Dahms, C.F.; Lindgren, J.R.; Miller, W.J.; Bittner, D.N.; Hendricks, C.D.

    1993-05-01

    The upgrade of the Omega laser at the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) will result in a need for large targets filled with D{sub 2} or Dt and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. This mandates a cryogenic target delivery system capable of filling, layering, characterizing and delivering cryogenic targets to the Omega Upgrade target chamber. The program goal is to design, construct, and test the entire target delivery system by June 1996. When completed (including an operational demonstration), the system will be shipped to Rochester for reassembly and commissioning in time for the Omega Upgrade cryogenic campaign, scheduled to start in 1998. General Atomics has been assigned the task of developing the conceptual design for the cryogenic target delivery system. Design and fabrication activities will be closely coordinated with the University of Rochester, Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), drawing upon their knowledge base in fuel layering and cryogenic characterization. The development of a target delivery system for Omega could also benefit experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the other ICF Laboratories in that the same technologies could be applied to NOVA, the National Ignition Facility or the future Laboratory Microfusion Facility.

  5. Time-controlled oral delivery systems for colon targeting.

    PubMed

    Gazzaniga, Andrea; Maroni, Alessandra; Sangalli, Maria Edvige; Zema, Lucia

    2006-09-01

    In recent years, many research efforts have been spent in the achievement of selective delivery of drugs into the colon following oral administration. Indeed, colonic release is regarded as a beneficial approach to the pharmacological treatment or prevention of widespread large bowel pathologies, such as inflammatory bowel disease and adenocarcinoma. In addition, it is extensively explored as a potential means of enhancing the oral bioavailability of peptides, proteins and other biotechnological molecules, which are known to be less prone to enzymatic degradation in the large, rather than in the small, intestine. Based on these premises, several formulation strategies have been attempted in pursuit of colonic release, chiefly including microflora-, pH-, pressure- and time-dependent delivery technologies. In particular, this review is focused on the main design features and release performances of time-controlled devices, which rely on the relative constancy that is observed in the small intestinal transit time of dosage forms.

  6. Targeted Delivery System of Nanobiomaterials in Anticancer Therapy: From Cells to Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Su-Eon; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Targeted delivery systems of nanobiomaterials are necessary to be developed for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Nanobiomaterials can be engineered to recognize cancer-specific receptors at the cellular levels and to deliver anticancer drugs into the diseased sites. In particular, nanobiomaterial-based nanocarriers, so-called nanoplatforms, are the design of the targeted delivery systems such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles/micelles, nanoconjugates, norganic materials, carbon-based nanobiomaterials, and bioinspired phage system, which are based on the nanosize of 1–100 nm in diameter. In this review, the design and the application of these nanoplatforms are discussed at the cellular levels as well as in the clinics. We believe that this review can offer recent advances in the targeted delivery systems of nanobiomaterials regarding in vitro and in vivo applications and the translation of nanobiomaterials to nanomedicine in anticancer therapy. PMID:24672796

  7. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Gregg A.; Bevan, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting

  8. Implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in delivery and targeting tubulin binding agent, noscapine in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Ramesh; Madan, Jitender; Singh, Prashant; Chandra, Ankush; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Vartika; Dass, Sujata K

    2012-12-01

    Noscapine, a tubulin binding anticancer agent undergoing Phase I/II clinical trials, inhibits tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of breast, lung, ovarian, brain, and prostrate origin. The analogues of noscapine like 9-bromonoscapine (EM011) are 5 to 10-fold more active than parent compound, noscapine. Noscapinoids inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells that are resistant to paclitaxel and epothilone. Noscapine also potentiated the anticancer activity of doxorubicin in a synergistic manner against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, physicochemical and pharmacokinetic (ED50˜300-600 mg/kg bodyweight) limitations of noscapine present hurdle in development of commercial anticancer formulations. Therefore, objectives of the present review are to summarize the chemotherapeutic potential of noscapine and implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of noscapine in cancer cells. We have constructed noscapine-enveloped gelatin nanoparticles, NPs and poly (ethylene glycol) grafted gelatin NPs as well as inclusion complex of noscapine in β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and evaluated their physicochemical characteristics. The Fe3O4 NPs were also used to incorporate noscapine in its polymeric nanomatrix system where molecular weight of the polymer governed the encapsulation efficiency of drug. The enhanced noscapine delivery using μPAR-targeted optical-MR imaging trackable NPs offer a great potential for image directed targeted delivery of noscapine. Human Serum Albumin NPs (150-300 nm) as efficient noscapine drug delivery systems have also been developed for potential use in breast cancer.

  9. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies. PMID:21995320

  10. Microemulsion-based drug delivery system for transnasal delivery of Carbamazepine: preliminary brain-targeting study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rashmin Bharatbhai; Patel, Mrunali Rashmin; Bhatt, Kashyap K; Patel, Bharat G; Gaikwad, Rajiv V

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the development and evaluation of Carbamazepine (CMP)-loaded microemulsions (CMPME) for intranasal delivery in the treatment of epilepsy. The CMPME was prepared by the spontaneous emulsification method and characterized for physicochemical parameters. All formulations were radiolabeled with (99m)Tc (technetium) and biodistribution of CMP in the brain was investigated using Swiss albino rats. Brain scintigraphy imaging in rats was also performed to determine the uptake of the CMP into the brain. CMPME were found crystal clear and stable with average globule size of 34.11 ± 1.41 nm. (99m)Tc-labeled CMP solution (CMPS)/CMPME/CMP mucoadhesive microemulsion (CMPMME) were found to be stable and suitable for in vivo studies. Brain/blood ratio at all sampling points up to 8 h following intranasal administration of CMPMME compared to intravenous CMPME was found to be 2- to 3-fold higher signifying larger extent of distribution of the CMP in brain. Drug targeting efficiency and direct drug transport were found to be highest for CMPMME post-intranasal administration compared to intravenous CMP. Rat brain scintigraphy also demonstrated higher intranasal uptake of the CMP into the brain. This investigation demonstrates a prompt and larger extent of transport of CMP into the brain through intranasal CMPMME, which may prove beneficial for treatment of epilepsy.

  11. Recent approaches of lipid-based delivery system for lymphatic targeting via oral route.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Shilpa; Garg, Tarun; Murthy, R S R; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2014-12-01

    Lymphatic system is a key target in research field due to its distinctive makeup and huge contributing functions within the body. Intestinal lymphatic drug transport (chylomicron pathway) is intensely described in research field till date because it is considered to be the best for improving oral drug delivery by avoiding first pass metabolism. The lymphatic imaging techniques and potential therapeutic candidates are engaged for evaluating disease states and overcoming these conditions. The novel drug delivery systems such as self-microemulsifying drug delivery system, nanoparticles, liposomes, nano-lipid carriers, solid lipid carriers are employed for delivering drugs through lymphatic system via various routes such as subcutaneous route, intraperitoneal route, pulmonary route, gastric sub-mucosal injection, intrapleural and intradermal. Among these colloidal particles, lipid-based delivery system is considered to be the best for lymphatic delivery. From the last few decades, mesenteric lymph duct cannulation and thoracic lymph duct cannulation are followed to assess lymphatic uptake of drugs. Due to their limitations, chylomicrons inhibitors and in-vitro models are employed, i.e. lipolysis model and permeability model. Currently, research on this topic still continues and drainage system used to deliver the drugs against lymphatic disease as well as targeting other organs by modulating the chylomicron pathway.

  12. Laser-induced disruption of systemically administered liposomes for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackanos, Mark A.; Larabi, Malika; Shinde, Rajesh; Simanovskii, Dmitrii M.; Guccione, Samira; Contag, Christopher H.

    2009-07-01

    Liposomal formulations of drugs have been shown to enhance drug efficacy by prolonging circulation time, increasing local concentration and reducing off-target effects. Controlled release from these formulations would increase their utility, and hyperthermia has been explored as a stimulus for targeted delivery of encapsulated drugs. Use of lasers as a thermal source could provide improved control over the release of the drug from the liposomes with minimal collateral tissue damage. Appropriate methods for assessing local release after systemic delivery would aid in testing and development of better formulations. We use in vivo bioluminescence imaging to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of luciferin, used as a model small molecule, and demonstrate laser-induced release from liposomes in animal models after systemic delivery. These liposomes were tested for luciferin release between 37 and 45 °C in PBS and serum using bioluminescence measurements. In vivo studies were performed on transgenic reporter mice that express luciferase constitutively throughout the body, thus providing a noninvasive readout for controlled release following systemic delivery. An Nd:YLF laser was used (527 nm) to heat tissues and induce rupture of the intravenously delivered liposomes in target tissues. These data demonstrate laser-mediated control of small molecule delivery using thermally sensitive liposomal formulations.

  13. Systemic Delivery of Blood-Brain Barrier Targeted Polymeric Nanoparticles Enhances Delivery to Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K.; Deng, Yang; Seo, Young-Eun; Cheng, Christopher J.; Zhang, Junwei; Quijano, Elias; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents to the central nervous system is a significant challenge, hindering progress in the treatment of diseases such as glioblastoma. Due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), therapeutic agents do not readily transverse the brain endothelium to enter the parenchyma. Previous reports suggest that surface modification of polymer nanoparticles can improve their ability to cross the BBB, but it is unclear whether the observed enhancements in transport are large enough to enhance therapy. In this study, we synthesized two degradable polymer nanoparticle systems surface-modified with ligands previously suggested to improve BBB transport, and tested their ability to cross the BBB after intravenous injection in mice. All nanoparticle preparations were able to cross the BBB, although generally in low amounts (<0.5% of the injected dose), which was consistent with prior reports. One nanoparticle produced significantly higher brain uptake (~0.8% of the injected dose): a block copolymer of polylactic acid and hyperbranched polyglycerol, surface modified with adenosine (PLA-HPG-Ad). PLA-HPG-Ad nanoparticles provided controlled release of camptothecin, killing U87 glioma cells in culture. When administered intravenously in mice with intracranial U87 tumors, they failed to increase survival. These results suggest that enhancing nanoparticle transport across the BBB does not necessarily yield proportional pharmacological effects. PMID:26453169

  14. Targeted delivery of nano-therapeutics for major disorders of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huile; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

    2013-10-01

    Major central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including brain tumors, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and stroke, are significant threats to human health. Although impressive advances in the treatment of CNS disorders have been made during the past few decades, the success rates are still moderate if not poor. The blood–brain barrier (BBB) hampers the access of systemically administered drugs to the brain. The development of nanotechnology provides powerful tools to deliver therapeutics to target sites. Anchoring them with specific ligands can endow the nano-therapeutics with the appropriate properties to circumvent the BBB. In this review, the potential nanotechnology-based targeted drug delivery strategies for different CNS disorders are described. The limitations and future directions of brain-targeted delivery systems are also discussed.

  15. A targeted drug delivery system based on dopamine functionalized nano graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudipour, Elham; Kashanian, Soheila; Maleki, Nasim

    2017-01-01

    The cellular targeting property of a biocompatible drug delivery system can widely increase the therapeutic effect against various diseases. Here, we report a dopamine conjugated nano graphene oxide (DA-nGO) carrier for cellular delivery of the anticancer drug, Methotrexate (MTX) into DA receptor positive human breast adenocarcinoma cell line. The material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy. Furthermore, the antineoplastic action of MTX loaded DA-nGO against DA receptor positive and negative cell lines were explored. The results presented in this article demonstrated that the application of DA functionalized GO as a targeting drug carrier can improve the drug delivery efficacy for DA receptor positive cancer cell lines and promise future designing of carrier conjugates based on it.

  16. Towards multifunctional, targeted drug delivery systems using mesoporous silica nanoparticles - opportunities & challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenholm, Jessica M.; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Lindén, Mika

    2010-10-01

    One of the big challenges of medicine today is to deliver drugs specifically to defected cells. Nanoparticulate drug carriers have the potential to answer to this call, as nanoparticles can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, and also be provided in a targetable form aimed at enhancing cell specificity of the carrier. Recent developments within material science and strong collaborative efforts crossing disciplinary borders have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for such targeted drug delivery. Here we outline recent advances which in this sense push MSNs to the forefront of drug delivery development. Relatively straightforward inside-out tuning of the vehicles, high flexibility, and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for targeted drug delivery such as `smart' cancer therapies. Moreover, due to the large surface area and the controllable surface functionality of MSNs, they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting, simultaneously carrying traceable (fluorescent or magnetically active) modalities, also making them highly interesting as theragnostic agents. However, the increased relative surface area and small size, and flexible surface functionalization which is beneficially exploited in nanomedicine, consequently also includes potential risks in their interactions with biological systems. Therefore, we also discuss some safety issues regarding MSNs and highlight how different features of the drug delivery platform influence their behaviour in a biological setting. Addressing these burning questions will facilitate the application of MSNs in nanomedicine.

  17. Theranostic nanoparticles carrying doxorubicin attenuate targeting ligand specific antibody responses following systemic delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Emmy; Qian, Weiping; Cao, Zehong; Wang, Liya; Bozeman, Erica N; Ward, Christina; Yang, Bin; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Wang, Y Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effects of immune responses on targeted delivery of nanoparticles is important for clinical translations of new cancer imaging and therapeutic nanoparticles. In this study, we found that repeated administrations of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) conjugated with mouse or human derived targeting ligands induced high levels of ligand specific antibody responses in normal and tumor bearing mice while injections of unconjugated mouse ligands were weakly immunogenic and induced a very low level of antibody response in mice. Mice that received intravenous injections of targeted and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated IONPs further increased the ligand specific antibody production due to differential uptake of PEG-coated nanoparticles by macrophages and dendritic cells. However, the production of ligand specific antibodies was markedly inhibited following systemic delivery of theranostic nanoparticles carrying a chemotherapy drug, doxorubicin. Targeted imaging and histological analysis revealed that lack of the ligand specific antibodies led to an increase in intratumoral delivery of targeted nanoparticles. Results of this study support the potential of further development of targeted theranostic nanoparticles for the treatment of human cancers.

  18. Collagen Coated Nanoliposome as a Targeted and Controlled Drug Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, G.; Stephen, P.; Prabhu, M.; Sehgal, P. K.; Sadulla, S.

    2010-10-01

    The collagen coated nanoliposome (CCNL) have been prepared and characterized in order to develop a targeted and controlled drug delivery system. The zeta potential (ZP) measurement, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectral and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Cell viability assay data showed that the collagen coated nanoliposome particle size and charges, structural interaction and surface morphology and high bio-cyto-compatibility of collagen coated nanoliposome. The particle sizes of nanoliposome (NL) and collagen coated nanoliposome are 20-300 nm and 0.1-10 μm respectively. The introduction of triple helical, coiled coil and fibrous protein of collagen into nanoliposome can improves the stability of nanoliposome, resistant to phospholipase activities and decreasing the phagocytosis of liposomes by reticuloendothelial system. The collagen coated nanoliposome is expected to be used as for targeted and controlled drug delivery system, and tissue engineering application.

  19. Exploitation of pleiotropic actions of statins by using tumour-targeted delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Licarete, Emilia; Sesarman, Alina; Banciu, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Statins are drugs traditionally used to lower cholesterol levels in blood. At concentrations 100- to 500-fold higher than those needed for reaching cholesterol lowering activity, they have anti-tumour activity. This anti-tumour activity is based on statins pleiotropic effects derived from their ability to inhibit the mevalonate synthesis and include anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-metastatic actions and modulatory effects on intra-tumour oxidative stress. Thus, in this review, we summarise the possible pleiotropic actions of statins involved in tumour growth inhibition. Since the administration of these high doses of statins is accompanied by severe side effects, targeted delivery of statins seems to be the appropriate strategy for efficient application of statins in oncology. Therefore, we also present an overview of the current status of targeted delivery systems for statins with possible utilisation in oncology.

  20. Targeted magnetic delivery and tracking of cells using a magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Riegler, Johannes; Wells, Jack A; Kyrtatos, Panagiotis G; Price, Anthony N; Pankhurst, Quentin A; Lythgoe, Mark F

    2010-07-01

    The success of cell therapies depends on the ability to deliver the cells to the site of injury. Targeted magnetic cell delivery is an emergent technique for localised cell transplantation therapy. The use of permanent magnets limits such a treatment to organs close to the body surface or an implanted magnetic source. A possible alternative method for magnetic cell delivery is magnetic resonance targeting (MRT), which uses magnetic field gradients inherent to all magnetic resonance imaging system, to steer ferromagnetic particles to their target region. In this study we have assessed the feasibility of such an approach for cell targeting, using a range of flow rates and different super paramagnetic iron oxide particles in a vascular bifurcation phantom. Using MRT we have demonstrated that 75% of labelled cells could be guided within the vascular bifurcation. Furthermore we have demonstrated the ability to image the labelled cells before and after magnetic targeting, which may enable interactive manipulation and assessment of the distribution of cellular therapy. This is the first demonstration of cellular MRT and these initial findings support the potential value of MRT for improved targeting of intravascular cell therapies.

  1. Magnetic chitosan nanoparticles as a drug delivery system for targeting photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun; Chen, Zhi-long; Yang, Xiao-xia; Huang, Peng; Zhou, Xin-ping; Du, Xiao-xia

    2009-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become an increasingly recognized alternative to cancer treatment in clinic. However, PDT therapy agents, namely photosensitizer (PS), are limited in application as a result of prolonged cutaneous photosensitivity, poor water solubility and inadequate selectivity, which are encountered by numerous chemical therapies. Magnetic chitosan nanoparticles provide excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-toxicity and water solubility without compromising their magnetic targeting. Nevertheless, no previous attempt has been reported to develop an in vivo magnetic drug delivery system with chitosan nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) monitored targeting photodynamic therapy. In this study, magnetic targeting chitosan nanoparticles (MTCNPs) were prepared and tailored as a drug delivery system and imaging agents for PS, designated as PHPP. Results showed that PHPP-MTCNPs could be used in MRI monitored targeting PDT with excellent targeting and imaging ability. Non-toxicity and high photodynamic efficacy on SW480 carcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo were achieved with this method at the level of 0-100 µM. Notably, localization of nanoparticles in skin and hepatic tissue was significantly less than in tumor tissue, therefore photosensitivity and hepatotoxicity can be attenuated.

  2. Engineered Polymer-Transferrin Conjugates as Self-Assembling Targeted Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Makwana, Hiteshri; Mastrotto, Francesca; Magnusson, Johannes Pall; Sleep, Darrell; Hay, Joanna; Nicholls, Karl J; Allen, Stephanie; Alexander, Cameron

    2017-03-28

    Polymer-protein conjugates can be engineered to self-assemble into discrete and well-defined drug delivery systems which combine the advantages of receptor targeting and controlled drug release. We designed specific conjugates of the iron-binding and transport protein, transferrin (Tf), to combine the advantages of this serum-stable protein as a targeting agent for cancer cells with self-assembling polymers to act as carriers of cytotoxic drugs. Tf variants were expressed with cysteine residues at sites spanning different regions of the protein surface and the polymer conjugates grown from these variants were compared with polymer conjugates grown from non-selectively derivatised sites on native Tf. The resulting synthetic biopolymer hybrids were evaluated for self-assembly properties, size and topology, ability to carry an anti-cancer drug (paclitaxel) and cytotoxicity with and without a drug payload in a representative human colon cancer cell line. The results demonstrated that the engineered Tf variant polymer conjugates formed better-defined self-assembled nanoparticles than the non-selectively derivatised conjugates and showed greater efficacy in paclitaxel delivery. A polymer conjugate grown from a specific Tf variant, S415C was found to be taken up rapidly into cancer cells expressing the Tf-receptor, and, while tolerated well by cells in the absence of drugs, was as cytotoxic as free paclitaxel when loaded with the drug. Importantly, the S415C conjugate polymer was not the most active variant in Tf-receptor binding, suggesting that the nanoscale self-assembly of the polymer-protein hybrid is also a key factor in delivery efficacy. The data overall suggest new design rules for polymer-biopolymer hybrids and therapeutic delivery systems which include engineering specific residues for conjugation which mediate nanoscale assembly as well as control of ligand-receptor interactions to target specific cell types.

  3. Medicinal chemistry based approaches and nanotechnology-based systems to improve CNS drug targeting and delivery.

    PubMed

    Vlieghe, Patrick; Khrestchatisky, Michel

    2013-05-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is protected by various barriers, which regulate nervous tissue homeostasis and control the selective and specific uptake, efflux, and metabolism of endogenous and exogenous molecules. Among these barriers is the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a physical and physiological barrier that filters very efficiently and selectively the entry of compounds from the blood to the brain and protects nervous tissue from harmful substances and infectious agents present in the bloodstream. The BBB also prevents the entry of potential drugs. As a result, various drug targeting and delivery strategies are currently being developed to enhance the transport of drugs from the blood to the brain. Following a general introduction, we briefly overview in this review article the fundamental physiological properties of the BBB. Then, we describe current strategies to bypass the BBB (i.e., invasive methods, alternative approaches, and temporary opening) and to cross it (i.e., noninvasive approaches). This section is followed by a chapter addressing the chemical and technological solutions developed to cross the BBB. A special emphasis is given to prodrug-targeting approaches and targeted nanotechnology-based systems, two promising strategies for BBB targeting and delivery of drugs to the brain.

  4. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries. PMID:27351915

  5. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries.

  6. Emulsomes Meet S-layer Proteins: An Emerging Targeted Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Ucisik, Mehmet H.; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Schuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Here, the use of emulsomes as a drug delivery system is reviewed and compared with other similar lipidic nanoformulations. In particular, we look at surface modification of emulsomes using S-layer proteins, which are self-assembling proteins that cover the surface of many prokaryotic organisms. It has been shown that covering emulsomes with a crystalline S-layer lattice can protect cells from oxidative stress and membrane damage. In the future, the capability to recrystallize S-layer fusion proteins on lipidic nanoformulations may allow the presentation of binding functions or homing protein domains to achieve highly specific targeted delivery of drug-loaded emulsomes. Besides the discussion on several designs and advantages of composite emulsomes, the success of emulsomes for the delivery of drugs to fight against viral and fungal infections, dermal therapy, cancer, and autoimmunity is summarized. Further research might lead to smart, biocompatible emulsomes, which are able to protect and reduce the side effects caused by the drug, but at the same time are equipped with specific targeting molecules to find the desired site of action. PMID:25697368

  7. A multifunctional metal-organic framework based tumor targeting drug delivery system for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Dong, Zhi-Yue; Cheng, Hong; Wan, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Wei-Hai; Zou, Mei-Zhen; Huo, Jia-Wei; Deng, He-Xiang; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects.Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  8. Characterization of cubosomes as a targeted and sustained transdermal delivery system for capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinsheng; Zhou, Yanfang; Han, Ke; Qin, Lingzhen; Dian, Linghui; Li, Ge; Pan, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2015-01-01

    Phytantriol- and glycerol monooleate-based cubosomes were produced and characterized as a targeted and sustained transdermal delivery system for capsaicin. The cubosomes were prepared by emulsification and homogenization of phytantriol (F1), glycerol monooleate (F2), and poloxamer dispersions, characterized for morphology and particle size distribution by transmission electron microscope and photon correlation spectroscopy. Their Im3m crystallographic space group was confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering. An in vitro release study showed that the cubosomes provided a sustained release system for capsaicin. An in vitro diffusion study conducted using Franz diffusion cells indicated that the skin retention of capsaicin from cubosomes in the stratum corneum was much higher (2.75±0.22 μg versus 4.32±0.13 μg, respectively) than that of capsaicin cream (0.72±0.13 μg). The stress testing showed that the cubosome formulations were stable under strong light and high temperature for up to 10 days. After multiapplications on mouse skin, the irritation of capsaicin cubosomes and cream was light with the least amount of side effects. Overall, the present study demonstrated that cubosomes may be a suitable skin-targeted and sustained delivery system for the transdermal administration of capsaicin. PMID:26345516

  9. Therapy of Chronic Hepatitis C in the Era of Nanotechnology: Drug Delivery Systems and Liver Targeting.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Maria Lujan

    2017-01-01

    Since the British scientist Michael Houghton along with George Kuo, Qui-Lim Choo (Chiron Corporation Emeryville), and Daniel W. Bradley (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) codiscovered the causative agent of hepatitis C in 1989, so much progress has been made for the screening of blood donors and management of this chronic liver disease. In this regard, direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) have emerged as the potential "cure" of this slowly progressing and devastating disease. However, improvements are still clearly required since the anti-hepatitis C drugs currently available in the market are so extremely expensive (i.e. $94,500 for a 12-week course of treatment), that many patients will have a denied access to such drugs by their insurers.

    In the last few years, nanotechnology has emerged as a new platform for drug development, contributing significantly to the improvement of the administration and delivery of many drugs. Additionally, nanotechnologies can provide unique solutions even in poorer societies.

    This manuscript reviews the current knowledges on the available anti-hepatitis C drugs and the new drug candidates being investigated as well, and introduces the recent advances in nanocarrier-based delivery systems. Finally, the challenges in the development of drug delivery systems for the targeting of antiviral drugs to the liver are also discussed.

  10. Neutrophil targeted nano-drug delivery system for chronic obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Vij, Neeraj; Min, Taehong; Bodas, Manish; Gorde, Aakruti; Roy, Indrajit

    2016-11-01

    The success of drug delivery to target airway cell(s) remains a significant challenge due to the limited ability of nanoparticle (NP) systems to circumvent protective airway-defense mechanisms. The size, density, surface and physical-chemical properties of nanoparticles are the key features that determine their ability to navigate across the airway-barrier. We evaluated here the efficacy of a PEGylated immuno-conjugated PLGA-nanoparticle (PINP) to overcome this challenge and selectively deliver drug to specific inflammatory cells (neutrophils). We first characterized the size, shape, surface-properties and neutrophil targeting using dynamic laser scattering, transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. Next, we assessed the efficacy of neutrophil-targeted PINPs in transporting through the airway followed by specific binding and release of drug to neutrophils. Finally, our results demonstrate the efficacy of PINP mediated non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-(ibuprofen) delivery to neutrophils in murine models of obstructive lung diseases, based on its ability to control neutrophilic-inflammation and resulting lung disease.

  11. Drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system mediated by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction: A promising therapy method.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; DU, Lian Fang; Chen, Ming; Wang, Hang Hui; Xing, Ling Xi; Jing, Li Fang; Li, Yun Hua

    2013-07-01

    The nano-microcapsules drug delivery system is currently a promising method for the treatment of many types of diseases, particularly tumors. However, the drug delivery efficiency does not reach a satisfactory level to meet treatment demands. Therefore, the effectiveness of delivery needs to be improved. Based on the alterations in the structure and modification of nano-microcapsules, ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), a safe physical targeted method, may increase tissue penetration and cell membrane permeability, aiding the drug-loaded nano-microcapsules ingress the interior of targeted tissues and cells. The effectiveness and exact mechanism of action of the drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system mediated by UTMD have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, the latest advancement in UTMD-mediated drug loaded nano-microcapsules system technology was reviewed and the hindrances of UTMD-mediated drug delivery were assessed, in combination with a prospective study. The findings suggested that the drug delivery efficiency of nano-microcapsules mediated by UTMD was distinctly improved. Thus, the UTMD-mediated drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system may significantly improve the efficiency of drug delivery, which may be a promising new therapeutic method.

  12. Formulation, Evaluation and Optimization of Pectin- Bora Rice Beads for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Ramteke, Kuldeep Hemraj; Nath, Lilakant

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to established new polysaccharide for the colon targeted drug delivery system, its formulation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation. Methods: Microspheres containing pectin and bora rice were prepared by ionotropic gelation technique using zinc acetate as cross linking agent and model drug used was glipizide. A 32 full factorial design was employed to study the effect of independent variables, polymer to drug ratio (A), and concentration of cross linking agent (B) on dependent variables, particle size, swelling index, drug entrapment efficiency and percentage drug release. Results: Results of trial batches indicated that polymer to drug ratio and concentration of cross linking agent affects characteristics of beads. Beads were discrete, spherical and free flowing. Beads exhibited small particle size and showed higher percentage of drug entrapment efficiency. The optimized batch P2 exhibited satisfactory drug entrapment efficiency 68% and drug release was also controlled for more than 24 hours. The polymer to drug ratio had a more significant effect on the dependent variables. In vivo gamma scintigraphy study of optimized pectin-bora rice beads demonstrated degradation of beads whenever they reached to the colon. Conclusion: Bora rice is potential polysaccharide for colon targeted drug delivery system. PMID:24511481

  13. Targeted Drug Delivery to the Peripheral Nervous System using Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Darren; Mata, Marina; Fink, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Gene transfer to target delivery of neurotrophic factors to the primary sensory afferent for treatment of polyneuropathy, or of inhibitory neurotransmitters for relief of chronic pain, offers the possibility of a highly selective targeted release of bioactive molecules within the nervous system. Preclinical studies with non-replicating herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based vectors injected into the skin to transduce neurons in the dorsal root ganglion have demonstrated efficacy in reducing-pain related behaviors in animal models of inflammatory pain, neuropathic pain, and pain caused by cancer, and in preventing progression of sensory neuropathy caused by toxins, chemotherapeutic drugs or resulting from diabetes. Successful completion of the first phase 1 clinical trial of HSV-mediated gene transfer in patients with intractable pain from cancer has set the stage for further clinical trials of this approach. PMID:22565023

  14. Enzyme-induced and tumor-targeted drug delivery system based on multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yin-Jia; Luo, Guo-Feng; Zhu, Jing-Yi; Xu, Xiao-Ding; Zeng, Xuan; Cheng, Dong-Bing; Li, You-Mei; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; He, Feng

    2015-05-06

    Functional mesoporous silica particles have attracted growing research interest for controlled drug delivery in targeted cancer therapy. For the purpose of efficient targeting tumor cells and reducing the adverse effect of antitumor drug doxorubicin (DOX), biocompatible and enzyme-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with tumor specificity were desired. To construct these functional MSNs, the classic rotaxane structure formed between alkoxysilane tether and α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) was employed to anchor onto the orifices of MSNs as gatekeeper in this work. After subsequent modification by multifunctional peptide (azido-GFLGR7RGDS with tumor-targeting, membrane-penetrating, and cathepsin B-responsive functions) to stabilize the gatekeeper, the resulting functional MSNs showed a strong ability to load and seal DOX in their nanopores. When incubating these DOX-loaded MSNs with tumor and normal cells, the nanoparticles could efficiently employ their surface-encoded RGDS and continuous seven arginine (R7) sequences to target tumor cells, penetrate the cell membrane, and enter tumor cells. Because cathepsin B overexpressed in late endosomes and lysosomes of tumor cells could specifically hydrolyze GFLG sequences of the nanovalves, the DOX-loaded MSNs showed an "off-on" drug release behavior that ∼80% loaded DOX could be released within 24 h and thus showed a high rate of apoptosis. Furthermore, in vitro cellular experiments indicated that DOX-loaded MSNs (DOX@MSN-GFLGR7RGDS/α-CD) had high growth inhibition toward αvβ3-positive HeLa cancerous cells. The research might offer a practical way for designing the tumor-targeted and enzyme-induced drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

  15. An intraocular drug delivery system using targeted nanocarriers attenuates retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Chen, Guojun; Li, Jun; Fu, Yingmei; Mavlyutov, Timur A; Yao, Annie; Nickells, Robert W; Gong, Shaoqin; Guo, Lian-Wang

    2017-02-10

    Glaucoma is a common blinding disease characterized by loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). To date, there is no clinically available treatment directly targeting RGCs. We aim to develop an RGC-targeted intraocular drug delivery system using unimolecular micelle nanoparticles (unimNPs) to prevent RGC loss. The unimNPs were formed by single/individual multi-arm star amphiphilic block copolymer poly(amidoamine)-polyvalerolactone-poly(ethylene glycol) (PAMAM-PVL-PEG). While the hydrophobic PAMAM-PVL core can encapsulate hydrophobic drugs, the hydrophilic PEG shell provides excellent water dispersity. We conjugated unimNPs with the cholera toxin B domain (CTB) for RGC-targeting and with Cy5.5 for unimNP-tracing. To exploit RGC-protective sigma-1 receptor (S1R), we loaded unimNPs with an endogenous S1R agonist dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) as an FDA-approved model drug. These unimNPs produced a steady DHEA release in vitro for over two months at pH7.4. We then co-injected (mice, intraocular) unimNPs with the glutamate analog N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), which is excito-toxic and induces RGC death. The CTB-conjugated unimNPs (i.e., targeted NPs) accumulated at the RGC layer and effectively preserved RGCs at least for 14days, whereas the unimNPs without CTB (i.e., non-targeted NPs) showed neither accumulation at nor protection of NMDA-treated RGCs. Consistent with S1R functions, targeted NPs relative to non-targeted NPs showed markedly better inhibitory effects on apoptosis and oxidative/inflammatory stresses in the RGC layer. Hence, the DHEA-loaded, CTB-conjugated unimNPs represent an RGC/S1R dual-targeted nanoplatform that generates an efficacious template for further development of a sustainable intraocular drug delivery system to protect RGCs, which may be applicable to treatments directed at glaucomatous pathology.

  16. A graphene oxide based smart drug delivery system for tumor mitochondria-targeting photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yanchun; Zhou, Feifan; Zhang, Da; Chen, Qun; Xing, Da

    2016-02-01

    Subcellular organelles play critical roles in cell survival. In this work, a novel photodynamic therapy (PDT) drug delivery and phototoxicity on/off nano-system based on graphene oxide (NGO) as the carrier is developed to implement subcellular targeting and attacking. To construct the nanodrug (PPa-NGO-mAb), NGO is modified with the integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) for tumor targeting. Pyropheophorbide-a (PPa) conjugated with polyethylene-glycol is used to cover the surface of the NGO to induce phototoxicity. Polyethylene-glycol phospholipid is loaded to enhance water solubility. The results show that the phototoxicity of PPa on NGO can be switched on and off in organic and aqueous environments, respectively. The PPa-NGO-mAb assembly is able to effectively target the αvβ3-positive tumor cells with surface ligand and receptor recognition; once endocytosized by the cells, they are observed escaping from lysosomes and subsequently transferring to the mitochondria. In the mitochondria, the `on' state PPa-NGO-mAb performs its effective phototoxicity to kill cells. The biological and physical dual selections and on/off control of PPa-NGO-mAb significantly enhance mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of PDT. This smart system offers a potential alternative to drug delivery systems for cancer therapy.Subcellular organelles play critical roles in cell survival. In this work, a novel photodynamic therapy (PDT) drug delivery and phototoxicity on/off nano-system based on graphene oxide (NGO) as the carrier is developed to implement subcellular targeting and attacking. To construct the nanodrug (PPa-NGO-mAb), NGO is modified with the integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) for tumor targeting. Pyropheophorbide-a (PPa) conjugated with polyethylene-glycol is used to cover the surface of the NGO to induce phototoxicity. Polyethylene-glycol phospholipid is loaded to enhance water solubility. The results show that the phototoxicity of PPa on NGO can be switched on and off in

  17. Nanoemulsion-based intranasal drug delivery system of saquinavir mesylate for brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Hitendra S; Mahajan, Milind S; Nerkar, Pankaj P; Agrawal, Anshuman

    2014-03-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is an immunological privileged sanctuary site-providing reservoir for HIV-1 virus. Current anti-HIV drugs, although effective in reducing plasma viral levels, cannot eradicate the virus completely from the body. The low permeability of anti-HIV drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) leads to insufficient delivery. Therefore, developing a novel approaches enhancing the CNS delivery of anti-HIV drugs are required for the treatment of neuro-AIDS. The aim of this study was to develop intranasal nanoemulsion (NE) for enhanced bioavailability and CNS targeting of saquinavir mesylate (SQVM). SQVM is a protease inhibitor which is a poorly soluble drug widely used as antiretroviral drug, with oral bioavailability is about 4%. The spontaneous emulsification method was used to prepare drug-loaded o/w nanoemulsion, which was characterized by droplet size, zeta potential, pH, drug content. Moreover, ex-vivo permeation studies were performed using sheep nasal mucosa. The optimized NE showed a significant increase in drug permeation rate compared to the plain drug suspension (PDS). Cilia toxicity study on sheep nasal mucosa showed no significant adverse effect of SQVM-loaded NE. Results of in vivo biodistribution studies show higher drug concentration in brain after intranasal administration of NE than intravenous delivered PDS. The higher percentage of drug targeting efficiency (% DTE) and nose-to-brain drug direct transport percentage (% DTP) for optimized NE indicated effective CNS targeting of SQVM via intranasal route. Gamma scintigraphy imaging of the rat brain conclusively demonstrated transport of drug in the CNS at larger extent after intranasal administration as NE.

  18. Human CD64-targeted non-viral siRNA delivery system for blood monocyte gene modulation

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Seok-Beom; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jang Kyoung; Chung, Jee Young; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2017-01-01

    A subset of phagocytes including inflammatory monocytes in blood migrate and give rise to macrophages in inflammatory tissues which generated the idea that blood monocytes are the therapeutic targets for drug delivery. Fc gamma receptor I (CD64) is a membrane receptor for the Fc region of immunoglobulin G, primarily expressed on monocyte-lineage, and H22 a monoclonal antibody for human CD64 had shown rapid blood monocyte binding and occupation in clinical studies. Small interfering RNA-mediated gene silencing as a therapeutic has been proposed and is a promising strategy in terms of its “knock-down” ability on the target gene prior to translation. However, its instability and off-targeting effect must be overcome for success in clinical studies. In this study, we developed a non-viral delivery system composed of oligo-nona-arginine (9R) and anti-human CD64 single chain antibodies (H22) for human monocyte-specific siRNA delivery. A targeted and efficient siRNA delivery mediated by anti-CD64 scFv-9R was observed in CD64 positive human leukemia cells, THP-1. With primary human blood cells, anti-CD64 scFv-9R mediated gene silencing was quantitatively confirmed representing blood monocyte selective gene delivery. These results demonstrate the potential of anti-CD64 scFv-9R mediated siRNA delivery for the treatment of human inflammatory diseases via blood monocytes gene delivery. PMID:28169353

  19. Reduction of nontarget infection and systemic toxicity by targeted delivery of conditionally replicating viruses transported in mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dembinski, J L; Spaeth, E L; Fueyo, J; Gomez-Manzano, C; Studeny, M; Andreeff, M; Marini, F C

    2010-04-01

    The fiber-modified adenoviral vector Delta-24-RGD (D24RGD) offers vast therapeutic potential. Direct injection of D24RGD has been used to successfully target ovarian tumors in mice. However, systemic toxicity, especially in the liver, profoundly limits the efficacy of direct viral vector delivery. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have the ability to function as a vector for targeted gene therapy because of their preferential engraftment into solid tumors and participation in tumor stroma formation. We show that MSC-guided delivery of D24RGD is specific and efficient and reduces the overall systemic toxicity in mice to negligible levels compared with D24RGD alone. In our model, we found efficient targeted delivery of MSC-D24RGD to both breast and ovarian cell lines. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining for adenoviral hexon protein confirmed negligible levels of systemic toxicity in mice that were administered MSC-D24RGD compared with those that were administered D24RGD. These data suggest that delivery of D24RGD through MSC not only increases the targeted delivery efficiency, but also reduces the systemic exposure of the virus, thereby reducing overall systemic toxicity to the host and ultimately enhancing its value as an anti-tumor therapeutic candidate.

  20. Reduction of nontarget infection and systemic toxicity by targeted delivery of conditionally replicating viruses transported in mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Dembinski, Jennifer L.; Spaeth, Erika; Fueyo, Juan; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Studeny, Matus; Andreeff, Michael; Marini, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The fiber-modified adenoviral vector Delta-24-RGD (D24RGD) offers vast therapeutic potential. Direct injection of D24RGD has been used to successfully target ovarian tumors in mice. However, systemic toxicity, especially in the liver, is a profoundly limits the efficacy of direct viral vector delivery. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have the ability to function as a vector for targeted gene therapy because of their preferential engraftment into solid tumors and participation in tumor stroma formation. We show that MSC-guided delivery of D24RGD is specific and efficient and reduces the overall systemic toxicity in mice to negligible levels compared with D24RGD alone. In our model, we found efficient targeted delivery of MSC-D24RGD to both breast and ovarian cell lines. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining for adenoviral hexon protein confirmed negligible levels of systemic toxicity in mice given MSC-D24RGD compared with those given D24RGD. These data suggest that delivery of D24RGD via MSC not only increases the targeted delivery efficiency but also reduces the systemic exposure of the virus, thereby reducing overall systemic toxicity to the host and ultimately enhancing its value as an anti-tumor therapeutic candidate. PMID:19876078

  1. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro evaluation of a bone targeting delivery system for salmon calcitonin.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Krishna Hari; Newa, Madhuri; Uludag, Hasan; Doschak, Michael R

    2010-07-15

    Synthetic salmon Calcitonin (sCT) is currently used to treat and manage conditions associated with low bone mass, and elicits its antiresorptive effect by acting upon Calcitonin receptors (CTRs) located on bone-resorbing osteoclast cells. However, CTRs are also widely distributed in many non-skeletal tissues (such as kidney, brain, and lung), and the competitive uptake of available sCT amongst such CTRs likely reduces sCT availability for bone resident osteoclast cells, particularly if the drug is administered systemically and not specifically targeted to bone. Hence, the objective of this study was to synthesize and characterize a bisphosphonate (BP)-mediated bone targeting delivery system for sCT and to determine whether the bioactivity of sCT was retained after BP conjugation. BP-sCT conjugates were synthesized by initially reacting sCT with sulfosuccinimidyl-4-[N-maleimidomethyl]cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC) in dimethyl formamide in the presence of triethylamine (TEA) at room temperature. Thiolated (Thiol)-BP was then reacted with the sCT-sulfo-SMCC conjugates to generate sCT-BP conjugates, which were purified by dialysis and assayed using the micro-BCA protein assay. Non-BP containing control sCT-Cysteine conjugates were also synthesized using the same procedure. Reactions were monitored and characterized using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF) analysis and Tris-Tricine SDS-PAGE. Conjugates were evaluated for in vitro bone mineral affinity using a hydroxyapatite binding test, for bone mineral specificity using different calcium salt binding affinity assays, and for continued sCT bioactivity after conjugation using an intracellular cAMP stimulation in human T47D breast cancer cells. Our results confirmed that BP-conjugated sCT exhibited significantly greater affinity and specificity for bone mineral over unmodified sCT, and that sCT-BP conjugates retained strong CT bioactivity after conjugation

  2. Targeted Drug Delivery Systems Mediated by a Novel Peptide in Breast Cancer Therapy and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chien-Yu; Lin, Wei-Chuan; Yan, Shin-Long; Wang, Yi-Ping; Kuo, Yuan-Sung; Yeh, Chen-Yun; Lo, Albert; Wu, Han-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Targeted delivery of drugs to tumors represents a significant advance in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Therefore, development of novel tumor-specific ligands or pharmaceutical nanocarriers is highly desirable. In this study, we utilized phage display to identify a new targeting peptide, SP90, which specifically binds to breast cancer cells, and recognizes tumor tissues from breast cancer patients. We used confocal and electron microscopy to reveal that conjugation of SP90 with liposomes enables efficient delivery of drugs into cancer cells through endocytosis. Furthermore, in vivo fluorescent imaging demonstrated that SP90-conjugated quantum dots possess tumor-targeting properties. In tumor xenograft and orthotopic models, SP90-conjugated liposomal doxorubicin was found to improve the therapeutic index of the chemotherapeutic drug by selectively increasing its accumulation in tumors. We conclude that the targeting peptide SP90 has significant potential in improving the clinical benefits of chemotherapy in the treatment and the diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:23776619

  3. Tuberculosis therapeutics: Engineering of nanomedicinal systems for local delivery of targeted drug cocktails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Addio, Suzanne M.

    In this thesis, a multifunctional nanocarrier drug delivery system was investigated and optimized to improve tuberculosis therapy by promoting the intracellular delivery of high payloads of antibiotics. To meet the needs of a patient population which continues to grow by close to 10 million people a year, innovative therapeutics must be formulated by robust and scalable processes. We use Flash NanoPrecipitation for the continuous precipitation of nanocarriers by block copolymer directed assembly, which enables the development of nanocarriers with tunable properties. Stable nanocarriers of Rifampicin and a hydrophobic Rifampicin prodrug have efficacy against tuberculosis in vitro that is equivalent to the soluble Rifampicin. To overcome poor in vivo efficacy of the recently discovered antitubercular drug SQ641, we co-encapsulate SQ641 and Cyclosporine A in a stable aqueous nanocarrier suspension, which enables drug administration and also enhances intracellular accumulation and antitubercular efficacy relative to SQ641 in solution. Since the mannose receptor is involved in the phagocytosis of tuberculosis bacilli, we modify the surface of nanocarriers with mannoside residues to target specific intracellular accumulation in macrophages. The surface density of mannoside terminated polyethylene glycol chains was controlled between 0 and 75% and in vitro cellular association reveals a 9% surface density is optimal for internalization mediated by the mannose receptor. We explore the preparation of large, porous aerosol carrier particles of with tunable deposition characteristics by spray freeze drying with ultrasonic atomization for direct dosing to the lungs. Nanocarriers are loaded at 3 - 50 wt% in mannitol particles with constant size, limited nanocarrier aggregation, and 63% dose delivered to the lungs, as determined by in vitro cascade impaction. There has been a lag in the development of new technologies to facilitate development and commercialization of

  4. Optimizing targeted gene delivery: chemical modification of viral vectors and synthesis of artificial virus vector systems.

    PubMed

    Boeckle, Sabine; Wagner, Ernst

    2006-01-01

    In comparison to classical medicines, gene therapy has the potential to mediate the highest possible level of therapeutic specificity. Every normal or diseased cell can switch on or off a gene expression cassette in a tissue-, disease-, and time-dependent fashion, by use of specific transcription factors that are active only in a given unique situation. In practice, we face the problem in realizing the concept: the delivery of nucleic acids into target cells is very ineffective and presents a formidable challenge. Key issues for future developments include improved targeting, enhanced intracellular uptake, and reduced toxicity of gene vectors. The currently used classes of vectors have complementary characteristics, such as high intracellular efficiency of viral vectors on the one hand and low immunogenicity and greater flexibility of nonviral vectors on the other hand. The merge of viral and nonviral vector technologies is highlighted as an encouraging strategy for the future; concepts include chemically modified viral vectors ("chemo-viruses") and synthesis of virus-like systems ("synthetic viruses"). Examples for the development of vectors toward artificial synthetic viruses are presented.

  5. BIODEGRADABLE NANOPARTICLES MIMICKING PLATELET BINDING AS A TARGETED AND CONTROLLED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Kona, Soujanya; Dong, Jing-Fei; Liu, Yaling; Tan, Jifu

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to develop targeted nanoparticles as drug carriers to the injured arterial wall under fluid shear stress by mimicking the natural binding ability of platelets via interactions of glycoprotein Ib-alpha (GP Ibα) of platelets with P-selectin of damaged endothelial cells (ECs) and/or with von Willebrand factor (vWF) of the subendothelium. Drug-loaded poly (D, L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles were formulated using a standard emulsion method and conjugated with glycocalicin, the external fraction of platelet GPIbα, via carbodiimide chemistry. Surface-coated and cellular uptake studies in ECs showed that conjugation of PLGA nanoparticles with GPIb significantly increased nanoparticle adhesion to P-selectin- and vWF-coated surfaces as well as nanoparticle uptake by activated ECs under fluid shear stresses. In addition, effects of nanoparticle size and shear stress on adhesion efficiency were characterized through parallel flow chamber studies. The observed decrease in bound nanoparticle density with increased particle sizes and shear stresses is also explained through a computational model. Our results demonstrate that the GPIb-conjugated PLGA nanoparticles can be used as a targeted and controlled drug delivery system under flow conditions at the site of vascular injury. PMID:22172292

  6. A muscle-targeting peptide displayed on AAV2 improves muscle tropism on systemic delivery.

    PubMed

    Yu, C-Y; Yuan, Z; Cao, Z; Wang, B; Qiao, C; Li, J; Xiao, X

    2009-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has become a leading gene transfer vector for striated muscles. However, the AAV vectors also exhibit broad tropisms after systemic delivery. In an attempt to improve muscle tropism, we inserted a 7-amino-acid (ASSLNIA) muscle-targeting peptide (MTP) in the capsids of AAV2 at residue 587 or 588, generating AAV(587)MTP and AAV(588)MTP. In vitro studies showed that both viruses diminished their infectivity on non-muscle cell lines as well as on un-differentiated myoblasts; however, preserved or enhanced their infectivity on differentiated myotubes. AAV(587)MTP, but not AAV(588)MTP, also abolished its heparin-binding capacity and infected myotubes in a heparin-independent manner. Furthermore, in vivo studies by intravenous vector administration in mice showed that AAV(587)MTP enhanced its tropism to various muscles and particularly to the heart (24.3-fold of unmodified AAV2), whereas reduced its tropism to the non-muscle tissues such as the liver, lungs, spleen and so on. This alteration of tissue tropism is not simply because of the loss of heparin-binding, as a mutant AAV2 (AAVHBSMut) containing heparin-binding site mutations lost infectivity on both non-muscle and muscle cells. Furthermore, free MTP peptide, but not the scrambled control peptide, competitively inhibited AAV(587)MTP infection on myotubes. These results suggest that AAV2 could be re-targeted to the striated muscles by a MTP inserted after residue 587 of the capsids. This proof of principle study showed first evidence of peptide-directed muscle targeting on systemic administration of AAV vectors.

  7. Strategies of targeting oral drug delivery systems to the colon and their potential use for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Krishnaiah, Yellela S R; Khan, Mansoor A

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women. Often, surgical intervention remains the choice in treating CRC. Traditional dosage forms used for treating CRC deliver drug to wanted as well as unwanted sites of drug action resulting in several adverse side effects. Targeted oral drug delivery systems are being investigated to target and deliver chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents directly to colon and rectum. Site-specific delivery of a drug to colon increases its concentration at the target site, and thus requires a lower dose with reduced incidence of side effects. The major obstacle to be overcome for successful targeting of drug to colon through oral route is that drug absorption/degradation must be avoided in stomach and small intestine before the dosage form reaches colon. The review includes discussion of physiological factors that must be considered when targeting drugs directly to colorectal region, an outline on drugs used for treatment and prevention of CRC, and a brief description of various types of colon-targeted oral drug delivery systems. The focus is on the assessment of various formulation approaches being investigated for oral colon-specific delivery of drugs used in the treatment and prevention of CRC.

  8. Tumor vascular-targeted co-delivery of anti-angiogenesis and chemotherapeutic agents by mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system for synergetic therapy of tumor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyu; Wu, Meiying; Pan, Limin; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the drawback of drug non-selectivity in traditional chemotherapy, the construction of multifunctional targeting drug delivery systems is one of the most effective and prevailing approaches. The intratumoral anti-angiogenesis and the tumor cell-killing are two basic approaches in fighting tumors. Herein we report a novel tumor vascular-targeting multidrug delivery system using mesoporous silica nanoparticles as carrier to co-load an antiangiogenic agent (combretastatin A4) and a chemotherapeutic drug (doxorubicin) and conjugate with targeting molecules (iRGD peptide) for combined anti-angiogenesis and chemotherapy. Such a dual-loaded drug delivery system is capable of delivering the two agents at tumor vasculature and then within tumors through a differentiated drug release strategy, which consequently results in greatly improved antitumor efficacy at a very low doxorubicin dose of 1.5 mg/kg. The fast release of the antiangiogenic agent at tumor vasculatures led to the disruption of vascular structure and had a synergetic effect with the chemotherapeutic drug slowly released in the following delivery of chemotherapeutic drug into tumors. PMID:26766908

  9. Effect of co-administration of probiotics with polysaccharide based colon targeted delivery systems to optimize site specific drug release.

    PubMed

    Prudhviraj, G; Vaidya, Yogyata; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Yadav, Ankit Kumar; Kaur, Puneet; Gulati, Monica; Gowthamarajan, K

    2015-11-01

    Significant clinical success of colon targeted dosage forms has been limited by their inappropriate release profile at the target site. Their failure to release the drug completely in the colon may be attributed to changes in the colonic milieu because of pathological state, drug effect and psychological stress accompanying the diseased state or, a combination of these. Alteration in normal colonic pH and bacterial picture leads to incomplete release of drug from the designed delivery system. We report the effectiveness of a targeted delivery system wherein the constant replenishment of the colonic microbiota is achieved by concomitant administration of probiotics along with the polysaccharide based drug delivery system. Guar gum coated spheroids of sulfasalazine were prepared. In the dissolution studies, these spheroids showed markedly higher release in the simulated colonic fluid. In vivo experiments conducted in rats clearly demonstrated the therapeutic advantage of co-administration of probiotics with guar gum coated spheroids. Our results suggest that concomitant use of probiotics along with the polysaccharide based delivery systems can be a simple strategy to achieve satisfactory colon targeting of drugs.

  10. Diagnosis-Therapy Integrative Systems Based on Magnetic RNA Nanoflowers for Co-drug Delivery and Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yingshu; Li, Shuang; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Shusheng

    2017-02-21

    This study was to develop a codrug delivery system for targeting cancer therapy based on magnetic RNA nanoflowers (RNA NF). Compared with traditional nucleic acid structure, convenient separation can be achieved by introducing magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) into RNA NF. Folic acid (FA) modified MNP/RNA NF (FA/MNP/RNA NF) was used as a targeting nanocarrier with excellent biocompatibility to overcome the nonselectivity of MNP/RNA NF. And then, anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) and photosensitizer 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (1-methylpyridinium-4-yl) porphyrin (TMPyP4) binding with RNA NF were used as codrug cargo models. RNA NF was first used for codrug delivery. So, imaging fluorescent tags, target recognition element, and drug molecules were all assembled together on the surface of MNP/RNA NF. The experimental results suggested that the treatment efficacy of codrug delivery platform (FA/MNP/RNA NF/D/T) was better than single-drug delivery platform (FA/MNP/RNA NF/D). Besides, the FA/MNP/RNA NF was used as a probe for cancer cell detection. The limit of detection was 50 HeLa cells. In conclusion, the codrug delivery platform based on FA/MNP/RNA NF was a promising approach for the intracellular quantification of other biomolecules, as well as a diagnosis-therapy integrative system.

  11. Virus-mimetic polyplex particles for systemic and inflammation-specific targeted delivery of large genetic contents.

    PubMed

    Kang, S; Lu, K; Leelawattanachai, J; Hu, X; Park, S; Park, T; Min, I M; Jin, M M

    2013-11-01

    Systemic and target-specific delivery of large genetic contents has been difficult to achieve. Although viruses effortlessly deliver kilobase-long genome into cells, its clinical use has been hindered by serious safety concerns and the mismatch between native tropisms and desired targets. Nonviral vectors, in contrast, are limited by low gene transfer efficiency and inherent cytotoxicity. Here we devised virus-mimetic polyplex particles (VMPs) based on electrostatic self-assembly among polyanionic peptide (PAP), cationic polymer polyethyleneimine (PEI) and nucleic acids. We fused PAP to the engineered ligand-binding domain of integrin αLβ2 to target intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), an inducible marker of inflammation. Fully assembled VMPs packaged large genetic contents, bound specifically to target molecules, elicited receptor-mediated endocytosis and escaped endosomal pathway, resembling intracellular delivery processes of viruses. Unlike conventional PEI-mediated transfection, molecular interaction-dependent gene delivery of VMPs was unaffected by the presence of serum and achieved higher efficiency without toxicity. By targeting overexpressed ICAM-1, VMPs delivered genes specifically to inflamed endothelial cells and macrophages both in vitro and in vivo. Simplicity and versatility of the platform and inflammation-specific delivery may open up opportunities for multifaceted gene therapy that can be translated into the clinic and treat a broad range of debilitating immune and inflammatory diseases.

  12. Integrin Targeting and Toxicological Assessment of Peptide-Conjugated Liposome Delivery Systems to Activated Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Villadsen, Klaus; Østrem, Ragnhild G; Jensen, Knud J; Møller, Peter; Loft, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    Utilization of functionalized liposomes as the means of targeted delivery of therapeutics may enhance specific transport of biologically active drugs to target tissues, while avoiding or reducing undesired side effects. In the present investigation, peptide-conjugated cationic liposomes were constructed with the aim of targeting integrins (i.e. vitronectin and/or fibronectin receptors) on activated endothelial cells. The peptide-conjugated liposomes induced only cytotoxicity at the highest concentration in non-activated or activated endothelial cells, as well as in co-culture of endothelial cells and macrophages. There was unaltered secretion of cytokines after exposure of peptide-conjugated liposomes to endothelial cells, indicating that the materials were not inflammogenic. Liposomes with a peptide targeting the fibronectin receptor (integrin α5β1) were more effective in targeting of activated endothelial cells, as compared to a liposome with a peptide that targeted both the fibronectin and vitronectin receptors, as well as liposomes with a control peptide. The liposome targeted to the fibronectin receptor also displayed uptake in endothelial cells in co-culture with activated macrophages. Therefore, this study demonstrates the feasibility of constructing a peptide-conjugated cationic liposome, which displays targeting to activated endothelial cells at concentrations that are not cytotoxic or inflammogenic to the cells.

  13. Targeted delivery of therapeutics to endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Eric; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2009-01-01

    The endothelium is a target for therapeutic and diagnostic interventions in a plethora of human disease conditions including ischemia, inflammation, edema, oxidative stress, thrombosis and hemorrhage, and metabolic and oncological diseases. Unfortunately, drugs have no affinity to the endothelium, thereby limiting the localization, timing, specificity, safety, and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Molecular determinants on the surface of resting and pathologically altered endothelial cells, including cell adhesion molecules, peptidases, and receptors involved in endocytosis, can be used for drug delivery to the endothelial surface and into intracellular compartments. Drug delivery platforms such as protein conjugates, recombinant fusion constructs, targeted liposomes, and stealth polymer carriers have been designed to target drugs and imaging agents to these determinants. We review endothelial target determinants and drug delivery systems, describe parameters that control the binding of drug carriers to the endothelium, and provide examples of the endothelial targeting of therapeutic enzymes designed for the treatment of acute vascular disorders including ischemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, and thrombosis. PMID:18815813

  14. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  15. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Muna; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Alexander, Phillip M.; McDannold, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete targets. This review provides insight on the current status of this unique drug delivery technique, experience in preclinical models, and potential for clinical translation. If translated to humans, this method would offer a flexible means to target therapeutics to desired points or volumes in the brain, and enable the whole arsenal of drugs in the CNS that are currently prevented by the BBB. PMID:24462453

  16. Harnessing the power of cell-penetrating peptides: activatable carriers for targeting systemic delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    MacEwan, Sarah R; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2013-01-01

    Targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents aims to enhance the accumulation of these molecules in a solid tumor while avoiding uptake in healthy tissues. Tumor-specific accumulation has been pursued with passive targeting by the enhanced permeability and retention effect, as well as with active targeting strategies. Active targeting is achieved by functionalization of carriers to allow specific interactions between the carrier and the tumor environment. Functionalization of carriers with ligands that specifically interact with overexpressed receptors on cancer cells represents a classic approach to active tumor targeting. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) provide a non-specific and receptor-independent mechanism to enhance cellular uptake that offers an exciting alternative to traditional active targeting approaches. While the non-specificity of CPP-mediated internalization has the intriguing potential to make this approach applicable to a wide range of tumor types, their promiscuity is, however, a significant barrier to their clinical utility for systemically administered applications. Many approaches have been investigated to selectively turn on the function of systemically delivered CPP-functionalized carriers specifically in tumors to achieve targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents.

  17. Fabrication of functional hollow microspheres constructed from MOF shells: Promising drug delivery systems with high loading capacity and targeted transport

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xuechuan; Hai, Xiao; Baigude, Huricha; Guan, Weihua; Liu, Zhiliang

    2016-01-01

    An advanced multifunctional, hollow metal-organic framework (MOF) drug delivery system with a high drug loading level and targeted delivery was designed and fabricated for the first time and applied to inhibit tumour cell growth. This hollow MOF targeting drug delivery system was prepared via a simple post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from hollow ZIF-8 successfully obtained for the first time via a mild phase transformation under solvothermal conditions. As a result, the hollow ZIF-8 exhibits a higher loading capacity for the model anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Subsequently, 5-FU-loaded ZIF-8 was encapsulated into polymer layers (FA-CHI-5-FAM) with three components: a chitosan (CHI) backbone, the imaging agent 5-carboxyfluorescein (5-FAM), and the targeting reagent folic acid (FA). Thus, an advanced drug delivery system, ZIF-8/5-FU@FA-CHI-5-FAM, was fabricated. A cell imaging assay demonstrated that ZIF-8/5-FU@FA-CHI-5-FAM could target and be taken up by MGC-803 cells. Furthermore, the as-prepared ZIF-8/5-FU@FA-CHI-5-FAM exhibited stronger cell growth inhibitory effects on MGC-803 cells because of the release of 5-FU, as confirmed by a cell viability assay. In addition, a drug release experiment in vitro indicated that ZIF-8/5-FU@FA-CHI-5-FAM exhibited high loading capacity (51%) and a sustained drug release behaviour. Therefore, ZIF-8/5-FU@FA-CHI-5-FAM could provide targeted drug transportation, imaging tracking and localized sustained release. PMID:27876876

  18. Fabrication of functional hollow microspheres constructed from MOF shells: Promising drug delivery systems with high loading capacity and targeted transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xuechuan; Hai, Xiao; Baigude, Huricha; Guan, Weihua; Liu, Zhiliang

    2016-11-01

    An advanced multifunctional, hollow metal-organic framework (MOF) drug delivery system with a high drug loading level and targeted delivery was designed and fabricated for the first time and applied to inhibit tumour cell growth. This hollow MOF targeting drug delivery system was prepared via a simple post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from hollow ZIF-8 successfully obtained for the first time via a mild phase transformation under solvothermal conditions. As a result, the hollow ZIF-8 exhibits a higher loading capacity for the model anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Subsequently, 5-FU-loaded ZIF-8 was encapsulated into polymer layers (FA-CHI-5-FAM) with three components: a chitosan (CHI) backbone, the imaging agent 5-carboxyfluorescein (5-FAM), and the targeting reagent folic acid (FA). Thus, an advanced drug delivery system, ZIF-8/5-FU@FA-CHI-5-FAM, was fabricated. A cell imaging assay demonstrated that ZIF-8/5-FU@FA-CHI-5-FAM could target and be taken up by MGC-803 cells. Furthermore, the as-prepared ZIF-8/5-FU@FA-CHI-5-FAM exhibited stronger cell growth inhibitory effects on MGC-803 cells because of the release of 5-FU, as confirmed by a cell viability assay. In addition, a drug release experiment in vitro indicated that ZIF-8/5-FU@FA-CHI-5-FAM exhibited high loading capacity (51%) and a sustained drug release behaviour. Therefore, ZIF-8/5-FU@FA-CHI-5-FAM could provide targeted drug transportation, imaging tracking and localized sustained release.

  19. Targeted delivery system for cancer cells consist of multiple ligands conjugated genetically modified CCMV capsid on doxorubicin GNPs complex

    PubMed Central

    Barwal, Indu; Kumar, Rajiv; Kateriya, Suneel; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Yadav, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Targeted nano-delivery vehicles were developed from genetically modified Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid by ligands bioconjugation for efficient drug delivery in cancer cells. RNA binding (N 1-25aa) and β-hexamer forming (N 27-41aa) domain of capsid was selectively deleted by genetic engineering to achieve the efficient in vitro assembly without natural cargo. Two variants of capsids were generated by truncating 41 and 26 amino acid from N terminus (NΔ41 and NΔ26) designated as F1 and F2 respectively. These capsid were optimally self-assembled in 1:2 molar ratio (F1:F2) to form a monodisperse nano-scaffold of size 28 nm along with chemically conjugated modalities for visualization (fluorescent dye), targeting (folic acid, FA) and anticancer drug (doxorubicin). The cavity of the nano-scaffold was packed with doxorubicin conjugated gold nanoparticles (10 nm) to enhance the stability, drug loading and sustained release of drug. The chimeric system was stable at pH range of 4–8. This chimeric nano-scaffold system showed highly specific receptor mediated internalization (targeting) and ~300% more cytotoxicity (with respect to FA− delivery system) to folate receptor positive Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF7) cell lines. The present system may offer a programmable nano-scaffold based platform for developing chemotherapeutics for cancer. PMID:27872483

  20. Ligand-conjugated mesoporous silica nanorattles based on enzyme targeted prodrug delivery system for effective lung cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sundarraj, Shenbagamoorthy; Thangam, Ramar; Sujitha, Mohanan V.; Vimala, Karuppaiya; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2014-03-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (EGFRAb) conjugated silica nanorattles (SNs) were synthesized and used to develop receptor mediated endocytosis for targeted drug delivery strategies for cancer therapy. The present study determined that the rate of internalization of silica nanorattles was found to be high in lung cancer cells when compared with the normal lung cells. EGFRAb can specifically bind to EGFR, a receptor that is highly expressed in lung cancer cells, but is expressed at low levels in other normal cells. Furthermore, in vitro studies clearly substantiated that the cPLA{sub 2}α activity, arachidonic acid release and cell proliferation were considerably reduced by pyrrolidine-2 loaded EGFRAb-SN in H460 cells. The cytotoxicity, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis were significantly induced by the treatment of pyrrolidine-2 loaded EGFRAb-SN when compared with free pyrrolidine-2 and pyrrolidine-2 loaded SNs in human non-small cell lung cancer cells. An in vivo toxicity assessment showed that silica nanorattles and EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 exhibited low systemic toxicity in healthy Balb/c mice. The EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 showed a much better antitumor activity (38%) with enhanced tumor inhibition rate than the pyrrolidine-2 on the non-small cell lung carcinoma subcutaneous model. Thus, the present findings validated the low toxicity and high therapeutic potentials of EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2, which may provide a convincing evidence of the silica nanorattles as new potential carriers for targeted drug delivery systems. - Highlights: • EGFRAb-SN developed for receptor-mediated Drug delivery system (DDS). • EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 targeted DDS for cPLA2α inhibition in NSLC. • Study indicates EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 as an efficient in target dug delivery carrier. • Study explains entire efficiency of EGFRAb-SN-pyrrolidine-2 in vitro and in vivo models.

  1. An aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system using ``off-on'' graphene oxide wrapped mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yuxia; Hu, Hao; Zhang, Molly Gu; Song, Jibin; Nie, Liming; Wang, Shouju; Niu, Gang; Huang, Peng; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a novel aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system by non-covalent assembly of a Cy5.5-AS1411 aptamer conjugate on the surface of graphene oxide wrapped doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-Dox@GO-Apt) for light-mediated drug release and aptamer-targeted cancer therapy. The two ``off-on'' switches of the MSN-Dox@GO-Apt were controlled by aptamer targeting and light triggering, respectively. The Cy5.5-AS1411 ligand provides MSN-Dox@GO-Apt with nucleolin specific targeting and real-time indicator abilities by ``off-on'' Cy5.5 fluorescence recovery. The GO acts as a gatekeeper to prevent the loaded Dox from leaking in the absence of laser irradiation, and to control the Dox release in response to laser irradiation. When the GO wrapping falls off upon laser irradiation, the ``off-on'' photoresponsive drug delivery system is activated, thus inducing chemotherapy. Interestingly, with an increase in laser power, the synergism of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy in a single MSN-Dox@GO-Apt platform led to much more effective cancer cell killing than monotherapies, providing a new approach for treatment against cancer.We have developed a novel aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system by non-covalent assembly of a Cy5.5-AS1411 aptamer conjugate on the surface of graphene oxide wrapped doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-Dox@GO-Apt) for light-mediated drug release and aptamer-targeted cancer therapy. The two ``off-on'' switches of the MSN-Dox@GO-Apt were controlled by aptamer targeting and light triggering, respectively. The Cy5.5-AS1411 ligand provides MSN-Dox@GO-Apt with nucleolin specific targeting and real-time indicator abilities by ``off-on'' Cy5.5 fluorescence recovery. The GO acts as a gatekeeper to prevent the loaded Dox from leaking in the absence of laser irradiation, and to control the Dox release in response to laser irradiation. When the GO wrapping falls off upon

  2. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Power, Chanikarn; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Livingstone, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete targets. The method presents new opportunities for the use of drugs and for the study of the brain.

  3. Systemic delivery of small interfering RNA by use of targeted polycation liposomes for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kenjo, Eriya; Asai, Tomohiro; Yonenaga, Norihito; Ando, Hidenori; Ishii, Takayuki; Hatanaka, Kentaro; Shimizu, Kosuke; Urita, Yugo; Dewa, Takehisa; Nango, Mamoru; Tsukada, Hideo; Oku, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Novel polycation liposomes decorated with cyclic(Cys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe) peptide (cyclicRGD)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) (RGD-PEG-polycation liposomes (PCL)) were previously developed for cancer therapy based on RNA interference. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to tumors by use of RGD-PEG-PCL in B16F10 melanoma-bearing mice. Pharmacokinetic data obtained by positron emission tomography showed that cholesterol-conjugated siRNA formulated in RGD-PEG-PCL markedly accumulated in the tumors. Delivered by RGD-PEG-PCL, a therapeutic cocktail of siRNAs composed of cholesterol-conjugated siRNAs for c-myc, MDM2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were able to significantly inhibit the growth of B16F10 melanoma both in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that targeted delivery of siRNAs by use of RGD-PEG-PCL has considerable potential for cancer treatment.

  4. A graphene quantum dot-based FRET system for nuclear-targeted and real-time monitoring of drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Wang, Zhuyuan; Zong, Shenfei; Chen, Peng; Zhu, Dan; Wu, Lei; Cui, Yiping

    2015-10-07

    A graphene quantum dot-based FRET system is demonstrated for nuclear-targeted drug delivery, which allows for real-time monitoring of the drug release process through FRET signals. In such a system, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) simultaneously serve as the carriers of drugs and donors of FRET pairs. Additionally, a peptide TAT as the nuclear localization signal is conjugated to GQDs, which facilitates the transportation of the delivery system to the nucleus. We have demonstrated that: (a) both the conjugated TAT and small size of GQDs contribute to targeting the nucleus, which results in a significantly enhanced intranuclear accumulation of drugs; (b) FRET signals being extremely sensitive to the distance between donors and acceptors are capable of real-time monitoring of the separation process of drugs and GQDs, which is more versatile in tracking the drug release dynamics. Our strategy for the assembly of a FRET-based drug delivery system may be unique and universal for monitoring the dynamic release process. This study may give more exciting new opportunities for improving the therapeutic efficacy and tracking precision.

  5. Towards a micropositioning system for targeted drug delivery in wireless capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Woods, Stephen P; Constandinou, Timothy G

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a novel micropositioning mechanism for achieving 1 ml of targeted drug delivery within wireless capsule endoscopes. The mechanism allows a needle to be positioned within a 22.5° segment of a cylindrical capsule and be extendible by up to 4mm. The mechanism achieves both these functions using only a single micromotor and occupying a volume of just 200 mm(3) (including micromotor), this represents only 6.6% of the total available space. Through a detailed stress analysis it has been shown that the proposed mechanism can be fabricated using FDA approved materials and requires a power budget of under 3.3% of the available capacity. It is envisaged this mechanism would empower a new breed of capsule microrobots for therapy in addition to diagnostics for pathologies such as ulcerative colitis and small intestinal Crohn's disease.

  6. Transferrin-PEG-PE modified dexamethasone conjugated cationic lipid carrier mediated gene delivery system for tumor-targeted transfection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhou, Fang; Ge, Linfu; Liu, Ximin; Kong, Fansheng

    2012-01-01

    Background The main barriers to non-viral gene delivery include cellular and nuclear membranes. As such, the aim of this study was to develop a type of vector that can target cells through receptor-mediated pathways and by using nuclear localization signal (NLS) to increase the nuclear uptake of genetic materials. Methods A dexamethasone (Dexa)-conjugated lipid was synthesized as the material of the solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), and transferrin (Tf) was linked onto polyethylene glycol-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) to obtain Tf-PEG-PE ligands for the surface modification of the carriers. The in vitro transfection efficiency of the novel modified vectors was evaluated in human hepatoma carcinoma cell lines, and in vivo effects were observed in an animal model. Results Tf-PEG-PE modified SLNs/enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid (pEGFP) had a particle size of 222 nm and a gene loading quantity of 90%. Tf-PEG-PE-modified SLNs/pEGFP (Tf-SLNs/pEGFP) displayed remarkably higher transfection efficiency than non-modified SLNs/pEGFP and the vectors not containing Dexa, both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion It can be concluded that Tf and Dexa could function as an excellent active targeting ligand to improve the cell targeting and nuclear targeting ability of the carriers, and the resulting nanomedicine could be a promising active targeting drug/gene delivery system. PMID:22679364

  7. Colloidal drug delivery systems in vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Beg, Sarwar; Samad, Abdus; Nazish, Iram; Sultana, Ruksar; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Ahmad, Md Zaki; Akbar, Md

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines play a vital role in the field of community medicine to combat against several diseases of human existence. Vaccines primarily trigger the acquired immune system to develop long-lasting immunity against pathogens. Conventional approaches for vaccine delivery lacks potential to target a particular antigen to develop acquired immunity by specific antibodies. Recent advancements in vaccine delivery showed that inclusion of adjuvants in vaccine formulations or delivery of them in a carrier helps in achieving desired targeting ability, reducing the immunogenicity and significant augmentation in the immune response. Colloidal carriers (liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, proteosomes, virosomes and virus like particles (VLPs), antigen cochleates, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) have been widely explored for vaccine delivery. Further, surface engineering of these carriers with ligands, functional moieties and monoclonal antibodies tend to enhance the immune recognition potential of vaccines by differentiation of antigen specific memory T-cells. The current review, therefore, provides an updated account on the recent advancements in various colloidal delivery systems in vaccine delivery, outlining the mechanism of immune response initiated by them along with potential applications and marketed instances in an explicit manner.

  8. Mucoadhesive nanoemulsion-based intranasal drug delivery system of olanzapine for brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Misra, Ambikanandan; Mishra, A K; Mishra, Pushpa; Pathak, Kamla

    2008-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to optimize olanzapine nanoemulsion (ONE), for nose-to-brain delivery. The nanoemulsions and olanzapine mucoadhesive nanoemulsions (OMNEs) were prepared using water titration method and characterized for technical and electrokinetic properties. Biodistribution of nanoemulsions and olanzapine solution (OS) in the brain and blood of rats following intranasal (intranasal) and intravenous (intravenous) administrations were examined using optimized technetium-labeled ((99m)Tc-labeled) olanzapine formulations. The brain/blood uptake ratios of 0.45, 0.88, 0.80, and 0.04 of OS (intranasal), ONE (intranasal), OMNE (intranasal), ONE (intravenous), respectively, at 0.5 h are indicative of direct nose-to-brain transport (DTP). Higher % drug targeting efficiency (%DTE) and %DTP for mucoadhesive nanoemulsions indicated effective brain targeting of olanzapine among the prepared nanoemulsions. Gamma scintigraphy imaging of the rat brain conclusively demonstrated rapid and larger extent of transport of olanzapine by OMNE (intranasal), when compared with OS (intranasal), ONE (intranasal), and ONE (intravenous), into the rat brain.

  9. A nanomedicine-promising approach to provide an appropriate colon-targeted drug delivery system for 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sima; Kotla, Niranjan G; Tomar, Sonia; Maddiboyina, Balaji; Webster, Thomas J; Sharma, Dinesh; Sunnapu, Omprakash

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery plays a significant role in disease treatment associated with the colon, affording therapeutic responses for a prolonged period of time with low side effects. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women with an estimated 102,480 cases of colon cancer and 40,340 cases of rectal cancer in 2013 as reported by the American Cancer Society. In the present investigation, we developed an improved oral delivery system for existing anticancer drugs meant for colon cancer via prebiotic and probiotic approaches. The system comprises three components, namely, nanoparticles of drug coated with natural materials such as guar gum, xanthan gum (that serve as prebiotics), and probiotics. The natural gums play a dual role of protecting the drug in the gastric as well as intestinal conditions to allow its release only in the colon. In vitro results obtained from these experiments indicated the successful targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil to the colon. Electron microscopy results demonstrated that the prepared nanoparticles were spherical in shape and 200 nm in size. The in vitro release data indicated that the maximum release occurs at pH 7.2 and 7.4 with 93% of the drug released in the presence of 4% (w/v) of rat cecal content. In vivo results conclude a practical mechanism to maintain the integrity and intactness of the intestinal/colonic microflora, in the face of a “chemical attack” by oral colon-targeted drug delivery for colon cancer treatment. PMID:26648721

  10. Receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient delivery system for MRTF silencing in conjunctival fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-Wai-Man, Cynthia; Tagalakis, Aristides D.; Manunta, Maria D.; Hart, Stephen L.; Khaw, Peng T.

    2016-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that the Myocardin-related transcription factor/Serum response factor (MRTF/SRF) pathway plays a key role in fibroblast activation and that knocking down MRTF can lead to reduced scarring and fibrosis. Here, we have developed a receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticle as a non-viral delivery system for MRTF-B siRNA in conjunctival fibrosis. Using 50 nM siRNA, the MRTF-B gene was efficiently silenced by 76% and 72% with LYR and LER nanoparticles, respectively. The silencing efficiency was low when non-targeting peptides or siRNA alone or liposome-siRNA alone were used. LYR and LER nanoparticles also showed higher silencing efficiency than PEGylated LYR-P and LER-P nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were not cytotoxic using different liposomes, targeting peptides, and 50 nM siRNA. Three-dimensional fibroblast-populated collagen matrices were also used as a functional assay to measure contraction in vitro, and showed that MRTF-B LYR nanoparticles completely blocked matrix contraction after a single transfection treatment. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop and show that receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient and safe non-viral siRNA delivery system that could be used to prevent fibrosis after glaucoma filtration surgery and other contractile scarring conditions in the eye.

  11. Receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient delivery system for MRTF silencing in conjunctival fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, Cynthia; Tagalakis, Aristides D.; Manunta, Maria D.; Hart, Stephen L.; Khaw, Peng T.

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the Myocardin-related transcription factor/Serum response factor (MRTF/SRF) pathway plays a key role in fibroblast activation and that knocking down MRTF can lead to reduced scarring and fibrosis. Here, we have developed a receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticle as a non-viral delivery system for MRTF-B siRNA in conjunctival fibrosis. Using 50 nM siRNA, the MRTF-B gene was efficiently silenced by 76% and 72% with LYR and LER nanoparticles, respectively. The silencing efficiency was low when non-targeting peptides or siRNA alone or liposome-siRNA alone were used. LYR and LER nanoparticles also showed higher silencing efficiency than PEGylated LYR-P and LER-P nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were not cytotoxic using different liposomes, targeting peptides, and 50 nM siRNA. Three-dimensional fibroblast-populated collagen matrices were also used as a functional assay to measure contraction in vitro, and showed that MRTF-B LYR nanoparticles completely blocked matrix contraction after a single transfection treatment. In conclusion, this is the first study to develop and show that receptor-targeted liposome-peptide-siRNA nanoparticles represent an efficient and safe non-viral siRNA delivery system that could be used to prevent fibrosis after glaucoma filtration surgery and other contractile scarring conditions in the eye. PMID:26905457

  12. Mechanism-Based Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery System. Validation of Efficient Vitamin Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Drug Release

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Wong, S.; Zhao, X.; Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Kuznetsova, L.; Ojima, I.

    2010-05-01

    An efficient mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system, based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis, has been developed. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system is a conjugate of a tumor-targeting molecule (biotin: vitamin H or vitamin B-7), a mechanism-based self-immolative linker and a second-generation taxoid (SB-T-1214) as the cytotoxic agent. This conjugate (1) is designed to be (i) specific to the vitamin receptors overexpressed on tumor cell surface and (ii) internalized efficiently through receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by smooth drug release via glutathione-triggered self-immolation of the linker. In order to monitor and validate the sequence of events hypothesized, i.e., receptor-mediated endocytosis of the conjugate, drug release, and drug-binding to the target protein (microtubules), three fluorescent/fluorogenic molecular probes (2, 3, and 4) were designed and synthesized. The actual occurrence of these processes was unambiguously confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and flow cytometry using L1210FR leukemia cells, overexpressing biotin receptors. The molecular probe 4, bearing the taxoid linked to fluorescein, was also used to examine the cell specificity (i.e., efficacy of receptor-based cell targeting) for three cell lines, L1210FR (biotin receptors overexpressed), L1210 (biotin receptors not overexpressed), and WI38 (normal human lung fibroblast, biotin receptor negative). As anticipated, the molecular probe 4 exhibited high specificity only to L1210FR. To confirm the direct correlation between the cell-specific drug delivery and anticancer activity of the probe 4, its cytotoxicity against these three cell lines was also examined. The results clearly showed a good correlation between the two methods. In the same manner, excellent cell-specific cytotoxicity of the conjugate 1 (without fluorescein attachment to the taxoid) against the same three cell lines was confirmed. This mechanism

  13. Development of a real time imaging-based guidance system of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingming; Le, Tuan-Anh; Yoon, Jungwon

    2017-04-01

    Targeted drug delivery using magnetic nanoparticles is an efficient technique as molecules can be directed toward specific tissues inside a human body. For the first time, we implemented a real-time imaging-based guidance system of nanoparticles using untethered electro-magnetic devices for simultaneous guiding and tracking. In this paper a low-amplitude-excitation-field magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is introduced. Based on this imaging technology, a hybrid system comprised of an electromagnetic actuator and MPI was used to navigate nanoparticles in a non-invasive way. The real-time low-amplitude-excitation-field MPI and electromagnetic actuator of this navigation system are achieved by applying a time-division multiplexing scheme to the coil topology. A one dimensional nanoparticle navigation system was built to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach and it could achieve a 2 Hz navigation update rate with the field gradient of 3.5 T/m during the imaging mode and 8.75 T/m during the actuation mode. Particles with both 90 nm and 5 nm diameters could be successfully manipulated and monitored in a tube through the proposed system, which can significantly enhance targeting efficiency and allow precise analysis in a real drug delivery.

  14. A novel target-specific gene delivery system combining baculovirus and sequence-specific long interspersed nuclear elements.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Tomoko; Osanai, Mizuko; Futahashi, Ryo; Kojima, Tetsuya; Fujiwara, Haruhiko

    2007-07-01

    Transposable elements are valuable for somatic and germ-line transformation. However, long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs) have not been used because of poor information on the transposition mechanism. We have developed a novel gene delivery system combining baculovirus AcNPV and two silkworm LINEs, SART1 and R1, which integrate into specific sequences of telomeric repeats and 28S ribosomal DNA, respectively. When two LINEs containing the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene recombined into AcNPV were infected into fifth instar larvae of the silkworm, we observed target-specific retrotransposition of LINEs at 72h post-infection, using polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing. Telomere- and 28S rDNA-specific transposition occurred in all nine tissues tested, including the ovary and testis. This is the first demonstration of site-specific gene delivery in living larvae. Insertion efficiencies were dependent on the virus titer for injection and the host strains of Bombyx mori. Using this system, we successfully detected the intergeneration transmission of retrotransposed sequences. In addition, AcNPV-mediated SART1 also transposed into telomere of another lepidopteran, Orgyia recens, suggesting that this system is useful for a wide variety of AcNPV-infectious insects. Site-specific gene delivery by virus-mediated LINE will be a potential gene therapy tool to avoid harmful unexpected insertions.

  15. The application of high-content analysis in the study of targeted particulate delivery systems for intracellular drug delivery to alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Ciaran; O'Sullivan, Mary P; Sivadas, Neera; O'Leary, Seonadh; Gallagher, Paul J; Keane, Joseph; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2011-08-01

    With an ever increasing number of particulate drug delivery systems being developed for the intracellular delivery of therapeutics a robust high-throughput method for studying particle-cell interactions is urgently required. Current methods used for analyzing particle-cell interaction include spectrofluorimetry, flow cytometry, and fluorescence/confocal microscopy, but these methods are not high throughput and provide only limited data on the specific number of particles delivered intracellularly to the target cell. The work herein presents an automated high-throughput method to analyze microparticulate drug delivery system (DDS) uptake byalveolar macrophages. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles were prepared in a range of sizes using a solvent evaporation method. A human monocyte cell line (THP-1) was differentiated into macrophage like cells using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and cells were treated with microparticles for 1 h and studied using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), spectrofluorimetry and a high-content analysis (HCA). PLGA microparticles within the size range of 0.8-2.1 μm were found to be optimal for macrophage targeting (p < 0.05). Uptake studies carried out at 37 °C and 4 °C indicated that microparticles were internalized in an energy dependent manner. To improve particle uptake, a range of opsonic coatings were assessed. Coating PLGA particles with gelatin and ovalbumin was found to significantly increase particle uptake from 2.75 ± 0.98 particles per cell for particles coated with gelatin. Opsonic coating also significantly increased particle internalization into primary human alveolar macrophages (p < 0.01) with a 1.7-fold increase in uptake from 4.19 ± 0.48 for uncoated to 7.53 ± 0.88 particles per cell for coated particles. In comparison to techniques such as spectrofluorimetry and CLSM, HCA provides both qualitative and quantitative data on the influence of carrier design on cell targeting that can be

  16. Development of erythropoietin receptor-targeted drug delivery system against breast cancer using tamoxifen-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers

    PubMed Central

    Beh, Chaw Yee; How, Chee Wun; Foo, Jhi Biau; Foong, Jia Ning; Selvarajah, Gayathri Thevi; Rasedee, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM) has been used in the treatment of breast cancers and is supplemented with erythropoietin (EPO) to alleviate the cancer-related anemia. The purported deleterious effects caused by the use of EPO with chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer-related anemia vary across studies and remain controversial. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has the potential to improve the specificity of anticancer drugs. In this study, we simultaneously incorporated two pharmacological active ingredients in one nanocarrier to develop EPO-conjugated TAM-loaded lipid nanoparticles (EPO-TAMNLC), a targeted delivery system, to enhance the cytotoxic activity while reducing the side effects of the ingredients. The effect of temperature in modulating the thermodynamic parameters associated with the binding of EPO and TAMNLC was assessed using isothermal titration calorimetry, while the unfolding of EPO structure was determined using fluorescence-quenching approach. The association efficiency of EPO and TAMNLC was 55.43%. Unlike binding of albumin to TAMNLC, the binding of EPO to TAMNLC occurred through endothermic and entropy-driven reaction. The EPO-TAMNLC formulation was stable because of the hydrophobic interaction and the high free energy, suggesting the spontaneity of the interactions between EPO and TAMNLC. The EPO-TAMNLC enhanced the in vitro cytotoxicity of TAM to MCF-7 cells. The EPO surface-functionalized TAMNLC could sequentially deliver EPO and TAM as well as improving site-specific delivery of these therapeutic compounds. PMID:28352153

  17. Development of erythropoietin receptor-targeted drug delivery system against breast cancer using tamoxifen-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers.

    PubMed

    Beh, Chaw Yee; How, Chee Wun; Foo, Jhi Biau; Foong, Jia Ning; Selvarajah, Gayathri Thevi; Rasedee, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM) has been used in the treatment of breast cancers and is supplemented with erythropoietin (EPO) to alleviate the cancer-related anemia. The purported deleterious effects caused by the use of EPO with chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cancer-related anemia vary across studies and remain controversial. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has the potential to improve the specificity of anticancer drugs. In this study, we simultaneously incorporated two pharmacological active ingredients in one nanocarrier to develop EPO-conjugated TAM-loaded lipid nanoparticles (EPO-TAMNLC), a targeted delivery system, to enhance the cytotoxic activity while reducing the side effects of the ingredients. The effect of temperature in modulating the thermodynamic parameters associated with the binding of EPO and TAMNLC was assessed using isothermal titration calorimetry, while the unfolding of EPO structure was determined using fluorescence-quenching approach. The association efficiency of EPO and TAMNLC was 55.43%. Unlike binding of albumin to TAMNLC, the binding of EPO to TAMNLC occurred through endothermic and entropy-driven reaction. The EPO-TAMNLC formulation was stable because of the hydrophobic interaction and the high free energy, suggesting the spontaneity of the interactions between EPO and TAMNLC. The EPO-TAMNLC enhanced the in vitro cytotoxicity of TAM to MCF-7 cells. The EPO surface-functionalized TAMNLC could sequentially deliver EPO and TAM as well as improving site-specific delivery of these therapeutic compounds.

  18. Targeted intracellular delivery of therapeutics: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rawat, A; Vaidya, B; Khatri, K; Goyal, A K; Gupta, P N; Mahor, S; Paliwal, R; Rai, S; Vyas, S P

    2007-09-01

    During the last decade, intracellular drug delivery has become an emerging area of research in the medical and pharmaceutical field. Many therapeutic agents such as drugs and DNA/oligonucleotides can be delivered not just to the cell but also to a particular compartment of that cell to achieve better activity e.g. proapoptotic drugs to the mitochondria, antibiotics and enzymes to the lysosomes and various anticancer drugs and gene to the nucleus. The lipidic nature of biological membrans is the major obstacle to the intracellular delivery of macromolecular and ionic drugs. Additionally, after endocytosis, the lysosome, the major degradation compartment, needs to be avoided for better activity. To avoid these problems, various carriers have been investigated for efficient intracellular delivery, either by direct entry to cytoplasm or by escaping the endosomal compartment. These include cell penetrating peptides, and carrier systems such as liposomes, cationic lipids and polymers, polymeric nanoparticles, etc. Various properties of these carriers, including size, surface charge, composition and the presence of cell specific ligands, alter their efficacy and specificity towards particular cells. This review summarizes various aspects of targeted intracellular delivery of therapeutics including pathways, mechanisms and approaches. Various carrier constructs having potential for targeted intracellular delivery are also been discussed.

  19. An autoantibody is modified for use as a delivery system to target the cell nucleus: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Weisbart, R H; Stempniak, M; Harris, S; Zack, D J; Ferreri, K

    1998-10-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-dsDNA antibody was found to penetrate living cells and localize in the nucleus without pathologic effects. A single mutation in VH markedly enhanced cellular penetration. The mutant antibody was produced as recombinant Fab and single chain antibody fragments to investigate its use as a delivery system to target the cell nucleus. Complexes were made containing Fab fragments and alkaline phosphatase conjugated goat antibodies to mouse |gk chains. Fab fragments transported 305 kDa goat antibody-enzyme complexes into the nucleus in COS-7 and CHO cells. A single chain antibody cDNA was constructed by splice overlap extension PCR and expressed in COS-7 cells. Binding of the single chain antibody to dsDNA was shown by ELISA, and cellular penetration and nuclear localization were demonstrated in COS-7 and CHO cells. The single chain antibody cDNA was ligated into the expression vector, pEGFP, to produce a fusion protein with green fluorescent protein. The fusion protein penetrated COS-7 cells and localized in the cell nucleus. The single chain antibody produced during sustained expression in CHO cells re-entered antibody-producing cells and localized in the nucleus without affecting cell viability. Our results demonstrate the potential use of a modified autoantibody as a delivery system to target the cell nucleus.

  20. Targeted therapy of SMMC-7721 liver cancer in vitro and in vivo with carbon nanotubes based drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zongfei; Lin, Gaofeng; Lu, Qinghua; Meng, Lingjie; Shen, Xizhong; Dong, Ling; Fu, Chuanlong; Zhang, Xiaoke

    2012-01-01

    A new type of drug delivery system (DDS) involved chitosan (CHI) modified single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for controllable loading/release of anti-cancer doxorubicin (DOX) was constructed. CHI was non-covalently wrapped around SWNTs, imparting water-solubility and biocompatibility to the nanotubes. Folic acid (FA) was also bounded to the outer CHI layer to realize selective killing of tumor cells. The targeting DDS could effectively kill the HCC SMMC-7721 cell lines and depress the growth of liver cancer in nude mice, showing superior pharmaceutical efficiency to free DOX. The results of the blood routine and serum biochemical parameters, combined with the histological examinations of vital organs, demonstrating that the targeting DDS had negligible in vivo toxicity. Thus, this DDS is promising for high treatment efficacy and low side effects for future cancer therapy.

  1. Application of Collagen-Model Triple-Helical Peptide-Amphiphiles for CD44-Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ndinguri, Margaret W.; Zheleznyak, Alexander; Lauer, Janelle L.; Anderson, Carolyn J.; Fields, Gregg B.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer treatment by chemotherapy is typically accompanied by deleterious side effects, attributed to the toxic action of chemotherapeutics on proliferating cells from nontumor tissues. The cell surface proteoglycan CD44 has been recognized as a cancer stem cell marker. The present study has examined CD44 targeting as a way to selectively deliver therapeutic agents encapsulated inside colloidal delivery systems. CD44/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan binds to a triple-helical sequence derived from type IV collagen, α1(IV)1263–1277. We have assembled a peptide-amphiphile (PA) in which α1(IV)1263–1277 was sandwiched between 4 repeats of Gly-Pro-4-hydroxyproline and conjugated to palmitic acid. The PA was incorporated into liposomes composed of DSPG, DSPC, cholesterol, and DSPE-PEG-2000 (1 : 4 : 5 : 0.5). Doxorubicin-(DOX-)loaded liposomes with and without 10% α1(IV)1263–1277 PA were found to exhibit similar stability profiles. Incubation of DOX-loaded targeted liposomes with metastatic melanoma M14#5 and M15#11 cells and BJ fibroblasts resulted in IC50 values of 9.8, 9.3, and >100 μM, respectively. Nontargeted liposomes were considerably less efficacious for M14#5 cells. In the CD44+ B16F10 mouse melanoma model, CD44-targeted liposomes reduced the tumor size to 60% of that of the untreated control, whereas nontargeted liposomes were ineffective. These results suggest that PA targeted liposomes may represent a new class of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems. PMID:23213537

  2. Characterization and evaluation of a folic acid receptor-targeted cyclodextrin complex as an anticancer drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiaojiao; Xu, Beihua; Shou, Dan; Qin, Fuhua; Xu, Yong; Hu, Ying

    2016-02-15

    efficacy and diminished systemic side effects. These results suggest that the novel FR-targeted cyclodextrin complex is a promising alternative as an anticancer drug delivery system.

  3. Biopolymer based nanosystem for doxorubicin targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Csikós, Zsuzsanna; Kerekes, Krisztina; Fazekas, Erika; Kun, Sándor; Borbély, János

    2017-01-01

    This study describes formation of an actively and passively targeted, water-soluble drug delivery system (DDS) which contains doxorubicin (DOX). The system comprises two biocompatible and biodegradable polymers: poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) and chitosan (CH). Self-assembly of these biopolymers in aqueous medium results stable nanoparticles (NPs) with a hydrodynamic size of 80-150 nm and slightly negative surface charge. Folic acid (FA) was used as targeting agent bonded to the polyanion (PA) and also to the surface of the NPs. The NP’s physical stability, active targeting effect, cellular toxicity, release profile and in vivo anti-tumor efficacy were investigated. It was found that the targeted, self-assembled nanoparticles are stable at 4°C for several months, cause better in vitro toxicity effect on folate receptor (FR) positive cell lines than the doxorubicin or the non-targeted nanosystem and based on its release profile it is expected, that the nanosystem will remain stable during the circulation in the body. Pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated that the DOX-loaded nanoparticles can deliver greater tumor growth inhibition than the free drug molecules and the liposomal compound, with less general toxicity. It was observed that the overall survival is the main benefit of the biopolymer based drug delivery system.

  4. Engineering Design and Molecular Dynamics of Mucoadhesive Drug Delivery Systems as Targeting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Laura; Doménech, Josep; Peppas, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this critical review is to provide a critical analysis of the chain dynamics responsible for the action of micro- and nanoparticles of mucoadhesive biomaterials. The objective of using bioadhesive controlled drug delivery devices is to prolong their residence at a specific site of delivery, thus enhancing the drug absorption process. These mucoadhesive devices can protect the drug during the absorption process in addition to protecting it on its route to the delivery site. The major emphasis of recent research on mucoadhesive biomaterials has been on the use of adhesion promoters, which would enhance the adhesion between synthetic polymers and mucus. The use of adhesion promoters such as linear or tethered polymer chains is a natural result of the diffusional characteristics of adhesion. Mucoadhesion depends largely on the structure of the synthetic polymer gels used in controlled release applications. PMID:18976706

  5. Systemic delivery of siRNA by hyaluronan-functionalized calcium phosphate nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Chong; Wei, Wei; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Ding, Jing-Song; Wang, Jian-Cheng; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    In this study, hyaluronan (HA)-functionalized calcium phosphate nanoparticles (CaP-AHA/siRNA NPs) were developed for an injectable and targetable delivery of siRNA, which were prepared by coating the alendronate-hyaluronan graft polymer (AHA) around the surface of calcium phosphate-siRNA co-precipitates. The prepared CaP-AHA/siRNA NPs had a uniform spherical core-shell morphology with an approximate size of 170 nm and zeta potential of -12 mV. The coating of hydrophilic HA improved the physical stability of nanoparticles over one month due to the strong interactions between phosphonate and calcium. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the negatively charged CaP-AHA/siRNA NPs could effectively deliver EGFR-targeted siRNA into A549 cells through CD44-mediated endocytosis and significantly down-regulate the level of EGFR expression. Also, the internalized CaP-AHA/siRNA NPs exhibited a pH-responsive release of siRNA, indicating that the acidification of lysosomes probably facilitated the disassembling of nanoparticles and the resultant ions sharply increased the inner osmotic pressure and thus expedited the release of siRNA from late lysosomes into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, in vivo tumor therapy demonstrated that high accumulation of CaP-AHA/siEGFR NPs in tumor led to a significant tumor growth inhibition with a specific EGFR gene silencing effect after intravenous administration in nude mice xenografted with A549 tumor, along with a negligible body weight loss. These results suggested that the CaP-AHA/siRNA NPs could be an effective and safe systemic siRNA delivery system for a RNAi-based tumor targeted therapy strategy.In this study, hyaluronan (HA)-functionalized calcium phosphate nanoparticles (CaP-AHA/siRNA NPs) were developed for an injectable and targetable delivery of siRNA, which were prepared by coating the alendronate-hyaluronan graft polymer (AHA) around the surface of calcium phosphate-siRNA co-precipitates. The prepared CaP-AHA/siRNA NPs had a uniform

  6. Nanovehicular Intracellular Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    PROKOP, ALES; DAVIDSON, JEFFREY M.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood–brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list “elementary” phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  7. Delivery systems for brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2014-10-28

    Brachytherapy is described as the short distance treatment of cancer with a radioactive isotope placed on, in, or near the lesions or tumor to be treated. The main advantage of brachytherapy compared with external beam radiation (EBR) is the improved localized delivery of dose to the target volume of interest, thus normal tissue irradiation is reduced. The precise and targeted nature of brachytherapy provides a number of key benefits for the effective treatment of cancer such as efficacy, minimized risk of side effects, short treatment times, and cost-effectiveness. Brachytherapy devices have yielded promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. However, brachytherapy can only be used in localized and relatively small tumors. Although the introduction of new delivery devices allows the treatment of more complex tumor sites, with wider range of dose rate for improving treatment efficacy and reduction of side effects, a better understanding about the safety, efficacy, and accuracy of these systems is required, and further development of new techniques is warranted. Therefore, this review focuses on the delivery devices for brachytherapy and their application in prostate, breast, brain, and other tumor sites.

  8. Optimizing tumor targeting of the lipophilic EGFR-binding radiotracer SKI 243 using a liposomal nanoparticle delivery system.

    PubMed

    Medina, Oula Penate; Pillarsetty, Nagavarakishore; Glekas, Athanasios; Punzalan, Blesida; Longo, Valerie; Gönen, Mithat; Zanzonico, Pat; Smith-Jones, Peter; Larson, Steven M

    2011-02-10

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase-specific radiolabeled tracers could provide a means for non-invasively characterizing EGFR expression and signaling activity in patients' tumors before, during, and after therapy with EGFR inhibitors. Towards this goal, our group has developed PET tracers which irreversibly bind to EGFR. However, tumor uptake is relatively low because of both the lipophilicity of such tracers (e.g. the morpholino-[124I]-IPQA [SKI 212243]), with octanol-to-water partition coefficients of up to 4, and a short dwell time in the blood and significant hepatobiliary clearance and intestinal reuptake. Liposomal nanoparticle delivery systems may favorably alter the pharmacokinetic profile and improve tumor targeting of highly lipophilic but otherwise promising cancer imaging tracers, such as the EGFR inhibitor SKI 243. SKI 243 is therefore an interesting model molecule for incorporation into lipid-based nanoparticles, as it would not only improve their solubility but also increase the circulation time, availability and, potentially, targeting of tumors. In the current study, we compared the pharmacokinetics and tumor targeting of the bare EGFR kinase-targeting radiotracer SKI 212243 (SKI 243) with that of the same tracer embedded in liposomes. SKI 243 and liposomal SKI 243 are both taken up by tumor xenografts but liposomal SKI 243 remained in the blood longer and consequently exhibited a 3- to 6-fold increase in uptake in the tumor among several other organs.

  9. Advances in nanotechnology-based carrier systems for targeted delivery of bioactive drug molecules with special emphasis on immunotherapy in drug resistant tuberculosis - a critical review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jagdeep; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2016-06-01

    From the early sixteenth and seventeenth centuries to the present day of life, tuberculosis (TB) still is a global health threat with some new emergence of resistance. This type of emergence poses a vital challenge to control TB cases across the world. Mortality and morbidity rates are high due to this new face of TB. The newer nanotechnology-based drug-delivery approaches involving micro-metric and nano-metric carriers are much needed at this stage. These delivery systems would provide more advantages over conventional systems of treatment by producing enhanced therapeutic efficacy, uniform distribution of drug molecule to the target site, sustained and controlled release of drug molecules and lesser side effects. The main aim to develop these novel drug-delivery systems is to improve the patient compliance and reduce therapy time. This article reviews and elaborates the new concepts and drug-delivery approaches for the treatment of TB involving solid-lipid particulate drug-delivery systems (solid-lipid micro- and nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers), vesicular drug-delivery systems (liposomes, niosomes and liposphere), emulsion-based drug-delivery systems (micro and nanoemulsion) and some other novel drug-delivery systems for the effective treatment of tuberculosis and role of immunomodulators as an adjuvant therapy for management of MDR-TB and XDR-TB.

  10. Transferrin receptor-targeted pH-sensitive micellar system for diminution of drug resistance and targetable delivery in multidrug-resistant breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Ye, Guihua; Duan, Xiaochuan; Yang, Xiaoying; Yang, Victor C

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance is partially associated with overproduction of transferrin receptor (TfR). To overcome multidrug resistance (MDR) and achieve tumor target delivery, we designed a novel biodegradable pH-sensitive micellar system modified with HAIYPRH, a TfR ligand (7pep). First, the polymers poly(l-histidine)-coupled polyethylene glycol-2000 (PHIS-PEG2000) and 7pep-modified 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-polyethylene glycol-2000 (7pep-DSPE-PEG2000) were synthesized, and the mixed micelles were prepared by blending of PHIS-PEG2000 and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-polyethylene glycol-2000 (DSPE-PEG2000) or 7pep-DSPE-PEG2000 (7-pep HD micelles). The micelles exhibited good size uniformity, high encapsulation efficiency, and a low critical micelle concentration. By changing the polymer ratio in the micellar formulation, the pH response range was specially tailored to pH ~6.0. When loaded with antitumor drug doxorubicin (DOX), the micelle showed an acid pH-triggering drug release profile. The cellular uptake and cytotoxicity study demonstrated that 7-pep HD micelles could significantly enhance the intracellular level and antitumor efficacy of DOX in multidrug-resistant cells (MCF-7/Adr), which attributed to the synergistic effect of poly(l-histidine)-triggered endolysosom escape and TfR-mediated endocytosis. Most importantly, the in vivo imaging study confirmed the target-ability of 7-pep HD micelles to MDR tumor. These findings indicated that 7-pep HD micelles would be a promising drug delivery system in the treatment of drug-resistant tumors. PMID:28223798

  11. Systems and Components Fuel Delivery System, Water Delivery System, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Systems and Components - Fuel Delivery System, Water Delivery System, Derrick Crane System, and Crane System Details - Marshall Space Flight Center, F-1 Engine Static Test Stand, On Route 565 between Huntsville and Decatur, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  12. Optimization of an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody targeted delivery system using PEGylated human serum albumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kouchakzadeh, Hasan; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Tahmasebi, Fathollah; Shokri, Fazel

    2013-04-15

    Human serum albumin (HSA) nanoparticles represent an attractive strategy for active targeting of therapeutics into tumor cells due to the presence of superficial functional groups. HER2 is highly expressed in a significant proportion of cancers and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against HER2 hold great promise for effective therapy. Herein, covalent coupling of a novel mAb (1F2) directed against the extracellular domain of HER2 to the surface of HSA nanoparticles was evaluated to obtain nanoparticles with highest cellular uptake. HER2 reactivity of 1F2-conjugated nanoparticles produced under different conditions was screened by an indirect ELISA and flow cytometry techniques. Monoclonal antibody thiolation with 100-fold molar excess of 2-iminothiolane and the ratio of 10:1 for the thiolated 1F2 (μg) to PEGylated nanoparticles (mg), were optimum for the attachment process. Under this condition, 23±4% of 1F2 was conjugated to nanoparticles. The flow cytometry results show that 1F2-modified nanoparticles interact with nearly all HER2 receptors on the surface of BT474 cells. In addition, no cellular uptake was observed on MCF7 cells. In vitro analyses showed no significant cytotoxicity of produced system against BT474 cells. Therefore, 1F2-attached HSA nanoparticles represent a potential delivery system for targeted transport of therapeutic agents into HER2-positive tumor cells.

  13. Preparation, Evaluation and Optimization of Multiparticulate System of Mebendazole for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery by Using Natural Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Hemraj Ramteke, Kuldeep; Balaji Jadhav, Varsha; Kulkarni, Nilesh Shrikant; Kharat, Amol Rameshrao; Diwate, Sonali Bhima

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A Multiparticulate system of Mebendazole was developed for colon targeted drug delivery by using natural polysaccharides like Chitosan and Sodium-alginate beads. Methods: Chitosan microspheres were formulated by using Emulsion crosslinking method using Glutaraldehyde as crosslinking agent. Sodium-alginate beads were formulated by using Calcium chloride as gelling agent. Optimization for Chitosan microspheres was carried out by using 23 full factorial design. 32 full factorial design was used for the optimization of Sodium-alginate beads. The formulated batches were evaluated for percentage yield, particle size measurement, flow properties, percent entrapment efficiency, Swelling studies. The formulations were subjected to Stability studies and In-vitro release study (with and without rat caecal content). Release kinetics data was subjected to different dissolution models. Results: The formulated batches showed acceptable particle size range as well as excellent flow properties. Entrapment efficiency for optimized batches of Chitosan microspheres and sodium alginate beads was found to be 74.18% and 88.48% respectively. In-vitro release of drug for the optimized batches was found to be increased in presence of rat caecal content. The best-fit models were koresmeyer-peppas for Chitosan microspheres and zero order for sodium-alginate beads. Conclusion: Chitosan and Sodium-alginate was used successfully for the formulation of Colon targeted Multiparticulate system. PMID:26504758

  14. A review on proniosomal drug delivery system for targeted drug action

    PubMed Central

    Radha, G. V.; Rani, T. Sudha; Sarvani, B.

    2013-01-01

    Proniosomes are dry formulation of water soluble carrier particles that are coated with surfactant. They are rehydrated to form niosomal dispersion immediately before use on agitation in hot aqueous media within minutes. Proniosomes are physically stable during the storage and transport. Drug encapsulated in the vesicular structure of proniosomes prolong the existence of drug in the systematic circulation and enhances the penetration into target tissue and reduce toxicity. From a technical point of view, niosomes are promising drug carriers as they possess greater chemical stability and lack of many disadvantages associated with liposomes, such as high- cost and variable purity problems of phospholipids. The present review emphasizes on overall methods of preparation characterization and applicability of proniosomes in targeted drug action. PMID:24808669

  15. A novel antibiotic-delivery system by using ovotransferrin as targeting molecule.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hisham R; Tatsumoto, Sayuri; Ono, Hajime; Van Immerseel, Filip; Raspoet, Ruth; Miyata, Takeshi

    2015-01-23

    Synthetic antibiotics and antimicrobial agents, such as sulfonamide and triclosan (TCS), have provided new avenues in the treatment of bacterial infections, as they target lethal intracellular pathways. Sulfonamide antibiotics block synthesis of folic acid by inhibiting dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) while TCS block fatty acid synthesis through inhibition of enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI). They are water-insoluble agents and high doses are toxic, limiting their therapeutic efficiency. In this study, an antibiotic drug-targeting strategy based on utilizing ovotransferrin (OTf) as a carrier to allow specific targeting of the drug to microbial or mammalian cells via the transferrin receptor (TfR) is explored, with potential to alleviate insolubility and toxicity problems. Complexation, through non-covalent interaction, with OTf turned sulfa antibiotics or TCS into completely soluble in aqueous solution. OTf complexes showed superior bactericidal activity against several bacterial strains compared to the activity of free agents. Strikingly, a multi-drug resistant Salmonella strain become susceptible to antibiotics-OTf complexes while a tolC-knockout mutant strain become susceptible to OTf and more sensitive to the complexes. The antibiotic bound to OTf was, thus exported through the multi-drug efflux pump TolC in Salmonella wild-type strain. Further, antibiotics-OTf complexes were able to efficiently kill intracellular pathogens after infecting human colon carcinoma cells (HCT-116). The results demonstrate, for the first time, that the TfR mediated endocytosis of OTf can be utilized to specifically target drugs directly to pathogens or intracellularly infected cells and highlights the potency of the antibiotic-OTf complex for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  16. Targeted delivery of colloids by swimming bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumakis, N.; Lepore, A.; Maggi, C.; di Leonardo, R.

    2013-10-01

    The possibility of exploiting motile microorganisms as tiny propellers represents a fascinating strategy for the transport of colloidal cargoes. However, delivery on target sites usually requires external control fields to steer propellers and trigger cargo release. The need for a constant feedback mechanism prevents the design of compact devices where biopropellers could perform their tasks autonomously. Here we show that properly designed three-dimensional (3D) microstructures can define accumulation areas where bacteria spontaneously and efficiently store colloidal beads. The process is stochastic in nature and results from the rectifying action of an asymmetric energy landscape over the fluctuating forces arising from collisions with swimming bacteria. As a result, the concentration of colloids over target areas can be strongly increased or depleted according to the topography of the underlying structures. Besides the significance to technological applications, our experiments pose some important questions regarding the structure of stationary probability distributions in non-equilibrium systems.

  17. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Li, Ye; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies. PMID:27006893

  18. Brain targeted nanoparticulate drug delivery system of rasagiline via intranasal route.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Deepti; Md, Shadab; Hasan, Quamrul; Fazil, Mohammad; Ali, Asgar; Baboota, Sanjula; Ali, Javed

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare and evaluate a rasagiline-loaded chitosan glutamate nanoparticles (RAS-CG-NPs) by ionic gelation of CG with tripolyphosphate anions (TPP). RAS-loaded CG-NPs were characterized for particle size, size distribution, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release. The mean particles size, polydispersity index (PDI) and encapsulation efficiency was found to be 151.1 ± 10.31, 0.380 ± 0.01 and 96.43 ± 4.23, respectively. Biodistribution of RAS formulations in the brain and blood of mice following intranasal (i.n.) and intravenous (i.v.) administration was performed using HPLC analytical method. The drug concentrations in brain following the i.n. of CG-NPs were found to be significantly higher at all the time points compared to both drug (i.n.) and drug CG-NPs (i.v.). The Cmax (999.25 ng/ml) and AUC (2086.60 ng h/ml) of formulation CG-NPs (i.n) were found to be significantly higher than CG-NPs (i.v.) and RAS solution (i.n.). The direct transport percentage (DTP%) values of RAS-loaded CG-NPs (i.n.) as compared to drug solution (i.n.) increased from 66.27 ± 1.8 to 69.27 ± 2.1%. The results showed significant enhancement of bioavailability in brain, after administration of the RAS-loaded CG-NPs which could be a substantial achievement of direct nose to brain targeting in Parkinson's disease therapy.

  19. Targeted delivery of a model immunomodulator to the lymphatic system: comparison of alkyl ester versus triglyceride mimetic lipid prodrug strategies.

    PubMed

    Han, Sifei; Quach, Tim; Hu, Luojuan; Wahab, Anisa; Charman, William N; Stella, Valentino J; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Simpson, Jamie S; Porter, Christopher J H

    2014-03-10

    A lipophilic prodrug approach has been used to promote the delivery of a model immunomodulator, mycophenolic acid (MPA), to the lymphatic system after oral administration. Lymphatic transport was employed to facilitate enhanced drug uptake into lymphocytes, as recent studies demonstrate that targeted drug delivery to lymph resident lymphocytes may enhance immunomodulatory effects. Two classes of lymph-directing prodrugs were synthesised. Alkyl chain derivatives (octyl mycophenolate, MPA-C8E; octadecyl mycophenolate, MPA-C18E; and octadecyl mycophenolamide, MPA-C18AM), to promote passive partitioning into lipids in lymphatic transport pathways, and a triglyceride mimetic prodrug (1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-mycophenoloyl glycerol, 2-MPA-TG) to facilitate metabolic integration into triglyceride deacylation-reacylation pathways. Lymphatic transport, lymphocyte uptake and plasma pharmacokinetics were assessed in mesenteric lymph and carotid artery cannulated rats following intraduodenal infusion of lipid-based formulations containing MPA or MPA prodrugs. Patterns of prodrug hydrolysis in rat digestive fluid, and cellular re-esterification in vivo, were evaluated to examine the mechanisms responsible for lymphatic transport. Poor enzyme stability and low absorption appeared to limit lymphatic transport of the alkyl derivatives, although two of the three alkyl chain prodrugs - MPA-C18AM (6-fold) and MPA-C18E (13-fold) still increased lymphatic drug transport when compared to MPA. In contrast, 2-MPA-TG markedly increased lymphatic drug transport (80-fold) and drug concentrations in lymphocytes (103-fold), and this was achieved via biochemical incorporation into triglyceride deacylation-reacylation pathways. The prodrug was hydrolysed rapidly to 2-mycophenoloyl glycerol (2-MPA-MG) in the presence of rat digestive fluid, and 2-MPA-MG was subsequently re-esterified in the enterocyte with oleic acid (most likely originating from the co-administered formulation) prior to accessing the

  20. Split vector systems for ultra-targeted gene delivery: a contrivance to achieve ethical assurance of somatic gene therapy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tolmachov, Oleg E

    2014-08-01

    Tightly controlled spatial localisation of therapeutic gene delivery is essential to maximize the benefits of somatic gene therapy in vivo and to reduce its undesired effects on the 'bystander' cell populations, most importantly germline cells. Indeed, complete ethical assurance of somatic gene therapy can only be achieved with ultra-targeted gene delivery, which excludes the risk of inadvertent germline gene transfer. Thus, it is desired to supplement existing strategies of physical focusing and biological (cell-specific) targeting of gene delivery with an additional principle for the rigid control over spread of gene transfer within the body. In this paper I advance the concept of 'combinatorial' targeting of therapeutic gene transfer in vivo. I hypothesize that it is possible to engineer complex gene delivery vector systems consisting of several components, each one of them capable of independent spread within the human body but incapable of independent facilitation of gene transfer. As the gene delivery augmented by such split vector systems would be reliant on the simultaneous availability of all the vector system components at a predetermined body site, it is envisaged that higher order reaction kinetics required for the assembly of the functional gene transfer configuration would sharpen spatial localisation of gene transfer via curtailing the blurring effect of the vector spread within the body. A particular implementation of such split vector system could be obtained through supplementing a viral therapeutic gene vector with a separate auxiliary vector carrying a non-integrative and non-replicative form of a gene (e.g., mRNA) coding for a cellular receptor of the therapeutic vector component. Gene-transfer-enabling components of the vector system, which would be delivered separately from the vector component loaded with the therapeutic gene cargo, could also be cell-membrane-insertion-proficient receptors, elements of artificial transmembrane channels

  1. Polysaccharide-based Noncovalent Assembly for Targeted Delivery of Taxol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Chen, Yong; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The construction of synthetic straightforward, biocompatible and biodegradable targeted drug delivery system with fluorescent tracking abilities, high anticancer activities and low side effects is still a challenge in the field of biochemistry and material chemistry. In this work, we constructed targeted paclitaxel (Taxol) delivery nanoparticles composed of permethyl-β-cyclodextrin modified hyaluronic acid (HApCD) and porphyrin modified paclitaxel prodrug (PorTaxol), through host-guest and amphiphilic interactions. The obtained nanoparticles (HATXP) were biocompatible and enzymatic biodegradable due to their hydrophilic hyaluronic acid (HA) shell and hydrophobic Taxol core, and exhibited specific targeting internalization into cancer cells via HA receptor mediated endocytosis effects. The cytotoxicity experiments showed that the HATXP exhibited similar anticancer activities to, but much lower side effects than commercial anticancer drug Taxol. The present work would provide a platform for targeted paclitaxel drug delivery and a general protocol for the design of advanced multifunctional nanoscale biomaterials for targeted drug/gene delivery.

  2. A novel local anti-colorectal cancer drug delivery system: negative lipidoid nanoparticles with a passive target via a size-dependent pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Weifeng; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Guo, Yibing; Ju, Shaoqing; Wang, Huimin

    2013-09-01

    The nontoxic, targeted and effective delivery of nucleic acid drugs remains an important challenge for clinical development. Here, we describe a novel negative lipidoid nanoparticle delivery system, providing entrapment-based transfection agents for local delivery of siRNA to the colorectal cancer focus. The delivery system was synthesized with lipidoid material 98N12-5(1), mPEG2000-C12/C14 glyceride and cholesterol at a desired molar ratio to realize the anionic surface charge of particles, which could alleviate to a larger degree the inflammatory response and immune stimulation of the organism, embodying dramatic biocompatibility. In particular, mPEG2000-C12/C14 glyceride was selected to ameliorate the stability of the delivery system and protection of nucleic acids by extending the tail length of the carbons, crucial also to neutralize the positive charge of 98N12-5(1) to form a resultant anionic particle. In vivo experiments revealed that a particle size of 90 nm perfectly realized a passive target in a size-dependent manner and did not affect the function of the liver and kidneys by a local delivery method, enema. We clarified that the uptake of negative lipidoid nanoparticles internalized through a lipid raft endocytotic pathway with low cytotoxicity, strong biocompatibility and high efficacy. This study suggests that negative lipidoid nanoparticles with enema delivery costitute, uniquely and appropriately, a local anti-colorectal cancer nucleic acid drug delivery platform, and the application of similar modes may be feasible in other therapeutic settings.

  3. Drug delivery systems and liver targeting for the improved pharmacotherapy of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.

    PubMed

    Cuestas, María L; Mathet, Verónica L; Oubiña, José R; Sosnik, Alejandro

    2010-07-01

    In spite of the progress made in vaccine and antiviral therapy development, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is still the most common cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, with more than 400 million people chronically infected worldwide. Antiviral therapy with nucleos(t)ide analogues and/or immunomodulating peptides is the only option to control and prevent the progression of the disease in chronic hepatitis B (CHB)-infected patients. So far, the current antiviral monotherapy remains unsatisfactory because of the low efficacy and the development of drug resistance mutants. Moreover, viral rebound is frequently observed following therapy cessation, since covalent closed circular DNA (cccDNA) is not removed from hepatocytes by antiviral therapy. First, this review describes the current pharmacotherapy for the management of CHB and the new drug candidates being investigated. Then, the challenges in the development of drug delivery systems for the targeting of antiviral drugs to the liver parenchyma are discussed. Finally, perspectives in the design of a more efficient pharmacotherapy to eradicate the virus from the host are addressed.

  4. A Promising Approach to Provide Appropriate Colon Target Drug Delivery Systems of Vancomycin HCL: Pharmaceutical and Microbiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Elkhodairy, Kadria A.; Afifi, Samar A.; Zakaria, Azza S.

    2014-01-01

    Vancomycin HCl was prepared as orally administered colon target drug delivery tablets for systemic therapy. Tablet matrices containing 10–60% of tablet weight of guar gum (F1–F6) were prepared by direct compression and subjected to in vitro release studies to explore their sustained release in the colon. Various synthetic and natural polymers were incorporated to F6 to modify the drug release rate. Different 15 matrix tablet formulations (F6–F20) were enteric coated with hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose phthalate. F6, F13 and F20 showed promising sustained release results having median dissolution time (MDT) values: 8.25, 7.97, and 7.64, respectively. Microbiological assay was performed to test the efficacy of F6, F13, and F20 to inhibit clinical Staphylococcus aureus (SA) isolates. Bactericidal activity of F6 was reached after 2, 4, and 24 hours of incubation against MSSA 18, MRSA 29, and MRSA 11 strains, respectively, while it was reached within 6–8 hours in case of F13, and F20 against all strains tested. F13 enhanced log microbial reduction by 1.74, 0.65 and 2.4 CFU/mL compared to F6 while it was 1, 2.57 and 1.57 compared to F20 against MSSA18, MRSA11 and MRSA29, respectively. Vancomycin HCl tablets displayed a promising sustained release in vitro and microbiological inhibitory action on all isolates tested. PMID:24551841

  5. Intranasal delivery bypasses the blood-brain barrier to target therapeutic agents to the central nervous system and treat neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Leah R; Frey, William H

    2008-12-10

    Intranasal delivery provides a practical, non-invasive method of bypassing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to deliver therapeutic agents to the brain and spinal cord. This technology allows drugs that do not cross the BBB to be delivered to the central nervous system within minutes. It also directly delivers drugs that do cross the BBB to the brain, eliminating the need for systemic administration and its potential side effects. This is possible because of the unique connections that the olfactory and trigeminal nerves provide between the brain and external environment. Intranasal delivery does not necessarily require any modification to therapeutic agents. A wide variety of therapeutics, including both small molecules and macromolecules, can be targeted to the olfactory system and connected memory areas affected by Alzheimer's disease. Using the intranasal delivery system, researchers have reversed neurodegeneration and rescued memory in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Intranasal insulin-like growth factor-I, deferoxamine, and erythropoietin have been shown to protect the brain against stroke in animal models. Intranasal delivery has been used to target the neuroprotective peptide NAP to the brain to treat neurodegeneration. Intranasal fibroblast growth factor-2 and epidermal growth factor have been shown to stimulate neurogenesis in adult animals. Intranasal insulin improves memory, attention, and functioning in patients with Alzheimer's disease or mild cognitive impairment, and even improves memory and mood in normal adult humans. This new method of delivery can revolutionize the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, stroke, and other brain disorders.

  6. Polyester nanoparticles presenting mannose residues: toward the development of new vaccine delivery systems combining biodegradability and targeting properties.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Jutta; Freichels, Hélène; Imberty, Anne; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Delair, Thierry; Jérôme, Christine; Auzély-Velty, Rachel

    2009-03-09

    We report the synthesis of fully biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles presenting mannose residues at their surface and their interaction with lectins. A simple and versatile method was used to reach the surface functionalization of poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PLA) nanoparticles by mannose moieties: It consists in using an amphiphilic mannosylated poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(E-caprolactone) (PEO-b-PCL) diblock copolymer as a bioresorbable surface modifier in a simple nanoprecipitation-evaporation procedure. The size and zeta potential of the nanoparticles were found to depend on the molar copolymer/PLA ratio, demonstrating the influence of the copolymer on the formation of the nanoparticles. The bioavailability of the mannose residues as specific recognition sites on the nanoparticle surface could be demonstrated by a modified enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) using biotin-labeled lectins which interact specifically with alpha-D-mannopyrannoside derivatives. Besides specific interaction by lectin-mannose complex formation, nonspecific adsorption of the proteins on the nanoparticle surface was observed. These results were fully supported by isothermal titration calorimetry experiments which suggested that the balance between specific and nonspecific interactions can be controlled by the amount of glycosylated polymer used for the preparation of the nanoparticles. Such nanoparticles are expected to be specifically recognized by mannose receptors, which are highly expressed in cells of the immune system. The targeting properties of these carrier systems combined with their potential adjuvant effects due to their size in the range of 200-300 nm make them attractive candidates as vaccine delivery systems.

  7. Cyclic RGD peptide-modified liposomal drug delivery system for targeted oral apatinib administration: enhanced cellular uptake and improved therapeutic effects

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhiwang; Lin, Yun; Zhang, Xia; Feng, Chan; Lu, Yonglin; Gao, Yong; Dong, Chunyan

    2017-01-01

    Apatinib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which selectively targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and has the potential to treat many tumors therapeutically. Cyclic arginylglycylaspartic acid (cRGD)- and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified liposomes (cRGD-Lipo-PEG) were constructed to act as a targeted delivery system for the delivery of apatinib to the human colonic cancer cell line, HCT116. These cRGD-modified liposomes specifically recognized integrin αvβ3 and exhibited greater uptake efficiency with respect to delivering liposomes into HCT116 cells when compared to nontargeted liposomes (Lipo-PEG), as well as greater death of tumor cells and apoptosis. The mechanism by which cRGD-Lipo-PEG targets cells was elucidated further with competition assays. To determine the anticancer efficacy in vivo, nude mice were implanted with HCT116 xenografts and treated with apatinib-loaded liposomes or free apatinib intravenously or via intragastric administration. The active and passive targeting of cRGD-Lipo-PEG led to significant tumor treatment targeting ability, better inhibition of tumor growth, and less toxicity when compared with treatments using uncombined apatinib. The results presented strongly support the case for cRGD-Lipo-PEG representing a targeted delivery system for apatinib in the treatment of colonic cancer. PMID:28331317

  8. Development and Evaluation of Amphotericin B Loaded Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery to Systemic Fungal Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabathula, Pavan

    A targeted nanotheronostic drug delivery system to diagnose and treat life threatening invasive fungal infections (IFIs) such as cryptococcal meningitis was designed, developed, characterized, and evaluated. To address the development processes, first, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) (34-40 nm) coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA), loaded and targeted with amphotericin B (AMB) (AMB-IONP) was formulated by applying a layer by layer approach. Several designs (A, B, C, D, & E) of AMB-IONP were developed and their physicochemical properties such as drug loading with HPLC method, particle size, poly dispersity index (PDI), and zeta-potential using dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique, morphology with transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), and in vitro drug release profile with dialysis method were evaluated. Second, uptake (with fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry) and killing efficacy (with susceptibility testing) of AMB-IONP in fungal clinical isolates of Candida species were evaluated and compared with standard drug AMB deoxycholate (AMB-D) data. Third, the cellular uptake mechanisms with endocytosis inhibitors and intracellular trafficking using TEM for design D were evaluated in selected isolates. Fourth, a stable lyophilized AMB-IONP formulation was developed and was suitable for clinical trials. A validated isocratic HPLC method was developed and validated for the quantitative determination of AMB. Design D was determined to be the lead formulation with drug loading of 13.6+/-6.9 of AMB/mg of IONP. The size, zeta-potential, and PDI for all formulation designs were found to be in an optimum range for a nanomedicine with ≤36 nm, ˜ -20 mV, and ≤0.2, respectively. The TEM images confirmed that the nanoparticles were monodispersed and spherical in shape. The drug release profile indicated a burst release up to 3 hours for designs A and B, followed by a sustained drug release profile up to 72 hours. Designs C and D (with and without glutaraldehyde

  9. Tumor-targeted Chlorotoxin-coupled Nanoparticles for Nucleic Acid Delivery to Glioblastoma Cells: A Promising System for Glioblastoma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Pedro M; Cardoso, Ana L; Mendonça, Liliana S; Serani, Angelo; Custódia, Carlos; Conceição, Mariana; Simões, Sérgio; Moreira, João N; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C

    2013-01-01

    The present work aimed at the development and application of a lipid-based nanocarrier for targeted delivery of nucleic acids to glioblastoma (GBM). For this purpose, chlorotoxin (CTX), a peptide reported to bind selectively to glioma cells while showing no affinity for non-neoplastic cells, was covalently coupled to liposomes encapsulating antisense oligonucleotides (asOs) or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). The resulting targeted nanoparticles, designated CTX-coupled stable nucleic acid lipid particles (SNALPs), exhibited excellent features for in vivo application, namely small size (<180 nm) and neutral surface charge. Cellular association and internalization studies revealed that attachment of CTX onto the liposomal surface enhanced particle internalization into glioma cells, whereas no significant internalization was observed in noncancer cells. Moreover, nanoparticle-mediated miR-21 silencing in U87 human GBM and GL261 mouse glioma cells resulted in increased levels of the tumor suppressors PTEN and PDCD4, caspase 3/7 activation and decreased tumor cell proliferation. Preliminary in vivo studies revealed that CTX enhances particle internalization into established intracranial tumors. Overall, our results indicate that the developed targeted nanoparticles represent a valuable tool for targeted nucleic acid delivery to cancer cells. Combined with a drug-based therapy, nanoparticle-mediated miR-21 silencing constitutes a promising multimodal therapeutic approach towards GBM. PMID:23778499

  10. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  11. Systemic Central Nervous System (CNS)-targeted Delivery of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) Reduces Neurodegeneration and Increases Neural Precursor Cell Proliferation in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Brian; Potkar, Rewati; Metcalf, Jeff; Thrin, Ivy; Adame, Anthony; Rockenstein, Edward; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant protein transmitters in the central nervous system with roles in a variety of biological functions including: food intake, cardiovascular regulation, cognition, seizure activity, circadian rhythms, and neurogenesis. Reduced NPY and NPY receptor expression is associated with numerous neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD). To determine whether replacement of NPY could ameliorate some of the neurodegenerative and behavioral pathology associated with AD, we generated a lentiviral vector expressing NPY fused to a brain transport peptide (apoB) for widespread CNS delivery in an APP-transgenic (tg) mouse model of AD. The recombinant NPY-apoB effectively reversed neurodegenerative pathology and behavioral deficits although it had no effect on accumulation of Aβ. The subgranular zone of the hippocampus showed a significant increase in proliferation of neural precursor cells without further differentiation into neurons. The neuroprotective and neurogenic effects of NPY-apoB appeared to involve signaling via ERK and Akt through the NPY R1 and NPY R2 receptors. Thus, widespread CNS-targeted delivery of NPY appears to be effective at reversing the neuronal and glial pathology associated with Aβ accumulation while also increasing NPC proliferation. Overall, increased delivery of NPY to the CNS for AD might be an effective therapy especially if combined with an anti-Aβ therapeutic. PMID:26620558

  12. Systemic Central Nervous System (CNS)-targeted Delivery of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) Reduces Neurodegeneration and Increases Neural Precursor Cell Proliferation in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Brian; Potkar, Rewati; Metcalf, Jeff; Thrin, Ivy; Adame, Anthony; Rockenstein, Edward; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-01-22

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant protein transmitters in the central nervous system with roles in a variety of biological functions including: food intake, cardiovascular regulation, cognition, seizure activity, circadian rhythms, and neurogenesis. Reduced NPY and NPY receptor expression is associated with numerous neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD). To determine whether replacement of NPY could ameliorate some of the neurodegenerative and behavioral pathology associated with AD, we generated a lentiviral vector expressing NPY fused to a brain transport peptide (apoB) for widespread CNS delivery in an APP-transgenic (tg) mouse model of AD. The recombinant NPY-apoB effectively reversed neurodegenerative pathology and behavioral deficits although it had no effect on accumulation of Aβ. The subgranular zone of the hippocampus showed a significant increase in proliferation of neural precursor cells without further differentiation into neurons. The neuroprotective and neurogenic effects of NPY-apoB appeared to involve signaling via ERK and Akt through the NPY R1 and NPY R2 receptors. Thus, widespread CNS-targeted delivery of NPY appears to be effective at reversing the neuronal and glial pathology associated with Aβ accumulation while also increasing NPC proliferation. Overall, increased delivery of NPY to the CNS for AD might be an effective therapy especially if combined with an anti-Aβ therapeutic.

  13. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  14. Hydrotropic polymeric mixed micelles based on functional hyperbranched polyglycerol copolymers as hepatoma-targeting drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejiao; Zhang, Xinge; Yu, Peien; Han, Yucai; Li, Yangguang; Li, Chaoxing

    2013-01-01

    Mixed copolymer nanoparticles (NPs) self-assembled from β-cyclodextrin-grafted hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG-g-CD) and lactobionic acid (LA)-grafted hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG-g-LA) were applied as carriers for a hydrophobic antitumor drug, paclitaxel (PTX), achieving hepatocellular carcinoma-targeted delivery. The resulting NPs exhibited high drug loading capacity and substantial stability in aqueous solution. In vitro drug release studies demonstrated a controlled drug release profile with increased release at acidic pH. Remarkably, tumor proliferation assays showed that PTX-loaded mixed copolymer NPs inhibited asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptor positive HepG2 cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner in comparison with ASGP receptor negative BGC-823 cells. Moreover, the competition assay demonstrated that the small molecular LA inhibited the cellular uptake of the PTX-loaded mixed copolymer NPs, indicating the ASGP receptor-mediated endocytosis in HepG2 cells. In addition, the intracellular uptake tests by confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the mixed copolymer NPs were more efficiently taken up by HepG2 cells compared with HPG-g-CD NPs. These results suggest a feasible application of the mixed copolymer NPs as nanocarriers for hepatoma-targeted delivery of potent antitumor drugs.

  15. Preparation, transportation mechanisms and brain-targeting evaluation in vivo of a chemical delivery system exploiting the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Tuo, Jue; Xie, Yanqi; Huang, Meihong; Huang, Min; Pi, Rongbiao; Hu, Haiyan

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, specific transportation mechanisms on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are extensively employed for brain-targeted drug delivery via colloidal nanocarriers. However, in this study, we purposed to exploit the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2)-mediated transportation on the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier to enhance central nervous system penetration of the highly hydrophilic ibuprofen (IBU) by synthesizing a SVCT2-targeted chemical delivery system (CDS), ibuprofen-C6-O-ascorbic acid (IAA). The physicochemical parameters of IAA were determined, and the transporter-mediated transportation mechanism of IAA was explored on a BBB monolayer mode. The overall brain targeting effect of IAA was assayed on mice by measuring the biodistribution of IBU after i.v. administration and calculating the pharmacokinetic parameters and targeting indexes. Results showed that lipophilicity and solubility of IAA was conspicuously improved compared with IBU. At the physiological pH, IAA was stable while in brain homogenates it was easily degraded. Transport studies on the BBB monolayer mode revealed that IAA displayed higher transepithelial permeability than IBU via SVCT2. The biodistribution study in vivo demonstrated that the overall targeting efficiency of IAA was 1.77-fold greater than that of the IBU. In conclusion, the synthetic IAA might be a promising brain-targeted CDS for smuggling small-molecule hydrophilic pharmaceuticals into the brain.

  16. Targeted systemic delivery of siRNA to cervical cancer model using cyclic RGD-installed unimer polyion complex-assembled gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yi, Yu; Kim, Hyun Jin; Mi, Peng; Zheng, Meng; Takemoto, Hiroyasu; Toh, Kazuko; Kim, Beob Soo; Hayashi, Kotaro; Naito, Mitsuru; Matsumoto, Yu; Miyata, Kanjiro; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2016-12-28

    For systemic delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to solid tumors, we developed an actively-targeted unimer polyion complex-assembled gold nanoparticle (uPIC-AuNP) by a two-step assembling process. First is the monodispersed uPIC formation from the single molecules of therapeutic siRNA and the block catiomer, cyclic RGD (cRGD) peptide-installed poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(l-lysine) modified with lipoic acid (LA) at the ω-end (cRGD-PEG-PLL-LA). Second is the surface decoration of a 20nm-sized AuNP with uPICs. The cRGD-installed uPIC-AuNPs (cRGD-uPIC-AuNP) provided the targetability for selective binding to the cancer and cancer-related endothelial cellular surface, while regulating their size <50nm with a quite narrow distribution. The targeting efficacy of the cRGD-uPIC-AuNP was confirmed by in vitro cellular uptake in cultured cervical cancer (HeLa) cells and in vivo tumor accumulation in a subcutaneous HeLa model after systemic administration, compared with a non-targeted control uPIC-AuNP. Due to the targetability of the ligand, the cRGD-uPIC-AuNP achieved the significantly enhanced gene silencing ability in the subcutaneous HeLa tumor. Ultimately, the systemic delivery of siRNA targeted for papilloma virus-derived E6 oncogene by cRGD-uPIC-AuNP significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneous HeLa tumor. This research demonstrates that the bottom-up construction of nanocarriers using monodispersed building blocks can be employed as delivery platforms for RNA interference-based cancer therapy.

  17. Design of Nanoparticle-Based Carriers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Muqing; Duval, Kayla; Guo, Xing; Chen, Zi

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have shown promise as both drug delivery vehicles and direct antitumor systems, but they must be properly designed in order to maximize efficacy. Computational modeling is often used both to design new nanoparticles and to better understand existing ones. Modeled processes include the release of drugs at the tumor site and the physical interaction between the nanoparticle and cancer cells. In this article, we provide an overview of three different targeted drug delivery methods (passive targeting, active targeting and physical targeting), compare methods of action, advantages, limitations, and the current stage of research. For the most commonly used nanoparticle carriers, fabrication methods are also reviewed. This is followed by a review of computational simulations and models on nanoparticle-based drug delivery. PMID:27398083

  18. Mathematical modeling of vesicle drug delivery systems 2: targeted vesicle interactions with cells, tumors, and the body.

    PubMed

    Ying, Chong T; Wang, Juntian; Lamm, Robert J; Kamei, Daniel T

    2013-02-01

    Vesicles have been studied for several years in their ability to deliver drugs. Mathematical models have much potential in reducing time and resources required to engineer optimal vesicles, and this review article summarizes these models that aid in understanding the ability of targeted vesicles to bind and internalize into cancer cells, diffuse into tumors, and distribute in the body. With regard to binding and internalization, radiolabeling and surface plasmon resonance experiments can be performed to determine optimal vesicle size and the number and type of ligands conjugated. Binding and internalization properties are also inputs into a mathematical model of vesicle diffusion into tumor spheroids, which highlights the importance of the vesicle diffusion coefficient and the binding affinity of the targeting ligand. Biodistribution of vesicles in the body, along with their half-life, can be predicted with compartmental models for pharmacokinetics that include the effect of targeting ligands, and these predictions can be used in conjunction with in vivo models to aid in the design of drug carriers. Mathematical models can prove to be very useful in drug carrier design, and our hope is that this review will encourage more investigators to combine modeling with quantitative experimentation in the field of vesicle-based drug delivery.

  19. CD20 monoclonal antibody targeted nanoscale drug delivery system for doxorubicin chemotherapy: an in vitro study of cell lysis of CD20-positive Raji cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuang; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhiran; Sun, Lan; Pu, Yunzhu; Yao, Hongjuan; Li, Jingcao; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yingge; Zhang, Weijing

    2016-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody targeted nanoscale drug delivery system (NDDS) for chemotherapy was evaluated in CD20-positive Raji cells in vitro. Nanoparticles were formed by the assembly of an amphiphilic polymer consisting of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-methoxypolyethyleneglycol-2000 (DSPE-PEG2000). Active carbon nanoparticles (ACNP) were conjugated to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX), and the nanoliposome carrier, DSPE-PEG2000 and DSPE-PEG2000-NH2 conjugated to the human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocytes. This monoclonal antibody targeted nanoparticle delivery system for chemotherapy formed the active NDDS complex, ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20. This active NDDS was spherical in morphology and had good dispersion in the culture medium. When compared with the effects on CD20-negative YTS cells derived from natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, the active NDDS, ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20, demonstrated DOX delivery to CD20-positive Raji cells derived from Burkitt’s lymphoma (B cell lymphoma), resulting in increased cell killing in vitro. The intracellular targeting efficiency of the ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20 complex was assessed by confocal laser microscopy and flow cytometry. The findings of this in vitro study have shown that the DSPE-PEG2000 polymeric liposome is an effective nanocarrier of both a monoclonal antibody and a chemotherapy agent and can be used to target chemotherapy to specific cells, in this case to CD20-positive B-cells. Future developments in this form of targeted therapy will depend on the development of monoclonal antibodies that are specific for malignant cells, including antibodies that can distinguish between lymphoma cells and normal lymphocyte subsets. PMID:27843311

  20. CD20 monoclonal antibody targeted nanoscale drug delivery system for doxorubicin chemotherapy: an in vitro study of cell lysis of CD20-positive Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuang; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhiran; Sun, Lan; Pu, Yunzhu; Yao, Hongjuan; Li, Jingcao; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yingge; Zhang, Weijing

    A monoclonal antibody targeted nanoscale drug delivery system (NDDS) for chemotherapy was evaluated in CD20-positive Raji cells in vitro. Nanoparticles were formed by the assembly of an amphiphilic polymer consisting of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-methoxypolyethyleneglycol-2000 (DSPE-PEG2000). Active carbon nanoparticles (ACNP) were conjugated to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX), and the nanoliposome carrier, DSPE-PEG2000 and DSPE-PEG2000-NH2 conjugated to the human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocytes. This monoclonal antibody targeted nanoparticle delivery system for chemotherapy formed the active NDDS complex, ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20. This active NDDS was spherical in morphology and had good dispersion in the culture medium. When compared with the effects on CD20-negative YTS cells derived from natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, the active NDDS, ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20, demonstrated DOX delivery to CD20-positive Raji cells derived from Burkitt's lymphoma (B cell lymphoma), resulting in increased cell killing in vitro. The intracellular targeting efficiency of the ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20 complex was assessed by confocal laser microscopy and flow cytometry. The findings of this in vitro study have shown that the DSPE-PEG2000 polymeric liposome is an effective nanocarrier of both a monoclonal antibody and a chemotherapy agent and can be used to target chemotherapy to specific cells, in this case to CD20-positive B-cells. Future developments in this form of targeted therapy will depend on the development of monoclonal antibodies that are specific for malignant cells, including antibodies that can distinguish between lymphoma cells and normal lymphocyte subsets.

  1. Bioinert Anodic Alumina Nanotubes for Targeting of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagic Signaling: A Combinatorial Nanotube-Based Drug Delivery System for Enhancing Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; Kaur, Gagandeep; Chen, Yuting; Santos, Abel; Losic, Dusan; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-12-16

    Although nanoparticle-based targeted delivery systems have gained promising achievements for cancer therapy, the development of sophisticated strategies with effective combinatorial therapies remains an enduring challenge. Herein, we report the fabrication of a novel nanomaterial, so-called anodic alumina nanotubes (AANTs) for proof-of-concept cancer therapy by targeting cell signaling networks. This strategy is to target autophagic and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling by using thapsigargin (TG)-loaded AANTs cotreated with an autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). We first show that AANTs are nontoxic and can activate autophagy in different cell types including human fibroblast cells (HFF), human monocyte cells (THP-1), and human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB 231-TXSA). Treatment with 3-MA at a nontoxic dose reduced the level of autophagy induced by AANTs, and consequently sensitized breast cancer cells to AANTs-induced cellular stresses. To target autophagic and ER stress signaling networking, breast cancer cells were treated with 3-MA together with AANTs loaded with the prototype ER stress inducer TG. We demonstrated that 3-MA enhanced the cancer cell killing effect of AANTs loaded with TG. This effect was associated with enhanced ER stress signaling due to the combination effect of TG and 3-MA. These findings not only demonstrate the excellent biocompatibility of AANTs as novel biomaterials but also provide new opportunities for developing ER- and autophagy-targeted delivery systems for future clinical cancer therapy.

  2. Toward Intracellular Targeted Delivery of Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hetal; Debinski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    A number of anti-cancer drugs have their targets localized to particular intracellular compartments. These drugs reach the targets mainly through diffusion, dependent on biophysical and biochemical forces that allow cell penetration. This means that both cancer cells and normal cells will be subjected to such diffusion; hence many of these drugs, like chemotherapeutics, are potentially toxic and the concentration achieved at the site of their action is often suboptimal. The same relates to radiation that indiscriminately affects normal and diseased cells. However, nature-designed systems enable compounds present in the extracellular environment to end up inside the cell and even travel to more specific intracellular compartments. For example, viruses and bacterial toxins can more or less specifically recognize eukaryotic cells, enter these cells, and direct some protein portions to designated intracellular areas. These phenomena have led to creative thinking, such as employing viruses or bacterial toxins for cargo delivery to cells and, more specifically, to cancer cells. Proteins can be genetically engineered in order to not only mimic what viruses and bacterial toxins can do, but also to add new functions, extending or changing the intracellular routes. It is possible to make conjugates or, more preferably, single-chain proteins that recognize cancer cells and deliver cargo inside the cells, even to the desired subcellular compartment. These findings offer new opportunities to deliver drugs/labels only to cancer cells and only to their site of action within the cells. The development of such dual-specificity vectors for targeting cancer cells is an attractive and potentially safer and more efficacious way of delivering drugs. We provide examples of this approach for delivering brain cancer therapeutics, using a specific biomarker on glioblastoma tumor cells. PMID:22671766

  3. Educational Telecommunications Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, John A., Ed.; Biedenbach, Joseph M., Ed.

    This monograph is a single volume reference manual providing an overall review of the current status and likely near future application of six major educational telecommunications delivery technologies. The introduction provides an overview to the usage and potential for these systems in the context of the major educational issues involved. Each…

  4. Experiments and synthesis of bone-targeting epirubicin with the water-soluble macromolecular drug delivery systems of oxidized-dextran.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Cai, Lin; Hu, Hao; Zhang, Yi

    2014-05-01

    Epirubicin (EPI) is a broad spectrum antineoplastic drug, commonly used as a chemotherapy method to treat osteosarcoma. However, its application has been limited by many side-effects. Therefore, targeted drug delivery to bone has been the aim of current anti-bone-tumor drug studies. Due to the exceptional affinity of Bisphosphonates (BP) to bone, 1-amino-ethylene-1, 1-dephosphate acid (AEDP) was chosen as the bone targeting moiety for water-soluble macromolecular drug delivery systems of oxidized-dextran (OXD) to transport EPI to bone in this article. The bone targeting drug of AEDP-OXD-EPI was designed for the treatment of malignant bone tumors. The successful conjugation of AEDP-OXD-EPI was confirmed by analysis of FTIR and (1)H-NMR spectra. To study the bone-seeking potential of AEDP-OXD-EPI, an in vitro hydroxyapatite (HAp) binding assay and an in vivo experiment of bone-targeting capacity were established. The effectiveness of AEDP-OXD-EPI was demonstrated by inducing apoptosis and necrosis of MG-63 tumor cell line. The obtained experimental data indicated that AEDP-OXD-EPI is an ideal bone-targeting anti-tumor drug.

  5. Biotechnology Conference: Drug Delivery and Drug Targeting Systems Held in London, United Kingdom on 14-15 December 1987

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-10

    release catalysts in comparison to 116,800 without catalysts. systems have an advantage over other systems in obviat- When acidic p-Toluene sulphonic acid ...systems, amino salicylic acid . Drug targeting - liposome for- biological problems can occur, according to Davis. Some mulations for Pentostam, colloidal...achieved close to ambient conditions and the gel can be Anionic formed into the shape of the container (mold). Accord- acrylic acid derivatives ing to

  6. Trivalent galactosyl-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a target-specific delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chian-Hui; Lai, Nien-Chu; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chou, Fong-In; Yang, Chia-Min; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2013-09-01

    A multi-functional mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN)-based boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, designated as T-Gal-B-Cy3@MSN, was synthesized with hydrophobic mesopores for incorporating a large amount of o-carborane (almost 60% (w/w) boron atoms per MSN), and the amines on the external surface were conjugated with trivalent galactosyl ligands and fluorescent dyes for cell targeting and imaging, respectively. The polar and hydrophilic galactosyl ligands enhance the water dispersibility of the BNCT agent and inhibit the possible leakage of o-carborane loaded in the MSN. Confocal microscopic images showed that T-Gal-B-Cy3@MSNs were endocytosed by cells and were then released from lysosomes into the cytoplasm of cells. Moreover, in comparison with the commonly used clinical BNCT agent, sodium borocaptate (BSH), T-Gal-B-Cy3@MSN provides a higher delivery efficiency (over 40-50 fold) of boron atoms and a better effect of BNCT in neutron irradiation experiments. MTT assays show a very low cytotoxicity for T-Gal-B-Cy3@MSN over a 2 h incubation time. The results are promising for the design of multifunctional MSNs as potential BNCT agents for clinical use.A multi-functional mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN)-based boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, designated as T-Gal-B-Cy3@MSN, was synthesized with hydrophobic mesopores for incorporating a large amount of o-carborane (almost 60% (w/w) boron atoms per MSN), and the amines on the external surface were conjugated with trivalent galactosyl ligands and fluorescent dyes for cell targeting and imaging, respectively. The polar and hydrophilic galactosyl ligands enhance the water dispersibility of the BNCT agent and inhibit the possible leakage of o-carborane loaded in the MSN. Confocal microscopic images showed that T-Gal-B-Cy3@MSNs were endocytosed by cells and were then released from lysosomes into the cytoplasm of cells. Moreover, in comparison with the commonly used clinical BNCT agent, sodium

  7. Membrane-targeting liquid crystal nanoparticles (LCNPs) for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Okhil K.; Naciri, Jawad; Spillmann, Christopher M.; Delehanty, James B.

    2016-03-01

    In addition to maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, the plasma membrane regulates multiple important cellular processes, such as endocytosis and trafficking, apoptotic pathways and drug transport. The modulation or tracking of such cellular processes by means of controlled delivery of drugs or imaging agents via nanoscale delivery systems is very attractive. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery systems that mediate long-term residence (e.g., days) and controlled release of the cargoes in the plasma membrane while simultaneously not interfering with regular cellular physiology would be ideal for this purpose. Our laboratory has developed a plasma membrane-targeted liquid crystal nanoparticle (LCNP) formulation that can be loaded with dyes or drugs which can be slowly released from the particle over time. Here we highlight the utility of these nanopreparations for membrane delivery and imaging.

  8. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rahamatullah; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Garland, Martin James; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2011-01-01

    Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal). PMID:21430958

  9. Nanogel Carrier Design for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eckmann, D. M.; Composto, R. J.; Tsourkas, A.; Muzykantov, V. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-based nanogel formulations offer features attractive for drug delivery, including ease of synthesis, controllable swelling and viscoelasticity as well as drug loading and release characteristics, passive and active targeting, and the ability to formulate nanogel carriers that can respond to biological stimuli. These unique features and low toxicity make the nanogels a favorable option for vascular drug targeting. In this review, we address key chemical and biological aspects of nanogel drug carrier design. In particular, we highlight published studies of nanogel design, descriptions of nanogel functional characteristics and their behavior in biological models. These studies form a compendium of information that supports the scientific and clinical rationale for development of this carrier for targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:25485112

  10. The role of acoustofluidics in targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Nilanjana; Zhang, Xunli; Maiti, Tapas K.; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-01-01

    With the fast development of acoustic systems in clinical and therapeutic applications, acoustically driven microbubbles have gained a prominent role as powerful tools to carry, transfer, direct, and target drug molecules in cells, tissues, and tumors in the expanding fields of targeted drug delivery and gene therapy. The aim of the present study is to establish a biocompatible acoustic microfluidic system and to demonstrate the generation of an acoustic field and its effects on microbubbles and biological cells in the microfluidic system. The acoustic field creates non-linear oscillations of the microbubble-clusters, which results in generation of shear stress on cells in such microsystems. This effectively helps in delivering extracellular probes in living cells by sonoporation. The sonoporation is investigated under the combined effects of acoustic stress and hydrodynamic stress during targeted drug and gene delivery. PMID:26339329

  11. Strategies on the nuclear-targeted delivery of genes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Fan, Ying; Li, Yuanke; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    To improve the nuclear-targeted delivery of non-viral vectors, extensive effort has been carried out on the development of smart vectors which could overcome multiple barriers. The nuclear envelope presents a major barrier to transgene delivery. Viruses are capable of crossing the nuclear envelope to efficiently deliver their genome into the nucleus through the specialized protein components. However, non-viral vectors are preferred over viral ones because of the safety concerns associated with the latter. Non-viral delivery systems have been designed to include various types of components to enable nuclear translocation at the periphery of the nucleus. This review summarizes the progress of research regarding nuclear transport mechanisms. “Smart” non-viral vectors that have been modified by peptides and other small molecules are able to facilitate the nuclear translocation and enhance the efficacy of gene expression. The resulting technology may also enhance delivery of other macromolecules to the nucleus. PMID:23964565

  12. Pharmacytes: an ideal vehicle for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    An ideal nanotechnology-based drug delivery system is a pharmacyte--a self-powered, computer-controlled medical nanorobot system capable of digitally precise transport, timing, and targeted delivery of pharmaceutical agents to specific cellular and intracellular destinations within the human body. Pharmacytes may be constructed using future molecular manufacturing technologies such as diamond mechanosynthesis which are currently being investigated theoretically using quantum ab initio and density-functional computational methods. Pharmacytes will have many applications in nanomedicine such as initiation of apoptosis in cancer cells and direct control of cell signaling processes.

  13. Novel antigen delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Maria; Berardinis, Piergiuseppe De

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent the most relevant contribution of immunology to human health. However, despite the remarkable success achieved in the past years, many vaccines are still missing in order to fight important human pathologies and to prevent emerging and re-emerging diseases. For these pathogens the known strategies for making vaccines have been unsuccessful and thus, new avenues should be investigated to overcome the failure of clinical trials and other important issues including safety concerns related to live vaccines or viral vectors, the weak immunogenicity of subunit vaccines and side effects associated with the use of adjuvants. A major hurdle of developing successful and effective vaccines is to design antigen delivery systems in such a way that optimizes antigen presentation and induces broad protective immune responses. Recent advances in vector delivery technologies, immunology, vaccinology and system biology, have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which vaccines should stimulate both arms of the adaptive immune responses, offering new strategies of vaccinations. This review is an update of current strategies with respect to live attenuated and inactivated vaccines, DNA vaccines, viral vectors, lipid-based carrier systems such as liposomes and virosomes as well as polymeric nanoparticle vaccines and virus-like particles. In addition, this article will describe our work on a versatile and immunogenic delivery system which we have studied in the past decade and which is derived from a non-pathogenic prokaryotic organism: the “E2 scaffold” of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Geobacillus stearothermophilus. PMID:26279977

  14. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Tyson

    The systemic delivery of therapeutics is currently limited by off-target side effects and poor drug uptake into the cells that need to be treated. One way to circumvent these issues is to target the delivery and release of therapeutics to the desired location while limiting systemic toxicity. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures for the development of targeted therapies. Specifically, the research has focused on the interrelationships between presentation of targeting moeities and the control of nanostructure morphology in the context of systemic delivery for targeting cancer and vascular injuries. The self-assembly region of the PA was systematically altered to achieve control of nanostructure widths, from 100 nm to 10 nm, by the addition of valine-glutamic acid dimers into the chemical structure, subsequently increasing the degree of nanostructure twist. For the targeting of tumors, a homing PA was synthesized to include a dimeric, cyclic peptide sequence known to target the cancer-specific, death receptor 5 (DR5) and initiate apoptosis through the oligomerization of DR5. This PA presented a multivalent display of DR5-binding peptides, resulting in improved binding affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance. The DR5-targeting PA also showed enhanced efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models relative to non-targeted controls. Alternative modifications to the PA-based antitumor therapies included the use of a cytotoxic, membrane-lytic PA coassembled with a pegylated PA, which showed enhanced biodistribution and in vivo activity after coassembly. The functionalization of the hydrophobic core was also accomplished through the encapsulation of the chemotherapy camptothecin, which was shown to be an effective treatment in vivo. Additionally, a targeted PA nanostructure was designed to bind to the site of vascular intervention by targeting collagen IV. Following balloon angioplasty

  15. Drug delivery systems: An updated review

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Tiwari, Ruchi; Sriwastawa, Birendra; Bhati, L; Pandey, S; Pandey, P; Bannerjee, Saurabh K

    2012-01-01

    Drug delivery is the method or process of administering a pharmaceutical compound to achieve a therapeutic effect in humans or animals. For the treatment of human diseases, nasal and pulmonary routes of drug delivery are gaining increasing importance. These routes provide promising alternatives to parenteral drug delivery particularly for peptide and protein therapeutics. For this purpose, several drug delivery systems have been formulated and are being investigated for nasal and pulmonary delivery. These include liposomes, proliposomes, microspheres, gels, prodrugs, cyclodextrins, among others. Nanoparticles composed of biodegradable polymers show assurance in fulfilling the stringent requirements placed on these delivery systems, such as ability to be transferred into an aerosol, stability against forces generated during aerosolization, biocompatibility, targeting of specific sites or cell populations in the lung, release of the drug in a predetermined manner, and degradation within an acceptable period of time. PMID:23071954

  16. PLGA-PLL-PEG-Tf-based targeted nanoparticles drug delivery system enhance antitumor efficacy via intrinsic apoptosis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Wen; Liu, Ran; Wang, Yonglu; Wang, Fei; Xia, Guohua; Zhang, Haijun; Li, Xueming; Yin, Haixiang; Chen, Baoan

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy offers a systemic cancer treatment; however, it is limited in clinical administration due to its serious side effects. In cancer medicine, the use of nanoparticles (NPs) drug delivery system (DDS) can sustainedly release anticancer drug at the specific site and reduce the incidence of toxicity in normal tissues. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the benefit of a novel chemotherapeutic DDS and its underlying mechanisms. Daunorubicin (DNR) was loaded into poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-poly-l-lysine (PLL)-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-transferrin (Tf) NPs to construct DNR-PLGA-PLL-PEG-Tf-NPs (DNR-loaded NPs) as a DDS. After incubating with PLGA-PLL-PEG-Tf-NPs, DNR, and DNR-loaded NPs, the leukemia K562 cells were collected and the intracellular concentration of DNR was detected by flow cytometry, respectively. Furthermore, the effect of drugs on the growth of tumors in K562 xenografts was observed and the relevant toxicity of therapeutic drugs on organs was investigated in vivo. Meanwhile, cell apoptosis in the excised xenografts was measured by transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay, and the expression of apoptosis-related proteins, including Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-9, Caspase-3, and cleaved-PARP, was determined by Western blotting analysis. Results showed that DNR-loaded NPs increased intracellular concentration of DNR in K562 cells in vitro and induced a remarkable improvement in anticancer activity in the xenografts in vivo. The expression of Bcl-2 protein was downregulated and that of Bax, Caspase-9, Caspase-3, and cleaved-PARP proteins were obviously upregulated in the DNR-loaded NPs group than that in other ones. Interestingly, pathological assessment showed no apparent damage to the main organs. In summary, the results obtained from this study showed that the novel NPs DDS could improve the efficacy of DNR in the treatment of leukemia and induce apoptosis via intrinsic pathway. Thus, it can be inferred that the new drug

  17. Secondary fuel delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Parker, David M.; Cai, Weidong; Garan, Daniel W.; Harris, Arthur J.

    2010-02-23

    A secondary fuel delivery system for delivering a secondary stream of fuel and/or diluent to a secondary combustion zone located in the transition piece of a combustion engine, downstream of the engine primary combustion region is disclosed. The system includes a manifold formed integral to, and surrounding a portion of, the transition piece, a manifold inlet port, and a collection of injection nozzles. A flowsleeve augments fuel/diluent flow velocity and improves the system cooling effectiveness. Passive cooling elements, including effusion cooling holes located within the transition boundary and thermal-stress-dissipating gaps that resist thermal stress accumulation, provide supplemental heat dissipation in key areas. The system delivers a secondary fuel/diluent mixture to a secondary combustion zone located along the length of the transition piece, while reducing the impact of elevated vibration levels found within the transition piece and avoiding the heat dissipation difficulties often associated with traditional vibration reduction methods.

  18. Design of novel multifunctional targeting nano-carrier drug delivery system based on CD44 receptor and tumor microenvironment pH condition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daquan; Lian, Shengnan; Sun, Jingfang; Liu, Zongliang; Zhao, Feng; Jiang, Yongtao; Gao, Mingming; Sun, Kaoxiang; Liu, Wanhui; Fu, Fenghua

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to develop a multifunctional targeting nano-carrier drug delivery system for cancer therapy, the novel pH-sensitive ketal based oligosaccharides of hyaluronan (oHA) conjugates were synthesized by chemical conjugation of hydrophobic menthone 1,2-glycerol ketal (MGK) to the backbone of oHA with the histidine as the linker of proton sponge effect. The multifunctional oHA conjugates, oHA-histidine-MGK (oHM) carried the pH-sensitive MGK as hydrophobic moieties and oHA as the target of CD44 receptor. The oHM could self-assemble to nano-sized spherical shape with the average diameters of 128.6 nm at pH 7.4 PBS conditions. The oHM nanoparticles (oHMN) could release encapsulated curcumin (Cur) with 82.6% at pH 5.0 compared with 49.3% at pH 7.4. The results of cytotoxicity assay indicated that encapsulated Cur in oHMN (Cur-oHMN) were stable and have less toxicity compared to Cur suspension. The anti-tumor efficacy in vivo suggested that Cur-oHMN suppressed tumor growth most efficiently. These results present the promising potential of oHMN as a stable and effective nano-sized pH-sensitive drug delivery system for cancer treatment.

  19. Vincristine-sulphate-loaded liposome-templated calcium phosphate nanoshell as potential tumor-targeting delivery system.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Hetal Paresh; Baser, Amit Kumar; Parmar, Mayur Prakashbhai; Patel, Ketul Harshadbhai; Ramachandra Murthy, Rayasa

    2012-06-01

    Vincristine-sulfate-loaded liposomes were prepared with an aim to improve stability, reduce drug leakage during systemic circulation, and increase intracellular uptake. Liposomes were prepared by the thin-film hydration method, followed by coating with calcium phosphate, using the sequential addition approach. Prepared formulations were characterized for size, zeta potential, drug-entrapment efficiency, morphology by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in vitro drug-release profile, and in vitro cell cytotoxicity study. Effect of formulation variables, such as drug:lipid ratio as well as nature and volume of hydration media, were found to affect drug entrapment, and the concentration of calcium chloride in coating was found to affect size and coating efficiency. Size, zeta potential, and TEM images confirmed that the liposomes were effectively coated with calcium phosphate. The calcium phosphate nanoshell exhibited pH-dependent drug release, showing significantly lower release at pH 7.4, compared to the release at pH 4.5, which is the pH of the tumor interstitium. The in vitro cytotoxicity study done on the lung cancer cell line indicated that coated liposomes are more cytotoxic than plain liposomes and drug solution, indicating their potential for intracellular drug delivery. The cell-uptake study done on the lung cancer cell line indicated that calcium-phosphate-coated liposomes show higher cell uptake than uncoated liposomes.

  20. Prostate Cancer Relevant Antigens and Enzymes for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Barve, Ashutosh; Jin, Wei; Cheng, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the most widely used approaches in combating advanced prostate cancer, but its therapeutic efficacy is usually insufficient due to lack of specificity and associated toxicity. Lack of targeted delivery to prostate cancer cells is also the primary obstacles in achieving feasible therapeutic effect of other promising agents including peptide, protein, and nucleic acid. Consequently, there remains a critical need for strategies to increase the selectivity of anti-prostate cancer agents. This review will focus on various prostate cancer-specific antigens and enzymes that could be exploited for prostate cancer targeted drug delivery. Among various targeting strategies, active targeting is the most advanced approach to specifically deliver drugs to their designated cancer cells. In this approach, drug carriers are modified with targeting ligands that can specifically bind to prostate cancer-specific antigens. Moreover, there are several specific enzymes in the tumor microenvironment of prostate cancer that can be exploited for stimulus-responsive drug delivery systems. These systems can specifically release the active drug in the tumor microenvironment of prostate cancer, leading to enhanced tumor penetration efficiency. PMID:24878184

  1. Targeted gene delivery to the enteric nervous system using AAV: a comparison across serotypes and capsid mutants.

    PubMed

    Benskey, Matthew J; Kuhn, Nathan C; Galligan, James J; Garcia, Joanna; Boye, Shannon E; Hauswirth, William W; Mueller, Christian; Boye, Sanford L; Manfredsson, Fredric P

    2015-03-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are one of the most widely used gene transfer systems in research and clinical trials. AAV can transduce a wide range of biological tissues, however to date, there has been no investigation on targeted AAV transduction of the enteric nervous system (ENS). Here, we examined the efficiency, tropism, spread, and immunogenicity of AAV transduction in the ENS. Rats received direct injections of various AAV serotypes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) into the descending colon. AAV serotypes tested included; AAV 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, or 9 and the AAV2 and AAV8 capsid mutants, AAV2-Y444F, AAV2-tripleY-F, AAV2-tripleY-F+T-V, AAV8-Y733F, and AAV8-doubeY-F+T-V. Transduction, as determined by GFP-positive cells, occurred in neurons and enteric glia within the myenteric and submucosal plexuses of the ENS. AAV6 and AAV9 showed the highest levels of transduction within the ENS. Transduction efficiency scaled with titer and time, was translated to the murine ENS, and produced no vector-related immune response. A single injection of AAV into the colon covered an area of ~47 mm(2). AAV9 primarily transduced neurons, while AAV6 transduced enteric glia and neurons. This is the first report on targeted AAV transduction of neurons and glia in the ENS.

  2. Novel targeting using nanoparticles: an approach to the development of an effective anti-leishmanial drug-delivery system.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Tatiana G; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A; Valadares, Diogo G; França, Juçara R; Rodrigues, Lívia B; Duarte, Mariana C; Lage, Paula S; Andrade, Pedro H R; Lage, Daniela P; Arruda, Leonardo V; Abánades, Daniel R; Costa, Lourena E; Martins, Vivian T; Tavares, Carlos A P; Castilho, Rachel O; Coelho, Eduardo A F; Faraco, André A G

    2014-01-01

    The study reported here aimed to develop an optimized nanoparticle delivery system for amphotericin B (AmpB) using a polyelectrolyte complexation technique. For this, two oppositely charged polymers presenting anti-leishmanial activity - chitosan (Cs) and chondroitin sulfate (ChS) - were used: Cs as a positively charged polymer and ChS as a negatively charged polymer. The chitosan (NQ) nanoparticles, chitosan-chondroitin sulfate (NQC) nanoparticles, and chitosan-chondroitin sulfate-amphotericin B (NQC-AmpB) nanoparticles presented a mean particle size of 79, 104, and 136 nm, respectively; and a polydispersity index of 0.2. The measured zeta potential of the nanoparticles indicated a positive charge in their surface, while scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed spherical nanoparticles with a smooth surface. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed an electrostatic interaction between the polymers, whereas the release profile of AmpB from the NQC-AmpB nanoparticles showed a controlled release. In addition, the Cs; ChS; and NQ, NQC, and NQC-AmpB nanoparticles proved to be effective against promastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania chagasi, with a synergistic effect observed between Cs and ChS. Moreover, the applied NQ, NQC, and NQC-AmpB compounds demonstrated low toxicity in murine macrophages, as well as null hemolytic activity in type O(+) human red blood cells. Pure AmpB demonstrated high toxicity in the macrophages. The results show that cells infected with L. amazonensis and later treated with Cs, ChS, NQ, NQC, NQC-AmpB nanoparticles, or pure AmpB presented with a significant reduction in parasite number in the order of 24%, 31%, 55%, 66%, 90%, and 89%, respectively. The data presented indicate that the engineered NQC-AmpB nanoparticles could potentially be used as an alternative therapy to treat leishmaniasis, mainly due its low toxicity to mammals' cells.

  3. Novel targeting using nanoparticles: an approach to the development of an effective anti-leishmanial drug-delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Tatiana G; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A; Valadares, Diogo G; França, Juçara R; Rodrigues, Lívia B; Duarte, Mariana C; Lage, Paula S; Andrade, Pedro H R; Lage, Daniela P; Arruda, Leonardo V; Abánades, Daniel R; Costa, Lourena E; Martins, Vivian T; Tavares, Carlos AP; Castilho, Rachel O; Coelho, Eduardo AF; Faraco, André AG

    2014-01-01

    The study reported here aimed to develop an optimized nanoparticle delivery system for amphotericin B (AmpB) using a polyelectrolyte complexation technique. For this, two oppositely charged polymers presenting anti-leishmanial activity – chitosan (Cs) and chondroitin sulfate (ChS) – were used: Cs as a positively charged polymer and ChS as a negatively charged polymer. The chitosan (NQ) nanoparticles, chitosan-chondroitin sulfate (NQC) nanoparticles, and chitosan-chondroitin sulfate-amphotericin B (NQC-AmpB) nanoparticles presented a mean particle size of 79, 104, and 136 nm, respectively; and a polydispersity index of 0.2. The measured zeta potential of the nanoparticles indicated a positive charge in their surface, while scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed spherical nanoparticles with a smooth surface. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed an electrostatic interaction between the polymers, whereas the release profile of AmpB from the NQC-AmpB nanoparticles showed a controlled release. In addition, the Cs; ChS; and NQ, NQC, and NQC-AmpB nanoparticles proved to be effective against promastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania chagasi, with a synergistic effect observed between Cs and ChS. Moreover, the applied NQ, NQC, and NQC-AmpB compounds demonstrated low toxicity in murine macrophages, as well as null hemolytic activity in type O+ human red blood cells. Pure AmpB demonstrated high toxicity in the macrophages. The results show that cells infected with L. amazonensis and later treated with Cs, ChS, NQ, NQC, NQC-AmpB nanoparticles, or pure AmpB presented with a significant reduction in parasite number in the order of 24%, 31%, 55%, 66%, 90%, and 89%, respectively. The data presented indicate that the engineered NQC-AmpB nanoparticles could potentially be used as an alternative therapy to treat leishmaniasis, mainly due its low toxicity to mammals’ cells. PMID:24627630

  4. Colon targeting: an emerging frontier for oral insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mayur Mahendrakumar

    2013-06-01

    Subcutaneous administration of insulin is associated with several limitations such as discomfort, local pain, irritation, infections, immune reactions and lipoatrophy as well as lipohypertrophy manifestations at the injection site. To overcome these drawbacks, enormous research is currently going on worldwide for designing of an alternative noninvasive route of administration. Pulmonary and oral route seem to be the most promising ones, with respect to the market value. However, after the letdown by pulmonary delivery of insulin, oral colon targeted delivery of insulin has gained tremendous interest among researchers. Although bioavailability remains a challenge for oral colon specific delivery of insulin, the employment of protease inhibitors, permeation enhancers and polymeric delivery systems have proved to be advantageous to overcome the said problem. This Editorial article is not intended to offer a comprehensive review on drug delivery, but shall familiarize the readers with the strategies employed for attaining non-erratic bioavailability of insulin, and to highlight some of the formulation technologies that have been developed for attaining oral colon-specific delivery of insulin.

  5. Self-assembled drug delivery systems. Part 7: hepatocyte-targeted nanoassemblies of an adefovir lipid derivative with cytochrome P450-triggered drug release.

    PubMed

    Du, Lina; Wu, Lailong; Jin, Yiguang; Jia, Junwei; Li, Miao; Wang, Yu

    2014-09-10

    A novel strategy was used in the design of self-assembled drug delivery systems (SADDSs) in this study. The nanoassemblies of an amphiphilic adefovir lipid derivative were prepared and demonstrated to have the functions of hepatocyte targeting, enzyme-triggered drug release and high anti-hepatitis effect. An amphiphilic adefovir lipid derivative, N-lauroyl-1-(3-chlorophenyl)-1,3-propanyl phosphonyl adefovir (LCPA) was prepared and formed the nanoassemblies by injecting the mixture of LCPA and another amphiphilic polymer, d-galactide polyoxyethylene (20) cetyl ether (GPCE) (ca. 20:1, mol/mol) into water. The nanoassemblies were very stable and showed negative charge. LCPA was sensitive to the cytochrome P450 isozymes that were expressed predominantly in the hepatocytes to produce adefovir. GPCE contained a long hydrophilic chain and a galactose ligand targeting the asialoglycoprotein receptors overexpressed on the surface of hepatocytes. The nanoassemblies showed the long-circulating and liver targeting effects according to the results of pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and fluorescence imagination after bolus intravenous administration of the nanoassemblies to the mice. The highly efficient hepatitis B treatment was achieved by 10 day continuous administration of the nanoassemblies to the HBV-infected mice. Many functions were combined in the nanoassemblies, including prodrug, molecular self-assembly, nanotechnology, long-circulating, hepatocyte targeting and hepatocyte over expressing enzyme-triggered drug release.

  6. Disconnecting the Yin and Yang Relation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-Mediated Delivery: A Fully Synthetic, EGFR-Targeted Gene Transfer System Avoiding Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, A.; Pahnke, A.; Schaffert, D.; van Weerden, W.M.; de Ridder, C.M.A.; Rödl, W.; Vetter, A.; Spitzweg, C.; Kraaij, R.; Wagner, E.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is upregulated within a high percentage of solid tumors and hence is an attractive target for tumor-targeted therapies including gene therapy. The natural EGFR ligand epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been used for this purpose, despite the risk of mitogenic effects due to EGFR activation. We have developed a fully synthetic, EGFR-targeted gene delivery system based on PEGylated linear polyethylenimine (LPEI), allowing evaluation of different EGFR-binding peptides in terms of transfection efficiency and EGFR activation. Peptide sequences directly derived from the human EGF molecule enhanced transfection efficiency with concomitant EGFR activation. Only the EGFR-binding peptide GE11, which has been identified by phage display technique, showed specific enhancement of transfection on EGFR-overexpressing tumor cells including glioblastoma and hepatoma, but without EGFR activation. EGFR targeting led to high levels of cell association of fluorescently labeled polyplexes after only 30 min of incubation. EGF pretreatment of cells induced enhanced cellular internalization of all polyplex types tested, pointing at generally enhanced macropinocytosis. EGF polyplexes diminished cell surface expression of EGFR for up to 4 hr, whereas GE11 polyplexes did not. In a clinically relevant orthotopic prostate cancer model, intratumorally injected GE11 polyplexes were superior in inducing transgene expression when compared with untargeted polyplexes. PMID:21644815

  7. A pH-responsive prodrug delivery system of 10-HCPT for controlled release and tumor targeting

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Li, Dan; Guo, Xinhong; Xu, Haiwei; Li, Zhi; Zhang, Yanling; Song, Chuanjun; Fan, Ruhan; Tang, Xing; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2017-01-01

    We synthesized a pH-responsive conjugate of 10-hydroxycamptothecin-thiosemicarbazide-linear polyethylene glycol 2000 (PEG2000). The conjugate was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption time of flight mass spectrometry, 1H NMR, and 13C NMR. The water solubility of the prodrug was increased by over 3,000 times; much longer body circulation time, higher tumor-targeting ability, and reduced toxicity were observed, compared with commercial 10-HCPT injection. The linker contains a pH-sensitive hydrazone bond, which breaks under low pH conditions in the tumor microenvironment. The conjugates showed good stability in phosphate-buffered saline (pH 7.4) and rat plasma. This amphiphilic conjugate could self-assemble into nanosized micelles of 80–100 nm. Cytotoxicity assay results indicate significantly higher efficacy of the conjugate (IC50 [half maximal inhibitory concentration] =0.117 µM on SW180 cells) than 10-HCPT solution (IC50 =0.241 µM on SW480 cells). Cellular uptake analysis suggested its rapid internalization and nuclear transport. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the conjugates demonstrated that the conjugate circulated for a longer time in the blood circulation system (T2/1 =10.516±1.158 h) than did 10-HCPT solution (T2/1 =1.859±1.385 h), and that it also enhanced the targeting and mean residence time (MRT0–inf =39.873±4.549 h) in the tumor site, compared with 10-HCPT (MRT0–inf =9.247±1.026 h). Finally, the conjugate demonstrated an increased tumor growth inhibition effect (TIR =82.66%±7.175%) in vivo and lower side effects than 10-HCPT (TIR =63.85%±5.233%). This prodrug holds great promise in improving therapeutic efficacy and overcoming multidrug resistance. PMID:28356739

  8. Radiation sterilization of new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Abuhanoğlu, Gürhan; Ozer, A Yekta

    2014-06-01

    Radiation sterilization has now become a commonly used method for sterilization of several active ingredients in drugs or drug delivery systems containing these substances. In this context, many applications have been performed on the human products that are required to be sterile, as well as on pharmaceutical products prepared to be developed. The new drug delivery systems designed to deliver the medication to the target tissue or organ, such as microspheres, nanospheres, microemulsion, and liposomal systems, have been sterilized by gamma (γ) and beta (β) rays, and more recently, by e-beam sterilization. In this review, the sterilization of new drug delivery systems was discussed other than conventional drug delivery systems by γ irradiation.

  9. Accelerated killing of cancer cells using a multifunctional single-walled carbon nanotube-based system for targeted drug delivery in combination with photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Jeyamohan, Prashanti; Hasumura, Takashi; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

    2013-01-01

    The photothermal effect of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in combination with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for targeting and accelerated destruction of breast cancer cells is demonstrated in this paper. A targeted drug-delivery system was developed for selective killing of breast cancer cells with polyethylene glycol biofunctionalized and DOX-loaded SWCNTs conjugated with folic acid. In our work, in vitro drug-release studies showed that the drug (DOX) binds at physiological pH (pH 7.4) and is released only at a lower pH, ie, lysosomal pH (pH 4.0), which is the characteristic pH of the tumor environment. A sustained release of DOX from the SWCNTs was observed for a period of 3 days. SWCNTs have strong optical absorbance in the near-infrared (NIR) region. In this special spectral window, biological systems are highly transparent. Our study reports that under laser irradiation at 800 nm, SWCNTs exhibited strong light-heat transfer characteristics. These optical properties of SWCNTs open the way for selective photothermal ablation in cancer therapy. It was also observed that internalization and uptake of folate-conjugated NTs into cancer cells was achieved by a receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism. Results of the in vitro experiments show that laser was effective in destroying the cancer cells, while sparing the normal cells. When the above laser effect was combined with DOX-conjugated SWCNTs, we found enhanced and accelerated killing of breast cancer cells. Thus, this nanodrug-delivery system, consisting of laser, drug, and SWCNTs, looks to be a promising selective modality with high treatment efficacy and low side effects for cancer therapy.

  10. Programmed near-infrared light-responsive drug delivery system for combined magnetic tumor-targeting magnetic resonance imaging and chemo-phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qianhua; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Wanxia; Hao, Yongwei; Wang, Yongchao; Zhang, Hongling; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2017-02-01

    In this study, an intelligent drug delivery system was developed by capping doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded hollow mesoporous CuS nanoparticles (HMCuS NPs) with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). Under near infrared (NIR) light irradiation, the versatile HMCuS NPs could exploit the merits of both photothermal therapy (PTT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) simultaneously. Herein, the multifunctional IONPs as gatekeeper with the enhanced capping efficiency were supposed to realize "zero premature release" and minimize the adverse side effects during the drug delivery in vivo. More importantly, the hybrid metal nanoplatform (HMCuS/DOX@IONP-PEG) allowed several emerging exceptional characteristics. Our studies have substantiated the hybrid nanoparticles possessed an enhanced PTT effect due to coupled plasmonic resonances with an elevated heat-generating capacity. Notably, an effective removal of IONP-caps occurred after NIR-induced photo-hyperthermia via weakening of the coordination interactions between HMCuS-NH2 and IONPs, which suggested the feasibility of sophisticated controlled on-demand drug release upon exposing to NIR stimulus with spatial/temporal resolution. Benefiting from the favorable magnetic tumor targeting efficacy, the in vitro and in vivo experiments indicated a remarkable anti-tumor therapeutic efficacy under NIR irradiation, resulting from the synergistic combination of chemo-phototherapy. In addition, T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast performance of IONPs provided the identification of cancerous lesions. Based on these findings, the well-designed drug delivery system via integration of programmed functions will provide knowledge for advancing multimodality theranostic strategy.

  11. Aptamer-Mediated Targeted Delivery of Therapeutics: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Catuogno, Silvia; Esposito, Carla L.; de Franciscis, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    The selective delivery of drugs in a cell- or tissue-specific manner represents the main challenge for medical research; in order to reduce the occurrence of unwanted off-target effects. In this regard, nucleic acid aptamers have emerged as an attractive class of carrier molecules due to their ability to bind with high affinity to specific ligands; their high chemical flexibility; as well as tissue penetration capability. To date, different aptamer-drug systems and aptamer–nanoparticles systems, in which nanoparticles function together with aptamers for the targeted delivery, have been successfully developed for a wide range of therapeutics, including toxins; peptides; chemotherapeutics and oligonucleotides. Therefore, aptamer-mediated drug delivery represents a powerful tool for the safe and effective treatment of different human pathologies, including cancer; neurological diseases; immunological diseases and so on. In this review, we will summarize recent progress in the field of aptamer-mediated drug delivery and we will discuss the advantages, the achieved objectives and the challenges to be still addressed in the near future, in order to improve the effectiveness of therapies. PMID:27827876

  12. Targeted Drug Delivery to Treat Pain and Cerebral Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Limited drug penetration is an obstacle that is often encountered in treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including pain and cerebral hypoxia. Over the past several years, biochemical characteristics of the brain (i.e., tight junction protein complexes at brain barrier sites, expression of influx and efflux transporters) have been shown to be directly involved in determining CNS permeation of therapeutic agents; however, the vast majority of these studies have focused on understanding those mechanisms that prevent drugs from entering the CNS. Recently, this paradigm has shifted toward identifying and characterizing brain targets that facilitate CNS drug delivery. Such targets include the organic anion–transporting polypeptides (OATPs in humans; Oatps in rodents), a family of sodium-independent transporters that are endogenously expressed in the brain and are involved in drug uptake. OATP/Oatp substrates include drugs that are efficacious in treatment of pain and/or cerebral hypoxia (i.e., opioid analgesic peptides, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors). This clearly suggests that OATP/Oatp isoforms are viable transporter targets that can be exploited for optimization of drug delivery to the brain and, therefore, improved treatment of CNS diseases. This review summarizes recent knowledge in this area and emphasizes the potential that therapeutic targeting of OATP/Oatp isoforms may have in facilitating CNS drug delivery and distribution. Additionally, information presented in this review will point to novel strategies that can be used for treatment of pain and cerebral hypoxia. PMID:23343976

  13. Targeted Cellular Drug Delivery using Tailored Dendritic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kolhe, Parag; Kannan, Sujatha; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2002-03-01

    Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers possess highly branched architectures, with a large number of controllable, tailorble, ‘peripheral’ functionalities. Since the surface chemistry of these materials can be modified with relative ease, these materials have tremendous potential in targeted drug and gene delivery. The large number of end groups can also be tailored to create special affinity to targeted cells, and can also encapsulate drugs and deliver them in a controlled manner. We are developing tailor-modified dendritic systems for drug delivery. Synthesis, in-vitro drug loading, in-vitro drug delivery, and the targeting efficiency to the cell are being studied systematically using a wide variety of experimental tools. Polyamidoamine and Polyol dendrimers, with different generations and end-groups are studied, with drugs such as Ibuprofen and Methotrexate. Our results indicate that a large number of drug molecules can be encapsulated/attached to the dendrimers, depending on the end groups. The drug-encapsulated dendrimer is able to enter the cells rapidly and deliver the drug. Targeting strategies being explored

  14. 42 CFR 457.490 - Delivery and utilization control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.490 Delivery and utilization control systems. A... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Delivery and utilization control systems. 457.490... targeted low-income children, including a description of the proposed methods of delivery and...

  15. 42 CFR 457.490 - Delivery and utilization control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.490 Delivery and utilization control systems. A... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Delivery and utilization control systems. 457.490... targeted low-income children, including a description of the proposed methods of delivery and...

  16. 42 CFR 457.490 - Delivery and utilization control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.490 Delivery and utilization control systems. A... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Delivery and utilization control systems. 457.490... targeted low-income children, including a description of the proposed methods of delivery and...

  17. Effects of targeted nano-delivery systems combined with hTERT-siRNA and Bmi-1-siRNA on MCF-7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Li, Huixiang; Zhang, Min; Lv, Xinquan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a targeted siRNA nano-delivery system to silence the expression of Bmi-1 and hTERT, and to verify the toxicity of this delivery system in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The most effective Bmi-1 siRNA and hTERT siRNA sequences were selected using RT-PCR and Western blotting. The polyethyleneimine (PEI)/siRNA nano-condensate was synthesized using PEI and modified using an NGR peptide fragment for targeting to tumor cells. The vector morphology, particle size and zeta potential were observed using an atomic force microscope and a laser particle size analyzer. The MCF-7 breast cancer cell line was transfected with the vector, and cytotoxicity was tested by MTT assays. The transfection efficiency was evaluated by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Changes in gene expression and apoptosis rate were measured by flow cytometry. The size of LPN carrier and the condensate particle was between 100 and 200 nm and the potentials were close to neutral. There was maximum transfection efficiency and no significant increase in toxicity at 15 pmol/L. Bmi-1 and hTERT expression decreased, but the inhibition rate increased in the hTERT siRNA group, the hTERT+Bmi-1 siRNA group and the hTERT+Bmi-1 siRNA group compared with the scrambled siRNA group and the control group. Moreover, the hTERT+Bmi-1 siRNA group had the highest level of gene silencing. The complex, composed of Lipo, PEI and siRNA, is low toxicity and efficient transfection vectors. The expression level of Bmi-1 and hTERT was decreased by the gene silencing of either Bmi-1 or hTERT, but the effects were more significant when both were silenced simultaneously. PMID:26261549

  18. Aptamer-guided DNA tetrahedron as a novel targeted drug delivery system for MUC1-expressing breast cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Bindong; Hu, Yan; Duan, JinHong; Yang, Xian-Da

    2016-01-01

    Mucin 1 (MUC1) is an important molecular target for cancer treatment because it is overexpressed in most adenocarcinomas. In this study, a new MUC1-targeted drug delivery system was assembled using an aptamer (Apt) that could recognize MUC1 and a DNA tetrahedron (Td) that could carry doxorubicin (Dox) within its DNA structure. The complex thus formed (Apt-Td) had an average size of 12.38 nm and was negatively charged. Similar to the MUC1 aptamer, the Apt-Td could preferentially bind with MUC1-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells. A drug loading experiment revealed that each Apt-Td complex could carry approximately 25 Dox molecules. Moreover, Apt-Td selectively delivered Dox into the MUC1-positive breast cancer cells but reduced Dox uptake by the MUC1-negative control cells. Dox-loaded Apt-Td also induced a significantly higher cytotoxicity to the MUC1-positive cancer cells versus the MUC1-negative control cells in vitro (p<0.01). These results suggest that Apt-Td may potentially serve as a drug carrier in the targeted treatment of MUC1-expressing breast cancers. PMID:27203221

  19. Aptamer-guided DNA tetrahedron as a novel targeted drug delivery system for MUC1-expressing breast cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bindong; Hu, Yan; Duan, JinHong; Yang, Xian-Da

    2016-06-21

    Mucin 1 (MUC1) is an important molecular target for cancer treatment because it is overexpressed in most adenocarcinomas. In this study, a new MUC1-targeted drug delivery system was assembled using an aptamer (Apt) that could recognize MUC1 and a DNA tetrahedron (Td) that could carry doxorubicin (Dox) within its DNA structure. The complex thus formed (Apt-Td) had an average size of 12.38 nm and was negatively charged. Similar to the MUC1 aptamer, the Apt-Td could preferentially bind with MUC1-positive MCF-7 breast cancer cells. A drug loading experiment revealed that each Apt-Td complex could carry approximately 25 Dox molecules. Moreover, Apt-Td selectively delivered Dox into the MUC1-positive breast cancer cells but reduced Dox uptake by the MUC1-negative control cells. Dox-loaded Apt-Td also induced a significantly higher cytotoxicity to the MUC1-positive cancer cells versus the MUC1-negative control cells in vitro (p<0.01). These results suggest that Apt-Td may potentially serve as a drug carrier in the targeted treatment of MUC1-expressing breast cancers.

  20. Magnetically Targeted Stem Cell Delivery for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cores, Jhon; Caranasos, Thomas G.; Cheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells play a special role in the body as agents of self-renewal and auto-reparation for tissues and organs. Stem cell therapies represent a promising alternative strategy to regenerate damaged tissue when natural repairing and conventional pharmacological intervention fail to do so. A fundamental impediment for the evolution of stem cell therapies has been the difficulty of effectively targeting administered stem cells to the disease foci. Biocompatible magnetically responsive nanoparticles are being utilized for the targeted delivery of stem cells in order to enhance their retention in the desired treatment site. This noninvasive treatment-localization strategy has shown promising results and has the potential to mitigate the problem of poor long-term stem cell engraftment in a number of organ systems post-delivery. In addition, these same nanoparticles can be used to track and monitor the cells in vivo, using magnetic resonance imaging. In the present review we underline the principles of magnetic targeting for stem cell delivery, with a look at the logic behind magnetic nanoparticle systems, their manufacturing and design variants, and their applications in various pathological models. PMID:26133387

  1. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) for drug delivery and targeting.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chia-Lang; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Fang, Jia-You

    2013-01-01

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) are drug-delivery systems composed of both solid and liquid lipids as a core matrix. It was shown that NLCs reveal some advantages for drug therapy over conventional carriers, including increased solubility, the ability to enhance storage stability, improved permeability and bioavailability, reduced adverse effect, prolonged half-life, and tissue-targeted delivery. NLCs have attracted increasing attention in recent years. This review describes recent developments in drug delivery using NLCs strategies. The structures, preparation techniques, and physicochemical characterization of NLCs are systematically elucidated in this review. The potential of NLCs to be used for different administration routes is highlighted. Special attention is paid to parenteral injection and topical delivery since these are the most common routes for investigating NLCs. Relevant issues for the introduction of NLCs to market, including pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications, are discussed. The related patents of NLCs for drug delivery are also reviewed. Finally, the future development and current obstacles needing to be resolved are elucidated.

  2. Polymers for Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liechty, William B.; Kryscio, David R.; Slaughter, Brandon V.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Polymers have played an integral role in the advancement of drug delivery technology by providing controlled release of therapeutic agents in constant doses over long periods, cyclic dosage, and tunable release of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. From early beginnings using off-the-shelf materials, the field has grown tremendously, driven in part by the innovations of chemical engineers. Modern advances in drug delivery are now predicated upon the rational design of polymers tailored for specific cargo and engineered to exert distinct biological functions. In this review, we highlight the fundamental drug delivery systems and their mathematical foundations and discuss the physiological barriers to drug delivery. We review the origins and applications of stimuli-responsive polymer systems and polymer therapeutics such as polymer-protein and polymer-drug conjugates. The latest developments in polymers capable of molecular recognition or directing intracellular delivery are surveyed to illustrate areas of research advancing the frontiers of drug delivery. PMID:22432577

  3. Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Walley, Susan C; Jenssen, Brian P

    2015-11-01

    Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) are rapidly growing in popularity among youth. ENDS are handheld devices that produce an aerosolized mixture from a solution typically containing concentrated nicotine, flavoring chemicals, and propylene glycol to be inhaled by the user. ENDS are marketed under a variety of names, most commonly electronic cigarettes and e-cigarettes. In 2014, more youth reported using ENDS than any other tobacco product. ENDS pose health risks to both users and nonusers. Nicotine, the major psychoactive ingredient in ENDS solutions, is both highly addictive and toxic. In addition to nicotine, other toxicants, carcinogens, and metal particles have been detected in solutions and aerosols of ENDS. Nonusers are involuntarily exposed to the emissions of these devices with secondhand and thirdhand aerosol. The concentrated and often flavored nicotine in ENDS solutions poses a poisoning risk for young children. Reports of acute nicotine toxicity from US poison control centers have been increasing, with at least 1 child death reported from unintentional exposure to a nicotine-containing ENDS solution. With flavors, design, and marketing that appeal to youth, ENDS threaten to renormalize and glamorize nicotine and tobacco product use. There is a critical need for ENDS regulation, legislative action, and counter promotion to protect youth. ENDS have the potential to addict a new generation of youth to nicotine and reverse more than 50 years of progress in tobacco control.

  4. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and siRNA for glioma therapy by a brain targeting system: angiopep-2-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Hao, Yongwei; Li, Haixia; Zhao, Yalin; Meng, Dehui; Li, Dong; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Hongling; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    It is very challenging to treat brain cancer because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricting therapeutic drug or gene to access the brain. In this research project, angiopep-2 (ANG) was used as a brain-targeted peptide for preparing multifunctional ANG-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs), which encapsulated both doxorubicin (DOX) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) siRNA, designated as ANG/PLGA/DOX/siRNA. This system could efficiently deliver DOX and siRNA into U87MG cells leading to significant cell inhibition, apoptosis and EGFR silencing in vitro. It demonstrated that this drug system was capable of penetrating the BBB in vivo, resulting in more drugs accumulation in the brain. The animal study using the brain orthotopic U87MG glioma xenograft model indicated that the ANG-targeted co-delivery of DOX and EGFR siRNA resulted in not only the prolongation of the life span of the glioma-bearing mice but also an obvious cell apoptosis in glioma tissue.

  5. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery. PMID:27376328

  6. Viral and nonviral delivery systems for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nayerossadat, Nouri; Maedeh, Talebi; Ali, Palizban Abas

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is the process of introducing foreign genomic materials into host cells to elicit a therapeutic benefit. Although initially the main focus of gene therapy was on special genetic disorders, now diverse diseases with different patterns of inheritance and acquired diseases are targets of gene therapy. There are 2 major categories of gene therapy, including germline gene therapy and somatic gene therapy. Although germline gene therapy may have great potential, because it is currently ethically forbidden, it cannot be used; however, to date human gene therapy has been limited to somatic cells. Although numerous viral and nonviral gene delivery systems have been developed in the last 3 decades, no delivery system has been designed that can be applied in gene therapy of all kinds of cell types in vitro and in vivo with no limitation and side effects. In this review we explain about the history of gene therapy, all types of gene delivery systems for germline (nuclei, egg cells, embryonic stem cells, pronuclear, microinjection, sperm cells) and somatic cells by viral [retroviral, adenoviral, adeno association, helper-dependent adenoviral systems, hybrid adenoviral systems, herpes simplex, pox virus, lentivirus, Epstein–Barr virus)] and nonviral systems (physical: Naked DNA, DNA bombardant, electroporation, hydrodynamic, ultrasound, magnetofection) and (chemical: Cationic lipids, different cationic polymers, lipid polymers). In addition to the above-mentioned, advantages, disadvantages, and practical use of each system are discussed. PMID:23210086

  7. A novel brain metastasis xenograft model for convection‑enhanced delivery of targeted toxins via a micro‑osmotic pump system enabled for real‑time bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Li, Yan Michael; Cheng, Quan; Vallera, Daniel A; Hall, Walter A

    2015-10-01

    Brain metastasis is a common cause of mortality in patients with cancer, and is associated with poor prognosis. There is a current requirement for the identification of relevant brain metastasis tumor models, which may be used to test novel therapeutic agents and delivery systems in pre‑clinical studies. The present study aimed to investigate the development of a murine model of brain metastasis, and the application of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) for monitoring tumor growth and response to targeted toxins (TT). A luciferase‑modified human brain metastasis cell line was implanted into the caudate‑putamen of athymic mice using a stereotactic frame. Tumor growth was monitored by BLI, and tumor volume was calculated from three‑dimensional measurements of serial histopathological sections. Histopathological analyses revealed the presence of tumor growth within the caudate‑putamen of all of the mice, and BLI was shown to be correlated with tumor volume. To evaluate whether this model would allow the detection of a therapeutic response, mice bearing metastatic brain tumor cell xenografts were treated with TT delivered by convection‑enhanced delivery (CED), via a micro‑osmotic pump system. The TT‑treated groups were submitted to metastatic brain tumor cell experiments, the results of which suggested that TT treatment delayed tumor growth, as determined by BLI monitoring, and significantly extended the survival of the mice. The results of the present study demonstrated the efficacy of a brain metastasis model for CED of TT via a micro‑osmotic pump system in athymic mice, in which tumor growth and response to therapy were accurately monitored by BLI. In conclusion, this model may be well‑suited for pre‑clinical testing of potential therapeutics for the treatment of patients with metastatic brain tumors.

  8. Nanoparticle-based targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajesh; Lillard, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology could be defined as the technology that has allowed for the control, manipulation, study, and manufacture of structures and devices in the “nanometer” size range. These nano-sized objects, e.g., “nanoparticles”, take on novel properties and functions that differ markedly from those seen from items made of identical materials. The small size, customized surface, improved solubility, and multi-functionality of nanoparticles will continue to open many doors and create new biomedical applications. Indeed, the novel properties of nanoparticles offer the ability to interact with complex cellular functions in new ways. This rapidly growing field requires cross-disciplinary research and provides opportunities to design and develop multifunctional devices that can target, diagnose, and treat devastating diseases such as cancer. This article presents an overview of nanotechnology for the biologist and discusses the attributes of our novel XPclad© nanoparticle formulation that has shown efficacy in treating solid tumors, for single dose vaccination, and oral delivery of therapeutic proteins. PMID:19186176

  9. Lung-targeting drug delivery system of baicalin-loaded nanoliposomes: development, biodistribution in rabbits, and pharmacodynamics in nude mice bearing orthotopic human lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yumeng; Liang, Jing; Zheng, Xiaoli; Pi, Chao; Liu, Hao; Yang, Hongru; Zou, Yonggen; Ye, Yun; Zhao, Ling

    2017-01-01

    The present study aims to develop a kind of novel nanoliposomes for the lung-targeting delivery system of baicalin as a Chinese medicine monomer. Baicalin-loaded nanoliposomes were prepared by the effervescent dispersion and lyophilized techniques. Baicalin-loaded nanoliposomes had an average particle size of 131.7±11.7 nm with 0.19±0.02 polydispersity index, 82.8%±1.24% entrapment efficiency and 90.47%±0.93% of yield and sustaining drug release effect over 24 h and were stable for 12 months at least. In vitro no hemolytic activity was observed for the experimental drug concentration. After intravenous administration of baicalin-loaded nanoliposomes to rabbits, drug concentration in the lungs was the highest among the tested organs at all time points and was significantly higher than that of its solution. For the targeting parameters, the relative intake rate and the ratio of peak concentration of lung were 4.837 and 2.789, respectively. Compared with plasma, liver, spleen, and kidney, the ratios of targeting efficacy (Te)liposomes to (Te)injection of lung were increased by a factor of 14.131, 1.893, 3.357, and 3.470, respectively. Furthermore, the results showed that the baicalin-loaded nanoliposomes did not induce lung injury. Importantly, baicalin-loaded nanoliposomes showed better antitumor therapeutic efficacy in the nude mice bearing orthotopic human lung cancer with the median survival time of blank liposomes (11.40±0.16 days), baicalin solution (17.30±0.47 days), and baicalin-loaded nanoliposomes (25.90±0.53 days). Therefore, the liposome is a promising drug carrier with an excellent lung-targeting property and therapeutic effect for the treatment of lung disease, such as lung cancer. PMID:28096670

  10. Internalized compartments encapsulated nanogels for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Ranson, Davis; Ye, Yanqi; Weng, Yuyan; Gu, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The resulting nanogels loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) displayed enhanced internalization efficiency to the source cells through a specific homotypic affinity in vitro. However, when treated with the non-source cells, the EM-NGs exhibited insignificant difference in therapeutic efficiency compared to a bare HA nanogel with DOX. This study illustrates the potential of utilizing an internalized compartments encapsulated formulation for targeted cancer therapy, and offers guidelines for developing a natural particulate-inspired drug delivery system.Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The

  11. Temperature-sensitive polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles as a potential drug delivery system for targeted therapy of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Koppolu, Bhanuprasanth; Bhavsar, Zarna; Wadajkar, Aniket S; Nattama, Sivaniarvindpriya; Rahimi, Maham; Nwariaku, Fiemu; Nguyen, Kytai T

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and investigate temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylamide-allylamine)-coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (TPMNPs) as possible targeted drug carriers for treatments of advanced thyroid cancer (ATC). These nanoparticles were prepared by free radical polymerization of monomers on the surface of silane-coupled iron oxide nanoparticles. In vitro studies demonstrated that TPMNPs were cytocompatible and effectively taken up by cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. An external magnetic field significantly increased nanoparticle uptake, especially when cells were exposed to physiological flow conditions. Drug loading and release studies using doxorubicin confirmed the temperature-responsive release of drugs from nanoparticles. In addition, doxorubicin-loaded nanoparticles significantly killed ATC cells when compared to free doxorubicin. The in vitro results indicate that TPMNPs have potential as targeted and controlled drug carriers for thyroid cancer treatment.

  12. Drug carrier interaction with blood: a critical aspect for high-efficient vascular-targeted drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Sobczynski, Daniel J; Fish, Margaret B; Fromen, Catherine A; Carasco-Teja, Mariana; Coleman, Rhima M; Eniola-Adefeso, Omolola

    2015-01-01

    Vascular wall endothelial cells control several physiological processes and are implicated in many diseases, making them an attractive candidate for drug targeting. Vascular-targeted drug carriers (VTCs) offer potential for reduced side effects and improved therapeutic efficacy, however, only limited therapeutic success has been achieved to date. This is perhaps due to complex interactions of VTCs with blood components, which dictate VTC transport and adhesion to endothelial cells. This review focuses on VTC interaction with blood as well as novel ‘bio-inspired’ designs to mimic and exploit features of blood in VTC development. Advanced approaches for enhancing VTCs are discussed along with applications in regenerative medicine, an area of massive potential growth and expansion of VTC utility in the near future. PMID:26272334

  13. SW43-DOX ± loading onto drug-eluting bead, a potential new targeted drug delivery platform for systemic and locoregional cancer treatment – An in vitro evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Johannes M.; Gai, Yongkang; Sun, Lingyi; Xiang, Guangya; Zeng, Dexing; Kim, Hyun S.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of unresectable primary cancer and their distant metastases, with the liver representing one of the most frequent location, is still plagued by insufficient treatment success and poor survival rates. The Sigma-2 receptor is preferentially expressed on many tumor cells making it an appealing target for therapy. Thus, we developed a potential targeted drug conjugate consisting of the Sigma-2 receptor ligand SW43 and Doxorubicin (SW43-DOX) for systemic cancer therapy and for locoregional treatment of primary and secondary liver malignancies when loaded onto drug-eluting bead (DEB) which was compared in vitro to the treatment with Doxorubicin alone. SW43-DOX binds specifically to the Sigma-2 receptor expressed on hepatocellular (Hep G2, Hep 3B), pancreatic (Panc-1) and colorectal (HT-29) carcinoma cell lines with high affinity and subsequent early specific internalization. Free SW43-DOX showed superior concentration and time depended cancer toxicity than treatment with Doxorubicin alone. Action mechanisms analysis revealed an apoptotic cell death with increased caspase 3/7 activation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Only ROS scavenging with α-Tocopherol, but not the caspase inhibition (Z-VAD-FMK), partly reverted the effect. SW43-DOX could successfully be loaded onto DEB and showed prolonged eluting kinetics compared to Doxorubicin. SW43-DOX loaded DEB vs. Doxorubicin loaded DEB showed a significantly greater time dependent toxicity in all cell lines. In conclusion, the novel conjugate SW43-DOX ± loading onto DEB is a promising drug delivery platform for targeted systemic and locoregional cancer therapy. PMID:27262893

  14. Radiation delivery system and method

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, Scott A.; Robison, Thomas W.; Taylor, Craig M. V.

    2002-01-01

    A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

  15. Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, Trudy M; Nikanjam, Mina

    2012-08-28

    The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

  16. In vivo single molecular imaging and sentinel node navigation by nanotechnology for molecular targeting drug-delivery systems and tailor-made medicine.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Motohiro; Tada, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Hideo; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Masaki; Sakurai, Yuu; Ishida, Takanori; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2008-01-01

    The recent advances in nanotechnology have a great potential to improve the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human diseases. Nanomaterials for medical applications are expected to grasp pharmacokinetics and the toxicity for application to medical treatment on the aspect of safety of the nanomaterials and nanodevices. We describe a generation of CdSe nanoparticles [quantum dots (QDs)] conjugated with monoclonal anti-HER2 antibody (Trastuzumab), for single molecular in vivo imaging of breast cancer cells. We established a high-resolution in vivo 3D microscopic system for a novel imaging method at the molecular level. The cancer cells expressing HER2 protein were visualized by the nanoparticles in vivo at subcellular resolution, suggesting future utilization of the system in medical applications to improve drug-delivery systems to target the primary and metastatic tumors for made-to-order treatment. We also describe sentinel node navigation using fluorescent nanoparticles for breast cancer surgery in experimental model, which have shown the potential to be an alternative to existing tracers in the detection of the sentinel node if we select the appropriate particle size and wavelength. Future innovation in cancer imaging by nanotechnology and novel measurement technology will provide great improvement, not only in the clinical field but also in basic medical science for the development of medicine.

  17. Fluid delivery control system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  18. Novel antisense therapeutics delivery systems: In vitro and in vivo studies of liposomes targeted with anti-CD20 antibody.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Justyna M; Toporkiewicz, Monika; Czogalla, Aleksander; Matusewicz, Lucyna; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2015-12-28

    Antisense gene therapy using molecules such as antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, siRNA or miRNA is a very promising strategy for the treatment of neoplastic diseases. It can be combined with other treatment strategies to enhance therapeutic effect. In acute leukemias, overexpression of the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 is observed in more than 70% of cases. Therefore, reduction of the Bcl-2 protein level could, in itself, prevent the development of cancer or could possibly help sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis inducers. The main objective of our work is to develop therapeutic liposome formulations characterized by high transfection efficiency, stability in the presence of serum, as well as specificity and toxicity for target (leukemic) cells. Each of our liposomal formulations consists of a core composed of antisense oligonucleotides complexed by either cationic lipid, DOTAP, or a synthetic polycation, polyethyleneimine, encapsulated within liposomes modified with polyethylenoglycol. In addition, the liposomal shells are enriched with covalently-bound antibodies recognizing a well characterized bio-marker, CD20, exposed on the surface of leukemia cells. The resulting immunoliposomes selectively and effectively reduced the expression of BCL2 in target cells. Model animal experiments carried out on mice-engrafted tumors expressing the specific marker showed high efficiency of the liposome formulations against specific tumor development. In conclusion, we show that lipid formulations based on a polyplex or lipoplex backbone additionally equipped with antibodies are promising non-viral vectors for specific oligonucleotide transfer into human tumor cells.

  19. Formulation development and evaluation of metronidazole magnetic nanosuspension as a magnetic-targeted and polymeric-controlled drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latha, Subbiah; Selvamani, Palanisamy; Kumar, Chelladurai Senthil; Sharavanan, Palaniappan; Suganya, Govindan; Beniwal, Vijender Singh; Rao, Poduri Rama

    2009-05-01

    A nanosuspension of magnetically tagged metronidazole was developed by the solvent displacement method coupled with ultrasonication and was evaluated for its physicochemical properties. The drug release from metronidazole magnetic nanosuspension at pH 1.2 and 7.0 shows maximum correlation coefficient for zero order and Higuchi model, respectively. The anthelmintic activity of the formulated metronidazole magnetic nanosuspension was evaluated on Indian earthworms (Pheretima poi). Metronidazole magnetic nanosuspension at a dose of 10 and 50 mg/ml shortened by 31% and 34%, respectively, the mean time to death of the earthworms when compared against a non-magnetic metronidazole suspension. Thus, the developed metronidazole magnetic nanosuspension showed potent, controlled and targeted drug action and might be a good therapeutic avenue in combating infectious GI disorders.

  20. Adenosine-Associated Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Annabi, Nasim; Tamayol, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi; Ghanem, Amyl; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring purine nucleoside in every cell. Many critical treatments such as modulating irregular heartbeat (arrhythmias), regulation of central nervous system (CNS) activity, and inhibiting seizural episodes can be carried out using adenosine. Despite the significant potential therapeutic impact of adenosine and its derivatives, the severe side effects caused by their systemic administration have significantly limited their clinical use. In addition, due to adenosine’s extremely short half-life in human blood (less than 10 s), there is an unmet need for sustained delivery systems to enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. In this paper, various adenosine delivery techniques, including encapsulation into biodegradable polymers, cell-based delivery, implantable biomaterials, and mechanical-based delivery systems, are critically reviewed and the existing challenges are highlighted. PMID:26453156

  1. Thermo-sensitive liposomes loaded with doxorubicin and lysine modified single-walled carbon nanotubes as tumor-targeting drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiali; Xie, Yingxia; Zhang, Yingjie; Huang, Heqing; Huang, Shengnan; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Zhi; Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2014-11-01

    This report focuses on the thermo-sensitive liposomes loaded with doxorubicin and lysine-modified single-walled carbon nanotube drug delivery system, which was designed to enhance the anti-tumor effect and reduce the side effects of doxorubicin. Doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes was prepared by reverse-phase evaporation method, the mean particle size was 232.0 ± 5.6 nm, and drug entrapment efficiency was 86.5 ± 3.7%. The drug release test showed that doxorubicin released more quickly at 42℃ than at 37℃. Compared with free doxorubicin, doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes could efficiently cross the cell membranes and afford higher anti-tumor efficacy on the human hepatic carcinoma cell line (SMMC-7721) cells in vitro. For in vivo experiments, the relative tumor volumes of the sarcomaia 180-bearing mice in thermo-sensitive liposomes group and doxorubicin group were significantly smaller than those of N.S. group. Meanwhile, the combination of near-infrared laser irradiation at 808 nm significantly enhanced the tumor growth inhibition both on SMMC-7721 cells and the sarcomaia 180-bearing mice. The quality of life such as body weight, mental state, food and water intake of sarcomaia 180 tumor-bearing mice treated with doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes were much higher than those treated with doxorubicin. In conclusion, doxorubicin-lysine/single-walled carbon nanotube-thermo-sensitive liposomes combined with near-infrared laser irradiation at 808 nm may potentially provide viable clinical strategies for targeting delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

  2. Intelligent, self-powered, drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Patra, Debabrata; Sengupta, Samudra; Duan, Wentao; Zhang, Hua; Pavlick, Ryan; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-02-21

    Self-propelled nano/micromotors and pumps are considered to be next generation drug delivery systems since the carriers can either propel themselves ("motor"-based drug delivery) or be delivered ("pump"-based drug delivery) to the target in response to specific biomarkers. Recently, there has been significant advancement towards developing nano/microtransporters into proof-of-concept tools for biomedical applications. This review encompasses the progress made to date on the design of synthetic nano/micromotors and pumps with respect to transportation and delivery of cargo at specific locations. Looking ahead, it is possible to imagine a day when intelligent machines navigate through the human body and perform challenging tasks.

  3. Modular Nanotransporters for Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Drugs: Folate Receptors as Potential Targets

    PubMed Central

    Slastnikova, Tatiana A.; Rosenkranz, Andrey A.; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Sobolev, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    The review is devoted to a subcellular drug delivery system, modular nanotransporters (MNT) that can penetrate into target cells and deliver a therapeutic into their subcellular compartments, particularly into the nucleus. The therapeutics which need such type of delivery belong to two groups: (i) those that exert their effect only when delivered into a certain cell compartment (like DNA delivered into the nucleus); and (ii) those drugs that are capable of exerting their effect in different parts of the cells, however there can be found a cell compartment that is the most sensitive to their effect. A particular interest attract such cytotoxic agents as Auger electron emitters which are known to be ineffective outside the cell nucleus, whereas they possess high cytotoxicity in the vicinity of nuclear DNA through the induction of non-reparable double-strand DNA breaks. The review discusses main approaches permitting to choose internalizable receptors permitting both recognition of target cells and penetration into them. Special interest attract folate receptors which become accessible to blood circulating therapeutics after malignant transformation or on activated macrophages which makes them an attractive target for both several oncological and inflammatory diseases, like atherosclerosis. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that MNT is a promising platform for targeted delivery of different therapeutics into the nuclei of target cells. PMID:25312738

  4. Targeted delivery of magnetic aerosol droplets to the lung.

    PubMed

    Dames, Petra; Gleich, Bernhard; Flemmer, Andreas; Hajek, Kerstin; Seidl, Nicole; Wiekhorst, Frank; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Bittmann, Iris; Bergemann, Christian; Weyh, Thomas; Trahms, Lutz; Rosenecker, Joseph; Rudolph, Carsten

    2007-08-01

    The inhalation of medical aerosols is widely used for the treatment of lung disorders such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, respiratory infection and, more recently, lung cancer. Targeted aerosol delivery to the affected lung tissue may improve therapeutic efficiency and minimize unwanted side effects. Despite enormous progress in optimizing aerosol delivery to the lung, targeted aerosol delivery to specific lung regions other than the airways or the lung periphery has not been adequately achieved to date. Here, we show theoretically by computer-aided simulation, and for the first time experimentally in mice, that targeted aerosol delivery to the lung can be achieved with aerosol droplets comprising superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles--so-called nanomagnetosols--in combination with a target-directed magnetic gradient field. We suggest that nanomagnetosols may be useful for treating localized lung disease, by targeting foci of bacterial infection or tumour nodules.

  5. Dendrimeric micelles for controlled drug release and targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ambade, Ashootosh V.; Savariar, Elamprakash N.; Thayumanavan, S.

    2008-01-01

    This review highlights the developments in dendrimer-based micelles for drug delivery. Dendrimers, the perfectly branched monodisperse macromolecules, have certain structural advantages that make them attractive candidates as drug carriers for controlled release or targeted delivery. As polymeric micelle-based approaches precede the work in dendrimers, these are also discussed briefly. The review concludes with a perspective on possible applications of biaryl-based dendrimeric micelles that exhibit environment-dependent conformations, in drug delivery. PMID:16053329

  6. Novel central nervous system drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Jocelyn; Abdi, Nabiha; Lu, Xiaofan; Maheshwari, Oshin; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2014-05-01

    For decades, biomedical and pharmaceutical researchers have worked to devise new and more effective therapeutics to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system. The blood-brain barrier effectively protects the brain, but poses a profound challenge to drug delivery across this barrier. Many traditional drugs cannot cross the blood-brain barrier in appreciable concentrations, with less than 1% of most drugs reaching the central nervous system, leading to a lack of available treatments for many central nervous system diseases, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain tumors. Due to the ineffective nature of most treatments for central nervous system disorders, the development of novel drug delivery systems is an area of great interest and active research. Multiple novel strategies show promise for effective central nervous system drug delivery, giving potential for more effective and safer therapies in the future. This review outlines several novel drug delivery techniques, including intranasal drug delivery, nanoparticles, drug modifications, convection-enhanced infusion, and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. It also assesses possible clinical applications, limitations, and examples of current clinical and preclinical research for each of these drug delivery approaches. Improved central nervous system drug delivery is extremely important and will allow for improved treatment of central nervous system diseases, causing improved therapies for those who are affected by central nervous system diseases.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of airway targeted PLGA nanoparticles for drug delivery in obstructive lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Vij, Neeraj

    2012-01-01

    Chronic airway inflammation is a hallmark of chronic obstructive airway diseases, including asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), and CF (cystic fibrosis). It is also a major challenge in delivery and therapeutic efficacy of nano-based delivery systems in these chronic airway conditions as nanoparticle (NP) need to bypass airways defense mechanisms as we recently discussed. NPs which are capable of overcoming airways defense mechanisms should allow targeted drug delivery to disease cells. Over the last decade there has been increasing interest in development of targeted NPs for cancer but relatively little effort on designing novel systems for treating chronic inflammatory and obstructive airway conditions. Here we describe methods for preparing drug loaded multifunctional nanoparticles for targeted delivery to specific cell types in airways. The formulations and methods for selective drug delivery, discussed here are currently under preclinical development in our laboratory for treating chronic airway conditions such as COPD, CF, and asthma.

  8. Delivery System, 2003-2004.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Federal Student Aid (ED), Washington, DC.

    This workshop guide for financial aid administrators provides training in the federal student financial aid delivery system. An introduction enables the participant to share some information about his or her responsibilities and to reflect on the relevance of the training to the job. Session 1, "Application Systems," identifies methods of applying…

  9. 5-ASA-loaded SiO2 nanoparticles-a novel drug delivery system targeting therapy on ulcerative colitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haiying; Xiang, Dan; Wang, Feng; Mao, Jingwei; Tan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yingde

    2017-01-01

    The targeting of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), a first-line therapeutic agent for mild to moderate active ulcerative colitis (UC), to the site of inflammation has remained a challenge and an unmet requirement in the treatment of UC. However, nanoscale carriers for targeted drug delivery are promising for pharmacotherapy, and nanoparticles improve the pharmacokinetics of the loaded therapeutics based on their physical properties. To design and prepare 5-ASA-loaded silicon dioxide nanoparticles (5-ASA-SiO2 NPs), a micro-emulsion method was conducted, and their respective therapeutic effects were validated in a mouse model of UC. Cytotoxicity of 5-ASA-SiO2 NPs was detected in vitro using the Cell Counting Kit-8 method. The therapeutic effect of 5-ASA-SiO2 NPs was assessed based on their disease activity index (DAI), colon histopathology, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). SiO2 NPs were successfully prepared, and cytotoxicity of 5-ASA-SiO2 NPs was identified as being similar to 5-ASA and SiO2 NPs. DAI and colonic histopathology scores in the normal dosage, high dosage and the 5-ASA-SiO2 NP groups demonstrated a significant improvement when compared with the model group. DAI in the high dosage and 5-ASA-SiO2 NP groups also demonstrated a significant improvement when compared with the normal dosage group. However, MPO, serum IL-6 and TNF-α levels in normal dosage, high dosage and 5-ASA-SiO2 NPs groups were significantly lower than in the model group, and these indexes in the high dosage group and 5-ASA-SiO2 NP group were significantly lower than that in the normal dosage group. Expression of IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA in colonic mucosa in the normal dosage, high dosage and 5-ASA-SiO2 NP group was significantly lower than that in the model group. Colonic mucosal IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression in the high dosage and 5-ASA-SiO2 NP groups was significantly lower than that in the normal dosage group (P<0.05). In

  10. Nanostructured lipid carriers and their current application in targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Piyush; Gidwani, Bina; Vyas, Amber

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades, various drug-delivery technologies have emerged and a fascinating part of this has been the development of nanoscale drug delivery devices. Nanoparticles (NPs) and other colloidal drug-delivery systems modify the kinetics, drug distribution in the body and release profile of an associated drug. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) have been reported to be an alternative system to emulsions, liposomes, microparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and their polymeric counterparts due to their numerous advantages. This paper basically reviews the types of NLCs, mechanism of skin penetration, stability related issues along with their production techniques, characterisation and applications towards targeted drug delivery.

  11. Biomimetics in drug delivery systems: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Sheikhpour, Mojgan; Barani, Leila; Kasaeian, Alibakhsh

    2017-03-18

    Today, the advanced drug delivery systems have been focused on targeted drug delivery fields. The novel drug delivery is involved with the improvement of the capacity of drug loading in drug carriers, cellular uptake of drug carriers, and the sustained release of drugs within target cells. In this review, six groups of therapeutic drug carriers including biomimetic hydrogels, biomimetic micelles, biomimetic liposomes, biomimetic dendrimers, biomimetic polymeric carriers and biomimetic nanostructures, are studied. The subject takes advantage of the biomimetic methods of productions or the biomimetic techniques for the surface modifications, similar to what accrues in natural cells. Moreover, the effects of these biomimetic approaches for promoting the drug efficiency in targeted drug delivery are visible. The study demonstrates that the fabrication of biomimetic nanocomposite drug carriers could noticeably promote the efficiency of drugs in targeted drug delivery systems.

  12. Recent advancements in erythrocytes, platelets, and albumin as delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peipei; Wang, Ruju; Wang, Xiaohui; Ouyang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems have been applied to enhance the efficacy of therapeutics and to alleviate negative effects through the controlled delivery of targeting and releasing agents. However, few drug carriers can achieve high targeting efficacy, even when targeting modalities and surface markers are introduced. Immunological problems have also limited their wide applications. Biological drug delivery systems, such as erythrocytes, platelets, and albumin, have been extensively investigated because of their unique properties. In this review, erythrocytes, platelets, and albumin are described as efficient drug delivery systems. Their properties, applications, advantages, and limitations in disease treatment are explained. This review confirms that these systems can be used to facilitate a specific, biocompatible, and smart drug delivery. PMID:27274282

  13. Systemic co-delivery of doxorubicin and siRNA using nanoparticles conjugated with EGFR-specific targeting peptide to enhance chemotherapy in ovarian tumor bearing mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C. W.; Lin, W. J.

    2013-10-01

    This aim of this study was to develop peptide-conjugated nanoparticles (NPs) for systemic co-delivery of siRNA and doxorubicin to enhance chemotherapy in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) high-expressed ovarian tumor bearing mice. The active targeting NPs were prepared using heptapeptide-conjugated poly( d, l-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-poly(ethylene glycol). The particle sizes of peptide-free and peptide-conjugated NPs were 159.3 ± 32.5 and 184.0 ± 52.9 nm, respectively, with zeta potential -21.3 ± 3.8 and -15.3 ± 2.8 mV. The peptide-conjugated NPs uptake were more efficient in EGFR high-expressed SKOV3 cells than in EGFR low-expressed HepG2 cells due to heptapeptide specificity. The NPs were used to deliver small molecule anticancer drug (e.g., doxorubicin) and large molecule genetic agent (e.g., siRNA). The IC50 of doxorubicin-loaded peptide-conjugated NPs (0.09 ± 0.06 μM) was significantly lower than peptide-free NPs (5.72 ± 2.64 μM). The similar result was observed in siRNA-loaded NPs. The peptide-conjugated NPs not only served as a nanocarrier to efficiently deliver doxorubicin and siRNA to EGFR high-expressed ovarian cancer cells but also increased the intracellular accumulation of the therapeutic agents to induce assured anti-tumor growth effect in vivo.

  14. Liposomal drug delivery systems--clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Parveen; Goyal, Kumud; Vijaya Kumar, Sengodan Gurusamy; Singh, Ajit; Katare, Om Prakash; Mishra, Dina Nath

    2005-03-01

    Liposomes have been widely investigated since 1970 as drug carriers for improving the delivery of therapeutic agents to specific sites in the body. As a result, numerous improvements have been made, thus making this technology potentially useful for the treatment of certain diseases in the clinics. The success of liposomes as drug carriers has been reflected in a number of liposome-based formulations, which are commercially available or are currently undergoing clinical trials. The current pharmaceutical preparations of liposome-based therapeutic systems mainly result from our understanding of lipid-drug interactions and liposome disposition mechanisms. The insight gained from clinical use of liposome drug delivery systems can now be integrated to design liposomes that can be targeted on tissues, cells or intracellular compartments with or without expression of target recognition molecules on liposome membranes. This review is mainly focused on the diseases that have attracted most attention with respect to liposomal drug delivery and have therefore yielded most progress, namely cancer, antibacterial and antifungal disorders. In addition, increased gene transfer efficiencies could be obtained by appropriate selection of the gene transfer vector and mode of delivery.

  15. Drug delivery system and breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colone, Marisa; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Calcabrini, Annarica; Tortora, Mariarosaria; Cavalieri, Francesca; Stringaro, Annarita

    2016-06-01

    Recently, nanomedicine has received increasing attention for its ability to improve the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. Nanosized polymer therapeutic agents offer the advantage of prolonged circulation in the blood stream, targeting to specific sites, improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this way, local, controlled delivery of the drug will be achieved with the advantage of a high concentration of drug release at the target site while keeping the systemic concentration of the drug low, thus reducing side effects due to bioaccumulation. Various drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles and implants have been demonstrated to significantly enhance the preventive/therapeutic efficacy of many drugs by increasing their bioavailability and targetability. As these carriers significantly increase the therapeutic effect of drugs, their administration would become less cost effective in the near future. The purpose of our research work is to develop a delivery system for breast cancer cells using a microvector of drugs. These results highlight the potential uses of these responsive platforms suited for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version was published on 12 July 2016. The manuscript was prepared and submitted without Dr. Francesca Cavalieri's contribution and her name was added without her consent. Her name has been removed in the updated and re-published article.

  16. Software Build and Delivery Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, Robert W.

    2016-07-10

    This presentation deals with the hierarchy of software build and delivery systems. One of the goals is to maximize the success rate of new users and developers when first trying your software. First impressions are important. Early successes are important. This also reduces critical documentation costs. This is a presentation focused on computer science and goes into detail about code documentation.

  17. Deep Space Systems Technology Program Future Deliveries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvo, Christopher G.; Keuneke, Matthew S.

    2000-01-01

    NASA is in a period of frequent launches of low cost deep space missions with challenging performance needs. The modest budgets of these missions make it impossible for each to develop its own technology, therefore, efficient and effective development and insertion of technology for these missions must be approached at a higher level than has been done in the past. The Deep Space Systems Technology Program (DSST), often referred to as X2000, has been formed to address this need. The program is divided into a series of "Deliveries" that develop and demonstrate a set of spacecraft system capabilities with broad applicability for use by multiple missions. The First Delivery Project, to be completed in 2001, will provide a one MRAD-tolerant flight computer, power switching electronics, efficient radioisotope power source, and a transponder with services at 8.4 GHz and 32 GHz bands. Plans call for a Second Delivery in late 2003 to enable complete deep space systems in the 10 to 50 kg class, and a Third Delivery built around Systems on a Chip (extreme levels of electronic and microsystems integration) around 2006. Formulation of Future Deliveries (past the First Delivery) is ongoing and includes plans for such developments as highly miniaturized digital/analog/power electronics, optical communications, multifunctional structures, miniature lightweight propulsion, advanced thermal control techniques, highly efficient radioisotope power sources, and a unified flight ground software architecture to support the needs of future highly intelligent space systems. All developments are targeted at broad applicability and reuse, and will be commercialized within the US.

  18. Targeted drug delivery and enhanced intracellular release using functionalized liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Ashish

    The ability to target cancer cells using an appropriate drug delivery system can significantly reduce the associated side effects from cancer therapies and can help in improving the overall quality of life, post cancer survival. Integrin alpha5beta1 is expressed on several types of cancer cells, including colon cancer and plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis. Thus, the ability to target the integrin alpha 5beta1 using an appropriate drug delivery nano-vector can significantly help in inhibiting tumor growth and reducing tumor metastasis. The work in this thesis focuses on designing and optimizing, functionalized stealth liposomes (liposomes covered with polyethylene glycol (PEG)) that specifically target the integrin alpha5beta1. The PEG provides a steric barrier allowing the liposomes to circulate in the blood for longer duration and the functionalizing moiety, PR_b peptide specifically recognizes and binds to integrin alpha5beta1 expressing cells. The work demonstrates that by optimizing the amount of PEG and PR_b on the liposomal interface, nano-vectors can be engineered that bind to CT26.WT colon cancer cells in a specific manner and internalize through alpha 5beta1-mediated endocytosis. To further improve the efficacy of the system, PR_b functionalized pH-sensitive stealth liposomes that exhibit triggered release under mild acidic conditions present in endocytotic vesicles were designed. The study showed that PR_b functionalized pH-sensitive stealth liposomes, undergo destabilization under mildly acidic conditions and incorporation of the PR_b peptide does not significantly affect the pH-sensitivity of the liposomes. PR_b functionalized pH-sensitive stealth liposomes bind to CT26.WT colon carcinoma cells that express integrin alpha5beta 1, undergo cellular internalization, and release their load intracellularly in a short period of time as compared to other formulations. PR_b-targeted pH-sensitive stealth liposomes encapsulating 5

  19. Molecularly imprinted polymeric micro- and nano-particles for the targeted delivery of active molecules.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imprinting (MI) represents a strategy to introduce a 'molecular memory' in a polymeric system obtaining materials with specific recognition properties. MI particles can be used as drug delivery systems providing a targeted release and thus reducing the side effects. The introduction of molecular recognition properties on a polymeric drug carrier represents a challenge in the development of targeted delivery systems to increase their efficiency. This review will summarize the limited number of drug delivery MI particles described in the literature along with an overview of potential solutions for a larger exploitation of MI particles as targeted drug delivery carriers. Molecularly imprinted drug carriers can be considered interesting candidates to significantly improve the efficiency of a controlled drug treatment.

  20. Advanced drug delivery and targeting technologies for the ocular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Fathi, Marziyeh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ocular targeted therapy has enormously been advanced by implementation of new methods of drug delivery and targeting using implantable drug delivery systems (DDSs) or devices (DDDs), stimuli-responsive advanced biomaterials, multimodal nanomedicines, cell therapy modalities and medical bioMEMs. These technologies tackle several ocular diseases such as inflammation-based diseases (e.g., scleritis, keratitis, uveitis, iritis, conjunctivitis, chorioretinitis, choroiditis, retinitis, retinochoroiditis), ocular hypertension and neuropathy, age-related macular degeneration and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Such therapies appear to provide ultimate treatments, even though much more effective, yet biocompatible, noninvasive therapies are needed to control some disabling ocular diseases/disorders. Methods: In the current study, we have reviewed and discussed recent advancements on ocular targeted therapies. Results: On the ground that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses of ophthalmic drugs need special techniques, most of ocular DDSs/devices developments have been designed to localized therapy within the eye. Application of advanced DDSs such as Subconjunctival insert/implants (e.g., latanoprost implant, Gamunex-C), episcleral implant (e.g., LX201), cationic emulsions (e.g., Cationorm™, Vekacia™, Cyclokat™), intac/punctal plug DDSs (latanoprost punctal plug delivery system, L-PPDS), and intravitreal implants (I-vitaion™, NT-501, NT- 503, MicroPump, Thethadur, IB-20089 Verisome™, Cortiject, DE-102, Retisert™, Iluvein™ and Ozurdex™) have significantly improved the treatment of ocular diseases. However, most of these DDSs/devices are applied invasively and even need surgical procedures. Of these, use of de novo technologies such as advanced stimuli-responsive nanomaterials, multimodal nanosystems (NSs)/nanoconjugates (NCs), biomacromolecualr scaffolds, and bioengineered cell therapies

  1. Optimizing Consulting Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spottswood, Curran

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes a study of several types of consulting groups in the Bell System and describes characteristics which are associated with high-impact consulting. A strategy which is designed for internal consulting organizations to maximize the likelihood of both initial success and long-term survival of the group is proposed. (Author/MER)

  2. Chitosan Microspheres in Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Analava; Dey, Baishakhi

    2011-01-01

    The main aim in the drug therapy of any disease is to attain the desired therapeutic concentration of the drug in plasma or at the site of action and maintain it for the entire duration of treatment. A drug on being used in conventional dosage forms leads to unavoidable fluctuations in the drug concentration leading to under medication or overmedication and increased frequency of dose administration as well as poor patient compliance. To minimize drug degradation and loss, to prevent harmful side effects and to increase drug bioavailability various drug delivery and drug targeting systems are currently under development. Handling the treatment of severe disease conditions has necessitated the development of innovative ideas to modify drug delivery techniques. Drug targeting means delivery of the drug-loaded system to the site of interest. Drug carrier systems include polymers, micelles, microcapsules, liposomes and lipoproteins to name some. Different polymer carriers exert different effects on drug delivery. Synthetic polymers are usually non-biocompatible, non-biodegradable and expensive. Natural polymers such as chitin and chitosan are devoid of such problems. Chitosan comes from the deacetylation of chitin, a natural biopolymer originating from crustacean shells. Chitosan is a biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic natural polymer with excellent film-forming ability. Being of cationic character, chitosan is able to react with polyanions giving rise to polyelectrolyte complexes. Hence chitosan has become a promising natural polymer for the preparation of microspheres/nanospheres and microcapsules. The techniques employed to microencapsulate with chitosan include ionotropic gelation, spray drying, emulsion phase separation, simple and complex coacervation. This review focuses on the preparation, characterization of chitosan microspheres and their role in novel drug delivery systems. PMID:22707817

  3. Sterile Product Packaging and Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Akers, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Both conventional and more advanced product container and delivery systems are the focus of this brief article. Six different product container systems will be discussed, plus advances in primary packaging for special delivery systems and needle technology.

  4. Application of proteins in burst delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, E.; Weiland, L. M.; Meng, W. S.

    2010-09-01

    Biological proteins embedded in either a biological or an engineered membrane will actively maintain electrochemical balance across that membrane. In this study two applications will be examined. First a system of governing equations will be calibrated for a biological endosome. The endocytosis predictions presented then serve to validate the model. In addition, these predictions introduce new insights into endosome burst, which is of interest for advancing DNA vaccine delivery. The calibrated model is subsequently adapted to an analogous engineering scenario for targeted payload delivery. In the presence of a specific external stimulus, burst release of an arbitrary payload encased in a vesicle akin to an endosome is explored. Control of the process through manipulation of vesicle size, stimulus, and transporters is presented. A case is made for application of proteins as building blocks in the design of targeted response materials.

  5. Insulin Delivery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    When Programmable Implantable Medication System (PIMS) is implanted in human body, it delivers precise programmed amounts of insulin over long periods of time. Mini-Med Technologies has been refining the Technologies since initial development at APL. The size of a hockey puck, and encased in titanium shell, PIMS holds about 2 1/2 teaspoons of insulin at a programmed basal rate. If a change in measured blood sugar level dictates a different dose, the patient can vary the amount of insulin delivered by holding a small radio transceiver over the implanted system and dialing in a specific program held in the PIMS computer memory. Insulin refills are accomplished approximately 4 times a year by hypodermic needle.

  6. Preparation, characterization and in vitro release of Zein-pectin capsules for target delivery.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai-Wa; Dong, Fangyuan; Wong, Ka-Hing; Wang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery has been the interest of many researchers to improve drug efficiency and reduce side effects. Because of the potential toxicity and contamination problems of the current gelatin capsules, plant derived materials are selected for the developments of capsules for drug delivery systems. The objective of this work is to develop a target drug delivery system using zein and pectin. Different ratios of zein and pectin were used to achieve target delivery in stomach and small intestine. Zein-pectin capsule for colon-specific delivery was also developed. In vitro performance of zeinpectin capsules was examined and their structural morphology was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical interactions between zein and pectin were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy equipped with attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR). Zein and pectin formed complex by hydrogen bonding. The swelling behavior of pectin was suppressed by zein in the zein-pectin interacted complex. By adjusting the ratio of zein to pectin, the drug release from the capsule in simulated gastric solution for 2 hours can be controlled in the range of 0% to 38%. Zein-pectin capsule for colon-specific delivery had no release in gastric and intestinal solutions while gradual release from zein-pectin capsule was observed in colonic solution, finally reaching about 80% release. Zein-pectin capsule has a potential in developing targeted drug delivery system.

  7. [Targeted Delivery of Quantum Dots to HER2-Expressing Tumor Using Recombinant Antibodies].

    PubMed

    Balalaeva, I V; Zdobnova, T A; Sokolova, E A; Deyev, S M

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of semiconductor quantum dots (Q Ds) to tumors overexpressing HER2 cancer marker has been. demonstrated on immunocompromised mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts. To obtain targeted QDs complexes we applied the approach based on the use of protein adaptor system, RNAase barnase and its inhibitor barstar. Specific binding to target cancer marker was achieved through bivalent fusion protein containing two fragments of4D5scFv recombinant antibody and a fragment of barnase. QDs were conjugated to barstar, and final assembly of targeted complexes was obtained through non-covalent specific interaction of barstar, attached to QD, and barnase, that is part of the recombinant targeting protein. The efficient delivery of QDs to HER2-expressing tumor demonstrates the possibilities and prospects of the approach for targeted delivery of nanoparticles to cancer cells in vivo as the way to improve the efficiency of diagnosis and promote development of therapies based on the use of nanoparticles.

  8. Cell-Mediated Delivery of Nanoparticles: Taking Advantage of Circulatory Cells to Target Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Anselmo, Aaron C.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Cellular hitchhiking leverages the use of circulatory cells to enhance the biological outcome of nanoparticle drug delivery systems, which often suffer from poor circulation time and limited targeting. Cellular hitchhiking utilizes the natural abilities of circulatory cells to: (i) navigate the vasculature while avoiding immune system clearance, (ii) remain relatively inert until needed and (iii) perform specific functions, including nutrient delivery to tissues, clearance of pathogens, and immune system surveillance. A variety of synthetic nanoparticles attempt to mimic these functional attributes of circulatory cells for drug delivery purposes. By combining the advantages of circulatory cells and synthetic nanoparticles, many advanced drug delivery systems have been developed that adopt the concept of cellular hitchhiking. Here, we review the development and specific applications of cellular hitchhiking-based drug delivery systems. PMID:24747161

  9. Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Based Delivery Systems for Biotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Hyejung; Zhang, Miqin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION)-based carrier systems have many advantages over other nanoparticle-based systems. They are biocompatible, biodegradable, facilely tunable, and superparamagnetic and thus controllable by an external magnetic field. These attributes enable their broad biomedical applications. In particular, magnetically-driven carriers are drawing considerable interest as an emerging therapeutic delivery system because of their superior delivery efficiency. Area covered This article reviews the recent advances in use of SPION-based carrier systems to improve the delivery efficiency and target specificity of biotherapeutics. We examine various formulations of SPION-based delivery systems, including SPION micelles, clusters, hydrogels, liposomes, and micro/nanospheres, as well as their specific applications in delivery of biotherapeutics. Expert opinion Recently, biotherapeutics including therapeutic cells, proteins and genes have been studied as alternative treatments to various diseases. Despite the advantages of high target specificity and low adverse effects, clinical translation of biotherapeutics has been hindered by the poor stability and low delivery efficiency compared to chemical drugs. Accordingly, biotherapeutic delivery systems that can overcome these limitations are actively pursued. SPION-based materials can be ideal candidates for developing such delivery systems because of their excellent biocompatibility and superparamagnetism that enables long-term accumulation/retention at target sites by utilization of a suitable magnet. In addition, synthesis technologies for production of finely-tuned, homogeneous SPIONs have been well developed, which may promise their rapid clinical translation. PMID:23199200

  10. Mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Acartürk, Füsun

    2009-11-01

    Vaginal delivery is an important route of drug administration for both local and systemic diseases. The vaginal route has some advantages due to its large surface area, rich blood supply, avoidance of the first-pass effect, relatively high permeability to many drugs and self-insertion. The traditional commercial preparations, such as creams, foams, gels, irrigations and tablets, are known to reside in the vaginal cavity for a relatively short period of time owing to the self-cleaning action of the vaginal tract, and often require multiple daily doses to ensure the desired therapeutic effect. The vaginal route appears to be highly appropriate for bioadhesive drug delivery systems in order to retain drugs for treating largely local conditions, or for use in contraception. In particular, protection against sexually-transmitted diseases is critical. To prolong the residence time in the vaginal cavity, bioadhesive therapeutic systems have been developed in the form of semi-solid and solid dosage forms. The most commonly used mucoadhesive polymers that are capable of forming hydrogels are synthetic polyacrylates, polycarbophil, chitosan, cellulose derivatives (hydroxyethycellulose, hydroxy-propylcellulose and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose), hyaluronic acid derivatives, pectin, tragacanth, carrageenan and sodium alginate. The present article is a comprehensive review of the patents related to mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems.

  11. Chitosan magnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Assa, Farnaz; Jafarizadeh-Malmiri, Hoda; Ajamein, Hossein; Vaghari, Hamideh; Anarjan, Navideh; Ahmadi, Omid; Berenjian, Aydin

    2016-06-01

    The potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in drug delivery systems (DDSs) is mainly related to its magnetic core and surface coating. These coatings can eliminate or minimize their aggregation under physiological conditions. Also, they can provide functional groups for bioconjugation to anticancer drugs and/or targeted ligands. Chitosan, as a derivative of chitin, is an attractive natural biopolymer from renewable resources with the presence of reactive amino and hydroxyl functional groups in its structure. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs), due to their huge surface to volume ratio as compared to the chitosan in its bulk form, have outstanding physico-chemical, antimicrobial and biological properties. These unique properties make chitosan NPs a promising biopolymer for the application of DDSs. In this review, the current state and challenges for the application magnetic chitosan NPs in drug delivery systems were investigated. The present review also revisits the limitations and commercial impediments to provide insight for future works.

  12. Biomaterials for Nanoparticle Vaccine Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sahdev, Preety; Ochyl, Lukasz J.; Moon, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Subunit vaccination benefits from improved safety over attenuated or inactivated vaccines, but their limited capability to elicit long-lasting, concerted cellular and humoral immune responses is a major challenge. Recent studies have demonstrated that antigen delivery via nanoparticle formulations significantly improve immunogenicity of vaccines due to either intrinsic immunostimulatory properties of the materials or by co-entrapment of molecular adjuvants such as Toll-like receptor agonists. These studies have collectively shown that nanoparticles designed to mimic biophysical and biochemical cues of pathogens offer new exciting opportunities to enhance activation of innate immunity and elicit potent cellular and humoral immunity with minimal cytotoxicity. In this review, we present key research advances that were made within the last 5 years in the field of nanoparticle vaccine delivery systems. In particular, we focus on the impact of biomaterials composition, size, and surface charge of nanoparticles on modulation of particle biodistribution, delivery of antigens and immunostimulatory molecules, trafficking and targeting of antigen presenting cells, and overall immune responses in systemic and mucosal tissues. This review describes recent progresses in the design of nanoparticle vaccine delivery carriers, including liposomes, lipid-based particles, micelles and nanostructures composed of natural or synthetic polymers, and lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles. PMID:24848341

  13. Targeted delivery of doxorubicin by nano-loaded mesenchymal stem cells for lung melanoma metastases therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuekui; Tang, Shanshan; Guo, Jiamin; Alahdal, Murad; Cao, Shunxiu; Yang, Zhaocong; Zhang, Fangfang; Shen, Yumeng; Sun, Minjie; Mo, Ran; Zong, Li; Jin, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Poor antigenic presentation of tumor tissues and a lack of specific targets currently limit the success of nanoparticle delivery system. Cellular carrier technique has been recently explored extensively as a substitutive or supplement for traditional targeting delivery system. Here, we demonstrate the usage of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) loaded with doxorubicin containing polymer nanoparticles in pulmonary melanoma metastases therapy, as a modified technique of targeted delivery system. The characterizations of prepared nanoparticles and MSCs sensitivity to DOX and PLGA-DOX were measured. In vitro tumor tropism, and in vivo distributions of nanoparticles loaded MSCs were also investigated. The findings have demonstrated that, the modified system not only integrates the controlled-release property of nanoparticles but also exhibits tumor tropism and penetrative characteristics of MSCs. Furthermore, the in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor study has demonstrated that drug loaded MSCs had potent efficacy in lung melanoma metastases treatment. PMID:28303966

  14. Targeted delivery of doxorubicin by nano-loaded mesenchymal stem cells for lung melanoma metastases therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuekui; Tang, Shanshan; Guo, Jiamin; Alahdal, Murad; Cao, Shunxiu; Yang, Zhaocong; Zhang, Fangfang; Shen, Yumeng; Sun, Minjie; Mo, Ran; Zong, Li; Jin, Liang

    2017-03-17

    Poor antigenic presentation of tumor tissues and a lack of specific targets currently limit the success of nanoparticle delivery system. Cellular carrier technique has been recently explored extensively as a substitutive or supplement for traditional targeting delivery system. Here, we demonstrate the usage of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) loaded with doxorubicin containing polymer nanoparticles in pulmonary melanoma metastases therapy, as a modified technique of targeted delivery system. The characterizations of prepared nanoparticles and MSCs sensitivity to DOX and PLGA-DOX were measured. In vitro tumor tropism, and in vivo distributions of nanoparticles loaded MSCs were also investigated. The findings have demonstrated that, the modified system not only integrates the controlled-release property of nanoparticles but also exhibits tumor tropism and penetrative characteristics of MSCs. Furthermore, the in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor study has demonstrated that drug loaded MSCs had potent efficacy in lung melanoma metastases treatment.

  15. Synthesis of folate-functionalized RAFT polymers for targeted siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Danielle S W; Srinivasan, Selvi; Shubin, Andrew D; Stayton, Patrick S

    2011-07-11

    Receptor-mediated, cell-specific delivery of siRNA enables silencing of target genes in specific tissues, opening the door to powerful therapeutic options for a multitude of diseases. However, the development of delivery systems capable of targeted and effective siRNA delivery typically requires multiple steps and the use of sophisticated, orthogonal chemistries. Previously, we developed diblock copolymers consisting of dimethaminoethyl methacrylate-b-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate-co-butyl methacrylate-co-propylacrylic acid as potent siRNA delivery systems that protect siRNA from enzymatic degradation and enable its cytosolic delivery through pH-responsive, endosomolytic behavior. (1, 2) These architectures were polymerized using a living radical polymerization method, specifically reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, which employs a chain transfer agent (CTA) to modulate the rate of reaction, resulting in polymers with low polydispersity and telechelic chain ends reflecting the chemistry of the CTA. Here we describe the straightforward, facile synthesis of a folate receptor-targeted diblock copolymer siRNA delivery system because the folate receptor is an attractive target for tumor-selective therapies as a result of its overexpression in a number of cancers. Specifically, we detail the de novo synthesis of a folate-functionalized CTA, use the folate-CTA for controlled polymerizations of diblock copolymers, and demonstrate efficient, specific cellular folate receptor interaction and in vitro gene knockdown using the folate-functionalized polymer.

  16. Delivery of Therapeutic RNAs Into Target Cells IN VIVO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Mei Ying; Hagen, Thilo

    2014-02-01

    RNA-based therapy is one of the most promising approaches to treat human diseases. Specifically, the use of short interfering RNA (siRNA) siRNA and microRNA (miRNA) mimics for in vivo RNA interference has immense potential as it directly lowers the expression of the therapeutic target protein. However, there are a number of major roadblocks to the successful implementation of siRNA and other RNA based therapies in the clinic. These include the instability of RNAs in vivo and the difficulty to efficiently deliver the RNA into the target cells. Hence, various innovative approaches have been taken over the years to develop effective RNA delivery methods. These methods include liposome-, polymeric nanoparticle- and peptide-mediated cellular delivery. In a recent innovative study, bioengineered bacterial outer membrane vesicles were used as vehicles for effective delivery of siRNA into cells in vivo.

  17. Ultrasound-targeted HSVtk and Timp3 gene delivery for synergistically enhanced antitumor effects in hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, B-F; Wu, J; Zhang, Y; Sung, H-W; Xie, J; Li, R-K

    2013-05-01

    Cancer gene therapy has great potential for decreasing tumor-induced mortality but has been clinically limited by non-targeted and insufficient gene transfer. We evaluated gene therapy targeting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSVtk/GCV) suicide gene system and the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (Timp3) gene. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) targeted gene delivery to the tumor tissue, and the α-fetoprotein promoter targeted HSVtk expression to the HCC cells. Human HepG2 cells transfected with the HSVtk or Timp3 gene demonstrated a reduction in cell viability by >40% compared with the vector control. Cell viability was further inhibited by over 50% with co-transfection of the genes. HepG2 cells were inoculated subcutaneously into athymic mice to induce tumors. UTMD-mediated delivery of HSVtk or Timp3 suppressed tumor growth by >45% and increased survival of tumor-bearing animals (P<0.01 vs vector control). Co-delivery of the genes resulted in a further 30% improvement in tumor suppression and significant extension of animal survival (P<0.01 vs vector control). Targeted gene delivery increased the number of apoptotic cells and decreased the vascular density of the tumors. Targeted co-delivery of the genes synergistically improved the antitumor effects and may provide an effective therapy for HCC.

  18. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine TN; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a ‘magic bullet’ to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a ‘Grail Quest’ by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made ‘made the turn’ toward meaningful translational success. PMID:26296541

  19. Advances toward More Efficient Targeted Delivery of Nanoparticles in Vivo: Understanding Interactions between Nanoparticles and Cells.

    PubMed

    Polo, Ester; Collado, Manuel; Pelaz, Beatriz; Del Pino, Pablo

    2017-03-07

    In this Perspective, we describe current challenges and recent advances in efficient delivery and targeting of nanoparticles in vivo. We discuss cancer therapy, nanoparticle-biomolecule interactions, nanoparticle trafficking in cells, and triggers and responses to nanoparticle-cell interactions. No matter which functionalization strategy to target cancer is chosen, passive or active targeting, more than 99% of the nanoparticles administered in vivo end up in the mononuclear phagocytic system, mainly sequestered by macrophages. Comprehensive studies, such as the one reported by MacParland et al. in this issue of ACS Nano, will help to close the gap between nanotechnology-based drug-delivery solutions and advanced medicinal products.

  20. Reservoir-Based Drug Delivery Systems Utilizing Microtechnology

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Cynthia L.; Santini, John T.; Langer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This review covers reservoir-based drug delivery systems that incorporate microtechnology, with an emphasis on oral, dermal, and implantable systems. Key features of each technology are highlighted such as working principles, fabrication methods, dimensional constraints, and performance criteria. Reservoir-based systems include a subset of microfabricated drug delivery systems and provide unique advantages. Reservoirs, whether external to the body or implanted, provide a well-controlled environment for a drug formulation, allowing increased drug stability and prolonged delivery times. Reservoir systems have the flexibility to accommodate various delivery schemes, including zero order, pulsatile, and on demand dosing, as opposed to a standard sustained release profile. Furthermore, the development of reservoir-based systems for targeted delivery for difficult to treat applications (e.g., ocular) has resulted in potential platforms for patient therapy. PMID:22465783

  1. Facile Construction of Chloroquine Containing PLGA-Based pDNA Delivery System for Efficient Tumor and Pancreatitis Targeting in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chengli; Hu, Tingting; Cao, Hua; Zhang, Lijing; Zhou, Pengxiang; He, Gu; Song, Xiangrong; Tong, Aiping; Guo, Gang; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Xiaoning; Qian, Zhiyong; Qi, Xiaorong; Zhou, Liangxue; Zheng, Yu

    2015-06-01

    Chloroquine diphosphate (CQ) was ingeniously used to take place of phosphate salt in traditional calcium phosphate coprecipitation method for pDNA transfection. With multiple roles of CQ in the novel Ca-CQ-pDNA complex including pDNA compaction and assistance in lysosome escape, the transfection efficiency of the pDNA was significantly increased relative to the traditional method. CQ did not intercalate into the DNA double helix as free CQ did, which was probably ascribed to the prior mixing of the pDNA with high concentration of calcium chloride. In order to construct efficacious vector for in vivo gene delivery, Ca-CQ-pDNA-PLGA-NPs was designed and prepared. With entrapment efficiency, particle size and pDNA integrity as screening conditions, the optimal prescription was obtained and CaPi-pDNA-PLGA-NPs made with classic calcium phosphate coprecipitation method after optimization was also prepared as control to systematically study the role of CQ in the novel vector. Physical characters of the vectors were comprehensively studied using TEM, DSC, and XRD. The safety of the vector both in vitro and in vivo was evaluated using MTT, hemolysis test, and histological sections. The Ca-CQ-pDNA-PLGA-NPs dramatically enhanced the gene tranfection efficiency in Human Embryonic kidney HEK293 cells compared with the CaPi-pDNA-PLGA-NPs and presented an increasing gene transfection for up 144 h. The relative fast release of the CQ compared with pDNA from the nanoparticles was responsive for the increased transfection. The Did-labeled-Ca-CQ-pDNA-PLGA-NPs exhibited excellent tumor targeting efficiency and sustained circulation time in CT26 mouse model. The Ca-CQ-pDNA-PLGA-NP loaded with the plasmid pVITRO2 expressing mSurvivin-T34A protein gave 70% tumor inhibition rate, which was partially ascribed to CQ. The Ca-CQ-pDNA-PLGA-NPs showed high targeting efficiency in C57 acute pancreatitis model. In all, the Ca-CQ-pDNA-PLGA-NP was a promising candidate for targeted gene delivery to

  2. Barriers to Liposomal Gene Delivery: from Application Site to the Target

    PubMed Central

    Saffari, Mostafa; Moghimi, Hamid Reza; Dass, Crispin R

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy is a therapeutic approach to deliver genetic material into cells to alter their function in entire organism. One promising form of gene delivery system (DDS) is liposomes. The success of liposome-mediated gene delivery is a multifactorial issue and well-designed liposomal systems might lead to optimized gene transfection particularly in vivo. Liposomal gene delivery systems face different barriers from their site of application to their target, which is inside the cells. These barriers include presystemic obstacles (epithelial barriers), systemic barriers in blood circulation and cellular barriers. Epithelial barriers differ depending on the route of administration. Systemic barriers include enzymatic degradation, binding and opsonisation. Both of these barriers can act as limiting hurdles that genetic material and their vector should overcome before reaching the cells. Finally liposomes should overcome cellular barriers that include cell entrance, endosomal escape and nuclear uptake. These barriers and their impact on liposomal gene delivery will be discussed in this review. PMID:28228799

  3. Delivery of Polymeric Nanoparticles to Target Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Agyare, Edward; Kandimalla, Karunyna

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in nanotechnology have paved the way for the early detection, prevention and treatment of various diseases such as vascular disorders and cancer. These advances have provided novel approaches or modalities of incorporating or adsorbing therapeutic, biosensor and targeting agents into/on nanoparticles. With significant progress, nanomedicine for vascular therapy has shown significant advantages over traditional medicine because of its ability to selectively target the disease site and reduce adverse side effects. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to vascular endothelial cells or the vascular wall provides an effective and more efficient way for early detection and/or treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis and Cerebrovascular Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA). Clinical applications of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers in areas such as vascular graft, implantable drug delivery, stent devices and tissue engineering scaffolds have advanced the candidature of polymers as potential nano-carriers for vascular-targeted delivery of diagnostic agents and drugs. This review focuses on the basic aspects of the vasculature and its associated diseases and relates them to polymeric nanoparticle-based strategies for targeting therapeutic agents to diseased vascular site. PMID:26069867

  4. Targeted drug delivery using genetically engineered diatom biosilica.

    PubMed

    Delalat, Bahman; Sheppard, Vonda C; Rasi Ghaemi, Soraya; Rao, Shasha; Prestidge, Clive A; McPhee, Gordon; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Donoghue, Jacqueline F; Pillay, Vinochani; Johns, Terrance G; Kröger, Nils; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-11-10

    The ability to selectively kill cancerous cell populations while leaving healthy cells unaffected is a key goal in anticancer therapeutics. The use of nanoporous silica-based materials as drug-delivery vehicles has recently proven successful, yet production of these materials requires costly and toxic chemicals. Here we use diatom microalgae-derived nanoporous biosilica to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to cancer cells. The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana is genetically engineered to display an IgG-binding domain of protein G on the biosilica surface, enabling attachment of cell-targeting antibodies. Neuroblastoma and B-lymphoma cells are selectively targeted and killed by biosilica displaying specific antibodies sorbed with drug-loaded nanoparticles. Treatment with the same biosilica leads to tumour growth regression in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model of neuroblastoma. These data indicate that genetically engineered biosilica frustules may be used as versatile 'backpacks' for the targeted delivery of poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs to tumour sites.

  5. Non-Spherical Particles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinrong; Clay, Nicholas; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-01-01

    Nano- and microparticles loaded with various bioimaging contrast agents or therapeutic molecules have been increasingly used for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and tissue defects. These particles, often a filled or hollow sphere, can extend the lifetime of encapsulated biomedical modalities in circulation and in target tissue. However, there is a great need to improve the drug loading and targeting efficiency of these particles. Recently, several simulation and in vitro experimental studies reported that particle shape plays a pivotal role in the targeted delivery of molecules. To better understand these findings and subsequently expedite the use of particles in biomedical applications, this review paper summarizes the methods to prepare non-spherical nano- and micro-scaled particles. In addition, this review covers studies reporting the effects of particle shape on the loading, delivery and release of encapsulated bioactive cargos. Finally, it discusses future directions to further improve the properties of non-spherical particles. PMID:25838583

  6. Active Targeted Drug Delivery for Microbes Using Nano-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Sheng; Lee, Ming-Yuan; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Although vaccines and antibiotics could kill or inhibit microbes, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat because of acquired resistance and adverse side effects. Nano-carriers-based technology has made significant progress for a long time and is introducing a new paradigm in drug delivery. However, it still has some challenges like lack of specificity toward targeting the infectious site. Nano-carriers utilized targeting ligands on their surface called ‘active target’ provide the promising way to solve the problems like accelerating drug delivery to infectious areas and preventing toxicity or side-effects. In this mini review, we demonstrate the recent studies using the active targeted strategy to kill or inhibit microbes. The four common nano-carriers (e.g. liposomes, nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) delivering encapsulated drugs are introduced. PMID:25877093

  7. Dual responsive PNIPAM-chitosan targeted magnetic nanopolymers for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Ramasamy, Shivaraman; Chandrasekaran, Gopalakrishnan; Michael, Isaac; Therese, Helen Annal; Chennakesavulu, Ramasamy

    2015-04-01

    A dual stimuli sensitive magnetic hyperthermia based drug delivery system has been developed for targeted cancer treatment. Thermosensitive amine terminated poly-N-isopropylacrylamide complexed with pH sensitive chitosan nanoparticles was prepared as the drug carrier. Folic acid and fluorescein were tagged to the nanopolymer complex via N-hydroxysuccinimide and ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide reaction to form a fluorescent and cancer targeting magnetic carrier system. The formation of the polymer complex was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy. Gadolinium doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles prepared by a hydrothermal method were encapsulated in the polymer complex to form a magnetic drug carrier system. The proton relaxation studies on the magnetic carrier system revealed a 200% increase in the T1 proton relaxation rate. These magnetic carriers were loaded with curcumin using solvent evaporation method with a drug loading efficiency of 86%. Drug loaded nanoparticles were tested for their targeting and anticancer properties on four cancer cell lines with the help of MTT assay. The results indicated apoptosis of cancer cell lines within 3 h of incubation.

  8. Polymeric Nanomaterials for Islet Targeting and Immunotherapeutic Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Kaustabh; Kanapathipillai, Mathumai; Korin, Netanel; McCarthy, Jason R.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a proof-of-concept for development of pancreatic islet-targeting nanoparticles for immunomodulatory therapy of autoimmune Type 1 Diabetes. Modified with a unique islet-homing peptide, these polymeric nanomaterials exhibit 3-fold greater binding to islet endothelial cells and a 200-fold greater anti-inflammatory effect through targeted islet endothelial cell delivery of an immunosuppressant drug. Our findings also underscore the need to carefully tailor drug loading and nanoparticle dosage to achieve maximal vascular targeting and immunosuppression. PMID:22196766

  9. Mucoadhesive platforms for targeted delivery to the colon.

    PubMed

    Varum, Felipe J O; Veiga, Francisco; Sousa, João S; Basit, Abdul W

    2011-11-25

    A novel platform system, comprising a mucoadhesive core and a rapid release carrier, was designed for targeted drug delivery to the colon. Prednisolone pellets containing different carbomers, including Carbopol 971P, Carbopol 974P and Polycarbophil AA-1, with or without organic acids, were produced by extrusion-spheronization. Mucoadhesive pellets were coated with a new enteric double-coating system, which dissolves at pH 7. This system comprises an inner layer of partially neutralized Eudragit S and buffer salt and an outer coating of standard Eudragit S. A single layer of standard Eudragit S was also applied for comparison purposes. Dissolution of the coated pellets was assessed in USP II apparatus in 0.1N HCl followed by Krebs bicarbonate buffer pH 7.4. Visualization of the coating dissolution process was performed by confocal laser scanning microscopy using fluorescent markers in both layers. The mucoadhesive properties of uncoated, single-coated and-double coated pellets were evaluated ex vivo on porcine colonic mucosa. Mucoadhesive pellets coated with a single layer of Eudragit S release its cargo after a lag time of 120 min in Krebs buffer. In contrast, drug release from the double-coated mucoadhesive pellets was significantly accelerated, starting at 75 min. In addition, the mucoadhesive properties of the core of the double coated pellets were higher than those from single-coated pellets after the core had been exposed to the buffer medium. This novel platform technology has the potential to target the colon and overcome the variability in transit and harmonize drug release and bioavailability.

  10. Mechanisms and biomaterials in pH-responsive tumour targeted drug delivery: A review.

    PubMed

    Kanamala, Manju; Wilson, William R; Yang, Mimi; Palmer, Brian D; Wu, Zimei

    2016-04-01

    As the mainstay in the treatment of various cancers, chemotherapy plays a vital role, but still faces many challenges, such as poor tumour selectivity and multidrug resistance (MDR). Targeted drug delivery using nanotechnology has provided a new strategy for addressing the limitations of the conventional chemotherapy. In the last decade, the volume of research published in this area has increased tremendously, especially with functional nano drug delivery systems (nanocarriers). Coupling a specific stimuli-triggered drug release mechanism with these delivery systems is one of the most prevalent approaches for improving therapeutic outcomes. Among the various stimuli, pH triggered delivery is regarded as the most general strategy, targeting the acidic extracellular microenvironment and intracellular organelles of solid tumours. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the development of pH-sensitive nanocarriers for tumour-targeted drug delivery. The review focuses on the chemical design of pH-sensitive biomaterials, which are used to fabricate nanocarriers for extracellular and/or intracellular tumour site-specific drug release. The pH-responsive biomaterials bring forth conformational changes in these nanocarriers through various mechanisms such as protonation, charge reversal or cleavage of a chemical bond, facilitating tumour specific cell uptake or drug release. A greater understanding of these mechanisms will help to design more efficient drug delivery systems to address the challenges encountered in conventional chemotherapy.

  11. Targeted blood-to-brain drug delivery --10 key development criteria.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Pieter J; Visser, Corine C; Appeldoorn, Chantal C M; Rip, Jaap

    2012-09-01

    Drug delivery to the brain remains challenging due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier. In this review, 10 key development criteria are presented that are important for successful drug development to treat CNS diseases by targeted drug delivery systems. Although several routes of delivery are being investigated, such as intranasal delivery, direct injections into the brain or CSF, and transient opening of the blood-brain barrier, the focus of this review is on physiological strategies aiming to target endogenous transport mechanisms. Examples from literature, focusing on targeted drug delivery systems that are being commercially developed, will be discussed to illustrate the 10 key development criteria. The first four criteria apply to the targeting of the blood-brain barrier: (1) a proven inherently safe receptor biology, (2) a safe and human applicable ligand, (3) receptor specific binding, and (4) applicable for acute and chronic indications. Next to an efficient and safe targeting strategy, as captured in key criteria 1 to 4, a favorable pharmacokinetic profile is also important (key criterion 5). With regard to the drug carriers, two criteria are important: (6) no modification of active ingredient and (7) able to carry various classes of molecules. The final three criteria apply to the development of a drug from lab to clinic: (8) low costs and straightforward manufacturing, (9) activity in all animal models, and (10) strong intellectual property (IP) protection. Adhering to these 10 key development criteria will allow for a successful brain drug development.

  12. Implantable drug-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Blackshear, P J

    1979-12-01

    Implantable drug-delivery systems are being developed to release drugs to the bloodstream continuously as well as free patients from being hospitalized to receive intravenous infusions or frequent injections. One technique is implantation of a pellet in the subcutaneous tissue so the pellet may be released by erosion. Drugs are also diffused through silicone rubber capsules but only polyacrylamide is able to release large molecules. Contraceptive rings containing progesterone and placed in the uterus or vagina and implanted silicone-rubber capsules use these principles. Disadvantages to the subcutaneous delivery of drugs include: 1) release of the drug in subcutaneous tissue rather than in the bloodstream directly; 2) entry into the circulatory system is controlled by surrounding blood supplies which vary with fat; 3) diffusion may be difficult due to dense layers of fibrous tissue; and 4) drug amounts cannot be readily regulated. The Ommaya reservoir uses a container with a self-sealing membrane implanted in the scalp and connected to a cerebral ventricle to treat forms of leukemia and fungal meningitis. Another development is an implantable disk-shaped infusion pump with 2 compartments, the outer one containing a propellant and the inner chamber containing the drug, holds 45 milliliters and releases about 1 milliliter/day. In the future these systems may release drugs in response to biochemical feedback or deliver a drug to 1 specific area.

  13. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies.Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of

  14. Novel Bone-Targeting Agent for Enhanced Delivery of Vancomycin to Bone

    PubMed Central

    Albayati, Zaineb A. F.; Sunkara, Manjula; Schmidt-Malan, Suzannah M.; Karau, Melissa J.; Morris, Andrew J.; Steckelberg, James M.; Patel, Robin; Breen, Philip J.; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Taylor, K. Grant; Merten, Kevyn E.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the pharmacokinetic properties of vancomycin conjugated to a bone-targeting agent (BT) with high affinity for hydroxyapatite after systemic intravenous administration. The results confirm enhanced persistence of BT-vancomycin in plasma and enhanced accumulation in bone relative to vancomycin. This suggests that BT-vancomycin may be a potential carrier for the systemic targeted delivery of vancomycin in the treatment of bone infections, potentially reducing the reliance on surgical debridement to achieve the desired therapeutic outcome. PMID:26666918

  15. Delivery systems and adjuvants for oral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Ed C; O'Hagan, D T

    2006-11-01

    The oral route is the ideal means of delivering prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, offering significant advantages over systemic delivery. Most notably, oral delivery is associated with simple administration and improved safety. In addition, unlike systemic immunisation, oral delivery can induce mucosal immune responses. However, the oral route of vaccine delivery is the most difficult because of the numerous barriers posed by the gastrointestinal tract. To facilitate effective immunisation with peptide and protein vaccines, antigens must be protected, uptake enhanced and the innate immune response activated. Numerous delivery systems and adjuvants have been evaluated for oral vaccine delivery, including live vectors, inert particles and bacterial toxins. Although developments in oral vaccines have been disappointing so far, in terms of the generation of products, the availability of a range of novel delivery systems offers much greater hope for the future development of improved oral vaccines.

  16. Buparvaquone loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for targeted delivery in theleriosis

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Maheshkumar P.; Shelkar, Nilakash; Gaikwad, Rajiv V.; Vanage, Geeta R.; Samad, Abdul; Devarajan, Padma V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Buparvaquone (BPQ), a hydroxynaphthoquinone derivative, has been investigated for the treatment of many infections and is recommended as the gold standard for the treatment of theileriosis. Theileriosis, an intramacrophage infection is localized mainly in reticuloendotheileial system (RES) organs. The present study investigates development of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) of BPQ for targeted delivery to the RES. Materials and Methods: BPQ SLN was prepared using melt method by adding a molten mixture into aqueous Lutrol F68 solution (80°C). Larger batches were prepared up to 6 g of BPQ with GMS: BPQ, 2:1. SLN of designed size were obtained using ultraturrax and high pressure homogenizer. A freeze and thaw study was used to optimize type and concentration of cryoprotectant with Sf: Mean particle size, Si: Initial particle size <1.3. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) study was performed on optimized formulation. Formulation was investigated for in vitro serum stability, hemolysis and cell uptake study. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution study was performed in Holtzman rat. Results: Based on solubility in lipid; glyceryl monostearate (GMS) was selected for preparation of BPQ SLN. Batches of BPQ SLN were optimized for average particle size and entrapment efficiency at <100 mg solid content. A combination of Solutol HS-15 and Lutrol F68 at 2% w/v and greater enabled the desired Sf/Si < 1.3. Differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction revealed decrease in crystallinity of BPQ in BPQ SLN while, scanning electron microscope revealed spherical morphology. BPQ SLN revealed good stability at 4°C and 25°C. Low hemolytic potential (<8%) and in vitro serum stability up to 5 h was observed. Cytotoxicity of SLN to the U937 cell was low. The macrophage cell line revealed high (52%) uptake of BPQ SLN in 1 h suggesting the potential to RES uptake. SLN revealed longer

  17. Prodrugs - an efficient way to breach delivery and targeting barriers.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Kristiina M; Rautio, Jarkko

    2011-01-01

    The study of prodrugs that are chemically modified bioreversible derivatives of active drug compounds to alter their undesired properties has been expanded widely during the last decades. Despite the commercial success the prodrugs have afforded, the concept is still quite unknown among many scientist. Furthermore, many scientists regard prodrugs as a pure interest of academic research groups and not as a feasible solution to improve the delivery or targeting properties of new chemical entities, drug candidates failed in clinical trials, or drugs withdrawn from the market. Although there are still unmet needs that require addressing, prodrugs should be seen as fine-tuning tools for the successful drug research and development. This review represents the potential of prodrugs to improve the drug delivery by enhanced aqueous solubility or permeability as well as describes several targeted prodrug strategies.

  18. Breakable mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Cabrera, Ingrid; Ruiz-Carretero, Amparo; Prasetyanto, Eko A; Robinet, Eric; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-04-07

    "Pop goes the particle". Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery.

  19. Magnetic nanoparticles for targeted therapeutic gene delivery and magnetic-inducing heating on hepatoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chenyan; An, Yanli; Zhang, Jia; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2014-08-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treating cancers, but their clinical applications are being hampered due to uncontrolled gene delivery and expression. To develop a targeted, safe and efficient tumor therapy system, we constructed a tissue-specific suicide gene delivery system by using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers for the combination of gene therapy and hyperthermia on hepatoma. The suicide gene was hepatoma-targeted and hypoxia-enhanced, and the MNPs possessed the ability to elevate temperature to the effective range for tumor hyperthermia as imposed on an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The tumoricidal effects of targeted gene therapy associated with hyperthermia were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The experiment demonstrated that hyperthermia combined with a targeted gene therapy system proffer an effective tool for tumor therapy with high selectivity and the synergistic effect of hepatoma suppression.

  20. Targeting metastatic cancer from the inside: a new generation of targeted gene delivery vectors enables personalized cancer vaccination in situ.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Erlinda M; Levy, John P; Reed, Rebecca A; Petchpud, W Nina; Liu, Liqiong; Wendler, Carlan B; Hall, Frederick L

    2008-10-01

    The advent of pathotropic (disease-seeking) targeting technologies, combined with advanced gene delivery vectors, provides a unique opportunity for the systemic delivery of immunomodulatory cytokine genes to remote sites of cancer metastasis. When injected intravenously, such pathotropic nanoparticles seek out and accumulate selectively at sites of tumor invasion and neo-angiogenesis, resulting in enhanced gene delivery, and thus cytokine production, within the tumor nodules. Used in conjunction with a primary tumoricidal agent (e.g., Rexin-G) that exposes tumor neoantigens, the tumor-targeted immunotherapy vector is intended to promote the recruitment and activation of host immune cells into the metastastic site(s), thereby initiating cancer immunization in situ. In this study, we examine the feasibility of cytokine gene delivery to cancerous lesions in vivo using intravenously administered pathotropically targeted nanoparticles bearing the gene encoding granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; i.e., Reximmune-C). In vitro, transduction of target cancer cells with Reximmune-C resulted in the quantitative production of bioactive and immunoreactive GM-CSF protein. In tumor-bearing nude mice, intravenous infusions of Reximmune-C-induced GM-CSF production by transduced cancer cells and paracrine secretion of the cytokine within the tumor nodules, which promoted the recruitment of host mononuclear cells, including CD40+ B cells and CD86+ dendritic cells, into the tumors. With the first proofs of principle established in preclinical studies, we generated an optimized vector configuration for use in advanced clinical trial designs, and extended the feasibility studies to the clinic. Targeted delivery and localized expression of the GM-CSF transgene was confirmed in a patient with metastatic cancer, as was the recruitment of significant tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Taken together, these studies provide the first demonstrations of cytokine gene

  1. Breakable mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggini, Laura; Cabrera, Ingrid; Ruiz-Carretero, Amparo; Prasetyanto, Eko A.; Robinet, Eric; de Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    ``Pop goes the particle''. Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery.``Pop goes the particle''. Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Full experimental procedures, additional SEM and TEM images of particles, complete UV-Vis and PL-monitored characterization of the breakdown of

  2. Status of Statewide Career Information Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Wynonia L.

    Intended as a resource document as well as a status report on all the statewide career information delivery systems (CIDS) in operation, this report examines the status of 39 statewide information systems. (Career information delivery systems are computer-based systems that provide national, state, and local information to individuals who are in…

  3. Development of a successive targeting liposome with multi-ligand for efficient targeting gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kun; Shen, Haijun; Shen, Song; Xie, Men; Mao, Chuanbin; Qiu, Liyan; Jin, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Background A successful gene delivery system needs to breakthrough several barriers to allow efficient transgenic expression. In the present study, successive targeting liposomes (STL) were constructed by integrating various targeting groups into a nanoparticle to address this issue. Methods Polyethylenimine (PEI) 1800-triamcinolone acetonide (TA) with nuclear targeting capability was synthesized by a two-step reaction. Lactobionic acid was connected with cholesterol to obtain a compound of [(2-lactoylamido) ethylamino]formic acid cholesterol ester (CHEDLA) with hepatocyte-targeting capability. The liposome was modified with PEI 1800-TA and CHEDLA to prepare successive targeting liposome (STL). Its physicochemical properties and transfection efficiency were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results The diameter of STL was approximately 100 nm with 20 mV of potential. The confocal microscopy observation and potential assay verified that lipid bilayer of STL was decorated with PEI 1800-TA. Cytotoxicity of STL was significantly lower than that of PEI 1800-TA and PEI 25K. The transfection efficiency of 10% CHEDLA STL in HepG2 cells was the higher than of the latter two with serum. Its transfection efficiency was greatly reduced with excessive free galactose, indicating that STL was absorbed via galactose receptor-mediated endocytosis. The in vivo study in mice showed that 10% CHEDLA STL had better transgenic expression in liver than the other carriers. Conclusions STL with multi-ligand was able to overcome the various barriers to target nucleus and special cells and present distinctive transgenic expression. Therefore, it has a great potential for gene therapy as a nonviral carrier. PMID:21574214

  4. Drug Delivery Systems for Platinum Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Vien T.; Scarano, Wei; Stenzel, Martina H.

    2013-09-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin, drugs based on platinum, have made a significant impact on the treatment of various cancers. The administration of platinum drugs is however accompanied by significant side effects. This chapter discusses the types of drug delivery systems that have been developed in order to enable the targeted delivery while maintaining controlled temporal supply of the drug. The sizes of carriers range from nanometer to micrometer sized particles. The most common types of drug carriers are micelles, liposomes, nanoparticles, and dendrimers, but also a few microspheres have been developed. Most striking aspect of the delivery of platinum drugs is the possibility of physical encapsulation but also the binding of the drug to the polymer carrier coordinate covalent bond. Since platinum drugs have typically two permanent and two leaving ligands, the polymer can be part of either ligand. As the leaving ligand, the platinum drug is released often as cisplatin. If the polymer provides the functionality for the permanent ligand, a new macromolecular drug has been formed. In addition to the attachment of pt(II) drugs, recent offorts are devoted to the conjugation via the Pt((IV) prodrug.

  5. Exploiting EPR in polymer drug conjugate delivery for tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Modi, Sweta; Prakash Jain, Jay; Domb, A J; Kumar, Neeraj

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of tumor tissue without affecting normal cells has always been formidable task for drug delivery scientists and this task is effectively executed by polymer drug conjugate (PDC) delivery. The novelty of this concept lies in the utilization of a physical mechanism called enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) for targeting tumors. EPR is a physiological phenomenon that is customary for fast growing tumor and solves the problem of targeting the miscreant tissue. PDCs offer added advantages of reduced deleterious effects of anticancer drugs and augmentation of its formulation capability (e.g. Solubility). There are now at least eleven PDCs that have entered phase I/II/III clinical trial as anticancer drugs. PDCs once entered into the tumor tissue, taking advantage of EPR, are endocytosed into the cell either by simple or receptor mediated endocytosis. Various polymeric carriers have been used with hydrolyzable linker arm for conjugation with bioactive moiety. The hydrolyzable linkages of PDC are broken down by acid hydrolyses of lysosomes and releases the drug. High concentrations of the chemotherapeutic agent are maintained near the nucleus, the target site. Passive targeting by PDCs is due to the physiological event of EPR, which is becoming one of the major thrust areas for targeting solid tumors.

  6. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Leach, John C.; Wang, Andrew; Ye, Kaiming; Jin, Sha

    2016-01-01

    The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox) was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells. PMID:26985893

  7. Use of Single-Chain Antibody Derivatives for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Safdari, Yaghoub; Ahmadzadeh, Vahideh; Khalili, Masoumeh; Jaliani, Hossein Zarei; Zarei, Vahid; Erfani-Moghadam, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Single-chain antibodies (scFvs), which contain only the variable domains of full-length antibodies, are relatively small molecules that can be used for selective drug delivery. In this review, we discuss how scFvs help improve the specificity and efficiency of drugs. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery using scFv-drug fusion peptides, siRNA delivery using scFv-conjugated nanoparticles, targeted delivery using scFv-viral peptide-fusion proteins, use of scFv in fusion with cell-penetrating peptides for effective targeted drug delivery, scFv-mediated targeted delivery of inorganic nanoparticles, scFv-mediated increase of tumor killing activity of granulocytes, use of scFv for tumor imaging, site-directed conjugation of scFv molecules to drug carrier systems, use of scFv to relieve pain and use of scFv for increasing drug loading efficiency are among the topics that are discussed here. PMID:27249008

  8. Rapid Data Delivery System (RDDS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cress, Jill J.; Goplen, Susan E.

    2007-01-01

    Since the start of the active 2000 summer fire season, the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) Rocky Mountain Geographic Science Center (RMGSC) has been actively engaged in providing crucial and timely support to Federal, State, and local natural hazards monitoring, analysis, response, and recovery activities. As part of this support, RMGSC has developed the Rapid Data Delivery System (RDDS) to provide emergency and incident response teams with timely access to geospatial data. The RDDS meets these needs by combining a simple web-enabled data viewer for the selection and preview of vector and raster geospatial data with an easy to use data ordering form. The RDDS viewer also incorporates geospatial locations for current natural hazard incidents, including wildfires, earthquakes, hurricanes, and volcanoes, allowing incident responders to quickly focus on their area of interest for data selection.

  9. Microfabricated injectable drug delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated, fully integrated drug delivery system capable of secreting controlled dosages of multiple drugs over long periods of time (up to a year). The device includes a long and narrow shaped implant with a sharp leading edge for implantation under the skin of a human in a manner analogous to a sliver. The implant includes: 1) one or more micromachined, integrated, zero power, high and constant pressure generating osmotic engine; 2) low power addressable one-shot shape memory polymer (SMP) valves for switching on the osmotic engine, and for opening drug outlet ports; 3) microfabricated polymer pistons for isolating the pressure source from drug-filled microchannels; 4) multiple drug/multiple dosage capacity, and 5) anisotropically-etched, atomically-sharp silicon leading edge for penetrating the skin during implantation. The device includes an externally mounted controller for controlling on-board electronics which activates the SMP microvalves, etc. of the implant.

  10. Formulation and Application of Biodegradable Nanoparticles Based Biopharmaceutical Delivery - An Efficient Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Sarkar, Biplab; Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Gupta, Priya; Sharma, Garima; Lee, Sang-Soo; Chakraborty, Chiranjib

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable polymer based drug delivery has emerged as a promising and successful clinical tool for specific targeting and controlled drug release delivery system. Various other unique advantages associated with this delivery system include prolonged circulation, biocompatibility, degradation in nontoxic by-products etc. Till date, various biopharmaceutical agents have been successfully encapsulated within biodegradable polymers and used in clinics. However, before the clinical implementation of such nanocarriers different parameters have to be considered which influence the success of these nanocarriers such as drug release profile, size of nanocarrier, degradation mechanism, toxicity profile, type of polymer used, appropriate synthesis method, selection of mode of delivery etc. The following review focuses on such considerations to explore the area of designing and development of biodegradable polymeric nanosystems which when encapsulated with biopharmaceutical agents can be efficient for clinical application.

  11. Drug delivery system based on chronobiology--A review.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Asim Sattwa; Biswas, Nikhil; Karim, Kazi Masud; Guha, Arijit; Chatterjee, Sugata; Behera, Mamata; Kuotsu, Ketousetuo

    2010-11-01

    With the advancement in the field of chronobiology, modern drug delivery approaches have been elevated to a new concept of chronopharmacology i.e. the ability to deliver the therapeutic agent to a patient in a staggered profile. However the major drawback in the development of such delivery system that matches the circadian rhythm requires the availability of precise technology (pulsatile drug delivery). The increasing research interest surrounding this delivery system has widened the areas of pharmaceutics in particular with many more sub-disciplines expected to coexist in the near future. This review on chronopharmaceutics gives a comprehensive emphasis on potential disease targets, revisits the existing technologies in hand and also addresses the theoretical approaches to emerging discipline such as genetic engineering and target based specific molecules. With the biological prospective approaches in delivering drugs it is well understood that safer and more realistic approaches in the therapy of diseases will be achieved in the days to come.

  12. Convection-enhanced delivery to the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Lonser, Russell R; Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Morrison, Paul F; Oldfield, Edward H

    2015-03-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is a bulk flow-driven process. Its properties permit direct, homogeneous, targeted perfusion of CNS regions with putative therapeutics while bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Development of surrogate imaging tracers that are co-infused during drug delivery now permit accurate, noninvasive real-time tracking of convective infusate flow in nervous system tissues. The potential advantages of CED in the CNS over other currently available drug delivery techniques, including systemic delivery, intrathecal and/or intraventricular distribution, and polymer implantation, have led to its application in research studies and clinical trials. The authors review the biophysical principles of convective flow and the technology, properties, and clinical applications of convective delivery in the CNS.

  13. Ocular drug delivery systems: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Agrahari, Vibhuti; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    The major challenge faced by today’s pharmacologist and formulation scientist is ocular drug delivery. Topical eye drop is the most convenient and patient compliant route of drug administration, especially for the treatment of anterior segment diseases. Delivery of drugs to the targeted ocular tissues is restricted by various precorneal, dynamic and static ocular barriers. Also, therapeutic drug levels are not maintained for longer duration in target tissues. In the past two decades, ocular drug delivery research acceleratedly advanced towards developing a novel, safe and patient compliant formulation and drug delivery devices/techniques, which may surpass these barriers and maintain drug levels in tissues. Anterior segment drug delivery advances are witnessed by modulation of conventional topical solutions with permeation and viscosity enhancers. Also, it includes development of conventional topical formulations such as suspensions, emulsions and ointments. Various nanoformulations have also been introduced for anterior segment ocular drug delivery. On the other hand, for posterior ocular delivery, research has been immensely focused towards development of drug releasing devices and nanoformulations for treating chronic vitreoretinal diseases. These novel devices and/or formulations may help to surpass ocular barriers and associated side effects with conventional topical drops. Also, these novel devices and/or formulations are easy to formulate, no/negligibly irritating, possess high precorneal residence time, sustain the drug release, and enhance ocular bioavailability of therapeutics. An update of current research advancement in ocular drug delivery necessitates and helps drug delivery scientists to modulate their think process and develop novel and safe drug delivery strategies. Current review intends to summarize the existing conventional formulations for ocular delivery and their advancements followed by current nanotechnology based formulation developments

  14. Electronic Delivery Systems: A Selection Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallesen, Peter J.; Haley, Paul; Jones, Edward S.; Moore, Bobbie; Widlake, Dina E.; Medsker, Karen L.

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of electronic learning delivery systems focuses on a delivery system selection model that is designed for use by performance improvement professionals who are choosing between satellite networks, teleconferencing, Internet/Intranet networks, desktop multimedia, electronic performance support systems, transportable audio/video, and the…

  15. Nano-enhanced optical delivery into targeted cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Weldon; Pradhan, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    Nano-enhanced optical field of gold nanoparticles allowed the use of a continuous wave (cw) laser beam for efficient delivery of exogenous impermeable materials into targeted cells. Using this Nano-enhanced Optical Delivery (NOD) method, we show that large molecules could be delivered with low power cw laser with exposure time ~ 1sec. At such low power (and exposure), the non-targeted cells (not bound to gold nanoparticles) were not adversely affected by the laser beam. Further, by varying the size of the gold nanoparticles, cells could be exclusively sensitized to selective wavelengths of laser beam. In contrast other nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles were found to have lower cytotoxicity, making it better suited for clinical NOD. Further, as compared with pulsed lasers, cw (diode) lasers are compact, easy-to-use and therefore, NOD using cw laser beam has significant translational potential for delivery of impermeable bio-molecules to tissues in different organs. We will present optimization of NOD parameters for delivering different molecules to different cells. Success of this NOD method may lead to a new clinical approach for treating AMD and RP patients with geographic atrophy in retina.

  16. Intelligent hydrogels for drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    He, Liumin; Zuo, Qinhua; Xie, Shasha; Huang, Yuexin; Xue, Wei

    2011-09-01

    Intelligent hydrogel, also known as smart hydrogels, are materials with great potential for development in drug delivery system. Intelligent hydrogel also has the ability to perceive as a signal structure change and stimulation. The review introduces the temperature-, pH-, electric signal-, biochemical molecule-, light- and pressure- sensitive hydrogels. Finally, we described the application of intelligent hydrogel in drug delivery system and the recent patents involved for hydrogel in drug delivery.

  17. Fiber coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan

    2008-08-12

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, the spark delivery system including a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. In addition, the laser delivery assembly includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. In accordance with embodiments of the present invention, the assembly may be used to create a spark in a combustion engine. In accordance with other embodiments of the present invention, a method of using the spark delivery system is provided. In addition, a method of choosing an appropriate fiber for creating a spark using a laser beam is also presented.

  18. Cartilage-targeting drug delivery: can electrostatic interactions help?

    PubMed

    Bajpayee, Ambika G; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2017-03-01

    Current intra-articular drug delivery methods do not guarantee sufficient drug penetration into cartilage tissue to reach cell and matrix targets at the concentrations necessary to elicit the desired biological response. Here, we provide our perspective on the utilization of charge-charge (electrostatic) interactions to enhance drug penetration and transport into cartilage, and to enable sustained binding of drugs within the tissue's highly negatively charged extracellular matrix. By coupling drugs to positively charged nanocarriers that have optimal size and charge, cartilage can be converted from a drug barrier into a drug reservoir for sustained intra-tissue delivery. Alternatively, a wide variety of drugs themselves can be made cartilage-penetrating by functionalizing them with specialized positively charged protein domains. Finally, we emphasize that appropriate animal models, with cartilage thickness similar to that of humans, must be used for the study of drug transport and retention in cartilage.

  19. Delivery and targeting of nanoparticles into hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chia-Lang; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that nanoparticles used for follicular delivery provide some advantages over conventional pathways, including improved skin bioavailability, enhanced penetration depth, prolonged residence duration, fast transport into the skin and tissue targeting. This review describes recent developments using nanotechnology approaches for drug delivery into the follicles. Different types of nanosystems may be employed for management of follicular permeation, such as polymeric nanoparticles, metallic nanocrystals, liposomes, and lipid nanoparticles. This review systematically introduces the mechanisms of follicles for nanoparticulate penetration, highlighting the therapeutic potential of drug-loaded nanoparticles for treating skin diseases. Special attention is paid to the use of nanoparticles in treating appendage-related disorders, in particular, nanomedical strategies for treating alopecia, acne, and transcutaneous immunization.

  20. Multifunctional hybrid-carbon nanotubes: new horizon in drug delivery and targeting.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Jain, Narendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as an intriguing nanotechnological tool for numerous biomedical applications including biocompatible modules for the bioactives delivery ascribed to their unique properties, such as greater loading efficiency, biocompatibility, non-immunogenicity, high surface area and photoluminescence, that make them ideal candidate in pharmaceutical and biomedical science. The design of multifunctional hybrid-CNTs for drug delivery and targeting may differ from the conventional drug delivery system. The conventional nanocarriers have few limitations, such as inappropriate availability of surface-chemical functional groups for conjugation, low entrapment/loading efficiency as well as stability as per ICH guidelines with generally regarded as safe (GRAS) prominences. The multifunctional hybrid-CNTs will sparked and open a new door for researchers, scientist of the pharmaceutical and biomedical arena. This review summarizes the vivid aspects of CNTs like characterization, supramolecular chemistry of CNTs-dendrimer, CNTs-nanoparticles, CNTs-quantum dots conjugate for delivery of bioactives, not discussed so far.

  1. Enterprise networks. Strategies for integrated delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Siwicki, B

    1997-02-01

    More integrated delivery systems are making progress toward building computer networks that link all their care delivery sites so they can efficiently and economically coordinate care. A growing number of these systems are turning to intranets--private computer networks that use Internet-derived protocols and technologies--to move information that's essential to managing scare health care resources.

  2. Development of the Choctaw Health Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Binh N.

    The Choctaw Tribe is the first and only tribe to develop a health delivery system to take over an existing Indian Health Service inpatient facility. The takeover was accomplished in January 1984 under the Indian Self-Determination Act through a contract with the Indian Health Service. The Choctaw Health Delivery System includes a 35-bed general…

  3. Lipid microbubbles as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery using focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Carlos; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry; Wu, Shih-Ying; Karakatsani, Maria E; Bernal, Manuel; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2017-04-01

    Focused ultrasound in conjunction with lipid microbubbles has fully demonstrated its ability to induce non-invasive, transient, and reversible blood-brain barrier opening. This study was aimed at testing the feasibility of our lipid-coated microbubbles as a vector for targeted drug delivery in the treatment of central nervous system diseases. These microbubbles were labeled with the fluorophore 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein. Focused ultrasound targeted mouse brains in vivo in the presence of these microbubbles for trans-blood-brain barrier delivery of 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein. This new approach, compared to previously studies of our group, where fluorescently labeled dextrans and microbubbles were co-administered, represents an appreciable improvement in safety outcome and targeted drug delivery. This novel technique allows the delivery of 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein at the region of interest unlike the alternative of systemic exposure. 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein delivery was assessed by ex vivo fluorescence imaging and by in vivo transcranial passive cavitation detection. Stable and inertial cavitation doses were quantified. The cavitation dose thresholds for estimating, a priori, successful targeted drug delivery were, for the first time, identified with inertial cavitation were concluded to be necessary for successful delivery. The findings presented herein indicate the feasibility and safety of the proposed microbubble-based targeted drug delivery and that, if successful, can be predicted by cavitation detection in vivo.

  4. Fluorine-Containing Taxoid Anticancer Agents and Their Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Joshua; Vineberg, Jacob G.; Zuniga, Edison S.; Ojima, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing problem of conventional chemotherapy is the lack of tumor-specific treatments. Traditional chemotherapy relies on the premise that rapidly proliferating cancer cells are more likely to be killed by a cytotoxic agent. In reality, however, cytotoxic agents have very little or no specificity, which leads to systemic toxicity, causing undesirable severe side effects. Consequently, various “molecularly targeted cancer therapies” have been developed for use in specific cancers, including tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. In general, such a drug delivery system consists of a tumor recognition moiety and a cytotoxic “warhead” connected through a “smart” linker to form a conjugate. When a multi-functionalized nanomaterial is used as the vehicle, a “Trojan Horse” approach can be used for mass delivery of cytotoxic “warheads” to maximize the efficacy. Exploitation of the special properties of fluorine has proven successful in the development of new and effective biochemical tools as well as therapeutic agents. Fluorinated congeners can also serve as excellent probes for the investigation of biochemical mechanisms. 19F-NMR can provide unique and powerful tools for mechanistic investigations in chemical biology. This account presents our recent progress, in perspective, on the molecular approaches to the design and development of novel tumor-targeted drug delivery systems for new generation chemotherapy by exploiting the unique nature of fluorine. PMID:23935213

  5. Targeting blood–brain barrier changes during inflammatory pain: an opportunity for optimizing CNS drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ronaldson, Patrick T; Davis, Thomas P

    2012-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is the most significant obstacle to effective CNS drug delivery. It possesses structural and biochemical features (i.e., tight-junction protein complexes and, influx and efflux transporters) that restrict xenobiotic permeation. Pathophysiological stressors (i.e., peripheral inflammatory pain) can alter BBB tight junctions and transporters, which leads to drug-permeation changes. This is especially critical for opioids, which require precise CNS concentrations to be safe and effective analgesics. Recent studies have identified molecular targets (i.e., endogenous transporters and intracellular signaling systems) that can be exploited for optimization of CNS drug delivery. This article summarizes current knowledge in this area and emphasizes those targets that present the greatest opportunity for controlling drug permeation and/or drug transport across the BBB in an effort to achieve optimal CNS opioid delivery. PMID:22468221

  6. Computational and Pharmacological Target of Neurovascular Unit for Drug Design and Delivery.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Mirazul; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic and highly selective permeable interface between central nervous system (CNS) and periphery that regulates the brain homeostasis. Increasing evidences of neurological disorders and restricted drug delivery process in brain make BBB as special target for further study. At present, neurovascular unit (NVU) is a great interest and highlighted topic of pharmaceutical companies for CNS drug design and delivery approaches. Some recent advancement of pharmacology and computational biology makes it convenient to develop drugs within limited time and affordable cost. In this review, we briefly introduce current understanding of the NVU, including molecular and cellular composition, physiology, and regulatory function. We also discuss the recent technology and interaction of pharmacogenomics and bioinformatics for drug design and step towards personalized medicine. Additionally, we develop gene network due to understand NVU associated transporter proteins interactions that might be effective for understanding aetiology of neurological disorders and new target base protective therapies development and delivery.

  7. Computational and Pharmacological Target of Neurovascular Unit for Drug Design and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Mirazul; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic and highly selective permeable interface between central nervous system (CNS) and periphery that regulates the brain homeostasis. Increasing evidences of neurological disorders and restricted drug delivery process in brain make BBB as special target for further study. At present, neurovascular unit (NVU) is a great interest and highlighted topic of pharmaceutical companies for CNS drug design and delivery approaches. Some recent advancement of pharmacology and computational biology makes it convenient to develop drugs within limited time and affordable cost. In this review, we briefly introduce current understanding of the NVU, including molecular and cellular composition, physiology, and regulatory function. We also discuss the recent technology and interaction of pharmacogenomics and bioinformatics for drug design and step towards personalized medicine. Additionally, we develop gene network due to understand NVU associated transporter proteins interactions that might be effective for understanding aetiology of neurological disorders and new target base protective therapies development and delivery. PMID:26579539

  8. Targeted chimera delivery to ovarian cancer cells by heterogeneous gold magnetic nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Xu, Mengjiao; Guo, Yi; Tu, Keyao; Wu, Weimin; Wang, Jianjun; Tong, Xiaowen; Wu, Wenjuan; Qi, Lifeng; Shi, Donglu

    2017-01-01

    Efficient delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to the targeted cells has remained a significant challenge in clinical applications. In the present study, we developed a novel aptamer-siRNA chimera delivery system mediated by cationic Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs). The chimera constructed by VEGF RNA aptamer and Notch3 siRNA was bonded with heterogeneous Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles by electrostatic interaction. The obtained complex exhibited much higher silencing efficiency against Notch3 gene compared with chimera alone and lipofectamine-siRNA complex, and improved the antitumor effects of the loaded chimera. Moreover, the efficient delivery of the chimera by Au-Fe3O4 NPs could reverse multi-drug resistance (MDR) of ovarian cancer cells against the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin, indicating its potential capability for future targeted cancer therapy while overcoming MDR.

  9. Hydrodynamic modeling of targeted magnetic-particle delivery in a blood vessel.

    PubMed

    Weng, Huei Chu

    2013-03-01

    Since the flow of a magnetic fluid could easily be influenced by an external magnetic field, its hydrodynamic modeling promises to be useful for magnetically controllable delivery systems. It is desirable to understand the flow fields and characteristics before targeted magnetic particles arrive at their destination. In this study, we perform an analysis for the effects of particles and a magnetic field on biomedical magnetic fluid flow to study the targeted magnetic-particle delivery in a blood vessel. The fully developed solutions of velocity, flow rate, and flow drag are derived analytically and presented for blood with magnetite nanoparticles at body temperature. Results reveal that in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles, a minimum magnetic field gradient (yield gradient) is required to initiate the delivery. A magnetic driving force leads to the increase in velocity and has enhancing effects on flow rate and flow drag. Such a magnetic driving effect can be magnified by increasing the particle volume fraction.

  10. Target-tracking deliveries on an Elekta linac: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuaid, D.; Partridge, M.; Symonds-Tayler, J. R.; Evans, P. M.; Webb, S.

    2009-06-01

    A target-tracking, intensity-modulated delivery on an Elekta MLCi system was assessed by film measurement with a simulated target-motion trajectory. A toroidally shaped idealized target surrounding an organ at risk necessitating multiple field segments to irradiate the target and spare the organ at risk was defined in a solid-water phantom. The phantom was programmed to move following a reproducible 2D elliptical trajectory in the beam's-eye view with a period of 10 s. Static and target-tracking treatments were planned for delivery on a standard Elekta Precise series linac with integrated MLCi system. Dose was delivered in three ways: (i) a static treatment to a static phantom, (ii) a static treatment to a moving phantom and (iii) a target-tracking treatment to a moving phantom. The dose delivered was assessed by film measurement on the central plane through the target and organ at risk. The target dose blurring was quantified by the standard deviation of the dose to the target which was evaluated as 2.8% for the static treatment to the static phantom, 7.2% for the static treatment to the moving phantom and 2.6% for the tracking treatment to the moving phantom. The mean organ-at-risk dose was 38.2%, 54.0% and 38.2% of the prescription dose for each delivery case. We have therefore shown that the linac is capable of delivering target-tracking fields with MLCs for the target trajectories tested.

  11. Target-tracking deliveries on an Elekta linac: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    McQuaid, D; Partridge, M; Symonds-Tayler, J R; Evans, P M; Webb, S

    2009-06-07

    A target-tracking, intensity-modulated delivery on an Elekta MLCi system was assessed by film measurement with a simulated target-motion trajectory. A toroidally shaped idealized target surrounding an organ at risk necessitating multiple field segments to irradiate the target and spare the organ at risk was defined in a solid-water phantom. The phantom was programmed to move following a reproducible 2D elliptical trajectory in the beam's-eye view with a period of 10 s. Static and target-tracking treatments were planned for delivery on a standard Elekta Precise series linac with integrated MLCi system. Dose was delivered in three ways: (i) a static treatment to a static phantom, (ii) a static treatment to a moving phantom and (iii) a target-tracking treatment to a moving phantom. The dose delivered was assessed by film measurement on the central plane through the target and organ at risk. The target dose blurring was quantified by the standard deviation of the dose to the target which was evaluated as 2.8% for the static treatment to the static phantom, 7.2% for the static treatment to the moving phantom and 2.6% for the tracking treatment to the moving phantom. The mean organ-at-risk dose was 38.2%, 54.0% and 38.2% of the prescription dose for each delivery case. We have therefore shown that the linac is capable of delivering target-tracking fields with MLCs for the target trajectories tested.

  12. An Efficient Targeted Drug Delivery through Apotransferrin Loaded Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Golla; Kondapi, Anand Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancerous state is a highly stimulated environment of metabolically active cells. The cells under these conditions over express selective receptors for assimilation of factors essential for growth and transformation. Such receptors would serve as potential targets for the specific ligand mediated transport of pharmaceutically active molecules. The present study demonstrates the specificity and efficacy of protein nanoparticle of apotransferrin for targeted delivery of doxorubicin. Methodology/Principal Findings Apotransferrin nanoparticles were developed by sol-oil chemistry. A comparative analysis of efficiency of drug delivery in conjugated and non-conjugated forms of doxorubicin to apotransferrin nanoparticle is presented. The spherical shaped apotransferrin nanoparticles (nano) have diameters of 25–50 ηm, which increase to 60–80 ηm upon direct loading of drug (direct-nano), and showed further increase in dimension (75–95 ηm) in conjugated nanoparticles (conj-nano). The competitive experiments with the transferrin receptor specific antibody showed the entry of both conj-nano and direct-nano into the cells through transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. Results of various studies conducted clearly establish the superiority of the direct-nano over conj-nano viz. (a) localization studies showed complete release of drug very early, even as early as 30 min after treatment, with the drug localizing in the target organelle (nucleus) (b) pharmacokinetic studies showed enhanced drug concentrations, in circulation with sustainable half-life (c) the studies also demonstrated efficient drug delivery, and an enhanced inhibition of proliferation in cancer cells. Tissue distribution analysis showed intravenous administration of direct nano lead to higher drug localization in liver, and blood as compared to relatively lesser localization in heart, kidney and spleen. Experiments using rat cancer model confirmed the efficacy of the formulation in regression

  13. Direct Cytoplasmic Delivery and Nuclear Targeting Delivery of HPMA-MT Conjugates in a Microtubules Dependent Fashion.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jiaju; Zhu, Xi; Luo, Kui; Li, Lian; Tang, Manlin; Liu, Yanxi; Zhou, Zhou; Huang, Yuan

    2016-09-06

    As the hearts of tumor cells, the nucleus is the ultimate target of many chemotherapeutic agents and genes. However, nuclear drug delivery is always hampered by multiple intracellular obstacles, such as low efficiency of lysosome escape and insufficient nuclear trafficking. Herein, an N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) polymer-based drug delivery system was designed, which could achieve direct cytoplasmic delivery by a nonendocytic pathway and transport into the nucleus in a microtubules dependent fashion. A special targeting peptide (MT), derived from an endogenic parathyroid hormone-related protein, was conjugated to the polymer backbone, which could accumulate into the nucleus a by microtubule-mediated pathway. The in vitro studies found that low temperature and NaN3 could not influence the cell internalization of the conjugates. Besides, no obvious overlay of the conjugates with lysosome demonstrated that the polymer conjugates could enter the tumor cell cytoplasm by a nonendocytic pathway, thus avoiding the drug degradation in the lysosome. Furthermore, after suppression of the microtubule dynamics with microtubule stabilizing docetaxel (DTX) and destabilizing nocodazole (Noc), the nuclear accumulation of polymeric conjugates was significantly inhibited. Living cells fluorescence recovery after photobleaching study found that the nuclear import rate of conjugates was 2-fold faster compared with the DTX and Noc treated groups. These results demonstrated that the conjugates transported into the nucleus in a microtubules dependent way. Therefore, in addition to direct cytoplasmic delivery, our peptide conjugated polymeric platform could simultaneously mediate nuclear drug accumulation, which may open a new path for further intracellular genes/peptides delivery.

  14. Nanomicellar carriers for targeted delivery of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Huang, Yixian; Li, Song

    2014-01-01

    Clinical application of anticancer drugs is limited by problems such as low water solubility, lack of tissue-specificity and toxicity. Formulation development represents an important approach to these problems. Among the many delivery systems studied, polymeric micelles have gained considerable attention owing to ease in preparation, small sizes (10–100 nm), and ability to solubilize water-insoluble anticancer drugs and accumulate specifically at the tumors. This article provides a brief review of several promising micellar systems and their applications in tumor therapy. The emphasis is placed on the discussion of the authors’ recent work on several nanomicellar systems that have both a delivery function and antitumor activity, named dual-function drug carriers. PMID:24341817

  15. Starch Applications for Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jason

    2013-03-01

    Starch is one of the most abundant and economical renewable biopolymers in nature. Starch molecules are high molecular weight polymers of D-glucose linked by α-(1,4) and α-(1,6) glycosidic bonds, forming linear (amylose) and branched (amylopectin) structures. Octenyl succinic anhydride modified starches (OSA-starch) are designed by carefully choosing a proper starch source, path and degree of modification. This enables emulsion and micro-encapsulation delivery systems for oil based flavors, micronutrients, fragrance, and pharmaceutical actives. A large percentage of flavors are encapsulated by spray drying in today's industry due to its high throughput. However, spray drying encapsulation faces constant challenges with retention of volatile compounds, oxidation of sensitive compound, and manufacturing yield. Specialty OSA-starches were developed suitable for the complex dynamics in spray drying and to provide high encapsulation efficiency and high microcapsule quality. The OSA starch surface activity, low viscosity and film forming capability contribute to high volatile retention and low active oxidation. OSA starches exhibit superior performance, especially in high solids and high oil load encapsulations compared with other hydrocolloids. The submission is based on research and development of Ingredion

  16. The implications of recent advances in carboxymethyl chitosan based targeted drug delivery and tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Laxmi; Singh, Jay; Agarwal, Vishnu; Tewari, Ravi Prakash

    2014-07-28

    Over the last decade carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) has emerged as a promising biopolymer for the development of new drug delivery systems and improved scaffolds along with other tissue engineering devices for regenerative medicine that is currently one of the most rapidly growing fields in the life sciences. CMCS is amphiprotic ether, derived from chitosan, exhibiting enhanced aqueous solubility, excellent biocompatibility, controllable biodegradability, osteogenesis ability and numerous other outstanding physicochemical and biological properties. More strikingly, it can load hydrophobic drugs and displays strong bioactivity which highlight its suitability and extensive usage for preparing different drug delivery and tissue engineering formulations respectively. This review provides a comprehensive introduction to various types of CMCS based formulations for delivery of therapeutic agents and tissue regeneration and further describes their preparation procedures and applications in different tissues/organs. Detailed information of CMCS based nano/micro systems for targeted delivery of drugs with emphasis on cancer specific and organ specific drug delivery have been described. Further, we have discussed various CMCS based tissue engineering biomaterials along with their preparation procedures and applications in different tissues/organs. The article then, gives a brief account of therapy combining drug delivery and tissue engineering. Finally, identification of major challenges and opportunities for current and ongoing application of CMCS based systems in the field are summarised.

  17. Target isolation system, high power laser and laser peening method and system using same

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Harris, Fritz

    2007-11-06

    A system for applying a laser beam to work pieces, includes a laser system producing a high power output beam. Target delivery optics are arranged to deliver the output beam to a target work piece. A relay telescope having a telescope focal point is placed in the beam path between the laser system and the target delivery optics. The relay telescope relays an image between an image location near the output of the laser system and an image location near the target delivery optics. A baffle is placed at the telescope focal point between the target delivery optics and the laser system to block reflections from the target in the target delivery optics from returning to the laser system and causing damage.

  18. Nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutics and small interfering RNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Farzan, Maryam

    2015-11-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5(th) most common malignancy which is responsible for more than half million annual mortalities; also, it is the third leading cause of cancer related death. Unfavorable systemic side-effects of chemotherapeutic agents and susceptibility to the degradation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can knock down a specific gene involved in the disease, have hampered their clinical application. So, it could be beneficial to develop an efficient carrier for the stabilization and specific delivery of drugs and siRNA to cells. Targeted nanoparticles have gained considerable attention as an efficient drug and gene delivery system, which is due to their capability in achieving the highest accumulation of cytotoxic agents in tumor tissue, modifiable drug pharmacokinetic- and bio-distribution, improved effectiveness of treatment, and limited side-effects. Recent studies have shed more light on the advantages of novel drug loaded carrier systems vs free drugs. Most of the animal studies have reported improvement in treatment efficacy and survival rate using novel carrier systems. Targeted delivery may be achieved passively or actively. In passive targeting, no ligand as homing device is used, while targeting is achieved by incorporating the therapeutic agent into a macromolecule or nanoparticle that passively reaches the target organ. However, in active targeting, the therapeutic agent or carrier system is conjugated to a tissue or cell-specific receptor which is over-expressed in a special malignancy using a ligand called a homing device. This review covers a broad spectrum of targeted nanoparticles as therapeutic and non-viral siRNA delivery systems, which are developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and their characteristics and opportunities for the clinical applications of drugs and therapeutic siRNA are discussed in this article. Asialoglycoprotein receptors, low-density lipoprotein

  19. Nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutics and small interfering RNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Farzan, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5th most common malignancy which is responsible for more than half million annual mortalities; also, it is the third leading cause of cancer related death. Unfavorable systemic side-effects of chemotherapeutic agents and susceptibility to the degradation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can knock down a specific gene involved in the disease, have hampered their clinical application. So, it could be beneficial to develop an efficient carrier for the stabilization and specific delivery of drugs and siRNA to cells. Targeted nanoparticles have gained considerable attention as an efficient drug and gene delivery system, which is due to their capability in achieving the highest accumulation of cytotoxic agents in tumor tissue, modifiable drug pharmacokinetic- and bio-distribution, improved effectiveness of treatment, and limited side-effects. Recent studies have shed more light on the advantages of novel drug loaded carrier systems vs free drugs. Most of the animal studies have reported improvement in treatment efficacy and survival rate using novel carrier systems. Targeted delivery may be achieved passively or actively. In passive targeting, no ligand as homing device is used, while targeting is achieved by incorporating the therapeutic agent into a macromolecule or nanoparticle that passively reaches the target organ. However, in active targeting, the therapeutic agent or carrier system is conjugated to a tissue or cell-specific receptor which is over-expressed in a special malignancy using a ligand called a homing device. This review covers a broad spectrum of targeted nanoparticles as therapeutic and non-viral siRNA delivery systems, which are developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and their characteristics and opportunities for the clinical applications of drugs and therapeutic siRNA are discussed in this article. Asialoglycoprotein receptors, low-density lipoprotein

  20. Cancer nanomedicine: from targeted delivery to combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Ho, William; Zhang, Xueqing; Bertrand, Nicolas; Farokhzad, Omid

    2015-04-01

    The advent of nanomedicine marks an unparalleled opportunity to advance the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. The unique properties of nanoparticles (NPs), such as large surface-to-volume ratio, small size, the ability to encapsulate various drugs, and tunable surface chemistry, give them many advantages over their bulk counterparts. This includes multivalent surface modification with targeting ligands, efficient navigation of the complex in vivo environment, increased intracellular trafficking, and sustained release of drug payload. These advantages make NPs a mode of treatment potentially superior to conventional cancer therapies. This review highlights the most recent developments in cancer treatment using NPs as drug delivery vehicles, including promising opportunities in targeted and combination therapy.

  1. Phospholipid nanodisc engineering for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuya

    2012-06-01

    Biocompatible mesoscale nanoparticles (5-100 nm in diameter) are attractive tools for drug delivery. Among them are several types of liposomes and polymer micelles already in clinical trial or use. Generally, biocompatibility of such particles is achieved by coating them with polyethylene glycol (PEG). Without PEG coating, particles are quickly trapped in the reticuloendothelial system when intravenously administered. However, recent studies have revealed several potential problems with PEG coating, including antigenicity and restriction of cellular uptake. This has motivated the development of alternative drug and gene delivery vehicles, including chemically and genetically engineered high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-like nanodiscs or "bicelles". HDL is a naturally occurring mesoscale nanoparticle that normally ferries cholesterol around in the body. Its initial "nascent" form is thought to be a simple 10 nm disc of phospholipids in a bilayer, and can be easily synthesized in vitro by mixing recombinant apoA-I proteins with various phospholipids. In this review, the use of synthetic HDL-like phospholipid nanodiscs as biocompatible drug carriers is summarized, focussing on manufacturing, size-control, drug loading and cell targeting.

  2. Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT): a potential target for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-06-01

    Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT; product of the SLC5A6 gene) is an important transmembrane protein responsible for translocation of vitamins and other essential cofactors such as biotin, pantothenic acid and lipoic acid. Hydropathy plot (Kyte-Dolittle algorithm) revealed that human SMVT protein consists of 635 amino acids and 12 transmembrane domains with both amino and carboxyl termini oriented towards the cytoplasm. SMVT is expressed in various tissues such as placenta, intestine, brain, liver, lung, kidney, cornea, retina and heart. This transporter displays broad substrate specificity and excellent capacity for utilization in drug delivery. Drug absorption is often limited by the presence of physiological (epithelial tight junctions), biochemical (efflux transporters and enzymatic degradation) and chemical (size, lipophilicity, molecular weight, charge etc.) barriers. These barriers may cause many potential therapeutics to be dropped from the preliminary screening portfolio and subsequent entry into the market. Transporter targeted delivery has become a powerful approach to deliver drugs to target tissues because of the ability of the transporter to translocate the drug to intracellular organelles at a higher rate. This review highlights studies employing SMVT transporter as a target for drug delivery to improve bioavailability and investigate the feasibility of developing SMVT targeted drug delivery systems.

  3. Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-03-04

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  4. Multi-channel gas-delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenzon, Yan; Trujillo, Robert T.; Beese, Steven C.

    2016-09-13

    One embodiment of the present invention provides a gas-delivery system for delivering reaction gas to a reactor chamber. The gas-delivery system includes a main gas-inlet port for receiving reaction gases and a gas-delivery plate that includes a plurality of gas channels. A gas channel includes a plurality of gas holes for allowing the reaction gases to enter the reactor chamber from the gas channel. The gas-delivery system further includes a plurality of sub-gas lines coupling together the main gas-inlet port and the gas-delivery plate, and a respective sub-gas line is configured to deliver a portion of the received reaction gases to a corresponding gas channel.

  5. Efficient delivery of therapeutic agents by using targeted albumin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kouchakzadeh, Hasan; Safavi, Maryam Sadat; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Albumin nanoparticles are one of the most important drug carriers for the delivery of therapeutic drugs, especially for the treatment of malignancies. This potential is due to their high binding capacity for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs and the possibility of surface modification. Accumulation of albumin-bound drugs in the tumor interstitium occurs by the enhanced permeability and retention effect, which is also facilitated by the 60-kDa glycoprotein transcytosis pathway and binding to secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine located in the tumor extracellular matrix. In addition, specific ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, folic acid, transferrin, and peptides can be conjugated to the surface of albumin nanoparticles to actively target the drug to its site of action. The albumin-bound paclitaxel, Abraxane, is one of the several therapeutic nanocarriers that have been approved for clinical use. By the development of Abraxane that demonstrates a higher response rate and improved tolerability and therapeutic efficiency in comparison with solvent-based formulation, and with consideration of its commercial success, albumin is attracting the interest of many biotechnological and pharmaceutical companies. This chapter explores the current targeted and nontargeted albumin-based nanoparticles that are in various stages of development for the delivery of therapeutic agents in order to enhance the efficacy of cancer treatment.

  6. Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Spatial and Temporal Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While a host of methods exist to deliver genetic materials or small molecules to cells, very few are available for protein delivery to the cytosol. We describe a modular, light-activated nanocarrier that transports proteins into cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the cargo to the cytosol by light triggered endosomal escape. The platform is based on hollow gold nanoshells (HGN) with polyhistidine tagged proteins attached through an avidity-enhanced, nickel chelation linking layer; here, we used green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model deliverable cargo. Endosomal uptake of the GFP loaded nanocarrier was mediated by a C-end Rule (CendR) internalizing peptide fused to the GFP. Focused femtosecond pulsed-laser excitation triggered protein release from the nanocarrier and endosome disruption, and the released protein was capable of targeting the nucleoli, a model intracellular organelle. We further demonstrate the generality of the approach by loading and releasing Sox2 and p53. This method for targeting of individual cells, with resolution similar to microinjection, provides spatial and temporal control over protein delivery. PMID:25490248

  7. Functionalized mesoporous silicon for targeted-drug-delivery.

    PubMed

    Tabasi, Ozra; Falamaki, Cavus; Khalaj, Zahra

    2012-10-01

    The present work concerns a preliminary step in the production of anticancer drug loaded porous silicon (PSi) for targeted-drug-delivery applications. A successful procedure for the covalent attachment of folic acid, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and doxorubicin to hydrophilic mesoporous silicon layers is presented. A systematic approach has been followed to obtain the optimal composition of the N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC)/N-hydroxysuccimide (NHS) in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution for the surface activation process of the undecylenic acid (UD) grafted molecules to take place with minimal undesired byproduct formation. The effect of reactant concentration and kind of solvent (aqueous or DMSO) on the attachment of folic acid to the activated PSi layer has been investigated. The covalent attachment of the doxorubicin molecules to the PSi layer functionalized with folic acid and PEG is discussed. The drug release kinetics as a function of pH has been studied. The functionalized PSi particles show a high cytotoxicity compared to the equivalent amount of free drug. Cell toxicity tests show clearly that the incorporation of folate molecules increases substantially the toxicity of the loaded PSi particles. Accordingly this new functionalized PSi may be considered a proper candidate for targeted drug delivery.

  8. Organized Athletics as a Leisure Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Thomas R.; Mendell, Ron

    1980-01-01

    Athletic programs are leisure time delivery systems for the athletes, spectators, and the local community as long as scholarships and extensive media coverage are not involved. College administration should make sure that sports and athletics do not become a delivery sytem for public relations and finance. (CJ)

  9. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) of Efavirenz as lymph targeting drug delivery system: Elucidation of mechanism of uptake using chylomicron flow blocking approach.

    PubMed

    Makwana, Vivek; Jain, Rashmi; Patel, Komal; Nivsarkar, Manish; Joshi, Amita

    2015-11-10

    The aim of the present work was to develop a lymph targeted SLN formulation of antiretroviral (ARV) drug and to have an understanding of its underlying mechanism of uptake by the lymphatics. The lymphatics are the inaccessible reservoirs of HIV in human body. Efavirenz (EFV) is a BCS class II, ARV drug that undergoes extensive first pass metabolism. The EFV SLN formulation was prepared using Gelucire 44/14, Compritol 888 ATO, Lipoid S 75 and Poloxamer 188 by hot homogenization technique followed by ultrasonication method, with mean particle size of 168 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) <0.220, and mean zeta potential of -35.55 mV. DSC and XRPD studies revealed change in crystallinity index of drug when incorporated into SLN. In vitro drug release was found to be prolonged and biphasic in PBS pH 6.8. There was no significant change in the mean particle size, PDI, zeta potential and entrapment efficiency of EFV SLN after storage at 30 ± 2°C/60 ± 5%RH for two months. The results from lymphatic transport and tissue distribution study indicate that a significant part of the EFV had by-passed portal system and was recovered in the lymph via chylomicron uptake mechanism. Reduction in the amount (44.70%) of the EFV reaching to liver indicates that major amount of EFV bypasses the liver and thereby, enhances the oral bioavailability of the EFV. A significant amount of EFV was found in spleen, a major lymphatic organ. EFV SLN seems to have potential to target the ARV to lymphatics for the better management of HIV.

  10. Nanotechnologies in delivery of mRNA therapeutics using nonviral vector-based delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Guan, S; Rosenecker, J

    2017-02-02

    Because of its safe and effective protein expression profile, in vitro transcribed messenger RNA (IVT-mRNA) represents a promising candidate in the development of novel therapeutics for genetic diseases, vaccines or gene editing strategies, especially when its inherent shortcomings (for example, instability and immunogenicity) have been partially addressed via structural modifications. However, numerous unsolved technical difficulties in successful in vivo delivery of IVT-mRNA have greatly hindered the applications of IVT-mRNA in clinical development. Recent advances in nanotechnology and material science have yielded many promising nonviral delivery systems, some of which were able to efficiently facilitate targeted in vivo delivery of IVT-mRNA in safe and noninvasive manners. The diversity and flexibility of these delivery systems highlight the recent progress of IVT-mRNA-based therapy using nonviral vectors. In this review, we summarize recent advances of existing and emerging nonviral vector-based nanotechnologies for IVT-mRNA delivery and briefly summarize the interesting but rarely discussed applications on simultaneous delivery of IVT-mRNA with DNA.Gene Therapy advance online publication, 2 February 2017; doi:10.1038/gt.2017.5.

  11. Phage display: development of nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Khalaj-Kondori, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier represents a formidable obstacle for the transport of most systematically administered neurodiagnostics and neurotherapeutics to the brain. Phage display is a high throughput screening strategy that can be used for the construction of nanomaterial peptide libraries. These libraries can be screened for finding brain targeting peptide ligands. Surface functionalization of a variety of nanocarriers with these brain homing peptides is a sophisticated way to develop nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery platforms that are able to cross the blood brain barrier. These efficient drug delivery systems raise our hopes for the diagnosis and treatment of various brain disorders in the future. PMID:26199590

  12. New delivery systems and propellants.

    PubMed

    Dolovich, M

    1999-01-01

    The removal of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) propellants from industrial and household products has been agreed to by over 165 countries of which more than 135 are developing countries. The timetable for this process is outlined in the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer document and in several subsequent amendments. Pressured metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) for medical use have been granted temporary exemptions until replacement formulations, providing the same medication via the same route, and with the same efficacy and safety profiles, are approved for human use. Hydrofluoroalkanes (HFAs) are the alternative propellants for CFCs-12 and -114. Their potential for damage to the ozone layer is nonexistent, and while they are greenhouse gases, their global warming potential is a fraction (one-tenth) of that of CFCs. Replacement formulations for almost all inhalant respiratory medications have been or are being produced and tested; in Canada, it is anticipated that the transition to these HFA or CFC-free pMDIs will be complete by the year 2005. Initially, an HFA pMDI was to be equivalent to the CFC pMDI being replaced, in terms of aerosol properties and effective clinical dose. However, this will not necessarily be the situation, particularly for some corticosteroid products. Currently, only one CFC-free formulation is available in Canada - Airomir, a HFA salbutamol pMDI. This paper discusses the in vitro aerosol characteristics, in vivo deposition and clinical data for several HFA pMDIs for which there are data available in the literature. Alternative delivery systems to the pMDI, namely, dry powder inhalers and nebulizers, are briefly reviewed.

  13. Hydrogel-Based Controlled Delivery Systems for Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of bioactive factors is a very valuable strategy for articular cartilage repair. Nevertheless, the direct supply of such biomolecules is limited by several factors including rapid degradation, the need for supraphysiological doses, the occurrence of immune and inflammatory responses, and the possibility of dissemination to nontarget sites that may impair their therapeutic action and raise undesired effects. The use of controlled delivery systems has the potential of overcoming these hurdles by promoting the temporal and spatial presentation of such factors in a defined target. Hydrogels are promising materials to develop delivery systems for cartilage repair as they can be easily loaded with bioactive molecules controlling their release only where required. This review exposes the most recent technologies on the design of hydrogels as controlled delivery platforms of bioactive molecules for cartilage repair. PMID:27642587

  14. Drug delivery systems from nose to brain.

    PubMed

    Misra, Ambikanandan; Kher, Gitanjali

    2012-09-01

    The treatment of brain disorders is particularly challenging due to the presence of a variety of formidable obstacles to deliver drugs selectively and effectively to the brain. Blood-brain-barrier (BBB) constitutes the major obstacle to the uptake of drugs into the brain following systemic administration. Intranasal delivery offers a non-invasive and convenient method to bypass the BBB and delivery of therapeutics directly to the brain. The review discusses the potential of intranasal route to deliver drugs to the brain, the mechanisms and pathways of direct nose to brain drug transport, the various factors influencing transnasal drug absorption, the conventional and novel intranasal drug delivery systems, the various intranasal drug delivery techniques and devices, and examples of brain drug transport that have been feasible in treating various brain disorders. Moreover, products on the market, investigational drugs, and the author's perceptions about the prospect of intranasal delivery for treating brain disorders are also been discussed.

  15. Alternative delivery systems in rural areas.

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, J B

    1989-01-01

    Alternative delivery systems, such as HMOs, PPOs, and primary care case-management programs, have a long history in rural America despite significant impediments to their development. However, little is known about the effect of these systems on rural communities and their medical care delivery systems. Existing studies, which focus on rural HMOs, are qualitative in nature and generally are directed at identifying factors that facilitate or retard HMO development. Despite their limitations, the studies do raise a variety of issues deserving of quantitative analysis. Research is now needed that (1) investigates the effect of rural alternative delivery systems on the cost and quality of care received by rural residents, (2) assesses the effectiveness of different mechanisms used by these systems to contain costs, (3) estimates the effect of alternative delivery systems on rural providers, (4) determines the extent to which the presence or absence of alternative delivery systems influences physician decisions to locate in rural areas, (5) identifies factors that are important in consumer decisions to enroll or not enroll in a rural alternative delivery system, and (6) analyzes the diffusion patterns of these systems in rural areas. PMID:2645250

  16. Exosomes for targeted siRNA delivery across biological barriers.

    PubMed

    El Andaloussi, Samir; Lakhal, Samira; Mäger, Imre; Wood, Matthew J A

    2013-03-01

    Using oligonucleotide-based drugs to modulate gene expression has opened a new avenue for drug discovery. In particular small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are being rapidly recognized as promising therapeutic tools, but their poor bioavailability limits the full realization of their clinical potential. In recent years, cumulating evidence has emerged for the role of membrane vesicles, secreted by most cells and found in all body fluids, as key mediators of information transmission between cells. Importantly, a sub-group of these termed exosomes, have recently been shown to contain various RNA species and to mediate their horizontal transfer to neighbouring- or distant recipient cells. Here, we provide a brief overview on membrane vesicles and their role in exchange of genetic information. We also describe how these natural carriers of genetic material can be harnessed to overcome the obstacle of poor delivery and allow efficient systemic delivery of exogenous siRNA across biological barriers such as the blood-brain barrier.

  17. Drug Delivery Systems for Imaging and Therapy of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gunay, Mine Silindir; Ozer, A. Yekta; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although a variety of therapeutic approaches are available for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, challenges limit effective therapy. Among these challenges are delivery of drugs through the blood brain barier to the target brain tissue and the side effects observed during long term administration of antiparkinsonian drugs. The use of drug delivery systems such as liposomes, niosomes, micelles, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, gold nanoparticles, microspheres, microcapsules, nanobubbles, microbubbles and dendrimers is being investigated for diagnosis and therapy. Methods: This review focuses on formulation, development and advantages of nanosized drug delivery systems which can penetrate the central nervous system for the therapy and/or diagnosis of PD, and highlights future nanotechnological approaches. Results: It is esential to deliver a sufficient amount of either therapeutic or radiocontrast agents to the brain in order to provide the best possible efficacy or imaging without undesired degradation of the agent. Current treatments focus on motor symptoms, but these treatments generally do not deal with modifying the course of Parkinson’s disease. Beyond pharmacological therapy, the identification of abnormal proteins such as α-synuclein, parkin or leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine protein kinase 2 could represent promising alternative targets for molecular imaging and therapy of Parkinson's disease. Conclusion: Nanotechnology and nanosized drug delivery systems are being investigated intensely and could have potential effect for Parkinson’s disease. The improvement of drug delivery systems could dramatically enhance the effectiveness of Parkinson’s Disease therapy and reduce its side effects. PMID:26714584

  18. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development

    SciTech Connect

    Handrock, J.L.; Wally, K.; Raber, T.N.

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. The purpose of this project is to develop a platform for the engineering evaluation of hydrogen storage and delivery systems with an added focus on lightweight hydride utilization. Hybrid vehicles represent the primary application area of interest, with secondary interests including such items as existing vehicles and stationary uses. The near term goal is the demonstration of an internal combustion engine/storage/delivery subsystem. The long term goal is optimization of storage technologies for both vehicular and industrial stationary uses. In this project an integrated approach is being used to couple system operating characteristics to hardware development. A model has been developed which integrates engine and storage material characteristics into the design of hydride storage and delivery systems. By specifying engine operating parameters, as well as a variety of storage/delivery design features, hydride bed sizing calculations are completed. The model allows engineering trade-off studies to be completed on various hydride material/delivery system configurations. A more generalized model is also being developed to allow the performance characteristics of various hydrogen storage and delivery systems to be compared (liquid, activated carbon, etc.). Many of the features of the hydride storage model are applicable to the development of this more generalized model.

  19. Active targeting co-delivery system based on pH-sensitive methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)2K-poly(ε-caprolactone)4K-poly(glutamic acid)1K for enhanced cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Nuannuan; Huang, Chunzhi; Luan, Yuxia; Song, Aixin; Song, Yunmei; Garg, Sanjay

    2016-06-15

    In this paper, we successfully synthesized folate-modified pH-sensitive copolymer methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)2K-poly(ε-caprolactone)4K-poly(glutamic acid)1K (mPEG2K-PCL4K-PGA1K-FA), which could form the polymeric assembly in an aqueous solution, for co-delivering hydrophilic drugs doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) and verapamil hydrochloride (VER) (FA-poly(DOX+VER)). Since VER was an effective P-glycoprotein inhibitor, the combination of DOX and VER could reverse the multidrug resistance efficiently and enhance the therapeutic effect. Therefore, the inhibition ratios of MCF-7/ADR resistant cancer cell treated by FA-poly (DOX+VER) were almost more than 30% higher than those of FA-polyDOX after 48h and 72h. Furthermore, the conjugation of FA could lead the co-delivery systems actively targeting into the FA receptor over-expressing cancer cells in addition to the passive accumulation of the assembly in tumor tissues. Importantly, the prepared mPEG2K-PCL4K-PGA1K-FA assembly showed high pH-sensitive property, which made the drugs mostly released in tumor tissue (acid environment) than in physiological environment (neutral environment). In summary, the as-prepared co-delivery system FA-poly(DOX+VER) demonstrated a high efficiency in reversing the multidrug resistance and targeting FA receptor to improve the anticancer effect of DOX in MCF-7/ADR resistant cells.

  20. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential for Targeting Human Brain Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etame, Arnold B.

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) remains a major challenge to the advancement and application of systemic anti-cancer therapeutics into the central nervous system. The structural and physiological delivery constraints of the BBB significantly limit the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, thereby making systemic administration a non-viable option for the vast majority of chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, the lack of specificity of conventional systemic chemotherapy when applied towards malignant brain tumors remains a major shortcoming. Hence novel therapeutic strategies that focus both on targeted and enhanced delivery across the BBB are warranted. In recent years nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as attractive vehicles for efficient delivery of targeted anti-cancer therapeutics. In particular, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained prominence in several targeting applications involving systemic cancers. Their enhanced permeation and retention within permissive tumor microvasculature provide a selective advantage for targeting. Malignant brain tumors also exhibit transport-permissive microvasculature secondary to blood brain barrier disruption. Hence AuNPs may have potential relevance for brain tumor targeting. However, the permeation of AuNPs across the BBB has not been well characterized, and hence is a potential limitation for successful application of AuNP-based therapeutics within the central nervous system (CNS). In this dissertation, we designed and characterized AuNPs and assessed the role of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the physical and biological properties of AuNPs. We established a size-dependent permeation profile with respect to core size as well as PEG length when AuNPs were assessed through a transport-permissive in-vitro BBB. This study was the first of its kind to systematically examine the influence of design on permeation of AuNPs through transport-permissive BBB. Given the significant delivery limitations through the non

  1. Designing Bioactive Delivery Systems for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Hillary E.

    2010-01-01

    The direct infusion of macromolecules into defect sites generally does not impart adequate physiological responses. Without the protection of delivery systems, inductive molecules may likely redistribute away from their desired locale and are vulnerable to degradation. In order to achieve efficacy, large doses supplied at interval time periods are necessary, often at great expense and ensuing detrimental side effects. The selection of a delivery system plays an important role in the rate of re-growth and functionality of regenerating tissue: not only do the release kinetics of inductive molecules and their consequent bioactivities need to be considered, but also how the delivery system interacts and integrates with its surrounding host environment. In the current review, we describe the means of release of macromolecules from hydrogels, polymeric microspheres, and porous scaffolds along with the selection and utilization of bioactive delivery systems in a variety of tissue-engineering strategies. PMID:20676773

  2. WEDDS: The WITS Encrypted Data Delivery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J.; Backes, P.

    1999-01-01

    WEDDS, the WITS Encrypted Data Delivery System, is a framework for supporting distributed mission operations by automatically transferring sensitive mission data in a secure and efficient manner to and from remote mission participants over the internet.

  3. A dual-mediated liposomal drug delivery system targeting the brain: rational construction, integrity evaluation across the blood–brain barrier, and the transporting mechanism to glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Xiao-Na; Wang, Gui-Ling; Hei, Yu; Meng, Shuai; Yang, Ling-Fei; Yuan, Lan; Xie, Ying

    2017-01-01

    As the global population ages, cancer rates increase worldwide, and degenerative diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), brain tumors, and inflammation threaten human health more frequently. We designed a dual-mediated (receptor-mediated and adsorption-mediated) liposome, named transferrin–cell penetrating peptide–sterically stabilized liposome (TF-CPP-SSL), to improve therapy for gliomas through combining molecular recognition of transferrin receptors (TF-Rs) on the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and glioma cells with the internalization and lysosomal escaping ability of CPP. Based on the systematic investigation of structure–activity relations on the cellular level, we constructed TF-CPP-SSL rationally by conjugating TF and CPP moieties to the liposomes via PEG3.4K and PEG2.0K, respectively, and found the optimum densities of TF and CPP were 1.8% and 4%, respectively. These liposomes had the highest targeting efficacy for brain microvascular endothelial cell and C6 cell uptake but avoided capture by normal cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer technology and coculture models of BBB and glioma C6 cells indicated that TF-CPP-SSL was transported across the BBB without drug leakage, liposome breakup, or cleavage of ligand. TF-CPP-SSL offered advantages for crossing the BBB and entering into glioma C6 cells. Real-time confocal viewing revealed that TF-CPP-SSL was entrapped in endosomes of glioma C6 cells and then escaped from lysosomes successfully to release the liposomal contents into the cytosol. Entrapped contents, such as doxorubicin, could then enter the nucleus to exert pharmacological effects.

  4. Design strategies and applications of circulating cell-mediated drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gloria B.; Dong, Cheng; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery systems, particularly nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems, possess a tremendous amount of potential to improve diagnostic and therapeutic effects of drugs. Controlled drug delivery targeted to a specific disease is designed to significantly improve the pharmaceutical effects of drugs and reduce their side effects. Unfortunately, only a few targeted drug delivery systems can achieve high targeting efficiency after intravenous injection, even with the development of numerous surface markers and targeting modalities. Thus, alternative drug and nanomedicine targeting approaches are desired. Circulating cells, such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, and stem cells, present innate disease sensing and homing properties. Hence, using living cells as drug delivery carriers has gained increasing interest in recent years. This review highlights the recent advances in the design of cell-mediated drug delivery systems and targeting mechanisms. The approaches of drug encapsulation/conjugation to cell-carriers, cell-mediated targeting mechanisms, and the methods of controlled drug release are elaborated here. Cell-based “live” targeting and delivery could be used to facilitate a more specific, robust, and smart payload distribution for the next-generation drug delivery systems. PMID:25984572

  5. Claudin 4-targeted protein incorporated into PLGA nanoparticles can mediate M cell targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksa, Thejani E.; Stover-Hamer, Mary; Fernandez, Xiomara; Eckelhoefer, Holly A.; Lo, David D.

    2009-01-01

    Polymer-based microparticles are in clinical use mainly for their ability to provide controlled release of peptides and compounds, but they are also being explored for their potential to deliver vaccines and drugs as suspensions directly into mucosal sites. It is generally assumed that uptake is mediated by epithelial M cells, but this is often not directly measured. To study the potential for optimizing M cell uptake of polymer microparticles in vivo, we produced sub-micron size PLGA particles incorporating a recombinant protein. This recombinant protein was produced with or without a c-terminal peptide previously shown to have high affinity binding to Claudin 4, a protein associated with M cell endocytosis. While the PLGA nanoparticles incorporate the protein throughout the matrix, much of the protein was also displayed on the surface, allowing us to take advantage of the binding activity of the targeting peptide. Accordingly, we found that instillation of these nanoparticles into the nasal passages or stomach of mice was found to significantly enhance their uptake by upper airway and intestinal M cells. Our results suggest that a reasonably simple nanoparticle manufacture method can provide insight into developing an effective needle-free delivery system. PMID:19896996

  6. Possibilities of acoustic thermometry for controlling targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Nemchenko, O. Yu.; Less, Yu. A.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Mansfel'd, A. D.

    2015-07-01

    Model acoustic thermometry experiments were conducted during heating of an aqueous liposome suspension. Heating was done to achieve the liposome phase transition temperature. At the moment of the phase transition, the thermal acoustic signal achieved a maximum and decreased, despite continued heating. During subsequent cooling of the suspension, when lipids again passed through the phase transition point, the thermal acoustic signal again increased, despite a reduction in temperature. This effect is related to an increase in ultrasound absorption by the liposome suspension at the moment of the lipid phase transition. The result shows that acoustic thermography can be used to control targeted delivery of drugs mixed in thermally sensitive liposomes, the integrity of which is violated during heating to the phase transition temperature.

  7. Coacervate delivery systems for proteins and small molecule drugs

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Coacervates represent an exciting new class of drug delivery vehicles, developed in the past decade as carriers of small molecule drugs and proteins. This review summarizes several well-described coacervate systems, including Elastin-like peptides for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutics,Heparin-based coacervates with synthetic polycations for controlled growth factor delivery,Carboxymethyl chitosan aggregates for oral drug delivery,Mussel adhesive protein and hyaluronic acid coacervates. Coacervates present advantages in their simple assembly and easy incorporation into tissue engineering scaffolds or as adjuncts to cell therapies. They are also amenable to functionalization such as for targeting or for enhancing the bioactivity of their cargo. These new drug carriers are anticipated to have broad applications and noteworthy impact in the near future. PMID:25138695

  8. Adamantane in Drug Delivery Systems and Surface Recognition.

    PubMed

    Štimac, Adela; Šekutor, Marina; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata; Frkanec, Leo; Frkanec, Ruža

    2017-02-16

    The adamantane moiety is widely applied in design and synthesis of new drug delivery systems and in surface recognition studies. This review focuses on liposomes, cyclodextrins, and dendrimers based on or incorporating adamantane derivatives. Our recent concept of adamantane as an anchor in the lipid bilayer of liposomes has promising applications in the field of targeted drug delivery and surface recognition. The results reported here encourage the development of novel adamantane-based structures and self-assembled supramolecular systems for basic chemical investigations as well as for biomedical application.

  9. Cyclodextrins in delivery systems: Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Tiwari, Ruchi; Rai, Awani K.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are a family of cyclic oligosaccharides with a hydrophilic outer surface and a lipophilic central cavity. CD molecules are relatively large with a number of hydrogen donors and acceptors and, thus in general, they do not permeate lipophilic membranes. In the pharmaceutical industry, CDs have mainly been used as complexing agents to increase aqueous solubility of poorly soluble drugs and to increase their bioavailability and stability. CDs are used in pharmaceutical applications for numerous purposes, including improving the bioavailability of drugs. Current CD-based therapeutics is described and possible future applications are discussed. CD-containing polymers are reviewed and their use in drug delivery is presented. Of specific interest is the use of CD-containing polymers to provide unique capabilities for the delivery of nucleic acids. Studies in both humans and animals have shown that CDs can be used to improve drug delivery from almost any type of drug formulation. Currently, there are approximately 30 different pharmaceutical products worldwide containing drug/CD complexes in the market. PMID:21814436

  10. Virus-Mimetic Fusogenic Exosomes for Direct Delivery of Integral Membrane Proteins to Target Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yoosoo; Hong, Yeonsun; Nam, Gi-Hoon; Chung, Jin Hwa; Koh, Eunee; Kim, In-San

    2017-02-06

    An efficient system for direct delivery of integral membrane proteins is successfully developed using a new biocompatible exosome-based platform. Fusogenic exosomes harboring viral fusogen, vascular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G protein, can fuse with and modify plasma membranes in a process called "membrane editing." This can facilitate the transfer of biologically active membrane proteins into the target cell membranes both in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Sequence-defined shuttles for targeted nucleic acid and protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Röder, Ruth; Wagner, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Molecular medicine opens into a space of novel specific therapeutic agents: intracellularly active drugs such as peptides, proteins or nucleic acids, which are not able to cross cell membranes and enter the intracellular space on their own. Through the development of cell-targeted shuttles for specific delivery, this restriction in delivery has the potential to be converted into an advantage. On the one hand, due to the multiple extra- and intracellular barriers, such carrier systems need to be multifunctional. On the other hand, they must be precise and reproducibly manufactured due to pharmaceutical reasons. Here we review the design of precise sequence-defined delivery carriers, including solid-phase synthesized peptides and nonpeptidic oligomers, or nucleotide-based carriers such as aptamers and origami nanoboxes.

  12. Delivery of Hydrogen Sulfide by Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia-reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gangbin; Yang, Li; Zhong, Lintao; Kutty, Shelby; Wang, Yuegang; Cui, Kai; Xiu, Jiancheng; Cao, Shiping; Huang, Qiaobing; Liao, Wangjun; Liao, Yulin; Wu, Juefei; Zhang, Wenzhu; Bin, Jianping

    2016-07-29

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an attractive agent for myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, systemic delivery of H2S may cause unwanted side effects. Ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction has become a promising tool for organ specific delivery of bioactive substance. We hypothesized that delivery of H2S by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and could avoid unwanted side effects. We prepared microbubbles carrying hydrogen sulfide (hs-MB) with different H2S/C3F8 ratios (4/0, 3/1, 2/2, 1/3, 0/4) and determined the optimal ratio. Release of H2S triggered by ultrasound was investigated. The cardioprotective effect of ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction was investigated in a rodent model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. The H2S/C3F8 ratio of 2/2 was found to be an optimal ratio to prepare stable hs-MB with higher H2S loading capability. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction triggered H2S release and increased the concentration of H2S in the myocardium and lung. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction limited myocardial infarct size, preserved left ventricular function and had no influence on haemodynamics and respiratory. This cardioprotective effect was associated with alleviation of apoptosis and oxidative stress. Delivery of H2S to the myocardium by ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and may avoid unwanted side effects.

  13. Delivery of Hydrogen Sulfide by Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia-reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gangbin; Yang, Li; Zhong, Lintao; Kutty, Shelby; Wang, Yuegang; Cui, Kai; Xiu, Jiancheng; Cao, Shiping; Huang, Qiaobing; Liao, Wangjun; Liao, Yulin; Wu, Juefei; Zhang, Wenzhu; Bin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an attractive agent for myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, however, systemic delivery of H2S may cause unwanted side effects. Ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction has become a promising tool for organ specific delivery of bioactive substance. We hypothesized that delivery of H2S by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and could avoid unwanted side effects. We prepared microbubbles carrying hydrogen sulfide (hs-MB) with different H2S/C3F8 ratios (4/0, 3/1, 2/2, 1/3, 0/4) and determined the optimal ratio. Release of H2S triggered by ultrasound was investigated. The cardioprotective effect of ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction was investigated in a rodent model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. The H2S/C3F8 ratio of 2/2 was found to be an optimal ratio to prepare stable hs-MB with higher H2S loading capability. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction triggered H2S release and increased the concentration of H2S in the myocardium and lung. Ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction limited myocardial infarct size, preserved left ventricular function and had no influence on haemodynamics and respiratory. This cardioprotective effect was associated with alleviation of apoptosis and oxidative stress. Delivery of H2S to the myocardium by ultrasound targeted hs-MB destruction attenuates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and may avoid unwanted side effects. PMID:27469291

  14. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shan; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guo-Jun; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2014-07-28

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common pathogenic bacterial infections and is found in the stomachs of approximately half of the world's population. It is the primary known cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, combined drug therapy as the general treatment in the clinic, the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, adverse reactions and poor patient compliance are major obstacles to the eradication of H. pylori. Oral site-specific drug delivery systems that could increase the longevity of the treatment agent at the target site might improve the therapeutic effect and avoid side effects. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems potentially prolong the gastric retention time and controlled/sustained release of a drug, thereby increasing the concentration of the drug at the application site, potentially improving its bioavailability and reducing the necessary dosage. Recommended gastroretentive drug delivery systems for enhancing local drug delivery include floating systems, bioadhesive systems and expandable systems. In this review, we summarize the important physiological parameters of the gastrointestinal tract that affect the gastric residence time. We then focus on various aspects useful in the development of gastroretentive drug delivery systems, including current trends and the progress of novel forms, especially with respect to their application for the treatment of H. pylori infections.

  15. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shan; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guo-Jun; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common pathogenic bacterial infections and is found in the stomachs of approximately half of the world’s population. It is the primary known cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, combined drug therapy as the general treatment in the clinic, the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, adverse reactions and poor patient compliance are major obstacles to the eradication of H. pylori. Oral site-specific drug delivery systems that could increase the longevity of the treatment agent at the target site might improve the therapeutic effect and avoid side effects. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems potentially prolong the gastric retention time and controlled/sustained release of a drug, thereby increasing the concentration of the drug at the application site, potentially improving its bioavailability and reducing the necessary dosage. Recommended gastroretentive drug delivery systems for enhancing local drug delivery include floating systems, bioadhesive systems and expandable systems. In this review, we summarize the important physiological parameters of the gastrointestinal tract that affect the gastric residence time. We then focus on various aspects useful in the development of gastroretentive drug delivery systems, including current trends and the progress of novel forms, especially with respect to their application for the treatment of H. pylori infections. PMID:25071326

  16. Planetary Regolith Delivery Systems for ISRU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mantovani, James G.; Townsend, Ivan I., III

    2012-01-01

    The challenges associated with collecting regolith on a planetary surface and delivering it to an in-situ resource utilization system differ significantly from similar activities conducted on Earth. Since system maintenance on a planetary body can be difficult or impossible to do, high reliability and service life are expected of a regolith delivery system. Mission costs impose upper limits on power and mass. The regolith delivery system must provide a leak-tight interface between the near-vacuum planetary surface and the pressurized ISRU system. Regolith delivery in amounts ranging from a few grams to tens of kilograms may be required. Finally, the spent regolith must be removed from the ISRU chamber and returned to the planetary environment via dust tolerant valves capable of operating and sealing over a large temperature range. This paper will describe pneumatic and auger regolith transfer systems that have already been field tested for ISRU, and discuss other systems that await future field testing.

  17. Prospective Preliminary In Vitro Investigation of a Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Conjugated with Ligand CD80 and VEGF Antibody As a Targeted Drug Delivery System for the Induction of Cell Death in Rodent Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kovach, AnneMarie Kay; Gambino, Jen M.; Nguyen, Vina; Nelson, Zach; Szasz, Taylor; Liao, Jun; Williams, Lakiesha; Bulla, Sandra; Prabhu, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Target drug deliveries using nanotechnology are a novel consideration in the treatment of cancer. We present herein an in vitro mouse model for the preliminary investigation of the efficacy of an iron oxide nanoparticle complex conjugated to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody and ligand cluster of differentiation 80 (CD80) for the purpose of eventual translational applications in the treatment of human osteosarcoma (OSA). The 35 nm diameter iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles are functionalized with an n-hydroxysuccinimide biocompatible coating and are conjugated on the surface to proteins VEGF antibody and ligand CD80. Combined, these proteins have the ability to target OSA cells and induce apoptosis. The proposed system was tested on a cancerous rodent osteoblast cell line (ATCCTMNPO CRL-2836) at four different concentrations (0.1, 1.0, 10.0, and 100.0 μg/mL) of ligand CD80 alone, VEGF antibody alone, and a combination thereof (CD80+VEGF). Systems were implemented every 24 h over different sequential treatment timelines: 24, 48, and 72 h, to find the optimal protein concentration required for a reduction in cell proliferation. Results demonstrated that a combination of ligand CD80 and VEGF antibody was consistently most effective at reducing aberrant osteoblastic proliferation for both the 24- and 72-h timelines. At 48 h, however, an increase in cell proliferation was documented for the 0.1 and 1 μg/mL groups. For the 24- and 72-h tests, concentrations of 1.0 μg/mL of CD80+VEGF and 0.1 μg/mL of VEGF antibody were most effective. Concentrations of 10.0 and 100.0 μg/mL of CD80+VEGF reduced cell proliferation, but not as remarkably as the 1.0 μg/mL concentration. In addition, cell proliferation data showed that multiple treatments (72-h test) induced cell death in the osteoblasts better than a single treatment. Future targeted drug delivery system research includes trials in OSA cell lines from greater phylum species

  18. History of Polymeric Gene Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Wagner, Ernst

    2017-04-01

    As an option for genetic disease treatment and an alternative for traditional cancer chemotherapy, gene therapy achieves significant attention. Nucleic acid delivery, however, remains a main challenge in human gene therapy. Polymer-based delivery systems offer a safer and promising route for therapeutic gene delivery. Over the past five decades, various cationic polymers have been optimized for increasingly effective nucleic acid transfer. This resulted in a chemical evolution of cationic polymers from the first-generation polycations towards bioinspired multifunctional sequence-defined polymers and nanocomposites. With the increasing of knowledge in molecular biological processes and rapid progress of macromolecular chemistry, further improvement of polymeric nucleic acid delivery systems will provide effective tool for gene-based therapy in the near future.

  19. Versatile surface engineering of porous nanomaterials with bioinspired polyphenol coatings for targeted and controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Wu, Shuxian; Wu, Cuichen; Qiu, Liping; Zhu, Guizhi; Cui, Cheng; Liu, Yuan; Hou, Weijia; Wang, Yanyue; Zhang, Liqin; Teng, I.-Ting; Yang, Huang-Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2016-04-01

    The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles, termed MSN@polyphenol. The polyphenol coatings not only improved colloidal stability and prevented premature drug leakage, but also provided a scaffold for immobilization of targeting moieties, such as aptamers. Both immobilization of targeting aptamers and synthesis of polyphenol coating are easily accomplished without the aid of any other organic reagents. Importantly, the polyphenol coating (EGCg) used in this study could be biodegraded by acidic pH and intracellular glutathione, resulting in the release of trapped anticancer drugs. Based on confocal fluorescence microscopy and cytotoxicity experiments, drug-loaded and polyphenol-coated MSNs were shown to possess highly efficient internalization and an apparent cytotoxic effect on target cancer, but not control, cells. Our results suggest that these highly biocompatible and biodegradable polyphenol-coated MSNs are promising vectors for controlled-release biomedical applications and cancer therapy.The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles

  20. Molecular design and nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery of functional proteins to target cellular pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Dhiral Ashwin

    functional proteins can be delivered intracellularly in vitro using nanoparticles and used to target key signaling proteins and regulate cell signaling pathways. The same concept of naturally occurring protein-protein interactions can also be implemented to selectively bring intracellular protein targets in close proximity to proteasomal degradation machinery in cells and effect their depletion from the cellular compartments. This approach will be able to not only target entire pool of proteins to ubiquitination-mediated degradation, but also to specific sub-pools of posttranslationally modified proteins in the cell, provided peptides having distinct binding affinities are identified for posttranslational modifications. This system can then be tested for intracellular protein delivery using nanoparticle carriers to identify roles of different posttranslational modifications on the protein's activity. In future work, we propose to develop a cellular detection system, based on GFP complementation, which can be used to evaluate the efficiency of different protein delivery carriers to internalize proteins into the cell cytosol. We envision the application of nanoscale materials as intracellular protein delivery vehicles to target diverse cell signaling pathways at the posttranslational level, and subsequent metabolic manipulation, which may have interesting therapeutic properties and can potentially target stem cell fate.

  1. Escort Aptamers: New Tools for the Targeted Delivery of Therapeutics into Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davydova, A.S.; Vorobjeva, M.A.; Venyaminova, A.G.

    2011-01-01

    Escort aptamers are DNA or RNA sequences with high affinity to certain cell-surface proteins, which can be used for targeted delivery of various agents into cells of a definite type. The peculiarities of the selection of escort aptamers are discussed in this review. The methods used in selection of escort aptamers via the SELEX technique are considered, including selection against isolated cell-surface proteins, cell fragments, living eukaryotic cells, and bacteria. Particular attention is given to the design and chemical modification of escort aptamers. The different fields of application of escort aptamers are described, including the targeted delivery of siRNAs, nanoparticles, toxins, and photoagents, as well as the identification of specific cell markers and the detection or isolation of cells of a definite type. The potential for the application of escort aptamers in the development of new therapeutic agents and diagnostic systems is also discussed. PMID:22649701

  2. Near-infrared light-responsive core-shell nanogels for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huaizhi; Trondoli, Anna Carolina; Zhu, Guizhi; Chen, Yan; Chang, Ya-Jen; Liu, Haipeng; Huang, Yu-Fen; Zhang, Xiaoling; Tan, Weihong

    2011-06-28

    A near-infrared light-responsive drug delivery platform based on Au-Ag nanorods (Au-Ag NRs) coated with DNA cross-linked polymeric shells was constructed. DNA complementarity has been applied to develop a polyacrylamide-based sol-gel transition system to encapsulate anticancer drugs into the gel scaffold. The Au-Ag NR-based nanogels can also be readily functionalized with targeting moieties, such as aptamers, for specific recognition of tumor cells. When exposed to NIR irradiation, the photothermal effect of the Au-Ag NRs leads to a rapid rise in the temperature of the surrounding gel, resulting in the fast release of the encapsulated payload with high controllability. In vitro study confirmed that aptamer-functionalized nanogels can be used as drug carriers for targeted drug delivery with remote control capability by NIR light with high spatial/temporal resolution.

  3. Goals for Postsecondary Instructional Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Stuart E.; Valentine, Carol A.

    Extrapolating from the trends in postsecondary instructional delivery systems identified by Brown, Lewis and Harcleroad, this report attempts to identify how these trends might be implemented in Oregon. Separating the systems into technology-centered and people-centered, the report proposes future applications of dial access systems, self learning…

  4. Dual drug delivery system for targeting H. pylori in the stomach: preparation and in vitro characterization of amoxicillin-loaded Carbopol® nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Harsha, Sree

    2012-01-01

    Background and methods: A dual (immediate/sustained-release) oral amoxicillin suspension was developed as a new dosage form to eradicate Helicobacter pylori. Carbopol®-loaded amoxi-cillin nanospheres could bind with the mucosa after delivery to the stomach and could increase the efficiency of the drug, providing both an immediate and a sustained action. Results: The objective of this research was to develop amoxicillin nanospheres using a spray-drying technique and to investigate such features as their particle size, drug content, percentage yield, surface morphology, in vitro release, and stability. The nanospheres had a particle size range of 280–320 nm after optimizing the preparation method using a central composite design. The drug content and percentage yield was 85.3% ± 0.7% and 92.8% ± 0.9%, respectively. The in vitro release profile of the amoxicillin nanospheres was consistent with a Korsmeyer-Peppas pattern, and the release after one hour was 19%, while for the original drug, amoxicillin, under the same conditions, 90% was released in the first 30 minutes. Conclusion: The nanospheres used in this study enabled controlled release of amoxicillin over an extended period of time for up to 12 hours and the formulation was stable for 12 months. PMID:22969298

  5. Tobacco mosaic virus-based protein nanoparticles and nanorods for chemotherapy delivery targeting breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bruckman, Michael A.; Czapar, Anna E.; VanMeter, Allen; Randolph, Lauren N.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2016-01-01

    Drug delivery systems are required for drug targeting to avoid adverse effects associated with chemotherapy treatment regimes. Our approach is focused on the study and development of plant virus-based materials as drug delivery systems; specifically, this work focuses on the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Native TMV forms a hollow, high aspect-ratio nanotube measuring 300 × 18 nm with a 4 nm-wide central channel. Heat-transformation can be applied to TMV yielding spherical nanoparticles (SNPs) measuring ~50 nm in size. While bioconjugate chemistries have been established to modify the TMV rod, such methods have not yet been described for the SNP platform. In this work, we probed the reactivity of SNPs toward bioconjugate reactions targeting lysine, glutamine/aspartic acid, and cysteine residues. We demonstrate functionalization of SNPs using these chemistries yielding efficient payload conjugation. In addition to covalent labeling techniques, we developed encapsulation techniques, where the cargo is loaded into the SNP during heat-transition from rod-to-sphere. Finally, we developed TMV and SNP formulations loaded with the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin, and we demonstrate the application of TMV rods and spheres for chemotherapy delivery targeting breast cancer. PMID:26941034

  6. Tobacco mosaic virus-based protein nanoparticles and nanorods for chemotherapy delivery targeting breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bruckman, Michael A; Czapar, Anna E; VanMeter, Allen; Randolph, Lauren N; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-06-10

    Drug delivery systems are required for drug targeting to avoid adverse effects associated with chemotherapy treatment regimes. Our approach is focused on the study and development of plant virus-based materials as drug delivery systems; specifically, this work focuses on the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Native TMV forms a hollow, high aspect-ratio nanotube measuring 300×18nm with a 4nm-wide central channel. Heat-transformation can be applied to TMV yielding spherical nanoparticles (SNPs) measuring ~50nm in size. While bioconjugate chemistries have been established to modify the TMV rod, such methods have not yet been described for the SNP platform. In this work, we probed the reactivity of SNPs toward bioconjugate reactions targeting lysine, glutamine/aspartic acid, and cysteine residues. We demonstrate functionalization of SNPs using these chemistries yielding efficient payload conjugation. In addition to covalent labeling techniques, we developed encapsulation techniques, where the cargo is loaded into the SNP during heat-transition from rod-to-sphere. Finally, we developed TMV and SNP formulations loaded with the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin, and we demonstrate the application of TMV rods and spheres for chemotherapy delivery targeting breast cancer.

  7. A Molecular Communication System Model for Particulate Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Chahibi, Youssef; Pierobon, Massimiliano; Song, Sang Ok; Akyildiz, Ian F

    2013-12-01

    The goal of a drug delivery system (DDS) is to convey a drug where the medication is needed, while, at the same time, preventing the drug from affecting other healthy parts of the body. Drugs composed of micro- or nano-sized particles (particulate DDS) that are able to cross barriers which prevent large particles from escaping the bloodstream are used in the most advanced solutions. Molecular communication (MC) is used as an abstraction of the propagation of drug particles in the body. MC is a new paradigm in communication research where the exchange of information is achieved through the propagation of molecules. Here, the transmitter is the drug injection, the receiver is the drug delivery, and the channel is realized by the transport of drug particles, thus enabling the analysis and design of a particulate DDS using communication tools. This is achieved by modeling the MC channel as two separate contributions, namely, the cardiovascular network model and the drug propagation network. The cardiovascular network model allows to analytically compute the blood velocity profile in every location of the cardiovascular system given the flow input by the heart. The drug propagation network model allows the analytical expression of the drug delivery rate at the targeted site given the drug injection rate. Numerical results are also presented to assess the flexibility and accuracy of the developed model. The study of novel optimization techniques for a more effective and less invasive drug delivery will be aided by this model, while paving the way for novel communication techniques for Intrabody communication networks.

  8. Thiolated polymers as mucoadhesive drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sarah; Cummins, Wayne; O' Donovan, Orla; Hughes, Helen; Owens, Eleanor

    2017-03-30

    Mucoadhesion is the process of binding a material to the mucosal layer of the body. Utilising both natural and synthetic polymers, mucoadhesive drug delivery is a method of controlled drug release which allows for intimate contact between the polymer and a target tissue. It has the potential to increase bioavailability, decrease potential side effects and offer protection to more sensitive drugs such as proteins and peptide based drugs. The thiolation of polymers has, in the last number of years, come to the fore of mucoadhesive drug delivery, markedly improving mucoadhesion due to the introduction of free thiol groups onto the polymer backbone while also offering a more cohesive polymeric matrix for the slower and more controlled release of drug. This review explores the concept of mucoadhesion and the recent advances in both the polymers and the methods of thiolation used in the synthesis of mucoadhesive drug delivery devices.

  9. Current Multistage Drug Delivery Systems Based on the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Binlong; Dai, Wenbing; He, Bing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Yiguang; Zhang, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The development of traditional tumor-targeted drug delivery systems based on EPR effect and receptor-mediated endocytosis is very challenging probably because of the biological complexity of tumors as well as the limitations in the design of the functional nano-sized delivery systems. Recently, multistage drug delivery systems (Ms-DDS) triggered by various specific tumor microenvironment stimuli have emerged for tumor therapy and imaging. In response to the differences in the physiological blood circulation, tumor microenvironment, and intracellular environment, Ms-DDS can change their physicochemical properties (such as size, hydrophobicity, or zeta potential) to achieve deeper tumor penetration, enhanced cellular uptake, timely drug release, as well as effective endosomal escape. Based on these mechanisms, Ms-DDS could deliver maximum quantity of drugs to the therapeutic targets including tumor tissues, cells, and subcellular organelles and eventually exhibit the highest therapeutic efficacy. In this review, we expatiate on various responsive modes triggered by the tumor microenvironment stimuli, introduce recent advances in multistage nanoparticle systems, especially the multi-stimuli responsive delivery systems, and discuss their functions, effects, and prospects. PMID:28255348

  10. Dendrimeric Systems and Their Applications in Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Burçin; Bozdağ Pehlivan, Sibel; Ünlü, Nurşen

    2013-01-01

    Ophthalmic drug delivery is one of the most attractive and challenging research area for pharmaceutical scientists and ophthalmologists. Absorption of an ophthalmic drug in conventional dosage forms is seriously limited by physiological conditions. The use of nonionic or ionic biodegradable polymers in aqueous solutions and colloidal dosage forms such as liposomes, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, microspheres, microcapsules, microemulsions, and dendrimers has been studied to overcome the problems mentioned above. Dendrimers are a new class of polymeric materials. The unique nanostructured architecture of dendrimers has been studied to examine their role in delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents. Dendrimers can enhance drug's water solubility, bioavailability, and biocompatibility and can be applied for different routes of drug administration successfully. Permeability enhancer properties of dendrimers were also reported. The use of dendrimers can also reduce toxicity versus activity and following an appropriate application route they allow the delivery of the drug to the targeted site and provide desired pharmacokinetic parameters. Therefore, dendrimeric drug delivery systems are of interest in ocular drug delivery. In this review, the limitations related to eye's unique structure, the advantages of dendrimers, and the potential applications of dendrimeric systems to ophthalmology including imaging, drug, peptide, and gene delivery will be discussed. PMID:24396306

  11. Electrospun Nanofibers of Guar Galactomannan for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hsiao Mei Annie

    2011-12-01

    Guar galactomannan is a biodegradable polysaccharide used widely in the food industry but also in the cosmetics, pharmaceutical, oil drilling, textile and paper industries. Guar consists of a mannose backbone and galactose side groups that are both susceptible to enzyme degradation, a unique property that can be explored for targeted drug delivery especially since those enzymes are naturally secreted by the microflora in human colon. The present study can be divided into three parts. In the first part, we discuss ways to modify guar to produce nanofibers by electrospinning, a process that involves the application of an electric field to a polymer solution or melt to facilitate production of fibers in the sub-micron range. Nanofibers are currently being explored as the next generation of drug carriers due to its many advantages, none more important than the fact that nanofibers are on a size scale that is a fraction of a hair's width and have large surface-to-volume ratio. The incorporation and controlled release of nano-sized drugs is one way in which nanofibers are being utilized in drug delivery. In the second part of the study, we explore various methods to crosslink guar nanofibers as a means to promote water-resistance in a potential drug carrier. The scope and utility of water-resistant guar nanofibers can only be fully appreciated when subsequent drug release studies are carried out. To that end, the third part of our study focuses on understanding the kinetics and diffusion mechanisms of a model drug, Rhodamine B, through moderately-swelling (crosslinked) hydrogel nanofibers in comparison to rapidly-swelling (non-crosslinked) nanofibers. Along the way, our investigations led us to a novel electrospinning set-up that has a unique collector designed to capture aligned nanofibers. These aligned nanofiber bundles can then be twisted to hold them together like yarn. From a practical standpoint, these yarns are advantageous because they come freely suspended and

  12. Intranasal microemulsion for targeted nose to brain delivery in neurocysticercosis: Role of docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Rajshree L; Bharkad, Gopal P; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-10-01

    Intranasal Microemulsions (MEs) for nose to brain delivery of a novel combination of Albendazole sulfoxide (ABZ-SO) and Curcumin (CUR) for Neurocysticercosis (NCC), a brain infection are reported. MEs prepared by simple solution exhibited a globule size <20nm, negative zeta potential and good stability. The docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ME revealed high and rapid ex vivo permeation of drugs through sheep nasal mucosa. Intranasal DHA ME resulted in high brain concentrations and 10.76 (ABZ-SO) and 3.24 (CUR) fold enhancement in brain area-under-the-curve (AUC) compared to intravenous DHA MEs at the same dose. Direct nose to brain transport (DTP) of >95% was seen for both drugs. High drug targeting efficiency (DTE) to the brain compared to Capmul ME and drug solution (P<0.05) suggested the role of DHA in aiding nose to brain delivery. Histopathology study confirmed no significant changes. High efficacy of ABZ-SO: CUR (100:10ng/mL) DHA ME in vitro on Taenia solium cysts was confirmed by complete ALP inhibition and disintegration of cysts at 96h. Considering that the brain concentration at 24h was 1400±160.1ng/g (ABZ-SO) and 120±35.2ng/g (CUR), the in vitro efficacy seen at a 10 fold lower concentration of the drugs strongly supports the assumption of clinical efficacy. The intranasal DHA ME is a promising delivery system for targeted nose to brain delivery.

  13. 'One-pot' synthesis of multifunctional GSH-CdTe quantum dots for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqin; Tang, Yajun; Cai, Bing; Fan, Hongsong

    2014-06-13

    A novel quantum dots-based multifunctional nanovehicle (DOX-QD-PEG-FA) was designed for targeted drug delivery, fluorescent imaging, tracking, and cancer therapy, in which the GSH-CdTe quantum dots play a key role in imaging and drug delivery. To exert curative effects, the antineoplastic drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) was loaded on the GSH-CdTe quantum dots through a condensation reaction. Meanwhile, a polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell was introduced to wrap the DOX-QD, thus stabilizing the structure and preventing clearance and drug release during systemic circulation. To actively target cancer cells and prevent the nanovehicles from being absorbed by normal cells, the nanoparticles were further decorated with folic acid (FA), allowing them to target HeLa cells that express the FA receptor. The multifunctional DOX-QD-PEG-FA conjugates were simply prepared using the 'one pot' method. In vitro study demonstrated that this simple, multifunctional nanovehicle can deliver DOX to the targeted cancer cells and localize the nanoparticles. After reaching the tumor cells, the FA on the DOX-QD-PEG surface allowed folate receptor recognition and increased the drug concentration to realize a higher curative effect. This novel, multifunctional DOX-QD-PEG-FA system shows great potential for tumor imaging, targeting, and therapy.

  14. Dose error analysis for a scanned proton beam delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Wang, N.; Miller, D. W.; Yang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    All particle beam scanning systems are subject to dose delivery errors due to errors in position, energy and intensity of the delivered beam. In addition, finite scan speeds, beam spill non-uniformities, and delays in detector, detector electronics and magnet responses will all contribute errors in delivery. In this paper, we present dose errors for an 8 × 10 × 8 cm3 target of uniform water equivalent density with 8 cm spread out Bragg peak and a prescribed dose of 2 Gy. Lower doses are also analyzed and presented later in the paper. Beam energy errors and errors due to limitations of scanning system hardware have been included in the analysis. By using Gaussian shaped pencil beams derived from measurements in the research room of the James M Slater Proton Treatment and Research Center at Loma Linda, CA and executing treatment simulations multiple times, statistical dose errors have been calculated in each 2.5 mm cubic voxel in the target. These errors were calculated by delivering multiple treatments to the same volume and calculating the rms variation in delivered dose at each voxel in the target. The variations in dose were the result of random beam delivery errors such as proton energy, spot position and intensity fluctuations. The results show that with reasonable assumptions of random beam delivery errors, the spot scanning technique yielded an rms dose error in each voxel less than 2% or 3% of the 2 Gy prescribed dose. These calculated errors are within acceptable clinical limits for radiation therapy.

  15. Liposomes as Advanced Delivery Systems for Nutraceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Shade, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Liposomes are delivery vehicles for transporting substances into the body effectively via facilitating absorption directly in the mouth or by preventing breakdown by stomach acid. Since the 1970s, liposomes have been investigated as potential drug delivery systems because of their biocompatibility and ability to incorporate both hydrophilic and hydrophobic therapeutic agents. Despite early promise, it was decades later, in the late 1990s to the present, that liposome technologies could create successful commercial products. Oral deliveries are recently emerging as availability of quality phospholipids and reliable homogenization and sizing equipment have become routinely available. Nutritional industry use of liposomes will grow rapidly in the next 5–10 y. High-quality products with more complex mixtures of pure compounds and complex botanical mixtures will offer clinicians less-invasive options for dosing and delivery of these actives. PMID:27053934

  16. Chitosan coatings to control release and target tissues for therapeutic delivery.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Jessica Amber; Wells, Carlos Montez; McGraw, Gregory S; Velasquez Pulgarin, Diego A; Whitaker, Marsalas D; Pruitt, Reginald L; Bumgardner, Joel David

    2015-07-01

    The natural biopolymer chitosan has versatile applications in therapeutic delivery. Coating drug delivery matrices or biomaterials with chitosan offers several advantages in drug delivery, including control of drug release, slowing degradation rate and improving biocompatibility. Advanced uses of chitosan in coating form include targeting drug delivery vehicles to specific tissue as well as providing a stimulus-controlled release response. The present review summarizes the current applications of chitosan coatings in the context of different biomaterial delivery technologies, as well as future directions of chitosan coatings for drug delivery technologies under development.

  17. Multifunctional, stimuli-sensitive nanoparticulate systems for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanoparticulate pharmaceutical drug delivery systems (NDDSs) to enhance the in vivo effectiveness of drugs is now well established. The development of multifunctional and stimulus-sensitive NDDSs is an active area of current research. Such NDDSs can have long circulation times, target the site of the disease and enhance the intracellular delivery of a drug. This type of NDDS can also respond to local stimuli that are characteristic of the pathological site by, for example, releasing an entrapped drug or shedding a protective coating, thus facilitating the interaction between drug-loaded nanocarriers and target cells or tissues. In addition, imaging contrast moieties can be attached to these carriers to track their real-time biodistribution and accumulation in target cells or tissues. Here, I highlight recent developments with multifunctional and stimuli-sensitive NDDSs and their therapeutic potential for diseases including cancer, cardiovascular diseases and infectious diseases. PMID:25287120

  18. Niosomes: a controlled and novel drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Rajera, Rampal; Nagpal, Kalpana; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Mishra, Dina Nath

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade formulation of vesicles as a tool to improve drug delivery, has created a lot of interest amongst the scientist working in the area of drug delivery systems. Vesicular system such as liposomes, niosomes, transferosomes, pharmacosomes and ethosomes provide an alternative to improve the drug delivery. Niosomes play an important role owing to their nonionic properties, in such drug delivery system. Design and development of novel drug delivery system (NDDS) has two prerequisites. First, it should deliver the drug in accordance with a predetermined rate and second it should release therapeutically effective amount of drug at the site of action. Conventional dosage forms are unable to meet these requisites. Niosomes are essentially non-ionic surfactant based multilamellar or unilamellar vesicles in which an aqueous solution of solute is entirely enclosed by a membrane resulting from the organization of surfactant macromolecules as bilayer. Niosomes are formed on hydration of non-ionic surfactant film which eventually hydrates imbibing or encapsulating the hydrating aqueous solution. The main aim of development of niosomes is to control the release of drug in a sustained way, modification of distribution profile of drug and for targeting the drug to the specific body site. This paper deals with composition, characterization/evaluation, merits, demerits and applications of niosomes.

  19. pH-responsive hybrid quantum dots for targeting hypoxic tumor siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, HongYan; Zhang, ShengYu; Ling, Yong; Meng, GuoLiang; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Wei

    2015-12-28

    Hypoxia is a characteristic of cancer and plays a key role in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and resistance to cancer therapies. SiRNA treatment is effective against hypoxic tumors by gene silencing. However, siRNA delivery to the hypoxic regions of solid tumors still presents a challenge due to the distance from blood vessels and the increased presence of efflux transporters. Therefore, tumor therapies would be improved through the immediate development of an effective siRNA delivery system to hypoxic regions. To this end, we synthesized a system to deliver HIF-1α siRNA into hypoxic tumor cells. The system consists of a functional shell composed of 2-deoxyglucose (DG)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) connected with the compound of lipoic acid, lysine and 9-poly-d-arginine (LA-Lys-9R) by a hydrazone bond and a core of CdTe quantum dots (QDs). The molecular structure of DG-PEG-LA-Lys-9R was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The multifunctional CdTe QDs measured approximately 200 nm and showed excellent biocompatibility, perfect siRNA binding capability and enhanced hypoxic tumor targeting. Importantly, the system described here is pH-responsive with a hydrazone bond; therefore, it avoids GLUT1 receptor-mediated endocytic recycling, resulting in irreversible delivery of the siRNA. We used Western blots to confirm the superior gene silencing efficiency induced by the DG-PEG-LA-Lys-9R with hydrazone modified CdTe QDs. Here, we demonstrate high efficacy of the siRNA tumor delivery system using in vitro and in vivo experiments. In addition, these studies demonstrate that pH-responsive hybrid quantum dots show improved antitumor efficacy with decreased organ toxicity, indicating a promising siRNA delivery system for hypoxic cancer therapy.

  20. Going beyond the liver: progress and challenges of targeted delivery of siRNA therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lorenzer, Cornelia; Dirin, Mehrdad; Winkler, Anna-Maria; Baumann, Volker; Winkler, Johannes

    2015-04-10

    Therapeutic gene silencing promises significant progress in pharmacotherapy, including considerable expansion of the druggable target space and the possibility for treating orphan diseases. Technological hurdles have complicated the efficient use of therapeutic oligonucleotides, and siRNA agents suffer particularly from insufficient pharmacokinetic properties and poor cellular uptake. Intense development and evolution of delivery systems have resulted in efficient uptake predominantly in liver tissue, in which practically all nanoparticulate and liposomal delivery systems show the highest accumulation. The most efficacious strategies include liposomes and bioconjugations with N-acetylgalactosamine. Both are in early clinical evaluation stages for treatment of liver-associated diseases. Approaches for achieving knockdown in other tissues and tumors have been proven to be more complicated. Selective targeting to tumors may be enabled through careful modulation of physical properties, such as particle size, or by taking advantage of specific targeting ligands. Significant barriers stand between sufficient accumulation in other organs, including endothelial barriers, cellular membranes, and the endosome. The brain, which is shielded by the blood-brain barrier, is of particular interest to facilitate efficient oligonucleotide therapy of neurological diseases. Transcytosis of the blood-brain barrier through receptor-specific docking is investigated to increase accumulation in the central nervous system. In this review, the current clinical status of siRNA therapeutics is summarized, as well as innovative and promising preclinical concepts employing tissue- and tumor-targeted ligands. The requirements and the respective advantages and drawbacks of bioconjugates and ligand-decorated lipid or polymeric particles are discussed.

  1. Investigation of xFe2O4 (x = Mn, Co) doped hydroxylapatite ferromagnetic biomaterials for the treatment of damaged bone and magnetically targeted drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Vikas; Singh, K. J.; Kaur, Kulwinder; Bhatia, Gaurav

    2016-05-01

    Magnetically attracted MnFe2O4 and CoFe2O4 doped hydroxylapatite samples have been prepared by using co-precipitation method in the laboratory. Bioactive nature of samples has been confirmed from XRD spectra. Ferromagnetic behavior of samples has been studied by using vibration sample magnetometer. Human osteoblast cell line MG63 has been used to explore the cell viability of samples. Drug carrier ability of samples has been checked with gentamycin as an antibiotic and results show that samples can be used as excellent drug carriers. Drug loaded samples can be easily targeted to specific area due to their attractive nature towards external magnetic field. Our results indicate that prepared samples possess good bioactive as well as ferromagnetic behavior with drug carrier ability and hence, our samples can be potential candidates for the clinical applications.

  2. Carrier-Based Drug Delivery System for Treatment of Acne

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Amber; Kumar Sonker, Avinesh

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 95% of the population suffers at some point in their lifetime from acne vulgaris. Acne is a multifactorial disease of the pilosebaceous unit. This inflammatory skin disorder is most common in adolescents but also affects neonates, prepubescent children, and adults. Topical conventional systems are associated with various side effects. Novel drug delivery systems have been used to reduce the side effect of drugs commonly used in the topical treatment of acne. Topical treatment of acne with active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) makes direct contact with the target site before entering the systemic circulation which reduces the systemic side effect of the parenteral or oral administration of drug. The objective of the present review is to discuss the conventional delivery systems available for acne, their drawbacks, and limitations. The advantages, disadvantages, and outcome of using various carrier-based delivery systems like liposomes, niosomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and so forth, are explained. This paper emphasizes approaches to overcome the drawbacks and limitations associated with the conventional system and the advances and application that are poised to further enhance the efficacy of topical acne formulations, offering the possibility of simplified dosing regimen that may improve treatment outcomes using novel delivery system. PMID:24688376

  3. Smart surface-enhanced Raman scattering traceable drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Tang, Yonghong; Dai, Sheng; Kleitz, Freddy; Qiao, Shi Zhang

    2016-06-01

    A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells.A novel smart nanoparticle-based system has been developed for tracking intracellular drug delivery through surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This new drug delivery system (DDS) shows targeted cytotoxicity towards cancer cells via pH-cleavable covalent carboxylic hydrazone links and the SERS tracing capability based on gold@silica nanocarriers. Doxorubicin, as a model anticancer drug, was employed to compare SERS with conventional fluorescence tracing approaches. It is evident that SERS demonstrates higher sensitivity and resolution, revealing intracellular details, as the strengths of the original Raman signals can be amplified by SERS. Importantly, non-destructive SERS will provide the designed DDS with great autonomy and potential to study the dynamic procedures of non-fluorescent drug delivery into living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03869g

  4. Quetiapine Nanoemulsion for Intranasal Drug Delivery: Evaluation of Brain-Targeting Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Boche, Mithila; Pokharkar, Varsha

    2016-05-20

    To evaluate the possibility of improved drug delivery of quetiapine fumarate (QTP), a nanoemulsion system was developed for intranasal delivery. Effects of different HLBs of Emalex LWIS 10, PEG 400 and Transcutol P, as co-surfactants, were studied on isotropic region of pseudoternary-phase diagrams of nanoemulsion system composed of capmul MCM (CPM) as oil phase, Tween 80 as surfactant and water. Phase behaviour, globule size, transmission electron microscope (TEM) photographs and brain-targeting efficiency of quetiapine nanoemulsion were investigated. In vitro dissolution study of optimised nanoemulsion formulation, with mean diameter 144 ± 0.5 nm, showed more than twofold increase in drug release as compared with pure drug. According to results of in vivo tissue distribution study in Wistar rats, intranasal administration of QTP-loaded nanoemulsion had shorter T max compared with that of intravenous administration. Higher drug transport efficiency (DTE%) and direct nose-to-brain drug transport (DTP%) was achieved by nanoemulsion. The nanoemulsion system may be a promising strategy for brain-targeted delivery of QTP.

  5. Educational Power Tools: New Instructional Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    1991-01-01

    New instructional delivery systems are needed to individualize instruction, relieve the teacher's burden as sole information provider, and meet the challenge of student diversity. Microcomputers, optical memory devices, videodiscs, and hypermedia programs are being combined to create integrated learning systems, multimedia work stations, and other…

  6. Transporter targeted gatifloxacin prodrugs: synthesis, permeability, and topical ocular delivery.

    PubMed

    Vooturi, Sunil K; Kadam, Rajendra S; Kompella, Uday B

    2012-11-05

    In this work, we aim to design and synthesize prodrugs of gatifloxacin targeting organic cation transporter (OCT), monocarboxylate transporter (MCT), and ATB (0, +) transporters and to identify a prodrug with enhanced delivery to the back of the eye. Dimethylamino-propyl, carboxy-propyl, and amino-propyl(2-methyl) derivatives of gatifloxacin (GFX), DMAP-GFX, CP-GFX, and APM-GFX, were designed and synthesized to target OCT, MCT, and ATB (0, +) transporters, respectively. An LC-MS method was developed to analyze drug and prodrug levels in various studies. Solubility and log D (pH 7.4) were measured for prodrugs and the parent drug. The permeability of the prodrugs was determined in the cornea, conjunctiva, and sclera-choroid-retinal pigment epitheluim (SCRPE) and compared with gatifloxacin using an Ussing chamber assembly. Permeability mechanisms were elucidated by determining the transport in the presence of transporter specific inhibitors. 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium iodide (MPP+), nicotinic acid sodium salt, and α-methyl-DL-tryptophan were used to inhibit OCT, MCT, and ATB (0, +) transporters, respectively. A prodrug selected based on in vitro studies was administered as an eye drop to pigmented rabbits, and the delivery to various eye tissues including vitreous humor was compared with gatifloxacin dosing. DMAP-GFX exhibited 12.8-fold greater solubility than GFX. All prodrugs were more lipophilic, with the measured log D (pH 7.4) values ranging from 0.05 to 1.04, when compared to GFX (log D: -1.15). DMAP-GFX showed 1.4-, 1.8-, and 1.9-fold improvement in permeability across the cornea, conjunctiva, and SCRPE when compared to GFX. Moreover, it exhibited reduced permeability in the presence of MPP+ (competitive inhibitor of OCT), indicating OCT-mediated transport. CP-GFX showed 1.2-, 2.3-, and 2.5-fold improvement in permeability across the cornea, conjunctiva, and SCRPE, respectively. In the presence of nicotinic acid (competitive inhibitor of MCT), the

  7. Modern prodrug design for targeted oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Arik; Zimmermann, Ellen M; Ben-Shabat, Shimon

    2014-10-14

    The molecular information that became available over the past two decades significantly influenced the field of drug design and delivery at large, and the prodrug approach in particular. While the traditional prodrug approach was aimed at altering various physiochemical parameters, e.g., lipophilicity and charge state, the modern approach to prodrug design considers molecular/cellular factors, e.g., membrane influx/efflux transporters and cellular protein expression and distribution. This novel targeted-prodrug approach is aimed to exploit carrier-mediated transport for enhanced intestinal permeability, as well as specific enzymes to promote activation of the prodrug and liberation of the free parent drug. The purpose of this article is to provide a concise overview of this modern prodrug approach, with useful successful examples for its utilization. In the past the prodrug approach used to be viewed as a last option strategy, after all other possible solutions were exhausted; nowadays this is no longer the case, and in fact, the prodrug approach should be considered already in the very earliest development stages. Indeed, the prodrug approach becomes more and more popular and successful. A mechanistic prodrug design that aims to allow intestinal permeability by specific transporters, as well as activation by specific enzymes, may greatly improve the prodrug efficiency, and allow for novel oral treatment options.

  8. Hypoxia-targeted 131I therapy of hepatocellular cancer after systemic mesenchymal stem cell-mediated sodium iodide symporter gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Müller, Andrea M; Schmohl, Kathrin A; Knoop, Kerstin; Schug, Christina; Urnauer, Sarah; Hagenhoff, Anna; Clevert, Dirk-André; Ingrisch, Michael; Niess, Hanno; Carlsen, Janette; Zach, Christian; Wagner, Ernst; Bartenstein, Peter; Nelson, Peter J; Spitzweg, Christine

    2016-08-23

    Adoptively transferred mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) home to solid tumors. Biologic features within the tumor environment can be used to selectively activate transgenes in engineered MSCs after tumor invasion. One of the characteristic features of solid tumors is hypoxia. We evaluated a hypoxia-based imaging and therapy strategy to target expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene to experimental hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) delivered by MSCs.MSCs engineered to express transgenes driven by a hypoxia-responsive promoter showed robust transgene induction under hypoxia as demonstrated by mCherry expression in tumor cell spheroid models, or radioiodide uptake using NIS. Subcutaneous and orthotopic HCC xenograft mouse models revealed significant levels of perchlorate-sensitive NIS-mediated tumoral radioiodide accumulation by tumor-recruited MSCs using 123I-scintigraphy or 124I-positron emission tomography. Functional NIS expression was further confirmed by ex vivo 123I-biodistribution analysis. Administration of a therapeutic dose of 131I in mice treated with NIS-transfected MSCs resulted in delayed tumor growth and reduced tumor perfusion, as shown by contrast-enhanced sonography, and significantly prolonged survival of mice bearing orthotopic HCC tumors. Interestingly, radioiodide uptake into subcutaneous tumors was not sufficient to induce therapeutic effects. Our results demonstrate the potential of using tumor hypoxia-based approaches to drive radioiodide therapy in non-thyroidal tumors.

  9. Hypoxia-targeted 131I therapy of hepatocellular cancer after systemic mesenchymal stem cell-mediated sodium iodide symporter gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Andrea M.; Schmohl, Kathrin A.; Knoop, Kerstin; Schug, Christina; Urnauer, Sarah; Hagenhoff, Anna; Clevert, Dirk-André; Ingrisch, Michael; Niess, Hanno; Carlsen, Janette; Zach, Christian; Wagner, Ernst; Bartenstein, Peter; Nelson, Peter J.; Spitzweg, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Adoptively transferred mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) home to solid tumors. Biologic features within the tumor environment can be used to selectively activate transgenes in engineered MSCs after tumor invasion. One of the characteristic features of solid tumors is hypoxia. We evaluated a hypoxia-based imaging and therapy strategy to target expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene to experimental hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) delivered by MSCs. MSCs engineered to express transgenes driven by a hypoxia-responsive promoter showed robust transgene induction under hypoxia as demonstrated by mCherry expression in tumor cell spheroid models, or radioiodide uptake using NIS. Subcutaneous and orthotopic HCC xenograft mouse models revealed significant levels of perchlorate-sensitive NIS-mediated tumoral radioiodide accumulation by tumor-recruited MSCs using 123I-scintigraphy or 124I-positron emission tomography. Functional NIS expression was further confirmed by ex vivo 123I-biodistribution analysis. Administration of a therapeutic dose of 131I in mice treated with NIS-transfected MSCs resulted in delayed tumor growth and reduced tumor perfusion, as shown by contrast-enhanced sonography, and significantly prolonged survival of mice bearing orthotopic HCC tumors. Interestingly, radioiodide uptake into subcutaneous tumors was not sufficient to induce therapeutic effects. Our results demonstrate the potential of using tumor hypoxia-based approaches to drive radioiodide therapy in non-thyroidal tumors. PMID:27458162

  10. P-selectin is a nanotherapeutic delivery target in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Elkabets, Moshe; Li, Hongyan; Shah, Janki; Brook, Samuel; Wang, Feng; Adler, Keren; Baut, Emily; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Jena, Prakrit V; Gardner, Eric E; Poirier, John T; Rudin, Charles M; Baselga, José; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Heller, Daniel A

    2016-06-29

    Disseminated tumors are poorly accessible to nanoscale drug delivery systems because of the vascular barrier, which attenuates extravasation at the tumor site. We investigated P-selectin, a molecule expressed on activated vasculature that facilitates metastasis by arresting tumor cells at the endothelium, for its potential to target metastases by arresting nanomedicines at the tumor endothelium. We found that P-selectin is expressed on cancer cells in many human tumors. To develop a targeted drug delivery platform, we used a fucosylated polysaccharide with nanomolar affinity to P-selectin. The nanoparticles targeted the tumor microenvironment to localize chemotherapeutics and a targeted MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase) inhibitor at tumor sites in both primary and metastatic models, resulting in superior antitumor efficacy. In tumors devoid of P-selectin, we found that ionizing radiation guided the nanoparticles to the disease site by inducing P-selectin expression. Radiation concomitantly produced an abscopal-like phenomenon wherein P-selectin appeared in unirradiated tumor vasculature, suggesting a potential strategy to target disparate drug classes to almost any tumor.

  11. Intracellular targeting delivery of liposomal drugs to solid tumors based on EPR effects.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kazuo

    2011-03-18

    The success of an effective drug delivery system using liposomes for solid tumor targeting based on EPR effects is highly dependent on both size ranging from 100-200 nm in diameter and prolonged circulation half-life in the blood. A major development was the synthesis of PEG-liposomes with a prolonged circulation time in the blood. Active targeting of immunoliposomes to the solid tumor tissue can be achieved by the Fab' fragment which is better than whole IgG in terms of designing PEG-immunoliposomes with prolonged circulation. For intracellular targeting delivery to solid tumors based on EPR effects, transferrin-PEG-liposomes can stay in blood circulation for a long time and extravasate into the extravascular of tumor tissue by the EPR effect as PEG-liposomes. The extravasated transferrin-PEG-liposomes can maintain anti cancer drugs in interstitial space for a longer period, and deliver them into the cytoplasm of tumor cells via transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis. Transferrin-PEG-liposomes improve the safety and efficacy of anti cancer drug by both passive targeting by prolonged circulation and active targeting by transferrin.

  12. P-selectin is a nanotherapeutic delivery target in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Shamay, Yosi; Elkabets, Moshe; Li, Hongyan; Shah, Janki; Brook, Samuel; Wang, Feng; Adler, Keren; Baut, Emily; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Jena, Prakrit V.; Gardner, Eric E.; Poirier, John T.; Rudin, Charles M.; Baselga, José; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Heller, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated tumors are poorly accessible to nanoscale drug delivery systems because of the vascular barrier, which attenuates extravasation at the tumor site. We investigated P-selectin, a molecule expressed on activated vasculature that facilitates metastasis by arresting tumor cells at the endothelium, for its potential to target metastases by arresting nanomedicines at the tumor endothelium. We found that P-selectin is expressed on cancer cells in many human tumors. To develop a targeted drug delivery platform, we used a fucosylated polysaccharide with nanomolar affinity to P-selectin. The nanoparticles targeted the tumor microenvironment to localize chemotherapeutics and a targeted MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase) inhibitor at tumor sites in both primary and metastatic models, resulting in superior antitumor efficacy. In tumors devoid of P-selectin, we found that ionizing radiation guided the nanoparticles to the disease site by inducing P-selectin expression. Radiation concomitantly produced an abscopal-like phenomenon wherein P-selectin appeared in unirradiated tumor vasculature, suggesting a potential strategy to target disparate drug classes to almost any tumor. PMID:27358497

  13. Interpenetrating Polymer Networks as Innovative Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lohani, Alka; Singh, Garima; Bhattacharya, Shiv Sankar; Verma, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Polymers have always been valuable excipients in conventional dosage forms, also have shown excellent performance into the parenteral arena, and are now capable of offering advanced and sophisticated functions such as controlled drug release and drug targeting. Advances in polymer science have led to the development of several novel drug delivery systems. Interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) have shown superior performances over the conventional individual polymers and, consequently, the ranges of applications have grown rapidly for such class of materials. The advanced properties of IPNs like swelling capacity, stability, biocompatibility, nontoxicity and biodegradability have attracted considerable attention in pharmaceutical field especially in delivering bioactive molecules to the target site. In the past few years various research reports on the IPN based delivery systems showed that these carriers have emerged as a novel carrier in controlled drug delivery. The present review encompasses IPNs, their types, method of synthesis, factors which affects the morphology of IPNs, extensively studied IPN based drug delivery systems, and some natural polymers widely used for IPNs. PMID:24949205

  14. Liposomal drug delivery systems: from concept to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Allen, Theresa M; Cullis, Pieter R

    2013-01-01

    The first closed bilayer phospholipid systems, called liposomes, were described in 1965 and soon were proposed as drug delivery systems. The pioneering work of countless liposome researchers over almost 5 decades led to the development of important technical advances such as remote drug loading, extrusion for homogeneous size, long-circulating (PEGylated) liposomes, triggered release liposomes, liposomes containing nucleic acid polymers, ligand-targeted liposomes and liposomes containing combinations of drugs. These advances have led to numerous clinical trials in such diverse areas as the delivery of anti-cancer, anti-fungal and antibiotic drugs, the delivery of gene medicines, and the delivery of anesthetics and anti-inflammatory drugs. A number of liposomes (lipidic nanoparticles) are on the market, and many more are in the pipeline. Lipidic nanoparticles are the first nanomedicine delivery system to make the transition from concept to clinical application, and they are now an established technology platform with considerable clinical acceptance. We can look forward to many more clinical products in the future.

  15. Renewable energy delivery systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Howard Andrew

    2013-12-10

    A system, method and/or apparatus for the delivery of energy at a site, at least a portion of the energy being delivered by at least one or more of a plurality of renewable energy technologies, the system and method including calculating the load required by the site for the period; calculating the amount of renewable energy for the period, including obtaining a capacity and a percentage of the period for the renewable energy to be delivered; comparing the total load to the renewable energy available; and, implementing one or both of additional and alternative renewable energy sources for delivery of energy to the site.

  16. Single walled carbon nanotubes as drug delivery vehicles: targeting doxorubicin to tumors.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingjie; Zhang, Xiaoke; Lu, Qinghua; Fei, Zhaofu; Dyson, Paul J

    2012-02-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are emerging as promising delivery vehicles for cancer diagnostics and chemotherapies due to their unique properties, including, remarkable cell membrane penetrability, high drug-carrying capacities, pH-dependent therapeutic unloading, prolonged circulating times and intrinsic fluorescent, photothermal, photoacoustic and Raman properties. In this leading opinion paper, we systemically discuss and evaluate the relationship of the biological safety of SWNTs with their physicochemical properties such as their length, purity, agglomeration state, concentration and surface functionalization. Other relevant issues, including the cellular uptake mechanism, biodistribution and metabolism of SWNTs are also reviewed. The design and preparation of SWNT-based drug delivery systems (DDSs) and their pharmacokinetic, cancer targeting and therapeutic properties both in vitro and in vivo are highlighted. Future opportunities and challenges of SWNT-based DDSs are also discussed.

  17. A comprehensive overview of exosomes as drug delivery vehicles - endogenous nanocarriers for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Gudbergsson, Johann Mar; Skov, Martin Najbjerg; Pilgaard, Linda; Moos, Torben; Duroux, Meg

    2014-08-01

    Exosomes denote a class of secreted nanoparticles defined by size, surface protein and lipid composition, and the ability to carry RNA and proteins. They are important mediators of intercellular communication and regulators of the cellular niche, and their altered characteristics in many diseases, such as cancer, suggest them to be important both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, prompting the idea of using exosomes as drug delivery vehicles, especially for gene therapy. This review covers the current status of evidence presented in the field of exosome-based drug delivery systems. Components for successful exosome-based drug delivery, such as choice of donor cell, therapeutic cargo, use of targeting peptide, loading method and administration route are highlighted and discussed with a general focus pertaining to the results obtained in models of different cancer types. In addition, completed and on-going clinical trials are described, evaluating exosome-based therapies for the treatment of different cancer types. Due to their endogenous origin, exosome-based drug delivery systems may have advantages in the treatment of cancer, but their design needs further refinement to justify their usage on the clinical scale.

  18. Folic acid-conjugated amphiphilic alternating copolymer as a new active tumor targeting drug delivery platform

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Szewczuk, Myron R; Malardier-Jugroot, Cecile

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery using polymeric nanostructures is an emerging cancer research area, engineered for safer, more efficient, and effective use of chemotherapeutic drugs. A pH-responsive, active targeting delivery system was designed using folic acid functionalized amphiphilic alternating copolymer poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) (FA-DABA-SMA) via a biodegradable linker 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DABA). The polymeric template is pH responsive, forming amphiphilic nanostructures at pH 7, allowing the encapsulation of hydrophobic drugs on its interior. Moreover, the structure is stable only at neutral pH and collapses in the acidic tumor microenvironment, releasing drugs on-site from its core. The delivery vehicle is investigated using human pancreatic PANC-1 cancer cells and RAW-Blue™ mouse macrophage reporter cell line, both of which have overly expression of folic acid receptors. To trace the cellular uptake by both cell lines, curcumin was selected as a dye and drug mimic owing to its fluorescence nature and hydrophobic properties. Fluorescent microscopy of FA-DABA-SMA loaded with curcumin revealed a significant internalization of the dye by human pancreatic PANC-1 cancer cells compared to those with unfunctionalized polymers (SMA). Moreover, the FA-DABA-SMA polymers exhibit rodlike association specific to the cells. Both empty SMA and FA-DABA-SMA show little toxicity to PANC-1 cells as characterized by WST-1 cell proliferation assay. These results clearly indicate that FA-DABA-SMA polymers show potential as an active tumor targeting drug delivery system with the ability to internalize hydrophobic chemotherapeutics after they specifically attach to cancer cells. PMID:28008233

  19. Targeted delivery using peptide-functionalised gold nanoparticles to white adipose tissues of obese rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thovhogi, Ntevheleni; Sibuyi, Nicole; Meyer, Mervin; Onani, Martin; Madiehe, Abram

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is a complex metabolic disease of excessive fat accumulation. It is a worldwide epidemic affecting billions of people. Current pharmacological treatment of obesity remains limited and ineffective due to systemic drug toxicity and undesirable side effects. The current epidemic raises a serious need for development of safer drugs to treat obesity. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery system for administering pharmaceutical compound to achieve therapeutic effects is currently an exciting field in cancer treatment. Drug delivery involves either modification of drug release profile, absorption, distribution and/or elimination, for the benefit of improving drug efficacy and safety. Therefore, nanotechnology holds promise in the treatment of diseases including obesity. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) functionalised with different biomolecules have been successfully used as drug delivery, labelling and imaging tools in biomedical research. In this study, the binding-specificity and targeting ability of adipose homing peptide (AHP)-functionalised GNPs (AHP-GNPs) were evaluated using flow cytometry and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy. Caco-2 cells and rats fed either chow or a high-fat diet were treated with either unfunctionalised GNPs or AHP-GNPs. Cellular uptake of GNPs was detected in cells treated with AHP-GNPs and not those treated with GNPs alone. Binding of AHP to cells was both temperature- and concentration-dependent. Compared to rats treated with GNPs alone, treatment of obese rats with AHP-GNPs resulted in the targeted delivery of the GNPs to the white adipose tissue (WAT). This paper reports the successful targeting of AHP-functionalised GNPs to WAT of obese rats.

  20. Bacteriophages and phage-inspired nanocarriers for targeted delivery of therapeutic cargos.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mahdi; Mirshekari, Hamed; Moosavi Basri, Seyed Masoud; Bahrami, Sajad; Moghoofei, Mohsen; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-11-15

    The main goal of drug delivery systems is to target therapeutic cargoes to desired cells and to ensure their efficient uptake. Recently a number of studies have focused on designing bio-inspired nanocarriers, such as bacteriophages, and synthetic carriers based on the bacteriophage structure. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically recognize their bacterial hosts. They can replicate only inside their host cell and can act as natural gene carriers. Each type of phage has a particular shape, a different capacity for loading cargo, a specific production time, and their own mechanisms of supramolecular assembly, that have enabled them to act as tunable carriers. New phage-based technologies have led to the construction of different peptide libraries, and recognition abilities provided by novel targeting ligands. Phage hybridization with non-organic compounds introduces new properties to phages and could be a suitable strategy for construction of bio-inorganic carriers. In this review we try to cover the major phage species that have been used in drug and gene delivery systems, and the biological application of phages as novel targeting ligands and targeted therapeutics.

  1. RNA nanoparticle as a vector for targeted siRNA delivery into glioblastoma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Jin; Haque, Farzin; Shu, Dan; Yoo, Ji Young; Li, Hui; Yokel, Robert A; Horbinski, Craig; Kim, Tae Hyong; Kim, Sung-Hak; Kwon, Chang-Hyuk; Nakano, Ichiro; Kaur, Balveen; Guo, Peixuan; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-06-20

    Systemic siRNA administration to target and treat glioblastoma, one of the most deadly cancers, requires robust and efficient delivery platform without immunogenicity. Here we report newly emerged multivalent naked RNA nanoparticle (RNP) based on pRNA 3-way-junction (3WJ) from bacteriophage phi29 to target glioblastoma cells with folate (FA) ligand and deliver siRNA for gene silencing. Systemically injected FA-pRNA-3WJ RNPs successfully targeted and delivered siRNA into brain tumor cells in mice, and efficiently reduced luciferase reporter gene expression (4-fold lower than control). The FA-pRNA-3WJ RNP also can target human patient-derived glioblastoma stem cells, thought to be responsible for tumor initiation and deadly recurrence, without accumulation in adjacent normal brain cells, nor other major internal organs. This study provides possible application of pRNA-3WJ RNP for specific delivery of therapeutics such as siRNA, microRNA and/or chemotherapeutic drugs into glioblastoma cells without inflicting collateral damage to healthy tissues.

  2. RNA nanoparticle as a vector for targeted siRNA delivery into glioblastoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Jin; Haque, Farzin; Shu, Dan; Yoo, Ji Young; Li, Hui; Yokel, Robert A.; Horbinski, Craig; Kim, Tae Hyong; Kim, Sung-Hak; Kwon, Chang-Hyuk; Nakano, Ichiro; Kaur, Balveen; Guo, Peixuan; Croce, Carlo M.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic siRNA administration to target and treat glioblastoma, one of the most deadly cancers, requires robust and efficient delivery platform without immunogenicity. Here we report newly emerged multivalent naked RNA nanoparticle (RNP) based on pRNA 3-way-junction (3WJ) from bacteriophage phi29 to target glioblastoma cells with folate (FA) ligand and deliver siRNA for gene silencing. Systemically injected FA-pRNA-3WJ RNPs successfully targeted and delivered siRNA into brain tumor cells in mice, and efficiently reduced luciferase reporter gene expression (4-fold lower than control). The FA-pRNA-3WJ RNP also can target human patient-derived glioblastoma stem cells, thought to be responsible for tumor initiation and deadly recurrence, without accumulation in adjacent normal brain cells, nor other major internal organs. This study provides possible application of pRNA-3WJ RNP for specific delivery of therapeutics such as siRNA, microRNA and/or chemotherapeutic drugs into glioblastoma cells without inflicting collateral damage to healthy tissues. PMID:25885522

  3. Carrier-free, functionalized pure drug nanorods as a novel cancer-targeted drug delivery platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanan; Yang, Yinlong; An, Feifei; Liu, Zhuang; Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2013-01-01

    A one-dimensional drug delivery system (1D DDS) is highly attractive since it has distinct advantages such as enhanced drug efficiency and better pharmacokinetics. However, drugs in 1D DDSs are all encapsulated in inert carriers, and problems such as low drug loading content and possible undesirable side effects caused by the carriers remain a serious challenge. In this paper, a novel, carrier-free, pure drug nanorod-based, tumor-targeted 1D DDS has been developed. Drugs are first prepared as nanorods and then surface functionalized to achieve excellent water dispersity and stability. The resulting drug nanorods show enhanced internalization rates mainly through energy-dependent endocytosis, with the shape-mediated nanorod (NR) diffusion process as a secondary pathway. The multiple endocytotic mechanisms lead to significantly improved drug efficiency of functionalized NRs with nearly ten times higher cytotoxicity than those of free molecules and unfunctionalized NRs. A targeted drug delivery system can be readily achieved through surface functionalization with targeting group linked amphipathic surfactant, which exhibits significantly enhanced drug efficacy and discriminates between cell lines with high selectivity. These results clearly show that this tumor-targeting DDS demonstrates high potential toward specific cancer cell lines.

  4. Brain drug delivery systems for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Garbayo, E; Ansorena, E; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2012-09-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders (NDs) are rapidly increasing as population ages. However, successful treatments for NDs have so far been limited and drug delivery to the brain remains one of the major challenges to overcome. There has recently been growing interest in the development of drug delivery systems (DDS) for local or systemic brain administration. DDS are able to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of conventional drugs and reduce their side effects. The present review provides a concise overview of the recent advances made in the field of brain drug delivery for treating neurodegenerative disorders. Examples include polymeric micro and nanoparticles, lipidic nanoparticles, pegylated liposomes, microemulsions and nanogels that have been tested in experimental models of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. Overall, the results reviewed here show that DDS have great potential for NDs treatment.

  5. Olfactory targeting through intranasal delivery of biopharmaceutical drugs to the brain: current development.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ming Ming

    2011-06-01

    Many therapeutic drugs are difficult to reach the central nervous system (CNS) from the systemic blood circulation because the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) form a very effective barrier which prevents most molecules from passing through. To bypass BBB, drugs can be delivered through olfactory region for nose-to-brain targeting. Peptide and protein drugs have been developed for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases. Drug delivery of these therapeutic proteins is facing several challenges because of the instability, high enzymatic metabolism, low gastrointestinal absorption, rapid renal elimination, and potential immunogenicity. New genetically engineered biotechnology products, such as recombinant human nerve growth factor, human VEGF, and interferons, are now possible to be delivered into the brain from the non-invasive intranasal route. For gene therapy, intranasal route is also a promising alternative method to deliver plasmid DNA to the brain. This review provides an overview of strategies to improve the drug delivery to the brain and the latest development of protein, peptide, and gene intranasal delivery for brain targeting.

  6. Crystallization Methods for Preparation of Nanocrystals for Drug Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Wang, Jingkang; Wang, Yongli; Yin, Qiuxiang; Glennon, Brian; Zhong, Jian; Ouyang, Jinbo; Huang, Xin; Hao, Hongxun

    2015-01-01

    Low water solubility of drug products causes delivery problems such as low bioavailability. The reduced particle size and increased surface area of nanocrystals lead to the increasing of the dissolution rate. The formulation of drug nanocrystals is a robust approach and has been widely applied to drug delivery system (DDS) due to the significant development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. It can be used to improve drug efficacy, provide targeted delivery and minimize side-effects. Crystallization is the main and efficient unit operation to produce nanocrystals. Both traditional crystallization methods such as reactive crystallization, anti-solvent crystallization and new crystallization methods such as supercritical fluid crystallization, high-gravity controlled precipitation can be used to produce nanocrystals. The current mini-review outlines the main crystallization methods addressed in literature. The advantages and disadvantages of each method were summarized and compared.

  7. Peptide-22 and Cyclic RGD Functionalized Liposomes for Glioma Targeting Drug Delivery Overcoming BBB and BBTB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cuitian; Duan, Ziqing; Yuan, Yan; Li, Ruixiang; Pang, Liang; Liang, Jianming; Xu, Xinchun; Wang, Jianxin

    2017-02-22

    Chemotherapy outcomes for the treatment of glioma remain unsatisfied due to the inefficient drug transport across BBB/BBTB and poor drug accumulation in the tumor site. Nanocarriers functionalized with different targeting ligands are considered as one of the most promising alternatives. However, few studies were reported to compare the targeting efficiency of the ligands and develop nanoparticles to realize BBB/BBTB crossing and brain tumor targeting simultaneously. In this study, six peptide-based ligands (Angiopep-2, T7, Peptide-22, c(RGDfK), D-SP5 and Pep-1), widely used for brain delivery, were selected to decorate liposomes, respectively, so as to compare their targeting ability to BBB or BBTB. Based on the in vitro cellular uptake results on BCECs and HUVECs, Peptide-22 and c(RGDfK) were picked to construct a BBB/BBTB dual-crossing, glioma-targeting liposomal drug delivery system c(RGDfK)/Pep-22-DOX-LP. In vitro cellular uptake demonstrated that the synergetic effect of c(RGDfK) and Peptide-22 could significantly increase the internalization of liposomes on U87 cells. In vivo imaging further verified that c(RGDfK)/Pep-22-LP exhibited higher brain tumor distribution than single ligand modified liposomes. The median survival time of glioma-bearing mice treated with c(RGDfK)/Pep-22-DOX-LP (39.5 days) was significantly prolonged than those treated with free doxorubicin or other controls. In conclusion, the c(RGDfK) and Peptide-22 dual-modified liposome was constructed based on the targeting ability screening of various ligands. The system could effectively overcome BBB/BBTB barriers, target to tumor cells and inhibit the growth of glioma, which proved its potential for improving the efficacy of chemotherapeutics for glioma therapy.

  8. Synthesis of a novel, sequentially active-targeted drug delivery nanoplatform for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Satsangi, Arpan; Roy, Sudipa S; Satsangi, Rajiv K; Tolcher, Anthony W; Vadlamudi, Ratna K; Goins, Beth; Ong, Joo L

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women. Paclitaxel (PTX), an important breast cancer medicine, exhibits reduced bioavailability and therapeutic index due to high hydrophobicity and indiscriminate cytotoxicity. PTX encapsulation in one-level active targeting overcomes such barriers, but enhances toxicity to normal tissues with cancer-similar expression profiles. This research attempted to overcome this challenge by increasing selectivity of cancer cell targeting while maintaining an ability to overcome traditional pharmacological barriers. Thus, a multi-core, multi-targeting construct for tumor specific delivery of PTX was fabricated with (i) an inner-core prodrug targeting the cancer-overexpressed cathepsin B through a cathepsin B-cleavable tetrapeptide that conjugates PTX to a poly(amidoamine) dendrimer, and (ii) the encapsulation of this prodrug (PGD) in an outer core of a RES-evading, folate receptor (FR)-targeting liposome. Compared to traditional FR-targeting PTX liposomes, this sequentially active-targeted dendrosome demonstrated better prodrug retention, an increased cytotoxicity to cancer cells (latter being true when FR and cathepsin B activities were both at moderate-to-high levels) and higher tumor reduction. This research may eventually evolve a product platform with reduced systemic toxicity inherent with traditional chemotherapy and localized toxicity inherent to single-target nanoplatforms, thereby allowing for better tolerance of higher therapeutic load in advanced disease states.

  9. Exosome mimetics: a novel class of drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kooijmans, Sander A A; Vader, Pieter; van Dommelen, Susan M; van Solinge, Wouter W; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2012-01-01

    The identification of extracellular phospholipid vesicles as conveyors of cellular information has created excitement in the field of drug delivery. Biological therapeutics, including short interfering RNA and recombinant proteins, are prone to degradation, have limited ability to cross biological membranes, and may elicit immune responses. Therefore, delivery systems for such drugs are under intensive investigation. Exploiting extracellular vesicles as carriers for biological therapeutics is a promising strategy to overcome these issues and to achieve efficient delivery to the cytosol of target cells. Exosomes are a well studied class of extracellular vesicles known to carry proteins and nucleic acids, making them especially suitable for such strategies. However, the considerable complexity and the related high chance of off-target effects of these carriers are major barriers for translation to the clinic. Given that it is well possible that not all components of exosomes are required for their proper functioning, an alternative strategy would be to mimic these vesicles synthetically. By assembly of liposomes harboring only crucial components of natural exosomes, functional exosome mimetics may be created. The low complexity and use of well characterized components strongly increase the pharmaceutical acceptability of such systems. However, exosomal components that would be required for the assembly of functional exosome mimetics remain to be identified. This review provides insights into the composition and functional properties of exosomes, and focuses on components which could be used to enhance the drug delivery properties of exosome mimetics.

  10. Porous Inorganic Drug Delivery Systems-a Review.

    PubMed

    Sayed, E; Haj-Ahmad, R; Ruparelia, K; Arshad, M S; Chang, M-W; Ahmad, Z

    2017-02-28

    Innovative methods and materials have been developed to overcome limitations associated with current drug delivery systems. Significant developments have led to the use of a variety of materials (as excipients) such as inorganic and metallic structures, marking a transition from conventional polymers. Inorganic materials, especially those possessing significant porosity, are emerging as good candidates for the delivery of a range of drugs (antibiotics, anticancer and anti-inflammatories), providing several advantages in formulation and engineering (encapsulation of drug in amorphous form, controlled delivery and improved targeting). This review focuses on key selected developments in porous drug delivery systems. The review provides a short broad overview of porous polymeric materials for drug delivery before focusing on porous inorganic materials (e.g. Santa Barbara Amorphous (SBA) and Mobil Composition of Matter (MCM)) and their utilisation in drug dosage form development. Methods for their preparation and drug loading thereafter are detailed. Several examples of porous inorganic materials, drugs used and outcomes are discussed providing the reader with an understanding of advances in the field and realistic opportunities.

  11. Magnetic graphene oxide as a carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya-Shu; Lu, Yu-Jen; Chen, Jyh-Ping

    2017-04-01

    A magnetic targeted functionalized graphene oxide (GO) complex is constituted as a nanocarrier for targeted delivery and pH-responsive controlled release of chemotherapy drugs to cancer cells. Magnetic graphene oxide (mGO) was prepared by chemical co-precipitation of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles on GO nano-platelets. The mGO was successively modified by chitosan and mPEG-NHS through covalent bindings to synthesize mGOC-PEG. The polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety is expected to prolong the circulation time of mGO by reducing the reticuloendothelial system clearance. Irinotecan (CPT-11) or doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded to mGOC-PEG through π-π stacking interactions for magnetic targeted delivery of the cancer chemotherapy drug. The best values of loading efficiency and loading content of CPT-11 were 54% and 2.7% respectively; whereas for DOX, they were 65% and 393% The pH-dependent drug release profile was further experimented at different pHs, in which 60% of DOX was released at pH 5.4 and 10% was released at pH 7.4. In contrast, 90% CPT-11 was released at pH 5.4 and 70% at pH 7.4. Based on the drug loading and release characteristics, mGOC-PEG/DOX was further chosen for in vitro cytotoxicity tests against U87 human glioblastoma cell line. The IC50 value of mGOC-PEG/DOX was found to be similar to that of free DOX but was reduced dramatically when subject to magnetic targeting. It is concluded that with the high drug loading and pH-dependent drug release properties, mGOC-PEG will be a promising drug carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapy drugs in cancer therapy.

  12. Peptide/protein vaccine delivery system based on PLGA particles

    PubMed Central

    Allahyari, Mojgan; Mohit, Elham

    2016-01-01

    abstract Due to the excellent safety profile of poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) particles in human, and their biodegradability, many studies have focused on the application of PLGA particles as a controlled-release vaccine delivery system. Antigenic proteins/peptides can be encapsulated into or adsorbed to the surface of PLGA particles. The gradual release of loaded antigens from PLGA particles is necessary for the induction of efficient immunity. Various factors can influence protein release rates from PLGA particles, which can be defined intrinsic features of the polymer, particle characteristics as well as protein and environmental related factors. The use of PLGA particles encapsulating antigens of different diseases such as hepatitis B, tuberculosis, chlamydia, malaria, leishmania, toxoplasma and allergy antigens will be described herein. The co-delivery of antigens and immunostimulants (IS) with PLGA particles can prevent the systemic adverse effects of immunopotentiators and activate both dendritic cells (DCs) and natural killer (NKs) cells, consequently enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of antigen-loaded PLGA particles. We will review co-delivery of different TLR ligands with antigens in various models, highlighting the specific strengths and weaknesses of the system. Strategies to enhance the immunotherapeutic effect of DC-based vaccine using PLGA particles can be designed to target DCs by functionalized PLGA particle encapsulating siRNAs of suppressive gene, and disease specific antigens. Finally, specific examples of cellular targeting where decorating the surface of PLGA particles target orally administrated vaccine to M-cells will be highlighted. PMID:26513024

  13. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D.; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J.; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Vemula, Praveen K.; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amphiphile that is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. IT-hydrogel microfibers loaded with the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) were stable, released drug only upon enzymatic digestion, and demonstrated preferential adhesion to inflamed epithelial surfaces in vitro and in two mouse colitis models in vivo. Dex-loaded IT-hydrogel enemas, but not free Dex enemas, administered every other day to mice with colitis resulted in a significant reduction in inflammation and were associated with lower Dex peak serum concentrations and, thus, less systemic drug exposure. Ex vivo analysis of colon tissue samples from patients with ulcerative colitis demonstrated that IT-hydrogel microfibers adhered preferentially to mucosa from inflamed lesions compared with histologically normal sites. The IT-hydrogel drug delivery platform represents a promising approach for targeted enema-based therapies in patients with colonic IBD. PMID:26268315

  14. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R; Glickman, Jonathan N; Vemula, Praveen K; Glimcher, Laurie H; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2015-08-12

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amphiphile that is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. IT-hydrogel microfibers loaded with the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) were stable, released drug only upon enzymatic digestion, and demonstrated preferential adhesion to inflamed epithelial surfaces in vitro and in two mouse colitis models in vivo. Dex-loaded IT-hydrogel enemas, but not free Dex enemas, administered every other day to mice with colitis resulted in a significant reduction in inflammation and were associated with lower Dex peak serum concentrations and, thus, less systemic drug exposure. Ex vivo analysis of colon tissue samples from patients with ulcerative colitis demonstrated that IT-hydrogel microfibers adhered preferentially to mucosa from inflamed lesions compared with histologically normal sites. The IT-hydrogel drug delivery platform represents a promising approach for targeted enema-based therapies in patients with colonic IBD.

  15. Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    JULYK, L.J.

    2000-05-05

    This document provides a documented basis for the required design pressure rating and pump pressure capacity of the Hanford Site waste-transfer system in support of the waste feed delivery to the privatization contractor for vitrification. The scope of the analysis includes the 200 East Area double-shell tank waste transfer pipeline system and the associated transfer system pumps for a11 Phase 1B and Phase 2 waste transfers from AN, AP, AW, AY, and A2 Tank Farms.

  16. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery of targeted echogenic liposomes in a novel ex vivo mouse aorta model.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Kathryn E; Caudell, Danielle N; Sutton, Jonathan T; Klegerman, Melvin E; Vela, Deborah; Pyne-Geithman, Gail J; Abruzzo, Todd; Cyr, Peppar E P; Geng, Yong-Jian; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2010-06-15

    The goal of this study was to determine whether targeted, Rhodamine-labeled echogenic liposomes (Rh-ELIP) containing nanobubbles could be delivered to the arterial wall, and whether 1-MHz continuous wave ultrasound would enhance this delivery profile. Aortae excised from apolipoprotein-E-deficient (n=8) and wild-type (n=8) mice were mounted in a pulsatile flow system through which Rh-ELIP were delivered in a stream of bovine serum albumin. Half the aortae from each group were treated with 1-MHz continuous wave ultrasound at 0.49 MPa peak-to-peak pressure, and half underwent sham exposure. Ultrasound parameters were chosen to promote stable cavitation and avoid inertial cavitation. A broadband hydrophone was used to monitor cavitation activity. After treatment, aortic sections were prepared for histology and analyzed by an individual blinded to treatment conditions. Delivery of Rh-ELIP to the vascular endothelium was observed, and sub-endothelial penetration of Rh-ELIP was present in five of five ultrasound-treated aortae and was absent in those not exposed to ultrasound. However, the degree of penetration in the ultrasound-exposed aortae was variable. There was no evidence of ultrasound-mediated tissue damage in any specimen. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery within the arterial wall was demonstrated in this novel model, which allows quantitative evaluation of therapeutic delivery.

  17. Dendrimers in drug delivery and targeting: Drug-dendrimer interactions and toxicity issues

    PubMed Central

    Madaan, Kanika; Kumar, Sandeep; Poonia, Neelam; Lather, Viney; Pandita, Deepti

    2014-01-01

    Dendrimers are the emerging polymeric architectures that are known for their defined structures, versatility in drug delivery and high functionality whose properties resemble with biomolecules. These nanostructured macromolecules have shown their potential abilities in entrapping and/or conjugating the high molecular weight hydrophilic/hydrophobic entities by host-guest interactions and covalent bonding (prodrug approach) respectively. Moreover, high ratio of surface groups to molecular volume has made them a promising synthetic vector for gene delivery. Owing to these properties dendrimers have fascinated the researchers in the development of new drug carriers and they have been implicated in many therapeutic and biomedical applications. Despite of their extensive applications, their use in biological systems is limited due to toxicity issues associated with them. Considering this, the present review has focused on the different strategies of their synthesis, drug delivery and targeting, gene delivery and other biomedical applications, interactions involved in formation of drug-dendrimer complex along with characterization techniques employed for their evaluation, toxicity problems and associated approaches to alleviate their inherent toxicity. PMID:25035633

  18. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery of targeted echogenic liposomes in a novel ex vivo mouse aorta model

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, Kathryn E.; Caudell, Danielle N.; Sutton, Jonathan T.; Klegerman, Melvin E.; Vela, Deborah; Pyne-Geithman, Gail J.; Abruzzo, Todd; Cyr, Peppar E. P.; Geng, Yong-Jian; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether targeted, Rhodamine-labeled echogenic liposomes (Rh-ELIP) containing nanobubbles could be delivered to the arterial wall, and whether 1 MHz continuous wave ultrasound would enhance this delivery profile. Aortae excised from apolipoprotein-E-deficient (n = 8) and wild-type (n = 8) mice were mounted in a pulsatile flow system through which Rh-ELIP were delivered in a stream of bovine serum albumin. Half the aortae from each group were treated with 1-MHz continuous wave ultrasound at 0.49 MPa peak-to-peak pressure, and half underwent sham exposure. Ultrasound parameters were chosen to promote stable cavitation and avoid inertial cavitation. A broadband hydrophone was used to monitor cavitation activity. After treatment, aortic sections were prepared for histology and analyzed by an individual blinded to treatment conditions. Delivery of Rh-ELIP to the vascular endothelium was observed, and subendothelial penetration of Rh-ELIP was present in five of five ultrasound-treated aortae and was absent in those not exposed to ultrasound. However, the degree of penetration in the ultrasound-exposed aortae was variable. There was no evidence of ultrasound-mediated tissue damage in any specimen. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery within the arterial wall was demonstrated in this novel model, which allows quantitative evaluation of therapeutic delivery. PMID:20202474

  19. Systemic siRNA Delivery with a Dual pH-Responsive and Tumor-targeted Nanovector for Inhibiting Tumor Growth and Spontaneous Metastasis in Orthotopic Murine Model of Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bo; Kang, Lin; Chen, Liqing; Sun, Ping; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming; Bae, You Han; Huang, Wei; Gao, Zhonggao

    2017-01-01

    Phenylboronic acid (PBA)-mediated tumor targeting nanovector is an attractive strategy for enhancing siRNA delivery and treatment of metastatic cancers. However, its nonspecific binding with various biological membranes containing cis-diol moieties restricts its potential application by systematic administration. Herein, we constructed a novel pH-activated “sheddable” PEG-coated nanoparticle for effective treatment of primary tumors and metastases, which was based on the conjugation of catechol group modified poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-Cat) and PBA-terminated polyethylenimine (PEI-PBA) via the borate ester formed between PBA and Cat. By virtue of the pH-dependent stability of borate ester in an aqueous medium, the PEG-shell could “shield” the PBA ligand in systemic circulation to reduce its “off-target effect”, while PEG was detached at tumor extracellular pH (~6.5) to expose intact PBA moiety. Simultaneously, the PBA ligand could bind with overexpressed sialic acid residues on cancer cells, giving rise to enhanced cellular internalization. In addition, the PBA moieties could also couple with each 3'-end ribose of double-stranded siRNA. siRNAs were used as both a payload and a pH-responsive intermolecular cross-linker, and thereby acquired sufficient stability during circulating in blood and a rapidly triggered release in response to acidic endosomal/lysosomal pH-stimuli. As a result, this dual pH-sensitive nanoparticle showed enhanced siRNA uptake, gene silencing efficacy and anti-metastatic effects in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo studies demonstrated that PBA-based nanoparticles effectively accumulated in tumor and inhibited tumor growth and metastasis in 4T1 orthotopic mammary tumor model after intravenous administration. PMID:28042340

  20. The LITA Drill and Sample Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, G.; Yoon, S.; Zacny, K.; Wettergreeng, D.; Cabrol, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Life in the Atacama (LITA) project has a goal of demonstrating autonomous roving, sample acquisition, delivery and analysis operations in Atacama, Chile. To enable the sample handling requirement, Honeybee Robotics developed a rover-deployed, rotary-percussive, autonomous drill, called the LITA Drill, capable of penetrating to ~80 cm in various formations, capturing and delivering subsurface samples to a 20 cup carousel. The carousel has a built-in capability to press the samples within each cup, and position target cups underneath instruments for analysis. The drill and sample delivery system had to have mass and power requirements consistent with a flight system. The drill weighs 12 kg and uses less than 100 watt of power to penetrate ~80 cm. The LITA Drill auger has been designed with two distinct stages. The lower part has deep and gently sloping flutes for retaining powdered sample, while the upper section has shallow and steep flutes for preventing borehole collapse and for efficient movement of cuttings and fall back material out of the hole. The drill uses the so called 'bite-sampling' approach that is samples are taken in short, 5-10 cm bites. To take the first bite, the drill is lowered onto the ground and upon drilling of the first bite it is then retracted into an auger tube. The auger with the auger tube are then lifted off the ground and positioned next to the carousel. To deposit the sample, the auger is rotated and retracted above the auger tube. The cuttings retained on the flutes are either gravity fed or are brushed off by a passive side brush into the cup. After the sample from the first bite has been deposited, the drill is lowered back into the same hole to take the next bite. This process is repeated until a target depth is reached. The bite sampling is analogous to peck drilling in the machining process where a bit is periodically retracted to clear chips. If there is some fall back into the hole once the auger has cleared the hole, this

  1. Construction of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin copolymer nanoparticles and targeting delivery of paclitaxel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Qinghua; Li, Suping; Han, Siyuan; Wang, Zhi; Wu, Yan; Nie, Guangjun

    2012-08-01

    A novel amphiphilic copolymer with p-maleimidophenyl isocyanate-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-polylactide-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine to generate copolymer nanoparticles (NPs) has been designed. In order to develop an active targeting system, integrin αvβ3-specific targeting peptide cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Cys), cRGD, was conjugated to the surface of NPs (NPs-RGD). These NPs were used to encapsulate anti-tumor drug, paclitaxel. The resulting NPs exhibited high drug-loading capacity and controlled drug release in vitro at acidic pH. In vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrates that paclitaxel-loaded NPs-RGD significantly inhibited B16 tumor cell (high αvβ3) proliferation relative to free paclitaxel and paclitaxel-loaded NPs at high concentrations. Paclitaxel-loaded NPs-RGD localized mainly in lysosomes in B16 cells as revealed by confocal microscopy. These results suggest a novel strategy for fabrication—functionalizing hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin copolymer nanoparticles for targeting delivery of paclitaxel to integrin αvβ3-rich tumor cells. These nanocarriers can be readily extended to couple other bioactive molecules for active targeting and delivery of various chemotherapeutic drugs.

  2. Molecularly self-assembled nucleic acid nanoparticles for targeted in vivo siRNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyukjin; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K. R.; Chen, Yi; Love, Kevin T.; Park, Angela I.; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D.; Sehgal, Alfica; Querbes, William; Zurenko, Christopher S.; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Peng, Chang G.; Charisse, Klaus; Borodovsky, Anna; Manoharan, Muthiah; Donahoe, Jessica S.; Truelove, Jessica; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2012-06-01

    Nanoparticles are used for delivering therapeutics into cells. However, size, shape, surface chemistry and the presentation of targeting ligands on the surface of nanoparticles can affect circulation half-life and biodistribution, cell-specific internalization, excretion, toxicity and efficacy. A variety of materials have been explored for delivering small interfering RNAs (siRNAs)--a therapeutic agent that suppresses the expression of targeted genes. However, conventional delivery nanoparticles such as liposomes and polymeric systems are heterogeneous in size, composition and surface chemistry, and this can lead to suboptimal performance, a lack of tissue specificity and potential toxicity. Here, we show that self-assembled DNA tetrahedral nanoparticles with a well-defined size can deliver siRNAs into cells and silence target genes in tumours. Monodisperse nanoparticles are prepared through the self-assembly of complementary DNA strands. Because the DNA strands are easily programmable, the size of the nanoparticles and the spatial orientation and density of cancer-targeting ligands (such as peptides and folate) on the nanoparticle surface can be controlled precisely. We show that at least three folate molecules per nanoparticle are required for optimal delivery of the siRNAs into cells and, gene silencing occurs only when the ligands are in the appropriate spatial orientation. In vivo, these nanoparticles showed a longer blood circulation time (t1/2 ~ 24.2 min) than the parent siRNA (t1/2 ~ 6 min).

  3. Molecularly self-assembled nucleic acid nanoparticles for targeted in vivo siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyukjin; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K R; Chen, Yi; Love, Kevin T; Park, Angela I; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D; Sehgal, Alfica; Querbes, William; Zurenko, Christopher S; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Peng, Chang G; Charisse, Klaus; Borodovsky, Anna; Manoharan, Muthiah; Donahoe, Jessica S; Truelove, Jessica; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2012-06-03

    Nanoparticles are used for delivering therapeutics into cells. However, size, shape, surface chemistry and the presentation of targeting ligands on the surface of nanoparticles can affect circulation half-life and biodistribution, cell-specific internalization, excretion, toxicity and efficacy. A variety of materials have been explored for delivering small interfering RNAs (siRNAs)--a therapeutic agent that suppresses the expression of targeted genes. However, conventional delivery nanoparticles such as liposomes and polymeric systems are heterogeneous in size, composition and surface chemistry, and this can lead to suboptimal performance, a lack of tissue specificity and potential toxicity. Here, we show that self-assembled DNA tetrahedral nanoparticles with a well-defined size can deliver siRNAs into cells and silence target genes in tumours. Monodisperse nanoparticles are prepared through the self-assembly of complementary DNA strands. Because the DNA strands are easily programmable, the size of the nanoparticles and the spatial orientation and density of cancer-targeting ligands (such as peptides and folate) on the nanoparticle surface can be controlled precisely. We show that at least three folate molecules per nanoparticle are required for optimal delivery of the siRNAs into cells and, gene silencing occurs only when the ligands are in the appropriate spatial orientation. In vivo, these nanoparticles showed a longer blood circulation time (t(1/2) ≈ 24.2 min) than the parent siRNA (t(1/2) ≈ 6 min).

  4. Targeted delivery of antibody-based therapeutic and imaging agents to CNS tumors: Crossing the blood-brain-barrier divide

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Ann-Marie; Li, Chunsheng; Pryma, Daniel A.; Brem, Steven; Coukos, George; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Brain tumors are inherently difficult to treat in large part due to the cellular blood-brain barriers (BBB) that limit the delivery of therapeutics to the tumor tissue from the systemic circulation. Virtually no large-molecules, including antibody-based proteins, can penetrate the BBB. With antibodies fast becoming attractive ligands for highly specific molecular targeting to tumor antigens, a variety of methods are being investigated to enhance the access of these agents to intracranial tumors for imaging or therapeutic applications. Areas covered This review describes the characteristics of the BBB and the vasculature in brain tumors, described as the blood-brain tumor barrier (BBTB). Antibodies targeted to molecular markers of CNS tumors will be highlighted, and current strategies for enhancing the delivery of antibodies across these cellular barriers into the brain parenchyma to the tumor will be discussed. Non-invasive imaging approaches to assess BBB/BBTB permeability and/or antibody targeting will be presented as a means of guiding the optimal delivery of targeted agents to brain tumors. Expert Opinion Pre-clinical and clinical studies highlight the potential of several approaches in increasing brain tumor delivery across the blood-brain barrier divide. However, each carries its own risks and challenges. There is tremendous potential in using neuroimaging strategies to assist in understanding and defining the challenges to translating and optimizing molecularly-targeted antibody delivery to CNS tumors to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:23751126

  5. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meihua; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; Thorn, Peter; Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a targeted drug delivery system has been developed based on hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). HA-MSNs possess a specific affinity to CD44 over-expressed on the surface of a specific cancer cell line, HCT-116 (human colon cancer cells). The cellular uptake performance of fluorescently labelled MSNs with and without HA modification has been evaluated by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Compared to bare MSNs, HA-MSNs exhibit a higher cellular uptake via HA receptor mediated endocytosis. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox), has been loaded into MSNs and HA-MSNs as drug delivery vehicles. Dox loaded HA-MSNs show greater cytotoxicity to HCT-116 cells than free Dox and Dox-MSNs due to the enhanced cell internalization behavior of HA-MSNs. It is expected that HA-MSNs have a great potential in targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to CD44 over-expressing tumors.

  6. Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Hina; Bala, Rajni; Arora, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    The principle objective of formulation of lipid-based drugs is to enhance their bioavailability. The use of lipids in drug delivery is no more a new trend now but is still the promising concept. Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) are one of the emerging technologies designed to address challenges like the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Lipid-based formulations can be tailored to meet a wide range of product requirements dictated by disease indication, route of administration, cost consideration, product stability, toxicity, and efficacy. These formulations are also a commercially viable strategy to formulate pharmaceuticals, for topical, oral, pulmonary, or parenteral delivery. In addition, lipid-based formulations have been shown to reduce the toxicity of various drugs by changing the biodistribution of the drug away from sensitive organs. However, the number of applications for lipid-based formulations has expanded as the nature and type of active drugs under investigation have become more varied. This paper mainly focuses on novel lipid-based formulations, namely, emulsions, vesicular systems, and lipid particulate systems and their subcategories as well as on their prominent applications in pharmaceutical drug delivery. PMID:26556202

  7. Integrated delivery systems focus on service delivery after capitation efforts stall.

    PubMed

    2005-03-01

    Integrated delivery systems focus on service delivery after capitation efforts stall. Integrated delivery systems are going through changes that are focusing the provider organizations more on delivering care than managing risk, says Dean C. Coddington, one of the leading researchers into capitated organizations and a senior consultant with McManis Consulting in Denver.

  8. Potential and problems in ultrasound-responsive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Du, Li-Na; Lu, Cui-Tao; Jin, Yi-Guang; Ge, Shu-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important local stimulus for triggering drug release at the target tissue. Ultrasound-responsive drug delivery systems (URDDS) have become an important research focus in targeted therapy. URDDS include many different formulations, such as microbubbles, nanobubbles, nanodroplets, liposomes, emulsions, and micelles. Drugs that can be loaded into URDDS include small molecules, biomacromolecules, and inorganic substances. Fields of clinical application include anticancer therapy, treatment of ischemic myocardium, induction of an immune response, cartilage tissue engineering, transdermal drug delivery, treatment of Huntington’s disease, thrombolysis, and disruption of the blood–brain barrier. This review focuses on recent advances in URDDS, and discusses their formulations, clinical application, and problems, as well as a perspective on their potential use in the future. PMID:23637531

  9. Current HPLC Methods for Assay of Nano Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Tekkeli, Serife Evrim Kepekci; Kiziltas, Mustafa Volkan

    2016-12-22

    In nano drug formulations the mechanism of release is a critical process to recognize controlled and targeted drug delivery systems. In order to gain high bioavailability and specificity from the drug to reach its therapeutic goal, the active substance must be loaded into the nanoparticles efficiently. Therefore, the amount in biological fluids or tissues and the remaining amount in nano carriers are very important parameters to understand the potential of the nano drug delivery systems. For this aim, suitable and validated quantitation methods are required to determine released drug concentrations from nano pharmaceutical formulations. HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) is one of the most common techniques used for determination of released drug content out of nano drug formulations, in different physical conditions, over different periods of time. Since there are many types of HPLC methods depending on detector and column types, it is a challenge for the researchers to choose a suitable method that is simple, fast and validated HPLC techniques for their nano drug delivery systems. This review's goal is to compare HPLC methods that are currently used in different nano drug delivery systems in order to provide detailed and useful information for researchers.

  10. Polymeric nanocarriers for magnetic targeted drug delivery: preparation, characterization, and in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Licciardi, Mariano; Scialabba, Cinzia; Fiorica, Calogero; Cavallaro, Gennara; Cassata, Giovanni; Giammona, Gaetano

    2013-12-02

    In this paper the preparation of magnetic nanocarriers (MNCs), containing superparamagnetic domains, is reported, useful as potential magnetically targeted drug delivery systems. The preparation of MNCs was performed by using the PHEA-IB-p(BMA) graft copolymer as coating material through the homogenization-solvent evaporation method. Magnetic and nonmagnetic nanocarriers containing flutamide (FLU-MNCs) were prepared. The prepared nanocarriers have been exhaustively characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and magnetic measurements. Biological evaluation was performed by in vitro cytotoxicity and cell uptake tests and in vivo biodistribution studies. Magnetic nanocarriers showed dimensions of about 300 nm with a narrow size distribution, an amount of loaded FLU of 20% (w/w), and a superparamagnetic behavior. Cell culture experiments performed on prostate cancer cell line LNCaP demonstrated the cytotoxic effect of FLU-MNCs. In vivo biodistribution studies carried out by the application of an external magnetic field in rats demonstrated the effect of the external magnet on modifying the biodistribution of FLU-MNCs. FLU-MNCs resulted efficiently internalized by tumor cells and susceptible to magnetic targeting by application of an external magnetic field. The proposed nanocarriers can represent a very promising approach to obtain an efficient magnetically targeted anticancer drug delivery system.

  11. Calibrator for microflow delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinozzi, Franco; Bini, Fabiano; Cappa, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for calibrating the fluid flow rate down to 3×10-2ml/h is proposed, based on the volumetric pump working principle. Constant flow rate is assured by means of the constant speed at which the plunger of a laboratory syringe is moved. To test effectiveness of the system, a flow sensor, composed by a differential pressure transducer and a needle was calibrated and afterward utilized for characterizing a clinical drug infusion device. The proposed apparatus showed a full scale (FS) uncertainty approximately equal to 3.5% over a range of 6 ml/h. The calibration range starts at 3×10-2ml/h with a 1 ml syringe and at 3×10-3ml/h with a 0.1 ml syringe. The minimum detectable signal (evaluated at 6 dB SNR) was equal to about 1.4×10-2ml/h by using a syringe of 1 ml. The outcomes of the adopted procedure allowed a characterization of the performance of an infusion pump, without the need of the usual but somewhat cumbersome gravimetric calibration standard. Moreover, some issues about the expected resolution and uncertainty, depending on the characteristics of the system, is also reported.

  12. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB) for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods. PMID:25136634

  13. A stabilized peptide ligand for multifunctional glioma targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ying, Man; Shen, Qing; Zhan, Changyou; Wei, Xiaoli; Gao, Jie; Xie, Cao; Yao, Bingxin; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-12-10

    Peptide ligands consisting of l-amino acids are subject to proteolysis in vivo. When modified on the surface of nanocarriers, those peptide ligands would readily degrade and the targeting efficacy is significantly attenuated. It has received increasing scrutiny to design stable peptide ligands for targeted drug delivery. Here, we present the design of a stable peptide ligand by the formation of a head-to-tail amide bond as an example. Even though the linear l-peptide A7R (termed (L)A7R) can bind specifically to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) that are overexpressed on glioma cells, neovasculature and glioma vasculogenic mimicry (VM), the tumor-homing capacity of (L)A7R is greatly impaired in vivo due to proteolysis (e.g. in the serum). A cyclic A7R (cA7R) peptide was identified by computer-aided peptide design and synthesized with high yield by combining solid phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. The binding of cA7R to both receptors was theoretically and experimentally assessed. In our simulated model hydrophobic and ionic interactions dominated the binding of (L)A7R to receptors. It is very interesting that cA7R adopting a different structure from (L)A7R retained high binding affinities to receptors without affecting the hydrophobic and ionic interactions. After head-to-tail cyclization by the formation of an amide bond, cA7R exhibited exceptional stability in mouse serum. Either cA7R or (L)A7R was conjugated on the surface of doxorubicin (DOX) loaded liposomes (cA7R-LS/DOX or (L)A7R-LS/DOX). The results of in vitro cellular assays indicated that cA7R-LS/DOX not only displayed stronger anti-proliferative effect against glioma cells, but also demonstrated to be more efficient in destruction of VM and HUVEC tubes in comparison to (L)A7R-LS/DOX and plain liposomes (LS/DOX, without peptide conjugation). cA7R conjugation could achieve significantly higher accumulation of liposomes in glioma than did (L

  14. Focusing of photomechanical waves with an optical lens for depth-targeted molecular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Takuichirou; Sato, Shunichi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2014-02-01

    We have been developing molecular delivery systems based on photomechanical waves (PMWs), which are generated by the irradiation of a laser absorbing material with nanosecond laser pulses. This method enables highly site-specific delivery in the horizontal plane of the tissue. However, targeting in the vertical direction is a remaining challenge. In this study, we developed a novel PMW focusing device for deeper tissue targeting. A commercial optical concave lens and black natural rubber sheet (laser absorber) were attached to the top and bottom end of a cylindrical spacer, respectively, which was filled with water. A laser pulse was transmitted through the lens and water and hit the rubber sheet to induce a plasma, generating a PMW. The PMW was propagated both downward and upward. The downward wave (1st wave) was diffused, while the upward (2nd wave) wave was reflected with the concave surface of the lens and focused at a depth determined by the geometrical parameters. To attenuate the 1st wave, a small-diameter silicon sponge rubber disk was adhered just under the rubber sheet concentrically with the laser axis. With the lens of f = -40 mm, the 2nd wave was focused to a diameter of 5.7 mm at a targeted depth of 20 mm, which was well agreed with the result of calculation by ray tracing. At a laser fluence of 5.1 J/cm2, peak pressure of the PMW reached ~40 MPa at the depth of 20 mm. Under this condition, we examined depth-targeted gene delivery to the rat skin.

  15. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development: Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Handrock, J.L.; Malinowski, M.E.; Wally, K.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. This project is part of the Field Work Proposal entitled Hydrogen Utilization in Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The goal of the Hydrogen Storage and Delivery System Development Project is to expand the state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage and delivery system design and development. At the foundation of this activity is the development of both analytical and experimental evaluation platforms. These tools provide the basis for an integrated approach for coupling hydrogen storage and delivery technology to the operating characteristics of potential hydrogen energy use applications. Analytical models have been developed for internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid and fuel cell driven vehicles. The dependence of hydride storage system weight and energy use efficiency on engine brake efficiency and exhaust temperature for ICE hybrid vehicle applications is examined. Results show that while storage system weight decreases with increasing engine brake efficiency energy use efficiency remains relatively unchanged. The development, capability, and use of a newly developed fuel cell vehicle hydride storage system model will also be discussed. As an example of model use power distribution and control for a simulated driving cycle is presented. An experimental test facility, the Hydride Bed Testing Laboratory (HBTL) has been designed and fabricated. The development of this facility and its use in storage system development will be reviewed. These two capabilities (analytical and experimental) form the basis of an integrated approach to storage system design and development. The initial focus of these activities has been on hydride utilization for vehicular applications.

  16. Tumor-targeted liposomal drug delivery mediated by a diseleno bond-stabilized cyclic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chong; Wang, Yixin; Zhang, Xiaolin; Deng, Li; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Zhangbao

    2013-01-01

    Peptide ligands have played an important role in tumor-targeted drug delivery as targeting moieties. The in vivo fate of peptide-mediated drug delivery systems and the following antitumor effects may greatly depend on the stability of the peptide ligand. In the current study, a tumor-targeting cyclic peptide screened by phage display, Lyp-1 (a peptide that specifically binds to tumor and endothelial cells of tumor lymphatics in certain tumors), was structurally modified by replacement of the original intramolecular disulfide bond with a diseleno bond. The produced analog Syp-1 (seleno derivative of Lyp-1) maintained specific binding ability to the target protein p32 (Kd = 18.54 nM), which is similar to that of Lyp-1 (Kd = 10.59 nM), indicated by surface plasmon resonance assay. Compared with Lyp-1, Syp-1 showed significantly improved stability against serum. After the peptide attached onto the surface of fluorophore-encapsulating liposomes, the more efficient tumor uptake of liposomal fluorophore mediated by Syp-1 was observed. Furthermore, Syp-1 modified liposomal doxorubicin presented the most potent tumor growth inhibitory ability among all the therapeutic groups, with a low half maximal inhibitory concentration of 588 nM against MDA-MB-435 cells in vitro and a high tumor inhibition rate of 73.5% in vivo. These findings clearly indicated that Syp-1 was a stable and effective tumor targeting ligand and suggest that the sulfur-to-selenium replacement strategy may help stabilize the phage-displayed cyclic peptide containing disulfide-bond under physiological conditions and strongly support the validity of peptide-mediated drug targeting. PMID:23515368

  17. Analysis of structure and dynamics of superfine polyhydroxybutyrate fibers for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkhov, A.; Kucherenko, E.; Pantyukhov, P.; Zykova, A.; Karpova, S.; Iordanskii, A.

    2017-02-01

    Creation of polymer matrix systems for targeted drug delivery into a living organism is a challenging problem of modern treatment of various diseases and injuries. Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) is commonly used for development of therapeutic systems. The aim of this article is to examine the changes in structure and morphology of fibers in presence of dipyridamole (DPD) as model drug for controlled release. It was found that addition of dipyridamole led to disappearance of spindle-shaped nodules on fibers of PHB in comparison with pure PHB. The research of thermophysical parameters showed that specific melting enthalpy (and the degree of crystallinity) of PHB fibers increased with the addition of DPD. With the increasing of DPD content in PHB fibers, more perfect and equilibrium crystal structure was formed. According to analysis of intercrystalline regions of PHB fibers, it was found that as the crystallinity of PHB in intergranular regions rose, the corresponding decrease of radical rotation speed was observed. It was concluded that fibers of PHB can be used for creating therapeutic systems for targeted and prolonged drug delivery.

  18. Hydrogen storage and delivery system development: Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Handrock, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen storage and delivery is an important element in effective hydrogen utilization for energy applications and is an important part of the FY1994-1998 Hydrogen Program Implementation Plan. This project is part of the Field Work Proposal entitled Hydrogen Utilization in Internal Combustion Engines (ICE). The goal of the Hydrogen Storage and Delivery System Development Project is to expand the state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage and delivery system design and development. At the foundation of this activity is the development of both analytical and experimental evaluation platforms. These tools provide the basis for an integrated approach for coupling hydrogen storage and delivery technology to the operating characteristics of potential hydrogen energy use applications. Results of the analytical model development portion of this project will be discussed. Analytical models have been developed for internal combustion engine (ICE) hybrid and fuel cell driven vehicles. The dependence of hydride storage system weight and energy use efficiency on engine brake efficiency and exhaust temperature for ICE hybrid vehicle applications is examined. Results show that while storage system weight decreases with increasing engine brake efficiency energy use efficiency remains relatively unchanged. The development, capability, and use of a recently developed fuel cell vehicle storage system model will also be discussed. As an example of model use, power distribution and control for a simulated driving cycle is presented. Model calibration results of fuel cell fluid inlet and exit temperatures at various fuel cell idle speeds, assumed fuel cell heat capacities, and ambient temperatures are presented. The model predicts general increases in temperature with fuel cell power and differences between inlet and exit temperatures, but under predicts absolute temperature values, especially at higher power levels.

  19. Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Rationally Designed Vehicles for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,J.; Wong,S.; Chen, S.; Zhao, X.; Kuznetsova, L.V.; and Ojima, I.

    2008-11-14

    A novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based tumor-targeted drug delivery system (DDS) has been developed, which consists of a functionalized SWNT linked to tumor-targeting modules as well as prodrug modules. There are three key features of this nanoscale DDS: (a) use of functionalized SWNTs as a biocompatible platform for the delivery of therapeutic drugs or diagnostics, (b) conjugation of prodrug modules of an anticancer agent (taxoid with a cleavable linker) that is activated to its cytotoxic form inside the tumor cells upon internalization and in situ drug release, and (c) attachment of tumor-recognition modules (biotin and a spacer) to the nanotube surface. To prove the efficacy of this DDS, three fluorescent and fluorogenic molecular probes were designed, synthesized, characterized, and subjected to the analysis of the receptor-mediated endocytosis and drug release inside the cancer cells (L1210FR leukemia cell line) by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The specificity and cytotoxicity of the conjugate have also been assessed and compared with L1210 and human noncancerous cell lines. Then, it has unambiguously been proven that this tumor-targeting DDS works exactly as designed and shows high potency toward specific cancer cell lines, thereby forming a solid foundation for further development.

  20. LFA-1 on Leukemic Cells as a Target for Therapy or Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Phongpradist, Rungsinee; Chittasupho, Chuda; Okonogi, Siriporn; Siahaan, Teruna; Anuchapreeda, Songyot; Ampasavate, Chadarat; Berkland, Cory

    2014-01-01

    Leukemia therapeutics are aiming for improved efficacy by targeting molecular markers differentially expressed on cancerous cells. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) expression on various types of leukemia has been well studied. Here, the role and expression of LFA-1 on leukemic cells and the possibility of using this integrin as a target for drug delivery is reviewed. To support this rationale, experimental results were also included where cIBR, a cyclic peptide derived from a binding site of LFA-1, was conjugated to the surface of polymeric nanoparticles and used as a targeting ligand. These studies revealed a correlation of LFA-1 expression level on leukemic cell lines and binding and internalization of cIBR-NPs suggesting a differential binding and internalization of cIBR-NPs to leukemic cells overexpressing LFA-1. Nanoparticles conjugated with a cyclic peptide against an accessible molecular marker of disease hold promise as a selective drug delivery system for leukemia treatment. PMID:20618153

  1. Notch1 targeting siRNA delivery nanoparticles for rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Ju; Park, Jong-Sung; Lee, So Jin; Jang, Jiyeon; Park, Jin Su; Back, Seung Hyun; Bahn, Gahee; Park, Jae Hyung; Kang, Young Mo; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kwon, Ick Chan; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2015-10-28

    Notch pathway plays a pivotal role in synoviocytes involved in progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Herein, we designed the Notch1 targeting siRNA delivery nanoparticles (siRNA-NPs) in order to confirm the anti-inflammatory effect in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. The siRNA-NPs were successfully produced by encapsulating polymerized siRNA (poly-siRNA) into thiolated glycol chitosan (tGC) nanoparticles in aqueous condition. The in vitro Notch1 inhibition of siRNA-NPs in murine macrophage cell (RAW 264.7) was confirmed using confocal microscopy and real time PCR. Fluorescently labeled siRNA-NPs were successfully transfected in RAW 264.7 and modulated the expression of Notch1 in mRNA level. For in vivo study, siRNA-NPs exhibited the higher targeting efficiency in the arthritic joins of CIA mice, confirmed by the near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging. Furthermore, inhibition of Notch1 with siRNA-NPs resulted in retarded progression of inflammation, bone erosion, and cartilage damage in CIA mice. Novel Notch1 targeting siRNA delivery system of siRNA-NPs showed effective RA treatment by suppressing Notch1 signaling pathway without undesirable severe toxicity. Thus, Notch1 inhibiting siRNA-NPs demonstrated the great potential in RA therapeutics that was hard to be achieved using conventional drugs.

  2. Folate-conjugated boron nitride nanospheres for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shini; Zhang, Huijie; Yan, Ting; Huang, Dandi; Zhi, Chunyi; Nakanishi, Hideki; Gao, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    With its unique physical and chemical properties and structural similarity to carbon, boron nitride (BN) has attracted considerable attention and found many applications. Biomedical applications of BN have recently started to emerge, raising great hopes in drug and gene delivery. Here, we developed a targeted anticancer drug delivery system based on folate-conjugated BN nanospheres (BNNS) with receptor-mediated targeting. Folic acid (FA) was successfully grafted onto BNNS via esterification reaction. In vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that BNNS-FA complexes were non-toxic to HeLa cells up to a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Then, doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), a commonly used anticancer drug, was loaded onto BNNS-FA complexes. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes were stable at pH 7.4 but effectively released DOX at pH 5.0, which exhibited a pH sensitive and sustained release pattern. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes could be recognized and specifically internalized by HeLa cells via FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. BNNS-FA/DOX complexes exhibited greater cytotoxicity to HeLa cells than free DOX and BNNS/DOX complexes due to the increased cellular uptake of DOX mediated by the FA receptor. Therefore, BNNS-FA complexes had strong potential for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:27695318

  3. Preparation and characterization of novel chitosan-protamine nanoparticles for nucleus-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiwei; Hou, Jiahui; Shi, Yijie; Su, Chang; Zhao, Liang

    It is well known that most anticancer drugs commonly show high toxicity to the DNA of tumor cells and exert effects by combining with the DNA or associated enzymes in the nucleus. Most developed drugs are first delivered into the cytoplasm and then transferred to the nucleus through the membrane pores. Sometimes, the transportation of drugs from cytoplasm to nucleus is not efficient and often results in poor therapeutic effects. In this study, we developed special and novel nanoparticles (NPs) made of chitosan and protamine for targeted nuclear capture of drugs to enhance anticancer effects. The anticancer effects of nuclear targeted-delivery of drugs in NPs were also evaluated by investigating cytotoxicity, cellular uptake mechanism, and cell apoptosis on cells. Chitosan-protamine NPs were characterized by good drug entrapment, sustained release, small average particle size, low polydispersity index, and high encapsulation efficiency; and accomplished the efficient nuclear delivery of fluorouracil (5-Fu). Compared with free 5-Fu and 5-Fu-loaded chitosan NPs, treatment of A549 cells and HeLa cells with 5-Fu-loaded chitosan-protamine NPs showed the highest cytotoxicity and further induced the significant apoptosis of cells. In addition, 5-Fu-loaded chitosan-protamine NPs exhibited the best efficiency in inhibiting tumor growth than the other three formulations. 5-Fu-loaded chitosan-protamine NPs enhanced antitumor efficacy through the targeted nuclear capture of drugs and showed promising potential as a nanodelivery system for quickly locating drugs in the nucleus of cells.

  4. Multifunctional magnetic silica nanotubes for MR imaging and targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Ao, Lijiao; Wang, Wei; Hu, Dehong; Sheng, Zonghai; Su, Wu

    2015-03-04

    A multifunctional drug delivery vehicle consisting of a tubular shaped silica host, a compact superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle layer and a hyaluronic acid surface coating was developed as a theranostic platform, for in vivo MR imaging and magnetically guided/cancer targeted drug delivery.

  5. Transdermal testosterone delivery: comparison between scrotal and nonscrotal delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Lin, S; Xing, Q F; Chien, Y W

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the bioequivalence of two testosterone transdermal delivery systems (T-TDSs). Testoderm, designed to deliver testosterone through scrotal skin, and Androderm, designed for nonscrotal permeation. In vitro permeation and release kinetics as well as in vivo pharmacokinetics in the castrated Yucatan miniature swine (minipigs) model of both T-TDSs were studied side by side under the same experimental conditions. In vitro skin permeation kinetics studies demonstrated that testosterone permeates through minipig dorsal skin at zero-order kinetics from both T-TDSs. The nonscrotal T-TDS, however, has a permeation rate which is approximately 13 times higher than that for the scrotal T-TDS. The release of testosterone from the nonscrotal T-TDS showed a biphasic release profile between cumulative amount released and time, whereas a monophasic release profile between cumulative amount released and square root of time was observed for the scrotal T-TDS. Pharmacokinetic analysis of plasma testosterone profiles in minipigs indicated a significant difference (p < 0.001) in daily dose of testosterone delivered (1.20 versus 4.83 mg/day), maximum concentration (Cmax) (54.2 versus 218.0 ng/dl), and area under concentration-time curve (AUC0-28)[665 versus 3208 (ng/dl) x hr] between these T-TDSs. However, there is no difference in time to reach Cmax mean residence time, and daily-delivered-dose-normalized Cmax and AUC0-28. The difference in pharmacokinetic profiles resulted from the difference in daily doses delivered, which could be attributed remarkably to the difference in permeation rate (approximately 13-fold) between the nonscrotal and scrotal T-TDSs.

  6. Inhaled formulations and pulmonary drug delivery systems for respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Leung, Sharon Shui Yee; Tang, Patricia; Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Loh, Zhi Hui; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2015-05-01

    Respiratory infections represent a major global health problem. They are often treated by parenteral administrations of antimicrobials. Unfortunately, systemic therapies of high-dose antimicrobials can lead to severe adverse effects and this calls for a need to develop inhaled formulations that enable targeted drug delivery to the airways with minimal systemic drug exposure. Recent technological advances facilitate the development of inhaled anti-microbial therapies. The newer mesh nebulisers have achieved minimal drug residue, higher aerosolisation efficiencies and rapid administration compared to traditional jet nebulisers. Novel particle engineering and intelligent device design also make dry powder inhalers appealing for the delivery of high-dose antibiotics. In view of the fact that no new antibiotic entities against multi-drug resistant bacteria have come close to commercialisation, advanced formulation strategies are in high demand for combating respiratory 'super bugs'.

  7. Investigation of strategies for drug delivery by combination targeting of nanocarriers to multiple epitopes or receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papademetriou, Iason Titos

    Development of drug delivery systems (ie. nanocarriers) with controllable composition, architecture, and functionalities is heavily investigated in the field of drug delivery in order to improve clinical interventions. Designing drug nanocarriers which possess targeting properties is critical to enable them to reach the intended site of intervention in the body. To achieve this goal, the surface of drug nanocarriers can be modified with targeting moieties (antibodies, peptides, etc.) addressed to cell surface molecules expressed on the diseased tissues and cells. If these molecules are receptors capable of internalizing bound ligands via endocytosis, targeting can then enable drug transport into cells or across cellular barriers in the body. Yet, addressing nanocarriers to single targets presents limited control over cellular interactions and biodistribution. Since most cell-surface markers are not exclusively expressed in a precise site in vivo, high affinity of targeted nanocarriers may lead to non-desired accumulation in regions of the body associated with low expression. Modification of nanocarriers to achieve combined-targeting (binding to more than one cell-surface receptor) may help modulate binding to cells and also endocytosis, since cell receptors possess distinct functions and features affecting these parameters, such as their expression, location on the plasmalemma, activation in disease, mechanism of endocytosis, etc. Further, targeting nanocarriers to multiple epitopes of the same receptor, a strategy which has never been tested, may also modulate these parameters since they are highly epitope specific. In this dissertation, we investigate the effect of targeting model polymer nanocarriers to: (1) multiple receptors of similar function (intercellular-, platelet-endothelial-, and/or vascular-cell adhesion molecules), (2) multiple receptors of different function (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and transferrin receptor), or (3) multiple epitopes of

  8. Using DNA nanotechnology to produce a drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huyen La, Thi; Thu Thuy Nguyen, Thi; Phuc Pham, Van; Huyen Nguyen, Thi Minh; Huan Le, Quang

    2013-03-01

    Drug delivery to cancer cells in chemotherapy is one of the most advanced research topics. The effectiveness of the current cancer treatment drugs is limited because they are not capable of distinguishing between cancer cells and normal cells so that they kill not only cancer cells but also normal ones. To overcome this disadvantage by profiting from the differences in physical and chemical properties between cancer and normal cells, nanoparticles (NPs) delivering a drug are designed in a specific manner such that they can distinguish the cancer cells from the normal ones and are targeted only to the cancer cells. Currently, there are various drug delivery systems with many advantages, but sharing some common disadvantages such as difficulty with controlling the size, low encapsulation capacity and low stability. With the development and success of DNA nanotechnology, DNA strands are used to create effective drug delivery NPs with precisely controlled size and structure, safety and high stability. This article presents our study on drug encapsulation in DNA nanostructure which loaded docetaxel and curcumin in a desire to create a new and effective drug delivery system with high biological compatibility. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology, 30 October-2 November, 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  9. Self-assembled polymeric nanocarriers for the targeted delivery of retinoic acid to the hair follicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapteva, Maria; Möller, Michael; Gurny, Robert; Kalia, Yogeshvar N.

    2015-11-01

    Acne vulgaris is a highly prevalent dermatological disease of the pilosebaceous unit (PSU). An inability to target drug delivery to the PSU results in poor treatment efficacy and the incidence of local side-effects. Cutaneous application of nanoparticulate systems is reported to induce preferential accumulation in appendageal structures. The aim of this work was to prepare stable polymeric micelles containing retinoic acid (RA) using a biodegradable and biocompatible diblock methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(hexylsubstituted lactic acid) copolymer (MPEG-dihexPLA) and to evaluate their ability to deliver RA to skin. An innovative punch biopsy sample preparation method was developed to selectively quantify follicular delivery; the amounts of RA present were compared to those in bulk skin, (i.e. without PSU), which served as the control. RA was successfully incorporated into micelle nanocarriers and protected from photoisomerization by inclusion of Quinoline Yellow. Incorporation into the spherical, homogeneous and nanometer-scale micelles (dn < 20 nm) increased the aqueous solubility of RA by >400-fold. Drug delivery experiments in vitro showed that micelles were able to deliver RA to porcine and human skins more efficiently than Retin-A® Micro (0.04%), a marketed gel containing RA loaded microspheres, (7.1 +/- 1.1% vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1% and 7.5 +/- 0.8% vs. 0.8 +/- 0.1% of the applied dose, respectively). In contrast to a non-colloidal RA solution, Effederm® (0.05%), both the RA loaded MPEG-dihexPLA polymeric micelles (0.005%) and Retin-A® Micro (0.04%) displayed selectivity for delivery to the PSU with 2-fold higher delivery to PSU containing samples than to control samples. Moreover, the micelle formulation outperformed Retin-A® Micro in terms of delivery efficiency to PSU presenting human skin (10.4 +/- 3.2% vs. 0.6 +/- 0.2%, respectively). The results indicate that the polymeric micelle formulation enabled an increased and targeted delivery of RA to the PSU

  10. Cell-mediated Delivery and Targeted Erosion of Noncovalently Crosslinked Hydrogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiick, Kristi L. (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Nori (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for targeted delivery of therapeutic compounds from hydrogels is presented. The method involves administering to a cell a hydrogel in which a therapeutic compound is noncovalently bound to heparin.

  11. Systemic delivery to central nervous system by engineered PLGA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiang; Wang, Long; Deng, Gang; Liu, Junhui; Chen, Qianxue; Chen, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    Neurological disorders are an important global public health problem, but pharmaceutical treatments are limited due to drug access to the central nervous system being restricted by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the most promising drug and gene delivery systems for crossing the BBB. While these systems offer great promise, PLGA NPs also have some intrinsic drawbacks and require further engineering for clinical and research applications. Multiple strategies have been developed for using PLGA NPs to deliver compounds across the BBB. We classify these strategies into three categories according to the adaptations made to the PLGA NPs (1) to facilitate travel from the injection site (pre-transcytosis strategies); (2) to enhance passage across the brain endothelial cells (BBB transcytosis strategies) and (3) to achieve targeting of the impaired nervous system cells (post-transcytosis strategies). PLGA NPs modified according to these three strategies are denoted first, second, and third generation NPs, respectively. We believe that fusing these three strategies to engineer multifunctional PLGA NPs is the only way to achieve translational applications. PMID:27158367

  12. Systemic drug delivery systems for bone tissue regeneration- a mini review.

    PubMed

    Xinluan, Wang; Yuxiao, Lai; Helena, Ng HueiLeng; Zhijun, Yang; Ling, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal metabolic diseases such as osteoporosis have become the major public health problems worldwide in our aging society. Pharmaceutical therapy is one of the approaches to prevent and treat related medical conditions. Most of the clinically used anti-osteoporotic drugs are administered systemically and have demonstrated some side effects in non-skeletal tissues. One of the innovative approaches to prevent potential adverse effects is the development of bone-targeting drug delivery technologies that not only minimizes the systemic toxicity but also improves the pharmacokinetic profile and therapeutic efficacy of chemical drugs. This paper reviews the currently available bone targeting drug delivery systems with emphasis as bone-targeting moieties, including the bonesurface- site-specific (bone formation dominant or bone resorption dominant) and cell-specific moieties. In addition, the connections of drug-bone-targeting moieties-carrier are also summarized, and the newly developed liposomes and nanoparticles are discussed for their potential use and main challenges in delivering therapeutic agents to bone tissue. As a rapid-developing biotechnology, systemic bonetargeting delivery system is promising but still in its infancy where challenges are ahead of us, including the stability and the toxicity issues, especially to fulfill the regulatory requirement to realize bench-to-bedside translation. Newly developed biomaterials and technologies with potential for safer and more effective drug delivery require multidisciplinary collaborations with preclinical and clinical scientists that are essential to facilitate their clinical applications.

  13. 42 CFR 457.490 - Delivery and utilization control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Delivery and utilization control systems. 457.490... State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.490 Delivery and utilization control systems. A... control systems. A State must— (a) Describe the methods of delivery of child health assistance...

  14. 42 CFR 457.490 - Delivery and utilization control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Delivery and utilization control systems. 457.490... State Plan Requirements: Coverage and Benefits § 457.490 Delivery and utilization control systems. A... control systems. A State must— (a) Describe the methods of delivery of child health assistance...

  15. A Partnership Training Program: Studying Targeted Drug Delivery Using Nanoparticles in Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    TITLE: A Partnership Training Program: Studying Targeted Drug Delivery Using Nanoparticles in Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy PRINCIPAL...Drug Delivery Using Nanoparticles in Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0767 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...graduate and 3 undergraduate students from 7 departments at the Howard University have been trained in the use of nanoparticles as targeted drug

  16. Platelets as Contractile Nanomachines for Targeting Drug Delivery in Hemostasis and Thrombosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0495 TITLE: Platelets as Contractile Nanomachines for Targeting Drug Delivery in Hemostasis and Thrombosis PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Platelets as Contractile Nanomachines for Targeting Drug Delivery in Hemostasis and Thrombosis 5b. GRANT...flow and thrombin concentration affect drug release. The proposed proof-of-concept experiments will validate our concept of platelet contraction

  17. RGD-modified lipid disks as drug carriers for tumor targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jie; Xie, Cao; Zhang, Mingfei; Wei, Xiaoli; Yan, Zhiqiang; Ren, Yachao; Ying, Man; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-03-01

    Melittin, the major component of the European bee venom, is a potential anticancer candidate due to its lytic properties. However, in vivo applications of melittin are limited due to its main side effect, hemolysis, especially when applied through intravenous administration. The polyethylene glycol-stabilized lipid disk is a novel type of nanocarrier, and the rim of lipid disks has a high affinity to amphiphilic peptides. In our study, a c(RGDyK) modified lipid disk was developed as a tumor targeted drug delivery system for melittin. Cryo-TEM was used to confirm the shape and size of lipid disks with or without c(RGDyK) modification. In vitro and in vivo hemolysis analyses revealed that the hemolysis effect significantly decreased after melittin associated with lipid disks. Importantly, the results of our in vivo biodistribution and tumor growth inhibitory experiments showed that c(RGDyK) modification increased the distribution of lipid disks in the tumor and the anticancer efficacy of melittin loaded lipid disks. Thus, we successfully achieved a targeted drug delivery system for melittin and other amphiphilic peptides with a good therapeutic effect and low side effects.

  18. Recent Trends of Polymer Mediated Liposomal Gene Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Soo; George Priya Doss, C.; Yagihara, Shin; Kim, Do-Young

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in the gene delivery system have resulted in clinical successes in gene therapy for patients with several genetic diseases, such as immunodeficiency diseases, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) blindness, thalassemia, and many more. Among various delivery systems, liposomal mediated gene delivery route is offering great promises for gene therapy. This review is an attempt to depict a portrait about the polymer based liposomal gene delivery systems and their future applications. Herein, we have discussed in detail the characteristics of liposome, importance of polymer for liposome formulation, gene delivery, and future direction of liposome based gene delivery as a whole. PMID:25250340

  19. Coupled Particulate and Continuum Model for Nanoparticle Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jifu; Wang, Shunqiang; Yang, Jie; Liu, Yaling

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of nanoparticle (NP) distribution in a vasculature involves transport phenomena at various scales and is crucial for the evaluation of NP delivery efficiency. A combined particulate and continuum model is developed to model NP transport and delivery processes. In the particulate model ligand-receptor binding kinetics is coupled with Brownian dynamics to study NP binding on a microscale. An analytical formula is derived to link molecular level binding parameters to particulate level adhesion and detachment rates. The obtained NP adhesion rates are then coupled with a convection-diffusion-reaction model to study NP transport and delivery at macroscale. The binding results of the continuum model agree well with those from the particulate model. The effects of shear rate, particle size and vascular geometry on NP adhesion are investigated. Attachment rates predicted by the analytical formula also agree reasonably well with the experimental data reported in literature. The developed coupled model that links ligand-receptor binding dynamics to NP adhesion rate along with macroscale transport and delivery processes may serve as a faster evaluation and prediction tool to determine NP distribution in complex vascular networks. PMID:23729869

  20. Lipid nanoparticles for targeted siRNA delivery – going from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Zatsepin, Timofei S; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V; Koteliansky, Victor

    2016-01-01

    This review covers the basic aspects of small interfering RNA delivery by lipid nano-particles (LNPs) and elaborates on the current status of clinical trials for these systems. We briefly describe the roles of all LNP components and possible strategies for their improvement. We also focus on the current clinical trials using LNP-formulated RNA and the possible outcomes for therapy in the near future. Also, we present a critical analysis of selected clinical trials that reveals the common logic behind target selection. We address this review to a wide audience, especially to medical doctors who are interested in the application of RNA interference–based treatment platforms. We anticipate that this review may spark interest in this particular audience and generate new ideas in target selection for the disorders they are dealing with. PMID:27462152

  1. Thermal treatment of galactose-branched polyelectrolyte microcapsules to improve drug delivery with reserved targetability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fu; Wu, Qi; Liu, Li-Jun; Chen, Zhi-Chun; Lin, Xian-Fu

    2008-06-05

    A novel multilayered drug delivery system by LbL assembly of galactosylated polyelectrolyte, which is possible to have the potential in hepatic targeting by the presence of galactose residues at the microcapsule's surface, is designed. Thermal treatment was performed on the capsules and a dramatic thermal shrinkage up to 60% decrease of capsule diameter above 50 degrees C was observed. This thermal behavior was then used to manipulate drug loading capacity and release rate. Heating after drug loading could seal the capsule shell, enhancing the loading capacity and reducing the release rate significantly. Excellent affinity between galactose-binding lectin and heated galactose-containing microcapsules were observed, indicating a stable targeting potential even after high temperature elevating up to 90 degrees C.

  2. Aided targeting system simulation evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demaio, Joe; Becker, Curtis

    1994-01-01

    Simulation research was conducted at the Crew Station Research and Development Facility on the effectiveness and ease of use of three targeting systems. A manual system required the aviator to scan a target array area with a simulated second generation forward looking infrared (FLIR) sensor, locate and categorize targets, and construct a target hand-off list. The interface between the aviator and the system was like that of an advanced scout helicopter (manual mode). Two aided systems detected and categorized targets automatically. One system used only the FLIR sensor and the second used FLIR fused with Longbow radar. The interface for both was like that of an advanced scout helicopter aided mode. Exposure time while performing the task was reduced substantially with the aided systems, with no loss of target hand-off list accuracy. The fused sensor system showed lower time to construct the target hand-off list and a slightly lower false alarm rate than the other systems. A number of issues regarding system sensitivity and criterion, and operator interface design are discussed.

  3. Targeted delivery of paclitaxel and doxorubicin to cancer xenografts via the nanoparticle of nano-diamino-tetrac

    PubMed Central

    Sudha, Thangirala; Bharali, Dhruba J; Yalcin, Murat; Darwish, Noureldien HE; Debreli Coskun, Melis; Keating, Kelly A; Lin, Hung-Yun; Davis, Paul J; Mousa, Shaker A

    2017-01-01

    The tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) component of nano-diamino-tetrac (NDAT) is chemically bonded via a linker to a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticle that can encapsulate anticancer drugs. Tetrac targets the plasma membrane of cancer cells at a receptor on the extracellular domain of integrin αvβ3. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of NDAT delivery of paclitaxel and doxorubicin to, respectively, pancreatic and breast cancer orthotopic nude mouse xenografts. Intra-tumoral drug concentrations were 5-fold (paclitaxel; P<0.001) and 2.3-fold (doxorubicin; P<0.01) higher than with conventional systemic drug administration. Tumor volume reductions reflected enhanced xenograft drug uptake. Cell viability was estimated by bioluminescent signaling in pancreatic tumors and confirmed an increased paclitaxel effect with drug delivery by NDAT. NDAT delivery of chemotherapy increases drug delivery to cancers and increases drug efficacy. PMID:28243091

  4. Targeted delivery of paclitaxel and doxorubicin to cancer xenografts via the nanoparticle of nano-diamino-tetrac.

    PubMed

    Sudha, Thangirala; Bharali, Dhruba J; Yalcin, Murat; Darwish, Noureldien He; Debreli Coskun, Melis; Keating, Kelly A; Lin, Hung-Yun; Davis, Paul J; Mousa, Shaker A

    2017-01-01

    The tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) component of nano-diamino-tetrac (NDAT) is chemically bonded via a linker to a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticle that can encapsulate anticancer drugs. Tetrac targets the plasma membrane of cancer cells at a receptor on the extracellular domain of integrin αvβ3. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of NDAT delivery of paclitaxel and doxorubicin to, respectively, pancreatic and breast cancer orthotopic nude mouse xenografts. Intra-tumoral drug concentrations were 5-fold (paclitaxel; P<0.001) and 2.3-fold (doxorubicin; P<0.01) higher than with conventional systemic drug administration. Tumor volume reductions reflected enhanced xenograft drug uptake. Cell viability was estimated by bioluminescent signaling in pancreatic tumors and confirmed an increased paclitaxel effect with drug delivery by NDAT. NDAT delivery of chemotherapy increases drug delivery to cancers and increases drug efficacy.

  5. Targeted Drug Delivery in Covalent Organic Nanosheets (CONs) via Sequential Postsynthetic Modification.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Shouvik; Sasmal, Himadri Sekhar; Kundu, Tanay; Kandambeth, Sharath; Illath, Kavya; Díaz Díaz, David; Banerjee, Rahul

    2017-03-29

    Covalent organic nanosheets (CONs) have emerged as a new class of functional two-dimensional (2D) porous organic polymeric materials with a high accessible surface, diverse functionality, and chemical stability. They could become versatile candidates for targeted drug delivery. Despite their many advantages, there are limitations to their use for target specific drug delivery. We anticipated that these drawbacks could be overturned by judicious postsynthetic modification steps to use CONs for targeted drug delivery. The postsynthetic modification would not only produce the desired functionality, it would also help to exfoliate to CONs as well. In order to meet this requirement, we have developed a facile, salt-mediated synthesis of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) in the presence of p-toluenesulfonic acid (PTSA). The COFs were subjected to sequential postsynthetic modifications to yield functionalized targeted CONs for targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil to breast cancer cells. This postsynthetic modification resulted in simultaneous chemical delamination and functionalization to targeted CONs. Targeted CONs showed sustained release of the drug to the cancer cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis, which led to cancer cell death via apoptosis. Considering the easy and facile COF synthesis, functionality based postsynthetic modifications, and chemical delamination to CONs for potential advantageous targeted drug delivery, this process can have a significant impact in biomedical applications.

  6. Targeting of gastrointestinal tract for amended delivery of protein/peptide therapeutics: strategies and industrial perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Vivek K; Meher, Jaya Gopal; Singh, Yuvraj; Chaurasia, Mohini; Surendar Reddy, B; Chourasia, Manish K

    2014-12-28

    Delivery of proteins/peptides to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract via peroral/oral route involves tremendous challenges due to unfavorable environmental conditions like harsh pH, presence of proteolytic enzymes and absorption barriers. Detailed research is being conducted at the academic and industrial levels to diminish these troubles and various products are under clinical trials. Several approaches have been established to optimize oral delivery of proteins and peptides and can be broadly categorized into chemical and physical strategies. Chemical strategies include site specific mutagenesis, proteinylation, glycosylation, PEGylation and prodrug approaches, whereas physical strategies comprise formulation based approaches including application of absorption enhancers and metabolism modifiers along with delivering them via colloidal carrier systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles, and micro- and nano-emulsions. This review stands to accomplish the diverse aspects of oral delivery of proteins/peptides and summarizes the key concepts involved in targeting the biodrugs to specific sites of the GI tract such as the intestine and colon. Furthermore some light has also been shed on the current industrial practices followed in developing oral formulations of such bioactives.

  7. Dual pH-responsive and CD44 receptor targeted multifunctional nanoparticles for anticancer intracellular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daquan; Sun, Jingfang; Lian, Shengnan; Liu, Zongliang; Sun, Kaoxiang; Liu, Wanhui; Wu, Zimei; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-11-01

    In this article, we prepared a multifunctional oligosaccharides of hyaluronan (oHA) conjugates, oHA-histidine-menthone 1,2-glycerol ketal (oHM). The oHM conjugates possess pH-sensitive menthone 1,2-glycerol ketal (MGK) as hydrophobic moieties and oHA as the target of CD44 receptor. The polymeric mPEG-Chitosan-Ketal (PCK) carrying pH-sensitive ketal group as hydrophobic moieties and PEG group as hydrophilic moieties were synthesized. The two pH-sensitive ketal derivatives were employed to fabricate nanoparticles for anti-tumor drug delivery. The oHM-PCK nanoparticles (oHPN) can spontaneously self-assemble into mixed micellar structure with nano-sized spherical shape of 100-200 nm at pH 7.4 PBS conditions. The oHPN could release encapsulated curcumin with 92.6 % at pH 5.0 compared with 55.3 % at pH 7.4. The results of cytotoxicity assay indicated that encapsulated curcumin in oHPN (Cur-oHPN) have less toxicity compared to curcumin suspension. The anti-tumor efficacy in vivo suggested that Cur-oHPN suppressed tumor growth most efficiently. These results present the promising potential of oHPN as an effective nano-sized pH-sensitive drug delivery system for intracellular delivery.

  8. Targeted drug delivery to bone: pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of acidic oligopeptide-tagged drugs.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Nishioka, Tatsuo; Yokogawa, Koichi; Tomatsu, Shunji; Nomura, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi

    2008-03-01

    Site-specific drug delivery to bone is considered to be achievable by utilizing acidic amino acid homopeptides. We found that fluorescence-labeled acidic amino acid (L-Asp or L-Glu) homopeptides containing six or more residues bound strongly to hydroxyapatite, which is a major component of bone, and were selectively delivered to and retained in bone after systemic administration. We explored the applicability of this result for drug delivery by conjugation of estradiol and levofloxacin with an L-Asp hexapeptide. We also similarly tagged an enzyme, tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, to see whether this would improve the efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy. The L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs, including the enzyme, were selectively delivered to bone in comparison with the untagged drugs. It was expected that the ester linkage to the hexapeptide would be susceptible to hydrolysis in situ, releasing the drug or enzyme from the acidic oligopeptide. An in vivo experiment confirmed the efficacy of L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged estradiol and levofloxacin, although there was some loss of bioactivity of estradiol and levofloxacin in vitro, suggesting that the acidic hexapeptide was partly removed by hydrolysis in the body after delivery to bone. The adverse effect of estradiol on the uterus was greatly reduced by conjugation to the hexapeptide. These results support the usefulness of acidic oligopeptides as bone-targeting carriers for therapeutic agents. We present some pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of the L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs and enzyme.

  9. Targeted delivery of GDNF through the blood-brain barrier by MRI-guided focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Shi, Yu; Lu, Lin; Liu, Li; Cai, Youli; Zheng, Hairong; Liu, Xin; Yan, Fei; Zou, Chao; Sun, Chengyu; Shi, Jie; Lu, Shukun; Chen, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors, such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), are promising therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases. However, the application of GDNF to treat these diseases effectively is limited because the blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents the local delivery of macromolecular therapeutic agents from entering the central nervous system (CNS). Focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles (MBs) using appropriate parameters has been previously demonstrated to be able to open the BBB locally and noninvasively. This study investigated the targeted delivery of GDNF MBs through the BBB by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound. Evans Blue extravasation and histological examination were used to determine the optimum focused ultrasound parameters. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to verify the effects of GDNF bound on MBs using a biotin-avidin bridging chemistry method to promote GDNF delivery into the brain. The results showed that GDNF can be delivered locally and noninvasively into the CNS through the BBB using MRI-guided focused ultrasound combined with MBs under optimum parameters. MBs that bind GDNF combined with MRI-guided focused ultrasound may be an effective way of delivering neurotrophic factors directly into the CNS. The method described herein provides a potential means of treating patients with CNS diseases.

  10. Targeted delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor for the treatment of blindness and deafness.

    PubMed

    Khalin, Igor; Alyautdin, Renad; Kocherga, Ganna; Bakar, Muhamad Abu

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative causes of blindness and deafness possess a major challenge in their clinical management as proper treatment guidelines have not yet been found. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been established as a promising therapy against neurodegenerative disorders including hearing and visual loss. Unfortunately, the blood-retinal barrier and blood-cochlear barrier, which have a comparable structure to the blood-brain barrier prevent molecules of larger sizes (such as BDNF) from exiting the circulation and reaching the targeted cells. Anatomical features of the eye and ear allow use of local administration, bypassing histo-hematic barriers. This paper focuses on highlighting a variety of strategies proposed for the local administration of the BDNF, like direct delivery, viral gene therapy, and cell-based therapy, which have been shown to successfully improve development, survival, and function of spiral and retinal ganglion cells. The similarities and controversies for BDNF treatment of posterior eye diseases and inner ear diseases have been analyzed and compared. In this review, we also focus on the possibility of translation of this knowledge into clinical practice. And finally, we suggest that using nanoparticulate drug-delivery systems may substantially contribute to the development of clinically viable techniques for BDNF delivery into the cochlea or posterior eye segment, which, ultimately, can lead to a long-term or permanent rescue of auditory and optic neurons from degeneration.

  11. Targeted delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor for the treatment of blindness and deafness

    PubMed Central

    Khalin, Igor; Alyautdin, Renad; Kocherga, Ganna; Bakar, Muhamad Abu

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative causes of blindness and deafness possess a major challenge in their clinical management as proper treatment guidelines have not yet been found. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been established as a promising therapy against neurodegenerative disorders including hearing and visual loss. Unfortunately, the blood–retinal barrier and blood–cochlear barrier, which have a comparable structure to the blood–brain barrier prevent molecules of larger sizes (such as BDNF) from exiting the circulation and reaching the targeted cells. Anatomical features of the eye and ear allow use of local administration, bypassing histo-hematic barriers. This paper focuses on highlighting a variety of strategies proposed for the local administration of the BDNF, like direct delivery, viral gene therapy, and cell-based therapy, which have been shown to successfully improve development, survival, and function of spiral and retinal ganglion cells. The similarities and controversies for BDNF treatment of posterior eye diseases and inner ear diseases have been analyzed and compared. In this review, we also focus on the possibility of translation of this knowledge into clinical practice. And finally, we suggest that using nanoparticulate drug-delivery systems may substantially contribute to the development of clinically viable techniques for BDNF delivery into the cochlea or posterior eye segment, which, ultimately, can lead to a long-term or permanent rescue of auditory and optic neurons from degeneration. PMID:25995632

  12. Improved Therapeutic Efficacy in Bone and Joint Disorders by Targeted Drug Delivery to Bone.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

     Site-specific drug delivery to bone is considered achievable using acidic amino acid (L-Asp or L-Glu) homopeptides known as acidic oligopeptides. We found that fluorescence-labeled acidic oligopeptides containing six or more residues bound strongly to hydroxyapatite, which is a major component of bone, and were selectively delivered to and retained in bone after systemic administration. We explored the applicability of this result for drug delivery by conjugation of estradiol and levofloxacin with an L-Asp hexapeptide. We also similarly tagged enzymes (tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, β-glucuronidase, and N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase) and decoy receptors (endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation end products and etanercept) to assess whether these would improve therapeutic efficacy. The L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs, including enzymes and decoy receptors, were efficiently delivered to bone in comparison with the untagged drugs. An in vivo experiment confirmed the efficacy of L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs on bone and joint disorders, although there was some loss of bioactivity of estradiol and levofloxacin in vitro, suggesting that the acidic hexapeptide was partly removed by hydrolysis in the body after delivery to bone. It was expected that the ester linkage to the hexapeptide would be susceptible to hydrolysis in situ, releasing the drug from the acidic oligopeptide. These results support the usefulness of acidic oligopeptides as bone-targeting carriers for therapeutic agents. We present some pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of the L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs.

  13. Ultrasound-mediated nail drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Danielle; Zderic, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    A novel ultrasound-mediated drug delivery system has been developed for treatment of a nail fungal disorder (onychomycosis) by improving delivery to the nail bed using ultrasound to increase the permeability of the nail. The slip-in device consists of ultrasound transducers and drug delivery compartments above each toenail. The device is connected to a computer, where a software interface allows users to select their preferred course of treatment. In in vitro testing, canine nails were exposed to 3 energy levels (acoustic power of 1.2 W and exposure durations of 30, 60, and 120 seconds). A stereo -microscope was used to determine how much of a drug-mimicking compound was delivered through the nail layers by measuring brightness on the cross section of each nail tested at each condition, where brightness level decreases coincide with increases in permeability. Each of the 3 energy levels tested showed statistical significance when compared to the control (P < .05) with a permeability factor of 1.3 after 30 seconds of exposure, 1.3 after 60 seconds, and 1.5 after 120 seconds, where a permeability factor of 1 shows no increase in permeability. Current treatments for onychomycosis include systemic, topical, and surgical. Even when used all together, these treatments typically take a long time to result in nail healing, thus making this ultrasound-mediated device a promising alternative.

  14. Nanodelivery System for Mitochondrial Targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoong, Sia Lee; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondria are indispensable in cellular functions such as energy production and death execution. They are emerging as intriguing therapeutic target as their dysregulation was found to be monumental in diseases such as neurodegenerative disease, obesity, and cancer etc. Despite tremendous interest being focused on therapeutically intervening mitochondrial function, few mito-active drugs were successfully developed, particularly due to challenges in delivering active compound to this organelle. In this review, effort in utilizing nanotechnology for targeted mitochondrial delivery of compound is expounded based on the nature of the nanomaterial used. The advantage and potential offered are discussed alongside the limitation. Finally the review is concluded with perspectives of the application of nanocarrier in mitochondrial medicine, given the unresolved concern on potential complications.

  15. Protocells and their use for targeted delivery of multicomponent cargos to cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C Jeffrey; Ashley, Carlee Erin; Jiang, Xingmao; Liu, Juewen; Peabody, David S; Wharton, Walker Richard; Carnes, Eric; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L

    2015-03-31

    Various embodiments provide materials and methods for synthesizing protocells for use in targeted delivery of cargo components to cancer cells. In one embodiment, the lipid bilayer can be fused to the porous particle core to form a protocell. The lipid bilayer can be modified with targeting ligands or other ligands to achieve targeted delivery of cargo components that are loaded within the protocell to a target cell, e.g., a type of cancer. Shielding materials can be conjugated to the surface of the lipid bilayer to reduce undesired non-specific binding.

  16. Protocells and their use for targeted delivery of multicomponent cargos to cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Ashley, Carlee Erin; Jiang, Xingmao; Liu, Juewen; Peabody, David S.; Wharton, Walker Richard; Carnes, Eric; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L.

    2016-11-01

    Various embodiments provide materials and methods for synthesizing protocells for use in targeted delivery of cargo components to cancer cells. In one embodiment, the lipid bilayer can be fused to the porous particle core to form a protocell. The lipid bilayer can be modified with targeting ligands or other ligands to achieve targeted delivery of cargo components that are loaded within the protocell to a target cell, e.g., a type of cancer. Shielding materials can be conjugated to the surface of the lipid bilayer to reduce undesired non-specific binding.

  17. Target Evaluation System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenden, Dan

    The Instructor and Course Evaluation System (ICES) is a computer-based system for obtaining student ratings of instructors and courses. To use ICES, an instructor will choose 23 evaluative items from an item catalog. These items are then printed on a standard form. Students respond to these items using a five position scale. On the back of the…

  18. Feasibility of targeted drug delivery to selective areas of the retina

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, Y.; Guran, T.; Shahidi, M.; Mori, M.T.; Zeimer, R.C. )

    1991-07-01

    A new method was developed to deliver locally a bolus dose of a drug to the retinal vasculature. The targeted delivery system was based on encapsulating the drug in heat-sensitive liposomes, which are injected intravenously and lysed in the retinal vessels by a heat pulse generated by a laser. To test if substances delivered in the vessels could also penetrate into the surrounding tissue, 6-carboxyfluorescein was encapsulated in liposomes and used as a marker for drug penetration. Moderate argon laser pulses were applied to the retinal vessels of Dutch pigmented rabbits to induce breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB). A suspension of liposomes at a dose of 2 ml/kg body weight, corresponding to a carboxyfluorescein dose of 12 mg/kg, was injected into the ear vein. The dye was released from the liposomes proximal to the damaged portion of the vessel. Fundus fluorescein angiograms were recorded with a video camera and digitized for subsequent image analysis. The penetration of carboxyfluorescein into the retinal tissue was evaluated by comparing the fluorescence intensity of the area around the damaged vessel with that of an adjacent control area. The dye penetration increased with the numbers of laser applications (P less than 0.001). The leakage was localized distally to the released site and was restricted to areas with a disrupted BRB. The mass of carboxyfluorescein that penetrated gradually spread with time. Both veins and arteries could be used for the targeted delivery. These results indicated that this delivery system, which is fully controllable by laser through the pupil, can deliver drugs inside the vasculature and into the retinal tissue wherever the BRB is disrupted.

  19. Targeted sustained delivery of antineoplastic agent with multicomponent polylactide stereocomplex micelle.

    PubMed

    Shen, Kexin; Li, Di; Guan, Jingjing; Ding, Jianxun; Wang, Zhongtang; Gu, Jingkai; Liu, Tongjun; Chen, Xuesi

    2017-01-05

    A c(RGDfC)-decorated polylactide stereocomplex micelle (cRGD-SCM) was prepared through the stereocomplex and hydrophobic interactions among 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(D-lactide) (4-arm PEG-b-PDLA), methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lactide) (mPEG-b-PLLA), and c(RGDfC)-poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lactide) (cRGD-PEG-b-PLLA) for targeted treatment of αvβ3 integrin-positive C26 colon cancer. Doxorubicin (DOX), a model antitumor drug, was loaded into cRGD-SCM with a diameter of approximately 100nm, and the drug loading efficiency was 45.9wt.%. cRGD-SCM/DOX with a sustained release pattern exhibited prolonged circulation time, upregulated accumulation in tumor, enhanced tumor inhibition, and decreased side effects compared with free DOX and non-targeting SCM/DOX in vivo. More interestingly, the targeting ligand in the terminal of PEG can be easily replaced with other targeting groups according to the different types of malignancies. Therefore, the cRGD-decorated platform might be a promising targeted drug delivery system for personal chemotherapy clinically.

  20. Mito-DCA: a mitochondria targeted molecular scaffold for efficacious delivery of metabolic modulator dichloroacetate.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rakesh K; Marrache, Sean; Harn, Donald A; Dhar, Shanta

    2014-05-16

    Tumor growth is fueled by the use of glycolysis, which normal cells use only in the scarcity of oxygen. Glycolysis makes tumor cells resistant to normal death processes. Targeting this unique tumor metabolism can provide an alternative strategy to selectively destroy the tumor, leaving normal tissue unharmed. The orphan drug dichloroacetate (DCA) is a mitochondrial kinase inhibitor that has the ability to show such characteristics. However, its molecular form shows poor uptake and bioavailability and limited ability to reach its target mitochondria. Here, we describe a targeted molecular scaffold for construction of a multiple DCA loaded compound, Mito-DCA, with three orders of magnitude enhanced potency and cancer cell specificity compared to DCA. Incorporation of a lipophilic triphenylphosphonium cation through a biodegradable linker in Mito-DCA allowed for mitochondria targeting. Mito-DCA did not show any significant metabolic effects toward normal cells but tumor cells with dysfunctional mitochondria were affected by Mito-DCA, which caused a switch from glycolysis to glucose oxidation and subsequent cell death via apoptosis. Effective delivery of DCA to the mitochondria resulted in significant reduction in lactate levels and played important roles in modulating dendritic cell (DC) phenotype evidenced by secretion of interleukin-12 from DCs upon activation with tumor antigens from Mito-DCA treated cancer cells. Targeting mitochondrial metabolic inhibitors to the mitochondria could lead to induction of an efficient antitumor immune response, thus introducing the concept of combining glycolysis inhibition with immune system to destroy tumor.

  1. Hyaluronic acid-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes for targeted delivery of doxorubicin into cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xueyan; Tao, Lei; Wen, Shihui; Hou, Wenxiu; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-03-20

    Development of novel drug carriers for targeted cancer therapy with high efficiency and specificity is of paramount importance and has been one of the major topics in current nanomedicine. Here we report a general approach to using multifunctional multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a platform to encapsulate an anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for targeted cancer therapy. In this approach, polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified MWCNTs were covalently conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) and hyaluronic acid (HA). The formed MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA conjugates were characterized via different techniques and were used as a new carrier system to encapsulate the anticancer drug doxorubicin for targeted delivery to cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. We show that the formed MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA/DOX complexes with a drug loading percentage of 72% are water soluble and stable. In vitro release studies show that the drug release rate under an acidic condition (pH 5.8, tumor cell microenvironment) is higher than that under physiological condition (pH 7.4). Cell viability assay demonstrates that the carrier material has good biocompatibility in the tested concentration range, and the MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA/DOX complexes can specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors and exert growth inhibition effect to the cancer cells. The developed HA-modified MWCNTs hold a great promise to be used as an efficient anticancer drug carrier for tumor-targeted chemotherapy.

  2. Folate receptor targeted three-layered micelles and hydrogels for gene delivery to activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mariam; Li, Ying; Abebe, Daniel G; Xie, Yuran; Kandil, Rima; Kraus, Teresa; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; Fujiwara, Tomoko; Merkel, Olivia M

    2016-12-28

    New folic acid (FA) coupled three layered micelles (3LM) were designed to encapsulate DNA, and their application as delivery system that specifically targets activated macrophages was investigated for new treatment options in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). FA coupled poly(l-lactide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (FA-PEG-PLLA) was synthesized via the NHS-ester activated/amine coupling method. Fluorescein labeled folic acid was used for flow cytometric detection of the expression of functional folic receptor β in LPS-activated and resting macrophages. FA coupled 3LM were formulated in a two-step procedure and characterized regarding hydrodynamic diameters and zeta potentials. The presence of the targeting ligand was shown not to increase the size of the 3LM compared to their non-targeted counterparts. Targeted and non-targeted 3LM were used in vitro to optimize uptake conditions in the RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line. The amount of FA coupled polymer in the final formulation was found to be optimal at 75% FA-PEG-PLLA and 25% PLLA-PEG-PLLA. Subsequently, transgene expression in vitro in RAW 264.7 cells and ex vivo in primary activated and resting mouse macrophages was determined as a function of FR-mediated internalization of 3LM encapsulating GFP expressing plasmid. FR-overexpressing activated cells, as successfully identified by internalization of FA-fluorescein, showed significantly higher GFP expression in vitro and ex vivo than resting macrophages with only a basal level of FR expression. Lastly, injectable hydrogels as depot formulation were formed by stereocomplexation, and their degradation, DNA release profiles, and dissociation into intact 3LM were found to be beneficial for potential in vivo application. Our findings confirm that FA-3LM are taken up by activated macrophages via folate receptor mediated endocytosis and that their hydrogels release intact 3LM for efficient transfection of primary macrophages. Therefore, FA-3LM could become a promising delivery system

  3. Versatile RNA Interference Nanoplatform for Systemic Delivery of RNAs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Development of nontoxic, tumor-targetable, and potent in vivo RNA delivery systems remains an arduous challenge for clinical application of RNAi therapeutics. Herein, we report a versatile RNAi nanoplatform based on tumor-targeted and pH-responsive nanoformulas (NFs). The NF was engineered by combination of an artificial RNA receptor, Zn(II)-DPA, with a tumor-targetable and drug-loadable hyaluronic acid nanoparticle, which was further modified with a calcium phosphate (CaP) coating by in situ mineralization. The NF can encapsulate small-molecule drugs within its hydrophobic inner core and strongly secure various RNA molecules (siRNAs, miRNAs, and oligonucleotides) by utilizing Zn(II)-DPA and a robust CaP coating. We substantiated the versatility of the RNAi nanoplatform by demonstrating effective delivery of siRNA and miRNA for gene silencing or miRNA replacement into different human types of cancer cells in vitro and into tumor-bearing mice in vivo by intravenous administration. The therapeutic potential of NFs coloaded with an anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox) and multidrug resistance 1 gene target siRNA (siMDR) was also demonstrated in this study. NFs loaded with Dox and siMDR could successfully sensitize drug-resistant OVCAR8/ADR cells to Dox and suppress OVCAR8/ADR tumor cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. This gene/drug delivery system appears to be a highly effective nonviral method to deliver chemo- and RNAi therapeutics into host cells. PMID:24779637

  4. Targeted delivery of a poorly water-soluble compound to hair follicles using polymeric nanoparticle suspensions.

    PubMed

    Morgen, Michael; Lu, Guang Wei; Du, Daniel; Stehle, Randall; Lembke, Franz; Cervantes, Jessica; Ciotti, Susan; Haskell, Roy; Smithey, Dan; Haley, Kevin; Fan, Conglin

    2011-09-15

    This study explored the utility of topically applied polymeric nanoparticle suspensions to target delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs to hair follicles. Several formulations of amorphous drug/polymer nanoparticles were prepared from ethyl cellulose and UK-157,147 (systematic name (3S,4R)-[6-(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]-2,2,3-trimethyl-4-(2-methyl-3-oxo-2,3-dihydropyridazin-6-yloxy)-3-chromanol), a potassium channel opener, using sodium glycocholate (NaGC) as a surface stabilizer. Nanoparticle suspensions were evaluated to determine if targeted drug delivery to sebaceous glands and hair follicles could be achieved. In in vitro testing with rabbit ear tissue, delivery of UK-157,147 to the follicles was demonstrated with limited distribution to the surrounding dermis. Delivery to hair follicles was also demonstrated in vivo, based on stimulation of hair growth in tests of 100-nm nanoparticles with a C3H mouse model. The nanoparticles were well-tolerated, with no visible skin irritation. In vivo tests of smaller nanoparticles with a hamster ear model also indicated targeted delivery to sebaceous glands. The nanoparticles released drug rapidly in in vitro nonsink dissolution tests and were stable in suspension for 3 months. The present results show selective drug delivery to the follicle by follicular transport of nanoparticles and rapid release of a poorly water-soluble drug. Thus, nanoparticles represent a promising approach for targeted topical delivery of low-solubility compounds to hair follicles.

  5. Nanotechnology of emerging targeting systems

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, S. S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in the design and testing of complex nanoscale payload-carrying systems (i.e. systems with payloads that do not exceed 100 nm in size) are the focus of this brief review. Emerging systems include targeted single-walled nanotubes, viral capsids, dendrimers, gold nanoparticles, milled boron carbide nanoparticles, and protein nucleic acid assemblies. Significant advances are emerging with each of these bionanotechnological approaches to cellular targeting. PMID:21687833

  6. Marked enhancement of lysosomal targeting and efficacy of ErbB2-targeted drug delivery by HSP90 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Bhopal; Luan, Haitao; Soni, Kruti; Zhang, Jinjin; Storck, Matthew A.; Feng, Dan; Bielecki, Timothy A.; Band, Vimla; Cohen, Samuel M.; Bronich, Tatiana K.; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor cells using monoclonal antibodies against oncogenic cell surface receptors is an emerging therapeutic strategy. These strategies include drugs directly conjugated to monoclonal antibodies through chemical linkers (Antibody-Drug Conjugates, ADCs) or those encapsulated within nanoparticles that in turn are conjugated to targeting antibodies (Antibody-Nanoparticle Conjugates, ANPs). The recent FDA approval of the ADC Trastuzumab-TDM1 (Kadcyla®; Genentech; San Francisco) for the treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer patients has validated the strong potential of these strategies. Even though the activity of ANPs and ADCs is dependent on lysosomal traffic, the roles of the endocytic route traversed by the targeted receptor and of cancer cell-specific alterations in receptor dynamics on the efficiency of drug delivery have not been considered in these new targeted therapies. For example, constitutive association with the molecular chaperone HSP90 is thought to either retard ErbB2 endocytosis or to promote its recycling, traits undesirable for targeted therapy with ANPs and ADCs. HSP90 inhibitors are known to promote ErbB2 ubiquitination, targeting to lysosome and degradation. We therefore hypothesized that ErbB2-targeted drug delivery using Trastuzumab-conjugated nanoparticles could be significantly improved by HSP90 inhibitor-promoted lysosomal traffic of ErbB2. Studies reported here validate this hypothesis and demonstrate, both in vitro and in vivo, that HSP90 inhibition facilitates the intracellular delivery of Trastuzumab-conjugated ANPs carrying a model chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, specifically into ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, resulting in improved antitumor activity. These novel findings highlight the need to consider oncogene-specific alterations in receptor traffic in the design of targeted drug delivery strategies. We suggest that combination of agents that enhance

  7. Marked enhancement of lysosomal targeting and efficacy of ErbB2-targeted drug delivery by HSP90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Raja, Srikumar M; Desale, Swapnil S; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Luan, Haitao; Soni, Kruti; Zhang, Jinjin; Storck, Matthew A; Feng, Dan; Bielecki, Timothy A; Band, Vimla; Cohen, Samuel M; Bronich, Tatiana K; Band, Hamid

    2016-03-01

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor cells using monoclonal antibodies against oncogenic cell surface receptors is an emerging therapeutic strategy. These strategies include drugs directly conjugated to monoclonal antibodies through chemical linkers (Antibody-Drug Conjugates, ADCs) or those encapsulated within nanoparticles that in turn are conjugated to targeting antibodies (Antibody-Nanoparticle Conjugates, ANPs). The recent FDA approval of the ADC Trastuzumab-TDM1 (Kadcyla; Genentech; San Francisco) for the treatment of ErbB2-overexpressing metastatic breast cancer patients has validated the strong potential of these strategies. Even though the activity of ANPs and ADCs is dependent on lysosomal traffic, the roles of the endocytic route traversed by the targeted receptor and of cancer cell-specific alterations in receptor dynamics on the efficiency of drug delivery have not been considered in these new targeted therapies. For example, constitutive association with the molecular chaperone HSP90 is thought to either retard ErbB2 endocytosis or to promote its recycling, traits undesirable for targeted therapy with ANPs and ADCs. HSP90 inhibitors are known to promote ErbB2 ubiquitination, targeting to lysosome and degradation. We therefore hypothesized that ErbB2-targeted drug delivery using Trastuzumab-conjugated nanoparticles could be significantly improved by HSP90 inhibitor-promoted lysosomal traffic of ErbB2. Studies reported here validate this hypothesis and demonstrate, both in vitro and in vivo, that HSP90 inhibition facilitates the intracellular delivery of Trastuzumab-conjugated ANPs carrying a model chemotherapeutic agent, Doxorubicin, specifically into ErbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, resulting in improved antitumor activity. These novel findings highlight the need to consider oncogene-specific alterations in receptor traffic in the design of targeted drug delivery strategies. We suggest that combination of agents that enhance receptor

  8. Nanoengineered drug delivery systems for enhancing antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Kalhapure, Rahul S; Suleman, Nadia; Mocktar, Chunderika; Seedat, Nasreen; Govender, Thirumala

    2015-03-01

    Formulation scientists are recognizing nanoengineered drug delivery systems as an effective strategy to overcome limitations associated with antibiotic drug therapy. Antibiotics encapsulated into nanodelivery systems will contribute to improved management of patients with various infectious diseases and to overcoming the serious global burden of antibiotic resistance. An extensive review of several antibiotic-loaded nanocarriers that have been formulated to target drugs to infectious sites, achieve controlled drug release profiles, and address formulation challenges, such as low-drug entrapment efficiencies, poor solubility and stability is presented in this paper. The physicochemical properties and the in vitro/in vivo performances of various antibiotic-loaded delivery systems, such as polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, dendrimers, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles, nanohybirds, nanofibers/scaffolds, nanosheets, nanoplexes, and nanotubes/horn/rods and nanoemulsions, are highlighted and evaluated. Future studies that will be essential to optimize formulation and commercialization of these antibiotic-loaded nanosystems are also identified. The review presented emphasizes the significant formulation progress achieved and potential that novel nanoengineered antibiotic drug delivery systems have for enhancing the treatment of patients with a range of infections.

  9. Functional Assays for Specific Targeting and Delivery of RNA Nanoparticles to Brain Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Jin; Haque, Farzin; Vieweger, Mario; Yoo, Ji Young; Kaur, Balveen; Guo, Peixuan; Croce, Carlo M.

    2017-01-01

    Cumulative progress in nanoparticle development has opened a new era of targeted delivery of therapeutics to cancer cells and tissue. However, developing proper detection methods has lagged behind resulting in the lack of precise evaluation and monitoring of the systemically administered nanoparticles. RNA nanoparticles derived from the bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor pRNA have emerged as a new generation of drugs for cancer therapy. Multifunctional RNA nanoparticles can be fabricated by bottom-up self-assembly of engineered RNA fragments harboring targeting (RNA aptamer or chemical ligand), therapeutic (siRNA, miRNA, ribozymes, and small molecule drugs), and imaging (fluorophore, radiolabels) modules. We have recently demonstrated that RNA nanoparticles can reach and target intracranial brain tumors in mice upon systemic injection with little or no accumulation in adjacent healthy brain tissues or in major healthy internal organs. Herein, we describe various functional imaging methods (fluorescence confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, fluorescence whole body imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging) to evaluate and monitor RNA nanoparticle targeting to intracranial brain tumors in mice. Such imaging techniques will allow in-depth evaluation of specifically delivered RNA therapeutics to brain tumors. PMID:25896001

  10. Stimuli-Responsive Polymeric Systems for Controlled Protein and Peptide Delivery: Future Implications for Ocular Delivery.

    PubMed

    Mahlumba, Pakama; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2016-07-30

    Therapeutic proteins and peptides have become notable in the drug delivery arena for their compatibility with the human body as well as their high potency. However, their biocompatibility and high potency does not negate the existence of challenges resulting from physicochemical properties of proteins and peptides, including large size, short half-life, capability to provoke immune responses and susceptibility to degradation. Various delivery routes and delivery systems have been utilized to improve bioavailability, patient acceptability and reduce biodegradation. The ocular route remains of great interest, particularly for responsive delivery of macromolecules due to the anatomy and physiology of the eye that makes it a sensitive and complex environment. Research in this field is slowly gaining attention as this could be the breakthrough in ocular drug delivery of macromolecules. This work reviews stimuli-responsive polymeric delivery systems, their use in the delivery of therapeutic proteins and peptides as well as examples of proteins and peptides used in the treatment of ocular disorders. Stimuli reviewed include pH, temperature, enzymes, light, ultrasound and magnetic field. In addition, it discusses the current progress in responsive ocular drug delivery. Furthermore, it explores future prospects in the use of stimuli-responsive polymers for ocular delivery of proteins and peptides. Stimuli-responsive polymers offer great potential in improving the delivery of ocular therapeutics, therefore there is a need to consider them in order to guarantee a local, sustained and ideal delivery of ocular proteins and peptides, evading tissue invasion and systemic side-effects.

  11. Multifunctional polymer-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for pH-responsive targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermayer, Stefan; Weiss, Veronika; Herrmann, Annika; Schmidt, Alexandra; Datz, Stefan; Müller, Katharina; Wagner, Ernst; Bein, Thomas; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    A highly stable modular platform, based on the sequential covalent attachment of different functionalities to the surface of core-shell mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for targeted drug delivery is presented. A reversible pH-responsive cap system based on covalently attached poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PVP) was developed as drug release mechanism. Our platform offers (i) tuneable interactions and release kinetics with the cargo drug in the mesopores based on chemically orthogonal core-shell design, (ii) an extremely robust and reversible closure and release mechanism based on endosomal acidification of the covalently attached PVP polymer block, (iii) high colloidal stability due to a covalently coupled PEG shell, and (iv) the ability to covalently attach a wide variety of dyes, targeting ligands and other functionalities at the outer periphery of the PEG shell. The functionality of the system was demonstrated in several cell studies, showing pH-triggered release in the endosome, light-triggered endosomal escape with an on-board photosensitizer, and efficient folic acid-based cell targeting.A highly stable modular platform, based on the sequential covalent attachment of different functionalities to the surface of core-shell mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for targeted drug delivery is presented. A reversible pH-responsive cap system based on covalently attached poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PVP) was developed as drug release mechanism. Our platform offers (i) tuneable interactions and release kinetics with the cargo drug in the mesopores based on chemically orthogonal core-shell design, (ii) an extremely robust and reversible closure and release mechanism based on endosomal acidification of the covalently attached PVP polymer block, (iii) high colloidal stability due to a covalently coupled PEG shell, and (iv) the ability to covalently attach a wide variety of dyes, targeting ligands and other functionalities at the outer periphery of the PEG shell. The

  12. Nanoscale drug delivery systems and the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Alyautdin, Renad; Khalin, Igor; Nafeeza, Mohd Ismail; Haron, Muhammad Huzaimi; Kuznetsov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    The protective properties of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) are conferred by the intricate architecture of its endothelium coupled with multiple specific transport systems expressed on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs) in the brain’s vasculature. When the stringent control of the BBB is disrupted, such as following EC damage, substances that are safe for peripheral tissues but toxic to neurons have easier access to the central nervous system (CNS). As a consequence, CNS disorders, including degenerative diseases, can occur independently of an individual’s age. Although the BBB is crucial in regulating the biochemical environment that is essential for maintaining neuronal integrity, it limits drug delivery to the CNS. This makes it difficult to deliver beneficial drugs across the BBB while preventing the passage of potential neurotoxins. Available options include transport of drugs across the ECs through traversing occludins and claudins in the tight junctions or by attaching drugs to one of the existing transport systems. Either way, access must specifically allow only the passage of a particular drug. In general, the BBB allows small molecules to enter the CNS; however, most drugs with the potential to treat neurological disorders other than infections have large structures. Several mechanisms, such as modifications of the built-in pumping-out system of drugs and utilization of nanocarriers and liposomes, are among the drug-delivery systems that have been tested; however, each has its limitations and constraints. This review comprehensively discusses the functional morphology of the BBB and the challenges that must be overcome by drug-delivery systems and elaborates on the potential targets, mechanisms, and formulations to improve drug delivery to the CNS. PMID:24550672

  13. Potential applications of boron nitride nanotubes as drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Ciofani, Gianni

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, there has been an explosion of research in the 'bio-nano' field, with the discovery and introduction of ever more fascinating materials for applications as drug delivery systems, sensors, transducers, and so on. The author's group, for the first time in the literature, proposed boron nitride nanotubes as a valid alternative to carbon nanotubes and other kinds of inorganic materials, because of their improved chemical properties that theoretically guarantee better stability and compatibility in a biological context. In this paper, the bio-applications of boron nitride nanotubes that have emerged in the literature are summarized, with special attention given to their exploitation as safe drug delivery and targeting carriers. Finally, the possibility of combining their physical and chemical properties is approached, highlighting the features that render these innovative nanovectors unique and exceptional candidates for many bio-applications.

  14. Microemulsions based transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Vadlamudi, Harini C; Narendran, Hyndavi; Nagaswaram, Tejeswari; Yaga, Gowri; Thanniru, Jyotsna; Yalavarthi, Prasanna R

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of microemulsions by Jack H Schulman, there has been huge progress made in applying microemulsion systems in plethora of research and industrial process. Microemulsions are optically isotropic systems consisting of water, oil and amphiphile. These systems are beneficial due to their thermodynamic stability, optical clarity, ease of preparati