Science.gov

Sample records for delta frequency bursting

  1. LTP in Hippocampal Area CA1 Is Induced by Burst Stimulation over a Broad Frequency Range Centered around Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Lawrence M.; Kim, Eunyoung; Cooke, Jennifer D.; Holmes, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is typically studied using either continuous high-frequency stimulation or theta burst stimulation. Previous studies emphasized the physiological relevance of theta frequency; however, synchronized hippocampal activity occurs over a broader frequency range. We therefore tested burst stimulation at intervals from 100…

  2. LTP in Hippocampal Area CA1 Is Induced by Burst Stimulation over a Broad Frequency Range Centered around Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Lawrence M.; Kim, Eunyoung; Cooke, Jennifer D.; Holmes, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is typically studied using either continuous high-frequency stimulation or theta burst stimulation. Previous studies emphasized the physiological relevance of theta frequency; however, synchronized hippocampal activity occurs over a broader frequency range. We therefore tested burst stimulation at intervals from 100…

  3. Burst-by-burst laser frequency monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esproles, Carlos (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a system for real-time frequency monitoring and display of an RF burst where the burst frequency is analyzed and displayed on a burst-by-burst basis in order to allow for frequency control. Although the invention was made for monitoring the laser frequency of a LIDAR system, it has other applications where realtime monitoring is required. The novelty of the invention resides in the use of a counter that is reset at the beginning of each unit time of monitoring and then gated for a unit of time. The invention also has an LED bar graph for displaying the measure of frequency at the end of each unit time in either a bar length mode or a moving dot mode. In the latter mode, the operator makes necessary adjustments to maintain the dot at the center of the bar graph.

  4. CMEs and frequency cutoff of solar bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, Al.; Konovalenko, Al.; Koval, Ar.; Volvach, Y.; Zarka, P.

    2016-05-01

    Radio observations of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff by the radio telescope UTR-2 (near Kharkiv, Ukraine) at 8-33 MHz on 17-19 August 2012 are presented. Such cutoff may be attributed to the emergence of the burst sources behind limb of the Sun with respect to an observer on the Earth. The events are strongly associated with solar eruptions occurred in a new active region. Ray tracing simulations show that the CMEs play a constructive role for the behind-limb bursts to be detected in ground-based observations. Likely, due to tunnel-like cavities with low density in CMEs, the radio emission of behind-limb solar bursts can be directed towards the Earth.

  5. Bursting frequency prediction in turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    LIOU,WILLIAM W.; FANG,YICHUNG

    2000-02-01

    The frequencies of the bursting events associated with the streamwise coherent structures of spatially developing incompressible turbulent boundary layers were predicted using global numerical solution of the Orr-Sommerfeld and the vertical vorticity equations of hydrodynamic stability problems. The structures were modeled as wavelike disturbances associated with the turbulent mean flow. The global method developed here involves the use of second and fourth order accurate finite difference formula for the differential equations as well as the boundary conditions. An automated prediction tool, BURFIT, was developed. The predicted resonance frequencies were found to agree very well with previous results using a local shooting technique and measured data.

  6. The Jovian S-bursts. I - Occurrence with L-bursts and frequency limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Y.; Genova, F.; de La Noe, J.

    1980-06-01

    The first spectra of Jovian radio emission in which S bursts can be observed over a wide range of frequencies (20 MHz) during storms lasting two or three hours are examined. It is shown that the S bursts occur only in two regions (Io-controlled emission) of the Io-CML plane with a probability of occurrence reaching 60 percent. The association of the S bursts with the more lasting and broad band L bursts is closely related to the Io-CML configuration, as is the maximum frequency of emission which has not been observed to exceed 33 MHz. Three sections are defined in the Io B-region, in which the S bursts occur alone with a maximum frequency of emission lower than 25 MHz, the S bursts occur superimposed on the L bursts, and the L bursts occur alone.

  7. Transcriptional burst frequency and burst size are equally modulated across the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, Roy D.; Simpson, Michael L; Weinberger, Leor S.; Razooky, B; Cox, Chris D.; McCollum, James M.; Trimeloni, Tom; Singh, A

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression occurs either as an episodic process, characterized by pulsatile bursts or as a constitutive, Poisson-like accumulation of gene products. It is not clear which mode of gene expression (constitutive versus bursty) predominates across a genome or how transcriptional dynamics are influenced by genomic position and promoter sequence. Here, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, building off of theoretical studies that exploit the time-resolved structure of stochastic fluctuations in gene expression, to develop a three-dimensional method for mapping underlying gene-regulatory mechanisms. Over 8,000 individual human genomic loci were analyzed, and at virtually all loci, episodic bursting as opposed to constitutive expression was found to be the predominant mode of expression. Quantitative analysis of the expression dynamics at these 8,000 loci indicates that both frequency and size of transcriptional bursts vary equally across the human genome independent of promoter sequence. Strikingly, weaker expression loci modulate burst frequency to increase activity, while stronger expression loci modulate burst size to increase activity. Transcriptional activators, such as TNF, generate similar patterns of change in burst frequency and burst size. In summary, transcriptional bursting dominates across the human genome, both burst frequency and burst size vary by chromosomal location, and transcriptional activators alter burst frequency and burst size, depending on the expression level of the locus.

  8. Damped Oscillator with Delta-Kicked Frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manko, O. V.

    1996-01-01

    Exact solutions of the Schrodinger equation for quantum damped oscillator subject to frequency delta-kick describing squeezed states are obtained. The cases of strong, intermediate, and weak damping are investigated.

  9. Numerical study of the vortex burst phenomenon for delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartwich, PETER-M.; Hsu, C.-H.; Luckring, James M.; Liu, C. H.

    1988-01-01

    A flux-difference splitting scheme is employed to compute low-speed flows over a delta wing for angles of attack from 0 to 40 deg as steady-state solutions to the three-dimensional, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations in their thin-layer approximation. The finite-difference scheme is made spatially second-order accurate by applying a total variation diminishing-like discretization to the inviscid fluxes and central differencing to the viscous shear fluxes. Using first-order accurate Euler backward-time differencing, an efficient implicit algorithm is constructed, which combines approximate factorization in cross planes with a symmetric planar Gauss-Seidel relaxation in the remaining third spatial direction. The geometry of the thin (maximum thickness is 0.021), slender (aspect ratio is unity), sharp-edged delta wing is taken from Hummel's (1967, 1978) wind tunnel model. Over the entire angle-of-attack range, the computed values of lift and pitching moment are in good agreement with the experimental data. Also details of the flow-fieldlike spanwise surface pressure distributions compare well with the experiment. Computed flow-field results with a bubble-type vortex burst are analyzed in detail.

  10. Solar S-bursts at Frequencies of 10 - 30 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Abranin, E. P.; Lecacheux, A.; Lonskaya, A. S.

    2010-06-01

    Solar S-bursts observed by the radio telescope UTR-2 in the period 2001 - 2002 are studied. The bursts chosen for a detailed analysis occurred in the periods 23 - 26 May 2001, 13 - 16 and 27 - 39 July 2002 during three solar radio storms. More than 800 S-bursts were registered in these days. Properties of S-bursts are studied in the frequency band 10 - 30 MHz. All bursts were always observed against a background of other solar radio activity such as type III and IIIb bursts, type III-like bursts, drift pairs and spikes. Moreover, S-bursts were observed during days when the active region was situated near the central meridian. Characteristic durations of S-bursts were about 0.35 and 0.4 - 0.6 s for the May and July storms, respectively. For the first time, we found that the instantaneous frequency width of S-bursts increased with frequency linearly. The dependence of drift rates on frequency followed the McConnell dependence derived for higher frequencies. We propose a model of S-bursts based on the assumption that these bursts are generated due to the confluence of Langmuir waves with fast magnetosonic waves, whose phase and group velocities are equal.

  11. Transcriptional burst frequency and burst size are equally modulated across the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Roy D.; Razooky, Brandon S.; Singh, Abhyudai; Trimeloni, Thomas V.; McCollum, James M.; Cox, Chris D.; Simpson, Michael L.; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression occurs either as an episodic process, characterized by pulsatile bursts, or as a constitutive process, characterized by a Poisson-like accumulation of gene products. It is not clear which mode of gene expression (constitutive versus bursty) predominates across a genome or how transcriptional dynamics are influenced by genomic position and promoter sequence. Here, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy to analyze 8,000 individual human genomic loci and find that at virtually all loci, episodic bursting—as opposed to constitutive expression—is the predominant mode of expression. Quantitative analysis of the expression dynamics at these 8,000 loci indicates that both the frequency and size of the transcriptional bursts varies equally across the human genome, independent of promoter sequence. Strikingly, weaker expression loci modulate burst frequency to increase activity, whereas stronger expression loci modulate burst size to increase activity. Transcriptional activators such as trichostatin A (TSA) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) only modulate burst size and frequency along a constrained trend line governed by the promoter. In summary, transcriptional bursting dominates across the human genome, both burst frequency and burst size vary by chromosomal location, and transcriptional activators alter burst frequency and burst size, depending on the expression level of the locus. PMID:23064634

  12. Comparative Study of Solar Bursts at Sub-THz Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, L. O. T.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Marun, A.; Pereyra, P.; Raulin, J.-P.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze a large set of 17 solar radio bursts observed at sub-THz (0.2 and 0.4 THz) in 2012-2014 together with the new solar patrol radio telescopes (45 and 90 GHz), operated at El Leoncito, in the Argentinean Andes, allowing the derivation of complete burst spectra in this unexplored range of frequencies. We discuss the uncertainties in sub-THz flux estimates caused by calibration techniques and the corrections for atmospheric transmission. The burst spectra were completed with microwave bursts data obtained by the Radio Solar Telescope Network - RSTN. The events selection was based on GOES soft X-rays burst reported for classes stronger then C. Nearly 50 percent of the bursts exhibited a frequency increasing sub-THz spectral component. The results suggest that the THz component might be always present, with the minimum turn-over frequencies shifting to higher frequencies for larger energies of the electrons producing the emissions.

  13. Frequency-modulated nuclear localization bursts coordinate gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Long; Dalal, Chiraj K.; Elowitz, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    In yeast, the transcription factor Crz1 is dephosphorylated and translocates into the nucleus in response to extracellular calcium. Using time-lapse microscopy, we found that Crz1 exhibited short bursts of nuclear localization (∼2 minutes) that occurred stochastically in individual cells and propagated to the expression of downstream genes. Strikingly, calcium concentration controlled the frequency, but not duration, of localization bursts. Using an analytic model, we found that this frequency modulation (FM) of bursts ensures proportional expression of multiple target genes across a wide dynamic range of expression levels, independent of promoter characteristics. We experimentally confirmed this theory with natural and synthetic Crz1 target promoters. Another stress response transcription factor, Msn2, exhibits similar, but largely uncorrelated, localization bursts under calcium stress. These results suggest that FM regulation of localization bursts may be a general control strategy utilized by the cell to coordinate multi-gene responses to external signals. PMID:18818649

  14. Simultaneous multi-frequency imaging observations of solar microwave bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; White, S. M.; Schmahl, E. J.

    1989-01-01

    The results of simultaneous two-frequency imaging observations of solar microwave bursts with the Very Large Array are reviewed. Simultaneous 2 and 6 cm observations have been made of bursts which are optically thin at both frequencies, or optically thick at the lower frequency. In the latter case, the source structure may differ at the two frequencies, but the two sources usually seem to be related. However, this is not always true of simultaneous 6 and 20 cm observations. The results have implications for the analysis of nonimaging radio data of solar and stellar flares.

  15. High-Frequency Cutoff in Type III Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Volvach, Ya. S.; Koval, A. A.

    In this article we report about a group of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff, observed on 19 August of 2012 near 8:23 UT, simultaneously by three different radio telescopes: the Ukrainian decameter radio telescope (8-33 MHz), the French Nancay Decametric Array (10-70 MHz) and the Italian San Vito Solar Observatory of RSTN (25-180 MHz). Morphologically the bursts are very similar to the type III bursts. The solar activity is connected with the emergency of a new group of solar spots on the far side of the Sun with respect to observers on Earth. The solar bursts accompany many moderate flares over eastern limb. The refraction of the behind-limb radio bursts towards the Earth is favorable, if CMEs generate low-density cavities in solar corona.

  16. Radio frequency interference affecting type III solar burst observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anim, N. M.; Hamidi, Z. S.; Abidin, Z. Z.; Monstein, C.; Rohizat, N. S.

    2013-05-01

    The solar burst extinguish from the Sun's corona atmosphere and it dynamical structure of the magnetic field in radio wavelength are studied. Observation of solar radio burst with Compact Astronomical Low cost Low frequency Instrument for Spectroscopy and Transportable Observatory (CALLISTO) from ETH, Zurich in frequency range of 45 until 870 MHz. Observation done at Pusat Angkasa Negara, Banting, Selangor and successfully detected the solar burst type III on 9th March 2012 from 4:22:00 UT until 4:28:00 UT. The solar burst emission is associated with M6.3 solar flare which occurred at sunspot AR1429 at 03:58UT were observed by NOAA. Frequency ranges chosen as the best ranges for solar monitoring in Malaysia is 150 MHz until 400 MHz. The highest signal amplitude within this frequency ranges is 1.7619 dB at 153.188 MHz (Government Use) have potential to influence the detection of solar radio burst type III within 20 until 400 MHz.

  17. Spectral Trends of Solar Bursts at Sub-THz Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, L. O. T.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Giménez de Castro, C. G.; Kudaka, A. S.; Marun, A.; Pereyra, P.; Raulin, J.-P.; Valio, A. B. M.

    2017-01-01

    Previous sub-THz studies were derived from single-event observations. We here analyze for the first time spectral trends for a larger collection of sub-THz bursts. The collection consists of a set of 16 moderate to small impulsive solar radio bursts observed at 0.2 and 0.4 THz by the Solar Submillimeter-wave Telescope (SST) in 2012 - 2014 at El Leoncito, in the Argentinean Andes. The peak burst spectra included data from new solar patrol radio telescopes (45 and 90 GHz), and were completed with microwave data obtained by the Radio Solar Telescope Network, when available. We critically evaluate errors and uncertainties in sub-THz flux estimates caused by calibration techniques and the corrections for atmospheric transmission, and introduce a new method to obtain a uniform flux scale criterion for all events. The sub-THz bursts were searched during reported GOES soft X-ray events of class C or larger, for periods common to SST observations. Seven out of 16 events exhibit spectral maxima in the range 5 - 40 GHz with fluxes decaying at sub-THz frequencies (three of them associated to GOES class X, and four to class M). Nine out of 16 events exhibited the sub-THz spectral component. In five of these events, the sub-THz emission fluxes increased with a separate frequency from that of the microwave spectral component (two classified as X and three as M), and four events have only been detected at sub-THz frequencies (three classified as M and one as C). The results suggest that the THz component might be present throughout, with the minimum turnover frequency increasing as a function of the energy of the emitting electrons. The peculiar nature of many sub-THz burst events requires further investigations of bursts that are examined from SST observations alone to better understand these phenomena.

  18. Ionic and neuromodulatory regulation of burst discharge controls frequency tuning.

    PubMed

    Mehaffey, W Hamish; Ellis, Lee D; Krahe, Rüdiger; Dunn, Robert J; Chacron, Maurice J

    2008-01-01

    Sensory neurons encode natural stimuli by changes in firing rate or by generating specific firing patterns, such as bursts. Many neural computations rely on the fact that neurons can be tuned to specific stimulus frequencies. It is thus important to understand the mechanisms underlying frequency tuning. In the electrosensory system of the weakly electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus, the primary processing of behaviourally relevant sensory signals occurs in pyramidal neurons of the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL). These cells encode low frequency prey stimuli with bursts of spikes and high frequency communication signals with single spikes. We describe here how bursting in pyramidal neurons can be regulated by intrinsic conductances in a cell subtype specific fashion across the sensory maps found within the ELL, thereby regulating their frequency tuning. Further, the neuromodulatory regulation of such conductances within individual cells and the consequences to frequency tuning are highlighted. Such alterations in the tuning of the pyramidal neurons may allow weakly electric fish to preferentially select for certain stimuli under various behaviourally relevant circumstances.

  19. Chasing Low Frequency Radio Bursts from Magnetically Active Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Christene; Murphy, Tara; Kaplan, David

    2017-05-01

    Flaring activity is a common characteristic of magnetically active stars. These events produce emission throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, implying a range of physical processes. A number of objects exhibit short-duration, narrow band, and highly circularly polarised (reaching 100%) radio bursts. The observed polarisation and frequency-time structure of these bursts points to a coherent emission mechanism such as the electron cyclotron maser. Due to the stochastic nature of these bursts and the sensitivity of current instruments, the number of stars where coherent emission has been detected is few, with numbers limited to a few tens of objects. Observations of a wider sample of active stars are necessary in order to establish the percentage that exhibit coherent radio bursts and to relate the observed emission characteristics to stellar magnetic properties. New wide-field, low frequency radio telescopes will probe a frequency regime that is mostly unexplored for many magnetically active stars and where coherent radio emissions are expected to be more numerous. M dwarf stars are of particular interest as they are currently favoured as most likely to host habitable planets. Yet the extreme magnetic activity observed for some M dwarf stars places some doubt on the ability of orbiting planets to host life. This presentation reports the first results from a targeted Murchison Widefield Array survey of M dwarf stars that were previously detected at 100 - 200 MHz using single dish telescopes. We will discuss robust flare-rate measurements over a high dynamic range of flare properties, as well as investigate the physical mechanism(s) behind the flares.

  20. Low-Frequency Radio Bursts and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency radio phenomena are due to the presence of nonthermal electrons in the interplanetary (IP) medium. Understanding these phenomena is important in characterizing the space environment near Earth and other destinations in the solar system. Substantial progress has been made in the past two decades, because of the continuous and uniform data sets available from space-based radio and white-light instrumentation. This paper highlights some recent results obtained on IP radio phenomena. In particular, the source of type IV radio bursts, the behavior of type III storms, shock propagation in the IP medium, and the solar-cycle variation of type II radio bursts are considered. All these phenomena are closely related to solar eruptions and active region evolution. The results presented were obtained by combining data from the Wind and SOHO missions.

  1. Observations of Fast Radio Bursts and perspectives at low frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarka, P.; Mottez, F.

    2016-12-01

    We briefly summarize the characteristics of the elusive Fast Radio Bursts from existing observations. Then we emphasize the interest of low-frequency observations, e.g. with NenuFAR. In order to define the best observing parameters and detection scheme, we have built a simulation program of FRB at low-frequencies, that proceeds in 2 steps: (i) FRB generation and dilution in a dynamic spectrum with given characteristics, and (ii) definition of the FRB spectrum, and detection on the galactic radio background by means of parametric dedispersion. We carry on a preliminary simulation study, that allows us to draw first conclusions, among which the possibility to detect Lorimer-like FRB with NenuFAR.

  2. Solar U- and J- Bursts at the Frequencies 10-30MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorovskyy, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Abranin, E. P.; Rucker, H. O.; Lecacheux, A.

    2006-08-01

    In the present report we discuss the results of observations of solar U- and J- bursts over the frequency range 10-30MHz, which have been obtained within the framework of an international observational campaign in June - August, 2004 at the radio telescope UTR-2 (Kharkov, Ukraine). We succeed to observe these types of bursts for the first time at such a low frequencies due to combination of large effective area of the radio telescope and high sensitivity of the new back-end. During June - August, 2004 about 30 U- and J- bursts were registered, and only 5 of them were confidently identified as U-bursts that may speak about the relative sparsity of the latter at mentioned frequencies. Both the isolated bursts and their sequences were observed. On average the turning frequencies lay in the range 10-22 MHz that corresponds to the arches heliocentric heights of 1.6-2.2 solar radii. In some sequences the bursts turning frequency was stable that may indicate the arch stability, while in others the turning frequency had tendency to vary from burst to burst. Durations of U- and J- bursts did not differ from those of usual Type III bursts (3-7s), while the drift rates of an ascending arm (on the average -1MHz/ s) was a little bit lower, than those of ordinary Type III bursts in this range. The harmonic structure of U- and J- bursts, and also Jb-J pairs (analogous to IIIb-III pairs) were registered. Also L-shaped bursts (Leblanc and Hoyos, 1985) were recorded. A specific feature of L-shaped bursts is prolonged zero-drift region on their dynamic spectra. The sizes and configurations of the arches were estimated on the base of obtained data. Possible explanations of the observed properties of U- and J- bursts are discussed.

  3. Fast and slow frequency-drifting millisecond bursts in Jovian decametric radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabov, V. B.; Zarka, P.; Hess, S.; Konovalenko, A.; Litvinenko, G.; Zakharenko, V.; Shevchenko, V. A.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-01

    We present an analysis of several Jovian Io-related decametric radio storms recorded in 2004-2012 at the Ukrainian array UTR-2 using the new generation of baseband digital receivers. Continuous baseband sampling within sessions lasting for several hours enabled us to study the evolution of multiscale spectral patterns during the whole storm at varying time and frequency resolutions and trace the temporal transformation of burst structures in unprecedented detail. In addition to the well-known frequency drifting millisecond patterns known as S bursts we detected two other classes of events that often look like S bursts at low resolution but reveal a more complicated structure in high resolution dynamic spectra. The emissions of the first type (LS bursts, superposition of L and S type emissions) have a much lower frequency drift rate than the usual quasi linearly drifting S bursts (QS) and often occur within a frequency band where L emission is simultaneously present, suggesting that both LS and at least part of L emissions may come from the same source. The bursts of the second type (modulated S bursts called MS) are formed by a wideband frequency-modulated envelope that can mimic S bursts with very steep negative (or even positive) drift rates. Observed with insufficient time-frequency resolution, MS look like S bursts with complex shapes and varying drifts; MS patterns often occur in association with (i) narrowband emission; (ii) S burst trains; or (iii) sequences of fast drift shadow events. We propose a phenomenological description for various types of S emissions, that should include at least three components: high- and low-frequency limitation of the overall frequency band of the emission, fast frequency modulation of emission structures within this band, and emergence of elementary S burst substructures, that we call "forking" structures. All together, these three components can produce most of the observed spectral structures, including S bursts with

  4. Frequency drift rate of solar decameter “drift pair” bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, Aleksander; Konovalenko, Aleksander; Volvach, Yaroslav

    2017-09-01

    This paper deals with the detailed analysis of frequency drift rates of solar “drift pair” (DP) bursts observed from 2015 July 10 to 12 during a type III burst storm. The observations were conducted by the UTR-2 radio telescope at 9–33 MHz with high frequency and time resolution. DPs were recorded drifting from higher to lower frequencies (forward DPs) as well as from lower to higher ones (reverse DPs). Patterns on their dynamic spectrum had various inclines and occupied different bandwidths. The frequency drift rate versus frequency dependence of these bursts has been studied. The fitting model to describe the peak evolution of these bursts in the frequency-time plane is presented. The relationship between DPs and type III solar bursts is discussed.

  5. Low-Frequency Type III Bursts and Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Makela, Pertti

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and type 11 radio bursts associated with a set of six low frequency (<14 MHz) extended type III bursts from active region 10588. The durations were measured at 1 and 14 MHz using high resolution data from Wind/WAVES and were within the range (>15 min) normally used to define these bursts. All but one of the type III bursts was not associated with a type 11 burst in the metric or longer wavelength domains. The burst without type 11 burst also lacked a solar energetic particle (SEP) event at energies >25 MeV. The 1-MHz duration of the type III burst (28 min) is near the median value of type III durations found for gradual SEP events and ground level enhancement (GLE) events. Yet, there was no sign of SEP events. On the other hand, two other type III bursts from the same active region had similar duration but accompanied by WAVES type 11 bursts; these bursts were also accompanied by SEP events detected by SOHO/ERNE. The CMEs were of similar speeds and the flares are also of similar size and duration. This study suggests that the type III burst duration may not be a good indicator of an SEP event.

  6. The Jovian S-bursts. II - Frequency drift measurements at different frequencies throughout several storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Y.; Aubier, M. G.; Rosolen, C.; Genova, F.; de La Noe, J.

    1980-06-01

    The frequency drift measurements performed at different frequencies throughout several storms to test the hypothesis of trapped electrons accelerated at Io are presented. The observations were made in the 20-40 MHz range with high time and frequency resolutions; the measurements show that the average value of the drift-rate at a fixed frequency varies all along a given storm. The measured drift-rate of a storm cannot be fitted by a set of curves deduced from the trapped electrons hypothesis; at the maximum frequency of emission, very high drift-rates are measured for most cases, which contradicts this hypothesis. It is concluded that the electrons responsible for the S-burst emission are more likely accelerated in the ionosphere of Jupiter than at Io.

  7. Differential regulation of sympathetic burst frequency and amplitude following acute hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Steinback, Craig D; Kevin Shoemaker, J

    2012-09-15

    Current evidence suggests that the persistent sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), commonly observed after exposure to hypoxia (HX), is mediated by chemoreceptor sensitization and or baroreflex resetting. Evidence in humans and animals suggests that these reflexes may independently regulate the frequency (gating) and amplitude (neuronal recruitment) of SNA bursts. In humans (n = 7), we examined the regulation of SNA following acute isocapnic HX (5 min; end-tidal P(O2) = 45 Torr) and euoxic hypercapnia (HC; 5 min; end-tidal P(CO2) = +10 from baseline). HX increased SNA burst frequency (21 ± 7 to 28 ± 8 bursts/min, P < 0.05) and amplitude (99 ± 10 to 125 ± 19 au, P < 0.05) as did HC (14 ± 6 to 22 ± 10 bursts/min, P < 0.05 and 100 ± 12 to 133 ± 29 au, P < 0.05, respectively). Burst frequency (26 ± 7 bursts/min, P < 0.05), but not amplitude (97 ± 12 au), remained elevated 10 min post-HX. The change in burst amplitude (but not frequency) was significantly related to the measured change in ventilation (r(2) = 0.527, P < 0.001). Both frequency and amplitude decreased during recovery following HC. These data indicate the differential regulation of pattern and magnitude of sympathetic outflow in humans with sympathetic persistence following HX being specific to burst frequency and not amplitude.

  8. Investigation of Millimeter Wave Bursts at ECE Frequencies in DIII-D Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. M.; Austin, M. E.

    2005-10-01

    Intense bursts of narrowband millimeter wave radiation have been observed in low density H-mode and QH-mode plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak. These bursts occur in the range of second harmonic electron cyclotron frequencies and have bandwidths of 1 to 4 GHz. The narrow frequency width suggests that the bursting is not classic runaway electron emission which typically has a bandwidth of 10 GHz or more. ECE bursting has been observed in three different conditions. The burst occurs simultaneously with edge-localized mode (ELM) precursors, edge harmonic oscillations, or plasma disruption precursors. In the precursor cases the bursts precede the collapse phase and are coincident with similar types of MHD events. The data will be compared to models of stimulated and scattered emission for electrons in the high energy tail of the distribution.

  9. Solar S-bursts in frequency band 10-30 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.; Rucker, H. O.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Abranin, E. P.; Lonskaya, A. S.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract In this paper the first observations of solar S-bursts in the frequency band 10-30MHz obtained with radio telescope UTR-2 are discussed. More than 700 bursts, which were registered during two solar storms on July, 11-19 and July, 25 - August, 3 in 2002, were analyzed.

  10. Spatial-temporal variation of low-frequency earthquake bursts near Parkfield, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Chunquan; Guyer, Robert; Shelly, David R.; Trugman, D.; Frank, William; Gomberg, Joan S.; Johnson, P.

    2015-01-01

    Tectonic tremor (TT) and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) have been found in the deeper crust of various tectonic environments globally in the last decade. The spatial-temporal behaviour of LFEs provides insight into deep fault zone processes. In this study, we examine recurrence times from a 12-yr catalogue of 88 LFE families with ∼730 000 LFEs in the vicinity of the Parkfield section of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) in central California. We apply an automatic burst detection algorithm to the LFE recurrence times to identify the clustering behaviour of LFEs (LFE bursts) in each family. We find that the burst behaviours in the northern and southern LFE groups differ. Generally, the northern group has longer burst duration but fewer LFEs per burst, while the southern group has shorter burst duration but more LFEs per burst. The southern group LFE bursts are generally more correlated than the northern group, suggesting more coherent deep fault slip and relatively simpler deep fault structure beneath the locked section of SAF. We also found that the 2004 Parkfield earthquake clearly increased the number of LFEs per burst and average burst duration for both the northern and the southern groups, with a relatively larger effect on the northern group. This could be due to the weakness of northern part of the fault, or the northwesterly rupture direction of the Parkfield earthquake.

  11. Decameter type III bursts with positive and negative frequency drift rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Briand, C.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Zarka, P.; Frantzusenko, A. V.; Rucker, H. O.; Rutkevych, B. P.; Panchenko, M.; Zaqarashvili, T.; Shergelashvili, B.

    2013-09-01

    We report about observations of decameter type III bursts whose frequency drift rates vary their signs from negative to positive. Moreover drift rates of some bursts vary the sign some times. Positive drift rates for some bursts are changed from 0.44 MHz/s to 12 MHz/s. At the same time the negative drift rates of these bursts are standard values for decameter type III bursts. A possible interpretation of such phenomenon on the base of plasma mechanism of type III burst generation is discussed. The sense of this interpretation is that group velocity of type III electromagnetic waves generated by fast electrons at some conditions can be smaller than velocity of these electrons.

  12. On the Directivity of Low-Frequency Type IV Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Akiyama, S.; Makela, P.; Yashiro, S.; Cairns, I. H.

    2016-01-01

    An intense type IV radio burst was observed by the STEREO Behind (STB) spacecraft located about 144 deg. behind Earth. The burst was associated with a large solar eruption that occurred on the backside of the Sun (N05E151) close to the disk center in the STB view. The eruption was also observed by the STEREO Ahead (STA) spacecraft (located at 149 deg. ahead of Earth) as an eruption close to the west limb (N05W60) in that view. The type IV burst was complete in STB observations in that the envelope reached the lowest frequency and then receded to higher frequencies. The burst was partial viewed from STA, revealing only the edge coming down to the lowest frequency. The type IV burst was not observed at all near Earth because the source was 61 deg. behind the east limb. The eruption was associated with a low-frequency type II burst observed in all three views, although it was not very intense. Solar energetic particles were also observed at both STEREOs and at SOHO, suggesting that the shock was much extended, consistent with the very high speed of the CME (2048 km/s). These observations suggest that the type IV emission is directed along a narrow cone above the flare site. We confirm this result statistically using the type IV bursts of solar cycle 23.

  13. Phase-locking of bursting neuronal firing to dominant LFP frequency components

    PubMed Central

    Constantinou, Maria; Elijah, Daniel H.; Squirrell, Daniel; Gigg, John; Montemurro, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal firing in the hippocampal formation relative to the phase of local field potentials (LFP) has a key role in memory processing and spatial navigation. Firing can be in either tonic or burst mode. Although bursting neurons are common in the hippocampal formation, the characteristics of their locking to LFP phase are not completely understood. We investigated phase-locking properties of bursting neurons using simulations generated by a dual compartmental model of a pyramidal neuron adapted to match the bursting activity in the subiculum of a rat. The model was driven with stochastic input signals containing a power spectral profile consistent with physiologically relevant frequencies observed in LFP. The single spikes and spike bursts fired by the model were locked to a preferred phase of the predominant frequency band where there was a peak in the power of the driving signal. Moreover, the preferred phase of locking shifted with increasing burst size, providing evidence that LFP phase can be encoded by burst size. We also provide initial support for the model results by analysing example data of spontaneous LFP and spiking activity recorded from the subiculum of a single urethane-anaesthetised rat. Subicular neurons fired single spikes, two-spike bursts and larger bursts that locked to a preferred phase of either dominant slow oscillations or theta rhythms within the LFP, according to the model prediction. Both power-modulated phase-locking and gradual shift in the preferred phase of locking as a function of burst size suggest that neurons can use bursts to encode timing information contained in LFP phase into a spike-count code. PMID:26305338

  14. Interaction between pulsed discharge and radio frequency discharge burst at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Ying; Shi, Yuncheng; Zhang, Jing; Shi, J. J.

    2015-08-15

    The atmospheric pressure glow discharges (APGD) with dual excitations in terms of pulsed voltage and pulse-modulation radio frequency (rf) power are studied experimentally between two parallel plates electrodes. Pulse-modulation applied in rf APGD temporally separates the discharge into repetitive discharge bursts, between which the high voltage pulses are introduced to ignite sub-microsecond pulsed discharge. The discharge characteristics and spatio-temporal evolution are investigated by means of current voltage characteristics and time resolved imaging, which suggests that the introduced pulsed discharge assists the ignition of rf discharge burst and reduces the maintain voltage of rf discharge burst. Furtherly, the time instant of pulsed discharge between rf discharge bursts is manipulated to study the ignition dynamics of rf discharge burst.

  15. Turnover Frequency in Solar Microwave Bursts with an Extremely Flat Optically Thin Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Q. W.; Nakajima, H.; Huang, G. L.; Tan, B. L.; Huang, Y.; Wu, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Four microwave bursts have been selected from the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter (NoRP) observations with an extremely flat spectrum in the optically thin part and a very hard spectral index between 0 and -1 in the maximum phase of all bursts. It is found that the time evolution of the turnover frequency is inversely proportional to the time profiles of the radio flux in all bursts. Based on the nonthermal gyrosynchrotron theory of Ramaty ( Astrophys. J. 158, 753, 1969), the local magnetic field strength and the electron spectral index are calculated uniquely from the observed radio spectral index and the turnover frequency. We found that the electron energy spectrum is very hard (spectral index 1 - 2), and the time variation of the magnetic field strength is also inversely proportional to the radio flux as a function of time in all bursts. Hence, the time evolution of the turnover frequency can be explained directly by its dependence on the local magnetic field strength. The high turnover frequency (several tens of GHz) is mainly caused by a strong magnetic field of up to several hundred gauss, and probably by the Razin effect under a high plasma density over 10^{10} cm^{-3} in the maximum phase of these bursts. Therefore, the extremely flat microwave spectrum can be well understood by the observed high turnover frequency and the calculated hard electron spectral index.

  16. On High and Low Starting Frequencies of Type II Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, J.; Mittal, N.

    2017-06-01

    We have studied the characteristics of type II radio burst during the period May 1996 to March 2015, for the solar cycle 23 and 24, observed by WIND/WAVES radio instrument. A total of 642 events were recorded by the instrument during the study period. We have divided the events with two starting frequency range (high > 1 MHz; low ≤ 1MHz) as type II1 (i.e., 1-16 MHz) radio burst and type II2 (i.e., 20 KHz - 1020 KHz) radio burst which constitute the DH and km type II radio burst observed by WIND spacecraft, and determined their time and frequency characteristics. The mean drift rate of type II1 and type II2 radio bursts is 29.76 × 10-4 MHz/s and 0.17 × 10-4 MHz/s respectively, which shows that type II1 with high start frequency hase larger drift rate than the type II2 with low starting frequencies. We have also reported that the start frequency and the drift rate of type II1 are in good correlation, with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.58.

  17. Decameter Type III Bursts with Changing Frequency Drift-Rate Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Briand, C.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Zarka, P.; Frantsuzenko, A. V.; Rucker, H. O.; Rutkevych, B. P.; Panchenko, M.; Denis, L.; Zaqarashvili, T.; Shergelashvili, B.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss properties of type III bursts that change the sign of their drift rate from negative to positive and vice versa. Moreover, these bursts may change the sign of their drift rates more than once. These particular type III bursts were observed simultaneously by the radio telescopes UTR-2 ( Ukrainian T-shaped Radio telescope, Kharkov, Ukraine), URAN-2 ( Ukrainian Radio telescope of the Academy of Sciences, Poltava, Ukraine), and by the NDA ( Nançay Decametric Array, Nancay, France) in the frequency range 8 - 41 MHz. The negative drift rates of these bursts are similar to those of previously reported decameter type III bursts and vary from -0.7 MHz s-1 to -1.7 MHz s-1, but their positive drift rates vary in a wider range from 0.44 MHz s-1 to 6 MHz s-1. Unlike inverted U-bursts, the tracks of these type III bursts have C- or inverted C-shapes.

  18. On-off control of burst high frequency electrical stimulation to suppress 4-AP induced seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chia-Chu; Lin, Chou-Ching K.; Ju, Ming-Shaung

    2013-06-01

    Objective. The goal of this study was to investigate, using model simulations and animal experiments, the efficiency and the side effects of burst high frequency stimulation combined with on-off control in seizure suppression. Approach. A modified mathematical hippocampal seizure model was created to provide evidence of the eligibility of this approach. In the experimental setup, two recording electrodes were inserted into bilateral septal CA1 of the hippocampus, and a stimulation electrode was placed on the ventral hippocampal commissure of a rat. After seizures had been induced by 4-aminopyridine treatment, on-off control stimulation was used to suppress the seizures at 20 s intervals. The stimulation time, cumulative charge and post-stimulation suppression were used to assess the effects of burst duration. Main results. The results showed that burst stimulation could suppress the seizures during the control period and burst stimulation of a shorter duration could keep the seizure suppressed with less effort. By decreasing the burst duration, the cumulative stimulation time became shorter, the delivered cumulative charge became lower, and the cumulative time of post-stimulation suppression became longer. Significance. The on-off control stimulation not only prolonged the duration of suppression but also avoided the side effects of the conversion of seizure patterns. In particular, decreasing the specified burst duration increased the efficiency of the burst stimulation.

  19. Decametric radio bursts associated with the 13 July 2004 CME event at frequencies 10-30 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiko, A. I.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Rucker, H. O.

    2012-03-01

    We report on the observations of solar type IV burst and its precursors on the 13 of July 2004 at frequencies 10-30 MHz. The radio telescope UTR-2 observational data compiled from SOHO, WIND, NDA, RHESSI, GOES data were used. The main properties (frequency drift rate, duration, flux) of type IV burst and its precursors, namely solar type III and type II bursts, are analysed. We consider the type IV burst connected with appearance of the coronal mass ejection, which occurrence coincides with the type IV burst beginning. Several physical characteristics of this CME were estimated.

  20. Novel Burst Suppression Segmentation in the Joint Time-Frequency Domain for EEG in Treatment of Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaeyun; Song, Woo-Jin; Lee, Hyang Woon

    2016-01-01

    We developed a method to distinguish bursts and suppressions for EEG burst suppression from the treatments of status epilepticus, employing the joint time-frequency domain. We obtained the feature used in the proposed method from the joint use of the time and frequency domains, and we estimated the decision as to whether the measured EEG was a burst segment or suppression segment by the maximum likelihood estimation. We evaluated the performance of the proposed method in terms of its accordance with the visual scores and estimation of the burst suppression ratio. The accuracy was higher than the sole use of the time or frequency domains, as well as conventional methods conducted in the time domain. In addition, probabilistic modeling provided a more simplified optimization than conventional methods. Burst suppression quantification necessitated precise burst suppression segmentation with an easy optimization; therefore, the excellent discrimination and the easy optimization of burst suppression by the proposed method appear to be beneficial. PMID:27872655

  1. Potential Impacts of Tsangpo Lake-Burst Megafloods and Their Preservation in the Bengal Basin and Delta System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, M. S.; Goodbred, S. L., Jr.; Palamenghi, L.; Hossain, S.; Pickering, J.; Sincavage, R.; Spiess, V.; Williams, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Large, glacially-dammed lakes formed via the impoundment of the Tsangpo River in Tibet led to lake-burst floods during the late Pleistocene and at least two intervals in the early and late Holocene. We present the first critical examination of the potential effects that the Holocene lake drainages had on the downstream Bengal delta and their preservation in the geologic record. Based on stratigraphic evidence from cores drilled across the delta, digital elevation models, seismic data, and hydraulic flow calculations, we propose that lake-burst floods could be responsible for (a) triggering short-lived avulsion events of the Brahmaputra River into the Sylhet basin, (b) the formation of two apparent overflow channels on the Madhupur Terrace, and (c) the deposition of a large, mass transport deposit in the submarine Swatch of No Ground canyon system. Comparing the early and late Holocene events, we expect the distribution of the floodwaters and their deposits in the two intervals to differ sharply owing to major differences in flood volume and the paleotopography of the delta. Despite much higher discharge, the early Holocene floods were largely accommodated within the vast lowstand valley of the Brahmaputra, with some spillover into the Sylhet basin. In contrast, the late Holocene floods likely spread over a larger area due to the relatively even, low-gradient topography. Offshore, a 40 m thick chaotic, semi-transparent seismic facies observed in the canyon corresponds temporally with the early Holocene floods and is tentatively interpreted as a subaqueous debris flow generated by the flood pulse directed to the canyon via the lowstand river valley. We examine the theoretical preservation potential of rare flood events in light of signal shredding mechanisms to help explain why evidence of the larger, early Holocene floods is preserved whereas we have found no clear signal from the younger floods.

  2. DELTAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C.; Swift, G.W. )

    1993-11-01

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  3. DELTAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.C. ); Swift, G.W. )

    1993-11-01

    In thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators, and in many simple acoustic systems, a one dimensional wave equation determines the spatial dependence of the acoustic pressure and velocity. DELTAE numerically integrates such wave equations in the acoustic approximation, in gases or liquids, in user-defined geometries. Boundary conditions can include conventional acoustic boundary conditions of geometry and impedance, as well as temperature and thermal power in thermoacoustic systems. DELTAE can be used easily for apparatus ranging from simple duct networks and resonators to thermoacoustic engines refrigerators and combinations thereof. It can predict how a given apparatus will perform, or can allow the user to design an apparatus to achieve desired performance. DELTAE views systems as a series of segments; twenty segment types are supported. The purely acoustic segments include ducts and cones, and lumped impedances including compliances, series impedances, and endcaps. Electroacoustics tranducer segments can be defined using either frequency-independent coefficients or the conventional parameters of loudspeaker-style drivers: mass, spring constant, magnetic field strength, etc. Tranducers can be current driven, voltage driven, or connected to an electrical load impedance. Thermoacoustic segment geometries include parallel plates, circular and rectangular pores, and pin arrays. Side branches can be defined with fixed impedances, frequency-dependent radiation impedances, or as an auxiliary series of segments of any types. The user can select working fluids from among air, helium, neon, argon, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium-argon mixtures, helium-xenon mixtures, liquid sodium, and eutectic sodium-potassium. Additional fluids and solids can be defined by the user.

  4. Auroral medium frequency burst radio emission associated with the 23 March 2007 THEMIS study substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, N. L.; Labelle, J.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Hughes, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Auroral medium frequency (MF) burst is an impulsive auroral radio emission associated with substorm onset detected by ground-based instruments between 1.3 and 4.5 MHz. On 23 March 2007 an MF burst emission was detected by the Dartmouth radio interferometer located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. This emission temporally coincides with the onset of the 23 March 2007 Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) study substorm. Directions of arrival computed using the Dartmouth radio interferometer for this event also coincide spatially with the location of the expanding auroral arcs to the south observed by the all-sky imager at Fort Yukon, Alaska. This observation represents the first example of a direction of arrival measurement for MF burst. It strongly supports the association of MF burst with intense auroral arcs accompanying substorm onset. The direction of arrival of the MF burst is consistent with the direction to the eastern edge of the substorm onset location determined by multiple data sets during this substorm and suggests that location of MF burst radio emissions may be an effective method of locating substorm onsets, much as radio atmospherics are used to locate lightning.

  5. Temporal Intraspeech Masking of Plosive Bursts: Effects of Hearing Loss and Frequency Shaping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackersie, Carol L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes were (a) to compare masking of consonant bursts by adjacent vowels for listeners with and without hearing loss and (b) to determine the extent to which the temporal intraspeech masking can be reduced by a simulated hearing-aid frequency-response shaping. Method: Fourteen adults with sensorineural hearing loss and 10 with…

  6. Temporal Intraspeech Masking of Plosive Bursts: Effects of Hearing Loss and Frequency Shaping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackersie, Carol L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes were (a) to compare masking of consonant bursts by adjacent vowels for listeners with and without hearing loss and (b) to determine the extent to which the temporal intraspeech masking can be reduced by a simulated hearing-aid frequency-response shaping. Method: Fourteen adults with sensorineural hearing loss and 10 with…

  7. Membrane resonance in bursting pacemaker neurons of an oscillatory network is correlated with network frequency.

    PubMed

    Tohidi, Vahid; Nadim, Farzan

    2009-05-20

    Network oscillations typically span a limited range of frequency. In pacemaker-driven networks, including many central pattern generators (CPGs), this frequency range is determined by the properties of bursting pacemaker neurons and their synaptic connections; thus, factors that affect the burst frequency of pacemaker neurons should play a role in determining the network frequency. We examine the role of membrane resonance of pacemaker neurons on the network frequency in the crab pyloric CPG. The pyloric oscillations (frequency of approximately 1 Hz) are generated by a group of pacemaker neurons: the anterior burster (AB) and the pyloric dilator (PD). We examine the impedance profiles of the AB and PD neurons in response to sinusoidal current injections with varying frequency and find that both neuron types exhibit membrane resonance, i.e., demonstrate maximal impedance at a given preferred frequency. The membrane resonance frequencies of the AB and PD neurons fall within the range of the pyloric network oscillation frequency. Experiments with pharmacological blockers and computational modeling show that both calcium currents I(Ca) and the hyperpolarization-activated inward current I(h) are important in producing the membrane resonance in these neurons. We then demonstrate that both the membrane resonance frequency of the PD neuron and its suprathreshold bursting frequency can be shifted in the same direction by either direct current injection or by using the dynamic-clamp technique to inject artificial conductances for I(h) or I(Ca). Together, these results suggest that membrane resonance of pacemaker neurons can be strongly correlated with the CPG oscillation frequency.

  8. FIRST VERY LOW FREQUENCY DETECTION OF SHORT REPEATED BURSTS FROM MAGNETAR SGR J1550-5418

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Takahashi, T.; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Bertoni, Fernando C. P.; Fagundes, P. R.; Chau, J.; Schuch, N. J.; Hayakawa, M.; Hobara, Y.; Terasawa, T.

    2010-09-20

    We report on the first detection of ionospheric disturbances caused by short repeated gamma-ray bursts from the magnetar SGR J1550-5418. Very low frequency (VLF) radio wave data obtained in South America clearly show sudden amplitude and phase changes at the corresponding times of eight soft gamma-ray repeater bursts. Maximum amplitude and phase changes of the VLF signals appear to be correlated with the gamma-ray fluence. On the other hand, VLF recovery timescales do not show any significant correlation with the fluence, possibly suggesting that the bursts' spectra are not similar to each other. In summary, Earth's ionosphere can be used as a very large gamma-ray detector and the VLF observations provide us with a new method to monitor high-energy astrophysical phenomena without interruption such as Earth occultation.

  9. Solar burst with millimetre-wave emission at high frequency only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J. E. R.; Vaz, A. M. Z.; Dennis, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    The first high sensitivity and high time-resolution observations of a solar burst taken simultaneously at 90 GHz and at 30 GHz are presented. These identify a unique impulsive burst on May 21, 1984 with fast pulsed emission that was considerably more intense at 90 GHz than at lower frequencies. Hard X-ray time structures at energies above 25 keV were almost identical to the 90 GHz structures to better than 1 s. The structure of the onset of the major 90 GHz burst coincided with the hard X-ray structure to within 128 ms. All 90 GHz major time structures consisted of trains of multiple subsecond pulses with rise times as short as 0.03 s and amplitudes that were large compared with the mean flux. When detectable, the 30 GHz subsecond pulses had smaller relative amplitude and were in phase with the corresponding 90 GHz pulses.

  10. On the propagation and mode conversion of auroral medium frequency bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broughton, M. C.; LaBelle, J.; Kim, E.-H.; Yoon, P. H.; Johnson, J. R.; Cairns, I. H.

    2016-02-01

    Auroral medium frequency (MF) bursts are broadband, impulsive radio emissions associated with local substorm onsets. MF bursts consist of a characteristic fine structure whereby the higher frequencies arrive 10-100 ms before the lower frequencies. LaBelle (2011a) proposed that MF bursts originate as Langmuir/Z mode waves on the topside of the ionosphere that mode-convert to LO mode waves and propagate to ground level, with the fine structure resulting by propagation delays due to the topside ionospheric density profile. We investigate three aspects of this mechanism. First, full-wave calculations are used to simulate the MF burst fine structure using a realistic ionospheric density profile. The delay between the highest and lowest frequencies is 21 ms. This value is smaller than the experimentally determined delays of ˜100 ms presented in Bunch and LaBelle (2009), but differences between the topside electron number density profile used in the simulations and the number density profile during disturbed conditions make comparisons only approximate. Second, the Landau damping of Langmuir/Z mode waves on the topside ionosphere is calculated, assuming the electron distribution function consists of a cold background population (ne0) and a warm secondary population (nse). The Landau damping is small when nse/ne0 = 0.04% (consistent with Maggs and Lotko (1981)) but is significant when nse/ne0 > 0.4%. Finally, full-wave calculations are used to determine the mode conversion efficiency from Langmuir/Z mode waves to LO mode waves. These imply that waves would suffer an attenuation of wave energy density of approximately 5-10% if they are generated with their wave vectors in a narrow cone centered around the local magnetic field. Taken together, these calculations suggest that for small values of nse/ne0 <0.4%, the mechanism proposed by LaBelle (2011a) is a plausible explanation for the origin of MF bursts.

  11. Frequency modulation of stochastic gene expression bursts by strongly interacting small RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Niraj; Jia, Tao; Zarringhalam, Kourosh; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2016-10-01

    The sporadic nature of gene expression at the single-cell level—long periods of inactivity punctuated by bursts of mRNA or protein production—plays a critical role in diverse cellular processes. To elucidate the cellular role of bursting in gene expression, synthetic biology approaches have been used to design simple genetic circuits with bursty mRNA or protein production. Understanding how such genetic circuits can be designed with the ability to control burst-related parameters requires the development of quantitative stochastic models of gene expression. In this work, we analyze stochastic models for the regulation of gene expression bursts by strongly interacting small RNAs. For the parameter range considered, results based on mean-field approaches are significantly inaccurate and alternative analytical approaches are needed. Using simplifying approximations, we obtain analytical results for the corresponding steady-state distributions that are in agreement with results from stochastic simulations. These results indicate that regulation by small RNAs, in the strong interaction limit, can be used to effectively modulate the frequency of bursting. We explore the consequences of such regulation for simple genetic circuits involving feedback effects and switching between promoter states.

  12. The membrane potential waveform of bursting pacemaker neurons is a predictor of their preferred frequency and the network cycle frequency.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hua-an; Nadim, Farzan

    2010-08-11

    Many oscillatory networks involve neurons that exhibit intrinsic rhythmicity but possess a large variety of voltage-gated currents that interact in a complex fashion, making it difficult to determine which factors control frequency. Yet these neurons often have preferred (resonance) frequencies that can be close to the network frequency. Because the preferred frequency results from the dynamics of ionic currents, it can be assumed to depend on parameters that determine the neuron's oscillatory waveform shape. The pyloric network frequency in the crab Cancer borealis is correlated with the preferred frequency of its bursting pacemaker neurons anterior burster and pyloric dilator (PD). We measured the preferred frequency of the PD neuron in voltage clamp, which allows control of the oscillation voltage range and waveforms (sine waves and realistic oscillation waveforms), and showed that (1) the preferred frequency depends on the voltage range of the oscillating voltage waveform; (2) the slope of the waveform near its peak has a strongly negative correlation with the preferred frequency; and (3) correlations between parameters of the PD neuron oscillation waveform and its preferred frequency can be used to predict shifts in the network frequency. As predicted by these results, dynamic clamp shifts of the upper or lower voltage limits of the PD neuron waveform during ongoing oscillations changed the network frequency, consistent with the predictions from the preferred frequency. These results show that the voltage waveform of oscillatory neurons can be predictive of their preferred frequency and thus the network oscillation frequency.

  13. The membrane potential waveform of bursting pacemaker neurons is a predictor of their preferred frequency and the network cycle frequency

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hua-an; Nadim, Farzan

    2010-01-01

    Many oscillatory networks involve neurons that exhibit intrinsic rhythmicity, but possess a large variety of voltage-gated currents which interact in a complex fashion making it difficult to determine which factors control frequency. Yet, these neurons often have preferred (resonance) frequencies that can be close to the network frequency. Because the preferred frequency results from the dynamics of ionic currents, it can be assumed to depend on parameters that determine the neuron’s oscillatory waveform shape. The pyloric network frequency in the crab Cancer borealis is correlated with the preferred frequency of its bursting pacemaker neurons AB and PD. We measure the preferred frequency of the PD neuron in voltage-clamp, which allows control of the oscillation voltage range and waveforms (sine waves and realistic oscillation waveforms), and showthat1) the preferred frequency depends on the voltage range of the oscillating voltage waveform; 2) the slope of the waveform near its peak has a strongly negative correlation with the preferred frequency; and 3) correlations between parameters of the PD neuron oscillation waveform and its preferred frequency can be used to predict shifts in the network frequency. As predicted by these results, dynamic clamp shifts of the upper or lower voltage limits of the PD neuron waveform during ongoing oscillations changed the network frequency, consistent with the predictions from the preferred frequency. These results show that the voltage waveform of oscillatory neurons can be predictive of their preferred frequency and thus the network oscillation frequency. PMID:20702710

  14. Distributions of solar drift-pair bursts in frequency from decameter radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, Aleksander; Volvach, Yaroslav

    2017-04-01

    Statement of the Problem: Solar drift-pair (DP) bursts are one of interesting manifestations of solar activity. Observed during the solar storms of type III bursts, they demonstrate a very simple form on dynamic radio spectra as two short components separated in time, often the second component being the full repetition of the first. As is well known, type III bursts are produced by the accelerated electrons propagating along open magnetic field lines in solar corona. However, no each storm of type III bursts leads to any DP. The role of electron beams in the generation of DPs remains unclear. Solar DPs are detected by ground-based instruments at decameter and meter wavelengths, but each individual DP occupies only a limited bandwidth in the frequency range. The bursts drift in frequency, and their frequency drift rate can be both negative and positive (so-called the forward and reverse DPs), from -2 MHz/s to 6 MHz/s [1]. Besides, there are cases of vertical DPs, which occur simultaneously in all the frequencies within their bandwidth. It is difficult to interpret them by means of a moving source, as any exciting agent responsible for such bursts would travel with velocities faster than velocity of light [2]. Methodology & Experimental Orientation: New features of modern low-frequency radio astronomy allow us to study the empirical properties of DPs more deeply than ever before. Our results are based on the recent radio data (during 10-12 July of 2015) obtained with help of the UTR-2 radio telescope at frequencies 9-33 MHz with the time resolution of 50 ms and the frequency resolution of 4 kHz. We have identified 301 DP bursts in which 209 events were forward (FDP), and the rest were reverse (RDP). Results & Significance: According to the data, the occurrence of FDPs decreased at high frequencies, whereas the number of RDPs had an opposite tendency, they rarely occured at lower frequencies. During the observational session, at 20-25 MHz almost the same amount of

  15. Frequency of delta F508 in a Mexican sample of cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, L; Salcedo, M; Lezana, J L; Chávez, M; Valdez, H; Moreno, M; Carnevale, A

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports the frequency of the delta F508 mutation in a cohort of 50 Mexican patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The mutation was detected by PCR mediated site directed mutagenesis. delta F508 was found in 39% of CF chromosomes, a frequency lower than that reported in Argentina and Spain. The high rate of CF cases who die undiagnosed, the ethnic origin of Mexican populations, and the limited number of cases studied could account for the low frequency of the delta F508 mutation found in this preliminary report. Images PMID:8326494

  16. Discovery of the Spin Frequency of 4U 0614+09 with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Kuulkers, Erik

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of burst oscillations at 414.7 Hz during a thermonuclear X-ray burst from the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) 4U 0614+091 with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift. In a search of the BAT archive, we found two burst triggers consistent with the position of 4U 0614+091. We searched both bursts for high-frequency timing signatures and found a significant detection at 414.7 Hz during a 5 s interval in the cooling tail of the brighter burst. This result establishes the spin frequency of the neutron star in 4U 0614+091 as ≈415 Hz. The oscillation had an average amplitude (rms) of 14%. These results are consistent with those known for burst oscillations seen in other LMXBs. The inferred ratio of the frequency difference between the twin kHz quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and the spin frequency, Δ ν/νs, in this source is strongly inconsistent with either 0.5 or 1 and tends to support the recent suggestions by Yin et al. and Mendez & Belloni that the kHz QPO frequency difference may not have a strong connection to the neutron star spin frequency.

  17. Deka-keV X-ray observations of solar bursts with WATCH/GRANAT: frequency distributions of burst parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, N.; Vilmer, N.; Lund, N.; Sunyaev, R.

    1998-06-01

    Solar flare observations in the deka-keV range are performed by the WATCH experiment on board the GRANAT satellite. The WATCH experiment is presented, including the energy calibration as applied in the present work. The creation of the solar burst catalogue covering two years of observation is described and some examples of solar observations are given. The estimated energy releases in the flares presented here are found to extend below the range of hard X-ray flares which were previously studied by ISEE-3 and HXRBS/SMM detectors. The X-ray emitting component cannot be exclusively explained by contributions from a thermal plasma around a few keV. Either a hotter component or a non-thermal population of particles must also be present to produce the observed deka-keV emission. The WATCH data furthermore shows that the relative contributions of these components may change during an event or from event to event and that the injection of energy contained in suprathermal electrons may occur throughout an event and not only during the rise phase. For the most energetic WATCH flares simultaneous observations performed by other experiments at higher energies further indicate that non-thermal emission can be observed as low as 10 keV. A statistical study is performed on the total WATCH solar database and frequency distributions are built on measured X-ray flare parameters. It is also investigated how the properties of these frequency distributions behave when subgroups of events defined by different ranges of parameters are considered. No correlation is found between the elapsed time interval between successive flares arising from the same active region and the peak intensity of the flare.

  18. [Frequency of the coreceptor CCR5 gene delta 32 mutation in different French regions].

    PubMed

    Lucotte, G; Mercier, G

    1998-05-01

    We studied the frequency of the coreceptor CCR5 gene delta 32 mutation on 1,836 DNA samples originating from ten French regions. This mutation confers, in the homozygous state, resistance to HIV-1 infection. For the whole territory, the mean percentage presence of the delta 32 mutation is 9.2%. The mutation is statistically more frequent in the north (11.2%) than in the south (6.3%) of the country; this differentiation corresponds probably to a gradient of decreasing frequencies of the delta 32 mutation in Europe.

  19. Frequency of the delta ccr5 deletion allele in the urban Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Passos, G A; Picanço, V P

    1998-04-01

    Studies on screening genes conferring resistance to HIV-1 and AIDS onset have shown a direct relationship between a 32 base pair (bp) deletion in the CCR5 beta-chemokine receptor gene (delta ccr5 mutant allele) and long survival of HIV-1 infected individuals bearing this mutation. These findings led to an interest in studies of delta ccr5 allele distribution in human populations. In the present study, polymerase chain reactions (PCR) in genomic DNA samples, using specific CCR5 oligonucleotide primers surrounding the breakpoint deletion, detected a 193-bp product from the normal CCR5 allele and a 161-bp product from the 32-bp deletion allele. In an investigation of the urban Brazilian population we detected a 93% frequency of normal CCR5/CCR5 homozygous individuals and a 7% frequency of CCR5/delta ccr5 heterozygous individuals. The frequency of the delta ccr5 mutant allele in this population is 0.035; however, no homozygous delta ccr5 individual has been detected thus far. This is the first evidence for the contribution of the delta ccr5 allele to the genetic background of the urban Brazilian population, which is characterized by intense ethnic admixture. These findings open perspectives for further studies on the relationship between delta ccr5 allele frequency and AIDS onset in high-risk HIV-1 exposures individuals.

  20. EMG burst presence probability: a joint time-frequency representation of muscle activity and its application to onset detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Ying, Dongwen; Rymer, William Zev

    2015-04-13

    The purpose of this study was to quantify muscle activity in the time-frequency domain, therefore providing an alternative tool to measure muscle activity. This paper presents a novel method to measure muscle activity by utilizing EMG burst presence probability (EBPP) in the time-frequency domain. The EMG signal is grouped into several Mel-scale subbands, and the logarithmic power sequence is extracted from each subband. Each log-power sequence can be regarded as a dynamic process that transits between the states of EMG burst and non-burst. The hidden Markov model (HMM) was employed to elaborate this dynamic process since HMM is intrinsically advantageous in modeling the temporal correlation of EMG burst/non-burst presence. The EBPP was eventually yielded by HMM based on the criterion of maximum likelihood. Our approach achieved comparable performance with the Bonato method.

  1. Size-frequency distribution of gamma ray bursts from thermonuclear runaway on neutron stars accreting interstellar gas

    SciTech Connect

    Higdon, J.C.; Lingenfelter, R.E.

    1984-05-26

    We present some preliminary results of calculations we have made suggesting that runaway thermonuclear burning of interstellar gas accreted onto magnetic neutron stars can account for the observed size-frequency distribution of gamma ray bursts.

  2. Direction of Arrival Studies of Medium Frequency Burst Radio Emissions at Toolik Lake, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, N.; Labelle, J.; Weatherwax, A.; Lummerzheim, D.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H.

    2008-05-01

    MF burst is an impulsive radio emission of auroral origin, which can be detected by ground-based instruments at frequencies between 1,300 and 4,500kHz. MF burst has been shown to be associated with substorm onset, but its exact generation mechanism remains unknown, although it is thought to arise from mode conversion radiation [see review by LaBelle and Treumann, 2002] . In search of the generation mechanism of this emission, Dartmouth College has deployed radio interferometers in Alaska, Northern Canada, Greenland, and Antarctica, including a three-element interferometer deployed to Toolik Field Station in Alaska during the summer of 2006. This instrument measured spectra, amplitudes and directions of arrival (DOA's) of over 47 MF burst events between November 30, 2006 and May 26, 2007. These data represent the first DOA measurements of impulsive MF burst, of which selected case studies were presented at the Fall 2007 AGU conference. Here we present a statistical survey of all 47 events as well as detailed analysis of three events occurring on: Mar 5, Mar 23, and Nov 20, 2007. For the statistical survey, we present distributions of DOA as a function of local time and frequency. In each case study we analyze the direction of arrival of the emissions as a function of both time and frequency within each event. The time variations will be compared with the time variations of optical auroral forms simultaneously measured with all-sky cameras. The dependence of the arrival direction on frequency enables a significant test of the generation mechanism whereby the waves are emitted at the local plasma or upper hybrid frequency in the topside ionosphere, predicting that higher frequencies should originate at lower altitudes. These three events have been selected because All-Sky camera data are available at these times from Toolik Lake and Fort Yukon, Alaska. These are critical both for identifying which optical features are associated with the radio emissions as well as for

  3. Possible reasons for the frequency splitting of the harmonics of type II solar radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eselevich, V. G.; Eselevich, M. V.; Zimovets, I. V.

    2016-01-01

    AIA/SDO data in the 193 Å channel preceding a coronal mass ejection observed at the solar limb on June 13, 2010 are used to simultaneously identify and examine two different shock fronts. The angular size of each front relative to the CME center was about 20°, and their propagation directions differed by ≈25° (≈4° in position angle). The faster front, called the blast shock, advanced the other front, called the piston shock, by R ≈ (0.02-0.03) R⊙ ( R⊙ is the solar radius) and had a maximum initial speed of V B ≈ 850 km/s (with V P ≈ 700 km/s for the piston shock). The appearance and motion of these shocks were accompanied by a Type II radio burst observed at the fundamental frequency F and second harmonic H. Each frequency was split into two close frequencies f 1 and f 2 separated by Δ f = f 2 - f 1 ≪ F, H. It is concluded that the observed frequency splitting Δ f of the F and H components of the Type II burst could result from the simultaneous propagation of piston and blast shocks moving with different speeds in somewhat different directions displaying different coronal-plasma densities.

  4. Modeling temporal changes of low-frequency earthquake bursts near Parkfield, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Daub, E. G.

    2016-12-01

    Tectonic tremor and low-frequency earthquakes (LFE) are found in the deeper crust of various tectonic environments in the last decade. LFEs are presumed to be caused by failure of deep fault patches during a slow slip event, and the long-term variation in LFE recurrence could provide crucial insight into the deep fault zone processes that may lead to future large earthquakes. However, the physical mechanisms causing the temporal changes of LFE recurrence are still under debate. In this study, we combine observations of long-term changes in LFE burst activities near Parkfield, CA with a brittle and ductile friction (BDF) model, and use the model to constrain the possible physical mechanisms causing the observed long-term changes in LFE burst activities after the 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake. The BDF model mimics the slipping of deep fault patches by a spring-drugged block slider with both brittle and ductile friction components. We use the BDF model to test possible mechanisms including static stress imposed by the Parkfield earthquake, changes in pore pressure, tectonic force, afterslip, brittle friction strength, and brittle contact failure distance. The simulation results suggest that changes in brittle friction strength and failure distance are more likely to cause the observed changes in LFE bursts than other mechanisms.

  5. Analysis and modeling of time-variant amplitude-frequency couplings of and between oscillations of EEG bursts.

    PubMed

    Witte, Herbert; Putsche, Peter; Hemmelmann, Claudia; Schelenz, Christoph; Leistritz, Lutz

    2008-08-01

    Low-frequency (0.5-2.5 Hz) and individually defined high-frequency (7-11 or 8-12 Hz; 11-15 or 14-18 Hz) oscillatory components of the electroencephalogram (EEG) burst activity derived from thiopental-induced burst-suppression patterns (BSP) were investigated in seven sedated patients (17-26 years old) with severe head injury. The predominant high-frequency burst oscillations (>7 Hz) were detected for each patient by means of time-variant amplitude spectrum analysis. Thereafter, the instantaneous envelope (IE) and the instantaneous frequency (IF) were computed for these low- and high-frequency bands to quantify amplitude-frequency dependencies (envelope-envelope, envelope-frequency, and frequency-frequency correlations). Time-variant phase-locking, phase synchronization, and quadratic phase couplings are associated with the observed amplitude-frequency characteristics. Additionally, these time-variant analyses were carried out for modeled burst patterns. Coupled Duffing oscillators were adapted to each EEG burst and by means of these models data-based burst simulations were generated. Results are: (1) strong envelope-envelope correlations (IE courses) can be demonstrated; (2) it can be shown that a rise of the IE is associated with an increase of the IF (only for the frequency bands 0.5-2.5 and 7-11 or 8-12 Hz); (3) the rise characteristics of all individually averaged envelope-frequency courses (IE-IF) are strongly correlated; (4) for the 7-11 or 8-12 Hz oscillation these associations are weaker and the variation between the time courses of the patients is higher; (5) for both frequency ranges a quantitative amplitude-frequency dependency can be shown because higher IE peak maxima are accompanied by stronger IF changes; (6) the time range of significant phase-locking within the 7-11 or 8-12 Hz frequency bands and of the strongest quadratic phase couplings (between 0.5-2.5 and 7-11 or 8-12 Hz) is between 0 and 1,000 ms; (7) all phase coupling characteristics of the

  6. A novel network of multipolar bursting interneurons generates theta frequency oscillations in neocortex.

    PubMed

    Blatow, Maria; Rozov, Andrei; Katona, Istvan; Hormuzdi, Sheriar G; Meyer, Axel H; Whittington, Miles A; Caputi, Antonio; Monyer, Hannah

    2003-06-05

    GABAergic interneurons can phase the output of principal cells, giving rise to oscillatory activity in different frequency bands. Here we describe a new subtype of GABAergic interneuron, the multipolar bursting (MB) cell in the mouse neocortex. MB cells are parvalbumin positive but differ from fast-spiking multipolar (FS) cells in their morphological, neurochemical, and physiological properties. MB cells are reciprocally connected with layer 2/3 pyramidal cells and are coupled with each other by chemical and electrical synapses. MB cells innervate FS cells but not vice versa. MB to MB cell as well as MB to pyramidal cell synapses exhibit paired-pulse facilitation. Carbachol selectively induced synchronized theta frequency oscillations in MB cells. Synchrony required both gap junction coupling and GABAergic chemical transmission, but not excitatory glutamatergic input. Hence, MB cells form a distinct inhibitory network, which upon cholinergic drive can generate rhythmic and synchronous theta frequency activity, providing temporal coordination of pyramidal cell output.

  7. Quadri-Pulse Theta Burst Stimulation using Ultra-High Frequency Bursts - A New Protocol to Induce Changes in Cortico-Spinal Excitability in Human Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Jung, Nikolai H; Gleich, Bernhard; Gattinger, Norbert; Hoess, Catrina; Haug, Carolin; Siebner, Hartwig R; Mall, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Patterned transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) such as theta burst stimulation (TBS) or quadri-pulse stimulation (QPS) can induce changes in cortico-spinal excitability, commonly referred to as long-term potentiation (LTP)-like and long-term depression (LTD)-like effects in human motor cortex (M1). Here, we aimed to test the plasticity-inducing capabilities of a novel protocol that merged TBS and QPS. 360 bursts of quadri-pulse TBS (qTBS) were continuously given to M1 at 90% of active motor threshold (1440 full-sine pulses). In a first experiment, stimulation frequency of each burst was set to 666 Hz to mimic the rhythmicity of the descending cortico-spinal volleys that are elicited by TMS (i.e., I-wave periodicity). In a second experiment, burst frequency was set to 200 Hz to maximize postsynaptic Ca2+ influx using a temporal pattern unrelated to I-wave periodicity. The second phase of sinusoidal TMS pulses elicited either a posterior-anterior (PA) or anterior-posterior (AP) directed current in M1. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded before and after qTBS to probe changes in cortico-spinal excitability. PA-qTBS at 666 Hz caused a decrease in PA-MEP amplitudes, whereas AP-qTBS at 666 Hz induced an increase in mean AP-MEP amplitudes. At a burst frequency of 200 Hz, PA-qTBS and AP-qTBS produced an increase in cortico-spinal excitability outlasting for at least 60 minutes in PA- and AP-MEP amplitudes, respectively. Continuous qTBS at 666 Hz or 200 Hz can induce lasting changes in cortico-spinal excitability. Induced current direction in the brain appears to be relevant when qTBS targets I-wave periodicity, corroborating that high-fidelity spike timing mechanisms are critical for inducing bi-directional plasticity in human M1.

  8. Energetic electrons from solar flares and associated type 3 radio bursts from metric to hectometric wave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1972-01-01

    Distinct Kev electron events as observed by satellites near the earth are, in general, associated with solar flares which are accompained by the emission of both metric and hectometric type 3 radio bursts. The positions of these flares are mainly on the western hemisphere of the sun. These results show that Kev electrons propagate under the control of the magnetic field in the interplanetary space and that, while propagating through this space, these electrons excite type 3 radio bursts from metric to hectometric wave frequencies. Emission characteristics of hectometric type 3 bursts are briefly considered in relation to the positions of associated flares.

  9. Expectancy effects in feedback processing are explained primarily by time-frequency delta not theta.

    PubMed

    Watts, Adreanna T M; Bachman, Matthew D; Bernat, Edward M

    2017-09-01

    The roles of outcome valence and expectancy in feedback processing have been investigated as important factors modulating event-related potential (ERP) measures including the feedback negativity (FN) and P300, but results have been inconsistent. Recent work from our group has shown that processes underlying the FN and P300 are better represented as separable processes in the theta (3-7Hz) and delta (0-3Hz) ranges using time-frequency analysis. The current study evaluated the modulation of time-domain FN and P300 and time-frequency theta and delta to outcome valence and expectancy in a gambling feedback task paradigm. Results revealed that the FN was sensitive to valence but not expectancy, and that valence effects were driven by loss-sensitive theta and gain-sensitive delta. Alternatively, the P300 was sensitive to the expectedness of outcomes but only for gain trials, and these expectancy differences were explained by time-frequency delta not theta. These results add to a growing body of research showing that time-frequency measures reflect separable processes underlying time-domain components, where theta is more sensitive to primary task features and less sensitive to secondary features while delta is sensitive to primary and more complex, secondary task features. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Bursting frequency versus phase synchronization in time-delayed neuron networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordenfelt, Anders; Used, Javier; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2013-05-01

    We investigate the dependence of the average bursting frequency on time delay for neuron networks with randomly distributed time-delayed chemical synapses. The result is compared with the corresponding curve for the phase synchronization and it turns out that, in some intervals, these have a very similar shape and appear as almost mirror images of each other. We have analyzed both the map-based chaotic Rulkov model and the continuous Hindmarsh-Rose model, yielding the same conclusions. In order to gain further insight, we also analyzed time-delayed Kuramoto models displaying an overall behavior similar to that observed on the neuron network models. For the Kuramoto models, we were able to derive analytical formulas providing an implicit functional relationship between the mean frequency and the phase synchronization. These formulas suggest a strong dependence between those two measures, which could explain the similarities in shape between the curves.

  11. New Evidence for a Coronal Mass Ejection-driven High Frequency Type II Burst near the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Anshu; Ramesh, R.; Kathiravan, C.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2017-07-01

    We report observations of the high frequency type II radio burst (≈430-30 MHz) that occurred in the solar corona on 2015 November 4. The drift rate of the burst, estimated close to the start frequency of its fundamental component (≈215 MHz), is unusually high (≈2 MHz s-1). Our analysis shows that the estimated speed of the magnetohydrodynamic shock driver of the burst varies with time. The peak speed and acceleration are very large, ≈ 2450 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and ≈ 17 {km} {{{s}}}-2, respectively. There is spatio-temporal correlation between the type II burst and the associated coronal mass ejection (CME) in the whitelight and extreme-ultraviolet images. The time profile of the shock speed and the light curve of the associated soft X-ray flare correlate well. These results indicate that in the present case, (i) the magnetohydrodynamic shock responsible for the high frequency coronal type II burst is driven by the CME and (ii) the time profile of the type II burst shock speed represents the near-Sun kinematics of the CME.

  12. Cosine Directional Tuning of Theta Cell Burst Frequencies: Evidence for Spatial Coding by Oscillatory Interference

    PubMed Central

    Welday, Adam C.; Shlifer, I. Gary; Bloom, Matthew L.; Zhang, Kechen

    2011-01-01

    The rodent septohippocampal system contains “theta cells,” which burst rhythmically at 4–12 Hz, but the functional significance of this rhythm remains poorly understood (Buzsáki, 2006). Theta rhythm commonly modulates the spike trains of spatially tuned neurons such as place (O'Keefe and Dostrovsky, 1971), head direction (Tsanov et al., 2011a), grid (Hafting et al., 2005), and border cells (Savelli et al., 2008; Solstad et al., 2008). An “oscillatory interference” theory has hypothesized that some of these spatially tuned neurons may derive their positional firing from phase interference among theta oscillations with frequencies that are modulated by the speed and direction of translational movements (Burgess et al., 2005, 2007). This theory is supported by studies reporting modulation of theta frequency by movement speed (Rivas et al., 1996; Geisler et al., 2007; Jeewajee et al., 2008a), but modulation of theta frequency by movement direction has never been observed. Here we recorded theta cells from hippocampus, medial septum, and anterior thalamus of freely behaving rats. Theta cell burst frequencies varied as the cosine of the rat's movement direction, and this directional tuning was influenced by landmark cues, in agreement with predictions of the oscillatory interference theory. Computer simulations and mathematical analysis demonstrated how a postsynaptic neuron can detect location-dependent synchrony among inputs from such theta cells, and thereby mimic the spatial tuning properties of place, grid, or border cells. These results suggest that theta cells may serve a high-level computational function by encoding a basis set of oscillatory signals that interfere with one another to synthesize spatial memory representations. PMID:22072668

  13. HIV promoter integration site primarily modulates transcriptional burst size rather than frequency.

    PubMed

    Skupsky, Ron; Burnett, John C; Foley, Jonathan E; Schaffer, David V; Arkin, Adam P

    2010-09-30

    Mammalian gene expression patterns, and their variability across populations of cells, are regulated by factors specific to each gene in concert with its surrounding cellular and genomic environment. Lentiviruses such as HIV integrate their genomes into semi-random genomic locations in the cells they infect, and the resulting viral gene expression provides a natural system to dissect the contributions of genomic environment to transcriptional regulation. Previously, we showed that expression heterogeneity and its modulation by specific host factors at HIV integration sites are key determinants of infected-cell fate and a possible source of latent infections. Here, we assess the integration context dependence of expression heterogeneity from diverse single integrations of a HIV-promoter/GFP-reporter cassette in Jurkat T-cells. Systematically fitting a stochastic model of gene expression to our data reveals an underlying transcriptional dynamic, by which multiple transcripts are produced during short, infrequent bursts, that quantitatively accounts for the wide, highly skewed protein expression distributions observed in each of our clonal cell populations. Interestingly, we find that the size of transcriptional bursts is the primary systematic covariate over integration sites, varying from a few to tens of transcripts across integration sites, and correlating well with mean expression. In contrast, burst frequencies are scattered about a typical value of several per cell-division time and demonstrate little correlation with the clonal means. This pattern of modulation generates consistently noisy distributions over the sampled integration positions, with large expression variability relative to the mean maintained even for the most productive integrations, and could contribute to specifying heterogeneous, integration-site-dependent viral production patterns in HIV-infected cells. Genomic environment thus emerges as a significant control parameter for gene expression

  14. Ion Acoustic Wave Frequencies and Onset Times During Type 3 Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Conflicting interpretations exist for the low-frequency ion acoustic (S) waves often observed by ISEE 3 in association with intense Langmuir (L) waves in the source regions of type III solar radio bursts near 1 AU. Two indirect lines of observational evidence, as well as plasma theory, suggest they are produced by the electrostatic (ES) decay L yields L(PRIME) + S. However, contrary to theoretical predictions, an existing analysis of the wave frequencies instead favors the electromagnetic (EM) decays L yields T + S, where T denotes an EM wave near the plasma frequency. This conflict is addressed here by comparing the observed wave frequencies and onset times with theoretical predictions for the ES and EM decays, calculated using the time-variable electron beam and magnetic field orientation data, rather than the nominal values used previously. Field orientation effects and beam speed variations are shown analytically to produce factor-of-three effects, greater than the difference in wave frequencies predicted for the ES and EM decays; effects of similar magnitude occur in the events analyzed here. The S-wave signals are extracted by hand from a sawtooth noise background, greatly improving the association between S waves and intense L waves. Very good agreement exists between the time-varying predictions for the ES decay and the frequencies of most (but not all) wave bursts. The waves occur only after the ES decay becomes kinematically allowed, which is consistent with the ES decay proceeding and producing most of the observed signals. Good agreement exists between the EM decay's predictions and a significant fraction of the S-wave observations while the EM decay is kinematically allowed. The wave data are not consistent, however, with the EM decay being the dominant nonlinear process. Often the observed waves are sufficiently broadband to overlap simultaneously the frequency ranges predicted for the ES and EM decays. Coupling the dominance of the ES decay with this

  15. Ion Acoustic Wave Frequencies and Onset Times During Type 3 Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Conflicting interpretations exist for the low-frequency ion acoustic (S) waves often observed by ISEE 3 in association with intense Langmuir (L) waves in the source regions of type III solar radio bursts near 1 AU. Two indirect lines of observational evidence, as well as plasma theory, suggest they are produced by the electrostatic (ES) decay L yields L(PRIME) + S. However, contrary to theoretical predictions, an existing analysis of the wave frequencies instead favors the electromagnetic (EM) decays L yields T + S, where T denotes an EM wave near the plasma frequency. This conflict is addressed here by comparing the observed wave frequencies and onset times with theoretical predictions for the ES and EM decays, calculated using the time-variable electron beam and magnetic field orientation data, rather than the nominal values used previously. Field orientation effects and beam speed variations are shown analytically to produce factor-of-three effects, greater than the difference in wave frequencies predicted for the ES and EM decays; effects of similar magnitude occur in the events analyzed here. The S-wave signals are extracted by hand from a sawtooth noise background, greatly improving the association between S waves and intense L waves. Very good agreement exists between the time-varying predictions for the ES decay and the frequencies of most (but not all) wave bursts. The waves occur only after the ES decay becomes kinematically allowed, which is consistent with the ES decay proceeding and producing most of the observed signals. Good agreement exists between the EM decay's predictions and a significant fraction of the S-wave observations while the EM decay is kinematically allowed. The wave data are not consistent, however, with the EM decay being the dominant nonlinear process. Often the observed waves are sufficiently broadband to overlap simultaneously the frequency ranges predicted for the ES and EM decays. Coupling the dominance of the ES decay with this

  16. FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF POLARIZATION OF ZEBRA PATTERN IN TYPE-IV SOLAR RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneda, Kazutaka; Misawa, H.; Tsuchiya, F.; Obara, T.; Iwai, K.

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the polarization characteristics of a zebra pattern (ZP) in a type-IV solar radio burst observed with AMATERAS on 2011 June 21 for the purpose of evaluating the generation processes of ZPs. Analyzing highly resolved spectral and polarization data revealed the frequency dependence of the degree of circular polarization and the delay between two polarized components for the first time. The degree of circular polarization was 50%–70% right-handed and it varied little as a function of frequency. Cross-correlation analysis determined that the left-handed circularly polarized component was delayed by 50–70 ms relative to the right-handed component over the entire frequency range of the ZP and this delay increased with the frequency. We examined the obtained polarization characteristics by using pre-existing ZP models and concluded that the ZP was generated by the double-plasma-resonance process. Our results suggest that the ZP emission was originally generated in a completely polarized state in the O-mode and was partly converted into the X-mode near the source. Subsequently, the difference between the group velocities of the O-mode and X-mode caused the temporal delay.

  17. Solar Radio Burst Data Processing of CALLISTO and Frequency Drift Rate Determination of Solar Radio Burst Detected by CALLISTO Network in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batubara, M.; Manik, T.; Suryana, R.; Lathif, M.; Sitompul, P.; Zamzam, M.; Mumtahana, F.

    2017-03-01

    Space Science Center of Indonesian Institute of Aeronautics and Space called LAPAN has installed several solar radio receivers named CALLISTO in various parts of Indonesia. The equipment has made some solar radio observational data which is indicate solar radio burst since its operation. All of the observational data stored in the file format of Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) which is the raw data. Therefore, it is required a such kind of related data processing to produce a data that can be used for further research. In this paper will discuss how the observational data of CALLISTO could be generated included the information of data format, CALLISTO data processing techniques used in these activities as well as some of the data processing based on data indicating solar radio bursts. As the results, a map of solar radio spectrum as spectrograph profiles and some determinations of frequency drift base on the data will also be discussed in this paper.

  18. Relationship between low and high frequencies in the \\delta Scuti star KIC 9764965

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostopchina, A.; Breger, M.

    2014-10-01

    Two years of Kepler spacecraft data of the \\delta Sct/\\gamma Dor star KIC 9764965 revealed 67 statistically significant frequencies from 0.45 to 59.17 c d-1 (0.005 to 0.685 mHz). The 19 low frequencies do not show equidistant period spacing predicted for gravity modes of successive radial order. We note a favored frequency spacing of 2.053 c d-1 that appears in both the low-frequency (gravity mode) region and high-frequency (pressure mode) regions. The value of this frequency spacing also occurs as a dominant low frequency and in a high-frequency triplet. A peak at exactly twice the value of the 2.053 c d-1 mode is shown not to be a Fourier harmonic of the low-frequency peak due to a different amplitude variability. This behavior is also seen in other \\delta Sct stars. The test for resonant mode coupling between low and high frequencies could not be carried out due to the small amplitudes of the peaks, making it difficult to separate the parent and child modes.

  19. Mitigation of impedance changes due to electroporation therapy using bursts of high-frequency bipolar pulses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background For electroporation-based therapies, accurate modeling of the electric field distribution within the target tissue is important for predicting the treatment volume. In response to conventional, unipolar pulses, the electrical impedance of a tissue varies as a function of the local electric field, leading to a redistribution of the field. These dynamic impedance changes, which depend on the tissue type and the applied electric field, need to be quantified a priori, making mathematical modeling complicated. Here, it is shown that the impedance changes during high-frequency, bipolar electroporation therapy are reduced, and the electric field distribution can be approximated using the analytical solution to Laplace's equation that is valid for a homogeneous medium of constant conductivity. Methods Two methods were used to examine the agreement between the analytical solution to Laplace's equation and the electric fields generated by 100 µs unipolar pulses and bursts of 1 µs bipolar pulses. First, pulses were applied to potato tuber tissue while an infrared camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution in real-time as a corollary to the electric field distribution. The analytical solution was overlaid on the thermal images for a qualitative assessment of the electric fields. Second, potato ablations were performed and the lesion size was measured along the x- and y-axes. These values were compared to the analytical solution to quantify its ability to predict treatment outcomes. To analyze the dynamic impedance changes due to electroporation at different frequencies, electrical impedance measurements (1 Hz to 1 MHz) were made before and after the treatment of potato tissue. Results For high-frequency bipolar burst treatment, the thermal images closely mirrored the constant electric field contours. The potato tissue lesions differed from the analytical solution by 39.7 ± 1.3 % (x-axis) and 6.87 ± 6.26 % (y-axis) for conventional unipolar pulses

  20. Mitigation of impedance changes due to electroporation therapy using bursts of high-frequency bipolar pulses.

    PubMed

    Bhonsle, Suyashree P; Arena, Christopher B; Sweeney, Daniel C; Davalos, Rafael V

    2015-01-01

    For electroporation-based therapies, accurate modeling of the electric field distribution within the target tissue is important for predicting the treatment volume. In response to conventional, unipolar pulses, the electrical impedance of a tissue varies as a function of the local electric field, leading to a redistribution of the field. These dynamic impedance changes, which depend on the tissue type and the applied electric field, need to be quantified a priori, making mathematical modeling complicated. Here, it is shown that the impedance changes during high-frequency, bipolar electroporation therapy are reduced, and the electric field distribution can be approximated using the analytical solution to Laplace's equation that is valid for a homogeneous medium of constant conductivity. Two methods were used to examine the agreement between the analytical solution to Laplace's equation and the electric fields generated by 100 µs unipolar pulses and bursts of 1 µs bipolar pulses. First, pulses were applied to potato tuber tissue while an infrared camera was used to monitor the temperature distribution in real-time as a corollary to the electric field distribution. The analytical solution was overlaid on the thermal images for a qualitative assessment of the electric fields. Second, potato ablations were performed and the lesion size was measured along the x- and y-axes. These values were compared to the analytical solution to quantify its ability to predict treatment outcomes. To analyze the dynamic impedance changes due to electroporation at different frequencies, electrical impedance measurements (1 Hz to 1 MHz) were made before and after the treatment of potato tissue. For high-frequency bipolar burst treatment, the thermal images closely mirrored the constant electric field contours. The potato tissue lesions differed from the analytical solution by 39.7 ± 1.3 % (x-axis) and 6.87 ± 6.26 % (y-axis) for conventional unipolar pulses, and 15.46 ± 1.37 % (x

  1. Dispersion by pulsars, magnetars, fast radio bursts and massive electromagnetism at very low radio frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentum, Mark J.; Bonetti, Luca; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of the universe relies mostly on electromagnetism. As photons are the messengers, fundamental physics is concerned in testing their properties. Photon mass upper limits have been earlier set through pulsar observations, but new investigations are offered by the excess of dispersion measure (DM), sometimes observed with pulsar and magnetar data at low frequencies, or with the fast radio bursts (FRBs), of yet unknown origin. Arguments for the excess of DM do not reach a consensus, but are not mutually exclusive. Thus, we remind that for massive electromagnetism, dispersion goes as the inverse of the frequency squared. Thereby, new avenues are offered also by the recently operating ground observatories in 10-80 MHz domain and by the proposed Orbiting Low Frequency Antennas for Radio astronomy (OLFAR). The latter acts as a large aperture dish by employing a swarm of nano-satellites observing the sky for the first time in the 0.1-15 MHz spectrum. The swarm must be deployed sufficiently away from the ionosphere to avoid distorsions from terrestrial interference, especially during solar maxima, and offer stable conditions for calibration during observations.

  2. Improved dichotomous search frequency offset estimator for burst-mode continuous phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Wen-Chao; Li, Zan; Si, Jiang-Bo; Bai, Jun

    2015-11-01

    A data-aided technique for carrier frequency offset estimation with continuous phase modulation (CPM) in burst-mode transmission is presented. The proposed technique first exploits a special pilot sequence, or training sequence, to form a sinusoidal waveform. Then, an improved dichotomous search frequency offset estimator is introduced to determine the frequency offset using the sinusoid. Theoretical analysis and simulation results indicate that our estimator is noteworthy in the following aspects. First, the estimator can operate independently of timing recovery. Second, it has relatively low outlier, i.e., the minimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) required to guarantee estimation accuracy. Finally, the most important property is that our estimator is complexity-reduced compared to the existing dichotomous search methods: it eliminates the need for fast Fourier transform (FFT) and modulation removal, and exhibits faster convergence rate without accuracy degradation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61301179), the Doctorial Programs Foundation of the Ministry of Education, China (Grant No. 20110203110011), and the Programme of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Universities, China (Grant No. B08038).

  3. Flare stars and solar bursts - High resolution in time and frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, K. R.

    1986-01-01

    Coronal loops on the sun and nearby stars are studied using observations at 20-cm wavelength with high resolution in time and frequency. Observations of the dwarf M star AD Leonis with high time resolution led to the discovery of a quasi-periodic train of circularly polarized spikes with a mean periodicity of 32 + or - 5 ms and a total duration of 150 ms. Observations at closely spaced wavelengths using the VLA revealed a narrow-band structure in solar bursts and in the slowly varying radiation of the dwarf M star YZ Canis Minoris. This narrow-band emission may be attributed to electron-cyclotron maser radiation. Maser action at the second or first harmonic of the gyrofrequency implies magnetic field strengths of 250 and 500 G, respectively. Hence, observations with high resolution in time and frequency suggest coherent processs in the coronas of the sun and dwarf M stars. It is noted that the scientific potential suggested by the present data can be realized by the development of a solar-stellar synthesis radiotelescope. This instrument would be dedicated to solar and stellar observations with high angular, temporal, and frequency resolution.

  4. Quadri-Pulse Theta Burst Stimulation using Ultra-High Frequency Bursts – A New Protocol to Induce Changes in Cortico-Spinal Excitability in Human Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Nikolai H.; Gleich, Bernhard; Gattinger, Norbert; Hoess, Catrina; Haug, Carolin; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Mall, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Patterned transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) such as theta burst stimulation (TBS) or quadri-pulse stimulation (QPS) can induce changes in cortico-spinal excitability, commonly referred to as long-term potentiation (LTP)-like and long-term depression (LTD)-like effects in human motor cortex (M1). Here, we aimed to test the plasticity-inducing capabilities of a novel protocol that merged TBS and QPS. 360 bursts of quadri-pulse TBS (qTBS) were continuously given to M1 at 90% of active motor threshold (1440 full-sine pulses). In a first experiment, stimulation frequency of each burst was set to 666 Hz to mimic the rhythmicity of the descending cortico-spinal volleys that are elicited by TMS (i.e., I-wave periodicity). In a second experiment, burst frequency was set to 200 Hz to maximize postsynaptic Ca2+ influx using a temporal pattern unrelated to I-wave periodicity. The second phase of sinusoidal TMS pulses elicited either a posterior-anterior (PA) or anterior-posterior (AP) directed current in M1. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded before and after qTBS to probe changes in cortico-spinal excitability. PA-qTBS at 666 Hz caused a decrease in PA-MEP amplitudes, whereas AP-qTBS at 666 Hz induced an increase in mean AP-MEP amplitudes. At a burst frequency of 200 Hz, PA-qTBS and AP-qTBS produced an increase in cortico-spinal excitability outlasting for at least 60 minutes in PA- and AP-MEP amplitudes, respectively. Continuous qTBS at 666 Hz or 200 Hz can induce lasting changes in cortico-spinal excitability. Induced current direction in the brain appears to be relevant when qTBS targets I-wave periodicity, corroborating that high-fidelity spike timing mechanisms are critical for inducing bi-directional plasticity in human M1. PMID:27977758

  5. Frequency of the CCR5-delta 32 chemokine receptor gene mutation in the Lebanese population.

    PubMed

    Karam, W; Jurjus, R; Khoury, N; Khansa, H; Assad, C; Zalloua, P; Jurjus, A

    2004-01-01

    A direct correlation between HIV infection and mutation in the chemokine receptor (CCR5) gene has been established. However, such correlation has never been investigated in Lebanon. We report the frequency of the CCR5-delta 32 mutation in a random sample of 209 healthy, HIV-1 seronegative Lebanese aged 19-68. Overall, 4.8% were heterozygous for the mutation. Homozygosity was absent from our sample. The frequency for the CCR5-delta 32 allele was 2.5%. Distribution of the mutation was unaffected by sex, age, religion or educational level. The frequency in the Lebanese population is consistent with that in the origin of the mutation in northern Europe. This could be attributed to a gene flow into the Middle East from northern Europe.

  6. Astrophysically motivated time frequency clustering for burst gravitational wave search: application to TAMA300 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Ryota; Yamagishi, Shougo; Kanda, Nobuyuki; TAMA Collaboration

    2008-09-01

    We have developed a method of 'time frequency (TF) clustering' to find burst gravitational waves for TAMA data analysis. The TF clustering method on the sonogram (spectrogram) shows some characteristics of short-duration signals. Burst gravitational waveforms from stellar-core collapse of supernovae that are predicted by Dimmelmeier et al [1, 2] (DFM waveforms) have short durations on the order of 10 ms and have a large spike and ringing tail in time series. On the other hand, typical detector instrumental noise transients of the same timescale have different waveforms as like as simpler spikes. Since the numerically predicted waveforms may not be reliable given conditions and model dependency, using one search algorithm is not robust to differentiate gravitational waves from instrumental noises. Our proposal for performing the separation is to compare many parameters of the cluster that represent the signal waveform. This approach will be useful for cases when the difference between gravitational waves and noise is not clear for one parameter. We employ TF clustering to represent the waveform characteristics. We calculated the parameters of each respective cluster, such as the magnitude and the Nth momentum around the center of a power distribution of the cluster. Using these parameters, we can efficiently identify some predicted gravitational waveforms and can exclude the TAMA detector's typical unstable spike-like noises due to the instruments. Our selection criteria for TF cluster shape parameters achieved an average efficiency of roughly 50% for injected DFM waveforms of h_rss\\sim 2 \\times 10^{-20}\\; {Hz^{-1/2}} (source distance of 350 pc) with false alarm rate of ~1 Hz. In addition, the false alarm rate for larger noises, such as SNR > 100, is improved 10-fold by applying the selection criteria for TF cluster parameters.

  7. DNA in nanopores: negative capacitance and delta-relaxation at high frequency.

    PubMed

    Mandal, S K

    2006-05-01

    We measured the high frequency dielectric relaxation behavior of DNA molecules confined in nanopores of polycarbonate membrane. The data revealed the existence of a critical frequency omega(c) approximately GHz at which the ac conductivity showed delta-relaxation. Interestingly, the DNA molecules also exhibited a crossover from positive to negative capacitance corresponding to omega(c). The negative capacitance at the critical frequency suggested a strong inductive behavior of DNA molecules in the high frequency regime. The results are interpreted in terms of the confined geometry of the DNA molecules in the nanopores. The interfacial water H-bonded to DNA played a crucial role in determining the high frequency relaxation of DNA molecules. The results indicated that the DNA in nanopores could be designed for application in high frequency bandpass/notch filters.

  8. High-frequency EEG covaries with spike burst patterns detected in cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Stuart N.; Herz, Andreas V. M.; Curio, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    Invasive microelectrode recordings measure neuronal spikes, which are commonly considered inaccessible through standard surface electroencephalogram (EEG). Yet high-frequency EEG potentials (hf-EEG, f > 400 Hz) found in somatosensory evoked potentials of primates may reflect the mean population spike responses of coactivated cortical neurons. Since cortical responses to electrical nerve stimulation vary strongly from trial to trial, we investigated whether the hf-EEG signal can also echo single-trial variability observed at the single-unit level. We recorded extracellular single-unit activity in the primary somatosensory cortex of behaving macaque monkeys and identified variable spike burst responses following peripheral stimulation. Each of these responses was classified according to the timing of its spike constituents, conforming to one of a discrete set of spike patterns. We here show that these spike patterns are accompanied by variations in the concomitant epidural hf-EEG. These variations cannot be explained by fluctuating stimulus efficacy, suggesting that they were generated within the thalamocortical network. As high-frequency EEG signals can also be reliably recorded from the scalp of human subjects, they may provide a noninvasive window on fluctuating cortical spike activity in humans. PMID:21490283

  9. Low-frequency analog signal distribution on digital photonic networks by optical delta-sigma modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanno, Atsushi; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2013-12-01

    We propose a delta-sigma modulation scheme for low- and medium-frequency signal transmission in a digital photonic network system. A 10-Gb/s-class optical transceiver with a delta-sigma modulator utilized as a high-speed analog-to-digital converter (ADC) provides a binary optical signal. On the signal reception side, a low-cost and slow-speed photonic receiver directly converts the binary signal into an analog signal at frequencies from several hundreds of kilohertz several tens of megahertz. Further, by using a clock and data recovery circuit at the receiver to reduce jitters, the single-sideband phase noise of the generated signals can be significantly reduced.

  10. Single-Bit All-Digital Frequency Synthesis Using Homodyne Sigma-Delta Modulation.

    PubMed

    Sotiriadis, Paul P

    2017-02-01

    All-digital frequency synthesis using bandpass sigma-delta modulation to achieve spectrally clean single-bit output is presented and mathematically analyzed resulting in a complete model to predict the stability and output spectrum. The quadrature homodyne filter architecture is introduced resulting in efficient implementations of carrier-frequency-centered bandpass filters for the modulator. A multiplierless version of the quadrature homodyne filter architecture is also introduced to reduce complexity while maintaining a clean in-band spectrum. MATLAB and SIMULINK simulation results present the potential capabilities of the synthesizer architectures and validate the accuracy of the developed theoretical framework.

  11. High energy, single frequency, tunable laser source operating in burst mode for space based LIDAR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosentino, Alberto; Mondello, Alessia; Sapia, Adalberto; D'Ottavi, Alessandro; Brotini, Mauro; Nava, Enzo; Stucchi, Emanuele; Trespidi, Franco; Mariottini, Cristina; Wazen, Paul; Falletto, Nicolas; Fruit, Michel

    2004-06-01

    This paper describes the laser transmitter assembly used in the ALADIN instrument currently in C/D development phase for the ESA ADM-AEOLUS mission (EADS Astrium as prime contractor for the satellite and the instrument). The Laser Transmitter Assembly (TXA), based on a diode pumped tripled Nd:YAG laser, is used to generate tunable laser pulses of 150 mJ at a nominal wavelength of 355 nm. This laser is operated in burst mode, with a pulse repetition cycle of 100 Hz. The TXA is composed of the following units: a diode-pumped CW Nd:YAG Laser named Reference Laser Head (RLH), used to inject a diode-pumped, Q-switched, amplified and frequency tripled Nd:YAG Laser working in the third harmonic referred as Power Laser Head (PLH) and a Transmitter Laser Electronics (TLE) containing all the control and power electronics needed for PLH and RLH operation. The TXA is made by an European consortium under the leadership of Galileo Avionica (It), and including CESI (It), Quantel (Fr), TESAT (Ge) and Thales (Fr).

  12. Two-frequency /Delta k/ microwave scatterometer measurements of ocean wave spectra from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Jones, W. L.; Weissman, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for remotely sensing the large-scale gravity wave spectrum on the ocean surface using a two frequency (Delta k) microwave scatterometer has been demonstrated from stationary platforms and proposed from moving platforms. This measurement takes advantage of Bragg type resonance matching between the electromagnetic wavelength at the difference frequency and the length of the large-scale surface waves. A prominent resonance appears in the cross product power spectral density (PSD) of the two backscattered signals. Ku-Band aircraft scatterometer measurements were conducted by NASA in the North Sea during the 1979 Maritime Remote Sensing (MARSEN) experiment. Typical examples of cross product PSD's computed from the MARSEN data are presented. They demonstrate strong resonances whose frequency and bandwidth agree with the surface characteristics and the theory. Directional modulation spectra of the surface reflectivity are compared to the gravity wave spectrum derived from surface truth measurements.

  13. Two-frequency /Delta k/ microwave scatterometer measurements of ocean wave spectra from an aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. W.; Jones, W. L.; Weissman, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for remotely sensing the large-scale gravity wave spectrum on the ocean surface using a two frequency (Delta k) microwave scatterometer has been demonstrated from stationary platforms and proposed from moving platforms. This measurement takes advantage of Bragg type resonance matching between the electromagnetic wavelength at the difference frequency and the length of the large-scale surface waves. A prominent resonance appears in the cross product power spectral density (PSD) of the two backscattered signals. Ku-Band aircraft scatterometer measurements were conducted by NASA in the North Sea during the 1979 Maritime Remote Sensing (MARSEN) experiment. Typical examples of cross product PSD's computed from the MARSEN data are presented. They demonstrate strong resonances whose frequency and bandwidth agree with the surface characteristics and the theory. Directional modulation spectra of the surface reflectivity are compared to the gravity wave spectrum derived from surface truth measurements.

  14. A HIGH-FREQUENCY TYPE II SOLAR RADIO BURST ASSOCIATED WITH THE 2011 FEBRUARY 13 CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, K.-S.; Kim, R.-S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Kwon, R.-Y.; Yashiro, S.

    2013-03-10

    We examine the relationship between the high-frequency (425 MHz) type II radio burst and the associated white-light coronal mass ejection (CME) that occurred on 2011 February 13. The radio burst had a drift rate of 2.5 MHz s{sup -1}, indicating a relatively high shock speed. From SDO/AIA observations we find that a loop-like erupting front sweeps across high-density coronal loops near the start time of the burst (17:34:17 UT). The deduced distance of shock formation (0.06 Rs) from the flare center and speed of the shock (1100 km s{sup -1}) using the measured density from SDO/AIA observations are comparable to the height (0.05 Rs, from the solar surface) and speed (700 km s{sup -1}) of the CME leading edge observed by STEREO/EUVI. We conclude that the type II burst originates even in the low corona (<59 Mm or 0.08 Rs, above the solar surface) due to the fast CME shock passing through high-density loops.

  15. Magnetothermoacoustics from magnetic nanoparticles by short bursting or frequency chirped alternating magnetic field: A theoretical feasibility analysis

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Daqing; Towner, Rheal A.; Smith, Nataliya; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To propose an alternative method of thermoacoustic wave generation based on heating of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) using alternating magnetic field (AMF). Methods: The feasibility of thermoacoustic wave generation from MNPs by applying a short-burst of AMF or a frequency-modulated AMF is theoretically analyzed. As the relaxation of MNPs is strongly dependent upon the amplitude and frequency of AMF, either an amplitude modulated, fixed frequency AMF (termed time-domain AMF) or a frequency modulated, constant amplitude AMF (termed frequency-domain AMF) will result in time-varying heat dissipation from MNPs, which has the potential to generate thermoacoustic waves. Following Rosensweig's model of specific power loss of MNPs in a steady-state AMF, the time-resolved heat dissipations of MNPs of superparamagnetic size when exposed to a short bursting of AMF and/or to a linearly frequency chirped AMF are derived, and the resulted acoustic propagation is presented. Based on experimentally measured temperature-rise characteristics of a superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticle (SPION) matrix in a steady-state AMF of various frequencies, the heat dissipations of the SPION under time-domain and frequency-domain AMF configurations that could have practical utility for thermoacoustic wave generation are estimated. Results: The initial rates of the temperature-rise of the SPION matrix were measured at an iron-weight concentration of 0.8 mg/ml and an AMF frequency of 88.8 kHz to 1.105 MHz. The measured initial rates of temperature-rise were modeled by Rosensweig's theory, and projected to 10 MHz AMF frequency, at which a 1 μs bursting corresponding to a 1.55 mm axial resolution of acoustic detection could contain 10 complete cycles of AMF oscillation and the power dissipation is approximately 84 times of that at 1 MHz. Exposing the SPION matrix to a 1 μs bursting of AMF at 10 MHz frequency and 100 Oe field intensity would produce a volumetric heat dissipation of 7

  16. Frequency Drift Rate Investigation of Solar Radio Burst Type II Due to Coronal Mass Ejections Occurrence on 4th November 2015 Captured by CALLISTO at Sumedang-Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batubara, M.; Manik, T.; Suryana, R.; Lathif, M.; Sitompul, P.; Zamzam, M.; Mumtahana, F.

    2017-03-01

    The formations type of solar radio bursts can be known base on the frequency range that is detected. The CALLISTO system works with a wide band of the frequency making it possible to detect several types of solar burst. Indonesia exactly at Sumedang, CALLISTO system detected the formation of solar radio bursts forms of type II for the first time on 5 November 2014. On the other side, CALLISTO spectrometer detects and traces the phenomenon of CME (Coronal Mass Ejections) which causes the solar radio burst type II occurrence. In this paper will be calculated frequency drift rate during the occurrence of solar radio bursts of type II phenomenon on 4th November 2015 at 03:30 UT. The results of these calculations will be discussed as a related study of drift rate during the phenomenon of burst type II radio bursts associated with CME. The obtained drift rate during the solar radio bursts events above 2.8 MHz / s with low drift rate so that the speed of the CME that occurred only about 790 km / s as shown from LASCO.

  17. Detailed Analysis of the Pulsations During and After Bursts from the Bursting Pulsar (GROJ1744-28)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; vanParadijs, Jan; Koshut, Thomas M.; Finger, Mark H.; Briggs, Michael S.; Fishman, G. J.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    2000-01-01

    The hard X-ray bursts observed during both major outbursts of the Bursting Pulsar (GRO J1744-28) show pulsations near the neutron star spin frequency with an enhanced amplitude relative to that of the persistent emission. Consistent with previous work, we find that the pulsations within bursts lag behind their expected arrival times based upon the persistent pulsar ephemeris. For an ensemble of 1293 bursts recorded with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment, the average burst pulse time delay (DELTA t (sub FWHM)) is 61.0 plus or minus 0.8 ms in the 25 - 50 keV energy range and 72 plus or minus 5 ms in the 50 - 100 keV band. The residual time delay (DELTA t (sub resid)) from 10 to 240 s following the start of the burst is 18.1 plus or minus 0.7 ms (25 - 50 keV). A significant correlation of the average burst time delay with burst peak flux is found. Our results are consistent with the model of the pulse time lags presented by Miller (1996).

  18. Search for high frequency gravitational-wave bursts in the first calendar year of LIGO's fifth science run

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Armor, P.; Aso, Y.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Behnke, B.; Benacquista, M.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummit, A.; Brunet, G.; Bullington, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Caride, S.; Castaldi, G.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, N.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Cokelaer, T.; Colacino, C. N.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R. C.; Cornish, N.; Coward, D.; Coyne, D. C.; di Credico, A.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Culter, R. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Daudert, B.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Debra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; Desalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dueck, J.; Duke, I.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, J. G.; Echols, C.; Edgar, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Faltas, Y.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Finn, L. S.; Flasch, K.; Foley, S.; Forrest, C.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Garofoli, J. A.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grimaldi, F.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G. D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hughey, B.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D. R.; Isogai, T.; Ito, M.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, R.; Khazanov, E.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, H.; Lei, M.; Leindecker, N.; Leonor, I.; Li, C.; Lin, H.; Lindquist, P. E.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lu, P.; Lubiński, M.; Lucianetti, A.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; Macinnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McIntyre, G.; McKechan, D. J. A.; McKenzie, K.; Mehmet, M.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Menéndez, D. F.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miller, J.; Minelli, J.; Mino, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Mohanty, S. D.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moreno, G.; Morioka, T.; Mors, K.; Mossavi, K.; Mowlowry, C.; Mueller, G.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Muhammad, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, H.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murray, P. G.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Numata, K.; O'Dell, J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ochsner, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Perraca, A.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H. J.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Principe, M.; Prix, R.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raics, Z.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Raymond, V.; Reed, C. M.; Reed, T.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Roberts, P.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Röver, C.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J. H.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; de La Jordana, L. Sancho; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Santamaría, L.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Satterthwaite, M.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Scanlan, M.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schulz, B.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sergeev, A.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, N. D.; Somiya, K.; Sorazu, B.; Stein, A.; Stein, L. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stochino, A.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Strigin, S.; Stroeer, A.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K.-X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Szokoly, G. P.; Talukder, D.; Tang, L.; Tanner, D. B.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, J. R.; Taylor, R.; Thacker, J.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thüring, A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Torres, C.; Torrie, C.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Ugolini, D.; Ulmen, J.; Urbanek, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vallisneri, M.; van den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.; Veltkamp, C.; Villadsen, J.; Villar, A.; Vorvick, C.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Waldman, S. J.; Wallace, L.; Ward, R. L.; Weidner, A.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wen, S.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whitcomb, S. E.; Whiting, B. F.; Wilkinson, C.; Willems, P. A.; Williams, H. R.; Williams, L.; Willke, B.; Wilmut, I.; Winkelmann, L.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Woan, G.; Wooley, R.; Worden, J.; Wu, W.; Yakushin, I.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, Z.; Yoshida, S.; Zanolin, M.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zotov, N.; Zucker, M. E.; Zur Mühlen, H.; Zweizig, J.

    2009-11-01

    We present an all-sky search for gravitational waves in the frequency range 1 to 6 kHz during the first calendar year of LIGO’s fifth science run. This is the first untriggered LIGO burst analysis to be conducted above 3 kHz. We discuss the unique properties of interferometric data in this regime. 161.3 days of triple-coincident data were analyzed. No gravitational events above threshold were observed and a frequentist upper limit of 5.4year-1 on the rate of strong gravitational-wave bursts was placed at a 90% confidence level. Implications for specific theoretical models of gravitational-wave emission are also discussed.

  19. Search for high frequency gravitational-wave bursts in the first calendar year of LIGO's fifth science run

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Aso, Y.; Ballmer, S.; Barton, M. A.; Betzwieser, J.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Cannon, K. C.; Cardenas, L.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T.

    2009-11-15

    We present an all-sky search for gravitational waves in the frequency range 1 to 6 kHz during the first calendar year of LIGO's fifth science run. This is the first untriggered LIGO burst analysis to be conducted above 3 kHz. We discuss the unique properties of interferometric data in this regime. 161.3 days of triple-coincident data were analyzed. No gravitational events above threshold were observed and a frequentist upper limit of 5.4 year{sup -1} on the rate of strong gravitational-wave bursts was placed at a 90% confidence level. Implications for specific theoretical models of gravitational-wave emission are also discussed.

  20. Light Echos in Kerr Geometry: A Source of High Frequency QPOs from Random X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukumura, K.; Kazanas, D.

    2008-01-01

    We propose that high frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) can be produced from randomly-formed X-ray bursts (flashes) by plasma interior to the ergosphere of a rapidly-rotating black hole. We show by direct computation of their orbits that the photons comprising the observed X-ray light curves, if due to a multitude of such flashes, are affected significantly by the black hole's dragging of inertial frames; the photons of each such burst arrive to an observer at infinity in multiple (double or triple), distinct 'bunches' separated by a roughly constant time lag of t/M approximately equal to 14, regardless of the bursts' azimuthal position. We argue that every other such 'bunch' represents photons that follow trajectories with an additional orbit around the black hole at the photon circular orbit radius (a photon 'echo'). The presence of this constant lag in the response function of the system leads to a QPO feature in its power density spectra, even though the corresponding light curve consists of a totally stochastic signal. This effect is by and large due to the black hole spin and is shown to gradually diminish as the spin parameter a decreases or the radial position of the burst moves outside the static limit surface (ergosphere). Our calculations indicate that for a black hole with Kerr parameter of a/M=0.99 and mass of M=10*Msun the QPO is expected at a frequency of approximately 1.3-1.4 kHz. We discuss the plausibility and observational implications of our model/results as well as its limitations.

  1. Light Echos in Kerr Geometry: A Source of High Frequency QPOs from Random X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukumura, K.; Kazanas, D.

    2008-01-01

    We propose that high frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (HFQPOs) can be produced from randomly-formed X-ray bursts (flashes) by plasma interior to the ergosphere of a rapidly-rotating black hole. We show by direct computation of their orbits that the photons comprising the observed X-ray light curves, if due to a multitude of such flashes, are affected significantly by the black hole's dragging of inertial frames; the photons of each such burst arrive to an observer at infinity in multiple (double or triple), distinct 'bunches' separated by a roughly constant time lag of t/M approximately equal to 14, regardless of the bursts' azimuthal position. We argue that every other such 'bunch' represents photons that follow trajectories with an additional orbit around the black hole at the photon circular orbit radius (a photon 'echo'). The presence of this constant lag in the response function of the system leads to a QPO feature in its power density spectra, even though the corresponding light curve consists of a totally stochastic signal. This effect is by and large due to the black hole spin and is shown to gradually diminish as the spin parameter a decreases or the radial position of the burst moves outside the static limit surface (ergosphere). Our calculations indicate that for a black hole with Kerr parameter of a/M=0.99 and mass of M=10*Msun the QPO is expected at a frequency of approximately 1.3-1.4 kHz. We discuss the plausibility and observational implications of our model/results as well as its limitations.

  2. Evidence for Harmonic Content and Frequency Evolution of Oscillations During the Rising Phase of X-ray Bursts From 4U 1636-536

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bgattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, E.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a study of the evolution of burst oscillation properties during the rising phase of X-ray bursts from 4U 1636-536 observed with the proportional counter array (PCA) on board the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) . We present evidence for significant harmonic structure of burst oscillation pulses during the early rising phases of bursts. This is the first such detection in burst rise oscillations, and is very important for constraining neutron star structure parameters and the equation of state models of matter at the core of a neutron star. The detection of harmonic content only during the initial portions of the burst rise is consistent with the theoretical expectation that with time the thermonuclear burning region becomes larger, and hence the fundamental and harmonic amplitudes both diminish. We also find, for the first time from this source, strong evidence of oscillation frequency increase during the burst rise. The timing behavior of harmonic content, amplitude, and frequency of burst rise oscillations may be important in understanding the spreading of thermonuclear flames under the extreme physical conditions on neutron star surfaces.

  3. EEG synchronization characteristics of functional connectivity and complex network properties of memory maintenance in the delta and theta frequency bands.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Brigitta; Boha, Roland; Pósfai, Márton; Gaál, Zsófia Anna; Kónya, Anikó; Stam, Cornelis Jan; Molnár, Márk

    2012-03-01

    Task-dependent changes of nonlinear-linear synchronization features and graph theoretical properties of the delta and theta frequencies were analyzed in the present EEG study that were related to episodic memory maintenance processes. Synchronization was found to increase with respect to both the delta and theta bands within the frontal and parietal areas and also between these regions. Results of graph theoretical analysis indicated a task-related shift towards small-world network topology in the theta band.

  4. Direction of Arrival Measurements of Auroral Medium Frequency Burst Radio Emissions at Toolik Lake, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunch, N. L.; Labelle, J. W.; Hughes, J. M.; Weatherwax, A. T.; Ye, S.; Lummerzheim, D.

    2007-12-01

    MF burst is an impulsive radio emission of auroral origin detected by ground-based instruments approximately between 1,300 and 3,700 kHz, and associated with substorm onsets. Its exact generation mechanism is unknown, though it has been speculated that it arises from mode conversion radiation. To discover the generation mechanism and the relation of MF burst to auroral processes, Dartmouth has deployed radio interferometers in Alaska, Northern Canada, Greenland, and Antarctica, including a three-element interferometer deployed at Toolik Lake Field Station in Alaska in 2006. This instrument measured spectra, amplitudes, and directions of arrival (DOA's) of over 47 MF burst events occurring between November 30, 2006 and May 26, 2007. These represent the first DOA measurements ever reported for the impulsive MF burst phenomenon. Preliminary analysis shows that the events originated from a wide range of directions in the sky, with all azimuths represented in the distribution of DOA's. The DOA of each individual event is well-defined, however. Many events show apparent motion, with southward motions more common than northward among the subset of events analyzed so far. Some of the events were detected simultaneously on an interferometer deployed at Kaktovik, Alaska, 400 km away. The all-sky imager at Toolik Lake was also operational for some events. Further analysis of these data promises to reveal first information about the locations and motions of MF burst sources, a first step towards discovering the generation mechanism of this mysterious radio emission and its relation to auroral processes.

  5. Delta-sarcoglycan gene polymorphism frequency in Amerindian and Mestizo populations of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez-Razo, Rosa María; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Peñaloza, Rosenda; Minauro-Sanmiguel, Fernando; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Canto, Patricia; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio

    2010-04-01

    Mutations on the delta-sarcoglycan gene have been associated with the development of both hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy. Recently, the polymorphism c.-94C>G was associated with HCM in Japanese patients. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency of c.-94C>G polymorphism in Mexican-Amerindian and Mexican-Mestizo populations. We analyzed the frequency of this polymorphism in 165 Mexican-Amerindian individuals (23 Triquis, 25 Zapotecos, 24 Mayas, 41 Nahuas, and 52 Mixtecos) and 100 unrelated Mexican-Mestizos. Allele frequencies were similar in all Amerindian groups (0.33 Triquis, 0.54 Zapotecos, 0.54 Mayas, 0.46 Nahuas, and 0.49 Mixtecos). When compared with Mexican-Mestizos, only Triquis were different (p = 0.00742). However, when comparing the total sample of the Amerindian population with the Mestizos, the difference was not significant (p = 0.12225). Allele frequencies of Mexican populations were higher than in Asians and less than African and European populations (p < 0.05). These data show that the distribution of the C allele is higher in Mexican populations studied and consequently it is necessary to define if this may be associated with genetic susceptibility for HCM in the Mexican patients.

  6. Frequency analysis of the delta32ccr5 HIV resistance allele in a medieval plague mass grave.

    PubMed

    Kremeyer, Barbara; Hummel, Susanne; Herrmann, Bernd

    2005-03-01

    The 32 basepair deletion in the gene for the human chemokine receptor CCR5 (delta32ccr5) conferring resistance against HIV-1 infection is present in Caucasian populations. The mutant allele is believed to have originated by a single mutational event in historic times and to have reached its present population frequency of an average 10 % in Europe through selective pressure by a pathogenic agent. Because of their great impact on European populations, the medieval Plague epidemics have been considered as a possible candidate. To test this hypothesis, we studied the delta32ccr5-frequency in 35 individuals from a mass grave containing victims of the 14th century Plague pandemic in Lübeck, Northern Germany, and compared them to the frequency in a control group from the same burial site, dating from the time before the first Plague pandemic. If the delta32ccr5 allele conferred an at least partial resistance against the medieval Plague, its frequency would be expected to be lower in those that died in the pandemic, than it was in the local population before the arrival of the Plague. The CCR5 locus could be typed successfully for 14 Plague victims and for 20 individuals from the medieval control group. We found a delta32ccr5 allelic frequency of 14.2% and 12.5%, respectively. The difference between these figures is not statistically significant. Furthermore, they are comparable to the delta32ccr5 frequency for nowadays Northern Europe. We therefore conclude that the medieval Plague pandemic has not contributed to an increase in the allelic frequency of the mutant delta32ccr5 allele and that, if there has been a positive selection of this allele, it is likely to have occurred before the 14th century and thus before the arrival of the Plague in Europe.

  7. Quantification of cell membrane permeability induced by monopolar and high-frequency bipolar bursts of electrical pulses.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Daniel C; Reberšek, Matej; Dermol, Janja; Rems, Lea; Miklavčič, Damijan; Davalos, Rafael V

    2016-11-01

    High-frequency bipolar electric pulses have been shown to mitigate undesirable muscle contraction during irreversible electroporation (IRE) therapy. Here, we evaluate the potential applicability of such pulses for introducing exogenous molecules into cells, such as in electrochemotherapy (ECT). For this purpose we develop a method for calculating the time course of the effective permeability of an electroporated cell membrane based on real-time imaging of propidium transport into single cells that allows a quantitative comparison between different pulsing schemes. We calculate the effective permeability for several pulsed electric field treatments including trains of 100μs monopolar pulses, conventionally used in IRE and ECT, and pulse trains containing bursts or evenly-spaced 1μs bipolar pulses. We show that shorter bipolar pulses induce lower effective membrane permeability than longer monopolar pulses with equivalent treatment times. This lower efficiency can be attributed to incomplete membrane charging. Nevertheless, bipolar pulses could be used for increasing the uptake of small molecules into cells more symmetrically, but at the expense of higher applied voltages. These data indicate that high-frequency bipolar bursts of electrical pulses may be designed to electroporate cells as effectively as and more homogeneously than conventional monopolar pulses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A new class of solar burst with MM-wave emission but only at the highest frequency (90 GHz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J. E. R.; Vaz, A. M. Z.; Dennis, B. R.

    1984-01-01

    High sensitivity and high time resolution solar observations at 90 GHz (lambda = 3.3 mm) have identified a unique impulsive burst on May 21, 1984 with emission that was more intense at this frequency than at lower frequencies. The first major time structure of the burst was over 10 times more intense at 90 GHz than at 30 GHz, 7 GHz, or 2.8 GHz.Only 6 seconds later, the 30 GHz impulsive structures started to be observed but still with lower intensity than at 90 GHz. Hard X-ray time structures at energies above 25 keV were almost identical to the 90 GHZ structures (to better than one second). All 90 GHz major time structures consisted of trains of multiple subsecond pulses with rise times as short as 0.03 sec and amplitudes large compared to the mean flux. When detectable, the 30 GHz subsecond pulses had smaller relative amplitude and were in phase with the corresponding 90 GHz pulses.

  9. [The effect of anesthetic concentration on burst-suppression of the EEG in rats].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dandan; Jia, Xiaofeng; Ding, Haiyan

    2012-04-01

    The term "burst-suppression" is used to describe the electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern characterized by theta or delta waves, at times intermixed with faster waves, and intervening periods of relative quiescence. Burst-suppression pattern can reflect the seriously suppressed brain activity under deep anesthesia. To investigate the relationship between burst-suppression features and anesthetic concentration, we adopted four straightforward indexes, i. e., burst-suppression ratio (BSR), burst frequency, burst amplitude and suppression amplitude, and used them to analyze the EEG recordings in ten isoflurane-anesthetized rats. It was found that all the four burst-suppression indexes changed along with anesthetic concentration, that BSR and burst amplitude increased with higher concentration of isoflurane while burst frequency and suppression amplitude decreased, and that BSR was the most sensitive and consistent measurement to indicate isoflurane concentration so it constituted a valuable tool for timely evaluation of burst-suppression feature under deep anesthesia. The result also showed that the composition of carrier gas (i. e. pure oxygen vs. mixed oxygen) did not influence the effect of anesthesia significantly; and the four indexes of burst-suppression features could keep relatively stable within 60 min under the isoflurane concentration of 2%. The present study provides quantitative information of burst-suppression features under different anesthetic depth and may help to develop a clinically satisfied system that could quantify the characteristics of EEG and rigorously evaluate the cerebral state of patients.

  10. Gamma-ray burst constraints on the galactic frequency of extrasolar Oort Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Stern, S. Alan

    1995-01-01

    With the strong Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory/Burst and Transient Source Experiment (CGRO/BATSE) evidence that most gamma-ray bursts do not come from galactic neutron stars, models involving the accretion of a comet onto a neutron star (NS) no longer appear to be strong contenders for explaining the majority of bursts. If this is the case, then it is worth asking whether the lack of an observed galactic gamma-ray burst population provides a useful constraint on the number of comets and comet clouds in the galaxy. Owing to the previously unrecognized structural weakness of cometary nuclei, we find the capture cross sections for comet-NS events to be much higher than previously published estimates, with tidal breakup at distances R(sub b) approx. equals 4 x 10(exp 10) cm from the NS. As a result, impacts of comets onto field NSs penetrating the Oort Clouds of other stars are found to dominate all other galactic NS-comet capture rates by a factor of 100. This in turn predicts that if comet clouds are common, there should be a significant population of repeater sources with (1) a galactic distribution, (2) space-correlated repetition, and (3) a wide range of peak luminosities and luminosity time histories. If all main sequence stars have Oort Clouds like our own, we predict approximately 4000 such repeater sources in the Milky Way at any time, each repeating on time scales of months to years. Based on estimates of the sensitivity of the CGRO/BATSE instrument and assuming isotropic gamma-ray beaming from such events, we estimate that a population of approximately 20-200 of these galactic NS-Oort Cloud gamma-ray repeater sources should be detectable by CGRO. In addition, if giant planet formation is common in the galaxy, we estimate that the accretion of isolated comets injected to the interstellar medium by giant planet formation should produce an additional source of galactic, nonrepeating, events. Comparing these estimates to the 3-4 soft gamma-ray repeater sources

  11. Structure of proton centers and associated nonthermal bursts at microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enome, S.; Tanaka, H.

    1973-01-01

    A very broad band of electromagnetic radiation is emitted during solar flares, especially at the explosive phase. The existence of a large variety of plasmas with various densities and a wide range of temperatures or energies is proposed as the initiating agent. The manner in which the plasmas are heated and accelerated to subrelativistic and relativistic energies is discussed. Observational evidence on the characteristics of active regions which produced proton flares and on the structure of the associated nonthermal microwave bursts of the sun is presented. The behavior of subrelativistic electrons on the sun is described.

  12. High Frequency Burst Firing of Granule Cells Ensures Transmission at the Parallel Fiber to Purkinje Cell Synapse at the Cost of Temporal Coding

    PubMed Central

    van Beugen, Boeke J.; Gao, Zhenyu; Boele, Henk-Jan; Hoebeek, Freek; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cells (GrCs) convey information from mossy fibers (MFs) to Purkinje cells (PCs) via their parallel fibers (PFs). MF to GrC signaling allows transmission of frequencies up to 1 kHz and GrCs themselves can also fire bursts of action potentials with instantaneous frequencies up to 1 kHz. So far, in the scientific literature no evidence has been shown that these high-frequency bursts also exist in awake, behaving animals. More so, it remains to be shown whether such high-frequency bursts can transmit temporally coded information from MFs to PCs and/or whether these patterns of activity contribute to the spatiotemporal filtering properties of the GrC layer. Here, we show that, upon sensory stimulation in both un-anesthetized rabbits and mice, GrCs can show bursts that consist of tens of spikes at instantaneous frequencies over 800 Hz. In vitro recordings from individual GrC-PC pairs following high-frequency stimulation revealed an overall low initial release probability of ~0.17. Nevertheless, high-frequency burst activity induced a short-lived facilitation to ensure signaling within the first few spikes, which was rapidly followed by a reduction in transmitter release. The facilitation rate among individual GrC-PC pairs was heterogeneously distributed and could be classified as either “reluctant” or “responsive” according to their release characteristics. Despite the variety of efficacy at individual connections, grouped activity in GrCs resulted in a linear relationship between PC response and PF burst duration at frequencies up to 300 Hz allowing rate coding to persist at the network level. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that the cerebellar granular layer acts as a spatiotemporal filter between MF input and PC output (D’Angelo and De Zeeuw, 2009). PMID:23734102

  13. Increase in nitric oxide and cyclic GMP of rat cerebellum by radio frequency burst-type electromagnetic field radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Miura, M; Takayama, K; Okada, J

    1993-01-01

    1. Using rat cerebellum supernatant, the effects of radio frequency (RF) burst-type electromagnetic (EM) field radiation on the production of cyclic GMP were examined under various conditions. The radiation was generated by a generator coil, and set at a 10 MHz radiation frequency, a 50% burst time, a 10 kHz burst rate and a 5 V peak-to-peak generator voltage. 2. When the cerebellum supernatant was incubated with both exogenous L-arginine (nitric oxide (NO) donor) and NADPH, and irradiated by an RF burst-type EM field, the production of cyclic GMP was increased significantly from a level of 21-22 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1 to 25-26 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1. By contrast, such an effect was not found when the cerebellum supernatant was irradiated by an RF volley-type EM field. 3. When neither L-arginine nor NADPH were added to the cerebellum supernatant, the production of cyclic GMP was lowered to a level of 6 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1 and the radiation effect was not found. When the cerebellum supernatant was chelated with EDTA, the production of cyclic GMP was lowered to a level of 7 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1 and the radiation effect was not found. 4. Incubation with Methylene Blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, lowered the production of cyclic GMP to a level of 10-12 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1, and the radiation effect did not occur. On incubation with a NO synthase inhibitor, either NG-methyl-L-arginine or N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the production of cyclic GMP was lowered to a level of 10-12 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1 or 5-9 nmol min-1 (g tissue)-1 respectively, and the radiation effect was not observed. 5. Using electrochemical NO probes, the production of NO in the cerebellum supernatant was detected. The concentration of NO increased gradually after the onset of the EM field radiation. The radiation effect persisted, and reached a maximum after the cessation of the radiation. 6. In an in vivo study, the arterioles of the frog web were dilated by the radiation

  14. Frequency of the CCR5-delta32 allele in Brazilian populations: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva-Carvalho, Wlisses Henrique Veloso; de Moura, Ronald Rodrigues; Coelho, Antonio Victor Campos; Crovella, Sergio; Guimarães, Rafael Lima

    2016-09-01

    The CCR5 is a chemokine receptor widely expressed by several immune cells that are engaged in inflammatory responses. Some populations have individuals exhibiting a 32bp deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5-delta32) that produces a truncated non-functional protein not expressed on the cell surface. This polymorphism, known to be associated with susceptibility to infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as osteomyelitis, pre-eclampsia, systemic lupus erythematous, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and HIV/AIDS, is more commonly found in European populations with average frequency of 10%. However, it is also possible to observe a significant frequency in other world populations, such as the Brazilian one. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of CCR5-delta32 genetic association studies in Brazilian populations throughout the country to estimate the frequency of this polymorphism. We also compared CCR5-delta32 frequencies across Brazilian regions. The systematic literature reviewed studies involving delta32 allele in Brazilian populations published from 1995 to 2015. Among the reviewed literature, 25 studies including 30 Brazilian populations distributed between the North, Northeast, South and Southeast regions were included in our meta-analysis. We observed an overall allelic frequency of 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), that was considered moderate and, notably, higher than some European populations, such as Cyprus (2.8%), Italy (3%) and Greece (2.4%). Regarding the regional frequency comparisons between North-Northeast (N-NE) and South-Southeast (S-SE) regions, we observed an allelic frequency of 3% (95%-CI, 0.02-0.04) and 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), respectively. The populations from S-SE regions had a slightly higher CCR5-delta32 frequency than N-NE regions (OR=1.41, p=0.002). Although there are several studies about the CCR5-delta32 polymorphism and its effect on the immune response of some infectious diseases, this report is the first meta

  15. A combined quality-control methodology in Ebro Delta (NE Spain) high frequency radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorente, P.; Piedracoba, S.; Soto-Navarro, J.; Alvarez-Fanjul, E.

    2015-08-01

    Ebro River Delta is a relevant marine protected area in the western Mediterranean. In order to promote the conservation of its ecosystem and support operational decision making in this sensitive area, a three site standard-range (13.5 MHz) CODAR SeaSonde High Frequency (HF) radar was deployed in 2013. Since there is a growing demand for reliable HF radar surface current measurements, the main goal of this work is to present a combined quality control methodology. Firstly, one year-long (2014) real-time web monitoring of nonvelocity-based diagnostic parameters is conducted in order to infer both radar site status and HF radar system performance. Signal-to-noise ratio at the monopole exhibited a consistent monthly evolution although some abrupt decreases (below 10 dB), occasionally detected in June for one of the radar sites, impacted negatively on the spatiotemporal coverage of total current vectors. It seemed to be a sporadic episode since radar site overall performance was found to be robust during 2014. Secondly, a validation of HF radar data with independent in situ observations from a moored current meter was attempted for May-October 2014. The accuracy assessment of radial and total vectors revealed a consistently high agreement. The directional accuracy of the HF radar was rated at better than 8°. The correlation coefficient and RMSE values emerged in the ranges 0.58-0.83 and 4.02-18.31 cm s-1, respectively. The analysis of the monthly averaged current maps for 2014 showed that the HF radar properly represented basic oceanographic features previously reported, namely: the predominant southwestward flow, the coastal clockwise eddy confined south of Ebro Delta mouth or the Ebro River impulsive-type freshwater discharge. Future works should include the use of verified HF radar data for the rigorous skill assessment of operational ocean circulation systems currently running in Ebro estuarine region like MyOcean IBI.

  16. GEOTAIL and POLAR Observations of Auroral Kilometric Radiation and Terrestrial Low Frequency Bursts and their Relationship to Energetic Particles, Auroras, and Other Substorm Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R . R.; Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.; Thomsen, Michelle F.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Spann, James F., Jr.; Imhoff, W. L.; Mobilia, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    Terrestrial low frequency (LF) bursts are plasma wave phenomena that appear to be a part of the low frequency end of the auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) spectrum and are observed during strong substorms, GEOTAIL and POLAR plasma wave observations from within the magnetosphere show that the AKR increases in intensity and its lower frequency limits decrease when LF bursts are observed. The first is expected as it is shows substorm onset and the latter indicates that the AKR source region is expanding to higher altitudes. Images from the POLAR VIS Earth Camera operating in the far-UV range and the POLAR UVI experiment usually feature an auroral brightening and an expansion of the aurora to higher latitudes at the time of the LF bursts. Enhanced fluxes of X-rays from precipitating electrons have also been observed by POLAR PIXIE. High resolution ground Abstract: magnetometer data from the CANOPUS and IMAGE networks show that the LF bursts occur when the expansive phase onset signatures are most intense. The ground magnetometer data and the CANOPUS meridian scanning photometer data sometimes show that during the LF burst events the expansive phase onset starts at unusually low latitudes and moves poleward. Large injections of energetic protons and electrons have also been detected by the GOES and LANL geosynchronous satellites during LF burst events. While most of the auroral brightenings and energetic particle injections associated with the LF bursts occur near local midnight, several have been observed as early as mid-afternoon. From these various measurements, we are achieving a better understanding of the plasma and particle motions during substorms that are associated with the generation and propagation of terrestrial LF bursts

  17. Putative EEG measures of social anxiety: Comparing frontal alpha asymmetry and delta-beta cross-frequency correlation.

    PubMed

    Harrewijn, A; Van der Molen, M J W; Westenberg, P M

    2016-12-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine whether frontal alpha asymmetry and delta-beta cross-frequency correlation during resting state, anticipation, and recovery are electroencephalographic (EEG) measures of social anxiety. For the first time, we jointly examined frontal alpha asymmetry and delta-beta correlation during resting state and during a social performance task in high (HSA) versus low (LSA) socially anxious females. Participants performed a social performance task in which they first watched and evaluated a video of a peer, and then prepared their own speech. They believed that their speech would be videotaped and evaluated by a peer. We found that HSA participants showed significant negative delta-beta correlation as compared to LSA participants during both anticipation of and recovery from the stressful social situation. This negative delta-beta correlation might reflect increased activity in subcortical brain regions and decreased activity in cortical brain regions. As we hypothesized, no group differences in delta-beta correlation were found during the resting state. This could indicate that a certain level of stress is needed to find EEG measures of social anxiety. As for frontal alpha asymmetry, we did not find any group differences. The present frontal alpha asymmetry results are discussed in relation to the evident inconsistencies in the frontal alpha asymmetry literature. Together, our results suggest that delta-beta correlation is a putative EEG measure of social anxiety.

  18. Gamma-ray burst constraints on the galactic frequency of extra-solar Oort clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Stern, S. Alan

    1994-01-01

    With the strong CGRO/BATSE evidence that most gamma-ray bursts do not come from galactic neutron stars, models involving the accretion of a comet onto a neutron star (NS) no longer appear to be strong contenders for explaining the majority of bursts. If this is the case, then it is worth asking whether the lack of an observed galactic gamma-ray burst population provides a useful constraint on the number of comets and comet clouds in the galaxy. Owing to the previously unrecognized structural weakness of cometary nuclei, we find the capture cross sections for comet-NS events to be much higher than previously published estimates, with tidal breakup at distances R(sub b) approximately equals to 4 x 10(exp 10) cm from the NS. As a result, impacts of comets onto field NS's penetrating the Oort Clouds of other stars are found to dominate all other galactic NS-comet capture rates by a factor of 100. This in turn predicts that if comet clouds are common, there should be a significant population of repeater sources with (1) a galactic distribution, (2) space-correlated repetition, and (3) a wide range of peak luminosities and luminosity time histories. If all main sequences stars have Oort Clouds like our own, we predict approximately 4000 such repeater sources in the Milky Way at any time, each repeating on timescales of months to years. Based on estimates of the sensitivity of the CGRO/BATSE instrument and assuming isotropic gamma-ray beaming from such events, we estimate that a population of approximately 20-200 of these galactic NS-Oort Cloud gamma-ray repeater sources should be detectable by CGRO. In addition, if giant planet formation is common in the galaxy, we estimate that the accretion of isolated comets injected to the interstellar medium by giant planet formation should produce an additional source of galactic, nonrepeating events. Comparing these estimates to the three to four soft gamma-ray repeater sources detected by BATSE, one is forced to conclude that (1

  19. The Relationship between Coronal Mass Ejections and Low Frequency Radio Bursts in the Low Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Peter; Carley, Eoin; Byrne, Jason; Long, David; Zucca, Pietro; Bloomfield, Shaun; McCauley, Joseph

    Cosmic rays and solar energetic particles may be accelerated to relativistic energies by shock waves in astrophysical plasmas. On the Sun, shocks and particle acceleration are often associated with the eruption of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). However, the physical relationship between CMEs and shock particle acceleration is not well understood. Here, we use extreme ultraviolet, radio and white-light imaging of a solar eruptive event on 22 September 2011 to show that a CME-induced shock was coincident with a coronal wave and an intense metric radio burst generated by intermittent acceleration of electrons to kinetic energies of 2-46 keV (0.1-0.4 c). Our observations show that plasmoid-driven quasiperpendicular shocks are capable of producing quasiperiodic acceleration of electrons, an effect consistent with a turbulent or rippled plasma shock surface.

  20. Frequency-tuning characteristics of cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials induced by air-conducted tone bursts.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong Ju; Lee, In-Sik; Shin, Jung Eun; Lee, Yeo Jin; Park, Mun Su

    2010-01-01

    To better characterize both ocular and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) responses at different frequencies of sound in 20 normal subjects. Cervical and ocular VEMPs were recorded. The intensities of sound stimulation decreased from the maximal intensity, until no responses were evoked. Thresholds, amplitudes, latencies and interaural amplitude difference ratio (IADR) at the maximal stimulation were calculated. Both tests showed the similar frequency tuning, with the lowest threshold and highest amplitude for 500-Hz tone-burst stimuli. Sound stimulation at 500Hz showed the response rates of 100% in both tests. Cervical VEMPs showed higher incidence than ocular VEMPs. Ocular VEMP thresholds were significantly higher than those of cervical VEMP. Cervical VEMP amplitudes were significantly higher than ocular VEMP amplitudes. IADRs of ocular and cervical VEMPs did not differ significantly. Ocular VEMP showed the similar frequency tuning to cervical VEMP. Cervical VEMP responses showed higher incidence, lower thresholds and larger amplitudes than ocular VEMP. Cervical VEMP is a more reliable measure than ocular VEMP, though the results of both tests will be complementary. Five hundred Hertz is the optimal frequency to use. Copyright 2009 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cystic fibrosis in the Basque country: high frequency of mutation delta F508 in patients of Basque origin.

    PubMed

    Casals, T; Vázquez, C; Lázaro, C; Girbau, E; Giménez, F J; Estivill, X

    1992-02-01

    The Basque population is one of the oldest populations of Europe. It has been suggested that the Basques arose from a population established in western Europe during the late Paleolithic Age. The Basque language (Euskera) is a supposedly pre-Indo-European language that originates from the first settlers of Europe. The variable distribution of the major cystic fibrosis (CF) mutation (delta F508 deletion) in Europe, with higher frequencies of the mutation in northern Europe and lower frequencies in southern Europe, has suggested that the delta F508 mutation was spread by early farmers migrating from the Middle East during the Neolithic period. We have studied 45 CF families from the Basque Country, where the incidence of CF is approximately 1/4,500. The birthplaces of the parents and grandparents have been traced and are distributed according to their origin as Basque or Mixed Basque. The frequency of the delta F508 mutation in the chromosomes of Basque origin is 87%, compared with 58% in those of Mixed Basque origin. The analysis of haplotypes, both with markers closely linked to the CF gene and with intragenic markers, suggests that the delta F508 mutation was not spread by the Indo-European invasions but was already present in Europe more than 10,000 years ago, during the Paleolithic period.

  2. Ethnic variation in genotype frequencies of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD).

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Junko; Agusa, Tetsuro; Yasuda, Toshihiro; Soejima, Mikiko; Kato, Hideaki; Panduro, Arturo; Koda, Yoshiro; Kimura-Kataoka, Kaori; Takeshita, Haruo

    2009-12-15

    Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) is a cytosolic enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway. The ALAD is controlled by two codominant alleles (ALAD1 and ALAD2), which result in a Asn-Lys substitution at amino acid position 59 of the mature enzyme based on a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (G177C) leading three phenotypes (ALAD1-1, ALAD1-2, and ALAD2-2). Previous studies have shown that this polymorphism is related to lead toxicity. There is little evidence showing interethnic differences in the distribution of this polymorphism. We examined the distribution of genetic variants of the ALAD G177C polymorphism in four Asians, three Africans, and three Mexicans. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood or bloodstain, and the genotypes for the ALAD polymorphism were determined by PCR followed by RFLP digestion and gel electrophoresis. We found a notable interethnic disparity in the distribution of ALAD G177C genotypes and alleles. The frequencies of ALAD2 in Asian populations were comparable to those in Caucasians, while Africans had no mutation allele. These findings may help us understand the interethnic disparities in susceptibility to lead toxicity.

  3. Heterogeneous populations of cells mediate spontaneous synchronous bursting in the developing hippocampus through a frequency-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Menendez de la Prida, L; Sanchez-Andres, J V

    2000-01-01

    Under normal conditions, hippocampal slices from newborn rats and rabbits (postnatal days 0-8) show spontaneous synchronous bursts known as giant depolarizing potentials. These bursts are recorded from CA3, CA1 and the fascia dentata in both intact slices and isolated hipocampal regions. Giant depolarizing potentials are network-driven events resulting from the synergistic activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxadepropionate and GABA(A) receptors, the latter playing an excitatory role. Recently, we showed that they spontaneously emerge in an all-or-none manner after the increase of synaptic and cellular activity beyond a threshold frequency [Menendez de la Prida L. and Sanchez-Andres J. V. (1999) J. Neurophysiol. 82, 202-208]. Under this framework, background levels of spontaneous activity at individual neurons build up network synchronization 100-300ms prior to the onset of giant depolarizing potentials. However, the role of distinct cellular populations and connectivity in determining the threshold frequency has not been examined. By performing simultaneous intracellular recordings from pyramidal cells, non-pyramidal cells and interneurons, we investigated their participation in the generation of giant depolarizing potentials. Electrodes containing Neurobiotin were used to examine the cellular morphology. We found that giant depolarizing potentials were not initiated from a single pacemaker cellular group; instead, they involved recurrent cooperation among these groups, which contributed differently according to their intrinsic firing capability. In all the neurons examined, the onset of these bursts took place in an all-or-none frequency-dependent manner, both spontaneously (depending on the frequency of the excitatory postsynaptic potentials) or when triggered by extracellular stimulation. The CA3 threshold of frequency was at 12Hz in both pyramidal cells and interneurons, while in the fascia dentata it was 17Hz. The

  4. A search for Fermi bursts associated with supernovae and their frequency of occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacevic, M.; Izzo, L.; Wang, Y.; Muccino, M.; Della Valle, M.; Amati, L.; Barbarino, C.; Enderli, M.; Pisani, G. B.; Li, L.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Observations suggest that most long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are connected with broad-line supernovae Ib/c, (SNe-Ibc). The presence of GRB-SNe is revealed by rebrightenings emerging from the optical GRB afterglow 10-15 days, in the rest-frame of the source, after the prompt GRB emission. Aims: Fermi/GBM has a field of view (FoV) about 6.5 times larger than the FoV of Swift, therefore we expect that a number of GRB-SN connections have been missed because of lack of optical and X-ray instruments on board of Fermi, which are essential for revealing SNe associated with GRBs. This has motivated our search in the Fermi catalog for possible GRB-SN events. Methods: The search for possible GRB-SN associations follows two requirements: (1) SNe should fall inside the Fermi/GBM error box of the considered long GRB, and (2) this GRB should occur within 20 days before the SN event. Results: We have found five cases within z< 0.2 fulfilling the above reported requirements. One of them, GRB 130702A-SN 2013dx, was already known to have a GRB-SN association. We have analyzed the remaining four cases and we have concluded that three of them are, very likely, just random coincidences due to the Fermi/GBM large error box associated with each GRB detection. We found one GRB possibly associated with a SN 1998bw-like source, GRB 120121B/SN 2012ba. Conclusions: The very low redshift of GRB 120121B/SN 2012ba (z = 0.017) implies a low isotropic energy of this burst (Eiso = 1.39 × 1048) erg. We then compute the rate of Fermi low-luminosity GRBs connected with SNe to be ρ0,b ≤ 770 Gpc-3 yr-1. We estimate that Fermi/GBM could detect 1-4 GRBs-SNe within z ≤ 0.2 in the next 4 years.

  5. The Subthalamic Nucleus becomes a Generator of Bursts in the Dopamine-Depleted State. Its High Frequency Stimulation Dramatically Weakens Transmission to the Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Ammari, Rachida; Bioulac, Bernard; Garcia, Liliana; Hammond, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Excessive burst firing in the dopamine-depleted basal ganglia correlates with severe motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease that are attenuated by high frequency electrical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Here we test the hypothesis that pathological bursts in dopamine-deprived basal ganglia are generated within the STN and transmitted to globus pallidus neurons. To answer this question we recorded excitatory synaptic currents and potentials from subthalamic and pallidal neurons in the basal ganglia slice (BGS) from dopamine-depleted mice while continuously blocking GABAA receptors. In control mice, a single electrical stimulus delivered to the internal capsule or the rostral pole of the STN evoked a short duration, small amplitude, monosynaptic EPSC in subthalamic neurons. In contrast, in the dopamine-depleted BGS, this monosynaptic EPSC was amplified and followed by a burst of polysynaptic EPSCs that eventually reverberated three to seven times, providing a long lasting response that gave rise to bursts of EPSCs and spikes in GP neurons. Repetitive (10–120 Hz) stimulation delivered to the STN in the dopamine-depleted BGS attenuated STN-evoked bursts of EPSCs in pallidal neurons after several minutes of stimulation but only high frequency (90–120 Hz) stimulation replaced them with small amplitude EPSCs at 20 Hz. We propose that the polysynaptic pathway within the STN amplifies subthalamic responses to incoming excitation in the dopamine-depleted basal ganglia, thereby transforming the STN into a burst generator and entraining pallidal neurons in pathogenic bursting activities. High frequency stimulation of the STN prevents the transmission of this pathological activity to globus pallidus and imposes a new glutamatergic synaptic noise on pallidal neurons. PMID:21716635

  6. Burst Detector Sensitivity: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2005-01-01

    I compare the burst detection sensitivity of CGRO's BATSE, Swift's BAT, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) and EXIST as a function of a burst s spectrum and duration. A detector's overall burst sensitivity depends on its energy sensitivity and set of accumulations times (Delta)t; these two factors shape the detected burst population. For example, relative to BATSE, the BAT s softer energy band decreases the detection rate of short, hard bursts, while the BAT s longer accumulation times increase the detection rate of long, soft bursts. Consequently, Swift is detecting long, low fluence bursts (2-3 x fainter than BATSE).

  7. Gravitational lensing, time delay, and gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Shude

    1992-01-01

    The probability distributions of time delay in gravitational lensing by point masses and isolated galaxies (modeled as singular isothermal spheres) are studied. For point lenses (all with the same mass) the probability distribution is broad, and with a peak at delta(t) of about 50 S; for singular isothermal spheres, the probability distribution is a rapidly decreasing function with increasing time delay, with a median delta(t) equals about 1/h month, and its behavior depends sensitively on the luminosity function of galaxies. The present simplified calculation is particularly relevant to the gamma-ray bursts if they are of cosmological origin. The frequency of 'recurrent' bursts due to gravitational lensing by galaxies is probably between 0.05 and 0.4 percent. Gravitational lensing can be used as a test of the cosmological origin of gamma-ray bursts.

  8. Frequency of CCR5 delta-32 mutation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seropositive and HIV-exposed seronegative individuals and in general population of Medellin, Colombia.

    PubMed

    Díaz, F J; Vega, J A; Patiño, P J; Bedoya, G; Nagles, J; Villegas, C; Vesga, R; Rugeles, M T

    2000-01-01

    Repeated exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) does not always result in seroconversion. Modifications in coreceptors for HIV entrance to target cells are one of the factors that block the infection. We studied the frequency of Delta-32 mutation in ccr5 gene in Medellin, Colombia. Two hundred and eighteen individuals distributed in three different groups were analyzed for Delta-32 mutation in ccr5 gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR): 29 HIV seropositive (SP), 39 exposed seronegative (ESN) and 150 individuals as a general population sample (GPS). The frequency of the Delta-32 mutant allele was 3.8% for ESN, 2.7% for GPS and 1.7% for SP. Only one homozygous mutant genotype (Delta-32/Delta-32) was found among the ESN (2.6%). The heterozygous genotype (ccr5/Delta-32) was found in eight GPS (5.3%), in one SP (3.4%) and in one ESN (2.6%). The differences in the allelic and genotypic frequencies among the three groups were not statistically significant. A comparison between the expected and the observed genotypic frequencies showed that these frequencies were significantly different for the ESN group, which indirectly suggests a protective effect of the mutant genotype (Delta-32/Delta-32). Since this mutant genotype explained the resistance of infection in only one of our ESN persons, different mechanisms of protection must be playing a more important role in this population.

  9. Designing a high-frequency nutrient and biogeochemical monitoring network for the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Downing, Bryan D.; Kraus, Tamara E.C.; Pellerin, Brian A.

    2017-07-11

    Executive SummaryThis report is the third in a series of three reports that provide information about how high-frequency (HF) nutrient monitoring may be used to assess nutrient inputs and dynamics in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California (Delta). The purpose of this report is to provide the background, principles, and considerations for designing an HF nutrient-monitoring network for the Delta to address high-priority, nutrient-management questions. The report starts with discussion of the high-priority management questions to be addressed, continues through discussion of the questions and considerations that place demands and constraints on network design, discusses the principles applicable to network design, and concludes with the presentation of three example nutrient-monitoring network designs for the Delta. For three example network designs, we assess how they would address high-priority questions that have been identified by the Delta Regional Monitoring Program (Delta Regional Monitoring Program Technical Advisory Committee, 2015).This report, along with the other two reports of this series (Kraus and others, 2017; Downing and others, 2017), was drafted in cooperation with the Delta Regional Monitoring Program to help scientists, managers, and planners understand how HF data improve our understanding of nutrient sources and sinks, drivers, and effects in the Delta. The first report in the series (Kraus and others, 2017) provides an introduction to the reasons for and fundamental concepts behind using HF monitoring measurements, including a brief summary of nutrient status and trends in the Delta and an extensive literature review showing how and where other research and monitoring programs have used HF monitoring to improve our understanding of nutrient cycling. The report covers the various technologies available for HF nutrient monitoring and presents the different ways HF monitoring instrumentation may be used for both fixed station and spatial

  10. On vortex bursting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werle, H.

    1984-01-01

    Vortex bursting is studied by means of visualization. The physical behavior of the phenomenon is emphasized, and its similarity with boundary layer separation or wake bursting becomes apparent. The essential influence of an increasing pressure gradient on the initiation, the position and the type of bursting is clearly confirmed. The evolution of the phenomena as a function of several parameters is analyzed in the case of delta wings, alone or installed on aircraft models, and compared with the results of similar wind tunnel or flight tests.

  11. An introduction to high-frequency nutrient and biogeochemical monitoring for the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraus, Tamara E.C.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Downing, Bryan D.

    2017-07-11

    Executive SummaryThis report is the first in a series of three reports that provide information about high-frequency (HF) nutrient and biogeochemical monitoring in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta of northern California (Delta). This first report provides an introduction to the reasons for and fundamental concepts behind collecting HF measurements, and describes the benefits associated with a real-time, continuous, HF, multi-parameter water quality monitoring station network that is co-located with flow stations. It then provides examples of how HF nutrient measurements have improved our understating of nutrient sources and cycling in aquatic systems worldwide, followed by specific examples from the Delta. These examples describe the ways in which HF instrumentation may be used for both fixed-station and spatial assessments. The overall intent of this document is to describe how HF measurements currently (2017) are being used in the Delta to examine the relationship between nutrient concentrations, nutrient cycling, and aquatic habitat conditions.The second report in the series (Downing and others, 2017) summarizes information about HF nutrient and associated biogeochemical monitoring in the northern Delta. The report synthesizes data available from the nutrient and water quality monitoring network currently operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in this ecologically important region of the Delta. In the report, we present and discuss the available data at various timescales—first, at the monthly, seasonal, and inter-annual timescales; and, second, for comparison, at the tidal and event (for example, storms, reservoir releases, phytoplankton blooms) timescales. As expected, we determined that there is substantial variability in nitrate concentrations at short timescales within hours, but also significant variability at longer timescales such as months or years. This multi-scale, high variability affects calculation of fluxes and loads, indicating that HF

  12. Frequencies of 32 base pair deletion of the (Delta 32) allele of the CCR5 HIV-1 co-receptor gene in Caucasians: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Gérard

    2002-05-01

    The CCR5 gene encodes for the co-receptor for the major macrophage-tropics strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), and a mutant allele of this gene (Delta 32) provide to homozygotes a strong resistance against infection by HIV. The frequency of the Delta 32 allele was investigated in 40 populations of 8842 non-infected subjects coming from Europe, the Middle-East and North Africa. A clear north-south decreasing gradient was evident for Delta 32 frequencies, with a significant correlation coefficient (r=0.83). The main frequency value of Delta 32 for Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland (0.134) is significantly (chi(2)=63.818, P<0.001) highest than the Delta 32 mean value, indicating that probably the Vikings might have been instrumental in disseminating the Delta 32 allele during the eighth to the tenth centuries during historical times. Possibly variola virus has discriminated the Delta 32 carriers in Europe since the eighth century AD, explaining the high frequency of the Delta 32 allele in Europe today.

  13. Beyond Word Frequency: Bursts, Lulls, and Scaling in the Temporal Distributions of Words

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Eduardo G.; Pierrehumbert, Janet B.; Motter, Adilson E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Zipf's discovery that word frequency distributions obey a power law established parallels between biological and physical processes, and language, laying the groundwork for a complex systems perspective on human communication. More recent research has also identified scaling regularities in the dynamics underlying the successive occurrences of events, suggesting the possibility of similar findings for language as well. Methodology/Principal Findings By considering frequent words in USENET discussion groups and in disparate databases where the language has different levels of formality, here we show that the distributions of distances between successive occurrences of the same word display bursty deviations from a Poisson process and are well characterized by a stretched exponential (Weibull) scaling. The extent of this deviation depends strongly on semantic type – a measure of the logicality of each word – and less strongly on frequency. We develop a generative model of this behavior that fully determines the dynamics of word usage. Conclusions/Significance Recurrence patterns of words are well described by a stretched exponential distribution of recurrence times, an empirical scaling that cannot be anticipated from Zipf's law. Because the use of words provides a uniquely precise and powerful lens on human thought and activity, our findings also have implications for other overt manifestations of collective human dynamics. PMID:19907645

  14. Land subsidence in the Yangtze River Delta, China revealed from multi-frequency SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhong; Motagh, Mahdi; Yu, Jun; Gong, Xulong; Wu, Jianqiang; Zhu, Yefei; Chen, Huogen; Zhang, Dengming; Xu, Yulin

    2014-05-01

    Land subsidence is a major worldwide hazard, and its principal causes are subsurface fluid withdrawal, drainage of organic soils, sinkholes, underground mining, hydrocompaction, thawing permafrost, and natural consolidation. Land subsidence causes many problems including: damage to public facilities such as bridges, roads, railroads, electric power lines, underground pipes; damage to private and public buildings; and in some cases of low-lying land, can increase the risk of coastal flooding from storm surges and rising sea-levels. In China, approximately 48600 km2 of land, an area roughly 30 times of the size of the Greater London, has subsided (nearly 50 cities across 16 provinces), and the annual direct economic loss is estimated to be more than RMB 100 million (~12 million). It is believed that the Suzhou-Wuxi-Changzhou region within the Yangtze River Delta is the most severely affected area for subsidence hazards in China. With its global coverage and all-weather imaging capability, Interferometric SAR (InSAR) is revolutionizing our ability to image the Earth's surface and the evolution of its shape over time. In this paper, an advanced InSAR time series technique, InSAR TS + AEM, has been employed to analysed ERS (C-band), Envisat (C-band) and TerraSAR-X (X-band) data collected over the Suzhou-Wuxi-Changzhou region during the period from 1992 to 2013. Validation with precise levelling and GPS data suggest: (1) the accuracy of the InSAR-derived mean velocity measurements is 1-3 mm/yr; (2) InSAR-derived displacements agreed with precise levelling with root mean square errors around 5 mm. It is evident that InSAR TS + AEM can be used to image the evolution of deformation patterns in the Suzhou-Wuxi-Changzhou region over time: the maximum mean velocity decreased from ~12 cm/yr during the period of 1992-1993 to ~2 cm/yr in 2003-2013. This is believed to be a result of the prohibition of groundwater use carried out by Jiangsu provincial government. The combination

  15. A Comparative Study of the Impact of Theta-Burst and High-Frequency Stimulation on Memory Performance

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yating; Wang, Rubin; Wang, Yihong

    2016-01-01

    The transformation of the information stored in the working memory into the system of long-term memory depends on the physiological mechanism, long-term potential (LTP). In a large number of experimental studies, theta-burst stimulation (TBS) and high-frequency stimulation (HFS) are LTP induction protocols. However, they have not been adapted to the model related to memory. In this paper, the improved Camperi–Wang (C–W) model with Ca2+ subsystem-induced bi-stability was adopted, and TBS and HFS were simulated to act as the initial stimuli of this working memory model. Evaluating the influence of stimuli properties (cycle, amplitude, duty ration) on memory mechanism of the model, it is found that both TBS and HFS can be adopted to activate working memory model and produce long-term memory. Moreover, the different impacts of two types of stimuli on the formation of long-term memory were analyzed as well. Thus, the importance of this study lies firstly in describing the link and interaction between working memory and long-term memory from the quantitative view, which provides a theoretical basis for the study of neural dynamics mechanism of long-term memory formation in the future. PMID:26869903

  16. A Search for Fast Radio Bursts at Low Frequencies with Murchison Widefield Array High Time Resolution Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C. M.; Wayth, R. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Feng, L.; Gaensler, B. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hancock, P. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Murphy, T.; Oberoi, D.; Prabu, T.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of a pilot study search for fast radio bursts (FRBs) using the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) at low frequencies (139-170 MHz). We utilized MWA data obtained in a routine imaging mode from observations where the primary target was a field being studied for Epoch of Reionization detection. We formed images with 2 s time resolution and 1.28 MHz frequency resolution for 10.5 hr of observations, over 400 square degrees of the sky. We de-dispersed the dynamic spectrum in each of 372,100 resolution elements of 2 × 2 arcmin2, between dispersion measures of 170 and 675 pc cm-3. Based on the event rate calculations in Trott et al., which assume a standard candle luminosity of 8 × 1037 Js-1, we predict that with this choice of observational parameters, the MWA should detect (˜10, ˜2, ˜0) FRBs with spectral indices corresponding to (-2, -1, 0), based on a 7σ detection threshold. We find no FRB candidates above this threshold from our search, placing an event rate limit of \\lt 700 above 700 Jy ms per day per sky and providing evidence against spectral indices α \\lt -1.2 (S\\propto {ν }α ). We compare our event rate and spectral index limits with others from the literature. We briefly discuss these limits in light of recent suggestions that supergiant pulses from young neutron stars could explain FRBs. We find that such supergiant pulses would have to have much flatter spectra between 150 and 1400 MHz than have been observed from Crab giant pulses to be consistent with the FRB spectral index limit we derive.

  17. Attitudes and beliefs affect frequency of eating out in the Lower Mississippi Delta

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Attitudes and beliefs reflecting cultural values can have a positive or negative influence on eating behaviors. Eating out may negatively affect diet quality through increased fat intake and larger portion sizes. In a representative sample of the Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) consisting of 1601 Af...

  18. Evidence for recent selection of the CCR5-delta 32 deletion from differences in its frequency between Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jews.

    PubMed

    Maayan, S; Zhang, L; Shinar, E; Ho, J; He, T; Manni, N; Kostrikis, L G; Neumann, A U

    2000-08-01

    Recent studies have shown higher frequencies of the CCR5-delta 32 allele and the CCR5-delta 32/delta 32 genotype, which confers protection against HIV infection, in northern Europe as compared to Mediterranean countries. Here, we analyse the prevalence of CCR5-delta 32 in 922 HIV seronegative blood donors in Israel to verify its frequency in Jews of Ashkenazi and Sephardi origin. A significant difference (P < 0.001) was found between the CCR5-delta 32 allele frequency in Ashkenazi (13.8%) vs (4.9%) Jews. In contrast, no significant difference was observed in the frequency of the CCR2-641 mutation between Ashkenazi (9.2%) and Sephardi (13.4%) Jews. Using the Island model we calculate that a minimal genetic migration rate of 3% per generation would have been necessary if the higher CCR5-delta 32 prevalence in Ashkenazi is to be fully explained by mixing with the indigenous north-European populations. This putative migration rate is 20-fold higher than that currently estimated from other genes, and would correspond to a non-realistic minimal current admixture of 80%. Thus, our results suggest that a positive selection process for CCR5-delta 32 should have occurred in northern Europe at most a 1000 years ago, after the Ashkenazi Jews separated from their Sephardi kin and moved to north Europe.

  19. Decomposing delta, theta, and alpha time–frequency ERP activity from a visual oddball task using PCA

    PubMed Central

    Bernat, Edward M.; Malone, Stephen M.; Williams, William J.; Patrick, Christopher J.; Iacono, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Time–frequency (TF) analysis has become an important tool for assessing electrical and magnetic brain activity from event-related paradigms. In electrical potential data, theta and delta activities have been shown to underlie P300 activity, and alpha has been shown to be inhibited during P300 activity. Measures of delta, theta, and alpha activity are commonly taken from TF surfaces. However, methods for extracting relevant activity do not commonly go beyond taking means of windows on the surface, analogous to measuring activity within a defined P300 window in time-only signal representations. The current objective was to use a data driven method to derive relevant TF components from event-related potential data from a large number of participants in an oddball paradigm. Methods A recently developed PCA approach was employed to extract TF components [Bernat, E. M., Williams, W. J., and Gehring, W. J. (2005). Decomposing ERP time-frequency energy using PCA. Clin Neurophysiol, 116(6), 1314–1334] from an ERP dataset of 2068 17 year olds (979 males). TF activity was taken from both individual trials and condition averages. Activity including frequencies ranging from 0 to 14 Hz and time ranging from stimulus onset to 1312.5 ms were decomposed. Results A coordinated set of time–frequency events was apparent across the decompositions. Similar TF components representing earlier theta followed by delta were extracted from both individual trials and averaged data. Alpha activity, as predicted, was apparent only when time–frequency surfaces were generated from trial level data, and was characterized by a reduction during the P300. Conclusions Theta, delta, and alpha activities were extracted with predictable time-courses. Notably, this approach was effective at characterizing data from a single-electrode. Finally, decomposition of TF data generated from individual trials and condition averages produced similar results, but with predictable differences

  20. A Gamma-Ray Burst Trigger Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The detection rate of a gamma-ray burst detector can be increased by using a count rate trigger with many accumulation times DELTAt and energy bands DELTAE Because a burst's peak flux varies when averaged over different DELTAt and DELTAE the nominal sensitivity (the numerical value of the peak flux) of a trigger system is less important than how much fainter a burst could be at the detection threshold as DELTAt and DELTAE are changed. The relative sensitivity of different triggers can be quantified by referencing the detection threshold back to the peak flux for a fiducial value of DELTAt and DELTA E. This mapping between peak flux values for different sets of DELTAt and DELTAE varies from burst to burst. Quantitative estimates of the burst detection rate for a given detector and trigger system can be based on the observed rate at a measured peak flux value in this fiducial trigger. Predictions of a proposed trigger's burst detection rate depend on the assumed burst population, and these predictions can be wildly in error for triggers that differ significantly from previous missions. I base the fiducial rate on the BATSE observations: 550 bursts per sky above a peak flux of 0.3 ph per square centimeter per second averaged over DELTAt=1.024 sec and DELTAE=50-300 keV. Using a sample of 100 burst lightcurves I find that triggering on any value of DELTAt that is a multiple of 0.064 sec decreases the average threshold peak flux on the 1.024 sec timescale by a factor of 0.6. Extending DELTAE to lower energies includes the large flux of the X-ray background, increasing the background count rate. Consequently a low energy DELTAE is advantageous only for very soft bursts. Whether a large fraction of the population of bright bursts is soft is disputed; the new population of X-ray Flashes is soft but relatively faint.

  1. Preliminary results on the apparent size of the sources of type III bursts observed at low frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, H.

    1976-01-01

    We present preliminary results on the apparent angular size of the sources of four type III bursts observed between 3500 and 50 kHz from the IMP-6 spacecraft. The observations were made with a dipole rotating in the plane of the ecliptic where the sources are assumed to be. The apparent angular sizes obtained are unexpectedly large. We discuss different explanations for the results. It seems that the scattering of radio waves by electron density inhomogeneities is the most likely cause. We report a temporal increase of the apparent angular size of the source during the burst lifetime for some bursts. From its characteristics it appears to be a real effect.

  2. Energetic Particle Propagation in the Inner Heliosphere as Deduced from Low Frequency (less than 100 kHz) Observations of Type III Radio Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Erickson, W. C.

    2003-01-01

    Solar energetic particle (SEP) events are well-associated with solar flares. It is observed that the delay between the time of the flare and the first-arriving particles at a spacecraft increases with increasing difference between the flare longitude and the footpoint of the field line on which the spacecraft is located. This difference we call the "connection angle" and can be as large as approximately 120 deg. Recently it has been found that all SEP events are preceded by type III radio bursts. These bursts are plasma emission caused by the propagation of 2-50 keV flare electrons through the solar corona and into the solar wind. The drift of these type III radio bursts to lower and lower frequencies enables the propagation of the flare electrons to be traced from the Sun to about 1 AU. We have made an extensive analysis of the type III bursts associated with greater than 20 MeV proton events and find that, in most cases, the radio emission extends to the local plasma frequency when the energetic particles arrive within a few hours of the flare. We conclude that this emission at the lowest possible frequency is generated close to the spacecraft. We then use the time from when the burst started at the Sun to when it reached the local plasma frequency to infer the time it took the radio producing electrons to travel to the spacecraft. We find that these delay times are organized by the connection angle and correlate with the proton delay times. We also find that the differences between the radio delays at Wind and Ulysses are matched by differences in the relative arrival times of the energetic particles at the two spacecraft. The consistent timing between the relative arrival times of energetic electrons and protons and the start of the lowest frequency radio emissions suggests that the first arriving particles of both species are accelerated as part of the flare process and that they propagate to the spacecraft along trajectories similar to those of the lower

  3. The Effect of Contact Angles and Capillary Dimensions on the Burst Frequency of Super Hydrophilic and Hydrophilic Centrifugal Microfluidic Platforms, a CFD Study

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh, Amin; Ganesan, Poo; Ibrahim, Fatimah; He, Shuisheng; Madou, Marc J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper employs the volume of fluid (VOF) method to numerically investigate the effect of the width, height, and contact angles on burst frequencies of super hydrophilic and hydrophilic capillary valves in centrifugal microfluidic systems. Existing experimental results in the literature have been used to validate the implementation of the numerical method. The performance of capillary valves in the rectangular and the circular microfluidic structures on super hydrophilic centrifugal microfluidic platforms is studied. The numerical results are also compared with the existing theoretical models and the differences are discussed. Our experimental and computed results show a minimum burst frequency occurring at square capillaries and this result is useful for designing and developing more sophisticated networks of capillary valves. It also predicts that in super hydrophilic microfluidics, the fluid leaks consistently from the capillary valve at low pressures which can disrupt the biomedical procedures in centrifugal microfluidic platforms. PMID:24069169

  4. The effect of contact angles and capillary dimensions on the burst frequency of super hydrophilic and hydrophilic centrifugal microfluidic platforms, a CFD study.

    PubMed

    Kazemzadeh, Amin; Ganesan, Poo; Ibrahim, Fatimah; He, Shuisheng; Madou, Marc J

    2013-01-01

    This paper employs the volume of fluid (VOF) method to numerically investigate the effect of the width, height, and contact angles on burst frequencies of super hydrophilic and hydrophilic capillary valves in centrifugal microfluidic systems. Existing experimental results in the literature have been used to validate the implementation of the numerical method. The performance of capillary valves in the rectangular and the circular microfluidic structures on super hydrophilic centrifugal microfluidic platforms is studied. The numerical results are also compared with the existing theoretical models and the differences are discussed. Our experimental and computed results show a minimum burst frequency occurring at square capillaries and this result is useful for designing and developing more sophisticated networks of capillary valves. It also predicts that in super hydrophilic microfluidics, the fluid leaks consistently from the capillary valve at low pressures which can disrupt the biomedical procedures in centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

  5. Propeller tone bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Succi, G. P.; Munro, D. H.; Ingard, K. U.

    1983-01-01

    Intense high frequency (25-38 kHz) tone bursts have been observed in acoustic tests of a scale model of a general aviation propeller. The amplitude of the tone burst is approximately equal to the amplitude of the propeller noise signature. The conditions necessary for the production of these tone bursts are described. The experiments indicate that the origin of these bursts is a periodic flow oscillation on the suction surface of the propeller blade tips which may be due to the interaction between an oscillating shock wave and a laminar boundary layer.

  6. Adolescent Changes in Homeostatic Regulation of EEG Activity in the Delta and Theta Frequency Bands during NREM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ian G.; Darchia, Nato; Higgins, Lisa M.; Dykan, Igor V.; Davis, Nicole M.; de Bie, Evan; Feinberg, Irwin

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Slow wave EEG activity in NREM sleep decreases by more than 60% between ages 10 and 20 years. Slow wave EEG activity also declines across NREM periods (NREMPs) within a night, and this decline is thought to represent the dynamics of sleep homeostasis. We used longitudinal data to determine whether these homeostatic dynamics change across adolescence. Design: All-night sleep EEG was recorded semiannually for 6 years. Setting: EEG was recorded with ambulatory recorders in the subjects' homes. Participants: Sixty-seven subjects in 2 cohorts, one starting at age 9 and one starting at age 12 years. Measurements and Results: For NREM delta (1-4 Hz) and theta (4-8 Hz) EEG, we tested whether the proportion of spectral energy contained in the first NREMP changes with age. We also tested for age changes in the parameters of the process S exponential decline. For both delta and theta, the proportion of energy in the first NREMP declined significantly across ages 9 to 18 years. Process S parameters SWA0 and TWA0, respectively, represent slow wave (delta) activity and theta wave activity at the beginning of the night. SWA0 and TWA0 declined significantly (P < 0.0001) across ages 9 to 18. Conclusions: These declines indicate that the intensity of the homeostatic or restorative processes at the beginning of sleep diminished across adolescence. We propose that this change in sleep regulation is caused by the synaptic pruning that occurs during adolescent brain maturation. Citation: Campbell IG; Darchia N; Higgins LM; Dykan IV; Davis NM; de Bie E; Feinberg I. Adolescent changes in homeostatic regulation of EEG activity in the delta and theta frequency bands during NREM sleep. SLEEP 2011;34(1):83-91. PMID:21203377

  7. Increased frequency of {gamma}{delta} T cells in cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood of patients with multiple sclerosis: Reactivity, cytotoxicity, and T cell receptor V gene rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Stinissen, P.; Vandevyver, C.; Medaer, R.

    1995-05-01

    Infiltrating {gamma}{delta} T cells are potentially involved in the central nervous system demyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS). To further study this hypothesis, we analyzed the frequency and functional properties of {gamma}{delta} T cells in peripheral blood (PB) and paired cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with MS and control subjects, including patients with other neurologic diseases (OND) and healthy individuals. The frequency analysis was performed under limiting dilution condition using rIL-2 and PHA. After PHA stimulation, a significantly increased frequency of {gamma}{delta} T cells was observed in PB and in CSF of MS patients as compared with PB and CSF of patients with OND. The frequency was represented equally in OND patients and normal individuals. Similarly, the IL-2-responsive {gamma}{delta} T cells occurred at a higher frequency in PB of MS than of control subjects. Forty-three percent of the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones isolates from PB and CSF of MS patients responded to heat shock protein (HSP70) but not HSP65, whereas only 2 of 30 control {gamma}{delta} T cell clones reacted to the HSP. The majority of the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones were able to induce non-MHC-restricted cytolysis of Daudi cells. All clones displayed a substantial reactivity to bacterial superantigens staphylococcal enterotoxin B and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, irrespective of their {gamma}{delta} V gene usage. Furthermore, the {gamma}{delta} T cell clones expressed predominantly TCRDV2 and GV2 genes, whereas the clones derived from CSF of MS patients expressed either DV1 or DV2 genes. The obtained {gamma}{delta} clones, in general, represented rather heterogeneous clonal origins, even though a predominant clonal origin was found in a set of 10 {gamma}{delta} clones derived from one patient with MS. The present study provides new evidence supporting a possible role of {gamma}{delta} T cells in the secondary inflammatory processes in MS. 39 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Discovery of Nearly Coherent Oscillations with a Frequency of approximately 567 Hz During Type I X-ray Bursts of the X-ray Transient and Eclipsing Binary X1658-298

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wijnands, Rudy; Strohmayer, Tod; Franco, Lucia M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We report the discovery of nearly coherent oscillations with a frequency of approximately 567 Hz during type I X-ray bursts from the X-ray transient and eclipsing binary X1658-298. If these oscillations are directly related to the neutron star rotation, then the spin period of the neutron star in X1658-298 is approximately 1.8 ms. The oscillations can be present during the rise or decay phase of the bursts. Oscillations during the decay phase of the bursts show an increase in frequency of approximately 0.5-1 Hz. However, in one particular burst the oscillations reappear at the end of the decay phase at about 571.5 Hz. This represents an increase in oscillation frequency of about 5 Hz, which is the largest frequency change seen so far in a burst oscillation. It is unclear if such a large change can be accommodated by present models used to explain the frequency evolution of the oscillations. The oscillations at 571.5 Hz are unusually soft compared to the oscillations found at 567 Hz. We also observed several bursts during which the oscillations are detected at much lower significance or not at all. Most of these bursts happen during periods of X-ray dipping behavior, suggesting that the X-ray dipping might decrease the amplitude of the oscillations (although several complications exist with this simple picture). We discuss our discovery in the framework of the neutron star spin interpretation.

  9. Differences in EEG delta frequency characteristics and patterns in slow-wave sleep between dementia patients and controls: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bonanni, Enrica; Di Coscio, Elisa; Maestri, Michelangelo; Carnicelli, Luca; Tsekou, Hara; Economou, Nicholas Tiberio; Paparrigopoulos, Thomas; Bonakis, Anastasios; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G; Vassilopoulos, Dimitris; Soldatos, Constantin R; Murri, Luigi; Ktonas, Periklis Y

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the modifications of EEG activity during slow-wave sleep in patients with dementia compared with healthy elderly subjects, using spectral analysis and period-amplitude analysis. Five patients with dementia and 5 elderly control subjects underwent night polysomnographic recordings. For each of the first three nonrapid eye movement-rapid eye movement sleep cycles, a well-defined slow-wave sleep portion was chosen. The delta frequency band (0.4-3.6 Hz) in these portions was analyzed with both spectral analysis and period-amplitude analysis. Spectral analysis showed an increase in the delta band power in the dementia group, with a decrease across the night observed only in the control group. For the dementia group, period-amplitude analysis showed a decrease in well-defined delta waves of frequency lower than 1.6 Hz and an increase in such waves of frequency higher than 2 Hz, in incidence and amplitude. Our study showed (1) a loss of the dynamics of delta band power across the night sleep, in dementia, and (2) a different distribution of delta waves during slow-wave sleep in dementia compared with control subjects. This kind of computer-based analysis can highlight the presence of a pathologic delta activity during slow-wave sleep in dementia and may support the hypothesis of a dynamic interaction between sleep alteration and cognitive decline.

  10. Decameter Type III-Like Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rutkevych, B. P.; Rucker, H. O.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Abranin, E. P.; Lecacheux, A.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Stanislavskyy, A. A.

    2007-12-01

    Starting from 1960s Type III-like bursts (Type III bursts with high drift rates) in a wide frequency range from 300 to 950MHz have been observed. These new bursts observed at certain frequency being compared to the usual Type III bursts at the same frequency show similar behaviour but feature frequency drift 2-6 times higher than the normal bursts. In this paper we report the first observations of Type III-like bursts in decameter range, carried out during summer campaigns 2002 - 2004 at UTR-2 radio telescope. The circular polarization of the bursts was measured by the radio telescope URAN-2 in 2004. The observed bursts are analyzed and compared with usual Type III bursts in the decameter range. From the analysis of over 1100 Type III-like bursts, their main parameters have been found. Characteristic feature of the observed bursts is similar to Type III-like bursts at other frequencies, i.e. measured drift rates (5-10 MHz/s) of this bursts are few times larger than that for usual Type III bursts, and their durations (1-2 s) are few times smaller than that for usual Type III bursts in this frequency band.

  11. High Frequency (10 kHz) or Burst Spinal Cord Stimulation in Failed Back Surgery Syndrome Patients With Predominant Back Pain: Preliminary Data From a Prospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Kinfe, Thomas M; Pintea, Bogdan; Link, Carolina; Roeske, Sandra; Güresir, Erdem; Güresir, Ági; Vatter, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    Conventional spinal cord stimulation (SCS) exhibits pain relief and improved quality of life in refractory failed back surgery syndrome. However, patients suffering from predominant back pain failed to achieve a favorable neuromodulation outcome. Currently, two new stimulation concepts, the burst and the HF10 stimulation paradigms successfully suppress intractable back pain levels in this difficult-to-treat subgroup. To date, literature data comparing both stimulation patterns is lacking. A prospective, observational study was conducted including 16 refractory Failed-back surgery syndrome (FBSS) patients with previous spine surgery and predominant back pain (70% of overall pain) with or without leg pain eligible for burst or high-frequency SCS. At baseline and at a three-month follow-up the pain intensity (back pain (VASB )/leg pain (VASL ), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]), changes in severity of depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]) and any adverse event related to the implantation and the stimulation were recorded. Overall baseline VASB was significantly suppressed in 14 FBSS patients (eight burst/six patients with 10 HF10) from baseline 7.9 ± 0.7 to 2.3 ± 1 (p < 0.001), while the overall VASL declined significantly from 3.1 ± 1.5 to 1.9 ± 0.83 (p < 0.01). The burst patients experienced significant VASL reduction (burst 1.8 ± 0.7 (p < 0.009) compared to HF10 patients 2.2 ± 1). Two patients failed 10 HF10-trial. The BDI [23.3 ± 2.1 to 13.5 ± 4.5 (p < 0.001)] and the PSQI [7.6 ± 3.7 to 4.2 ± 1.4 (p < 0.003)] dropped down significantly for both modalities. No implantation/stimulation-related complications were observed. Burst and HF10 SCS performed efficiently and safely in intractable FBSS patients with predominant back pain and deserve more refined, specific investigations to determine their efficacy. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  12. Cortical glucose metabolism correlates negatively with delta-slowing and spike-frequency in epilepsy associated with tuberous sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Masaaki; Asano, Eishi; Juhasz, Csaba; Muzik, Otto; Sood, Sandeep; Chugani, Harry T

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The mechanism of altered glucose metabolism seen on positron emission tomography (PET) in focal epilepsy is not fully understood. We determined the association between interictal glucose metabolism and interictal neuronal activity, using PET and electrocorticography (ECoG) measures derived from 865 intracranial electrode sites in 11 children with focal epilepsy associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) (age: 0.5 – 16 years) undergoing epilepsy surgery. A multiple linear regression analysis was applied to each patient, to determine whether the glucose uptake at each electrode site on interictal PET was predicted by ECoG amplitude powers and interictal spike-frequency measured in the given electrode site. The regression slopes as well as R-square values (an indicator of fitness of the regression models) were finally averaged across the 11 patients. The mean regression slope for delta amplitude power was -0.0025 (95%CI: -0.0045 to -0.0004; p=0.02 based on one-sample t-test) and that for spike frequency was -0.023 (95%CI: -0.042 to -0.0038; p=0.02). On the other hand, the mean regression slopes for the remaining ECoG amplitude powers (theta, alpha, sigma, beta and gamma activities) were not significantly different from zero. The mean R-square value was 0.39. These results suggest that increased delta-slowing and frequent spike activity were independently and additively associated with glucose hypometabolism in children with focal epilepsy associated with TSC. Association between frequent interictal spike activity and low glucose metabolism may be attributed to slow-wave components following spike discharges on ECoG recording, and a substantial proportion of the variance in regional glucose metabolism on PET could be explained by electrophysiological traits derived from conventional subdural ECoG recording. PMID:17948886

  13. Magnetar Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) was launched in June 2008. During the last five years the instrument has observed several hundreds of bursts from 8 confirmed magnetars and 19 events from unconfirmed sources. I will discuss the results of the GBM magnetar burst catalog, expand on the different properties of their diverse source population, and compare these results with the bursting activity of past sources. I will then conclude with thoughts of how these properties fit the magnetar theoretical models.

  14. Theta-Burst LTP

    PubMed Central

    Larson, John; Munkácsy, Erin

    2014-01-01

    This review covers the spatial and temporal rules governing induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) by theta-burst stimulation. Induction of LTP in field CA1 by high frequency stimulation bursts that resemble the burst discharges (complex-spikes) of hippocampal pyramidal neurons involves a multiple-step mechanism. A single burst is insufficient for LTP induction because it evokes both excitatory and inhibitory currents that partially cancel and limit postsynaptic depolarization. Bursts repeated at the frequency (~5 Hz) of the endogenous theta rhythm induce maximal LTP, primarily because this frequency disables feed-forward inhibition and allows sufficient postsynaptic depolarization to activate voltage-sensitive NMDA receptors. The disinhibitory process, referred to as “priming”, involves presynaptic GABA autoreceptors that inhibit GABA release. Activation of NMDA receptors allows a calcium flux into dendritic spines that serves as the proximal trigger for LTP. We include new data showing that theta-burst stimulation is more efficient than other forms of stimulation for LTP induction. In addityion, we demonstrate that associative interactions between synapses activated during theta-bursts are limited to major dendritic domains since such interactions occur within apical or basal dendritic trees but not between them. We review evidence that recordings of electrophysiological responses during theta burst stimulation can help to determine if experimental manipulations that affect LTP do so by affecting events antecedent to the induction process, such as NMDA receptor activation, or downstream signaling cascades that result from postsynaptic calcium fluxes. Finally, we argue that theta-burst LTP represents a minimal model for stable, non-decremental LTP that is more sensitive to a variety of experimental manipulations than is LTP induced by other stimulation paradigms. PMID:25452022

  15. Coronal loops diagnostics using the parameters of U-burst harmonic pair at frequencies 10-70 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorovskyy, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Bubnov, I. N.; Gridin, A. A.; Shevchuk, N. V.; Rucker, H. O.; Panchenko, M.

    2013-09-01

    The results of the first observations of solar sporadic radio emission using one section of the new being currently created Giant Ukrainian Radio Telescope (GURT) are presented. The parameters of inverted U-burst with harmonic structure observed with GURT are considered. The main attention is paid to the time delay between the fundamental and harmonic components. The analytical model explaining the observed time delay is proposed.

  16. Type III burst pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zongjun; Fu, Qijun; Lu, Quankang

    2000-05-01

    We present a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0-2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory (BAO). Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. We call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is a nice interpretation of type III burst pair since the plasma beta β~=0.01 is much less than 1 and the beams have velocity of about 1.07×10^8 cm s^-1 after leaving the reconnection region if we assume that the ambient magnetic field strength is about 100 G.

  17. Type III burst pair.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zongjun, Ning; Fu, Qijun; Quankang, Lu

    2000-05-01

    Presents a special solar radio burst detected on 5 January 1994 using the multi-channel (50) spectrometer (1.0 - 2.0 GHz) of the Beijing Astronomical Observatory. Sadly, the whole event could not be recorded since it had a broader bandwidth than the limit range of the instrument. The important part was obtained, however. The event is composed of a normal drift type III burst on the lower frequency side and a reverse drift type III burst appearing almost simultaneously on the high side. The authors call the burst type III a burst pair. It is a typical characteristic of two type III bursts that they are morphologically symmetric about some frequency from 1.64 GHz to 1.78 GHz on the dynamic spectra records, which indicates that there are two different electron beams from the same acceleration region travelling simultaneously in opposite directions (upward and downward). A magnetic reconnection mode is an interpretation of type III burst pair.

  18. Jovian type III radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.

    1989-01-01

    Radio bursts have been observed in the Voyager plasma wave data from Jupiter that bear a striking resemblance to solar type III radio bursts. The emissions lie in the frequency range near 10 kHz, have durations of a minute or so, and occur in a set of periodically spaced bursts. The spacing between primary bursts is typically 15 min, but the bursts may have additional components which recur on time scales of about 3 min. The similarity with solar type III radio bursts suggests a source mechanism involving the movement of energetic electrons through a density gradient in the plasma surrounding Jupiter. The periodicity of bursts suggests Io may be involved in the generation of waves, since the timing is similar to the Alfven wave travel time from one hemisphere to the other through the Io torus.

  19. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LOW AND HIGH FREQUENCIES IN {delta} SCUTI STARS: PHOTOMETRIC KEPLER AND SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSES OF THE RAPID ROTATOR KIC 8054146

    SciTech Connect

    Breger, M.; Robertson, P.; Fossati, L.; Balona, L.; Kurtz, D. W.; Bohlender, D.; Lenz, P.; Mueller, I.; Lueftinger, Th.; Clarke, Bruce D.

    2012-11-01

    Two years of Kepler data of KIC 8054146 ({delta} Sct/{gamma} Dor hybrid) revealed 349 statistically significant frequencies between 0.54 and 191.36 cycles day{sup -1} (6.3 {mu}Hz to 2.21 mHz). The 117 low frequencies cluster in specific frequency bands, but do not show the equidistant period spacings predicted for gravity modes of successive radial order, n, and reported for at least one other hybrid pulsator. The four dominant low frequencies in the 2.8-3.0 cycles day{sup -1} (32-35 {mu}Hz) range show strong amplitude variability with timescales of months and years. These four low frequencies also determine the spacing of the higher frequencies in and beyond the {delta} Sct pressure-mode frequency domain. In fact, most of the higher frequencies belong to one of three families with spacings linked to a specific dominant low frequency. In the Fourier spectrum, these family regularities show up as triplets, high-frequency sequences with absolutely equidistant frequency spacings, side lobes (amplitude modulations), and other regularities in frequency spacings. Furthermore, within two families the amplitude variations between the low and high frequencies are related. We conclude that the low frequencies (gravity modes, rotation) and observed high frequencies (mostly pressure modes) are physically connected. This unusual behavior may be related to the very rapid rotation of the star: from a combination of high- and low-resolution spectroscopy we determined that KIC 8054146 is a very fast rotator ({upsilon} sin i = 300 {+-} 20 km s{sup -1}) with an effective temperature of 7600 {+-} 200 K and a surface gravity log g of 3.9 {+-} 0.3. Several astrophysical ideas explaining the origin of the relationship between the low and high frequencies are explored.

  20. Pulsational frequencies in the delta Scuti stars V624 Tauri and HD 23194. Results of the STEPHI X campaign on the Pleiades cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox-Machado, L.; Álvarez, M.; Michel, E.; Li, Z. P.; Pérez Hernández, F.; Chevreton, M.; Barban, C.; Belmonte, J. A.; Dolez, N.; Fernandez, A.; Guo, J. P.; Haywood, M.; Liu, Y. Y.; Pau, S.; Planas, H.; Servan, B.

    2002-02-01

    The results of the tenth multi-site campaign of the STEPHI network are reported. The delta Scuti stars V624 Tau (HD 23156) and HD 23194, belonging to the Pleiades cluster, were observed photometrically for 34 days on three continents during 1999 November-December. An overall run of 343 hours of data was collected. Seven frequencies for V624 Tau and two frequencies for HD 23194 have been found above a 99% confidence level. These results greatly improve those found in previous studies with much less data. A preliminary comparison of observed and theoretical frequencies suggests that both stars may oscillate with radial and non-radial p modes of radial orders typical among delta Scuti stars.

  1. Bursting Neurons in the Hippocampal Formation Encode Features of LFP Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Constantinou, Maria; Gonzalo Cogno, Soledad; Elijah, Daniel H.; Kropff, Emilio; Gigg, John; Samengo, Inés; Montemurro, Marcelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Burst spike patterns are common in regions of the hippocampal formation such as the subiculum and medial entorhinal cortex (MEC). Neurons in these areas are immersed in extracellular electrical potential fluctuations often recorded as the local field potential (LFP). LFP rhythms within different frequency bands are linked to different behavioral states. For example, delta rhythms are often associated with slow-wave sleep, inactivity and anesthesia; whereas theta rhythms are prominent during awake exploratory behavior and REM sleep. Recent evidence suggests that bursting neurons in the hippocampal formation can encode LFP features. We explored this hypothesis using a two-compartment model of a bursting pyramidal neuron driven by time-varying input signals containing spectral peaks at either delta or theta rhythms. The model predicted a neural code in which bursts represented the instantaneous value, phase, slope and amplitude of the driving signal both in their timing and size (spike number). To verify whether this code is employed in vivo, we examined electrophysiological recordings from the subiculum of anesthetized rats and the MEC of a behaving rat containing prevalent delta or theta rhythms, respectively. In both areas, we found bursting cells that encoded information about the instantaneous voltage, phase, slope and/or amplitude of the dominant LFP rhythm with essentially the same neural code as the simulated neurons. A fraction of the cells encoded part of the information in burst size, in agreement with model predictions. These results provide in-vivo evidence that the output of bursting neurons in the mammalian brain is tuned to features of the LFP. PMID:28082890

  2. Neuronal Networks during Burst Suppression as Revealed by Source Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reinicke, Christine; Moeller, Friederike; Anwar, Abdul Rauf; Mideksa, Kidist Gebremariam; Pressler, Ronit; Deuschl, Günther; Stephani, Ulrich; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Burst-suppression (BS) is an electroencephalography (EEG) pattern consisting of alternant periods of slow waves of high amplitude (burst) and periods of so called flat EEG (suppression). It is generally associated with coma of various etiologies (hypoxia, drug-related intoxication, hypothermia, and childhood encephalopathies, but also anesthesia). Animal studies suggest that both the cortex and the thalamus are involved in the generation of BS. However, very little is known about mechanisms of BS in humans. The aim of this study was to identify the neuronal network underlying both burst and suppression phases using source reconstruction and analysis of functional and effective connectivity in EEG. Material/Methods Dynamic imaging of coherent sources (DICS) was applied to EEG segments of 13 neonates and infants with burst and suppression EEG pattern. The brain area with the strongest power in the analyzed frequency (1–4 Hz) range was defined as the reference region. DICS was used to compute the coherence between this reference region and the entire brain. The renormalized partial directed coherence (RPDC) was used to describe the informational flow between the identified sources. Results/Conclusion Delta activity during the burst phases was associated with coherent sources in the thalamus and brainstem as well as bilateral sources in cortical regions mainly frontal and parietal, whereas suppression phases were associated with coherent sources only in cortical regions. Results of the RPDC analyses showed an upwards informational flow from the brainstem towards the thalamus and from the thalamus to cortical regions, which was absent during the suppression phases. These findings may support the theory that a “cortical deafferentiation” between the cortex and sub-cortical structures exists especially in suppression phases compared to burst phases in burst suppression EEGs. Such a deafferentiation may play a role in the poor neurological outcome of

  3. V(D)J recombination generates a high frequency of nonstandard TCR D[delta]-associated rearrangements in thymocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, A.M.; Slack, J.K.; Mu, Xiaochun )

    1993-03-15

    The standard products of V(D)J recombination are coding junctions, which encode Ag receptor polypeptide, and their commonly excised reciprocal products, signal junctions. Additional nonstandard products also have been detected, mostly in artificial recombination substrate studies. The occurrence of nonstandard products, including pseudonormal, hybrid, and open/shut junctions, indicates significant indeterminacy of the V(D)J recombinase. However, the incidence of nonstandard products of endogenous Ag receptor genes in vivo has not been specifically addressed. The data presented here show that for the TCR-[delta] locus, D element-associated recombination in mouse thymocytes results in a high incidence of nonstandard recombination products. D[delta]1-D[delta]2 rearrangements, both chromosome retained and excised episomal products, were studied by polymerase chain reaction amplification, cloning, and sequence analysis. The proximity of D[delta]1 and D[delta]2 elements, and the fact that both are flanked by 5[prime] and 3[prime] recombination signal sequences with 12-bp and 23-bp spacers, respectively, results in frequent pseudonormal joining. The resulting products are signal junctions retained on the chromosome. Excised episomal products include coding junctions, hybrid junctions formed in apparent violation of the 12/23 spacer rule, and standard signal junctions; some signal junctions show evidence of imprecise cleavage. Evidence for open/shut and/or oligonucleotide capture events was also seen. Similar rearrangements were detectable in thymocytes of mutant scid mice. These findings indicate a high degree of indeterminancy of V(D)J recombinase-mediated D[delta]1-D[delta]2 rearrangement in both wild-type and scid thymocytes. This indeterminacy affects the productive potential of TCR-[delta] loci. 45 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Relations between the frequency of the DeltaF 508 mutation and the course of pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rosenecker, J

    2000-08-18

    The course of pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis is variable. There are controversial data on the impact of the type of mutation on the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene on the course of pulmonary disease in CF. Since selected mutations of the CFTR gene appear to be associated with relatively mild disease, this study addressed the question whether the course of pulmonary disease in CF patients colonized with P. aeruginosa is influenced by the frequency of the DeltaF 508 mutation. For this study, we assessed FVC and FEV1 in 127 CF patients who attended regularly the Munich CF Center over a mean period of 43 +/- 16 (SD) months. Of these 127 patients, 69 (54.3%) were homozygous for the DeltaF 508 mutation, 42 (33.1%) were compound heterozygous for the DeltaF 508 mutation, and 16 (12.6%) did not carry the DeltaF 508 mutation on either chromosome. In homozygotes 59 (85.5%) out of 69 CF-patients were colonized with P. aeruginosa as compared with 27 (64.3%) out of 42 in heterozygotes (p <0.05). The mean age of onset of P. aeruginosa colonization was 11.0 years, and there was no difference between the three groups. The mean FVC and FEV1 values did not differ significantly between the three genotype groups when P. aeruginosa infection was disregarded. However, when only P. aeruginosa colonized patients were compared FVC and FEV1 values were lower in heterozygotes than in the other two groups both at the beginning and at the end of the study. These findings indicate that the course of pulmonary disease in CF patients is at least partially influenced by the frequency of the DeltaF 508 mutation.

  5. Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2017-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are a recently discovered phenomenon consisting of short (few ms) bursts of radio waves that have dispersion measures that strongly suggest an extragalactic and possibly cosmological origin. Current best estimates for the rate of FRBs is several thousand per sky per day at radio frequencies near 1.4 GHz. Even with so high a rate, to date, fewer than 20 FRBs have been reported, with one source showing repeated bursts. In this talk I will describe known FRB properties including what is known about the lone repeating source, as well as models for the origin of these mysterious events. I will also describe the CHIME radio telescope, currently under construction in Canada. Thanks to its great sensitivity and unprecedented field-of-view, CHIME promises major progress on FRBs.

  6. Synthesis of data from high-frequency nutrient and associated biogeochemical monitoring for the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downing, Bryan D.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Kraus, Tamara E.C.

    2017-07-11

    Executive SummaryThis report is the second in a series of three reports that provide information about high-frequency (HF) nutrient and biogeochemical monitoring in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta of northern California (Delta). The purpose of this report is to synthesize the data available from a nutrient and water-quality HF (about every 15 minutes) monitoring network operated by the U.S. Geological Survey in the northern Delta. In this report, we describe the network and focus on the purpose of each station. We then present and discuss the available data, at various timescales—first at the monthly, seasonal, and inter-annual timescales, and second, for comparison, at the tidal and event timescales. As expected, we determined that there is substantial variability in nitrate-N concentrations at short timescales within hours, but also significant variability at longer timescales such as months or years. Resolving this variability is made possible by the HF data, with the largest variability caused by storms, tides, and diel biological processes. Given this large temporal variability, calculations of cumulative nutrient fluxes (for example, daily, monthly, or annual loads) is difficult without HF data. For example, in the Cache Slough, calculation of the annual load without the tidal variability resulted in a 30 percent underestimation of the true annual load value. We conclude that HF measurements are important for accurate determination of fluxes and loads in tidal environments, but, more importantly, provide important insights into processes and rates of nutrient cycling.This report, along with the other two reports of this series (Bergamaschi and others, 2017; Kraus, Bergamaschi, and others, 2017), was drafted in cooperation with the Delta Regional Monitoring Program to help scientists, managers, and planners understand how HF data improve our understanding of nutrient sources and sinks, drivers, and effects in the Delta. The first report in the series

  7. Multi-Frequency and Multi-Polarization Study on SAR-Based Coastal AReas Characterization: The Case of the Yellow River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buono, Andrea; Nunziata, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Maurizio; Li, Xiaofeng; Shen, Dongliang; Ding, Xianwen

    2016-08-01

    The Yellow River is the most sediment-filled river and the sixth-longest one in the world. It is of paramount importance for safe navigation, local economy and environment due to the presence of floods, farms, aquacultures and pollution. Further, the Yellow River delta is characterized by several physical phenomena due to both natural and anthropogenic processes: sedimentation, erosion, floods, pollution, etc.In this study, actual partially-overlapped L-/C-band fully- polarimetric (FP) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data are used to investigate the scattering properties of the Yellow River delta, whose very complex area is characterized by different environments as recorded by ground truth data acquired during a ship-based in-situ campaign. Preliminary results witness that multi-polarization and multi-frequency SAR measurements allow inferring more physical information in such a complex environment that can be used as starting point for developing ad hoc classification algorithms.

  8. X-ray observations of the burst source MXB 1728 - 34

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basinska, E. M.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Sztajno, M.; Cominsky, L. R.; Marshall, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    Where sufficient information has been obtained, attention is given to the maximum burst flux, integrated burst flux, spectral hardness, rise time, etc., of 96 X-ray bursts observed from March 1976 to March 1979. The integrated burst flux and the burst frequency appear to be correlated; the longer the burst interval, the larger the integrated burst flux, as expected on the basis of simple thermonuclear flash models. The maximum burst flux and the integrated burst flux are strongly correlated; for low flux levels their dependence is approximately linear, while for increasing values of the integrated burst flux, the flux at burst maximum saturates and reaches a plateau.

  9. Frequencies of the G-protein beta3 subunit C825T polymorphism and the delta 32 mutation of the chemokine receptor-5 in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Haase, Claus G; Schmidt, Stephan; Faustmann, Pedro M

    2002-09-27

    In the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) genetic factors are known to influence autoreactive T-cell-actions like proliferation and chemotaxis across the blood-brain barrier via chemokine receptors (CCR) and G-protein coupled activating mechanisms. For the first time, we studied the frequencies of a recently described C825T polymorphism in the G-protein encoding gene for the beta3 subunit (GNB3) together with frequencies of a 32-base-pair deletion in the CCR5 gene (delta32 CCR5) in patients with MS (n = 253: relapsing-remitting (RR), n = 124 and chronic progressive course, n = 129). Apart from a trend to a reduced frequency of delta32 CCR5 and increased GNB3 825T polymorphism in primary chronic progressive patients, numbers did not reach statistical significance in any group of MS. These results could not support differences in the genetic background of MS based on that CCR5 mutation or the described GNB3 polymorphism.

  10. Resource Sharing Controls Gene Expression Bursting.

    PubMed

    Caveney, Patrick M; Norred, S Elizabeth; Chin, Charles W; Boreyko, Jonathan B; Razooky, Brandon S; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, C Patrick; Simpson, Michael L

    2017-02-17

    Episodic gene expression, with periods of high expression separated by periods of no expression, is a pervasive biological phenomenon. This bursty pattern of expression draws from a finite reservoir of expression machinery in a highly time variant way, i.e., requiring no resources most of the time but drawing heavily on them during short intense bursts, that intimately links expression bursting and resource sharing. Yet, most recent investigations have focused on specific molecular mechanisms intrinsic to the bursty behavior of individual genes, while little is known about the interplay between resource sharing and global expression bursting behavior. Here, we confine Escherichia coli cell extract in both cell-sized microfluidic chambers and lipid-based vesicles to explore how resource sharing influences expression bursting. Interestingly, expression burst size, but not burst frequency, is highly sensitive to the size of the shared transcription and translation resource pools. The intriguing implication of these results is that expression bursts are more readily amplified than initiated, suggesting that burst formation occurs through positive feedback or cooperativity. When extrapolated to prokaryotic cells, these results suggest that large translational bursts may be correlated with large transcriptional bursts. This correlation is supported by recently reported transcription and translation bursting studies in E. coli. The results reported here demonstrate a strong intimate link between global expression burst patterns and resource sharing, and they suggest that bursting plays an important role in optimizing the use of limited, shared expression resources.

  11. Frequency of the CCR5 delta 32 mutant allele in HIV-1-positive patients, female sex workers, and a normal population in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Yan, Y P; Shieh, B; Lee, C M; Lin, R Y; Chen, Y M

    1997-12-01

    A specific 32-nucleotide deletion mutant of the CCR5 gene (Accr5), the coreceptor gene for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), can effectively suppress the transmission and pathogenesis of the virus. Individuals homozygous for the delta ccr5 allele resist primary macrophage-tropic HIV-1 infection, despite multiple high-risk sexual exposures. This gene deletion is relatively common among Caucasians but uncommon among Africans, Asians, and South Americans. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology to determine the frequency of the delta ccr5 allele in a Taiwanese population with diverse health status and social backgrounds. Subjects included 24 HIV-1-infected persons in the northern and southern parts of Taiwan; 131 HIV-1 high-risk, licensed female sex workers in the northern part of the island (21% of whom were aborigines); and 187 unrelated, healthy, HIV-1-negative individuals in southern Taiwan. PCR with primers encompassing the entire CCR5 gene was used to explore possible deletions at regions other than the 32-nucleotide area in the female sex workers. No ccr5 deletions were detected, indicating that they are rare or absent in the Taiwanese population. This finding implies that delta ccr5 is not likely to be part of the defense against the spread of HIV-1-infection in Taiwanese.

  12. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  13. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From a burst of fire and smoke, the Delta II launch vehicle races into the sky carrying the second Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity. The bright glare briefly illuminated Florida Space Coast beaches. Opportunity’s dash to Mars began with liftoff at 11:18:15 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The spacecraft separated successfully from the Delta's third stage 83 minutes later, after it had been boosted out of Earth orbit and onto a course toward Mars.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-07

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - From a burst of fire and smoke, the Delta II launch vehicle races into the sky carrying the second Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity. The bright glare briefly illuminated Florida Space Coast beaches. Opportunity’s dash to Mars began with liftoff at 11:18:15 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The spacecraft separated successfully from the Delta's third stage 83 minutes later, after it had been boosted out of Earth orbit and onto a course toward Mars.

  14. Modelling the increased frequency of extreme sea levels in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna delta due to sea level rise and other effects of climate change.

    PubMed

    Kay, S; Caesar, J; Wolf, J; Bricheno, L; Nicholls, R J; Saiful Islam, A K M; Haque, A; Pardaens, A; Lowe, J A

    2015-07-01

    Coastal flooding due to storm surge and high tides is a serious risk for inhabitants of the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) delta, as much of the land is close to sea level. Climate change could lead to large areas of land being subject to increased flooding, salinization and ultimate abandonment in West Bengal, India, and Bangladesh. IPCC 5th assessment modelling of sea level rise and estimates of subsidence rates from the EU IMPACT2C project suggest that sea level in the GBM delta region may rise by 0.63 to 0.88 m by 2090, with some studies suggesting this could be up to 0.5 m higher if potential substantial melting of the West Antarctic ice sheet is included. These sea level rise scenarios lead to increased frequency of high water coastal events. Any effect of climate change on the frequency and severity of storms can also have an effect on extreme sea levels. A shelf-sea model of the Bay of Bengal has been used to investigate how the combined effect of sea level rise and changes in other environmental conditions under climate change may alter the frequency of extreme sea level events for the period 1971 to 2099. The model was forced using atmospheric and oceanic boundary conditions derived from climate model projections and the future scenario increase in sea level was applied at its ocean boundary. The model results show an increased likelihood of extreme sea level events through the 21st century, with the frequency of events increasing greatly in the second half of the century: water levels that occurred at decadal time intervals under present-day model conditions occurred in most years by the middle of the 21st century and 3-15 times per year by 2100. The heights of the most extreme events tend to increase more in the first half of the century than the second. The modelled scenarios provide a case study of how sea level rise and other effects of climate change may combine to produce a greatly increased threat to life and property in the GBM delta by the end

  15. Differential Regulation of Action Potential Shape and Burst-Frequency Firing by BK and Kv2 Channels in Substantia Nigra Dopaminergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Kimm, Tilia; Khaliq, Zayd M; Bean, Bruce P

    2015-12-16

    channel types participate in action potential repolarization about equally, they have contrasting and partially opposite effects in regulating neuronal firing at frequencies typical of bursting. Our analysis shows that this results from their different kinetic properties, with fast-activating BK channels serving to short-circuit activation of Kv2 channels, which tend to slow firing by producing a deep afterhyperpolarization. The cross-regulation of BK and Kv2 activation illustrates that the functional role of a channel cannot be defined in isolation but depends critically on the context of the other conductances in the cell. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3516404-14$15.00/0.

  16. Millimeter wave transmission studies of YBa2Cu3O7-delta thin films in the 26.5 to 40.0 GHz frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, F. A.; Gordon, W. L.; Bhasin, K. B.; Heinen, V. O.; Warner, J. D.; Valco, G. J.

    1989-01-01

    Millimeter wave transmission measurements through YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) thin films on MgO, ZrO2 and LaAlO3 substrates, are reported. The films (approx. 1 micron) were deposited by sequential evaporation and laser ablation techniques. Transition temperatures T sub c, ranging from 89.7 K for the Laser Ablated film on LaAlO3 to approximately 72 K for the sequentially evaporated film on MgO, were obtained. The values of the real and imaginary parts of the complex conductivity, sigma 1 and sigma 2, are obtained from the transmission data, assuming a two fluid model. The BCS approach is used to calculate values for an effective energy gap from the obtained values of sigma sub 1. A range of gap values from 2 DELTA o/K sub B T sub c = 4.19 to 4.35 was obtained. The magnetic penetration depth is evaluated from the deduced values of sigma 2. These results are discussed together with the frequency dependence of the normalized transmission amplitude, P/P sub c, below and above T sub c.

  17. Solar Radio Bursts and Space Weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk,

    2012-01-01

    Radio bursts from the Sun are produced by electron accelerated to relativistic energies by physical processes on the Sun such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The radio bursts are thus good indicators of solar eruptions. Three types of nonthermal radio bursts are generally associated with CMEs. Type III bursts due to accelerated electrons propagating along open magnetic field lines. The electrons are thought to be accelerated at the reconnection region beneath the erupting CME, although there is another view that the electrons may be accelerated at the CME-driven shock. Type II bursts are due to electrons accelerated at the shock front. Type II bursts are also excellent indicators of solar energetic particle (SEP) events because the same shock is supposed accelerate electrons and ions. There is a hierarchical relationship between the wavelength range of type /I bursts and the CME kinetic energy. Finally, Type IV bursts are due to electrons trapped in moving or stationary structures. The low frequency stationary type IV bursts are observed occasionally in association with very fast CMEs. These bursts originate from flare loops behind the erupting CME and hence indicate tall loops. This paper presents a summary of radio bursts and their relation to CMEs and how they can be useful for space weather predictions.

  18. High-frequency depositional sequences and stratal stacking patterns in lower pliocene coastal deltas, mid-Norwegian continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, S.; Weimer, P.

    1996-12-01

    Extensive deltaic and coastal progradation occurred along the mid-Norwegian continental shelf during the early Pliocene. Thirty-eight well-developed, high-frequency (fourth-order) sequences are identified within the deltaic complex on multifold seismic data. The fourth-order sequences are arranged in four oblique progradational and two sigmoid progradational sequence sets. Deposition of the high-frequency sequences and their stacking patterns probably were in response to high-frequency cycles of relative changes in sea level cycles produced by variable rates of subsidence and uplift, superimposed on ;high-frequency eustatic cycles within a lower frequency eustatic system. The mixed aggrading/prograding sequence sets are interpreted to represent increased space-added accommodation rates and deposition within third-order highstand systems tracts. Conversely, the progradational sequence sets are interpreted to represent decreasing space-added accommodation rates and deposition within the third-order low-stand systems tracts. The recognition of multiple sequence sets likely reflects the effect of long-term relative fall in sea level (tectonic uplift?) super-imposed on high-frequency eustatic cycles.

  19. Effects of various extremely low frequency magnetic fields on the free radical processes, natural antioxidant system and respiratory burst system activities in the heart and liver tissues.

    PubMed

    Canseven, Ayse Gulnihal; Coskun, Sule; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2008-10-01

    Magnetic fields (MFs) can affect biological systems by increasing the release of free radicals that are able to alter cell defense systems and breakdown tissue homeostasis. In the present study, the effects of extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) were investigated on free radical levels, natural antioxidant systems and respiratory burst system activities in heart and liver tissues of guinea pigs exposed to 50 Hz MFs of 1, 2 and 3 mT for 4 h/day and 8 h/day for 5 days by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), glutathione (GSH) levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. A total of sixty-two male guinea pigs, 10-12 weeks old were studied in seven groups as control and exposure groups: Group I (control), II (1 mT, 4 h/day), III (1 mT, 8 h/day), IV (2 mT, 4 h/day), V (2 mT, 8 h/day), VI (3 mT, 4 h/day), and VII (3 mT, 8 h/day). Controls were kept under the same conditions without any exposure to MF. MDA levels increased in liver in groups II and IV, but decreased in group VII for both liver and heart tissues. NOx levels declined in heart in groups II and III and in liver in groups III, V, and VI, but increased in liver in group VII. GSH levels increased in heart in groups II, IV, V, and in liver in groups V and VI and VI, but decreased in groups II and IV in liver. MPO activity decreased in liver in groups III, IV, VI and VII with respect to controls and in heart tissues in groups II, III and IV; however, there was a significant increase MPO activity in heart in group VII. From the results, it can be concluded that the intensity and exposure duration of MFs are among the effective conditions on the formation of free radicals and behaviour of antioxidant enzymes.

  20. Differential Regulation of Action Potential Shape and Burst-Frequency Firing by BK and Kv2 Channels in Substantia Nigra Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kimm, Tilia; Khaliq, Zayd M.

    2015-01-01

    pars compacta. Although both channel types participate in action potential repolarization about equally, they have contrasting and partially opposite effects in regulating neuronal firing at frequencies typical of bursting. Our analysis shows that this results from their different kinetic properties, with fast-activating BK channels serving to short-circuit activation of Kv2 channels, which tend to slow firing by producing a deep afterhyperpolarization. The cross-regulation of BK and Kv2 activation illustrates that the functional role of a channel cannot be defined in isolation but depends critically on the context of the other conductances in the cell. PMID:26674866

  1. Herringbone bursts associated with type II solar radio emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, I. H.; Robinson, R. D.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed observations of the herringbone (HB) fine structure on type II solar radio bursts are presented. Data from the Culgoora radiospectrograph, radiometer and radioheliograph are analyzed. The characteristic spectral profiles, frequency drift rates and exciter velocities, fluxes, source sizes, brightness temperatures, and polarizations of individual HB bursts are determined. Correlations between individual bursts within the characteristic groups of bursts and the properties of the associated type II bursts are examined. These data are compatible with HB bursts being radiation at multiples of the plasma frequency generated by electron streams accelerated by the type II shock. HB bursts are physically distinct phenomena from type II and type III bursts, differing significantly in emission processes and/or source conditions; this conclusion indicates that many of the presently available theoretical ideas for HB bursts are incorrect.

  2. Abrupt change of josephson plasma frequency at the phase boundary of the bragg glass in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta)

    PubMed

    Gaifullin; Matsuda; Chikumoto; Shimoyama; Kishio

    2000-03-27

    We report the first detailed and quantitative study of the Josephson coupling energy in the vortex liquid, Bragg glass, and vortex glass phases of Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta) by the Josephson plasma resonance. The measurements revealed distinct features in the T and H dependencies of the plasma frequency omega(pl) for each of these three vortex phases. When going across either the Bragg-to-vortex glass or the Bragg-to-liquid transition line, omega(pl) shows a dramatic change. We provide a quantitative discussion on the properties of these phase transitions, including the first order nature of the Bragg-to-vortex glass transition.

  3. Nile Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  The Nile River Delta     View Larger Image ... of eastern Africa. At the apex of the fertile Nile River Delta is the Egyptian capital city of Cairo. To the west are the Great Pyramids ...

  4. Auditory Delta Event-Related Oscillatory Responses are Decreased in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yener, G. G.; Güntekin, B.; Örken, D. Necioglu; Tülay, E.; Forta, H.; Başar, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Visual delta event-related (ERO) and evoked oscillations (EO) of Alzheimer patients (AD) are different than healthy. In the present study, the analysis is extented to include auditory ERO and EO in AD. The rationale is to reveal whether the auditory ERO delta responses are also reduced, and whether this is a general phenomenon in Alzheimer patients upon applying stimuli with cognitive load. Methods: Thirty-four mild AD subjects (17 de-novo and 17 medicated (cholinergic)) and seventeen healthy controls were included. Auditory oddball paradigm and sensory auditory stimuli were applied to the subjects. Oscillatory responses were analyzed by measuring maximum amplitudes in delta frequency range (0.5–3.5 Hz). Results: Auditory delta ERO (0.5–3.5 Hz) responses of healthy controls were higher than either de-novo AD or medicated AD group, without a difference between two AD subgroups. Furthermore, the auditory EO after presentation of tone bursts yielded no group difference. Conclusion: Our findings imply that delta ERO is highly unstable in AD patients in comparison to age-matched healthy controls only during the cognitive paradigm. Our results favor the hypothesis that neural delta networks are activated during cognitive tasks and that the reduced delta response is a general phenomenon in AD, due to cognitive impairment. PMID:22207418

  5. Auditory delta event-related oscillatory responses are decreased in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Yener, G G; Güntekin, B; Örken, D Necioglu; Tülay, E; Forta, H; Başar, E

    2012-01-01

    Visual delta event-related (ERO) and evoked oscillations (EO) of Alzheimer patients (AD) are different than healthy. In the present study, the analysis is extented to include auditory ERO and EO in AD. The rationale is to reveal whether the auditory ERO delta responses are also reduced, and whether this is a general phenomenon in Alzheimer patients upon applying stimuli with cognitive load. Thirty-four mild AD subjects [17 de-novo and 17 medicated (cholinergic)] and seventeen healthy controls were included. Auditory oddball paradigm and sensory auditory stimuli were applied to the subjects. Oscillatory responses were analyzed by measuring maximum amplitudes in delta frequency range (0.5-3.5 Hz). Auditory delta ERO (0.5-3.5 Hz) responses of healthy controls were higher than either de-novo AD or medicated AD group, without a difference between two AD subgroups. Furthermore, the auditory EO after presentation of tone bursts yielded no group difference. Our findings imply that delta ERO is highly unstable in AD patients in comparison to age-matched healthy controls only during the cognitive paradigm. Our results favor the hypothesis that neural delta networks are activated during cognitive tasks and that the reduced delta response is a general phenomenon in AD, due to cognitive impairment.

  6. Volga Delta

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Volga Delta and the Caspian Sea     View ... appear reddish. A small cloud near the center of the delta separates into red, green, and blue components due to geometric parallax ... include several linear features located near the Volga Delta shoreline. These long, thin lines are artificially maintained shipping ...

  7. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one's understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying (delta) Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for (delta) Scuti stars, using FG Vir, (delta) Scuti, and CD-24(degree) 7599 as examples.

  8. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one`s understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying {delta} Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for {delta} Scuti stars, using FG Vir, {delta} Scuti, and CD-24{degree} 7599 as examples.

  9. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, J. A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one's understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying (delta) Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for (delta) Scuti stars, using FG Vir, (delta) Scuti, and CD-24(degree) 7599 as examples.

  10. Hardness/intensity correlations among BATSE bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Conclusions about the nature of gamma-ray bursts derived from the size-frequency distribution may be altered if a significant correlation exists between burst intensity and spectral shape. Moreover, if gamma-ray bursts have a cosmological origin, such a correlation may be expected to result from the expansion of the universe. We have performed a rudimentary search of the BATSE bursts for hardness/intensity correlations. The range of spectral shapes was determined for each burst by computing the ratio of the intensity in the range 100-300 keV to that in 55-300 keV. We find weak evidence for the existence of a correlation, the strongest effect being present when comparing the maximum hardness ratio for each burst with its maximum rate.

  11. A joint probability approach using a 1-D hydrodynamic model for estimating high water level frequencies in the Lower Rhine Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, H.; van Overloop, P.-J.; van Gelder, P. H. A. J. M.

    2013-07-01

    The Lower Rhine Delta, a transitional area between the River Rhine and Meuse and the North Sea, is at risk of flooding induced by infrequent events of a storm surge or upstream flooding, or by more infrequent events of a combination of both. A joint probability analysis of the astronomical tide, the wind induced storm surge, the Rhine flow and the Meuse flow at the boundaries is established in order to produce the joint probability distribution of potential flood events. Three individual joint probability distributions are established corresponding to three potential flooding causes: storm surges and normal Rhine discharges, normal sea levels and high Rhine discharges, and storm surges and high Rhine discharges. For each category, its corresponding joint probability distribution is applied, in order to stochastically simulate a large number of scenarios. These scenarios can be used as inputs to a deterministic 1-D hydrodynamic model in order to estimate the high water level frequency curves at the transitional locations. The results present the exceedance probability of the present design water level for the economically important cities of Rotterdam and Dordrecht. The calculated exceedance probability is evaluated and compared to the governmental norm. Moreover, the impact of climate change on the high water level frequency curves is quantified for the year 2050 in order to assist in decisions regarding the adaptation of the operational water management system and the flood defense system.

  12. A Neocortical Delta Rhythm Facilitates Reciprocal Interlaminar Interactions via Nested Theta Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Carracedo, Lucy M.; Kjeldsen, Henrik; Cunnington, Leonie; Jenkins, Alastair; Schofield, Ian; Cunningham, Mark O.; Davies, Ceri H.; Traub, Roger D.

    2013-01-01

    Delta oscillations (1–4 Hz) associate with deep sleep and are implicated in memory consolidation and replay of cortical responses elicited during wake states. A potent local generator has been characterized in thalamus, and local generators in neocortex have been suggested. Here we demonstrate that isolated rat neocortex generates delta rhythms in conditions mimicking the neuromodulatory state during deep sleep (low cholinergic and dopaminergic tone). The rhythm originated in an NMDA receptor-driven network of intrinsic bursting (IB) neurons in layer 5, activating a source of GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition. In contrast, regular spiking (RS) neurons in layer 5 generated theta-frequency outputs. In layer 2/3 principal cells, outputs from IB cells associated with IPSPs, whereas those from layer 5 RS neurons related to nested bursts of theta-frequency EPSPs. Both interlaminar spike and field correlations revealed a sequence of events whereby sparse spiking in layer 2/3 was partially reflected back from layer 5 on each delta period. We suggest that these reciprocal, interlaminar interactions may represent a “Helmholtz machine”-like process to control synaptic rescaling during deep sleep. PMID:23804097

  13. Frequency of the CCR5-delta32 mutation in the Atlantic island populations of Madeira, the Azores, Cabo Verde, and São Tomé e Príncipe.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Tamira; Brehm, António; Fernandes, Ana Teresa

    2006-12-01

    There is evidence that the CCR5-delta32 mutation confers protection against HIV-1 infection to homozygous individuals. It is believed that this mutation spread through Europe with the Vikings and that it has been subjected to positive selection, leading to a high frequency in Europe (approximately 10%). We carried out the present study to determine the 32-bp deletion allele and genotype frequencies of the CCR5 gene (CCR5-delta32) in the Atlantic island populations of Madeira, the Azores, Cabo Verde, and São Tomé e Principe. These Atlantic archipelagos were all colonized by the Portuguese in the 15th and 16th centuries, but the latter two received most of their settlers from the West African coast. The frequency of the CCR5-delta32 mutation varies between 0% in São Tomé e Príncipe and 16.5% in the Azores. The Azores Islands have one of the highest frequencies of homozygotes found in Europe (4.8%). There are significant differences (P < 0.05) between some of these populations, for example, between São Tomé e Príncipe and Cabo Verde, and even within populations (e.g., Portugal, Madeira, and the Azores).

  14. How Long does a Burst Burst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Bing; Murase, Kohta; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael S.

    2014-05-01

    Several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) last much longer (~hours) in γ-rays than typical long GRBs (~minutes), and it has recently been proposed that these "ultra-long GRBs" may form a distinct population, probably with a different (e.g., blue supergiant) progenitor than typical GRBs. However, Swift observations suggest that many GRBs have extended central engine activities manifested as flares and internal plateaus in X-rays. We perform a comprehensive study on a large sample of Swift GRBs with X-Ray Telescope observations to investigate GRB central engine activity duration and to determine whether ultra-long GRBs are unusual events. We define burst duration t burst based on both γ-ray and X-ray light curves rather than using γ-ray observations alone. We find that t burst can be reliably measured in 343 GRBs. Within this "good" sample, 21.9% GRBs have t burst >~ 103 s and 11.5% GRBs have t burst >~ 104 s. There is an apparent bimodal distribution of t burst in this sample. However, when we consider an "undetermined" sample (304 GRBs) with t burst possibly falling in the gap between GRB duration T 90 and the first X-ray observational time, as well as a selection effect against t burst falling into the first Swift orbital "dead zone" due to observation constraints, the intrinsic underlying t burst distribution is consistent with being a single component distribution. We found that the existing evidence for a separate ultra-long GRB population is inconclusive, and further multi-wavelength observations are needed to draw a firmer conclusion. We also discuss the theoretical implications of our results. In particular, the central engine activity duration of GRBs is generally much longer than the γ-ray T 90 duration and it does not even correlate with T 90. It would be premature to make a direct connection between T 90 and the size of the progenitor star.

  15. Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging

    DOEpatents

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.

    1998-04-28

    A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time. 12 figs.

  16. Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging

    DOEpatents

    Wachter, Eric A.; Fisher, Walter G.

    1998-01-01

    A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time.

  17. Autaptic Connections Shift Network Excitability and Bursting

    PubMed Central

    Wiles, Laura; Gu, Shi; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Parvesse, Brandon; Gabrieli, David; Bassett, Danielle S.; Meaney, David F.

    2017-01-01

    We examine the role of structural autapses, when a neuron synapses onto itself, in driving network-wide bursting behavior. Using a simple spiking model of neuronal activity, we study how autaptic connections affect activity patterns, and evaluate if controllability significantly affects changes in bursting from autaptic connections. Adding more autaptic connections to excitatory neurons increased the number of spiking events and the number of network-wide bursts. We observed excitatory synapses contributed more to bursting behavior than inhibitory synapses. We evaluated if neurons with high average controllability, predicted to push the network into easily achievable states, affected bursting behavior differently than neurons with high modal controllability, thought to influence the network into difficult to reach states. Results show autaptic connections to excitatory neurons with high average controllability led to higher burst frequencies than adding the same number of self-looping connections to neurons with high modal controllability. The number of autapses required to induce bursting was lowered by adding autapses to high degree excitatory neurons. These results suggest a role of autaptic connections in controlling network-wide bursts in diverse cortical and subcortical regions of mammalian brain. Moreover, they open up new avenues for the study of dynamic neurophysiological correlates of structural controllability. PMID:28266594

  18. Delta II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Delta II expendable launch vehicle with the ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite), cooperative space X-ray astronomy mission between NASA, Germany and United Kingdom, was launched from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on June 1, 1990.

  19. Burst Oscillations: Watching Neutron Stars Spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2010-01-01

    It is now almost 15 years since the first detection of rotationally modulated emission from X-ray bursting neutron stars, "burst oscillations," This phenomenon enables us to see neutron stars spin, as the X-ray burst flux asymmetrically lights up the surface. It has enabled a new way to probe the neutron star spin frequency distribution, as well as to elucidate the multidimensional nature of nuclear burning on neutron stars. I will review our current observational understanding of the phenomenon, with an eye toward highlighting some of the interesting remaining puzzles, of which there is no shortage.

  20. Statistical study of solar radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Gelu-Marius

    2004-10-01

    The peak flux distribution of 40 years of solar radio burst data recorded by NOAA, as a function of frequency and time over a wide range of frequencies, was investigated to quantify the potential impact of radio bursts on wireless systems. Tables of fit parameters, which can be used to find burst occurrence rates in a number of frequency ranges, are presented. The typical power-law index of number density distribution, ~-1.8, is similar to that found in many hard X-ray studies. Significant changes were found in power-law index with frequency. The results may be useful for designers of current and future wireless systems. A set of 412 flares detected by OVSA during 2001-2002 was analyzed. Distributions of the spectral parameters were investigated and the correlations between them discussed, adding to the understanding of particle acceleration and flare energetics. The observed microwave bursts were classified according to their spectral and temporal characteristics, and the natural limits of different emission mechanisms were empirically inferred. An analysis of spectral peak evolution of microwave bursts found that, generally, the peak frequency is very well correlated with the intensity of microwave bursts, in agreement with theoretical predictions following from the gyrosynchrotron self-absorption origin of the low frequency turnover of the spectrum. However, for some events the peak frequency increase is much smaller than expected or even absent. It was found that the peak frequency almost always increases on the late decay phase of strong long duration events. For 60% of the cases, the spectral dynamics of peak frequency around the peak time is caused by gyrosynchrotron self-absorption, but in 70% of cases, Razin suppression is dominant at some time during the burst, especially on the early rise and late decay phases. The properties of decimetric spike bursts occurring simultaneously with microwave gyrosynchrotron continuum bursts were analyzed. The spike

  1. Voyager observations of Jovian millisecond radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. K.; Desch, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    Voyager Planetary Radio Astronomy data collected over 30-day intervals centered on the two close encounters with Jupiter were utilized to study the characteristics of millisecond-duration radio bursts (s-bursts) at frequencies between 5 and 15 MHz. In this frequency range, s-bursts are found to occur almost independently of Central Meridian Longitude and to depend entirely on the phase of Io with respect to the observer's planetocentric line of sight. Individual bursts typically cover a total frequency range of about 1.5 to 3 MHz, and they are usually strongly circularly polarized. Most bursts in a particular s-burst storm will exhibit the same polarization sense (either right-hand or left-hand), and there is some evidence for a systematic pattern in which one polarizations sense is preferred over the other as a function of Io phase and Central Meridian Longitude. These data are all suggestive of a radio source that is located along the instantaneous Io flux tube and that extends over a linear dimension of 5000 km along the field lines in both the northern and southern Hemispheres.

  2. A Model-based Interpretation of Low-frequency Changes in the Carbon Cycle during the Last 120,000 years and its Implications for the Reconstruction of Atmospheric (delta) 14-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, Peter; Muscheler, Raimund; Fischer, Hubertus

    2006-01-01

    A main caveat in the interpretation of observed changes in atmospheric (Delta)C-l4 during the last 50,000 years is the unknown variability of the carbon cycle, which together with changes in the C-14 production rates determines the C-14 dynamics. A plausible scenario explaining glacial/interglacial dynamics seen in atmospheric CO2 and (delta)C-13 was proposed recently (Kohler et al., 2005a). A similar approach that expands its interpretation to the C-14 cycle is an important step toward a deeper understanding of (Delta)C-14 variability. This approach is based on an ocean/atmosphere/biosphere box model of the global carbon cycle (BICYCLE) to reproduce low-frequency changes in atmospheric CO2 as seen in Antarctic ice cores. The model is forced forward in time by various paleoclimatic records derived from ice and sediment cores. The simulation results of our proposed scenario match a compiled CO2 record from various ice cores during the last 120,000 years with high accuracy (r(sup 2) = 0.89). We analyze scenarios with different C-14 production rates, which are either constant or based on Be-10 measured in Greenland ice cores or the recent high-resolution geomagnetic field reconstruction GLOPIS-75 and compare them with the available (Delta)C-14 data covering the last 50,000 years. Our results suggest that during the last glacial cycle in general less than 110%0o f the increased atmospheric (Delta)C-14 is based on variations in the carbon cycle, while the largest part (5/6) of the variations has to be explained by other factors. Glacial atmospheric (Delta)C-14 larger than 700% cannot not be explained within our framework, neither through carbon cycle-based changes nor through variable C-14 production. Superimposed on these general trends might lie positive anomalies in atmospheric (Delta)C-14 of approx. 50% caused by millennial-scale variability of the northern deep water production during Heinrich events and Dansgaard/Oeschger climate fluctuations. According to our

  3. A Model-based Interpretation of Low-frequency Changes in the Carbon Cycle during the Last 120,000 years and its Implications for the Reconstruction of Atmospheric (delta) 14-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, Peter; Muscheler, Raimund; Fischer, Hubertus

    2006-01-01

    A main caveat in the interpretation of observed changes in atmospheric (Delta)C-l4 during the last 50,000 years is the unknown variability of the carbon cycle, which together with changes in the C-14 production rates determines the C-14 dynamics. A plausible scenario explaining glacial/interglacial dynamics seen in atmospheric CO2 and (delta)C-13 was proposed recently (Kohler et al., 2005a). A similar approach that expands its interpretation to the C-14 cycle is an important step toward a deeper understanding of (Delta)C-14 variability. This approach is based on an ocean/atmosphere/biosphere box model of the global carbon cycle (BICYCLE) to reproduce low-frequency changes in atmospheric CO2 as seen in Antarctic ice cores. The model is forced forward in time by various paleoclimatic records derived from ice and sediment cores. The simulation results of our proposed scenario match a compiled CO2 record from various ice cores during the last 120,000 years with high accuracy (r(sup 2) = 0.89). We analyze scenarios with different C-14 production rates, which are either constant or based on Be-10 measured in Greenland ice cores or the recent high-resolution geomagnetic field reconstruction GLOPIS-75 and compare them with the available (Delta)C-14 data covering the last 50,000 years. Our results suggest that during the last glacial cycle in general less than 110%0o f the increased atmospheric (Delta)C-14 is based on variations in the carbon cycle, while the largest part (5/6) of the variations has to be explained by other factors. Glacial atmospheric (Delta)C-14 larger than 700% cannot not be explained within our framework, neither through carbon cycle-based changes nor through variable C-14 production. Superimposed on these general trends might lie positive anomalies in atmospheric (Delta)C-14 of approx. 50% caused by millennial-scale variability of the northern deep water production during Heinrich events and Dansgaard/Oeschger climate fluctuations. According to our

  4. Control and synchronization of laser bursting and its implications in neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Arecchi, F Tito; Meucci, Riccardo; Al Naimee, Kais; Salvadori, Francesco

    2009-02-01

    We present experimental and numerical evidence of control and synchronization of burst events in modulated CO(2) lasers. Bursts appear randomly in each laser as trains of large amplitude spikes intercalated by a small amplitude chaotic regime. Experimental data and model display the frequency locking of bursts in a suitable interval of coupling strengths. The analogy with neuronal bursting will also be discussed in view of the role of bursting synchronization in cognitive functions.

  5. UWB multi-burst transmit driver for averaging receivers

    DOEpatents

    Dallum, Gregory E

    2012-11-20

    A multi-burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a sequence of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. There are two oscillators in the transmitter circuit, a gated burst rate oscillator and a gated RF burst or RF power output oscillator. The burst rate oscillator produces a relatively low frequency, i.e., MHz, square wave output for a selected transmit cycle, and drives the RF burst oscillator, which produces RF bursts of much higher frequency, i.e., GHz, during the transmit cycle. The frequency of the burst rate oscillator sets the spacing of the RF burst packets. The first oscillator output passes through a bias driver to the second oscillator. The bias driver conditions, e.g., level shifts, the signal from the first oscillator for input into the second oscillator, and also controls the length of each RF burst. A trigger pulse actuates a timing circuit, formed of a flip-flop and associated reset time delay circuit, that controls the operation of the first oscillator, i.e., how long it oscillates (which defines the transmit cycle).

  6. Characterizing Oscillatory Bursts in Single-Trial EEG Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, K. H.; Shah, A. S.; Lakatos, P.; Schroeder, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Oscillatory bursts in numerous bands ranging from low (theta) to high frequencies (e.g., gamma) undoubtedly play an important role in cortical dynamics. Largely because of the inadequacy of existing analytic techniques. however, oscillatory bursts and their role in cortical processing remains poorly understood. To study oscillatory bursts effectively one must be able to isolate them and characterize them in the single trial. We describe a series of straightforward analysis techniques that produce useful indices of burst characteristics. First, stimulus-evoked responses are estimated using Differentially Variable Component Analysis (dVCA), and are subtracted from the single-trial. The single-trial characteristics of the evoked responses are stored to identify possible correlations with burst activity. Time-frequency (T-F), or wavelet, analyses are then applied to the single trial residuals. While T-F plots have been used in recent studies to identify and isolate bursts, we go further by fitting each burst in the T-F plot with a two-dimensional Gaussian. This provides a set of burst characteristics, such as, center time. burst duration, center frequency. frequency dispersion. and amplitude, all of which contribute to the accurate characterization of the individual burst. The burst phase can also be estimated. Burst characteristics can be quantified with several standard techniques (e.g.. histogramming and clustering), as well as Bayesian techniques (e.g., blocking) to allow a more parametric description analysis of the characteristics of oscillatory bursts, and the relationships of specific parameters to cortical excitability and stimulus integration.

  7. Characterizing Oscillatory Bursts in Single-Trial EEG Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, K. H.; Shah, A. S.; Lakatos, P.; Schroeder, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Oscillatory bursts in numerous bands ranging from low (theta) to high frequencies (e.g., gamma) undoubtedly play an important role in cortical dynamics. Largely because of the inadequacy of existing analytic techniques. however, oscillatory bursts and their role in cortical processing remains poorly understood. To study oscillatory bursts effectively one must be able to isolate them and characterize them in the single trial. We describe a series of straightforward analysis techniques that produce useful indices of burst characteristics. First, stimulus-evoked responses are estimated using Differentially Variable Component Analysis (dVCA), and are subtracted from the single-trial. The single-trial characteristics of the evoked responses are stored to identify possible correlations with burst activity. Time-frequency (T-F), or wavelet, analyses are then applied to the single trial residuals. While T-F plots have been used in recent studies to identify and isolate bursts, we go further by fitting each burst in the T-F plot with a two-dimensional Gaussian. This provides a set of burst characteristics, such as, center time. burst duration, center frequency. frequency dispersion. and amplitude, all of which contribute to the accurate characterization of the individual burst. The burst phase can also be estimated. Burst characteristics can be quantified with several standard techniques (e.g.. histogramming and clustering), as well as Bayesian techniques (e.g., blocking) to allow a more parametric description analysis of the characteristics of oscillatory bursts, and the relationships of specific parameters to cortical excitability and stimulus integration.

  8. Percussion drilling of metals using bursts of nanosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Hendow, Sami T; Romero, Rosa; Shakir, Sami A; Guerreiro, Paulo T

    2011-05-23

    The effect of ns bursting on percussion drilling of metal is investigated experimentally and analytically, and compared with the efficiency and quality of drilling using single ns pulses. Key advantages are demonstrated, correlating well with the results from a thermal theoretical model. The 1064 nm bursts contain up to 14 pulses of various pulse widths and spacing, and at frequencies of tens of MHz within the burst. The individual pulses have pulse widths of 10 to 200 ns, and up to 12 kW peak power. Burst repetition frequency is single shot to 500 kHz.

  9. Mechanisms subserving the physiological nocturnal relative hypoprolactinemia of healthy older men: dual decline in prolactin secretory burst mass and basal release with preservation of pulse duration, frequency, and interpulse interval--a General Clinical Research Center study.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, A; Mulligan, T; Veldhuis, J D

    1999-03-01

    Increasing age is accompanied by decrements in randomly obtained, fasting, or frequently sampled serum PRL concentrations. The precise neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying such relative hypoprolactinemia in aging are incompletely understood. In the present study, we sampled blood at 2.5-min intervals overnight in 11 young (aged 21-34 yr) and 8 older (aged 62-72 yr) healthy men for subsequent chemiluminescence-based assay of serum PRL concentrations. The mean (+/- SEM) serum PRL concentration was significantly reduced at 4.3 +/- 0.78 microg/L in older men compared with 9.5 +/- 1.2 microg/L in young volunteers (P = 0.0049). PRL concentrations correlated with serum testosterone (r = 0.473; P = 0.041), dehydroepiandrosteroen sulfate (r = +0.455, P = 0.05), and insulin-like growth factor I (r = 0.494; P = 0.032) levels. Deconvolution analysis was used to evaluate combined pulsatile and basal modes of PRL secretion. In older men, discrete PRL secretory bursts were marked by a significantly (2.4-fold) attenuated mass of hormone secreted per burst (amount of PRL secreted per unit distribution volume), viz. 1.6 +/- 0.23 (older) vs. 3.9 +/- 0.57 microg/L (young; P < 0.01). In contrast, PRL secretory burst frequency, interpulse interval, and pulse duration were invariant of age. Concomitantly, basal PRL secretion was reduced by 2-fold in older subjects, namely to 0.00030 +/- 0.00027 (older) vs. 0.00065 +/- 0.0002 microg/L/min (young; P < 0.01). The amount of total PRL secretion that was pulsatile averaged 82 +/- 5.3% in young and 99 +/- 0.13% in older men (P = 0.012), indicating preferential loss of the basal mode of PRL release in aging. Assuming that basal PRL secretion mirrors functional pituitary lactotroph cell secretory mass, whereas pulsatile PRL release reflects effective (net) intermittent hypothalamic drive to responsive lactotroph cells, then our results suggest both an attrition in lactotroph cell mass and an impoverishment of net positive hypothalamic (agonistic

  10. Observational properties of decameter type IV bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Valentin; Brazhenko, Anatoly; Rucker, Helmut; Konovalenko, Alexander; Briand, Carine; Dorovskyy, Vladimir; Zarka, Philippe; Frantzusenko, Anatoly; Panchenko, Michael; Poedts, Stefan; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Shergelashvili, Bidzina

    2013-04-01

    Oscillations of decameter type IV bursts were registered during observations of solar radio emission by UTR-2, URAN-2 and NDA in 2011-2012. Large majority of these bursts were accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which were observed by SOHO and STEREO in the visible light. Only in some cases decameter type IV bursts were not associated with CMEs. The largest periods of oscillations P were some tens of minutes. There were some modes of long periods of oscillations simultaneously. Periods of oscillations in flux and in polarization profiles were close. Detailed properties of oscillations at different frequencies were analyzed on the example of two type IV bursts. One of them was observed on April 7, 2011 when a CME happened. Another one (August 1, 2011) was registered without any CME. The 7 April type IV burst had two periods in the frames 75-85 and 35-85 minutes. Interesting feature of these oscillations is decreasing periods with time. The observed decreasing rates dP/dt equaled 0.03-0.07. Concerning type IV burst observed on August 1, 2011 the period of its oscillations increases from 17 min. at 30 MHz to 44 min. at 10 MHz. Connection of type IV burst oscillations with oscillations of magnetic arches and CMEs at corresponding altitudes are discussed. The work is fulfilled in the frame of FP7 project "SOLSPANET".

  11. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R. Marc; vonKienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Lichti, Giselher; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Steinle, Helmut; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors designed to enhance the scientific return from GLAST in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By observing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV energy range, GBM extends the spectral coverage of GRBs more than 3 decades below the LAT energy threshold. GBM computes burst locations on-board, allowing repointing of the GLAST Observatory to place strong bursts within the LAT field-of-view to observe delayed high-energy emission.

  12. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Meegan, Charles; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Kienlin, Andreas von; Lichti, Giselher; Steinle, Helmut; Kippen, R. Marc

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors designed to enhance the scientific return from GLAST in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By observing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV energy range, GBM extends the spectral coverage of GRBs more than 3 decades below the LAT energy threshold. GBM computes burst locations on-board, allowing repointing of the GLAST Observatory to place strong bursts within the LAT field-of-view to observe delayed high-energy emission.

  13. Low-Speed Investigation of the Effects of Frequency and Amplitude of Oscillation in Sideslip on the Lateral Stability Derivatives of a 60 deg Delta Wing, a 45 deg Sweptback Wing and an Unswept Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, Jacob H.; Williams, James L.

    1961-01-01

    A low-speed investigation has been conducted in the Langley stability tunnel to study the effects of frequency and amplitude of sideslipping motion on the lateral stability derivatives of a 60 deg. delta wing, a 45 deg. sweptback wing, and an unswept wing. The investigation was made for values of the reduced-frequency parameter of 0.066 and 0.218 and for a range of amplitudes from +/- 2 to +/- 6 deg. The results of the investigation indicated that increasing the frequency of the oscillation generally produced an appreciable change in magnitude of the lateral oscillatory stability derivatives in the higher angle-of-attack range. This effect was greatest for the 60 deg. delta wing and smallest for the unswept wing and generally resulted in a more linear variation of these derivatives with angle of attack. For the relatively high frequency at which the amplitude was varied, there appeared to be little effect on the measured derivatives as a result of the change in amplitude of the oscillation.

  14. Neutrino bursts from gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paczynski, Bohdan; Xu, Guohong

    1994-01-01

    If gamma-ray bursts originate at cosmological distances, as strongly indicated by the results from Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO), then ultrarelativistic ejecta are the likely consequence of the highly super-Eddington luminosity of the sources. If the energy injection rate varies with time, then the Lorentz factor of the wind also varies, and the shells of ejected matter collide with each other. The collisions between baryons produce pions which decay into high-energy photons, electrons, electron positron pairs, and neutrino pairs. The bulk Lorentz factor of approximately 300 is required if our model is to be compatible with the observed millisecond variability. The strongest gamma-ray bursts are observed to deliver approximately 10(exp -4) ergs/sq cm in 100-200 keV photons. In our scenario more energy may be delivered in a neutrino burst. Typical neutrinos may be approximately 30 GeV if the protons have a Maxwellian energy distribution, and up to approximately TeV if the protons have a power-law distribution. Such neutrino bursts are close to the detection limit of the DUMAND II experiment.

  15. Type III Radio Burst Duration and SEP Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Xie, H.

    2010-01-01

    Long-duration (>15 min), low-frequency (<14 MHz) type III radio bursts have been reported to be indicative of solar energetic particle events. We measured the durations of type III bursts associated with large SEP events of solar cycle 23. The Type III durations are distributed symmetrically at 1 MHz yielding a mean value of approximately 33 min (median = 32 min) for the large SEP events. When the SEP events with ground level enhancement (GLE,) are considered, the distribution is essentially unchanged (mean = 32 min, median = 30 min). To test the importance of type III bursts in indicating SEP events, we considered a set of six type III bursts from the same active region (AR 10588) whose durations fit the "long duration" criterion. We analyzed the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and type II radio bursts associated with the type III bursts. The CMEs were of similar speeds and the flares are also of similar size and duration. All but one of the type III bursts was not associated with a type II burst in the metric or longer wavelength domains. The burst without type II burst also lacked a solar energetic particle (SEP) event at energies >25 MeV. The 1-MHz duration of the type III burst (28 rein) is near the median value of type III durations found for gradual SEP events and ground level enhancement (GLE) events. Yet, there was no sign of SEP events. On the other hand, two other type III bursts from the same active region had similar duration but accompanied by WAVES type 11 bursts; these bursts were also accompanied by SEP events detected by SOHO/ERNE. This study suggests that the type III burst duration may not be a good indicator of an SEP event, consistent with the statistical study of Cliver and Ling (2009, ApJ ).

  16. Comptel measurements of the gamma-ray burst GRB 930131

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J.; Bennett, K.; Collmar, W.; Connors, A.; Fishman, G. J.; Greiner, J.; Hanlon, L. O.; Hermsen, W.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.

    1994-01-01

    On 1993 January 31 at 1857:12 Universal Time (UT), the Imaging Compton Telescope COMPTEL onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) detected the cosmic gamma-ray burst GRB 930131. COMPTEL's MeV imaging capability was employed to locate the source to better than 2 deg (1 sigma error radius) within 7 hr of the event, initiating a world-wide search for an optical and radio counterpart. The maximum likelihood position of the burst from the COMPTEL data is alpha(sub 2000) = 12h 18m, delta(sub 2000) = -9 deg 42 min, consistent with independent CGRO-Burst and Transient Source Experiment (CGRO-BATSE) and Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) locations as well as with the triangulation annulus constructed using BATSE and Ulysses timing data. The combined COMPTEL and EGRET burst data yield a better estimate of the burst location: alpha(sub 2000) = 12h 18m and delta(sub 2000) = -10 deg 21 min, with a 1 sigma error radius of 32 min. In COMPTEL's energy range, this burst was short, consisting of two separate spikes occurring within a approximately 1 s interval with a low intensity tail for approximately 1 s after the second spike. No statistically significant flux is present for a 30 s period after the main part of the burst. This is consistent with the EGRET data. The COMPTEL telescope events indicate a hard, power-law emission extending to beyond 10 MeV with a spectral index of -1.8 +/- 0.4. The rapid fluctuations and high intensities of the gamma-ray flux greater than 10 MeV place the burst object no farther than 250 pc if the burst emission is not beamed.

  17. Unusual Solar Radio Burst Observed at Decameter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.; Frantsuzenko, A. V.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Panchenko, M.; Stanislavskyy, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    An unusual solar burst was observed simultaneously by two decameter radio telescopes UTR-2 (Kharkov, Ukraine) and URAN-2 (Poltava, Ukraine) on 3 June 2011 in the frequency range of 16 - 28 MHz. The observed radio burst had some unusual properties, which are not typical for the other types of solar radio bursts. Its frequency drift rate was positive (about 500 kHz s-1) at frequencies higher than 22 MHz and negative (100 kHz s-1) at lower frequencies. The full duration of this event varied from 50 s up to 80 s, depending on the frequency. The maximum radio flux of the unusual burst reached ≈103 s.f.u. and its polarization did not exceed 10 %. This burst had a fine frequency-time structure of unusual appearance. It consisted of stripes with the frequency bandwidth 300 - 400 kHz. We consider that several accompanied radio and optical events observed by SOHO and STEREO spacecraft were possibly associated with the reported radio burst. A model that may interpret the observed unusual solar radio burst is proposed.

  18. Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woosley, Stan

    2012-11-01

    Prologue C. Kouveliotou, R. A . M. J. Wijers and S. E. Woosley; 1. The discovery of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon R. W. Klebesadel; 2. Instrumental principles E. E. Fenimore; 3. The BATSE era G. J. Fishman and C. A. Meegan; 4. The cosmological era L. Piro and K. Hurley; 5. The Swift era N. Gehrels and D. N. Burrows; 6. Discoveries enabled by multi-wavelength afterglow observations of gamma-ray bursts J. Greiner; 7. Prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts T. Piran, R. Sari and R. Mochkovitch; 8. Basic gamma-ray burst afterglows P. Mészáros and R. A. M. J. Wijers; 9. The GRB-supernova connection J. Hjorth and J. S. Bloom; 10. Models for gamma-ray burst progenitors and central engines S. E. Woosley; 11. Jets and gamma-ray burst unification schemes J. Granot and E. Ramirez-Ruiz; 12. High-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos E. Waxman; 13. Long gamma-ray burst host galaxies and their environments J. P. U. Fynbo, D. Malesani and P. Jakobsson; 14. Gamma-ray burst cosmology V. Bromm and A. Loeb; 15. Epilogue R. D. Blandford; Index.

  19. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass - radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290Hz) has, been claimed.

  20. Superfine Structure of Jovian Millisecond Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rucker, H. O.; Litvinenko, G.; Taubenschuss, U.; Leitner, M.; Lecacheux, A.; Konovalenko, A.

    2004-05-01

    Jupiter decameter (DAM) radio emission mainly consists of wide-band radio storms with time scales in seconds (L-bursts) and milliseconds (S-bursts), the latter comprising a series of short pulses with duration of a few to tens of milliseconds, and strongly controlled by the satellite Io. First in-depth analysis of the subpulse structure was made by Carr and Reyes (1999) with the discovery of successive deep envelope modulations, with time resolution better than 30 microseconds, and during these subpulse periods the discovery of phase coherence. Recent observations by means of the newly developed waveform receiver (at present unsurpassed in spectral resolution) and connected to the decameter world-largest radio telescope UTR-2 (Kharkov) yielded waveform measurements of Jovian S-bursts which have been analyzed by the wavelet analysis method. Main outcome of the present investigation is the detection of clear signatures of microsecond modulations, providing evidence of a superfine burst structure with the following parameters: a) instantaneous frequency band of one separated microsecond pulse of 100 to 300 kHz, b) time duration of one separated micropulse of 6 to 15 microseconds, and c) time interval between closest subsequent microsecond pulses of 5 to 25 microseconds. The apparent frequency drift of a millisecond burst evidently results from sequentially decreasing frequencies of subsequent subpulses, each representing an island of phase coherent gyrating electron bunches.

  1. Gamma Ray Bursts - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    We are in an exciting period of discovery for gamma-ray bursts. The Swift observatory is detecting 100 bursts per year, providing arcsecond localizations and sensitive observations of the prompt and afterglow emission. The Fermi observatory is observing 250 bursts per year with its medium-energy GRB instrument and about 10 bursts per year with its high-energy LAT instrument. In addition, rapid-response telescopes on the ground are providing new capabilities to study optical emission during the prompt phase and spectral signatures of the host galaxies. The combined data set is enabling great advances in our understanding of GRBs including afterglow physics, short burst origin, and high energy emission.

  2. Delta wing vortex manipulation using pulsed and steady blowing during ramp pitching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreira, J.; Johari, H.

    1995-01-01

    The effectiveness of steady and pulsed blowing as a method of controlling delta wing vortices during ramp pitching has been investigated in flow visualization experiments conducted in a water tunnel. The recessed angled spanwise blowing technique was utilized for vortex manipulation. This technique was implemented on a beveled 60 delta wing using a pair of blowing ports located beneath the vortex core at 40% chord. The flow was injected primarily in the spanwise direction but was also composed of a component normal to the wing surface. The location of vortex burst was measured as a function of blowing intensity and pulsing frequency under static conditions, and the optimum blowing case was applied at three different wing pitching rates. Experimental results have shown that, when the burst location is upstream of the blowing port, pulsed blowing delays vortex breakdown in static and dynamic cases. Dynamic tests verified the existence of a hysteresis effect and demonstrated the improvements offered by pulsed blowing over both steady blowing and no-blowing scenarios. The application of blowing, at the optimum pulsing frequency, made the vortex breakdown location comparable in static and ramp pitch-up conditions.

  3. Characteristics of Type-II Radio Bursts Associated with Flares and CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanth, V.; Umapathy, S.; Vršnak, Bojan; Anna Lakshmi, M.

    2011-10-01

    We present a statistical study of the characteristics of type-II radio bursts observed in the metric (m) and deca-hectometer (DH) wavelength range during 1997-2008. The collected events are divided into two groups: Group I contains the events of m-type-II bursts with starting frequency ≥ 100 MHz, and group II contains the events with starting frequency of m-type-II radio bursts < 100 MHz. We have analyzed both samples considering three different aspects: i) statistical properties of type-II bursts, ii) statistical properties of flares and CMEs associated with type-II bursts, and iii) time delays between type-II bursts, flares, and CMEs. We find significant differences in the properties of m-type-II bursts in duration, bandwidth, drift rate, shock speed and delay between m- and DH-type-II bursts. From the timing analysis we found that the majority of m-type-II bursts in both groups occur during the flare impulsive phase. On the other hand, the DH-type-II bursts in both groups occur during the decaying phase of the associated flares. Almost all m-DH-type-II bursts are found to be associated with CMEs. Our results indicate that there are two kinds of shock in which group I (high frequency) m-type-II bursts seem to be ignited by flares whereas group II (low frequency) m-type-II bursts are CME-driven.

  4. 34 First Callisto solar burst spectrometer station in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monstein, Christian

    2016-04-01

    In mid of March 2016 a new long wavelength station in Greenland was set into operation. It is a dual circular polarization, frequency agile solar radio burst spectrometer based on two Callisto spectrometers and the Long Wavelength Array antenna. During the commissioning phase several nice radio burst observations proved that the system works as expected.

  5. Prevalence of the Extinction Burst and Its Attenuation during Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Dorothea C.; Iwata, Brian A.

    1995-01-01

    A commonly associated side effect of extinction as a treatment for behavior disorders is an initial increased frequency of the target response, called an "extinction burst." This study analyzed 113 sets of extinction data and found that extinction bursting occurred in only 24% of cases and was less common when extinction was combined…

  6. Discovery of the Neutron Star Spin Frequency in EXO 0748-676

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villarreal, Adam R.; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2004-01-01

    We report the results of a search for burst oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from the low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) EXO 0748-676. With the proportional counter array (PCA) onboard the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) we have detected a 45 Hz oscillation in the average power spectrum of 38 thermonuclear X-ray bursts from this source. We computed power spectra with 1 Hz frequency resolution for both the rising and decaying portions of 38 X-ray bursts from the public RXTE archive. We averaged the 1 Hz power spectra and detected a significant signal at 45 Hz in the decaying phases of the bursts. The signal is detected at a significance level of 4 x 10 (exp -8) similar signal was detected in the rising intervals. The oscillation peak is unresolved at 1 Hz frequency resolution, indicating an oscillation quality factor, Q = nu (sub 0)/Delta nu (sub fwhm) greater than 45, and the average signal amplitude is approximately equal to 3% (rms) The detection of 45 Hz burst oscillations from EXO 0748-676 provides compelling evidence that this is the neutron star spin frequency in this system. We use the inferred spin frequency to model the widths of absorption lines from the neutron star surface and show that the widths of the absorption lines from EXO 0748-676 recently reported by Cottam et al. are consistent with a 45 Hz spin frequency as long as the neutron star radius is in the range from about 9.5 - 15 km. With a known spin frequency, precise modelling of the line profiles from EXO 0748-676 holds great promise for constraining the dense matter equation of state.

  7. The GLAST burst monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Meegan, Charles A.; Lichti, Giselher G.; Bhat, Narayana P.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald J.; Greiner, Jochen; Hoover, Andrew S.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.; Schönfelder, Volker; Steinle, Helmut; Wilson, Robert B.

    2004-10-01

    The next large NASA mission in the field of gamma-ray astronomy, GLAST, is scheduled for launch in 2007. Aside from the main instrument LAT (Large-Area Telescope), a gamma-ray telescope for the energy range between 20 MeV and > 100GeV, a secondary instrument, the GLAST burst monitor (GBM), is foreseen. With this monitor one of the key scientific objectives of the mission, the determination of the high-energy behaviour of gamma-ray bursts and transients can be ensured. Its task is to increase the detection rate of gamma-ray bursts for the LAT and to extend the energy range to lower energies (from ~10 keV to ~30 MeV). It will provide real-time burst locations over a wide FoV with sufficient accuracy to allow repointing the GLAST spacecraft. Time-resolved spectra of many bursts recorded with LAT and the burst monitor will allow the investigation of the relation between the keV and the MeV-GeV emission from GRBs over unprecedented seven decades of energy. This will help to advance our understanding of the mechanisms by which gamma-rays are generated in gamma-ray bursts

  8. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, S.; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the Wide Angle Telescope for Cosmic Hard X-rays (WATCH) instruments during the 11 months flight of the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA). The identification of the bursts was complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by a high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy, trapped particle streams. These background events may simulate the count rate increases characteristic of cosmic gamma bursts. For 12 of the detected events, their true cosmic nature have been confirmed through consistent localizations of the burst sources based on several independent WATCH data sets. The derived positions of the bursts are reported. Additionally, most of the events have been confirmed by coincident detections with instruments on other spacecraft. The features of two of the bursts and the results of searches for related events in the optical are described.

  9. An Overview of Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, G. E.

    2017-07-01

    I offer a short review of the current understanding of fast radio bursts: episodic flares of radio waves detected at low frequencies with durations of about 1 ms. These events seem to have an extragalactic origin. I summarize the evidence supporting this statement and I discuss some of the theoretical models proposed so far to explain their nature.

  10. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The streamers of clouds draped over the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color MODIS image from February 27, 2002, suggest that a cold, dry wind was blowing southward over the United States and began to pick up moisture over the Gulf, causing these strips of clouds. That the clouds didn't pick up until some distance from the coastline allowed MODIS to get a perfect view of the dynamic Gulf Coast environment spanning (left to right) Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida's Western Panhandle. The Mississippi River runs roughly down the center of the image, and is joined in Louisiana by the Red River coming in from the northwest. Over the past 7000 years, the actual delta, where the main river channel empties into the Gulf, has wandered around what we now think of as the Louisiana coast. Considering all the sediment visible in this image, it's not hard to imagine that the river carries about 2.4 billion kilograms of sediment into the Gulf each year. Deposition of some of this sediment has been building up the current delta, called the Birdfoot Delta, for obvious reasons, for about 700 years. The coastal waters are alive with microscopic organisms called phytoplankton, which contain colorful pigments, including chlorophyll, for harvesting sunlight. Beyond the sediment plume off Louisiana, the waters are very dark, which could indicate that a large amount of chlorophyll is present, absorbing lots of sunlight and causing the water to appear dark. Farther south, the waters appear bright blue, which could be a signature of coccolithophores, which use highly reflective calcium carbonate to build scaly coverings for themselves. The brighter offshore waters could also be caused by a blue-green algae called Trichodesmium, an organism that can not only harness carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, but can also take nitrogen from the air and turn it into a form that can be used by living organisms. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  11. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The streamers of clouds draped over the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color MODIS image from February 27, 2002, suggest that a cold, dry wind was blowing southward over the United States and began to pick up moisture over the Gulf, causing these strips of clouds. That the clouds didn't pick up until some distance from the coastline allowed MODIS to get a perfect view of the dynamic Gulf Coast environment spanning (left to right) Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida's Western Panhandle. The Mississippi River runs roughly down the center of the image, and is joined in Louisiana by the Red River coming in from the northwest. Over the past 7000 years, the actual delta, where the main river channel empties into the Gulf, has wandered around what we now think of as the Louisiana coast. Considering all the sediment visible in this image, it's not hard to imagine that the river carries about 2.4 billion kilograms of sediment into the Gulf each year. Deposition of some of this sediment has been building up the current delta, called the Birdfoot Delta, for obvious reasons, for about 700 years. The coastal waters are alive with microscopic organisms called phytoplankton, which contain colorful pigments, including chlorophyll, for harvesting sunlight. Beyond the sediment plume off Louisiana, the waters are very dark, which could indicate that a large amount of chlorophyll is present, absorbing lots of sunlight and causing the water to appear dark. Farther south, the waters appear bright blue, which could be a signature of coccolithophores, which use highly reflective calcium carbonate to build scaly coverings for themselves. The brighter offshore waters could also be caused by a blue-green algae called Trichodesmium, an organism that can not only harness carbon dioxide for photosynthesis, but can also take nitrogen from the air and turn it into a form that can be used by living organisms. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  12. INTEGRAL burst alert service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, H.; Jennings, D.; Mereghetti, S.; Teegarden, B.

    1997-01-01

    The detection, accurate positioning, and spectral analysis of cosmic gamma ray bursts is an objective of the International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission. Due to their unpredictable nature, gamma ray bursts can only be observed in serendipity mode. In order to allow and promote multiwavelength follow-up observations of such events, it is desirable to make the information available to the astrophysics community with a minimum delay through the use of Internet. Ideally, the data dissemination should occur within a few seconds of the start of the burst event so that follow up observations can proceed while gamma rays are still being emitted. The technical feasibility of building such a system to disseminate INTEGRAL burst alerts in real time is currently under consideration, the preliminary results of which are presented. It is concluded that such an alert service is technically feasible.

  13. INTEGRAL burst alert service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, H.; Jennings, D.; Mereghetti, S.; Teegarden, B.

    1997-01-01

    The detection, accurate positioning, and spectral analysis of cosmic gamma ray bursts is an objective of the International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission. Due to their unpredictable nature, gamma ray bursts can only be observed in serendipity mode. In order to allow and promote multiwavelength follow-up observations of such events, it is desirable to make the information available to the astrophysics community with a minimum delay through the use of Internet. Ideally, the data dissemination should occur within a few seconds of the start of the burst event so that follow up observations can proceed while gamma rays are still being emitted. The technical feasibility of building such a system to disseminate INTEGRAL burst alerts in real time is currently under consideration, the preliminary results of which are presented. It is concluded that such an alert service is technically feasible.

  14. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  15. The Glast Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meegan, C.; Fishman, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Paciesas, W.; Kippen, R.; Briggs, M.; Preece, R.; Lichti, G.; von Kienlin, A.; Georgii, R.; Diehl, R.; Schöenfelder, V.

    2002-12-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will include a secondary instrument to augment the observatory's capabilities for GRB studies. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will extend energy coverage from the main instrument's lower limit of ~ 20 MeV down to ~ 10 keV, and will provide an on-board burst trigger and approximate location. The instrument consists of twelve NaI detectors and two BGO detectors.

  16. Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rane, Akshaya; Lorimer, Duncan

    2017-09-01

    We summarize our current state of knowledge of fast radio bursts (FRBs) which were first discovered a decade ago. Following an introduction to radio transients in general, including pulsars and rotating radio transients, we discuss the discovery of FRBs. We then discuss FRB follow-up observations in the context of repeat bursts before moving on to review propagation effects on FRB signals, FRB progenitor models and an outlook on FRBs as potential cosmological tools.

  17. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  18. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D.; Kippen, M.

    2004-09-28

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  19. Analysis of the role of the low threshold currents IT and Ih in intrinsic delta oscillations of thalamocortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Amarillo, Yimy; Mato, Germán; Nadal, Marcela S.

    2015-01-01

    Thalamocortical neurons are involved in the generation and maintenance of brain rhythms associated with global functional states. The repetitive burst firing of TC neurons at delta frequencies (1–4 Hz) has been linked to the oscillations recorded during deep sleep and during episodes of absence seizures. To get insight into the biophysical properties that are the basis for intrinsic delta oscillations in these neurons, we performed a bifurcation analysis of a minimal conductance-based thalamocortical neuron model including only the IT channel and the sodium and potassium leak channels. This analysis unveils the dynamics of repetitive burst firing of TC neurons, and describes how the interplay between the amplifying variable mT and the recovering variable hT of the calcium channel IT is sufficient to generate low threshold oscillations in the delta band. We also explored the role of the hyperpolarization activated cationic current Ih in this reduced model and determine that, albeit not required, Ih amplifies and stabilizes the oscillation. PMID:25999847

  20. Meteor-Burst Communications: Is This What the Navy Needs?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    UNDERDENSE Time OVERDENSE Time Figure 5 -Underdense and Overdense Ion Trails 24 and receiver, and the action of the high altitude winds. The net effect of...experience increased fading at the lower frequencies, with attendant competing modes of propagation. As the frequency is decreased, the amount of...random occurrence of limited duration, MBC systems use a burst- mode concept. The flow of data in a burst- mode system is intermittent, transmitting only

  1. Narrow band characteristics of Jovian L-bursts.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    Review of some radio observations of Jupiter made during three recent apparitions using several receivers, each tuned to a slightly different frequency close to 18 MHz. Sequences of oppositely polarized bursts have been observed and also differences in polarization mode between channels 400 kHz apart. Occasionally, isolated bursts of durations of 1 to 2 sec have been found to show real drifts in frequency, as distinct from the apparent drifts shown by changing intensity across a group of features.

  2. Search for the Third Harmonic of Type III Bursts Radio Emission at Decameter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhenko, A. I.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Pylaev, O. S.; Frantsuzenko, A. V.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Vashchishin, R. V.; Rucker, H. O.

    The results of observations of trio bursts consisting of type III bursts are presented in this paper. The instantaneous frequency ratio of trio components is near 1:2:3. We analyze flow, duration, frequency drift rate and polarization of trio components as well as dependencies of these characteristics on frequency.

  3. Mississippi Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Mississippi River delta teems with sediment deposited by the river as it flows into the Gulf of Mexico in this true-color image captured by MODIS on October 15, 2001. The sediment, which is marked by brown swirls in the Gulf, provides nutrients for the bloom of phytoplankton visible as blue-green swirls off the coastline. In the high-resolution image the city of Memphis can be seen in the southwest corner of Tennessee, which is just to left of center at the top of the image. The brown coloration that encompasses Memphis and either side of the river, as flows north to south along the left side of the image, is the river's flood plain. Also visible, in the upper-right hand corner of the image is the southern end of the Appalachian Mountains.

  4. Experimental measurements on an oscillating 70-degree delta wing in subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltani, M. R.; Bragg, M. B.; Brandon, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    A series of low-speed wind tunnel tests on a 70-degree sharp leading-edged delta wing at both static and dynamic conditions were performed to investigate the aerodynamic forces and moments. Forces and moments were obtained from a six component internal strain gauge balance. Static results compared well with the previous experimental findings. Large amplitude dynamic motion was produced by sinusoidally oscillating the model over a range of reduced frequencies. Substantial force and moment overshoots, a delay in dynamic stall, and hysteresis loops between the values of aerodynamnic loads in upstroke and downstroke motion were observed, all of which were strong functions of the reduced frequency. The aerodynamic forces and moments were influenced by the Reynolds number. Asymmetrical vortex bursting produced by nonzero sideslip angle created a complex rolling moment variations with angle of attack.

  5. Spectral evolution of multiply impulsive solar bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpen, J. T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1979-01-01

    Some results from the analysis of a set of multiply impulsive hard X-ray and microwave solar bursts are presented, showing that some bursts can exhibit widely different magnetic-field strengths at different times. Two categories of microwave spectral behavior are identified: those events during which the microwave turnover frequency (MTF) and spectral shape (SS) remain the same from peak to peak, and those during which the MTF and SS change significantly. These categories correspond to two classes of multiply impulsive bursts: those for which the emission can be characterized by a constant magnetic field and therefore a single source region, and those in which groups of component spikes appear to originate in regions of different magnetic-field strengths, corresponding to separate source regions which flare sequentially. With regard to the latter type, examples are presented, the discrete flaring regions are examined, and their spatial separations are estimated.

  6. Can we identify lensed gamma-ray bursts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Grossman, Scott A.

    1994-01-01

    A gravitationally lensed gamma-ray burst (GRB) would appear as multiple bursts with identical light curves, separated in time and differing only by the scaling of their amplitudes. In reality, the detected bursts will be noisy, and therefore they may be difficult to identify as lensed images. Furthermore, faint, intrinsically similar, yet distinct light curves may be falsely identified as lensing events. In this paper we develop two statistical tests to distinguish noisy burst light curves. We use Fourier analysis techniques to analyze the signals for both intrinsic variability and variability due to noise. We are able to determine the noise level, and we compare the bursts only at frequency channels that are signal dominated. Utilizing these methods, we are able to make quantitative statements about whether two bursts are distinct. We apply these statistics to scaled versions of two subbursts of GRB 910503 -- subbursts previously investigated by Wambsganss using a different statistical test. We find that our methods are able to distinguish these bursts at slightly smaller amplitudes than those at which Wambsganss's method succeeds. We then apply our techniques to 'candidate' lensing events taken from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) catalog, and we find that nearly all of them, except for the very shortest ones (durations approx. less than 3 sec), are distinguishable. We therefore expect that a majority of bursts will be distinguishable from one another.

  7. Can we identify lensed gamma-ray bursts?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Grossman, Scott A.

    1994-01-01

    A gravitationally lensed gamma-ray burst (GRB) would appear as multiple bursts with identical light curves, separated in time and differing only by the scaling of their amplitudes. In reality, the detected bursts will be noisy, and therefore they may be difficult to identify as lensed images. Furthermore, faint, intrinsically similar, yet distinct light curves may be falsely identified as lensing events. In this paper we develop two statistical tests to distinguish noisy burst light curves. We use Fourier analysis techniques to analyze the signals for both intrinsic variability and variability due to noise. We are able to determine the noise level, and we compare the bursts only at frequency channels that are signal dominated. Utilizing these methods, we are able to make quantitative statements about whether two bursts are distinct. We apply these statistics to scaled versions of two subbursts of GRB 910503 -- subbursts previously investigated by Wambsganss using a different statistical test. We find that our methods are able to distinguish these bursts at slightly smaller amplitudes than those at which Wambsganss's method succeeds. We then apply our techniques to 'candidate' lensing events taken from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) catalog, and we find that nearly all of them, except for the very shortest ones (durations approx. less than 3 sec), are distinguishable. We therefore expect that a majority of bursts will be distinguishable from one another.

  8. Effect of burst parameters on automotive brake squeal suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badertscher, Jeff; Cunefare, Kenneth A.

    2003-04-01

    Implementing a dither control signal with a 100% duty cycle is an effective means of suppressing automotive brake squeal. Dither control is a method by which high-frequency control efforts are introduced into a system to suppress a lower frequency disturbance. Dither is introduced to a brake by placing a piezoelectric stack actuator in the piston of a floating caliper brake. Burst mode dither control is characterized by duty cycles of less than 100%. A burst control signal of a specific duty cycle is also specified by the burst count and burst rate. Burst mode signals are shown to suppress brake squeal. This paper examines the nature of suppression and the effectiveness of burst mode dither control signals with varied burst parameters. An examination of the squeal response and dither control signal is used to examine the nature of suppression during bursting and dwell time. The amplitude of the control signal that is necessary to obtain full control of the system is used to assess control signal effectiveness.

  9. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meegan, C.; Lichti, G.; Briggs, M.; Diehl, R.; Fishman, G.; Kippen, R.; Kouveliotou, C.; von Kienlin, A.; Paciesas, W.; Preece, R.; Schönfelder, V.

    2003-04-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled for launch in 2006, comprises a Large Area Telescope (LAT) and a GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). The LAT is a pair telescope with unprecedented sensitivity in the 20 MeV to 300 GeV energy range. The GLAST Burst Monitor consists of an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 10 keV to 25 MeV range and covering a wide field of view. The GBM will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage into the range of current GRB databases, and will provide a trigger for repointing the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from bursts outside the LAT field of view.

  10. A Burst to See

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    On 19 March, Nature was particularly generous and provided astronomers with the wealth of four gamma-ray bursts on the same day. But that was not all: one of them is the most luminous object ever observed in the Universe. Despite being located in a distant galaxy, billions of light years away, it was so bright that it could have been seen, for a brief while, with the unaided eye. ESO PR Photo 08a/08 ESO PR Photo 08a/08 The REM Telescope and TORTORA Camera Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous quantity of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events since the Big Bang. It is now widely accepted that the majority of the gamma-ray bursts signal the explosion of very massive, highly evolved stars that collapse into black holes. Gamma-ray bursts, which are invisible to our eyes, are discovered by telescopes in space. After releasing their intense burst of high-energy radiation, they become detectable for a short while in the optical and in the near-infrared. This 'afterglow' fades very rapidly, making detailed analysis possible for only a few hours after the gamma-ray detection. This analysis is important in particular in order to determine the GRB's distance and, hence, intrinsic brightness. The gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B was detected by the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift satellite. "It was so bright that it almost blinded the Swift instruments for a while," says Guido Chincarini, Italian principal investigator of the mission. A bright optical counterpart was soon identified in the Boötes Constellation (the "Bear Driver" or "Herdsman"). A host of ground-based telescopes reacted promptly to study this new object in the sky. In particular, the optical emission was detected by a few wide-field cameras on telescopes that constantly monitor a large fraction of the sky, including the TORTORA camera in symbiosis with the 0.6-m REM telescope located at La Silla

  11. Positional characteristics of meter-decameter wavelength bursts associated with hard X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Gergely, T. E.; Kane, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    Isolated and grouped type III bursts have been observed in temporal association with impulsive hard X-ray bursts in the 26-154 keV range, down to frequencies as low as 30 MHz and out to a distance of 3.1 solar radii from the disk center. The bursts occurred in regions whose electron density may have been as much as 20 times higher than that of the Newkirk-Saito model. The present observations indicate that electron acceleration/injection occurs over a region covering a wide range of magnetic field lines. It is noted that, of the two gradual hard X-ray bursts observed in association with type IV bursts, one was accompanied by a type II event, while the other was not, although both exhibited the same characteristics. It is suggested that the gradual burst associated with a type IV only involved electrons which are trapped in the plasmoid which produces the meter-decameter emission, while another fraction of the population is trapped in the low-lying loops which produce the hard X-ray and centimeter radiation.

  12. Positional characteristics of meter-decameter wavelength bursts associated with hard X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Gergely, T. E.; Kane, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    Isolated and grouped type III bursts have been observed in temporal association with impulsive hard X-ray bursts in the 26-154 keV range, down to frequencies as low as 30 MHz and out to a distance of 3.1 solar radii from the disk center. The bursts occurred in regions whose electron density may have been as much as 20 times higher than that of the Newkirk-Saito model. The present observations indicate that electron acceleration/injection occurs over a region covering a wide range of magnetic field lines. It is noted that, of the two gradual hard X-ray bursts observed in association with type IV bursts, one was accompanied by a type II event, while the other was not, although both exhibited the same characteristics. It is suggested that the gradual burst associated with a type IV only involved electrons which are trapped in the plasmoid which produces the meter-decameter emission, while another fraction of the population is trapped in the low-lying loops which produce the hard X-ray and centimeter radiation.

  13. Fine structures of type III radio bursts observed by LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdalenic, Jasmina; Marque, Christophe; Fallows, Richard; Mann, Gottfried; Vocks, Christian

    2017-04-01

    On August 25, 2014, NOAA AR 2146 produced the M2.0 class flare (peaked at 15:11 UT). The flare was associated with a coronal dimming, a EUV wave, a halo CME and a radio event observed by LOFAR (the LOw-Frequency Array). The radio event consisted of a type II, type III and type IV radio emissions. In this study, we focus on LOFAR observations of the type III bursts, generally considered to be radio signatures of fast electron beams propagating along open or quasi open field lines. The group of type III bursts was, as usually, observed during the impulsive phase of the flare. At first hand, type III bursts show no peculiarity, but the high frequency/time resolution LOFAR observations reveal that only few of these type III bursts have a smooth emission profile. The majority of bursts is strongly fragmented. Some show a structuring similar to type IIIb bursts, but on a smaller frequency scale, and others show a non-organized patchy structure which gives indication on the possibly related turbulence processes. Although fine structures of type III bursts were already reported, the wealth of fine structures, and the fragmentation of the radio emission observed in this August 25 event is unprecedented. We show that these LOFAR observations bring completely new insight and pose a new challenge for the physics of the acceleration of electron beams and associated emission processes.

  14. The Glast Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will include a secondary instrument to augment the observatory's capabilities for GRB studies. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBK is a collaboration between Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Huntsville, Alabama, and the Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. The purpose of the GBM is to extend energy coverage below the main instrument's lower limit of about 20 MeV, and to provide an on-board burst trigger and approximate location. The instrument consists of twelve NaI detectors and two BGO detectors. This combination provides energy coverage from a few keV up to about 30 MeV.

  15. Could FIV zoonosis responsible of the breakdown of the pathocenosis which has reduced the European CCR5-Delta32 allele frequencies?

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Background In Europe, the north-south downhill cline frequency of the chemokine receptor CCR5 allele with a 32-bp deletion (CCR5-Δ32) raises interesting questions for evolutionary biologists. We had suggested first that, in the past, the European colonizers, principally Romans, might have been instrumental of a progressively decrease of the frequencies southwards. Indeed, statistical analyses suggested strong negative correlations between the allele frequency and historical parameters including the colonization dates by Mediterranean civilisations. The gene flows from colonizers to native populations were extremely low but colonizers are responsible of the spread of several diseases suggesting that the dissemination of parasites in naive populations could have induced a breakdown rupture of the fragile pathocenosis changing the balance among diseases. The new equilibrium state has been reached through a negative selection of the null allele. Results Most of the human diseases are zoonoses and cat might have been instrumental in the decrease of the allele frequency, because its diffusion through Europe was a gradual process, due principally to Romans; and that several cat zoonoses could be transmitted to man. The possible implication of a feline lentivirus (FIV) which does not use CCR5 as co-receptor is discussed. This virus can infect primate cells in vitro and induces clinical signs in macaque. Moreover, most of the historical regions with null or low frequency of CCR5-Δ32 allele coincide with historical range of the wild felid species which harbor species-specific FIVs. Conclusion We proposed the hypothesis that the actual European CCR5 allelic frequencies are the result of a negative selection due to a disease spreading. A cat zoonosis, could be the most plausible hypothesis. Future studies could provide if CCR5 can play an antimicrobial role in FIV pathogenesis. Moreover, studies of ancient DNA could provide more evidences regarding the implications of

  16. Four new Delta Scuti stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Four new Delta Scuti stars are reported. Power, modified into amplitude, spectra, and light curves are used to determine periodicities. A complete frequency analysis is not performed due to the lack of a sufficient time base in the data. These new variables help verify the many predictions that Delta Scuti stars probably exist in prolific numbers as small amplitude variables. Two of these stars, HR 4344 and HD 107513, are possibly Am stars. If so, they are among the minority of variable stars which are also Am stars.

  17. Delta III—an evolutionary delta growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvesen, R. J.; Simpson, J. S.

    1996-03-01

    In order to remain competitive in the future and expand the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace market share, MDA has developed an expendable launch system strategy that devices cost-effective launch systems from the Delta II with a growth vehicle configuration called Delta III. The Delta III evolves from the Delta II launch system through development of a larger payload fairing (4-meter diameter), new cryogenically propelled upper stage, new first stage fuel tank, and larger strap-on solid rocket motors. We are developing the Delta III using Integrated Product Development Teams that capitalize on the experience base that has led us to a world record breaking mission success of 49 consecutive Delta II missions. The Delta III first-launch capability is currently planned for the spring of 1998 in support of our first spacecraft customer, Hughes Space and Communications International.

  18. Kilometric shock-associated events and microwave bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Macdowall, R. J.; Stone, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    The peak times of impulsive microwaves bursts are compared with those of shock-associated (SA) kilometric radio events. The first peaks in these two frequency regimes are usually well-correlated in time, but the last peaks of the SA events observed at 1 MHz occur an average of 20 min after the last impulsive microwave peaks. In some cases, the SA events overlap in time with the post-burst increases of microwave bursts; sometimes there is general correspondence in their intensity time profiles. These observations suggest that the earlier components of the SA events are usually caused by electrons accelerated in or near the microwave source region. The possibility that the later components of some SA events could be associated with nonthermal electrons responsible for microwave post-burst increases, although they have traditionally been attributed to electrons accelerated at type II burst producing shocks in the upper corona is discussed.

  19. Properties of X-ray bursts from the X-ray transient 1608-522

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, T.; Inoue, H.; Koyama, K.

    1980-09-15

    The recurrent X-ray transient 1608--522 was observed from the X-ray astronomy satellite Hakucho through the high- and low-luminosity states of its persistent flux. 1608--522 is identified to be a burst source from which 22 X-ray bursts were recorded. The burst peak intensity is found to fluctuate by a factor as large as 7. 1608--522 exhibited two distinctly different burst modes with respect to the burst profile and the peak luminosity distribution. The burst mode seems to have changed in correlation with the persistent flux, whereas the burst frequency as well as the time-averaged burst luminosity were essentially constant despite a large change in the persistent flux.

  20. Vibration-induced drop atomization and bursting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, A. J.; Vukasinovic, B.; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, A.

    2003-02-01

    A liquid drop placed on a vibrating diaphragm will burst into a fine spray of smaller secondary droplets if it is driven at the proper frequency and amplitude. The process begins when capillary waves appear on the free surface of the drop and then grow in amplitude and complexity as the acceleration amplitude of the diaphragm is slowly increased from zero. When the acceleration of the diaphragm rises above a well-defined critical value, small secondary droplets begin to be ejected from the free-surface wave crests. Then, quite suddenly, the entire volume of the drop is ejected from the vibrating diaphragm in the form of a spray. This event is the result of an interaction between the fluid dynamical process of droplet ejection and the vibrational dynamics of the diaphragm. During droplet ejection, the effective mass of the drop diaphragm system decreases and the resonance frequency of the system increases. If the initial forcing frequency is above the resonance frequency of the system, droplet ejection causes the system to move closer to resonance, which in turn causes more vigorous vibration and faster droplet ejection. This ultimately leads to drop bursting. In this paper, the basic phenomenon of vibration-induced drop atomization and drop bursting will be introduced, demonstrated, and characterized. Experimental results and a simple mathematical model of the process will be presented and used to explain the basic physics of the system.

  1. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) observatory, scheduled for launch in 2007, comprises the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). spectral changes that are known to occur within GRBs. between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. It consists of an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 10 kev to 25 MeV range. The field of view includes the entire unocculted sky when the observatory is pointing close to the zenith. The GBM will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage into the range of current GRB databases, and will provide a trigger for reorienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM is expected to trigger on about 200 bursts per year, and will provide on-board locations of strong bursts accurate to better than 10 degrees.

  2. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) observatory, scheduled for launch in 2007, comprises the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). spectral changes that are known to occur within GRBs. between the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. It consists of an array of NaI and BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 10 kev to 25 MeV range. The field of view includes the entire unocculted sky when the observatory is pointing close to the zenith. The GBM will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage into the range of current GRB databases, and will provide a trigger for reorienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM is expected to trigger on about 200 bursts per year, and will provide on-board locations of strong bursts accurate to better than 10 degrees.

  3. Action potential bursts enhance transmitter release at a giant central synapse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Sun, Liang; Yang, Yi-Mei; Huang, Hong-Ping; Zhu, Fei-Peng; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Guo, Shu; Zuo, Pan-Li; Zhang, Claire X; Ding, Jiu-Ping; Wang, Lu-Yang; Zhou, Zhuan

    2011-05-01

    Patterns of action potentials (APs), often in the form of bursts, are critical for coding and processing information in the brain. However, how AP bursts modulate secretion at synapses remains elusive. Here, using the calyx of Held synapse as a model we compared synaptic release evoked by AP patterns with a different number of bursts while the total number of APs and frequency were fixed. The ratio of total release produced by multiple bursts to that by a single burst was defined as 'burst-effect'.We found that four bursts of 25 stimuli at 100 Hz increased the totalcharge of EPSCs to 1.47 ± 0.04 times that by a single burst of 100 stimuli at the same frequency.Blocking AMPA receptor desensitization and saturation did not alter the burst-effect, indicating that it was mainly determined by presynaptic mechanisms. Simultaneous dual recordings of presynaptic membrane capacitance (Cm) and EPSCs revealed a similar burst-effect, being 1.58±0.13by Cm and 1.49±0.05 by EPSCs. Reducing presynapticCa2+ influx by lowering extracellular Ca2+concentration or buffering residual intracellular Ca2+ with EGTA inhibited the burst-effect. We further developed a computational model largely recapitulating the burst-effect and demonstrated that this effect is highly sensitive to dynamic change in availability of the releasable pool of synaptic vesicles during various patterns of activities. Taken together, we conclude that AP bursts modulate synaptic output mainly through intricate interaction between depletion and replenishment of the large releasable pool. This burst-effect differs from the somatic burst-effect previously described from adrenal chromaffin cells, which substantially depends on activity-induced accumulation of Ca2+ to facilitate release of a limited number of vesicles in the releasable pool. Hence, AP bursts may play an important role in dynamically regulating synaptic strength and fidelity during intense neuronal activity at central synapses.

  4. Action potential bursts enhance transmitter release at a giant central synapse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Sun, Liang; Yang, Yi-Mei; Huang, Hong-Ping; Zhu, Fei-Peng; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Guo, Shu; Zuo, Pan-Li; Zhang, Claire X; Ding, Jiu-Ping; Wang, Lu-Yang; Zhou, Zhuan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Patterns of action potentials (APs), often in the form of bursts, are critical for coding and processing information in the brain. However, how AP bursts modulate secretion at synapses remains elusive. Here, using the calyx of Held synapse as a model we compared synaptic release evoked by AP patterns with a different number of bursts while the total number of APs and frequency were fixed. The ratio of total release produced by multiple bursts to that by a single burst was defined as ‘burst-effect’. We found that four bursts of 25 stimuli at 100 Hz increased the total charge of EPSCs to 1.47 ± 0.04 times that by a single burst of 100 stimuli at the same frequency. Blocking AMPA receptor desensitization and saturation did not alter the burst-effect, indicating that it was mainly determined by presynaptic mechanisms. Simultaneous dual recordings of presynaptic membrane capacitance (Cm) and EPSCs revealed a similar burst-effect, being 1.58 ± 0.13 by Cm and 1.49 ± 0.05 by EPSCs. Reducing presynaptic Ca2+ influx by lowering extracellular Ca2+ concentration or buffering residual intracellular Ca2+ with EGTA inhibited the burst-effect. We further developed a computational model largely recapitulating the burst-effect and demonstrated that this effect is highly sensitive to dynamic change in availability of the releasable pool of synaptic vesicles during various patterns of activities. Taken together, we conclude that AP bursts modulate synaptic output mainly through intricate interaction between depletion and replenishment of the large releasable pool. This burst-effect differs from the somatic burst-effect previously described from adrenal chromaffin cells, which substantially depends on activity-induced accumulation of Ca2+ to facilitate release of a limited number of vesicles in the releasable pool. Hence, AP bursts may play an important role in dynamically regulating synaptic strength and fidelity during intense neuronal activity at central synapses

  5. The Delta 2 launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ousley, Gilbert W., Sr.

    1991-12-01

    The utilization of the Delta 2 as the vehicle for launching Aristoteles into its near Sun synchronous orbit is addressed. Delta is NASA's most reliable launch vehicle and is well suited for placing the present Aristoteles spacecraft into a 400 m circular orbit. A summary of some of the Delta 2 flight parameters is presented. Diagrams of a typical Delta 2 two stage separation are included along with statistics on delta reliability and launch plans.

  6. Periodic bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission

    PubMed Central

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H.O.; Farrell, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    During the years 2000–2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period ≈1.5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every ∼25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind. PMID:23585696

  7. Periodic bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H. O.; Farrell, W. M.

    2013-03-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period ≈1.5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every ∼25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind.

  8. Periodic Bursts of Jovian Non-Io Decametric Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H O.; Farrell, W. M.

    2013-01-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have Recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period approx. = 1:5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300 deg. and 60 deg. (via 360 deg.). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every approx. 25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind.

  9. Periodic bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, M; Rucker, H O; Farrell, W M

    2013-03-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period [Formula: see text] longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every [Formula: see text] days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind.

  10. The Double Firing Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    Astronomers from around the world combined data from ground- and space-based telescopes to paint a detailed portrait of the brightest explosion ever seen. The observations reveal that the jets of the gamma-ray burst called GRB 080319B were aimed almost directly at the Earth. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 28/08 A Gamma-Ray Burst with Two Jets Read more on this illuminating blast in the additional story. GRB 080319B was so intense that, despite happening halfway across the Universe, it could have been seen briefly with the unaided eye (ESO 08/08). In a paper to appear in the 11 September issue of Nature, Judith Racusin of Penn State University, Pennsylvania (USA), and a team of 92 co-authors report observations across the electromagnetic spectrum that began 30 minutes before the explosion and followed it for months afterwards. "We conclude that the burst's extraordinary brightness arose from a jet that shot material almost directly towards Earth at almost the speed of light - the difference is only 1 part in 20 000," says Guido Chincarini, a member of the team. Gamma-ray bursts are the Universe's most luminous explosions. Most occur when massive stars run out of fuel. As a star collapses, it creates a black hole or neutron star that, through processes not fully understood, drives powerful gas jets outward. As the jets shoot into space, they strike gas previously shed by the star and heat it, thereby generating bright afterglows. The team believes the jet directed toward Earth contained an ultra-fast component just 0.4 degrees across (this is slightly smaller than the apparent size of the Full Moon). This jet is contained within another slightly less energetic jet about 20 times wider. The broad component is more typical of other bursts. "Perhaps every gamma-ray burst has a narrow jet, but astronomers miss it most of the time," says team member Stefano Covino. "We happened to view this monster down the barrel of the very narrow and energetic jet, and the chance for

  11. A comparison between hearing and tone burst electrophysiological thresholds.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Fernanda Rodrigues; Matas, Carla Gentile

    2007-01-01

    Studies have reported compatibility between hearing and electrophysiological thresholds in the auditory brainstem response (ABR) with tone burst stimuli. to verify waves I, III, V and their latency times for tone bursts at 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz and at 80 dB HL, and to compare tone burst electrophysiological thresholds with those obtained from audiological and psychoacoustic evaluations. audiological, psychoacoustic and electrophysiological evaluations of 40 male and female normal hearing individuals aged between 18 and 40 years were undertaken. only wave V was visualized at 80 dB HL and its latency values decreased with increased frequencies in both genders. At 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz male subjects presented higher electrophysiological thresholds values than females at all frequencies. At 500, 1000 and 2000 Hz, electrophysiological, hearing, and psychoacoustic thresholds were statistically different in both genders. although ABR with tone burst stimulus is clinically applicable, further research is needed to standardize test techniques and results.

  12. Brown University Radio Student Telescope (BURST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The Brown University Radio Student Telescope (BURST) is a rooftop low frequency radio interferometer that we hope to potentially use to observe radio transients, non-thermal radio emission from Galactic synchrotron and supernova remnants, and extragalactic radio sources. It was built by a group of Brown undergraduates this past summer. An overview of the design, ultimate installation, challenges in implementation and data acquisition will be covered in the poster.

  13. Q-Bursts: Natural ELF Radio Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickolaenko, A. P.; Hayakawa, M.; Hobara, Y.

    2010-07-01

    We overview resonance spectra and present analytical expressions for the waveforms of natural extremely low frequency transient events (Q-bursts). It is shown that model and observed waveforms are similar when a wideband receiver is used at a place with low level of industrial interference. We also describe how to detect a natural ELF transient signal embedded in the man-made noise by using the singular spectral analysis.

  14. A type IV burst associated with a coronal streamer disruption event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    A type IV burst was observed on February 17, 1985 with the Clark Lake Radio Observatory multifrequency radioheliograph operating in the frequency range 20-125 MHz. This burst was associated with a coronal streamer disruption event. From two-dimensional images produced at 50 MHz, evidence of a type II burst and a slow moving type IV burst are shown. The observations of the moving type IV burst suggests that a plasmoid containing energetic electrons can result from the disruption of a coronal streamer.

  15. Burst Populations and Detector Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2003-01-01

    The F(sub T) (peak bolometric photon flux) vs. E(sub p) (peak energy) plane is a powerful tool to compare the burst populations detected by different detectors. Detector sensitivity curves in this plane demonstrate which burst populations the detectors will detect. For example, future CZT-based detectors will show the largest increase in sensitivity for soft bursts, and will be particularly well- suited to study X-ray rich bursts and X-ray Flashes. Identical bursts at different redshifts describe a track in the F(sub T)-E(sub p) plane.

  16. Burst Populations and Detector Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2003-01-01

    The F(sub T) (peak bolometric photon flux) vs. E(sub p) (peak energy) plane is a powerful tool to compare the burst populations detected by different detectors. Detector sensitivity curves in this plane demonstrate which burst populations the detectors will detect. For example, future CZT-based detectors will show the largest increase in sensitivity for soft bursts, and will be particularly well- suited to study X-ray rich bursts and X-ray Flashes. Identical bursts at different redshifts describe a track in the F(sub T)-E(sub p) plane.

  17. A repeating fast radio burst.

    PubMed

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  18. A repeating fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  19. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J.; Harrison, R.; Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.

    2015-06-20

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  20. Searching For Fast Radio Burst Counterparts with Swift's Burst Alert Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaunay, James; Fox, Derek; AMON Team

    2017-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-long bursts of GHz-frequency emission with Dispersion Measures large enough to be of a cosmological origin. There has yet to be a non-radio counterpart or high-confidence host galaxy detected for any FRB, leaving their true nature to be very mysterious. Using sub-threshold archival data from Swift's Burst Alert Telescope (BAT;) we searched for evidence of a gamma-ray counterpart to any of the FRBs. In this talk I will present the details and results of our search. If real-time FRB alerts are integrated into the Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network (AMON;), sub-threshold FRBs can be detected through real-time spatial and temporal coincidences with other messengers. I will also talk about the real-time AMON analysis that's currently running. We gratfully acknowledge support from the Penn State Institute for Gravitation and Cosmos

  1. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, P. N.; Meegan, C. A.; Lichti, G. G.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Diehl, R.; Fishman, G. J.; Greiner, J.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Schönfelder, V.; Wilson, R. B.; von Kienlin, A.

    2004-09-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission is a followup to the successful EGRET experiment onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It will provide a high-sensitivity survey of the sky in high-energy γ-rays, and will perform detailed observations of persistent and transient sources. There are two experiments onboard the GLAST - the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM). The primary mission of the GBM instrument is to support the LAT in observing γ-ray bursts (GRBs) by providing low-energy measurements with high time resolution and rapid burst locations over a large field-of-view (>= 8 sr). The GBM will complement the LAT measurements by observing GRBs in the energy range 10 keV to 30 MeV, the region of the spectral turnover in most GRBs. An important objective of the GBM is to compute the locations of GRB sources on-board the spacecraft and quickly communicate them to the LAT and to the ground to allow rapid followup observations. This information may be used to re-point the LAT towards particularly interesting burst sources that occurred outside its field-of-view. The GBM consists of 14 uncollimated scintillation detectors coupled to phototubes to measure γ-ray energies and time profiles. Two types of detectors are used to obtain spectral information over a wide energy range: 12 NaI(Tl) detectors (10 keV to 1 MeV), and 2 BGO detectors (150 keV to 30 MeV). The detectors are distributed around the GLAST spacecraft to provide a large, unobstructed field of view. The 12 NaI(Tl) detectors are mounted with different orientations for use in locating GRB sources.

  2. The GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, P.N.; Briggs, M.S.; Connaughton, V.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Meegan, C.A.; Fishman, G.J.; Wilson, R.B.; Lichti, G.G.; Diehl, R.; Greiner, J.; Schoenfelder, V.; Kienlin, A. von; Kippen, R.M.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2004-09-28

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission is a followup to the successful EGRET experiment onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). It will provide a high-sensitivity survey of the sky in high-energy {gamma}-rays, and will perform detailed observations of persistent and transient sources. There are two experiments onboard the GLAST - the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM).The primary mission of the GBM instrument is to support the LAT in observing {gamma}-ray bursts (GRBs) by providing low-energy measurements with high time resolution and rapid burst locations over a large field-of-view ({>=} 8 sr). The GBM will complement the LAT measurements by observing GRBs in the energy range 10 keV to 30 MeV, the region of the spectral turnover in most GRBs. An important objective of the GBM is to compute the locations of GRB sources on-board the spacecraft and quickly communicate them to the LAT and to the ground to allow rapid followup observations. This information may be used to re-point the LAT towards particularly interesting burst sources that occurred outside its field-of-view. The GBM consists of 14 uncollimated scintillation detectors coupled to phototubes to measure {gamma}-ray energies and time profiles. Two types of detectors are used to obtain spectral information over a wide energy range: 12 NaI(Tl) detectors (10 keV to 1 MeV), and 2 BGO detectors (150 keV to 30 MeV). The detectors are distributed around the GLAST spacecraft to provide a large, unobstructed field of view. The 12 NaI(Tl) detectors are mounted with different orientations for use in locating GRB sources.

  3. Quasi-periodic oscillations in short recurring bursts of the soft gamma repeater J1550–5418

    SciTech Connect

    Huppenkothen, D.; D'Angelo, C.; Watts, A. L.; Heil, L.; Van der Klis, M.; Van der Horst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Baring, M. G.; Göğüş, E.; Kaneko, Y.; Granot, J.; Lin, L.; Von Kienlin, A.; Younes, G.

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. The scarcity of giant flares makes a search for QPOs in the shorter, far more numerous bursts from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) desirable. In Huppenkothen et al., we developed a Bayesian method for searching for QPOs in short magnetar bursts, taking into account the effects of the complicated burst structure, and have shown its feasibility on a small sample of bursts. Here we apply the same method to a much larger sample from a burst storm of 286 bursts from SGR J1550–5418. We report a candidate signal at 260 Hz in a search of the individual bursts, which is fairly broad. We also find two QPOs at ∼93 Hz, and one at 127 Hz, when averaging periodograms from a number of bursts in individual triggers, at frequencies close to QPOs previously observed in magnetar giant flares. Finally, for the first time, we explore the overall burst variability in the sample and report a weak anti-correlation between the power-law index of the broadband model characterizing aperiodic burst variability and the burst duration: shorter bursts have steeper power-law indices than longer bursts. This indicates that longer bursts vary over a broader range of timescales and are not simply longer versions of the short bursts.

  4. Feasibility of generating an artificial burst in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gad-El-hak, M.

    1986-01-01

    Artificial bursts were generated in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The burst-like events were produced by withdrawing near-wall fluid from two minute holes separated in the spanwise direction or by pitching a miniature delta wing that was flush-mounted to the wall. Either of these actions generated streamwise vorticity and a low-speed streak that resembled a naturally occurring one. The resulting sequence of events occurred at a given location and at controlled times, allowing detailed examination and comparison with natural, random bursts by means of flow visualization and fast-response probe measurement techniques.

  5. Time-Resolved Magneto-Optical Imaging of Y1Ba2Cu3O7-delta Thin Films in High-Frequency AC Current Regime (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    controlled power source in order to obtain time-resolved MO images of the current flow in the sample. We use a 6 µm thick epitaxial grown ferrite ...that reaches the minimum value slightly beyond w /2 on both sides. At the sample edges the occurrence of zigzag lines is more pronounced because the...frequency AC current regime φ=0φ=-π/2 φ=+π/2 120 80 40 0 B (m T ) x/ w 120 80 40 0 B (m T ) 100 µm 10.5-0.5 0-1 10.5-0.5 0-1 10.5-0.5 0-1 x/ w x/ w H Figure 2

  6. X-ray Bursts and Oscillations: Prospects with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mahmoodifar, Simin

    2016-04-01

    X-ray bursts (Type I) are produced by thermonuclear flashes in the accreted surface layers of some neutron stars in Low Mass X-ray Binaries (LMXBs). High frequency oscillations are observed during some of these bursts. These "burst oscillations" result from rotational modulation of an inhomogeneous temperature distribution on the neutron star surface induced by ignition and subsequent spreading of the thermonuclear flash. They provide a means to measure the spin rates of accreting neutron stars and since the burst emission arises from the neutron star surface, a unique probe of neutron star structure. To date, virtually all observations of such oscillations have been made with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We have developed a burst model employing the Schwarzschild + Doppler approximation for surface emission coupled with realistic flame spreading geometries and burst cooling to compute light curves and oscillation amplitudes for both the rising and cooling phases of X-ray bursts. We use this model to explore the capabilities for the Neutron star Interior Composition ExploreR (NICER) to detect and study burst oscillations, particularly in the energy band below 3 keV. NICER is an International Space Station attached payload (X-ray telescope) with capabilities optimized for fast timing of neutron stars in the 0.2-10 keV band. It has large collecting area (twice that of the XMM-Newton EPIC-pn camera), CCD-quality spectral resolution, and high-precision time tagging referenced to UTC through an onboard GPS receiver. NICER will begin its 18-month prime mission around the end of 2016. We will present results of simulated X-ray bursts with NICER that explore its burst oscillation detection capabilities and prospects for inferring neutron star properties from phase-resolved spectra.

  7. The Korean Solar Radio Burst Locator (KSRBL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Yujiang; Gary, Dale E.; Liu, Zhiwei; Nita, Gelu M.; Bong, Su-Chan; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Park, Young-Deuk; Moon, Yong-Jae

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the design and operation of the Korean Solar Radio Burst Locator (KSRBL). The KSRBL is a radio spectrometer designed to observe solar decimeter and microwave bursts over a wide band (0.245–18 GHz) as well as to detect the burst locations without interferometry or mechanical sweeping. As a prototype, it is temporarily observing at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO), California, USA, and after commissioning will be operated at the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon, Republic of Korea. The control system can agilely choose four 500 MHz intermediate frequency (IF) bands (2 GHz instantaneous bandwidth) from the entire 0.245–18 GHz band, with a standard time resolution of 100 ms, although higher time resolution is possible subject to data-rate constraints. To cover the entire band requires 10 tunings, which are therefore completed in 1 s. Each 500 MHz band is sampled at a 1 GS s-1 (gigasample per second) rate, and 4096 time samples are Fast Fourier transformed (FFT) to 2048 subchannels for a frequency resolution of 0.24 MHz. To cover the entire range also requires two different feeds, a dual-frequency Yagi centered at 245 and 410 MHz, and a broadband spiral feed covering 0.5–18 GHz. The dynamic range is 35 dB over the 0.5–18 GHz band, and 55 dB in the 245 and 410 MHz bands, set by using switchable attenuators in steps of 5 dB. Each 500 MHz IF has a further 63 dB of settable analog attenuation. The characteristics of the spiral feed provide the ability to locate flaring sources on the Sun to typically 2‧. The KSRBL will provide a broadband view of solar bursts for the purposes of studying solar activity for basic research, and for monitoring solar activity as the source of Space Weather and solar-terrestrial effects.

  8. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-09-01

    . "It was a bit of luck that the survey included some observations of the sky surrounding the clouds," Narkevic said. It was from those "flanking" observations that the mysterious radio burst appeared in the data. The burst of radio waves was strong by astronomical standards, but lasted less than five milliseconds. The signal was spread out, with higher frequencies arriving at the telescope before the lower frequencies. This effect, called dispersion, is caused by the signal passing through ionized gas in interstellar and intergalactic space. The amount of this dispersion, the astronomers said, indicates that the signal likely originated about three billion light-years from Earth. No previously-detected cosmic radio burst has the same set of characteristics. "This burst represents an entirely new astronomical phenomenon," Bailes said. The astronomers estimate on the basis of their results that hundreds of similar events should occur over the sky each day. "Few radio surveys have the necessary sensitivity to such short-duration bursts, which makes them notoriously difficult to detect with current instruments," added Crawford. The next generation of radio telescopes currently under development should be able to detect many of these bursts across the sky. Although the nature of the mysterious new object is unclear, the astronomers have some ideas of what may cause such a burst. One idea is that it may be part of the energy released when a pair of superdense neutron stars collide and merge. Such an event is thought by some scientists to be the cause of one type of gamma-ray burst, but the only radio emission seen so far from these has been from the long-lived "afterglow" that follows the original burst. Another, more exotic, candidate is a burst of energy from an evaporating black hole. Black holes, concentrations of mass so dense that not even light can escape their powerful gravity, can lose mass and energy through a process proposed by famed British physicist Stephen

  9. delta-Hexachlorocyclohexane (delta-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    delta - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( delta - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 86 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  10. Connection Between the CME Velocities and Decameter Radio Bursts Parameters from URAN-4 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanin, V. V.; Isaeva, E. A.; Kravetz, R. O.

    The paper reports the results of the research of connection between the coronal mass ejections (CME) with the IV type continual decameter bursts parameters. As the parameters characterizing the CME velocity, we used the integrated flux of the radio bursts and background intensity on 20 and 25 MHz frequencies. The analysis demonstrated that the connection between the CME velocity and IV type bursts increases, if we take into account the intensity of the radio bursts and background on two polarizations at a given frequency. In this case, the correlation coefficient is ≍ 0.75.

  11. Carotenoid Intakes, Assessed by food frequency questionnaires are associated with serum carotenoid concentrations in the Jackson Heart Study: Validation of the Jackson Heart Study Delta NIRI Adult Food Frequency Questionnaire

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objectives: Intake and status of carotenoids have been associated with chronic disease. The objectives of this study were to examine the association between carotenoid intakes as measured by two regional food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs) and their corresponding measures in serum, and to report ...

  12. Delta K measurements with synthetic aperture radar data. [micirowavelength difference values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. W.; Jackson, P. L.; Klooster, A.

    1985-01-01

    Delta K measurements are obtained from the interference of two electromagnetic waves of different frequencies. Constructive interference occurs when 2pi phase differences between the two frequencies correspond to a surface wavelength. Previous Delta K measurements have used two discrete frequencies for this purpose. Range pulses and Doppler signatures of a synthetic aperture radar system were filtered to obtain a sequence of Delta K values. Those Delta K values which correspond to the wavelengths of known surfaces show maximum constructive interference. SAR data can therefore be used for Delta K measurements, indicating the possibility of selective Delta K filtering during data gathering.

  13. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometers Burst Mode Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.; Crespo Grau, R.; Brocco, L.; Lalanne, X.; Sirol, O.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.; Fratter, I.

    2014-12-01

    Each of the three Swarm satellites embarks an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) to provide absolute scalar measurements of the magnetic field with high accuracy and stability. Nominal data acquisition of these ASMs is 1 Hz. But they can also run in a so-called "burst mode" and provide data at 250 Hz. During the commissioning phase of the mission, seven burst mode acquisition campaigns have been run simultaneously for all satellites, obtaining a total of ten days of burs-mode data. These campaigns allowed the identification of issues related to the operations of the piezo-electric motor and the heaters connected to the ASM, that do not impact the nominal 1 Hz scalar data. We analyze the burst mode data to identify high frequency geomagnetic signals, focusing the analysis in two regions: the low latitudes, where we seek signatures of ionospheric irregularities, and the high latitudes, to identify high frequency signals related to polar region currents. Since these campaigns have been conducted during the initial months of the mission, the three satellites where still close to each other, allowing to analyze the spatial coherency of the signals. Wavelet analysis have revealed 31 Hz signals appearing in the night-side in the equatorial region.

  14. Developing Benchmarks for Solar Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesecker, D. A.; White, S. M.; Gopalswamy, N.; Black, C.; Domm, P.; Love, J. J.; Pierson, J.

    2016-12-01

    Solar radio bursts can interfere with radar, communication, and tracking signals. In severe cases, radio bursts can inhibit the successful use of radio communications and disrupt a wide range of systems that are reliant on Position, Navigation, and Timing services on timescales ranging from minutes to hours across wide areas on the dayside of Earth. The White House's Space Weather Action Plan has asked for solar radio burst intensity benchmarks for an event occurrence frequency of 1 in 100 years and also a theoretical maximum intensity benchmark. The solar radio benchmark team was also asked to define the wavelength/frequency bands of interest. The benchmark team developed preliminary (phase 1) benchmarks for the VHF (30-300 MHz), UHF (300-3000 MHz), GPS (1176-1602 MHz), F10.7 (2800 MHz), and Microwave (4000-20000) bands. The preliminary benchmarks were derived based on previously published work. Limitations in the published work will be addressed in phase 2 of the benchmark process. In addition, deriving theoretical maxima requires additional work, where it is even possible to, in order to meet the Action Plan objectives. In this presentation, we will present the phase 1 benchmarks and the basis used to derive them. We will also present the work that needs to be done in order to complete the final, or phase 2 benchmarks.

  15. Type 2 and type 3 burst theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. F.

    1973-01-01

    The present state of the theory of type 3 bursts is reviewed by dividing the problem into the exciting agency, radiation source, and propagation of radiation between the source and the observer. In-situ measurements indicate that the excitors are electron streams of energy about 40 keV which are continuously relaxing. An investigation of neutralization of an electron stream indicates that n sub s is much less than 100,000 n sub e, where n sub s is the stream density and n sub e the coronal electron density. In situ observations are consistent with this result. An analysis of propagation of electrons in the current sheets of coronal streamers shows that such propagation at heights greater than 1 solar radius is impossible. The mechanisms for radiation are reviewed; it is shown that fundamental radiation at high frequencies (approximately 100 MHz) is highly beamed in the radial direction and that near the earth second harmonic radiation must be dominant. Because of beaming of the fundamental at high frequencies, it can often be quite weak near the limb so that the second harmonic is dominant. In considering propagation to the observer, the results of scattering of radiation are discussed. The present state of the theory of type 2 bursts is reviewed in the same manner as type 3 bursts.

  16. Optothermally actuated capillary burst valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Johan; Bilenberg, Brian; Kristensen, Anders; Marie, Rodolphe

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate the optothermal actuation of individual capillary burst valves in an all-polymer microfluidic device. The capillary burst valves are realised in a planar design by introducing a fluidic constriction in a microfluidic channel of constant depth. We show that a capillary burst valve can be burst by raising the temperature due to the temperature dependence of the fluid surface tension. We address individual valves by using a local heating platform based on a thin film of near infrared absorber dye embedded in the lid used to seal the microfluidic device [L. H. Thamdrup et al., Nano Lett. 10, 826-832 (2010)]. An individual valve is burst by focusing the laser in its vicinity. We demonstrate the capture of single polystyrene 7 μm beads in the constriction triggered by the bursting of the valve.

  17. Observation of a metric type N solar radio burst

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Xiangliang; Chen, Yao; Feng, Shiwei; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang; Koval, Artem; Vasanth, V.; Wang, Bing; Guo, Fan; Li, Gang

    2016-10-10

    Type III and type-III-like radio bursts are produced by energetic electron beams guided along coronal magnetic fields. As a variant of type III bursts, Type N bursts appear as the letter "N" in the radio dynamic spectrum and reveal a magnetic mirror effect in coronal loops. Here, we report a well-observed N-shaped burst consisting of three successive branches at metric wavelength with both fundamental and harmonic components and a high brightness temperature (>109 K). We verify the burst as a true type N burst generated by the same electron beam from three aspects of the data. First, durations of the three branches at a given frequency increase gradually and may be due to the dispersion of the beam along its path. Second, the flare site, as the only possible source of non-thermal electrons, is near the western feet of large-scale closed loops. Third, the first branch and the following two branches are localized at different legs of the loops with opposite senses of polarization. We also find that the sense of polarization of the radio burst is in contradiction to the O-mode and there exists a fairly large time delay (~3–5 s) between the fundamental and harmonic components. Possible explanations accounting for these observations are presented. Finally, assuming the classical plasma emission mechanism, we can infer coronal parameters such as electron density and magnetic field near the radio source and make diagnostics on the magnetic mirror process.

  18. Observation of a Metric Type N Solar Radio Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangliang; Chen, Yao; Feng, Shiwei; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang; Koval, Artem; Vasanth, V.; Wang, Bing; Guo, Fan; Li, Gang

    2016-10-01

    Type III and type-III-like radio bursts are produced by energetic electron beams guided along coronal magnetic fields. As a variant of type III bursts, Type N bursts appear as the letter “N” in the radio dynamic spectrum and reveal a magnetic mirror effect in coronal loops. Here, we report a well-observed N-shaped burst consisting of three successive branches at metric wavelength with both fundamental and harmonic components and a high brightness temperature (>109 K). We verify the burst as a true type N burst generated by the same electron beam from three aspects of the data. First, durations of the three branches at a given frequency increase gradually and may be due to the dispersion of the beam along its path. Second, the flare site, as the only possible source of non-thermal electrons, is near the western feet of large-scale closed loops. Third, the first branch and the following two branches are localized at different legs of the loops with opposite senses of polarization. We also find that the sense of polarization of the radio burst is in contradiction to the O-mode and there exists a fairly large time delay (˜3-5 s) between the fundamental and harmonic components. Possible explanations accounting for these observations are presented. Assuming the classical plasma emission mechanism, we can infer coronal parameters such as electron density and magnetic field near the radio source and make diagnostics on the magnetic mirror process.

  19. Observation of a metric type N solar radio burst

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Xiangliang; Chen, Yao; Feng, Shiwei; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang; Koval, Artem; Vasanth, V.; Wang, Bing; Guo, Fan; Li, Gang

    2016-10-10

    Type III and type-III-like radio bursts are produced by energetic electron beams guided along coronal magnetic fields. As a variant of type III bursts, Type N bursts appear as the letter "N" in the radio dynamic spectrum and reveal a magnetic mirror effect in coronal loops. Here, we report a well-observed N-shaped burst consisting of three successive branches at metric wavelength with both fundamental and harmonic components and a high brightness temperature (>109 K). We verify the burst as a true type N burst generated by the same electron beam from three aspects of the data. First, durations of the three branches at a given frequency increase gradually and may be due to the dispersion of the beam along its path. Second, the flare site, as the only possible source of non-thermal electrons, is near the western feet of large-scale closed loops. Third, the first branch and the following two branches are localized at different legs of the loops with opposite senses of polarization. We also find that the sense of polarization of the radio burst is in contradiction to the O-mode and there exists a fairly large time delay (~3–5 s) between the fundamental and harmonic components. Possible explanations accounting for these observations are presented. Finally, assuming the classical plasma emission mechanism, we can infer coronal parameters such as electron density and magnetic field near the radio source and make diagnostics on the magnetic mirror process.

  20. On the three harmonics of solar type III bursts at the decameter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazhenko, Anatolii; Pylaev, Oleg; Melnik, Valentin; Konovalenko, Alexandr; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Rucker, Helmut; Frantsuzenko, Anatolii; Dorovskyy, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Harmonic structure of type III bursts are explained in terms of plasma emission mechanism. The second harmonic emission is well known. But there are theoretical papers about the third harmonic of type III bursts. And there were observations of the third harmonic of such types of bursts as U, J, V, II. We observed triple type III bursts where frequency ratio is close to 1:2:3. They are structures where type III emission is repeated at the double and triple frequencies. Incidentally, components of triple type III bursts are not only standard type III but also type IIIb bursts. We registered 30 triple bursts during 2011 and 2012 years. Observations were made by radio telescope URAN-2, Poltava, Ukraine. It enables polarization measurements at the frequencies 8 - 32 MHz. URAN-2 allows registration of radio emission with time and frequency resolution 10 ms and 4 kHz correspondingly. We analyze properties of the components of triple bursts and their dependencies on frequency, type of burst and on the position of the component within the triplet. The main properties of the components of triple bursts such as duration and drift rate are similar to those of standard type III and IIIb bursts. We find usual for type III bursts dependencies such as follow: duration decreases with frequency, the type IIIb bursts have always smaller duration at the same frequencies, all bursts drift from high to low frequencies. But we also find the linear dependence of drift rate on frequency. All components of a trio have the same sign of polarization. Polarization of the first component is always the highest in triple bursts. It corresponds to the generally accepted viewpoint about the first harmonic emission. The second and the third components of trio have low polarization. It is typical for the second and the third harmonics according to the plasma radiation mechanism. We discuss possible emission mechanisms and theoretical aspects of observed dependencies. The most of detected regularities

  1. Optimal Burst Duration During a Facilitated Quadriceps Femoris Contraction

    PubMed Central

    McLoda, Todd A.; Carmack, Jennifer A.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To determine the most efficient burst duty cycle for eliciting an involuntary quadriceps femoris contraction in healthy subjects. This information will allow clinicians to make an informed decision about the optimal burst duty cycle based upon a specific treatment goal. The logical goal for such a treatment choice is to enhance motor unit recruitment in an effort to maintain postoperative or postinjury strength, when voluntary contractions may be less effective. Design and Setting: Single-group and 5-measures design. All tests were performed in a university laboratory. Subjects: Forty-eight healthy subjects (27 men and 21 women; mean age, 26.4 ± 8.5 years) performed a maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) on an isokinetic device and received neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) at 5 different burst duty cycles. Measurements: Subjects first performed an MVIC for knee extension on an isokinetic dynamometer at 60° of knee flexion. NMES surface electrodes were applied to the quadriceps muscle of each subject's dominant leg. The values for the NMES were 2500-Hz carrier frequency, 50-bursts-per-second treatment frequency, amplitude increased to maximum tolerance, and burst duty cycle set to each of the 5 comparison values. The peak isometric force generated by each of the 5 nonvolitional contractions was recorded, along with the maximal charge per burst tolerated by each subject. Force generated was described as percentage of MVIC. Efficiency was the amount of force per burst charge. Results: The mean MVIC achieved by the subjects was 553.8 newtons (N). The average force per burst charge generated at 10% burst duty cycle was 132.9 N; at 30%, 104.2 N; at 50%, 93.1 N; at 70%, 52.9 N; and at 90%, 41.3 N. The average efficiency (force per millicoulombs [mC]) at 10% burst duty cycle was the highest at 6.49 N/mC and at 90% was the lowest at 1.05 N/mC. Conclusions: A burst duty cycle of 10% was the most efficient ratio of burst duration to

  2. Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  3. Stimulation parameters define the effectiveness of burst spinal cord stimulation in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Nathan D; Goodman Keiser, Melanie D; Smith, Jenell R; Zeeman, Martha E; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2015-01-01

    Although burst spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been reported to reduce neuropathic pain, no study has explicitly investigated how the different parameters that define burst SCS may modulate its efficacy. The effectiveness of burst SCS to reduce neuronal responses to noxious stimuli by altering stimulation parameters was evaluated in a rat model of cervical radiculopathy. Neuronal firing was recorded in the spinal dorsal horn before and after burst SCS on day 7 following painful cervical nerve root compression (N = 8 rats). The parameters defining the stimulation (number of pulses per burst, pulse frequency, pulse width, burst frequency, amplitude) were individually varied in separate stimulation trials while holding the remaining parameters constant. The percent reduction of firing of wide-dynamic-range (WDR) and high-threshold neurons after SCS and the percentage of neurons responding to SCS were quantified for each parameter and correlated to the charge per burst delivered during stimulation. Pulse number, pulse width, and amplitude each were significantly correlated (p <0.009) to suppression of neuronal firing after SCS. Pulse frequency and amplitude significantly affected (p <0.05) the percentage of responsive neurons. Charge per burst was correlated to a reduction of WDR neuronal firing (p <0.03) and had a nonlinear effect on the percentage of neurons responding to burst SCS. Burst SCS can be optimized by adjusting relevant stimulation parameters to modulate the charge delivered to the spinal cord during stimulation. The efficacy of burst SCS is dependent on the charge per burst. © 2014 International Neuromodulation Society.

  4. Burst Mode ASIC-Based Modem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is sponsoring the Advanced Communication Technology Insertion (ACTION) for Commercial Space Applications program. The goal of the program is to expedite the development of new technology with a clear path towards productization and enhancing the competitiveness of U.S. manufacturers. The industry has made significant investment in developing ASIC-based modem technology for continuous-mode applications and has made investigations into East, reliable acquisition of burst-mode digital communication signals. With rapid advances in analog and digital communications ICs, it is expected that more functions will be integrated onto these parts in the near future. In addition custom ASIC's can also be developed to address the areas not covered by the other IC's. Using the commercial chips and custom ASIC's, lower-cost, compact, reliable, and high-performance modems can be built for demanding satellite communication application. This report outlines a frequency-hop burst modem design based on commercially available chips.

  5. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    SciTech Connect

    Dallum, Gregory E; Pratt, Garth C; Haugen, Peter C; Zumstein, James M; Vigars, Mark L; Romero, Carlos E

    2012-04-17

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  6. Differential behavioral state-dependence in the burst properties of CA3 and CA1 neurons.

    PubMed

    Tropp Sneider, J; Chrobak, J J; Quirk, M C; Oler, J A; Markus, E J

    2006-09-15

    Brief bursts of fast high-frequency action potentials are a signature characteristic of CA3 and CA1 pyramidal neurons. Understanding the factors determining burst and single spiking is potentially significant for sensory representation, synaptic plasticity and epileptogenesis. A variety of models suggest distinct functional roles for burst discharge, and for specific characteristics of the burst in neural coding. However, little in vivo data demonstrate how often and under what conditions CA3 and CA1 actually exhibit burst and single spike discharges. The present study examined burst discharge and single spiking of CA3 and CA1 neurons across distinct behavioral states (awake-immobility and maze-running) in rats. In both CA3 and CA1 spike bursts accounted for less than 20% of all spike events. CA3 neurons exhibited more spikes per burst, greater spike frequency, larger amplitude spikes and more spike amplitude attenuation than CA1 neurons. A major finding of the present study is that the propensity of CA1 neurons to burst was affected by behavioral state, while the propensity of CA3 to burst was not. CA1 neurons exhibited fewer bursts during maze running compared with awake-immobility. In contrast, there were no differences in burst discharge of CA3 neurons. Neurons in both subregions exhibited smaller spike amplitude, fewer spikes per burst, longer inter-spike intervals and greater spike amplitude attenuation within a burst during awake-immobility compared with maze running. These findings demonstrate that the CA1 network is under greater behavioral state-dependent regulation than CA3. The present findings should inform both theoretic and computational models of CA3 and CA1 function.

  7. PEAK FLUX DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR RADIO TYPE-I BURSTS FROM HIGHLY RESOLVED SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, K.; Masuda, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Tsuchiya, F.; Morioka, A.; Misawa, H.

    2013-05-01

    Solar radio type-I bursts were observed on 2011 January 26 by high resolution observations with the radio telescope AMATERAS in order to derive their peak flux distributions. We have developed a two-dimensional auto burst detection algorithm that can distinguish each type-I burst element from complex noise storm spectra that include numerous instances of radio frequency interference (RFI). This algorithm removes RFI from the observed radio spectra by applying a moving median filter along the frequency axis. Burst and continuum components are distinguished by a two-dimensional maximum and minimum search of the radio dynamic spectra. The analysis result shows that each type-I burst element has one peak flux without double counts or missed counts. The peak flux distribution of type-I bursts derived using this algorithm follows a power law with a spectral index between 4 and 5.

  8. Manifestation of peripherial coding in the effect of increasing loudness and enhanced discrimination of the intensity of tone bursts before and after tone burst noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimskaya-Korsavkova, L. K.

    2017-07-01

    To find the possible reasons for the midlevel elevation of the Weber fraction in intensity discrimination of a tone burst, a comparison was performed for the complementary distributions of spike activity of an ensemble of space nerves, such as the distribution of time instants when spikes occur, the distribution of interspike intervals, and the autocorrelation function. The distribution properties were detected in a poststimulus histogram, an interspike interval histogram, and an autocorrelation histogram—all obtained from the reaction of an ensemble of model space nerves in response to an auditory noise burst-useful tone burst complex. Two configurations were used: in the first, the peak amplitude of the tone burst was varied and the noise amplitude was fixed; in the other, the tone burst amplitude was fixed and the noise amplitude was varied. Noise could precede or follow the tone burst. The noise and tone burst durations, as well as the interval between them, was 4 kHz and corresponded to the characteristic frequencies of the model space nerves. The profiles of all the mentioned histograms had two maxima. The values and the positions of the maxima in the poststimulus histogram corresponded to the amplitudes and mutual time position of the noise and the tone burst. The maximum that occurred in response to the tone burst action could be a basis for the formation of the loudness of the latter (explicit loudness). However, the positions of the maxima in the other two histograms did not depend on the positions of tone bursts and noise in the combinations. The first maximum fell in short intervals and united intervals corresponding to the noise and tone burst durations. The second maximum fell in intervals corresponding to a tone burst delay with respect to noise, and its value was proportional to the noise amplitude or tone burst amplitude that was smaller in the complex. An increase in tone burst or noise amplitudes was caused by nonlinear variations in the two

  9. Search for gamma ray bursts with coincident balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Teegarden, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    A search was conducted for cosmic gamma ray bursts of small size and of sufficient frequency of occurrence to be detected during a one day observation program. Two similar detectors, successfully balloon-borne from launch sites in South Dakota and Texas, achieved about 20 hours of simultaneous operation at several millibars atmospheric depth, with continuous separation of over 1,500 km. Fluctuations of the counting rates of less than 150 keV photons with temporal structures from microseconds to several minutes were compared in order to detect coincident or associated responses from the two instruments. No coincident gamma-ray burst events were detected. The resulting integral size spectrum of small bursts, from this and from all other searches, remains a spectrum of upper limits, consistent with an extrapolation of the size spectrum of the largest known bursts, fitting a power low of index -1.5.

  10. An interacting loop model for solar flare bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    A schematic model is presented which attempts to explain the quasi-periodic behavior (on a timescale of less than or approximately equal to 10 s) frequency observed in solar hard X-ray bursts. It is shown how, as a result of the strong heating produced during a solar flare burst, the local gas pressure can transiently attain very large values in regions corresponding to the upper preflare chromosphere. The effectiveness of the surrounding magnetic field at confining this high pressure plasma is therefore reduced and the flaring loop becomes free to expand laterally. In so doing it may drive magnetic field lines into neighboring, non-flaring, loops in the same active region, causing magnetic reconnection to take place and triggering another flare burst. The features of this interacting loop model are found to be in good agreement with the energetics and time structure of flare-associated solar hard X-ray bursts.

  11. An interacting loop model for solar flare bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    A schematic model is presented which attempts to explain the quasi-periodic behavior (on a timescale of less than or approximately equal to 10 s) frequency observed in solar hard X-ray bursts. It is shown how, as a result of the strong heating produced during a solar flare burst, the local gas pressure can transiently attain very large values in regions corresponding to the upper preflare chromosphere. The effectiveness of the surrounding magnetic field at confining this high pressure plasma is therefore reduced and the flaring loop becomes free to expand laterally. In so doing it may drive magnetic field lines into neighboring, non-flaring, loops in the same active region, causing magnetic reconnection to take place and triggering another flare burst. The features of this interacting loop model are found to be in good agreement with the energetics and time structure of flare-associated solar hard X-ray bursts.

  12. Analysis of variability in the burst oscillations of the accreting millisecond pulsar XTE J1814-338

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, Anna L.; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Markwardt, Craig B.

    2005-01-01

    The accreting millisecond pulsar XTE J1814-338 exhibits oscillations at the known spin frequency during Type I X-ray bursts. The properties of the burst oscillations reflect the nature of the thermal asymmetry on the stellar surface. We present an analysis of the variability of the burst oscillations of this source, focusing on three characteristics: fractional amplitude, harmonic content and frequency. Fractional amplitude and harmonic content constrain the size, shape and position of the emitting region, whilst variations in frequency indicate motion of the emitting region on the neutron star surface. We examine both long-term variability over the course of the outburst, and short-term variability during the bursts. For most of the bursts, fractional amplitude is consistent with that of the accretion pulsations, implying a low degree of fuel spread. There is however a population of bursts whose fractional amplitudes are substantially lower, implying a higher degree of fuel spread, possibly forced by the explosive burning front of a precursor burst. For the first harmonic, substantial differences between the burst and accretion pulsations suggest that hotspot geometry is not the only mechanism giving rise to harmonic content in the latter. Fractional amplitude variability during the bursts is low; we can only rule out the hypothesis that the fractional amplitude remains constant at the l(sigma) level for bursts that do not exhibit photospheric radius expansion (PRE). There are no significant variations in frequency in any of the bursts except for the one burst that exhibits PRE. This burst exhibits a highly significant but small (= 0.1Hz) drop in frequency in the burst rise. The timescale of the frequency shift is slower than simple burning layer expansion models predict, suggesting that other mechanisms may be at work.

  13. Microwave Type III Pair Bursts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Baolin; Mészárosová, Hana; Karlický, Marian; Huang, Guangli; Tan, Chengming

    2016-03-01

    A solar microwave type III pair burst is composed of normal and reverse-sloped (RS) burst branches with oppositely fast frequency drifts. It is the most sensitive signature of the primary energy release and electron accelerations in flares. This work reports 11 microwave type III pair events in 9 flares observed by radio spectrometers in China and the Czech Republic at a frequency of 0.80-7.60 GHz during 1994-2014. These type III pairs occurred in flare impulsive and postflare phases with separate frequencies in the range of 1.08-3.42 GHz and a frequency gap of 10-1700 MHz. The frequency drift increases with the separate frequency (fx), the lifetime of each burst is anti-correlated to fx, while the frequency gap is independent of fx. In most events, the normal branches are drifting obviously faster than the RS branches. The type III pairs occurring in flare impulsive phase have lower separate frequencies, longer lifetimes, wider frequency gaps, and slower frequency drifts than that occurring in postflare phase. Also, the latter always has strong circular polarization. Further analysis indicates that near the flare energy release sites the plasma density is about {10}10{--}{10}11 cm-3 and the temperature is higher than 107 K. These results provide new constraints to the acceleration mechanism in solar flares.

  14. Static measurements of slender delta wing rolling moment hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Levin, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    Slender delta wing planforms are susceptible to self-induced roll oscillations due to aerodynamic hysteresis during the limit cycle roll oscillation. Test results are presented which clearly establish that the static rolling moment hysteresis has a damping character; hysteresis tends to be greater when, due to either wing roll or side slip, the vortex burst moves back and forth over the wing trailing edge. These data are an indirect indication of the damping role of the vortex burst during limit cycle roll oscillations.

  15. EMISSION PATTERNS OF SOLAR TYPE III RADIO BURSTS: STEREOSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Thejappa, G.; Bergamo, M.; MacDowall, R. J. E-mail: mbergamo@umd.edu

    2012-02-01

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft R{sub j} = I{sub j} /{Sigma}I{sub j} (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of {approx}2 Degree-Sign and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from {approx} - 100 Degree-Sign to {approx}100 Degree-Sign . The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  16. Emission Patterns of Solar Type III Radio Bursts: Stereoscopic Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft Rj = Ij /[Sigma]Ij (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of approximately 2 deg and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from [approx] -100 deg to approximately 100 deg. The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  17. Self-Organization on Social Media: Endo-Exo Bursts and Baseline Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Mizuki; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    A salient dynamic property of social media is bursting behavior. In this paper, we study bursting behavior in terms of the temporal relation between a preceding baseline fluctuation and the successive burst response using a frequency time series of 3,000 keywords on Twitter. We found that there is a fluctuation threshold up to which the burst size increases as the fluctuation increases and that above the threshold, there appears a variety of burst sizes. We call this threshold the critical threshold. Investigating this threshold in relation to endogenous bursts and exogenous bursts based on peak ratio and burst size reveals that the bursts below this threshold are endogenously caused and above this threshold, exogenous bursts emerge. Analysis of the 3,000 keywords shows that all the nouns have both endogenous and exogenous origins of bursts and that each keyword has a critical threshold in the baseline fluctuation value to distinguish between the two. Having a threshold for an input value for activating the system implies that Twitter is an excitable medium. These findings are useful for characterizing how excitable a keyword is on Twitter and could be used, for example, to predict the response to particular information on social media. PMID:25329610

  18. Burst Firing is a Neural Code in an Insect Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Eyherabide, Hugo G.; Rokem, Ariel; Herz, Andreas V. M.; Samengo, Inés

    2008-01-01

    Various classes of neurons alternate between high-frequency discharges and silent intervals. This phenomenon is called burst firing. To analyze burst activity in an insect system, grasshopper auditory receptor neurons were recorded in vivo for several distinct stimulus types. The experimental data show that both burst probability and burst characteristics are strongly influenced by temporal modulations of the acoustic stimulus. The tendency to burst, hence, is not only determined by cell-intrinsic processes, but also by their interaction with the stimulus time course. We study this interaction quantitatively and observe that bursts containing a certain number of spikes occur shortly after stimulus deflections of specific intensity and duration. Our findings suggest a sparse neural code where information about the stimulus is represented by the number of spikes per burst, irrespective of the detailed interspike-interval structure within a burst. This compact representation cannot be interpreted as a firing-rate code. An information-theoretical analysis reveals that the number of spikes per burst reliably conveys information about the amplitude and duration of sound transients, whereas their time of occurrence is reflected by the burst onset time. The investigated neurons encode almost half of the total transmitted information in burst activity. PMID:18946533

  19. Comparative analysis of decametre "drift pair" bursts observed in 2002 and 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volvach, Ya. S.; Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Koval, A. A.; Dorovskyy, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    We report about new observations of solar "drift pair" (DP) bursts by means of the UTR-2 radio telescope at frequencies 10-30 MHz. Our experimental data include both "forward" and "reverse" bursts with high frequency and time resolution. The records of 301 bursts, observed in 10-12 July of 2015, are investigated. The main properties of these bursts (frequency bandwidth, central frequency and others) have been analysed. In this report our main attention is paid to the comparison of our observations with the similar observations of decametre DPs performed earlier during 13-15 July of 2002 in the same frequency range. Common features of DPs in the two different pieces of data samples have been found. This may indicate the possible presence of stability in the frequency-time properties of decametre DPs from one cycle of solar activity to another.

  20. Fine and Superfine Structure of the Decameter-Hectometer Type II Burst on 7 June 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorovskyy, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Panchenko, M.; Poedts, S.; Mykhaylov, V. A.

    2015-07-01

    The characteristics of a type II burst with a herringbone structure observed both with ground-based radio telescopes (UTR-2 and URAN-2) and space-borne spectrometers (STEREO-A and B) are discussed. The burst was recorded on 7 June 2011 in the frequency band 3 - 33 MHz. It was characterized by extremely rich fine structure. Statistical analysis of more than 300 herringbone sub-bursts constituting the burst was performed separately for the positively (reverse) and negatively (forward) drifting sub-bursts. The sense and the degree of circular polarization of the herringbone sub-bursts were measured in a wide frequency band (16 - 32 MHz). A second-order fine frequency structure of the herringbone sub-bursts was observed and studied for the first time. Using STEREO/COR1 and SOHO/LASCO-C2 images, we determined the direction and radial speed of the coronal mass ejection responsible for the studied type II burst. The possible location of the type II burst source on the flank of the shock was found.

  1. Swift's 500th Gamma Ray Burst

    NASA Image and Video Library

    On April 13, 2010, NASA's Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer satellite discovered its 500th burst. Swift's main job is to quickly localize each gamma-ray burst (GRB), report its position so that others...

  2. Eccentric gravitational wave bursts in the post-Newtonian formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loutrel, Nicholas; Yunes, Nicolás

    2017-07-01

    The detection of GW150914 by ground based gravitational wave observatories has brought about a new era in astrophysics. At optimal sensitivity, these observatories are expected to detect several events each year, with one or two of these occurring with non-negligible eccentricity. Such eccentric binaries will emit bursts of gravitational radiation during every pericenter passage, where orbital velocities can reach greater than ten percent the speed of light. As a result, such binaries may prove to be powerful probes of extreme gravitational physics and astrophysics. A promising method of achieving detection of such binaries is through power stacking, where the power in each burst is added up in time-frequency space. This detection strategy requires a theoretical prior of where the bursts will occur in time and frequency so that one knows where to search for successive bursts. We here present a generic post-Newtonian formalism for constructing such time-frequency model priors at generic post-Newtonian order. We apply our formalism to generate a burst model at third post-Newtonian order, making it potentially the most accurate, fully analytic model to date.

  3. Bursts de raios gama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, J.

    2003-02-01

    Nos últimos anos, graças principalmente aos dados obtidos pelo Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory e pelo satélite ítalo-holandês BeppoSAX, grandes avanços foram obtidos no nosso conhecimento sobre os fascinantes e enigmáticos fenômenos conhecidos por "bursts"de raios gama. Neste trabalho é feita uma revisão sobre a fenomenologia desses misteriosos objetos e são apresentados os desenvolvimentos recentes nessa área palpitante da astrofísica moderna, ressaltando tanto os resultados observacionais obtidos até o momento quanto os modelos teóricos propostos para explixá-los.

  4. Quantum Key Based Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    PubMed Central

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks. PMID:24578663

  5. Quantum key based burst confidentiality in optical burst switched networks.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, A M; Sivasubramanian, A

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks.

  6. EEG delta oscillations index inhibitory control of contextual novelty to both irrelevant distracters and relevant task-switch cues.

    PubMed

    Prada, Laura; Barceló, Francisco; Herrmann, Christoph S; Escera, Carles

    2014-07-01

    Delta oscillations contribute to the human P300 event-related potential evoked by oddball targets, although it is unclear whether they index contextual novelty (event oddballness, novelty P3, nP3), or target-related processes (event targetness, target P3b). To examine this question, the electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded during a cued task-switching version of the Wisconsin card-sorting test. Each target card was announced by a tone cueing either to switch or repeat the task. Novel sound distracters were interspersed among trials. Time-frequency EEG analyses revealed bursts of delta (2-4 Hz) power associated with enhanced nP3 amplitudes to both task-switch cues and novel distracters-but no association with target P3b. These findings indicate that the P300-delta response indexes contextual novelty regardless of whether novelty emanates from endogenous (new task rules) or exogenous (novel distracters) sources of information. Copyright © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  7. The Delta Scuti star HD 127759

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiping; Jiang, Shiyiang

    1992-06-01

    The results are reported of six nights of V-band observations of the newly discovered Delta Scuti variable HD 127759 during April 3-21, 1991 and its Stromgren uvby(beta) photometry. The period analysis indicates that HD 127759 is a single-sine frequency-dominant pulsation variable with a frequency of 14.78626 cycle/d and an amplitude of 0.0199 m. The times of maximum are given. The star is located at the blue edge of the Delta Scuti variable instability strip, with T(eff) about 8400 K and M(V) about 0.93 m.

  8. Identifying Crucial Parameter Correlations Maintaining Bursting Activity

    PubMed Central

    Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons) allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO) model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron) and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency) similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, Leak; a persistent K current, K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, P) that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of Leak, K2, and P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained. PMID:24945358

  9. Galactic dual population models of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higdon, J. C.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate in more detail the properties of two-population models for gamma-ray bursts in the galactic disk and halo. We calculate the gamma-ray burst statistical properties, mean value of (V/V(sub max)), mean value of cos Theta, and mean value of (sin(exp 2) b), as functions of the detection flux threshold for bursts coming from both Galactic disk and massive halo populations. We consider halo models inferred from the observational constraints on the large-scale Galactic structure and we compare the expected values of mean value of (V/V(sub max)), mean value of cos Theta, and mean value of (sin(exp 2) b), with those measured by Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) and other detectors. We find that the measured values are consistent with solely Galactic populations having a range of halo distributions, mixed with local disk distributions, which can account for as much as approximately 25% of the observed BATSE bursts. M31 does not contribute to these modeled bursts. We also demonstrate, contrary to recent arguments, that the size-frequency distributions of dual population models are quite consistent with the BATSE observations.

  10. Gamma ray bursts from extragalactic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyle, Fred; Burbidge, Geoffrey

    1992-01-01

    The properties of gamma ray bursts of classical type are found to be explicable in terms of high speed collisions between stars. A model is proposed in which the frequency of such collisions can be calculated. The model is then applied to the nuclei of galaxies in general on the basis that galaxies, or at least some fraction of them, originate in the expulsion of stars from creation centers. Evidence that low level activity of this kind is also taking place at the center of our own Galaxy is discussed. The implications for galactic evolution are discussed and a negative view of black holes is taken.

  11. Source location of the narrowbanded radio bursts at Uranus - Evidence of a cusp source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Desch, M. D.; Kaiser, M. L.; Kurth, W. S.

    1990-03-01

    While Voyager 2 was inbound to Uranus, radio bursts of narrow bandwidth (less than 5 kHz) were detected between 17-116 kHz. These R-X mode bursts, designated n-bursts, were of short duration, tended to occur when the north magnetic pole tipped toward the spacecraft, and increased in occurrence with increasing solar wind density. An explicit determination of the burst source location is presented, based upon fitting the region of detection at high and low frequencies to field-aligned, symmetric cones. The region of good fits was located between the north magnetic pole and the rotational pole, corresponding approximately to the northern polar cusp.

  12. The GLAST burst monitor (GBM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kippen, R. M.; Briggs, M. S.; Diehl, R.; Fishman, G. J.; Georgii, R. H.; Kouveliotou, C.; Lichti, G. G.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Schönfelder, V.; von Kienlin, A.

    2001-10-01

    The study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is one of the primary scientific objectives of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission. With its high sensitivity to prompt and extended 20 MeV to 300 GeV burst emission, GLAST's Large Area Telescope (LAT) is expected to yield significant progress in the understanding of GRB physics. To tie these breakthrough high-energy measurements to the known properties of GRBs at lower energies, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide spectra and timing in the 10 keV to 25 MeV energy range. The GBM will also have the capability to quickly localize burst sources to ~15° over more than half the sky, allowing the LAT to re-point at particularly interesting bursts which occur outside its field of view. With combined LAT/GBM measurements GLAST will be able to characterize the spectral behavior of many bursts over nearly six decades in energy. This will allow the unknown aspects of high-energy burst emission to be explored in the context of well-known low-energy properties. In this paper, we present an overview of the GBM instrument, including its technical design, scientific goals, and expected performance. .

  13. Burst Oscillation Studies with NICER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodifar, Simin; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2017-08-01

    Type I X-ray bursts are thermonuclear flashes observed from the surfaces of accreting neutron stars in Low Mass X-ray Binaries. Oscillations have been observed during the rise and/or decay of some of these X-ray bursts. Those seen during the rise can be well explained by a spreading hot spot model, but large amplitude oscillations in the decay phase remain mysterious because of the absence of a clear-cut source of asymmetry. Here we present the results of our computations of the light curves and amplitudes of oscillations in X-ray burst models that realistically account for both flame spreading and subsequent cooling. For the cooling phase of the burst we use two simple phenomenological models. The first considers asymmetric cooling that can achieve high amplitudes in the tail. The second considers a sustained temperature pattern on the stellar surface that is produced by r-modes propagating in the surface fluid ocean of the star. We will present some simulated burst light curves/spectra using these models and NICER response files, and will show the capabilities of NICER to detect and study burst oscillations. NICER will enable us to study burst oscillations in the energy band below ~3 keV, where there has been no previous measurements of these phenomena.

  14. Gamma-ray burst populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgili, Francisco Javier

    Over the last fifty years the field of gamma-ray bursts has shown incredible growth, but the amassing of data has also left observers and theorists alike wondering about some of the basic questions surrounding these phenomena. Additionally, these events show remarkable individuality and extrema, ranging in redshift throughout the observable universe and over ten orders of magnitude in energy. This work focuses on analyzing groups of bursts that are different from the general trend and trying to understand whether these bursts are from different intrinsic populations and if so, what can be said about their progenitors. This is achieved through numerical Monte Carlo simulations and statistical inference in conjunction with current GRB observations. Chapter 1 gives a general introduction of gamma-ray burst theory and observations in a semi-historical context. Chapter 2 provides an introduction to the theory and practical issues surrounding the numerical simulations and statistics. Chapters 3--5 are each dedicated to a specific problem relating to a different type of GRB population: high-luminosity v. low-luminosity bursts, constraints from high-redshift bursts, and Type I v. Type II bursts. Chapter 6 follows with concluding remarks.

  15. Concept for LEU Burst Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Kimpland, Robert Herbert

    2016-03-07

    Design and performance of a proposed LEU burst reactor are sketched. Salient conclusions reached are the following: size would be ~1,500 kg or greater, depending on the size of the central cavity; internal stresses during burst require split rings for relief; the reactor would likely require multiple control and safety rods for fine control; the energy spectrum would be comparable to that of HEU machines; and burst yields and steady-state power levels will be significantly greater in an LEU reactor.

  16. The Burst of the Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchter, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    The extraordinarily bright GRB 130427A has provided a multiwavelength data set unprecedented in the history of the field. However the light curve of this burst, like that of the large majority of LAT bursts, shows a puzzling lack of a jet break (the hallmark of a collimated outflow). We propose to continue our long-term monitoring of this GRB through to the end of 2015. A detection of a jet break will give us a direct measure of the absolute energy of the burst; its absence will effectively rule out a rotating neutron star as the central engine of the GRB.

  17. The Repeating Fast Radio Burst FRB 121102: Multi-wavelength Observations and Additional Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, P.; Spitler, L. G.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Kaspi, V. M.; Wharton, R. S.; Bassa, C. G.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Mickaliger, M.; Parent, E.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Tendulkar, S. P.

    2016-12-01

    We report on radio and X-ray observations of the only known repeating Fast Radio Burst (FRB) source, FRB 121102. We have detected six additional radio bursts from this source: five with the Green Bank Telescope at 2 GHz, and one at 1.4 GHz with the Arecibo Observatory, for a total of 17 bursts from this source. All have dispersion measures consistent with a single value (˜559 pc cm-3) that is three times the predicted maximum Galactic contribution. The 2 GHz bursts have highly variable spectra like those at 1.4 GHz, indicating that the frequency structure seen across the individual 1.4 and 2 GHz bandpasses is part of a wideband process. X-ray observations of the FRB 121102 field with the Swift and Chandra observatories show at least one possible counterpart; however, the probability of chance superposition is high. A radio imaging observation of the field with the Jansky Very Large Array at 1.6 GHz yields a 5σ upper limit of 0.3 mJy on any point-source continuum emission. This upper limit, combined with archival Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer 22 μm and IPHAS Hα surveys, rules out the presence of an intervening Galactic H ii region. We update our estimate of the FRB detection rate in the PALFA survey to be {1.1}-1.0+3.7× {10}4 FRBs sky-1 day-1 (95% confidence) for peak flux density at 1.4 GHz above 300 mJy. We find that the intrinsic widths of the 12 FRB 121102 bursts from Arecibo are, on average, significantly longer than the intrinsic widths of the 13 single-component FRBs detected with the Parkes telescope.

  18. Survey of research on unsteady aerodynamic loading of delta wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, H.; Vaneck, T.; Katz, J.; Jarrah, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    For aeronautical applications, there has been recent interest in accurately determining the aerodynamic forces and moments experienced by low-aspect-ratio wings performing transient maneuvers which go to angles of attack as high as 90 deg. Focusing on the delta planform with sharp leading edges, the paper surveys experimental and theoretical investigations dealing with the associated unsteady flow phenomena. For maximum angles above a value between 30 and 40 deg, flow details and airloads are dominated by hysteresis in the 'bursting' instability of intense vortices which emanate from the leading edge. As examples of relevant test results, force and moment histories are presented for a model series with aspect ratios 1, 1.5 and 2. Influences of key parameters are discussed, notably those which measure unsteadiness. Comparisons are given with two theories: a paneling approximation that cannot capture bursting but clarifies other unsteady influences, and a simplified estimation scheme which uses measured bursting data.

  19. Bursts of HF radio noises after irregularities of solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnik, O. V.; Malykhina, T. V.

    We present analyses of HF radio emission spectra of magnetospheric origin, at frequencies of 150 and 500 MHz, collected with ground-based antennae at middle latitudes ( L=2) during the second half of 1999. We discover a large occurrence of short-time-scale (1-10 s) sporadic radio bursts during active solar periods. To identify the source of these bursts, we associate their occurrence and perform correlations with solar wind parameters and energetic particle fluxes in interplanetary space and in the outer magnetosphere. Solar wind parameters and energetic ion fluxes in interplanetary space are provided by the ACE satellite. GOES8 and GOES10 satellites provide electron fluxes with energy E>2 MeV at geosynchronous orbit. These data are analyzed in order to show a correlation between particle fluxes and high amplitude radio bursts. There is a delay between the initiations of high-amplitude, short-term, sporadic radio bursts (at a frequency 150 MHz) and the arrival of high-speed solar wind streams at Earth's magnetosphere. The temporal delay of a few hours from the start of these features in the temporal distribution of electron fluxes at L=6.6 is shown, too. We suggest the possibility that the sources of radio bursts are located in the inner parts of magnetosphere.

  20. Directivity Patterns of Complex Solar Type III Radio Bursts: Stereoscopic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golla, T.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Complex solar type III-like radio bursts are a group of type III bursts that occur in association with slowly drifting type II radio bursts excited by coronal mass ejection (CME) driven shock waves. We presentsimultaneous observations of these radio bursts from the STEREO A, B and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies, located at different vantage points in the ecliptic plane. Using these stereoscopic observations, wedetermine the directivity of these complex radio bursts. We estimate the angles between the directions of the magnetic field at the sources and the lines connecting the source to the spacecraft (viewing angles) by assuming that the sources are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere. We estimate the normalized peak intensities of these bursts (directivity factors) at each spacecraft using their time profiles at each spacecraft. These observations indicate that the complex type III bursts can be divided into two groups: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field, and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone. We show that the bursts , which are emitted along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source are very intense, and their intensities steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. We have developed a ray tracing code and computed the distributions of the trajectories of rays emitted at the fundamental and second harmonic of the electron plasma frequency. The comparison of the observed emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relativelyweaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  1. Connectivity in river deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passalacqua, P.; Hiatt, M. R.; Sendrowski, A.

    2016-12-01

    Deltas host approximately half a billion people and are rich in ecosystem diversity and economic resources. However, human-induced activities and climatic shifts are significantly impacting deltas around the world; anthropogenic disturbance, natural subsidence, and eustatic sea-level rise are major causes of threat to deltas and in many cases have compromised their safety and sustainability, putting at risk the people that live on them. In this presentation, I will introduce a framework called Delta Connectome for studying connectivity in river deltas based on different representations of a delta as a network. Here connectivity indicates both physical connectivity (how different portions of the system interact with each other) as well as conceptual (pathways of process coupling). I will explore several network representations and show how quantifying connectivity can advance our understanding of system functioning and can be used to inform coastal management and restoration. From connectivity considerations, the delta emerges as a leaky network that evolves over time and is characterized by continuous exchanges of fluxes of matter, energy, and information. I will discuss the implications of connectivity on delta functioning, land growth, and potential for nutrient removal.

  2. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichti, G. G.; Briggs, M. S.; Diehl, R.; Fishman, G.; Georgii, R.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C.; Paciesas, W.; Preece, R.; Schönfelder, V.; von Kienlin, A.

    The selection of the GLAST burst monitor (GBM) by NASA will allow the investigation of the relation between the keV and the MeV-GeV emission from γ-ray bursts. The GBM consists of 12 NaI and 2 BGO crystals allowing a continuous measurement of the energy spectra of γ-ray bursts from ˜ 5 keV to ˜ 30 MeV. One feature of the GBM is its high time resolution for time-resolved γ-ray spectroscopy. Moreover the arrangement of the NaI-crystals allows a rapid on-board location ( < 15°) of a γ-ray burst within a FoV of ˜ 8.6 sr. This position will be communicated to the main instrument of GLAST making follow-up observations at high energies possible.

  3. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons to...

  4. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons to...

  5. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons to...

  6. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons to...

  7. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons to...

  8. Pen Branch delta expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Christensen, E.J.; Mackey, H.E.; Sharitz, R.R.; Jensen, J.R.; Hodgson, M.E.

    1984-02-01

    Since 1954, cooling water discharges from K Reactor ({anti X} = 370 cfs {at} 59 C) to Pen Branch have altered vegetation and deposited sediment in the Savannah River Swamp forming the Pen Branch delta. Currently, the delta covers over 300 acres and continues to expand at a rate of about 16 acres/yr. Examination of delta expansion can provide important information on environmental impacts to wetlands exposed to elevated temperature and flow conditions. To assess the current status and predict future expansion of the Pen Branch delta, historic aerial photographs were analyzed using both basic photo interpretation and computer techniques to provide the following information: (1) past and current expansion rates; (2) location and changes of impacted areas; (3) total acreage presently affected. Delta acreage changes were then compared to historic reactor discharge temperature and flow data to see if expansion rate variations could be related to reactor operations.

  9. Burst interference in TDMA radio systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Z.; Chen, M.-X.; Feher, K.

    1985-12-01

    Burst interference is inherent in TDMA subscriber radio and satellite communications systems. Spectral and interference properties of burst modulated signals are investigated. Owing to the burst mode operation of the TDMA system its spectrum spreads; this spread increases with the increase of burst gating rate and the decrease of the burst length. A theoretical derivation of the Pe = f(Eb/N0; I) performance, computer simulation and experimental results of IJF-OQPSK and conventional QPSK burst operated systems are presented. The performance of these systems in the presence of burst mode TDMA co-channel and adjacent channel interference (I) is evaluated.

  10. What Can Be Interesting in the Analysis of Crowded Solar Bursts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Koval, A. A.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Zarka, Ph.; Rucker, H. O.

    2015-03-01

    At decameter wavelengths the radio astronomy observations reveal a wide variety of solar bursts. They are associated with solar activity manifestations such as movements of electron beams and shock waves in solar corona, flare- related events, coronal mass ejections and others. The analysis of burst features allows one to use them as probing signals which comprise useful information about solar corona parameters and their changes over time. By frequency-time measurements of different types of solar bursts occurred about the same time one can provide a comparative study of their properties, complementing the missing pieces in the complex mosaic of solar events. In this purpose we discuss features of their signal processing by the gradient filtration, as applied to quasi-periodic bursts like a zebra pattern related to Bernstein modes. The measured frequency periodicity of the bursts gives a chance to determine the magnetic field strength in upper corona around the protracted solar minimum of solar activity.

  11. Interplanetary baseline observations of type 3 solar radio bursts. [by Helios satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, R. R.; Fitzenreiter, R. J.; Novaco, J. C.; Fainberg, J.

    1977-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of type III radio bursts using spacecraft separated by several tenths of an AU were made using the solar orbiters HELIOS-A and -B. The burst beginning at 1922 UT on March 28, 1976, was located from the intersection of the source directions measured at each spacecraft, and from the burst arrival time differences. Wide baseline observations give the radial distance of the source at each observing frequency. Consequently, coronal electron densities and exciter velocity were determined directly, without the need to assume a density model as is done with single spacecraft observations. The separation of HELIOS-A and -B also provided the first measurements of burst directivity at low frequencies. For the March 28 burst, the intensity observed from near the source longitude (HELIOS-B) was significantly greater than from 60 W of the source (HELIOS-A).

  12. Burst Oscillation Probes of Neutron Stars and Nuclear Burning with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2012-01-01

    X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts--burst oscillations--have provided a new probe of neutron star spins as well as of the dependent nuclear burning processes. The frequency drift and amplitude evolution of the oscillations observed during bursts can in principle place constraints on the physics of thermonuclear flame spreading and the dynamics of the burning atmosphere. I use simulations appropriate to LOFT to explore the precision with which the time dependence of the oscillation frequency can be inferred. This can test, for example, different models for the frequency drift, such as up-lift versus geostrophic drift. I also explore the precision with which asymptotic frequencies can be constrained in order to estimate the capability for LOFT to detect the Doppler shifts induced by orbital motion of the neutron star from a sample of bursts at different orbital phases.

  13. The Effect of Magnetic Fields on Gamma-Ray Bursts Inferred from Multi-Wavelength Observations of the Bursts of 23 January 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galama, T. J.; Briggs, M. S.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Rol, E.; Band, D.; vanParadijs, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Preece, R. D.; Bremer, M.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to arise when an extremely relativistic outflow of particles from a massive explosion (the nature at which is still unclear) interacts with material surrounding the site of the explosion. Observations of the evolving changes in emission at many wavelengths allow us to investigate the origin of the photons, and so potentially determine the nature of the explosion. Here we report the results of gamma-ray, optical, infrared, submillimeter, millimeter and radio observations of the burst ORB990123 and its afterglow. Our interpretation of the data indicates that the initial and afterglow emissions are associated with three distinct regions in the fireball. The peak flux of the afterglow, one day after the burst, has a lower frequency than observed for other bursts; this explains the short-lived radio emission. We suggest that the differences between bursts reflect variations in the magnetic-field strength in the afterglow-emitting regions.

  14. X-ray bursts: Observation versus theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1981-01-01

    Results of various observations of common type I X-ray bursts are discussed with respect to the theory of thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers of accreting neutron stars. Topics covered include burst profiles; irregular burst intervals; rise and decay times and the role of hydrogen; the accuracy of source distances; accuracy in radii determination; radius increase early in the burst; the super Eddington limit; temperatures at burst maximum; and the role of the magnetic field.

  15. Stabilization of electron streams in type 3 solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Goldstein, M. L.; Smith, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that the electron streams that give rise to Type 3 solar radio bursts are stable and will not be decelerated while propagating out of the solar corona. The stabilization mechanism depends on the parametric oscillating two stream instability. Radiation is produced near the fundamental and second harmonic of the local electron plasma frequency. Estimates of the emission at the second harmonic indicate that the wave spectra created by the oscillating two stream instability can account for the observed intensities of Type 3 bursts.

  16. Comet Bursting Through Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2012-10-01

    Comets may be excited and occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation states for a large fraction of their lifetimes. Many comet nuclei have been identified or are suspected to occupy non-principal axis (complex) rotation [Belton 2005, etc.] as well as have evolving rotation rates [Belton 2011, etc.]. Comet orbits drive these rotation states through cycles of excitation due to surface jets and relaxation due to time variable internal stresses that dissipate energy in the anelastic comet interior. Furthermore, relaxation from complex rotation can increase the loads along the symmetry axis of prolate comets. These loads stretch the body along the symmetry axis and may be the cause of the characteristic ``bowling pin’’ shape and eventually may lead to failure. This is an alternative model for comet bursting. Each cycle deposits only a small amount of energy and stress along the axis, but this process is repeated every orbit during which jets are activated. Our model for the evolution of comet nuclei includes torques due to a number of discrete jets located on the surface based on Neishtadt et al. [2002]. The model also includes internal dissipation using an approach developed by Sharma et al. [2005] and Vokrouhlicky et al. [2009]. These equations are averaged over the instantaneous spin state and the heliocentric orbit so the long-term evolution of the comet can be determined. We determine that even after the inclusion of internal dissipation there still exist non-principal axis equilibrium states for certain jet geometries. For ranges of dissipation factors and jet geometries, prolate comets are found to occupy states that have time variable internal loads over long time periods. These periodic loadings along the symmetry axis may lead to ``necking’’ as the body extends along the axis to release the stress and eventually disruption.

  17. Bursting at the seams

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-27

    This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image reveals the iridescent interior of one of the most active galaxies in our local neighbourhood — NGC 1569, a small galaxy located about eleven million light-years away in the constellation of Camelopardalis (The Giraffe). This galaxy is currently a hotbed of vigorous star formation. NGC 1569 is a starburst galaxy, meaning that — as the name suggests — it is bursting at the seams with stars, and is currently producing them at a rate far higher than that observed in most other galaxies. For almost 100 million years, NGC 1569 has pumped out stars over 100 times faster than the Milky Way! As a result, this glittering galaxy is home to super star clusters, three of which are visible in this image — one of the two bright clusters is actually  the superposition of two massive clusters. Each containing more than a million stars, these brilliant blue clusters reside within a large cavity of gas carved out by multiple supernovae, the energetic remnants of massive stars. In 2008, Hubble observed the galaxy's cluttered core and sparsely populated outer fringes. By pinpointing individual red giant stars, Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys enabled astronomers to calculate a new — and much more precise — estimate for NGC 1569’s distance. This revealed that the galaxy is actually one and a half times further away than previously thought, and a member of the IC 342 galaxy group. Astronomers suspect that the IC 342 cosmic congregation is responsible for the star-forming frenzy observed in NGC 1569. Gravitational interactions between this galactic group are believed to be compressing the gas within NGC 1569. As it is compressed, the gas collapses, heats up and forms new stars.

  18. LOFAR tied-array imaging and spectroscopy of solar S bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morosan, D. E.; Gallagher, P. T.; Zucca, P.; O'Flannagain, A.; Fallows, R.; Reid, H.; Magdalenić, J.; Mann, G.; Bisi, M. M.; Kerdraon, A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; MacKinnon, A. L.; Rucker, H. O.; Thidé, B.; Vocks, C.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, J.; Asgekar, A.; Avruch, I. M.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Bonafede, A.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J. W.; Brouw, W. N.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; de Geus, E.; Eislöffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Gunst, A. W.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hoeft, M.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kuper, G.; van Leeuwen, J.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; McKean, J. P.; Munk, H.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Sluman, J.; Tasse, C.; Toribio, M. C.; Vermeulen, R.; Zarka, P.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The Sun is an active source of radio emission that is often associated with energetic phenomena ranging from nanoflares to coronal mass ejections (CMEs). At low radio frequencies (<100 MHz), numerous millisecond duration radio bursts have been reported, such as radio spikes or solar S bursts (where S stands for short). To date, these have neither been studied extensively nor imaged because of the instrumental limitations of previous radio telescopes. Aims: Here, LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) observations were used to study the spectral and spatial characteristics of a multitude of S bursts, as well as their origin and possible emission mechanisms. Methods: We used 170 simultaneous tied-array beams for spectroscopy and imaging of S bursts. Since S bursts have short timescales and fine frequency structures, high cadence (~50 ms) tied-array images were used instead of standard interferometric imaging, that is currently limited to one image per second. Results: On 9 July 2013, over 3000 S bursts were observed over a time period of ~8 h. S bursts were found to appear as groups of short-lived (<1 s) and narrow-bandwidth (~2.5 MHz) features, the majority drifting at ~3.5 MHz s-1 and a wide range of circular polarisation degrees (2-8 times more polarised than the accompanying Type III bursts). Extrapolation of the photospheric magnetic field using the potential field source surface (PFSS) model suggests that S bursts are associated with a trans-equatorial loop system that connects an active region in the southern hemisphere to a bipolar region of plage in the northern hemisphere. Conclusions: We have identified polarised, short-lived solar radio bursts that have never been imaged before. They are observed at a height and frequency range where plasma emission is the dominant emission mechanism, however, they possess some of the characteristics of electron-cyclotron maser emission. A movie associated to Fig. 3 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Evidence of Transformation Bursts During Thermal Cycling of a Pu-Ga Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Blobaum, K M; Krenn, C R; Mitchell, J N; Haslam, J J; Wall, M A; Massalski, T B; Schwartz, A J

    2005-02-09

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of the fcc (delta) to monoclinic (alpha-prime) phase transformation and its reversion in a plutonium-gallium alloy have been studied using differential scanning calorimetry, resistometry, and dilatometry. Under ambient conditions, the delta phase is metastable in a Pu-2.0 at% Ga alloy. Thermal cycling to below the ambient temperature results in a partial transformation to the alpha-prime phase; this transformation is composition-invariant and exhibits martensitic behavior. Because this transformation results in an unusually invariant large 25% volume contraction that cannot be fully accommodated by purely elastic adjustments, the transformation mode is expected to involve burst formation of individual alpha-prime particles. However, upon cooling, these individual bursts were not resolved by the above techniques, although signals corresponding to the overall accumulation of many alpha-prime particles were observed. On the other hand, upon heating, signals from differential scanning calorimetry, resistometry, and dilatometry showed a series of discrete changes occurring in periodic increments beginning at approximately 32 C. These features correspond to the cooperative reversion of many alpha-prime particles to the delta phase; they appear to be the result of an interplay between the autocatalytically driven reversion of a cascade of individual martensite units, and self-quenching caused by small changes of temperature and/or stress accompanying each individual transformation burst. The heat of the delta/alpha-prime transformation is estimated to be about + 4 kJ/mole.

  20. Delta hepatitis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sinniah, M; Dimitrakakis, M; Tan, D S

    1986-06-01

    Sera from one hundred and fifty nine Malaysian individuals were screened for the prevalence of delta markers. These included 15 HBsAg positive homosexuals, 16 acute hepatitis B cases, 9 chronic hepatitis B patients, 13 healthy HBsAg carriers and 106 intravenous (i.v.) drug abusers, of whom 27 were positive for HBsAg only and the rest were anti-HBc IgG positive but HBsAg negative. The prevalence of delta markers in the homosexuals was found to be 6.7%, in the HBsAg positive drug abusers 17.8%, in acute hepatitis B cases 12.5%. No evidence of delta infection was detected in healthy HBsAg carriers, chronic hepatitis B cases and HBsAg negative i.v. drug abusers. With reference to i.v. drug abusers, the prevalence of delta markers was higher in Malays (23%) than in Chinese (7%) although the latter had a higher HBsAg carrier rate. Although the HBsAg carrier rate in the homosexuals was high, their delta prevalence rate was low as compared to drug abusers. In Malaysia, as in other non-endemic regions, hepatitis delta virus transmission appeared to occur mainly via the parenteral and sexual routes. This is the first time in Malaysia that a reservoir of delta infection has been demonstrated in certain groups of the population at high risk for hepatitis B.

  1. A bursting phenomenon in a vortex-gas boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekaran, Aarthi; Narasimha, Roddam; Govindarajan, Rama

    2014-11-01

    Bursts are a central phenomenon in turbulent boundary layers as they are an integral part of turbulent energy and stress production. They have consequently been a continuing area of interest since the 1970s following the detailed investigations of Kline et al. (1967). Despite several attempts to understand their dynamics, it has been difficult to arrive at a consensus even on the scaling of the burst frequency. The present investigation simulates the outer part of a plane turbulent boundary layer using the vortex-gas model, in a first step towards understanding the role of the outer layer in boundary layer dynamics. Preliminary results indicate the formation of regions of concentrated vorticity near the wall, at a frequency that is independent of the initial vortex configuration but a function of the mean velocity profile. Further, comparisons with existing experimental data indicate a burst frequency which when scaled on outer variables, is within the range of scatter among different studies. Quadrant occupancy statistics are also related to those in conventional boundary layers. It appears as if a bursting phenomenon of some kind may be a general feature of an inviscid, wall-bounded shear flow, and does not necessitate inclusion of either viscosity or three-dimensionality.

  2. EEG oscillations at 600 Hz are macroscopic markers for cortical spike bursts.

    PubMed

    Baker, Stuart N; Curio, Gabriel; Lemon, Roger N

    2003-07-15

    The human electroencephalogram (EEG) is generated predominantly by synchronised cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials oscillating at frequencies <100 Hz. Unusually, EEG responses to electrical nerve stimulation contain brief bursts of high-frequency (600 Hz) wavelets. Here we show, in awake monkeys, that a subset of primary somatosensory cortex single units consistently fires both bursts and single spikes phase-locked to EEG wavelets. Spike bursts were also evoked by tactile stimuli, proving that this is a natural response mode. EEG wavelets at 600 Hz may therefore permit non-invasive assessment of population spike timing in human cortex.

  3. EEG oscillations at 600 Hz are macroscopic markers for cortical spike bursts

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Stuart N; Gabriel, Curio; Lemon, Roger N

    2003-01-01

    The human electroencephalogram (EEG) is generated predominantly by synchronised cortical excitatory postsynaptic potentials oscillating at frequencies <100 Hz. Unusually, EEG responses to electrical nerve stimulation contain brief bursts of high-frequency (600 Hz) wavelets. Here we show, in awake monkeys, that a subset of primary somatosensory cortex single units consistently fires both bursts and single spikes phase-locked to EEG wavelets. Spike bursts were also evoked by tactile stimuli, proving that this is a natural response mode. EEG wavelets at 600 Hz may therefore permit non-invasive assessment of population spike timing in human cortex. PMID:12807983

  4. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  5. Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Nile Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population of 57 million. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta in the middle of the scene. Across the river from Cairo can be seen the three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  6. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  7. Modeling river delta formation

    PubMed Central

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2007-01-01

    A model to simulate the time evolution of river delta formation process is presented. It is based on the continuity equation for water and sediment flow and a phenomenological sedimentation/erosion law. Different delta types are reproduced by using different parameters and erosion rules. The structures of the calculated patterns are analyzed in space and time and compared with real data patterns. Furthermore, our model is capable of simulating the rich dynamics related to the switching of the mouth of the river delta. The simulation results are then compared with geological records for the Mississippi River. PMID:17940031

  8. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1984-10-13

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  9. Heterogeneity in Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels Neil; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample comprises 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales - durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals - for EE bursts are factors of approx 2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts - the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width - continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/XRT. The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts (approx 6 X 10(exp -10) erg / sq cm/ s) is approx > 20 x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts (approx 60,000 s) is approx 30 x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into more dense environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently p()wers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  10. HETEROGENEITY IN SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels, Neil

    2011-07-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample is comprised of 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales-durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals-for EE bursts are factors of {approx}2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts-the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width-continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition, we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/X-Ray Telescope (XRT). The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts ({approx}6x10{sup -10} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) is {approx}>20x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts ({approx}60,000 s) is {approx}30x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into denser environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently powers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  11. Observation of a metric type N solar radio burst

    DOE PAGES

    Kong, Xiangliang; Chen, Yao; Feng, Shiwei; ...

    2016-10-10

    Type III and type-III-like radio bursts are produced by energetic electron beams guided along coronal magnetic fields. As a variant of type III bursts, Type N bursts appear as the letter "N" in the radio dynamic spectrum and reveal a magnetic mirror effect in coronal loops. Here, we report a well-observed N-shaped burst consisting of three successive branches at metric wavelength with both fundamental and harmonic components and a high brightness temperature (>109 K). We verify the burst as a true type N burst generated by the same electron beam from three aspects of the data. First, durations of themore » three branches at a given frequency increase gradually and may be due to the dispersion of the beam along its path. Second, the flare site, as the only possible source of non-thermal electrons, is near the western feet of large-scale closed loops. Third, the first branch and the following two branches are localized at different legs of the loops with opposite senses of polarization. We also find that the sense of polarization of the radio burst is in contradiction to the O-mode and there exists a fairly large time delay (~3–5 s) between the fundamental and harmonic components. Possible explanations accounting for these observations are presented. Finally, assuming the classical plasma emission mechanism, we can infer coronal parameters such as electron density and magnetic field near the radio source and make diagnostics on the magnetic mirror process.« less

  12. A TYPE II RADIO BURST WITHOUT A CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Su, W.; Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F.; Sun, J. Q. E-mail: dmd@nju.edu.cn

    2015-05-10

    Type II radio bursts are thought to be a signature of coronal shocks. In this paper, we analyze a short-lived type II burst that started at 07:40 UT on 2011 February 28. By carefully checking white-light images, we find that the type II radio burst is not accompanied by a coronal mass ejection, only by a C2.4 class flare and narrow jet. However, in the EUV images provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we find a wave-like structure that propagated at a speed of ∼600 km s{sup −1} during the burst. The relationship between the type II radio burst and the wave-like structure is, in particular, explored. For this purpose, we first derive the density distribution under the wave by the differential emission measure method, which is used to restrict the empirical density model. We then use the restricted density model to invert the speed of the shock that produces the observed frequency drift rate in the dynamic spectrum. The inverted shock speed is similar to the speed of the wave-like structure. This implies that the wave-like structure is most likely a coronal shock that produces the type II radio burst. We also examine the evolution of the magnetic field in the flare-associated active region and find continuous flux emergence and cancellation taking place near the flare site. Based on these facts, we propose a new mechanism for the formation of the type II radio burst, i.e., the expansion of the strongly inclined magnetic loops after reconnecting with a nearby emerging flux acts as a piston to generate the shock wave.

  13. Compton-dragged Gamma-Ray Bursts Associated with Supernovae.

    PubMed

    Lazzati; Ghisellini; Celotti; Rees

    2000-01-20

    It is proposed that the gamma-ray photons that characterize the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts are produced through the Compton-drag process, which is caused by the interaction of a relativistic fireball with a very dense soft photon bath. If gamma-ray bursts are indeed associated with supernovae, then the exploding star can provide enough soft photons for radiative drag to be effective. This model accounts for the basic properties of gamma-ray bursts, i.e., the overall energetics, the peak frequency of the spectrum, and the fast variability, with an efficiency that can exceed 50%. In this scenario, there is no need for particle acceleration in relativistic collisionless shocks. Furthermore, although the Poynting flux may be important in accelerating the outflow, no magnetic field is required in the gamma-ray production. The drag also naturally limits the relativistic expansion of the fireball to Gamma less, similar104.

  14. SHORT-LIVED RADIO BURSTS FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, J. H.; Eilek, J. A.; Hankins, T. H.; Kern, J. S.

    2010-10-20

    Our high-time-resolution observations reveal that individual main pulses from the Crab pulsar contain one or more short-lived microbursts. Both the energy and duration of bursts measured above 1 GHz can vary dramatically in less than a millisecond. These fluctuations are too rapid to be caused by propagation through turbulence in the Crab Nebula or in the interstellar medium; they must be intrinsic to the radio emission process in the pulsar. The mean duration of a burst varies with frequency as {nu}{sup -2}, significantly different from the broadening caused by interstellar scattering. We compare the properties of the bursts to some simple models of microstructure in the radio emission region.

  15. A universal characteristic of type II radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Gopalswamy, N.; MacDowall, R.; Yashiro, S.; Kaiser, M. L.

    2005-12-01

    We present a study on the spectral properties of interplanetary type II radio bursts observed by the Radio and Plasma Wave (WAVES) experiment on board the Wind spacecraft. We investigated the relative bandwidth of the type II radio bursts observed by WAVES from 1997 up to 2003. We obtained three sets of events, based on the frequency domain of occurrence: 109 events in the low-frequency domain (30 KHz to 1000 kHz, detected by the RAD1 receiver), 216 events in the high-frequency domain (1-14 MHz, observed by the RAD2 receiver), and 73 events that spanned both domains (RAD1 and RAD2). Statistical results show that the average bandwidth-to-frequency ratio (BFR) was 0.28 ± 0.15, 0.26 ± 0.16, and 0.32 ± 0.15 for RAD1, RAD2, and RAD1 + RAD2, respectively. We compared our results with those obtained for ISEE-3 type II bursts and found a difference in the average BFR, which seems to be due to a selection effect. The BFR of the WAVES type II bursts is similar to that of metric type II bursts reported in published works. This suggests that the BFR is a universal characteristic, irrespective of the spectral domain. Finally, we also studied the BFR evolution with heliocentric distance using white-light observation of the associated coronal mass ejections. We found that the BFR remains roughly constant in the SOHO/LASCO field of view (i.e., from 2.1 to 32 solar radii), while the bandwidth itself decreases.

  16. Constraining the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field Strength using Split-band Type II Radio Burst Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, P.; Ramesh, R.; Hariharan, K.; Kathiravan, C.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-11-01

    We report on low-frequency radio (85-35 MHz) spectral observations of four different type II radio bursts, which exhibited fundamental-harmonic emission and split-band structure. Each of the bursts was found to be closely associated with a whitelight coronal mass ejection (CME) close to the Sun. We estimated the coronal magnetic field strength from the split-band characteristics of the bursts, by assuming a model for the coronal electron density distribution. The choice of the model was constrained, based on the following criteria: (1) when the radio burst is observed simultaneously in the upper and lower bands of the fundamental component, the location of the plasma level corresponding to the frequency of the burst in the lower band should be consistent with the deprojected location of the leading edge (LE) of the associated CME; (2) the drift speed of the type II bursts derived from such a model should agree closely with the deprojected speed of the LE of the corresponding CMEs. With the above conditions, we find that: (1) the estimated field strengths are unique to each type II burst, and (2) the radial variation of the field strength in the different events indicate a pattern. It is steepest for the case where the heliocentric distance range over which the associated burst is observed is closest to the Sun, and vice versa.

  17. Regulation of transcriptional bursting by a naturally oscillating signal.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Adam M; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2014-01-20

    Transcription is highly stochastic, occurring in irregular bursts. For temporal and spatial precision of gene expression, cells must somehow deal with this noisy behavior. To address how this is achieved, we investigated how transcriptional bursting is entrained by a naturally oscillating signal, by direct measurement of transcription together with signal dynamics in living cells. We identify a Dictyostelium gene showing rapid transcriptional oscillations with the same period as extracellular cAMP signaling waves. Bursting approaches antiphase to cAMP waves, with accelerating transcription cycles during differentiation. Although coupling between signal and transcription oscillations was clear at the population level, single-cell transcriptional bursts retained considerable heterogeneity, indicating that transcription is not governed solely by signaling frequency. Previous studies implied that burst heterogeneity reflects distinct chromatin states. Here we show that heterogeneity is determined by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic cues and is maintained by a transcriptional persistence. Unusually for a persistent transcriptional behavior, the lifetime was only 20 min, with rapid randomization of transcriptional state by the response to oscillatory signaling. Linking transcription to rapid signaling oscillations allows reduction of gene expression heterogeneity by temporal averaging, providing a mechanism to generate precision in cell choices during development. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulation of Transcriptional Bursting by a Naturally Oscillating Signal

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Adam M.; Chubb, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Transcription is highly stochastic, occurring in irregular bursts [1–3]. For temporal and spatial precision of gene expression, cells must somehow deal with this noisy behavior. To address how this is achieved, we investigated how transcriptional bursting is entrained by a naturally oscillating signal, by direct measurement of transcription together with signal dynamics in living cells. We identify a Dictyostelium gene showing rapid transcriptional oscillations with the same period as extracellular cAMP signaling waves. Bursting approaches antiphase to cAMP waves, with accelerating transcription cycles during differentiation. Although coupling between signal and transcription oscillations was clear at the population level, single-cell transcriptional bursts retained considerable heterogeneity, indicating that transcription is not governed solely by signaling frequency. Previous studies implied that burst heterogeneity reflects distinct chromatin states [4–6]. Here we show that heterogeneity is determined by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic cues and is maintained by a transcriptional persistence. Unusually for a persistent transcriptional behavior, the lifetime was only 20 min, with rapid randomization of transcriptional state by the response to oscillatory signaling. Linking transcription to rapid signaling oscillations allows reduction of gene expression heterogeneity by temporal averaging, providing a mechanism to generate precision in cell choices during development. PMID:24388853

  19. All optical binary delta-sigma modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeh, Mohammad R.; Siahmakoun, Azad

    2005-09-01

    This paper describes a novel A/D converter called "Binary Delta-Sigma Modulator" (BDSM) which operates only with nonnegative signal with positive feedback and binary threshold. This important modification to the conventional delta-sigma modulator makes the high-speed (>100GHz) all-optical implementation possible. It has also the capability to modify its own sampling frequency as well as its input dynamic range. This adaptive feature helps designers to optimize the system performance under highly noisy environment and also manage the power consumption of the A/D converters.

  20. Amplitude-Modulated Bursting: A Novel Class of Bursting Rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Theodore; Kramer, Mark A.; Kaper, Tasso J.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the discovery of a novel class of bursting rhythms, called amplitude-modulated bursting (AMB), in a model for intracellular calcium dynamics. We find that these rhythms are robust and exist on open parameter sets. We develop a new mathematical framework with broad applicability to detect, classify, and rigorously analyze AMB. Here we illustrate this framework in the context of AMB in a model of intracellular calcium dynamics. In the process, we discover a novel family of singularities, called toral folded singularities, which are the organizing centers for the amplitude modulation and exist generically in slow-fast systems with two or more slow variables.

  1. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000216.htm Hepatitis D (Delta agent) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis D is a viral infection caused by the ...

  2. Delta in Terra Cimmeria

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-18

    This unnamed crater in northern Terra Cimmeria has a small channel that created a delta feature. Such features are important indicators of liquid water in Mars past as shown in this image from NASA Mars Odyssey.

  3. Gamma ray bursts of black hole universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. X.

    2015-07-01

    Slightly modifying the standard big bang theory, Zhang recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which has only a single postulate but is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain existing observations of the universe. In the previous studies, we have explained the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, cosmic microwave background radiation, quasar, and acceleration of black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This study investigates gamma ray bursts of black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the energy and spectrum measurements of gamma ray bursts according to the black hole universe model. The results indicate that gamma ray bursts can be understood as emissions of dynamic star-like black holes. A black hole, when it accretes its star or merges with another black hole, becomes dynamic. A dynamic black hole has a broken event horizon and thus cannot hold the inside hot (or high-frequency) blackbody radiation, which flows or leaks out and produces a GRB. A star when it collapses into its core black hole produces a long GRB and releases the gravitational potential energy of the star as gamma rays. A black hole that merges with another black hole produces a short GRB and releases a part of their blackbody radiation as gamma rays. The amount of energy obtained from the emissions of dynamic star-like black holes are consistent with the measurements of energy from GRBs. The GRB energy spectra derived from this new emission mechanism are also consistent with the measurements.

  4. DECIMETRIC TYPE III BURSTS: GENERATION AND PROPAGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.; Yan, Y. H.

    2011-09-01

    Simulations are presented for decimetric type III radio bursts at 2f{sub p} , where f{sub p} is the local electron plasma frequency. The simulations show that 2f{sub p} radiation can be observed at Earth in two scenarios for the radiation's generation and propagation. In Scenario A, radiation is produced and propagates in warm plasmas in the lower corona that are caused by previous magnetic reconnection outflows and/or chromospheric evaporation. In Scenario B radiation is generated in normal plasmas, then due to its natural directivity pattern and refraction, radiation partly propagates into nearby regions, which are hot because of previous reconnection/evaporation. The profiles of plasma density n{sub e} (r) and electron temperature T{sub e} (r) in the lower corona (r - R{sub sun} {approx}< 100 Mm) are found to be crucial to whether radiation can be produced and escape at observable levels against the effects of free-free absorption, where r is the heliocentric distance. Significantly, the observed wide ranges of radiation properties (e.g., drift rates) require n{sub e} (r) with a large range of scale heights h{sub s} , consistent nonetheless for Scenario B with short observed EUV loops. This is relevant to problems with large h{sub s} inferred from tall EUV loops. The simulations suggest: (1) n{sub e} (r) with small h{sub s} , such as n{sub e} (r){proportional_to}(r - R{sub sun}){sup -2.38} for flaring regions, are unexpectedly common deep in the corona. This result is consistent with recent work on n{sub e} (r) for r {approx} (1.05-2)R{sub sun} extracted from observed metric type IIIs. (2) The dominance of reverse-slope bursts over normal bursts sometimes observed may originate from asymmetric reconnection/acceleration, which favors downgoing beams.

  5. Solar Flares, Type III Radio Bursts, Coronal Mass Ejections, and Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, Hilary V.; Erickson, W. C.; Prestage, N. P.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this correlative study between greater than 20 MeV solar proton events, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares, and radio bursts it is found that essentially all of the proton events are preceded by groups of type III bursts and all are preceded by CMEs. These type III bursts (that are a flare phenomenon) usually are long-lasting, intense bursts seen in the low-frequency observations made from space. They are caused by streams of electrons traveling from close to the solar surface out to 1 AU. In most events the type III emissions extend into, or originate at, the time when type II and type IV bursts are reported (some 5 to 10 minutes after the start of the associated soft X-ray flare) and have starting frequencies in the 500 to approximately 100 MHz range that often get lower as a function of time. These later type III emissions are often not reported by ground-based observers, probably because of undue attention to type II bursts. It is suggested to call them type III-1. Type III-1 bursts have previously been called shock accelerated (SA) events, but an examination of radio dynamic spectra over an extended frequency range shows that the type III-1 bursts usually start at frequencies above any type II burst that may be present. The bursts sometimes continue beyond the time when type II emission is seen and, furthermore, sometimes occur in the absence of any type II emission. Thus the causative electrons are unlikely to be shock accelerated and probably originate in the reconnection regions below fast CMEs. A search did not find any type III-1 bursts that were not associated with CMEs. The existence of low-frequency type III bursts proves that open field lines extend from within 0.5 radius of the Sun into the interplanetary medium (the bursts start above 100 MHz, and such emission originates within 0.5 solar radius of the solar surface). Thus it is not valid to assume that only closed field lines exist in the flaring regions associated with CMEs and some

  6. Persistent Na+ current modifies burst discharge by regulating conditional backpropagation of dendritic spikes.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Brent; Noonan, Liza; Lemon, Neal; Turner, Ray W

    2003-01-01

    The estimation and detection of stimuli by sensory neurons is affected by factors that govern a transition from tonic to burst mode and the frequency characteristics of burst output. Pyramidal cells in the electrosensory lobe of weakly electric fish generate spike bursts for the purpose of stimulus detection. Spike bursts are generated during repetitive discharge when a frequency-dependent broadening of dendritic spikes increases current flow from dendrite to soma to potentiate a somatic depolarizing afterpotential (DAP). The DAP eventually triggers a somatic spike doublet with an interspike interval that falls inside the dendritic refractory period, blocking spike backpropagiation and the DAP. Repetition of this process gives rise to a rhythmic dendritic spike failure, termed conditional backpropagation, that converts cell output from tonic to burst discharge. Through in vitro recordings and compartmental modeling we show that burst frequency is regulated by the rate of DAP potentiation during a burst, which determines the time required to discharge the spike doublet that blocks backpropagation. DAP potentiation is magnified through a positive feedback process when an increase in dendritic spike duration activates persistent sodium current (I(NaP)). I(NaP) further promotes a slow depolarization that induces a shift from tonic to burst discharge over time. The results are consistent with a dynamical systems analysis that shows that the threshold separating tonic and burst discharge can be represented as a saddle-node bifurcation. The interaction between dendritic K(+) current and I(NaP) provides a physiological explanation for a variable time scale of bursting dynamics characteristic of such a bifurcation.

  7. Federal Funding in the Delta.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Richard J.; Calhoun, Samuel D.

    2002-01-01

    The Lower Mississippi Delta region, especially the rural Delta, faces many economic challenges. The rural Delta has received much federal aid in basic income support and funding for human resource development, but less for community resource programs, which are important for economic development. Federal aid to the Delta is analyzed in terms of…

  8. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global, and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of the stability function in the incoherent (i.e., disorder), coherent, chimera, and multichimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multichimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is in contrast with the existence of chimera states in populations of nonlocally or globally coupled oscillators. A chemical synaptic coupling function is used which plays a key role in the emergence of chimera states in bursting neurons. The existence of chimera, multichimera, coherent, and disordered states is confirmed by means of the recently introduced statistical measures and mean phase velocity.

  9. Bursts in discontinuous Aeolian saltation

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, M. V.; Rasmussen, K. R.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of discontinuous flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the fluid threshold Shields number θc. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain discontinuous flux even below the fluid threshold. PMID:26073305

  10. LOCALIZATION OF A TYPE III RADIO BURST OBSERVED BY THE STEREO SPACECRAFT

    SciTech Connect

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J. E-mail: Robert.MacDowall@nasa.go

    2010-09-10

    Ray tracing calculations show that (1) emissions from a localized source escape as direct and reflected waves along different paths, (2) the reflected waves experience higher attenuation and group delay because they travel longer path lengths in regions of reduced refractive index, and (3) widely separated spacecraft 'A' and 'B' can detect the direct as well as reflected emissions escaping along different directions. It is proposed that the source of a radio burst observed by twin spacecraft 'A' and 'B' can be localized if at a given frequency the emission at one of them is identified as the direct emission and is identified at the other as the reflected emission by comparing the observed time delays {Delta}T, as well as intensity ratios I{sub B} /I{sub A} with the corresponding values of the direct and reflected emissions obtained for a given coronal model. A type III event observed by the STEREO spacecraft 'A' and 'B' shows that its characteristics are consistent with direct and reflected emissions by being less intense and delayed at 'A' in comparison to that at 'B'. By applying the proposed technique to this event, the location of its source is found to lie between the turning point of the ray and the harmonic layer corresponding to f {sub pe} = f/2, where f and f {sub pe} are the frequency of the emission and the electron plasma frequency, respectively. The comparisons of the widths of the fundamental and harmonic emission cones with the angular separation of spacecraft 'A' and 'B' indicate that the mode of the observed emission is probably the harmonic.

  11. The Swift Burst Alert Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A.; Barthelmy, S.; Barbier, L.; Gehrels, N.; Palmer, D.; Tueller, J.; Fenimore, E.; BAT Engineering Team

    2000-10-01

    The Swift Gamma Ray Burst MIDEX is a multiwavelength observatory scheduled to be launched in September 2003 to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their x-ray and optical afterglow emission. Swift will exploit these newly discovered GRB afterglow characteristics to make a comprehensive study of ~ 1000 GRBs and use the afterglow phenomenon as a tool for probing their source and evolution. Swift will also be able to use GRBs to probe the early Universe. The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), a large coded aperture instrument with a wide field-of-view (FOV), provides the gamma-ray burst triggers and locations for the Swift Mission. BAT will observe and locate hundreds of bursts per year to better than 4 arc minutes accuracy. Using this prompt burst location information, Swift can slew quickly (within 20 - 70 s) to point on-board x-ray (XRT) and optical (UVOT) instrumentation at the burst for continued afterglow studies. The BAT instrument consists of a large (5200 cm2) hard x-ray detector plane positioned one meter away from an even larger (2.6 m2) coded aperture mask. The BAT detector plane consists of 128 CdZnTe semiconductor detector modules each containing 256 individual, planar 4 mm x 4 mm x 2 mm CdZnTe detectors that are read out by a pair of XA1 Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs). The BAT mask will be constructed using 5 mm x 5 mm x 1 mm lead tiles attached to a self-supporting 0.4 g/cm2 substrate fabricated from Kevlar fiber/honeycomb materials. With 4 mm square focal plane detector elements and 5 mm square mask pixels, BAT will have angular resolution better than 22 arc minutes and will determine GRB source locations to ~ 4 arc minutes for bursts detected at 5 sigma or brighter. A full description of the BAT instrument and its capabilities will be presented along with results from performance tests of prototype detector modules.

  12. Languages evolve in punctuational bursts.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Quentin D; Meade, Andrew; Venditti, Chris; Greenhill, Simon J; Pagel, Mark

    2008-02-01

    Linguists speculate that human languages often evolve in rapid or punctuational bursts, sometimes associated with their emergence from other languages, but this phenomenon has never been demonstrated. We used vocabulary data from three of the world's major language groups-Bantu, Indo-European, and Austronesian-to show that 10 to 33% of the overall vocabulary differences among these languages arose from rapid bursts of change associated with language-splitting events. Our findings identify a general tendency for increased rates of linguistic evolution in fledgling languages, perhaps arising from a linguistic founder effect or a desire to establish a distinct social identity.

  13. Cross-frequency interactions in the precedence effect.

    PubMed

    Shinn-Cunningham, B G; Zurek, P M; Durlach, N I; Clifton, R K

    1995-07-01

    This paper concerns the extent to which the precedence effect is observed when leading and lagging sounds occupy different spectral regions. Subjects, listening under headphones, were asked to match the intracranial lateral position of an acoustic pointer to that of a test stimulus composed of two binaural noise bursts with asynchronous onsets, parametrically varied frequency content, and different interaural delays. The precedence effect was measured by the degree to which the interaural delay of the matching pointer was independent of the interaural delay of the lagging noise burst in the test stimulus. The results, like those of Blauert and Divenyi [Acustica 66, 267-274 (1988)], show an asymmetric frequency effect in which the lateralization influence of a lagging high-frequency burst is almost completely suppressed by a leading low-frequency burst, whereas a lagging low-frequency burst is weighted equally with a leading high-frequency burst. This asymmetry is shown to be the result of an inherent low-frequency dominance that is seen even with simultaneous bursts. When this dominance is removed (by attenuating the low-frequency burst) the precedence effect operates with roughly equal strength both upward and downward in frequency. Within the scope of the current study (with lateralization achieved through the use of interaural time differences alone, stimuli from only two frequency bands, and only three subjects performing in all experiments), these results suggest that the precedence effect arises from a fairly central processing stage in which information is combined across frequency.

  14. Cascade model of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Harding, A. K.; Daugherty, J. K.

    1989-01-01

    If, in a neutron star magnetosphere, an electron is accelerated to an energy of 10 to the 11th or 12th power eV by an electric field parallel to the magnetic field, motion of the electron along the curved field line leads to a cascade of gamma rays and electron-positron pairs. This process is believed to occur in radio pulsars and gamma ray burst sources. Results are presented from numerical simulations of the radiation and photon annihilation pair production processes, using a computer code previously developed for the study of radio pulsars. A range of values of initial energy of a primary electron was considered along with initial injection position, and magnetic dipole moment of the neutron star. The resulting spectra was found to exhibit complex forms that are typically power law over a substantial range of photon energy, and typically include a dip in the spectrum near the electron gyro-frequency at the injection point. The results of a number of models are compared with data for the 5 Mar., 1979 gamma ray burst. A good fit was found to the gamma ray part of the spectrum, including the equivalent width of the annihilation line.

  15. On the origin of gamma ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahia, M. N.; Rao, A. R.

    1988-03-01

    It is argued that observations of gamma ray bursts show that the neutron star model is not tenable. A similarity between gamma ray burst characteristics and solar hard X-ray flares is established. The temporal and spectral features observed in the gamma ray bursts are also seen in the solar hard X-ray flares. The only distinction is in the energy contents of the two. Gamma ray bursts may originate from sources which have Sun-like activity. Large scale Sun-like activity is observed in flare stars, RS CVn binaries, and cataclysmic variables, grouped together as magnetically active stellar systems. These systems have enough energy to produce gamma ray bursts. Positional identification between the gamma ray burst error boxes and the magnetically active stellar systems produces an association of 46 objects with 36 error boxes with a probability of chance coincidence of 10 to the minus 10th power. A gamma ray burst that has a spatial and temporal correlation to a soft X-ray flare associated with a magnetically active stellar system and another time coincidence where the gamma ray burst location is not known to be found. Gamma ray bursts should be considered the stellar equivalent of the solar hard X-ray burst. gamma ray burst location is not known are found. Gamma ray bursts should be considered as stellar equivalents of solar hard X-ray bursts.

  16. MICROWAVE QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATION WITH MILLISECOND BURSTS IN A SOLAR FLARE ON 2011 AUGUST 9

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Baolin; Tan Chengming

    2012-04-10

    A peculiar microwave quasi-periodic pulsation (QPP) accompanying a hard X-ray (HXR) QPP of about 20 s duration occurred just before the maximum of an X6.9 solar flare on 2011 August 9. The most interesting aspect is that the microwave QPP consists of millisecond timescale superfine structures. Each microwave QPP pulse is made up of clusters of millisecond spike bursts or narrowband type III bursts. There are three different frequency drift rates: the global frequency drift rate of the microwave QPP pulse group, the frequency drift rate of the microwave QPP pulse, and the frequency drift rate of individual millisecond spikes or type III bursts. The physical analysis indicates that the energetic electrons accelerating from a large-scale highly dynamic magnetic reconnecting current sheet above the flaring loop propagate downward, impact the flaring plasma loop, and produce HXR bursts. The tearing-mode (TM) oscillations in the current sheet modulate HXR emission and generate HXR QPP; the energetic electrons propagating downward produce Langmuir turbulence and plasma waves, resulting in plasma emission. The modulation of TM oscillation on the plasma emission in the current-carrying plasma loop may generate microwave QPP. The TM instability produces magnetic islands in the loop. Each X-point will be a small reconnection site and will accelerate the ambient electrons. These accelerated electrons impact the ambient plasma and trigger the millisecond spike clusters or the group of type III bursts. Possibly, each millisecond spike burst or type III burst is one of the elementary bursts (EBs). A large number of such EB clusters form an intense flaring microwave burst.

  17. Solar Radio Bursts and Their Effects on Wireless Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, D. E.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Nita, G. M.; Thomson, D. J.

    2002-05-01

    We review the state of current understanding of the potential for interference and interruption of service of wireless communications systems due to solar radio bursts. There have been several reported instances of an enhanced rate of dropped cell-phone calls during solar bursts, and the design of current base station systems make them vulnerable to problems near sunrise and sunset for antennas facing in the direction of the Sun during outbursts. It is likely that many cases of interference have gone unreported and perhaps unrecognized. We determine the level of radio noise that can cause potential problems, and then discuss how often bursts of the required magnitude might happen. We find that bursts that can cause potential problems occur on average once every 3.5 days at solar maximum, but also occur at a reduced rate of 18.5 days between events at solar minimum. We investigate the rate of occurrence as a function of frequency, which is relevant for future wireless systems that will operate at higher frequencies than the present systems. This work is supported by NSF grant ATM-0077273 to New Jersey Institute of Technology.

  18. Decimetric solar type U bursts - VLA and Phoenix observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Bastian, T. S.; Benz, A. O.; Brosius, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of type U bursts, simultaneously detected by the VLA at 1.446 GHz and by the broadband spectrometer Phoenix in the 1.1-1.7 GHz frequency band on August 13, 1989 are reported. Extrapolations of the coronal magnetic field, assuming a potential configuration, indicate that the VLA 20 cm source demarcates an isodensity level. The source covers a wide angle of diverging magnetic field lines whose footpoints originate close to a magnetic intrusion of negative polarity into the main sunspot group of the active region with dominant positive polarity. The centroid of the 20-cm U-burst emission, which corresponds to the turnover frequency of the type U bursts and remains stationary during all U bursts, coincides with the apex of extrapolated potential field lines at a height of about 130,000 km. It is demonstrated that the combination of radio imaging and broadband dynamic spectra, combined with the magnetic field reconstruction from magnetograms, can constrain all physical parameters of a magnetic loop system.

  19. Interplanetary density models as inferred from solar Type III bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppeneiger, Lucas; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Lichtenegger, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    We report on the density models derived from spectral features of solar Type III bursts. They are generated by beams of electrons travelling outward from the Sun along open magnetic field lines. Electrons generate Langmuir waves at the plasma frequency along their ray paths through the corona and the interplanetary medium. A large frequency band is covered by the Type III bursts from several MHz down to few kHz. In this analysis, we consider the previous empirical density models proposed to describe the electron density in the interplanetary medium. We show that those models are mainly based on the analysis of Type III bursts generated in the interplanetary medium and observed by satellites (e.g. RAE, HELIOS, VOYAGER, ULYSSES,WIND). Those models are confronted to stereoscopic observations of Type III bursts recorded by WIND, ULYSSES and CASSINI spacecraft. We discuss the spatial evolution of the electron beam along the interplanetary medium where the trajectory is an Archimedean spiral. We show that the electron beams and the source locations are depending on the choose of the empirical density models.

  20. Polarization and position measurements of Type III bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, S.; Sheridan, K. V.; Dulk, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The positional and polarization characteristics of Type III bursts in the range 24-220 MHz as measured by the Culgoora radioheliograph, spectrograph and spectropolarimeter are reported. The study includes 997 bursts which are of two classes: fundamental-harmonic (F-H) pairs and 'structureless' bursts with no visible F-H structure, and concentrates on the polarization of the bursts and the variation of polarization from centre to limb. The observed centre-to-limb decrease in polarization approximately follows a cosine law. This decrease is not as predicted by simple theory but is consistent with other observations which imply that open field lines from an active region diverge strongly. The observed o-mode polarization of harmonic radiation implies that the wave vectors of Langmuir waves are always parallel, within about 20 deg, to the magnetic field, while the constancy of H polarization with frequency implies that the ratio of gyromagnetic to plasma frequency, the Alfven speed and the plasma beta are constant with height on the open field lines above an active region. Finally, it is inferred that some factor, in addition to the magnetic field strength, controls the polarization of F radiation.

  1. Coronal Magnetic Field Lines and Electrons Associated with Type III-V Radio Bursts in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, P.; Kathiravan, C.; Ramesh, R.; Ebenezer, E.

    2017-06-01

    We recently investigated some of the hitherto unreported observational characteristics of the low frequency (85-35 MHz) type III-V bursts from the Sun using radio spectropolarimeter observations. The quantitative estimates of the velocities of the electron streams associated with the above two types of bursts indicate that they are in the range ≳0.13c-0.02 c for the type V bursts, and nearly constant ({≈ }0.4c) for the type III bursts. We also find that the degree of circular polarization of the type V bursts vary gradually with frequency/heliocentric distance as compared to the relatively steeper variation exhibited by the preceding type III bursts. These imply that the longer duration of the type V bursts at any given frequency (as compared to the preceding type III bursts) which is its defining feature, is due to the combined effect of the lower velocities of the electron streams that generate type V bursts, spread in the velocity spectrum, and the curvature of the magnetic field lines along which they travel.

  2. Detection of artifacts from high energy bursts in neonatal EEG.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sourya; Biswas, Arunava; Mukherjee, Jayanta; Majumdar, Arun Kumar; Majumdar, Bandana; Mukherjee, Suchandra; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Detection of non-cerebral activities or artifacts, intermixed within the background EEG, is essential to discard them from subsequent pattern analysis. The problem is much harder in neonatal EEG, where the background EEG contains spikes, waves, and rapid fluctuations in amplitude and frequency. Existing artifact detection methods are mostly limited to detect only a subset of artifacts such as ocular, muscle or power line artifacts. Few methods integrate different modules, each for detection of one specific category of artifact. Furthermore, most of the reference approaches are implemented and tested on adult EEG recordings. Direct application of those methods on neonatal EEG causes performance deterioration, due to greater pattern variation and inherent complexity. A method for detection of a wide range of artifact categories in neonatal EEG is thus required. At the same time, the method should be specific enough to preserve the background EEG information. The current study describes a feature based classification approach to detect both repetitive (generated from ECG, EMG, pulse, respiration, etc.) and transient (generated from eye blinking, eye movement, patient movement, etc.) artifacts. It focuses on artifact detection within high energy burst patterns, instead of detecting artifacts within the complete background EEG with wide pattern variation. The objective is to find true burst patterns, which can later be used to identify the Burst-Suppression (BS) pattern, which is commonly observed during newborn seizure. Such selective artifact detection is proven to be more sensitive to artifacts and specific to bursts, compared to the existing artifact detection approaches applied on the complete background EEG. Several time domain, frequency domain, statistical features, and features generated by wavelet decomposition are analyzed to model the proposed bi-classification between burst and artifact segments. A feature selection method is also applied to select the

  3. Burst Mode Receiver for 112 Gb/s DP-QPSK with parallel DSP.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Benn C; Maher, Robert; Millar, David S; Savory, Seb J

    2011-12-12

    A burst mode 112 Gb/s DP-QPSK digital coherent optical receiver with parallel DSP suitable for implementation in a CMOS ASIC with a 218.75 MHz clock speed is presented. The receiver performance is validated in a five channel 50 GHz grid WDM burst switching experiment using a commercially available wavelength tunable laser as the local oscillator. A new equalizer initialization scheme that overcomes the degenerate convergence problem and ensures rapid convergence is introduced. We show that the performance of the tunable local oscillator is commensurate with burst mode coherent reception when differential decoding in employed and that required parallel DSP implementation does not seriously impair the polarization and frequency tracking performance of a digital coherent receiver under burst mode operation. We report a burst acquisition time of less than 200 ns.

  4. Notched delta, phenotype, and Angelman syndrome.

    PubMed

    Korff, Christian M; Kelley, Kent R; Nordli, Douglas R

    2005-08-01

    The notched delta pattern is one of the characteristic EEG features found in Angelman syndrome patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using the notched delta pattern as a detection tool for Angelman syndrome patients by analyzing its frequency in a tertiary care pediatric center, its specificity for Angelman syndrome, and the age at which it was observed. The authors performed a retrospective review of the video-EEG recordings of all the patients who had either the notched delta pattern or a phenotype consistent with Angelman syndrome. The notched delta was observed in 1.1% of all the EEGs performed. Its specificity for Angelman syndrome was evaluated at 38%. The youngest age at which it was noted was 14 months. The results indicate that the notched delta pattern is relatively rare, but more frequent than expected, and is easily recognizable. The pattern was observed not only in Angelman syndrome patients, but also in children with a spectrum of conditions wider than reported. It is a powerful detection tool for Angelman syndrome when correlated to a suggestive phenotype, and the association of these features should raise suspicion for Angelman syndrome in both infants and adults.

  5. Cosmology: Home of a fast radio burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorimer, Duncan

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding of fast radio bursts -- intense pulses of radio waves -- and their use as cosmic probes promises to be transformed now that one burst has been associated with a galaxy of known distance from Earth. See Letter p.453

  6. A first missense mutation in the delta sarcoglycan gene associated with a severe phenotype and frequency of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2F (LGMD2F) in Brazilian sarcoglycanopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, E S; Vainzof, M; Marie, S K; Nigro, V; Zatz, M; Passos-Bueno, M R

    1998-01-01

    Among the heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (AR LGMDs), the sarcoglycanopathies (LGMD2C-2F) represent a subgroup characterised by defects in the gamma, alpha, beta, and delta sarcoglycan genes, respectively. Genotype-phenotype correlations in these forms of AR LGMD are important to enhance our understanding of protein function. Regarding LGMD2F, only two homozygous frameshift mutations have been reported to date in patients with a severe phenotype. In the present report, through screening 23 unrelated AR LGMD patients, we identified three subjects with LGMD2F, two with a previously reported frameshift mutation and the other homozygous for a new missense mutation in the delta sarcoglycan gene. Interestingly, this new mutation is also associated with a severe clinical course. In addition, our results suggest that this form of severe AR LGMD is not very rare in our population. Images PMID:9832045

  7. A SCENARIO FOR THE FINE STRUCTURES OF SOLAR TYPE IIIb RADIO BURSTS BASED ON ELECTRON CYCLOTRON MASER EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. B.

    2015-06-10

    A scenario based on electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro frequency by ultra-low-frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of ECM instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation for the observed fine-structure components in the solar Type IIIb bursts is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of Type IIIb bursts are addressed: (1) the physical mechanism that results in intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of Type IIIb bursts, (2) the cause of split pairs (or double stria) and triple stria, and (3) why only IIIb–III bursts are observed in the events of fundamental harmonic pair emission whereas IIIb–IIIb or III–IIIb bursts are very rarely observed.

  8. A Scenario for the Fine Structures of Solar Type IIIb Radio Bursts Based on Electron Cyclotron Maser Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. B.

    2015-06-01

    A scenario based on electron cyclotron maser (ECM) emission is proposed for the fine structures of solar radio emission. It is suggested that under certain conditions modulation of the ratio between the plasma frequency and electron gyro frequency by ultra-low-frequency waves, which is a key parameter for excitation of ECM instability, may lead to the intermittent emission of radio waves. As an example, the explanation for the observed fine-structure components in the solar Type IIIb bursts is discussed in detail. Three primary issues of Type IIIb bursts are addressed: (1) the physical mechanism that results in intermittent emission elements that form a chain in the dynamic spectrum of Type IIIb bursts, (2) the cause of split pairs (or double stria) and triple stria, and (3) why only IIIb-III bursts are observed in the events of fundamental harmonic pair emission whereas IIIb-IIIb or III-IIIb bursts are very rarely observed.

  9. Respiratory burst oxidase of fertilization.

    PubMed Central

    Heinecke, J W; Shapiro, B M

    1989-01-01

    Partially reduced oxygen species are toxic, yet sea urchin eggs synthesize H2O2 in a "respiratory burst" at fertilization, as an extracellular oxidant to crosslink their protective surface envelopes. To study the biochemical mechanism for H2O2 production, we have isolated an NADPH-specific oxidase fraction from homogenates of unfertilized Strongylocentrotus purpuratus eggs that produces H2O2 when stimulated with Ca2+ and MgATP2-. Concentrations of free Ca2+ previously implicated in regulation of egg activation modulate the activity of the oxidase. Inhibitors were used to test the relevance of this oxidase to the respiratory burst of fertilization. Procaine, two phenothiazines, and N-ethylmaleimide (but not iodoacetamide) inhibited H2O2 production by the oxidase fraction and oxygen consumption by activated eggs. The ATP requirement suggested that protein kinase activity might regulate the respiratory burst of fertilization; consonant with this hypothesis, H-7 and staurosporine were inhibitory. The respiratory burst oxidase of fertilization is an NADPH:O2 oxidoreductase that appears to be regulated by a protein kinase; although it bears a remarkable resemblance to the neutrophil oxidase, unlike the latter it does not form O2- as its initial product. PMID:2537493

  10. Gamma-ray burst observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atteia, J.-L.

    1993-01-01

    The most important observational characteristics of gamma-ray bursts are reviewed, with emphasis on X-ray and gamma-ray data. The observations are used to derive some basic properties of the sources. The sources are found to be isotropically distributed; the burster population is limited in space, and the edge of the distribution is visible.

  11. Dark gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brdar, Vedran; Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia

    2017-03-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stellar interior, also its DM core heats up and contracts, so that the DM density increases rapidly during the final stages of stellar evolution. We argue that, counterintuitively, the annihilation burst is more intense if DM annihilation is a p -wave process than for s -wave annihilation because in the former case, more DM particles survive until the supernova. If among the DM annihilation products are particles like dark photons that can escape the exploding star and decay to standard model particles later, the annihilation burst results in a flash of gamma rays accompanying the supernova. For a galactic supernova, this "dark gamma-ray burst" may be observable in the Čerenkov Telescope Array.

  12. Mississippi River Delta

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-11

    As the Mississippi River enters the Gulf of Mexico, it loses energy and dumps its load of sediment that it has carried on its journey through the mid continent. This pile of sediment, or mud, accumulates over the years building up the delta front. As one part of the delta becomes clogged with sediment, the delta front will migrate in search of new areas to grow. The area shown on this image is the currently active delta front of the Mississippi. The migratory nature of the delta forms natural traps for oil. Most of the land in the image consists of mud flats and marsh lands. There is little human settlement in this area due to the instability of the sediments. The main shipping channel of the Mississippi River is the broad stripe running northwest to southeast. This image was acquired on May 24, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03497

  13. Initiation of network bursts by Ca2+-dependent intrinsic bursting in the rat pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, E R; Su, H; Yaari, Y

    2001-04-01

    Chronically epileptic rats, produced by prior injection of pilocarpine, were used to investigate whether changes in intrinsic neuronal excitability may contribute to the epileptogenicity of the hippocampus in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Paired extra-/intracellular electrophysiological recordings were made in the CA1 pyramidal layer in acute hippocampal slices prepared from control and epileptic rats and perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF). Whereas orthodromic activation of CA1 neurons evoked only a single, stimulus-graded population spike in control slices, it produced an all-or-none burst of population spikes in epileptic slices. The intrinsic firing patterns of CA1 pyramidal cells were determined by intrasomatic positive current injection. In control slices, the vast majority (97%) of the neurons were regular firing cells. In epileptic slices, only 53% the pyramidal cells fired in a regular mode. The remaining 47% of the pyramidal cells were intrinsic bursters. These neurons generated high-frequency bursts of three to six spikes in response to threshold depolarizations. A subgroup of these neurons (10.1% of all cells) also burst fired spontaneously even after suppression of synaptic activity. In epileptic slices, burst firing in most cases (ca 70%) was completely blocked by adding the Ca2+ channel blocker Ni2+ (1 mM) to, or removing Ca2+ from, the ACSF, but not by intracellular application of the Ca2+ chelater 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N ',N '-tetra-acetic acid (BAPTA), suggesting it was driven by a Ca2+ current. Spontaneously recurring population bursts were observed in a subset of epileptic slices. They were abolished by adding 2 M 6-cyano-7-nitro-quinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) to the ACSF, indicating that synaptic excitation is critical for the generation of these events. All sampled pyramidal cells fired repetitively during each population burst. The firing of spontaneously active bursters anteceded the population

  14. Turbulent heat exchanger {Delta}T and {Delta}P

    SciTech Connect

    Steinmeyer, D.

    1996-12-31

    Optimum pressure drop ({Delta}P) and temperature difference ({Delta}T) in turbulent flow heat exchangers are presented in three frameworks: as quantitatively defined by fluid properties, the value of energy and the cost of heat exchange surface (with a little help from a relationship between [power/mass] and heat transfer); as the energy cost for heat recovery (with the {Delta}T cost being about equal to the heat exchanger cost and the {Delta}P cost being about 1/3 as great); and as the second law lost work inherent in heat exchange (with the {Delta}T loss being {approximately}3 times the {Delta}T loss).

  15. [Photon burst mass spectrometry technique.] Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbank, W.M. Jr

    1996-04-01

    The basic tools have been developed and demonstrated for selective detection of Kr isotopes in the Photon Burst Mass Spectrometry technique. The effort is divided into: photon burst measurements on Mg{sup +} demonstrating high isotopic selectivity, charge exchange of Kr{sup +} with Cs and Rb to produce metastable Kr atoms, development of a diode laser system for photon burst detection of Kr{sup +}, and measurements of photon bursts detection of Kr.

  16. The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    1998-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts remain on of the greatest mysteries in astrophysics in spite of recent observational advances and intense theoretical work. Although some of the basic properties of bursts were known 25 years ago, new and more detailed observations have been made by the BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory in the past five years. Recent observations of bursts and some proposed models will be discussed.

  17. Type III-L Solar Radio Bursts and Their Associations with Solar Energetic Proton Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffin, Robert T.; White, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Kaiser, M. L.

    2010-05-01

    Type III-L bursts are a sub-class of type III solar radio bursts that tend to occur after the impulsive phase of flares; are longer in duration than individual type IIIs and tend to be low-frequency. There has been a proposal that type III-Ls are connected to solar energetic proton (SEP) events. Most work on this connection has started from samples of SEP events, but if type III-Ls are to be useful for prediction of SEP events, then we need to understand the properties of samples of type III-L bursts. This talk reports preliminary results from such a study. An operating definition based on previous work is used to identify type III-L events amongst M- and X-class flares from 2001; and then associations with other properties of these events are investigated, including association with SEP events. If there is an association with SEP events, one important factor that these bursts allow us to address is the question of whether acceleration takes place at an associated CME, or closer to the flare site well below the CME. Work has been developed on a type III fitting tool. A Template is chosen from a representative individual type III burst and fit to individual type III bursts and components of Complex type III bursts in order to help analyze and distinguish these bursts. This type III fitting tool can also be used to fit and distinguish Impulsive type III and type III-L bursts and help analyze various characteristics of the components of these bursts such as drift-rate and change in the duration of their intensity-time profiles with frequency. Funding for this research came from the Naval Research Laboratory where basic research in radio astronomy is funded by the Office of Naval Research, and from NASA LWS Grant FRS 526249.

  18. Are fast radio bursts wandering narrow beams?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2017-05-01

    It is generally assumed that the sources of fast radio bursts (FRB) radiate roughly isotropically, so that the observed low duty cycle of any individual source indicates a similar low duty cycle of its radio-frequency emission. An alternative hypothesis is that the radiative duty cycle is O(1), but that the radiation is emitted in a beam with a solid angle comparable to the observed duty cycle, whose direction wanders or sweeps across the sky. This hypothesis relaxes the extreme power demands of isotropically radiating models of FRB at the price of multiplying the number of sources. The constraints on pulsar models are relaxed; rather than being unprecedentedly fast-spinning and highly magnetized with short spin-down times, their parameters may be closer to those of typical radio pulsars. In general, it is not possible to distinguish intermittent isotropic emission from wandering beams on purely phenomenological grounds.

  19. Synchrotron masers and fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.

    2017-02-01

    Fast radio bursts, with a typical duration of 1 ms and 1 Jy flux density at gigahertz frequencies, have brightness temperatures exceeding 1033 K, requiring a coherent emission process. This can be achieved by bunching particles in volumes smaller than the typical wavelength, but this may be challenging. Maser emission is a possibility. Under certain conditions, the synchrotron-stimulated emission process can be more important than true absorption, and a synchrotron maser can be created. This occurs when the emitting electrons have a very narrow distribution of pitch angles and energies. This process overcomes the difficulties of having extremely dense bunches of particles and relaxes the light-crossing time limits, since there is no simple relation between the actual size of the source and the observed variability time-scale.

  20. Coherent delta-band oscillations between cortical areas correlate with decision making

    PubMed Central

    Nácher, Verónica; Ledberg, Anders; Deco, Gustavo; Romo, Ranulfo

    2013-01-01

    Coherent oscillations in the theta-to-gamma frequency range have been proposed as a mechanism that coordinates neural activity in large-scale cortical networks in sensory, motor, and cognitive tasks. Whether this mechanism also involves coherent oscillations at delta frequencies (1–4 Hz) is not known. Rather, delta oscillations have been associated with slow-wave sleep. Here, we show coherent oscillations in the delta frequency band between parietal and frontal cortices during the decision-making component of a somatosensory discrimination task. Importantly, the magnitude of this delta-band coherence is modulated by the different decision alternatives. Furthermore, during control conditions not requiring decision making, delta-band coherences are typically much reduced. Our work indicates an important role for synchronous activity in the delta frequency band when large-scale, distant cortical networks coordinate their neural activity during decision making. PMID:23980180

  1. Burst firing in gonadotrophin-releasing hormone neurones does not require ionotrophic GABA or glutamate receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, K; Liu, X; Herbison, A E

    2012-12-01

    Burst firing is a feature of many neuroendocrine cell types, including the hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones that control fertility. The role of intrinsic and extrinsic influences in generating GnRH neurone burst firing is presently unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of fast amino acid transmission in burst firing by examining the effects of receptor antagonists on bursting displayed by green fluorescent protein GnRH neurones in sagittal brain slices prepared from adult male mice. Blockade of AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors with a cocktail of CNQX and AP5 was found to have no effects on burst firing in GnRH neurones. The frequency of bursts, dynamics of individual bursts, or percentage of firing clustered in bursts was not altered. Similarly, GABA(A) receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin had no effects upon burst firing in GnRH neurones. To examine the importance of both glutamate and GABA ionotrophic signalling, a cocktail including picrotoxin, CNQX and AP5 was used but, again, this was found to have no effects on GnRH neurone burst firing. To further question the impact of endogenous amino acid release on burst firing, electrical activation of anteroventral periventricular nuclei GABA/glutamate inputs to GnRH neurones was undertaken and found to have no impact on burst firing. Taken together, these observations indicate that bursting in GnRH neurones is not dependent upon acute ionotrophic GABA and glutamate signalling and suggest that extrinsic inputs to GnRH neurones acting through AMPA, NMDA and GABA(A) receptors are unlikely to be required for burst initiation in these cells. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2012 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  2. Auditory nerve spatial encoding of high-frequency pure tones: population response profiles derived from d' measure associated with nearby places along the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Kim, D O; Parham, K

    1991-03-01

    We examined a measure of discriminability in auditory nerve (AN) population responses that may underlie behavioral frequency discrimination of high-frequency pure tones in the cat. Population responses of high- (greater than = 15 spikes/s) and low- (less than 15 spikes/s) spontaneous rate (SR) AN fibers in unanesthetized decerebrate cats to 5 kHz pure tones were measured in the form of mean, mu, and standard deviation, sigma, of spike counts for 0.2 s tone bursts. The AN responses were analyzed in terms of a d'e(x, delta x) associated with adjoining cochlear places as defined in the manner of signal detection theory. We also examined sigma d'e(x, delta x), a spatial summation of the discriminability measure. The major findings are: (1) the d'e(x, delta x) function conveys information about 5 kHz pure tone frequency over a region of +/- 0.5 to 1.0 octave, or +/- 1.67 to 3.33 mm, around the characteristic place (CP), with the region being narrower at lower stimulus levels; (2) at 30 dB SPL, the integrated d'e(x, delta x) discriminability scores are similar for the apical and basal regions surrounding the CP whereas, at 70 dB SPL, the scores are higher for the apical region than for the basal region; and (3) at 50 and 70 dB SPL, the integrated d'e(x, delta x) discriminability scores of low-SR fibers were higher than those of high-SR fibers although, at 30 dB SPL, the latter were higher than the former. By using the cat cochlear frequency-place relationship and the inner hair cell (IHC) spacing, we interpret that the cat's frequency difference limen, delta f/f = 0.0088 at 4 kHz [Elliott et al., 1960, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 32, 380-384], corresponds to a shift of cochlear excitation profile by 4.5 IHCs. From the present analysis of AN responses, we conclude that, for high-frequency pure tones, the d'e(x, delta x) code, an example of rate-place code, of frequency provides sufficient information to support the cat's behavioral frequency discrimination.

  3. Ganges River Delta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Ganges River forms an extensive delta where it empties into the Bay of Bengal. The delta is largely covered with a swamp forest known as the Sunderbans, which is home to the Royal Bengal Tiger. It is also home to most of Bangladesh, one of the world's most densely populated countries. Roughly 120 million people live on the Ganges Delta under threat of repeated catastrophic floods due to heavy runoff of meltwater from the Himalayas, and due to the intense rainfall during the monsoon season. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on February 28, 2000. This is a false-color composite image made using green, infrared, and blue wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  4. Zambezi River Delta

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-29

    It drains a watershed that spans eight countries and nearly 1.6 million square kilometers 600,000 square miles. The Zambezi also Zambeze is the fourth largest river in Africa, and the largest east-flowing waterway. The Operational Land Imager on the Landsat 8 satellite acquired this natural-color image of the Zambezi Delta on August 29, 2013. Sandbars and barrier spits stretch across the mouths of the delta, and suspended sediment extends tens of kilometers out into the sea. The sandy outflow turns the coastal waters to a milky blue-green compared to the deep blue of open water in the Indian Ocean. The Zambezi Delta includes 230 kilometers of coastline fronting 18,000 square kilometers (7,00 square miles) of swamps, floodplains, and even savannahs (inland). The area has long been prized by subsistence fishermen and farmers, who find fertile ground for crops like sugar and fertile waters for prawns and fish. Two species of endangered cranes and one of the largest concentration of buffalo in Africa -- among many other species of wildlife -- have found a haven in this internationally recognized wetland. However, the past six decades have brought great changes to the Zambezi Delta, which used to pour more water and sediment off of the continent. Hydropower dams upstream-most prominently, the Kariba and the Cahora Bassa-greatly reduce river flows during the wet season; they also trap sediments that would otherwise flow downstream. The result has been less water reaching the delta and the floodplains, which rely on pulses of nutrients and sediments from annual (and mostly benign) natural flooding. The change in the flow of the river affects freshwater availability and quality in the delta. Strong flows push fresh water further out into the sea and naturally keep most of a delta full of fresh (or mostly fresh) water. When that fresh flow eases, the wetlands become drier and more prone to fire. Salt water from the Indian Ocean also can penetrate further into the marsh

  5. The Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This pair of true- and false-color images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer was acquired on June 3, 2002. The fertile land along the Nile River supports lush green vegetation, amid the desert landscape. At its delta at the Mediterranean Sea, the Nile broadens into a large fan-shaped delta. All of Egypt's large cities fall along the Nile, which sustains life in a region of scant rainfall. At the point where the river widens into the delta, a grayish cluster of pixels marks the location of Cairo. To the east is the Sinai Peninsula, whose impermanent water courses create silvery streaks on the pale brown, arid landscape. At lower right is the Red Sea. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  6. Optimal Intrinsic Dynamics for Bursting in a Three-Cell Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmyre, Justin R.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2010-01-01

    Previous numerical and analytical work has shown that synaptic coupling can allow a network of model neurons to synchronize despite heterogeneity in intrinsic parameter values. In particular, synchronous bursting oscillations can arise in a network with excitatory synaptic coupling, even in the absence of intrinsically bursting neurons. In this work, we explore how the intrinsic dynamics of neurons within a reduced three-cell network influence its ability to exhibit synchronous bursting and the frequency range over which such activity can occur. We establish necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of synchronous bursting solutions and perform related numerical experiments in three-cell networks that include a quiescent cell, a tonically active cell, and a third added cell. Our results show that, in most cases, the addition of a quiescent cell is optimal for synchronous network bursting, in a variety of ways, and that intrinsically bursting cells can be detrimental to synchronous bursting, and we explain the mechanisms underlying these effects. These findings may help explain how robust synchronous oscillations arise in neuronal central pattern generators, such as the mammalian inspiratory network, despite the presence of significant cellular heterogeneity. They also support the idea that intrinsic burst capabilities of individual cells need not be central to these networks' rhythms.

  7. MULTI-INSTRUMENT X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS WITH SHORT RECURRENCE TIMES

    SciTech Connect

    Keek, L.; Heger, A.; Galloway, D. K.; In't Zand, J. J. M.

    2010-07-20

    Type I X-ray bursts from low-mass X-ray binaries result from a thermonuclear runaway in the material accreted onto the neutron star. Although typical recurrence times are a few hours, consistent with theoretical ignition model predictions, there are also observations of bursts occurring as promptly as 10 minutes or less after the previous event. We present a comprehensive assessment of this phenomenon using a catalog of 3387 bursts observed with the BeppoSAX/WFCs and RXTE/PCA X-ray instruments. This catalog contains 136 bursts with recurrence times of less than 1 hr, that come in multiples of up to four events, from 15 sources. Short recurrence times are not observed from the so-called ultra-compact binaries, indicating that hydrogen-burning processes play a crucial role. As far as the neutron star spin frequency is known, these sources all spin fast at over 500 Hz; the rotationally induced mixing may explain burst recurrence times of the order of 10 minutes. Short recurrence time bursts generally occur at all mass accretion rates where normal bursts are observed, but for individual sources the short recurrence times may be restricted to a smaller interval of accretion rate. The fraction of such bursts is roughly 30%. We also report the shortest known recurrence time of 3.8 minutes.

  8. Electron cyclotron maser emission in coronal arches and solar radio type V bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J. F.; Wu, D. J.; Tan, C. M.

    2013-12-10

    Solar radio type V bursts were classified as a special spectral class based on their moderately long duration, wide bandwidth, and sense of polarization opposite of associated type III bursts. However, type V bursts are also closely related to the preceding type III bursts. They have an approximately equal source height and the same dispersion of position with frequency. Electron cyclotron maser (ECM) instability driven by beam electrons has been used to explain type III bursts in recent years. We propose ECM emission as the physical process of type V solar radio bursts. According to the observed properties of type V and III bursts, we propose that energetic electrons in excited type V continuum are trapped in coronal loops, which are adjacent to the open field lines traced by type III electrons. With the proposed magnetic field configuration and the ECM emission mechanism, the observed properties of type V bursts, such as long duration, wide bandwidth, and opposite sense of polarization can be reasonably explained by our model.

  9. On the source conditions for herringbone structure in type II solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; White, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation is made of the correlation of the occurrence of the herringbone phenomenon in type II solar radio bursts with various flare properties. It is shown that herringbone is strongly correlated with the intensity of the type II burst: whereas about 21 percent of all type II bursts show herringbone, about 60 percent of the most intense bursts contain herringbone. This fact can explain most of the correlations between herringbone and other properties such as intense type III bursts, type IV emission, and high type II starting frequencies. It is also shown that when this is taken into account, there is no need to postulate two classes of type II burst in order to explain why there appears to be a difference in herringbone occurrence between the set of type II bursts associated with the leading edges of coronal mass ejections, and those not so associated. It is argued that the data are consistent with the idea that all coronal type II bursts are due to blast waves from flares.

  10. Thalamic burst mode and inattention in the awake LGNd.

    PubMed

    Bezdudnaya, Tatiana; Cano, Monica; Bereshpolova, Yulia; Stoelzel, Carl R; Alonso, Jose-Manuel; Swadlow, Harvey A

    2006-02-02

    Awake mammals are often inattentive in familiar environments, but must still respond appropriately to relevant visual stimulation. Such "inattentive vision" has received little study, perhaps due to difficulties in controlling eye position in this state. In rabbits, eye position is exceedingly stable in both alert and inattentive states. Here, we exploit this stability to examine temporal filtering of visual information in LGNd neurons as rabbits alternate between EEG-defined states. Within a single second of shifting from alert to an inattentive state, both peak temporal frequency and bandwidth were sharply reduced, and burst frequency increased dramatically. However, spatial dimensions of receptive field centers showed no significant state dependence. We conclude that extremely rapid and significant changes in temporal filtering and bursting occur in the LGNd as awake subjects shift between alert and inattentive states.

  11. Decameter U-burst Harmonic Pair from a High Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorovskyy, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Bubnov, I. N.; Gridin, A. A.; Shevchuk, N. V.; Rucker, H. O.; Poedts, S.; Panchenko, M.

    2015-01-01

    The results of the first observations of solar sporadic radio emission within 10 - 70 MHz by the Giant Ukrainian Radio Telescope (GURT) are presented and discussed. Observations in such a wide range of frequencies considerably facilitate the registration of harmonic pairs. The solar U-burst harmonic pair observed on 8 August 2012 is analyzed. The burst key features were determined. Among them, the time delay between the fundamental and harmonic emissions was of special interest. The fundamental emission was delayed for 7 s with respect to the harmonic emission. A model for explaining the occurrence of such a delay is proposed, in which the emission source is located inside a magnetic loop containing plasma of increased density. In this case, the delay appears due to the difference in group velocities of electromagnetic waves at the fundamental and the harmonic frequencies.

  12. Delta II Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Final preparations for lift off of the DELTA II Mars Pathfinder Rocket are shown. Activities include loading the liquid oxygen, completing the construction of the Rover, and placing the Rover into the Lander. After the countdown, important visual events include the launch of the Delta Rocket, burnout and separation of the three Solid Rocket Boosters, and the main engine cutoff. The cutoff of the main engine marks the beginning of the second stage engine. After the completion of the second stage, the third stage engine ignites and then cuts off. Once the third stage engine cuts off spacecraft separation occurs.

  13. Space Radar Image of Mississippi Delta

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-04-15

    This is a radar image of the Mississippi River Delta where the river enters into the Gulf of Mexico along the coast of Louisiana. This multi-frequency image demonstrates the capability of the radar to distinguish different types of wetlands surfaces in river deltas. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 2, 1995. The image is centered on latitude 29.3 degrees North latitude and 89.28 degrees West longitude. The area shown is approximately 63 kilometers by 43 kilometers (39 miles by 26 miles). North is towards the upper right of the image. As the river enters the Gulf of Mexico, it loses energy and dumps its load of sediment that it has carried on its journey through the mid-continent. This pile of sediment, or mud, accumulates over the years building up the delta front. As one part of the delta becomes clogged with sediment, the delta front will migrate in search of new areas to grow. The area shown on this image is the currently active delta front of the Mississippi. The migratory nature of the delta forms natural traps for oil and the numerous bright spots along the outside of the delta are drilling platforms. Most of the land in the image consists of mud flats and marsh lands. There is little human settlement in this area due to the instability of the sediments. The main shipping channel of the Mississippi River is the broad red stripe running northwest to southeast down the left side of the image. The bright spots within the channel are ships. The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; green is C-band vertically transmitted, vertically received; blue is X-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA01784

  14. Mixed-mode oscillations and population bursting in the pre-Bötzinger complex

    PubMed Central

    Bacak, Bartholomew J; Kim, Taegyo; Smith, Jeffrey C; Rubin, Jonathan E; Rybak, Ilya A

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on computational and theoretical investigations of neuronal activity arising in the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC), a medullary region generating the inspiratory phase of breathing in mammals. A progressive increase of neuronal excitability in medullary slices containing the pre-BötC produces mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) characterized by large amplitude population bursts alternating with a series of small amplitude bursts. Using two different computational models, we demonstrate that MMOs emerge within a heterogeneous excitatory neural network because of progressive neuronal recruitment and synchronization. The MMO pattern depends on the distributed neuronal excitability, the density and weights of network interconnections, and the cellular properties underlying endogenous bursting. Critically, the latter should provide a reduction of spiking frequency within neuronal bursts with increasing burst frequency and a dependence of the after-burst recovery period on burst amplitude. Our study highlights a novel mechanism by which heterogeneity naturally leads to complex dynamics in rhythmic neuronal populations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13403.001 PMID:26974345

  15. Model interpretation of type III radio burst characteristics. I - Spatial aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.

    1988-01-01

    The ways that the finite size of the source region and directivity of the emitted radiation modify the observed characteristics of type III radio bursts as they propagate through the interplanetary medium are investigated. A simple model that simulates the radio source region is developed to provide insight into the spatial behavior of the parameters that characterize radio bursts. The model is used to demonstrate that observed radio azimuths are systematically displaced from the geometric centroid of the exciter electron beam in such a way as to cause trajectories of the radio bursts to track back to the observer at low frequencies, rather than to follow expected Archimedean spiral-like paths. The source region model is used to investigate the spatial behavior of the peak intensities of radio bursts, and it is found that the model can qualitatively account for both the frequency dependence and the east-west asymmetry of the observed peak flux densities.

  16. The stimulation of auroral kilometric radiation by type III solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1981-01-01

    It has been found that the onset of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) frequently coincides with the arrival of type III solar radio bursts. Although the AKR onsets are usually abrupt and appear to be spontaneous, they sometimes develop from a discrete frequency near the leading edge of a type III burst or sometimes occur at progressively lower frequencies following that edge. From this, and the absence of the related solar electrons in specific cases, it was concluded that the incoming type III waves were sometimes responsible for stimulating auroral kilometric radiation. It was estimated that intense, isolated type III bursts were capable of stimulating AKR roughly one third of the time, and that at least ten percent of the observed AKR onsets could be attributed to these and weaker bursts, including some barely detectable by the ISEE plasma wave receivers.

  17. The stimulation of auroral kilometric radiation by type III solar radio bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1981-01-01

    It has been found that the onset of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) frequently coincides with the arrival of type III solar radio bursts. Although the AKR onsets are usually abrupt and appear to be spontaneous, they sometimes develop from a discrete frequency near the leading edge of a type III burst or sometimes occur at progressively lower frequencies following that edge. From this, and the absence of the related solar electrons in specific cases, it was concluded that the incoming type III waves were sometimes responsible for stimulating auroral kilometric radiation. It was estimated that intense, isolated type III bursts were capable of stimulating AKR roughly one third of the time, and that at least ten percent of the observed AKR onsets could be attributed to these and weaker bursts, including some barely detectable by the ISEE plasma wave receivers.

  18. Investigation of the Geoeffectiveness of CMEs Associated with IP Type II Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasanth, V.; Chen, Y.; Kong, X. L.; Wang, B.

    2015-06-01

    We perform a statistical analysis of the geoeffectiveness of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that are associated with interplanetary (IP) type II bursts in Solar Cycle 23 during the period 1997 - 2008. About 47 % (109 out of 232) of IP type II bursts are found to be associated with geomagnetic storms. Of these 47 %, 27 % are associated with moderate, 14 % with intense, and 6 % with severe geomagnetic storms. We find that the IP type II bursts and their corresponding end frequencies can be used as indicators of CME geoeffectiveness: the lower the type II burst end frequency, the higher the possibility of having a stronger storm. In addition, we show that various combinations of CME remote-sensing and IP type II parameters can be used to improve geomagnetic storm forecasting.

  19. Terrestrial Myriametric Radio Burst Observed by IMAGE and Geotail Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Hashimoto, Kozo; Boardsen, Scott A.; Garcia, Leonard N.; Green, James L.; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Reinisch, Bodo W.

    2010-01-01

    We report IMAGE and Geotail simultaneous observations of a terrestrial myriametric radio burst (TMRB) detected on August 19, 2001. The TMRB was confined in time (0830-1006 UT) and frequency (12-50 kHz), suggesting a fan beam-like emission pattern from a single discrete source. Analysis and comparisons with existing TMR radiations strongly suggest that the TMRB is a distinct emission perhaps resulting from dayside magnetic reconnection instigated by northward interplanetary field condition.

  20. Extracellular K+ in the supraoptic nucleus of the rat during reflex bursting activity by oxytocin neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Coles, J A; Poulain, D A

    1991-01-01

    1. We have investigated changes in extracellular potassium concentration [K+]o in the supraoptic nucleus of lactating rats and in particular those that occur during the intense burst of firing by the oxytocin neurones involved in the milk ejection reflex. 2. Double-barrelled K(+)-selective microelectrodes containing a highly selective sensor based on valinomycin were lowered through the exposed cortex towards the supraoptic nucleus (SON) of female rats anaesthetized with urethane. The mean resting [K+]o in the hypothalami of five rats was 2.4 mM, S.D. = 0.3 mM. 3. Where the reference barrel recorded extracellular action potentials from an oxytocin cell, the reflex burst of firing (4 s, typical maximum 50 Hz) was accompanied by a mean increase in [K+]o (delta[K+]o) of 0.22 mM (S.E.M. = 0.02 mM, fifty-seven bursts in eight cells in seven rats). The rise in [K+]o did not begin more than 0.1 s before the onset of the burst, and began to fall from its maximum during the burst. Slow field potentials, indicative of spatial buffering of K+, were undetectable (less than 50 microV). When the electrode was advanced in steps, the amplitudes of both delta[K+]o and the action potential declined steeply to about 10% over a distance of 20 microns: K+ from oxytocin cells appears to be prevented from dispersing freely through the extracellular space of the SON. 4. When the electrode recorded action potentials from a vasopressin cell, delta[K+]o during an oxytocin cell burst was very small: 0.021 mM (S.E.M. = 0.005 mM). At other sites in the SON, where antidromic stimulation evoked a field potential but no action potential, delta[K+]o was 0.047 +/- 0.005 mM. We conclude that the reason oxytocin bursts do not affect vasopressin cells is that [K+]o rises very little around vasopressin cells. A fortiori, since the increases in [K+]o were very small except where action potentials from oxytocin cells were recorded, they can make no significant contribution to synchronizing the onsets of

  1. Hotspot or Heatwave? Getting to Grips with Neutron Star Burst Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, A.

    2005-01-01

    Many accreting neutron stars, including two of the millisecond pulsars, exhibit high frequency oscillations during Type I X-ray bursts. The properties of the burst oscillations reflect the nature of the thermal asymmetry on the stellar surface. The mechanism that gives rise to the aspzetry, however , remains unclear: possibilities include a hotspot due to uneven fuel distribution, modes of oscillation in the surface layers of the neutron star, or vortices driven by the Coriolis force. I will review some of the latest theory and observations, and present the results of a recent study of variability in the burst oscillations of the millisecond pulsar 51814-338.

  2. Hotspot or Heatwave? Getting to Grips with Neutron Star Burst Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, A.

    2005-01-01

    Many accreting neutron stars, including two of the millisecond pulsars, exhibit high frequency oscillations during Type I X-ray bursts. The properties of the burst oscillations reflect the nature of the thermal asymmetry on the stellar surface. The mechanism that gives rise to the aspzetry, however , remains unclear: possibilities include a hotspot due to uneven fuel distribution, modes of oscillation in the surface layers of the neutron star, or vortices driven by the Coriolis force. I will review some of the latest theory and observations, and present the results of a recent study of variability in the burst oscillations of the millisecond pulsar 51814-338.

  3. The Mystery of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2004-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts remain one of the greatest mysteries in astrophysics. Observations of gamma-ray bursts made by the BATSE experiment on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory will be described. Most workers in the field now believe that they originate from cosmological distances. This view has been reinforced by observations this year of several optical afterglow counterparts to gamma-ray bursts. A summary of these recent discoveries will be presented, along with their implications for models of the burst emission mechanism and the energy source of the bursts.

  4. Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    Some basic observed properties of gamma-ray bursts are reviewed. Although some properties were known 25 years ago, new and more detailed observations have been made by the Compton Observatory in the past three years. The new observation with the greatest impact has been the observed isotropic distribution of bursts along with a deficiency of weak bursts which would be expected from a homogeneous burst distribution. This is not compatible with any known Galactic population of objects. Gamma-ray bursts show an enormous variety of burst morphologies and a wide spread in burst durations. The spectra of gamma-ray bursts are characterized by rapid variations and peak power which is almost entirely in the gamma-ray energy range. Delayed gamma-ray burst photons extending to GeV energies have been detected for the first time. A time dilation effect has also been reported to be observed in gamma-ray, bursts. The observation of a gamma-ray burst counterpart in another wavelength region has yet to be made.

  5. Narrowband Gyrosynchrotron Bursts: Probing Electron Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Gary, Dale E.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, in a few case studies we demonstrated that gyrosynchrotron microwave emission can be detected directly from the acceleration region when the trapped electron component is insignificant. For the statistical study reported here, we have identified events with steep (narrowband) microwave spectra that do not show a significant trapped component and, at the same time, show evidence of source uniformity, which simplifies the data analysis greatly. Initially, we identified a subset of more than 20 radio bursts with such narrow spectra, having low- and high-frequency spectral indices larger than three in absolute value. A steep low-frequency spectrum implies that the emission is nonthermal (for optically thick thermal emission, the spectral index cannot be steeper than two), and the source is reasonably dense and uniform. A steep high-frequency spectrum implies that no significant electron trapping occurs, otherwise a progressive spectral flattening would be observed. Roughly half of these radio bursts have RHESSI data, which allow for detailed, joint diagnostics of the source parameters and evolution. Based on an analysis of radio-to-X-ray spatial relationships, timing, and spectral fits, we conclude that the microwave emission in these narrowband bursts originates directly from the acceleration regions, which have a relatively strong magnetic field, high density, and low temperature. In contrast, the thermal X-ray emission comes from a distinct loop with a smaller magnetic field, lower density, but higher temperature. Therefore, these flares likely occurred due to interaction between two (or more) magnetic loops.

  6. Delta rhythm in wakefulness: evidence from intracranial recordings in human beings.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Robert N S; Gaspard, Nicolas; Gerrard, Jason L; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Spencer, Dennis D; Zaveri, Hitten P

    2015-08-01

    A widely accepted view is that wakefulness is a state in which the entire cortical mantle is persistently activated, and therefore desynchronized. Consequently, the EEG is dominated by low-amplitude, high-frequency fluctuations. This view is currently under revision because the 1-4 Hz delta rhythm is often evident during "quiet" wakefulness in rodents and nonhuman primates. Here we used intracranial EEG recordings to assess the occurrence of delta rhythm in 18 awake human beings. Our recordings reveal rhythmic delta during wakefulness at 10% of all recording sites. Delta rhythm could be observed in a single cortical lobe or in multiple lobes. Sites with high delta could flip between high and low delta power or could be in a persistently high delta state. Finally, these sites were rarely identified as the sites of seizure onset. Thus rhythmic delta can dominate the background operation and activity of some neocortical circuits in awake human beings. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Delta rhythm in wakefulness: evidence from intracranial recordings in human beings

    PubMed Central

    Gaspard, Nicolas; Gerrard, Jason L.; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; Spencer, Dennis D.; Zaveri, Hitten P.

    2015-01-01

    A widely accepted view is that wakefulness is a state in which the entire cortical mantle is persistently activated, and therefore desynchronized. Consequently, the EEG is dominated by low-amplitude, high-frequency fluctuations. This view is currently under revision because the 1–4 Hz delta rhythm is often evident during “quiet” wakefulness in rodents and nonhuman primates. Here we used intracranial EEG recordings to assess the occurrence of delta rhythm in 18 awake human beings. Our recordings reveal rhythmic delta during wakefulness at 10% of all recording sites. Delta rhythm could be observed in a single cortical lobe or in multiple lobes. Sites with high delta could flip between high and low delta power or could be in a persistently high delta state. Finally, these sites were rarely identified as the sites of seizure onset. Thus rhythmic delta can dominate the background operation and activity of some neocortical circuits in awake human beings. PMID:26084904

  8. Intensity distributions of gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Observations of individual bursts chosen by the vagaries of telescope availability demonstrated that bursts are not standard candles and that their apparent energy can be as great as 10{sup 54} erg. However, determining the distribution of their apparent energy (and of other burst properties) requires the statistical analysis of a well-defined burst sample; the sample definition includes the threshold for including a burst in the sample. Thus optical groups need to the criteria behind the decision to search for a spectroscopic redshift. Currently the burst samples are insufficient to choose between lognormal and power law functional forms of the distribution, and the parameter values for these functional forms differ between burst samples. Similarly, the actual intensity distribution may be broader than observed, with a low energy tail extending below the detection threshold.

  9. Do gamma-ray burst sources repeat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb, 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter, 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al., 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and the two-point angular correlation function. We find the data to be consistent with the hypothesis that burst sources do not repeat; however, a repeater fraction of up to about 20% of the observed bursts cannot be excluded.

  10. A turbulent burst model for boundary layer flows with pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, L. C.; Benton, D. J.

    The object of this paper is to develop a surface renewal model of the turbulent burst phenomenon for momentum and energy transfer in the wall region for turbulent boundary layer flows with pressure gradient. In addition to obtaining inner laws for the distributions in velocity and temperature, predictions are obtained for the effect of pressure gradient on the mean burst frequency and on the turbulent Prandtl number within the wall region for slight favorable and mild adverse pressure gradients.

  11. Lessons from KIPP Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maranto, Robert; Shuls, James V.

    2011-01-01

    KIPP Delta succeeds at its stated mission, probably because of its careful attention to culture building. What distinguishes this KIPP school is thoughtful work linking the daily processes of schooling to the goals of schooling, in this case success in college. Day to day tactics reflect broader themes: having a clear mission and hiring staff who…

  12. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  13. Delta Airlines LOFT training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, J.

    1981-01-01

    A LOFT program was developed as part of the DC-9 training program which serves as a prototype for much of Delta's other aircraft training programs. The LOFT used differs little from the ideology presented in the Advisory Circular. Difficulty and experienced concerns regarding the effectiveness of LOFT as a complete training vehicle are explored.

  14. Liquefaction potential of Nile delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fergany, Elsayed; Omar, Khaled

    2017-06-01

    Understanding how sedimentary basins respond to seismic-wave energy generated by earthquake events is a significant concern for seismic-hazard estimation and risk analysis. The main goal of this study is assessing the vulnerability index, Kg, as an indicator for liquefaction potential sites in the Nile delta basin based on the microtremor measurements. Horizontal to Vertical spectral ratio analyses (HVSR) of ambient noise data, which was conducted in 2006 at 120 sites covering the Nile delta from south to north were reprocessed using Geopsy software. HVSR factors of amplification, A, and fundamental frequency, F, were calculated and Kg was estimated for each measurement. The Kg value varies widely from south toward north delta and the potential liquefaction places were estimated. The higher vulnerability indices are associated with sites located in southern part of the Nile delta and close to the branches of Nile River. The HVSR factors were correlated with geologic setting of the Nile delta and show good correlations with the sediment thickness and subsurface stratigraphic boundaries. However, we note that sites located in areas that have greatest percentage of sand also yielded relatively high Kg values with respect to sites in areas where clay is abundant. We concluded that any earthquake with ground acceleration more than 50 gal at hard rock can cause a perceived deformation of sandy sediments and liquefaction can take place in the weak zones of Kg ≥ 20. The worst potential liquefaction zones (Kg > 30) are frequently joined to the Damietta and Rosetta Nile River branches and south Delta where relatively coarser sand exists. The HVSR technique is a very sensitive tool for lithological stratigraphy variations in two dimensions and varying liquefaction susceptibility.

  15. Soft Phonons in (delta)-Phase Plutonium Near the (delta)-(alpha)' Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, R; Wong, J; Zshack, P; Hong, H; Chiang, T

    2007-09-13

    Plutonium and its alloys exhibit complex phase diagrams that imply anomalous lattice dynamics near phase stability boundaries. Specifically, the TA [111] phonon branch in Ga-stabilized {delta}-Pu at room temperature shows a pronounced soft mode at the zone boundary, which suggests a possible connection to the martensitic transformation from the fcc {delta}-phase to the monoclinic {alpha}{prime}-phase at low temperatures. This work is a study of the lattice dynamics of this system by x-ray thermal diffuse scattering. The results reveal little temperature dependence of the phonon frequencies, thus indicating that kinetic phonon softening is not responsible for this phase transition.

  16. Predicting rock bursts in mines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1979-01-01

    The microseismic method relies on observational data, amply demonstrated in laboratory experiments, that acoustic noise occurs in rocks subjected to high differential stresses. Acoustic emission becomes most pronounced as the breaking strength of the rock is reached. Laboratory studies have shown that the acoustic emission is linked with the release of stored strain energy as the rock mass undergoes small-scale adjustments such as the formation of cracks. Studies in actual mines have shown that acoustic noises often precede failure of rock masses in rock bursts or in coal bumps. Seismologists are, therefore, very interested in whether these results can be applied to large-scale failures; that is, earthquakes. An active research program in predicting rock bursts in mines is being conducted by Brian T. Brady and his colleagues at the U.S Bureau of Mines, Denver Colo.  

  17. Simulations of the burst and coast swimming behavior of fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Quan; Moored, Keith; Smits, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    An investigation into the burst and coast swimming behavior of fish is simulated with a 2-D, inviscid Boundary Element Method. The fish is modeled as a thin pitching panel that is allowed to free swim. A simple drag model is used where drag is proportional to the velocity squared in order to calculate the cruising velocity. The burst-coast behavior is modeled by a coasting phase, where the panel is motionless, and a burst phase, where the panel pitches with a single sine wave motion. Varying the frequency of the fin-beat and the duration of the duty cycle (the ratio of the burst-phase to the entire period), it is found that it is possible to alter swimming motion to yield a decrease of 50% in the cost of transport with no sacrifice of time-averaged cruising velocity. The analyses of the wake structure demonstrate how vortices shed by the fish affect and shape swimming dynamics. Supported by the Office of Naval Research under Program Director Dr. Bob Brizzolara, MURI grant number N00014-08-1-0642.

  18. Therapy of Delta Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yurdaydin, Cihan; Idilman, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    Delta hepatitis is the less frequently encountered but most severe form of viral hepatitis. Acute delta hepatitis, as a result of coinfection with hepatitis B and hepatitis delta, is rare, but may lead to fulminant hepatitis, and no therapy exists for this form. Chronic delta hepatitis (CDH) mostly develops as a result of superinfection of a hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carrier with hepatitis delta virus (HDV). In general, HDV is the dominant virus. However, a dynamic shift of the dominant virus may occur with time in rare instances, and hepatitis B virus (HBV) may become the dominant virus, at which time nucleos(t)ide analog therapy may be indicated. Otherwise, the only established management of CDH consists of conventional or pegylated interferon therapy, which has to be administered at doses used for hepatitis B for a duration of at least 1 year. Posttreatment week-24 virologic response is the most widely used surrogate marker of treatment efficacy, but it does not represent a sustained virologic response, and late relapse can occur. As an easy-to-use simple serological test, anti-HDV-immunoglobulin M (IgM) correlates with histological inflammatory activity and clinical long-term outcome; however, it is not as sensitive as HDV RNA in assessing treatment response. No evidence-based rules for treating CDH exist, and treatment duration needs to be individualized based on virologic response at end of treatment or end of follow-up. Effective treatment may decrease liver-related complications, such as decompensation or liver-related mortality. In patients with decompensated cirrhosis, interferons are contraindicated and liver transplantation has to be considered. Alternative treatment options are an urgent need in CDH. New treatment strategies targeting different steps of the HDV life cycle, such as hepatocyte entry inhibitors or prenylation inhibitors, are emerging and provide hope for the future. PMID:26253093

  19. QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS AND BROADBAND VARIABILITY IN SHORT MAGNETAR BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Watts, Anna L.; Uttley, Phil; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Van der Klis, Michiel; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Goegues, Ersin; Granot, Jonathan; Vaughan, Simon; Finger, Mark H.

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. However, with only three giant flares ever recorded, and only two with data of sufficient quality to search for QPOs, such analysis is seriously data limited. We set out a procedure for doing QPO searches in the far more numerous, short, less energetic magnetar bursts. The short, transient nature of these bursts requires the implementation of sophisticated statistical techniques to make reliable inferences. Using Bayesian statistics, we model the periodogram as a combination of red noise at low frequencies and white noise at high frequencies, which we show is a conservative approach to the problem. We use empirical models to make inferences about the potential signature of periodic and QPOs at these frequencies. We compare our method with previously used techniques and find that although it is on the whole more conservative, it is also more reliable in ruling out false positives. We illustrate our Bayesian method by applying it to a sample of 27 bursts from the magnetar SGR J0501+4516 observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, and we find no evidence for the presence of QPOs in any of the bursts in the unbinned spectra, but do find a candidate detection in the binned spectra of one burst. However, whether this signal is due to a genuine quasi-periodic process, or can be attributed to unmodeled effects in the noise is at this point a matter of interpretation.

  20. The Devil's in the Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.

    2007-01-01

    Students frequently confuse and incorrectly apply the several "deltas" that are used in chemical engineering. The deltas come in three different flavors: "out minus in", "big minus little" and "now versus then." The first applies to a change in a stream property as the stream flows through a process. For example, the "[delta]H" in an energy…

  1. The Devil's in the Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.

    2007-01-01

    Students frequently confuse and incorrectly apply the several "deltas" that are used in chemical engineering. The deltas come in three different flavors: "out minus in", "big minus little" and "now versus then." The first applies to a change in a stream property as the stream flows through a process. For example, the "[delta]H" in an energy…

  2. Statistical Study of Shocks and CMEs Associated With Interplanetary Type II Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Gopalswamy, N.; MacDowall, R.; Yashiro, S.; Kaiser, M. L.

    2005-05-01

    We present a study of some spectral properties associated with interplanetary Type II radio emission. Type II radio bursts are signatures of violent eruptions from the Sun that result in shock waves propagating through the corona and the interplanetary medium. We investigated the relative bandwidth of all the type II bursts observed by the Radio and Plasma Wave Experiment (WAVES) on board the Wind spacecraft from 1997 up to 2003. We obtained three sets of events, based on the frequency domain of occurrence: 109 events in the low frequency domain (30 KHz to 1000 kHz detected by the RAD1 receiver), 216 events in the high frequency domain (1-14 MHz, observed by the RAD2 receiver), and 73 events that spanned both domains (RAD1 and RAD2). We present statistical results for the bandwidth-to-frequency ratio (BFR) in the three subsets as well as a comparision of our results with the Type II solar radio bursts observed by ISEE-3 radio experiment, which is similar to WAVES/RAD1. We analyzed the bandwidth and BFR evolution with the heliocentric distance as well as an analysis of drift rate magnitude of type II radio bursts and its starting frequency. We also present some properties of shocks and coronal mass ejections associated with interplanetary type II bursts. This work is partially supported by NSF/SHINE (ATM 0204588)

  3. Investigation of all-optical gain clamped erbium-doped amplifier in the presence of variable burst traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zannin, M.; Mangeni, S.; Taccheo, S.; Ennser, K.; Barlet, P.; Careglio, D.

    2011-03-01

    Optical gain clamping is an all-optical method to control the gain of optical amplifiers. Recent results show that this technique is very robust and reduces impairments in amplification of typical traffic from optical burst (and packets) switching networks, where the traffic profile is very dynamic. Nevertheless, recent results have also shown that interplay between the characteristics of the optical gain clamping optical amplifier (OGC-OA) and particular traffic profiles may induce chaotic behavior caused by resonance in the OGC-OA lasing cavity. The aim of this investigation is to assess the impact of burst duration and inter-arrival time on these chaotic behavior cases. The investigation shows that the resonating frequency in which chaotic variation of the OGC-OA gain occurs is shifted - and even reduced - when the burst duration and inter-arrival time are changed. For this investigation, continuous trains of bursts were used, with fixed burst generation frequency throughout each case considered.

  4. Multiple conductances cooperatively regulate spontaneous bursting in mouse olfactory bulb external tufted cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaolin; Shipley, Michael T

    2008-02-13

    External tufted (ET) cells are juxtaglomerular neurons that spontaneously generate bursts of action potentials, which persist when fast synaptic transmission is blocked. The intrinsic mechanism of this autonomous bursting is unknown. We identified a set of voltage-dependent conductances that cooperatively regulate spontaneous bursting: hyperpolarization-activated inward current (I(h)), persistent Na+ current (I(NaP)), low-voltage-activated calcium current (I(L/T)) mediated by T- and/or L-type Ca2+ channels, and large-conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ current (I(BK)). I(h) is important in setting membrane potential and depolarizes the cell toward the threshold of I(NaP) and I(T/L), which are essential to generate the depolarizing envelope that is crowned by a burst of action potentials. Action potentials depolarize the membrane and induce Ca2+ influx via high-voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (I(HVA)). The combined depolarization and increased intracellular Ca2+ activates I(BK), which terminates the burst by hyperpolarizing the membrane. Hyperpolarization activates I(h) and the cycle is regenerated. A novel finding is the role of L-type Ca2+ channels in autonomous ET cells bursting. A second novel feature is the role of BK channels, which regulate burst duration. I(L) and I(BK) may go hand-in-hand, the slow inactivation of I(L) requiring I(BK)-dependent hyperpolarization to deactivate inward conductances and terminate the burst. ET cells receive monosynaptic olfactory nerve input and drive the major inhibitory interneurons of the glomerular circuit. Modulation of the conductances identified here can regulate burst frequency, duration, and spikes per burst in ET cells and thus significantly shape the impact of glomerular circuits on mitral and tufted cells, the output channels of the olfactory bulb.

  5. Origin of suppression of otoacoustic emissions evoked by two-tone bursts.

    PubMed

    Jedrzejczak, W Wiktor; Smurzynski, Jacek; Blinowska, Katarzyna J

    2008-01-01

    Otoacoustic emission (OAE) data recorded for tone bursts presented separately and as a two-tone burst complex, that had been reported previously [Yoshikawa, H., Smurzynski, J., Probst R., 2000. Suppression of tone burst evoked otoacoustic emissions in relation to frequency separation. Hear. Res. 148, 95-106], were re-processed using the method of adaptive approximations by matching pursuit (MP). Two types of stimuli were applied to record tone burst OAEs (TBOAEs): (a) cosine-windowed tone bursts of 5-ms duration with center frequencies of 1, 1.5, 2 and 3kHz, (b) complex stimuli consisting of a digital addition of the 1-kHz tone burst together with either the 1.5-, 2- or 3-kHz tone burst. The MP method allowed decomposition of signals into waveforms of defined frequency, latency, time span, and amplitude. This approach provided a high time-frequency (t-f) resolution and identified patterns of resonance modes that were characteristic for TBOAEs recorded in each individual ear. Individual responses to single-tone bursts were processed off-line to form 'sum of singles' responses. The results confirmed linear superposition behavior for a frequency separation of two-tone bursts of 2kHz (the 1-kHz and 3-kHz condition). For the 1, 1.5-kHz condition, the MP results revealed the existence of closely positioned resonance modes associated with responses recorded individually with the stimuli differing in frequency by 500Hz. Then, the differences between t-f distributions calculated for dual (two-tone bursts) and sum-of-singles conditions exhibited mutual suppression of resonance modes common to both stimuli. The degree of attenuation depended on the individual pattern of characteristic resonance modes, i.e., suppression occurred when two resonant modes excited by both stimuli overlapped. It was postulated that the suppression observed in case of dual stimuli with closely-spaced components is due to mutual attenuation of the overlapping resonance modes.

  6. Stimulus induced bursts in severe postanoxic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Tjepkema-Cloostermans, Marleen C; Wijers, Elisabeth T; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2016-11-01

    To report on a distinct effect of auditory and sensory stimuli on the EEG in comatose patients with severe postanoxic encephalopathy. In two comatose patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with severe postanoxic encephalopathy and burst-suppression EEG, we studied the effect of external stimuli (sound and touch) on the occurrence of bursts. In patient A bursts could be induced by either auditory or sensory stimuli. In patient B bursts could only be induced by touching different facial regions (forehead, nose and chin). When stimuli were presented with relatively long intervals, bursts persistently followed the stimuli, while stimuli with short intervals (<1s) did not induce bursts. In both patients bursts were not accompanied by myoclonia. Both patients deceased. Bursts in patients with a severe postanoxic encephalopathy can be induced by external stimuli, resulting in stimulus-dependent burst-suppression. Stimulus induced bursts should not be interpreted as prognostic favourable EEG reactivity. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. DELTAS: A new Global Delta Sustainability Initiative (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2013-12-01

    Deltas are economic and environmental hotspots, food baskets for many nations, home to a large part of the world population, and hosts of exceptional biodiversity and rich ecosystems. Deltas, being at the land-water interface, are international, regional, and local transport hubs, thus providing the basis for intense economic activities. Yet, deltas are deteriorating at an alarming rate as 'victims' of human actions (e.g. water and sediment reduction due to upstream basin development), climatic impacts (e.g. sea level rise and flooding from rivers and intense tropical storms), and local exploration (e.g. sand or aggregates, groundwater and hydrocarbon extraction). Although many efforts exist on individual deltas around the world, a comprehensive global delta sustainability initiative that promotes awareness, science integration, data and knowledge sharing, and development of decision support tools for an effective dialogue between scientists, managers and policy makers is lacking. Recently, the international scientific community proposed to establish the International Year of Deltas (IYD) to serve as the beginning of such a Global Delta Sustainability Initiative. The IYD was proposed as a year to: (1) increase awareness and attention to the value and vulnerability of deltas worldwide; (2) promote and enhance international and regional cooperation at the scientific, policy, and stakeholder level; and (3) serve as a launching pad for a 10-year committed effort to understand deltas as complex socio-ecological systems and ensure preparedness in protecting and restoring them in a rapidly changing environment. In this talk, the vision for such an international coordinated effort on delta sustainability will be presented as developed by a large number of international experts and recently funded through the Belmont Forum International Opportunities Fund. Participating countries include: U.S., France, Germany, U.K., India, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Brazil, Bangladesh

  8. Burst Oscillations: A New Spin on Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2007-01-01

    Observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have shown that the X-ray flux during thermonuclear X-ray bursts fr-om accreting neutron stars is often strongly pulsed at frequencies as high as 620 Hz. We now know that these oscillations are produced by spin modulation of the thermonuclear flux from the neutron star surface. In addition to revealing the spin frequency, they provide new ways to probe the properties and physics of accreting neutron stars. I will briefly review our current observational and theoretical understanding of these oscillations and discuss what they are telling us about neutron stars.

  9. Burst Oscillations: A New Spin on Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2007-01-01

    Observations with NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) have shown that the X-ray flux during thermonuclear X-ray bursts fr-om accreting neutron stars is often strongly pulsed at frequencies as high as 620 Hz. We now know that these oscillations are produced by spin modulation of the thermonuclear flux from the neutron star surface. In addition to revealing the spin frequency, they provide new ways to probe the properties and physics of accreting neutron stars. I will briefly review our current observational and theoretical understanding of these oscillations and discuss what they are telling us about neutron stars.

  10. A Fast Radio Burst Every Second?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-09-01

    How frequently do fast radio busts occur in the observable universe? Two researchers have now developed a new estimate.Extragalactic SignalsIn 2007, scientists looking through archival pulsar data discovered a transient radio pulse a flash that lasted only a few milliseconds. Since then, weve found another 22 such fast radio bursts (FRBs), yet we still dont know what causes these energetic signals.Artists illustration of the Very Large Array pinpointing the location of FRB 121102. [Bill Saxton/NRAO/AUI/NSF/Hubble Legacy Archive/ESA/NASA]Recently, some clues have finally come from FRB 121102, the only FRB ever observed to repeat. The multiple pulses detected from this source over the last five years have allowed us to confirm its extragalactic origin and pinpoint an origin for this FRB: a small, low-mass, metal-poor dwarf galaxy located about three billion light-years away.Is FRB 121102 typical? How frequently do such bursts occur, and how frequently can we hope to be able to detect them in the future? And what might these rates tell us about their origins? Two scientists from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Anastasia Fialkov and Abraham Loeb, have now taken a phenomenological approach to answering these questions.Influencing FactorsFialkov and Loeb arguethat there are three main factors that influence the rate of observable FRBs in the universe:The spectral shape of the individual FRBsFRB 121102 had a Gaussian-like spectral profile, which means it peaks in a narrow range of frequencies and may not be detectable outside of that band. If this is typical for FRBs, then signals of distant FRBs may become redshifted to outside of the frequency band that we observe, making them undetectable.FRB detection rates in the 1.253.5GHz band predicted by the authors models (red and blue solid and dashed lines), as a function of the flux limit for detection (top) and as a function of the FRB hosts redshift (bottom). Grey circles mark our detections of FRBs thus

  11. Detecting fast radio bursts at decametric wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajwade, K. M.; Lorimer, D. R.

    2017-02-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are highly dispersed, sporadic radio pulses which are likely extragalactic in nature. Here, we investigate the constraints on the source population from surveys carried out at frequencies <1 GHz. All but one FRB has so far been discovered in the 1-2 GHz band, but new and emerging instruments look set to become valuable probes of the FRB population at sub-GHz frequencies in the near future. In this paper, we consider the impacts of free-free absorption and multipath scattering in our analysis via a number of different assumptions about the intervening medium. We consider previous low-frequency surveys along with an ongoing survey with University of Technology digital backend for the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope (UTMOST) as well as future observations with the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) and the Hydrogen Intensity and Real-time Analysis eXperiment (HIRAX). We predict that CHIME and HIRAX will be able to observe ∼30 or more FRBs per day, even in the most extreme scenarios where free-free absorption and scattering can significantly impact the fluxes below 1 GHz. We also show that UTMOST will detect 1-2 FRBs per month of observations. For CHIME and HIRAX, the detection rates also depend greatly on the assumed FRB distance scale. Some of the models we investigated predict an increase in the FRB flux as a function of redshift at low frequencies. If FRBs are truly cosmological sources, this effect may impact future surveys in this band, particularly if the FRB population traces the cosmic star formation rate.

  12. Photon mass limits from fast radio bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Luca; Ellis, John; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E.; Sakharov, Alexander S.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward K.; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The frequency-dependent time delays in fast radio bursts (FRBs) can be used to constrain the photon mass, if the FRB redshifts are known, but the similarity between the frequency dependences of dispersion due to plasma effects and a photon mass complicates the derivation of a limit on mγ. The dispersion measure (DM) of FRB 150418 is known to ∼ 0.1%, and there is a claim to have measured its redshift with an accuracy of ∼ 2%, but the strength of the constraint on mγ is limited by uncertainties in the modelling of the host galaxy and the Milky Way, as well as possible inhomogeneities in the intergalactic medium (IGM). Allowing for these uncertainties, the recent data on FRB 150418 indicate that mγ ≲ 1.8 ×10-14 eVc-2 (3.2 ×10-50 kg), if FRB 150418 indeed has a redshift z = 0.492 as initially reported. In the future, the different redshift dependences of the plasma and photon mass contributions to DM can be used to improve the sensitivity to mγ if more FRB redshifts are measured. For a fixed fractional uncertainty in the extra-galactic contribution to the DM of an FRB, one with a lower redshift would provide greater sensitivity to mγ.

  13. Fast Radio Bursts from Extragalactic Light Sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingam, Manasvi; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-03-01

    We examine the possibility that fast radio bursts (FRBs) originate from the activity of extragalactic civilizations. Our analysis shows that beams used for powering large light sails could yield parameters that are consistent with FRBs. The characteristic diameter of the beam emitter is estimated through a combination of energetic and engineering constraints, and both approaches intriguingly yield a similar result that is on the scale of a large rocky planet. Moreover, the optimal frequency for powering the light sail is shown to be similar to the detected FRB frequencies. These “coincidences” lend some credence to the possibility that FRBs might be artificial in origin. Other relevant quantities, such as the characteristic mass of the light sail, and the angular velocity of the beam, are also derived. By using the FRB occurrence rate, we infer upper bounds on the rate of FRBs from extragalactic civilizations in a typical galaxy. The possibility of detecting fainter signals is briefly discussed, and the wait time for an exceptionally bright FRB event in the Milky Way is estimated.

  14. Understanding pesticides in California's Delta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuivila, Kathryn; Orlando, James L.

    2012-01-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta (Delta) is the hub of California’s water system and also an important habitat for imperiled fish and wildlife. Aquatic organisms are exposed to mixtures of pesticides that flow through the maze of Delta water channels from sources including agricultural, landscape, and urban pest-control applications. While we do not know all of the effects pesticides have on the ecosystem, there is evidence that they cause some damage to organisms in the Delta. Decades of USGS research have provided a good understanding of when, where, and how pesticides enter the Delta. However, pesticide use is continually changing. New field studies and methods are needed so that scientists can analyze which pesticides are present in the Delta, and at what concentrations, enabling them to estimate exposure and ultimate effects on organisms. Continuing research will provide resource managers and stakeholders with crucial information to manage the Delta wisely.

  15. Martian deltas: Morphology and distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, J. W., Jr.; Scott, D. H.

    1993-01-01

    Recent detailed mapping has revealed numerous examples of Martian deltas. The location and morphology of these deltas are described. Factors that contribute to delta morphology are river regime, coastal processes, structural stability, and climate. The largest delta systems on Mars are located near the mouths of Maja, Maumee, Vedra, Ma'adim, Kasei, and Brazos Valles. There are also several smaller-scale deltas emplaced near channel mouths situated in Ismenius Lacus, Memnonia, and Arabia. Delta morphology was used to reconstruct type, quantity, and sediment load size transported by the debouching channel systems. Methods initially developed for terrestrial systems were used to gain information on the relationships between Martian delta morphology, river regime, and coastal processes.

  16. Fast radio burst discovered in the Arecibo pulsar ALFA survey

    SciTech Connect

    Spitler, L. G.; Freire, P. C. C.; Lazarus, P.; Lee, K. J.; Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S.; Wharton, R. S.; Brazier, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J. S.; Kaspi, V. M.; Karako-Argaman, C.; Allen, B.; Bogdanov, S.; Camilo, F.; Jenet, F. A.; Knispel, B.; and others

    2014-08-01

    Recent work has exploited pulsar survey data to identify temporally isolated, millisecond-duration radio bursts with large dispersion measures (DMs). These bursts have been interpreted as arising from a population of extragalactic sources, in which case they would provide unprecedented opportunities for probing the intergalactic medium; they may also be linked to new source classes. Until now, however, all so-called fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been detected with the Parkes radio telescope and its 13-beam receiver, casting some concern about the astrophysical nature of these signals. Here we present FRB 121102, the first FRB discovery from a geographic location other than Parkes. FRB 121102 was found in the Galactic anti-center region in the 1.4 GHz Pulsar Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFA) survey with the Arecibo Observatory with a DM = 557.4 ± 2.0 pc cm{sup –3}, pulse width of 3.0 ± 0.5 ms, and no evidence of interstellar scattering. The observed delay of the signal arrival time with frequency agrees precisely with the expectation of dispersion through an ionized medium. Despite its low Galactic latitude (b = –0.°2), the burst has three times the maximum Galactic DM expected along this particular line of sight, suggesting an extragalactic origin. A peculiar aspect of the signal is an inverted spectrum; we interpret this as a consequence of being detected in a sidelobe of the ALFA receiver. FRB 121102's brightness, duration, and the inferred event rate are all consistent with the properties of the previously detected Parkes bursts.

  17. First Radio Burst Imaging Observation From Mingantu Ultrawide Spectral Radioheliograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yihua; Chen, Linjie; Yu, Sijie; CSRH Team

    2015-08-01

    Radio imaging spectroscopy over wide range wavelength in dm/cm-bands will open new windows on solar flares and coronal mass ejections by tracing the radio emissions from accelerated electrons. The Chinese Spectral Radioheliograph (CSRH) with two arrays in 400MHz-2GHz /2-15GHz ranges with 64/532 frequency channels have been established in Mingantu Observing Station, Inner Mongolia of China, since 2013 and is in test observations now. CSRH is renamed as MUSER (Mingantu Ultrawide SpEctral Radioheliograph) after it's accomplishment We will introduce the progress and current status of CSRH. Some preliminary results of CSRH will be presented.On 11 Nov2014, the first burst event was registered by MUSER-I array at 400MHz-2GHz waveband. According to SGD event list there was a C-class flare peaked at 04:49UT in the disk center and the radio bursts around 04:22-04:24UT was attributed to this flare. However, MUSER-I image observation of the burst indicates that the radio burst peaked around 04:22UT was due to the eruption at the east limb of the Sun and connected to a CME appeared in that direction about 1 hour later. This demonstrate the importance of the spectroscopy observation of the solar radio burst.Acknowledgement: The CSRH team includes Wei Wang, Zhijun Chen, Fei Liu, Lihong Geng and Jian Zhang and CSRH project is supported by National Major Scientific Equipment R&D Project ZDYZ2009-3. The research was also supported by NSFC grants (11433006, 11221063), MOST grant (MOST2011CB811401), CAS Pilot-B Project (XDB09000000) and Marie Curie PIRSES- GA-295272-RADIOSUN.

  18. Radio Bursts as Diagnostics of Relative Abundances in Solar Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2008-05-01

    Based solely on the presence of associated low frequency type III radio bursts with specific characteristics, Cane et al. (2002) suggested that large solar energetic particle events are likely to include contributions from particles accelerated in the associated flares. Studies using ACE/SIS observations of O and Fe intensity-time profiles have supported this suggestion. Nevertheless, some researchers have argued that particles cannot be flare accelerated if the relative abundances differ from those in the small particle events that are widely accepted to be composed of flare particles. However, based on the radio data, the flare particles in large events are not released at the time of the flare soft X-ray onset but are delayed, either because they are accelerated later or released later. These changed conditions are expected to alter the relative abundances (electrons to protons, heavy to light ions) compared to those associated with small flares. From a comprehensive analysis of the characteristics of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), flares and radio bursts (at metric and longer wavelengths) associated with the ~340 proton events at >25 MeV that occurred during solar cycle 23, we confirm earlier results (Cane et al. 1986) that the timing of the type III bursts is a reasonable discriminator for the relative abundances at the start of solar particle events. In contrast, the speeds of the associated CMEs do not discriminate events, nor does the presence of meter wavelength type II bursts. Cane, H. V., R. E. McGuire, and T. T. von Rosenvinge (1986), Two classes of solar energetic particle events associated with impulsive and long-duration soft X-ray flares, Astrophys. J., 301, 448. Cane, H. V., W. C. Erickson, and N. P. Prestage (2002), Solar flares, type III radio bursts, coronal mass ejections, and energetic particles, J. Geophys. Res., 107(A10), 1315, doi:10.1029/2001JA000320.

  19. [Study on the relationship between tone burst ABR and CE-Chirp ASSR in infants with profound sensorineural hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jialin; Liu, Dabo; Huang, Zhenyun; Zhong, Jianwen; Feng, Shuang; Zou, Wenting

    2015-07-01

    To analyse the correlation between tone burst auditory brainstem response (tone burst auditory brainstem response, tb-ABR) and CE-Chirp voice evoked auditory steady-state response (auditory steady-state response, CE-Chirp ASSR) in infants with profound sensorineural hearing loss. A total of 45 infants with profound sensorineural hearing loss underwent threshold tone burst ABR and CE-Chirp ASSR of the frequency response test, response thresholds were recorded in 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 kHz. Whether there was correlation or not existed between two methods were analyzed, SPSS 11.0 statistics software was used. Tone burst ABR and CE-Chirp ASSR could lead to different degrees of threshold in each frequency. Response e elicited threshold percentage mainly concentrated in the 91-100 dBnHL, correlation coefficient between 500-4 000 Hz response threshold elicited rate were: 0.837, 0.913, 0.909, and 0.919, respectively (P < 0.001). The difference of the frequency response threshold test between CE-Chirp ASSR and tone burst ABR were not significant (P > 0.05, Chi square). The tone burst ABR and CE-Chirp ASSR each frequency have different levels of residual hearing in infants with profound sensorineural hearing loss diagnosed by Click ABR, good correlation exists between tone burst ABR and CE-Chirp ASSR.

  20. Delta-doping of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, E. F.

    2005-08-01

    Part I: 1. Introduction E. F. Schubert; Part II: 2. Electronic structure of delta-doped semiconductors C. R. Proetto; Part III: 3. Recent progress in delta-like confinement of impurities in GaAs K. H. Ploog; 4. Flow-rate modulation epitaxy (FME) of III-V semiconductors T. Makimoto and Y. Horikoshi; 5. Gas source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) of delta-doped III-V semiconductors D. Ritter; 6. Solid phase epitaxy for delta-doping in silicon I. Eisele; 7. Low temperature MBE of silicon H.-J. Gossmann; Part IV: 8. Secondary ion mass spectrometry of delta-doped semiconductors H. S. Luftmann; 9. Capacitance-voltage profiling E. F. Schubert; 10. Redistribution of impurities in III-V semiconductors E. F. Schubert; 11. Dopant diffusion and segregation in delta-doped silicon films H.-J. Gossmann; 12. Characterisation of silicon and delta-doped structures in GaAs R. C. Newman; 13. The DX-center in silicon delta-doped GaAs and AlxGa1-xAs P. M. Koenraad; Part V: 14. Luminescence and ellipsometry spectroscopy H. Yao and E. F. Schubert; 15. Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy of single delta-doped III-V semiconductor heterostructures J. Wagner and D. Richards; 16. Electron transport in delta-doped quantum wells W. T. Masselink; 17. Electron mobility in delta-doped layers P. M. Koenraad; 18. Hot electrons in delta-doped GaAs M. Asche; 19. Ordered delta-doping R. L. Headrick, L. C. Feldman and B. E. Weir; Part IV: 20. Delta-doped channel III-V field effect transistors (FETs) W.-P. Hong; 21. Selectively doped heterostructure devices E. F. Schubert; 22. Silicon atomic layer doping FET K. Nakagawa and K. Yamaguchi; 23. Planar doped barrier devices R. J. Malik; 24. Silicon interband and intersubband photodetectors I. Eisele; 25. Doping superlattice devices E. F. Schubert.

  1. SOLAR RADIO BURSTS WITH SPECTRAL FINE STRUCTURES IN PREFLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yin; Tan, Baolin; Huang, Jing; Tan, Chengming; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana; Simões, Paulo J.A.

    2015-01-20

    Good observations of preflare activities are important for us to understand the origin and triggering mechanism of solar flares, and to predict the occurrence of solar flares. This work presents the characteristics of microwave spectral fine structures as preflare activities of four solar flares observed by the Ondřejov radio spectrograph in the frequency range of 0.8-2.0 GHz. We found that these microwave bursts which occurred 1-4 minutes before the onset of flares have spectral fine structures with relatively weak intensities and very short timescales. They include microwave quasi-periodic pulsations with very short periods of 0.1-0.3 s and dot bursts with millisecond timescales and narrow frequency bandwidths. Accompanying these microwave bursts are filament motions, plasma ejection or loop brightening in the EUV imaging observations, and non-thermal hard X-ray emission enhancements observed by RHESSI. These facts may reveal certain independent, non-thermal energy releasing processes and particle acceleration before the onset of solar flares. They may help us to understand the nature of solar flares and to predict their occurrence.

  2. Solar Flares, Type III Radio Bursts, CMEs, and Energetic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the fact that it has been well known since the earliest observations that solar energetic particle events are well associated with solar flares it is often considered that the association is not physically significant. Instead, in large events, the particles are considered to be only accelerated at a shock driven by the coronal mass ejection (CME) that is also always present. If particles are accelerated in the associated flare, it is claimed that such particles do not find access to open field lines and therefore do not escape from the low corona. However recent work has established that long lasting type III radio bursts extending to low frequencies are associated with all prompt solar particle events. Such bursts establish the presence of open field lines. Furthermore, tracing the radio bursts to the lowest frequencies, generated near the observer, shows that the radio producing electrons gain access to a region of large angular extent. It is likely that the electrons undergo cross field transport and it seems reasonable that ions do also. Such observations indicate that particle propagation in the inner heliosphere is not yet fully understood. They also imply that the contribution of flare particles in major particle events needs to be properly addressed.

  3. Pressure vessel burst test program. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Maurice R.; Sharp, Douglas E.; Coleman, Michael D.

    1991-01-01

    The current status is disucssed of a program to study the characteristics of blast waves and fragmentation generated by ruptured gas-filled pressure vessels. Current methods for assessing vessel safety and burst parameters are briefly reviewed, and pneumatic burst testing operations and testing results are examined. A comparison is made with current methods for burst assessment. It is tentatively concluded that, at close distances, vessel burst overpressures are less than those of high-explosive (HE) blasts with equivalent energy and are greater than HE far from the vessel. The impulse appears to be the same for both vessel bursts and equivalent energy HE blasts. The functional relationship between shock velocity and overpressure ratio appears to be the same for vessel bursts as for HE blasts. The initial shock overpressure appears to be much less than vessel pressure and may be found using the one-dimensional shock tube equation.

  4. Stirling Colgate and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Donald

    2014-10-01

    Even before the discovery of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), Stirling Colgate proposed that bursts of x rays and gamma rays might be produced by a relativistic shock created in the supernova explosion of a massive star. We trace the scientific story of GRBs from their detection to the present, highlighting along the way Stirling's interest in them and his efforts to understand them. We summarize our current understanding that short, soft, repeating bursts are produced by magnetic neutron stars; short, hard bursts are produced by the mergers of neutron star-neutron star binaries; and long, hard bursts are produced by the core collapse of massive stars that have lost their hydrogen and helium envelopes. We then discuss some important open questions about GRBs and how they might be answered. We conclude by describing the recent serendipitous discovery of an x-ray burst of exactly the kind he proposed, and the insights into core collapse supernovae and GRBs that it provided.

  5. Stirling Colgate and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Donald

    2014-10-01

    Even before the discovery of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), Stirling Colgate proposed that bursts of x rays and gamma rays might be produced by a relativistic shock created in the supernova explosion of a massive star. We trace the scientific story of GRBs from their detection to the present, highlighting along the way Stirling's interest in them and his efforts to understand them. We summarize our current understanding that short, soft, repeating bursts are produced by magnetic neutron stars; short, hard bursts are produced by the mergers of neutron star-neutron star binaries; and long, hard bursts are produced by the core collapse of massive stars that have lost their hydrogen and helium envelopes. We then discuss some important open questions about GRBs and how they might be answered. We conclude by describing the recent serendipitous discovery of an x-ray burst of exactly the kind he proposed, and the insights into core collapse supernovae and GRBs that it provided.

  6. Burst interference in TDMA radio systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Z.; Chen, M.-X.; Feher, K.

    Analytical and experimental studies show that burst interference in TDMA systems causes spectral spreading, which depends on the gating rate and duty cycle of the burst. A probability-of-error performance study of IJF (intersymbol and jitter-free) OQPSK systems in the presence of burst interference signals shows that the higher gating rate or smaller duty cycle of the burst will introduce more degradation because of increased spectral spreading. It is concluded that the transmitted power of the burst signal should be limited more strictly than that of CW signals, because the burst interference causes more degradation in the performance of the desired channel than nonburst interference with the same (C/I)mean.

  7. Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Instrument Response

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, A.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Gehrels, N.; Hullinger, D.; Krimm, H.; Markwardt, C.; Tueller, J.; Sato, G.; Takahashi, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Okada, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Suzuki, M.; Tashiro, M.

    2004-09-28

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), a large coded aperture instrument with a wide field-of-view (FOV), provides the gamma-ray burst triggers and locations for the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer. In addition to providing this imaging information, BAT will perform a 15 keV - 150 keV all-sky hard x-ray survey based on the serendipitous pointings resulting from the study of gamma-ray bursts, and will also monitor the sky for transient hard x-ray sources. For BAT to provide spectral and photometric information for the gamma-ray bursts, the transient sources and the all-sky survey, the BAT instrument response must be determined to an increasingly greater accuracy. This paper describes the spectral models and the ground calibration experiments used to determine the BAT response to an accuracy suitable for gamma-ray burst studies.

  8. Transitions to Synchrony in Coupled Bursting Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhamala, Mukeshwar; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Ding, Mingzhou

    2004-01-01

    Certain cells in the brain, for example, thalamic neurons during sleep, show spike-burst activity. We study such spike-burst neural activity and the transitions to a synchronized state using a model of coupled bursting neurons. In an electrically coupled network, we show that the increase of coupling strength increases incoherence first and then induces two different transitions to synchronized states, one associated with bursts and the other with spikes. These sequential transitions to synchronized states are determined by the zero crossings of the maximum transverse Lyapunov exponents. These results suggest that synchronization of spike-burst activity is a multi-time-scale phenomenon and burst synchrony is a precursor to spike synchrony.

  9. Novel bursting patterns in a Van der pol-Duffing oscillator with slow varying external force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Zhao, Min; Zhang, Zhengdi

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the emergence of bursting dynamics with complex waveforms and their relation to periodic behavior in typical Van der pol-Duffing equation with fifth order polynomial stiffness nonlinearity, when the external force changes slowly with the variation of time. We exploit bifurcation characteristics of the fast subsystem using the slowly changing periodic excitation as a bifurcation parameter to show how the bursting oscillations are created in this model. We also identify that some regimes of bursting patterns are related to codimension two bifurcation type over a wide range of parameters. A subsequent two-parameter continuation reveals a transition in the bursting behavior from fold/fold hysteresis cycle to sup-Hopf/sup-Hopf or limit point cycle/sub-Hopf bursting type. Furthermore, the effects of external forcing item on bursting oscillations are investigated. For instance, the time interval between two adjacent spikes of bursting oscillations is dependent on the forcing frequency. Some numerical simulations are included to illustrate the validity of our study.

  10. Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honnappa, Vijayakumar; Raveesha, K. H.; Subramanian, K. R.

    Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts Vijayakumar H Doddamani1*, Raveesha K H2 and Subramanian3 1Bangalore University, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 2CMR Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 3 Retd, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India Abstract Magnetic fields play an important role in the astrophysical processes occurring in solar corona. In the solar atmosphere, magnetic field interacts with the plasma, producing abundant eruptive activities. They are considered to be the main factors for coronal heating, particle acceleration and the formation of structures like prominences, flares and Coronal Mass Ejections. The magnetic field in solar atmosphere in the range of 1.1-3 Rsun is especially important as an interface between the photospheric magnetic field and the solar wind. Its structure and time dependent change affects space weather by modifying solar wind conditions, Cho (2000). Type II doublet bursts can be used for the estimation of the strength of the magnetic field at two different heights. Two type II bursts occur sometimes in sequence. By relating the speed of the type II radio burst to Alfven Mach Number, the Alfven speed of the shock wave generating type II radio burst can be calculated. Using the relation between the Alfven speed and the mean frequency of emission, the magnetic field strength can be determined at a particular height. We have used the relative bandwidth and drift rate properties of multiple type II radio bursts to derive magnetic field strengths at two different heights and also the gradient of the magnetic field in the outer corona. The magnetic field strength has been derived for different density factors. It varied from 1.2 to 2.5 gauss at a solar height of 1.4 Rsun. The empirical relation of the variation of the magnetic field with height is found to be of the form B(R) = In the present case the power law index ‘γ’ varied from -3 to -2 for variation of

  11. The 2006-2007 Active Phase Of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiat